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Sample records for neoliberal health reform

  1. Neoliberal reform and health dilemmas: social hierarchy and therapeutic decision making in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Foley, Ellen E

    2008-09-01

    In this article, I trace the links among neoliberalism, regional ecological decline, and the dynamics of therapeutic processes in rural Senegal. By focusing on illness management in a small rural community, the article explores how economic reform is mediated by existing social structures, and how household social organization in turn influences therapeutic decision making. The illness episodes relayed here demonstrate how the acute economic and social crisis facing the Ganjool region becomes written on the bodies of young men, and how the fault lines of gender and generation shape illness experiences. These narratives also illuminate the tremendous discrepancy between the lived realities of sickness and death, and the idealized models of health participation and empowerment envisioned by the state. Rather than "neoliberal subjects" who behave as rational economic actors, men and women coping with illness are social beings embedded in fields of power characterized by highly stratified household social relations. PMID:19014015

  2. Ecuador's silent health reform.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Pierre; Echeverría Tapia, Ramiro; Aguilar Santacruz, Edison; Unger, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Health sector reform was implemented in many Latin American countries in the 1980s and 1990s, leading to reduced public expenditure on health, limitations on public provision for disease control, and a minimum package of services, with concomitant growth of the private sector. At first sight, Ecuador appeared to follow a different pattern: no formal reform was implemented, despite many plans to reform the Ministry of Health and social health insurance. The authors conducted an in-depth review and analysis of published and gray literature on the Ecuadorian health sector from 1990 onward. They found that although neoliberal reform of the health sector was not openly implemented, many of its typical elements are present: severe reduction of public budgets, "universal" health insurance with limited coverage for targeted groups, and contracting out to private providers. The health sector remains segmented and fragmented, explaining the population's poor health status. The leftist Correa government has prepared an excellent long-term plan to unite services of the Ministry of Health and social security, but implementation is extremely slow. In conclusion, the health sector in Ecuador suffered a "silent" neoliberal reform. President Correa's progressive government intends to reverse this, increasing public budgets for health, but hesitates to introduce needed radical changes. PMID:22611652

  3. Standardization and Subjection: An Autonomist Critique of Neoliberal School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Graham B.; Griggs, C. Bradford

    2015-01-01

    Education under neoliberal reform has been targeted as an indispensable source of profit. Market-based reforms have commodified education and are transforming public school into a corporatized industry concerned not with democracy but with the smooth functioning of the capitalist economy. Targeting public schooling as a site in which to accumulate…

  4. Neoliberalism, Social Darwinism, and Consumerism Masquerading as School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Education reform policies harvested from neoliberalism, social Darwinism, consumerism, and free-market ideologies have begun to replace the pragmatic progressivism of the pre-World War II era. In this article, I use three federal and state education reform policies and programs--No Child Left Behind Act, Common Core State Standards Initiative, and…

  5. Neoliberalism and Corporate School Reform: "Failure" and "Creative Destruction"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltman, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, corporate school reform or neoliberal educational restructuring has overtaken educational policy, practice, curriculum, and nearly all aspects of educational reform. Although this movement began on the political right, the corporate school model has been heralded across the political spectrum and is aggressively embraced now…

  6. Partnership as Cultural Practice in the Face of Neoliberal Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rob; O'Leary, Matt

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the nature of an on-going educational partnership between a Higher Education institution and a number of Further Education (FE) colleges in the West Midlands region of England, forged against the backdrop of sectoral marketisation and neoliberal reform. The partnership originates in the organisation and administration of…

  7. The Reform of New Zealand's University System: "After Neoliberalism"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Cris

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the legacy of three decades of neoliberal reforms on New Zealand's university system. By tracing the different government policies during this period, it seeks to contribute to wider debates about the trajectory of contemporary universities in an age of globalisation. Since Lyotard's influential report on "The Postmodern…

  8. Turnaround as Reform: Opportunity for Meaningful Change or Neoliberal Posturing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mette, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the neoliberal agenda of turnaround school reform efforts in America by examining the application and transformation of a Midwest State Turnaround Schools Project for the public school system. Perceptions of administrators and state-level policy actors are considered. Data were collected from 13 participants during the…

  9. Moments or a Movement? Teacher Resistance to Neoliberal Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Public school teachers in the USA are working in an era of intense interference from neoliberal reform policies. Corporate-driven forces are working to dismantle unions, narrow curricula, replace neighborhood schools with charter schools, tie student test scores to teacher evaluations and replace university-prepared career teachers with…

  10. Education Governance Reform in Ontario: Neoliberalism in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattler, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between neoliberal ideology and the discourse and practice of education governance reform in Ontario over the last two decades. It focuses on changes in education governance introduced by successive Ontario governments: the NDP government from 1990 to 1995, the Progressive Conservative government from 1995 to…

  11. THE NEOLIBERAL TURN IN AMERICAN HEALTH CARE.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Leaving millions both uninsured and underinsured, the Affordable Care Act does not create a system of universal health care in the United States. To understand its shortcomings, we have to understand it as part of a historic shift in the political economy of American health care. This "neoliberal turn" began as a reaction against the welfare state as it expanded during the New Deal and post-World War II period. What began as a movement associated with philosophers like Friedrich Hayek ultimately had a powerful impact via the attraction of powerful corporate sponsors and political supporters, and it was to historically transform American health care thought and organization. In health policy circles, for example, it can be seen in a rising emphasis on "moral hazard," overuse, and cost sharing above a concern with universalism and equity. It was likewise manifested by the corporatization of the health maintenance organization and the rise of the "consumer-driven" health care movement. By the time of the health care reform debate, the influence of corporate "stakeholders" was to prove predominant. These developments, however, must be construed as connected parts of a much larger political transformation, reflected in rising inequality and privatization, occurring both domestically and internationally. PMID:26460446

  12. Neoliberalism as Nihilism? A Commentary on Educational Accountability, Teacher Education, and School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuck, Eve

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses neoliberalism as an extension of settler colonialism. The article provides commentary on five recent articles on teacher education and the neoliberal agenda. The article presents an analysis of neoliberalism as despair, and as a form of nihilism. The author discusses an indigenous model of school reform and…

  13. The Class and Culture-Based Exclusion of the Chilean Neoliberal Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavieres, Eduardo A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I analyze the class- and cultural-based exclusion produced by the Chilean neoliberal educational reform, carried out during the period from 1990 to 2010. This educational reform follows the same neoliberal model applied to the economy of the country. Although some indicators improved in relation to coverage and public spending in…

  14. Teaching Neoliberalism, in the Context of Corporate Reform, in the Undergraduate Social Foundations Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Sandra Beth

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an autoethnographic and theoretical reflection on my justifications for the use of "neoliