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Sample records for neoformans capsular polysaccharide

  1. Capsular polysaccharides from Cryptococcus neoformans modulate production of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juliana D B; Nascimento, Michelle T C; Decote-Ricardo, Debora; Côrte-Real, Suzana; Morrot, Alexandre; Heise, Norton; Nunes, Marise P; Previato, José Osvaldo; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; DosReis, George A; Saraiva, Elvira M; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we characterized the in vitro modulation of NETs (neutrophil extracellular traps) induced in human neutrophils by the opportunistic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, evaluating the participation of capsular polysaccharides glucuronoxylomanan (GXM) and glucuronoxylomannogalactan (GXMGal) in this phenomenon. The mutant acapsular strain CAP67 and the capsular polysaccharide GXMGal induced NET production. In contrast, the wild-type strain and the major polysaccharide GXM did not induce NET release. In addition, C. neoformans and the capsular polysaccharide GXM inhibited PMA-induced NET release. Additionally, we observed that the NET-enriched supernatants induced through CAP67 yeasts showed fungicidal activity on the capsular strain, and neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, collagenase and histones were the key components for the induction of NET fungicidal activity. The signaling pathways associated with NET induction through the CAP67 strain were dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peptidylarginine deiminase-4 (PAD-4). Neither polysaccharide induced ROS production however both molecules blocked the production of ROS through PMA-activated neutrophils. Taken together, the results demonstrate that C. neoformans and the capsular component GXM inhibit the production of NETs in human neutrophils. This mechanism indicates a potentially new and important modulation factor for this fungal pathogen. PMID:25620354

  2. Enhanced binding of capsular polysaccharides of Cryptococcus neoformans to polystyrene microtitration plates for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Cherniak, R; Cheeseman, M M; Reyes, G H; Reiss, E; Todaro, F

    1988-01-01

    A sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure antibodies against capsular polysaccharide was developed, based on the enhanced binding of polysaccharide to polystyrene microtitration plates. The wells of the microtitration plate were primed with an adipic acid dihydrazide derivative of bovine serum albumin (AH-BSA) (100 micrograms/mL, 0.01 M NaPO4-0.14 M NaCl, pH 7.2 (PBS]. Capsular polysaccharide, the glucuronoxylomannan of Cryptococcus neoformans serotype A, was oxidized with NaIO4 for 5 min; the reaction was then quenched with ethylene glycol. The partially oxidized polysaccharide was dialyzed vs. PBS, and its concentration was adjusted to 50 micrograms/mL with PBS. This solution (100 microL/well) was covalently bound to the AH-BSA primed microtitration plates through formation of a Schiff base between the hydrazide group on the AH-BSA and the aldehyde groups on the polysaccharide. Antimouse IgG-alkaline phosphatase conjugate was used in an indirect ELISA to measure captured murine monoclonal antibodies directed against glucuronoxylomannan. Mean absorbances, after 15 min, were 0.13 in negative control wells, and greater than 0.7 in test wells. No intermediate steps were required to block nonspecific binding of antibody. PMID:3064947

  3. Variable Region Identical IgA and IgE to Cryptococcus neoformans Capsular Polysaccharide Manifest Specificity Differences*

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Nakouzi, Antonio; Pohl, Mary Ann; Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years several groups have shown that isotype switching from IgM to IgG to IgA can affect the affinity and specificity of antibodies sharing identical variable (V) regions. However, whether the same applies to IgE is unknown. In this study we compared the fine specificity of V region-identical IgE and IgA to Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide and found that these differed in specificity from each other. The IgE and IgA paratopes were probed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 15N-labeled peptide mimetics of cryptococcal polysaccharide antigen (Ag). IgE was found to cleave the peptide at a much faster rate than V region-identical IgG subclasses and IgA, consistent with an altered paratope. Both IgE and IgA were opsonic for C. neoformans and protected against infection in mice. In summary, V-region expression in the context of the ϵ constant (C) region results in specificity changes that are greater than observed for comparable IgG subclasses. These results raise the possibility that expression of certain V regions in the context of α and ϵ C regions affects their function and contributes to the special properties of those isotypes. PMID:25778397

  4. A synthetic strategy to xylose-containing thioglycoside tri- and tetrasaccharide building blocks corresponding to Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide structures.

    PubMed

    Guazzelli, Lorenzo; Ulc, Rebecca; Rydner, Lina; Oscarson, Stefan

    2015-06-21

    As part of an ongoing project aimed at developing vaccine candidates against Cryptococcus neoformans the preparation of tri- and tetrasaccharide thioglycoside building blocks, to be used in construction of structurally defined part structures of C. neoformans GXM capsular polysaccharide, was investigated. Using a naphthalenylmethyl (NAP) ether as a temporary protecting group and trichloroacetimidate donors in optimized glycosylations the target building blocks, ethyl 6-O-acetyl-2,4-di-O-benzyl-3-O-(2-naphthalenylmethyl)-α-D-mannopyranosyl-(1→3)-[2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)]-4,6-di-O-benzyl-1-thio-α-D-mannopyranoside (16) and ethyl 2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)-4,6-di-O-benzyl-3-O-(2-naphthalenylmethyl)-α-D-mannopyranosyl-(1→3)-[2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-β-D-xylopyra-nosyl-(1→2)]-6-O-acetyl-4-O-benzyl-1-thio-α-D-mannopyranoside (21), were efficiently prepared. These synthesized thiosaccharide building blocks were then used as donors in high-yielding (~90%) DMTST promoted glycosylations to a spacer-containing acceptor to, after deprotection, afford GXM polysaccharide part structures ready for protein conjugation to give vaccine candidates. Also, the NAP groups in the building blocks were removed to obtain tri- and tetrasaccharide acceptors suitable for further elongation towards larger thiosaccharide building blocks. PMID:25986781

  5. Opsonization of Cryptococcus neoformans by a family of isotype-switch variant antibodies specific for the capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Schlageter, A M; Kozel, T R

    1990-01-01

    A family of immunoglobulin isotype-switch variants was isolated by sib selection from a murine hybridoma which produced an immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1) antibody specific for the capsular polysaccharide of Cryptococcus neoformans. Antibodies of the IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b isotypes had similar serotype specificity patterns in double immunodiffusion assays which used polysaccharides of the four cryptococcal serotypes as antigens. A quantitative difference in the ability of the isotypes to form a precipitate with the polysaccharide was observed in a double immunodiffusion assay and confirmed in a quantitative precipitin assay. The relative precipitating activity of the antibodies was IgG2a greater than IgG1 much greater than IgG2b. Analysis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of the reactivity of the three isotypes with cryptococcal polysaccharide showed identical titers and slopes, suggesting that the variable region of the class-switch antibodies was unaltered. This system allowed us to examine the effect of the Fc portion of the antibody on opsonization of encapsulated cryptococci. Yeast cells were precoated with antibodies of each isotype and incubated with murine macrophages or cultured human monocytes. Antibodies of all three isotypes exhibited a dose-dependent opsonization for phagocytosis by both human and murine phagocytes. The relative opsonic activity of the antibodies was IgG2a greater than IgG1 greater than IgG2b. Images PMID:2187813

  6. Method for producing capsular polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G. (Inventor); Petersen, Gene R. (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides are produced by mutant bacteria. These polysaccharides are isolated by selecting a wild type bacterial strain and a phage producing degradative enzymes that have substrate specificity for the capsular polysaccharides produced by the wild type bacteria. Phage-resistant mutants producing capsular polysaccharides are selected and the structurally altered capsular polysaccharide is isolated therefrom.

  7. Synthesis of a Glucuronic Acid-Containing Thioglycoside Trisaccharide Building Block and Its Use in the Assembly of Cryptococcus Neoformans Capsular Polysaccharide Fragments.

    PubMed

    Guazzelli, Lorenzo; Ulc, Rebecca; Oscarson, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    As part of an ongoing project aimed at identifying protective capsular polysaccharide epitopes for the development of vaccine candidates against the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, the synthesis and glycosylation properties of a naphthalenylmethyl (NAP) orthogonally protected trisaccharide thioglycoside, a common building block for construction of serotype B and C capsular polysaccharide structures, were investigated. Ethyl (benzyl 2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-β-d-glucopyranosyl- uronate)-(1→2)-[2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→4)]-6-O-benzyl-3-O-(2-naphthalenylmethyl)-1-thio-α-d-mannopyranoside was prepared and used both as a donor and an acceptor in glycosylation reactions to obtain spacer equipped hexa- and heptasaccharide structures suitable either for continued elongation or for deprotection and printing onto a glycan array or conjugation to a carrier protein. The glycosylation reactions proceeded with high yields and α-selectivity, proving the viability of the building block approach also for construction of 4-O-xylosyl-containing C. neoformans CPS structures. PMID:27308199

  8. Synthesis of a Glucuronic Acid‐Containing Thioglycoside Trisaccharide Building Block and Its Use in the Assembly of Cryptococcus Neoformans Capsular Polysaccharide Fragments†

    PubMed Central

    Guazzelli, Lorenzo; Ulc, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As part of an ongoing project aimed at identifying protective capsular polysaccharide epitopes for the development of vaccine candidates against the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, the synthesis and glycosylation properties of a naphthalenylmethyl (NAP) orthogonally protected trisaccharide thioglycoside, a common building block for construction of serotype B and C capsular polysaccharide structures, were investigated. Ethyl (benzyl 2,3,4‐tri‐O‐benzyl‐β‐d‐glucopyranosyl‐ uronate)‐(1→2)‐[2,3,4‐tri‐O‐benzyl‐β‐d‐xylopyranosyl‐(1→4)]‐6‐O‐benzyl‐3‐O‐(2‐naphthalenylmethyl)‐1‐thio‐α‐d‐mannopyranoside was prepared and used both as a donor and an acceptor in glycosylation reactions to obtain spacer equipped hexa‐ and heptasaccharide structures suitable either for continued elongation or for deprotection and printing onto a glycan array or conjugation to a carrier protein. The glycosylation reactions proceeded with high yields and α‐selectivity, proving the viability of the building block approach also for construction of 4‐O‐xylosyl‐containing C. neoformans CPS structures. PMID:27308199

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Immunorecessive Epitopes of Glucuronoxylomannan, the Major Capsular Polysaccharide of Cryptococcus neoformans, Reduce Serotype Bias in an Immunoassay for Cryptococcal Antigen▿

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Ann; Thorkildson, Peter; Kozel, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoassay for detection of glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), the major capsular polysaccharide of Cryptococcus neoformans, is an important tool for diagnosis of cryptococcosis. However, immunoassays that are based solely or in part on detection with polyclonal antibodies may show serotype bias in detection of GXM, particularly limited sensitivity for serotype C. In this study, we describe detection of GXM in an antigen capture sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that used a cocktail of two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). MAb F12D2 was previously produced by immunization with GXM that had been treated to remove O-acetyl groups, a major source of serotype specificity. MAb F12D2 has a high degree of reactivity with GXM of serotypes A, B, C, and D, but the reactivity with serotype D was less than was found with other MAbs. MAb 339 is highly reactive with GXM of serotypes A and D. Use of a combination of the two MAbs produced an immunoassay that had the best properties of both MAbs, including good reactivity with serotype C, which is an emerging threat in sub-Saharan Africa. These results suggest that next-generation immunoassays for diagnosis of cryptococcosis may be formulated by (i) use of immunization and hybridoma screening strategies that are designed to prospectively meet the needs of immunoassay performance and (ii) careful selection of MAbs that span the expected polysaccharide serotypes in the subject patient population. PMID:21697342

  10. Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides produced by mutant bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G. (Inventor); Petersen, Gene R. (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides are produced by mutant bacteria. These polysaccharides are isolated by selecting a wild type bacterial strain and a phage producing degradative enzymes that have substrate specificity for the capsular polysaccharides produced by the wild type bacteria. Phage-resistant mutants producing capsular polysaccharides are selected and the structurally altered capsular polysaccharide is isolated therefrom.

  11. Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A capsular polysaccharide acetyltransferase, methods and compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, David S.; Gudlavalleti, Seshu K.; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Datta, Anup K.; Carlson, Russell W.

    2011-02-08

    Provided are methods for recombinant production of an O-acetyltransferase and methods for acetylating capsular polysaccharides, especially those of a Serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis using the recombinant O-acetyltransferase, and immunogenic compositions comprising the acetylated capsular polysaccharide.

  12. Phospholipids Trigger Cryptococcus neoformans Capsular Enlargement during Interactions with Amoebae and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chrisman, Cara J.; Albuquerque, Patricia; Guimaraes, Allan J.; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    A remarkable aspect of the interaction of Cryptococcus neoformans with mammalian hosts is a consistent increase in capsule volume. Given that many aspects of the interaction of C. neoformans with macrophages are also observed with amoebae, we hypothesized that the capsule enlargement phenomenon also had a protozoan parallel. Incubation of C. neoformans with Acanthamoeba castellanii resulted in C. neoformans capsular enlargement. The phenomenon required contact between fungal and protozoan cells but did not require amoeba viability. Analysis of amoebae extracts showed that the likely stimuli for capsule enlargement were protozoan polar lipids. Extracts from macrophages and mammalian serum also triggered cryptococcal capsular enlargement. C. neoformans capsule enlargement required expression of fungal phospholipase B, but not phospholipase C. Purified phospholipids, in particular, phosphatidylcholine, and derived molecules triggered capsular enlargement with the subsequent formation of giant cells. These results implicate phospholipids as a trigger for both C. neoformans capsule enlargement in vivo and exopolysaccharide production. The observation that the incubation of C. neoformans with phospholipids led to the formation of giant cells provides the means to generate these enigmatic cells in vitro. Protozoan- or mammalian-derived polar lipids could represent a danger signal for C. neoformans that triggers capsular enlargement as a non-specific defense mechanism against potential predatory cells. Hence, phospholipids are the first host-derived molecules identified to trigger capsular enlargement. The parallels apparent in the capsular response of C. neoformans to both amoebae and macrophages provide additional support for the notion that certain aspects of cryptococcal virulence emerged as a consequence of environmental interactions with other microorganisms such as protists. PMID:21637814

  13. Vesicular Polysaccharide Export in Cryptococcus neoformans Is a Eukaryotic Solution to the Problem of Fungal Trans-Cell Wall Transport▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Oliveira, Débora L.; Frases, Susana; Miranda, Kildare; Zaragoza, Oscar; Alvarez, Mauricio; Nakouzi, Antonio; Feldmesser, Marta; Casadevall, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms by which macromolecules are transported through the cell wall of fungi are not known. A central question in the biology of Cryptococcus neoformans, the causative agent of cryptococcosis, is the mechanism by which capsular polysaccharide synthesized inside the cell is exported to the extracellular environment for capsule assembly and release. We demonstrate that C. neoformans produces extracellular vesicles during in vitro growth and animal infection. Vesicular compartments, which are transferred to the extracellular space by cell wall passage, contain glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), a component of the cryptococcal capsule, and key lipids, such as glucosylceramide and sterols. A correlation between GXM-containing vesicles and capsule expression was observed. The results imply a novel mechanism for the release of the major virulence factor of C. neoformans whereby polysaccharide packaged in lipid vesicles crosses the cell wall and the capsule network to reach the extracellular environment. PMID:17114598

  14. Antibodies to the Cryptococcus neoformans capsular glucuronoxylomannan are ubiquitous in serum from HIV+ and HIV- individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Deshaw, M; Pirofski, L A

    1995-01-01

    Murine MoAbs to the Cryptococcus neoformans capsular glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) polysaccharide are protective in mice in vivo and in vitro. The prevalence of protective anti-GXM antibodies in human serum is unknown. To provide further insight into the human antibody response to C. neoformans we determined the prevalence, isotype, and IgG subclass utilization of human anti-GXM antibodies in HIV+ and HIV- sera by a sensitive antigen capture FLISA assay. One hundred and twenty-three sera from the Bronx Municipal Hospital Centre serum bank were studied retrospectively. Seventy were from HIV+ individuals, 10 with a history of cryptococcal meningitis (CM), and 53 were from HIV- individuals. Serum GXM determinations were also performed on 61 HIV+ sera. Our results demonstrated that anti-GXM IgG, IgA, and IgM are ubiquitous in both HIV+ (including those with CM), and HIV- sera. Anti-GXM IgA titres and total serum IgA concentration were elevated in HIV+ sera. Anti-GXM IgG antibodies were almost exclusively isotype-restricted to the IgG2 subclass. Our data also demonstrated elevations of anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) titres in HIV+ sera. Taken together, our findings confirm hypergammaglobulinaemia and expansion of anti-protein (BSA) antibodies in HIV+ individuals and isotype restriction of human anti-carbohydrate (GXM) antibodies to the IgG2 subclass. Our report of ubiquitous anti-GXM antibodies of the IgG and IgA isotypes suggests that anti-GXM antibodies exist before HIV infection. PMID:7882565

  15. Study of Capsular Polysaccharide from Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yu-Chi; Liang, Shu-Mei; Tsai, Wan-Ling; Chen, Yee-Hsiung; Liu, Teh-Yung; Liang, Chi-Ming

    2003-01-01

    The leading cause of food poisoning in both Taiwan and Japan is Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection, whose mechanism of enteropathogenesis is still unclear. To evaluate whether surface components are responsible for the intestinal adhesion of V. parahaemolyticus, we have developed a novel method for isolating the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) from V. parahaemolyticus (serotype O4:K8). We found that culturing of V. parahaemolyticus in broth for 1 week or more changed the colony form of the bacteria on an agar plate from opaque to translucent. The translucent colonies of V. parahaemolyticus contained little CPS and exhibited a much lower level of adherence to epithelial cells (Int-407) than the opaque colonies of the bacteria. Incubation of V. parahaemolyticus in medium supplemented with bile increased the levels of CPS and adherence. Treatment of V. parahaemolyticus with anti-CPS but not anti-LPS serum decreased the level of bacterial adherence. In addition, purified CPS bound to epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Intranasal administration of CPS to mice in the presence of adjuvants such as immunostimulatory sequence oligodeoxynucleotides or cholera toxin elicited CPS-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. These results indicate that CPS plays an important role in the adherence of V. parahaemolyticus to its target cells and may be considered a potential target for the development of a vaccine against this pathogen. PMID:12761115

  16. Inorganic Phosphate Limitation Modulates Capsular Polysaccharide Composition in Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    van de Weerd, Robert; Boot, Maikel; Maaskant, Janneke; Sparrius, Marion; Verboom, Theo; van Leeuwen, Lisanne M; Burggraaf, Maroeska J; Paauw, Nanne J; Dainese, Elisa; Manganelli, Riccardo; Bitter, Wilbert; Appelmelk, Ben J; Geurtsen, Jeroen

    2016-05-27

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is protected by an unusual and highly impermeable cell envelope that is critically important for the successful colonization of the host. The outermost surface of this cell envelope is formed by capsular polysaccharides that play an important role in modulating the initial interactions once the bacillus enters the body. Although the bioenzymatic steps involved in the production of the capsular polysaccharides are emerging, information regarding the ability of the bacterium to modulate the composition of the capsule is still unknown. Here, we study the mechanisms involved in regulation of mycobacterial capsule biosynthesis using a high throughput screen for gene products involved in capsular α-glucan production. Utilizing this approach we identified a group of mutants that all carried mutations in the ATP-binding cassette phosphate transport locus pst These mutants collectively exhibited a strong overproduction of capsular polysaccharides, including α-glucan and arabinomannan, suggestive of a role for inorganic phosphate (Pi) metabolism in modulating capsular polysaccharide production. These findings were corroborated by the observation that growth under low Pi conditions as well as chemical activation of the stringent response induces capsule production in a number of mycobacterial species. This induction is, in part, dependent on σ factor E. Finally, we show that Mycobacterium marinum, a model organism for M. tuberculosis, encounters Pi stress during infection, which shows the relevance of our findings in vivo. PMID:27044743

  17. Masquerading microbial pathogens: Capsular polysaccharides mimic host-tissue molecules

    PubMed Central

    Cress, Brady F.; Englaender, Jacob A.; He, Wenqin; Kasper, Dennis; Linhardt, Robert J.; Koffas, Mattheos A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacterial pathogens bearing capsular polysaccharides identical to mammalian glycans benefit from an additional level of protection from host immune response. The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria portends an impending post-antibiotic age, characterized by diminishing efficacy of common antibiotics and routine application of multifaceted, complementary therapeutic approaches to treat bacterial infections, particularly multidrug-resistant organisms. The first line of defense for most bacterial pathogens consists of a physical and immunological barrier known as the capsule, commonly composed of a viscous layer of carbohydrates that are covalently bound to the cell wall in Gram-positive bacteria or often to lipids of the outer membrane in many Gram-negative bacteria. Bacterial capsular polysaccharides are a diverse class of high molecular weight polysaccharides contributing to virulence of many human pathogens in the gut, respiratory tree, urinary tract, and other host tissues, by hiding cell-surface components that might otherwise elicit host immune response. This review highlights capsular polysaccharides that are structurally identical or similar to polysaccharides found in mammalian tissues, including polysialic acid and glycosaminoglycan capsules hyaluronan, heparosan, and chondroitin. Such non-immunogenic coatings render pathogens insensitive to certain immune responses, effectively increasing residence time in host tissues and enabling pathologically relevant population densities to be reached. Biosynthetic pathways and capsular involvement in immune system evasion are described providing a basis for potential therapies aimed at supplementing or replacing antibiotic treatment. PMID:24372337

  18. Evidence for Branching in Cryptococcal Capsular Polysaccharides and Consequences on its Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Radames J.B.; Frases, Susana; Guimaräes, Allan J.; Rivera, Johanna; Casadevall, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The encapsulated fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is a common cause of life-threatening disease in immunocompromised individuals. Its major virulence determinant is the polysaccharide (PS) capsule. An unsolved problem in cryptococcal biology is whether the PSs composing the capsule are linear or complex branched polymers, as well as the implications of this structural composition in pathogenesis. In this study we approached the problem by combining static and dynamic light scattering, viscosity analysis, and high-resolution microscopy and correlated the findings with biological properties. Analysis of the dependence of capsular PS molecular mass and the radius of gyration provided strong evidence against a simple linear PS configuration. Shape factors calculated from light scattering measurements in solution revealed values consistent with polymer branching. Furthermore, viscosity measurements provided complementary evidence for structural branching. Electron microscopy showed PS spherical-like structures similar to other branched PS. Finally, we show that the capacity of capsular PS to interfere in complement-mediated phagocytosis, inhibit nitric oxide production by macrophage-like cells, protect against reactive oxygen species, antibody reactivity and half-life in serum were influenced by the degree of branching, providing evidence for the notion that PS branching is an important parameter in determining the biological activity of C. neoformans PS. PMID:21208301

  19. Capsular Polysaccharide Synthesis Regions in Klebsiella pneumoniae Serotype K57 and a New Capsular Serotype▿

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi-Jiun; Fang, Han-Chi; Yang, Hui-Ching; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Tsai, Feng-Chiao; Keynan, Yoav; Wang, Jin-Town

    2008-01-01

    Community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae is an emerging infectious disease. We explored the capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps) regions of three non-K1, non-K2 K. pneumoniae strains, A1142, A7754, and A1517, from Taiwanese patients experiencing pyogenic liver abscess. Two of the strains, A1142 and A7754, belonged to capsular serotype K57, while the third belonged to a new capsular serotype, different from the previously reported 77 serotypes. Deletion and complementation experiments suggested that a unique K57 gene, a homologue of wzy, was essential for K57 capsular synthesis and confirmed that this gene cluster was a genetic coding region for K57. Compared to K1 and K2 strains, the three strains were all serum sensitive, suggesting that host factors might also be involved in the three patients. PCR using primers from specific genes for K57 was more sensitive and specific than traditional serotyping. The remaining strain, A1517, did not react to the antisera from any of the 77 serotypes, and none of the 77 reference strains reacted to the serum against this strain. Moreover, PCR analyses using various primer pairs from the serotype-specific open reading frames did not reveal cross-reactivity to any of the 77 reference strains, suggesting that this strain likely represents a new capsular type. We conclude that sequences from these two cps regions are very useful in detecting K57 and the new cps genotype. PMID:18508935

  20. Roles of Lipooligosaccharide and Capsular Polysaccharide in Antimicrobial Resistance and Natural Transformation of Campylobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: To investigate the roles of surface polysaccharides, such as capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and lipooligosaccharide (LOS), in modulating natural transformation and antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter jejuni. Methods: A series of C. jejuni mutants, which are defective in either CPS ...

  1. Production of Capsular Polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae Type 14 and Its Purification by Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Norma; Fraguas, Laura Franco; Texeira, Esther; Massaldi, Hugo; Batista-Viera, Francisco; Ferreira, Fernando

    2001-01-01

    We describe a rapid and efficient method for producing the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae by fermentation on tryptic soy broth and purification of this compound by using immobilized soybean lectin as an affinity adsorbent. In principle, the same strategy can be used to produce purified capsular polysaccharides from other streptococcal serotypes by selecting the appropriate lectin adsorbents. PMID:11157270

  2. Production of capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14 and its purification by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Suárez, N; Fraguas, L F; Texeira, E; Massaldi, H; Batista-Viera, F; Ferreira, F

    2001-02-01

    We describe a rapid and efficient method for producing the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae by fermentation on tryptic soy broth and purification of this compound by using immobilized soybean lectin as an affinity adsorbent. In principle, the same strategy can be used to produce purified capsular polysaccharides from other streptococcal serotypes by selecting the appropriate lectin adsorbents. PMID:11157270

  3. Recombinant expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Emily J.; Yates, Laura E.; Terra, Vanessa S.; Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan W.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for over 14 million cases of pneumonia worldwide annually, and over 1 million deaths, the majority of them children. The major determinant for pathogenesis is a polysaccharide capsule that is variable and is used to distinguish strains based on their serotype. The capsule forms the basis of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) that contains purified capsular polysaccharide from 23 serotypes, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), containing 13 common serotypes conjugated to CRM197 (mutant diphtheria toxin). Purified capsule from S. pneumoniae is required for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine production, and costs can be prohibitively high, limiting accessibility of the vaccine in low-income countries. In this study, we demonstrate the recombinant expression of the capsule-encoding locus from four different serotypes of S. pneumoniae within Escherichia coli. Furthermore, we attempt to identify the minimum set of genes necessary to reliably and efficiently express these capsules heterologously. These E. coli strains could be used to produce a supply of S. pneumoniae serotype-specific capsules without the need to culture pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, these strains could be applied to synthetic glycobiological applications: recombinant vaccine production using E. coli outer membrane vesicles or coupling to proteins using protein glycan coupling technology. PMID:27110302

  4. Recombinant expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kay, Emily J; Yates, Laura E; Terra, Vanessa S; Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan W

    2016-04-01

    Currently, Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for over 14 million cases of pneumonia worldwide annually, and over 1 million deaths, the majority of them children. The major determinant for pathogenesis is a polysaccharide capsule that is variable and is used to distinguish strains based on their serotype. The capsule forms the basis of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) that contains purified capsular polysaccharide from 23 serotypes, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), containing 13 common serotypes conjugated to CRM197 (mutant diphtheria toxin). Purified capsule from S. pneumoniae is required for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine production, and costs can be prohibitively high, limiting accessibility of the vaccine in low-income countries. In this study, we demonstrate the recombinant expression of the capsule-encoding locus from four different serotypes of S. pneumoniae within Escherichia coli. Furthermore, we attempt to identify the minimum set of genes necessary to reliably and efficiently express these capsules heterologously. These E. coli strains could be used to produce a supply of S. pneumoniae serotype-specific capsules without the need to culture pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, these strains could be applied to synthetic glycobiological applications: recombinant vaccine production using E. coli outer membrane vesicles or coupling to proteins using protein glycan coupling technology. PMID:27110302

  5. Peptide mimicry of the meningococcal group C capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Westerink, M A; Giardina, P C; Apicella, M A; Kieber-Emmons, T

    1995-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the variable regions of the heavy and light chains of the anti-idiotypic antibody 6F9, which mimics the meningococcal group C capsular polysaccharide (MCP), was performed. The immunogenic site on 6F9 responsible for inducing an anti-MCP antibody response was determined by means of sequence and computer model analysis of these data. Complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) was found to be unique in that the sequence tract YRY was exposed on the surface. A synthetic peptide spanning the CDR3 domain was synthesized and complexed to proteosomes (meningococcal group B outer membrane protein). Immunizations of BALB/c mice with the peptide-proteosome complex resulted in a significant anti-MCP antibody response. Immunized mice were protected against infection with a lethal dose of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7732025

  6. Characterization of exopolysaccharide and ropy capsular polysaccharide formation by Weissella.

    PubMed

    Malang, Saskia Katharina; Maina, Ndegwa Henry; Schwab, Clarissa; Tenkanen, Maija; Lacroix, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    With their broad functional properties, lactic acid bacteria derived high molar mass exopolysaccharides (EPS) and oligosaccharides are of great interest for food, medical and pharmaceutical industry. EPS formation by 123 strains of Weissella cibaria and Weissella confusa, was evaluated. Dextran formation from sucrose was observed for all tested strains while 18 strains produced fructan in addition to dextran. Six isolates synthesized a highly ropy polymer from glucose associated with the formation of a cell-bound, capsular polysaccharide (CPS) composed of glucose, O-acetyl groups and two unidentified monomer components. The soluble EPSs of nine strains were identified as low α-1,3-branched dextran, levan and inulin type polymers using NMR. In addition to glucan and fructan, W. confusa produced gluco- and fructooligosaccharides. Partial dextransucrase and fructansucrase sequences were characterized in the selected Weissella strains. Our study reports the first structural characterization of fructan type EPS from Weissella as well as the first Weissella strain producing inulin. Production of more than one EPS-type by single strains may have high potential for development of applications combining EPS technological and nutritional benefits. PMID:25475311

  7. Radiological Studies Reveal Radial Differences in the Architecture of the Polysaccharide Capsule of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, R. A.; Zaragoza, O.; Zhang, T.; Ortiz, G.; Casadevall, A.; Dadachova, E.

    2005-01-01

    The polysaccharide capsule of the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is an important virulence factor, but relatively little is known about its architecture. We applied a combination of radiological, chemical, and serological methods to investigate the structure of this polysaccharide capsule. Exposure of C. neoformans cells to gamma radiation, dimethyl sulfoxide, or radiolabeled monoclonal antibody removed a significant part of the capsule. Short intervals of gamma irradiation removed the outer portion of the cryptococcal capsule without killing cells, which could subsequently repair their capsules. Survival analysis of irradiated wild-type, acapsular mutant, and complemented mutant strains demonstrated that the capsule contributed to radioprotection and had a linear attenuation coefficient higher than that of lead. The capsule portions remaining after dimethyl sulfoxide or gamma radiation treatment were comparable in size, 65 to 66 μm3, and retained immunoreactivity for a monoclonal antibody to glucuronoxylomannan. Simultaneous or sequential treatment of the cells with dimethyl sulfoxide and radiation removed the remaining capsule so that it was not visible by light microscopy. The capsule could be protected against radiation by either of the free radical scavengers ascorbic acid and sorbitol. Sugar composition analysis of polysaccharide removed from the outer and inner parts of the capsule revealed significant differences in glucuronic acid and xylose molar ratios, implying differences in the chemical structure of the constituent polysaccharides. Our results provide compelling evidence for the existence of two zones in the C. neoformans capsule that differ in susceptibility to dimethyl sulfoxide and radiation and, possibly, in packing and composition. PMID:15701808

  8. Characterization of the linkage between the type III capsular polysaccharide and the bacterial cell wall of group B Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Deng, L; Kasper, D L; Krick, T P; Wessels, M R

    2000-03-17

    The capsular polysaccharide of group B Streptococcus is a key virulence factor and an important target for protective immune responses. Until now, the nature of the attachment between the capsular polysaccharide and the bacterial cell has been poorly defined. We isolated insoluble cell wall fragments from lysates of type III group B Streptococcus and showed that the complexes contained both capsular polysaccharide and group B carbohydrate covalently bound to peptidoglycan. Treatment with the endo-N-acetylmuramidase mutanolysin released soluble complexes of capsular polysaccharide linked to group B carbohydrate by peptidoglycan fragments. Capsular polysaccharide could be enzymatically cleaved from group B carbohydrate by treatment of the soluble complexes with beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, which catalyzes hydrolysis of the beta-D-GlcNAc(1-->4)beta-D-MurNAc subunit produced by mutanolysin digestion of peptidoglycan. Evidence from gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and (31)P NMR analysis of the separated polysaccharides supports a model of the group B Streptococcus cell surface in which the group B carbohydrate and the capsular polysaccharide are independently linked to the glycan backbone of cell wall peptidoglycan; group B carbohydrate is linked to N-acetylmuramic acid, and capsular polysaccharide is linked via a phosphodiester bond and an oligosaccharide linker to N-acetylglucosamine. PMID:10713053

  9. Structural analysis of the capsular polysaccharide from Campylobacter jejuni RM1221

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome of Campylobacter jejuni strain RM1221 (Penner serotype HS:53) was reported recently and contains a novel capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis locus. Cell surface carbohydrates such as CPS are known to be important for bacterial survival and often contribute to pathogenesis....

  10. Recognition of bacterial capsular polysaccharides and lipopolysaccharides by the macrophage mannose receptor.

    PubMed

    Zamze, Susanne; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Jones, Hannah; Taylor, Philip R; Stillion, Richard J; Gordon, Siamon; Wong, Simon Y C

    2002-11-01

    The in vitro binding of the macrophage mannose receptor to a range of different bacterial polysaccharides was investigated. The receptor was shown to bind to purified capsular polysaccharides from Streptococcus pneumoniae and to the lipopolysaccharides, but not capsular polysaccharides, from Klebsiella pneumoniae. Binding was Ca(2+)-dependent and inhibitable with d-mannose. A fusion protein of the mannose receptor containing carbohydrate recognition domains 4-7 and a full-length soluble form of the mannose receptor containing all domains external to the transmembrane region both displayed very similar binding specificities toward bacterial polysaccharides, suggesting that domains 4-7 are sufficient for recognition of these structures. Surprisingly, no direct correlation could be made between polysaccharide structure and binding to the mannose receptor, suggesting that polysaccharide conformation may play an important role in recognition. The full-length soluble form of the mannose receptor was able to bind simultaneously both polysaccharide via the carbohydrate recognition domains and sulfated oligosaccharide via the cysteine-rich domain. The possible involvement of the mannose receptor, either cell surface or soluble, in the innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial polysaccharides is discussed. PMID:12196537

  11. Transport of Streptococcus pneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharide in MHC Class II Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Tom Li; Fabri, Mario; Groneck, Laura; Röhn, Till A; Hafke, Helena; Robinson, Nirmal; Rietdorf, Jens; Schrama, David; Becker, Jürgen C; Plum, Georg; Krönke, Martin; Kropshofer, Harald; Kalka-Moll, Wiltrud M

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial capsular polysaccharides are virulence factors and are considered T cell–independent antigens. However, the capsular polysaccharide Sp1 from Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 1 has been shown to activate CD4+ T cells in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II–dependent manner. The mechanism of carbohydrate presentation to CD4+ T cells is unknown. We show in live murine dendritic cells (DCs) that Sp1 translocates from lysosomal compartments to the plasma membrane in MHCII-positive tubules. Sp1 cell surface presentation results in reduction of self-peptide presentation without alteration of the MHCII self peptide repertoire. In DM-deficient mice, retrograde transport of Sp1/MHCII complexes resulting in T cell–dependent immune responses to the polysaccharide in vitro and in vivo is significantly reduced. The results demonstrate the capacity of a bacterial capsular polysaccharide antigen to use DC tubules as a vehicle for its transport as an MHCII/saccharide complex to the cell surface for the induction of T cell activation. Furthermore, retrograde transport requires the functional role of DM in self peptide–carbohydrate exchange. These observations open new opportunities for the design of vaccines against microbial encapsulated pathogens. PMID:17367207

  12. Purification of capsular polysaccharide from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pato, Tânia Pinheiro; Barbosa, Antonio de Pádua R; da Silva Junior, José Godinho

    2006-03-01

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C capsular polysaccharide (MenCPS) is an important antigen against meningococcal infection. This paper describes a new purification methodology employing liquid chromatography that resulted in a polysaccharide showing the characteristics recommended by the World Health Organization for vaccine purposes. In this method, steps of the traditional procedure that yield low recovery and use toxic materials were modified. The present process consists in the following steps: (1) continuous flow centrifugation of the culture for removal of the cells; (2) supernatant concentration by tangential filtration (100 kDa cutoff); (3) addition of 0.5% DOC, heating to 55 degrees C during 30 min and tangential filtration (100 kDa cutoff); (4) anion exchange chromatography (Source 15Q) and (5) size exclusion chromatography (Sepharose CL-4B). The polysaccharide C fraction obtained in that way was dialyzed and freeze-dried. The structural identity of the polysaccharide was demonstrated by (1)H-NMR spectrometry. PMID:16469547

  13. How Sweet it is! Cell Wall Biogenesis and Polysaccharide Capsule Formation in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Doering, Tamara Lea

    2010-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic fungus responsible for severe opportunistic infections. The most prominent feature of this yeast is its elaborate polysaccharide capsule, a complex structure that is required for virulence. The capsule is intimately associated with the cell wall, which underlies the capsule and offers the organism strength and flexibility in potentially hostile environments. Both structures are primarily composed of polysaccharides, offering a glimpse of the tremendous variation inherent in natural carbohydrate structures and their multiple biological functions. The steps in cell wall and capsule biosynthesis and assembly pose fascinating questions of metabolism, enzymology, cell biology, and regulation; the answers have potential application to treatment of a deadly infection. This article reviews current knowledge of cryptococcal cell wall and capsule biosynthesis and outstanding questions for the future. PMID:19575556

  14. Antibodies to capsular polysaccharides are not protective against experimental Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, J; Lee, J C

    1995-01-01

    The protective efficacy of antibodies to the Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharide was examined in a rat model of catheter-induced endocarditis. Capsular antibodies were induced either by active immunization with killed S. aureus or by passive immunization with hyperimmune rabbit antiserum to S. aureus. Control rats were injected with phosphate-buffered saline or passively immunized with normal rabbit serum or rabbit antiserum to a nonencapsulated strain. Animals with indwelling catheters were challenged intravenously with 5 x 10(4) to 4 x 10(6) CFU of the homologous S. aureus strain (capsular serotype 5 strain Reynolds or serotype 1 strain SA1 mucoid). Both immunized and control rats developed S. aureus endocarditis. The numbers of S. aureus cells recovered from the blood and aortic valve vegetations of immunized rats were similar to those of control rats, indicating that capsule-specific antibodies were not protective. To determine whether the presence of an indwelling catheter interfered with antibody-mediated protection against S. aureus endocarditis, catheters were removed 2 h after insertion in additional groups of rats. An inoculum of 10(8) CFU of strain Reynolds was needed to provoke endocarditis in rats catheterized for 2 h, compared with 5 x 10(4) CFU for rats with indwelling catheters. Passively transferred capsular antibodies were not protective since both immunized and nonimmunized animals developed endocarditis, and quantitative cultures of blood and valvular vegetations revealed no differences between immunized and control animals. The findings of this study indicate that antibodies to the capsular polysaccharide are not protective in the rat model of experimental S. aureus endocarditis. PMID:7821999

  15. A Role for LHC1 in Higher Order Structure and Complement Binding of the Cryptococcus neoformans Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon-Dong; Shin, Soowan; Panepinto, John; Ramos, Jeanie; Qiu, Jin; Frases, Susana; Albuquerque, Patricia; Cordero, Radames J. B.; Zhang, Nannan; Himmelreich, Uwe; Beenhouwer, David; Bennett, John E.; Casadevall, Arturo; Williamson, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Polysaccharide capsules are important virulence factors for many microbial pathogens including the opportunistic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans. In the present study, we demonstrate an unusual role for a secreted lactonohydrolase of C. neoformans, LHC1 in capsular higher order structure. Analysis of extracted capsular polysaccharide from wild-type and lhc1Δ strains by dynamic and static light scattering suggested a role for the LHC1 locus in altering the capsular polysaccharide, both reducing dimensions and altering its branching, density and solvation. These changes in the capsular structure resulted in LHC1-dependent alterations of antibody binding patterns, reductions in human and mouse complement binding and phagocytosis by the macrophage-like cell line J774, as well as increased virulence in mice. These findings identify a unique molecular mechanism for tertiary structural changes in a microbial capsule, facilitating immune evasion and virulence of a fungal pathogen. PMID:24789368

  16. Insertion of Tn916 in Neisseria meningitidis resulting in loss of group B capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Stephens, D S; Swartley, J S; Kathariou, S; Morse, S A

    1991-11-01

    We recently found that the 16.4-kb conjugative transposon Tn916 could be introduced into Neisseria meningitidis by transformation and that it appeared to transpose to many different sites in the chromosome of recipient meningococci. In order to identify transposon-induced alterations of specific meningococcal virulence determinants, a library of meningococcal Tetr transformants containing Tn916 was made and screened for those altered in the production of group B capsular polysaccharide. A capsule-defective mutant, M7, was identified by using monoclonal and polyclonal antisera to group B polysaccharide in immunoblot and agar antiserum procedures. Growth of M7 was similar to that of the parent strain. M7 produced no group B capsular polysaccharide by rocket immunoelectrophoresis, and the mutation was stable during laboratory passage. The capsule-defective phenotype was linked to Tetr, as demonstrated by immunoblot and Southern blot analysis of progeny Tetr transformants (transformants of the parent strain obtained with DNA from M7). A capsule-deficient mutant, O8, was identified by using a similar approach. Analysis of the Tn916 insertions in M7 and O8 indicated that a significant portion of the transposon on either side of the tetM determinant had been lost. The ability of Tn916 to generate defined, stable mutations in meningococcal virulence determinants is demonstrated by our study. PMID:1657783

  17. The rkpGHI and -J genes are involved in capsular polysaccharide production by Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, E; Reuhs, B L; Kim, J S; Kereszt, A; Petrovics, G; Putnoky, P; Dusha, I; Carlson, R W; Kondorosi, A

    1997-01-01

    The first complementation unit of the fix-23 region of Rhizobium meliloti, which comprises six genes (rkpAB-CDEF) exhibiting similarity to fatty acid synthase genes, is required for the production of a novel type of capsular polysaccharide that is involved in root nodule development and structurally analogous to group II K antigens found in Escherichia coli (G. Petrovics, P. Putnoky, R. Reuhs, J. Kim, T. A. Thorp, K. D. Noel, R. W. Carlson, and A. Kondorosi, Mol. Microbiol. 8:1083-1094, 1993; B. L. Reuhs, R. W. Carlson, and J. S. Kim, J. Bacteriol. 175:3570-3580, 1993). Here we present the nucleotide sequence for the other three complementation units of the fix-23 locus, revealing the presence of four additional open reading frames assigned to genes rkpGHI and -J. The putative RkpG protein shares similarity with acyltransferases, RkpH is homologous to short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases, and RkpJ shows significant sequence identity with bacterial polysaccharide transport proteins, such as KpsS of E. coli. No significant homology was found for RkpI. Biochemical and immunological analysis of Tn5 derivatives for each gene demonstrated partial or complete loss of capsular polysaccharides from the cell surface; on this basis, we suggest that all genes in the fix-23 region are required for K-antigen synthesis or transport. PMID:9079896

  18. Cryptococcus neoformans: paradigm for the role of antibody immunity against fungi?

    PubMed

    Pirofski, L A; Casadevall, A

    1996-08-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated fungus that is a frequent cause of life-threatening infections in patients with AIDS. C. neoformans has many similarities with encapsulated bacteria such as S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae for which antibody immunity is important in protection. However the role of antibody immunity in protection against C. neoformans has been controversial. Experiments with polyclonal sera have produced conflicting evidence for and against the importance of antibody immunity in host defense. Experiments with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to the C. neoformans capsular polysaccharide (CPS) have revealed the existence of protective, non-protective and disease-enhancing mAbs, suggesting that the divergent results obtained with polyclonal preparations may be a result of relative proportion of protective and non-protective antibodies in immune sera. Administration of protective mAbs can prolong survival, decrease organ fungal burden, and reduce serum polysaccharide antigen. In vitro experiments suggests that protective mAbs modify the course of infection by enhancing effector cell function against C. neoformans. Addition of mAb to antifungal drugs enhances their efficacy against C. neoformans in vivo and in vitro. Human-mouse chimeric antibodies with activity against C. neoformans have been constructed. A highly immunogenic capsular polysaccharide-protein vaccine has been synthesized that elicits protective antibodies in mice. Antibody immunity elicited by conjugate vaccines or provided by passive administration may be useful in the prevention treatment of human cryptococcal infections. PMID:8899968

  19. Silver polyvinyl pyrrolidone nanoparticles exhibit a capsular polysaccharide influenced bactericidal effect against Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Bibbs, Ronda K.; Harris, Rhonda D.; Peoples, Veolanda A.; Barnett, Cleon; Singh, Shree R.; Dennis, Vida A.; Coats, Mamie T.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The highly adaptive nature of S. pneumoniae exemplifies the need for next generation antimicrobials designed to avoid high level resistance. Metal based nanomaterials fit this criterion. Our study examined the antimicrobial activity of gold nanospheres, silver coated polyvinyl pyrrolidone (AgPVP), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) against various serotypes of S. pneumoniae. Twenty nanometer spherical AgPVP demonstrated the highest level of killing among the tested materials. AgPVP (0.6 mg/mL) was able to kill pneumococcal serotypes 2, 3, 4, and 19F within 4 h of exposure. Detailed analysis of cultures during exposure to AgPVP showed that both the metal ions and the solid nanoparticles participate in the killing of the pneumococcus. The bactericidal effect of AgPVP was lessened in the absence of the pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide. Capsule negative strains, JD908 and RX1, were only susceptible to AgPVP at concentrations at least 33% higher than their respective capsule expressing counterparts. These findings suggest that mechanisms of killing used by nanomaterials are not serotype dependent and that the capsular polysaccharide participates in the inhibition. In the near future these mechanisms will be examined as targets for novel antimicrobials. PMID:25520713

  20. Synthesis and preliminary biological evaluation of carba analogues from Neisseria meningitidis A capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qi; Zaccaria, Cristina; Tontini, Marta; Poletti, Laura; Costantino, Paolo; Lay, Luigi

    2012-09-01

    The Gram-negative encapsulated bacterium Neisseria meningitidis type A (MenA) is a major cause of meningitis in developing countries, especially in the sub-Saharan region of Africa. The development and manufacture of an efficient glycoconjugate vaccine against MenA is greatly hampered by the poor hydrolytic stability of its capsular polysaccharide, consisting of (1→6)-linked 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-d-mannopyranosyl phosphate repeating units. The replacement of the ring oxygen with a methylene group to get a carbocyclic analogue leads to the loss of the acetalic character of the phosphodiester and consequently to the enhancement of its chemical stability. Here we report the synthesis of oligomers (mono-, di- and trisaccharide) of carba-N-acetylmannosamine-1-O-phosphate as candidates for stabilized analogues of the corresponding fragments of MenA capsular polysaccharide. Each of the synthesized compounds contains a phosphodiester-linked aminopropyl spacer at its reducing end to allow for protein conjugation. The inhibition abilities of the synthetic molecules were investigated by a competitive ELISA assay, showing that only the carba-disaccharide is recognized by a polyclonal anti-MenA serum with an affinity similar to a native MenA oligosaccharide with average polymerization degree of 3. PMID:22850927

  1. Bacteroides fragilis NCTC9343 Produces at Least Three Distinct Capsular Polysaccharides: Cloning, Characterization, and Reassignment of Polysaccharide B and C Biosynthesis Loci

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, Michael J.; Kalka-Moll, Wiltrud; Tzianabos, Arthur O.; Kasper, Dennis L.; Comstock, Laurie E.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis produces a capsular polysaccharide complex (CPC) that is directly involved in its ability to induce abscesses. Two distinct capsular polysaccharides, polysaccharide A (PS A) and PS B, have been shown to be synthesized by the prototype strain for the study of abscesses, NCTC9343. Both of these polysaccharides in purified form induce abscesses in animal models. In this study, we demonstrate that the CPC of NCTC9343 is composed of at least three distinct capsular polysaccharides: PS A, PS B, and PS C. A previously described locus contains genes whose products are involved in the biosynthesis of PS C rather than PS B as was originally suggested. The actual PS B biosynthesis locus was cloned, sequenced, and found to contain 22 genes in an operon-type structure. A mutant with a large chromosomal deletion of the PS B biosynthesis locus was created so that the contribution of PS B to the formation of abscesses could be assessed in a rodent model. Although purified PS B can induce abscesses, removal of this polysaccharide does not attenuate the organism's ability to induce abscesses. PMID:11035722

  2. Serogroup-specific interaction of Neisseria meningitidis capsular polysaccharide with host cell microtubules and effects on tubulin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Talà, Adelfia; Cogli, Laura; De Stefano, Mario; Cammarota, Marcella; Spinosa, Maria Rita; Bucci, Cecilia; Alifano, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that during late stages of the infectious process, serogroup B meningococci (MenB) are able to escape the phagosome of in vitro-infected human epithelial cells. They then multiply in the cytosolic environment and spread intracellularly and to surrounding cells by exploiting the microtubule cytoskeleton, as suggested by results of infections in the presence of microtubule inhibitors and evidence of nanotubes connecting neighboring cells. In this study, by using microtubule binding assays with purified microtubule asters and bundles and microtubule bundles synthesized in vitro, we demonstrate that the MenB capsule directly mediates the interaction between bacteria and microtubules. The direct interaction between the microtubules and the MenB capsular polysaccharide was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Unexpectedly, serogroup C meningococci (MenC), which have a capsular polysaccharide that differs from that of MenB only by its anomeric linkage, α(2→9) instead of α(2→8), were not able to interact with the microtubules, and the lack of interaction was not due to capsular polysaccharide O-acetylation that takes place in most MenC strains but not in MenB strains. Moreover, we demonstrate that the MenB capsular polysaccharide inhibits tubulin polymerization in vitro. Thus, at variance with MenC, MenB may interfere with microtubule dynamics during cell infection. PMID:24166951

  3. Characterization of the Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243 Capsular Polysaccharide I Coding Region

    PubMed Central

    Cuccui, Jon; Milne, Timothy S.; Harmer, Nicholas; George, Alison J.; Harding, Sarah V.; Dean, Rachel E.; Scott, Andrew E.; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Wren, Brendan W.; Prior, Joann L.

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease endemic to regions of Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. Both humans and a range of other animal species are susceptible to melioidosis, and the production of a group 3 polysaccharide capsule in B. pseudomallei is essential for virulence. B. pseudomallei capsular polysaccharide (CPS) I comprises unbranched manno-heptopyranose residues and is encoded by a 34.5-kb locus on chromosome 1. Despite the importance of this locus, the role of all of the genes within this region is unclear. We inactivated 18 of these genes and analyzed their phenotype using Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. Furthermore, by combining this approach with bioinformatic analysis, we were able to develop a model for CPS I biosynthesis and export. We report that inactivating gmhA, wcbJ, and wcbN in B. pseudomallei K96243 retains the immunogenic integrity of the polysaccharide despite causing attenuation in the BALB/c murine infection model. Mice immunized with the B. pseudomallei K96243 mutants lacking a functional copy of either gmhA or wcbJ were afforded significant levels of protection against a wild-type B. pseudomallei K96243 challenge. PMID:22252864

  4. Capsular Polysaccharide-Fimbrial Protein Conjugate Vaccine Protects against Porphyromonas gingivalis Infection in SCID Mice Reconstituted with Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jeom-Il; Schifferle, Robert E.; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Kim, Byung-Woo

    1998-01-01

    The effect of immunization with either a Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbrial protein, a capsular polysaccharide, or a capsular polysaccharide-fimbrial protein conjugate vaccine were compared in hu-PBL-SCID mice. A significantly higher human immunoglobulin G antibody response and the highest degree of in vivo protection against bacterial challenge was observed in the group immunized with the conjugate vaccine. It was concluded that capsular polysaccharide-fimbrial protein conjugate from P. gingivalis could potentially be developed as a vaccine against periodontal infection by P. gingivalis. PMID:9423888

  5. Capsular polysaccharide antigens for detection of serotype-specific antibodies to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Bossé, J T; Johnson, R P; Rosendal, S

    1990-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPS) of serotypes 1, 2, 5 and 7 of Actinobacillus (Haemophilus) pleuropneumoniae were obtained from 18 h culture supernatants by precipitation with hexadecyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide (Cetavlon) followed by extraction with sodium chloride and reprecipitation in ethanol. These crude extracts, and portions purified further by phenol extraction to remove contaminating proteins, were evaluated as antigens for the detection of serotype-specific antibodies to A. pleuropneumoniae in sera from immunized rabbits and swine by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The crude extracts reacted strongly with homologous antisera, but except for serotype 1 showed considerable cross-reactivity with antisera to other serotypes. Phenol extraction greatly improved the serospecificity of the antigens from serotypes 1, 7 and, to a lesser extent, 5. The serotype 2 CPS antigen showed poor reactivity following phenol extraction, and did not appear as useful for detection of serotype-specific antibodies. PMID:2379111

  6. Role of Capsular Polysaccharides in Biofilm Formation: An AFM Nanomechanics Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huabin; Wilksch, Jonathan J; Strugnell, Richard A; Gee, Michelle L

    2015-06-17

    Bacteria form biofilms to facilitate colonization of biotic and abiotic surfaces, and biofilm formation on indwelling medical devices is a common cause of hospital-acquired infection. Although it is well-recognized that the exopolysaccharide capsule is one of the key bacterial components for biofilm formation, the underlying biophysical mechanism is poorly understood. In the present study, nanomechanical measurements of wild type and specific mutants of the pathogen, Klebsiella pneumoniae, were performed in situ using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Theoretical modeling of the mechanical data and static microtiter plate biofilm assays show that the organization of the capsule can influence bacterial adhesion, and thereby biofilm formation. The capsular organization is affected by the presence of type 3 fimbriae. Understanding the biophysical mechanisms for the impact of the structural organization of the bacterial polysaccharide capsule on biofilm formation will aid the development of strategies to prevent biofilm formation. PMID:26034816

  7. The Vi Capsular Polysaccharide Enables Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi to Evade Microbe-Guided Neutrophil Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Wangdi, Tamding; Lee, Cheng-Yuk; Spees, Alanna M.; Yu, Chenzhou; Kingsbury, Dawn D.; Winter, Sebastian E.; Hastey, Christine J.; Wilson, R. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) causes typhoid fever, a disseminated infection, while the closely related pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is associated with a localized gastroenteritis in humans. Here we investigated whether both pathogens differ in the chemotactic response they induce in neutrophils using a single-cell experimental approach. Surprisingly, neutrophils extended chemotactic pseudopodia toward Escherichia coli and S. Typhimurium, but not toward S. Typhi. Bacterial-guided chemotaxis was dependent on the presence of complement component 5a (C5a) and C5a receptor (C5aR). Deletion of S. Typhi capsule biosynthesis genes markedly enhanced the chemotactic response of neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, deletion of capsule biosynthesis genes heightened the association of S. Typhi with neutrophils in vivo through a C5aR-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of the virulence-associated (Vi) capsular polysaccharide of S. Typhi obstructs bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:25101794

  8. Synthesis of the Repeating Unit of Capsular Polysaccharide Staphylococcus aureus Type 5 To Study Chemical Activation and Conjugation of Native CP5.

    PubMed

    Yasomanee, Jagodige P; Visansirikul, Satsawat; Pornsuriyasak, Papapida; Thompson, Melissa; Kolodziej, Stephen A; Demchenko, Alexei V

    2016-07-15

    The chemical synthesis of the repeating unit of S. aureus capsular polysaccharide type 5 equipped with capping methyl groups at the points of propagation of the polysaccharide sequence is described. This model compound was designed to study activation of the full length polysaccharide for conjugation to a carrier protein. PMID:27305525

  9. Inhibition of the classical pathway of complement by meningococcal capsular polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sarika; Vasudhev, Shreekant; DeOliveira, Rosane; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Almost all invasive Neisseria meningitidis isolates express capsular polysaccharide. Antibody (Ab) is required for complement-dependent killing of meningococci. While alternative pathway evasion has received considerable attention, little is known about classical pathway (CP) inhibition by meningococci and forms the basis of this study. We engineered capsulated and unencapsulated isogenic mutant strains of groups A, B, C, W and Y meningococci to express similar amounts of the same factor H-binding protein (fHbp; a key component of group B meningococcal vaccines) molecule. Despite similar anti-fHbp mAb binding, significantly less C4b was deposited on all five encapsulated mutants compared to their unencapsulated counterparts (P<0.01), when purified C1 and C4 were used to deposit C4b. Reduced C4b deposition was the result of capsule-mediated inhibition of C1q engagement by Ab. C4b deposition correlated linearly with C1q engagement by anti-fHbp. While B, C, W and Y capsules limited CP-mediated killing by anti-fHbp, the unencapsulated group A mutant paradoxically was more resistant than its encapsulated counterpart. Strains varied considerably in their susceptibility to anti-fHbp and complement despite similar Ab binding, which may have implications for the activity of fHbp-based vaccines. Capsule also limited C4b deposition by anti-porin A mAbs. Capsule expression decreased binding of an anti-LOS IgM mAb (~1.2 to 2-fold reduction in fluorescence). Akin to observations with IgG, capsule also decreased IgM-mediated C4b deposition when IgM binding to the mutant strain pairs was normalized. In conclusion, we show that capsular polysaccharide, a critical meningococcal virulence factor, inhibits the CP of complement. PMID:25015832

  10. Inhibition of the classical pathway of complement by meningococcal capsular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sarika; Vasudhev, Shreekant; DeOliveira, Rosane B; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-08-15

    Almost all invasive Neisseria meningitidis isolates express capsular polysaccharide. Ab is required for complement-dependent killing of meningococci. Although alternative pathway evasion has received considerable attention, little is known about classical pathway (CP) inhibition by meningococci, which forms the basis of this study. We engineered capsulated and unencapsulated isogenic mutant strains of groups A, B, C, W, and Y meningococci to express similar amounts of the same factor H-binding protein (fHbp; a key component of group B meningococcal vaccines) molecule. Despite similar anti-fHbp mAb binding, significantly less C4b was deposited on all five encapsulated mutants compared with their unencapsulated counterparts (p < 0.01) when purified C1 and C4 were used to deposit C4b. Reduced C4b deposition was the result of capsule-mediated inhibition of C1q engagement by Ab. C4b deposition correlated linearly with C1q engagement by anti-fHbp. Whereas B, C, W, and Y capsules limited CP-mediated killing by anti-fHbp, the unencapsulated group A mutant paradoxically was more resistant than its encapsulated counterpart. Strains varied considerably in their susceptibility to anti-fHbp and complement despite similar Ab binding, which may have implications for the activity of fHbp-based vaccines. Capsule also limited C4b deposition by anti-porin A mAbs. Capsule expression decreased binding of an anti-lipooligosaccharide IgM mAb (∼ 1.2- to 2-fold reduction in fluorescence). Akin to observations with IgG, capsule also decreased IgM-mediated C4b deposition when IgM binding to the mutant strain pairs was normalized. In conclusion, we show that capsular polysaccharide, a critical meningococcal virulence factor, inhibits the CP of complement. PMID:25015832

  11. Bacterial capsular polysaccharide prevents the onset of asthma through T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jenny L; Jones, Mark B; Cobb, Brian A

    2015-04-01

    Over the last four decades, increases in the incidence of immune-mediated diseases in the Western world have been linked to changes in microbial exposure. It is becoming increasingly clear that the normal microbiota in the gut can profoundly alter susceptibility to a wide range of diseases, such as asthma, in which immune homeostasis is disrupted, yet the mechanisms governing this microbial influence remains poorly defined. In this study, we show that gastrointestinal exposure to PSA, a capsular polysaccharide derived from the commensal bacterium Bacteroides fragilis, significantly limits susceptibility to the induction of experimental asthma. We report that direct treatment of mice with PSA generates protection from asthma, and this effect can be given to a naïve recipient by adoptive transfer of CD4(+) T cells from PSA-exposed mice. Remarkably, we found that these PSA-induced T cells are not canonical FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells, but that they potently inhibit both Th1 and Th2 models of asthma in an IL-10-dependent fashion. These findings reveal that bacterial polysaccharides link the microbiota with the peripheral immune system by activating CD4(+)Foxp3(-) T cells upon exposure in the gut, and they facilitate resistance to unnecessary inflammatory responses via the production of IL-10. PMID:25347992

  12. Functions of some capsular polysaccharide biosynthetic genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae NTUH K-2044.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jin-Yuan; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Li, Chun-Yen; Lee, Arwen; Cheng, An-Ning; Chen, Ming-Chuan; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Wang, Jin-Town; Li, Tsung-Lin; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2011-01-01

    The growing number of Klebsiella pneumoniae infections, commonly acquired in hospitals, has drawn great concern. It has been shown that the K1 and K2 capsular serotypes are the most detrimental strains, particularly to those with diabetes. The K1 cps (capsular polysaccharide) locus in the NTUH-2044 strain of the pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) K. pneumoniae has been identified recently, but little is known about the functions of the genes therein. Here we report characterization of a group of cps genes and their roles in the pathogenesis of K1 K. pneumoniae. By sequential gene deletion, the cps gene cluster was first re-delimited between genes galF and ugd, which serve as up- and down-stream ends, respectively. Eight gene products were characterized in vitro and in vivo to be involved in the syntheses of UDP-glucose, UDP-glucuronic acid and GDP-fucose building units. Twelve genes were identified as virulence factors based on the observation that their deletion mutants became avirulent or lost K1 antigenicity. Furthermore, deletion of kp3706, kp3709 or kp3712 (ΔwcaI, ΔwcaG or Δatf, respectively), which are all involved in fucose biosynthesis, led to a broad range of transcriptional suppression for 52 upstream genes. The genes suppressed include those coding for unknown regulatory membrane proteins and six multidrug efflux system proteins, as well as proteins required for the K1 CPS biosynthesis. In support of the suppression of multidrug efflux genes, we showed that these three mutants became more sensitive to antibiotics. Taken together, the results suggest that kp3706, kp3709 or kp3712 genes are strongly related to the pathogenesis of K. pneumoniae K1. PMID:21765903

  13. Anti-Biofilm Activity: A Function of Klebsiella pneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos Goncalves, Marina; Delattre, Cédric; Balestrino, Damien; Charbonnel, Nicolas; Elboutachfaiti, Redouan; Wadouachi, Anne; Badel, Stéphanie; Bernardi, Thierry; Michaud, Philippe; Forestier, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Competition and cooperation phenomena occur within highly interactive biofilm communities and several non-biocides molecules produced by microorganisms have been described as impairing biofilm formation. In this study, we investigated the anti-biofilm capacities of an ubiquitous and biofilm producing bacterium, Klebsiella pneumoniae. Cell-free supernatant from K. pneumoniae planktonic cultures showed anti-biofilm effects on most Gram positive bacteria tested but also encompassed some Gram negative bacilli. The anti-biofilm non-bactericidal activity was further investigated on Staphylococcus epidermidis, by determining the biofilm biomass, microscopic observations and agglutination measurement through a magnetic bead-mediated agglutination test. Cell-free extracts from K. pneumoniae biofilm (supernatant and acellular matrix) also showed an influence, although to a lesser extend. Chemical analyses indicated that the active molecule was a high molecular weight polysaccharide composed of five monosaccharides: galactose, glucose, rhamnose, glucuronic acid and glucosamine and the main following sugar linkage residues [→2)-α-l-Rhap-(1→]; [→4)-α-l-Rhap-(1→]; [α-d-Galp-(1→]; [→2,3)-α-d-Galp-(1→]; [→3)-β-d-Galp-(1→] and, [→4)-β-d-GlcAp-(1→]. Characterization of this molecule indicated that this component was more likely capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and precoating of abiotic surfaces with CPS extracts from different serotypes impaired the bacteria-surface interactions. Thus the CPS of Klebsiella would exhibit a pleiotropic activity during biofilm formation, both stimulating the initial adhesion and maturation steps as previously described, but also repelling potential competitors. PMID:24932475

  14. Production of capsular polysaccharide does not influence Staphylococcus aureus vancomycin susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diverse mechanisms (increased cell wall thickness, low cross linking, decreased autolysis, etc.) have been reported for Staphylococcus aureus strains with intermediate vancomycin susceptibility (VISA). This study was conducted to identify common mechanisms responsible for decreased vancomycin susceptibility in a VISA strain pair. Results Transcriptional profiling of the clinical heterogeneous VISA isolate SA137/93A and its spontaneous homogeneous mutant strain SA137/93G pointed to an increased capsule production in the strain pair compared to a susceptible control. Furthermore, transcript quantification of the gene cap5E, which is essential for capsule biosynthesis, revealed elevated levels in the VISA strains SA137/93A, SA137/93G and Mu50 in comparison with susceptible strains Reynolds, Newman and SA1450/94. The increased expression was observed in bacteria from exponential as well as stationary growth phase. However, suppression of type 5 capsule formation by expression of antisense RNA did not increase vancomycin susceptibility in the VISA strain SA137/93G. Likewise, construction of inducible mutants of S. aureus Newman or repair of capsule biosynthesis of S. aureus HG001 and S. aureus 1450/94 did not influence resistance to vancomycin. Furthermore, purified type 5 polysaccharide did not protect indicator strains from the action of vancomycin. Conclusions The VISA strain tested in this study displayed an increased production of type 5 capsular polysaccharide. However, the production of capsule material did not protect strain SA137/93G and three vancomycin sensitive strains in the presence of vancomycin and thus is not part of the resistance mechanism; however it may represent a by-product of VISA life style that is often characterized by a high sigma factor B activity. PMID:23522028

  15. Reduction of Streptococcus pneumoniae Colonization and Dissemination by a Nonopsonic Capsular Polysaccharide Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization of the nasopharynx (NP) is a prerequisite for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The marked reduction in IPD that followed the routine use of pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines (PCVs) has been linked to reduced NP colonization with vaccine-included serotypes (STs), with the caveat that PCVs are less effective against pneumonia than against IPD. Although PCV-elicited opsonic antibodies that enhance phagocytic killing of the homologous ST are considered a key correlate of PCV-mediated protection, recent studies question this relationship for some STs, including ST3. Studies with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PPS) of ST3 (PPS3) have shown that nonopsonic, as well as opsonic, antibodies can each protect mice against pneumonia and sepsis, but the effect of these types of MAbs on NP colonization is unknown. In this study, we determined the effects of protective opsonic and nonopsonic PPS3 MAbs on ST3 NP colonization in mice. Our results show that a nonopsonic MAb reduced early NP colonization and prevented ST3 dissemination to the lungs and blood, but an opsonic MAb did not. Moreover, the opsonic MAb induced a proinflammatory NP cytokine response, but the nonopsonic MAb had an antiinflammatory effect. The effect of the nonopsonic MAb on colonization did not require its Fc region, but its antiinflammatory effect did. Our findings challenge the paradigm that opsonic MAbs are required to prevent NP colonization and suggest that further studies of the activity of nonopsonic antibodies could advance our understanding of mechanisms of PCV efficacy and provide novel correlates of protection. PMID:26838726

  16. Development of capsular polysaccharide-based glycoconjugates for immunization against melioidosis and glanders

    PubMed Central

    Burtnick, Mary N.; Heiss, Christian; Roberts, Rosemary A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Azadi, Parastoo; Brett, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively, cause severe disease in humans and animals and are considered potential agents of biological warfare and terrorism. Diagnosis and treatment of infections caused by these pathogens can be challenging and, in the absence of chemotherapeutic intervention, acute disease is frequently fatal. At present, there are no human or veterinary vaccines available for immunization against these emerging/re-emerging infectious diseases. One of the long term objectives of our research, therefore, is to identify and characterize protective antigens expressed by B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and use them to develop efficacious vaccine candidates. Previous studies have demonstrated that the 6-deoxy-heptan capsular polysaccharide (CPS) expressed by these bacterial pathogens is both a virulence determinant and a protective antigen. Consequently, this carbohydrate moiety has become an important component of the various subunit vaccines that we are currently developing in our laboratory. In the present study, we describe a reliable method for isolating CPS antigens from O-polysaccharide (OPS) deficient strains of B. pseudomallei; including a derivative of the select agent excluded strain Bp82. Utilizing these purified CPS samples, we also describe a simple procedure for covalently linking these T-cell independent antigens to carrier proteins. In addition, we demonstrate that high titer IgG responses can be raised against the CPS component of such constructs. Collectively, these approaches provide a tangible starting point for the development of novel CPS-based glycoconjugates for immunization against melioidosis and glanders. PMID:22912938

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of phosphono analogues of capsular polysaccharide fragments from Neisseria meningitidis A.

    PubMed

    Torres-Sanchez, Maria I; Zaccaria, Cristina; Buzzi, Benedetta; Miglio, Gianluca; Lombardi, Grazia; Polito, Laura; Russo, Giovanni; Lay, Luigi

    2007-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis type A (MenA) is a Gram-negative encapsulated bacterium that may cause explosive epidemics of meningitis, especially in the sub-Saharan region of Africa. The development and manufacture of an efficient glycoconjugate vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis A is greatly hampered by the poor hydrolytic stability of its capsular polysaccharide, which is made up of (1-->6)-linked 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl phosphate repeating units. Since this chemical lability is a product of the inherent instability of the phosphodiester bridges, here we report the synthesis of phosphonoester-linked oligomers of N-acetyl mannosamine as candidates for stabilised analogues of the corresponding phosphate-bridged saccharides. The installation of each interglycosidic phosphonoester linkage was achieved by Mitsunobu coupling of a glycosyl C-phosphonate building block with the 6-OH moiety of a mannosaminyl residue. Each of the synthesised compounds contains an O-linked aminopropyl spacer at its reducing end (alpha- or beta-oriented) to allow for protein conjugation. The relative affinities of the synthetic molecules were investigated by a competitive ELISA assay and showed that a human polyclonal anti-MenA serum can recognise both the phosphonoester-bridged fragments 1-3 and their monomeric subunits, glycosides 20 and 21. Moreover, the biological results suggest that the abilities of these compounds to inhibit the binding of a specific antibody to MenA polysaccharide are dependent on the chain lengths of the molecules, but independent on the orientations of the anomeric linkers. PMID:17508372

  18. Dynamics of the Murine Humoral Immune Response to Neisseria meningitidis Group B Capsular Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Colino, Jesús; Outschoorn, Ingrid

    1998-01-01

    Immunization with Neisseria meningitidis group B capsular polysaccharide (CpsB) elicited responses in adult mice that showed the typical dynamic characteristics of the response to a thymus-independent antigen, in contrast to the thymus-dependent behavior of antibody responses to CpsC. The former had a short latent period and showed a rapid increase in serum antibodies that peaked at day 5, and immunoglobulin M (IgM) was the major isotype even though IgG (mainly IgG2a and IgG2b) was also detectable. This response was of short duration, and the specific antibodies were rapidly cleared from the circulation. The secondary responses were similar in magnitude, kinetics, IgM predominance, and IgG distribution. Nevertheless, a threefold IgG increase, a correlation between IgM and IgG levels, and dose-dependent secondary responses were observed. Hyperimmunization considerably reinforced these responses: 10-fold for IgM and 300-fold for IgG. This favored isotype switch was accompanied by a progressive change in the subclass distribution to IgG3 (62%) and IgG1 (28%), along with the possible generation of B-cell memory. The results indicate that CpsB is being strictly thymus independent and suggest that unresponsiveness to purified CpsB is due to tolerance. PMID:9453603

  19. Evaluation of various adjuvant nanoparticulate formulations for meningococcal capsular polysaccharide-based vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gala, Rikhav P; D'Souza, Martin; Zughaier, Susu M

    2016-06-14

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis and sepsis and its capsular polysaccharides (CPS) are a major virulence factor in meningococcal infections and form the basis for serogroup designation and preventive vaccines. We have formulated a novel meningococcal nanoparticulate vaccine formulation that does not require chemical conjugation, but encapsulates meningococcal CPS polymers in a biodegradable material that slowly release antigens, thereby has antigen depot effect to enhance antigenicity. The novel vaccine formulation is inexpensive and can be stored as a dry powder with extended shelf life that does not require the cold-chain which facilitates storage and distribution. In order to enhance the antigenicity of meningococcal nanoparticulate vaccine, we screened various adjuvants formulated in nanoparticles, for their ability to potentiate antigen presentation by dendritic cells. Here, we report that MF59 and Alum are superior to TLR-based adjuvants in enhancing dendritic cell maturation and antigen presentation markers MHC I, MHC II, CD40, CD80 and CD86 in dendritic cells pulsed with meningococcal CPS nanoparticulate vaccine. PMID:27177946

  20. Developing Peptide Mimotopes of Capsular Polysaccharides and Lipopolysaccharides Protective Antigens of Pathogenic Burkholderia Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pengfei; Zhang, Jing; Tsai, Shien; Li, Bingjie; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP) and Burkholderia mallei (BM) are two species of pathogenic Burkholderia bacteria. Our laboratory previously identified four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that reacted against Burkholderia capsular polysaccharides (PS) and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and effectively protected against a lethal dose of BP/BM infections in mice. In this study, we used phage display panning against three different phage peptide libraries to select phage clones specifically recognized by each of the four protective MAbs. After sequencing a total of 179 candidate phage clones, we examined in detail six selected phage clones carrying different peptide inserts for the specificity of binding by the respective target MAbs. Chemically synthesized peptides corresponding to those displayed by the six phage clones were conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin carrier protein and tested for their binding specificity to the respective protective MAbs. The study revealed that four of the six peptides, all derived from the library displaying dodecapeptides, functioned well as "mimotopes" of Burkholderia PS and LPS as demonstrated by a high degree of specific competition against the binding of three protective MAbs to BP and BM. Our results suggest that the four selected peptide mimics corresponding to PS/LPS protective antigens of BP and BM could potentially be developed into peptide vaccines against pathogenic Burkholderia bacteria. PMID:27328059

  1. Capsular Polysaccharide Is Involved in NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation by Klebsiella pneumoniae Serotype K1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng-Ling; Chiu, Hsiao-Wen; Chou, Ju-Ching; Dong, Wei-Chih; Lin, Chien-Nan; Lin, Chai-Yi; Wang, Jin-Town; Li, Lan-Hui; Chiu, Huan-Wen; Chiu, Yi-Chich

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (strain 43816, K2 serotype) induces interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion, but neither the bacterial factor triggering the activation of these inflammasome-dependent responses nor whether they are mediated by NLRP3 or NLRC4 is known. In this study, we identified a capsular polysaccharide (K1-CPS) in K. pneumoniae (NTUH-K2044, K1 serotype), isolated from a primary pyogenic liver abscess (PLA K. pneumoniae), as the Klebsiella factor that induces IL-1β secretion in an NLRP3-, ASC-, and caspase-1-dependent manner in macrophages. K1-CPS induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation through reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, and NF-κB activation. Inhibition of both the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and mitochondrial ROS generation inhibited K1-CPS-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Furthermore, IL-1β secretion in macrophages infected with PLA K. pneumoniae was shown to depend on NLRP3 but also on NLRC4 and TLR4. In macrophages infected with a K1-CPS deficiency mutant, an lipopolysaccharide (LPS) deficiency mutant, or K1-CPS and LPS double mutants, IL-1β secretion levels were lower than those in cells infected with wild-type PLA K. pneumoniae. Our findings indicate that K1-CPS is one of the Klebsiella factors of PLA K. pneumoniae that induce IL-1β secretion through the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:26077758

  2. The capsular polysaccharide Vi from Salmonella Typhi is a B1b antigen

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jennifer L.; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Kingsley, Robert A.; Hitchcock, Jessica R.; Ross, Ewan A.; Lopez-Macias, Constantino; Lakey, Jeremy; Martin, Laura B.; Toellner, Kai-Michael; MacLennan, Calman A.; MacLennan, Ian C; Henderson, Ian R.; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination with purified capsular polysaccharide Vi antigen from Salmonella Typhi can protect against typhoid fever, although the mechanism for its efficacy is not clearly established. Here, we have characterised the B cell response to this vaccine in wild-type and T cell-deficient mice. We show that immunization with Typhim Vi rapidly induces proliferation in B1b peritoneal cells, but not in B1a cells or marginal zone (MZ) B cells. This induction of B1b proliferation is concomitant with the detection of splenic Vi-specific antibody secreting cells and protective antibody and Rag1-deficient B1b cell chimeras generated by adoptive transfer induced specific antibody after Vi immunization. Furthermore, antibody derived from peritoneal B cells is sufficient to confer protection against Salmonella that express Vi antigen. Expression of Vi by Salmonella during infection did not inhibit the development of early antibody responses to non-Vi antigens. Despite this, the protection conferred by immunization of mice with porin proteins from Salmonella, which induce antibody-mediated protection, was reduced after infection with Vi-expressing Salmonella, although protection was not totally abrogated. This work therefore suggests that in mice, B1b cells contribute to the protection induced by Vi antigen and targeting non-Vi antigens as sub-unit vaccines may offer an attractive strategy to augment current Vi-based vaccine strategies. PMID:23162127

  3. Role of the capsular polysaccharide as a virulence factor for Streptococcus suis serotype 14

    PubMed Central

    Roy, David; Auger, Jean-Philippe; Segura, Mariela; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Okura, Masatoshi; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important swine pathogen and a zoonotic agent causing meningitis and septicemia. Although serotype 2 is the most virulent type, serotype 14 is emerging, and understanding of its pathogenesis is limited. To study the role of the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of serotype 14 as a virulence factor, we constructed knockout mutants devoid of either cps14B, a highly conserved regulatory gene, or neu14C, a gene coding for uridine diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase, which is involved in sialic acid synthesis. The mutants showed total loss of the CPS with coagglutination assays and electron microscopy. Phagocytosis assays showed high susceptibility of mutant Δcps14B. An in vivo murine model was used to demonstrate attenuated virulence of this non-encapsulated mutant. Despite the difference in the CPS composition of different serotypes, this study has demonstrated for the first time that the CPS of a serotype other than 2 is also an important antiphagocytic factor and a critical virulence factor. PMID:25852230

  4. O-METHYL PHOSPHORAMIDATE MODIFICATIONS ON THE CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDE OF CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI ARE INVOLVED IN SERUM RESISTANCE, INFECTION, AND INSECTICIDAL ACTIVITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most commonly reported cause of bacterial foodborne illness in North America. C. jejuni decorates its surface polysaccharides with a variety of variable phosphorylated structures, including O-methyl phosphoramidate (MeOPN) modifications on the capsular polysaccharide. Alt...

  5. The Efficacy of Pneumococcal Capsular Polysaccharide-specific Antibodies to Serotype 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae requires Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizio, Kevin; Manix, Catherine; Tian, Haijun; van Rooijen, Nico; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2010-01-01

    The efficacy of antibody immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae stems from the ability of opsonic, serotype (ST)-specific antibodies to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PPS) to facilitate killing of the homologous ST by host phagocytes. However, PPS-specific antibodies have been identified that are protective in mice, but do not promote opsonic killing in vitro, raising the question of how they mediate protection in vivo. To probe this question, we investigated the dependence of antibody efficacy against lethal systemic (intraperitoneal, i.p.) infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 (ST3) on macrophages and neutrophils for the following PPS3-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in survival experiments in mice using a non-opsonic human IgM (A7), a non-opsonic mouse IgG1 (1E2) and an opsonic mouse IgG1 (5F6). The survival of A7- and PPS3-specific and isotype control-MAb-treated neutrophil-depleted and neutrophil-sufficient and macrophage-depleted and macrophage-sufficient mice were determined after i.p. challenge with ST3 strains 6303 and WU2. Neutrophils were dispensable for A7 and the mouse MAbs to mediate protection in this model, but macrophages were required for the efficacy of A7 and optimal mouse MAb-mediated protection. For A7-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had higher blood CFU, cytokines and peripheral neutrophil levels than macrophage-sufficient mice, and macrophage-sufficient mice had lower tissue bacterial burdens than control MAb-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that macrophages contribute to opsonic and non-opsonic PPS3-specific MAb-mediated protection against ST3 infection by enhancing bacterial clearance and suggest that neutrophils do not compensate for the absence of macrophages in the model used in this study. PMID:20800700

  6. Protection against Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Infection Using a Capsular Polysaccharide Glycoconjugate Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Goyette-Desjardins, Guillaume; Calzas, Cynthia; Shiao, Tze Chieh; Neubauer, Axel; Kempker, Jennifer; Roy, René; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Segura, Mariela

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is an encapsulated bacterium and one of the most important bacterial pathogens in the porcine industry. Despite decades of research for an efficient vaccine, none is currently available. Based on the success achieved with other encapsulated pathogens, a glycoconjugate vaccine strategy was selected to elicit opsonizing anti-capsular polysaccharide (anti-CPS) IgG antibodies. In this work, glycoconjugate prototypes were prepared by coupling S. suis type 2 CPS to tetanus toxoid, and the immunological features of the postconjugation preparations were evaluated in vivo In mice, experiments evaluating three different adjuvants showed that CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ODN) induces very low levels of anti-CPS IgM antibodies, while the emulsifying adjuvants Stimune and TiterMax Gold both induced high levels of IgGs and IgM. Dose-response trials comparing free CPS with the conjugate vaccine showed that free CPS is nonimmunogenic independently of the dose used, while 25 μg of the conjugate preparation was optimal in inducing high levels of anti-CPS IgGs postboost. With an opsonophagocytosis assay using murine whole blood, sera from immunized mice showed functional activity. Finally, the conjugate vaccine showed immunogenicity and induced protection in a swine challenge model. When conjugated and administered with emulsifying adjuvants, S. suis type 2 CPS is able to induce potent IgM and isotype-switched IgGs in mice and pigs, yielding functional activity in vitro and protection against a lethal challenge in vivo, all features of a T cell-dependent response. This study represents a proof of concept for the potential of glycoconjugate vaccines in veterinary medicine applications against invasive bacterial infections. PMID:27113360

  7. Capsular polysaccharide production by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 1: from strain selection to fed-batch cultivation.

    PubMed

    Marthos, Bruno Vitorio; Ferri, Anne Letícia Silva; de Figueiredo, Douglas Borges; Zangirolami, Teresa Cristina; Gonçalves, Viviane Maimoni

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human pathogen largely transmitted by aerosols. Vaccines are the main strategy against this pathogen, and the capsular polysaccharide (PS) is its major antigen. S. pneumoniae serotype 1 is associated with large outbreaks and epidemics of invasive diseases. The aims of this work were to screen serotype 1 strains to identify the best PS1 producer, evaluate three peptones for PS1 production, investigate the effects of culture medium components using a design of experiments (DoE), a statistic tool for optimization, and propose a new medium/cultivation strategy. After flask cultivation of nine strains, two that produced high PS1 and biomass values were chosen for further evaluation in the bioreactor, and ST595/01 was chosen as the best PS1 producer strain. Among the peptones tested (Casamino acids, Soytone, and Phytone), the highest PS1 production (298 mg/L) was reached with Phytone. Next, DoE (2(4-1)) was performed to evaluate the effects of yeast extract (YE), Phytone, L-asparagine (Asn), and L-glutamine (Gln), yielding the following results: Phytone presented positive effects (p < 0.05) for maximum production of biomass, PS1, acetate, and lactate; YE showed positive effects for biomass and acid production (p < 0.05); Gln exerted a minor positive effect on PS1 yield factor on glucose (p < 0.1); and Asn presented only an effect on acetate production (p < 0.1). Hence, a new culture medium was formulated based on Phytone, YE, and glucose, and batch and fed-batch cultivations were evaluated. The fed-batch cultivation showed almost 2 times the biomass and 2.5 times the PS1 production as the batch culture, and 8-10 times higher PS1 production than has been previously reported. PMID:26298702

  8. Structure and molecular characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide 10F by carbohydrate engineering in Streptococcus oralis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinghua; Shelat, Nirav Y; Bush, C Allen; Cisar, John O

    2010-07-30

    Although closely related at the molecular level, the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of serotype 10F Streptococcus pneumoniae and coaggregation receptor polysaccharide (RPS) of Streptococcus oralis C104 have distinct ecological roles. CPS prevents phagocytosis of pathogenic S. pneumoniae, whereas RPS of commensal S. oralis functions as a receptor for lectin-like adhesins on other members of the dental plaque biofilm community. Results from high resolution NMR identified the recognition region of S. oralis RPS (i.e. Galfbeta1-6GalNAcbeta1-3Galalpha) in the hexasaccharide repeat of S. pneumoniae CPS10F. The failure of this polysaccharide to support fimbriae-mediated adhesion of Actinomyces naeslundii was explained by the position of Galf, which occurred as a branch in CPS10F rather than within the linear polysaccharide chain, as in RPS. Carbohydrate engineering of S. oralis RPS with wzy from S. pneumoniae attributed formation of the Galf branch in CPS10F to the linkage of adjacent repeating units through sub terminal GalNAc in Galfbeta1-6GalNAcbeta1-3Galalpha rather than through terminal Galf, as in RPS. A gene (wcrD) from serotype 10A S. pneumoniae was then used to engineer a linear surface polysaccharide in S. oralis that was identical to RPS except for the presence of a beta1-3 linkage between Galf and GalNAcbeta1-3Galalpha. This polysaccharide also failed to support adhesion of A. naeslundii, thereby establishing the essential role of beta1-6-linked Galf in recognition of adjacent GalNAcbeta1-3Galalpha in wild-type RPS. These findings, which illustrate a molecular approach for relating bacterial polysaccharide structure to function, provide insight into the possible evolution of S. oralis RPS from S. pneumoniae CPS. PMID:20507989

  9. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsular Polysaccharide Recognition by a Monoclonal Antibody Reveals Key Details toward a Biodefense Vaccine and Diagnostics against Melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Roberta; Dillon, Michael J; Burtnick, Mary N; Hubbard, Mark A; Kenfack, Marielle Tamigney; Blériot, Yves; Gauthier, Charles; Brett, Paul J; AuCoin, David P; Lanzetta, Rosa; Silipo, Alba; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-10-16

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the bacterium responsible for melioidosis, an infectious disease with high mortality rates. Since melioidosis is a significant public health concern in endemic regions and the organism is currently classified as a potential biothreat agent, the development of effective vaccines and rapid diagnostics is a priority. The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) expressed by B. pseudomallei is a highly conserved virulence factor and a protective antigen. Because of this, CPS is considered an attractive antigen for use in the development of both vaccines and diagnostics. In the present study, we describe the interactions of CPS with the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4C4 using a multidisciplinary approach including organic synthesis, molecular biology techniques, surface plasmon resonance, and nuclear magnetic spectroscopy. Using these methods, we determined the mode of binding between mAb 4C4 and native CPS or ad hoc synthesized capsular polysaccharide fragments. Interestingly, we demonstrated that the O-acetyl moiety of CPS is essential for the interaction of the CPS epitope with mAb 4C4. Collectively, our results provide important insights into the structural features of B. pseudomallei CPS that enable antibody recognition that may help the rational design of CPS-based vaccine candidates. In addition, our findings confirm that the mAb 4C4 is suitable for use in an antibody-based detection assay for diagnosis of B. pseudomallei infections. PMID:26198038

  10. Production of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against group A, B, and C capsular polysaccharides of Neisseria meningitidis and preparation of latex reagents.

    PubMed

    Nato, F; Mazie, J C; Fournier, J M; Slizewicz, B; Sagot, N; Guibourdenche, M; Postic, D; Riou, J Y

    1991-07-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against capsular polysaccharides of Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, B, and C were produced in order to develop immunological reagents allowing both the detection of soluble antigens during meningococcal meningitis and antigenic serogrouping of N. meningitidis cultures. The performance characteristics of monoclonal and polyclonal antibody latex reagents were compared. For the detection of soluble polysaccharide antigen, polyclonal antibody latex reagent was selected for N. meningitidis A and C. The latex reagent prepared with polyclonal antibodies against N. meningitidis B could not detect capsular polysaccharide even at 1 mg/ml. The monoclonal antibody B latex reagent which detected 100 ng of polysaccharide per ml was therefore chosen. For the serogroup identification of N. meningitidis, the use of a confirmatory test results in an overall specificity of 100% with polyclonal or monoclonal antibody latex reagents. PMID:1909346

  11. The capsule of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Oscar; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; De Jesus, Magdia; Frases, Susana; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    The capsule of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans has been studied extensively in recent decades, and a large body of information is now available to the scientific community. Well-known aspects of the capsule include its structure, antigenic properties and its function as a virulence factor. The capsule is composed primarily of two polysaccharides, glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) and galactoxylomannan (GalXM), in addition to a smaller proportion of mannoproteins (MP). Most of the studies on the composition of the capsule have focused on GXM, which comprises more than 90% of the capsule's polysaccharide mass. It is GalXM, however, that is of particular scientific interest because of its immunological properties. The molecular structure of these polysaccharides is very complex and has not yet been fully elucidated. Both GXM and GalXM are high molecular mass polymers with the mass of GXM equaling roughly 10 times that of GalXM. Recent findings suggest, however, that the actual Mw might be different to what it has traditionally been thought to be. In addition to their structural roles in the polysaccharide capsule, these molecules have been associated with many deleterious effects on the immune response. Capsular components are therefore considered key virulence determinants in Cryptococcus neoformans, which has motivated their use in vaccines and made them targets for monoclonal antibody treatments. In this review we will provide an update on the current knowledge of the C. neoformans capsule, covering aspects related to its structure, synthesis, and particularly, its role as a virulence factor. PMID:19426855

  12. A unique capsular polysaccharide structure from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H that mimics antifreeze (glyco)proteins.

    PubMed

    Carillo, Sara; Casillo, Angela; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Sannino, Filomena; Bayer-Giraldi, Maddalena; Cosconati, Sandro; Novellino, Ettore; Ewert, Marcela; Deming, Jody W; Lanzetta, Rosa; Marino, Gennaro; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Randazzo, Antonio; Tutino, Maria L; Corsaro, M Michela

    2015-01-14

    The low temperatures of polar regions and high-altitude environments, especially icy habitats, present challenges for many microorganisms. Their ability to live under subfreezing conditions implies the production of compounds conferring cryotolerance. Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H, a γ-proteobacterium isolated from subzero Arctic marine sediments, provides a model for the study of life in cold environments. We report here the identification and detailed molecular primary and secondary structures of capsular polysaccharide from C. psychrerythraea 34H cells. The polymer was isolated in the water layer when cells were extracted by phenol/water and characterized by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy together with chemical analysis. Molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations were also performed. The polysaccharide consists of a tetrasaccharidic repeating unit containing two amino sugars and two uronic acids bearing threonine as substituent. The structural features of this unique polysaccharide resemble those present in antifreeze proteins and glycoproteins. These results suggest a possible correlation between the capsule structure and the ability of C. psychrerythraea to colonize subfreezing marine environments. PMID:25525681

  13. Direct testing of blood culture for detection of the serotype 5 and 8 capsular polysaccharides of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Boutonnier, A; Nato, F; Bouvet, A; Lebrun, L; Audurier, A; Mazie, J C; Fournier, J M

    1989-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reactive with serotype 5 and 8 capsular polysaccharides of Staphylococcus aureus have been used to test, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), blood culture fluids for the presence of S. aureus. A total of 748 blood cultures from 665 patients yielding 706 bacterial isolates belonging to more than 26 bacterial species were studied. All blood cultures containing bacterial strains belonging to species other than S. aureus were negative in ELISA. All 23 blood cultures containing serotype 5 S. aureus were positive in ELISA with the corresponding MAb. Out of 20 blood cultures containing serotype 8 S. aureus, 19 were positive with the corresponding MAb. All 5 blood cultures containing nontypeable S. aureus were negative in ELISA with both MAbs. This method provides reliable identification of serotype 5 or serotype 8 S. aureus by direct testing of blood culture fluids with ELISA. PMID:2745705

  14. Direct testing of blood culture for detection of the serotype 5 and 8 capsular polysaccharides of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Boutonnier, A; Nato, F; Bouvet, A; Lebrun, L; Audurier, A; Mazie, J C; Fournier, J M

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reactive with serotype 5 and 8 capsular polysaccharides of Staphylococcus aureus have been used to test, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), blood culture fluids for the presence of S. aureus. A total of 748 blood cultures from 665 patients yielding 706 bacterial isolates belonging to more than 26 bacterial species were studied. All blood cultures containing bacterial strains belonging to species other than S. aureus were negative in ELISA. All 23 blood cultures containing serotype 5 S. aureus were positive in ELISA with the corresponding MAb. Out of 20 blood cultures containing serotype 8 S. aureus, 19 were positive with the corresponding MAb. All 5 blood cultures containing nontypeable S. aureus were negative in ELISA with both MAbs. This method provides reliable identification of serotype 5 or serotype 8 S. aureus by direct testing of blood culture fluids with ELISA. PMID:2745705

  15. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis of CapF, a capsular polysaccharide-synthesis enzyme from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Miyafusa, Takamitsu; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Kuroda, Makoto; Ohta, Toshiko; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2008-06-01

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPs) are important virulence factors of Staphylococcus aureus. The biosynthesis of type 5 and type 8 CPs (CP5 and CP8), which are produced by most clinical isolates of S. aureus, is catalyzed by 16 CP-assembling proteins. One of these proteins is the enzyme CapF, which catalyzes the synthesis of UDP-N-acetyl-L-fucosamine, a component of both CP5 and CP8. Here, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and diffraction analysis of CapF are reported. Optimization of the crystallization conditions by differential scanning calorimetry afforded a crystal of selenomethionine-substituted CapF that diffracted to a resolution of 2.80 A. The crystal belongs to space group P3(2)21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 119.6, c = 129.5 A. PMID:18540063

  16. Lipophilic dye staining of Cryptococcus neoformans extracellular vesicles and capsule.

    PubMed

    Nicola, André Moraes; Frases, Susana; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-09-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated yeast that causes systemic mycosis in immunosuppressed individuals. Recent studies have determined that this fungus produces vesicles that are released to the extracellular environment both in vivo and in vitro. These vesicles contain assorted cargo that includes several molecules associated with virulence and implicated in host-pathogen interactions, such as capsular polysaccharides, laccase, urease, and other proteins. To date, visualization of extracellular vesicles has relied on transmission electron microscopy, a time-consuming technique. In this work we report the use of fluorescent membrane tracers to stain lipophilic structures in cryptococcal culture supernatants and capsules. Two dialkylcarbocyanine probes with different spectral characteristics were used to visualize purified vesicles by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Dual staining of vesicles with dialkylcarbocyanine and RNA-selective nucleic acid dyes suggested that a fraction of the vesicle population carried RNA. Use of these dyes to stain whole cells, however, was hampered by their possible direct binding to capsular polysaccharide. A fluorescent phospholipid was used as additional membrane tracer to stain whole cells, revealing punctate structures on the edge of the capsule which are consistent with vesicular trafficking. Lipophilic dyes provide new tools for the study of fungal extracellular vesicles and their content. The finding of hydrophobic regions in the capsule of C. neoformans adds to the growing evidence for a structurally complex structure composed of polysaccharide and nonpolysaccharide components. PMID:19465562

  17. Detection of Bacterial Virulence Genes by Subtractive Hybridization: Identification of Capsular Polysaccharide of Burkholderia pseudomallei as a Major Virulence Determinant

    PubMed Central

    Reckseidler, Shauna L.; DeShazer, David; Sokol, Pamela A.; Woods, Donald E.

    2001-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is responsible for a broad spectrum of illnesses in humans and animals particularly in Southeast Asia and northern Australia, where it is endemic. Burkholderia thailandensis is a nonpathogenic environmental organism closely related to B. pseudomallei. Subtractive hybridization was carried out between these two species to identify genes encoding virulence determinants in B. pseudomallei. Screening of the subtraction library revealed A-T-rich DNA sequences unique to B. pseudomallei, suggesting they may have been acquired by horizontal transfer. One of the subtraction clones, pDD1015, encoded a protein with homology to a glycosyltransferase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This gene was insertionally inactivated in wild-type B. pseudomallei to create SR1015. It was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoelectron microscopy that the inactivated gene was involved in the production of a major surface polysaccharide. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) for wild-type B. pseudomallei is <10 CFU; the LD50 for SR1015 was determined to be 3.5 × 105 CFU, similar to that of B. thailandensis (6.8 × 105 CFU). DNA sequencing of the region flanking the glycosyltransferase gene revealed open reading frames similar to capsular polysaccharide genes in Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, and Neisseria meningitidis. In addition, DNA from Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia stabilis hybridized to a glycosyltransferase fragment probe, and a capsular structure was identified on the surface of B. stabilis via immunoelectron microscopy. Thus, the combination of PCR-based subtractive hybridization, insertional inactivation, and animal virulence studies has facilitated the identification of an important virulence determinant in B. pseudomallei. PMID:11119486

  18. Serological, chemical, and structural analyses of the Escherichia coli cross-reactive capsular polysaccharides K13, K20, and K23.

    PubMed Central

    Vann, W F; Soderstrom, T; Egan, W; Tsui, F P; Schneerson, R; Orskov, I; Orskov, F

    1983-01-01

    The Escherichia coli K13, K20, and K23 capsular polysaccharide antigens are serologically related. All of these polysaccharides contain ribose and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate in equimolar quantities. The K13 and K20 polysaccharides are partially O-acetylated. A comparison of these polysaccharides after O-deacetylation, by nuclear magnetic resonance and permethylation analysis, showed that these polysaccharides contained the disaccharide repeat unit leads to)-beta-ribofuranosyl-(1 leads to 7)-beta-2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate. They differed in the presence and location of an acetyl moiety. The K13 polysaccharide was O-acetylated at C-4 of the 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate. The K20 antigen was O-acetylated at C-5 of the ribose moiety. The K23 polymer was nonacetylated. The cross-reactivity of these antigens was demonstrated by tandem-crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Antibodies to K23 could be completely absorbed from OK K23 serum by K13, K20, and K23 antigenic extracts. The K13 and K20 antibodies could be completely absorbed from their respective antisera only by homologous antigenic extracts. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against a protein conjugate of the K13 polysaccharide. Analyses of the reactions of these antibodies with the three polysaccharides suggest that the K13 polysaccharide has at least three antigenic sites, one of which is common to the K13, K20, and K23 polysaccharides. PMID:6187684

  19. A glycoconjugate of Haemophilus influenzae Type b capsular polysaccharide with tetanus toxoid protein: hydrodynamic properties mainly influenced by the carbohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Adams, Gary G.; Morris, Gordon A.; Almutairi, Fahad M.; Duvivier, Pierre; Conrath, Karel; Harding, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Three important physical properties which may affect the performance of glycoconjugate vaccines against serious disease are molar mass (molecular weight), heterogeneity (polydispersity), and conformational flexibility in solution. The dilute solution behaviour of native and activated capsular polyribosylribitol (PRP) polysaccharides extracted from Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and the corresponding glycoconjugate made by conjugating this with the tetanus toxoid (TT) protein have been characterized and compared using a combination of sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity in the analytical ultracentrifuge with viscometry. The weight average molar mass of the activated material was considerably reduced (Mw ~ 0.24 × 106 g.mol−1) compared to the native (Mw ~ 1.2 × 106 g.mol−1). Conjugation with the TT protein yielded large polydisperse structures (of Mw ~ 7.4 × 106 g.mol−1), but which retained the high degree of flexibility of the native and activated polysaccharide, with frictional ratio, intrinsic viscosity, sedimentation conformation zoning behaviour and persistence length all commensurate with highly flexible coil behaviour and unlike the previously characterised tetanus toxoid protein (slightly extended and hydrodynamically compact structure with an aspect ratio of ~3). This non-protein like behaviour clearly indicates that it is the carbohydrate component which mainly influences the physical behaviour of the glycoconjugate in solution. PMID:26915577

  20. Role of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) in biofilm formation and regulation of CPS production by quorum-sensing in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jo; Kim, Jeong-A; Hwang, Won; Park, Soon-Jung; Lee, Kyu-Ho

    2013-11-01

    Extracellular polysaccharides, such as lipopolysaccharide and loosely associated exopolysaccharides, are essential for Vibrio vulnificus to form biofilms. The role of another major component of the V. vulnificus extracellular matrix, capsular polysaccharide (CPS), which contributes to colony opacity, has been characterized in biofilm formation. A CPS-deficient mutant, whose wbpP gene encoding UDP-GlcNAc C4-epimerase was knocked out, formed significantly more biofilm than wild type, due to increased hydrophobicity of the cell surface, adherence to abiotic surfaces and cell aggregation. To elucidate the direct effect of CPS on biofilm structure, extracted CPS and a CPS-degrading enzyme, α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, were added in biofilm assays, resulting in reduction and increment of biofilm sizes respectively. Therefore, it is suggested that CPS play a critical role in determining biofilm size by restricting continual growth of mature biofilms. Since CPS is required after maturation, CPS biosynthesis should be controlled in a cell density-dependent manner, e.g. by quorum-sensing (QS) regulation. Analysing transcription of the CPS gene cluster revealed that it was activated by SmcR, a QS master regulator, via binding to the upstream region of the cluster. Therefore, CPS was produced when biofilm cell density reached high enough to turn on QS regulation and limited biofilms to appropriate sizes. PMID:24102883

  1. Evaluation of synthetic schemes to prepare immunogenic conjugates of Vibrio cholerae O139 capsular polysaccharide with chicken serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Kossaczka, Z; Szu, S C

    2000-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae serotype O139 is a new etiologic agent of epidemic cholera. There is no vaccine available against cholera caused by this serotype. V. cholerae O139 is an encapsulated bacterium, and its polysaccharide capsule is an essential virulent factor and likely protective antigen. This study evaluated several synthetic schemes for preparation of conjugates of V. cholerae O139 capsular polysaccharide (CPS) with chicken serum albumin as the carrier protein (CSA) using 1-ethyl-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) or 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) as activating agents. Four conjugates described here as representative of many experiments were synthesized in 2 steps: 1) preparation of adipic acid hydrazide derivative of CPS (CPS(AH)) or of CSA (CSA(AH)), and 2) binding of CPS(AH) to CSA or of CPS to CSA(AH). Although all conjugates induced CPS antibodies, the conjugate prepared by EDC-mediated binding of CPS and CSA(AH) (EDC:CPS-CSA(AH)) was statistically significantly less immunogenic than the other three conjugates. Representative sera from mice injected with these three conjugates contained antibodies that mediated the lysis of V. cholerae O139 inoculum. Evaluation of the different synthetic schemes and reaction conditions in relation to the immunogenicity of the resultant conjugates provided the basis for the preparation of a V. cholerae O139 conjugate vaccine with a medically useful carrier protein such as diphtheria toxin mutant. PMID:11294508

  2. A glycoconjugate of Haemophilus influenzae Type b capsular polysaccharide with tetanus toxoid protein: hydrodynamic properties mainly influenced by the carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Adams, Gary G; Morris, Gordon A; Almutairi, Fahad M; Duvivier, Pierre; Conrath, Karel; Harding, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    Three important physical properties which may affect the performance of glycoconjugate vaccines against serious disease are molar mass (molecular weight), heterogeneity (polydispersity), and conformational flexibility in solution. The dilute solution behaviour of native and activated capsular polyribosylribitol (PRP) polysaccharides extracted from Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and the corresponding glycoconjugate made by conjugating this with the tetanus toxoid (TT) protein have been characterized and compared using a combination of sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity in the analytical ultracentrifuge with viscometry. The weight average molar mass of the activated material was considerably reduced (Mw ~ 0.24 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)) compared to the native (Mw ~ 1.2 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)). Conjugation with the TT protein yielded large polydisperse structures (of Mw ~ 7.4 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)), but which retained the high degree of flexibility of the native and activated polysaccharide, with frictional ratio, intrinsic viscosity, sedimentation conformation zoning behaviour and persistence length all commensurate with highly flexible coil behaviour and unlike the previously characterised tetanus toxoid protein (slightly extended and hydrodynamically compact structure with an aspect ratio of ~3). This non-protein like behaviour clearly indicates that it is the carbohydrate component which mainly influences the physical behaviour of the glycoconjugate in solution. PMID:26915577

  3. De Novo Asymmetric Synthesis of a 6-O-Methyl-d-glycero-l-gluco-heptopyranose-Derived Thioglycoside for the Preparation of Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168 Capsular Polysaccharide Fragments.

    PubMed

    Ashmus, Roger A; Jayasuriya, Anushka B; Lim, Ying-Jie; O'Doherty, George A; Lowary, Todd L

    2016-04-01

    An enantioselective de novo synthesis of a thioglycoside derivative of the 6-O-methyl-d-glycero-l-gluco-heptopyranose residue found in the Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168 (HS:2) capsular polysaccharide is reported. The compound is obtained from a furfural-derived chiral diol in 11 steps. Notably, compared to the only previous synthesis of this molecule, this approach significantly reduces the number of purification steps required to obtain the target. PMID:26982173

  4. Murine Immune Responses to Neisseria meningitidis Group C Capsular Polysaccharide and a Thymus-Dependent Toxoid Conjugate Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Leonard J.; García-Ojeda, Pablo A.; Michon, Francis; Jennings, Harold J.; Stein, Kathryn E.

    1998-01-01

    The polysaccharide (PS) capsules of many pathogenic bacteria are poor immunogens in infants and young children as a result of the delayed response to PS antigens during ontogeny. The development of polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines for Haemophilus influenzae type b, which have proven to be efficacious in this age group, has led to active development by a number of investigators of conjugate vaccines for other diseases. We describe here the response of several mouse strains to the capsular PS of Neisseria meningitidis group C (MCPS) conjugated to tetanus toxoid (MCPS-TT) and the same response in BALB/c mice as a model of the immune consequences of conjugate vaccine immunization. The use of a conjugate vaccine results in a shift in the isotype elicited in response to the MCPS, from immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG3 to primarily IgG1. A response to MCPS-TT is seen even among mouse strains which respond poorly to MCPS itself, emphasizing the importance of a strain survey when choosing a mouse model for a vaccine. The marked increase in IgG1 antibody titer was accompanied by a large increase in bactericidal activity of sera from these animals. Animals primed with the conjugate vaccine demonstrated a booster response after secondary immunization with either the MCPS or the conjugate. The ability to produce a boosted IgG1 anti-MCPS response to the MCPS can be transferred to adoptive recipients by B cells alone from mice primed with MCPS-TT but not mice primed with MCPS alone. These data indicate that in BALB/c mice a single immunization with MCPS-TT is sufficient to induce a shift to IgG1 and generate a memory B-cell population that does not require T cells for boosting. PMID:9784556

  5. Effect of conjugation methodology, carrier protein, and adjuvants on the immune response to Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Fattom, A; Li, X; Cho, Y H; Burns, A; Hawwari, A; Shepherd, S E; Coughlin, R; Winston, S; Naso, R

    1995-10-01

    Conjugate vaccines were prepared with S. aureus type 8 capsular polysaccharide (CP) using three carrier proteins: Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (ETA), a non-toxic recombinant ETA (rEPA), and diphtheria toxoid (DTd). Adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) or N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP) was used as a spacer to link the CP to carrier protein. All conjugates gave a high immune response with a boost after the second immunization. Conjugates prepared with ADH gave higher antibody titers than conjugates prepared with SPDP. IgG1 was the primary subclass elicited by all conjugates regardless of the carrier protein or the conjugation method used to prepare the vaccines. The non-immunogenic CP and the conjugates were formulated with either monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), QS21, or in Novasomes and evaluated in mice. While the adjuvants failed to improve the immunogenicity of the nonconjugated CP, a more than fivefold increase in the antibody levels was observed when these adjuvants were used with the conjugates. Significant rises in IgG2b and IgG3 were observed with all formulations. The enhancement of the immunogenicity and the IgG subclass shift, as seen with some adjuvants, may prove to be important in immunocompromised patients. PMID:8585282

  6. Streptococcus suis Capsular Polysaccharide Inhibits Phagocytosis through Destabilization of Lipid Microdomains and Prevents Lactosylceramide-Dependent Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Mathieu; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Gagnon, Fleur; Van Calsteren, Marie-Rose

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus suis type 2 is a major swine pathogen and a zoonotic agent, causing meningitis in both swine and humans. S. suis infects the host through the respiratory route, reaches the bloodstream, and persists until breaching into the central nervous system. The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of S. suis type 2 is considered a key virulence factor of the bacteria. Though CPS allows S. suis to adhere to the membrane of cells of the immune system, it provides protection against phagocytosis. In fact, nonencapsulated mutants are easily internalized and killed by macrophages and dendritic cells. The objective of this work was to study the molecular mechanisms by which the CPS of S. suis prevents phagocytosis. By using latex beads covalently linked with purified CPS, it was shown that CPS itself was sufficient to inhibit entry of both latex beads and bystander fluorescent beads into macrophages. Upon contact with macrophages, encapsulated S. suis was shown to destabilize lipid microdomains at the cell surface, to block nitric oxide (NO) production during infection, and to prevent lactosylceramide accumulation at the phagocytic cup during infection. In contrast, the nonencapsulated mutant was easily internalized via lipid rafts, in a filipin-sensitive manner, leading to lactosylceramide recruitment and strong NO production. This is the first report to identify a role for CPS in lipid microdomain stability and to recognize an interaction between S. suis and lactosylceramide in phagocytes. PMID:22124659

  7. N-Propionylated Group B Meningococcal Polysaccharide Mimics a Unique Bactericidal Capsular Epitope in Group B Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Robert A.; Lussier, Michele; Yang, Qing-Ling; Jennings, Harold J.

    1997-01-01

    The N-propionylated group B meningococcal polysaccharide (NPrGBMP) mimics a unique protective epitope on the surface of group B meningococci (GBM) and Escherichia coli K1. Using a series of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) induced by the NPrGBMP–monomeric tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate vaccine it was demonstrated that mAbs having specificities for both extended and conventional short segments of the NPrGBMP were formed, but only the former were bactericidal, and/or gave passive protection against live challenge by GBM. The failure of mAbs specific for short epitopes to protect was further established when (NeuPr)4–TT was used as the vaccine. Of all the mAbs produced that were specific for short internal segments of the NPrGBMP, none were protective, despite the fact that most of them cross-react with the GBM capsular polysaccharide. In contrast, most of the protective mAbs produced by NPrGBMP– TT did not recognize the group B meningococcal polysaccharide (GBMP) unless it was present in its aggregated high molecular weight form. The bactericidal epitope mimicked by the NPrGBMP was shown to be ubiquitous in the capsule of both GBM and E. coli K1 using immunogold labeling techniques and, because of its unique properties, its identification could be significant in the development of a comprehensive conjugate vaccine against group B meningococcal meningitis. This is because most known human α(2–8)-polysialic acid self-antigens can be accommodated in 30–50 α(2–8)-linked sialic acid residues, which is roughly equivalent to an 11-kD length of the GBMP. It has been hypothesized that the formation of the protective epitope on the surface of GBM is due to the interaction of helical segments of the GBMP with another molecule and that the protective epitope is mimicked by the NPrGBMP. Support for the above hypothesis is provided by the fact that the protective NPrGBMP epitope has a similar unusual length dependency to that of the GBMP epitope. PMID:9166422

  8. Effect of growth conditions on production of rhamnose-containing cell wall and capsular polysaccharides by strains of Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus.

    PubMed Central

    Wicken, A J; Ayres, A; Campbell, L K; Knox, K W

    1983-01-01

    Strains of Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus possessing two cell wall polysaccharides, a hexosamine-containing H-polysaccharide and a rhamnose-containing R-polysaccharide, were examined for the effect of growth conditions on the production of these two components. In strain NCTC 6375, R- and H-polysaccharides accounted for an estimated 44 and 20%, respectively, of the cell wall for organisms grown in batch culture with glucose as the carbohydrate source. Growth on fructose-containing media reduced the amount of R-polysaccharide by approximately 50% without affecting the amount of H-polysaccharide. Subculture of fructose-grown organisms in glucose restored the original proportions of the two polysaccharides. Galactose- and sucrose-grown cells behaved similarly to glucose-grown cells with respect to polysaccharide production, whereas growth in rhamnose or ribose showed values close to those for fructose-grown cells. Continuous culture of strain NCTC 6375 for more than 100 generations showed a gradual and irreversible reduction of the R-polysaccharide to less than 5% of the cell wall and an increase of the H-polysaccharide to 40% of the cell wall. Other type culture strains of L. casei subsp. rhamnosus, NCIB 7473 and ATCC 7469, behaved similarly in batch and continuous culture. In contrast, strains of L. casei subsp. rhamnosus isolated at the Institute of Dental Research showed phenotypic stability with respect to the relative proportions of R- and H-polysaccharides in both batch and continuous culture. Changes in polysaccharide composition of type culture strains were also mirrored in changes in the immunogenicity of the two components and resistance to the rate of enzymic lysis of whole organisms. For L. casei subsp. rhamnosus strain NCTC 10302 the R-polysaccharide is present entirely as capsular material. The amount of R-polysaccharide produced was also markedly dependent on the carbohydrate component of the medium in batch culture and both dilution rate and

  9. Microevolution of a Standard Strain of Cryptococcus neoformans Resulting in Differences in Virulence and Other Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Franzot, Sarah P.; Mukherjee, Jean; Cherniak, Robert; Chen, Lin-Chi; Hamdan, Junia S.; Casadevall, Arturo

    1998-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a major fungal pathogen for patients with debilitated immune systems. However, no information is available on the stability of virulence or of phenotypes associated with virulence for C. neoformans laboratory strains. A serendipitous observation in our laboratory that one isolate of C. neoformans ATCC 24067 (strain 52D) became attenuated after continuous in vitro culture prompted us to perform a comparative study of nine strain 24067 isolates obtained from six different research laboratories. Each isolate was characterized by DNA typing, virulence for mice, proteinase production, extracellular protein synthesis, melanin synthesis, carbon assimilation pattern, antifungal drug susceptibility, colony morphology, growth rate, agglutination titers, phagocytosis by murine macrophages, capsule size, and capsular polysaccharide structure. All isolates had similar DNA typing patterns consistent with their assignment to the same strain, although minor chromosome size polymorphisms were observed in the electrophoretic karyotypes of two isolates. Several isolates had major differences in phenotypes that may be associated with virulence, including growth rate, capsule size, proteinase production, and melanization. These findings imply that C. neoformans is able to undergo rapid changes in vitro, probably as a result of adaptation to laboratory conditions, and suggest the need for careful attention to storage and maintenance conditions. In summary, our results indicate that C. neoformans (i) can become attenuated by in vitro culture and (ii) is capable of microevolution in vitro with the emergence of variants exhibiting new genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. PMID:9423844

  10. Preparation and characterization of group A meningococcal capsular polysaccharide conjugates and evaluation of their immunogenicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhigang; Chu, Chiayung; Robbins, John B; Schneerson, Rachel

    2003-09-01

    Epidemic and endemic meningitis caused by group A Neisseria meningitidis remains a problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Although group A meningococcal capsular polysaccharide (GAMP) vaccine confers immunity at all ages, the improved immunogenicity of a conjugate and its compatibility with the World Health Organization's Extended Program on Immunization offers advantages over GAMP alone. Conjugates of GAMP bound to bovine serum albumin (BSA) were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for their immunogenicities in mice. Two methods, involving adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as a linker, were used. First, ADH was bound to GAMP activated with cyanogen bromide (CNBr) or with 1-cyano-4(dimethylamino)-pyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) to form GAMP(CNBr)AH and GAMP(CDAP)AH. These derivatives were bound to BSA by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) to form GAMP(CNBr)AH-BSA and GAMP(CDAP)AH-BSA. Second, ADH was bound to BSA with EDC to form AHBSA. AHBSA was bound to activated GAMP to form GAMP(CNBr)-AHBSA and GAMP(CDAP)-AHBSA. The yield of GAMP(CDAP)-AHBSA (35 to 40%) was higher than those of the other conjugates (5 to 20%). GAMP conjugates elicited immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-GAMP in all mice after three injections of 2.5 or 5.0 microg of GAMP: the geometric mean (GM) was highest in recipients of GAMP(CDAP)-AHBSA (11.40 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay units). Although the difference was not statistically significant, the 5.0- microg dose elicited a higher GM IgG anti-GAMP than the 2.5- microg dose. Low levels of anti-GAMP were elicited by GAMP alone. GAMP(CDAP)-AHBSA elicited bactericidal activity roughly proportional to the level of IgG anti-GAMP. PMID:12933854

  11. Release of tumor necrosis factor alpha in response to Vibrio vulnificus capsular polysaccharide in in vivo and in vitro models.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J L; Wright, A C; Wasserman, S S; Hone, D M; Morris, J G

    1997-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus produces a severe septic shock syndrome in susceptible individuals. Virulence of the bacterium has been closely linked to the presence of a surface-exposed acidic capsular polysaccharide (CPS). To investigate whether CPS plays an additional role in pathogenesis by modulating inflammatory-associated cytokine production, studies were initiated in a mouse model and followed by investigations of cytokine release from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Mouse tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) could be detected in serum up to 12 h postinoculation in animals challenged with the encapsulated parent strain MO6-24/O. The unencapsulated strain CVD752 was quickly eliminated by the animals, thus preventing a direct association between serum TNF-alpha levels and the presence or absence of the CPS. Purified CPS from MO6-24/O when injected into D-galactosamine-sensitized mice was a more immediate inducer of TNF-alpha than an equivalent quantity of MO6-24/O lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Both V. vulnificus CPS and V. vulnificus LPS induced inflammation-associated cytokine responses from primary human PBMCs in vitro. CPS elicited TNF-alpha from PBMCs in a dose-dependent manner, with maximal induction at 6 to 10 h, and was not inhibited by polymyxin B. Expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNAs was also induced in the presence of CPS. Interestingly, while adherent PBMCs secreted high levels of TNF-alpha after stimulation with LPS, they secreted little TNF-alpha in response to CPS. These studies provide evidence that V. vulnificus CPS directly stimulates the expression and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by murine and human cells and suggest that CPS activation of PBMCs operates through a cellular mechanism distinct from that of LPS. PMID:9284142

  12. Cross-reactive immune response induced by the Vi capsular polysaccharide typhoid vaccine against Salmonella Paratyphi strains.

    PubMed

    Pakkanen, S H; Kantele, J M; Kantele, A

    2014-03-01

    There are no vaccines in clinical use against paratyphoid fever, caused by Salmonella Paratyphi A and B or, rarely, C. Oral Salmonella Typhi Ty21a typhoid vaccine elicits a significant cross-reactive immune response against S. Paratyphi A and B, and some reports suggest cross-protective efficacy against the disease. These findings are ascribed to the O-12 antigen shared between the strains. The Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine has been shown to elicit antibodies reactive with O-9,12. Twenty-five volunteers immunized with the parenteral Vi vaccine (Typherix(®) ) were explored for plasmablasts cross-reactive with paratyphoid strains; the responses were compared to those in 25 age- and gender-matched volunteers immunized with Ty21a (Vivotif(®) ). Before vaccination, 48/50 vaccinees had no plasmablasts reactive with the antigens. Seven days after vaccination, 15/25 and 22/25 Vi- and Ty21a-vaccinated volunteers had circulating plasmablasts producing antibodies cross-reactive with S. Paratyphi A, 18/25 and 23/25 with S. Paratyphi B and 16/25 and 9/25 with Paratyphi C, respectively. Compared to the Ty21a group, the Vi group showed significantly lower responses to S. Paratyphi A and B and higher to S. Paratyphi C. To conclude, the Vi vaccine elicited a cross-reactive plasmablast response to S. Paratyphi C (Vi antigen in common) and less marked responses to S. Paratyphi A and B than the Ty21a preparation. S. Paratyphi A and B both being Vi-negative, the result can be explained by trace amounts of bacterial cell wall O-12 antigen in the Vi preparation, despite purification. The clinical significance of this finding remains to be determined. PMID:24383914

  13. Capsular polysaccharide from Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides shows potential for protection against contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed

    Mwirigi, Martin; Nkando, Isabel; Olum, Moses; Attah-Poku, Samuel; Ochanda, Horace; Berberov, Emil; Potter, Andrew; Gerdts, Volker; Perez-Casal, Jose; Wesonga, Hezron; Soi, Reuben; Naessens, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a severe respiratory disease caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm) which is widespread in Africa. The capsule polysaccharide (CPS) of Mmm is one of the few identified virulence determinants. In a previous study, immunization of mice against CPS generated antibodies, but they were not able to prevent multiplication of Mmm in this model animal. However, mice cannot be considered as a suitable animal model, as Mmm does not induce pathology in this species. Our aim was to induce antibody responses to CPS in cattle, and challenge them when they had specific CPS antibody titres similar or higher than those from cattle vaccinated with the live vaccine. The CPS was linked to the carrier protein ovalbumin via a carbodiimide-mediated condensation with 1-ethyl-3(3-imethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Ten animals were immunized twice and challenged three weeks after the booster inoculation, and compared to a group of challenged non-immunized cattle. When administered subcutaneously to adult cattle, the vaccine elicited CPS-specific antibody responses with the same or a higher titre than animals vaccinated with the live vaccine. Pathology in the group of immunized animals was significantly reduced (57%) after challenge with Mmm strain Afadé compared to the non-immunized group, a figure in the range of the protection provided by the live vaccine. PMID:27496744

  14. Functional Improvement of Regulatory T Cells from Rheumatoid Arthritis Subjects Induced by Capsular Polysaccharide Glucuronoxylomannogalactan

    PubMed Central

    Alunno, Alessia; Bartoloni Bocci, Elena; Perito, Stefano; Chow, Siu-Kei; Cenci, Elio; Casadevall, Arturo; Gerli, Roberto; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Objective Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a critical role in the prevention of autoimmunity, and the suppressive activity of these cells is impaired in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to investigate function and properties of Treg of RA patients in response to purified polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannogalactan (GXMGal). Methods Flow cytometry and western blot analysis were used to investigate the frequency, function and properties of Treg cells. Results GXMGal was able to: i) induce strong increase of FOXP3 on CD4+ T cells without affecting the number of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg cells with parallel increase in the percentage of non-conventional CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells; ii) increase intracellular levels of TGF-β1 in CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells and of IL-10 in both CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ and CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells; iii) enhance the suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ and CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells in terms of inhibition of effector T cell activity and increased secretion of IL-10; iv) decrease Th1 response as demonstrated by inhibition of T-bet activation and down-regulation of IFN-γ and IL-12p70 production; v) decrease Th17 differentiation by down-regulating pSTAT3 activation and IL-17A, IL-23, IL-21, IL-22 and IL-6 production. Conclusion These data show that GXMGal improves Treg functions and increases the number and function of CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells of RA patients. It is suggested that GXMGal may be potentially useful for restoring impaired Treg functions in autoimmune disorders and for developing Treg cell-based strategies for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:25338013

  15. Synthesis of Staphylococcus aureus type 5 capsular polysaccharide repeating unit using novel L-FucNAc and D-FucNAc synthons and immunochemical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Danieli, Elisa; Proietti, Daniela; Brogioni, Giulia; Romano, Maria R; Cappelletti, Emilia; Tontini, Marta; Berti, Francesco; Lay, Luigi; Costantino, Paolo; Adamo, Roberto

    2012-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial infections. Glycoconjugates of type 5 and 8 capsular polysaccharides have been investigated for vaccine application. The proposed structure of type 5 polysaccharide is: →4-β-D-ManNAcA-(1→4)-α-L-FucNAc(3OAc)-(1→3)-β-D-FucNAc-(1→. The stereocontrolled insertion of these three glycosydic bonds is a real synthetic challenge. In the present paper we report the preparation of two novel versatile L- and D-fucosamine synthons from commercially available starting materials. In addition we applied the two building blocks to the synthesis of type 5 trisaccharide repeating unit. The immunochemical properties of the synthesized trisaccharide were assessed by competitive ELISA and by immunodot blot analysis using sera of mice immunized with type 5 polysaccharide conjugated to CRM(197). The results suggest that although the type 5 S. aureus trisaccharide is recognized by specific anti polysaccharide antibodies in dot blot, structures longer than the trisaccharide may be needed in order to significantly compete with the native type 5 polymer in the binding with sera from mice immunized with S. aureus type 5 polysaccharide-CRM(197) conjugate. PMID:23000295

  16. Discovery and expression of 3 siglecs-like in Oreochromis niloticus neutrophil, and their interaction with group B streptococcal sialylated capsular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Dong, Junjian; Wei, Yuanzheng; Ye, Xing; Sun, Chengfei; Tian, Yuanyuan; Lu, Maixin; Du, Juanjuan; Chen, Zhihang

    2016-05-01

    Sialic acid - binding immunoglobulin - like lectins (Siglecs) are members of the largest superfamily of immune receptors; they recognize sialic acid and are mainly expressed in immune cells. Studies on mammals indicate that Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) evade immune reactions by interacting with the host immune cells via the sialic acid of sialylated capsular polysaccharides. However, it is currently unknown if fish-derived GBS can interact with Siglecs to evade host immunity. In this study, we examined the binding of FITC-GBS with neutrophils to determine the presence of receptors that binds with GBS. Furthermore, 3 Siglec-like genes, (OnSiglec-1-like/-4b-like/-14-like) from the neutrophils cDNA were screened by PCR. All the genes had specific domains (immunostimulation and immunosuppression domains), conserved amino acid residues, and sialic acid polysaccharide binding sites that are found in mammalian Siglecs. Flow cytometry of Siglecs-like/COS-7 cells and ELISA of Siglecs/Ex-Fc fusion proteins confirmed that 3 Siglecs-like have high binding activity with GBS. Erythrocytes adhesion assays and sialylated glycans binding assay confirmed that 3 Siglecs-like bind to sialic acid polysaccharides. Siglecs-like had high expression levels in the spleen, gill, and kidney in Oreochromis niloticus by qPCR. After experimental infection, Siglec-1-like/-14-like showed a significant upregulated initially and later downregulated in liver, spleen, kidney, and gill. However, Siglec-4b-like was downregulated in most tissues, except that in liver. The results indicate that 3 OnSiglecs-like may recognize GBS sialylated capsular polysaccharides. GBS infections led to significant changes in Siglecs-like expression in immune-related tissues. However, immunostimulation or immunosuppression via the recognition of GBS by different Siglecs-like molecules requires additional studies. PMID:26847490

  17. Explaining the Serological Characteristics of Streptococcus suis Serotypes 1 and 1/2 from Their Capsular Polysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Van Calsteren, Marie-Rose; Goyette-Desjardins, Guillaume; Gagnon, Fleur; Okura, Masatoshi; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Roy, René; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Segura, Mariela

    2016-04-15

    The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is a major virulence factor in many encapsulated pathogens, as it is the case for Streptococcus suis, an important swine pathogen and emerging zoonotic agent. Moreover, the CPS is the antigen at the origin of S. suis classification into serotypes. Hence, analyses of the CPS structure are an essential step to dissect its role in virulence and the serological relations between important serotypes. Here, the CPSs of serotypes 1 and 1/2 were purified and characterized for the first time. Chemical and spectroscopic data gave the following repeating unit sequences: [6)[Neu5Ac(α2-6)GalNAc(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-3)]Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc(β1-]n (serotype 1) and [4)[Neu5Ac(α2-6)GalNAc(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-3)]Gal(β1-4)[Gal(α1-3)]Rha(β1-4)Glc(β1-]n (serotype 1/2). The Sambucus nigra lectin, which recognizes the Neu5Ac(α2-6)Gal/GalNAc sequence, showed binding to both CPSs. Compared with previously characterized serotype 14 and 2 CPSs, N-acetylgalactosamine replaces galactose as the sugar bearing the sialic acid residue in the side chain. Serological analyses of the cross-reaction of serotype 1/2 with serotypes 1 and 2 and that between serotypes 1 and 14 suggested that the side chain, and more particularly the terminal sialic acid, constitutes one important epitope for serotypes 1/2 and 2. The side chain is also an important serological determinant for serotype 1, yet sialic acid seems to play a limited role. In contrast, the side chain does not seem to be part of a major epitope for serotype 14. These results contribute to the understanding of the relationship between S. suis serotypes and provide the basis for improving diagnostic tools. PMID:26912653

  18. Role of the cAMP-Dependent Carbon Catabolite Repression in Capsular Polysaccharide Biosynthesis in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Ting; Chen, Yu-Ching; Jinn, Tzyy-Rong; Wu, Chien-Chen; Hong, Yi-Ming; Wu, Wen-Hao

    2013-01-01

    K. pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscesses of diabetic patients in Asian countries. Although elevated blood glucose levels cause various immune problems, its effects on K. pneumoniae virulence are unknown. This study investigated the regulation of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis, a major determinant for K. pneumoniae virulence, in response to exogenous glucose. We found that K. pneumoniae produce more CPS in glucose-rich medium via reduction in cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. Individual deletion of cyaA or crp, which respectively encode adenylate cyclase and cAMP receptor protein in K. pneumoniae, markedly increased CPS production, while deletion of cpdA, which encodes cAMP phosphodiesterase, decreased CPS production. These results indicate that K. pneumoniae CPS biosynthesis is controlled by the cAMP-dependent carbon catabolite repression (CCR). To investigate the underlying mechanism, quantitative real-time PCR and promoter-reporter assays were used to verify that the transcription of CPS biosynthesis genes, which are organized into 3 transcription units (orf1-2, orf3-15, and orf16-17), were activated by the deletion of crp. Sequence analysis revealed putative CRP binding sites located on Porf3-15 and Porf16-17, suggesting direct CRP-cAMP regulation on the promoters. These results were then confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. In addition, we found putative CRP binding sites located in the promoter region of rcsA, which encodes a cps transcriptional activator, demonstrating a direct repression of CRP-cAMP and PrcsA. The deletion of rcsA in mutation of crp partially reduced CPS biosynthesis and the transcription of orf1-2 but not of orf3-15 or orf16-17. These results suggest that RcsA participates in the CRP-cAMP regulation of orf1-2 transcription and influences CPS biosynthesis. Finally, the effect of glucose and CCR proteins on CPS biosynthesis also reflects bacterial resistance to serum killing. We here provide

  19. Group B Streptococcus capsular polysaccharide-cholera toxin B subunit conjugate vaccines prepared by different methods for intranasal immunization.

    PubMed

    Shen, X; Lagergård, T; Yang, Y; Lindblad, M; Fredriksson, M; Holmgren, J

    2001-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) type III capsular polysaccharide (CPS III) was conjugated to recombinant cholera toxin B subunit (rCTB) using three different methods which employed (i) cystamine and N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP), (ii) carbodiimide with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as a spacer, or (iii) reductive amination (RA). The CPS III-rCTB conjugates were divided into large- and small-molecular-weight (M(r)) fractions, and the immunogenicities of the different preparations after intranasal (i.n.) immunization were studied in mice. Both large- and small-M(r) conjugates of CPS III-rCTB(RA) or CPS III-rCTB(ADH) induced high, almost comparable levels of CPS-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in serum, lungs, and vagina that were generally superior to those obtained with CPS III-rCTB(SPDP) conjugates or a CPS III and rCTB mixture. However, the smaller-M(r) conjugates of CPS III-rCTB(RA) or CPS III-rCTB(ADH) in most cases elicited a lower anti-CPS IgA immune response than the large-M(r) conjugates, and the highest anti-CPS IgA titers in both tissues and serum were obtained with the large-M(r) CPS III-rCTB(RA) conjugate. Serum IgG anti-CPS titers induced by the CPS III-rCTB(RA) conjugate had high levels of specific IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 antibodies. Based on the effectiveness of RA for coupling CPS III to rCTB, RA was also tested for conjugating GBS CPS Ia with rCTB. As for the CPS III-rCTB conjugates, the immunogenicity of CPS Ia was greatly increased by conjugation to rCTB. Intranasal immunization with a combination of CPS Ia-rCTB and CPS III-rCTB conjugates was shown to induce anti-CPS Ia and III immune responses in serum and lungs that were fully comparable with the responses to immunization with the monovalent CPS Ia-rCTB or CPS III-rCTB conjugates. These results suggest that the GBS CPS III-rCTB and CPS Ia-rCTB conjugates prepared by the RA method may be used in bivalent and possibly also in multivalent mucosal GBS conjugate vaccines. PMID

  20. Group B Streptococcus Capsular Polysaccharide-Cholera Toxin B Subunit Conjugate Vaccines Prepared by Different Methods for Intranasal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xuzhuang; Lagergård, Teresa; Yang, Yonghong; Lindblad, Marianne; Fredriksson, Margareta; Holmgren, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) type III capsular polysaccharide (CPS III) was conjugated to recombinant cholera toxin B subunit (rCTB) using three different methods which employed (i) cystamine and N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP), (ii) carbodiimide with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as a spacer, or (iii) reductive amination (RA). The CPS III-rCTB conjugates were divided into large- and small-molecular-weight (Mr) fractions, and the immunogenicities of the different preparations after intranasal (i.n.) immunization were studied in mice. Both large- and small-Mr conjugates of CPS III-rCTBRA or CPS III-rCTBADH induced high, almost comparable levels of CPS-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in serum, lungs, and vagina that were generally superior to those obtained with CPS III-rCTBSPDP conjugates or a CPS III and rCTB mixture. However, the smaller-Mr conjugates of CPS III-rCTBRA or CPS III-rCTBADH in most cases elicited a lower anti-CPS IgA immune response than the large-Mr conjugates, and the highest anti-CPS IgA titers in both tissues and serum were obtained with the large-Mr CPS III-rCTBRA conjugate. Serum IgG anti-CPS titers induced by the CPS III-rCTBRA conjugate had high levels of specific IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 antibodies. Based on the effectiveness of RA for coupling CPS III to rCTB, RA was also tested for conjugating GBS CPS Ia with rCTB. As for the CPS III-rCTB conjugates, the immunogenicity of CPS Ia was greatly increased by conjugation to rCTB. Intranasal immunization with a combination of CPS Ia-rCTB and CPS III-rCTB conjugates was shown to induce anti-CPS Ia and III immune responses in serum and lungs that were fully comparable with the responses to immunization with the monovalent CPS Ia-rCTB or CPS III-rCTB conjugates. These results suggest that the GBS CPS III-rCTB and CPS Ia-rCTB conjugates prepared by the RA method may be used in bivalent and possibly also in multivalent mucosal GBS conjugate vaccines. PMID:11119518

  1. Bactericidal antibody responses of juvenile rhesus monkeys immunized with group B Neisseria meningitidis capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zollinger, W D; Moran, E E; Devi, S J; Frasch, C E

    1997-03-01

    Reports on the bactericidal activities of antibodies to group B Neisseria meningitidis capsular polysaccharide (B PS) are conflicting. Using three different complement sources, we analyzed the bactericidal activities of sera of juvenile rhesus monkeys immunized with five conjugate vaccines of B PS synthesized by different schemes, an Escherichia coli K92 conjugate, and a noncovalent complex of B PS with group B meningococcal outer membrane vesicles (B+OMV) (S. J. N. Devi, W. D. Zollinger, P. J. Snoy, J. Y. Tai, P. Costantini, F. Norelli, R. Rappuoli, and C. E. Frasch, Infect. Immun. 65:1045-1052, 1997). With rabbit complement, nearly all preimmune sera showed relatively high bactericidal titers, and all vaccines, except the K92 conjugate, induced a fourfold or greater increase in bactericidal titers in most of the monkeys vaccinated. In contrast, with human complement, most prevaccination sera showed no bactericidal activity and in most of the vaccine groups, little or no increase in bactericidal titer was observed. However, the covalent conjugation of P BS and OMV (B-OMV) administered with and without the Ribi adjuvant induced relatively high bactericidal titers which persisted up to 30 weeks. An analysis of the specificities of bactericidal antibodies revealed that absorption with E. coli K1 cells did not change the bactericidal titer with human complement but reduced the titers observed with the rabbit and monkey complements. A significant increase in anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies was elicited by the B-OMV conjugates, and nearly all of the bactericidal activity with human complement could be inhibited with the purified group B meningococcal L3,7,8 LPS. B-OMV covalently coupled via adipic acid dihydrazide elicited significantly elevated levels (P < or = 0.02) of anti-OMV antibodies compared to those of the noncovalently complexed B+OMV. An initial small-scale evaluation of B PS conjugates in adult human males appears feasible, with careful monitoring

  2. Increased Immunogenicity and Induction of Class Switching by Conjugation of Complement C3d to Pneumococcal Serotype 14 Capsular Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Test, Samuel T.; Mitsuyoshi, Joyce; Connolly, Charles C.; Lucas, Alexander H.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an adjuvant effect for the C3d fragment of complement C3 when coupled to T-dependent protein antigens. In this study, we examined the antibody response to covalent conjugates of C3d and a T-independent antigen, the capsular polysaccharide of serotype 14 Streptococcus pneumoniae (PPS14). We prepared a conjugate of mouse C3d and PPS14 and compared its immunogenicity with that of a conjugate of PPS14 and ovalbumin (OVA). When BALB/c mice were immunized with PPS14-C3d, there was a significant increase in serum anti-PPS14 concentrations compared with either native PPS14 or control PPS14-glycine conjugates. This was accompanied by a switch in anti-PPS14 from predominantly immunoglobulin M (IgM) to IgG1 by day 25 following primary immunization. Following secondary immunization with PPS14-C3d, there was a marked booster response and a further increase in the ratio of IgG1 to IgM anti-PPS14. Although the primary antibody response to the PPS14-OVA conjugate exceeded that induced by immunization with PPS14-C3d, serum anti-PPS14 concentrations after a second injection of PPS14-C3d were nearly identical to those induced by secondary immunization with PPS14-OVA. Experiments with athymic nude mice suggested that T cells were not required for the adjuvant effect of C3d on the primary immune response to PPS14 but were necessary for enhancement of the memory response after a second injection of PPS14-C3d. These studies show that the adjuvant effects of C3d extend to T-independent antigens as well as T-dependent antigens. As a means of harnessing the adjuvant potential of the innate immune system, C3d conjugates may prove useful as a component of vaccines against encapsulated bacteria. PMID:11292721

  3. Increased immunogenicity and induction of class switching by conjugation of complement C3d to pneumococcal serotype 14 capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Test, S T; Mitsuyoshi, J; Connolly, C C; Lucas, A H

    2001-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an adjuvant effect for the C3d fragment of complement C3 when coupled to T-dependent protein antigens. In this study, we examined the antibody response to covalent conjugates of C3d and a T-independent antigen, the capsular polysaccharide of serotype 14 Streptococcus pneumoniae (PPS14). We prepared a conjugate of mouse C3d and PPS14 and compared its immunogenicity with that of a conjugate of PPS14 and ovalbumin (OVA). When BALB/c mice were immunized with PPS14-C3d, there was a significant increase in serum anti-PPS14 concentrations compared with either native PPS14 or control PPS14-glycine conjugates. This was accompanied by a switch in anti-PPS14 from predominantly immunoglobulin M (IgM) to IgG1 by day 25 following primary immunization. Following secondary immunization with PPS14-C3d, there was a marked booster response and a further increase in the ratio of IgG1 to IgM anti-PPS14. Although the primary antibody response to the PPS14-OVA conjugate exceeded that induced by immunization with PPS14-C3d, serum anti-PPS14 concentrations after a second injection of PPS14-C3d were nearly identical to those induced by secondary immunization with PPS14-OVA. Experiments with athymic nude mice suggested that T cells were not required for the adjuvant effect of C3d on the primary immune response to PPS14 but were necessary for enhancement of the memory response after a second injection of PPS14-C3d. These studies show that the adjuvant effects of C3d extend to T-independent antigens as well as T-dependent antigens. As a means of harnessing the adjuvant potential of the innate immune system, C3d conjugates may prove useful as a component of vaccines against encapsulated bacteria. PMID:11292721

  4. Synthesis of trisaccharide methyl glycosides related to fragments of the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 18C.

    PubMed

    van Steijn, A M; Kamerling, J P; Vliegenthart, J F

    1992-03-01

    The synthesis is reported of methyl 3-O-(4-O-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-alpha-D- glucopyranosyl)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (1), methyl 2-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-4-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-beta-D- galactopyranoside (3), methyl 3-O-(4-O-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-alpha-L- rhamnopyranoside 3"-(sn-glycer-3-yl sodium phosphate) (2), and methyl 2-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-4-O-beta-D- glucopyranosyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside 3-(sn-glycer-3-yl sodium phosphate) (4), which are trisaccharide methyl glycosides related to fragments of the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 18C ([----4)-beta-D- Glcp-(1----4)-[alpha-D-Glcp-(1----2)]-[Glycerol-(1-P----3)]-beta-D-Galp - (1----4)-alpha-D-Glcp-(1----3)-alpha-L-Rhap-(1----]n). Ethyl 4-O-acetyl-2,3,6-tri-O-benzyl-1-thio-beta-D-glucopyranoside (10) was coupled with benzyl 2,4-di-O-benzyl-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (6). Deacetylation of the product, followed by condensation with 2,4,6-tri-O-acetyl-3-O-allyl-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl trichloroacetimidate (18), gave benzyl 2,4-di-O-benzyl-3-O-[2,3,6-tri-O- benzyl-4-O-(2,4,6-tri-O-acetyl-3-O-allyl-beta-D-galactopyranosyl)-alpha- D- glucopyranosyl]-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (19). Acetolysis of 19, followed by methylation, deallylation (----22), and further deprotection afforded 1. Condensation of methyl 2,4-di-O-benzyl-3-O-[2,3,6-tri-O-benzyl-4-O-(2,4,6-tri- O-acetyl-beta-D-galactopyranosyl)-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl]-alpha-L- rhamnopyranoside (22) with 1,2-di-O-benzyl-sn-glycerol 3-(triethyl-ammonium phosphonate) (24), followed by oxidation and deprotection, yielded 2. Condensation of ethyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-benzyl-1-thio-beta-D-glucopyranoside (27) with methyl 3-O-allyl-4,6-O-benzylidene-beta-D-galactopyranoside (28), selective benzylidene ring-opening of the product, coupling with 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl trichloroacetimidate (31), and deallylation afforded methyl 6-O-benzyl-4-O-(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-2-O- (2

  5. Synthesis of a spacer-containing repeating unit of the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 23F.

    PubMed

    van Steijn, A M; Kamerling, J P; Vliegenthart, J F

    1991-04-24

    The synthesis is reported of 3-aminopropyl 4-O-(4-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-2-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-beta-D- galactopyranosyl)-beta-L-rhamnopyranoside 3'-(glycer-2-yl sodium phosphate) (25 beta), which represents the repeating unit of the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 23F (American type 23) [(----4)-beta-D-Glcp-(1----4)-[Glycerol-(2-P----3)] [alpha-L- Rhap-(1----2)]-beta-D-Galp-(1----4)-beta-L-Rhap-(1----)n). 2,4,6-Tri-O-acetyl-3-O-allyl-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl trichloroacetimidate (5) was coupled with ethyl 2,3-di-O-benzyl-1-thio-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (6). Deacetylation of the resulting disaccharide derivative, followed by benzylidenation, and condensation with 2,3,4-trio-O-acetyl-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl trichloroacetimidate (10) afforded ethyl 4-O-[3-O-allyl-4,6-O-benzylidene-2-O-(2,3,4-trio-O-acetyl- alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl]-2,3-di-O-benzyl-1-thio - alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (11). Deacetylation of 11, followed by benzylation, selective benzylidene ring-opening, and coupling with 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl trichloroacetimidate (15) gave ethyl 4-O-[3-O-allyl-6-O-benzyl-4-O-(2,3,4,6- tetra-O-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-2-O-(2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-alpha-L- rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl]-2,3-di-O-benzyl-1-thio-alpha-L - rhamnopyranoside (16). Deacetylation of 16 followed by benzylation, deallylation, and acetylation yielded ethyl 4-O-[3-O-acetyl-6-O-benzyl-4-O-(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-benzyl-beta-D-glucopy ran osyl)- 2-O-(2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl ]-2,3- di-O-benzyl-1-thio-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (20). The glycosyl bromide derived from 20, when coupled with 3-benzyloxycarbonylamino-1-propanol, gave the beta-glycoside (21 beta) as the major product. Deacetylation of 21 beta followed by condensation with 1,3-di-O-benzylglycerol 2-(triethylammonium phosphonate) (27), oxidation, and deprotection, afforded 25 beta. PMID:1769015

  6. The Capsular Polysaccharide of Staphylococcus aureus Is Attached to Peptidoglycan by the LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) Family of Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yvonne Gar-Yun; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Envelope biogenesis in bacteria involves synthesis of intermediates that are tethered to the lipid carrier undecaprenol-phosphate. LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) enzymes have been proposed to catalyze the transfer of undecaprenol-linked intermediates onto the C6-hydroxyl of MurNAc in peptidoglycan, thereby promoting attachment of wall teichoic acid (WTA) in bacilli and staphylococci and capsular polysaccharides (CPS) in streptococci. S. aureus encodes three lcp enzymes, and a variant lacking all three genes (Δlcp) releases WTA from the bacterial envelope and displays a growth defect. Here, we report that the type 5 capsular polysaccharide (CP5) of Staphylococcus aureus Newman is covalently attached to the glycan strands of peptidoglycan. Cell wall attachment of CP5 is abrogated in the Δlcp variant, a defect that is best complemented via expression of lcpC in trans. CP5 synthesis and peptidoglycan attachment are not impaired in the tagO mutant, suggesting that CP5 synthesis does not involve the GlcNAc-ManNAc linkage unit of WTA and may instead utilize another Wzy-type ligase to assemble undecaprenyl-phosphate intermediates. Thus, LCP enzymes of S. aureus are promiscuous enzymes that attach secondary cell wall polymers with discrete linkage units to peptidoglycan. PMID:24753256

  7. Effect of Metal Cations on the Viscosity of a Pectin-Like Capsular Polysaccharide from the Cyanobacterium Microcystis flos-aquae C3-40

    PubMed Central

    Parker, D. L.; Schram, B. R.; Plude, J. L.; Moore, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    The properties of purified capsular polysaccharide from the cyanobacterium Microcystis flos-aquae C3-40 were examined by capillary viscometry. Capsule suspensions exhibited similar viscosities between pH 6 and 10 but were more viscous at pH <=4 than at pH 6 to 11. At pH 7, a biphasic effect of metal ion concentration on capsule viscosity was observed: (i) capsule viscosity increased with increasing metal ion concentration until a maximal viscosity occurred at a specific concentration that was a reproducible characteristic of each metal ion, and (ii) the viscosity decreased with further addition of that ion. Because the latter part of the biphasic curve was complicated by additional factors (especially the precipitation or gelation of capsule by divalent metal ions), the effects of various metal chlorides were compared for the former phase in which capsule viscosity increased in the presence of metal ions. Equivalent increases in capsule viscosity were observed with micromolar concentrations of divalent metal ions but only with 10 to 20 times greater concentrations of Na(sup+). The relative abilities of various metal salts to increase capsule viscosity were as follows: CdCl(inf2), Pb(NO(inf3))(inf2), FeCl(inf2) > MnCl(inf2) > CuCl(inf2), CaCl(inf2) >> NaCl. This pattern of metal efficacy resembles known cation influences on the structural integrity of capsule in naturally occurring and cultured M. flos-aquae colonies. The data are the first direct demonstration of an interaction between metal ions and purified M. flos-aquae capsule, which has previously been proposed to play a role in the environmental cycling of certain multivalent metals, especially manganese. The M. flos-aquae capsule and the plant polysaccharide pectin have similar sugar compositions but differ in their relative responses to various metals, suggesting that capsular polysaccharide could be a preferable alternative to pectin for certain biotechnological applications. PMID:16535287

  8. Characterization of the antigenicity of Cpl1, a surface protein of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jian-Piao; Liu, Ling-Li; To, Kelvin K W; Lau, Candy C Y; Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Guo, Yong-Hui; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Che, Xiao-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans is an important fungal pathogen. The capsule is a well established virulence factor and a target site for diagnostic tests. The CPL1 gene is required for capsular formation and virulence. The protein product Cpl1 has been proposed to be a secreted protein, but the characteristics of this protein have not been reported. Here we sought to characterize Cpl1. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Cpl1 of C. neoformans var. neoformans and the Cpl1 orthologs identified in C. neoformans var. grubii and C. gattii formed a distinct cluster among related fungi; while the putative ortholog found in Trichosporon asahii was distantly related to the Cryptococcus cluster. We expressed Cpl1 abundantly as a secreted His-tagged protein in Pichia pastoris. The protein was used to immunize guinea pigs and rabbits for high titer mono-specific polyclonal antibody that was shown to be highly specific against the cell wall of C. neoformans var. neoformans and did not cross react with C. gattii, T. asahii, Aspergillus spp., Candida spp. and Penicillium spp. Using the anti-Cpl1 antibody, we detected Cpl1 protein in the fresh culture supernatant of C. neoformans var. neoformans and we showed by immunostaining that the Cpl1 protein was located on the surface. The Cpl1 protein is a specific surface protein of C. neoformans var. neoformans. PMID:25261494

  9. Development of a conjugate vaccine against invasive pneumococcal disease based on capsular polysaccharides coupled with PspA/family 1 protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haiying; Peng, Yonghui; Lin, ZiLin; Zhang, Shuangling; Guo, Yanghao

    2015-01-01

    The efforts were focused on exploring alternative pneumococcal vaccine strategies, aimed at addressing the shortcomings of existing formulations, without compromising efficacy. Our strategy involved the use of the carrier protein, pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), conjugated with capsular polysaccharides (CPS), to provide effective and non-serotype-dependent protection. In this study, we generated a stable Escherichia coli construct expressing functional PspA from a capsular serotype 6B strain and confirmed it belonging to family 1, which was conjugated with CPS. The distribution of anti-CPS antibody response was almost completely of IgG2a subclass followed by IgG3 and low level of IgG1 subclass, but that of anti-PspA IgG subclass antibodies was almost equal IgG1 and IgG2a subclasses. Though PspA was less conspicuous on the surface of pneumococci than the capsule, the antibodies induced with CPS-rPspA conjugate possessed more accessibility to the surface of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6B and 19F (the same family 1 PspA). By survival experiment, the result suggested that the level of cross-protection after immunized with the conjugate was more measurable within the same family 1. The CPS-rPspA conjugate not only induced CPS-specific protection but also provided PspA specific cross-protection. PMID:25959527

  10. New latex reagent using monoclonal antibodies to capsular polysaccharide for reliable identification of both oxacillin-susceptible and oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Fournier, J M; Bouvet, A; Mathieu, D; Nato, F; Boutonnier, A; Gerbal, R; Brunengo, P; Saulnier, C; Sagot, N; Slizewicz, B

    1993-05-01

    A new latex agglutination test (Pastorex Staph-Plus, Sanofi Diagnostics Pasteur), consisting of a mixture of latex particles coated with fibrinogen and immunoglobulin G for the detection of clumping factor and protein A and latex particles sensitized with monoclonal antibodies directed to Staphylococcus aureus serotype 5 and 8 capsular polysaccharides, was compared with three commercially available rapid agglutination methods for the identification of 220 isolates of S. aureus (61 oxacillin resistant) and 128 isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci. The sensitivity for identification of S. aureus was high with the Pastorex Staph-Plus test (98.6%) compared with those of the other tests, which ranged from 91.8 to 84.5%. Test sensitivities for the identification of oxacillin-resistant S. aureus were as follows: Pastorex Staph-Plus, 95.1%; Pastorex Staph, 73.8%; Staphyslide, 72.1%; and StaphAurex, 49.2%. PMID:8501240

  11. The contribution of naturally occurring IgM antibodies, IgM cross-reactivity and complement dependency in murine humoral responses to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hannah E; Taylor, Philip R; McGreal, Eamon; Zamze, Susanne; Wong, Simon Y C

    2009-09-25

    Immunogenicity of 12 capsular polysaccharides (CPS) from Streptococcus pneumoniae did not correlate with pre-existing levels of natural IgM anti-CPS antibodies in mice. Immunization of mice with individual CPS, with the exception of type 14 (the only neutral CPS tested), increased serum IgM that also bound other CPS serotypes independent of structural similarity or commonly known contaminants. Surprisingly only IgM response to type 4 (which has a small immunodominant epitope) was dependent on either complement C3 or complement receptors CD35/CD21. IgG anti-CPS responses were infrequently induced, but critically dependent on complement. Our results have clarified the role of complement in the induction of IgM and IgG anti-CPS antibody responses in mice and have implications for CPS vaccine development. PMID:19660585

  12. Regulated expression of polysaccharide utilization and capsular biosynthesis loci in biofilm and planktonic Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron during growth in chemostats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is a prominent member of the human distal gut microbiota that specializes in breaking down diet and host-derived polysaccharides. While polysaccharide utilization has been well studied in B. thetaiotaomicron, other aspects of its behavior are less well characterized, in...

  13. Vibrio cholerae O139 conjugate vaccines: synthesis and immunogenicity of V. cholerae O139 capsular polysaccharide conjugates with recombinant diphtheria toxin mutant in mice.

    PubMed

    Kossaczka, Z; Shiloach, J; Johnson, V; Taylor, D N; Finkelstein, R A; Robbins, J B; Szu, S C

    2000-09-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental data provide evidence that a critical level of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to the surface polysaccharide of Vibrio cholerae O1 (lipopolysaccharide) and of Vibrio cholerae O139 (capsular polysaccharide [CPS]) is associated with immunity to the homologous pathogen. The immunogenicity of polysaccharides, especially in infants, may be enhanced by their covalent attachment to proteins (conjugates). Two synthetic schemes, involving 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) as activating agents, were adapted to prepare four conjugates of V. cholerae O139 CPS with the recombinant diphtheria toxin mutant, CRMH21G. Adipic acid dihydrazide was used as a linker. When injected subcutaneously into young outbred mice by a clinically relevant dose and schedule, these conjugates elicited serum CPS antibodies of the IgG and IgM classes with vibriocidal activity to strains of capsulated V. cholerae O139. Treatment of these sera with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) reduced, but did not eliminate, their vibriocidal activity. These results indicate that the conjugates elicited IgG with vibriocidal activity. Conjugates also elicited high levels of serum diphtheria toxin IgG. Convalescent sera from 20 cholera patients infected with V. cholerae O139 had vibriocidal titers ranging from 100 to 3,200: absorption with the CPS reduced the vibriocidal titer of all sera to < or =50. Treatment with 2-ME reduced the titers of 17 of 20 patients to < or =50. These data show that, like infection with V. cholerae O1, infection with V. cholerae O139 induces vibriocidal antibodies specific to the surface polysaccharide of this bacterium (CPS) that are mostly of IgM class. Based on these data, clinical trials with the V. cholerae O139 CPS conjugates with recombinant diphtheria toxin are planned. PMID:10948122

  14. Biofilm Formation by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Luis R; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-06-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus neoformans possesses a polysaccharide capsule and can form biofilms on medical devices. The increasing use of ventriculoperitoneal shunts to manage intracranial hypertension associated with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis highlights the importance of investigating the biofilm-forming properties of this organism. Like other microbe-forming biofilms, C. neoformans biofilms are resistant to antimicrobial agents and host defense mechanisms, causing significant morbidity and mortality. This chapter discusses the recent advances in the understanding of cryptococcal biofilms, including the role of its polysaccharide capsule in adherence, gene expression, and quorum sensing in biofilm formation. We describe novel strategies for the prevention or eradication of cryptococcal colonization of medical prosthetic devices. Finally, we provide fresh thoughts on the diverse but interesting directions of research in this field that may result in new insights into C. neoformans biology. PMID:26185073

  15. Cryptococcus neoformans biofilm formation depends on surface support and carbon source and reduces fungal cell susceptibility to heat, cold, and UV light.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Luis R; Casadevall, Arturo

    2007-07-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus neoformans possesses a polysaccharide capsule and can form biofilms on medical devices. We describe the characteristics of C. neoformans biofilm development using a microtiter plate model, microscopic examinations, and a colorimetric 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium-hydroxide (XTT) reduction assay to observe the metabolic activity of cryptococci within a biofilm. A strong correlation between XTT and CFU assays was demonstrated. Chemical analysis of the exopolymeric material revealed sugar composition consisting predominantly of xylose, mannose, and glucose, indicating the presence of other polysaccharides in addition to glucurunoxylomannan. Biofilm formation was affected by surface support differences, conditioning films on the surface, characteristics of the medium, and properties of the microbial cell. A specific antibody to the capsular polysaccharide of this fungus was used to stain the extracellular polysaccharide matrix of the fungal biofilms using light and confocal microscopy. Additionally, the susceptibility of C. neoformans biofilms and planktonic cells to environmental stress was investigated using XTT reduction and CFU assays. Biofilms were less susceptible to heat, cold, and UV light exposition than their planktonic counterparts. Our findings demonstrate that fungal biofilm formation is dependent on support surface characteristics and that growth in the biofilm state makes fungal cells less susceptible to potential environmental stresses. PMID:17513597

  16. A simple and rapid method for measuring unconjugated capsular polysaccharide (PRP) of Haemophilus influenzae type b in PRP-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y Y; Anderson, R; McIver, J; Gupta, R K; Siber, G R

    1998-03-01

    The authors developed a simple and rapid method for quantitation of free capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b (polyribosyl ribitol phosphate, PRP) in PRP-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine based on acid precipitation of tetanus toxoid (TT). Acid hydrolysis of PRP during the assay was not detected. The conditions used in the assay did not precipitate unconjugated PRP or adipic acid dihydrazide derivatized PRP. The method was highly reliable, reproducible and sensitive. The accuracy of the assay was confirmed by spiking known amounts of unconjugated PRP to PRP-TT conjugate preparations. A PRP-TT preparation, incubated at 37 degrees C for 6 months showing most of the PRP as unconjugated (87% determined by this method), was not immunogenic in mice for the PRP component even after two injections. In contrast, the same preparation held at 4 degrees C for 20 months, showing 17% unconjugated PRP, induced IgG antibodies to PRP which were boosted after second injection. Therefore, this method is very useful to evaluate the stability of PRP-TT conjugate vaccine. The assay may be useful for characterizing other polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines. PMID:9637747

  17. The immune response to group B streptococcus type III capsular polysaccharide is directed to the -Glc-GlcNAc-Gal- backbone epitope.

    PubMed

    Safari, Dodi; Dekker, Huberta A T; Rijkers, Ger T; van der Ende, Arie; Kamerling, Johannis P; Snippe, Harm

    2011-12-01

    The structures of the branched capsular polysaccharides of group B streptococcus type III (GBSIIIPS) and Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14 (Pn14PS) are identical apart from the (α2→3)-linked sialic acid in the side chains of GBSIIIPS. The present study tries to determine the minimal epitope in GBSIIIPS, using both a panel of anti-Pn14PS mouse sera and sera of humans vaccinated with either Pn14PS or GBSIIIPS. Type-specific Pn14PS antibodies that recognize the branched structure of Pn14PS have a low affinity for the native GBSIIIPS. Desialylation of GBSIIIPS results in dramatically higher affinity of anti-Pn14PS antibodies. Epitope specific anti-Pn14PS mouse antibodies and human sera of PCV7 vaccinees only recognized structures with the branching element -Glc-(Gal-)GlcNAc-, in particular -Gal-Glc-(Gal-)GlcNAc- in Pn14PS. On the other hand anti-GBSIIIPS human antibodies recognize predominantly the linear structure in the backbone of Pn14PS or GBSIIIPS, i.e., -Glc-GlcNAc-Gal-. This difference in antigenicity of Pn14PS and GBSIIIPS is in agreement with the difference in flexibility of the two polysaccharides caused by the presence or absence of sialic acid. PMID:21984010

  18. Chemotaxigenesis and activation of the alternative complement pathway by encapsulated and non-encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Laxalt, K A; Kozel, T R

    1979-01-01

    In the presence of serum, whole cells of encapsulated and non-encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans generated a chemotactic response by neutrophils. Heat inactivation of serum ablated all chemotactic activity. Cryptococcal polysaccharide was not chemotaxigenic. Assays for alternative complement pathway activation such as depletion of alternative complement pathway factor B or electrophoretic conversion of factor B closely paralleled chemotaxis assays. Cells of encapsulated and non-encapsulated C. neoformans activated the alternative complement pathway, whereas cryptococcal polysaccharide was inactive. Failure of the capsular material to activate the alternative pathway was not due to serotype specificity because polysaccharide of several serotypes failed to achieve activation. The results suggest that chemotaxigenesis and alternative complement pathway activation are functions of the yeast cell wall. The results support our proposal that the cryptococcal capsul does not prevent potential opsonins from reaching binding and activation sites at the yeast cell wall or the release of biologically active soluble cleavage products into the surrounding medium; however, cell wall-bound cleavage products remain bound to the cell wall beneath the capsule. Therefore, they are unable to participate as opsonins in phagocytosis. PMID:397927

  19. Fisher scientific award lecture - the capsular polysaccharides of Group B Streptococcus and Streptococcus suis differently modulate bacterial interactions with dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Segura, Mariela

    2012-03-01

    Infections with encapsulated bacteria cause serious clinical problems. Besides being poorly immunogenic, the bacterial capsular polysaccharide (CPS) cloaks antigenic proteins, allowing bacterial evasion of the host immune system. Despite the clinical significance of bacterial CPS and its suggested role in the pathogenesis of the infection, the mechanisms underlying innate and, critically, adaptive immune responses to encapsulated bacteria have not been fully elucidated. As such, we became interested in studying the CPS of two similar, but unique, streptococcal species: Group B Streptococcus (GBS) and Streptococcus suis . Both streptococci are well encapsulated, some capsular types are more virulent than others, and they can cause severe meningitis and septicemia. For both pathogens, the CPS is considered the major virulence factor. Finally, these two streptococci are the sole Gram-positive bacteria possessing sialic acid in their capsules. GBS type III is a leading cause of neonatal invasive infections. Streptococcus suis type 2 is an important swine and emerging zoonotic pathogen in humans. We recently characterized the S. suis type 2 CPS. It shares common structural elements with GBS, but sialic acid is α2,6-linked to galactose rather than α2,3-linked. Differential sialic acid expression by pathogens might result in modulation of immune cell activation and, consequently, may affect the immuno-pathogenesis of these bacterial infections. Here, we review and compare the interactions of these two sialylated encapsulated bacteria with dendritic cells, known as the most potent antigen-presenting cells linking innate and adaptive immunity. We further address differences between dendritic cells and professional phagocytes, such as macrophages and neutrophils, in their interplay with these encapsulated pathogens. Elucidation of the molecular and cellular basis of the impact of CPS composition on bacterial interactions with immune cells is critical for mechanistic

  20. The vacuolar-sorting protein Snf7 is required for export of virulence determinants in members of the Cryptococcus neoformans complex.

    PubMed Central

    da C. Godinho, Rodrigo M.; Crestani, Juliana; Kmetzsch, Lívia; de S. Araujo, Glauber; Frases, Susana; Staats, Charley C.; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene H.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2014-01-01

    Fungal pathogenesis requires a number of extracellularly released virulence factors. Recent studies demonstrating that most fungal extracellular molecules lack secretory tags suggest that unconventional secretion mechanisms and fungal virulence are strictly connected. Proteins of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) have been recently associated with polysaccharide export in the yeast-like human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Snf7 is a key ESCRT operator required for unconventional secretion in Eukaryotes. In this study we generated snf7Δ mutant strains of C. neoformans and its sibling species C. gattii. Lack of Snf7 resulted in important alterations in polysaccharide secretion, capsular formation and pigmentation. This phenotype culminated with loss of virulence in an intranasal model of murine infection in both species. Our data support the notion that Snf7 expression regulates virulence in C. neoformans and C. gattii by ablating polysaccharide and melanin traffic. These results are in agreement with the observation that unconventional secretion is essential for cryptococcal pathogenesis and strongly suggest the occurrence of still obscure mechanisms of exportation of non-protein molecules in Eukaryotes. PMID:25178636

  1. The Microbial Capsular Polysaccharide Galactoxylomannan Inhibits IL-17A Production in Circulating T Cells from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pericolini, Eva; Alunno, Alessia; Gabrielli, Elena; Bartoloni, Elena; Cenci, Elio; Chow, Siu-Kei; Bistoni, Giovanni; Casadevall, Arturo; Gerli, Roberto; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The persistence of activated T cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovium may be attributable to increased homing, increased retention or a possible imbalance between cell proliferation and programmed cell death. Induction of apoptosis may represent a potential therapeutic approach. Galactoxylomannan (GalXM) from the opportunistic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans can interact with T cells and induce T-cell apoptosis through the inhibition of CD45 phosphatase activity. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of GalXM on circulating T cells from patients with RA and the underlying mechanisms. GalXM immunomodulating effect on apoptosis and signal transduction pathway involved in IL-17A production was evaluated on T cells. RA T-cell apoptosis, higher than that of control T cells, was further increased by GalXM through induction of caspase-3 activation. Activated T cells expressing the CD45RO molecule and producing IL-17A were the main target of GalXM-induced apoptosis. GalXM induced consistent impairment of IL-17A production and inhibition of STAT3, which was hyperactivated in RA. In conclusion, GalXM triggered apoptosis of activated memory T cells and interfered with IL-17A production in RA. These data suggest therapeutic targeting of deleterious Th17 cells in RA and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:23308194

  2. Synthesis of di- and tri-saccharide fragments of Salmonella typhi Vi capsular polysaccharide and their zwitterionic analogues.

    PubMed

    Fusari, Matteo; Fallarini, Silvia; Lombardi, Grazia; Lay, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Zwitterionic polysaccharides (ZPS) behave like traditional T cell-dependent antigens, suggesting the design of new classes of vaccines alternative to currently used glycoconjugates and based on the artificial introduction of a zwitterionic charge motif onto the carbohydrate structure of pathogen antigens. Here we report the new synthesis and antigenic evaluation of di-/tri-saccharide fragments of Salmonella typhi Vi polysaccharide, as well as of their corresponding zwitterionic analogues. Our strategy is based on versatile intermediates enabling chain elongation either by iterative single monomer attachment or by faster and more flexible approach using disaccharide donors. The effect of structural modifications of the synthetic compounds on antigenic properties was evaluated by competitive ELISA. All the oligosaccharides were recognized by specific anti-Vi polyclonal antibodies in a concentration-dependent manner, and the introduction of a zwitterionic motif into the synthetic molecules did not prevent the binding. PMID:26558515

  3. Recognition of riboflavin and the capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b by antibodies generated to the haptenic epitope D-ribitol.

    PubMed

    Ravi, G; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2014-04-01

    D-Ribitol, a five-carbon sugar alcohol, is an important metabolite in the pentose phosphate pathway; it is an integral part of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and cell wall polysaccharides in most Gram-positive and a few Gram-negative bacteria. Antibodies specific to D-ribitol were generated in New Zealand white rabbits by using reductively aminated D-ribose-BSA conjugate as the immunogen. MALDI-TOF and amino group analyses of ribitol-BSA conjugate following 120 h reaction showed ~27-30 mol of ribitol conjugated per mole BSA. The presence of sugar alcohol in the conjugates was also confirmed by an increase in molecular mass and a positive periodic acid-Schiff staining in SDS-PAGE. Caprylic acid precipitation of rabbit serum followed by hapten affinity chromatography on ribitol-KLH-Sepharose CL-6B resulted in pure ribitol-specific antibodies (~45-50 μg/mL). The affinity constant of ribitol antibodies was found to be 2.9 × 10(7) M(-1) by non-competitive ELISA. Ribitol antibodies showed 100% specificity towards ribitol, ~800% cross-reactivity towards riboflavin, 10-15% cross-reactivity with sorbitol, xylitol and mannitol, and 5-7% cross-reactivity with L-arabinitol and meso-erythritol. The specificity of antibody to ribitol was further confirmed by its low cross-reactivity (0.4%) with lumichrome. Antibodies to D-ribitol recognized the purified capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b, which could be specifically inhibited by ribitol. In conclusion, antibodies specific to D-ribitol have been generated and characterized, which have potential applications in the detection of free riboflavin and ribitol in biological samples, as well as identification of cell-surface macromolecules containing ribitol. PMID:24643482

  4. Polyclonal B-cell activation by Neisseria meningitidis capsular polysaccharides elicit antibodies protective against Trypanosoma cruzi infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, T G; Milani, S R; Travassos, L R

    1996-01-01

    A hyperimmune rabbit antiserum against group C Neisseria meningitidis agglutinated and lysed Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes in a complement-mediated reaction. Immunization of rabbits with the purified polysaccharide C from N. meningitidis and of human volunteers with the AC-polysaccharide vaccine against meningitis also resulted in antibody production cross-reactive with T. cruzi infective forms. The rabbit antibodies bound to parasites, lysed metacyclic forms, and recognized several components from lysates of cell-derived trypomastigotes. The sera from six human volunteers reacted with cell-cultured trypomastigotes in vitro, lysed these forms, and recognized glycoconjugates migrating diffusely on the top of immunoblots. One serum also reacted with the isolated mucin-like glycoconjugate carrying the Ssp-3 epitope from cell-derived trypomastigotes, but treatment with sialidase did not abolish this reactivity. The anti-AC human antiserum also protected against HeLa cell infection and markedly decreased the number of parasites liberated after cell burst. The polyclonal response that resulted from human immunization with N. meningitidis polysaccharides A and C comprised trypanolytic antibodies that recognized nonsialylated epitopes expressed on infective forms of the parasite. It is suggested that human AC vaccination could be potentially helpful as an adjuvant to a specific immunotherapy of Chagas disease, developed with native or recombinant antigens of the parasite. PMID:8811466

  5. Antibodies to capsular polysaccharides of group B Streptococcus in pregnant Canadian women: relationship to colonization status and infection in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Davies, H D; Adair, C; McGeer, A; Ma, D; Robertson, S; Mucenski, M; Kowalsky, L; Tyrell, G; Baker, C J

    2001-08-01

    In a cohort study of 1207 pregnant women in Alberta, Canada, the serotype distributions of vaginal-rectal group B Streptococcus (GBS) isolates were compared with all isolates from neonates with invasive GBS disease identified by population-based surveillance. Serum concentrations of Ia, Ib, II, III, and V capsular polysaccharide (CPS)-specific IgG also were determined, according to serotype of the vaginal-rectal colonizing GBS strain. GBS colonization was detected in 19.5% (235 of 1207) of women. Serotype III accounted for 20.6% (48 of 233) of colonizing strains available for typing but for 37% (27 of 73) of invasive isolates from neonates (P<.01). Maternal colonization with type III was least likely to be associated with moderate concentrations of III CPS-specific IgG. Serotype III GBS is more invasive than other serotypes in this population; this may be due, at least in part, to poor maternal type III CPS-specific antibody response. PMID:11443553

  6. CpsR, a GntR family regulator, transcriptionally regulates capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis and governs bacterial virulence in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kaifeng; Xu, Hongmei; Zheng, Yuqiang; Wang, Libin; Zhang, Xuemei; Yin, Yibing

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of capsule expression is critical for pneumococcal transition from carriage to infection, yet the underlying mechanism remains incompletely understood. Here, we describe the regulation of capsular polysaccharide, one of the most important pneumococcal virulence factor by a GntR family regulator, CpsR. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays have shown the direct interaction between CpsR and the cps promoter (cpsp), and their interaction could be competitively interfered by glucose. DNase I footprinting assays localized the binding site to a region −146 to −114 base pairs relative to the transcriptional start site of the cps locus in S. pneumoniae D39. We found that CpsR negatively controlled the transcription of the cps locus and hence CPS production, which was confirmed by fine-tuning expression of CpsR in a ΔcpsR complemented strain. Increased expression of CpsR in complemented strain led to a decreased resistance to the whole-blood-mediated killing, suggesting a protective role for CpsR-cpsp interaction in the establishment of invasive infection. Finally, animal experiments showed that CpsR-cpsp interaction was necessary for both pneumococcal colonization and invasive infection. Taken together, our results provide a thorough insight into the regulation of capsule production mediated by CpsR and its important roles in pneumococcal pathogenesis. PMID:27386955

  7. A Synthetic Disaccharide Analogue from Neisseria meningitidis A Capsular Polysaccharide Stimulates Immune Cell Responses and Induces Immunoglobulin G (IgG) Production in Mice When Protein-Conjugated.

    PubMed

    Fallarini, Silvia; Buzzi, Benedetta; Giovarruscio, Sara; Polito, Laura; Brogioni, Giulia; Tontini, Marta; Berti, Francesco; Adamo, Roberto; Lay, Luigi; Lombardi, Grazia

    2015-10-01

    Some new phosphonoester-linked oligomers, stabilized analogues of the corresponding phosphate-bridged oligomers of Neisseria meningitidis A (MenA) capsular polysaccharide (CPS), were conjugated to human serum albumin (HSA), as a protein carrier model, and studied for immunological activities. We determined (i) in vitro, their biocompatibility (CAM test) and activity in inducing both T cell proliferation (CFSE method) and IL-2 release (ELISA), and (ii) in vivo, their ability to stimulate specific IgG antibody production (ELISA). All HSA-conjugated compounds induce T cell proliferation (40% of proliferation at 10(2) μM), whereas only the phosphonodisaccharide was effective (28% of proliferation at 10(2) μM) among the unconjugated forms. IL-2 release confirmed these results. In addition, the HSA-conjugated showed in vivo the capacity of eliciting the production of specific IgG antibodies. In conclusion, we obtained novel biocompatible, water-stable, and immunoactive MenA CPS analogues. A short disaccharide fragment showed the unusual behavior of triggering T cell proliferation in vitro. PMID:27623315

  8. Physical and chemical characterization and immunologic properties of Salmonella enterica serovar typhi capsular polysaccharide-diphtheria toxoid conjugates.

    PubMed

    Cui, Changfa; Carbis, Rodney; An, So Jung; Jang, Hyun; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Szu, Shousun C; Clemens, John D

    2010-01-01

    Typhoid fever remains a serious public health problem in developing countries, especially among young children. Recent studies showed more than 50% of typhoid cases are in children under 5 years old. Licensed vaccines, such as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi capsular Vi, did not confer protection against typhoid fever for this age group. Vi conjugate, prepared by binding Vi to Pseudomonas aeruginosa recombinant exoprotein A (rEPA), induces protective levels of antibody at as young as 2 years old. Because of the lack of regulatory precedent for rEPA in licensing vaccines, we employed diphtheria toxoid (DT) as the carrier protein to accommodate accessibility in developing countries. Five lots of Vi-DT conjugates were prepared using adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as the linker. All 5 lots showed consistency in their physical and chemical characteristics and final yields. These Vi-DT conjugates elicited levels of IgG anti-Vi in young mice significantly higher than those in mice injected with Vi alone and induced a booster response upon reinjection. This booster effect was absent if the Vi replaced one of the two conjugate injections. Vi-DT was stable under repeated freeze-thaw (20 cycles). We plan to perform clinical evaluation of the safety and immunogenicity of Vi-DT when added to the infant combination vaccines. PMID:19889941

  9. Physical and Chemical Characterization and Immunologic Properties of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Capsular Polysaccharide-Diphtheria Toxoid Conjugates▿

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Changfa; Carbis, Rodney; An, So Jung; Jang, Hyun; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Szu, Shousun C.; Clemens, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Typhoid fever remains a serious public health problem in developing countries, especially among young children. Recent studies showed more than 50% of typhoid cases are in children under 5 years old. Licensed vaccines, such as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi capsular Vi, did not confer protection against typhoid fever for this age group. Vi conjugate, prepared by binding Vi to Pseudomonas aeruginosa recombinant exoprotein A (rEPA), induces protective levels of antibody at as young as 2 years old. Because of the lack of regulatory precedent for rEPA in licensing vaccines, we employed diphtheria toxoid (DT) as the carrier protein to accommodate accessibility in developing countries. Five lots of Vi-DT conjugates were prepared using adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as the linker. All 5 lots showed consistency in their physical and chemical characteristics and final yields. These Vi-DT conjugates elicited levels of IgG anti-Vi in young mice significantly higher than those in mice injected with Vi alone and induced a booster response upon reinjection. This booster effect was absent if the Vi replaced one of the two conjugate injections. Vi-DT was stable under repeated freeze-thaw (20 cycles). We plan to perform clinical evaluation of the safety and immunogenicity of Vi-DT when added to the infant combination vaccines. PMID:19889941

  10. Vi capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugates for prevention of typhoid fever. Preparation, characterization, and immunogenicity in laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The Vi has proven to be a protective antigen in two double masked, controlled clinical trials in areas with high rates of typhoid fever (approximately 1% per annum). In both studies the protective efficacy of the Vi was approximately 70%. Approximately 75% of subjects in these areas responded with a fourfold or greater rise of serum Vi antibodies. In contrast, the Vi elicited a fourfold or greater rise in 95-100% of young adults in France and the United States. Methods were devised, therefore, to synthesize Vi-protein conjugates in order to both enhance the antibody response and confer T-dependent properties to the Vi (and theoretically increase its protective action in populations at high risk for typhoid fever). We settled on a method that used the heterobifunctional crosslinking reagent, N-succinimidyl-3-(2- pyridyldithio)-propionate (SPDP), to bind thiol derivatives of the Vi to proteins. This synthetic scheme was reproducible, provided high yields of Vi-protein conjugates, and was applicable to several medically relevant proteins such as diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. The resultant conjugates were more immunogenic in mice and juvenile Rhesus monkeys than the Vi alone. In contrast to the T-independent properties of the Vi, conjugates of this polysaccharide with several medically relevant proteins induced booster responses in mice and in juvenile Rhesus monkeys. Clinical studies with Vi-protein conjugates are planned. This scheme is also applicable to synthesize protein conjugates with other polysaccharides that have carboxyl functions. PMID:3681191

  11. Non-covalent association of protein and capsular polysaccharide on bacteria-sized latex beads as a model for polysaccharide-specific humoral immunity to intact Gram-positive extracellular bacteria1

    PubMed Central

    Colino, Jesus; Duke, Leah; Snapper, Clifford M.

    2013-01-01

    Intact Streptococcus pneumoniae, expressing type 14 capsular polysaccharide (PPS14) and type III Streptococcus agalactiae containing a PPS14 core capsule identical to PPS14, exhibit non-covalent associations of PPS14 and bacterial protein, in contrast to soluble covalent conjugates of these respective antigens. Both bacteria and conjugates induce murine PPS14-specific IgG responses dependent on CD4+ T cells. Further, secondary immunization with conjugate and S. agalactiae, although not S. pneumoniae, results in a boosted response. However, in contrast to conjugate, PPS14-specific IgG responses to bacteria lack affinity maturation, utilize the 44.1-idiotype and are dependent on marginal zone B cells. To better understand the mechanism underlying this dichotomy we developed a minimal model of intact bacteria in which PPS14 and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) were stably attached to 1 μm (bacteria-sized) latex beads, but not directly linked to each other, in contrast to PPS14-PspA conjugate. PPS14+[PspA] beads, similar to conjugate, induced in mice boosted PPS14-specific IgG secondary responses, dependent on T cells and ICOS-dependent costimulation, and in which priming could be achieved with PspA alone. In contrast to conjugate, but similar to intact bacteria, the primary PPS14-specific IgG response to PPS14+[PspA] beads peaked rapidly, with the secondary response highly enriched for the 44.1-idiotype and lacking affinity maturation. These results demonstrate that non-covalent association in a particle, of polysaccharide and protein, recapitulates essential immunologic characteristics of intact bacteria that are distinct from soluble covalent conjugates of these respective antigens. PMID:23926322

  12. USA300 and USA500 Clonal Lineages of Staphylococcus aureus Do Not Produce a Capsular Polysaccharide Due to Conserved Mutations in the cap5 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Read, Timothy D.; Sieth, Julia; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Dobbins, Ginette; David, Michael Z.; Kumar, Neha; Eells, Samantha J.; Miller, Loren G.; Boxrud, David J.; Chambers, Henry F.; Lynfield, Ruth; Lee, Jean C.; Daum, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The surface capsular polysaccharide (CP) is a virulence factor that has been used as an antigen in several successful vaccines against bacterial pathogens. A vaccine has not yet been licensed against Staphylococcus aureus, although two multicomponent vaccines that contain CP antigens are in clinical trials. In this study, we evaluated CP production in USA300 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates that have become the predominant community-associated MRSA clones in the United States. We found that all 167 USA300 MRSA and 50 USA300 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates were CP negative (CP−). Moreover, all 16 USA500 isolates, which have been postulated to be the progenitor lineage of USA300, were also CP−. Whole-genome sequence analysis of 146 CP− USA300 MRSA isolates revealed they all carry a cap5 locus with 4 conserved mutations compared with strain Newman. Genetic complementation experiments revealed that three of these mutations (in the cap5 promoter, cap5D nucleotide 994, and cap5E nucleotide 223) ablated CP production in USA300 and that Cap5E75 Asp, located in the coenzyme-binding domain, is essential for capsule production. All but three USA300 MSSA isolates had the same four cap5 mutations found in USA300 MRSA isolates. Most isolates with a USA500 pulsotype carried three of these four USA300-specific mutations, suggesting the fourth mutation occurred in the USA300 lineage. Phylogenetic analysis of the cap loci of our USA300 isolates as well as publicly available genomes from 41 other sequence types revealed that the USA300-specific cap5 mutations arose sequentially in S. aureus in a common ancestor of USA300 and USA500 isolates. PMID:25852165

  13. Laboratory and clinical evaluation of conjugate vaccines composed of Staphylococcus aureus type 5 and type 8 capsular polysaccharides bound to Pseudomonas aeruginosa recombinant exoprotein A.

    PubMed Central

    Fattom, A; Schneerson, R; Watson, D C; Karakawa, W W; Fitzgerald, D; Pastan, I; Li, X; Shiloach, J; Bryla, D A; Robbins, J B

    1993-01-01

    The synthesis, standardization, and immunogenicity in young outbred mice and clinical evaluation in adult volunteers of investigational vaccines designed to induce serum antibodies to the type 5 and type 8 capsular polysaccharides (CPs) of Staphylococcus aureus are described. Conjugates composed of the type 5 CP and a sonicated preparation of a high-molecular-weight type 8 CP bound to a nontoxic recombinant protein derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (rEPA) were synthesized. The conjugates were nontoxic and elicited serum CP antibodies after two subcutaneous injections into young outbred mice; a third injection elicited a booster response. The lower-molecular-weight type 8 CP was not immunogenic in the mice, and the high-molecular-weight type 8 CP elicited low levels of antibodies without a booster effect. In the volunteers, neither the conjugates nor the type 8 CP alone caused significant local reactions or fever. The conjugates elicited type-specific antibodies of both the immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG classes after the first injection; a second injection 6 weeks later did not stimulate a booster effect. The high-molecular-weight type 8 CP alone, injected once only, elicited levels of IgG and IgM type-specific antibodies similar to those of the conjugate. The vaccine-induced CP antibodies were mostly of the IgG1 and IgG2 subclasses and had opsonophagocytic activity. The conjugates elicited IgG antibodies to the native exotoxin A with neutralizing activity. In summary, the type 5 and type 8 conjugates were safe and elicited biologically active antibodies to both the CP and rEPA components. PMID:8432585

  14. Induction of death receptor CD95 and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 by meningococcal capsular polysaccharide-loaded vaccine nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ubale, Ruhi V; Gala, Rikhav P; Zughaier, Susu M; D'Souza, Martin J

    2014-09-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis and sepsis, and its capsular polysaccharides (CPS) are a major virulence factor in meningococcal infections and form the basis for serogroup designation and protective vaccines. We formulated a novel nanovaccine containing meningococcal CPS as an antigen encapsulated in albumin-based nanoparticles (NPs) that does not require chemical conjugation to a protein carrier. These nanoparticles are taken up by antigen-presenting cells and act as antigen depot by slowly releasing the antigen. In this study, we determined the ability of CPS-loaded vaccine nanoparticles to induce co-stimulatory molecules, namely CD80, CD86, and CD95 that impact effective antigen presentation. Co-stimulatory molecule gene induction and surface expression on macrophages and dendritic cells pulsed with meningococcal CPS-loaded nanoparticles were investigated using gene array and flow cytometry methods. Meningococcal CPS-loaded NP significantly induced the surface protein expression of CD80 and CD86, markers of dendritic cell maturation, in human THP-1 macrophages and in murine dendritic cells DC2.4 in a dose-dependent manner. The massive upregulation was also observed at the gene expression. However, high dose of CPS-loaded NP, but not empty NP, induced the expression of death receptor CD95 (Fas) leading to reduced TNF-α release and reduction in cell viability. The data suggest that high expression of CD95 may lead to death of antigen-presenting cells and consequently suboptimal immune responses to vaccine. The CPS-loaded NP induces the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and acts as antigen depot and can spare antigen dose, highly desirable criteria for vaccine formulations. PMID:24981893

  15. Design and optimization of a chromatographic purification process for Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 23F capsular polysaccharide by a Design of Experiments approach.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yu; Tian, Yang; Ahnfelt, Mattias; Sui, Lili

    2014-06-27

    Multivalent pneumococcal vaccines were used worldwide to protect human beings from pneumococcal diseases. In order to eliminate the toxic organic solutions used in the traditional vaccine purification process, an alternative chromatographic process for Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 23F capsular polysaccharide (CPS) was proposed in this study. The strategy of Design of Experiments (DoE) was introduced into the process development to solve the complicated design procedure. An initial process analysis was given to review the whole flowchart, identify the critical factors of chromatography through FMEA and chose the flowthrough mode due to the property of the feed. A resin screening study was then followed to select candidate resins. DoE was utilized to generate a resolution IV fractional factorial design to further compare candidates and narrow down the design space. After Capto Adhere was selected, the Box-Behnken DoE was executed to model the process and characterize all effects of factors on the responses. Finally, Monte Carlo simulation was used to optimize the process, test the chosen optimal conditions and define the control limit. The results of three scale-up runs at set points verified the DoE and simulation predictions. The final results were well in accordance with the EU pharmacopeia requirements: Protein/CPS (w/w) 1.08%; DNA/CPS (w/w) 0.61%; the phosphorus content 3.1%; the nitrogen 0.315% and the Methyl-pentose percentage 47.9%. Other tests of final pure CPS also met the pharmacopeia specifications. This alternative chromatographic purification process for pneumococcal vaccine without toxic organic solvents was successfully developed by the DoE approach and proved scalability, robustness and suitability for large scale manufacturing. PMID:24845825

  16. Serodiagnosis of pleuropneumonia using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with capsular polysaccharide antigens of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 2, 5 and 7.

    PubMed Central

    Bossé, J T; Johnson, R P; Rosendal, S

    1990-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharide antigens of serotypes 1, 2, 5 and 7 of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae were used in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) to test sera from experimentally infected and field pigs. Specific reactions were found in sera of experimental pigs with antigens of serotypes 1, 5 and 7 whereas the serotype 2 antigen was cross-reactive. A 1:200 serum dilution was used for testing of 300 sera from 21 swine herds in southern Ontario. Cases of pleuropneumonia had occurred in 11 of these herds, but not in the others. The negative cut-off value was the mean optical density at 405 nm (OD405) + three standard deviations (SD) for 16 negative reference sera. Sera from four pigs naturally infected with Actinobacillus suis were tested and found to react to varying degrees with each of the antigens. Therefore a second cut-off value was determined as the mean OD405 + 2 SD for the A. suis sera. Sera which, in the ELISA produced OD readings above the latter cut-off were considered positive for antibodies to A. pleuropneumoniae; those which were lower than the former cut-off were considered negative. Readings between the two cut-off values may have been due to low positive titers or cross-reactivity, possibly with A. suis, and could not be used to predict pleuropneumonia. Of the pleuropneumonia-free herds, none had positive reactors to serotypes 5 or 7, whereas one and two herds had positive reactors to serotypes 1 and 2, respectively. Of the pleuropneumonia positive herds, six had positive reactors to serotype 1, one to serotype 2, four to serotype 5, and eight to serotype 7. PMID:2249177

  17. Conjugates of group A and W135 capsular polysaccharides of neisseria meningitidis bound to recombinant Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin C1: preparation, physicochemical characterization, and immunological properties in mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhigang; Bohach, Gregory A; Shiloach, Joseph; Norris, Scott E; Freedberg, Darón I; Deobald, Claudia; Coxon, Bruce; Robbins, John B; Schneerson, Rachel

    2005-12-01

    Neisseria meningitidis groups A (GAM) and W135 capsular polysaccharides (CPs) were bound to recombinant Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin C1 (rSEC). The CPs were activated with 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate and then bound to adipic acid dihydrazide derivatives of rSEC. Syntheses were conducted with native GAM CP (GAMP), W135 CP (W135P), and ultrasonicated or hydrazine-treated W135P at various concentrations of reactants, pHs, and ionic strengths. The conjugates were characterized by compositional and serologic analyses, high-performance size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle laser light scattering detection, and immunogenicity in 5- to 6-week-old mice. Conjugates injected subcutaneously in phosphate-buffered saline elicited immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses against their respective CPs and rSEC, whereas GAMP and W135P alone did not induce detectable CP antibodies. The O-acetyl content of W135P was low, and its removal had no adverse effect upon the conjugate's immunogenicity. Reduction of the molecular size of W135P by treatment with hydrazine improved the immunogenicity of W135P-rSEC. IgG anti-CP elicited by the conjugates showed complement-dependent bactericidal activity against their respective organisms, and IgG anti-rSEC neutralized the T-cell proliferative activity of native SEC. A bivalent formulation of GAMP-rSEC and W135P-rSEC elicited IgG anti-CP at comparable levels to those induced by the conjugates administered separately. PMID:16299279

  18. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of serum antibodies elicited in adults by Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcus type 6A capsular polysaccharide-tetanus toxoid conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Schneerson, R; Robbins, J B; Parke, J C; Bell, C; Schlesselman, J J; Sutton, A; Wang, Z; Schiffman, G; Karpas, A; Shiloach, J

    1986-01-01

    Covalent binding to immunogenic proteins increases the immunogenicity of the capsular polysaccharides of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and pneumococcus type 6A (Pn6A). Conjugates composed of Hib, Pn6A, or the cross-reacting Escherichia coli K100 covalently bound to tetanus toxoid (TT) were injected into young adult volunteers. Local reactions were common and were probably due to Arthus reactivity mediated by the preexisting antibodies reacting with the TT component of the conjugates. Fever occurred in about 10% of the volunteers after the first injection; no volunteers had fever after the second injection. Similar levels of Hib or Pn6A antibodies were elicited by either 50- or 100-micrograms doses or by concurrent injection of two different conjugates (Hib-TT and Pn6A-TT or Hib-TT and K100-TT). The Hib-TT elicited about a 180-fold increase in Hib antibodies, and the Pn6A-TT conjugate elicited about an 8-fold increase in Pn6A antibodies after one injection. Booster reactions were not elicited in adults; similar levels of antibodies in the five experimental groups suggested that the responses elicited by the conjugates were maximal. A one-way cross-reaction was noted as Pn6A conjugates elicited rises of Hib antibodies in 13 of 20 volunteers; only 4 of 59 volunteers immunized with Hib-TT had increases in Pn6A antibodies. The preimmunization Hib antibodies were composed of immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgA, and IgG. The postimmunization sera showed an increase in all three isotypes; the elevation of the IgG was the highest of the three isotypes. Conjugate-induced antibodies to both the polysaccharide and TT exerted biological activities that have been correlated with immunity. Adsorption of the Hib-TT onto aluminium hydroxide resulted in higher levels and an earlier Hib antibody response in infant rhesus. These results encourage the evaluation of Hib and Pn6A conjugates in human children and infants. PMID:3516876

  19. Role of complement receptor type 2 and endogenous complement in the humoral immune response to conjugates of complement C3d and pneumococcal serotype 14 capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Mitsuyoshi, Joyce K; Hu, Yong; Test, Samuel T

    2005-11-01

    Conjugation of the complement fragment C3d to both T-cell-dependent (TD) protein and T-cell-independent type 2 (TI-2) polysaccharide antigens enhances the humoral immune response in mice immunized with either type of antigen. However, the ability of C3d-protein conjugates to enhance the antibody response in mice deficient in complement receptor types 1 and 2 (CR1 and CR2) has raised questions about the role of C3d-CR2 interactions in the adjuvant effect of C3d. In this study, we examined the role of CR2 binding and endogenous complement activation in the antibody response to conjugates of C3d and serotype 14 pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PPS14). To block binding of PPS14-C3d conjugates to CR2, mice were immunized with a mixture of vaccine and (CR2)2-immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1). Mice receiving (CR2)2-IgG1 at the time of primary immunization had a marked reduction in the primary anti-PPS14 antibody response but an enhanced secondary anti-PPS14 response, suggesting that C3d-CR2 interactions are required for the primary response but can have negative effects on the memory response. Further, compared with mice receiving PPS14-C3d having a high C3d/PPS14 ratio, mice immunized with PPS14-C3d with low C3d/PPS14 ratios had an enhanced secondary antibody response. Treatment of mice with cobra venom factor to deplete complement had insignificant effects on the antibody response to PPS14-C3d. Experiments with CBA/N xid mice confirmed that PPS14-C3d conjugates retain the characteristics of TI-2 rather than TD antigens. Thus, the adjuvant effect of C3d conjugated to PPS14 requires C3d-CR2 interactions, does not require activation of endogenous complement, and is not mediated by TD carrier effects. PMID:16239528

  20. Deletion of Cryptococcus neoformans AIF Ortholog Promotes Chromosome Aneuploidy and Fluconazole-Resistance in a Metacaspase-Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Semighini, Camile P.; Averette, Anna F.; Perfect, John R.; Heitman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death critical for development and homeostasis in multicellular organisms. Apoptosis-like cell death (ALCD) has been described in several fungi, including the opportunistic human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. In addition, capsular polysaccharides of C. neoformans are known to induce apoptosis in host immune cells, thereby contributing to its virulence. Our goals were to characterize the apoptotic signaling cascade in C. neoformans as well as its unique features compared to the host machinery to exploit the endogenous fungal apoptotic pathways as a novel antifungal strategy in the future. The dissection of apoptotic pathways revealed that apoptosis-inducing factor (Aif1) and metacaspases (Mca1 and Mca2) are independently required for ALCD in C. neoformans. We show that the apoptotic pathways are required for cell fusion and sporulation during mating, indicating that apoptosis may occur during sexual development. Previous studies showed that antifungal drugs induce ALCD in fungi and that C. neoformans adapts to high concentrations of the antifungal fluconazole (FLC) by acquisition of aneuploidy, especially duplication of chromosome 1 (Chr1). Disruption of aif1, but not the metacaspases, stimulates the emergence of aneuploid subpopulations with Chr1 disomy that are resistant to fluconazole (FLCR) in vitro and in vivo. FLCR isolates in the aif1 background are stable in the absence of the drug, while those in the wild-type background readily revert to FLC sensitivity. We propose that apoptosis orchestrated by Aif1 might eliminate aneuploid cells from the population and defects in this pathway contribute to the selection of aneuploid FLCR subpopulations during treatment. Aneuploid clinical isolates with disomies for chromosomes other than Chr1 exhibit reduced AIF1 expression, suggesting that inactivation of Aif1 might be a novel aneuploidy-tolerating mechanism in fungi that facilitates the selection of antifungal drug resistance

  1. Capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis and pathogenicity in Erwinia stewartii require induction by an N-acylhomoserine lactone autoinducer.

    PubMed

    Beck von Bodman, S; Farrand, S K

    1995-09-01

    N-Acylhomoserine lactone (acyl-HSL)-mediated gene expression, also called autoinduction, is conserved among diverse gram-negative bacteria. In the paradigm Vibrio fischeri system, bioluminescence is autoinducible, and the lux operon requires the transcriptional activator LuxR and the acyl-HSL autoinducer for expression. The production of the acyl-HSL signal molecule is conferred by the luxI gene, and luxR encodes the transcriptional regulator. We show here that Erwinia stewartii, the etiological agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, synthesizes an acyl-HSL. Mass spectral analysis identified the signal molecule as N-(-3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone, which is identical to the V. fischeri autoinducer. We have cloned and sequenced the gene that confers acyl-HSL biosynthesis, called esaI, and the linked gene, esaR, that encodes a gene regulator. The two genes are convergently transcribed and show an unusual overlap of 31 bp at their 3' ends. Sequence analysis indicates that EsaI and EsaR are homologs of LuxI and LuxR, respectively. EsaR can repress its own expression but seems not to regulate the expression of esaI. The untranslated 5' region of esaR contains an inverted repeat with similarity to the lux box-like elements located in the promoter regions of other gene systems regulated by autoinduction. However, unlike the other systems, in which the inverted repeats are located upstream of the -35 promoter elements, the esaR-associated repeat overlaps a putative -10 element. We mutagenized the esaI gene in E. stewartii by gene replacement. The mutant no longer produced detectable levels of the acyl-HSL signal, leading to a concomitant loss of extracellular polysaccharide capsule production and pathogenicity. Both phenotypes were restored by complementation with esal or by exogenous addition of the acyl-HSL. PMID:7665477

  2. Capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis and pathogenicity in Erwinia stewartii require induction by an N-acylhomoserine lactone autoinducer.

    PubMed Central

    Beck von Bodman, S; Farrand, S K

    1995-01-01

    N-Acylhomoserine lactone (acyl-HSL)-mediated gene expression, also called autoinduction, is conserved among diverse gram-negative bacteria. In the paradigm Vibrio fischeri system, bioluminescence is autoinducible, and the lux operon requires the transcriptional activator LuxR and the acyl-HSL autoinducer for expression. The production of the acyl-HSL signal molecule is conferred by the luxI gene, and luxR encodes the transcriptional regulator. We show here that Erwinia stewartii, the etiological agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, synthesizes an acyl-HSL. Mass spectral analysis identified the signal molecule as N-(-3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone, which is identical to the V. fischeri autoinducer. We have cloned and sequenced the gene that confers acyl-HSL biosynthesis, called esaI, and the linked gene, esaR, that encodes a gene regulator. The two genes are convergently transcribed and show an unusual overlap of 31 bp at their 3' ends. Sequence analysis indicates that EsaI and EsaR are homologs of LuxI and LuxR, respectively. EsaR can repress its own expression but seems not to regulate the expression of esaI. The untranslated 5' region of esaR contains an inverted repeat with similarity to the lux box-like elements located in the promoter regions of other gene systems regulated by autoinduction. However, unlike the other systems, in which the inverted repeats are located upstream of the -35 promoter elements, the esaR-associated repeat overlaps a putative -10 element. We mutagenized the esaI gene in E. stewartii by gene replacement. The mutant no longer produced detectable levels of the acyl-HSL signal, leading to a concomitant loss of extracellular polysaccharide capsule production and pathogenicity. Both phenotypes were restored by complementation with esal or by exogenous addition of the acyl-HSL. PMID:7665477

  3. Constitutive expression of the Vi polysaccharide capsular antigen in attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar typhi oral vaccine strain CVD 909.

    PubMed

    Wang, J Y; Noriega, F R; Galen, J E; Barry, E; Levine, M M

    2000-08-01

    Live oral Ty21a and parenteral Vi polysaccharide vaccines provide significant protection against typhoid fever, albeit by distinct immune mechanisms. Vi stimulates serum immunoglobulin G Vi antibodies, whereas Ty21a, which does not express Vi, elicits humoral and cell-mediated immune responses other than Vi antibodies. Protection may be enhanced if serum Vi antibody as well as cell-mediated and humoral responses can be stimulated. Disappointingly, several new attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi oral vaccines (e.g., CVD 908-htrA and Ty800) that elicit serum O and H antibody and cell-mediated responses following a single dose do not stimulate serum Vi antibody. Vi expression is regulated in response to environmental signals such as osmolarity by controlling the transcription of tviA in the viaB locus. To investigate if Vi antibodies can be stimulated if Vi expression is rendered constitutive, we replaced P(tviA) in serovar Typhi vaccine CVD 908-htrA with the constitutive promoter P(tac), resulting in CVD 909. CVD 909 expresses Vi even under high-osmolarity conditions and is less invasive for Henle 407 cells. In mice immunized with a single intranasal dose, CVD 909 was more immunogenic than CVD 908-htrA in eliciting serum Vi antibodies (geometric mean titer of 160 versus 49, P = 0.0007), whereas O antibody responses were virtually identical (geometric mean titer of 87 versus 80). In mice challenged intraperitoneally with wild-type serovar Typhi 4 weeks after a single intranasal immunization, the mortality of those immunized with CVD 909 (3 of 8) was significantly lower than that of control mice (10 of 10, P = 0.043) or mice given CVD 908-htrA (9 of 10, P = 0.0065). PMID:10899868

  4. Cryptococcus neoformans Requires the ESCRT Protein Vps23 for Iron Acquisition from Heme, for Capsule Formation, and for Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guanggan; Caza, Mélissa; Cadieux, Brigitte; Chan, Vivienne; Liu, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Iron availability is a key regulator of virulence factor elaboration in Cryptococcus neoformans, the causative agent of fungal meningoencephalitis in HIV/AIDS patients. In addition, iron is an essential nutrient for pathogen proliferation in mammalian hosts but little is known about the mechanisms of iron sensing and uptake in fungal pathogens that attack humans. In this study, we mutagenized C. neoformans by Agrobacterium-mediated T-DNA insertion and screened for mutants with reduced growth on heme as the sole iron source. Among 34 mutants, we identified a subset with insertions in the gene for the ESCRT-I (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) protein Vps23 that resulted in a growth defect on heme, presumably due to a defect in uptake via endocytosis or misregulation of iron acquisition from heme. Remarkably, vps23 mutants were also defective in the elaboration of the cell-associated capsular polysaccharide that is a major virulence factor, while overexpression of Vps23 resulted in cells with a slightly enlarged capsule. These phenotypes were mirrored by a virulence defect in the vps23 mutant in a mouse model of cryptococcosis and by hypervirulence of the overexpression strain. Overall, these results reveal an important role for trafficking via ESCRT functions in both heme uptake and capsule formation, and they further reinforce the connection between iron and virulence factor deployment in C. neoformans. PMID:23132495

  5. Role of the small RNA RyhB in the Fur regulon in mediating the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis and iron acquisition systems in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and iron acquisition systems are important determinants of Klebsiella pneumoniae infections, and we have previously reported that the ferric uptake repressor (Fur) can play dual role in iron acquisition and CPS biosynthesis. In many bacteria, Fur negatively controls the transcription of the small non-coding RNA RyhB to modulate cellular functions and virulence. However, in K. pneumoniae, the role played by RyhB in the Fur regulon has not been characterised. This study investigated Fur regulation of ryhB transcription and the functional role of RyhB in K. pneumoniae. Results Deletion of fur from K. pneumoniae increased the transcription of ryhB; the electric mobility shift assay and the Fur-titration assay revealed that Fur could bind to the promoter region of ryhB, suggesting that Fur directly represses ryhB transcription. Additionally, in a Δfur strain with elevated CPS production, deletion of ryhB obviously reduced CPS production. The following promoter-reporter assay and quantitative real-time PCR of cps genes verified that RyhB activated orf1 and orf16 transcription to elevate CPS production. However, deletion of ryhB did not affect the mRNA levels of rcsA, rmpA, or rmpA2. These results imply that Fur represses the transcription of ryhB to mediate the biosynthesis of CPS, which is independent of RcsA, RmpA, and RmpA2. In addition, the Δfur strain’s high level of serum resistance was attenuated by the deletion of ryhB, indicating that RyhB plays a positive role in protecting the bacterium from serum killing. Finally, deletion of ryhB in Δfur reduced the expression of several genes corresponding to 3 iron acquisition systems in K. pneumoniae, and resulted in reduced siderophore production. Conclusions The regulation and functional role of RyhB in K. pneumoniae is characterized in this study. RyhB participates in Fur regulon to modulate the bacterial CPS biosynthesis and iron acquisition systems in K. pneumoniae

  6. Synthesis of two phosphate-containing "heptasaccharide" fragments of the capsular polysaccharides of Streptococcus pneumoniae types 6A and 6B.

    PubMed

    Slaghek, T M; Maas, A A; Kamerling, J P; Vliegenthart, J F

    1991-04-01

    The "heptasaccharides" O-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl-(1----3)- O-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1----3)-alpha, beta-L-rhamnopyranose 2''-[O-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl-(1----3)-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl- (1----3)-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1----3)-D-ribit-5-yl sodium phosphate] (25) and O-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl- (1----3)-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1----3)-alpha, beta-L-rhamnopyranose 2''-[O-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl-(1----3)-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl- (1----3)-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1----4)-D-ribit-5-yl sodium phosphate] (27), which are structural elements of the capsular polysaccharides of Streptococcus pneumoniae types 6A and 6B ([----2)- -alpha-D-Galp-(1----3)-alpha-D-Glcp-(1----3)-alpha-L-Rhap- (1----X)-D-RibOH-(5-P----]n; 6A X = 3, 6B X = 4), respectively, have been synthesized. 2,4-Di-O-acetyl- 3-O-[2,4,6-tri-O-acetyl-3-O-(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-alpha-D- galactopyranosyl)-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl]-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl trichloroacetimidate (13) was coupled with 5-O-allyloxycarbonyl-1,2,4-tri-O- benzyl-D-ribitol (10), using trimethylsilyl triflate as a promotor (----14), and deallyloxycarbonylation (----15) and conversion into the corresponding triethylammonium phosphonate then gave 16. Condensation of 16 with 4-methoxybenzyl 2,4-di-O-benzyl-3-O-[2,4,6-tri-O-benzyl-3-O-(3,4,6-tri-O-benzyl-alpha-D- galactopyranosyl)-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl]- alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (22) followed by oxidation and deprotection afforded 25. 5-O-Allyl-1-O-allyloxycarbonyl-2,3-di-O-benzyl-D-ribitol (12) was coupled with 13, using trimethylsilyl triflate as a promoter, the resulting tetrasaccharide-alditol derivative 17 was deallyloxycarbonylated (----18), acetylated (----19), and deallylated (----20), and the product was converted into the triethylammonium phosphonate derivative 21. Condensation of 21 with 22 followed by oxidation and deprotection afforded 27. PMID:1773430

  7. Determination of the chemical structure of the capsular polysaccharide of strain B33, a fast-growing soya bean-nodulating bacterium isolated from an arid region of China.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Carvajal, M A; Tejero-Mateo, P; Espartero, J L; Ruiz-Sainz, J E; Buendía-Clavería, A M; Ollero, F J; Yang, S S; Gil-Serrano, A M

    2001-01-01

    We have determined the structure of a polysaccharide from strain B33, a fast-growing bacterium that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules with Asiatic and American soya bean cultivars. On the basis of monosaccharide analysis, methylation analysis, one-dimensional 1H- and 13C-NMR and two-dimensional NMR experiments, the structure was shown to consist of a polymer having the repeating unit -->6)-4-O-methyl-alpha-D-Glcp-(1-->4)-3-O-methyl-beta-D-GlcpA-(1--> (where GlcpA is glucopyranuronic acid and Glcp is glucopyranose). Strain B33 produces a K-antigen polysaccharide repeating unit that does not have the structural motif sugar-Kdx [where Kdx is 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid (Kdo) or a Kdo-related acid] proposed for different Sinorhizobium fredii strains, all of them being effective with Asiatic soya bean cultivars but unable to form nitrogen-fixing nodules with American soya bean cultivars. Instead, it resembles the K-antigen of S. fredii strain HH303 (rhamnose, galacturonic acid)n, which is also effective with both groups of soya bean cultivars. Only the capsular polysaccharide from strains B33 and HH303 have monosaccharide components that are also present in the surface polysaccharide of Bradyrhizobium elkanii strains, which consists of a 4-O-methyl-D-glucurono-L-rhamnan. PMID:11439101

  8. Diagnostic Challenges of Cryptococcus neoformans in an Immunocompetent Individual Masquerading as Chronic Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Kedar R; Roberts, Amity L; Curtis, Mark T; Fortuna, Danielle; Dharia, Robin; Sheehan, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans can cause disseminated meningoencephalitis and evade immunosurveillance with expression of a major virulence factor, the polysaccharide capsule. Direct diagnostic assays often rely on the presence of the cryptococcal glucuronoxylomannan capsular antigen (CrAg) or visualization of the capsule. Strain specific phenotypic traits and environmental conditions influence differences in expression that can thereby compromise detection and timely diagnosis. Immunocompetent hosts may manifest clinical signs and symptoms indolently, often expanding the differential and delaying appropriate treatment and diagnosis. We describe a 63-year-old man who presented with a progressive four-year history of ambulatory dysfunction, headache, and communicating hydrocephalus. Serial lumbar punctures (LPs) revealed elevated protein (153-300 mg/dL), hypoglycorrhachia (19-47 mg/dL), lymphocytic pleocytosis (89-95% lymphocyte, WBC 67-303 mg/dL, and RBC 34-108 mg/dL), and normal opening pressure (13-16 cm H2O). Two different cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) CrAg assays were negative. A large volume CSF fungal culture grew unencapsulated C. neoformans. He was initiated on induction therapy with amphotericin B plus flucytosine and consolidation/maintenance therapy with flucytosine, but he died following discharge due to complications. Elevated levels of CSF Th1 cytokines and decreased IL6 may have affected the virulence and detection of the pathogen. PMID:27525140

  9. Diagnostic Challenges of Cryptococcus neoformans in an Immunocompetent Individual Masquerading as Chronic Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Fortuna, Danielle; Dharia, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans can cause disseminated meningoencephalitis and evade immunosurveillance with expression of a major virulence factor, the polysaccharide capsule. Direct diagnostic assays often rely on the presence of the cryptococcal glucuronoxylomannan capsular antigen (CrAg) or visualization of the capsule. Strain specific phenotypic traits and environmental conditions influence differences in expression that can thereby compromise detection and timely diagnosis. Immunocompetent hosts may manifest clinical signs and symptoms indolently, often expanding the differential and delaying appropriate treatment and diagnosis. We describe a 63-year-old man who presented with a progressive four-year history of ambulatory dysfunction, headache, and communicating hydrocephalus. Serial lumbar punctures (LPs) revealed elevated protein (153–300 mg/dL), hypoglycorrhachia (19–47 mg/dL), lymphocytic pleocytosis (89–95% lymphocyte, WBC 67–303 mg/dL, and RBC 34–108 mg/dL), and normal opening pressure (13–16 cm H2O). Two different cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) CrAg assays were negative. A large volume CSF fungal culture grew unencapsulated C. neoformans. He was initiated on induction therapy with amphotericin B plus flucytosine and consolidation/maintenance therapy with flucytosine, but he died following discharge due to complications. Elevated levels of CSF Th1 cytokines and decreased IL6 may have affected the virulence and detection of the pathogen. PMID:27525140

  10. Cryptococcosis in the era of AIDS--100 years after the discovery of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, T G; Perfect, J R

    1995-01-01

    Although Cryptococcus neoformans and cryptococcosis have existed for several millennia, a century has passed since the discovery of this encapsulated yeast and its devastating disease. With the advent of the AIDS pandemic, cryptococcal meningitis has emerged as a leading cause of infectious morbidity and mortality and a frequently life-threatening opportunistic mycosis among patients with AIDS. Both basic and clinical research have accelerated in the 1990s, and this review attempts to highlight some of these advances. The discussion covers recent findings, current concepts, controversies, and unresolved issues related to the ecology and genetics of C. neoformans; the surface structure of the yeast; and the mechanisms of host defense. Regarding cell-mediated immunity, CD4+ T cells are crucial for successful resistance, but CD8+ T cells may also participate significantly in the cytokine-mediated activation of anticryptococcal effector cells. In addition to cell-mediated immunity, monoclonal antibodies to the major capsular polysaccharide, the glucuronoxylomannan, offer some protection in murine models of cryptococcosis. Clinical concepts are presented that relate to the distinctive features of cryptococcosis in patients with AIDS and the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cryptococcosis in AIDS patients. PMID:8665468

  11. Capsule Growth in Cryptococcus neoformans Is Coordinated with Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    García-Rodas, Rocío; Cordero, Radames J. B.; Trevijano-Contador, Nuria; Janbon, Guilhem; Moyrand, Frédérique; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans has several virulence factors, among which the most important is a polysaccharide capsule. The size of the capsule is variable and can increase significantly during infection. In this work, we investigated the relationship between capsular enlargement and the cell cycle. Capsule growth occurred primarily during the G1 phase. Real-time visualization of capsule growth demonstrated that this process occurred before the appearance of the bud and that capsule growth arrested during budding. Benomyl, which arrests the cells in G2/M, inhibited capsule growth, while sirolimus (rapamycin) addition, which induces G1 arrest, resulted in cells with larger capsule. Furthermore, we have characterized a mutant strain that lacks a putative G1/S cyclin. This mutant showed an increased capacity to enlarge the capsule, both in vivo (using Galleria mellonella as the host model) and in vitro. In the absence of Cln1, there was a significant increase in the production of extracellular vesicles. Proteomic assays suggest that in the cln1 mutant strain, there is an upregulation of the glyoxylate acid cycle. Besides, this cyclin mutant is avirulent at 37°C, which correlates with growth defects at this temperature in rich medium. In addition, the cln1 mutant showed lower intracellular replication rates in murine macrophages. We conclude that cell cycle regulatory elements are involved in the modulation of the expression of the main virulence factor in C. neoformans. PMID:24939886

  12. Modulation of Macrophage Inflammatory Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling by Intracellular Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Hayes, James B; Sircy, Linda M; Heusinkveld, Lauren E; Ding, Wandi; Leander, Rachel N; McClelland, Erin E; Nelson, David E

    2016-07-22

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is a common facultative intracellular pathogen that can cause life-threatening fungal meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. Shortly after infection, Cn is detectable as both extra- and intracellular yeast particles, with Cn being capable of establishing long-lasting latent infections within host macrophages. Although recent studies have shown that shed capsular polysaccharides and intact extracellular Cn can compromise macrophage function through modulation of NF-κB signaling, it is currently unclear whether intracellular Cn also affects NF-κB signaling. Utilizing live cell imaging and computational modeling, we find that extra- and intracellular Cn support distinct modes of NF-κB signaling in cultured murine macrophages. Specifically, in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages treated with extracellular glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), the major Cn capsular polysaccharide, LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 is inhibited, whereas in cells with intracellular Cn, LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 is both amplified and sustained. Mathematical simulations and quantification of nascent protein expression indicate that this is a possible consequence of Cn-induced "translational interference," impeding IκBα resynthesis. We also show that long term Cn infection induces stable nuclear localization of p65 and IκBα proteins in the absence of additional pro-inflammatory stimuli. In this case, nuclear localization of p65 is not accompanied by TNFα or inducible NOS (iNOS) expression. These results demonstrate that capsular polysaccharides and intact intracellular yeast manipulate NF-κB via multiple distinct mechanisms and provide new insights into how Cn might modulate cellular signaling at different stages of an infection. PMID:27231343

  13. Cryptococcosis (C. neoformans)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch C. neoformans Infection Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... throughout the world. People can become infected with C. neoformans after breathing in the microscopic fungus, although ...

  14. Synthetic trimer and tetramer of 3-beta-D-ribose-(1-1)-D-ribitol-5-phosphate conjugated to protein induce antibody responses to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide in mice and monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, C C; Evenberg, D; Hoogerhout, P; Käyhty, H; Saarinen, L; van Boeckel, C A; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Poolman, J T

    1992-01-01

    Synthetic oligosaccharides derived from the capsular polysaccharide (PRP) of Haemophilus influenzae type b were conjugated to carrier proteins via a thioether linkage. Conjugates were made of trimeric and tetrameric ribose-ribitol-phosphate and tetanus toxoid or diphtheria toxin. All conjugates elicited anti-PRP antibody responses with an increasing immunoglobulin G/immunoglobulin M ratio in adult mice and monkeys. Trimer conjugates elicited lower anti-PRP antibody responses compared with tetramer conjugates. Adult monkeys responded equally well to the tetrameric oligosaccharide-tetanus toxoid conjugate as to the oligosaccharide-CRM197 conjugate (HbOC), which elicits protective levels of serum antibodies in human infants after two or three injections. PMID:1563770

  15. Comparative immunogenicity of conjugates composed of the Staphylococcus aureus type 8 capsular polysaccharide bound to carrier proteins by adipic acid dihydrazide or N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate.

    PubMed Central

    Fattom, A; Shiloach, J; Bryla, D; Fitzgerald, D; Pastan, I; Karakawa, W W; Robbins, J B; Schneerson, R

    1992-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus type 8 capsular polysaccharide (CP) was conjugated either to diphtheria toxoid or to Pseudomonas aeruginosa recombinant exoprotein A by using adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) or N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP) as the joining reagent. The polysaccharide/protein ratios of these two pairs of conjugates were similar. The two synthetic schemes bound the linker to the carboxyls of the type 8 CP by carbodiimide-mediated condensation. ADH was bound to the carboxyls of the protein, whereas SPDP reacted with the amino groups of the protein. Intermolecular linking of the carrier protein, caused by the carbodiimide during the conjugation reaction with the type 8 CP derivative, probably accounts for the larger size of the conjugates formed with ADH compared with those formed with SPDP. Both conjugates synthesized with ADH elicited higher levels of CP antibodies, especially after the first immunization, than did those prepared with SPDP. Similar levels of exoprotein A antibodies were elicited by both conjugates. Higher levels of diphtheria toxoid antibodies were elicited by the conjugate prepared with SPDP than by the one prepared with ADH. The basis for the differences in the immunogenicities of these two pairs of S. aureus type 8 CP conjugates is discussed. PMID:1730492

  16. Comparative immunogenicity of conjugates composed of the Staphylococcus aureus type 8 capsular polysaccharide bound to carrier proteins by adipic acid dihydrazide or N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate.

    PubMed

    Fattom, A; Shiloach, J; Bryla, D; Fitzgerald, D; Pastan, I; Karakawa, W W; Robbins, J B; Schneerson, R

    1992-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus type 8 capsular polysaccharide (CP) was conjugated either to diphtheria toxoid or to Pseudomonas aeruginosa recombinant exoprotein A by using adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) or N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP) as the joining reagent. The polysaccharide/protein ratios of these two pairs of conjugates were similar. The two synthetic schemes bound the linker to the carboxyls of the type 8 CP by carbodiimide-mediated condensation. ADH was bound to the carboxyls of the protein, whereas SPDP reacted with the amino groups of the protein. Intermolecular linking of the carrier protein, caused by the carbodiimide during the conjugation reaction with the type 8 CP derivative, probably accounts for the larger size of the conjugates formed with ADH compared with those formed with SPDP. Both conjugates synthesized with ADH elicited higher levels of CP antibodies, especially after the first immunization, than did those prepared with SPDP. Similar levels of exoprotein A antibodies were elicited by both conjugates. Higher levels of diphtheria toxoid antibodies were elicited by the conjugate prepared with SPDP than by the one prepared with ADH. The basis for the differences in the immunogenicities of these two pairs of S. aureus type 8 CP conjugates is discussed. PMID:1730492

  17. Complement-mediated bactericidal activity of human antibodies to poly alpha 2-->8 N-acetylneuraminic acid, the capsular polysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B.

    PubMed

    Mandrell, R E; Azmi, F H; Granoff, D M

    1995-11-01

    Serum antibodies to Neisseria meningitidis group B (MenB) polysaccharide are reported not to elicit bacteriolysis in the presence of human complement. To reexamine this question, we evaluated the ability of two human IgM anti-MenB polysaccharide monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and seven human MenB polysaccharide-reactive human IgM paraproteins to elicit bacteriolysis. In the presence of human complement, both MAbs and five of the seven paraproteins were bactericidal at antibody concentrations of 0.25-9.6 micrograms/mL (50% killing). Activity of the respective antibodies was enhanced 200- to > 10,000-fold when rabbit complement was used instead of human complement. With rabbit complement, the bactericidal activity of human IgM polyclonal antibody or MAb to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) polysaccharide but not human IgG polyclonal antibody or MAb to Hib polysaccharide was similarly augmented. Thus, for both MenB and Hib, IgM antipolysaccharide antibodies elicit complement-mediated bactericidal activity in the presence of human complement, and the use of rabbit complement yields spuriously high activity. PMID:7594665

  18. Eucalyptus Tree: A Potential Source of Cryptococcus neoformans in Egyptian Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Dalia; Elhelw, Rehab; Refai, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    In Egypt, the River Red Gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) is a well-known tree and is highly appreciated by the rural and urban dwellers. The role of Eucalyptus trees in the ecology of Cryptococcus neoformans is documented worldwide. The aim of this survey was to show the prevalence of C. neoformans during the flowering season of E. camaldulensis at the Delta region in Egypt. Three hundred and eleven samples out of two hundred Eucalyptus trees, including leaves, flowers, and woody trunks, were collected from four governorates in the Delta region. Thirteen isolates of C. neoformans were recovered from Eucalyptus tree samples (4.2%). Molecular identification of C. neoformans was done by capsular gene specific primer CAP64 and serotype identification was done depending on LAC1 gene. This study represents an update on the ecology of C. neoformans associated with Eucalyptus tree in Egyptian environment. PMID:26884765

  19. Eucalyptus Tree: A Potential Source of Cryptococcus neoformans in Egyptian Environment.

    PubMed

    Elhariri, Mahmoud; Hamza, Dalia; Elhelw, Rehab; Refai, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    In Egypt, the River Red Gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) is a well-known tree and is highly appreciated by the rural and urban dwellers. The role of Eucalyptus trees in the ecology of Cryptococcus neoformans is documented worldwide. The aim of this survey was to show the prevalence of C. neoformans during the flowering season of E. camaldulensis at the Delta region in Egypt. Three hundred and eleven samples out of two hundred Eucalyptus trees, including leaves, flowers, and woody trunks, were collected from four governorates in the Delta region. Thirteen isolates of C. neoformans were recovered from Eucalyptus tree samples (4.2%). Molecular identification of C. neoformans was done by capsular gene specific primer CAP64 and serotype identification was done depending on LAC1 gene. This study represents an update on the ecology of C. neoformans associated with Eucalyptus tree in Egyptian environment. PMID:26884765

  20. Polysaccharide-Based Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Violeta Fernández; Balbin, Yury Valdés; Calderón, Janoi Chang; Icart, Luis Peña; Verez-Bencomo, Vicente

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPS) and lipopolysaccharides from bacteria are employed for the production of vaccines against human diseases. Initial development of CPS as a vaccine was followed by the development and introduction of conjugate polysaccharide-protein vaccines. The principles leading to both developments are reviewed.

  1. Production of Extracellular Polysaccharides by CAP Mutants of Cryptococcus neoformans▿

    PubMed Central

    Grijpstra, Jan; Gerwig, Gerrit J.; Wösten, Han; Kamerling, Johannis P.; de Cock, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes meningoencephalitis. The polysaccharide capsule is one of the main virulence factors and consists of two distinct polysaccharides, glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) and galactoxylomannan (GalXM). How capsular polysaccharides are synthesized, transported, and assembled is largely unknown. Previously, it was shown that mutations in the CAP10, CAP59, CAP60, and CAP64 genes result in an acapsular phenotype. Here, it is shown that these acapsular mutants do secrete GalXM and GXM-like polymers. GXM and GalXM antibodies specifically reacted with whole cells and the growth medium of the wild type and CAP mutants, indicating that the capsule polysaccharides adhere to the cell wall and are shed into the environment. These polysaccharides were purified from the medium, either with or without anion-exchange chromatography. Monosaccharide analysis of polysaccharide fractions by gas-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry showed that wild-type cells secrete both GalXM and GXM. The CAP mutants, on the other hand, were shown to secrete GalXM and GXM-like polymers. Notably, the GalXM polymers were shown to contain glucuronic acid. One-dimensional 1H nuclear magnetic resonance confirmed that the CAP mutants secrete GalXM and also showed the presence of O-acetylated polymers. This is the first time it is shown that CAP mutants secrete GXM-like polymers in addition to GalXM. The small amount of this GXM-like polymer, 1 to 5% of the total amount of secreted polysaccharides, may explain the acapsular phenotype. PMID:19542308

  2. Variable region sequences and idiotypic expression of a protective human immunoglobulin M antibody to capsular polysaccharides of Neisseria meningitidis group B and Escherichia coli K1.

    PubMed Central

    Azmi, F H; Lucas, A H; Raff, H V; Granoff, D M

    1994-01-01

    We determined the heavy (H)- and light (L)-chain variable (V) region nucleotide and translated amino acid sequences of the human immunoglobulin M(kappa) monoclonal antibody (MAb) 5E1, which is specific for the polysaccharide capsule of Escherichia coli K1 and Neisseria meningitidis group B (poly[alpha(2-->8)-N-acetylneuraminic acid]) and which is protective in animal models of infection. The 5E1 VH gene is a member of the VHIIIb family and is 97% homologous to the 9.1 germ line gene. The 5E1 VL gene is a member of the kappa I subgroup and is 98% homologous to the germ line gene, 15A, also known as KLO12. The VL and/or VH genes used by 5E1 are highly homologous to the V genes encoding antibodies to the Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide and to antibodies reactive with self-antigens such as erythrocyte "i," DNA, and thyroid peroxidase. We also produced three murine anti-idiotype (Id) MAbs against 5E1. All three anti-Ids recognize a minor subset of antimeningococcal B polysaccharide antibodies present in serum from normal adults. Two of the anti-Ids define distinct Ids associated with antibodies having kappa I-15A V regions. These 15A-associated Ids are expressed by some heterologous human antimeningococcal B polysaccharide MAbs, and they also are independently expressed by two human MAbs that are specific for either the H. influenzae b polysaccharide or the i erythrocyte antigen and that utilize the kappa I-15A V region. Taken together, these data indicate that the 5E1 antibody uses V regions that recur in the human antibody repertoires to this polysaccharide and to structurally dissimilar polysaccharides and autoantigens. Thus, the poor immunogenicity of poly[alpha(2-->8)-N-acetylneuraminic acid] cannot be explained by the unavailability of certain critical VH and VL genes required for generation of antibody response. PMID:8168940

  3. Transcriptional Regulation by Protein Kinase A in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guanggan; Steen, Barbara R; Lian, Tianshun; Sham, Anita P; Tam, Nicola; Tangen, Kristin L; Kronstad, James W

    2007-01-01

    A defect in the PKA1 gene encoding the catalytic subunit of cyclic adenosine 5′-monophosphate (cAMP)–dependent protein kinase A (PKA) is known to reduce capsule size and attenuate virulence in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Conversely, loss of the PKA regulatory subunit encoded by pkr1 results in overproduction of capsule and hypervirulence. We compared the transcriptomes between the pka1 and pkr1 mutants and a wild-type strain, and found that PKA influences transcript levels for genes involved in cell wall synthesis, transport functions such as iron uptake, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and glycolysis. Among the myriad of transcriptional changes in the mutants, we also identified differential expression of ribosomal protein genes, genes encoding stress and chaperone functions, and genes for secretory pathway components and phospholipid synthesis. The transcriptional influence of PKA on these functions was reminiscent of the linkage between transcription, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and the unfolded protein response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functional analyses confirmed that the PKA mutants have a differential response to temperature stress, caffeine, and lithium, and that secretion inhibitors block capsule production. Importantly, we also found that lithium treatment limits capsule size, thus reinforcing potential connections between this virulence trait and inositol and phospholipid metabolism. In addition, deletion of a PKA-regulated gene, OVA1, revealed an epistatic relationship with pka1 in the control of capsule size and melanin formation. OVA1 encodes a putative phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein that appears to negatively influence capsule production and melanin accumulation. Overall, these findings support a role for PKA in regulating the delivery of virulence factors such as the capsular polysaccharide to the cell surface and serve to highlight the importance of secretion and phospholipid metabolism as potential targets for

  4. Biosynthesis of dermatan sulphate. Defructosylated Escherichia coli K4 capsular polysaccharide as a substrate for the D-glucuronyl C-5 epimerase, and an indication of a two-base reaction mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Hannesson, H H; Hagner-McWhirter, A; Tiedemann, K; Lindahl, U; Malmström, A

    1996-01-01

    The capsular polysaccharide from Escherichia coli K4 consists of a chondroitin ([GlcA(beta 1-->3)GalNAc(beta 1-->4)]n) backbone, to which beta-fructofuranose units are linked to C-3 of D-glucuronic acid (GlcA) residues. Removal of the fructose units by mild acid hydrolysis provided a substrate for the GlcA C-5 epimerase, which is involved in the generation of L-iduronic acid (IdoA) units during dermatan sulphate biosynthesis. Incubation of this substrate with solubilized fibroblast microsomal enzyme in the presence of 3H2O resulted in the incorporation of tritium at C-5 of hexuronyl units. A Km of 67 x 10(-6) M hexuronic acid (equivalent to disaccharide units) was determined, which is similar to that (80 x 10(-6) M) obtained for dermatan (desulphated dermatan sulphate). Vmax was about 4 times higher with dermatan than with the K4 substrate. A defructosylated K4 polysaccharide isolated after incubation of bacteria with D-[5-3H]glucose released 3H2O on reaction with the epimerase, and thus could be used to assay the enzyme. Incubation of a K4 substrate with solubilized microsomal epimerase for 6 h in the presence of 3H2O resulted in the formation of about 5% IdoA and approximately equal amounts of 3H in GlcA and IdoA. A corresponding incubation of dermatan yielded approx. 22% GlcA, which contained virtually all the 3H label. These results are tentatively explained in terms of a two-base reaction mechanism, involving a monoprotic L-ido-specific base and a polyprotic D-gluco-specific base. Most of the IdoA residues generated by the enzyme occurred singly, although some formation of two or three consecutive IdoA-containing disaccharide units was observed. PMID:8573097

  5. Cryptococcus neoformans serotype A glucuronoxylomannan-protein conjugate vaccines: synthesis, characterization, and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Devi, S J; Schneerson, R; Egan, W; Ulrich, T J; Bryla, D; Robbins, J B; Bennett, J E

    1991-10-01

    We synthesized Cryptococcus neoformans serotype A glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) conjugate vaccines under conditions suitable for human use to prevent disseminated cryptococcosis. The purified, sonicated GXM was derivatized with adipic acid dihydrazide through either hydroxyl or carboxyl groups and then covalently bound to tetanus toxoid (TT) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoprotein A (rEPA). The immunogenicity of these conjugates was evaluated in BALB/c and general purpose mice by subcutaneous injection in saline. The conjugates elicited higher GXM antibody responses than GXM alone. Booster immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM responses were elicited by all conjugates in BALB/c mice. The conjugates prepared through hydroxyl activation (GXM-TT2 and GXM-rEPA) were more immunogenic than the one prepared through carboxyl activation (GXM-TT1). GXM antibody response was enhanced by the administration of monophosphoryl lipid A 2 days following the injection of GXM-TT2 (P less than 0.03). The conjugates also elicited IgG antibodies to the carrier proteins. Gel diffusion tests using conjugate-induced hyperimmune sera and chemically modified GXMs suggested that the specificity of GXM-TT1-induced antibodies was conferred by the O-acetyl groups. Hyperimmune sera generated by GXM-TT2 precipitated with the chemically unmodified and the de-O-acetylated GXMs but not with the carboxyl-reduced and de-O-acetylated GXM. GXM-TT2-induced hyperimmune serum also precipitated with the capsular polysaccharides of C. neoformans serotypes D, B, and C. The conjugate vaccines prepared through hydroxyl activation of the GXM are sufficiently immunogenic and appear to be suitable for clinical evaluation. PMID:1716613

  6. Nasal immunization of mice with AFCo1 or AFPL1 plus capsular polysaccharide Vi from Salmonella typhi induces cellular response and memory B and T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; Reyes, Laura; González, Elizabeth; Borrero, Yusnaby; Lescaille, Diandra; Pérez, Rocmira; Nuñez, Darzy; Pérez, Oliver

    2014-12-01

    The response to infection against Salmonella involves both B and T cell mediated immunity. An effective immunization can activate an adequate immune response capable to control the primary infection and protect against a secondary infection. Mucosal vaccination, by inducing local pathogen-specific immune responses, has the potential to counter mucosally transmitted pathogens at the portal of entry, thereby increasing the efficacy of vaccines. The aim of this work was to explore the efficacy of AFCo1 or AFPL1, as mucosal adjuvants to stimulate cell immunity and memory responses against Vi polysaccharide antigen of Salmonella typhi (PsVi). Mice immunized with 3 intranasal doses exhibited high levels of PsVi-specific IgG (p<0.05), IgG2a and IgG2c subclasses. Also, an amplified recall response after a booster immunization with a plain polysaccharide vaccine was induced. Avidities index were higher in mice immunized with adjuvanted formulations at different chaotropic concentrations. Furthermore, IL-12 and IFN-γ levels in nasally vaccinated mice with both adjuvants were induced. Moreover, priming with 3 doses followed by booster immunization with VaxTyVi(®) resulted in high levels of anti-Vi specific IgG, IgG subclasses and antibody avidity. Long lived plasma cells in bone marrow, memory B cells and long-term memory T cells after booster dose were induced. The combined formulation of Vi polysaccharide with mucosal adjuvants provides an improved immunogenicity, in particular with regard to cellular responses and long lasting cells responses. PMID:25454865

  7. Antibody-Mediated Immobilization of Cryptococcus neoformans Promotes Biofilm Formation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Emma J.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Most microbes, including the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, can grow as biofilms. Biofilms confer upon microbes a range of characteristics, including an ability to colonize materials such as shunts and catheters and increased resistance to antibiotics. Here, we provide evidence that coating surfaces with a monoclonal antibody to glucuronoxylomannan, the major component of the fungal capsular polysaccharide, immobilizes cryptococcal cells to a surface support and, subsequently, promotes biofilm formation. We used time-lapse microscopy to visualize the growth of cryptococcal biofilms, generating the first movies of fungal biofilm growth. We show that when fungal cells are immobilized using surface-attached specific antibody to the capsule, the initial stages of biofilm formation are significantly faster than those on surfaces with no antibody coating or surfaces coated with unspecific monoclonal antibody. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that biofilm growth was a dynamic process in which cells shuffled position during budding and was accompanied by emergence of planktonic variant cells that left the attached biofilm community. The planktonic variant cells exhibited mobility, presumably by Brownian motion. Our results indicate that microbial immobilization by antibody capture hastens biofilm formation and suggest that antibody coating of medical devices with immunoglobulins must exclude binding to common pathogenic microbes and the possibility that this effect could be exploited in industrial microbiology. PMID:19251903

  8. Acinetobacter baumannii K27 and K44 capsular polysaccharides have the same K unit but different structures due to the presence of distinct wzy genes in otherwise closely related K gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Shashkov, Alexander S; Kenyon, Johanna J; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Shneider, Mikhail M; Popova, Anastasiya V; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Volozhantsev, Nikolay V; Hall, Ruth M; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2016-05-01

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPSs), fromAcinetobacter baumanniiisolates 1432, 4190 and NIPH 70, which have related gene content at the K locus, were examined, and the chemical structures established using 2D(1)H and(13)C NMR spectroscopy. The three isolates produce the same pentasaccharide repeat unit, which consists of 5-N-acetyl-7-N-[(S)-3-hydroxybutanoyl] (major) or 5,7-di-N-acetyl (minor) derivatives of 5,7-diamino-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-d-glycero-d-galacto-non-2-ulosonic (legionaminic) acid (Leg5Ac7R),d-galactose,N-acetyl-d-galactosamine andN-acetyl-d-glucosamine. However, the linkage between repeat units in NIPH 70 was different to that in 1432 and 4190, and this significantly alters the CPS structure. The KL27 gene cluster in 4190 and KL44 gene cluster in NIPH 70 are organized identically and containlgagenes for Leg5Ac7R synthesis, genes for the synthesis of the common sugars, as well as anitrA2initiating transferase and four glycosyltransferases genes. They share high-level nucleotide sequence identity for corresponding genes, but differ in thewzygene encoding the Wzy polymerase. The Wzy proteins, which have different lengths and share no similarity, would form the unrelated linkages in the K27 and K44 structures. The linkages formed by the four shared glycosyltransferases were predicted by comparison with gene clusters that synthesize related structures. These findings unambiguously identify the linkages formed by WzyK27and WzyK44, and show that the presence of differentwzygenes in otherwise closely related K gene clusters changes the structure of the CPS. This may affect its capacity as a protective barrier forA. baumannii. PMID:26711304

  9. Restricted immunoglobulin VH usage and VDJ combinations in the human response to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide. Nucleotide sequences of monospecific anti-Haemophilus antibodies and polyspecific antibodies cross-reacting with self antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Adderson, E E; Shackelford, P G; Quinn, A; Wilson, P M; Cunningham, M W; Insel, R A; Carroll, W L

    1993-01-01

    To examine the human antibody repertoire generated against a biologically significant antigen we have obtained sequences of heavy chain variable region genes (IgVH) from 15 monoclonal antibodies specific for the capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib PS). All VH segments are members of the VH3 family and 9 of 15 are members of the smaller VH3b subfamily. Restriction is evident by the shared use of certain VDJ joints in independent hybridomas from different subjects. Two hybridomas generated from the same subject demonstrate identical heavy chain variable region gene sequences but differ in isotype and rearrange alternative light chain variable region genes (IgVL), suggesting that in a normal immune response, a single pre-B cell clone may use different light chain rearrangements and give rise to progeny capable of reacting with antigen. Using a polymerase chain reaction assay optimized to detect base pair differences among VH genes we demonstrate that at least a portion of expressed anti-Hib PS VH genes have undergone somatic mutation. Anti-Hib PS heavy chain genes are homologous to VH segments encoding autoantibodies and two hybridomas secrete anti-Hib PS antibody that cross-reacts with self antigens (double-stranded DNA and single-stranded DNA). Comparison of VH regions of self-reactive and monospecific anti-Hib PS Ab demonstrates no consistent structural feature correlating with fine antigen specificity. These data demonstrate significant restriction in VH usage and VDJ recombination in the anti-Hib PS response and confirm that autoantibodies may be elicited during normal immune responses. Images PMID:8514881

  10. Immunoglobulin light chain variable region gene sequences for human antibodies to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide are dominated by a limited number of V kappa and V lambda segments and VJ combinations.

    PubMed Central

    Adderson, E E; Shackelford, P G; Insel, R A; Quinn, A; Wilson, P M; Carroll, W L

    1992-01-01

    The immune repertoire to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (Hib PS) appears to be dominated by certain light chain variable region genes (IgVL). In order to examine the molecular basis underlying light chain bias, IgVL genes have been cloned from a panel of heterohybridomas secreting human anti-Hib PS (antibody) (anti-Hib PS Ab). One hybridoma, representative of the predominant serum clonotype of anti-Hib PS Ab in older children and adults following immunization or Hib infection, uses a V kappa II segment identical to the germline gene A2, and a JK3 segment. A second kappa hybridoma uses a member of the V kappa I family and a JK4 segment. Four lambda antibodies, all cross-reactive with the structurally related antigen Escherichia coli K100 PS, use V lambda VII segments which are 96-98% homologous to one another, and may originate from a single germline gene. Two additional lambda antibodies, not K100-cross-reactive, are encoded by members of the V lambda II family. All lambda antibodies use highly homologous J lambda 2 or J lambda 3 segments. The VJ joints of all lambda antibodies and the V kappa II-encoded antibody are notable for the presence of an arginine codon, suggesting an important role in antigen binding. Although more complex than heavy chain variable region gene usage, a significant portion of serum anti-Hib PS Ab is likely to be encoded by a limited number of V kappa and V lambda segments and VJ combinations, which may be selectively expressed during development, or following antigen exposure. Images PMID:1541667

  11. Depletion of complement has distinct effects on the primary and secondary antibody responses to a conjugate of pneumococcal serotype 14 capsular polysaccharide and a T-cell-dependent protein carrier.

    PubMed

    Test, Samuel T; Mitsuyoshi, Joyce K; Hu, Yong

    2005-01-01

    Complement activation plays a critical role in the immune response to T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent antigens. However, the effect of conjugation of T-cell-dependent protein carriers to T-cell-independent type 2 antigens on the requirement for complement in the humoral immune response to such antigens remains unknown. We studied the role of complement activation on the antibody response of BALB/c mice immunized with the T-cell-independent type 2 antigen serotype 14 pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PPS14), either in unmodified form or conjugated to ovalbumin (OVA). In mice immunized with either PPS14 or PPS14-OVA, depletion of endogenous complement at the time of primary immunization by treatment with cobra venom factor (CVF) diminished serum anti-PPS14 concentrations after primary immunization but enhanced antibody responses after secondary immunization. The secondary immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-PPS14 antibody response after immunization with PPS14-OVA was especially enhanced by complement depletion, was observed at doses as low as 0.2 mug of antigen, and was maximal when CVF was administered within 2 days of immunization. The avidity and opsonophagocytic functions of IgG anti-PPS14 antibodies were comparable in mice immunized with PPS14-OVA with or without complement depletion. Serum anti-PPS14 antibody concentrations were near normal, and the enhancing effects of CVF treatment on the secondary anti-PPS14 antibody response were also apparent in splenectomized mice immunized with PPS14-OVA. These results demonstrate that complement activation can have distinct effects on the primary and secondary antibody responses to a T-cell-independent type 2 antigen, either unmodified or conjugated to a T-cell-dependent protein carrier. These differences should be taken into consideration when using complement to modulate the immune response to vaccines. PMID:15618164

  12. [Phenotype characterization of environmental Cryptococcus neoformans isolates].

    PubMed

    Huérfano, Sandra; Cepero, Maria Caridad; Castañeda, Elizabeth

    2003-09-01

    Cryptococcosis is caused by the three varieties of C. neoformans with physiological and virulence differences, some of which have been studied to determine biological aspects of this microorganism. The phenotypical aspects of environmental isolates from varieties grubii and gattii were evaluated to establish differences associated with their life cycle and virulence. To this end, 28 and 31 strains of C. neoformans serotypes A (var. grubii) and C (var. gattii) were studied. The microscopic and macroscopic morphology on Sabouraud agar and soils, growth rate at 37 degrees C, production of 22 extracellular enzymes, haploid fructification, mating type, killer toxin sensitivity patterns and virulence in BALB/c mice were evaluated. No differences were observed between the two varieties regarding microscopic and macroscopic morphology or growth at 37 degrees C (p > 0.05). However, a decrease in the cellular and capsular sizes of yeast in soil, as compared to Sabouraud, was observed (p < 0.05). Additionally, higher enzimatic activity of proteases, phospholipases, phenoloxidase and beta-glucosidase was observed in var. grubii isolates as compared to var. gattii (p < 0.05). In both varieties, structures related with haploid fruitification were observed and all isolates were mating type alpha. Killer toxin sensitivity patterns of the isolates of var. grubii were I and II; in contrast, in var. gattii, seven different patterns were found: I, V, IX-XIII. In the animal model we found that 12 of 22 (54.5%) isolates of var. grubii caused the death of the mice during the observation period, while none of the 14 var. gattii isolates caused it. The decrease in capsular and cellular sizes of the yeast in soil and the frequency of mating type alpha with structures related to haploid fructification suggest an important mechanism of production of infectious particles in nature. Additionally, greater enzimatic activity of var. grubii can be associated with the virulence in the animal model

  13. Expression of the Escherichia coli K5 capsular antigen: immunoelectron microscopic and biochemical studies with recombinant E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kröncke, K D; Boulnois, G; Roberts, I; Bitter-Suermann, D; Golecki, J R; Jann, B; Jann, K

    1990-01-01

    The capsular K5 polysaccharide, a representative of group II capsular antigens of Escherichia coli, has been cloned previously, and three gene regions responsible for polymerization and surface expression have been defined (I. S. Roberts, R. Mountford, R. Hodge, K. B. Jann, and G. J. Boulnois, J. Bacteriol. 170:1305-1310, 1988). In this report, we describe the immunoelectron microscopic analysis of recombinant bacteria expressing the K5 antigen and of mutants defective in either region 1 or region 3 gene functions, as well as the biochemical analysis of the K5 capsular polysaccharide. Whereas the K5 clone expressed the K5 polysaccharide as a well-developed capsule in about 25% of its population, no capsule was observed in whole mount preparations and ultrathin sections of the expression mutants. Immunogold labeling of sections from the region 3 mutant revealed the capsular K5 polysaccharide in the cytoplasm. With the region 1 mutant, the capsular polysaccharide appeared associated with the cell membrane, and, unlike the region 3 mutant polysaccharide, the capsular polysaccharide could be detected in the periplasm after plasmolysis of the bacteria. Polysaccharides were isolated from the homogenized mutants with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. The polysaccharide from the region 1 mutant had the same size as that isolated from the capsule of the original K5 clone, and both polysaccharides were substituted with phosphatidic acid. The polysaccharide from the region 3 mutant was smaller and was not substituted with phosphatidic acid. These results prompt us to postulate that gene region 3 products are involved in the translocation of the capsular polysaccharide across the cytoplasmic membrane and that region 1 directs the transport of the lipid-substituted capsular polysaccharide through the periplasm and across the outer membrane. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 6 PMID:2404935

  14. The Cryptococcus neoformans capsule: lessons from the use of optical tweezers and other biophysical tools

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Bruno; Frases, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, representing one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients. The main virulence factor of C. neoformans is the polysaccharide capsule; however, many fundamental aspects of capsule structure and function remain poorly understood. Recently, important capsule properties were uncovered using optical tweezers and other biophysical techniques, including dynamic and static light scattering, zeta potential and viscosity analysis. This review provides an overview of the latest findings in this emerging field, explaining the impact of these findings on our understanding of C. neoformans biology and resistance to host immune defenses. PMID:26157436

  15. The Effect of a BSA Conjugate of a Synthetic Hexasaccharide Related to the Fragment of Capsular Polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae Type 14 on the Activation of Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Akhmatova, Nelli K.; Kurbatova, Ekaterina A.; Akhmatov, Elvin A.; Egorova, Nadezhda B.; Logunov, Denis Yu.; Gening, Marina L.; Sukhova, Elena V.; Yashunsky, Dmitry V.; Tsvetkov, Yury E.; Nifantiev, Nikolay E.

    2016-01-01

    We report the effect of a bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate of a synthetic hexasaccharide (HS) related to the fragment of the capsular polysaccharide (PS) of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14 on the stimulation of innate immune system and the subsequent development of a PS-specific antibody response. Glycoconjugate (GC) in the presence (GC + AL) or absence of aluminum hydroxide was administered to mice twice. GC increased the number of TLR2-expressing cells and induced the maturation of dendritic cells (CD11c+, CD80+ and, MHCII+), which secreted IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα into the culture medium. The level of IL-1β, IL-10, IFNγ, and TNFα in the blood increased within 24 h after the single GC administration to mice. On day 7, the numbers of splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes increased. After the second immunization, the levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes were lower than in the control, whereas the B cell, NK cell, and MHC class II-expressing cell numbers remained enhanced. However, of the presence of anti-PS, IgG antibodies were not detected. The addition of aluminum hydroxide to GC stimulated the production of GM-CSF, IL-1β, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, IFNγ, and TNFα. Anti-PS IgG1 antibody titers 7 days after the second immunization were high. During that period, normal levels of splenic CD4+ T lymphocytes were maintained, whereas reduced CD8+ T lymphocyte numbers and increased levels of B lymphocytes, NK cells, and MHC class II-expressing cell numbers were observed. Anti-PS IgG levels diminished until day 92. A booster immunization with GC + AL stimulated the production of anti-PS IgG memory antibodies, which were determined within 97 days. The elucidation of specific features of the effect of the synthetic HS conjugate on the stimulation of innate, cell-mediated immunity, and antibody response can favor the optimization of GC vaccine design. PMID:27446078

  16. The Cryptococcus neoformans Capsule: a Sword and a Shield

    PubMed Central

    O'Meara, Teresa R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is characterized by its ability to induce a distinct polysaccharide capsule in response to a number of host-specific environmental stimuli. The induction of capsule is a complex biological process encompassing regulation at multiple steps, including the biosynthesis, transport, and maintenance of the polysaccharide at the cell surface. By precisely regulating the composition of its cell surface and secreted polysaccharides, C. neoformans has developed intricate ways to establish chronic infection and dormancy in the human host. The plasticity of the capsule structure in response to various host conditions also underscores the complex relationship between host and parasite. Much of this precise regulation of capsule is achieved through the transcriptional responses of multiple conserved signaling pathways that have been coopted to regulate this C. neoformans-specific virulence-associated phenotype. This review focuses on specific host stimuli that trigger the activation of the signal transduction cascades and on the downstream transcriptional responses that are required for robust encapsulation around the cell. PMID:22763631

  17. The capsular network of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Cassone, A; Garaci, E

    1977-06-01

    Attempts at improving chemical fixation for electron-microscopic observation of the capsule of Klebsiella pneumoniae were made. The capsule was preserved by using alcian blue - lanthanum and tris-(1-aziridinyl) phosphine oxide (TAPO) - aldehyde - osmium procedures. Despite the different retention of the overall capsular material and minor variations in morphological details, in both cases the interpretation of ultrastructural patterns suggested that the capsule be composed of a meshed network of thin polysaccharide fibrils radiating from the cell wall. This organization is in keeping with all recognized chemical properties of bacterial polysaccharide capsules or, at least, does not contradict them. Moreover, an effective preservation of bacterial structures other than capsule has been obtained, mostly in specimens fixed by the TAPO-aldehyde-osmium method, a fact which gives further reliability to the technical approach used for capsule visualization. PMID:326360

  18. Oral priming with Salmonella Typhi vaccine strain CVD 909 followed by parenteral boost with the S. Typhi Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine induces CD27+IgD-S. Typhi-specific IgA and IgG B memory cells in humans.

    PubMed

    Wahid, Rezwanul; Pasetti, Marcela F; Maciel, Milton; Simon, Jakub K; Tacket, Carol O; Levine, Myron M; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2011-02-01

    Attenuated live oral typhoid vaccine candidate CVD 909 constitutively expresses Salmonella Typhi capsular polysaccharide antigen (Vi). A randomized, double-blind, heterologous prime-boost clinical study was conducted to determine whether immunity to licensed parenteral Vi vaccine could be enhanced by priming with CVD 909. Priming with CVD 909 elicited higher and persistent, albeit not significant, anti-Vi IgG and IgA following immunization with Vi, than placebo-primed recipients. Vi-specific IgA B memory (B(M)) cells were significantly increased in CVD 909-primed subjects. S. Typhi-specific LPS and flagella IgA B(M) cells were observed in subjects immunized with CVD 909 or with the licensed Vi-negative oral typhoid vaccine Ty21a. CVD 909-induced B(M) cells exhibited a classical B(M) phenotype (i.e., CD3(-)CD19(+)IgD(-)CD27(+)). This is the first demonstration of classical B(M) cells specific for bacterial polysaccharide or protein antigens following typhoid immunization. The persistent IgA B(M) responses demonstrate the capacity of oral typhoid vaccines to prime mucosally relevant immune memory. PMID:21146460

  19. Activity of tannins from Stryphnodendron adstringens on Cryptococcus neoformans: effects on growth, capsule size and pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Kelly; Rozental, Sonia; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2009-01-01

    Background Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart.) Coville, Leguminosae, also known in Brazil as barbatimão, is rich in tannins and many flavan-3-ols and proanthocyanidins such as prodelphinidins and prorobinetinidins. Previous studies have demonstrated several pharmacological properties of tannins from barbatimão, including anti-candidal activity. Methods The antifungal activity of proanthocyanidin polymeric tannins from Stryphnodendron adstringens (subfraction F2.4) was evaluated against three strains of Cryptococcus neoformans with different capsule expressions, using the broth microdilution technique, light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The effect of subfraction F2.4 on C. neoformans and melanoma mammalian cells pigmentation was also evaluated. Results Although susceptibility assays revealed MIC values quite similar (between 2.5 and 5.0 μg/ml), analyses of MFC values revealing that the acapsular mutant Cap 67 was more susceptible to be killed by the subfraction F2.4 (MFC = 20 μg/ml) than the two tested capsular strains (T1-444 and ATCC 28957) (MFC > 160 μg/ml). Optical and electron microscopy experiments revealed relevant alterations in cell shape and size in all strains treated with 1 and 2.5 μg/ml of subfraction F2.4. Capsule size of the capsular strains decreased drastically after subfraction F2.4 treatment. In addition, ultrastructural alterations such as cell wall disruption, cytoplasm extraction, mitochondria swelling, increase in the number of cytoplasmic vacuoles and formation of membranous structures in the cytoplasm were also observed in treated yeasts. Incubation with subfraction F2.4 also decreased C. neoformans pigmentation, however, did not interfere in melanization of B16F10 mammalian cells. Conclusion Our data indicate that tannins extracted from S. adstringens interfered with growth, capsule size and pigmentation, all important virulence factors of C. neoformans, and may be considered as a putative candidate for the

  20. Identification and Characterization of CPS1 as a Hyaluronic Acid Synthase Contributing to the Pathogenesis of Cryptococcus neoformans Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Jong, Ambrose; Wu, Chun-Hua; Chen, Han-Min; Luo, Feng; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J.; Chang, Yun C.; LaMunyon, Craig W.; Plaas, Anna; Huang, Sheng-He

    2007-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast that often causes devastating meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals. We have previously identified the C. neoformans CPS1 gene, which is required for a capsular layer on the outer cell wall. In this report, we investigate the function of the CPS1 gene and its pathogenesis. We demonstrated that treatment of yeast with either 4-methylumbelliferone or hyaluronidase resulted in a reduction of the level of C. neoformans binding to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Yeast extracellular structures were also altered accordingly in hyaluronidase-treated cells. Furthermore, observation of yeast strains with different hyaluronic acid contents showed that the ability to bind to HBMEC is proportional to the hyaluronic acid content. A killing assay with Caenorhabditis elegans demonstrated that the CPS1 wild-type strain is more virulent than the cps1Δ strain. When CPS1 is expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli, hyaluronic acid can be detected in the cells. Additionally, we determined by fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoretic analysis that hyaluronic acid is a component of the C. neoformans capsule. The size of hyaluronic acid molecules is evaluated by gel filtration and transmission electron microscopy studies. Together, our results support that C. neoformans CPS1 encodes hyaluronic acid synthase and that its product, hyaluronic acid, plays a role as an adhesion molecule during the association of endothelial cells with yeast. PMID:17545316

  1. Cryptococcus neoformans carried by Odontomachus bauri ants.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Mariana Santos de; Rodrigues, William Costa; Barbosa, Glaucia; Trilles, Luciana; Wanke, Bodo; Lazéra, Márcia dos Santos; Silva, Manuela da

    2012-06-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common causative agent of cryptococcosis worldwide. Although this fungus has been isolated from a variety of organic substrates, several studies suggest that hollow trees constitute an important natural niche for C. neoformans. A previously surveyed hollow of a living pink shower tree (Cassia grandis) positive for C. neoformans in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was chosen for further investigation. Odontomachus bauri ants (trap-jaw ants) found inside the hollow were collected for evaluation as possible carriers of Cryptococcus spp. Two out of 10 ants were found to carry phenoloxidase-positive colonies identified as C. neoformans molecular types VNI and VNII. The ants may have acted as a mechanical vector of C. neoformans and possibly contributed to the dispersal of the fungi from one substrate to another. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the association of C. neoformans with ants of the genus Odontomachus. PMID:22666855

  2. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in rat pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans granulomas.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, D.; Cho, Y.; Zhao, M.; Casadevall, A.; Lee, S. C.

    1996-01-01

    Rats, like humans, have extremely effective immune mechanisms for controlling pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans infection. The mechanism(s) responsible for efficient immunity in rat experimental infection is unknown. Recently, induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) have been implicated as an important microbicidal mechanism by which activated macrophages effect cytotoxicity against microbes. In this report, we investigated the expression of iNOS in rat pulmonary cryptococcosis. Localization and regulation of NO production was studied by immunohistochemistry for iNOS in conjunction with immunohistochemistry for cell markers, cytokines, and cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide. iNOS immunoreactivity was detected in macrophages, neutrophils, vascular endothelium, and respiratory epithelium. Double-immunolabeling studies revealed that the most prominent iNOS immunoreactivity was localized to epithelioid macrophages (CD11b/c+) within granulomas; CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were numerous around granulomas but did not express iNOS. iNOS immunoreactivity was detected in a selective population of epithelioid macrophages within some granulomas but not others. iNOS- granulomas were identical to iNOS+ granulomas with respect to morphology and immunohistochemical profiles. Macrophage iNOS immunoreactivity was detected 1 week after infection in one out of four rats and was strongly expressed in all rats at 2 weeks (in up to 50 percent of the granulomas) but declined considerably by 25 days. iNOS expression coincided with granuloma formation and preceded a decrease in lung fungal burden, suggesting an anticryptococcal role for NO. By double labeling, cytokines that have been shown to promote (interferon-gamma, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor) and inhibit (transforming growth factor-beta) macrophage iNOS expression were detected around iNOS+ granuloma. iNOS immunoreactivity was expressed in selected neutrophils (1 and 2 weeks) and

  3. Identification of a capsular variant and characterization of capsular acetylation in Klebsiella pneumoniae PLA-associated type K57

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chun-Ru; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Yang, Han-Ru; Yang, Feng-Ling; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Wang, Jin-Town

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can cause community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). Capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is important for its virulence. Among 79 capsular (K) types discovered thus far, K57 is often associated with PLA. Here, we report the identification of a K57 variant. Cps gene locus sequencing revealed differences between the K57 reference strain 4425/51 (Ref-K57) and a variant, the PLA isolate A1142. While Ref-K57 cps contained orf13 encoding a putative acetyltransferase, the insertion of a putative transposase-encoding gene at this position was detected in A1142. This variation was detected in other K57 clinical strains. Biochemical analyses indicated that A1142 was deficient in CPS acetylation. Genetic replacement and complementation verified that orf13 was responsible for CPS acetylation. Acetylation increased CPS immunoreactivity to antiserum and enhanced K. pneumoniae induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines through JNK and MAPK signaling. While acetylation diminished the serum resistance of bacteria, it promoted adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells possibly via increasing production of type I fimbriae. In conclusion, acetylation-mediated capsular variation in K57 was observed. Capsular acetylation contributed to the variety and antigenic diversity of CPS, influenced its biological activities, and was involved in K. pneumoniae-host interactions. These findings have implications for vaccine design and pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae. PMID:27550826

  4. Identification of a capsular variant and characterization of capsular acetylation in Klebsiella pneumoniae PLA-associated type K57.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chun-Ru; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Yang, Han-Ru; Yang, Feng-Ling; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Wang, Jin-Town

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can cause community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). Capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is important for its virulence. Among 79 capsular (K) types discovered thus far, K57 is often associated with PLA. Here, we report the identification of a K57 variant. Cps gene locus sequencing revealed differences between the K57 reference strain 4425/51 (Ref-K57) and a variant, the PLA isolate A1142. While Ref-K57 cps contained orf13 encoding a putative acetyltransferase, the insertion of a putative transposase-encoding gene at this position was detected in A1142. This variation was detected in other K57 clinical strains. Biochemical analyses indicated that A1142 was deficient in CPS acetylation. Genetic replacement and complementation verified that orf13 was responsible for CPS acetylation. Acetylation increased CPS immunoreactivity to antiserum and enhanced K. pneumoniae induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines through JNK and MAPK signaling. While acetylation diminished the serum resistance of bacteria, it promoted adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells possibly via increasing production of type I fimbriae. In conclusion, acetylation-mediated capsular variation in K57 was observed. Capsular acetylation contributed to the variety and antigenic diversity of CPS, influenced its biological activities, and was involved in K. pneumoniae-host interactions. These findings have implications for vaccine design and pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae. PMID:27550826

  5. Cryptococcus neoformans Is Internalized by Receptor-Mediated or ‘Triggered’ Phagocytosis, Dependent on Actin Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Caroline Rezende; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both ‘zipper’ (receptor-mediated) and ‘trigger’ (membrane ruffle-dependent) phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells. PMID:24586631

  6. A genetic linkage map of Cryptococcus neoformans variety neoformans serotype D (Filobasidiella neoformans).

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Robert E; Huang, Johnny C; Fung, Eula; Nielsen, Kirsten; Heitman, Joseph; Vilgalys, Rytas; Mitchell, Thomas G

    2004-01-01

    To construct a genetic linkage map of the heterothallic yeast, Cryptococcus neoformans (Filobasidiella neoformans), we crossed two mating-compatible strains and analyzed 94 progeny for the segregation of 301 polymorphic markers, consisting of 228 restriction site polymorphisms, 63 microsatellites, two indels, and eight mating-type (MAT)-associated markers. All but six markers showed no significant (P < 0.05) segregation distortion. At a minimum LOD score of 6.0 and a maximum recombination frequency of 0.30, 20 linkage groups were resolved, resulting in a map length of approximately 1500 cM. Average marker density is 5.4 cM (range 1-28.7 cM). Hybridization of selected markers to blots of electrophoretic karyotypes unambiguously assigned all linkage groups to chromosomes and led us to conclude that the C. neoformans genome is approximately 20.2 Mb, comprising 14 chromosomes ranging in size from 0.8 to 2.3 Mb, with a ratio of approximately 13.2 kb/cM averaged across the genome. However, only 2 of 12 ungrouped markers hybridized to chromosome 10. The hybridizations revealed at least one possible reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes 8, 9, and 12. This map has been critical to genome sequence assembly and will be essential for future studies of quantitative trait inheritance. PMID:15238516

  7. Campylobacter jejuni capsular genotypes are related to Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heikema, A P; Islam, Z; Horst-Kreft, D; Huizinga, R; Jacobs, B C; Wagenaar, J A; Poly, F; Guerry, P; van Belkum, A; Parker, C T; Endtz, H P

    2015-09-01

    In about one in a thousand cases, a Campylobacter jejuni infection results in the severe polyneuropathy Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). It is established that sialylated lipo-oligosaccharides (LOS) of C. jejuni are a crucial virulence factor in GBS development. Frequent detection of C. jejuni with sialylated LOS in stools derived from patients with uncomplicated enteritis implies that additional bacterial factors should be involved. To assess whether the polysaccharide capsule is a marker for GBS, the capsular genotypes of two geographically distinct GBS-associated C. jejuni strain collections and an uncomplicated enteritis control collection were determined. Capsular genotyping of C. jejuni strains from the Netherlands revealed that three capsular genotypes, HS1/44c, HS2 and HS4c, were dominant in GBS-associated strains and capsular types HS1/44c and HS4c were significantly associated with GBS (p 0.05 and p 0.01, respectively) when compared with uncomplicated enteritis. In a GBS-associated strain collection from Bangladesh, capsular types HS23/36c, HS19 and HS41 were most prevalent and the capsular types HS19 and HS41 were associated with GBS (p 0.008 and p 0.02, respectively). Next, specific combinations of the LOS class and capsular genotypes were identified that were related to the occurrence of GBS. Multilocus sequence typing revealed restricted genetic diversity for strain populations with the capsular types HS2, HS19 and HS41. We conclude that capsular types HS1/44c, HS2, HS4c, HS19, HS23/36c and HS41 are markers for GBS. Besides a crucial role for sialylated LOS of C. jejuni in GBS pathogenesis, the identified capsules may contribute to GBS susceptibility. PMID:26070960

  8. Capsular hook-assisted implantation of modified capsular tension ring.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Sudarshan; Gupta, Shikha; Nayak, Bhagabat; Gogia, Varun

    2016-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy presented with decrease of vision over a period of 2 years. On examination, he was diagnosed to have microspherophakia with lenticular myopia with secondary glaucoma in both eyes. He was treated by lens aspiration and two-point capsular support using a modified capsular tension ring (M-CTR) and capsular tension segment (CTS) sutured to the sclera along with implantation of a foldable intraocular lens inside the bag. Lens aspiration was performed without artificial capsular hook support of the bag, as the lens was soft and vitreous was formed. However, M-CTR rotation into the bag was fraught with repeated adherence of the advancing end of the M-CTR into the loose bag causing simultaneous rotation of the bag with the rotation of the ring resulting in transient increase in bag subluxation. Capsular hooks provided appropriate countertraction to the unsupported bag, thus facilitating easy insertion and rotation of the ring into the bag. PMID:27048263

  9. Binding of the wheat germ lectin to Cryptococcus neoformans chitooligomers affects multiple mechanisms required for fungal pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernanda L.; Guimarães, Allan J.; Kmetzsch, Lívia; Dutra, Fabianno F.; Silva, Fernanda D.; Taborda, Carlos P.; Araujo, Glauber de S.; Frases, Susana; Staats, Charley C.; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene H.; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Casadevall, Arturo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2015-01-01

    The principal capsular component of Cryptococcus neoformans, glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), interacts with surface glycans, including chitin-like oligomers. Although the role of GXM in cryptococcal infection has been well explored, there is no information on how chitooligomers affect fungal pathogenesis. In this study, surface chitooligomers of C. neoformans were blocked through the use of the wheat germ lectin (WGA) and the effects on animal pathogenesis, interaction with host cells, fungal growth and capsule formation were analyzed. Treatment of C. neoformans cells with WGA followed by infection of mice delayed mortality relative to animals infected with untreated fungal cells. This observation was associated with reduced brain colonization by lectin-treated cryptococci. Blocking chitooligomers also rendered yeast cells less efficient in their ability to associate with phagocytes. WGA did not affect fungal viability, but inhibited GXM release to the extracellular space and capsule formation. In WGA-treated yeast cells, genes that are involved in capsule formation and GXM traffic had their transcription levels decreased in comparison with untreated cells. Our results suggest that cellular pathways required for capsule formation and pathogenic mechanisms are affected by blocking chitin-derived structures at the cell surface of C. neoformans. Targeting chitooligomers with specific ligands may reveal new therapeutic alternatives to control cryptococcosis. PMID:23608320

  10. Unravelling secretion in Cryptococcus neoformans: more than one way to skin a cat.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcio L; Djordjevic, Julianne T

    2012-06-01

    Secretion pathways in fungi are essential for the maintenance of cell wall architecture and for the export of a number of virulence factors. In the fungal pathogen, Cryptococcus neoformans, much evidence supports the existence of more than one route taken by secreted molecules to reach the cell periphery and extracellular space, and a significant degree of crosstalk between conventional and non-conventional secretion routes. The need for such complexity may be due to differences in the nature of the exported cargo, the spatial and temporal requirements for constitutive and non-constitutive protein secretion, and/or as a means of compensating for the extra burden on the secretion machinery imposed by the elaboration of the polysaccharide capsule. This review focuses on the role of specific components of the C. neoformans secretion machinery in protein and/or polysaccharide export, including Sec4, Sec6, Sec14, Golgi reassembly and stacking protein and extracellular exosome-like vesicles. We also address what is known about traffic of the lipid, glucosylceramide, a target of therapeutic antibodies and an important regulator of C. neoformans pathogenicity, and the role of signalling pathways in the regulation of secretion. PMID:21898146

  11. Capsular Management in Hip Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joshua D

    2016-07-01

    The hip capsule is a highly complex anatomic structure, which influences normal hip motion and biomechanics. A dynamic stabilizing capsular contribution exists in the iliocapsularis and gluteus minimus, among other musculotendinous structures crossing the joint. Variable types and sizes of capsulotomy are necessary to sufficiently visualize and address the bony and soft tissue pathologic source of symptoms. Unrepaired capsulotomies may leave the hip significantly unstable to variable degrees. Capsular closure is a necessary part of a comprehensive arthroscopic hip preservation procedure. Greater titration of the degree of plication may be performed for patients with risk factors for postoperative instability. PMID:27343391

  12. Cryptococcus Neoformans Modulates Extracellular Killing by Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Asfia; Grey, Angus; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    We recently established a key role for host sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) in regulating the killing activity of neutrophils against Cryptococcus neoformans. In this paper, we studied the effect of C. neoformans on the killing activity of neutrophils and whether SMS would still be a player against C. neoformans in immunocompromised mice lacking T and natural killer (NK) cells (Tgε26 mice). To this end, we analyzed whether C. neoformans would have any effect on neutrophil survival and killing in vitro and in vivo. We show that unlike Candida albicans, neither the presence nor the capsule size of C. neoformans cells have any effect on neutrophil viability. Interestingly, melanized C. neoformans cells totally abrogated the killing activity of neutrophils. We monitored how exposure of neutrophils to C. neoformans cells would interfere with any further killing activity of the conditioned medium and found that pre-incubation with live but not “heat-killed” fungal cells significantly inhibits further killing activity of the medium. We then studied whether activation of SMS at the site of C. neoformans infection is dependent on T and NK cells. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization tissue imaging in infected lung we found that similar to previous observations in the isogenic wild-type CBA/J mice, SM 16:0 levels are significantly elevated at the site of infection in mice lacking T and NK cells, but only at early time points. This study highlights that C. neoformans may negatively regulate the killing activity of neutrophils and that SMS activation in neutrophils appears to be partially independent of T and/or NK cells. PMID:21960987

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans infection in malignancy.

    PubMed

    Schmalzle, Sarah A; Buchwald, Ulrike K; Gilliam, Bruce L; Riedel, David J

    2016-09-01

    Cryptococcosis is an opportunistic invasive fungal infection that is well described and easily recognised when it occurs as meningitis in HIV-infected persons. Malignancy and its treatment may also confer a higher risk of infection with Cryptococcus neoformans, but this association has not been as well described. A case of cryptococcosis in a cancer patient is presented, and all cases of coincident C. neoformans infection and malignancy in adults published in the literature in English between 1970 and 2014 are reviewed. Data from these cases were aggregated in order to describe the demographics, type of malignancy, site of infection, clinical manifestations, treatment and outcomes of cryptococcosis in patients with cancer. Haematologic malignancies accounted for 82% of cases, with lymphomas over-represented compared to US population data (66% vs. 53% respectively). Cryptococcosis was reported rarely in patients with solid tumours. Haematologic malignancy patients were more likely to have central nervous system (P < 0.001) or disseminated disease (P < 0.001), receive Amphotericin B as part of initial therapy (P = 0.023), and had higher reported mortality rates than those with solid tumours (P = 0.222). Providers should have heightened awareness of the possibility of cryptococcosis in patients with haematologic malignancy presenting with infection. PMID:26932366

  14. Dual Infections with Pigmented and Albino Strains of Cryptococcus neoformans in Patients with or without Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in India

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Piyali; Banerjee, Uma; Casadevall, Arturo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2005-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated yeast-like fungus of worldwide distribution. Melanin production is an important virulence factor of C. neoformans. We report the identification of distinct cryptococcal isolates with either pigmented or white colony phenotypes on l-dihydroxyphenylalanine agar plates in three patients who presented with meningitis to the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in India. Two of the patients were also infected with human immunodeficiency virus. Biochemical studies, India ink analysis, immunofluorescence with antibodies specific to capsular antigen, and serotyping confirmed that the melanotic and albino strains were C. neoformans serotypes A and D, respectively. Genotyping with M13 and [GACA]4 primers revealed that all the C. neoformans isolates were genetically different. The CNLAC1 gene associated with melanin production was identified in all the strains by PCR. Standard MIC testing revealed that the strains had similar susceptibilities to amphotericin B, but time-kill assays with the antifungal showed reduced susceptibility in melanin-producing strains. Infection studies with A/Jcr mice showed that the melanin-lacking yeast were less virulent than melanin-producing isolates. These findings indicate that these patients had dual infections with pigmented and albino strains of C. neoformans that were phenotypically and biologically different. Continued surveillance of primary isolates from patients with cryptococcosis by analyzing phenotypic differences and by molecular methods may reveal that mixed infections occur more commonly than is currently realized. PMID:16145139

  15. Current status of meningococcal group B vaccine candidates: capsular or noncapsular?

    PubMed Central

    Diaz Romero, J; Outschoorn, I M

    1994-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is a severe, life-threatening infection for which no adequate vaccine exists. Current vaccines, based on the group-specific capsular polysaccharides, provide short-term protection in adults against serogroups A and C but are ineffective in infants and do not induce protection against group B strains, the predominant cause of infection in western countries, because the purified serogroup B polysaccharide fails to elicit human bactericidal antibodies. Because of the poor immunogenicity of group B capsular polysaccharide, different noncapsular antigens have been considered for inclusion in a vaccine against this serogroup: outer membrane proteins, lipooligosaccharides, iron-regulated proteins, Lip, pili, CtrA, and the immunoglobulin A proteases. Alternatively, attempts to increase the immunogenicity of the capsular polysaccharide have been made by using noncovalent complexes with outer membrane proteins, chemical modifications, and structural analogs. Here, we review the strategies employed for the development of a vaccine for Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B; the difficulties associated with the different approaches are discussed. PMID:7834605

  16. Natural habitat of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, D H; Pfeiffer, T J

    1990-01-01

    Environmental isolations have established that Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii appears to have a specific ecological association with Eucalyptus camaldulensis. So far, we have isolated C. neoformans var. gattii on 35 separate occasions, all from samples associated with E. camaldulensis. The global distribution of E. camaldulensis appears to correspond to the epidemiologic distribution of cryptococcosis caused by C. neoformans var. gattii. No other environmental source for the fungus has yet been detected, and no other eucalypt has the distribution pattern corresponding to reported cases caused by this fungus. These findings may provided an explanation for the high incidence of infections caused by C. neoformans var. gattii in Australian aborigines living in the Northern Territory and for its low worldwide incidence in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. Images PMID:2199524

  17. A quantitative ELISA for antigen-specific IgG subclasses using equivalence dilutions of anti-kappa and anti-subclass specific secondary reagents. Application to the study of the murine immune response against the capsular polysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B.

    PubMed

    Colino, J; Diez, M; Outschoorn, I

    1996-04-19

    We have developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure murine antigen-specific IgG antibodies of defined subclass using precalibrated equivalence dilutions of anti-kappa (in the standard) and each anti-IgG subclass-specific polyclonal secondary antibody (in the test sample). The calibration of secondary reagents could be carried out easily with a set of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) specific for all IgG subclasses. These MoAbs do not require purification or standardization. In addition the MoAbs can be of different antigenic specificity. Once the equivalence dilutions have been determined, they can be applied in a quantitative ELISA using the same antigen in the standard and sample, and using only one IgG subclass standard for the determination of all the IgG subclasses. The method is easy to standardize for many antigenic systems. It is particularly useful when the only standard available is one standardized MoAb of the appropriate specificity, and it could be adapted to use with standard polyclonal antibodies having a known content of total antigen-specific IgG bearing kappa chains but unknown IgG subclass composition. The use of this method to quantitate IgG specific for the capsular polysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (CpsB) gave highly reproducible measures with an interbatch CV of 5-6% similar for all IgG subclasses and low detection limits ranging from 0.3 ng/well for IgG3 to 0.8 ng/well for IgG2a. The IgG subclass response observed after immunization with live meningococci was mainly IgG2a (74%) and IgG2b (18%). Hyperimmunization modified this IgG distribution to one of mainly IgG3 (62%) and IgG1 (28%) which was maintained in the response to a single immunization 4 weeks later, possibly indicating the generation of resting B cells during continuous stimulation. PMID:8621957

  18. Review on the association of Group B Streptococcus capsular antibody and protection against invasive disease in infants.

    PubMed

    Dangor, Ziyaad; Kwatra, Gaurav; Izu, Alane; Lala, Sanjay G; Madhi, Shabir A

    2015-01-01

    A trivalent Group B streptococcus (GBS) polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine for vaccination of pregnant women is under development to protect their newborns against invasive GBS disease. Establishing sero-correlates of protection against invasive GBS disease in infants could expedite the licensure pathway of polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine. A systematic review of studies reporting on the association of capsular antibodies and invasive GBS disease in infants and colonization in women or newborns was undertaken. Most studies that described maternal and/or infant capsular antibody levels in infants with invasive GBS disease identified an association between low capsular antibody levels in invasive GBS cases compared to controls. Different assay methods and the lack of standardized reference ranges for serotype-specific antibody levels makes it difficult to select an antibody level that may be used as a reliable sero-correlate of protection. Further studies using standardized methods are warranted. PMID:25242617

  19. Host immunity to Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Rohatgi, Soma; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is caused by the fungal genus Cryptococcus. Cryptococcosis, predominantly meningoencephalitis, emerged with the HIV pandemic, primarily afflicting HIV-infected patients with profound T-cell deficiency. Where in use, combination antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of and risk for disease, but cryptococcosis continues to afflict those without access to therapy, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. However, cryptococcosis also occurs in solid organ transplant recipients and patients with other immunodeficiencies as well as those with no known immunodeficiency. This article reviews innate and adaptive immune responses to C. neoformans, with an emphasis on recent studies on the role of B cells, natural IgM and Fc gamma receptor polymorphisms in resistance to cryptococcosis. PMID:25865194

  20. Host immunity to Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, Soma; Pirofski, Liise-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is caused by the fungal genus Cryptococcus. Cryptococcosis, predominantly meningoencephalitis, emerged with the HIV pandemic, primarily afflicting HIV-infected patients with profound T-cell deficiency. Where in use, combination antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of and risk for disease, but cryptococcosis continues to afflict those without access to therapy, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. However, cryptococcosis also occurs in solid organ transplant recipients and patients with other immunodeficiencies as well as those with no known immunodeficiency. This article reviews innate and adaptive immune responses to C. neoformans, with an emphasis on recent studies on the role of B cells, natural IgM and Fc gamma receptor polymorphisms in resistance to cryptococcosis. PMID:25865194

  1. Capsular gene typing of Streptococcus agalactiae compared to serotyping by latex agglutination.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kaihu; Poulsen, Knud; Maione, Domenico; Rinaudo, C Daniela; Baldassarri, Lucilla; Telford, John L; Sørensen, Uffe B Skov; Kilian, Mogens

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated three different PCR-based capsular gene typing methods applied to 312 human and bovine Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) isolates and compared the results to serotyping results obtained by latex agglutination. Among 281 human isolates 27% could not be typed by latex agglutination. All 312 isolates except 5 could be typed by the three PCR methods combined. Two of these methods were multiplex assays. Among the isolates that were typeable by both latex agglutination and capsular gene typing, 94% showed agreement between the two methods. However, each of the PCR methods showed limitations. One of the methods did not include all 10 recognized serotypes, one misidentified eight isolates of serotypes Ib and IV as serotype Ia, and one did not distinguish between serotypes VII and IX. For five isolates that showed aberrant patterns in the capsular gene typing, long-range PCR targeting the cps operon disclosed large insertions or deletions affecting the cps gene cluster. A sensitive flow cytometric assay based on serotype-specific antibodies applied to 76 selected isolates that were nontypeable by latex agglutination revealed that approximately one-half of these did express capsular polysaccharide. A procedure for convenient and reliable capsular gene typing to be included in epidemiological and surveillance studies of S. agalactiae is proposed. PMID:23196363

  2. Analysis of E. coli K5 capsular polysaccharide heparosan

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Mellisa; Wang, Zhenyu; Laremore, Tatiana N.; Zhang, Fuming; Zhong, Weihong; Pu, Dennis; Zagorevski, Dmitri V.; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Heparosan is the key precursor for the preparation of bioengineered heparin, a potential replacement for porcine intestinal heparin, an important anticoagulant drug. The molecular weight (MW) distribution of heparosan produced by the fermentation of E. coli K5 was investigated. Large-slab isocratic and mini-slab gradient polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were used to analyze the MW and polydispersity of heparosan. A preparative method that allowed fractionation by continuous-elution PAGE was used to obtain heparosan MW standards. The MWs of the heparosan standards were determined by electrospray ionization Fourier-transform mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-MS). A ladder of the standards was then used to determine the MW properties of polydisperse heparosan samples. Unbleached and bleached heparosan produced by fermentation of E. coli K5 had similar number-averaged MWs (MN), weight-averaged MWs (MW), and MW ranges of 3,000 to 150,000 Da. PMID:20407891

  3. Multilocus sequence typing analysis reveals that Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans is a recombinant population

    PubMed Central

    Cogliati, Massimo; Zani, Alberto; Rickerts, Volker; McCormick, Ilka; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Velegraki, Aristea; Escandon, Patricia; Ichikawa, Tomoe; Ikeda, Reiko; Bienvenue, Anne-Lise; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Tore, Okan; Akcaglar, Sevim; Lockhart, Shawn; Tortorano, Anna Maria; Varma, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans (serotype D) represents about 30% of the clinical isolates in Europe and is present less frequently in the other continents. It is the prevalent etiological agent in primary cutaneous cryptococcosis as well as in cryptococcal skin lesions of disseminated cryptococcosis. Very little is known about the genotypic diversity of this Cryptococcus subtype. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotypic diversity among a set of clinical and environmental C. neoformans var. neoformans isolates and to evaluate the relationship between genotypes, geographical origin and clinical manifestations. A total of 83 globally collected C. neoformans var. neoformans isolates from Italy, Germany, France, Belgium, Denmark, Greece, Turkey, Thailand, Japan, Colombia, and the USA, recovered from different sources (primary and secondary cutaneous cryptococcosis, disseminated cryptococcosis, the environment, and animals), were included in the study. All isolates were confirmed to belong to genotype VNIV by molecular typing and they were further investigated by MLST analysis. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic as well as network analysis strongly suggested the existence of a recombinant rather than a clonal population structure. Geographical origin and source of isolation were not correlated with a specific MLST genotype. The comparison with a set of outgroup C. neoformans var. grubii isolates provided clear evidence that the two varieties have different population structures. PMID:26768709

  4. Sec6-dependent sorting of fungal extracellular exosomes and laccase of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Panepinto, John; Komperda, Kazimierz; Frases, Susana; Park, Yoon-Dong; Djordjevic, Julianne T; Casadevall, Arturo; Williamson, Peter R

    2009-03-01

    The cell wall of pathogenic fungi such as Cryptococcus neoformans, provides a formidable barrier to secrete virulence factors that produce host cell damage. To study secretion of virulence factors to the cell periphery, sec6 RNAi mutant strains of C. neoformans were tested for virulence factor expression. The studies reported here show that SEC6 RNAi mutant strains were defective in a number of virulence factors including laccase, urease as well as soluble polysaccharide and demonstrated attenuated virulence in mice. Further analysis by transmission electron microscopy detected the production of abundant extracellular exosomes in wild-type strains containing empty plasmid, but a complete absence in the iSEC6 strain. In addition, a green fluorescent protein-laccase fusion protein demonstrated aberrant localization within cytoplasmic vesicles in iSEC6 strains. In contrast, iSEC6 strains retained normal growth at 37 degrees C, as well as substantially normal capsule formation, phospholipase activity and total secreted protein. These results provide the first molecular evidence for the existence of fungal exosomes and associate these vesicles with the virulence of C. neoformans. PMID:19210702

  5. Cryptococcus neoformans Intracellular Proliferation and Capsule Size Determines Early Macrophage Control of Infection.

    PubMed

    Bojarczuk, Aleksandra; Miller, Katie A; Hotham, Richard; Lewis, Amy; Ogryzko, Nikolay V; Kamuyango, Alfred A; Frost, Helen; Gibson, Rory H; Stillman, Eleanor; May, Robin C; Renshaw, Stephen A; Johnston, Simon A

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a significant fungal pathogen of immunocompromised patients. Many questions remain regarding the function of macrophages in normal clearance of cryptococcal infection and the defects present in uncontrolled cryptococcosis. Two current limitations are: 1) The difficulties in interpreting studies using isolated macrophages in the context of the progression of infection, and 2) The use of high resolution imaging in understanding immune cell behavior during animal infection. Here we describe a high-content imaging method in a zebrafish model of cryptococcosis that permits the detailed analysis of macrophage interactions with C. neoformans during infection. Using this approach we demonstrate that, while macrophages are critical for control of C. neoformans, a failure of macrophage response is not the limiting defect in fatal infections. We find phagocytosis is restrained very early in infection and that increases in cryptococcal number are driven by intracellular proliferation. We show that macrophages preferentially phagocytose cryptococci with smaller polysaccharide capsules and that capsule size is greatly increased over twenty-four hours of infection, a change that is sufficient to severely limit further phagocytosis. Thus, high-content imaging of cryptococcal infection in vivo demonstrates how very early interactions between macrophages and cryptococci are critical in the outcome of cryptococcosis. PMID:26887656

  6. Cryptococcus neoformans Intracellular Proliferation and Capsule Size Determines Early Macrophage Control of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bojarczuk, Aleksandra; Miller, Katie A.; Hotham, Richard; Lewis, Amy; Ogryzko, Nikolay V.; Kamuyango, Alfred A.; Frost, Helen; Gibson, Rory H.; Stillman, Eleanor; May, Robin C.; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Johnston, Simon A.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a significant fungal pathogen of immunocompromised patients. Many questions remain regarding the function of macrophages in normal clearance of cryptococcal infection and the defects present in uncontrolled cryptococcosis. Two current limitations are: 1) The difficulties in interpreting studies using isolated macrophages in the context of the progression of infection, and 2) The use of high resolution imaging in understanding immune cell behavior during animal infection. Here we describe a high-content imaging method in a zebrafish model of cryptococcosis that permits the detailed analysis of macrophage interactions with C. neoformans during infection. Using this approach we demonstrate that, while macrophages are critical for control of C. neoformans, a failure of macrophage response is not the limiting defect in fatal infections. We find phagocytosis is restrained very early in infection and that increases in cryptococcal number are driven by intracellular proliferation. We show that macrophages preferentially phagocytose cryptococci with smaller polysaccharide capsules and that capsule size is greatly increased over twenty-four hours of infection, a change that is sufficient to severely limit further phagocytosis. Thus, high-content imaging of cryptococcal infection in vivo demonstrates how very early interactions between macrophages and cryptococci are critical in the outcome of cryptococcosis. PMID:26887656

  7. The Arthroscopic Superior Capsular Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher R; Denard, Patrick J; Brady, Paul C; Hartzler, Robert U; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    In a subset of patients with rotator cuff tears, the glenohumeral joint has minimal degenerative changes and the rotator cuff tendon is either irreparable or very poor quality and unlikely to heal. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) is often considered for these patients despite the lack of glenohumeral arthritis. However, due to the permanent destruction of the glenohumeral articular surfaces, complication rates, and concerns about implant longevity with RSA, we believe the superior capsular reconstruction (SCR) is a viable alternative. In this article, we describe our technique for the SCR. PMID:27552457

  8. Serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae Based on Capsular Genes Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Frédéric; Boucher, Nancy; Allary, Robin; Robitaille, Lynda; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Tremblay, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype epidemiology is essential since serotype replacement is a concern when introducing new polysaccharide-conjugate vaccines. A novel PCR-based automated microarray assay was developed to assist in the tracking of the serotypes. Autolysin, pneumolysin and eight genes located in the capsular operon were amplified using multiplex PCR. This step was followed by a tagged fluorescent primer extension step targeting serotype-specific polymorphisms. The tagged primers were then hybridized to a microarray. Results were exported to an expert system to identify capsular serotypes. The assay was validated on 166 cultured S. pneumoniae samples from 63 different serotypes as determined by the Quellung method. We show that typing only 12 polymorphisms located in the capsular operon allows the identification at the serotype level of 22 serotypes and the assignation of 24 other serotypes to a subgroup of serotypes. Overall, 126 samples (75.9%) were correctly serotyped, 14 were assigned to a member of the same serogroup, 8 rare serotypes were erroneously serotyped, and 18 gave negative serotyping results. Most of the discrepancies involved rare serotypes or serotypes that are difficult to discriminate using a DNA-based approach, for example 6A and 6B. The assay was also tested on clinical specimens including 43 cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with meningitis and 59 nasopharyngeal aspirates from bacterial pneumonia patients. Overall, 89% of specimens positive for pneumolysin were serotyped, demonstrating that this method does not require culture to serotype clinical specimens. The assay showed no cross-reactivity for 24 relevant bacterial species found in these types of samples. The limit of detection for serotyping and S. pneumoniae detection was 100 genome equivalent per reaction. This automated assay is amenable to clinical testing and does not require any culturing of the samples. The assay will be useful for the evaluation of serotype

  9. Mouse-human immunoglobulin G1 chimeric antibodies with activities against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Zebedee, S L; Koduri, R K; Mukherjee, J; Mukherjee, S; Lee, S; Sauer, D F; Scharff, M D; Casadevall, A

    1994-01-01

    Passive antibody administration is a potentially useful approach for the therapy of human Cryptococcus neoformans infections. To evaluate the efficacy of the human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) constant region against C. neoformans and to construct murine antibody derivatives with reduced immunogenicities and longer half-lives in humans, two mouse-human IgG1 chimeric antibodies were generated from the protective murine monoclonal antibodies 2D10 (IgM) and 18B7 (IgG1). The 2D10 mouse-human IgG1 chimeric antibody (ch2D10) had significantly lower binding affinity than its parent murine antibody (m2D10), presumably because of a loss of avidity contribution on switching from IgM to IgG. The 18B7 mouse-human IgG1 chimeric antibody (ch18B7) had higher affinity for cryptococcal polysaccharide antigen than its parent murine antibody (m18B7). ch18B7 and ch2D10 promoted phagocytosis of C. neoformans by primary human microglial cells and the murine J774.16 macrophage-like cell line. ch18B7 and m18B7 enhanced fungistatic or fungicidal activity of J774.16 cells and prolonged the survival of lethally infected mice. We conclude that the human IgG1 constant chain can be effective in mediating antifungal activity against C. neoformans. ch18B7 or similar antibodies are potential candidates for passive antibody therapy of human cryptococcosis. PMID:7979280

  10. Networks of fibers and factors: regulation of capsule formation in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hao; Mayer, François L; Sánchez-León, Eddy; de S Araújo, Glauber R; Frases, Susana; Kronstad, James W

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans to cause life-threatening meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals is due in large part to elaboration of a capsule consisting of polysaccharide fibers. The size of the cell-associated capsule is remarkably responsive to a variety of environmental and host conditions, but the mechanistic details of the regulation, synthesis, trafficking, and attachment of the polysaccharides are poorly understood. Recent studies reveal a complex network of transcription factors that influence capsule elaboration in response to several different signals of relevance to disease (e.g., iron deprivation). The emerging complexity of the network is consistent with the diversity of conditions that influence the capsule and illustrates the responsiveness of the fungus to both the environment and mammalian hosts. PMID:27516877

  11. Networks of fibers and factors: regulation of capsule formation in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    de S. Araújo, Glauber R.; Frases, Susana; Kronstad, James W.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans to cause life-threatening meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals is due in large part to elaboration of a capsule consisting of polysaccharide fibers. The size of the cell-associated capsule is remarkably responsive to a variety of environmental and host conditions, but the mechanistic details of the regulation, synthesis, trafficking, and attachment of the polysaccharides are poorly understood. Recent studies reveal a complex network of transcription factors that influence capsule elaboration in response to several different signals of relevance to disease (e.g., iron deprivation). The emerging complexity of the network is consistent with the diversity of conditions that influence the capsule and illustrates the responsiveness of the fungus to both the environment and mammalian hosts. PMID:27516877

  12. Cryptococcus neoformans: Tripping on Acid in the Phagolysosome

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon-Rodriguez, Carlos M.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is a basidiomycetous pathogenic yeast that is a frequent cause of meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals. Cn is a facultative intracellular pathogen in mammals, insects and amoeba. Cn infection occurs after inhalation of spores or desiccated cells from the environment. After inhalation Cn localizes to the lungs where it can be phagocytosed by alveolar macrophages. Cn is surrounded by a polysaccharide capsule that helps the fungus survive in vivo by interfering with phagocytosis, quenching free radical bursts and shedding polysaccharides that negatively modulates the immune system. After phagocytosis, Cn resides within the phagosome that matures to become a phagolysosome, a process that results in the acidification of the phagolysosomal lumen. Cn replicates at a higher rate inside macrophages than in the extracellular environment, possibly as a result that the phagosomal pH is near that optimal for growth. Cn increases the phagolysosomal pH and modulates the dynamics of Rab GTPases interaction with the phagolysosome. Chemical manipulation of the phagolysosomal pH with drugs can result in direct and indirect killing of Cn and reduced non-lytic exocytosis. Phagolysosomal membrane damage after Cn infection occurs both in vivo and in vitro, and is required for Cn growth and survival. Macrophage treatment with IFN-γ reduces the phagolysosomal damage and increases intracellular killing of Cn. Studies on mice and humans show that treatment with IFN-γ can improve host control of the disease. However, the mechanism by which Cn mediates phagolysosomal membrane damage remains unknown but likely candidates are phospholipases and mechanical damage from an enlarging capsule. Here we review Cn intracellular interaction with a particular emphasis on phagosomal interactions and develop the notion that the extent of damage of the phagosomal membrane is a key determinant of the outcome of the Cn-macrophage interaction. PMID:26925039

  13. Structural determination of the polysaccharide isolated from biofilms produced by a clinical strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Cescutti, Paola; De Benedetto, Gianluigi; Rizzo, Roberto

    2016-07-22

    Klebsiella pneumoniae are Gram negative opportunistic pathogens producing capsular (K) polysaccharides. Seventy-seven different K antigens have been described and they are the basis for K serotyping. Capsular polysaccharides are important virulence factors and have a relevant role for the structure of biofilm communities. Nevertheless, little information is available on the polysaccharides produced in biofilm matrices by Klebsiella spp. In the present study, a clinical isolate of Klebsiella pneumoniae was grown both on cellulose membranes deposited on agar plates, where it formed an adherent biofilm, and in liquid medium, where it formed floating biofilms (flocs). Extraction and purification of the polysaccharide fraction showed that only one main carbohydrate polymer was present in both adherent biofilms and flocs. Composition and linkage analysis, Smith degradation followed by ESI-MS, 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy revealed that the polysaccharide belong to the type K24 and has the following structure. PMID:27182661

  14. Effects of solution conditions on characteristics and size exclusion chromatography of pneumococcal polysaccharides and conjugate vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hadidi, Mahsa; Buckley, John J; Zydney, Andrew L

    2016-11-01

    Molecular properties of bacterial polysaccharides and protein-polysaccharide conjugates play an important role in the efficiency and immunogenicity of the final vaccine product. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) is commonly used to analyze and characterize biopolymers, including capsular polysaccharides. The objective of this work was to determine the effects of solution ionic strength and pH on the SEC retention of several capsular polysaccharides from S. pneumoniae bacteria in their native and conjugated forms. The retention time of the charged polysaccharides increased with increasing ionic strength and decreasing pH due to compaction of the polysaccharides associated with a reduction in the intramolecular electrostatic interactions. The calculated radius of gyration was in good agreement with model calculations based on the worm-like chain model accounting for the increase in chain stiffness and excluded volume of the charged polysaccharide at low ionic strength. These results provide important insights into the effects of solution ionic strength on physical properties and SEC behavior of capsular polysaccharides and their corresponding conjugates. PMID:27516244

  15. Streptococcus iniae cpsG alters capsular carbohydrate composition and is a cause of serotype switching in vaccinated fish.

    PubMed

    Heath, Candice; Gillen, Christine M; Chrysanthopoulos, Panagiotis; Walker, Mark J; Barnes, Andrew C

    2016-09-25

    Streptococcus iniae causes septicaemia and meningitis in marine and freshwater fish wherever they are farmed in warm-temperate and tropical regions. Although serotype specific, vaccination with bacterins (killed bacterial cultures) is largely successful and vaccine failure occurs only occasionally through emergence of new capsular serotypes. Previously we showed that mutations in vaccine escapes are restricted to a limited repertoire of genes within the 20-gene capsular polysaccharide (cps) operon. cpsG, a putative UDP-galactose 4-epimerase, has three sequence types based on the insertion or deletion of the three amino acids leucine, serine and lysine in the substrate binding site of the protein. To elucidate the role of cpsG in capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis and capsular composition, we first prepared isogenic knockout and complemented mutants of cpsG by allelic exchange mutagenesis. Deletion of cpsG resulted in changes to colony morphology and cell buoyant density, and also significantly decreased galactose content relative to glucose in the capsular polysaccharide as determined by GC-MS, consistent with epimerase activity of CpsG. There was also a metabolic penalty of cpsG knockout revealed by slower growth in complex media, and reduced proliferation in whole fish blood. Moreover, whilst antibodies raised in fish against the wild type cross-reacted in whole cell and cps ELISA, they did not cross-opsonise the mutant in a peripheral blood neutrophil opsonisation assay, consistent with reported vaccine escape. We have shown here that mutation in cpsG results in altered CPS composition and this in turn results in poor cross-opsonisation that explains some of the historic vaccination failure on fish farms in Australia. PMID:27599938

  16. Virulence-Associated Enzymes of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fausto; Wolf, Julie M.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes play key roles in fungal pathogenesis. Manipulation of enzyme expression or activity can significantly alter the infection process, and enzyme expression profiles can be a hallmark of disease. Hence, enzymes are worthy targets for better understanding pathogenesis and identifying new options for combatting fungal infections. Advances in genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics, and mass spectrometry have enabled the identification and characterization of new fungal enzymes. This review focuses on recent developments in the virulence-associated enzymes from Cryptococcus neoformans. The enzymatic suite of C. neoformans has evolved for environmental survival, but several of these enzymes play a dual role in colonizing the mammalian host. We also discuss new therapeutic and diagnostic strategies that could be based on the underlying enzymology. PMID:26453651

  17. Isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans from bird droppings, fruits and vegetables in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, R; Castañón-Olivares, L R

    1995-01-01

    The presence of Cryptococcus neoformans in various natural sources, such as bird droppings, fruits and vegetables, was investigated. A total of 711 samples were analyzed; C. neoformans var. neoformans was isolated from seven out of 74 bird droppings (9.5%), with parrots as one of the most significant sources. Fruits were positive in 9.5% of the 169 samples studied, specially citrus fruits, particularly grapefruit, in which the highest frequency was found. From the 468 vegetable samples, only 20 were positive (4.2%). It is emphasized that five of the positive vegetables species are autochthonous to Mexico: avocado (Nectandra salicifolia), beet (Beta vulgaris var. quinopodiace), chayote (Sechium edule), stringbean (Cassia sp), and nopal (Opuntia ficus-indica). PMID:7617014

  18. Quantitative relationship between capsular content and killing of K1-encapsulated Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, C; Cross, A; Byrne, W R; Zollinger, W

    1988-01-01

    Since there are conflicting reports in the literature on a possible relationship between the K1 capsular polysaccharide (CP) content of Escherichia coli and its susceptibility to killing, we reexamined this issue in a strain that had a smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) phenotype (E. coli O18:K1:H7 Bort) and in a strain with a deep rough LPS phenotype (E412, spontaneously agglutinable: K1:H-). When cell-associated K1 capsular content was greater than 90 micrograms of K1 polysaccharide per 10(10) CFU, neither strain was lysed by 20% normal human serum. In contrast, at equivalent but lower levels of K1 CP content, E412 but not strain Bort was lysed by normal human serum. Thus, LPS phenotype is an additional surface determinant that affects bacterial susceptibility to killing. Organisms obtained from very early log phase, when cell-associated K1 CP is greatest, were significantly more virulent for mice than were bacteria harvested in stationary phase, when cell-associated K1 polysaccharide is lowest. We conclude that (i) there is a threshold level of K1 CP needed to confer protection from lysis by serum, and this is usually exceeded under standard growth conditions; (ii) at a given level of K1 CP the LPS phenotype is an important determinant of bacterial killing; and (iii) the loss of capsule at low pH may be an additional mechanism by which hosts defend against invasive infection by K1-encapsulated E. coli. Images PMID:3047064

  19. Antibiofilm polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Rendueles, Olaya; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bacterial extracellular polysaccharides have been shown to mediate many of the cell-to cell and cell-to-surface interactions that are required for the formation, cohesion and stabilization of bacterial biofilms. However, recent studies have identified several bacterial polysaccharides that inhibit biofilm formation by a wide-spectrum of bacteria and fungi both in vitro and in vivo. This review discusses the composition, modes of action, and potential biological roles of antibiofilm polysaccharides recently identified in bacteria and eukaria. Some of these molecules may have technological applications as antibiofilm agents in industry and medicine. PMID:22730907

  20. Polysaccharide synthesis in relation to nodulation behavior of Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed Central

    Breedveld, M W; Cremers, H C; Batley, M; Posthumus, M A; Zevenhuizen, L P; Wijffelman, C A; Zehnder, A J

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we characterized four Tn5 mutants derived from Rhizobium leguminosarum RBL5515 with respect to synthesis and secretion of cellulose fibrils, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), capsular polysaccharides, and cyclic beta-(1,2)-glucans. One mutant, strain RBL5515 exo-344::Tn5, synthesizes residual amounts of EPS, the repeating unit of which lacks the terminal galactose molecule and the substituents attached to it. On basis of the polysaccharide production pattern of strain RBL5515 exo-344::Tn5, the structural features of the polysaccharides synthesized, and the results of an analysis of the enzyme activities involved, we hypothesize that this strain is affected in a galactose transferase involved in the synthesis of EPS only. All four mutants failed to nodulate plants belonging to the pea cross-inoculation group; on Vicia sativa they induced root hair deformation and rare abortive infection threads. All of the mutants appeared to be pleiotropic, since in addition to defects in the synthesis of EPS, lipopolysaccharide, and/or capsular polysaccharides significant increases in the synthesis and secretion of cyclic beta-(1,2)-glucans were observed. We concluded that it is impossible to correlate a defect in the synthesis of a particular polysaccharide with nodulation characteristics. Images PMID:8423148

  1. Colonization of a voice prosthesis by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Bauters, T G; Moerman, M; Pini, G; Vermeersch, H; Nelis, H J

    2001-08-01

    Tracheoesophageal voice prostheses in laryngectomized patients commonly deteriorate due to the presence of yeasts, particularly Candida species. We describe the first case of colonization of such a device by Cryptococcus neoformans in a patient with a history of glottic carcinoma. The isolate showed an identical genomic pattern with C. neoformans from pigeon excreta in the patient's environment. PMID:11556769

  2. Molecular Genetic Analyses of Mating Pheromones Reveal Intervariety Mating or Hybridization in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Fan, Jinjiang; Stein, Birgit; Behr, Melissa J.; Samsonoff, William A.; Wickes, Brian L.; Chaturvedi, Sudha

    2002-01-01

    The sexual mating of the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is important for pathogenesis studies because the fungal virulence is linked to the α mating type (MATα). We characterized C. neoformans mating pheromones (MFα 1 and MFa1) from 122 strains to understand intervariety hybridization or mating and intervariety virulence. MFα 1 in three C. neoformans varieties showed (a) specific nucleotide polymorphisms, (b) different copy numbers and chromosomal localizations, and (c) unique deduced amino acids in two geographic populations of C. neoformans var. gattii. MFα 1 of different varieties cross-hybridized in Southern hybridizations. Their phylogenetic analyses showed purifying selection (neutral evolution). These observations suggested that MATα strains from any of the three C. neoformans varieties could mate or hybridize in nature with MATa strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans. A few serotype A/D diploid strains provided evidence for mating or hybridization, while a majority of A/D strains tested positive for haploid MFα 1 identical to that of C. neoformans var. grubii. MFα 1 sequence and copy numbers in diploids were identical to those of C. neoformans var. grubii, while their MFa1 sequences were identical to those of C. neoformans var. neoformans; thus, these strains were hybrids. The mice survival curves and histological lesions revealed A/D diploids to be highly pathogenic, with pathogenicity levels similar to that of the C. neoformans var. grubii type strain and unlike the low pathogenicity levels of C. neoformans var. neoformans strains. In contrast to MFα 1 in three varieties, MFa1 amplicons and hybridization signals could be obtained only from two C. neoformans var. neoformans reference strains and eight A/D diploids. This suggested that a yet undiscovered MFa pheromone(s) in C. neoformans var. gattii and C. neoformans var. grubii is unrelated to, highly divergent from, or rarer than that in C. neoformans var. neoformans. These

  3. Serotyping of Cryptococcus neoformans Isolates from Clinical and Environmental Sources in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Baró, Teresa; Torres-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Morera, Yolanda; Alía, Concepción; López, Olga; Méndez, Raul

    1999-01-01

    We determined biovars and serotypes of 154 isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans from clinical and environmental sources from different areas of Spain. All clinical isolates belonged to C. neoformans var. neoformans. Serotypes showed an irregular distribution. C. neoformans var. gattii serotype B was isolated from necropsy specimens from goats with pulmonary disease. PMID:10074545

  4. Characterization of Lipids and Proteins Associated to the Cell Wall of the Acapsular Mutant Cryptococcus neoformans Cap 67.

    PubMed

    Longo, Larissa V G; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Pires, Jhon H S; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Vallejo, Milene C; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Almeida, Igor C; Puccia, Rosana

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes life-threatening meningitis. In this fungus, the cell wall is exceptionally not the outermost structure due to the presence of a surrounding polysaccharide capsule, which has been highly studied. Considering that there is little information about C. neoformans cell wall composition, we aimed at describing proteins and lipids extractable from this organelle, using as model the acapsular mutant C. neoformans cap 67. Purified cell wall preparations were extracted with either chloroform/methanol or hot sodium dodecyl sulfate. Total lipids fractionated in silica gel 60 were analyzed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS), while trypsin digested proteins were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We detected 25 phospholipid species among phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid. Two glycolipid species were identified as monohexosyl ceramides. We identified 192 noncovalently linked proteins belonging to different metabolic processes. Most proteins were classified as secretory, mainly via nonclassical mechanisms, suggesting a role for extracellular vesicles (EV) in transwall transportation. In concert with that, orthologs from 86% of these proteins have previously been reported both in fungal cell wall and/or in EV. The possible role of the presently described structures in fungal-host relationship is discussed. PMID:25733123

  5. Carbonic anhydrase and CO2 sensing during Cryptococcus neoformans growth, differentiation, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Bahn, Yong-Sun; Cox, Gary M; Perfect, John R; Heitman, Joseph

    2005-11-22

    The gas carbon dioxide (CO2) plays a critical role in microbial and mammalian respiration, photosynthesis in algae and plants, chemoreception in insects, and even global warming . However, how CO2 is transported, sensed, and metabolized by microorganisms is largely not understood. For instance, CO2 is known to induce production of polysaccharide capsule virulence determinants in pathogenic bacteria and fungi via unknown mechanisms . Therefore, we studied CO2 actions in growth, differentiation, and virulence of the basidiomycetous human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. The CAN2 gene encoding beta-carbonic anhydrase in C. neoformans was found to be essential for growth in environmental ambient conditions but dispensable for in vivo proliferation and virulence at the high CO2 levels in the host. The can2Delta mutant in vitro growth defect is largely attributable to defective fatty acid synthesis. CO2 was found to inhibit cell-cell fusion but not filamentation during sexual reproduction. The can2 mutation restored early mating events in high CO2 but not later steps (fruiting body formation, sporulation), indicating a major role for carbonic anhydrase and CO2/HCO3- in this developmental cascade leading to the production of infectious spores. Our studies illustrate diverse roles of an ancient enzyme class in enabling environmental survival of a ubiquitous human pathogen. PMID:16303560

  6. Influence of growth temperature of Escherichia coli on K1 capsular antigen production and resistance to opsonization.

    PubMed Central

    Bortolussi, R; Ferrieri, P; Quie, P G

    1983-01-01

    When Escherichia coli strains that produce K1 capsular polysaccharide antigen at 37 degrees C were grown at 22 degrees C, K1 antigen was not detected in the supernatant or washed-cell fraction of broth cultures. Significant amounts of K1 polysaccharide were detected only when the organism was grown at temperatures of 30 degrees C or higher. Rabbits immunized with an E. coli K1 strain (serotype O18ac:K1:H7) grown at 37 degrees C produced agglutinating antibody to somatic antigen and precipitating and agglutinating antibody to capsular K1 antigen; those immunized with this strain grown at 22 degrees C produced antibody to somatic antigen, but not to K1 antigen. Antibody to somatic antigen was markedly reduced by adsorption with the organism grown at 22 degrees C, while antibody to capsular antigen was not. E. coli K1 strains grown at 37 degrees C (K1 present) resisted phagocytosis and killing if they were opsonized solely by the alternative complement pathway (ACP) using magnesium ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N-tetraacetic acid-chelated serum. When these strains were grown at 22 degrees C (K1 absent), they were opsonized efficiently by the ACP (28 versus 94% killing, respectively; P less than 0.001). In addition, a non-K1 mutant of an E. coli K1 strain was opsonized efficiently by the ACP although its encapsulated K1 parent was not. Sensitivity of E. coli strains to the bactericidal activity of serum was observed in strains with and without K1 capsular antigen. These studies demonstrated that production of K1 polysaccharide antigen was regulated by environmental temperature and that K1 capsule plays an essential role in rendering the organism resistant to opsonization by the ACP. PMID:6341228

  7. Solid-state NMR Reveals the Carbon-based Molecular Architecture of Cryptococcus neoformans Fungal Eumelanins in the Cell Wall*

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Itin, Boris; Casadevall, Arturo; Stark, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Melanin pigments protect against both ionizing radiation and free radicals and have potential soil remediation capabilities. Eumelanins produced by pathogenic Cryptococcus neoformans fungi are virulence factors that render the fungal cells resistant to host defenses and certain antifungal drugs. Because of their insoluble and amorphous characteristics, neither the pigment bonding framework nor the cellular interactions underlying melanization of C. neoformans have yielded to comprehensive molecular-scale investigation. This study used the C. neoformans requirement of exogenous obligatory catecholamine precursors for melanization to produce isotopically enriched pigment “ghosts” and applied 2D 13C-13C correlation solid-state NMR to reveal the carbon-based architecture of intact natural eumelanin assemblies in fungal cells. We demonstrated that the aliphatic moieties of solid C. neoformans melanin ghosts include cell-wall components derived from polysaccharides and/or chitin that are associated proximally with lipid membrane constituents. Prior to development of the mature aromatic fungal pigment, these aliphatic moieties form a chemically resistant framework that could serve as the scaffold for melanin synthesis. The indole-based core aromatic moieties show interconnections that are consistent with proposed melanin structures consisting of stacked planar assemblies, which are associated spatially with the aliphatic scaffold. The pyrrole aromatic carbons of the pigments bind covalently to the aliphatic framework via glycoside or glyceride functional groups. These findings establish that the structure of the pigment assembly changes with time and provide the first biophysical information on the mechanism by which melanin is assembled in the fungal cell wall, offering vital insights that can advance the design of bioinspired conductive nanomaterials and novel therapeutics. PMID:25825492

  8. Antibody Response to Cryptococcus neoformans Proteins in Rodents and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin-Chi; Goldman, David L.; Doering, Tamara L.; Pirofski, Liise-anne; Casadevall, Arturo

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence and specificity of serum antibodies to Cryptococcus neoformans proteins was studied in mice and rats with experimental infection, in individuals with or without a history of potential laboratory exposure to C. neoformans, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals who developed cryptococcosis, in matched samples from HIV-positive individuals who did not develop cryptococcosis, and in HIV-negative individuals. Rodents had little or no serum antibody reactive with C. neoformans proteins prior to infection. The intensity and specificity of the rodent antibody response were dependent on the species, the mouse strain, and the viability of the inoculum. All humans had serum antibodies reactive with C. neoformans proteins regardless of the potential exposure, the HIV infection status, or the subsequent development of cryptococcosis. Our results indicate (i) a high prevalence of antibodies reactive with C. neoformans proteins in the sera of rodents after cryptococcal infection and in humans with or without HIV infection; (ii) qualitative and quantitative differences in the antibody profiles of HIV-positive individuals; and (iii) similarities and differences between humans, mice, and rats with respect to the specificity of the antibodies reactive with C. neoformans proteins. The results are consistent with the view that C. neoformans infections are common in human populations, and the results have implications for the development of vaccination strategies against cryptococcosis. PMID:10225877

  9. Application of glyco-blotting for identification of structures of polysaccharides causing membrane fouling in a pilot-scale membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Katsuki; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Miyoshi, Risho; Hoque, Asiful; Miyoshi, Taro; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2015-03-01

    A new approach for the analysis of polysaccharides in membrane bioreactor (MBR) is proposed in this study. Enrichment of polysaccharides by glyco-blotting, in which polysaccharides are specifically collected via interactions between the aldehydes in the polysaccharides and aminooxy groups on glycoblotting beads, enabled MALDI-TOF/MS analysis at a high resolution. Structures of polysaccharides extracted from fouled membranes used in a pilot-scale MBR treating municipal wastewater and those in the supernatant of the mixed liquor suspension in the MBR were investigated. It was found that the overlap between polysaccharides found in the supernatants and those extracted from the fouled membrane was rather limited, suggesting that polysaccharides that dominate in supernatants may not be important in membrane fouling in MBRs. Analysis using a bacterial carbohydrate database suggested that capsular polysaccharides (CPS) and/or lipo-polysaccharides (LPS) produced by gram-negative bacteria are key players in the evolution of membrane fouling in MBRs. PMID:25544495

  10. Simvastatin Reduces Capsular Fibrosis around Silicone Implants.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyu Jin; Park, Ki Rin; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Tae Gon; Kim, Yong-Ha

    2016-08-01

    Capsular fibrosis and contracture occurs in most breast reconstruction patients who undergo radiotherapy, and there is no definitive solution for its prevention. Simvastatin was effective at reducing fibrosis in various models. Peri-implant capsular formation is the result of tissue fibrosis development in irradiated breasts. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on peri-implant fibrosis in rats. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to an experimental group (9 rats, 18 implants) or a control group (9 rats, 18 implants). Two hemispherical silicone implants, 10 mm in diameter, were inserted in subpanniculus pockets in each rat. The next day, 10-Gy of radiation from a clinical accelerator was targeted at the implants. Simvastatin (15 mg/kg/day) was administered by oral gavage in the experimental group, while animals in the control group received water. At 12 weeks post-implantation, peri-implant capsules were harvested and examined histologically and by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The average capsular thickness was 371.2 μm in the simvastatin group and 491.2 μm in the control group. The fibrosis ratio was significantly different, with 32.33% in the simvastatin group and 58.44% in the control group (P < 0.001). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 gene expression decreased significantly in the simvastatin group compared to the control group (P < 0.001). This study shows that simvastatin reduces radiation-induced capsular fibrosis around silicone implants in rats. This finding offers an alternative therapeutic strategy for reducing capsular fibrosis and contracture after implant-based breast reconstruction. PMID:27478339

  11. Mathematical modeling of pathogenicity of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Jacqueline; Shea, John; Alvarez-Vasquez, Fernando; Qureshi, Asfia; Luberto, Chiara; Voit, Eberhard O; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is the most common cause of fungal meningitis worldwide. In infected patients, growth of the fungus can occur within the phagolysosome of phagocytic cells, especially in non-activated macrophages of immunocompromised subjects. Since this environment is characteristically acidic, Cn must adapt to low pH to survive and efficiently cause disease. In the present work, we designed, tested, and experimentally validated a theoretical model of the sphingolipid biochemical pathway in Cn under acidic conditions. Simulations of metabolic fluxes and enzyme deletions or downregulation led to predictions that show good agreement with experimental results generated post hoc and reconcile intuitively puzzling results. This study demonstrates how biochemical modeling can yield testable predictions and aid our understanding of fungal pathogenesis through the design and computational simulation of hypothetical experiments. PMID:18414484

  12. Polysaccharide Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Bruce A.; Svensson, Birte; Collins, Michelle E.; Rastall, Robert A.

    An overview of current and potential enzymes used to degrade polysaccharides is presented. Such depolymerases are comprised of glycoside hydrolases, glycosyl transferases, phosphorylases and lyases, and their classification, active sites and action patterns are discussed. Additionally, the mechanisms that these enzymes use to cleave glycosidic linkages is reviewed as are inhibitors of depolymerase activity; reagents which react with amino acid residues, glycoside derivatives, transition state inhibitors and proteinaceous inhibitors. The characterization of various enzymes of microbial, animal or plant origin has led to their widespread use in the production of important oligosaccharides which can be incorporated into food stuffs. Sources of polysaccharides of particular interest in this chapter are those from plants and include inulin, dextran, xylan and pectin, as their hydrolysis products are purported to be functional foods in the context of gastrointestinal health. An alternative use of degraded polysaccharides is in the treatment of disease. The possibility exists to treat bacterial exopolysaccharide with lyases from bacteriophage to produce oligosaccharides exhibiting bioactive sequences. Although this area is currently in its infancy the knowledge is available to investigate further.

  13. Routine Complete Capsular Closure During Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Joshua D.; Slikker, William; Gupta, Anil K.; McCormick, Frank M.; Nho, Shane J.

    2013-01-01

    The utility of hip arthroscopy has recently progressed beyond diagnostic to therapeutic purposes addressing central and peripheral compartment pathologies. Capsulotomy provides freedom of visualization and instrumentation. The contribution to hip stability of both dynamic and static hip structures is not fully understood. However, both basic science biomechanical and clinical outcome studies have exhibited a relevant role of the capsule in hip stability. Though rare, iatrogenic post-arthroscopy subluxation and dislocation have been reported. Therefore many surgeons have cautioned against aggressive capsulotomy or capsulectomy without repair, because of the potential for precipitation of iatrogenic hip instability. We typically perform a “T” capsulotomy and recommend complete capsular closure in conjunction with labral repair and osseous femoral and acetabular treatment. A safe, efficient, and effective method to accomplish complete capsular closure is presented to reduce iatrogenic postoperative hip instability. PMID:23875156

  14. Capsular Contracture In Silicone Breast Implants: Insights From Rat Models.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Vilberto J; D'Acampora, Armando; Neves, Fernanda S; Mendes, Paulo R; Vasconcellos, Zulmar A DE; Neves, Rodrigo D'Eça; Figueiredo, Claudia P

    2016-09-01

    Breast augmentation with silicone implants is one of the most common procedures performed by plastic surgeons around the world. Capsular contracture is a frequent complication in breast augmentation and reconstructive surgery, that requires invasive intervention. The inflammatory response to implanted mammary prostheses appears to be directly associated to capsular contracture. This review discusses the evidences from rat models studies, on the role of inflammation and fibrosis in capsular contraction and its relation to silicone breast implants surface. PMID:27627068

  15. Induction of Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular antibody in neonatal rabbits by gastrointestinal colonization with cross-reacting Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Myerowitz, R L; Handzel, Z T; Scheerson, R; Robbins, J B

    1973-02-01

    In two separate experiments, newborn rabbits were fed a live suspension of either of two Escherichia coli strains which possess a "K" antigen cross-reactive with the capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b. Both feedings were harmless and resulted in fecal excretion of the fed E. coli in most animals as well as active immunization of fed animals toward H. influenzae type b. Feeding non-enteropathogenic, cross-reacting E coli to newborns may be a method for inducing active immunity toward H. influenzae type b diseases by accelerating the acquisition of "natural" immunity. PMID:4572607

  16. Intron retention-dependent gene regulation in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hilarion, Sara; Paulet, Damien; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Hon, Chung-Chau; Lechat, Pierre; Mogensen, Estelle; Moyrand, Frédérique; Proux, Caroline; Barboux, Rony; Bussotti, Giovanni; Hwang, Jungwook; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Janbon, Guilhem

    2016-01-01

    The biological impact of alternative splicing is poorly understood in fungi, although recent studies have shown that these microorganisms are usually intron-rich. In this study, we re-annotated the genome of C. neoformans var. neoformans using RNA-Seq data. Comparison with C. neoformans var. grubii revealed that more than 99% of ORF-introns are in the same exact position in the two varieties whereas UTR-introns are much less evolutionary conserved. We also confirmed that alternative splicing is very common in C. neoformans, affecting nearly all expressed genes. We also observed specific regulation of alternative splicing by environmental cues in this yeast. However, alternative splicing does not appear to be an efficient method to diversify the C. neoformans proteome. Instead, our data suggest the existence of an intron retention-dependent mechanism of gene expression regulation that is not dependent on NMD. This regulatory process represents an additional layer of gene expression regulation in fungi and provides a mechanism to tune gene expression levels in response to any environmental modification. PMID:27577684

  17. Intron retention-dependent gene regulation in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hilarion, Sara; Paulet, Damien; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Hon, Chung-Chau; Lechat, Pierre; Mogensen, Estelle; Moyrand, Frédérique; Proux, Caroline; Barboux, Rony; Bussotti, Giovanni; Hwang, Jungwook; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Janbon, Guilhem

    2016-01-01

    The biological impact of alternative splicing is poorly understood in fungi, although recent studies have shown that these microorganisms are usually intron-rich. In this study, we re-annotated the genome of C. neoformans var. neoformans using RNA-Seq data. Comparison with C. neoformans var. grubii revealed that more than 99% of ORF-introns are in the same exact position in the two varieties whereas UTR-introns are much less evolutionary conserved. We also confirmed that alternative splicing is very common in C. neoformans, affecting nearly all expressed genes. We also observed specific regulation of alternative splicing by environmental cues in this yeast. However, alternative splicing does not appear to be an efficient method to diversify the C. neoformans proteome. Instead, our data suggest the existence of an intron retention-dependent mechanism of gene expression regulation that is not dependent on NMD. This regulatory process represents an additional layer of gene expression regulation in fungi and provides a mechanism to tune gene expression levels in response to any environmental modification. PMID:27577684

  18. Mechanisms of inhibition of Cryptococcus neoformans by human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, S M; North, E A; Dupont, M P; Harrison, T S

    1995-01-01

    Recently, our laboratory and others have demonstrated that human peripheral blood T and NK lymphocytes directly inhibit the growth of Cryptococcus neoformans. In this study, we further define the conditions under which lymphocyte-mediated fungistasis against C. neoformans occurs and examine whether mechanisms implicated in lymphocyte-mediated activities against other target cells are also involved in anticryptococcal activity. The addition of whole or broken heat-killed C. neoformans modestly inhibited lymphocyte-mediated fungistasis, whereas other particulates had no effect. The hydroxyl radical scavenger catechin, but not diethyl urea or propyl gallate, profoundly inhibited fungistasis. Salicylic acid inhibited fungistasis in a dose-dependent fashion. However, two other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, piroxicam and indomethacin, had no effect, suggesting that the mechanism of inhibition by salicylic acid was cyclooxygenase independent. Reagent prostaglandin E2, at concentrations shown by others to inhibit NK cell-mediated bactericidal and tumorlytic activities, had no effect on lymphocyte-mediated fungistasis. The addition of selected monoclonal antibodies or ligands reactive with receptors on human lymphocytes had no significant effect on lymphocyte-mediated fungistasis. Acapsular, small-capsuled, and large-capsuled C. neoformans organisms were inhibited by lymphocytes to an approximately equal extent. These data demonstrate that lymphocyte-mediated activity against C. neoformans proceeds regardless of the presence of capsule and by mechanisms at least in part dissimilar from those seen with other target cells. PMID:7642290

  19. Cryptococcus neoformans: a sugar-coated killer with designer genes.

    PubMed

    Perfect, John R

    2005-09-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans has become a common central nervous system pathogen as the immunocompromised populations enlarge world-wide. This encapsulated yeast has significant advantages for the study of fungal pathogenesis and these include: (1) a clinically important human pathogen; (2) a tractable genetic system; (3) advanced molecular biology foundation; (4) understanding of several virulence phenotypes; (5) well-studied pathophysiology; and (6) robust animal models. With the use of a sequenced genome and site-directed mutagenesis to produce specific null mutants, the virulence composite of C. neoformans has begun to be identified one gene at a time. Studies into capsule production, melanin synthesis, high temperature growth, metabolic pathways and a variety of signaling pathways have led to understandings of what makes this yeast a pathogen at the molecular level. Multiple principles of molecular pathogenesis have been demonstrated in virulence studies with C. neoformans. These include evolutionary differences between the varieties of C. neoformans in their genes for virulence, quantitative impact of genes on the virulence composite, species and site-specific importance of a virulence gene, gene expression correlation with its functional importance or phenotype and the impact of a pathogenesis gene on the host immune response. C. neoformans has now become a primary model to study molecular fungal pathogenesis with the goal of identifying drug targets or vaccine strategies. PMID:16055314

  20. Isolation and characterization of the Cryptococcus neoformans MATa pheromone gene.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Carol M; Fu, Jianmin; Woodlee, Gay L; Seymour, Tara S; Wickes, Brian L

    2002-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a heterothallic basidiomycete with two mating types, MATa and MATalpha. The mating pathway of this fungus has a number of conserved genes, including a MATalpha-specific pheromone (MFalpha1). A modified differential display strategy was used to identify a gene encoding the MATa pheromone. The gene, designated MFa1, is 42 amino acids in length and contains a conserved farnesylation motif. MFa1 is present in three linked copies that span a 20-kb fragment of MATa-specific DNA and maps to the MAT-containing chromosome. Transformation studies showed that MFa1 induced filament formation only in MATalpha cells, demonstrating that MFa1 is functionally conserved. Sequence analysis of the predicted Mfa1 and Mfalpha1 proteins revealed that, in contrast to other fungi such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the C. neoformans pheromone genes are structurally and functionally conserved. However, unlike the MFalpha1 gene, which is found in MATalpha strains of both varieties of C. neoformans, MFa1 is specific for the neoformans variety of C. neoformans. PMID:11901112

  1. Immunogenicity of meningococcal B polysaccharide conjugated to tetanus toxoid or CRM197 via adipic acid dihydrazide.

    PubMed

    Bartoloni, A; Norelli, F; Ceccarini, C; Rappuoli, R; Costantino, P

    1995-04-01

    Vaccine development against Group B Neisseria meningitidis is complicated by the nature of the capsular polysaccharide, which is alpha 2-8-linked poly-sialic acid, identical in structure to the poly-sialic acid found in many mammalian tissues during development. To test the feasibility of a vaccine based on this polysaccharide, we synthesized several conjugates of meningococcal B polysaccharide linked to a carrier protein (tetanus toxoid or diphtheria CRM197), via an adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) spacer. All conjugates induced a strong immune response. However, most of the antibodies were not directed against the Meningococcus B polysaccharide and could not be inhibited by the purified polysaccharide alone. Further investigations showed that the antibodies recognized an epitope composed by the junction between the spacer and the polysaccharide and protein, that is not present in the native polysaccharide and is generated during the coupling reaction. This epitope becomes immunodominant with respect to the poorly immunogenic polysaccharide. While the majority of the immune response is directed against the above epitope, the conjugates induced also an immune response against the Meningococcus B polysaccharide. The anti-Meningococcus B antibodies elicited are of the IgM and IgG class and are inhibitable by the polysaccharide. Moreover, they are bactericidal, thus suggesting that they would induce protection against disease. PMID:7543714

  2. Capsular Contracture after Breast Augmentation: An Update for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Headon, Hannah; Kasem, Adbul

    2015-01-01

    Capsular contracture is the most common complication following implant based breast surgery and is one of the most common reasons for reoperation. Therefore, it is important to try and understand why this happens, and what can be done to reduce its incidence. A literature search using the MEDLINE database was conducted including search terms 'capsular contracture breast augmentation', 'capsular contracture pathogenesis', 'capsular contracture incidence', and 'capsular contracture management', which yielded 82 results which met inclusion criteria. Capsular contracture is caused by an excessive fibrotic reaction to a foreign body (the implant) and has an overall incidence of 10.6%. Risk factors that were identified included the use of smooth (vs. textured) implants, a subglandular (vs. submuscular) placement, use of a silicone (vs. saline) filled implant and previous radiotherapy to the breast. The standard management of capsular contracture is surgical via a capsulectomy or capsulotomy. Medical treatment using the off-label leukotriene receptor antagonist Zafirlukast has been reported to reduce severity and help prevent capsular contracture from forming, as has the use of acellular dermal matrices, botox and neopocket formation. However, nearly all therapeutic approaches are associated with a significant rate of recurrence. Capsular contracture is a multifactorial fibrotic process the precise cause of which is still unknown. The incidence of contracture developing is lower with the use of textured implants, submuscular placement and the use of polyurethane coated implants. Symptomatic capsular contracture is usually managed surgically, however recent research has focussed on preventing capsular contracture from occurring, or treating it with autologous fat transfer. PMID:26430623

  3. In vitro evaluation of combination of fluconazole and flucytosine against Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, M H; Barchiesi, F; McGough, D A; Yu, V L; Rinaldi, M G

    1995-01-01

    Amphotericin B and fluconazole are current acceptable therapies for cryptococcal meningitis; however, their effect remains suboptimal. The combination of fluconazole and flucytosine has yielded encouraging clinical results in human immunodeficiency virus patients with cryptococcal meningitis. To investigate the biological basis of this finding, we performed in vitro combination testing of fluconazole and flucytosine against 50 clinical strains of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans. Synergy (fractional inhibitory concentration index of < 1.0) was observed in 62% of cases, while antagonism (fractional inhibitory concentration index of > 2.0) was not observed. For cases in which synergy was not achieved (autonomous or additive effects), the beneficial effect of the combination was still seen (i.e., there was still a decrease, although not as dramatic, in the MIC of one or both drugs when used in combination). The in vitro inhibitory action of flucytosine was greatly enhanced by the addition of fluconazole; the flucytosine MICs for Cryptococcus isolates were markedly decreased to concentrations which were severalfold lower than the achievable cerebrospinal fluid flucytosine concentration. On the other hand, the addition of flucytosine did not greatly enhance the in vitro activity of fluconazole if the initial fluconazole MIC for the isolate was > or = 8 micrograms/ml. Controlled clinical studies are warranted to further elucidate the potential utility of fluconazole-flucytosine combination therapy. PMID:7486902

  4. The formation of titan cells in Cryptococcus neoformans depends on the mouse strain and correlates with induction of Th2-type responses.

    PubMed

    García-Barbazán, Irene; Trevijano-Contador, Nuria; Rueda, Cristina; de Andrés, Belén; Pérez-Tavárez, Raquel; Herrero-Fernández, Inés; Gaspar, María Luisa; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast that can form titan cells in the lungs, which are fungal cells of abnormal enlarged size. Little is known about the factors that trigger titan cells. In particular, it is not known how the host environment influences this transition. In this work, we describe the formation of titan cells in two mouse strains, CD1 and C57BL/6J. We found that the proportion of C. neoformans titan cells was significantly higher in C57BL/6J mice than in CD1. This higher proportion of titan cells was associated with a higher dissemination of the yeasts to the brain. Histology sections demonstrated eosinophilia in infected animals, although it was significantly lower in the CD1 mice which presented infiltration of lymphocytes. Both mouse strains presented infiltration of granulocytes, but the amount of eosinophils was higher in C57BL/6J. CD1 mice showed a significant accumulation of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL17, while C57BL/BL mice had an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4. IgM antibodies to the polysaccharide capsule and total IgE were more abundant in the sera from C57BL/6J, confirming that these animals present a Th2-type response. We conclude that titan cell formation in C. neoformans depends, not only on microbe factors, but also on the host environment. PMID:26243235

  5. ALL2, a Homologue of ALL1, Has a Distinct Role in Regulating pH Homeostasis in the Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Neena; Bouklas, Tejas; Gupta, Anjali; Varshney, Avanish K.; Orner, Erika P.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a facultative intracellular fungal pathogen that has a polysaccharide capsule and causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Its capsule, as well as its ability to survive in the acidic environment of the phagolysosome, contributes to the pathogen's resilience in the host environment. Previously, we reported that downregulation of allergen 1 (ALL1) results in the secretion of a shorter, more viscous exopolysaccharide with less branching and structural complexity, as well as altered iron homeostasis. Now, we report on a homologous coregulated gene, allergen 2 (ALL2). ALL2's function was characterized by generating null mutants in C. neoformans. In contrast to ALL1, loss of ALL2 attenuated virulence in the pulmonary infection model. The all2Δ mutant shed a less viscous exopolysaccharide and exhibited higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide than the wild type, and as a result, the all2Δ mutant was more resistant to macrophage-mediated killing. Transcriptome analysis further supported the distinct function of these two genes. Unlike ALL1's involvement in iron homeostasis, we now present data on ALL2's unique function in maintaining intracellular pH in low-pH conditions. Thus, our data highlight that C. neoformans, a human-pathogenic basidiomycete, has evolved a unique set of virulence-associated genes that contributes to its resilience in the human niche. PMID:26597983

  6. Serotyping of 467 Cryptococcus neoformans Isolates from Clinical and Environmental Sources in Brazil: Analysis of Host and Regional Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Marília M.; Lazera, Márcia S.; Barbosa, Glaucia G.; Trilles, Luciana; Balassiano, Beatriz R.; Macedo, Regina C. L.; Bezerra, Cláudia C. F.; Pérez, Maurício A.; Cardarelli, Paola; Wanke, Bodo

    2003-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an important zoopathogen, and it is one of the most prevalent lethal mycotic agents. Its polysaccharide capsule, synthesized in vivo and in vitro, is a virulence factor, contains predominantly glucuronoxylomannan, and is responsible for the antigenic differentiation of serotypes A, B, C, D, and AD. A total of 467 isolates of C. neoformans obtained from clinical and environmental sources from Brazilian regions were studied serologically by using the Crypto Check Iatron RM 304-K kit. Serotyping of the clinical isolates showed the following prevalences of the serotypes: A (77.95%), followed by B (18.2%), AD (1.3%), D (0.4%), C (0.2%), and untypeable (1.93%). The epidemiology of serotype A in the Brazilian southern and southeastern regions reproduces the picture observed worldwide. In contrast, serotype B was the most frequent agent of cryptococcosis in the northeastern region, occurring nearly equally in male and female healthy hosts. Among the isolates from environmental sources, serotypes A and B were found to occur in the hollows of tropical trees of the genera Cassia, Ficus, and Moquillea. The few isolates from Eucalyptus camaldulensis debris were serotypes A and B and untypeable. Overall, no association with a specific host tree was identified for these serotypes, denoting a distinct ecoepidemiological regional pattern. The one serotype C isolate was recovered from a human immunodeficiency virus-negative host. Serotype AD predominated over serotype D among both clinical and environmental isolates. PMID:12517828

  7. Serotyping of 467 Cryptococcus neoformans isolates from clinical and environmental sources in Brazil: analysis of host and regional patterns.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Marília M; Lazera, Márcia S; Barbosa, Glaucia G; Trilles, Luciana; Balassiano, Beatriz R; Macedo, Regina C L; Bezerra, Cláudia C F; Pérez, Maurício A; Cardarelli, Paola; Wanke, Bodo

    2003-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an important zoopathogen, and it is one of the most prevalent lethal mycotic agents. Its polysaccharide capsule, synthesized in vivo and in vitro, is a virulence factor, contains predominantly glucuronoxylomannan, and is responsible for the antigenic differentiation of serotypes A, B, C, D, and AD. A total of 467 isolates of C. neoformans obtained from clinical and environmental sources from Brazilian regions were studied serologically by using the Crypto Check Iatron RM 304-K kit. Serotyping of the clinical isolates showed the following prevalences of the serotypes: A (77.95%), followed by B (18.2%), AD (1.3%), D (0.4%), C (0.2%), and untypeable (1.93%). The epidemiology of serotype A in the Brazilian southern and southeastern regions reproduces the picture observed worldwide. In contrast, serotype B was the most frequent agent of cryptococcosis in the northeastern region, occurring nearly equally in male and female healthy hosts. Among the isolates from environmental sources, serotypes A and B were found to occur in the hollows of tropical trees of the genera Cassia, Ficus, and MOQUILLEA: The few isolates from Eucalyptus camaldulensis debris were serotypes A and B and untypeable. Overall, no association with a specific host tree was identified for these serotypes, denoting a distinct ecoepidemiological regional pattern. The one serotype C isolate was recovered from a human immunodeficiency virus-negative host. Serotype AD predominated over serotype D among both clinical and environmental isolates. PMID:12517828

  8. Using Solid-state NMR to Monitor the Molecular Consequences of Cryptococcus neoformans Melanization with Different Catecholamine Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Frases, Susana; Itin, Boris; Casadevall, Arturo; Stark, Ruth E.

    2012-01-01

    Melanins are a class of natural pigments associated with a wide range of biological functions, including microbial virulence, energy transduction, and protection against solar radiation. Because of their insolubility and structural heterogeneity, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides an unprecedented means to define the molecular architecture of these enigmatic pigments. The requirement of obligatory catecholamines for melanization of the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans also offers unique opportunities for investigating melanin development. In the current study, pigments produced with L-dopa, methyl-L-dopa, epinephrine, and norepinephrine precursors are compared structurally using 13C and 1H magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR. Striking structural differences were observed for both aromatic and aliphatic molecular constituents of the mature fungal pigment assemblies, thus making it possible to redefine the molecular prerequisites for formation of the aromatic domains of insoluble indole-based biopolymers, to rationalize their distinctive physical characteristics, and to delineate the role of cellular constituents in assembly of the melanized macromolecules with polysaccharides and fatty acyl chain-containing moieties. By achieving an augmented understanding of the mechanisms of C. neoformans melanin biosynthesis and cellular assembly, such studies can guide future drug discovery efforts related to melanin-associated virulence, resistance to tumor therapy, and production of melanin mimetics under cell-free conditions. PMID:22765382

  9. Vaccines for the prevention of meningococcal capsular group B disease: What have we recently learned?

    PubMed

    Findlow, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal disease remains a feared and devastating cause of sepsis and meningitis. Disease incidence is highest among infants and children although a significant burden of disease is experienced by adolescents, young adults and those with specific risk-factors. Prevention of disease against capsular groups A, C, W and Y; 4 of the 5 most pathogenic groups is achievable using capsular polysaccharide vaccines. It has only recently been possible to provide protection against capsular group B (MenB) strains following the licensure of a 4 component group B vaccine (4CMenB) in Europe in 2013. Following licensure, 4CMenB has been used in specific at-risk groups and in response to outbreaks of MenB disease. The largest outbreak interventions have been in students at 2 universities in the United States and for all individuals aged 2 months to 20 years of age in Quebec, Canada. The vaccine was recommended in February 2014 for implementation into the UK infant schedule at 2, 4 and 12 months of age, although it has taken over 12 months to resolve procurement discussions to enable implementation. The UK recommendation incorporates prophylactic paracetamol with infant doses when 4CMenB is administered concomitantly with routine vaccines. This is based on recent data demonstrating the ability of paracetamol to reduce fever rates to background levels without impacting immunogenicity. Post-implementation surveillance will be important to provide vaccine efficacy data as this was not possible to determine in pre-licensure studies due to the relative infrequency of MenB cases. PMID:26619037

  10. Polysaccharide capsule of Escherichia coli: microscope study of its size, structure, and sites of synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, M E; Thurow, H

    1977-01-01

    This report describes the structure, size, and shape of the uncollapsed polysaccharide capsule of Escherichia coli strain Bi 161/42 [O9:K29(A):H-], its ultrastructural preservation as well as the filamentous components of the isolated capsular material. In a temperature-sensitive mutant, sites were localized at which capsular polysaccharide is "exported" to the cell surface. The highly hydrated capsule of the wild-type cells was visible in the uncollapsed state after freeze-etching, whereas dehydration in greater than or equal to 50% acetone or alcohol caused the capsule to collapse into thick bundles. This was prevented by pretreatment of the cell with capsule-specific immunoglobulin G; the capsule appeared as a homogeneous layer of 250- to 300-nm thickness. The structural preservation depended on the concentration of the anti-capsular immunoglobulin G. Temperature-sensitive mutants, unable to produce capsular antigen at elevated temperatures, showed, 10 to 15 min after shift down to permissive temperature, polysaccharide strands with K29 specificity appearing at the cell surface at roughly 20 sites per cell; concomitantly, capsule-directed antibody started to agglutinate the bacteria. The sites at which the new antigen emerged were found in random distribution over the entire surface of the organism. Spreading of purified polysaccharide was achieved on air-water interfaces; after subsequent shadow casting with heavy metal, filamentous elements were observed with a smallest class of filaments measuring 250 nm in length and 3 to 6 nm in width. At one end these fibers revealed a knoblike structure of about 10-nm diameter. The slimelike polysaccharides from mutants produced filamentous bundles of greater than 100-microns length, with antigenic and phage-receptor properties indistinguishable from those of the wild-type K29 capsule antigen. Images PMID:400798

  11. Cryptococcus neoformans as a cause of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Alexander T; Al Kharrat, Tamim; Kourtis, Athena P

    2010-06-01

    The most frequent manifestations of Cryptococcus neoformans (CN) disease are systemic infections in immunocompromised patients and localized pulmonary disease in immunocompetent individuals. Such pulmonary cryptococcosis can range from asymptomatic infection to frank pneumonia that can be severe. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is a rare severe form of pneumonitis caused by a variety of infectious and toxic agents or connective tissue diseases. BOOP due to Cryptococcus neoformans has very rarely been reported; there have been only five such case reports, mostly in immunocompromised patients. We report herein on a case of CN-associated BOOP in an immunocompetent individual and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this entity. PMID:20169387

  12. Variations in the molecular masses of the capsular exopolysaccharides amylovoran, pyrifolan and stewartan.

    PubMed

    Schollmeyer, Martin; Langlotz, Christine; Huber, Anton; Coplin, David L; Geider, Klaus

    2012-04-01

    Erwinia amylovora, causing fire blight of apple, pear and some ornamentals, Erwinia pyrifoliae, causing Asian pear blight, and Pantoea stewartii, causing Stewart's wilt of sweet maize, synthesize capsular extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) with a high molecular mass. The EPSs are virulence factors and form viscous aggregates, which participate in clogging vessels of infected plants and causing wilting. The sizes of EPSs produced under different environmental growth conditions were determined by analysis with large pore HPLC columns. Their molecular mass of ca. 5 MDa, when isolated from agar plates, decreases to ca. 1 MDa for E. amylovora amylovoran from freeze-dried supernatants from liquid cultures and to 2 MDa for freeze-dried preparations of P. stewartii stewartan. Size changes were also found following growth in various other media and for different strains. Stewartan, amylovoran and E. pyrifoliae pyrifolan were also shown to be completely degraded by a bacteriophage EPS depolymerase. PMID:22266385

  13. Primary Frozen Shoulder Syndrome: Arthroscopic Capsular Release.

    PubMed

    Arce, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or primary frozen shoulder syndrome, is a fairly common orthopaedic problem characterized by shoulder pain and loss of motion. In most cases, conservative treatment (6-month physical therapy program and intra-articular steroid injections) improves symptoms and restores shoulder motion. In refractory cases, arthroscopic capsular release is indicated. This surgical procedure carries several advantages over other treatment modalities. First, it provides precise and controlled release of the capsule and ligaments, reducing the risk of traumatic complications observed after forceful shoulder manipulation. Second, release of the capsule and the involved structures with a radiofrequency device delays healing, which prevents adhesion formation. Third, the technique is straightforward, and an oral postoperative steroid program decreases pain and allows for a pleasant early rehabilitation program. Fourth, the procedure is performed with the patient fully awake under an interscalene block, which boosts the patient's confidence and adherence to the physical therapy protocol. In patients with refractory primary frozen shoulder syndrome, arthroscopic capsular release emerges as a suitable option that leads to a faster and long-lasting recovery. PMID:26870652

  14. Primary Frozen Shoulder Syndrome: Arthroscopic Capsular Release

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or primary frozen shoulder syndrome, is a fairly common orthopaedic problem characterized by shoulder pain and loss of motion. In most cases, conservative treatment (6-month physical therapy program and intra-articular steroid injections) improves symptoms and restores shoulder motion. In refractory cases, arthroscopic capsular release is indicated. This surgical procedure carries several advantages over other treatment modalities. First, it provides precise and controlled release of the capsule and ligaments, reducing the risk of traumatic complications observed after forceful shoulder manipulation. Second, release of the capsule and the involved structures with a radiofrequency device delays healing, which prevents adhesion formation. Third, the technique is straightforward, and an oral postoperative steroid program decreases pain and allows for a pleasant early rehabilitation program. Fourth, the procedure is performed with the patient fully awake under an interscalene block, which boosts the patient's confidence and adherence to the physical therapy protocol. In patients with refractory primary frozen shoulder syndrome, arthroscopic capsular release emerges as a suitable option that leads to a faster and long-lasting recovery. PMID:26870652

  15. The Role of Host Gender in the Pathogenesis of Cryptococcus neoformans Infections

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Erin E.; Hobbs, Letizia M.; Rivera, Johanna; Casadevall, Arturo; Potts, Wayne K.; Smith, Jennifer M.; Ory, Jeramia J.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is a pathogenic yeast and the cause of cryptococcal meningitis. Prevalence of disease between males and females is skewed, with males having an increased incidence of disease. Based on the reported gender susceptibility differences to Cn in the literature, we used clinical isolates from Botswanan HIV-infected patients to test the hypothesis that different gender environments exerted different selective pressures on Cn. When we examined this data set, we found that men had significantly higher risk of death despite having significantly higher CD4+ T lymphocyte counts upon admittance to the hospital. These observations suggested that Cn strains are uniquely adapted to different host gender environments and that the male immune response may be less efficient in controlling Cn infection. To discriminate between these possibilities, we tested whether there were phenotypic differences between strains isolated from males and females and whether there was an interaction between Cn and the host immune response. Virulence phenotypes showed that Cn isolates from females had longer doubling times and released more capsular glucoronoxylomannan (GXM). The presence of testosterone but not 17-β estradiol was associated with higher levels of GXM release for a laboratory strain and 28 clinical isolates. We also measured phagocytic efficiency, survival of Cn, and amount of killing of human macrophages by Cn after incubation with four isolates. While macrophages from females phagocytosed more Cn than macrophages from males, male macrophages had a higher fungal burden and showed increased killing by Cn. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that differential interaction between Cn and macrophages within different gender environments contribute to the increased prevalence of cryptococcosis in males. This could be related to differential expression of cryptococcal virulence genes and capsule metabolism, changes in Cn phagocytosis and increased death

  16. Production of diagnostic pigment by phenoloxidase activity of cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C E; Kapica, L

    1972-11-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans produces brown pigmented colonies when grown on agar media made from an extract of potatoes and carrots, broad beans (Vicia faba), or Guizotia abyssinica seeds. Since other yeasts do not produce the pigment, these media are useful as differential isolation media for C. neoformans. Similar specific pigment was produced by C. neoformans on chemically defined agar media which contained six different substrates of phenoloxidase (o-diphenol: oxygen oxidoreductase EC 1.10.3.1) an enzyme which catalyses the oxidation of o-diphenols to melanin. Substrates were incorporated singly into the media and included L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), chlorogenic acid, protocatechuic acid, catechol, norepinephrine, and 3-hydroxytyramine hydrochloride (dopamine). No pigment was produced on media without substrate. Phenoloxidase activity in (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitates of C. neoformans cell-free extract was assayed by measuring increases in absorbance at 480 nm produced in solutions of L-DOPA. This reaction showed oxygen uptake and was effectively inhibited by copper chelators, but not by catalase. The enzyme also oxidized the five other substrates which induced pigment formation. Electron micrographs of cells incubated in L-DOPA showed deposition of the pigment in the cell wall. PMID:4118328

  17. Cryptococcus neoformans copper detoxification machinery is critical for fungal virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chen; Festa, Richard A.; Chen, Ying-Lien; Espart, Anna; Palacios, Òscar; Espín, Jordi; Capdevila, Mercè; Atrian, Sílvia; Heitman, Joseph; Thiele, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Copper (Cu) is an essential metal that is toxic at high concentrations. Thus, pathogens often rely on host Cu for growth, but host cells can hyper-accumulate Cu to exert anti-microbial effects. The human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans encodes various Cu-responsive genes but their role in infection is unclear. We determine that pulmonary C. neoformans infection results in Cu-specific induction of genes encoding the Cu-detoxifying metallothionein (Cmt) proteins. Mutant strains lacking CMTs or expressing Cmt variants defective in Cu-coordination exhibit severely attenuated virulence and reduced pulmonary colonization. Consistent with the up-regulation of Cmt proteins, C. neoformans pulmonary infection results in increased serum Cu concentrations and respectively increases and decreases alveolar macrophage expression of the Cu importer, Ctr1, and ATP7A, a transporter implicated in phagosomal Cu compartmentalization. These studies indicate that the host mobilizes Cu as an innate anti-fungal defense but that C. neoformans senses and neutralizes toxic Cu to promote infection. PMID:23498952

  18. Primary Larynx Cryptococcus neoformans Infection: A Distinctive Clinical Entity.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Mathieu; Gagné, Andrée-Anne; Côté, Mathieu; Chênevert, Jacinthe; Dubé, Robert; Pelletier, René

    2015-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans can directly infect the vocal cords. Endoscopic findings were undistinctive from most infiltrative diseases. Tissue biopsy was essential for the diagnosis. Inhaled corticosteroids can predispose to the infection, and fluconazole 400 mg daily for at least 6 weeks appeared to be minimal to achieve a permanent cure. PMID:26753169

  19. Temporal kinetics and quantitative analysis of Cryptococcus neoformans nonlytic exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Stukes, Sabriya A; Cohen, Hillel W; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-05-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of cryptococcosis, a disease that is often fatal to those with compromised immune systems. C. neoformans has the capacity to escape phagocytic cells through a process known as nonlytic exocytosis whereby the cryptococcal cell is released from the macrophage into the extracellular environment, leaving both the host and pathogen alive. Little is known about the mechanism behind nonlytic exocytosis, but there is evidence that both the fungal and host cells contribute to the process. In this study, we used time-lapse movies of C. neoformans-infected macrophages to delineate the kinetics and quantitative aspects of nonlytic exocytosis. We analyzed approximately 800 macrophages containing intracellular C. neoformans and identified 163 nonlytic exocytosis events that were further characterized into three subcategories: type I (complete emptying of macrophage), type II (partial emptying of macrophage), and type III (cell-to-cell transfer). The majority of type I and II events occurred after several hours of intracellular residence, whereas type III events occurred significantly (P < 0.001) earlier in the course of macrophage infection. Our results show that nonlytic exocytosis is a morphologically and temporally diverse process that occurs relatively rapidly in the course of macrophage infection. PMID:24595144

  20. Radioimmunotherapy of Cryptococcus neoformans spares bystander mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Ruth A; Jiang, Zewei; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Aim Previously, we showed that radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for cryptococcal infections using radioactively labeled antibodies recognizing the cryptococcal capsule reduced fungal burden and prolonged survival of mice infected with Cryptococcus neoformans. Here, we investigate the effects of RIT on bystander mammalian cells. Materials & methods Heat-killed C. neoformans bound to anticapsular antibodies, unlabeled or labeled with the β-emitter rhenium-188 (16.9-h half-life) or the α-emitter bismuth-213 (46-min half-life), was incubated with macrophage-like J774.16 cells or epithelial-like Chinese hamster ovary cells. Lactate dehydrogenase activity, crystal violet uptake, reduction of tetrazolium dye (2,3)-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfenyl)-(2H)-terazolium-5-carboxanilide and nitric oxide production were measured. Results The J774.16 and Chinese hamster ovary cells maintained membrane integrity, viability and metabolic activity following exposure to radiolabeled C. neoformans. Conclusion RIT of C. neoformans is a selective therapy with minimal effects on host cells and these results are consistent with observations that RIT-treated mice with cryptococcal infection lacked RIT-related pathological changes in lungs and brain tissues. PMID:24020737

  1. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  6. Dynamic and Heterogeneous Mutations to Fluconazole Resistance in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianping; Onyewu, Chiatogu; Yoell, Heather J.; Ali, Rabia Y.; Vilgalys, Rytas J.; Mitchell, Thomas G.

    2001-01-01

    Infections with the human pathogenic basidiomycetous yeast Cryptococcus neoformans are often treated with fluconazole. Resistance to this antifungal agent has been reported. This study investigated the patterns of mutation to fluconazole resistance in C. neoformans in vitro. The MIC of fluconazole was measured for 21 strains of C. neoformans. The MICs for these 21 strains differed (0.25 to 4.0 μg/ml), but the strains were selected for this study because they exhibited no growth on plates of yeast morphology agar (YMA) containing 8 μg of fluconazole per ml. To determine their mutation rates, six independent cultures from a single original colony were established for each of the 21 strains. Each culture was then spread densely on a YMA plate with 8 μg of fluconazole per ml. A random set of putative mutants was subcultured, and the MIC of fluconazole was determined for each mutant. The 21 strains evinced significant heterogeneity in their mutation rates. The MICs of the putative mutants ranged widely, from their original MIC to 64 μg of fluconazole per ml. However, for this set of 21 strains, there was no significant correlation between the original MIC for a strain and the mutation rate of that strain; the MIC for the mutant could not be predicted from the original MIC. These results suggest that dynamic and heterogeneous mutational processes are involved in generating fluconazole resistance in C. neoformans. PMID:11158735

  7. Temporal Kinetics and Quantitative Analysis of Cryptococcus neoformans Nonlytic Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Stukes, Sabriya A.; Cohen, Hillel W.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of cryptococcosis, a disease that is often fatal to those with compromised immune systems. C. neoformans has the capacity to escape phagocytic cells through a process known as nonlytic exocytosis whereby the cryptococcal cell is released from the macrophage into the extracellular environment, leaving both the host and pathogen alive. Little is known about the mechanism behind nonlytic exocytosis, but there is evidence that both the fungal and host cells contribute to the process. In this study, we used time-lapse movies of C. neoformans-infected macrophages to delineate the kinetics and quantitative aspects of nonlytic exocytosis. We analyzed approximately 800 macrophages containing intracellular C. neoformans and identified 163 nonlytic exocytosis events that were further characterized into three subcategories: type I (complete emptying of macrophage), type II (partial emptying of macrophage), and type III (cell-to-cell transfer). The majority of type I and II events occurred after several hours of intracellular residence, whereas type III events occurred significantly (P < 0.001) earlier in the course of macrophage infection. Our results show that nonlytic exocytosis is a morphologically and temporally diverse process that occurs relatively rapidly in the course of macrophage infection. PMID:24595144

  8. Studies on cyanobacterial extracellular polymeric substances: functional groups, calcite biomineralization and formation of capsular polymeric substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, M.; Sibler, S.; Matsko, N.

    2006-12-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of microbial origin are an important class of polymeric materials which have been involved in different processes such as biofilm development or mineral precipitation. Cyanobacteria have been known as potential EPS producers for a long time. Despite their ubiquitous distribution, there is still a great lack of knowledge concerning the diversity of EPS binding sites of different picocyanobacterial strains on the one hand and the specific components of EPS which are responsible for calcite precipitation and crystal morphology on the other hand. It is generally accepted that capsular extracellular polymeric substances are the main components of biofilm matrixes. In this context, it is important to understand under which conditions cyanobacteria produce surface polysaccharides. In a recent study, we characterized the binding sites of EPS of three unicellular autotrophic picocyanobacterial strains of the Synechococcus-type. Potentiometric titrations were conducted to determine different types of functional groups present at the various sites. Precipitation experiments with EPS of different strains allowed for estimating the potential of EPS to precipitate calcium carbonate and the impact of functional groups composition on crystal morphology. In order to clarify the conditions under which cyanobacteria formed capsular EPS, we performed growth experiments in nutrients medium with different phosphorus concentrations (0.4, 4.1, 8.2 and 41 mgP/l). Cyanobacterial cells produced capsular EPS under phosphorus concentrations of 0.4, 4.1 and 8.2 mgP/l, while no capsular EPS were observed for the highest P concentration (41 mgP/l). At this concentration, however, calcium rich storage products were detected in the cells. The results thus suggest that both extracellular and intracellular products are regulated through phosphorus concentrations in growth solutions. Titrations reveal five or six distinct sites on surfaces of picocyanobacterial

  9. Rapid presumptive identification of Cryptococcus neoformans by staphylococcal coagglutination.

    PubMed Central

    Maccani, J E

    1981-01-01

    A coagglutination reagent was prepared by sensitizing the Cowan I strain of Staphylococcus aureus with rabbit immune globulin directed against Cryptococcus neofromans A15 and absorbed with C. laurentii. This reagent was evaluated for its usefulness in differentiating C. neoformans from other yeast colonies rapidly. Antigen-containing extracts were prepared form Sabouraud dextrose agar cultures of 48 C. neoformans, 33 other Cryptococcus species, 21 Candida, 4 Torulopsis, 3 Saccharomyces, and 2 Rhodotorula strains. This was done by suspending a 0.001-ml loopful of colony growth in 0.5 ml of phenolized saline, mixing for 30 s, and then centrifuging. Equal volumes (50 microliters) of coagglutination reagent and yeast extract were mixed within marked circles on a glass slide and then mechanically rotated at 180 rpm for 8 min. Forty-five of the 48 strains of C. neoformans produced strong (3+ to 4+) agglutination, and 3 strains of serotype C produced weak (1+ to 2+) agglutination with the reagent. Other Cryptococcus species which reacted positively were 4 C. albidus subsp. diffluens, 7 C. albidus subsp. albidus, and 2 C. terreus strains; however, false-positive errors in identification were circumvented by performing a supplemental rapid test for nitrate utilization which differentiated these yeasts from C. neoformans. None of the other yeasts tested (including 14 C. laurentii, 2 C. luteolus, and 2 C. uniguttulatus strains) produced any degree of agglutination with the reagent. A commercial cryptococcal latex agglutination reagent (Crypto-Test, Microbiological Associates, Walkersville, Md.) proved less reliable for identifying C. neoformans yeast colonies because of cross-reactions which occurred with all other species of Cryptococcus tested. PMID:7016909

  10. Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV)Treatment of pneumococcal infections with penicillin and other drugs used to be more effective. But ... the disease, through vaccination, even more important. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV) protects against 23 types of pneumococcal ...

  11. Cryptococcus neoformans Dual GDP-Mannose Transporters and Their Role in Biology and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo A.; Griffith, Cara L.; Skowyra, Michael L.; Salinas, Nichole; Williams, Matthew; Maier, Ezekiel J.; Gish, Stacey R.; Liu, Hong; Brent, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic yeast responsible for lethal meningoencephalitis in humans. This pathogen elaborates a polysaccharide capsule, which is its major virulence factor. Mannose constitutes over one-half of the capsule mass and is also extensively utilized in cell wall synthesis and in glycosylation of proteins and lipids. The activated mannose donor for most biosynthetic reactions, GDP-mannose, is made in the cytosol, although it is primarily consumed in secretory organelles. This compartmentalization necessitates specific transmembrane transporters to make the donor available for glycan synthesis. We previously identified two cryptococcal GDP-mannose transporters, Gmt1 and Gmt2. Biochemical studies of each protein expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that both are functional, with similar kinetics and substrate specificities in vitro. We have now examined these proteins in vivo and demonstrate that cells lacking Gmt1 show significant phenotypic differences from those lacking Gmt2 in terms of growth, colony morphology, protein glycosylation, and capsule phenotypes. Some of these observations may be explained by differential expression of the two genes, but others suggest that the two proteins play overlapping but nonidentical roles in cryptococcal biology. Furthermore, gmt1 gmt2 double mutant cells, which are unexpectedly viable, exhibit severe defects in capsule synthesis and protein glycosylation and are avirulent in mouse models of cryptococcosis. PMID:24747214

  12. Enzymatic Modifications of Polysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polysaccharides are often modified chemically in order to improve its properties or to impart specific characteristics. Indeed quite a few commercial products are based on modified polysaccharides. In this talk, I shall describe a new set of modified polysaccharides based on enzymatic reactions. ...

  13. Isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii from Eucalyptus camaldulensis in India.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, A; Jatana, M; Kumar, P; Chatha, L; Kaushal, A; Padhye, A A

    1997-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii has an ecological association with five Eucalyptus species: E. blakelyi, E. camaldulensis, E. gomphocephala, E. rudis, and E. tereticornis. After human infections due to C. neoformans var. gattii were diagnosed in the states of Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, and Karnataka, India, a study was undertaken to investigate the association of C. neoformans var. gattii with Indian eucalypts, especially in the state of Punjab. A total of 696 specimens collected from E. camaldulensis, E. citriodora and E. tereticornis (hybrid) trees were examined for the presence of C. neoformans var. gattii. Flowers from two trees of E. camaldulensis in the Chak Sarkar forest and one from the village of Periana near the Ferozepur area yielded five isolates of C. neoformans var. gattii. The origin of the trees could be traced to Australia, thus providing evidence that the distribution of E. camaldulensis correlated with the distribution of human cryptococcosis cases caused by C. neoformans var. gattii in northern India. PMID:9399553

  14. Capsular Plication for Treatment of Iatrogenic Hip Instability

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Grzybowski, Jeffrey; Salata, Michael J.; Mather, Richard C.; Aoki, Stephen K.; Nho, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly reported reasons for persistent hip pain after hip arthroscopy are residual femoroacetabular impingement, dysplasia and dysplasia variants, or extra-articular impingement. There are some cases in which the underlying osseous pathomorphology has been appropriately treated, and the cause of persistent hip pain can be soft-tissue injuries such as chondrolabral tears or capsular abnormalities. Capsular defects after hip arthroscopy may suggest an alteration of the biomechanical properties of the iliofemoral ligament and lead to iatrogenically induced hip instability. There are a growing number of biomechanical and clinical studies showing the importance of capsular management during hip arthroscopy. We describe the workup, examination under anesthesia, diagnostic arthroscopy, and technique of capsular plication for iatrogenic instability of the hip. PMID:26870636

  15. Is the Capsular Bag Perimeter Round or Elliptical?

    PubMed Central

    Amigó, Alfredo; Bonaque-González, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report findings that could suggest an elliptical shape of the capsular bag. Methods: Five eyes of three patients with axial length greater than 24 mm underwent phacoemulsification cataract surgery with plate-haptic multifocal toric intraocular lens (IOL) implantation oriented in the vertical meridian. Results: In all cases, correct orientation of the IOLs was verified 30 minutes after surgery. After 24 hours, all eyes demonstrated unwanted rotation of the IOLs ranging from 15 to 45 degrees. The IOLs remained stable in the new position in all cases until adhesion of the capsular bag took place. Conclusion: These observations could suggest that the perimeter of the capsular bag has an elliptical shape. Therefore, the IOL tends to become fixated in a meridian of the capsular bag that best fits the diagonal diameter of the IOL. PMID:27413495

  16. Pigment Production on L-Tryptophan Medium by Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Chaskes, Stuart; Cammer, Michael; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years strains previously grouped within Cryptococcus neoformans have been divided into two species C. neoformans and C. gattii, with Cryptococcus neoformans comprising serotypes A, D, and AD and C. gattii comprising serotypes B and C. Cryptococcus neoformans have also been subdivided into two varieties C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A, and C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D. We analyzed the growth and pigment production characteristics of 139 strains of Cryptococcus spp. in L-tryptophan containing media. Nearly all strains of Cryptococcus, including each variety and serotype tested produced a pink water-soluble pigment (molecular weight of 535.2 Da) from L-tryptophan. Consequently, the partial separation of the species was based on whether the pink pigment was secreted into the medium (extracellular) or retained as an intracellular pigment. On L-tryptophan medium C. neoformans var. grubii and serotype AD produced a pink extracellular pigment. In contrast, for C. gattii, the pink pigment was localized intracellularly and masked by heavy production of brown pigments. Pigment production by C. neoformans var. neoformans was variable with some strains producing the pink extracellular pigment and others retained the pink pigment intracellularly. The pink intracellular pigment produced by strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans was masked by production of brown pigments. Cryptococcus laccase mutants failed to produce pigments from L-tryptophan. This is the first report that the enzyme laccase is involved in tryptophan metabolism. Prior to this report Cryptococcus laccase produced melanin or melanin like-pigments from heterocyclic compounds that contained ortho or para diphenols, diaminobenzenes and aminophenol compounds. The pigments produced from L-tryptophan were not melanin. PMID:24736553

  17. Pigment production on L-tryptophan medium by Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Chaskes, Stuart; Cammer, Michael; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years strains previously grouped within Cryptococcus neoformans have been divided into two species C. neoformans and C. gattii, with Cryptococcus neoformans comprising serotypes A, D, and AD and C. gattii comprising serotypes B and C. Cryptococcus neoformans have also been subdivided into two varieties C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A, and C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D. We analyzed the growth and pigment production characteristics of 139 strains of Cryptococcus spp. in L-tryptophan containing media. Nearly all strains of Cryptococcus, including each variety and serotype tested produced a pink water-soluble pigment (molecular weight of 535.2 Da) from L-tryptophan. Consequently, the partial separation of the species was based on whether the pink pigment was secreted into the medium (extracellular) or retained as an intracellular pigment. On L-tryptophan medium C. neoformans var. grubii and serotype AD produced a pink extracellular pigment. In contrast, for C. gattii, the pink pigment was localized intracellularly and masked by heavy production of brown pigments. Pigment production by C. neoformans var. neoformans was variable with some strains producing the pink extracellular pigment and others retained the pink pigment intracellularly. The pink intracellular pigment produced by strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans was masked by production of brown pigments. Cryptococcus laccase mutants failed to produce pigments from L-tryptophan. This is the first report that the enzyme laccase is involved in tryptophan metabolism. Prior to this report Cryptococcus laccase produced melanin or melanin like-pigments from heterocyclic compounds that contained ortho or para diphenols, diaminobenzenes and aminophenol compounds. The pigments produced from L-tryptophan were not melanin. PMID:24736553

  18. Enhanced virulence of Histoplasma capsulatum through transfer and surface incorporation of glycans from Cryptococcus neoformans during co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Radames J. B.; Liedke, Susie Coutinho; de S. Araújo, Glauber R.; Martinez, Luis R.; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Frases, Susana; Peralta, Jose Mauro; Casadevall, Arturo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Guimaraes, Allan J.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) and Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc) co-exist in the environment and occasionally co-infect individuals, which can lead to severe disease/lethal outcomes. We investigated specific interactions between Cn-Hc to determine the impact of synchronous infection in virulence and disease. Co-infected mice had significantly higher mortality than infection with either species or acapsular Cn-Hc. Coating of Hc with cryptococcal glycans (Cn-gly) resulted in higher pulmonary fungal burden in co-infected animals relative to control. Co-cultivation or addition of Cn-gly resulted in enhanced pellicle formation with a hybrid polysaccharide matrix with higher reactivity to GXM mAbs. Transfer and incorporation of Cn polysaccharide onto Hc surface was time and temperature dependent. Cn-gly transfer altered the zeta potential of Hc and was associated with increased resistance to phagocytosis and killing by macrophages. Mice infected with Hc and subsequently injected with purified Cn-gly died significantly more rapidly than Hc alone infected, establishing the precedent that virulence factors from one fungus can enhance the virulence of unrelated species. These findings suggest a new mechanism of microbial interaction involving the transfer of virulence traits that translates into enhanced lethality during mixed fungal infections and highlights the importance of studying heterogeneous microbial populations in the setting of infection. PMID:26908077

  19. Enhanced virulence of Histoplasma capsulatum through transfer and surface incorporation of glycans from Cryptococcus neoformans during co-infection.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Radames J B; Liedke, Susie Coutinho; de S Araújo, Glauber R; Martinez, Luis R; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Frases, Susana; Peralta, Jose Mauro; Casadevall, Arturo; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Guimaraes, Allan J

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) and Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc) co-exist in the environment and occasionally co-infect individuals, which can lead to severe disease/lethal outcomes. We investigated specific interactions between Cn-Hc to determine the impact of synchronous infection in virulence and disease. Co-infected mice had significantly higher mortality than infection with either species or acapsular Cn-Hc. Coating of Hc with cryptococcal glycans (Cn-gly) resulted in higher pulmonary fungal burden in co-infected animals relative to control. Co-cultivation or addition of Cn-gly resulted in enhanced pellicle formation with a hybrid polysaccharide matrix with higher reactivity to GXM mAbs. Transfer and incorporation of Cn polysaccharide onto Hc surface was time and temperature dependent. Cn-gly transfer altered the zeta potential of Hc and was associated with increased resistance to phagocytosis and killing by macrophages. Mice infected with Hc and subsequently injected with purified Cn-gly died significantly more rapidly than Hc alone infected, establishing the precedent that virulence factors from one fungus can enhance the virulence of unrelated species. These findings suggest a new mechanism of microbial interaction involving the transfer of virulence traits that translates into enhanced lethality during mixed fungal infections and highlights the importance of studying heterogeneous microbial populations in the setting of infection. PMID:26908077

  20. Distribution of Cryptococcus neoformans in a natural site.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, A; Fromtling, R A; Bulmer, G S

    1981-01-01

    Pigeon droppings in a vacant tower were assayed for the number and size of viable cells of Cryptococcus neoformans. The dry, thinly scattered floor debris contained 2.6 x 10(6) viable cells per g--300 times more cells than were cultured from a large, compact pile of pigeon droppings (7.4 x 10(3) cells per g). Aerosols generated from floor debris containing pigeon droppings had an average of 360 viable cells in 31 liters of air; 27 of these cells (7.5%) were 1.1 to 3.3 micrometers in diameter and, therefore, capable of human lung deposition. Environmental factors which may influence the distribution, survival, and proliferation of C. neoformans in nature are discussed. PMID:7012011

  1. Cryptococcus neoformans Host Adaptation: Toward Biological Evidence of Dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Vernel-Pauillac, Frédérique; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Dromer, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcosis is an opportunistic infection due to the ubiquitous yeast Cryptococcus neoformans. This yeast interacts closely with innate immune cells, leading to various fates, including fungal persistence within cells, making possible the dissemination of the yeast cells with monocytes via a Trojan horse strategy. In humans, the natural history of the infection begins with primoinfection during childhood, which is followed by dormancy and, in some individuals, reactivation upon immunosuppression. To address the question of dormancy, we studied C. neoformans infection at the macrophage level (in vitro H99-macrophage interaction) and at the organ level in a murine model of cryptococcosis. We analyzed the diversity of yeast adaptation to the host by characterizing several C. neoformans populations with new assays based on flow cytometry (quantitative flow cytometry, multispectral imaging flow cytometry, sorting), microscopy (dynamic imaging), and gene expression analysis. On the basis of parameters of multiplication and stress response, various populations of yeast cells were observed over time in vivo and in vitro. Cell sorting allowed the identification of a subpopulation that was less prone to grow under standard conditions than the other populations, with growth enhanced by the addition of serum. Gene expression analysis revealed that this population had specific metabolic characteristics that could reflect dormancy. Our data suggest that dormant yeast cells could exist in vitro and in vivo. C. neoformans exhibits a huge plasticity and adaptation to hosts that deserves further study. In vitro generation of dormant cells is now the main challenge to overcome the limited number of yeast cells recovered in our models. PMID:25827423

  2. Systematic functional profiling of transcription factor networks in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwang-Woo; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Maeng, Shinae; Lee, Kyung-Tae; So, Yee-Seul; Hong, Joohyeon; Choi, Jaeyoung; Byun, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Hyelim; Bang, Soohyun; Song, Min-Hee; Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Seo-Young; Ji, Je-Hyun; Park, Goun; Kwon, Hyojeong; Cha, Suyeon; Meyers, Gena Lee; Wang, Li Li; Jang, Jooyoung; Janbon, Guilhem; Adedoyin, Gloria; Kim, Taeyup; Averette, Anna K.; Heitman, Joseph; Cheong, Eunji; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Yin-Won; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis in humans, but its overall biological and pathogenic regulatory circuits remain elusive, particularly due to the presence of an evolutionarily divergent set of transcription factors (TFs). Here, we report the construction of a high-quality library of 322 signature-tagged gene-deletion strains for 155 putative TF genes previously predicted using the DNA-binding domain TF database, and examine their in vitro and in vivo phenotypic traits under 32 distinct growth conditions. At least one phenotypic trait is exhibited by 145 out of 155 TF mutants (93%) and ∼85% of them (132/155) are functionally characterized for the first time in this study. The genotypic and phenotypic data for each TF are available in the C. neoformans TF phenome database (http://tf.cryptococcus.org). In conclusion, our phenome-based functional analysis of the C. neoformans TF mutant library provides key insights into transcriptional networks of basidiomycetous fungi and human fungal pathogens. PMID:25849373

  3. Histone deacetylases inhibitors effects on Cryptococcus neoformans major virulence phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Fabiana AS; Derengowski, Lorena S; Albuquerque, Patrícia; Nicola, André M; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio J

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans undergoes phenotypical changes during host infection in order to promote persistence and survival. Studies have demonstrated that such adaptations require alterations in gene transcription networks by distinct mechanisms. Drugs such as the histone deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi) Sodium Butyrate (NaBut) and Trichostatin A (TSA) can alter the chromatin conformation and have been used to modulate epigenetic states in the treatment of diseases such as cancer. In this work, we have studied the effect of NaBut and TSA on the expression of C. neoformans major virulence phenotypes and on the survival rate of an animal model infected with drugs-treated yeasts. Both drugs affected fungal growth at 37°C more intensely than at 30°C; nonetheless, drugs did not affect cell viability at the concentrations we studied. HDACi also provoked the reduction of the fungal capsule expansion. Phospholipases enzyme activity decreased; mating process and melanin synthesis were also affected by both inhibitors. NaBut led to an increase in the population of cells in G2/M. Treated yeast cells, which were washed in order to remove the drugs from the culture medium prior to the inoculation in the Galleria mellonela infection model, did not cause significant difference at the host survival curve when compared to non-treated cells. Overall, NaBut effects on the impairment of C. neoformans main virulence factors were more intense and stable than the TSA effects. PMID:26103530

  4. Whiplash causes increased laxity of cervical capsular ligament

    PubMed Central

    Ivancic, Paul C.; Ito, Shigeki; Tominaga, Yasuhiro; Rubin, Wolfgang; Coe, Marcus P.; Ndu, Anthony B.; Carlson, Erik J.; Panjabi, Manohar M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous clinical studies have identified the cervical facet joint, including the capsular ligaments, as sources of pain in whiplash patients. The goal of this study was to determine whether whiplash caused increased capsular ligament laxity by applying quasi-static loading to whiplash-exposed and control capsular ligaments. Methods A total of 66 capsular ligament specimens (C2/3 to C7/T1) were prepared from 12 cervical spines (6 whiplash-exposed and 6 control). The whiplash-exposed spines had been previously rear impacted at a maximum peak T1 horizontal acceleration of 8 g. Capsular ligaments were elongated at 1 mm/s in increments of 0.05 mm until a tensile force of 5 N was achieved and subsequently returned to neutral position. Four pre-conditioning cycles were performed and data from the load phase of the fifth cycle were used for subsequent analyses. Ligament elongation was computed at tensile forces of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 N. Two factor, non-repeated measures ANOVA (P<0.05) was performed to determine significant differences in the average ligament elongation at tensile forces of 0 and 5 N between the whiplash-exposed and control groups and between spinal levels. Findings Average elongation of the whiplash-exposed capsular ligaments was significantly greater than that of the control ligaments at tensile forces of 0 and 5 N. No significant differences between spinal levels were observed. Interpretation Capsular ligament injuries, in the form of increased laxity, may be one component perpetuating chronic pain and clinical instability in whiplash patients. PMID:17959284

  5. Specificity of bovine serum antibody to capsular carbohydrate antigens from Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    McVey, D S; Loan, R W; Purdy, C W; Shuman, W J

    1990-01-01

    A more complete understanding of the bovine immune response to antigens of Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A, serotype 1, will improve control of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Sera were obtained from blood samples of calves as they transited the market system of eastern Tennessee and were transported to a feedlot in Texas. The clinical histories and performance data were recorded and compared with serologic findings. The calves underwent a natural challenge of BRD. Serologic and bacteriologic evaluation indicated that P. haemolytica A1 was a significant component of the challenge. Serum antibody titers against P. haemolytica A1 capsular antigens (in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hemolysin-in-gel test) increased by day 15 and continued at high levels through day 56. The animals that remained free of BRD had higher initial serum antibody concentrations than those that succumbed to BRD. The specificity of the immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1) anticapsular antibody to P. haemolytica A1 increased from day 8 to day 29 as evidenced by a decrease in P. haemolytica A2 absorption inhibition from 60% (day 8) to 15% (day 29). However, IgA, IgG2, and IgM were more serotype specific on both days 8 and 29. There were no significant changes in anti-P. haemolytica A2 antibody titers. Both in vitro complement-dependent bacteriolysis and C3 deposition on the surface of the bacteria increased significantly (P less than 0.01) in a serotype-specific fashion from day 8 to day 29. These calves showed a humoral immune response to capsular polysaccharide antigens of P. haemolytica A1. Such a response may be an important component of immunity to BRD. PMID:2199487

  6. Chemical Modification of Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Cumpstey, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This review covers methods for modifying the structures of polysaccharides. The introduction of hydrophobic, acidic, basic, or other functionality into polysaccharide structures can alter the properties of materials based on these substances. The development of chemical methods to achieve this aim is an ongoing area of research that is expected to become more important as the emphasis on using renewable starting materials and sustainable processes increases in the future. The methods covered in this review include ester and ether formation using saccharide oxygen nucleophiles, including enzymatic reactions and aspects of regioselectivity; the introduction of heteroatomic nucleophiles into polysaccharide chains; the oxidation of polysaccharides, including oxidative glycol cleavage, chemical oxidation of primary alcohols to carboxylic acids, and enzymatic oxidation of primary alcohols to aldehydes; reactions of uronic-acid-based polysaccharides; nucleophilic reactions of the amines of chitosan; and the formation of unsaturated polysaccharide derivatives. PMID:24151557

  7. How much does inferior capsular shift reduce shoulder volume?

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, J; Bartolozzi, A; Rubinstein, D; Ciccotti, M; Schweitzer, M; Nazarian, L; Lombardi, J; Dellose, S; Landsdorf, A; Miller, L

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitate the effect of inferior capsular shift on shoulder volume. Four fresh frozen cadaveric shoulders were analyzed. Volume before and after shift was determined using 3 techniques: (1) Magnetic resonance imaging sequences were digitized to computer and analyzed for volume via a 35-mm camera using Cue 2 software. The capsule was delineated by contrast between light and dark regions. Volume was calculated by summing the total area of respective slices. (2) Ultrasound images, obtained after surgical exposure of the capsule, were digitized. Volume was calculated using the formula for a prolate ellipsoid. (3) An 18-gauge needle was used to inject and evacuate saline via an anterior approach. Quantity of aspirated fluid provided a direct measure of volume. Inferior capsular shift was performed. After the operation, measurements were repeated. Inferior capsular shift reduced volume in all shoulders with each technique. On average, inferior capsular shift reduced joint volume by 57 %). A measurable reduction in shoulder joint volume is an effect of capsular shift. This measurement may have clinical application if volume is an indicator of instability or laxity. PMID:8653983

  8. Identification of QTLs Associated with Virulence Related Traits and Drug Resistance in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Vogan, Aaron A.; Khankhet, Jordan; Samarasinghe, Himeshi; Xu, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a basidiomycete fungus capable of causing deadly meningoenchephilitis, primarily in immunocompromised individuals. Formerly, C. neoformans was composed of two divergent lineages, but these have recently been elevated to species status, now C. neoformans (formerly C. neoformans var. grubii) and C. deneoformans (formerly C. neoformans var. neoformans). While both species can cause deadly infections in humans, C. neoformans is much more prevalent in clinical settings than C. deneoformans. However, the genetic factors contributing to their significant differences in virulence remain largely unknown. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping is a powerful tool that can be used to identify genomic regions associated with phenotypic differences between strains. Here, we analyzed a hybrid cross between these two species and identified a total of 23 QTL, including five for melanin production, six for cell size, one for cell wall thickness, five for the frequency of capsule production, three for minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of fluconazole in broth, and three for MIC on solid medium. For the fluconazole resistance-associated QTL, three showed environment and/or concentration-specific effects. Our results provide a large number of candidate gene regions from which to explore the molecular bases for phenotypic differences between C. neoformans and C. deneoformans. PMID:27371951

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Cryptococcus neoformans from Environmental Sources in Busan

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kwang Seok

    2005-01-01

    Twenty nine samples of pigeon droppings (n = 12) and soil contaminated with avian excreta (n = 19), collected from different sites in Busan, were examined for isolation and characterization of Cryptococcus neoformans. Of these samples, 5 strains of C. neoformans were recovered from pigeon droppings (5/12 : 41.7%). All isolates were belonged to C. neoformans var. grubii (serotype A). The extracellular enzyme activities of the strains by using the API-ZYM system showed two different enzymatic patterns. The genetic variability among C. neoformans isolates was analyzed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) using three 10-mer primers. Two different RAPD patterns, which clearly distinguished the isolates, were identified. Analysis of RAPD patterns provided a good characterization of environmental strains of C. neoformans serotype A as a heterogeneous group and were in good agreement with enzymatic profiles. PMID:24049499

  10. KRE genes are required for β-1,6-glucan synthesis, maintenance of capsule architecture and cell wall protein anchoring in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Nicole M.; Donlin, Maureen J.; Gerik, Kimberly J.; Specht, Charles A.; Djordjevic, Julianne T.; Wilson, Christabel F.; Sorrell, Tania C.; Lodge, Jennifer K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The polysaccharide β-1,6-glucan is a major component of the cell wall of Cryptococcus neoformans, but its function has not been investigated in this fungal pathogen. We have identified and characterized seven genes, belonging to the KRE family, which are putatively involved in β-1,6-glucan synthesis. The H99 deletion mutants kre5Δ and kre6Δskn1Δ contained less cell wall β-1,6-glucan, grew slowly with an aberrant morphology, were highly sensitive to environmental and chemical stress and were avirulent in a mouse inhalation model of infection. These two mutants displayed alterations in cell wall chitosan and the exopolysaccharide capsule, a primary cryptococcal virulence determinant. The cell wall content of the GPI-anchored phospholipase B1 (Plb1) enzyme, which is required for cryptococcal cell wall integrity and virulence, was reduced in kre5Δ and kre6Δskn1Δ. Our results indicate that KRE5, KRE6 and SKN1 are involved in β-1,6-glucan synthesis, maintenance of cell wall integrity and retention of mannoproteins and known cryptococcal virulence factors in the cell wall of C. neoformans. This study sets the stage for future investigations into the function of this abundant cell wall polymer. PMID:20384682

  11. Analysis of the Protein Kinase A-Regulated Proteome of Cryptococcus neoformans Identifies a Role for the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Capsule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, J. M. H.; Caza, M.; Croll, D.; Stoynov, N.; Foster, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. The expression of virulence factors, including capsule and melanin, is in part regulated by the cyclic-AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) signal transduction pathway. In this study, we investigated the influence of PKA on the composition of the intracellular proteome to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the regulation that underpins virulence. Through quantitative proteomics, enrichment and bioinformatic analyses, and an interactome study, we uncovered a pattern of PKA regulation for proteins associated with translation, the proteasome, metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and virulence-related functions. PKA regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in C. neoformans showed a striking parallel with connections between PKA and protein degradation in chronic neurodegenerative disorders and other human diseases. Further investigation of proteasome function with the inhibitor bortezomib revealed an impact on capsule production as well as hypersusceptibility for strains with altered expression or activity of PKA. Parallel studies with tunicamycin also linked endoplasmic reticulum stress with capsule production and PKA. Taken together, the data suggest a model whereby expression of PKA regulatory and catalytic subunits and the activation of PKA influence proteostasis and the function of the endoplasmic reticulum to control the elaboration of the polysaccharide capsule. Overall, this study revealed both broad and conserved influences of the cAMP/PKA pathway on the proteome and identified proteostasis as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cryptococcosis. PMID:26758180

  12. Abulia from unilateral capsular genu infarction: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, K; Fukuyama, H; Kimura, J

    1996-11-01

    We report two cases of capsular genu infarction in patients showing pure abulia without motor weakness. One case is left-sided infarction, and another is right-sided. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) examination in both disclosed hypoperfusion in the ipsilateral frontal cortex at the infarction. In one case, reversion of frontal hypoperfusion was observed later. We considered that the frontal hypoperfusion was due to trans-synaptic hypofunction of thalamo-frontal projections from the deep-seated capsular genu lesion and that it resulted in the pure abulia without neurological deficits. PMID:8981321

  13. Characterization of a flocculation-like phenotype in Cryptococcus neoformans and its effects on pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Zaragoza, Oscar; Casadevall, Arturo; Fries, Bettina C

    2006-11-01

    We investigated the phenomenon of cell-cell aggregation (flocculation) in a serotype D strain of Cryptococcus neoformans (ATCC 24067, isolate RC-2). Cell aggregation into clumps of 5-40 cells (clump+ cells) occurred during the early log phase and disappeared in the beginning of the stationary phase (clump- cells). The cell aggregation phenomenon was medium dependent. Clump+ cells could be dispersed by either vortexing or proteinase K digestion. Most importantly, the transient change in cellular phenotype changed several important host-pathogen interactions. Adherence of clump+ cells to murine macrophage-like cells J774.16 was significantly (P < 0.001) enhanced compared with adherence of clump- cells. Furthermore, complement-mediated phagocytosis efficacy of dispersed clump+ cells was significantly higher (P < 0.001) compared with clump- cells. Similar findings were documented with an in vivo phagocytosis assay. Infection of mice with a low inoculum (10(4)) of clump+ cells resulted in lower fungal burden when compared with mice infected with clump- cells. Accordingly, mice infected with clump+ cells survived significantly longer than mice infected with clump- cells. These results indicate that the cellular phenotype undergoes significant changes that result in a transient flocculation-like phenotype. We hypothesize that this cell-cell aggregation is the result of changes in protein content in the polysaccharide capsule. We conclude from our data that the change in cellular phenotype has a dramatic effect on cell adherence, and on complement-mediated phagocytosis, both of which can affect the pathogenesis of the disease in the host. Our results underscore the complexity of studies that investigate host pathogen interactions and may explain differences and inconsistencies observed in in vitro and in vivo assays. PMID:16759224

  14. Water Accessibility, Aggregation, and Motional Features of Polysaccharide-Protein Conjugate Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Berti, Francesco; Costantino, Paolo; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    A relaxometric investigation of a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin and of its conjugates with capsular polysaccharides of different groups of Neisseria meningitidis was performed. The insertion of polysaccharides chains alters dramatically the hydrodynamic properties of the protein. The model-free analysis of the 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles of their water solutions shows: i), a reduced protein hydration with respect to the carrier protein alone; ii), a much larger flexibility of the conjugates with respect to a compact macromolecule of the same molecular weight; and iii), a strong tendency to aggregate. The above findings are largely independent on the nature of the polysaccharide and thus provide a fairly general picture of the dynamic properties of glycoconjugate proteins. PMID:14695244

  15. Improved conjugation and purification strategies for the preparation of protein-polysaccharide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Suárez, N; Massaldi, H; Franco Fraguas, L; Ferreira, F

    2008-12-12

    A glycoconjugate constituted by the Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 14 capsular polysaccharide (CPS14) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was prepared, and the unique properties of Sephadex LH-20 were used to separate the conjugate from the unconjugated material. The strength of this approach consists in its capacity to produce pure polysaccharide-protein conjugate in good yield and free from unconjugated material, a common residual contaminant of this type of immunobiologicals. The CPS14-BSA conjugate prepared via an improved 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP)-activation technique was characterized chemically and its immunogenicity was evaluated in mice. The purified conjugate, unlike the corresponding polysaccharide, produced a T-cell-dependent response in this species. PMID:18992885

  16. Capsules from Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Cryptococcus spp. Manifest Significant Differences in Structure and Ability to Protect against Phagocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Glauber de S.; Fonseca, Fernanda L.; Pontes, Bruno; Torres, Andre; Cordero, Radames J. B.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Casadevall, Arturo; Viana, Nathan B.; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Garcia, Eloi S.; de Souza, Wanderley; Frases, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Capsule production is common among bacterial species, but relatively rare in eukaryotic microorganisms. Members of the fungal Cryptococcus genus are known to produce capsules, which are major determinants of virulence in the highly pathogenic species Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii. Although the lack of virulence of many species of the Cryptococcus genus can be explained solely by the lack of mammalian thermotolerance, it is uncertain whether the capsules from these organisms are comparable to those of the pathogenic cryptococci. In this study, we compared the characteristic of the capsule from the non-pathogenic environmental yeast Cryptococcus liquefaciens with that of C. neoformans. Microscopic observations revealed that C. liquefaciens has a capsule visible in India ink preparations that was also efficiently labeled by three antibodies generated to specific C. neoformans capsular antigens. Capsular polysaccharides of C. liquefaciens were incorporated onto the cell surface of acapsular C. neoformans mutant cells. Polysaccharide composition determinations in combination with confocal microscopy revealed that C. liquefaciens capsule consisted of mannose, xylose, glucose, glucuronic acid, galactose and N-acetylglucosamine. Physical chemical analysis of the C. liquefaciens polysaccharides in comparison with C. neoformans samples revealed significant differences in viscosity, elastic properties and macromolecular structure parameters of polysaccharide solutions such as rigidity, effective diameter, zeta potential and molecular mass, which nevertheless appeared to be characteristics of linear polysaccharides that also comprise capsular polysaccharide of C. neoformans. The environmental yeast, however, showed enhanced susceptibility to the antimicrobial activity of the environmental phagocytes, suggesting that the C. liquefaciens capsular components are insufficient in protecting yeast cells against killing by amoeba. These results suggest that capsular

  17. Morphotype-specific effector functions of Cryptococcus neoformans PUM1

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jan Naseer; Panepinto, John C.

    2016-01-01

    The basidiomycete fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans requires the PUF protein, Pum1, for hyphal morphogenesis during sexual development. In this study we found that Pum1 was auto-repressive under growth as yeast, but that auto-repression was relieved during filamentous growth through utilization of an alternative transcription start site driven by the master filamentation regulator Znf2. In addition, Pum1 was required to stabilize the ZNF2 mRNA through an indirect mechanism suggesting that Znf2 and Pum1 each positively regulate the expression of the other to achieve the filamentous morphotype required for sexual development in Cryptococcus. PMID:27008977

  18. Antimicrobial activity of Hymenaea martiana towards dermatophytes and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Ana Cristina Machado; Kato, Lucilia; da Silva, Cleuza Conceição; Cidade, Amanda Feitosa; de Oliveira, Cecilia Maria Alves; Silva, Maria do Rosário Rodrigues

    2010-11-01

    The biological activity of crude extract and fractions of Hymenaea martiana was evaluated against a panel of human pathogenic fungi. The crude extracts and hydroalcoholic fractions (E) showed a high activity against Cryptococcus neoformans species complex isolates with MICs between 2 and 64 μg ml(-1). The methanolic (C) and butanolic (D) fractions were the most active against Trichopyton rubrum, Trichopyton mentagrophytes and Microsporum canis with MICs between 8 and 256 μg ml(-1). None of the extracts was active against the yeast Malassezia furfur, Malassezia obtusa and Malassezia sympodialis. PMID:19563478

  19. STAT1 signaling within macrophages is required for antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Leopold Wager, Chrissy M; Hole, Camaron R; Wozniak, Karen L; Olszewski, Michal A; Mueller, Mathias; Wormley, Floyd L

    2015-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, the predominant etiological agent of cryptococcosis, is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that primarily affects AIDS patients and patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. In immunocompromised individuals, C. neoformans can lead to life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Studies using a virulent strain of C. neoformans engineered to produce gamma interferon (IFN-γ), denoted H99γ, demonstrated that protection against pulmonary C. neoformans infection is associated with the generation of a T helper 1 (Th1)-type immune response and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-mediated classical (M1) macrophage activation. However, the critical mechanism by which M1 macrophages mediate their anti-C. neoformans activity remains unknown. The current studies demonstrate that infection with C. neoformans strain H99γ in mice with macrophage-specific STAT1 ablation resulted in severely increased inflammation of the pulmonary tissue, a dysregulated Th1/Th2-type immune response, increased fungal burden, deficient M1 macrophage activation, and loss of protection. STAT1-deficient macrophages produced significantly less nitric oxide (NO) than STAT1-sufficient macrophages, correlating with an inability to control intracellular cryptococcal proliferation, even in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, macrophages from inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, which had intact ROS production, were deficient in anticryptococcal activity. These data indicate that STAT1 activation within macrophages is required for M1 macrophage activation and anti-C. neoformans activity via the production of NO. PMID:26351277

  20. Extensive Genetic Diversity within the Dutch Clinical Cryptococcus neoformans Population

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ferry; Illnait-Zaragozí, María-Teresa; Meis, Jacques F.; Chew, William H. M.; Curfs-Breuker, Ilse; Mouton, Johan W.; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Verweij, Paul E.; Kampinga, Greetje A.; Kuijper, Ed J.; Klaassen, Corné H. W.

    2012-01-01

    A set of 300 Dutch Cryptococcus neoformans isolates, obtained from 237 patients during 1977 to 2007, was investigated by determining the mating type, serotype, and AFLP and microsatellite genotype and susceptibility to seven antifungal compounds. Almost half of the studied cases were from HIV-infected patients, followed by a patient group of individuals with other underlying diseases and immunocompetent individuals. The majority of the isolates were mating type α and serotype A, followed by αD isolates and other minor categories. The most frequently observed genotype was AFLP1, distantly followed by AFLP2 and AFLP3. Microsatellite typing revealed a high genetic diversity among serotype A isolates but a lower diversity within the serotype D set of isolates. One patient was infected by multiple AFLP genotypes. Fluconazole and flucytosine had the highest geometric mean MICs of 2.9 and 3.5 μg/ml, respectively, while amphotericin B (0.24 μg/ml), itraconazole (0.08 μg/ml), voriconazole (0.07 μg/ml), posaconazole (0.06 μg/ml), and isavuconazole (0.03 μg/ml) had much lower geometric mean MICs. One isolate had a high flucytosine MIC (>64 μg/ml), while decreased susceptibility (≥16 μg/ml) for flucytosine and fluconazole was found in 9 and 10 C. neoformans isolates, respectively. PMID:22442325

  1. Molecular Typing of IberoAmerican Cryptococcus neoformans Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda, Alexandra; Jackson, Stuart; Huynh, Matthew; Castañeda, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    A network was established to acquire basic knowledge of Cryptococcus neoformans in IberoAmerican countries. To this effect, 340 clinical, veterinary, and environmental isolates from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, Venezuela, Guatemala, and Spain were typed by using M13 polymerase chain reaction-fingerprinting and orotidine monophosphate pyrophosphorylase (URA5) gene restriction fragment length polymorphsm analysis with HhaI and Sau96I in a double digest. Both techniques grouped all isolates into eight previously established molecular types. The majority of the isolates, 68.2% (n=232), were VNI (var. grubii, serotype A), which accords with the fact that this variety causes most human cryptococcal infections worldwide. A smaller proportion, 5.6% (n=19), were VNII (var. grubii, serotype A); 4.1% (n=14), VNIII (AD hybrid), with 9 isolates having a polymorphism in the URA5 gene; 1.8% (n=6), VNIV (var. neoformans, serotype D); 3.5% (n=12), VGI; 6.2% (n=21), VGII; 9.1% (n=31), VGIII, and 1.5% (n=5) VGIV, with all four VG types containing var. gattii serotypes B and C isolates. PMID:12603989

  2. Transcriptional control of sexual development in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Mead, Matthew E; Hull, Christina M

    2016-05-01

    Developmental processes are essential for the normal life cycles of many pathogenic fungi, and they can facilitate survival in challenging environments, including the human host. Sexual development of the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans not only produces infectious particles (spores) but has also enabled the evolution of new disease-related traits such as drug resistance. Transcription factor networks are essential to the development and pathogenesis of C. neoformans, and a variety of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins control both key developmental transitions and virulence by regulating the expression of their target genes. In this review we discuss the roles of known transcription factors that harbor important connections to both development and virulence. Recent studies of these transcription factors have identified a common theme in which metabolic, stress, and other responses that are required for sexual development appear to have been co-opted for survival in the human host, thus facilitating pathogenesis. Future work elucidating the connection between development and pathogenesis will provide vital insights into the evolution of complex traits in eukaryotes as well as mechanisms that may be used to combat fungal pathogens. PMID:27095452

  3. Mitochondrial Protein Nfu1 Influences Homeostasis of Essential Metals in the Human Fungal Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmi; Park, Minji; Do, Eunsoo

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein Nfu1 plays an important role in the assembly of mitochondrial Fe-S clusters and intracellular iron homeostasis in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we identified the Nfu1 ortholog in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Our data showed that C. neoformans Nfu1 localized in the mitochondria and influenced homeostasis of essential metals such as iron, copper and manganese. Marked growth defects were observed in the mutant lacking NFU1, which suggests a critical role of Nfu1 in Fe-S cluster biosynthesis and intracellular metal homeostasis in C. neoformans. PMID:25606020

  4. Oligoclonal CD4+ T Cells Promote Host Memory Immune Responses to Zwitterionic Polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Groneck, Laura; Schrama, David; Fabri, Mario; Stephen, Tom Li; Harms, Fabian; Meemboor, Sonja; Hafke, Helena; Bessler, Martina; Becker, Jürgen C.; Kalka-Moll, Wiltrud M.

    2009-01-01

    Zwitterionic polysaccharides of the normal flora bacteria represent a novel class of antigens in that they correct systemic CD4+ T-cell deficiencies and direct lymphoid organogenesis during colonization of the host. Presentation of these polysaccharides to CD4+ T cells depends on major histocompatibility complex class II- and DM-dependent retrograde transport from lysosomes to the cell surface. Yet the phenotype and clonality of the immune response to the polysaccharide in the mature host immune system have not been studied. Using the zwitterionic capsular polysaccharide Sp1 of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a transient member of the bacterial flora, in an experimental mouse model of cellular immunity, we demonstrated the accumulation of TH1- and TH17-polarized CD4+ CD44high CD62low CD25− memory T cells. Subcutaneous immunization with Sp1 resulted in an increase of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), predominantly of the IgG1 subclass, and suggested the presence of a humoral memory response to the polysaccharide. CD4+ T cells stimulated with polysaccharide in vitro and in vivo showed a nonrestricted pattern for the T-cell receptor (TCR) β-chain variable region, as demonstrated by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR and flow cytometry. Clonotype mapping of in vivo and in vitro polysaccharide-activated CD4+ T cells revealed clonotypic TCR transcripts. Taken together, the data show the induction of clonal expansion of CD4+ T cells by polysaccharides of commensal bacteria. Cellular and humoral memory host responses imply the ability of these polysaccharides to mediate the expansion of T cells via recognition within the CDR3 region of the TCR. PMID:19546196

  5. Campylobacter Polysaccharide Capsules: Virulence and Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Guerry, Patricia; Poly, Frédéric; Riddle, Mark; Maue, Alexander C.; Chen, Yu-Han; Monteiro, Mario A.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni remains a major cause of bacterial diarrhea worldwide and is associated with numerous sequelae, including Guillain Barré Syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, reactive arthritis, and irritable bowel syndrome. C. jejuni is unusual for an intestinal pathogen in its ability to coat its surface with a polysaccharide capsule (CPS). These capsular polysaccharides vary in sugar composition and linkage, especially those involving heptoses of unusual configuration and O-methyl phosphoramidate linkages. This structural diversity is consistent with CPS being the major serodeterminant of the Penner scheme, of which there are 47 C. jejuni serotypes. Both CPS expression and expression of modifications are subject to phase variation by slip strand mismatch repair. Although capsules are virulence factors for other pathogens, the role of CPS in C. jejuni disease has not been well defined beyond descriptive studies demonstrating a role in serum resistance and for diarrhea in a ferret model of disease. However, perhaps the most compelling evidence for a role in pathogenesis are data that CPS conjugate vaccines protect against diarrheal disease in non-human primates. A CPS conjugate vaccine approach against this pathogen is intriguing, but several questions need to be addressed, including the valency of CPS types required for an effective vaccine. There have been numerous studies of prevalence of CPS serotypes in the developed world, but few studies from developing countries where the disease incidence is higher. The complexity and cost of Penner serotyping has limited its usefulness, and a recently developed multiplex PCR method for determination of capsule type offers the potential of a more rapid and affordable method. Comparative studies have shown a strong correlation of the two methods and studies are beginning to ascertain CPS-type distribution worldwide, as well as examination of correlation of severity of illness with specific CPS types. PMID:22919599

  6. Coordinate Regulation of Glycan Degradation and Polysaccharide Capsule Biosynthesis by a Prominent Human Gut Symbiont*

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Eric C.; Roth, Robyn; Heuser, John E.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria in the distal human gut have evolved diverse abilities to metabolize complex glycans, including the capacity to degrade these compounds as nutrients and to assemble their component sugars into new polymers such as extracellular capsules. The human gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is well endowed with the ability to metabolize both host- and diet-derived glycans. Its genome contains 88 different polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs) for complex glycan catabolism and eight different gene clusters for capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis. Here, we investigate one of the prominent mechanisms by which this gut symbiont regulates many PULs involved in host mucin O-glycan degradation; namely, transcriptional regulation via the concerted interactions of cell-envelope-localized TonB-dependent transporters, extra-cytoplasmic function σ factors and anti-σ factors, which participate together in a regulatory pathway termed trans-envelope signaling. Unexpectedly, we found that several different trans-envelope signaling switches involved in PUL-mediated O-glycan degradation also modulate capsular polysaccharide synthesis. A novel regulatory pathway, which is dependent on expression of O-glycan-targeting outer membrane proteins, governs this coordinated regulation of glycan catabolism and capsule synthesis. This latter finding provides a new link in the dynamic interplay between complex glycan metabolism, microbial physiology, and host responses that occurs during colonization of the gut. PMID:19403529

  7. Role of Mannoprotein in Induction and Regulation of Immunity to Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Pietrella, Donatella; Cherniak, Robert; Strappini, Carla; Perito, Stefano; Mosci, Paolo; Bistoni, Francesco; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2001-01-01

    Our previous observations showed that mannoprotein (MP) induces early and massive production of interleukin-12 (IL-12) in vitro. This study was designed to investigate whether this phenomenon could be applied in vivo and to determine the biological significance of MP in Cryptococcus neoformans infection. The results reported here show that MP treatment induces IL-12 secretion by splenic macrophages and IL-12 p40 mRNA in the brain. During C. neoformans infection, MP reinforced IL-12 and IFN-γ secretion that coincided with enhanced antifungal activity of natural effector cells, early resolution of the inflammatory process, and clearance of fungal load from the brain. These studies show that MP is a key inflammatory mediator that induces a protective immune response against C. neoformans infection. This information can be used to facilitate the design of a rational approach to manipulate the immune response to C. neoformans. PMID:11292692

  8. Genotypes of Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Hae; Choi, Seok Cheol; Lee, Kyung Won; Kim, Mi-Na

    2015-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing analysis was applied to determine the genotypes of 147 (137 clinical and 10 environmental) Cryptococcus neoformans and three clinical Cryptococcus gattii isolates from 1993 to 2014 in Korea. Among the 137 clinical isolates of C. neoformans, the most prevalent genotype was ST5 (n = 131), followed by ST31 (n = 5) and ST127 (n = 1). Three C. gattii strains were identified as ST57, ST7, and ST113. All environmental isolates were identified as C. neoformans with two genotypes, ST5 (n = 7) and ST31 (n = 3). Our results show that C. neoformans isolates in Korea are genetically homogeneous, and represent a close genetic relationship between clinical and environmental isolates. PMID:26539057

  9. Aging as an emergent factor that contributes to phenotypic variation in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Bouklas, Tejas; Fries, Bettina C

    2015-05-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, similar to other eukaryotes, undergoes replicative aging. Replicative life spans have been determined for clinical C. neoformans strains, and although they are a reproducible trait, life spans vary considerably among strains. C. neoformans has been proposed as an ideal model organism to investigate the contribution of replicative aging in a fungal pathogen population to emerging phenotypic variation during chronic cryptococcal infections. C. neoformans cells of advanced generational age manifest a distinct phenotype; specifically, a larger cell size, a thicker cell wall, drug resistance, as well as resistance to hydrogen peroxide-mediated killing. Consequently, old cells are selected in the host environment during chronic infection and aging could be an unanticipated mechanism of pathogen adaptation that contributes to persistent disease. Aging as a natural process of phenotypic variation should be further studied as it likely is also relevant for other eukaryotic pathogen populations that undergo asymmetric replicative aging. PMID:25307541

  10. Detection of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii in honeybee (Apis mellifera) colonies.

    PubMed

    Ergin, C; Ilkit, M; Kaftanoglu, O

    2004-10-01

    The plant flora has an important role in the ecology of Cryptococcus neoformans. It is estimated that the environmental spreading and contamination of human beings with this yeast occurs via contaminated particles of plants. Cultivation of canopy parts of plants in selective media is the most widely used isolation method of this yeast. Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii was isolated from honeybee colonies in Eucalyptus forests but was not isolated from the places where this flora did not exist. Our results indicate that the occurrence of C. neoformans in honeybee colonies during the flowering season of Eucalyptus spp. trees can be an important bioindicator for environmental yeast presence. The screening of honeybee colonies is a practical and a rapid method for the monitoring of the C. neoformans presence in flowering plants. PMID:15504129

  11. Magnesium Ion Acts as a Signal for Capsule Induction in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Sudarshan S.; Raman, Thiagarajan; Ramakrishnan, Jayapradha

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, is a common opportunistic neural infection in immunocompromised individuals. Cryptococcus meningitis is associated with fungal burden with larger capsule size in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). To understand the role of CSF constituents in capsule enlargement, we have evaluated the effect of artificial CSF on capsule induction in comparison with various other capsule inducing media. Two different strains of C. neoformans, an environmental and a clinical isolates were used in the present study. While comparing the various capsule inducing media for the two different strains of C. neoformans, it was observed that the capsule growth was significantly increased when grown in artificial CSF at pH 5.5, temperature 34°C for ATCC C. neoformans and 37°C for Clinical C. neoformans and with an incubation period of 72 h. In addition, artificial CSF supports biofilm formation in C. neoformans. While investigating the individual components of artificial CSF, we found that Mg2+ ions influence the capsule growth in both environmental and clinical strains of C. neoformans. To confirm our results we studied the expression of four major CAP genes namely, CAP10, CAP59, CAP60, and CAP64 in various capsule inducing media and in different concentrations of Mg2+ and Ca2+. Our results on gene expression suggest that, Mg2+ does have an effect on CAP gene expression, which are important for capsule biosynthesis and virulence. Our findings on the role of Mg2+ ion as a signal for capsule induction will promote a way to elucidate the control mechanisms for capsule biosynthesis in C. neoformans. PMID:27014245

  12. Genetic study of oxygen resistance and melanization in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Emery, H S; Shelburne, C P; Bowman, J P; Fallon, P G; Schulz, C A; Jacobson, E S

    1994-01-01

    Genetic analysis of oxygen-sensitive mutants of Cryptococcus neoformans revealed two loci (oxy1 and oxy2) linking hyperoxia sensitivity to production of melanin, a known virulence factor. Hyperoxia-sensitive strain 562 (oxy1 oxy2) is albino and avirulent. oxy2-defective strains lacking the oxy1 defect are melanin deficient but show normal hyperoxia resistance. Mutants defective at three additional mapped melanin loci fail to show hyperoxia sensitivity in the oxy1 background. Revertants of strain 562, which regain the ability to synthesize melanin by mutation at suppressor sites unlinked to oxy2, retain the oxygen sensitivity conferred by their oxy1 and oxy2 defects. These data identify the melanin gene oxy2 as unique in its association of hyperoxia resistance and melanization. Images PMID:7960156

  13. “Virulence Mechanisms and Cryptococcus neoformans pathogenesis”

    PubMed Central

    Alspaugh, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is able to rapidly and effectively adapt to varying conditions, favoring its survival in the environment and in the infected host. Many microbial phenotypes have been specifically correlated with virulence in this opportunistic pathogen, such as capsule production, melanin formation, and the secretion of various proteins. Additionally, cellular features such as the cell wall and morphogenesis play important roles in the interaction of this fungus with host immune recognition and response pathways. Survival in the face of host stress also requires maintaining RNA/DNA integrity. Additionally, aging and senescence of the fungal cells determines resistance to host-derived stresses. New mechanisms regulating the expression of these virulence-associated phenotypes have been recently explored. Importantly, human clinical studies are now confirming the roles of specific microbial factors in human infections. PMID:25256589

  14. Immunity to Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii during cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Josie F.; Johnston, Simon A.

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of infection with cryptococcal species occurs with Cryptococcus neoformans in the severely immunocompromised. A significant exception to this is the infections of those with apparently normal immune systems by Cryptococcus gattii. Susceptibility to cryptococcosis can be broadly categorised as a defect in adaptive immune responses, especially in T cell immunity. However, innate immune cells such as macrophages play a key role and are likely the primary effector cell in the killing and ultimate clearance of cryptococcal infection. In this review we discuss the current state of our understanding of how the immune system responds to cryptococcal infection in health and disease, with reference to the work communicated at the 9th International Conference on Cryptococcus and Cryptococcosis (ICCC9). We have focussed on cell mediated responses, particularly early in infection, but with the aim of presenting a broad overview of our understanding of immunity to cryptococcal infection, highlighting some recent advances and offering some perspectives on future directions. PMID:25498576

  15. Occurrence and susceptibilities to disinfectants of Cryptococcus neoformans in fecal droppings from pigeons in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Krangvichain, Prathomporn; Niyomtham, Waree; Prapasarakul, Nuvee

    2016-03-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pathogenic yeast that causes meningoencephalitis and deep skin dermatitis in humans and animals. A hygienic strategy using disinfectants on environmental samples can reduce the risk to the public. The objectives were to survey the distribution of C. neoformans in pigeon fecal droppings collected in 11 districts in Bangkok during 2011-2012 and to evaluate the efficacy of three commercial disinfectant products (based on potassium monopersulfate, sodium hypochlorite and quaternary ammonium compounds, respectively). These were evaluated against pure C. neoformans and yeasts resuspended in sterile pigeon feces using the dilution-neutralization method [Europäische NORM (EN) 1656]. In total, 18 of 164 (11%) samples were positive for C. neoformans. These came from only three of the 11 districts, with a prevalence of between 13-56%. Using multiplex PCR, serotype A was the sole group found. For all disinfectants, C. neoformans mixed in feces was tolerated at a higher dose and time exposure than pure isolates. The most effective disinfectant in this study was a 0.12% quaternary ammonium compound that could rapidly eradicate the yeasts mixed in feces. This finding highlights the occurrence and distribution of C. neoformans in the capital city of Thailand and the need to prolong the duration of exposure to disinfectants with pigeon feces. PMID:26596636

  16. Cryptococcus neoformans Mates on Pigeon Guano: Implications for the Realized Ecological Niche and Globalization▿

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Kirsten; De Obaldia, Anna L.; Heitman, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The ecological niche that a species can occupy is determined by its resource requirements and the physical conditions necessary for survival. The niche to which an organism is most highly adapted is the realized niche, whereas the complete range of habitats that an organism can occupy represents the fundamental niche. The growth and development of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii on pigeon guano were examined to determine whether these two species occupy the same or different ecological niches. C. neoformans is a cosmopolitan pathogenic yeast that infects predominantly immunocompromised individuals, exists in two varieties (grubii [serotype A] and neoformans [serotype D]), and is commonly isolated from pigeon guano worldwide. By contrast, C. gattii often infects immunocompetent individuals and is associated with geographically restricted environments, most notably, eucalyptus trees. Pigeon guano supported the growth of both species, and a brown pigment related to melanin, a key virulence factor, was produced. C. neoformans exhibited prolific mating on pigeon guano, whereas C. gattii did not. The observations that C. neoformans completes the life cycle on pigeon guano but that C. gattii does not indicates that pigeon guano could represent the realized ecological niche for C. neoformans. Because C. gattii grows on pigeon guano but cannot sexually reproduce, pigeon guano represents a fundamental but not a realized niche for C. gattii. Based on these studies, we hypothesize that an ancestral Cryptococcus strain gained the ability to sexually reproduce in pigeon guano and then swept the globe. PMID:17449657

  17. Occurrence and susceptibilities to disinfectants of Cryptococcus neoformans in fecal droppings from pigeons in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    KRANGVICHAIN, Prathomporn; NIYOMTHAM, Waree; PRAPASARAKUL, Nuvee

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pathogenic yeast that causes meningoencephalitis and deep skin dermatitis in humans and animals. A hygienic strategy using disinfectants on environmental samples can reduce the risk to the public. The objectives were to survey the distribution of C. neoformans in pigeon fecal droppings collected in 11 districts in Bangkok during 2011–2012 and to evaluate the efficacy of three commercial disinfectant products (based on potassium monopersulfate, sodium hypochlorite and quaternary ammonium compounds, respectively). These were evaluated against pure C. neoformans and yeasts resuspended in sterile pigeon feces using the dilution-neutralization method [Europäische NORM (EN) 1656]. In total, 18 of 164 (11%) samples were positive for C. neoformans. These came from only three of the 11 districts, with a prevalence of between 13–56%. Using multiplex PCR, serotype A was the sole group found. For all disinfectants, C. neoformans mixed in feces was tolerated at a higher dose and time exposure than pure isolates. The most effective disinfectant in this study was a 0.12% quaternary ammonium compound that could rapidly eradicate the yeasts mixed in feces. This finding highlights the occurrence and distribution of C. neoformans in the capital city of Thailand and the need to prolong the duration of exposure to disinfectants with pigeon feces. PMID:26596636

  18. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha in human leukocytes stimulated by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, S M; Tabuni, A; Kornfeld, H; Reardon, C C; Golenbock, D T

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a key mediator of inflammation and may promote human immunodeficiency virus replication in latently infected cells. Since cryptococcosis often is associated with aberrations in the host inflammatory response and occurs preferentially in persons with AIDS, we defined the conditions under which human leukocytes produce TNF-alpha when stimulated by Cryptococcus neoformans. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) produced comparable amounts of TNF-alpha following stimulation with C. neoformans and lipopolysaccharide. Detectable TNF-alpha release in response to C. neoformans occurred only when fungi with small-sized capsules were used and complement-sufficient serum was added. Fractionation of PBMC established that monocytes were the predominant source of TNF-alpha. TNF-alpha gene expression and release occurred significantly later in PBMC stimulated with C. neoformans than in PBMC stimulated with LPS. C. neoformans was also a potent inducer of TNF-alpha from freshly isolated bronchoalveolar macrophages (BAM). Upon in vitro culture, BAM and monocytes bound greater numbers of fungal cells, yet their capacity to produce TNF-alpha following cryptococcal stimulation declined by 74 to 100%. However, this decline was reversed if the BAM and monocytes were cultured with gamma interferon. These data establish that C. neoformans can potently stimulate TNF-alpha release from human leukocytes. However, several variables profoundly affected the amount of TNF-alpha released, including the type of leukocyte and its state of activation, the size of the cryptococcal capsule, and the availability of opsonins. PMID:8168965

  19. Synthesis and physicochemical and immunological characterization of pneumococcus type 12F polysaccharide-diphtheria toxoid conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Fattom, A; Vann, W F; Szu, S C; Sutton, A; Li, X; Bryla, D; Schiffman, G; Robbins, J B; Schneerson, R

    1988-01-01

    A scheme for the synthesis and purification of conjugates, composed of the type 12F capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn12F) and diphtheria toxoid, is described. The scheme is a modification of that described previously for the Vi capsular polysaccharide of Salmonella typhi, a linear homopolymer of N-acetylgalactoseaminouronic acid (S. C. Szu, A. L. Stone, J. D. Robbins, R. Schneerson, and J. B. Robbins, J. Exp. Med. 166:1510-1524, 1986). Pn12F is a branched-chain copolymer composed of a hexasaccharide repeating unit containing an aminouronic acid, N-acetylmannoseaminouronic acid (K. Leontein, B. Lindberg, and J. Lonngren, Can. J. Chem. 59:2081-2085, 1981). Sulfhydryl groups were introduced into Pn12F by forming an amide bond between cystamine and carboxyl groups of N-acetylmannoseaminouronic acid in the presence of a carbodiimide. The disulfide moiety of cystamine was reduced to form the cysteamine derivative of Pn12F which was, in turn, covalently bound to diphtheria toxoid by using the heterobifunctional linker N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridylthio)propionate. Unbound, high-molecular-weight Pn12F was removed from the conjugate by hydrophobic interaction chromatography through octyl Sepharose by using n-octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside as the eluent. In young outbred mice, Pn12F did not elicit detectable serum antibodies. Pn12F-diphtheria toxoid, in contrast, elicited antibodies after two injections and had T-cell-dependent properties as evidenced by a response to priming and by its ability to elicit booster responses. This scheme seems applicable to the synthesis of conjugates with other capsular polysaccharides containing aminouronic acids. Clinical evaluation of Pn12F-diphtheria toxoid conjugates in healthy and in immunocompromised hosts is planned. PMID:3410538

  20. Characterization of the Salmonella paratyphi C Vi polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, E M; Schneerson, R; Egan, W M; Szu, S C; Robbins, J B

    1989-01-01

    The Vi capsular polysaccharide (Vi) is both a virulence factor and a protective antigen of Salmonella typhi; its pathogenic role for Salmonella paratyphi C is less well understood. We found no differences between the antigenic and immunogenic properties and the structure of the Vi from representative strains of S. paratyphi C, S. typhi, and Citrobacter freundii. There were, however, differences in both the amount produced per cell and the degree of association with the cell among the Vi from the three species of Enterobacteriaceae. S. paratyphi C produced less Vi than both the wild-type S. typhi and C. freundii did, and it showed the fastest release of Vi into the media. These findings may provide an explanation for the inability of the Vi to inhibit completely the agglutination of S. paratyphi C by anti-O sera. In an outbreak of enteric fever caused by S. paratyphi C, 66 of 78 isolates (85%) were Vi positive. Images PMID:2506132

  1. Genetic and pathological characteristics of Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans from meningoencephalitis in autochthonous goats and mouflons, Sardinia, Italy.

    PubMed

    Maestrale, Caterina; Masia, Mariangela; Pintus, Davide; Lollai, Stefano; Kozel, Thomas R; Gates-Hollingsworth, Marcellene A; Cancedda, Maria Giovanna; Cabras, Pierangela; Pirino, Salvatore; D'Ascenzo, Vittoria; Ligios, Ciriaco

    2015-06-12

    In this study, we examined in Sardinia the brain of 555 autochthonous sheep, 50 goats, and 4 mouflons which were found affected by neurological signs. We found 6 goats and one mouflon with meningoencephalitis caused by Cryptococcus sp. There was no evidence of cryptococcal infections in any of the examined sheep. MLST genotyping on Cryptococcus sp. isolates identified Cryptococcus gatti genotype AFLP4/VGI and Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans genotype AFLP2/VNIV. Phylogenetically, all Cryptococcus gattii isolates fell within the autochthonous animal, human and environmental Mediterranean isolate cluster, forming a distinct branch along with environmental strains from Alicante, in the southern Mediterranean coast of Spain. PMID:25840469

  2. Capsular block syndrome: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, Mauricio; Velásquez, Luis F; Rojas, Sebastián; Montoya, Laura; Zuluaga, Katherine; Balparda, Kepa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the case of a patient who developed late capsular block syndrome and to review the current literature regarding this complication of phacoemulsification procedures. Methods The literature was reviewed to summarize the diagnosis, classification, use of diagnostic aids, and the current treatments for this complication. Results A 69-year-old patient complained of decreased visual acuity 11 months after undergoing phacoemulsification. She was found to have a secondary myopization. Anterior segment ultrabiomicroscopy confirmed the diagnosis of capsular block syndrome. The patient underwent neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser posterior capsulotomy, which resulted in complete resolution of her symptoms. Conclusion Capsular block syndrome is a fairly rare complication of phacoemulsification procedures that, depending primarily on the timing of its occurrence following surgery, can develop into one of the three following possible clinical scenarios: intraoperatory, early postoperatory, and late postoperatory. In this patient, Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy was shown to be a safe and effective treatment option for this type of complication. PMID:25152612

  3. Arthroscopic Thermal Capsular Shrinkage for Palmar Midcarpal Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic capsular shrinkage has been previously used to stabilize major joints. This is the first series of its use in the wrist for palmar midcarpal instability (PMCI). Materials and Methods This is a medium-term retrospective review of 13 patients (15 wrists) at an average follow-up of 48 months postoperative. All patients were assessed with a functional questionnaire for instability and a Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score, as well as clinical examination. Description of Technique Arthroscopic capsular shrinkage was performed to the palmar and dorsal capsules of the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints using a bipolar thermal probe. All wrists were immobilized for 6 weeks post operation. Results 100% follow-up was achieved . All cases had an improvement in the frequency and severity of instability symptoms. The average DASH score was significantly reduced. There were no complications. The average loss of movement following the procedure was 15%. Conclusions The medium-term results show that wrist instability due to PMCI can be improved significantly by thermal capsular shrinkage with only a minimal amount of secondary stiffness. PMID:25097808

  4. Genetic Mapping of the Antigenic Determinants of Two Polysaccharide K Antigens, K10 and K54, in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ørskov, Ida; Nyman, Kate

    1974-01-01

    The genes controlling synthesis of the Escherichia coli acidic polysaccharide capsular antigens K10 and K54 were transferred by conjugation to E. coli strains of other serotypes. The genes concerned with these K antigen determinants showed genetic linkage with the serA locus. We propose to name the K antigen-controlling gene kpsA. The genetic determinants of the two K antigens could also be transferred to enteropathogenic serotypes, even though such strains have never been found in nature with special acidic polysaccharide K antigens. A noncapsulated derivative, K−, of the K10 strain can transfer the genetic determinant of the K antigen, demonstrating the probable existence of another chromosomal locus involved in the production of such acidic polysaccharide K antigens. PMID:4138850

  5. Peroxisomal and Mitochondrial β-Oxidation Pathways Influence the Virulence of the Pathogenic Fungus Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, Matthias; Wang, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of the connections between metabolism and elaboration of virulence factors during host colonization by the human-pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is important for developing antifungal therapies. Lipids are abundant in host tissues, and fungal pathogens in the phylum basidiomycota possess both peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation pathways to utilize this potential carbon source. In addition, lipids are important signaling molecules in both fungi and mammals. In this report, we demonstrate that defects in the peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation pathways influence the growth of C. neoformans on fatty acids as well as the virulence of the fungus in a mouse inhalation model of cryptococcosis. Disease attenuation may be due to the cumulative influence of altered carbon source acquisition or processing, interference with secretion, changes in cell wall integrity, and an observed defect in capsule production for the peroxisomal mutant. Altered capsule elaboration in the context of a β-oxidation defect was unexpected but is particularly important because this trait is a major virulence factor for C. neoformans. Additionally, analysis of mutants in the peroxisomal pathway revealed a growth-promoting activity for C. neoformans, and subsequent work identified oleic acid and biotin as candidates for such factors. Overall, this study reveals that β-oxidation influences virulence in C. neoformans by multiple mechanisms that likely include contributions to carbon source acquisition and virulence factor elaboration. PMID:22707485

  6. Environmental distribution of Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii around the Mediterranean basin.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Massimo; D'Amicis, Roberta; Zani, Alberto; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Caggiano, Giuseppina; De Giglio, Osvalda; Balbino, Stella; De Donno, Antonella; Serio, Francesca; Susever, Serdar; Ergin, Cagri; Velegraki, Aristea; Ellabib, Mohamed S; Nardoni, Simona; Macci, Cristina; Oliveri, Salvatore; Trovato, Laura; Dipineto, Ludovico; Rickerts, Volker; McCormick-Smith, Ilka; Akcaglar, Sevim; Tore, Okan; Mlinaric-Missoni, Emilija; Bertout, Sebastien; Mallié, Michele; Martins, Maria da Luz; Vencà, Ana C F; Vieira, Maria L; Sampaio, Ana C; Pereira, Cheila; Griseo, Giuseppe; Romeo, Orazio; Ranque, Stéphane; Al-Yasiri, Mohammed H Y; Kaya, Meltem; Cerikcioglu, Nilgun; Marchese, Anna; Vezzulli, Luigi; Ilkit, Macit; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Pasquale, Vincenzo; Korem, Maya; Polacheck, Itzhack; Scopa, Antonio; Meyer, Wieland; Ferreira-Paim, Kennio; Hagen, Ferry; Theelen, Bart; Boekhout, Teun; Lockhart, Shawn R; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Tortorano, Anna Maria; Dromer, Françoise; Varma, Ashok; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Inácio, Joäo; Alonso, Beatriz; Colom, Maria F

    2016-06-01

    In order to elucidate the distribution of Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii in the Mediterranean basin, an extensive environmental survey was carried out during 2012-2015. A total of 302 sites located in 12 countries were sampled, 6436 samples from 3765 trees were collected and 5% of trees were found to be colonized by cryptococcal yeasts. Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from 177 trees and C. gattii from 13. Cryptococcus neoformans colonized 27% of Ceratonia, 10% of Olea, Platanus and Prunus trees and a lower percentage of other tree genera. The 13 C. gattii isolates were collected from five Eucalyptus, four Ceratonia, two Pinus and two Olea trees. Cryptococcus neoformans was distributed all around the Mediterranean basin, whereas C. gattii was isolated in Greece, Southern Italy and Spain, in agreement with previous findings from both clinical and environmental sources. Among C. neoformans isolates, VNI was the prevalent molecular type but VNII, VNIV and VNIII hybrid strains were also isolated. With the exception of a single VGIV isolate, all C. gattii isolates were VGI. The results confirmed the presence of both Cryptococcus species in the Mediterranean environment, and showed that both carob and olive trees represent an important niche for these yeasts. PMID:27188887

  7. Cryptococcus neoformans capsule protects cell from oxygen reactive species generated by antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, Renato Araujo; Hamblin, Michael R.; Kato, Ilka T.; Fuchs, Beth; Mylonakis, Eleytherios; Simões Ribeiro, Martha; Tegos, George

    2011-03-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI) is based on the utilization of substances that can photosensitize biological tissues and are capable of being activated in the presence of light. Cryptococcus neoformans is an yeast surrounded by a capsule composed primarily of glucoronoxylomannan that plays an important role in its virulence. This yeast causes infection on skin, lungs and brain that can be associated with neurological sequelae and neurosurgical interventions, and its conventional treatment requires prolonged antifungal therapy, which presents important adverse effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of Cryptococcus neoformans capsule against reactive oxygen species generated by APDI. Cryptococcus neoformans KN99α, which is a strain able to produce capsule, and CAP59 that does not present capsule production were submitted to APDI using methylene blue (MB), rose bengal (RB), and pL-ce6 as photosensitizers (PS). Then microbial inactivation was evaluated by counting colony form units following APDI and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) illustrated localization as well as the preferential accumulation of PS into the fungal cells. C. neoformans KN99α was more resistant to APDI than CAP59 for all PSs tested. CLSM showed incorporation of MB and RB into the cytoplasm and a preferential uptake in mitochondria. A nuclear accumulation of MB was also observed. Contrarily, pL-ce6 appears accumulated in cell wall and cell membrane and minimal florescence was observed inside the fungal cells. In conclusion, the ability of C. neoformans to form capsule enhances survival following APDI.

  8. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans Protein Farnesyltransferase Reveal Strategies for Developing Inhibitors That Target Fungal Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Michael A.; Nichols, Connie B.; Armstrong, Stephanie M.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Beese, Lorena S.

    2012-09-17

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  9. Neutrophil swarming toward Cryptococcus neoformans is mediated by complement and leukotriene B4.

    PubMed

    Sun, Donglei; Shi, Meiqing

    2016-09-01

    Swarming behavior of neutrophils has been noticed in both sterile injury and infection models and the mechanisms are being unveiled. So far, no in vitro model has been established to study neutrophil swarming to microbes. In the current study, using live-cell imaging, we observed in vitro neutrophil swarming toward Cryptococcus neoformans, a fungal pathogen causing human meningoencephalitis. Complement C3 and CD11b expression are essential for neutrophils to form cell swarms surrounding C. neoformans. Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) was quickly released by neutrophils during their interactions with C. neoformans. Blockade of LTB4 synthesis inhibited the swarming response to C. neoformans. Importantly, blockade of LTB4 synthesis also significantly reduced neutrophil recruitment in the lung vasculature of mice infected intravenously with C. neoformans, demonstrating a critical role of LTB4 in intravascular neutrophil swarming during infection. Together, this is the first report of neutrophil dynamics of swarming toward a microorganism in vitro, mediated by complement and LTB4. PMID:27402276

  10. Susceptibility profile and epidemiological cut-off values of Cryptococcus neoformans species complex from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Susana; Isla, Maria G; Szusz, Wanda; Vivot, Walter; Altamirano, Rodrigo; Davel, Graciela

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological cut-off values (ECVs) based on minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) distribution have been recently proposed for some antifungal drug/Cryptococcus neoformans combinations. However, these ECVs vary according to the species studied, being serotypes and the geographical origin of strains, variables to be considered. The aims were to define the wild-type (WT) population of the C. neoformans species complex (C. neoformans) isolated from patients living in Argentina, and to propose ECVs for six antifungal drugs. A total of 707 unique C. neoformans isolates obtained from HIV patients suffering cryptococcal meningitis were studied. The MIC of amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole was determined according to the EDef 7.2 (EUCAST) reference document. The MIC distribution, MIC50 , MIC90 and ECV for each of these drugs were calculated. The highest ECV, which included ≥95% of the WT population modelled, was observed for flucytosine and fluconazole (32 μg ml(-1) each). For amphotericin B, itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole, the ECVs were: 0.5, 0.5, 0.5 and 0.06 μg ml(-1) respectively. The ECVs determined in this study may aid in identifying the C. neoformans strains circulating in Argentina with decreased susceptibility to the antifungal drugs tested. PMID:26865081

  11. Fungicidal mechanism of action of D0870 against Cryptococcus neoformans under acidic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, H; Watanabe, T; Kato, K; Mochizuki, H

    1997-01-01

    The fungicidal mechanism of the triazole D0870 against Cryptococcus neoformans under acidic conditions was investigated. D0870 reduced the intracellular K+ content of C. neoformans at pH 4 to about half the value at pH 7 after 12 h of incubation. The 50% inhibitory concentrations of D0870 for ergosterol biosynthesis were almost the same at both pH 4 (0.017 microg/ml) and 7 (0.014 microg/ml); however, D0870 caused a marked accumulation of an unknown lipid and methylated sterols in C. neoformans cultured at pH 4. Extracted fractions containing the unknown lipid or methylated sterols showed strong fungicidal activities against C. neoformans both at pH 4 and 7 in phosphate-citrate buffer not containing D0870. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis showed that the unknown lipid was obtusifolione. These results suggest that D0870 kills C. neoformans by disturbing the permeability of the cell membrane through the accumulation of obtusifolione and methylated sterols in the cell membrane under acidic conditions. PMID:9420043

  12. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans Protein Farnesyltransferase Reveal Strategies for Developing Inhibitors That Target Fungal Pathogens*

    PubMed Central

    Hast, Michael A.; Nichols, Connie B.; Armstrong, Stephanie M.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Beese, Lorena S.

    2011-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections. PMID:21816822

  13. Arthroscopic capsular release of flexion contractures (arthrofibrosis) of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Jones, G S; Savoie, F H

    1993-01-01

    Twelve patients with flexion contractures of the elbow were managed by arthroscopic release of the proximal capsule and debridement of the olecranon fossa. Postoperatively the mean flexion contracture improved from 38 to 3 degrees with supination improving from 45 to 84 degrees and pronation improving from 80 to 88 degrees. All patients reported a decrease in pain level as well as improvement in motion. There was one severe complication in this series, in which a patient sustained a permanent posterior interosseous nerve palsy. Arthroscopic limited capsular release appears to be satisfactory management modality for flexion contracture of the elbow. PMID:8323612

  14. Incorporation of bacterial extracellular polysaccharide by black fly larvae (Simuliidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Couch, C.A.; Meyer, J.L.; Hall, R.O., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Black fly larvae (Simulium) assimilated, with high efficiency (80-90%), bacterial extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) extracted from laboratory cultures of a pseudomonad isolated from the Ogeechee River. Incorporation was traced using 13C-labelled EPS offered to larvae as a coating on a mixture of 1-??m latex beads and kaolin particles. These EPS-coated particles were used to simulate natural particles, both living and dead. Solubility, protein, and nitrogen content of the EPS suggested it was a slime rather than a capsular polysaccharide. Glycosyl composition of the EPS was glucose and galactose in ?? and ?? linkages, with pyruvate, succinate, and possibly malonate constituent groups. To evaluate the incorporation of C derived from protein associated with the EPS matrix, feeding experiments were conducted using EPS with and without proteins extracted. Black fly larvae incorporated 7.2 ??g EPS C larva-1 d-1 from EPS that did not have proteins extracted, and 19.5 ??g EPS C larva-1 d-1 from EPS with proteins extracted. Carbon in protein that is typically associated with EPS was not solely or selectively incorporated. EPS incorporation rates are similar to rates of cellular bacterial carbon incorporation previously estimated for Ogeechee River black fly larvae. If EPS is generally available as a food resource, the importance of bacteria in detrital food webs may be underestimated by studies that examine only the consumption of bacterial cells.

  15. Macrophage mitochondrial and stress response to ingestion of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Carolina; Souza, Ana Camila Oliveira; Derengowski, Lorena da Silveira; de Leon-Rodriguez, Carlos; Wang, Bo; Leon-Rivera, Rosiris; Bocca, Anamelia Lorenzetti; Gonçalves, Teresa; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Human infection with Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn), a common fungal pathogen follows deposition of yeast spores in the lung alveoli. The subsequent host-pathogen interaction can result in either eradication, latency or extra-pulmonary dissemination. Successful control of Cn infection is dependent on host macrophages but macrophages display little ability to kill Cn in vitro. Recently, we reported that ingestion of Cn by mouse macrophages induces early cell cycle progression followed by mitotic arrest, an event that almost certainly reflects host cell damage. The goal of the present work was to understand macrophage pathways affected by Cn toxicity. Infection of macrophages by Cn was associated with alterations in protein translation rate and activation of several stress pathways such as Hypoxia Inducing Factor-1α (HIF-1α), Receptor-interacting Protein 1 (RIP1) and Apoptosis Inducing Factor (AIF). Concomitantly we observed mitochondrial depolarization in infected macrophages, an observation that was replicated in vivo. We also observed differences in the stress pathways activated depending on macrophage cell type, consistent with the non-specific nature of Cn virulence known to infect phylogenetically distant hosts. Our results indicate that Cn infection impairs multiple host cellular functions and undermines the health of these critical phagocytic cells, which can potentially interfere with their ability to clear this fungal pathogen. PMID:25646306

  16. Interaction of Cryptococcus neoformans Extracellular Vesicles with the Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Julie M.; Espadas-Moreno, Javier; Luque-Garcia, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans produces extracellular vesicles containing a variety of cargo, including virulence factors. To become extracellular, these vesicles not only must be released from the plasma membrane but also must pass through the dense matrix of the cell wall. The greatest unknown in the area of fungal vesicles is the mechanism by which these vesicles are released to the extracellular space given the presence of the fungal cell wall. Here we used electron microscopy techniques to image the interactions of vesicles with the cell wall. Our goal was to define the ultrastructural morphology of the process to gain insights into the mechanisms involved. We describe single and multiple vesicle-leaving events, which we hypothesized were due to plasma membrane and multivesicular body vesicle origins, respectively. We further utilized melanized cells to “trap” vesicles and visualize those passing through the cell wall. Vesicle size differed depending on whether vesicles left the cytoplasm in single versus multiple release events. Furthermore, we analyzed different vesicle populations for vesicle dimensions and protein composition. Proteomic analysis tripled the number of proteins known to be associated with vesicles. Despite separation of vesicles into batches differing in size, we did not identify major differences in protein composition. In summary, our results indicate that vesicles are generated by more than one mechanism, that vesicles exit the cell by traversing the cell wall, and that vesicle populations exist as a continuum with regard to size and protein composition. PMID:24906412

  17. Hydroxyurea treatment inhibits proliferation of Cryptococcus neoformans in mice.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Kaushlendra; Mor, Visesato; Bairwa, Narendra K; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Mohanty, Bidyut K

    2012-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is a serious threat to immunocompromised individuals, especially for HIV patients who develop meningoencephalitis. For effective cryptococcal treatment, novel antifungal drugs or innovative combination therapies are needed. Recently, sphingolipids have emerged as important bioactive molecules in the regulation of microbial pathogenesis. Previously we reported that the sphingolipid pathway gene, ISC1, which is responsible for ceramide production, is a major virulence factor in Cn infection. Here we report our studies of the role of ISC1 during genotoxic stress induced by the antineoplastic hydroxyurea (HU) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), which affect DNA replication and genome integrity. We observed that Cn cells lacking ISC1 are highly sensitive to HU and MMS in a rich culture medium. HU affected cell division of Cn cells lacking the ISC1 gene, resulting in cell clusters. Cn ISC1, when expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) strain lacking its own ISC1 gene, restored HU resistance. In macrophage-like cells, although HU affected the proliferation of wild type (WT) Cn cells by 50% at the concentration tested, HU completely inhibited Cn isc1Δ cell proliferation. Interestingly, our preliminary data show that mice infected with WT or Cn isc1Δ cells and subsequently treated with HU had longer lifespans than untreated, infected control mice. Our work suggests that the sphingolipid pathway gene, ISC1, is a likely target for combination therapy with traditional drugs such as HU. PMID:22783238

  18. An OMV Vaccine Derived from a Capsular Group B Meningococcus with Constitutive FetA Expression: Preclinical Evaluation of Immunogenicity and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Norheim, Gunnstein; Sanders, Holly; Mellesdal, Jardar W.; Sundfør, Idunn; Chan, Hannah; Brehony, Carina; Vipond, Caroline; Dold, Chris; Care, Rory; Saleem, Muhammad; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Derrick, Jeremy P.; Feavers, Ian; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Following the introduction of effective protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines against capsular group C meningococcal disease in Europe, meningococci of capsular group B remain a major cause of death and can result in debilitating sequelae. The outer membrane proteins PorA and FetA have previously been shown to induce bactericidal antibodies in humans. Despite considerable antigenic variation among PorA and FetA OMPs in meningococci, systematic molecular epidemiological studies revealed this variation is highly structured so that a limited repertoire of antigenic types is congruent with the hyperinvasive meningococcal lineages that have caused most of the meningococcal disease in Europe in recent decades. Here we describe the development of a prototype vaccine against capsular group B meningococcal infection based on a N. meningitidis isolate genetically engineered to have constitutive expression of the outer membrane protein FetA. Deoxycholate outer membrane vesicles (dOMVs) extracted from cells cultivated in modified Frantz medium contained 21.8% PorA protein, 7.7% FetA protein and 0.03 μg LPS per μg protein (3%). The antibody response to the vaccine was tested in three mouse strains and the toxicological profile of the vaccine was tested in New Zealand white rabbits. Administration of the vaccine, MenPF-1, when given by intramuscular injection on 4 occasions over a 9 week period, was well tolerated in rabbits up to 50 μg/dose, with no evidence of systemic toxicity. These data indicated that the MenPF-1 vaccine had a toxicological profile suitable for testing in a phase I clinical trial. PMID:26390123

  19. Capsular Typing Method for Streptococcus agalactiae Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Alison; Jones, Nicola; Turner, Paul; Turner, Claudia; Efstratiou, Androulla; Patel, Darshana; Walker, A. Sarah; Berkley, James A.; Crook, Derrick W.

    2016-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) capsular serotypes are major determinants of virulence and affect potential vaccine coverage. Here we report a whole-genome-sequencing-based method for GBS serotype assignment. This method shows strong agreement (kappa of 0.92) with conventional methods and increased serotype assignment (100%) to all 10 capsular types. PMID:26962081

  20. Capsular Typing Method for Streptococcus agalactiae Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Anna E; Vaughan, Alison; Jones, Nicola; Turner, Paul; Turner, Claudia; Efstratiou, Androulla; Patel, Darshana; Walker, A Sarah; Berkley, James A; Crook, Derrick W; Seale, Anna C

    2016-05-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) capsular serotypes are major determinants of virulence and affect potential vaccine coverage. Here we report a whole-genome-sequencing-based method for GBS serotype assignment. This method shows strong agreement (kappa of 0.92) with conventional methods and increased serotype assignment (100%) to all 10 capsular types. PMID:26962081

  1. Control of extracellular polysaccharide synthesis in Erwinia stewartii and Escherichia coli K-12: a common regulatory function.

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Cabassa, A; Gottesman, S; Frederick, R D; Dolph, P J; Coplin, D L

    1987-01-01

    A primary determinant of pathogenicity in Erwinia stewartii is the production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS). A single mutation can abolish both EPS synthesis and pathogenicity; both properties are restored by a single cosmid clone. Subcloning and insertion analysis have defined a single positive regulatory function which shares a number of similarities with the rcsA function of Escherichia coli K-12, a positive regulator for capsular polysaccharide synthesis. In E. stewartii, the gene promotes the transcription of at least two operons (cps) involved in EPS synthesis; we have previously demonstrated a similar function for rcsA in E. coli. Both genes code for proteins of 25 to 27 kilodaltons; both proteins are unstable in E. coli. The E. stewartii RcsA protein was stabilized in E. coli lon mutants, as the RcsA product from E. coli is. The E. stewartii function complemented E. coli rcsA mutants, and the E. coli RcsA function increased cps expression and restored virulence in E. stewartii mutants. Therefore, these two gram-negative organisms share a similar component of their regulatory circuitry for the control of capsular polysaccharide synthesis. Images PMID:2820930

  2. Surface-Associated Plasminogen Binding of Cryptococcus neoformans Promotes Extracellular Matrix Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Background The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is a leading cause of illness and death in persons with predisposing factors, including: malignancies, solid organ transplants, and corticosteroid use. C. neoformans is ubiquitous in the environment and enters into the lungs via inhalation, where it can disseminate through the bloodstream and penetrate the central nervous system (CNS), resulting in a difficult to treat and often-fatal infection of the brain, called meningoencephalitis. Plasminogen is a highly abundant protein found in the plasma component of blood and is necessary for the degradation of fibrin, collagen, and other structural components of tissues. This fibrinolytic system is utilized by cancer cells during metastasis and several pathogenic species of bacteria have been found to manipulate the host plasminogen system to facilitate invasion of tissues during infection by modifying the activation of this process through the binding of plasminogen at their surface. Methodology The invasion of the brain and the central nervous system by penetration of the protective blood-brain barrier is a prerequisite to the establishment of meningoencephalitis by the opportunistic fungal pathogen C. neoformans. In this study, we examined the ability of C. neoformans to subvert the host plasminogen system to facilitate tissue barrier invasion. Through a combination of biochemical, cell biology, and proteomic approaches, we have shown that C. neoformans utilizes the host plasminogen system to cross tissue barriers, providing support for the hypothesis that plasminogen-binding may contribute to the invasion of the blood-brain barrier by penetration of the brain endothelial cells and underlying matrix. In addition, we have identified the cell wall-associated proteins that serve as plasminogen receptors and characterized both the plasminogen-binding and plasmin-activation potential for this significant human pathogen. Conclusions The results of this study provide

  3. Lipid Flippase Subunit Cdc50 Mediates Drug Resistance and Virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Liao, Guojian; Baker, Gregory M.; Wang, Yina; Lau, Richard; Paderu, Padmaja; Perlin, David S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a human fungal pathogen and a major cause of fungal meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. Treatment options for cryptococcosis are limited. Of the two major antifungal drug classes, azoles are active against C. neoformans but exert a fungistatic effect, necessitating long treatment regimens and leaving open an avenue for emergence of azole resistance. Drugs of the echinocandin class, which target the glucan synthase and are fungicidal against a number of other fungal pathogens, such as Candida species, are ineffective against C. neoformans. Despite the sensitivity of the target enzyme to the drug, the reasons for the innate resistance of C. neoformans to echinocandins remain unknown. To understand the mechanism of echinocandin resistance in C. neoformans, we screened gene disruption and gene deletion libraries for mutants sensitive to the echinocandin-class drug caspofungin and identified a mutation of CDC50, which encodes the β-subunit of membrane lipid flippase. We found that the Cdc50 protein localized to membranes and that its absence led to plasma membrane defects and enhanced caspofungin penetration into the cell, potentially explaining the increased caspofungin sensitivity. Loss of CDC50 also led to hypersensitivity to the azole-class drug fluconazole. Interestingly, in addition to functioning in drug resistance, CDC50 was also essential for fungal resistance to macrophage killing and for virulence in a murine model of cryptococcosis. Furthermore, the surface of cdc50Δ cells contained increased levels of phosphatidylserine, which has been proposed to act as a macrophage recognition signal. Together, these results reveal a previously unappreciated role of membrane lipid flippase in C. neoformans drug resistance and virulence. PMID:27165800

  4. Cryptococcus neoformans Directly Stimulates Perforin Production and Rearms NK Cells for Enhanced Anticryptococcal Microbicidal Activity▿

    PubMed Central

    Marr, Kaleb J.; Jones, Gareth J.; Zheng, Chunfu; Huston, Shaunna M.; Timm-McCann, Martina; Islam, Anowara; Berenger, Byron M.; Ma, Ling Ling; Wiseman, Jeremy C. D.; Mody, Christopher H.

    2009-01-01

    NK cells, in addition to possessing antitumor and antiviral activity, exhibit perforin-dependent microbicidal activity against the opportunistic pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. However, the factors controlling this response, particularly whether the pathogen itself provides an activation or rearming signal, are largely unknown. The current studies were performed to determine whether exposure to this fungus alters subsequent NK cell anticryptococcal activity. NK cells lost perforin and mobilized lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 to the cell surface following incubation with the fungus, indicating that degranulation had occurred. Despite a reduced perforin content during killing, NK cells acquired an enhanced ability to kill C. neoformans, as demonstrated using auxotrophs that allowed independent assessment of the killing of two strains. De novo protein synthesis was required for optimal killing; however, there was no evidence that a soluble factor contributed to the enhanced anticryptococcal activity. Exposure of NK cells to C. neoformans caused the cells to rearm, as demonstrated by increased perforin mRNA levels and enhanced loss of perforin when transcription was blocked. Degranulation alone was insufficient to provide the activation signal as NK cells lost anticryptococcal activity following treatment with strontium chloride. However, NK cells regained the activity upon prolonged exposure to C. neoformans, which is consistent with activation by the microbe. The enhanced cytotoxicity did not extend to tumor killing since NK cells exposed to C. neoformans failed to kill NK-sensitive tumor targets (K562 cells). These studies demonstrate that there is contact-mediated microbe-specific rearming and activation of microbicidal activity that are necessary for optimal killing of C. neoformans. PMID:19307209

  5. Circumscribed Capsular Infarct Modeling Using a Photothrombotic Technique.

    PubMed

    Song, Hanlim; Park, Ji-Young; Kim, Hyung-Sun; Lee, Min-Cheol; Kim, Young; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl

    2016-01-01

    Recent increase in the prevalence rate of white matter stroke demands specific research in the field. However, the lack of a pertinent animal model for white matter stroke has hampered research investigations. Here, we describe a novel method for creating a circumscribed capsular infarct that minimizes damage to neighboring gray matter structures. We used pre-surgery neural tracing with adeno-associated virus-green fluorescent protein (AAV-GFP) to identify somatotopic organization of the forelimb area within the internal capsule. The adjustment of light intensity based on different optical properties of gray and white matter contributes to selective destruction of white matter with relative preservation of gray matter. Accurate positioning of optical-neural interface enables destruction of entire forelimb area in the internal capsule, which leads to a marked and persistent motor deficit. Thus, this technique produces highly replicable capsular infarct lesions with a persistent motor deficit. The model will be helpful not only to study white matter stroke (WMS) at the behavioral, circuit, and cellular levels, but also to assess its usefulness for development of new therapeutic and rehabilitative interventions. PMID:27284776

  6. Chemical structure, conjugation, and cross-reactivity of Bacillus pumilus Sh18 cell wall polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kubler-Kielb, Joanna; Coxon, Bruce; Schneerson, Rachel

    2004-10-01

    Bacillus pumilus strain Sh18 cell wall polysaccharide (CWP), cross-reactive with the capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b, was purified and its chemical structure was elucidated using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, and sugar-specific degradation procedures. Two major structures, 1,5-poly(ribitol phosphate) and 1,3-poly(glycerol phosphate), with the latter partially substituted by 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-galactopyranose (13%) and 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-glucopyranose (6%) on position O-2, were found. A minor component was established to be a polymer of -->3-O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-beta-glucopyranosyl)-1-->4-ribitol-1-OPO3-->. The ratios of the three components were 56, 34, and 10 mol%, respectively. The Sh18 CWP was covalently bound to carrier proteins, and the immunogenicity of the resulting conjugates was evaluated in mice. Two methods of conjugation were compared: (i) binding of 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate-activated hydroxyl groups of the CWP to adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH)-derivatized protein, and (ii) binding of the carbodiimide-activated terminal phosphate group of the CWP to ADH-derivatized protein. The conjugate-induced antibodies reacted in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the homologous polysaccharide and with a number of other bacterial polysaccharides containing ribitol and glycerol phosphates, including H. influenzae types a and b and strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. PMID:15466043

  7. Amine treatment of polysaccharide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, L. K.; Reiter, S. E.

    1984-11-27

    A thermostable, viscous xanthan polysaccharide solution prepared by the process of heating a xanthan polysaccharide solution in the presence of at least one C/sub 1/ to C/sub 10/ alkyl or C/sub 3/ to C/sub 10/ cycloalkyl substituted primary or secondary mono- or diamine having an upper limit of a total of 15 carbon atoms under conditions sufficient to form a thermostable, viscous xanthan polysaccharide solution. The thermostable, viscous xanthan polysaccharide solution may be used as a mobility buffer in a process for the enhanced recovery of oil.

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans induces antimicrobial responses and behaves as a facultative intracellular pathogen in the non mammalian model Galleria mellonella

    PubMed Central

    Trevijano-Contador, Nuria; Herrero-Fernández, Inés; García-Barbazán, Irene; Scorzoni, Liliana; Rueda, Cristina; Rossi, Suélen Andreia; García-Rodas, Rocío; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated opportunistic fungal pathogen that is found in multiple niches in the environment and that can cause fatal meningoencephalitis in susceptible patients, mainly HIV+ individuals. Cryptococcus also infects environmental hosts such as nematodes, insects and plants. In particular, C. neoformans can kill the lepidopteran Galleria mellonella, which offers a useful tool to study microbial virulence and drug efficacy. Galleria mellonella immunity relies on innate responses based on melanization, accumulation of antimicrobial peptides, and cellular responses as phagocytosis or multicellular encapsulation. In this work we have investigated the immune response of G. mellonella during cryptococcal infection. We found that G. mellonella infected with C. neoformans had a high lytic activity in their hemolymph. This response was temperature- and capsule-dependent. During interaction with phagocytic cells, C. neoformans behaved as an intracellular pathogen since it could replicate within hemocytes. Non-lytic events were also observed. In contrast to Candida species, C. neoformans did not induce melanization of G. mellonella after infection. Finally, passage of C. neoformans through G. mellonella resulted in changes in capsule structure as it has been also reported during infection in mammals. Our results highlight that G. mellonella is an optimal model to investigate innate immune responses against C. neoformans. PMID:25531532

  9. Arthroscopic Treatment of Shoulder Instability: A Systematic Review of Capsular Plication Versus Thermal Capsulorrhaphy

    PubMed Central

    Rolfes, Kasey

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Shoulder instability is a common disorder of the shoulder that can result in debilitating pain and decreased function. Poorly treated cases of instability result in excessive mobility, possibly leading to labral tears and degenerative arthritis. The purpose of my systematic review was to compare the effectiveness of 2 popular arthroscopic techniques used to reduce shoulder instability: capsular plication and thermal capsulorrhaphy. Data Sources: Articles were retrieved from PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Ovid/MEDLINE searches using the terms capsular plication, capsular shift, capsular shrinkage, shoulder capsulorrhaphy, and treatment of shoulder instability. Study Selection: I sought cohort studies, case reviews, and randomized controlled trials published from 2000 through March 2013 that evaluated the outcomes of the 2 surgical procedures, which resulted in a total of 12 studies. Data Extraction: Outcome measures were range of motion, satisfaction, and return to previous activity level. Data Synthesis: The overall success rates of the reviewed studies were 91% for arthroscopic capsular plication and 76.5% for thermal capsulorrhaphy. Conclusions: Arthroscopic capsular plication had a higher rate of success than thermal capsulorrhaphy. However, postoperative management varied more among the thermal capsulorrhaphy studies and was generally less conservative than management involving standardized capsular-plication protocols. Future authors should investigate operative techniques and postoperative management, which may help to improve thermal capsulorrhaphy outcomes. PMID:25329347

  10. Effective Use of a Silicone-induced Capsular Flap in Secondary Asian Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sang-Ha; Suh, Man Koon; Kim, Chang Kyung; Kim, Kenneth K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Performing secondary rhinoplasty in patients who underwent primary rhinoplasty using a silicone implant is difficult due to thinning of nasal skin and formation of a capsule. Excess capsule formation can cause capsular contracture, resulting in short nose deformity or implant deviation, migration, or implant demarcation. Revision rhinoplasty using a capsular flap, dorsal silicone implant, and tip plasty was performed in 95 Korean patients (91 women and 4 men; mean age, 27 years) who previously underwent primary augmentation rhinoplasty using silicone implants. The capsular flap was composed by creating a dual plane above the anterior capsule and below the posterior capsule. The existing silicone implant was removed, and a new silicone implant was placed under the posterior capsule. The patients were followed up for 6 months to 4 years (mean, 31.7 months). Of the 95 patients who underwent secondary augmentation rhinoplasty using a capsular flap, 88 patients (92.6%) showed satisfactory results. There was no hematoma or nasal skin vascular compromise. There was no visible or palpable capsule resorption or recurrent capsular contracture. Early implant malpositioning (within 30 days postoperatively) was observed in 4 patients, and tip shape dissatisfaction (within 60 days postoperatively) was reported by 3 patients. Four patients underwent revision surgery and had successful outcomes. Nasal augmentation using a silicone implant and capsular flap in secondary rhinoplasty avoids complications caused by removal of the capsule. Recurrent capsule formation or clinically noticeable resorption of the capsular flap was not observed in this study. PMID:25289365

  11. The expanding host tree species spectrum of Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans and their isolations from surrounding soil in India.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, H S; Kowshik, T; Chowdhary, Anuradha; Preeti Sinha, K; Khan, Z U; Sun, Sheng; Xu, Jianping

    2008-12-01

    This study reports the widespread prevalence of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii in decayed wood inside trunk hollows of 14 species representing 12 families of trees and from soil near the base of various host trees from Delhi and several places in the Indian states of Uttar Pradesh, Haryana, Tamil Nadu and Chandigarh Union Territory. Of the 311 trees from which samples were obtained, 64 (20.5%) were found to contain strains of the C. neoformans species complex. The number of trees positive for C. neoformans var grubii (serotypeA) was 51 (16.3%), for C. gattii (serotype B) 24 (7.7%) and for both C. neoformans and C. gattii 11 (3.5%). The overall prevalence of C. neoformans species complex in decayed wood samples was 19.9% (111/556). There was no obvious correlation between the prevalence of these two yeast species and the species of host trees. The data on prevalence of C. gattii (24%) and C. neoformans (26%) in soil around the base of some host trees indicated that soil is another important ecologic niche for these two Cryptococcus species in India. Among our sampled tree species, eight and six were recorded for the first time as hosts for C. neoformans var grubii and C. gattii, respectively. A longitudinal surveillance of 8 host tree species over 0.7 to 2.5 years indicated long term colonization of Polyalthia longifolia, Mimusops elengi and Manilkara hexandra trees by C. gattii and/or C. neoformans. The mating type was determined for 153 of the isolates, including 98 strains of serotype A and 55 of serotype B and all proved to be mating type alpha (MAT alpha). Our observations document the rapidly expanding spectrum of host tree species for C. gattii and C. neoformans and indicate that decayed woods of many tree species are potentially suitable ecological niches for both pathogens. PMID:18608895

  12. Pleiotropic Roles of the Msi1-Like Protein Msl1 in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong-Hoon; Maeng, Shinae; Strain, Anna K.; Floyd, Anna; Nielsen, Kirsten; Heitman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Msi1-like (MSIL) proteins contain WD40 motifs and have a pleiotropic cellular function as negative regulators of the Ras/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway and components of chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1), yet they have not been studied in fungal pathogens. Here we identified and characterized an MSIL protein, Msl1, in Cryptococcus neoformans, which causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis in humans. Notably, Msl1 plays pleiotropic roles in C. neoformans in both cAMP-dependent and -independent manners largely independent of Ras. Msl1 negatively controls antioxidant melanin production and sexual differentiation, and this was repressed by the inhibition of the cAMP-signaling pathway. In contrast, Msl1 controls thermotolerance, diverse stress responses, and antifungal drug resistance in a Ras/cAMP-independent manner. Cac2, which is the second CAF-1 component, appears to play both redundant and distinct functions compared to the functions of Msl1. Msl1 is required for the full virulence of C. neoformans. Transcriptome analysis identified a group of Msl1-regulated genes, which include stress-related genes such as HSP12 and HSP78. In conclusion, this study demonstrates pleiotropic roles of Msl1 in the human fungal pathogen C. neoformans, providing insight into a potential novel antifungal therapeutic target. PMID:23042129

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans Yap1 is required for normal fluconazole and oxidative stress resistance

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sanjoy; Doering, Tamara L.; Moye-Rowley, W. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogen that is the most common cause of fungal meningitis. As with most fungal pathogens, the most prevalent clinical antifungal used to treat Cryptococcosis is orally administered fluconazole. Resistance to this antifungal is an increasing concern in treatment of fungal disease in general. Our knowledge of the specific determinants involved in fluconazole resistance in Cryptococcus is limited. Here we report the identification of an important genetic determinant of fluconazole resistance in Cryptococcus neoformans that encodes a basic region-leucine zipper transcription factor homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yap1. Expression of a codon-optimized form of the Cn YAP1 cDNA in S. cerevisiae complemented defects caused by loss of the endogenous S. cerevisiae YAP1 gene and activated transcription from a reporter gene construct. Mutant strains of C. neoformans lacking YAP1 were hypersensitive to a range of oxidative stress agents but importantly also to fluconazole. Loss of Yap1 homologues from other fungal pathogens like Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus was previously found to cause oxidant hypersensitivity but had no detectable effect on fluconazole resistance. Our data provide evidence for a unique biological role of Yap1 in wild-type fluconazole resistance in C. neoformans. PMID:25445311

  14. ISOLATION OF Cryptococcus neoformans FROM ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES COLLECTED IN SOUTHEASTERN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Nweze, Emeka I; Kechia, Fred A; Dibua, Uju E; Eze, Charles; Onoja, Uwakwe S

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans is the second most common fungal opportunistic pathogen and a life-threatening infection with serious clinical manifestations especially in HIV/AIDS and other immunocompromised patients. In Nigeria, HIV/AIDS infection has reached an alarming level. Despite this, information on the presence of this fungus in clinical and environmental samples is very scanty in Nigeria and many other parts of Africa. We set out to evaluate the presence of Cryptococcus neoformans or C. gattiiin pigeon droppings obtained from Southeastern Nigeria. One hundred and seventy-seven samples of pigeon droppings from six sample types were collected. The area covered comprised of ten cities and other locations spanning across five States in Nigeria. Using established techniques, Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from 39 of the 177 (22.0%) samples overall. No C. gattiiwas isolated. Most of the isolates (32.4%) were recovered from dovecotes (11 of 34) followed closely by samples taken from markets (31.8%; seven of 22) and least from the church (4.0%; one of 25). The highest isolation rate (38.9%) was found in samples from Enugu-Ezike(seven of 23) while the least came from Afikpo and the other locations each with 9.1% isolation rate. This is the first large-scale screening of Cryptococcus neoformans from pigeon droppings in Nigeria. The ecological and epidemiological significance of these findings are discussed. PMID:26422152

  15. Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis with negative cryptococcal antigen: Evaluation of a new immunochromatographic detection assay

    PubMed Central

    Opota, O.; Desgraz, B.; Kenfak, A.; Jaton, K.; Cavassini, M.; Greub, G.; Prod'hom, G.; Giulieri, S.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of cryptococcal antigen in serum or cerebrospinal fluid allows cryptococcal meningitis diagnosis within few hours with >90% sensitivity. In an HIV-positive patient with Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis, initial antigen detection by immunoagglutination was negative. We thus evaluated a new immunochromatographic detection assay that exhibited a higher sensitivity. PMID:25755893

  16. A Multi-Host Approach for the Systematic Analysis of Virulence Factors in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Desalermos, Athanasios; Tan, Xiaojiang; Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Arvanitis, Marios; Wang, Yan; Li, Dedong; Kourkoumpetis, Themistoklis K.; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    A multi-host approach was followed to screen a library of 1201 signature-tagged deletion strains of Cryptococcus neoformans mutants to identify previously unknown virulence factors. The primary screen was performed using a Caenorhabditis elegans–C. neoformans infection assay. The hits among these strains were reconfirmed as less virulent than the wild type in the insect Galleria mellonella–C. neoformans infection assay. After this 2-stage screen, and to prioritize hits, we performed serial evaluations of the selected strains, using the C. elegans model. All hit strains identified through these studies were validated in a murine model of systemic cryptococcosis. Twelve strains were identified through a stepwise screening assay. Among them, 4 (CSN1201, SRE1, RDI1, and YLR243W) were previously discovered, providing proof of principle for this approach, while the role of the remaining 8 genes (CKS101, CNC5600, YOL003C, CND1850, MLH3, HAP502, MSL5, and CNA2580) were not previously described in cryptococcal virulence. The multi-host approach is an efficient method of studying the pathogenesis of C. neoformans. We used diverse model hosts, C. elegans, G. mellonella, and mice, with physiological differences and identified 12 genes associated with mammalian infection. Our approach may be suitable for large pathogenesis screens. PMID:25114160

  17. Multilocus sequence typing of Cryptococcus neoformans in non-HIV associated cryptococcosis in Nagasaki, Japan.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Tomo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Ngamskulrungroj, Popchai; Umeyama, Takashi; Takazono, Takahiro; Tashiro, Masato; Nakamura, Shigeki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Ohno, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Miyzaki, Yoshitsugu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-04-01

    Cryptococcosis is primarily caused by two Cryptococcus species, i.e., Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii. Both include several genetically diverse subgroups that can be differentiated using various molecular strain typing methods. Since little is known about the molecular epidemiology of the C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex in Japan, we conducted a molecular epidemiological analysis of 35 C. neoformans isolates from non-HIV patients in Nagasaki, Japan and 10 environmental isolates from Thailand. All were analyzed using URA5-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Combined sequence data for all isolates were evaluated with the neighbor-joining method. All were found to be serotype A and mating type MATα. Thirty-two of the 35 clinical isolates molecular type VNI, while the three remaining isolates were VNII as determined through the URA5-RFLP method. Thirty-one of the VNI isolates were identified as MLST sequence type (ST) 5, the remaining one was ST 32 and the three VNII isolates were found to be ST 43. All the environmental isolates were identified as molecular type VNI (four MLST ST 5 and six ST 4). Our study shows that C. neoformans isolates in Nagasaki are genetically homogeneous, with most of the isolates being ST 5. PMID:22901045

  18. Experimental infection of almond trees seedlings (Terminalia catappa) with an environmental isolate of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii, serotype C.

    PubMed

    Huérfano, S; Castañeda, A; Castañeda, E

    2001-09-01

    Recently, our laboratory reported the isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii, serotype C for the first time from almond trees (Terminalia catappa) detritus. The aim of the present study was to establish the survival of C. neoformans in almond trees seedlings. Thirty seedlings were infected in the stems and samples were taken and processed at different times and by different techniques. No morphological alterations (macro or microscopic) were observed in the infected plants. However, C. neoformans was found to be viable for at least 100 days after infection. These data constitute our first approach towards the understanding of the yeast interactions with a host-plant. PMID:15487923

  19. The Relationship of Bacterial Biofilms and Capsular Contracture in Breast Implants.

    PubMed

    Ajdic, Dragana; Zoghbi, Yasmina; Gerth, David; Panthaki, Zubin J; Thaller, Seth

    2016-03-01

    Capsular contracture is a common sequelae of implant-based breast augmentation. Despite its prevalence, the etiology of capsular contracture remains controversial. Numerous studies have identified microbial biofilms on various implantable materials, including breast implants. Furthermore, biofilms have been implicated in subclinical infections associated with other surgical implants. In this review, we discuss microbial biofilms as a potential etiology of capsular contracture. The review also outlines the key diagnostic modalities available to identify the possible infectious agents found in biofilm, as well as available preventative and treatment measures. PMID:26843099

  20. Direct aspiration of capsular bag material in a case of sequestered endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Amit; Verma, Aditya

    2008-01-01

    Chronic recurrent endophthalmitis can occur following uncomplicated cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation secondary to organisms sequestered in the capsular bag. There is a need to identify these sequestered organisms to facilitate appropriate management. Frequently, specimens from the anterior chamber and vitreous cavity could be unyielding, especially in the early cases in which the vitreous is still uninvolved. This article highlights the technique of directly sampling the capsular bag material in the effective diagnosis of the organism, which facilitated the total cure by irrigation with appropriate antibiotics into the capsular bag. PMID:18292631

  1. Isolated posterior capsular rupture following blunt head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Jaroudi, Mahmoud O; Hamam, Rola N; Maalouf, Fadi C

    2014-01-01

    Closed-globe traumatic cataract is not uncommon in males in the pediatric age group. However, there is a relative paucity of literature on isolated posterior lens capsule rupture associated with closed-globe traumatic cataract. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with white cataract 1 day after blunt trauma to the forehead associated with posterior capsular rupture that was detected by B-scan ultrasonography preoperatively. No stigmata of trauma outside the posterior capsule could be detected by slit-lamp exam, funduscopy, and optical coherence tomography. Phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens implant was performed 24 hours after trauma, with the patient achieving 6/6 visual acuity 1 week and 6 months after surgery. Our case is unique, being the youngest (amblyogenic age) to be reported, with prompt surgical intervention, and with no signs of trauma outside the posterior capsule. PMID:25506201

  2. Outcome of Capsular Tension Ring (CTR) Implant in Complicated Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Sahai, Anshu; Kumar, Pukhrambam Ratan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgery in the presence of zonular weakness or subluxated lens was a great surgical challenge and included intracapsular cataract extraction with anterior chamber IOL implantation or pars plana lensectomy and vitrectomy with a sutured (IOL). Modern surgical approache involves placement of endocapsular flexible PMMA ring that prevents iatrogenic loss of zonular support, minimizing vitreous loss and enables placement of in the bag IOL. Aim To evaluate frequency and indications of capsular tension ring (CTR) implant and analyse the visual and anatomical outcome in various complicated cataract surgeries. Materials and Methods Retrospective screening of database of 6000 consecutive cataract surgeries was done. BCVA, complete ocular examination with SLEx, intraocular pressure, direct ophthalmoscope, fundus examination with +78/+90D were noted. CTR was implanted in cases where Zonular dialysis of > 3 clock hours was present or capsular bag instability was detected during capsulorhexis or subsequent intraoperative maneuvers. In cases with capsulorrhexis extension, CTR was not implanted. Records were analysed for indication of CTR implant and clinical outcome on Day 1, 1 month and 6 month follow up. Results In this series CTR implant was done in 45 cases. The indications were hypermature senile cataract in 9 cases, hypermature senile cataract with lens induced glaucoma in 9 cases, pseudoexfoliation syndrome in 9 cases, post blunt injury traumatic cataract in 6 cases, iridochoroidal coloboma in 6 cases, hypermature cataract with pseudoexfoliation and marfan syndrome in 3 cases respectively. Decision of CTR implant was intraoperative in 42 patients. At 6 month follow up, 39 patients had best corrected visual acuity ≥6/12. IOL decentration was detected in only 3 cases, but without any subjective visual complaints. Conclusion As per the results CTR was used very infrequently (0.75%) but remains useful in cataract surgeries with difficult pre and intraoperative

  3. A novel microactuator for microbiopsy in capsular endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sunkil; Koo, Kyo-in; Bang, Seoung Min; Youp Park, Jeong; Song, Si Young; 'Dan'Cho, Dongil

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents a LiGA (a German acronym for lithographie, galvanoformung, abformung) process based microactuator to be used for microbiopsy in capsular endoscopes. This microactuator is designed to be integrated into a capsular endoscope and to extract tissue samples inside the small gastrointestine which a conventional endoscope cannot reach. The proposed microactuator was fabricated as a cylindrical shape of diameter 10 mm and length 1.8 mm. This actuator consists of three parts: a microbiopsy part with a microspike, an actuating part with a torsion spring and a triggering part with a shape memory alloy (SMA) heating wire and polymer string. In order to extract sample tissue, a microspike in the developed actuator moves forward and backward using the slider-crank mechanism. For low power consumption triggering, a polymer-melting scheme was applied. The SMA heating wire consumed approximately 1.5 V × 160 mA × 1 second (66.67 µWH) for triggering. The precise components of the microactuator were fabricated using the LiGA process in order to overcome the limitations in accuracy of conventional precision machining. The developed microactuator was evaluated by extracting tissue samples from the small intestine of a pig ex vivo, and examining the tissue with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining protocol. The experimental tests demonstrated that the developed microactuator with microspike successfully extracted tissue samples from the pig's small intestines. This paper is an extended version of an oral paper presented at Transducers 2007: 14th International Conference on Solid State Sensors and Actuators, Lyon, France, 10-14 June, 2007.

  4. Characterization of Brucella polysaccharide B.

    PubMed Central

    Bundle, D R; Cherwonogrodzky, J W; Perry, M B

    1988-01-01

    Polysaccharide B was extracted from Brucella melitensis 16M and from a rough strain of Brucella abortus 45/20 by autoclaving or trichloroacetic acid extraction of whole cells and by a new method involving mild leaching of cells. The material obtained by either of the established procedures was contaminated by O polysaccharide. The new leaching protocol eliminated this impurity and provided a pure glucan, which was regarded as polysaccharide B. This polysaccharide was found by high-performance liquid chromatography separations, chemical composition, methylation, and two-dimensional homo- and heteronuclear magnetic resonance experiments to be a family of nonreducing cyclic 1,2-linked polymers of beta-D-glucopyranosyl residues. The degree of polymerization varied between 17 and 24. Polysaccharide B was essentially identical to cyclic D-glucans produced by Rhizobia, Agrobacteria, and other bacterial species. Pure polysaccharide B did not precipitate with Brucella anti-A or anti-M serum and did not inhibit the serological reaction of Brucella A or M antigen with either bovine or murine monoclonal Brucella anti-A or anti-M serum. Previously described serological reactions of polysaccharide B preparations with Brucella anti-A and anti-M sera are related in this study to the presence in crude extracts of contaminants with the antigenic properties of Brucella lipopolysaccharide O polysaccharides. PMID:3356461

  5. Iodine-Catalyzed Polysaccharide Esterification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A review is provided of the recent reports to use iodine-catalyzed esterification reaction to produce esters from polysaccharides. The process entails reaction of the polysaccharide with an acid anhydride in the presence of a catalytic level of iodine, and in the absence of additional solvents. T...

  6. Polysaccharides of Type 6 Klebsiella

    PubMed Central

    Gormus, B. J.; Wheat, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    Water-extractable type 6 Klebsiella antigens were separated into a type 6-specific acidic polysaccharide and a neutral polysaccharide. The neutral polymer was devoid of type 6 activity although it was serologically active. The type 6-specific polymer contained fucose, glucose, and mannose, and pyruvic, galacturonic, and possibly glucuronic acids. The neutral polymer contained glucose, galactose, and mannose. PMID:5003178

  7. The Role of Amino Acid Permeases and Tryptophan Biosynthesis in Cryptococcus neoformans Survival

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, João Daniel Santos; Martho, Kevin; Tofik, Veridiana; Vallim, Marcelo A.; Pascon, Renata C.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic diversity is an important factor during microbial adaptation to different environments. Among metabolic processes, amino acid biosynthesis has been demonstrated to be relevant for survival for many microbial pathogens, whereas the association between pathogenesis and amino acid uptake and recycling are less well-established. Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen with many habitats. As a result, it faces frequent metabolic shifts and challenges during its life cycle. Here we studied the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and found that the pathway is essential. RNAi indicated that interruptions in the biosynthetic pathway render strains inviable. However, auxotroph complementation can be partially achieved by tryptophan uptake when a non preferred nitrogen source and lower growth temperature are applied, suggesting that amino acid permeases may be the target of nitrogen catabolism repression (NCR). We used bioinformatics to search for amino acid permeases in the C. neoformans and found eight potential global permeases (AAP1 to AAP8). The transcriptional profile of them revealed that they are subjected to regulatory mechanisms which are known to respond to nutritional status in other fungi, such as (i) quality of nitrogen (Nitrogen Catabolism Repression, NCR) and carbon sources (Carbon Catabolism Repression, CCR), (ii) amino acid availability in the extracellular environment (SPS-sensing) and (iii) nutritional deprivation (Global Amino Acid Control, GAAC). This study shows that C. neoformans has fewer amino acid permeases than other model yeasts, and that these proteins may be subjected to complex regulatory mechanisms. Our data suggest that the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway is an excellent pharmacological target. Furthermore, inhibitors of this pathway cause Cryptococcus growth arrest in vitro. PMID:26162077

  8. Photodynamic therapy can kill Cryptococcus neoformans in in vitro and in vivo models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, Renato A.; da Silva, Eriques G.; Chaves, Priscila F.; Santos, Antônio José S.; Paula, Claudete R.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2009-02-01

    Cryptococcosis is an infection caused by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans and the most afflicted sites are lung, skin and central nervous system. A range of studies had reported that photodynamic therapy (PDT) can inactivate yeast cells; however, the in vivo experimental models of cryptococcosis photoinactivation are not commonly reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of methylene blue (MB) combined with a low-power red laser to inactivate Cryptococcus neoformans in in vitro and in vivo experimental models. To perform the in vitro study, suspension of Cryptococcus neoformans ATCC-90112 (106cfu/mL) was used. The light source was a laser (Photon Lase III, DMC, SÃ#o Carlos, Brazil) emitting at λ660nm with output power of 90mW for 6 and 9min of irradiation, resulting fluences at 108 and 162J/cm². As photosensitizer, 100μM MB was used. For the in vivo study, 10 BALB/c mice had the left paw inoculated with C. neoformans ATCC-90112 (107cfu). Twenty-four hours after inoculation, PDT was performed using 150μM MB and 100mW red laser with fluence at 180J/cm2. PDT was efficient in vitro against C. neoformans in both parameters used: 3 log reduction with 108J/cm² and 6 log reduction with 162J/cm². In the in vivo experiment, PDT was also effective; however, its effect was less expressive than in the in vitro study (about 1 log reduction). In conclusion, PDT seems to be a helpful alternative to treat dermal cryptococcosis; however, more effective parameters must be found in in vivo studies.

  9. Molecular typing of environmental Cryptococcus neoformans/C. gattii species complex isolates from Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alves, Gleica Soyan Barbosa; Freire, Ana Karla Lima; Bentes, Amaury Dos Santos; Pinheiro, José Felipe de Souza; de Souza, João Vicente Braga; Wanke, Bodo; Matsuura, Takeshi; Jackisch-Matsuura, Ani Beatriz

    2016-08-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are the main causative agents of cryptococcosis, a systemic fungal disease that affects internal organs and skin, and which is acquired by inhalation of spores or encapsulated yeasts. It is currently known that the C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex has a worldwide distribution, however, some molecular types seem to prevail in certain regions. Few environmental studies of Cryptococcus have been conducted in the Brazilian Amazon. This is the first ecological study of the pathogenic fungi C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex in the urban area of Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. A total of 506 samples from pigeon droppings (n = 191), captive bird droppings (n = 60) and tree hollows (n = 255) were collected from June 2012 to January 2014 at schools and public buildings, squares, pet shops, households, the zoo and the bus station. Samples were plated on niger seed agar (NSA) medium supplemented with chloramphenicol and incubated at 25°C for 5 days. Dark-brown colonies were isolated and tested for thermotolerance at 37°C, cycloheximide resistance and growth on canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue agar. Molecular typing was done by PCR-RFLP. Susceptibility to the antifungal drugs amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole was tested using Etest(®) strips. In total, 13 positive samples were obtained: one tree hollow (C. gattiiVGII), nine pigeon droppings (C. neoformansVNI) and three captive bird droppings (C. neoformansVNI). The environmental cryptococcal isolates found in this study were of the same molecular types as those responsible for infections in Manaus. PMID:27005969

  10. Sexual Cycle of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii and Virulence of Congenic a and α Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Kirsten; Cox, Gary M.; Wang, Ping; Toffaletti, Dena L.; Perfect, John R.; Heitman, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a human-pathogenic fungus that has evolved into three distinct varieties that infect most prominently the central nervous system. A sexual cycle involving haploid cells of a and α mating types has been reported for two varieties (C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D, and C. neoformans var. gattii, serotypes B and C), yet the vast majority of infections involve a distinct variety (C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A) that has been thought to be clonal and restricted to the α mating type. We recently identified the first serotype A isolate of the a mating type which had been thought to be extinct (strain 125.91). Here we report that this unusual strain can mate with a subset of pathogenic serotype A strains to produce a filamentous dikaryon with fused clamp connections, basidia, and viable recombinant basidiospores. One meiotic segregant mated poorly with the serotype A reference strain H99 but robustly with a crg1 mutant that lacks a regulator of G protein signaling and is hyperresponsive to mating pheromone. This meiotic segregant was used to create congenic a and α mating type serotype A strains. Virulence tests with rabbit and murine models of cryptococcal meningitis showed that the serotype A congenic a and α mating type strains had equivalent virulence in animal models, in contrast to previous studies linking the α mating type to increased virulence in congenic serotype D strains. Our studies highlight a role for sexual recombination in the evolution of a human fungal pathogen and provide a robust genetic platform to establish the molecular determinants of virulence. PMID:12933823

  11. Why Were Polysaccharides Necessary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstoguzov, Vladimir

    2004-12-01

    The main idea of this paper is that the primordial soup may be modelled by food systems whose structure-property relationship is based on non-specific interactions between denatured biopolymers. According to the proposed hypothesis, polysaccharides were the first biopolymers that decreased concentration of salts in the primordial soup, `compatibilised' and drove the joint evolution of proto-biopolymers. Synthesis of macromolecules within the polysaccharide-rich medium could have resulted in phase separation of the primordial soup and concentration of the polypeptides and nucleic acids in the dispersed phase particles. The concentration of proto-biopolymer mixtures favoured their cross-linking in hybrid supermacromolecules of conjugates. The cross-linking of proto-biopolymers could occur by hydrophobic, electrostatic interactions, H-bonds due to freezing aqueous mixed biopolymer dispersions and/or by covalent bonds due to the Maillard reaction. Cross-linking could have increased the local concentration of chemically different proto-biopolymers, fixed their relative positions and made their interactions reproducible. Attractive-repulsive interactions between cross-linked proto-biopolymer chains could develop pairing of the monomer units, improved chemical stability (against hydrolysis) and led to their mutual catalytic activity and coding. Conjugates could probably evolve to the first self-reproduced entities and then to specialized cellular organelles. Phase separation of the primordial soup with concentration of conjugates in the dispersed particles has probably resulted in proto-cells.

  12. Polysaccharides and bacterial plugging

    SciTech Connect

    Fogler, H.S.

    1991-11-01

    Before any successful application of Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery process can be realized, an understanding of the cells' transport and retentive mechanisms in porous media is needed. Cell transport differs from particle transport in their ability to produce polysaccharides, which are used by cells to adhere to surfaces. Cell injection experiments have been conducted using Leuconostoc cells to illustrate the importance of cellular polysaccharide production as a transport mechanism that hinders cell movement and plugs porous media. Kinetic studies of the Leuconostoc cells, carried out to further understand the plugging rates of porous media, have shown that the cells' growth rates are approximately equal when provided with monosaccharide (glucose and fructose) or sucrose. The only difference in cell metabolism is the production of dextran when sucrose is supplied as a carbon source. Experimentally it has also been shown that the cells' growth rate is weakly dependent upon the sucrose concentration in the media, and strongly dependent upon the concentration of yeast extract. The synthesis of cellular dextran has been found to lag behind cell generation, thus indicating that the cells need to reach maturity before they are capable of expressing the detransucrase enzyme and synthesizing insoluble dextran. Dextran yields were found to be dependent upon the sucrose concentration in the media. 10 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. The molecular basis of polysaccharide cleavage by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Kristian E H; Simmons, Thomas J; Dupree, Paul; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Hemsworth, Glyn R; Ciano, Luisa; Johnston, Esther M; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Marmuse, Laurence; Fort, Sébastien; Cottaz, Sylvain; Driguez, Hugues; Henrissat, Bernard; Lenfant, Nicolas; Tuna, Floriana; Baldansuren, Amgalanbaatar; Davies, Gideon J; Lo Leggio, Leila; Walton, Paul H

    2016-04-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-containing enzymes that oxidatively break down recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose and chitin. Since their discovery, LPMOs have become integral factors in the industrial utilization of biomass, especially in the sustainable generation of cellulosic bioethanol. We report here a structural determination of an LPMO-oligosaccharide complex, yielding detailed insights into the mechanism of action of these enzymes. Using a combination of structure and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we reveal the means by which LPMOs interact with saccharide substrates. We further uncover electronic and structural features of the enzyme active site, showing how LPMOs orchestrate the reaction of oxygen with polysaccharide chains. PMID:26928935

  14. Isolation, Identification and Molecular Typing of Cryptococcus neoformans from Pigeon Droppings and Other Environmental Sources in Tripoli, Libya.

    PubMed

    Ellabib, Mohamed S; Aboshkiwa, Mohamed A; Husien, Walid M; D'Amicis, Roberta; Cogliati, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii are the major cause of fungal meningitis, a potentially lethal mycosis. Since pigeon excreta and other environmental sources can be considered a significant environmental reservoir of this species in urban areas, 100 samples of pigeon excreta and 420 samples from Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Olea europaea (olive tree) around the city of Tripoli, Libya, were collected. C. neoformans was isolated and identified using standard biochemical assays from 46 samples: 34 from pigeon droppings, 3 from Eucalyptus trees and 9 from olive trees. Molecular typing revealed that all isolates from pigeon droppings belonged to molecular type VNI (C. neoformans var. grubii) and mating type αA, whereas those from trees included also the molecular type VNII and VNIII (AD hybrids). The present study reports, for the first time, information about the distribution of species, mating types and molecular types of C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex in Libya. PMID:26943725

  15. Corynebacterium minutissimum endophthalmitis: management with antibiotic irrigation of the capsular bag.

    PubMed

    Arsan, A K; Sizmaz, S; Ozkan, S B; Duman, S

    Chronic endophthalmitis, due to Corynebacterium minutissimum, developed in a patient following uncomplicated extracapsular cataract extraction and posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC-IOL) implantation. In this case, which to our knowledge is the first reported case of Corynebacterium minutissimum endophthalmitis, chronic inflammation persisted for 8 months with fluctuations in the inflammation. The specimens from the capsular bag yielded positive culture, but the vitreous culture was negative. The case was successfully treated by a capsular bag irrigation with vancomycin. PMID:8864817

  16. Biomechanical Comparison of the Latarjet Procedure with and without Capsular Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Matthew T.; Payne, William B.; McGarry, Michelle H.; Tibone, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine if capsular repair used in conjunction with the Latarjet procedure results in significant alterations in glenohumeral rotational range of motion and translation. Methods Glenohumeral rotational range of motion and translation were measured in eight cadaveric shoulders in 90° of abduction in both the scapular and coronal planes under the following four conditions: intact glenoid, 20% bony Bankart lesion, modified Latarjet without capsular repair, and modified Latarjet with capsular repair. Results Creation of a 20% bony Bankart lesion led to significant increases in anterior and inferior glenohumeral translation and rotational range of motion (p < 0.005). The Latarjet procedure restored anterior and inferior stability compared to the bony Bankart condition. It also led to significant increases in glenohumeral internal and external rotational range of motion relative to both the intact and bony Bankart conditions (p < 0.05). The capsular repair from the coracoacromial ligament stump to the native capsule did not significantly affect translations relative to the Latarjet condition; however it did cause a significant decrease in external rotation in both the scapular and coronal planes (p < 0.005). Conclusions The Latarjet procedure is effective in restoring anteroinferior glenohumeral stability. The addition of a capsular repair does not result in significant added stability; however, it does appear to have the effect of restricting glenohumeral external rotational range of motion relative to the Latarjet procedure performed without capsular repair. PMID:26929804

  17. Triclosan Demonstrates Synergic Effect with Amphotericin B and Fluconazole and Induces Apoptosis-Like Cell Death in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Movahed, Elaheh; Tan, Grace Min Yi; Munusamy, Komathy; Yeow, Tee Cian; Tay, Sun Tee; Wong, Won Fen; Looi, Chung Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungus that causes fatal meningoencephalitis especially in AIDS patients. There is an increasing need for discovery of new anti-cryptococcal drugs due to emergence of resistance cases in recent years. In this study, we aim to elucidate the antifungal effect of triclosan against C. neoformans. Methods: Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of triclosan in different C. neoformans strains was first examined. The in vitro interactions between triclosan and two standard anti-fungal drugs (amphotericin B and fluconazole) were further evaluated by microdilution checkerboard assay. Mechanism of triclosan fungicidal activity was then investigated by viewing the cell morphology under transmission electron microscope. Results: We reported that triclosan potently inhibited the growth of C. neoformans. A combination of triclosan with amphotericin B or with fluconazole enhanced their fungicidal effects. Triclosan-treated C. neoformans displayed characteristics such as nuclear chromatin condensation, extensive intracellular vacuolation and mitochondrial swelling, indicating that triclosan triggered apoptosis-like cell death. Conclusion: In summary, our report suggests triclosan as an independent drug or synergent for C. neoformans treatment. PMID:27047474

  18. Induction of Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cell Urokinase Expression by Cryptococcus neoformans Facilitates Blood-Brain Barrier Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Stie, Jamal; Fox, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The invasive ability of the blood-borne fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans can be enhanced through interactions with host plasma components, such as plasminogen. Previously we showed by in vitro studies that plasminogen coats the surface of C. neoformans and is converted to the active serine protease, plasmin, by host plasminogen activators. Viable, but not formaldehyde- or sodium azide-killed, cryptococcal strains undergo brain microvascular endothelial cell-dependent plasminogen-to-plasmin activation, which results in enhanced, plasmin-dependent cryptococcal invasion of primary bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells and fungal ability to degrade plasmin substrates. In the present work, brain microvascular endothelial cells cultured with viable, but not killed, cryptococcal strains led to significant increases in both urokinase mRNA transcription and cell-associated urokinase protein expression. Soluble urokinase was also detected in conditioned medium from brain microvascular endothelial cells cultured with viable, but not killed, C. neoformans. Exposure of plasminogen pre-coated viable C. neoformans to conditioned medium from strain-matched brain microvascular endothelial cell-fungal co-cultures resulted in plasminogen-to-plasmin activation and plasmin-dependent cryptococcal invasion. siRNA-mediated silencing of urokinase gene expression or the use of specific inhibitors of urokinase activity abrogated both plasminogen-to-plasmin activation on C. neoformans and cryptococcal-brain microvascular endothelial cell invasion. Our results suggest that pathogen exploitation of the host urokinase-plasmin(ogen) system may contribute to C. neoformans virulence during invasive cryptococcosis. PMID:23145170

  19. Decayed wood of Syzygium cumini and Ficus religiosa living trees in Delhi/New Delhi metropolitan area as natural habitat of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, H S; Kowshik, T; Khan, Z U

    2003-06-01

    The isolation is reported of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii and C. n. var. neoformans from decayed wood inside trunk hollows of Syzygium cumini and of C. n. var. neoformans from Ficus religiosa trees in the Delhi/New Delhi metropolitan area. Fourteen of sixty-six (21%) S. cumini trees investigated proved to be positive, seven for each variety. The two varieties never co-occurred in the same hollow. C. n. var. neoformans was also isolated from three of seventeen Ficus religiosa-trees. Two of these isolates originated from decayed wood and one from bark. The C. n. var. gattii and C. n. var. neoformans isolates belonged to serotype B and serotype A, respectively. The data strongly supported colonization of S. cumini by both varieties and of F. religiosa trees by C. n. var. neoformans. Evidence of this was found by repeated isolations. For example, in 36/44 (82%) samples for C. n. var. gattii and 22/27 (81%) samples for C. n. var. neoformans, and by a high population density in the tested wood debris (maximally 6 x 10(5) colony-forming units per gram [c.f.u./g] for C. n. var. gattii and 8 x 10(4) c.f.u./g for C. n. var. neoformans). No eucalypt trees were seen near the positive S. cumini and F. religiosa trees. The densities of C. neoformans in these trees exceeded those found previously in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and in other tree species more rarely reported to be sources of C. neoformans in India. S. cumini and F. religiosa appear not to have been reported to date as sources for either C. n. var. gattii or C n. var. neoformans. Our results add to the recently emerging evidence that the natural habitat of C. n. var. gattii and C. n. var. neoformans is not specific to woody or other debris of particular tree species, but instead is more generalized. PMID:12964711

  20. Genetic, Biochemical, and Serological Characterization of a New Pneumococcal Serotype, 6H, and Generation of a Pneumococcal Strain Producing Three Different Capsular Repeat Units

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Ho; Geno, K. Aaron; Yu, Jigui; Oliver, Melissa B.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates were recently described that produced capsular polysaccharide with properties of both serotypes 6A and 6B. Their hybrid serological property correlated with mutations affecting the glycosyltransferase WciP, which links rhamnose to ribitol by an α(1-3) linkage for serotypes 6A and 6C and an α(1-4) linkage for serotypes 6B and 6D. The isolates had mutations in the triad residues of WciP that have been correlated with enzyme specificity. The canonical triad residues of WciP are Ala192-Ser195-Arg254 for serotypes 6A and 6C and Ser192-Asn195-Gly254 for serotypes 6B and 6D. To prove that the mutations in the triad residues are responsible for the hybrid serotype, we introduced the previously described Ala192-Cys195-Arg254 triad into a 6A strain and found that the change made WciP bispecific, resulting in 6A and 6B repeat unit expression, although 6B repeat unit production was favored over production of 6A repeat units. Likewise, this triad permitted a 6C strain to express 6C and 6D repeat units. With reported bispecificity in WciN, which adds either glucose or galactose as the second sugar in the serogroup 6 repeat unit, the possibility exists for a strain to simultaneously produce all four serogroup 6 repeat units; however, when genes encoding both bispecific enzymes were introduced into a 6A strain, only 6A, 6B, and 6D repeat units were detected serologically. Nonetheless, this may be the first example of a bacterial polysaccharide with three different repeat units. This strategy of expressing multiple repeat units in a single polymer is a novel approach to broadening vaccine coverage by eliminating the need for multiple polysaccharide sources to cover multiple serogroup members. PMID:25589550

  1. Polymorphism, duplication, and IS1-mediated rearrangement in the chromosomal his-rfb-gnd region of Escherichia coli strains with group IA and capsular K antigens.

    PubMed

    Drummelsmith, J; Amor, P A; Whitfield, C

    1997-05-01

    Individual Escherichia coli strains produce several cell surface polysaccharides. In E. coli E69, the his region of the chromosome contains the rfb (serotype O9 lipopolysaccharide O-antigen biosynthesis) and cps (serotype K30 group IA capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis) loci. Polymorphisms in this region of the Escherichia coli chromosome reflect extensive antigenic diversity in the species. Previously, we reported a duplication of the manC-manB genes, encoding enzymes involved in GDP-mannose formation, upstream of rfb in strain E69 (P. Jayaratne et al., J. Bacteriol. 176:3126-3139, 1994). Here we show that one of the manC-manB copies is flanked by IS1 elements, providing a potential mechanism for the gene duplication. Adjacent to manB1 on the IS1-flanked segment is a further open reading frame (ugd), encoding uridine-5'-diphosphoglucose dehydrogenase. The Ugd enzyme is responsible for the production of UDP-glucuronic acid, a precursor required for K30 antigen synthesis. Construction of a chromosomal ugd::Gm(r) insertion mutation demonstrated the essential role for Ugd in the biosynthesis of the K30 antigen and confirmed that there is no additional functional ugd copy in strain E69. PCR amplification and Southern hybridization were used to examine the distribution of IS1 elements and ugd genes in the vicinity of rfb in other E. coli strains, producing different group IA K antigens. The relative order of genes and, where present, IS1 elements was established in these strains. The regions adjacent to rfb in these strains are highly variable in both size and gene order, but in all cases where a ugd homolog was present, it was found near rfb. The presence of IS1 elements in the rfb regions of several of these strains provides a potential mechanism for recombination and deletion events which could contribute to the antigenic diversity seen in surface polysaccharides. PMID:9150218

  2. Dynamics of naturally acquired antibody against Haemophilus influenzae type a capsular polysaccharide in a Canadian Aboriginal population.

    PubMed

    Konini, Angjelina; Nix, Eli; Ulanova, Marina; Moghadas, Seyed M

    2016-06-01

    Severe infections caused by Haemophilus influenzae type a (Hia) have reached alarming rates in some Canadian Aboriginal communities. We sought to estimate the frequency of exposure to this pathogen and timelines for boosting protective antibodies. We developed a model of secondary antigenic challenge (natural exposure), and used data for anti-Hia antibodies in serum samples of healthy and immunocompromised adults in a population of Northwestern Ontario, Canada. We parameterized the model with available estimates from previous studies for the decay rate of antibody and its protective levels against both Hia carriage and invasive disease. Simulations were initialized using antibody concentrations from data. We investigated both the duration of immunity without secondary antigenic challenge and the average time between subsequent exposures to Hia. When there was no new natural exposure, serum antibody concentrations in healthy Aboriginal individuals decreased below the level (1 μg/ml) assumed for protection against invasive Hia disease 3 years after primary exposure. This period was shorter (about 2 years) for Aboriginal individuals suffering from chronic renal failure. We estimated that a new antigenic challenge occurs once in 5 and 2 years for healthy and immunocompromised Aboriginal individuals, respectively. More frequent natural exposure was required to maintain protective antibody levels for non-Aboriginal individuals compared to Aboriginal individuals. The findings suggest that frequent boosting of natural immunity is required to maintain the anti-Hia antibody levels protecting against invasive Hia disease, particularly in individuals with underlying medical conditions. This information has important implications for immunization when an anti-Hia vaccine becomes available. PMID:27419007

  3. INFLUENCE OF METAL IONS, TEMPERATURE, AND POLYMER CONCENTRATION ON THE CONFORMATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI K1 CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDE. (R825503)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. Capsular polysaccharide vaccine for Group B Neisseria meningitidis, Escherichia coli K1, and Pasteurella haemolytica A2

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, John B.; Schneerson, Rachel; Xie, Guilin; Hanson, Lars Å.; Miller, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the literature that is the basis for our proposal that (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac conjugates will be safe and effective vaccines for Group B meningococci (GBMs), Escherichia coli K1, and Pasteurella haemolytica A2. Although (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac is a virulence factor and a protective antigen of these three pathogens, it is also a component of normal tissues (neural cell adhesion molecule). Natural, anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac present in most adults, vaccine-induced antibodies, and even high levels of spontaneously appearing monoclonal anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac did not cause autoimmunity. Although it is not possible to prove a null hypothesis, there are no epidemiologic, serologic, immunologic, or clinical data to indicate that (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac antibodies will induce pathology or an autoimmune disease. No increased pathology caused by these antibodies was found, even in neonates and infants of mothers recovered from GBM meningitis. The lack of pathology mediated by anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac may be explained by different presentations of (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac on bacterial and mammalian cells and by the unusual physicochemical properties of anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac. Based on clinical and experimental data collected over 30 y and because (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac is an essential virulence factor and a protective antigen for GBM, E. coli K1, and P. haemolytica A2, protein conjugates of it are easy to prepare using inexpensive and plentiful ingredients, and they would be compatible with routinely administered infant vaccines, clinical studies of these conjugates should proceed. PMID:22025709

  5. Synthesis and immunological properties of conjugates composed of group B streptococcus type III capsular polysaccharide covalently bound to tetanus toxoid.

    PubMed

    Lagergard, T; Shiloach, J; Robbins, J B; Schneerson, R

    1990-03-01

    A synthetic scheme for covalently binding group B streptococcus type III to tetanus toxoid (TT), using adipic acid dihydrazide as a spacer, is described. Type III alone or as a conjugate with TT was injected subcutaneously into laboratory mice, and the type-specific and TT antibody responses elicited by these immunogens were assayed. Type III-TT elicited significantly higher levels of type-specific antibodies after each immunization than did the type III alone. These levels were related to the dosage of the conjugate, enhanced by Freund adjuvant, and exhibited booster responses. Type III alone elicited only immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in Swiss albino mice and mostly IgM and low levels of IgG antibodies of the IgG3 subclass in BALB/c mice. Type III-TT conjugates, in contrast, elicited mostly IgG antibodies in both strains of mice. IgA type III antibodies were not detected. The first two immunizations with the conjugates elicited type III antibodies in the IgG1 and in the IgG3 subclasses. Low levels of IgG2a type III antibodies were detected after a third injection of type III-TT. Conjugate-induced antibodies facilitated opsonization of group B streptococcus type III organisms and did not react with the structurally related pneumococcus type 14. TT alone or as a component of type III-TT induced mostly antibodies of the IgG class: IgG1 levels were the highest of the four subclasses. No IgA TT antibodies were detected. The conjugation procedure, therefore, enhanced the immunogenicity of and conferred T-cell dependent properties to the type III while preserving the immunogenicity of the TT component. The T-cell dependent properties of the conjugates were responsible for stimulating IgG type III antibodies which could be boosted. Evaluation of type III-TT conjugates in antibody-negative women of child-bearing age is planned. PMID:2407652

  6. A Review of Pneumococcal Vaccines: Current Polysaccharide Vaccine Recommendations and Future Protein Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Calvin C.; Rogers, P. David

    2016-01-01

    This review describes development of currently available pneumococcal vaccines, provides summary tables of current pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in children and adults, and describes new potential vaccine antigens in the pipeline. Streptococcus pneumoniae, the bacteria responsible for pneumonia, otitis media, meningitis and bacteremia, remains a cause of morbidity and mortality in both children and adults. Introductions of unconjugated and conjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines have each reduced the rate of pneumococcal infections caused by the organism S. pneumoniae. The first vaccine developed, the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23), protected adults and children older than 2 years of age against invasive disease caused by the 23 capsular serotypes contained in the vaccine. Because PPSV23 did not elicit a protective immune response in children younger than 2 years of age, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) containing seven of the most common serotypes from PPSV23 in pediatric invasive disease was developed for use in children younger than 2 years of age. The last vaccine to be developed, the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), contains the seven serotypes in PCV7, five additional serotypes from PPSV23, and a new serotype not contained in PPSV23 or PCV7. Serotype replacement with virulent strains that are not contained in the polysaccharide vaccines has been observed after vaccine implementation and stresses the need for continued research into novel vaccine antigens. We describe eight potential protein antigens that are in the pipeline for new pneumococcal vaccines. PMID:26997927

  7. A Review of Pneumococcal Vaccines: Current Polysaccharide Vaccine Recommendations and Future Protein Antigens.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Calvin C; Rogers, P David; Shelton, Chasity M

    2016-01-01

    This review describes development of currently available pneumococcal vaccines, provides summary tables of current pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in children and adults, and describes new potential vaccine antigens in the pipeline. Streptococcus pneumoniae, the bacteria responsible for pneumonia, otitis media, meningitis and bacteremia, remains a cause of morbidity and mortality in both children and adults. Introductions of unconjugated and conjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines have each reduced the rate of pneumococcal infections caused by the organism S. pneumoniae. The first vaccine developed, the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23), protected adults and children older than 2 years of age against invasive disease caused by the 23 capsular serotypes contained in the vaccine. Because PPSV23 did not elicit a protective immune response in children younger than 2 years of age, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) containing seven of the most common serotypes from PPSV23 in pediatric invasive disease was developed for use in children younger than 2 years of age. The last vaccine to be developed, the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), contains the seven serotypes in PCV7, five additional serotypes from PPSV23, and a new serotype not contained in PPSV23 or PCV7. Serotype replacement with virulent strains that are not contained in the polysaccharide vaccines has been observed after vaccine implementation and stresses the need for continued research into novel vaccine antigens. We describe eight potential protein antigens that are in the pipeline for new pneumococcal vaccines. PMID:26997927

  8. A threading receptor for polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Mooibroek, Tiddo J; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Harniman, Robert L; Renney, Charles M; Carter, Tom S; Crump, Matthew P; Davis, Anthony P

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose, chitin and related polysaccharides are key renewable sources of organic molecules and materials. However, poor solubility tends to hamper their exploitation. Synthetic receptors could aid dissolution provided they are capable of cooperative action, for example by multiple threading on a single polysaccharide molecule. Here we report a synthetic receptor designed to form threaded complexes (polypseudorotaxanes) with these natural polymers. The receptor binds fragments of the polysaccharides in aqueous solution with high affinities (K(a) up to 19,000 M(-1)), and is shown--by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy--to adopt the threading geometry. Evidence from induced circular dichroism and atomic force microscopy implies that the receptor also forms polypseudorotaxanes with cellulose and its polycationic analogue chitosan. The results hold promise for polysaccharide solubilization under mild conditions, as well as for new approaches to the design of biologically active molecules. PMID:26673266

  9. A threading receptor for polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooibroek, Tiddo J.; Casas-Solvas, Juan M.; Harniman, Robert L.; Renney, Charles M.; Carter, Tom S.; Crump, Matthew P.; Davis, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose, chitin and related polysaccharides are key renewable sources of organic molecules and materials. However, poor solubility tends to hamper their exploitation. Synthetic receptors could aid dissolution provided they are capable of cooperative action, for example by multiple threading on a single polysaccharide molecule. Here we report a synthetic receptor designed to form threaded complexes (polypseudorotaxanes) with these natural polymers. The receptor binds fragments of the polysaccharides in aqueous solution with high affinities (Ka up to 19,000 M-1), and is shown—by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy—to adopt the threading geometry. Evidence from induced circular dichroism and atomic force microscopy implies that the receptor also forms polypseudorotaxanes with cellulose and its polycationic analogue chitosan. The results hold promise for polysaccharide solubilization under mild conditions, as well as for new approaches to the design of biologically active molecules.

  10. Improvements in interpretation of posterior capsular opacification (PCO) images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paplinski, Andrew P.; Boyce, James F.; Barman, Sarah A.

    2000-06-01

    We present further improvements to the methods of interpretation of the Posterior Capsular Opacification (PCO) images. These retro-illumination images of the back surface of the implanted lens are used to monitor the state of patient's vision after cataract operation. A common post-surgical complication is opacification of the posterior eye capsule caused by the growth of epithelial cells across the back surface of the capsule. Interpretation of the PCO images is based on their segmentation into transparent image areas and opaque areas, which are affected by the growth of epithelial cells and can be characterized by the increase in the image local variance. This assumption is valid in majority of cases. However, for different materials used for the implanted lenses it sometimes happens that the epithelial cells grow in a way characterized by low variance. In such a case segmentation gives a relatively big error. We describe an application of an anisotropic diffusion equation in a non-linear pre-processing of PCO images. The algorithm preserves the high-variance areas of PCO images and performs a low-pass filtering of small low- variance features. The algorithm maintains a mean value of the variance and guarantees existence of a stable solution and improves segmentation of the PCO images.

  11. Computer simulation and experimental study of the polysaccharide-polysaccharide interaction in the bacteria Azospirillum brasilense Sp245

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefeva, Oksana A.; Kuznetsov, Pavel E.; Tolmachev, Sergey A.; Kupadze, Machammad S.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Rogacheva, Svetlana M.

    2003-09-01

    We have studied the conformational properties and molecular dynamics of polysaccharides by using molecular modeling methods. Theoretical and experimental results of polysaccharide-polysaccharide interactions are described.

  12. Usefulness of silkworm as a host animal for understanding pathogenicity of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masaki; Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-02-01

    We propose Cryptococcus neoformans infection model using silkworm for understanding cryptococcosis and screening of therapeutically effective antibiotics. Silkworm is an insect whose rearing methods were established through a long history of the sericulture industry. Silkworm facilitates experiments using a large number of individuals because of low cost for rearing and few ethical problems caused by killing animals. Silkworm can be reared at 37˚C to perform infection experiments at same temperature to human body. Injection of accurate amounts of samples into hemolymph of silkworm by usual syringes is easy to be done since silkworm has an appropriate size to handle. Moreover two injection methods, injection into hemolymph and intestine, are distinguishable for silkworms. The former is correspondent to intravenous injection, and the latter is to oral administration in humans. Taking these advantages of silkworms as host animals, it is possible to evaluate the virulence factors in C. neoformans and the therapeutic efficacy of antifungal agents. PMID:26902902

  13. 3-Bromopyruvate: a novel antifungal agent against the human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Dyląg, Mariusz; Lis, Paweł; Niedźwiecka, Katarzyna; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2013-05-01

    We have investigated the antifungal activity of the pyruvic acid analogue: 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP). Growth inhibition by 3-BP of 110 strains of yeast-like and filamentous fungi was tested by standard spot tests or microdilution method. The human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans exhibited a low Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of 0.12-0.15 mM 3-BP. The high toxicity of 3-BP toward C. neoformans correlated with high intracellular accumulation of 3-BP and also with low levels of intracellular ATP and glutathione. Weak cytotoxicity towards mammalian cells and lack of resistance conferred by the PDR (Pleiotropic Drug Resistance) network in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are other properties of 3-BP that makes it a novel promising anticryptococcal drug. PMID:23541578

  14. A Small Protein Associated with Fungal Energy Metabolism Affects the Virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans in Mammals.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Erin E; Ramagopal, Udupi A; Rivera, Johanna; Cox, James; Nakouzi, Antonio; Prabu, Moses M; Almo, Steven C; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    The pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans causes cryptococcosis, a life-threatening fungal disease. C. neoformans has multiple virulence mechanisms that are non-host specific, induce damage and interfere with immune clearance. Microarray analysis of C. neoformans strains serially passaged in mice associated a small gene (CNAG_02591) with virulence. This gene, hereafter identified as HVA1 (hypervirulence-associated protein 1), encodes a protein that has homologs of unknown function in plant and animal fungi, consistent with a conserved mechanism. Expression of HVA1 was negatively correlated with virulence and was reduced in vitro and in vivo in both mouse- and Galleria-passaged strains of C. neoformans. Phenotypic analysis in hva1Δ and hva1Δ+HVA1 strains revealed no significant differences in established virulence factors. Mice infected intravenously with the hva1Δ strain had higher fungal burden in the spleen and brain, but lower fungal burden in the lungs, and died faster than mice infected with H99W or the hva1Δ+HVA1 strain. Metabolomics analysis demonstrated a general increase in all amino acids measured in the disrupted strain and a block in the TCA cycle at isocitrate dehydrogenase, possibly due to alterations in the nicotinamide cofactor pool. Macrophage fungal burden experiments recapitulated the mouse hypervirulent phenotype of the hva1Δ strain only in the presence of exogenous NADPH. The crystal structure of the Hva1 protein was solved, and a comparison of structurally similar proteins correlated with the metabolomics data and potential interactions with NADPH. We report a new gene that modulates virulence through a mechanism associated with changes in fungal metabolism. PMID:27583447

  15. Cryptococcosis Serotypes Impact Outcome and Provide Evidence of Cryptococcus neoformans Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Patel, Sweta; Raoux-Barbot, Dorothée; Heitman, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a human opportunistic fungal pathogen causing severe disseminated meningoencephalitis, mostly in patients with cellular immune defects. This species is divided into three serotypes: A, D, and the AD hybrid. Our objectives were to compare population structures of serotype A and D clinical isolates and to assess whether infections with AD hybrids differ from infections with the other serotypes. For this purpose, we analyzed 483 isolates and the corresponding clinical data from 234 patients enrolled during the CryptoA/D study or the nationwide survey on cryptococcosis in France. Isolates were characterized in terms of ploidy, serotype, mating type, and genotype, utilizing flow cytometry, serotype- and mating type-specific PCR amplifications, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) methods. Our results suggest that C. neoformans serotypes A and D have different routes of multiplication (primarily clonal expansion versus recombination events for serotype A and serotype D, respectively) and important genomic differences. Cryptococcosis includes a high proportion of proven or probable infections (21.5%) due to a mixture of genotypes, serotypes, and/or ploidies. Multivariate analysis showed that parameters independently associated with failure to achieve cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sterilization by week 2 were a high serum antigen titer, the lack of flucytosine during induction therapy, and the occurrence of mixed infection, while infections caused by AD hybrids were more likely to be associated with CSF sterilization. Our study provides additional evidence for the possible speciation of C. neoformans var. neoformans and grubii and highlights the importance of careful characterization of causative isolates. PMID:26060271

  16. Isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans from infected animals reveal genetic exchange in unisexual, alpha mating type populations.

    PubMed

    Bui, Tien; Lin, Xiaorong; Malik, Richard; Heitman, Joseph; Carter, Dee

    2008-10-01

    Sexual reproduction and genetic exchange are important for the evolution of fungal pathogens and for producing potentially infective spores. Studies to determine whether sex occurs in the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii have produced enigmatic results, however: basidiospores are the most likely infective propagules, and clinical isolates are fertile and genetically diverse, consistent with a sexual species, but almost all populations examined consist of a single mating type and have little evidence for genetic recombination. The choice of population is critical when looking for recombination, particularly when significant asexual propagation is likely and when latency may complicate assessing the origin of an isolate. We therefore selected isolates from infected animals living in the region of Sydney, Australia, with the assumption that the relatively short life spans and limited travels of the animal hosts would provide a very defined population. All isolates were mating type alpha and were of molecular genotype VNI or VNII. A lack of linkage disequilibrium among loci suggested that genetic exchange occurred within both genotype groups. Four diploid VNII isolates that produced filaments and basidium-like structures when cultured in proximity to an a mating type strain were found. Recent studies suggest that compatible alpha-alpha unions can occur in C. neoformans var. neoformans populations and in populations of the sibling species Cryptococcus gattii. As a mating type strains of C. neoformans var. grubii have never been found in Australia, or in the VNII molecular type globally, the potential for alpha-alpha unions is evidence that alpha-alpha unisexual mating maintains sexual recombination and diversity in this pathogen and may produce infectious propagules. PMID:18552280

  17. Restricted Substrate Specificity for the Geranylgeranyltransferase-I Enzyme in Cryptococcus neoformans: Implications for Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Selvig, Kyla; Ballou, Elizabeth R.; Nichols, Connie B.

    2013-01-01

    Proper cellular localization is required for the function of many proteins. The CaaX prenyltransferases (where CaaX indicates a cysteine followed by two aliphatic amino acids and a variable amino acid) direct the subcellular localization of a large group of proteins by catalyzing the attachment of hydrophobic isoprenoid moieties onto C-terminal CaaX motifs, thus facilitating membrane association. This group of enzymes includes farnesyltransferase (Ftase) and geranylgeranyltransferase-I (Ggtase-1). Classically, the variable (X) amino acid determines whether a protein will be an Ftase or Ggtase-I substrate, with Ggtase-I substrates often containing CaaL motifs. In this study, we identify the gene encoding the β subunit of Ggtase-I (CDC43) and demonstrate that Ggtase-mediated activity is not essential. However, Cryptococcus neoformans CDC43 is important for thermotolerance, morphogenesis, and virulence. We find that Ggtase-I function is required for full membrane localization of Rho10 and the two Cdc42 paralogs (Cdc42 and Cdc420). Interestingly, the related Rac and Ras proteins are not mislocalized in the cdc43Δ mutant even though they contain similar CaaL motifs. Additionally, the membrane localization of each of these GTPases is dependent on the prenylation of the CaaX cysteine. These results indicate that C. neoformans CaaX prenyltransferases may recognize their substrates in a unique manner from existing models of prenyltransferase specificity. It also suggests that the C. neoformans Ftase, which has been shown to be more important for C. neoformans proliferation and viability, may be the primary prenyltransferase for proteins that are typically geranylgeranylated in other species. PMID:24014765

  18. In Vitro Analysis of Metabolites Secreted during Infection of Lung Epithelial Cells by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Liew, Kah Leong; Jee, Jap Meng; Yap, Ivan; Yong, Phelim Voon Chen

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated basidiomycetous yeast commonly associated with pigeon droppings and soil. The opportunistic pathogen infects humans through the respiratory system and the metabolic implications of C. neoformans infection have yet to be explored. Studying the metabolic profile associated with the infection could lead to the identification of important metabolites associated with pulmonary infection. Therefore, the aim of the study was to simulate cryptococcal infection at the primary site of infection, the lungs, and to identify the metabolic profile and important metabolites associated with the infection at low and high multiplicity of infections (MOI). The culture supernatant of lung epithelial cells infected with C. neoformans at MOI of 10 and 100 over a period of 18 hours were analysed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The metabolic profiles obtained were further analysed using multivariate analysis and the pathway analysis tool, MetaboAnalyst 2.0. Based on the results from the multivariate analyses, ten metabolites were selected as the discriminatory metabolites that were important in both the infection conditions. The pathways affected during early C. neoformans infection of lung epithelial cells were mainly the central carbon metabolism and biosynthesis of amino acids. Infection at a higher MOI led to a perturbance in the β-alanine metabolism and an increase in the secretion of pantothenic acid into the growth media. Pantothenic acid production during yeast infection has not been documented and the β-alanine metabolism as well as the pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis pathways may represent underlying metabolic pathways associated with disease progression. Our study suggested that β-alanine metabolism and the pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis pathways might be the important pathways associated with cryptococcal infection. PMID:27054608

  19. In Vitro Analysis of Metabolites Secreted during Infection of Lung Epithelial Cells by Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated basidiomycetous yeast commonly associated with pigeon droppings and soil. The opportunistic pathogen infects humans through the respiratory system and the metabolic implications of C. neoformans infection have yet to be explored. Studying the metabolic profile associated with the infection could lead to the identification of important metabolites associated with pulmonary infection. Therefore, the aim of the study was to simulate cryptococcal infection at the primary site of infection, the lungs, and to identify the metabolic profile and important metabolites associated with the infection at low and high multiplicity of infections (MOI). The culture supernatant of lung epithelial cells infected with C. neoformans at MOI of 10 and 100 over a period of 18 hours were analysed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The metabolic profiles obtained were further analysed using multivariate analysis and the pathway analysis tool, MetaboAnalyst 2.0. Based on the results from the multivariate analyses, ten metabolites were selected as the discriminatory metabolites that were important in both the infection conditions. The pathways affected during early C. neoformans infection of lung epithelial cells were mainly the central carbon metabolism and biosynthesis of amino acids. Infection at a higher MOI led to a perturbance in the β-alanine metabolism and an increase in the secretion of pantothenic acid into the growth media. Pantothenic acid production during yeast infection has not been documented and the β-alanine metabolism as well as the pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis pathways may represent underlying metabolic pathways associated with disease progression. Our study suggested that β-alanine metabolism and the pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis pathways might be the important pathways associated with cryptococcal infection. PMID:27054608

  20. Scavenger Receptor A Modulates the Immune Response to Pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yafeng; Dayrit, Jeremy K.; Davis, Michael J.; Carolan, Jacob F.; Osterholzer, John J.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Olszewski, Michal A.

    2014-01-01

    Scavenger receptors represent an important class of pattern recognition receptors shown to mediate both beneficial and detrimental roles in host defense against microbial pathogens. The role of the major macrophage scavenger receptor, scavenger receptor A (SRA), in the immune response against the pathogenic fungus, Cryptococcus neoformans, is unknown. To evaluate the role of SRA in anticryptococcal host defenses, SRA+/+ mice and SRA−/− mice were infected intratracheally with C. neoformans. Results show that infection of SRA−/− mice resulted in a reduction in the pulmonary fungal burden at the efferent phase (3 wk) compared with SRA+/+ mice. Improved fungal clearance in SRA−/− mice was associated with decreased accumulation of eosinophils and greater accumulation of CD4+ T cells and CD11b+ dendritic cells. Additional parameters were consistent with enhanced anti-cryptococcal immunity in the infected SRA−/− mice: 1) increased expression of the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 by lung APCs, 2) decreased expression of Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-13) and IL-10 in lung leukocytes and in cryptococcal Ag-pulsed splenocytes, 3) diminished IgE production in sera, and 4) increased hallmarks of classical pulmonary macrophage activation. These effects were preceded by increased expression of early pro-Th1 genes in pulmonary lymph nodes at the afferent phase (1 wk). Collectively, our data show that SRA can be exploited by C. neoformans to interfere with the early events of the afferent responses that support Th1 immune polarization. This results in amplification of Th2 arm of the immune response and subsequently impaired adaptive control of C. neoformans in the infected lungs. PMID:23733871

  1. Invasion of the Central Nervous System by Cryptococcus neoformans Requires a Secreted Fungal Metalloprotease

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Kiem; Tham, Rick; Uhrig, John P.; Thompson, George R.; Na Pombejra, Sarisa; Jamklang, Mantana; Bautos, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus spp. cause life-threatening fungal infection of the central nervous system (CNS), predominantly in patients with a compromised immune system. Why Cryptococcus neoformans has this remarkable tropism for the CNS is not clear. Recent research on cerebral pathogenesis of C. neoformans revealed a predominantly transcellular migration of cryptococci across the brain endothelium; however, the identities of key fungal virulence factors that function specifically to invade the CNS remain unresolved. Here we found that a novel, secreted metalloprotease (Mpr1) that we identified in the extracellular proteome of C. neoformans (CnMpr1) is required for establishing fungal disease in the CNS. Mpr1 belongs to a poorly characterized M36 class of fungalysins that are expressed in only some fungal species. A strain of C. neoformans lacking the gene encoding Mpr1 (mpr1Δ) failed to breach the endothelium in an in vitro model of the human blood-brain barrier (BBB). A mammalian host infected with the mpr1Δ null strain demonstrated significant improvement in survival due to a reduced brain fungal burden and lacked the brain pathology commonly associated with cryptococcal disease. The in vivo studies further indicate that Mpr1 is not required for fungal dissemination and Mpr1 likely targets the brain endothelium specifically. Remarkably, the sole expression of CnMPR1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in a robust migration of yeast cells across the brain endothelium, demonstrating Mpr1’s specific activity in breaching the BBB and suggesting that Mpr1 may function independently of the hyaluronic acid-CD44 pathway. This distinct role for Mpr1 may develop into innovative treatment options and facilitate a brain-specific drug delivery platform. PMID:24895304

  2. Distinct and redundant roles of exonucleases in Cryptococcus neoformans: Implications for virulence and mating

    PubMed Central

    Wollschlaeger, Carolin; Trevijano-Contador, Nuria; Wang, Xuying; Legrand, Mélanie; Zaragoza, Oscar; Heitman, Joseph; Janbon, Guilhem

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic pathogens like Cryptococcus neoformans are constantly exposed to changing environments, in their natural habitat as well as when encountering a human host. This requires a coordinated program to regulate gene expression that can act at the levels of mRNA synthesis and also mRNA degradation. Here, we find that deletion of the gene encoding the major cytoplasmic 5’→3’ exonuclease Xrn1p in C. neoformans has important consequences for virulence associated phenotypes such as growth at 37°C, capsule and melanin. In an invertebrate model of cryptococcosis the alteration of these virulence properties corresponds to avirulence of the xrn1Δ mutant strains. Additionally, deletion of XRN1 impairs uni- and bisexual mating. On a molecular level, the absence of XRN1 is associated with the upregulation of other major exonuclease encoding genes (i.e. XRN2 and RRP44). Using inducible alleles of RRP44 and XRN2, we show that artificial overexpression of these genes alters LAC1 gene expression and mating. Our data thus suggest the existence of a complex interdependent regulation of exonuclease encoding genes that impact upon virulence and mating in C. neoformans. PMID:25267175

  3. Binding of Cryptococcus neoformans by human cultured macrophages. Requirements for multiple complement receptors and actin.

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, S M; Tabuni, A

    1991-01-01

    We studied the receptors on human cultured macrophages (MO-M phi) responsible for binding encapsulated and isogenic mutant acapsular strains of Cryptococcus neoformans, and whether such binding leads to a phagocytic event. Both strains required opsonization with complement components in normal human serum in order for binding to occur. Binding of the acapsular, but not the encapsulated, strain led to phagocytosis. MAb directed against any of the three defined complement receptors (CR) on MO-M phi (CR1, CR3, and CR4) profoundly inhibited binding of serum-opsonized encapsulated (and to a lesser extent acapsular) organisms to MO-M phi. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated migration of CR to the area of the cryptococcal binding site. Trypsin and elastase inhibited binding of encapsulated and, to a lesser extent, acapsular yeasts to MO-M phi. Binding of encapsulated C. neoformans was profoundly inhibited by incubation in the cold or by inhibitors of receptor capping and actin microfilaments. Thus, multiple CR appear to contribute to binding of serum-opsonized encapsulated C. neoformans by MO-M phi. Binding is an energy-dependent process that requires conformational changes in actin yet does not lead to phagocytosis of the organism. In contrast, energy is not required for binding of acapsular yeasts by MO-M phi and binding triggers phagocytosis. Images PMID:1991837

  4. Multicenter evaluation of broth microdilution method for susceptibility testing of Cryptococcus neoformans against fluconazole.

    PubMed Central

    Sanati, H; Messer, S A; Pfaller, M; Witt, M; Larsen, R; Espinel-Ingroff, A; Ghannoum, M

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a microdilution method for measuring the susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans to fluconazole. The present study evaluated the interlaboratory agreement of the results for the microdilution method obtained at three different sites and compared this method with the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M27-P reference method. Excellent interlaboratory agreement among the results obtained at the three sites was achieved with this method (83 and 96% agreement within 1 and 2 log2 dilutions, respectively). An overall agreement of 90% between the microdilution method and the M27-P method was observed, demonstrating the comparability of the two methods. However, there are inherent problems with the M27-P method in relation to measuring C. neoformans susceptibility, including suboptimal growth of the organism in RPMI 1640, a longer incubation period, and a narrow range of MICs. On the basis of these data, the microdilution method tested in this study is recommended for inclusion in the National Committee for Laboratory Standards method for testing the antifungal susceptibility of C. neoformans. PMID:8727919

  5. Cryptococcus neoformans Requires a Functional Glycolytic Pathway for Disease but Not Persistence in the Host

    PubMed Central

    Price, Michael S.; Betancourt-Quiroz, Marisol; Price, Jennifer L.; Toffaletti, Dena L.; Vora, Haily; Hu, Guanggan; Kronstad, James W.; Perfect, John R.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is an important fungal pathogen of immunocompromised individuals, with a close relative, Cryptococcus gattii, emerging as a serious threat for the immunocompetent. During initial infection, C. neoformans colonizes the airspaces of the lungs, resulting in pneumonia, and subsequently migrates to the central nervous system (CNS). We sought to understand fungal carbon utilization during colonization of these fundamentally different niches within the host, in particular the roles of gluconeogenesis and glycolysis. We created mutants at key points in the gluconeogenesis/glycolysis metabolic pathways that are restricted for growth on lactate and glucose, respectively. A phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mutant (the pck1∆ mutant), blocked for entry of 2- and 3-carbon substrates into gluconeogenesis and attenuated for virulence in a murine inhalation model, showed wild-type (WT) persistence in a rabbit cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) model of cryptococcosis. Conversely, both the pyruvate kinase (pyk1∆) and the hexose kinase I and II (hxk1∆/hxk2∆) mutants, which show impaired glucose utilization, exhibited severely attenuated virulence in the murine inhalation model of cryptococcosis and decreased persistence in the CNS in both the rabbit CSF and the murine inhalation models while displaying adequate persistence in the lungs of mice. These data suggest that glucose utilization is critical for virulence of C. neoformans and persistence of the yeast in the CNS. PMID:21652778

  6. Genome-Wide Transcription Study of Cryptococcus neoformans H99 Clinical Strain versus Environmental Strains

    PubMed Central

    Movahed, Elaheh; Munusamy, Komathy; Tan, Grace Min Yi; Looi, Chung Yeng; Tay, Sun Tee; Wong, Won Fen

    2015-01-01

    The infection of Cryptococcus neoformans is acquired through the inhalation of desiccated yeast cells and basidiospores originated from the environment, particularly from bird’s droppings and decaying wood. Three environmental strains of C. neoformans originated from bird droppings (H4, S48B and S68B) and C. neoformans reference clinical strain (H99) were used for intranasal infection in C57BL/6 mice. We showed that the H99 strain demonstrated higher virulence compared to H4, S48B and S68B strains. To examine if gene expression contributed to the different degree of virulence among these strains, a genome-wide microarray study was performed to inspect the transcriptomic profiles of all four strains. Our results revealed that out of 7,419 genes (22,257 probes) examined, 65 genes were significantly up-or down-regulated in H99 versus H4, S48B and S68B strains. The up-regulated genes in H99 strain include Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase (MVA1), Mitochondrial matrix factor 1 (MMF1), Bud-site-selection protein 8 (BUD8), High affinity glucose transporter 3 (SNF3) and Rho GTPase-activating protein 2 (RGA2). Pathway annotation using DAVID bioinformatics resource showed that metal ion binding and sugar transmembrane transporter activity pathways were highly expressed in the H99 strain. We suggest that the genes and pathways identified may possibly play crucial roles in the fungal pathogenesis. PMID:26360021

  7. Relationship of the Glyoxylate Pathway to the Pathogenesis of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Rude, Thomas H.; Toffaletti, Dena L.; Cox, Gary M.; Perfect, John R.

    2002-01-01

    Functional genomics has become a major focus in the study of microbial pathogenesis. This study used a functional genomic tool, differential display reverse transcription-PCR, to identify a transcriptional profile of Cryptococcus neoformans cells as they produced meningitis in an immunosuppressed host. This serial global gene expression during infection allowed for the identification of up- and down-regulated genes during infection. During this profiling, a single gene for the enzyme isocitrate lyase (ICL1) was found to be up regulated at 1 week of infection in a rabbit meningitis model and during a time of maximum host cellular response. The finding suggested that this enzyme and the glyoxylate shunt pathway are important to this yeast's energy production during infection. However, site-directed icl1 mutants had no apparent virulence defect in two animal models and no growth defect within macrophages. These observations suggest that although the yeast responded to a certain environmental cue(s) by an increase in ICL1 expression during infection, this gene was not necessary for progression of a C. neoformans infection. Compounds that specifically target only ICL1 are unlikely to cripple C. neoformans growth in vivo. PMID:12228298

  8. Leu1 plays a role in iron metabolism and is required for virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Do, Eunsoo; Hu, Guanggan; Caza, Mélissa; Oliveira, Debora; Kronstad, James W.; Jung, Won Hee

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid biosynthetic pathways that are absent in mammals are considered an attractive target for antifungal therapy. Leucine biosynthesis is one such target pathway, consisting of a five-step conversion process starting from the valine precursor 2-keto-isovalerate. Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (Leu1) is an Fe-S cluster protein that is required for leucine biosynthesis in the model fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans possesses an ortholog of S. cerevisiae Leu1, and our previous transcriptome data showed that the expression of LEU1 is regulated by iron availability. In this study, we characterized the role of Leu1 in iron homeostasis and the virulence of C. neoformans. We found that deletion of LEU1 caused leucine auxotrophy and that Leu1 may play a role in the mitochondrial-cytoplasmic Fe-S cluster balance. Whereas cytoplasmic Fe-S protein levels were not affected, mitochondrial Fe-S proteins were up- regulated in the leu1 mutant, suggesting that Leu1 mainly influences mitochondrial iron metabolism. The leu1 mutant also displayed increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and cell wall/membrane disrupting agents, which may have been caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the leu1 mutant was deficient in capsule formation and showed attenuated virulence in a mouse inhalation model of cryptococcosis. Overall, our results indicate that Leu1 plays a role in iron metabolism and is required for virulence in C. neoformans. PMID:25554701

  9. Biochemical And Genetic Modification Of Polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Petersen, Gene R.; Richards, Gil F.

    1993-01-01

    Bacteriophages producing endopolysaccharase-type enzymes used to produce, isolate, and purify high yields of modified polysaccharides from polysaccharides produced by, and incorporated into capsules of, certain bacteria. Bacteriophages used in conversion of native polysaccharide materials into polymers of nearly uniform high molecular weight or, alternatively, into highly pure oligosaccharides. Also used in genetic selection of families of polysaccharides structurally related to native polysaccharide materials, but having altered properties. Resulting new polysaccharides and oligosaccharides prove useful in variety of products, including pharmaceutical chemicals, coating materials, biologically active carbohydrates, and drag-reducing additives for fluids.

  10. Essential Roles of the Kar2/BiP Molecular Chaperone Downstream of the UPR Pathway in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwang-Woo; Kang, Hyun Ah; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a central hub where secreted or membrane-bound proteins are maturated and folded properly in eukaryotes. Maintenance of ER homeostasis is particularly important for human fungal pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, which encounter a plethora of host-mediated stresses during infection. Our previous study demonstrated that the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, composed of the evolutionarily conserved Ire1 kinase and the unique Hxl1 transcription factor, has pleiotropic roles in ER stress response, thermotolerance, antifungal drug resistance, and virulence in C. neoformans. Here, we functionally characterized an ER-resident molecular chaperone, Kar2/BiP, in C. neoformans. Conditional expression of KAR2 by the copper-regulated promoter revealed that Kar2 is essential for the viability of C. neoformans. Constitutive expression of KAR2 by the strong histone H3 promoter partially restores resistance to ER stress, cell wall stress, thermotolerance, and genotoxic stress in ire1Δ and hxl1Δ mutants, suggesting that Kar2 mainly functions downstream of the UPR pathway. Furthermore, Kar2 appears to control azole resistance in C. neoformans downstream of the UPR pathway without regulation of ERG11 or ERG3. Interestingly, we discovered that azole treatment is sensed as ER-stress and subsequently activates the Ire1-dependent Hxl1 splicing event and induction of KAR2 by the UPR pathway. In contrast, the constitutive expression of Kar2 is not sufficient to restore the Ire1-mediated regulation of capsule production in C. neoformans UPR mutants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Kar2 is not only essential for vegetative growth but also required for response and adaptation to the environmental stresses and antifungal drugs downstream of the UPR pathway in C. neoformans. PMID:23484059

  11. PEG as a spacer arm markedly increases the immunogenicity of meningococcal group Y polysaccharide conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qingrui; Li, Dongxia; Kang, Aijun; An, Wenqi; Fan, Bei; Ma, Xiaowei; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo; Hu, Tao

    2013-11-28

    Neisseria meningitidis is a life-threatening pathogen that causes meningitis and other clinical manifestations. As a key virulence determinant, meningococcal capsular polysaccharide (PS) can be used to prevent meningococcal diseases. Conjugation of PS to carrier protein can significantly improve the immunogenicity of PS and induce memory response in infants and young children. However, the conjugate vaccine may suffer from steric shielding of antigenic PS epitopes by carrier protein. Here, a heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used as a spacer arm to conjugate meningococcal group Y capsular PS with tetanus toxoid (TT). PEG can avoid self-crosslink of PS and increase the PS/TT ratio of the vaccine. Significant structural change in TT and PS was not observed upon conjugation. As compared to the vaccine without PEG, immunization with the vaccine using PEG as the spacer arm led to a 3.0-fold increase in the PS-specific IgG titers and a prolonged immune persistence. Paradoxically, PEG, a non-immunogenic hydrophilic polymer has been widely used to couple therapeutic protein for increasing its circulatory time and decreasing its immunogenicity. Presumably, PEG can fully decrease the steric shielding effect of TT on antigenic epitopes of PS and suppress the immunogenicity of TT. In addition, PEG can prolong the immune persistence of the conjugate vaccine and improve its ability to elicit cellular immunity. Thus, PEG can be used as a spacer arm to develop more effective PS conjugate vaccine for prevention of bacterial infection. PMID:23511718

  12. Cell Surface of Lactococcus lactis Is Covered by a Protective Polysaccharide Pellicle*

    PubMed Central

    Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Sadovskaya, Irina; Andre, Guillaume; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Furlan, Sylviane; Bidnenko, Elena; Courtin, Pascal; Péchoux, Christine; Hols, Pascal; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Kulakauskas, Saulius

    2010-01-01

    In Gram-positive bacteria, the functional role of surface polysaccharides (PS) that are not of capsular nature remains poorly understood. Here, we report the presence of a novel cell wall PS pellicle on the surface of Lactococcus lactis. Spontaneous PS-negative mutants were selected using semi-liquid growth conditions, and all mutations were mapped in a single chromosomal locus coding for PS biosynthesis. PS molecules were shown to be composed of hexasaccharide phosphate repeating units that are distinct from other bacterial PS. Using complementary atomic force and transmission electron microscopy techniques, we showed that the PS layer forms an outer pellicle surrounding the cell. Notably, we found that this cell wall layer confers a protective barrier against host phagocytosis by murine macrophages. Altogether, our results suggest that the PS pellicle could represent a new cell envelope structural component of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:20106971

  13. Collagen immunostains can distinguish capsular fibrous tissue from septal fibrosis and may help stage liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Rock, Jonathan B; Yearsley, Martha M; Hanje, A James; Frankel, Wendy L

    2014-01-01

    Core-needle biopsy remains essential for diagnosis of cirrhosis; however, evaluation of fibrosis in such biopsies is often challenging due to the fragmented nature of cirrhotic liver specimens. It is also common to see portions of liver capsules present in the biopsy which adds to the diagnostic challenge. The distinction between capsular/subcapsular fibrous tissue and septal fibrosis is critical to avoid potential overstaging of liver fibrosis. We compared the differential immunostaining in liver capsular and septal areas for collagens III, IV, V, VI, vitronectin, laminin, Orcein, and Trichrome in 15 whole sections of explanted cirrhotic livers and 5 simulated liver biopsies. Collagens III, IV, V, VI, Trichrome, and Orcein show distinct staining patterns in capsular fibrous tissue and septal fibrosis. Collagen IV shows strong diffuse septal staining and consistently weak to negative capsular staining. Collagens III and VI stain similar to IV for septal fibrosis, whereas collagen V, Trichrome, and Orcein show strong staining in both areas. Collagen IV, possibly with III or VI in addition to the routine Trichrome and hematoxylin and eosin stain, is useful in differentiating capsular fibrous tissue from septal fibrosis on challenging and fragmented liver biopsies. PMID:25046231

  14. Stimulation of protective antibodies against type Ia and Ib group B streptococci by a type Ia polysaccharide-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Wessels, M R; Paoletti, L C; Rodewald, A K; Michon, F; DiFabio, J; Jennings, H J; Kasper, D L

    1993-01-01

    Antisera elicited by type Ia group B streptococci (GBS) contain antibodies that react with both type Ia and type Ib strains. Previous studies suggested that antibodies elicited by type Ia organisms recognized a carbohydrate antigen or epitope common to Ia and Ib strains. We now report the synthesis and immunogenicity testing of a type Ia polysaccharide-tetanus toxoid (Ia-TT) conjugate vaccine. Ia-TT elicited type Ia polysaccharide-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies in all three of the rabbits inoculated. In competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, these antibodies reacted with high affinity to type Ia polysaccharide and with lower affinity to the structurally related GBS type Ib polysaccharide. Despite the lower binding affinity of the Ia-TT-induced antibodies for the type Ib polysaccharide, Ia-TT antiserum opsonized not only type Ia GBS but also type Ib GBS for killing by human blood leukocytes. Ia-TT antiserum was also evaluated in a mouse model designed to test the efficacy of maternal antibodies in protecting neonates against GBS infection. Pups born to dams that had received Ia-TT antiserum were protected against lethal challenge with either type Ia or Ib GBS. These studies using a polysaccharide-protein conjugate as an immunogen support the view that the carbohydrate immunodeterminant recognized on Ib strains by Ia antisera is a common epitope contained within the structurally related Ia and Ib capsular polysaccharides. Although antibodies elicited by Ia-TT had protective activity against both Ia and Ib strains, these antibodies reacted with lower affinity to Ib than to Ia polysaccharide. PMID:8406875

  15. Relative Contributions of Prenylation and Postprenylation Processing in Cryptococcus neoformans Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Esher, Shannon K; Ost, Kyla S; Kozubowski, Lukasz; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Min Su; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Alspaugh, J Andrew; Nichols, Connie B

    2016-01-01

    Prenyltransferase enzymes promote the membrane localization of their target proteins by directing the attachment of a hydrophobic lipid group at a conserved C-terminal CAAX motif. Subsequently, the prenylated protein is further modified by postprenylation processing enzymes that cleave the terminal 3 amino acids and carboxymethylate the prenylated cysteine residue. Many prenylated proteins, including Ras1 and Ras-like proteins, require this multistep membrane localization process in order to function properly. In the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, previous studies have demonstrated that two distinct forms of protein prenylation, farnesylation and geranylgeranylation, are both required for cellular adaptation to stress, as well as full virulence in animal infection models. Here, we establish that the C. neoformans RAM1 gene encoding the farnesyltransferase β-subunit, though not strictly essential for growth under permissive in vitro conditions, is absolutely required for cryptococcal pathogenesis. We also identify and characterize postprenylation protease and carboxyl methyltransferase enzymes in C. neoformans. In contrast to the prenyltransferases, deletion of the genes encoding the Rce1 protease and Ste14 carboxyl methyltransferase results in subtle defects in stress response and only partial reductions in virulence. These postprenylation modifications, as well as the prenylation events themselves, do play important roles in mating and hyphal transitions, likely due to their regulation of peptide pheromones and other proteins involved in development. IMPORTANCE Cryptococcus neoformans is an important human fungal pathogen that causes disease and death in immunocompromised individuals. The growth and morphogenesis of this fungus are controlled by conserved Ras-like GTPases, which are also important for its pathogenicity. Many of these proteins require proper subcellular localization for full function, and they are directed to cellular membranes

  16. Relative Contributions of Prenylation and Postprenylation Processing in Cryptococcus neoformans Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Esher, Shannon K.; Ost, Kyla S.; Kozubowski, Lukasz; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Min Su; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Nichols, Connie B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prenyltransferase enzymes promote the membrane localization of their target proteins by directing the attachment of a hydrophobic lipid group at a conserved C-terminal CAAX motif. Subsequently, the prenylated protein is further modified by postprenylation processing enzymes that cleave the terminal 3 amino acids and carboxymethylate the prenylated cysteine residue. Many prenylated proteins, including Ras1 and Ras-like proteins, require this multistep membrane localization process in order to function properly. In the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, previous studies have demonstrated that two distinct forms of protein prenylation, farnesylation and geranylgeranylation, are both required for cellular adaptation to stress, as well as full virulence in animal infection models. Here, we establish that the C. neoformans RAM1 gene encoding the farnesyltransferase β-subunit, though not strictly essential for growth under permissive in vitro conditions, is absolutely required for cryptococcal pathogenesis. We also identify and characterize postprenylation protease and carboxyl methyltransferase enzymes in C. neoformans. In contrast to the prenyltransferases, deletion of the genes encoding the Rce1 protease and Ste14 carboxyl methyltransferase results in subtle defects in stress response and only partial reductions in virulence. These postprenylation modifications, as well as the prenylation events themselves, do play important roles in mating and hyphal transitions, likely due to their regulation of peptide pheromones and other proteins involved in development. IMPORTANCE Cryptococcus neoformans is an important human fungal pathogen that causes disease and death in immunocompromised individuals. The growth and morphogenesis of this fungus are controlled by conserved Ras-like GTPases, which are also important for its pathogenicity. Many of these proteins require proper subcellular localization for full function, and they are directed to cellular

  17. Essential Gene Discovery in the Basidiomycete Cryptococcus neoformans for Antifungal Drug Target Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Ianiri, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fungal diseases represent a major burden to health care globally. As with other pathogenic microbes, there is a limited number of agents suitable for use in treating fungal diseases, and resistance to these agents can develop rapidly. Cryptococcus neoformans is a basidiomycete fungus that causes cryptococcosis worldwide in both immunocompromised and healthy individuals. As a basidiomycete, it diverged from other common pathogenic or model ascomycete fungi more than 500 million years ago. Here, we report C. neoformans genes that are essential for viability as identified through forward and reverse genetic approaches, using an engineered diploid strain and genetic segregation after meiosis. The forward genetic approach generated random insertional mutants in the diploid strain, the induction of meiosis and sporulation, and selection for haploid cells with counterselection of the insertion event. More than 2,500 mutants were analyzed, and transfer DNA (T-DNA) insertions in several genes required for viability were identified. The genes include those encoding the thioredoxin reductase (Trr1), a ribosome assembly factor (Rsa4), an mRNA-capping component (Cet1), and others. For targeted gene replacement, the C. neoformans homologs of 35 genes required for viability in ascomycete fungi were disrupted, meiosis and sporulation were induced, and haploid progeny were evaluated for their ability to grow on selective media. Twenty-one (60%) were found to be required for viability in C. neoformans. These genes are involved in mitochondrial translation, ergosterol biosynthesis, and RNA-related functions. The heterozygous diploid mutants were evaluated for haploinsufficiency on a number of perturbing agents and drugs, revealing phenotypes due to the loss of one copy of an essential gene in C. neoformans. This study expands the knowledge of the essential genes in fungi using a basidiomycete as a model organism. Genes that have no mammalian homologs and are essential

  18. [Experimental inoculation of Terminalia catappa seedlings with an environmental isolate of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii serotype C ].

    PubMed

    Escandón, Patricia; Huérfano, Sandra; Castañeda, Elizabeth

    2002-12-01

    In 1997, our laboratory reported for the first time the isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii serotype C associated with almond tree (Terminalia catappa) detritus. This finding led to a more detailed follow up of the association between the plant and the yeast. Preliminary data have shown that survival of the yeast in almond trees seedlings goes beyond 100 days. The aim of the present study was to establish if under the conditions previously studied, C. neoformans var. gattii would remain viable for longer periods. A total of 83 almond tree seedings, 20-40 cm high, were inoculated with C. neoformans var. gattii serotype C (INS-755). Assays were carried out inoculating the stem or the soil where the seedlings were planted. Observations were undertaken for a period of up to 12 months. As processing techniques we employed the endophytic fungi procedure (stems), maceration (roots, leaves) and standard suspension method (soils). Additionally, microscopic visualization of the yeast in plant tissues was done with trypan blue plus lactophenol. C. neoformans var. gattii was recovered from the inoculated plants for a period of up to 12 months post-inoculation; additionally, the fungus had the capacity to migrate from the stem to the soil and viceversa, without causing macroscopic or microscopic alterations in the plant tissues. This finding suggests that there appears to be an association between the host plant and C. neoformans var. gattii in the environment. PMID:12596450

  19. Ribotyping, biotyping and capsular typing of Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated from patients in Campinas, southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Marcelo; Pace, Fernanda de; Stehling, Eliana Guedes; Villares, Maria Cecília Barisson; Brocchi, Marcelo; Silveira, Wanderley Dias da

    2008-10-01

    Forty-five Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated from patients were characterized based on biochemical characteristics. Their capsular types were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); they were compared, using two molecular methods [ribotyping with a specific DNA probe amplified from the 16S rDNA region from H. influenzae and through restriction fragment length polymorphism (RLFP) of an amplified 16S DNA region]. The strains were better discriminated by the ribotyping technique that used the 16S probe and by the combination of both techniques. Biotypes I and IV were the most common, followed by biotypes VI, VIII and III. Biotypes II and VII were not found. Most of the capsular samples were nontypable (89%), with capsular types a and b found in 2 and 9% of the samples, respectively. We concluded that there is a very close genetic identity among pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. PMID:19219284

  20. Dementia and capsular genu ischemia in patients with severe bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Naito, Makoto; Johkura, Ken; Momoo, Takayuki; Nomiya, Tamaki; Kudo, Yosuke; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    Infarction in the genu of the internal capsule causes dementia that is characterized by abulia, lethargy and memory loss without obvious motor palsy (capsular genu syndrome). We found infarction or decreased cerebral blood flow in the genu of the internal capsule in 6 of 13 patients with severe bacterial meningitis. Four of these six patients developed post-meningitis dementia, characterized by abulia, lethargy, and memory loss. Of 24 patients with viral meningitis, none developed capsular genu ischemia or post-meningitis dementia. In patients with severe bacterial meningitis, capsular genu ischemia may play some role in the development of post-meningitis dementia. In patients with viral meningitis, absence of such ischemia may explain, at least in a part, the rarity of post-meningitis dementia. PMID:19838622

  1. Rheologically interesting polysaccharides from yeasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Nelson, G. A.; Cathey, C. A.; Fuller, G. G.

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the relationships between primary, secondary, and tertiary structures of polysaccharides exhibiting the rheological property of friction (drag) reduction in turbulent flows. We found an example of an exopolysaccharide from the yeast Cryptococcus laurentii that possessed high molecular weight but exhibited lower than expected drag reducing activity. Earlier correlations by Hoyt showing that beta 1 --> 3, beta 2 --> 4, and alpha 1 --> 3 linkages in polysaccharides favored drag reduction were expanded to include correlations to secondary structure. The effect of sidechains in a series of gellan gums was shown to be related to sidechain length and position. Disruption of secondary structure in drag reducing polysaccharides reduced drag reducing activity for some but not all exopolysaccharides. The polymer from C. laurentii was shown to be more stable than xanthan gum and other exopolysaccharides under the most vigorous of denaturing conditions. We also showed a direct relationship between extensional viscosity measurements and the drag reducing coefficient for four exopolysaccharides.

  2. Identification and functional characterization of the putative polysaccharide biosynthesis protein (CapD) of Enterococcus faecium U0317.

    PubMed

    Ali, Liaqat; Spiess, Meike; Wobser, Dominique; Rodriguez, Marta; Blum, Hubert E; Sakιnç, Türkân

    2016-01-01

    Most bacterial species produce capsular polysaccharides that contribute to disease pathogenesis through evasion of the host innate immune system and are also involved in inhibiting leukocyte killing. In the present study, we identified a gene in Enterococcus faecium U0317 with homologies to the polysaccharide biosynthesis protein CapD that is made up of 336 amino acids and putatively catalyzes N-linked glycosylation. A capD deletion mutant was constructed and complemented by homologous recombination that was confirmed by PCR and sequencing. The mutant revealed different growth behavior and morphological changes compared to wild-type by scanning electron microscopy, also the capD mutant showed a strong hydrophobicity and that was reversed in the reconstituted mutant. For further characterization and functional analyses, in-vitro cell culture and in-vivo a mouse infection models were used. Antibodies directed against alpha lipotechoic acid (αLTA) and the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (αPpiC), effectively mediated the opsonophagocytic killing in the capD knock-out mutant, while this activity was not observed in the wild-type and reconstituted mutant. By comparison more than 2-fold decrease was seen in mutant colonization and adherence to both T24 and Caco2 cells. However, a significant higher bacterial colonization was observed in capD mutant during bacteremia in the animal model, while virulence in a mouse UTI (urinary tract infection) model, there were no obvious differences. Further studies are needed to elucidate the function of capsular polysaccharide synthesis gene clusters and its involvement in the disease pathogenesis with the aim to develop targeted therapies to treat multidrug-resistant E. faecium infections. PMID:26611826

  3. Capsular Management in Hip Arthroscopy: An Anatomic, Biomechanical, and Technical Review

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Weber, Alexander E.; Levy, David M.; Bedi, Asheesh; Mather, Richard C.; Salata, Michael J.; Nho, Shane J.

    2016-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy has become an increasingly utilized surgical technique for the treatment of the young, active patients with hip pain. The clinical outcomes of hip arthroscopy in this patient population have been largely successful; however, there is increasing interest in the contribution of hip capsule in postoperative clinical and functional outcomes. The structure and function of the normal hip capsule will be reviewed. Capsular contributions to hip stability will be discussed in the setting of hip arthroscopy with an emphasis on diagnosis-based considerations. Lastly, clinical outcomes following hip arthroscopy will be discussed as they relate to capsular management. PMID:26973840

  4. All-Arthroscopic Reconstruction of the Acetabular Labrum by Capsular Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U.; Alpaugh, Kyle; McCormick, Frank; Martin, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    The acetabular labrum plays an important role in hip joint stability and articular cartilage maintenance. As such, reconstitution of the labral complex is ideal. In cases in which the labrum is too degenerative to allow adequate reconstruction with current repair techniques, a capsular augmentation is a novel technique that can be used to restore the labral structure. Use of capsular augmentation enables preservation of the donor-tissue blood supply with local tissue transfer, without adding significant complexity to the procedure or significant donor-site morbidity. PMID:26052488

  5. Cryptococcus neoformans Thermotolerance to Avian Body Temperature Is Sufficient For Extracellular Growth But Not Intracellular Survival In Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Simon A.; Voelz, Kerstin; May, Robin C.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fatal fungal pathogen of humans that efficiently parasitises macrophages. Birds can be colonised by cryptococci and can transmit cryptococcosis to humans via inhalation of inoculated bird excreta. However, colonisation of birds appears to occur in the absence of symptomatic infection. Here, using a pure population of primary bird macrophages, we demonstrate a mechanism for this relationship. We find that bird macrophages are able to suppress the growth of cryptococci seen in mammalian cells despite C. neoformans being able to grow at bird body temperature, and are able to escape from bird macrophages by vomocytosis. A small subset of cryptococci are able to adapt to the inhibitory intracellular environment of bird macrophages, exhibiting a large cell phenotype that rescues growth suppression. Thus, restriction of intracellular growth combined with survival at bird body temperature explains the ability of birds to efficiently spread C. neoformans in the environment whilst avoiding systemic disease. PMID:26883088

  6. Identification and properties of plasma membrane azole efflux pumps from the pathogenic fungi Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Luiz R.; Gast, Charles E.; Bruzual, Igor; Wong, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cryptococcus gattii from the North American Northwest (NW) have higher azole MICs than do non-NW C. gattii or Cryptococcus neoformans. Since mechanisms of azole resistance in C. gattii are not known, we identified C. gattii and C. neoformans plasma membrane azole efflux pumps and characterized their properties. Methods The C. gattii R265 genome was searched for orthologues of known fungal azole efflux genes, expression of candidate genes was assessed by RT–PCR and the expressed genes' cDNAs were cloned and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Azole MICs and intracellular [3H]fluconazole were measured in C. gattii and C. neoformans and in S. cerevisiae expressing each cDNA of interest, as was [3H]fluconazole uptake by post-Golgi vesicles (PGVs) isolated from S. cerevisiae sec6-4 mutants expressing each cDNA of interest. Results Intracellular [3H]fluconazole concentrations were inversely correlated with fluconazole MICs only in 25 NW C. gattii strains. S. cerevisiae expressing three C. gattii cDNAs (encoded by orthologues of C. neoformans AFR1 and MDR1 and the previously unstudied gene AFR2) and their C. neoformans counterparts had higher azole MICs and lower intracellular [3H]fluconazole concentrations than did empty-vector controls. PGVs from S. cerevisiae expressing all six Cryptococcus cDNAs also accumulated more [3H]fluconazole than did controls, and [3H]fluconazole transport by all six transporters of interest was ATP dependent and was inhibited by excess unlabelled fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole and posaconazole. Conclusions We conclude that C. gattii and C. neoformans AFR1, MDR1 and AFR2 encode ABC transporters that pump multiple azoles out of S. cerevisiae cells, thereby causing azole resistance. PMID:25630649

  7. Molecular characterization and evaluation of virulence factors of Cryptococcus laurentii and Cryptococcus neoformans strains isolated from external hospital areas.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Silva, Leonardo; Ferreira-Paim, Kennio; Silva-Vergara, Mario León; Pedrosa, André Luiz

    2010-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a common opportunistic fungal infection that is mainly caused by the species Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii, but there have recently been several reports of infection by non-neoformans Cryptococcus species. The aims of this study were to genetically characterize Cryptococcus spp. isolated from external hospital areas in Minas Gerais State, Brazil, and to evaluate their pathogenic potential, analyzing their phospholipase and melanin production and the capacity for capsule enlargement. Seventy-three different samples were collected: 62 from bird droppings and 11 from tree detritus. C. neoformans alone was isolated from 43.8% of the samples, Cryptococcus laurentii alone from 23.3% and both fungi were found together in 10.9%. C. laurentii was exclusively isolated from 45% (5/11) of the tree samples (Anacardium occidentale, Guazuma ulmifolia, Mangifera indica and Ficus benjamina). Among the 51 C. neoformans isolates, 47 were classified as type VNI and four as type VNII. All of the C. neoformans isolates were of MATα type. Among the 21 isolates of C. laurentii genotyped using the URA5-RFLP technique, 16 amplified a 1.6kb amplicon which produced a specific restriction profile in 15 isolates. In C. neoformans, 76.4% of the isolates were capable of capsule enlargement in the induction medium and 92.1% were phospholipase producers. In C. laurentii, 7.4% of the isolates were capable of capsule enlargement and 85.1% were phospholipase producers. Characterization of the genotypes and the pathogenic potential of the Cryptococcus spp. isolates studied may contribute towards better understanding of the epidemiology of cryptococcosis and the ecology of agents causing this disease in our region. PMID:20943154

  8. Polysaccharide-modified synthetic polymeric biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Aaron D; Kiick, Kristi L

    2010-01-01

    This review presents an overview of polysaccharide-conjugated synthetic polymers and their use in tissue-engineered scaffolds and drug-delivery applications. This topic will be divided into four categories: (1) polymeric materials modified with non-mammalian polysaccharides such as alginate, chitin, and dextran; (2) polymers modified with mammalian polysaccharides such as hyaluronan, chondroitin sulfate, and heparin; (3) multi-polysaccharide-derivatized polymer conjugate systems; and (4) polymers containing polysaccharide-mimetic molecules. Each section will discuss relevant conjugation techniques, analysis, and the impact of these materials as micelles, particles, or hydrogels used in in-vitro and in-vivo biomaterial applications. PMID:20091875

  9. Polysaccharide-Modified Synthetic Polymeric Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Aaron D.; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2010-01-01

    This review presents an overview of polysaccharide-conjugated synthetic polymers and their use in tissue-engineered scaffolds and drug-delivery applications. This topic will be divided into four categories: (1) polymeric materials modified with non-mammalian polysaccharides such as alginate, chitin, and dextran; (2) polymers modified with mammalian polysaccharides such as hyaluronan, chondroitin sulfate, and heparin; (3) multi-polysaccharide-derivatized polymer conjugate systems; and (4) polymers containing polysaccharide-mimetic molecules. Each section will discuss relevant conjugation techniques, analysis, and the impact of these materials as micelles, particles, or hydrogels used in in-vitro and in-vivo biomaterial applications. PMID:20091875

  10. Mitochondria are inherited from the MATa parent in crosses of the basidiomycete fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhun; Xu, Jianping

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was uniparentally transmitted in laboratory crosses of the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans. To begin understanding the mechanisms, this study examined the potential role of the mating-type locus on mtDNA inheritance in C. neoformans. Using existing isogenic strains (JEC20 and JEC21) that differed only at the mating-type locus and a clinical strain (CDC46) that possessed a mitochondrial genotype different from JEC20 and JEC21, we constructed strains that differed only in mating type and mitochondrial genotype. These strains were then crossed to produce hyphae and sexual spores. Among the 206 single spores analyzed from six crosses, all but one inherited mtDNA from the MATa parents. Analyses of mating-type alleles and mtDNA genotypes of natural hybrids from clinical and natural samples were consistent with the hypothesis that mtDNA is inherited from the MATa parent in C. neoformans. To distinguish two potential mechanisms, we obtained a pair of isogenic strains with different mating-type alleles, mtDNA types, and auxotrophic markers. Diploid cells from mating between these two strains were selected and 29 independent colonies were genotyped. These cells did not go through the hyphal stage or the meiotic process. All 29 colonies contained mtDNA from the MATa parent. Because no filamentation, meiosis, or spore formation was involved in generating these diploid cells, our results suggest a selective elimination of mtDNA from the MATalpha parent soon after mating. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that mating type controls mtDNA inheritance in fungi. PMID:12702677

  11. Multicenter Comparison of Three Different Analytical Systems for Evaluation of DNA Banding Patterns from Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Cardinali, Gianluigi; Martini, Alessandro; Preziosi, Roberta; Bistoni, Francesco; Baldelli, Franco

    2002-01-01

    The enormous improvement of molecular typing techniques for epidemiological and clinical studies has not always been matched by an equivalent effort in applying optimal criteria for the analysis of both phenotypic and molecular data. In spite of the availability of a large collection of statistical and phylogenetic methods, the vast majority of commercial packages are limited by using only the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean algorithm to construct trees and by considering electrophoretic pattern only as migration distances. The latter method has serious drawbacks when different runs (separate gels) of the same molecular analysis are to be compared. This work presents a multicenter comparison of three different systems of banding pattern analysis on random amplified polymorphic DNA, (GACA)4, and contour-clamped homogeneous electric field patterns from strains of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans isolated in different clinical and geographical situations and a standard Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain employed as an outgroup. The systems considered were evaluated for their actual ability to(i) recognize identities, (ii) define complete differences (i.e., the ability to place S. cerevisiae out of the C. neoformans cluster), and (iii) estimate the extent of similarity among different strains. The ability to cluster strains according to the patient from which they were isolated was also evaluated. The results indicate that different algorithms do indeed produce divergent trees, both in overall topology and in clustering of individual strains, thus suggesting that care must be taken by individual investigators to use the most appropriate procedure and by the scientific community in defining a consensus system. PMID:12037071

  12. The ZIP family zinc transporters support the virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Do, Eunsoo; Hu, Guanggan; Caza, Mélissa; Kronstad, James W; Jung, Won Hee

    2016-08-01

    Zinc is an essential element in living organisms and a cofactor for various metalloproteins. To disseminate and survive, a pathogenic microbe must obtain zinc from the host, which is an environment with extremely limited zinc availability. In this study, we investigated the roles of the ZIP family zinc transporters Zip1 and Zip2 in the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans Zip1 and Zip2 are homologous to Zrt1 and Zrt2 of the model fungus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively. We found that the expression of ZIP1 was regulated by the zinc concentration in the environment. Furthermore, the mutant lacking ZIP1 displayed a severe growth defect under zinc-limited conditions, while the mutant lacking ZIP2 displayed normal growth. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis showed that the absence of Zip1 expression significantly reduced total cellular zinc levels relative to that in the wild type, while overexpression of Zip1 was associated with increased cellular zinc levels. These findings suggested that Zip1 plays roles in zinc uptake in C. neoformans We also constructed a Zip1-FLAG fusion protein and found, by immunofluorescence, not only that the protein was localized to the periphery implying it is a membrane transporter, but also that the protein was N-glycosylated. Furthermore, the mutant lacking ZIP1 showed attenuated virulence in a murine inhalation model of cryptococcosis and reduced survival within murine macrophages. Overall, our data suggest that Zip1 plays essential roles in zinc transport and the virulence of C. neoformans. PMID:27118799

  13. Polysaccharides templates for assembly of nanosilver.

    PubMed

    Emam, Hossam E; Ahmed, Hanan B

    2016-01-01

    Polysaccharides are particularly attractive in biomedical applications due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility. In addition to its ecofriendly effects and easy processing into different hydrogel shapes, made polysaccharides used on a large scale as suitable media for preparation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). In spite of, most of polysaccharides are water insoluble, but it has shown to be quite efficient capping agents and/or nanoreactor matrices for production of AgNPs. Several methods have been developed to get the benefit of multi-functionality for polysaccharides' macromolecules in preparation of AgNPs. Therefore, recently, preparation of nanosilver using different polysaccharides have been the focus of an exponentially increasing number of works devoted to develop nanocomposites by blending AgNPs with different polysaccharides matrices. The current review represents a wide survey for the published studies which interested in using of polysaccharides in nanosilver preparations. PMID:26453881

  14. [Insertional mutation in the AZOBR_p60120 gene is accompanied by defects in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and calcofluor-binding polysaccharides in the bacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245].

    PubMed

    Katsy, E I; Prilipov, A G

    2015-03-01

    In the bacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245, extracellular calcofluor-binding polysaccharides (Cal+ phenotype) and two types of lipopolysaccharides, LPSI and LPSII, were previously identified. These lipopolysaccharides share the same repeating O-polysaccharide unit but have different antigenic structures and different charges of their O-polysaccharides and/or core oligosaccharides. Several dozens of predicted genes involved in the biosynthesis of polysaccharides have been localized in the AZOBR_p6 plasmid of strain Sp245 (GenBank accession no. HE577333). In the present work, it was demonstrated that an artificial transposon Omegon-Km had inserted into the central region of the AZOBR_p60120 gene in the A. brasilense Sp245 LPSI- Cal- KM252 mutant. In A. brasilense strain Sp245, this plasmid gene encodes a putative glycosyltransferase containing conserved domains characteristic of the enzymes participating in the synthesis of O-polysaccharides and capsular polysaccharides (accession no. YP004987664). In mutant KM252, a respective predicted protein is expected to be completely inactivated. As a result of the analysis of the EcoRI fragment of the AZOBR_p6 plasmid, encompassing the AZOBR_p60120 gene and a number of other loci, novel data on the structure of AZOBR_p6 were obtained: an approximately 5-kb gap (GenBank accession no. KM189439) was closed in the nucleotide sequence of this plasmid. PMID:26027369

  15. Enhanced bioavailability of EPA from emulsified fish oil preparations versus capsular triacylglycerol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pre-emulsified fish oil supplements, an alternative to capsular triacylglycerol, may enhance the uptake of LCn3 fatty acids it contains. A randomized, Latin-square crossover design was used to compare the effects of four fish oil supplement preparations on phospholipid (PLFA) and chylomicron fatty ...

  16. Epidemiology, Etiology, and Prevention of Late IOL-Capsular Bag Complex Dislocation: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ascaso, Francisco J.; Huerva, Valentín; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC-IOL) subluxation is uncommon but represents one of the most serious complications following phacoemulsification. Late spontaneous IOL-capsular bag complex dislocation is defined as occurring three months or later following cataract surgery. Unlike early IOL dislocation, late spontaneous IOL dislocation is due to a progressive zonular dehiscence and contraction of the capsular bag many years what seemed to be uneventful surgery. In recent years, late in-the-bag IOL subluxation or dislocation has been reported with increasing frequency, having a cumulative risk of IOL dislocation following cataract extraction of 0.1% after 10 years and 1.7% after 25 years. A predisposition to zonular insufficiency and capsular contraction is identified in 90% of reviewed cases. Multiple conditions likely play a role in contributing to this zonular weakness and capsular contraction. Pseudoexfoliation is the most common risk factor, accounting for more than 50% of cases. Other associated conditions predisposing to zonular dehiscence are aging, high myopia, uveitis, trauma, previous vitreoretinal surgery, retinitis pigmentosa, diabetes mellitus, atopic dermatitis, previous acute angle-closure glaucoma attack, and connective tissue disorders. The recognition of these predisposing factors suggests a modified approach in cases at risk. We review certain measures to prevent IOL-bag complex luxation that have been proposed. PMID:26798506

  17. A follow-up study of cognitive impairment due to inferior capsular genu infarction.

    PubMed

    Madureira, S; Guerreiro, M; Ferro, J M

    1999-09-01

    Abulia, memory loss, other cognitive deficits, and behavioral changes consistent with dementia can follow an inferior capsular genu infarction, but only little is known about the time course of these disturbances. The present study describes the long-term outcome of cognitive defects in four patients with inferior capsular genu infarction who underwent a neuropsychological examination within 3 and 12 months of onset. Three patients had infarcts in the inferior genu of the left internal capsule and had similar symptoms in the acute phase: disorientation, memory loss, language impairment, and behavioral changes. The patient with right-side infarct showed memory impairment and behavioral changes. Three patients had deficits in one or more cognitive domains on the first assessment, but none was demented. By the second evaluation all subjects had improved. In two patients there were a moderate memory defect persisted and a language disturbance. Improvement in these disturbances during long-time follow-up demonstrates that there are alternative pathways that reestablish the functional connections damaged by the strategically located capsular genu infarct. Inferior capsular genu infarction is not a cause of persisting "strategic infarct dementia." PMID:10525972

  18. Epidemiology, Etiology, and Prevention of Late IOL-Capsular Bag Complex Dislocation: Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ascaso, Francisco J; Huerva, Valentín; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC-IOL) subluxation is uncommon but represents one of the most serious complications following phacoemulsification. Late spontaneous IOL-capsular bag complex dislocation is defined as occurring three months or later following cataract surgery. Unlike early IOL dislocation, late spontaneous IOL dislocation is due to a progressive zonular dehiscence and contraction of the capsular bag many years what seemed to be uneventful surgery. In recent years, late in-the-bag IOL subluxation or dislocation has been reported with increasing frequency, having a cumulative risk of IOL dislocation following cataract extraction of 0.1% after 10 years and 1.7% after 25 years. A predisposition to zonular insufficiency and capsular contraction is identified in 90% of reviewed cases. Multiple conditions likely play a role in contributing to this zonular weakness and capsular contraction. Pseudoexfoliation is the most common risk factor, accounting for more than 50% of cases. Other associated conditions predisposing to zonular dehiscence are aging, high myopia, uveitis, trauma, previous vitreoretinal surgery, retinitis pigmentosa, diabetes mellitus, atopic dermatitis, previous acute angle-closure glaucoma attack, and connective tissue disorders. The recognition of these predisposing factors suggests a modified approach in cases at risk. We review certain measures to prevent IOL-bag complex luxation that have been proposed. PMID:26798506

  19. High throughput screening of particle conditioning operations: II. Evaluation of scale-up heuristics with prokaryotically expressed polysaccharide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Aaron; Huffman, Ben; Berrill, Alex; Merchant, Nick; Godavarti, Ranga; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel; Coffman, Jonathan; Sunasara, Khurram; Mukhopadhyay, Tarit

    2015-08-01

    Multivalent polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are typically comprised of several different polysaccharides produced with distinct and complex production processes. Particle conditioning steps, such as precipitation and flocculation, may be used to aid the recovery and purification of such microbial vaccine products. An ultra scale-down approach to purify vaccine polysaccharides at the micro-scale would greatly enhance productivity, robustness, and speed the development of novel conjugate vaccines. In part one of this series, we described a modular and high throughput approach to develop particle conditioning processes (HTPC) for biologicals that combines flocculation, solids removal, and streamlined analytics. In this second part of the series, we applied HTPC to industrially relevant feedstreams comprised of capsular polysaccharides (CPS) from several bacterial species. The scalability of HTPC was evaluated between 0.8 mL and 13 L scales, with several different scaling methodologies examined. Clarification, polysaccharide yield, impurity clearance, and product quality achieved with HTPC were reproducible and comparable with larger scales. Particle sizing was the response with greatest sensitivity to differences in processing scale and enabled the identification of useful scaling rules. Scaling with constant impeller tip speed or power per volume in the impeller swept zone offered the most accurate scale up, with evidence that time integration of these values provided the optimal basis for scaling. The capability to develop a process at the micro-scale combined with evidence-based scaling metrics provide a significant advance for purification process development of vaccine processes. The USD system offers similar opportunities for HTPC of proteins and other complex biological molecules. PMID:25727194

  20. Role of Vibrio cholerae O139 surface polysaccharides in intestinal colonization.

    PubMed

    Nesper, Jutta; Schild, Stefan; Lauriano, Crystal M; Kraiss, Anita; Klose, Karl E; Reidl, Joachim

    2002-11-01

    Since the first occurrence of O139 Vibrio cholerae as a cause of cholera epidemics, this serogroup has been investigated intensively, and it has been found that its pathogenicity is comparable to that of O1 El Tor strains. O139 isolates express a thin capsule, composed of a polymer of repeating units structurally identical to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O side chain. In this study, we investigated the role of LPS O side chain and capsular polysaccharide (CPS) in intestinal colonization by with genetically engineered mutants. We constructed CPS-negative, CPS/LPS O side chain-negative, and CPS-positive/LPS O side chain-negative mutants. Furthermore, we constructed two mutants with defects in LPS core oligosaccharide (OS) assembly. Loss of LPS O side chain or CPS resulted in a approximately 30-fold reduction in colonization of the infant mouse small intestine, indicating that the presence of both LPS O side chain and CPS is important during the colonization process. The strain lacking both CPS and LPS O side chain and a CPS-positive, LPS O side chain-negative core OS mutant were both essentially unable to colonize. To characterize the role of surface polysaccharides in survival in the host intestine, resistance to several antimicrobial substances was investigated in vitro. These investigations revealed that the presence of CPS protects the cell against attack of the complement system and that an intact core OS is necessary for survival in the presence of bile. PMID:12379674

  1. Physico-chemical properties of Salmonella typhi Vi polysaccharide-diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccines affect immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    An, So Jung; Yoon, Yeon Kyung; Kothari, Sudeep; Kothari, Neha; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Eugene; Kim, Deok Ryun; Park, Tai Hyun; Smith, Greg W; Carbis, Rodney

    2011-10-13

    In this study it was demonstrated that the immunogenicity of Vi polysaccharide-diphtheria toxoid conjugates was related to the physical and chemical structure of the conjugate. Conjugates were prepared in two steps, firstly binding adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) spacer molecules to diphtheria toxoid (DT) carrier protein then secondly binding varying amounts of this derivatized DT to a fixed amount of Vi capsular polysaccharide purified from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi. As the amount of DT bound to the Vi increased the size of the conjugate increased but also the degree of cross-linking increased. The immunogenicity of the conjugates was tested in mice and measured by ELISA for anti Vi and anti DT IgG responses, and the results revealed a trend that as the amount of DT bound to the Vi increased the anti Vi responses increased. This study establishes a correlation between physico-chemical characteristics of the conjugate and the magnitude of the anti Vi and anti DT responses. PMID:21843575

  2. Longitudinal changes in resting-state brain activity in a capsular infarct model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghyeon; Kim, Ra Gyung; Kim, Hyung-Sun; Kim, Jin-Myung; Jun, Sung Chan; Lee, Boreom; Jo, Hang Joon; Neto, Pedro R; Lee, Min-Cheol; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl

    2015-01-01

    Strokes attributable to subcortical infarcts have been increasing recently in elderly patients. To gain insight how this lesion influences the motor outcome and responds to rehabilitative training, we used circumscribed photothrombotic capsular infarct models on 36 Sprague-Dawley rats (24 experimental and 12 sham-operated). We used 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose-micro positron emission tomography (FDG-microPET) to assess longitudinal changes in resting-state brain activity (rs-BA) and daily single-pellet reaching task (SPRT) trainings to evaluate motor recovery. Longitudinal FDG-microPET results showed that capsular infarct resulted in a persistent decrease in rs-BA in bilateral sensory and auditory cortices, and ipsilesional motor cortex, thalamus, and inferior colliculus (P<0.0025, false discovery rate (FDR) q<0.05). The decreased rs-BA is compatible with diaschisis and contributes to manifest the malfunctions of lesion-specific functional connectivity. In contrast, capsular infarct resulted in increase of rs-BA in the ipsilesional internal capsule, and contralesional red nucleus and ventral hippocampus in recovery group (P<0.0025, FDR q<0.05), implying that remaining subcortical structures have an important role in conducting the recovery process in capsular infarct. The SPRT training facilitated motor recovery only in rats with an incomplete destruction of the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) (Pearson's correlation, P<0.05). Alternative therapeutic interventions are required to enhance the potential for recovery in capsular infarct with complete destruction of PLIC. PMID:25352047

  3. Longitudinal changes in resting-state brain activity in a capsular infarct model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyeon; Kim, Ra Gyung; Kim, Hyung-Sun; Kim, Jin-Myung; Jun, Sung Chan; Lee, Boreom; Jo, Hang Joon; Neto, Pedro R; Lee, Min-Cheol; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl

    2015-01-01

    Strokes attributable to subcortical infarcts have been increasing recently in elderly patients. To gain insight how this lesion influences the motor outcome and responds to rehabilitative training, we used circumscribed photothrombotic capsular infarct models on 36 Sprague-Dawley rats (24 experimental and 12 sham-operated). We used 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]-fluoro-D-glucose-micro positron emission tomography (FDG-microPET) to assess longitudinal changes in resting-state brain activity (rs-BA) and daily single-pellet reaching task (SPRT) trainings to evaluate motor recovery. Longitudinal FDG-microPET results showed that capsular infarct resulted in a persistent decrease in rs-BA in bilateral sensory and auditory cortices, and ipsilesional motor cortex, thalamus, and inferior colliculus (P<0.0025, false discovery rate (FDR) q<0.05). The decreased rs-BA is compatible with diaschisis and contributes to manifest the malfunctions of lesion-specific functional connectivity. In contrast, capsular infarct resulted in increase of rs-BA in the ipsilesional internal capsule, and contralesional red nucleus and ventral hippocampus in recovery group (P<0.0025, FDR q<0.05), implying that remaining subcortical structures have an important role in conducting the recovery process in capsular infarct. The SPRT training facilitated motor recovery only in rats with an incomplete destruction of the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) (Pearson's correlation, P<0.05). Alternative therapeutic interventions are required to enhance the potential for recovery in capsular infarct with complete destruction of PLIC. PMID:25352047

  4. Cryptococcus neoformans varieties from material under the canopies of eucalyptus trees and pigeon dropping samples from four major cities in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Hamasha, Akram Mohammad Saad; Yildiran, Sinasi Taner; Gonlum, Ahmet; Saracli, Mehmet Ali; Doganci, Levent

    2004-08-01

    To our best knowledge, any study related to the ecological distribution of Cryptococcus neoformans in Jordan does not exist in the medical literature. In order to determine the environmental occurrence of both varieties of Cryptococcus neoformans in Jordan, pigeon droppings and material under the canopies of eucalyptus trees were collected from four major cities of this country. For the isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans variety gattii from environmental sources, 500 samples of the mixed soil debris, including tree materials, under the eucalyptus trees from cities of Amman, Irbid, Jerash, and Ajlun were collected. Also, 509 samples of pigeon droppings were collected from the same cities for the isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans variety neoformans. After inoculating the samples onto modified Staib agar medium in Petri dishes, a total of 336 melanoid yeast colonies were picked up during screening process. At the end of serial mycological studies, none of these isolates was identified as Cryptococcus neoformans, but all were Cryptococcus species other than C. neoformans. For determining the exact status, more extensive environmental studies need to be done in the future. PMID:15518348

  5. Meningococcal meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa: the case for mass and routine vaccination with available polysaccharide vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, John B.; Schneerson, Rachel; Gotschlich, Emil C.; Mohammed, Idris; Nasidi, Abdulsalami; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe; Bernardino, Luis; Maiga, Moussa A.

    2003-01-01

    Endemic and epidemic group A meningococcal meningitis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa, despite the availability of the safe and inexpensive group A meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine, which is protective at all ages when administered as directed. Despite optimal therapy, meningococcal meningitis has a 10% fatality rate and at least 15% central nervous system damage. WHO's policy of epidemic containment prevents, at best, about 50% of cases and ignores endemic meningitis, which is estimated at 50,000 cases per year. The effectiveness of group A, C, W135, and Y capsular polysaccharides is the basis for recommending universal vaccination with group A meningococcal polysaccharide twice in infancy, followed by the four-valent vaccine in children aged two and six years. This could eliminate epidemic and endemic disease, prepare for the use of conjugates when they become available, and probably could have prevented the recent epidemics of groups A and W135 meningitis in Burkina Faso. PMID:14758435

  6. A Purification Process for Heparin and Precursor Polysaccharides Using the pH Responsive Behavior of Chitosan

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Ujjwal; Hickey, Anne M.; Li, Guoyun; Mundra, Ruchir V.; Zhang, Fuming; Fu, Li; Cai, Chao; Ou, Zhimin; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The contamination crisis of 2008 has brought to light several risks associated with use of animal tissue derived heparin. Because the total chemical synthesis of heparin is not feasible, a bioengineered approach has been proposed, relying on recombinant enzymes derived from the heparin/HS biosynthetic pathway and Escherichia coli K5 capsular polysaccharide. Intensive process engineering efforts are required to achieve a cost-competitive process for bioengineered heparin compared to commercially available porcine heparins. Towards this goal, we have used 96-well plate based screening for development of a chitosan-based purification process for heparin and precursor polysaccharides. The unique pH responsive behavior of chitosan enables simplified capture of target heparin or related polysaccharides, under low pH and complex solution conditions, followed by elution under mildly basic conditions. The use of mild, basic recovery conditions are compatible with the chemical Ndeacetylation/N-sulfonation step used in the bioengineered heparin process. Selective precipitation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) leads to significant removal of process related impurities such as proteins, DNA and endotoxins. Use of highly sensitive liquid chromatographymass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analytical techniques reveal a minimum impact of chitosan-based purification on heparin product composition. PMID:26147064

  7. A purification process for heparin and precursor polysaccharides using the pH responsive behavior of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Ujjwal; Hickey, Anne M; Li, Guoyun; Mundra, Ruchir V; Zhang, Fuming; Fu, Li; Cai, Chao; Ou, Zhimin; Dordick, Jonathan S; Linhardt, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The contamination crisis of 2008 has brought to light several risks associated with use of animal tissue derived heparin. Because the total chemical synthesis of heparin is not feasible, a bioengineered approach has been proposed, relying on recombinant enzymes derived from the heparin/HS biosynthetic pathway and Escherichia coli K5 capsular polysaccharide. Intensive process engineering efforts are required to achieve a cost-competitive process for bioengineered heparin compared to commercially available porcine heparins. Towards this goal, we have used 96-well plate based screening for development of a chitosan-based purification process for heparin and precursor polysaccharides. The unique pH responsive behavior of chitosan enables simplified capture of target heparin or related polysaccharides, under low pH and complex solution conditions, followed by elution under mildly basic conditions. The use of mild, basic recovery conditions are compatible with the chemical N-deacetylation/N-sulfonation step used in the bioengineered heparin process. Selective precipitation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) leads to significant removal of process related impurities such as proteins, DNA and endotoxins. Use of highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analytical techniques reveal a minimum impact of chitosan-based purification on heparin product composition. PMID:26147064

  8. Evaluation of Polysaccharide-Based Latex Agglutination Assays for the Rapid Detection of Antibodies to Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Suttisunhakul, Vichaya; Chantratita, Narisara; Wikraiphat, Chanthiwa; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Douglas, Zakiya; Day, Nicholas P J; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Brett, Paul J; Burtnick, Mary N

    2015-09-01

    Melioidosis is a severe disease caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Diagnosis of melioidosis currently relies on the isolation of B. pseudomallei from clinical samples, which can take several days. An indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA) is widely used for serodiagnosis, but it has a short shelf life, is poorly standardized, and requires a viable bacteria culture performed in a biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) laboratory. To improve the diagnostic methods, we have developed two rapid latex agglutination tests based on purified B. pseudomallei O-polysaccharide (OPS) and capsular polysaccharide (CPS) antigens. The immunodiagnostic potential of these tests was evaluated using serum from culture-confirmed melioidosis patients (N = 143) and healthy donors from either endemic (N = 199) or non-endemic areas (N = 90). The sensitivity of the OPS-based latex agglutination assay (OPS-latex; 84.4%) was significantly higher than both the CPS-latex (69.5%) (P < 0.001) and IHA (69.5%) (P = 0.001). When evaluated with Thai donor serum, the OPS-latex had comparable specificity (56.9%) to the CPS-latex (63.8%) (P = 0.053), but was significantly lower than the IHA (67.6%) (P = 0.002). In contrast, all tests with U.S. donor serum were highly specific (≥ 97.8%). These results suggest that polysaccharide-based latex agglutination assays may be useful for serodiagnosis of melioidosis in non-endemic areas. PMID:26123956

  9. Evaluation of Polysaccharide-Based Latex Agglutination Assays for the Rapid Detection of Antibodies to Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Suttisunhakul, Vichaya; Chantratita, Narisara; Wikraiphat, Chanthiwa; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Douglas, Zakiya; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Brett, Paul J.; Burtnick, Mary N.

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is a severe disease caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Diagnosis of melioidosis currently relies on the isolation of B. pseudomallei from clinical samples, which can take several days. An indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA) is widely used for serodiagnosis, but it has a short shelf life, is poorly standardized, and requires a viable bacteria culture performed in a biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) laboratory. To improve the diagnostic methods, we have developed two rapid latex agglutination tests based on purified B. pseudomallei O-polysaccharide (OPS) and capsular polysaccharide (CPS) antigens. The immunodiagnostic potential of these tests was evaluated using serum from culture-confirmed melioidosis patients (N = 143) and healthy donors from either endemic (N = 199) or non-endemic areas (N = 90). The sensitivity of the OPS-based latex agglutination assay (OPS-latex; 84.4%) was significantly higher than both the CPS-latex (69.5%) (P < 0.001) and IHA (69.5%) (P = 0.001). When evaluated with Thai donor serum, the OPS-latex had comparable specificity (56.9%) to the CPS-latex (63.8%) (P = 0.053), but was significantly lower than the IHA (67.6%) (P = 0.002). In contrast, all tests with U.S. donor serum were highly specific (≥ 97.8%). These results suggest that polysaccharide-based latex agglutination assays may be useful for serodiagnosis of melioidosis in non-endemic areas. PMID:26123956

  10. The S. aureus polysaccharide capsule and Efb-dependent fibrinogen shield act in concert to protect against phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Annemarie; Stapels, Daphne A. C.; Weerwind, Lleroy T.; Ko, Ya-Ping; Ruyken, Maartje; Lee, Jean C.; van Kessel, Kok P.M.; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has developed many mechanisms to escape from human immune responses. In order to resist phagocytic clearance, S. aureus expresses a polysaccharide capsule, which effectively masks the bacterial surface and surface-associated proteins, such as opsonins, from recognition by phagocytic cells. Additionally, secretion of the Extracellular fibrinogen binding protein (Efb) potently blocks phagocytic uptake of the pathogen. Efb creates a fibrinogen shield surrounding the bacteria by simultaneously binding complement C3b and fibrinogen at the bacterial surface. By means of neutrophil phagocytosis assays with fluorescently labeled encapsulated serotype 5 (CP5) and serotype 8 (CP8) strains we now compare the immune-modulating function of these shielding mechanisms. Our data indicate that, in highly encapsulated S. aureus strains, the polysaccharide capsule is able to prevent phagocytic uptake at plasma concentrations <10%, but loses its protective ability at higher concentrations of plasma. Interestingly, Efb shows a strong inhibitory effect on both capsule-negative as well as encapsulated strains at all tested plasma concentrations. Furthermore our results suggest that both shielding mechanisms can exist simultaneously and collaborate to provide optimal protection against phagocytosis at a broad range of plasma concentrations. Since opsonizing antibodies will be shielded from recognition by either mechanism, incorporating both capsular polysaccharides and Efb in future vaccines could be of great importance. PMID:27112346

  11. Real-Time Imaging of Interactions of Neutrophils with Cryptococcus neoformans Demonstrates a Crucial Role of Complement C5a-C5aR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Donglei; Zhang, Mingshun; Liu, Gongguan; Wu, Hui; Zhu, Xiaoping; Zhou, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils have been shown to efficiently kill Cryptococcus neoformans, a causative agent of meningoencephalitis. Here, using live-cell imaging, we characterize the dynamic interactions of neutrophils with C. neoformans and the underlying mechanisms in real time. Neutrophils were directly seen to chase C. neoformans cells and then rapidly internalize them. Complement C5a-C5aR signaling guided neutrophils to migrate to the yeast cells, resulting in optimal phagocytosis and subsequent killing of the organisms. The addition of recombinant complement C5a enhanced neutrophil movement but did not induce chemotaxis, suggesting that the C5a gradient is crucial. Incubation with C. neoformans resulted in enhanced activation of Erk and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases (MAPKs) in neutrophils. Inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway, but not the Erk pathway, significantly impaired neutrophil migration and its subsequent killing of C. neoformans. Deficiency of CD11b or blocking of CD11b did not affect the migration of neutrophils toward C. neoformans but almost completely abolished phagocytosis and killing of the organisms by neutrophils. C5a-C5aR signaling induced enhanced surface expression of CD11b. Interestingly, the original surface expression of CD11b was essential and sufficient for neutrophils to attach to C. neoformans but was unable to mediate phagocytosis. In contrast, the enhanced surface expression of CD11b induced by C5a-C5aR signaling was essential for neutrophil phagocytosis and subsequent killing of yeast cells. Collectively, this is the first report of the dynamic interactions of neutrophils with C. neoformans, demonstrating a crucial role of C5a-C5aR signaling in neutrophil killing of C. neoformans in real time. PMID:26502909

  12. Effect of Virulence Factors on the Photodynamic Inactivation of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Prates, Renato A.; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Mizuno, Kazue; Naqvi, Qurat; Kato, Ilka T.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Opportunistic fungal pathogens may cause an array of superficial infections or serious invasive infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogen causing cryptococcosis in HIV/AIDS patients, but treatment is limited due to the relative lack of potent antifungal agents. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) uses the combination of non-toxic dyes called photosensitizers and harmless visible light, which produces singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species that produce cell inactivation and death. We report the use of five structurally unrelated photosensitizers (methylene blue, Rose Bengal, selenium derivative of a Nile blue dye, a cationic fullerene and a conjugate between poly-L-lysine and chlorin(e6)) combined with appropriate wavelengths of light to inactivate C. neoformans. Mutants lacking capsule and laccase, and culture conditions that favoured melanin production were used to probe the mechanisms of PDI and the effect of virulence factors. The presence of cell wall, laccase and melanin tended to protect against PDI, but the choice of the appropriate photosensitizers and dosimetry was able to overcome this resistance. PMID:23349872

  13. Identification of the galactosyltransferase of Cryptococcus neoformans involved in the biosynthesis of basidiomycete-type glycosylinositolphosphoceramide

    PubMed Central

    Wohlschlager, Therese; Buser, Reto; Skowyra, Michael L; Haynes, Brian C; Henrissat, Bernard; Doering, Tamara L; Künzler, Markus; Aebi, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans synthesizes a complex family of glycosylinositolphosphoceramide (GIPC) structures. These glycosphingolipids (GSLs) consist of mannosylinositolphosphoceramide (MIPC) extended by β1-6-linked galactose, a unique structure that has to date only been identified in basidiomycetes. Further extension by up to five mannose residues and a branching xylose has been described. In this study, we identified and determined the gene structure of the enzyme Ggt1, which catalyzes the transfer of a galactose residue to MIPC. Deletion of the gene in C. neoformans resulted in complete loss of GIPCs containing galactose, a phenotype that could be restored by the episomal expression of Ggt1 in the deletion mutant. The entire annotated open reading frame, encoding a C-terminal GT31 galactosyltransferase domain and a large N-terminal domain of unknown function, was required for complementation. Notably, this gene does not encode a predicted signal sequence or transmembrane domain. The demonstration that Ggt1 is responsible for the transfer of a galactose residue to a GSL thus raises questions regarding the topology of this biosynthetic pathway and the function of the N-terminal domain. Phylogenetic analysis of the GGT1 gene shows conservation in hetero- and homobasidiomycetes but no homologs in ascomycetes or outside of the fungal kingdom. PMID:23926231

  14. Global Molecular Epidemiology of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii: An Atlas of the Molecular Types

    PubMed Central

    Cogliati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a fungal disease affecting more than one million people per year worldwide. The main etiological agents of cryptococcosis are the two sibling species Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii that present numerous differences in geographical distribution, ecological niches, epidemiology, pathobiology, clinical presentation and molecular characters. Genotyping of the two Cryptococcus species at subspecies level supplies relevant information to understand how this fungus has spread worldwide, the nature of its population structure, and how it evolved to be a deadly pathogen. At present, nine major molecular types have been recognized: VNI, VNII, VNB, VNIII, and VNIV among C. neoformans isolates, and VGI, VGII, VGIII, and VGIV among C. gattii isolates. In this paper all the information available in the literature concerning the isolation of the two Cryptococcus species has been collected and analyzed on the basis of their geographical origin, source of isolation, level of identification, species, and molecular type. A detailed analysis of the geographical distribution of the major molecular types in each continent has been described and represented on thematic maps. This study represents a useful tool to start new epidemiological surveys on the basis of the present knowledge. PMID:24278784

  15. Cluster of Cryptococcus neoformans Infections in Intensive Care Unit, Arkansas, USA, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Haselow, Dirk; Lloyd, Spencer; Lockhart, Shawn; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Lester, Laura; Wheeler, Gary; Gladden, Linda; Garner, Kelley; Derado, Gordana; Park, Benjamin; Harris, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated an unusual cluster of 6 patients with Cryptococcus neoformans infection at a community hospital in Arkansas during April–December 2013, to determine source of infection. Four patients had bloodstream infection and 2 had respiratory infection; 3 infections occurred within a 10-day period. Five patients had been admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with diagnoses other than cryptococcosis; none had HIV infection, and 1 patient had a history of organ transplantation. We then conducted a retrospective cohort study of all patients admitted to the ICU during April–December 2013 to determine risk factors for cryptococcosis. Four patients with C. neoformans infection had received a short course of steroids; this short-term use was associated with increased risk for cryptococcosis (rate ratio 19.1; 95% CI 2.1–170.0; p<0.01). Although long-term use of steroids is a known risk factor for cryptococcosis, the relationship between short-term steroid use and disease warrants further study PMID:26403080

  16. Thiazole compounds with activity against Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Sá, Nívea; Lino, Cleudiomar Inácio; Fonseca, Nayara Cristina; Borelli, Beatriz Martins; Ramos, Jonas Pereira; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine Maria; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Santos, Daniel Assis; Barbosa de Oliveira, Renata; Johann, Susana

    2015-09-18

    Human cryptococcosis can occur as a primary or opportunistic infection and develop as an acute, subacute, or chronic, systemic infection involving different host organs. We evaluated the antifungal activity of thirteen compounds against Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro, by assessing the toxicity of the compounds showing the greatest antifungal activity in VERO cells and murine macrophages. From these results, four compounds were considered promising for further studies because they displayed low cytotoxicity and significant antifungal activity. The heterocyclic compounds 1b, 1c, 1d, and 1m have antifungal activity levels between that of amphotericin B and fluconazole in vitro. The death curve of Cryptococcus spp. treated with these four compounds was similar to the curve obtained for amphotericin B, in that we observed a significant reduction in cell viability within the first 24 h of treatment. Additionally, we found that there was no effect when these compounds were combined with amphotericin and fluconazole, except for 1c, which antagonized the effect of amphotericin B against C. gattii, also reflected in the reduction of the post-antifungal effect (PAFE); however, this interaction did not alter the ergosterol content. The results shown in this paper reveal the discovery of novel thiazole compounds, which are easy to synthesize, and with potentially exhibit antifungal activity, and display low cytotoxicity in normal mammalian cells. These compounds can be used as prototypes for the design of new antifungal drugs against C. gattii and C. neoformans. PMID:26276437

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PYROGENICITY OF CANDIDA ALBICANS, SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE, AND CRYPTOCOCCUS NEOFORMANS.

    PubMed

    KOBAYASHI, G S; FRIEDMAN, L

    1964-09-01

    Kobayashi, George S. (Tulane University, New Orleans, La.), and Lorraine Friedman. Characterization of the pyrogenicity of Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Cryptococcus neoformans. J. Bacteriol. 88:660-666. 1964.-The intravenous injection into rabbits of 10(9) yeast cells of Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or Cryptococcus neoformans (both slightly and heavily encapsulated forms) induced a febrile response indistinguishable from that elicited by gram-negative bacterial endotoxin. There was a brisk rise in body temperature which began as early as 30 min after injection, peaked once or twice, and then returned to normal after about 10 hr. With viable C. albicans, the febrile response did not return to normal but remained elevated for several days and terminated at death of the animal. Of three extraction procedures employed in attempts to isolate the endotoxin-like pyrogenically active substances from C. albicans, only one, the phenol extraction method, was successful. Pyrogenic substances were more easily extractable from S. cerevisiae, but extracted cells of both species were still highly pyrogenic. It was concluded that the particulate nature of the yeast cell did not contribute to the induction of fever, for latex particles of a similar size were nonpyrogenic. Viable or heat-killed C. albicans, phenol extract of C. albicans, zymosan, and polystyrene latex particles all failed to induce in rabbits increased dermal reactivity to epinephrine. PMID:14208504

  18. First isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii, serotype C, from the environment in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Callejas, A; Ordoñez, N; Rodriguez, M C; Castañeda, E

    1998-10-01

    The natural habitat of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii, serotype B in the environment was established by Australian investigators who demonstrated its association with species of Eucalyptus. The aim of the present study was to search for the habitat of this variety in a city of Colombia, where clinical cases due to this variety occur with great frequency. For a period of 5 months detritus, vegetable material and air samples in and around 68 almond trees (Terminalia catappa) located in the city were studied. C. neoformans var. gattii serotype C was the only variety isolated from two of the 68 trees sampled. These trees were positive for 4 of the 5 months during which they were studied. From the first positive sample kept under refrigeration, it was possible to isolate the fungus up to 3 months later. This is the first report of the isolation of serotype C from the environment. More studies are required in order to establish the ecological significance of this finding. PMID:10075505

  19. Effects of CTR4 deletion on virulence and stress response in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Defa; Zhao, Xueru; Wei, Dongsheng; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Xudong

    2016-08-01

    Roles of the high-affinity copper transporter Ctr4 in the virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans remain to be fully determined. Here we demonstrate that Ctr4 plays a necessary role in virulence and tolerance to a number of stress conditions. We first observed, with the method of flame atomic absorption spectrometry, that deletion of CTR4 resulted in a significant decrease in intracellular copper level, confirming the role of Ctr4 as a copper transporter in C. neoformans. Furthermore, CTR4 was critical for the yeast to survive at both elevated and low temperatures, as the growth rate of the ctr4Δ mutant at 4 and 37 °C was significantly decreased. The mutant ctr4Δ also exhibited hypersensitivity to osmotic stress imposed by 2 M NaCl or KCl, indicating the possible crosstalk of Ctr4 with the HOG signalling pathway. Moreover, cell wall and plasma membrane integrity appeared to be impaired in the ctr4Δ strain. The virulence of ctr4Δ in two mouse cryptococcosis models was remarkably reduced either via an intranasal or intravenous inoculation. Our work confirms the roles of Ctr4 in virulence and copper homeostasis as well as other additional novel functions. PMID:27317510

  20. Activity of sertraline against Cryptococcus neoformans: in vitro and in vivo assays.

    PubMed

    Treviño-Rangel, Rogelio de J; Villanueva-Lozano, Hiram; Hernández-Rodríguez, Pedro; Martínez-Reséndez, Michel F; García-Juárez, Jaime; Rodríguez-Rocha, Humberto; González, Gloria M

    2016-03-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans infection is an important cause of meningitis in HIV/AIDS endemic regions. Antifungals for its management include amphotericin B, flucytosine, and fluconazole. Recently, treatment of this mycosis with sertraline has been studied with variable clinical outcomes. The aim of the study was to assess the in vitro antifungal effect of sertraline against clinical isolates of Cryptococcus spp. as well as its in vivo activity in a murine model of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. The in vitro susceptibility to fluconazole, amphotericin B, voriconazole and sertraline of 153 Cryptococcus spp. strains were evaluated according to CLSI procedures. Fungal tissue burden, serum antigenaemia and histopathology, together with the therapeutic efficacy of amphotericin B (3 mg/kg), fluconazole (15 mg/kg), and sertraline (3, 10, and 15 mg/kg) were evaluated in mice intracranially inoculated with one isolate of Cryptococcus neoformans. All strains were susceptible to the antifungals studied and exhibited growth inhibition with sertraline at clinically relevant concentrations. Sertraline at a dose of 15 mg/kg reduced the fungal burden in the brain and spleen with an efficacy comparable to that of fluconazole. In conclusion, sertraline exhibited an excellent in vitro-in vivo anti-cryptococcal activity, representing a possible new alternative for the clinical management of meningeal cryptococcosis. PMID:26705833

  1. Impact of Resistance to Fluconazole on Virulence and Morphological Aspects of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Suélen A.; Trevijano-Contador, Nuria; Scorzoni, Liliana; Mesa-Arango, Ana Cecilia; de Oliveira, Haroldo C.; Werther, Karin; de Freitas Raso, Tânia; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.; Zaragoza, Oscar; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus sp. are responsible for around 1 million cases of meningitis every year. Fluconazole (FLU) is commonly used in the treatment of cryptococcosis, mainly in immunocompromised patients and the resistance is usually reported after long periods of treatment. In this study, the morphological characterization and virulence profile of FLU-susceptible and FLU-resistant clinical and environmental isolates of C. neoformans and C. gattii were performed both in vitro and in vivo using the Galleria mellonella model. FLU-susceptible isolates from C. neoformans were significantly more virulent than the FLU-resistant isolates. FLU-susceptible C. gattii isolates showed a different virulence profile from C. neoformans isolates where only the environmental isolate, CL, was more virulent compared with the resistant isolates. Cell morphology and capsule size were analyzed and the FLU-resistant isolates did not change significantly compared with the most sensitive isolates. Growth at 37°C was also evaluated and in both species, the resistant isolates showed a reduced growth at this temperature, indicating that FLU resistance can affect their growth. Based on the results obtained is possible suggest that FLU resistance can influence the morphology of the isolates and consequently changed the virulence profiles. The most evident results were observed for C. neoformans showing that the adaptation of isolates to antifungal selective pressure influenced the loss of virulence. PMID:26909069

  2. The 14-3-3 Gene Function of Cryptococcus neoformans Is Required for its Growth and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingbo; Chang, Yun C; Wu, Chun-Hua; Liu, Jennifer; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Huang, Sheng-He; Shimada, Hiro; Fante, Rob; Fu, Xiaowei; Jong, Ambrose

    2016-05-28

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a life-threatening pathogenic yeast that causes devastating meningoencephalitis. The mechanism of cryptococcal brain invasion is largely unknown, and recent studies suggest that its extracellular microvesicles may be involved in the invasion process. The 14-3-3 protein is abundant in the extracellular microvesicles of C. neoformans, and the 14-3-3-GFP fusion has been used as the microvesicle's marker. However, the physiological role of 14-3-3 has not been explored. In this report, we have found that C. neoformans contains a single 14-3-3 gene that apparently is an essential gene. To explore the functions of 14-3-3, we substituted the promoter region of the 14-3-3 with the copper-controllable promoter CTR4. The CTR4 regulatory strain showed an enlarged cell size, drastic changes in morphology, and a decrease in the thickness of the capsule under copper-enriched conditions. Furthermore, the mutant cells produced a lower amount of total proteins in their extracellular microvesicles and reduced adhesion to human brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro. Proteomic analyses of the protein components under 14-3-3-overexpressed and -suppressed conditions revealed that the 14-3-3 function(s) might be associated with the microvesicle biogenesis. Our results support that 14-3-3 has diverse pertinent roles in both physiology and pathogenesis in C. neoformans. Its gene functions are closely relevant to the pathogenesis of this fungus. PMID:26437944

  3. Microsatellite Typing of Clinical and Environmental Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii Isolates from Cuba Shows Multiple Genetic Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Illnait-Zaragozi, Maria-Teresa; Martínez-Machín, Gerardo F.; Fernández-Andreu, Carlos M.; Boekhout, Teun; Meis, Jacques F.; Klaassen, Corné H. W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Human cryptococcal infections have been associated with bird droppings as a likely source of infection. Studies toward the local and global epidemiology of Cryptococcus spp. have been hampered by the lack of rapid, discriminatory, and exchangeable molecular typing methods. Methodology/Principal Findings We selected nine microsatellite markers for high-resolution fingerprinting from the genome of C. neoformans var. grubii. This panel of markers was applied to a collection of clinical (n = 122) and environmental (n = 68; from pigeon guano) C. neoformans var. grubii isolates from Cuba. All markers proved to be polymorphic. The average number of alleles per marker was 9 (range 5–51). A total of 104 genotypes could be distinguished. The discriminatory power of this panel of markers was 0.993. Multiple clusters of related genotypes could be discriminated that differed in only one or two microsatellite markers. These clusters were assigned as microsatellite complexes. The majority of environmental isolates (>70%) fell into 1 microsatellite complex containing only few clinical isolates (49 environmental versus 2 clinical). Clinical isolates were segregated over multiple microsatellite complexes. Conclusions/Significance A large genotypic variation exists in C. neoformans var. grubii. The genotypic segregation between clinical and environmental isolates from pigeon guano suggests additional source(s) of human cryptococcal infections. The selected panel of microsatellite markers is an excellent tool to study the epidemiology of C. neoformans var. grubii. PMID:20161737

  4. Role of Sterylglucosidase 1 (Sgl1) on the pathogenicity of Cryptococcus neoformans: potential applications for vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Rella, Antonella; Mor, Visesato; Farnoud, Amir M.; Singh, Ashutosh; Shamseddine, Achraf A.; Ivanova, Elitza; Carpino, Nicholas; Montagna, Maria T.; Luberto, Chiara; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii affects a large population and is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Despite its public health burden, there are currently no vaccines against cryptococcosis and new strategies against such infections are needed. In this study, we demonstrate that C. neoformans has the biochemical ability to metabolize sterylglucosides (SGs), a class of immunomodulatory glycolipids. Genetic manipulations that eliminate cryptococccal sterylglucosidase lead to the accumulation of SGs and generate a mutant strain (Δsgl1) that is non-pathogenic in the mouse models of cryptococcosis. Interestingly, this mutant strain acts as a vaccine strain and protects mice against cryptococcosis following infection with C. neoformans or C. gattii. The immunity induced by the Δsgl1 strain is not CD4+ T-cells dependent. Immunocompromised mice, which lack CD4+ T-cells, are able to control the infection by Δsgl1 and acquire immunity against the challenge by wild-type C. neoformans following vaccination with the Δsgl1 strain. These findings are particularly important in the context of HIV/AIDS immune deficiency and suggest that the Δsgl1 strain might provide a potential vaccination strategy against cryptococcosis. PMID:26322039

  5. Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii-Induced Arthritis with Encephalitic Dissemination in a Dog and Review of Published Literature.

    PubMed

    Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Mota, Francisco Claudio D; Lindsay, Scott; de Oliveira, Luiza M; Medeiros, Alessandra Aparecida; Pretto-Giordano, Lucienne Garcia; Saut, João Paulo Elsen; Krockenberger, Mark

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the clinical, pathological, and immunohistochemical findings associated with Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii in a 4-year-old female Boxer dog from Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil. Clinically, there was a swelling at the right metatarsal region and the hock joint with enlargement of regional lymph nodes. Radiographical evaluation revealed lysis of the tarsal bone; cytology demonstrated cryptococcal intralesional organisms at the swollen joint. Despite empirical antifungals therapeutic, the animal developed neurological cryptococcosis and died spontaneously. Significant pathological alterations included arthritis, lymphadenitis, and encephalitic cryptococcomas associated with numerous intralesional narrow-necked budding encapsulated yeasts. Immunohistochemistry utilising monoclonal antibodies that label C. neoformans sp. complex capsule, characterised the yeasts as C. neoformans var. grubii. Collectively, the pathological and immunohistochemical findings of this dog indicate that the intralesional organisms observed within the articular surface of the hock joint, lymph nodes, and the brain were C. neoformans var. grubii, confirming the participation of this fungal pathogen in the development of cryptococcal arthritis. In this case, the most likely pathogenesis was percutaneous inoculation with resultant abscess-like lesion, which resulted in the draining sinus, swelling of the right hind limb with progression to the articular disease. Thereafter, the fungal pathogen probably compromised the adjacent lymph nodes with subsequent haematogenous distribution to the brain, terminating with cryptococcal arthritis, lymphadenitis, and encephalitis. PMID:27126588

  6. Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels.

    PubMed

    Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Fang, Yapeng

    2016-05-18

    Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels has been studied extensively because it is expected to be useful in understanding flavour release from solid foods and to find a new processing method which produces more palatable and healthier foods. We provide an overview of the release of sucrose and other sugars from gels of agar and related polysaccharides. The addition of sucrose to agar solutions leads to the increase in transparency of the resulting gels and the decrease in syneresis, which is attributed to the decrease in mesh size in gels. The syneresis occurring in the quiescent condition and fluid release induced by compression is discussed. The relationship between the sugar release and the structural, rheological and thermal properties of gels is also discussed. Finally, the future research direction is proposed. PMID:26952168

  7. Cellulose degradation by polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Beeson, William T; Vu, Van V; Span, Elise A; Phillips, Christopher M; Marletta, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs), also known as lytic PMOs (LPMOs), enhance the depolymerization of recalcitrant polysaccharides by hydrolytic enzymes and are found in the majority of cellulolytic fungi and actinomycete bacteria. For more than a decade, PMOs were incorrectly annotated as family 61 glycoside hydrolases (GH61s) or family 33 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM33s). PMOs have an unusual surface-exposed active site with a tightly bound Cu(II) ion that catalyzes the regioselective hydroxylation of crystalline cellulose, leading to glycosidic bond cleavage. The genomes of some cellulolytic fungi contain more than 20 genes encoding cellulose-active PMOs, suggesting a diversity of biological activities. PMOs show great promise in reducing the cost of conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars; however, many questions remain about their reaction mechanism and biological function. This review addresses, in depth, the structural and mechanistic aspects of oxidative depolymerization of cellulose by PMOs and considers their biological function and phylogenetic diversity. PMID:25784051

  8. [Evaluation of a new medium, eggplant (Solanum melongena) agar as a screening medium for Cryptococcus neoformans in environmental samples].

    PubMed

    Sengul, Mustafa; Ergin, Cağrı; Kartal, Tuğba

    2014-04-01

    Cryptococcus neofomans is an encapsulated yeast-like fungus that causes life-threatening infections, especially in immunosuppresive patients. C.neoformans infection is believed to be acquired via inhalation of aerosolized particles from the environment. Avian guano, decaying tree hollows and soil are the related known environmental niches. Brown pigmented yeast growth from the precursors in growth media is an important step for the identification and isolation of C.neoformans. Seeds of plants in nature are preferred owing to easy accessibility and low costs for the preparation of such media. Guizotia abysinicca (Niger seed) as Staib agar, Helianthus annus (Sunflower) as Pal's medium, Brassica nigra (Mustard) agar, tobacco agar, Mucuna pruriens (Velvet bean) seed agar, Perilla frutescens (Beefsteak plant) seed agar, Rubus fruticosus (Blackberry) agar and ground red hot pepper agar are pigment-based selective media for the differentiation of C.neoformans. The aim of this study was to observe the pigment production of C.neoformans in a new medium based on eggplant (Solanum melongena) and also to compare its performance with the simplified Staib, Pal's and tobacco agar for isolation from the environment. Three different eggplant-based medium (S.melongena Melanzaza viserba, S.melongena Pinstripe F1 and S.ovigerum Ivory F1) were included in the study. Pigment-forming eggplant medium, simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and tobacco agar were used for the cultivation of the environmental swabbed samples from 19 Eucalyptus camaldulensis trunk hollows in continuous colonization region. While pigment formation were observed with S.melongena Melanzaza viserba and S.melongena Pinstripe F1 containing media, S.ovigerum Ivory F1 medium was found to be non-reactive. In colonization area (Gökova-Akyaka, Turkey), 11 (57.9%) out of 19 E.camaldulensis samples were positive with simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and eggplant agar while 10 (52.6%) of them are positive with tobacco agar. C.neoformans

  9. Polysaccharide-Based Micelles for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Wardwell, Patricia R.; Bader, Rebecca A.

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of hydrophobic molecules and proteins has been an issue due to poor bioavailability following administration. Thus, micelle carrier systems are being investigated to improve drug solubility and stability. Due to problems with toxicity and immunogenicity, natural polysaccharides are being explored as substitutes for synthetic polymers in the development of new micelle systems. By grafting hydrophobic moieties to the polysaccharide backbone, self-assembled micelles can be readily formed in aqueous solution. Many polysaccharides also possess inherent bioactivity that can facilitate mucoadhesion, enhanced targeting of specific tissues, and a reduction in the inflammatory response. Furthermore, the hydrophilic nature of some polysaccharides can be exploited to enhance circulatory stability. This review will highlight the advantages of polysaccharide use in the development of drug delivery systems and will provide an overview of the polysaccharide-based micelles that have been developed to date. PMID:24300453

  10. Marine Polysaccharides in Pharmaceutical Applications: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Laurienzo, Paola

    2010-01-01

    The enormous variety of polysaccharides that can be extracted from marine plants and animal organisms or produced by marine bacteria means that the field of marine polysaccharides is constantly evolving. Recent advances in biological techniques allow high levels of polysaccharides of interest to be produced in vitro. Biotechnology is a powerful tool to obtain polysaccharides from a variety of micro-organisms, by controlling the growth conditions in a bioreactor while tailoring the production of biologically active compounds. Following an overview of the current knowledge on marine polysaccharides, with special attention to potential pharmaceutical applications and to more recent progress on the discovering of new polysaccharides with biological appealing characteristics, this review will focus on possible strategies for chemical or physical modification aimed to tailor the final properties of interest. PMID:20948899

  11. Phase I clinical trial of O-Acetylated pectin conjugate, a plant polysaccharide based typhoid vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Szu, Shousun C.; Lin, Kimi F-Y; Hunt, Steven; Chu, Chiayung; Thinh, Nguyen Duc

    2014-01-01

    Background Typhoid fever remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing countries. Vi capsular polysaccharide conjugate vaccine demonstrated safety and efficacy in young children in high endemic regions. A novel typhoid conjugate vaccine based on plant polysaccharide pectin was studied in a phase I trial. Methods Fruit pectin, having the same carbohydrate backbone structure as Vi, was purified from citrus peel and used as the polysaccharide source to prepare a semi-synthetic typhoid conjugate vaccine. Pectin was chemically O-acetylated (OAcPec) to antigenically resemble Vi and conjugated to carrier protein rEPA, a recombinant exoprotein A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 25 healthy volunteers, 18–45 years old, were injected once with OAcPec-rEPA. Safety and IgG antibodies reactive with Vi and pectin were analyzed. Results No vaccine associated serious adverse reaction was reported. Six weeks after the injection of OAcPec-rEPA, 64% of the volunteers elicited >4 fold rise of anti-Vi IgG. At 26 weeks the level declined, but the difference between the levels at 6 and 26 weeks are not statistically significant. There is a direct correlation between the level of anti-Vi IgG before and after the injection (R2 = 0.96). The anti-Vi IgG can be absorbed by Vi, but not by pectin. There was no corresponding increase of anti-pectin after the injection, indicating the antibody response to OAcPec-rEPA was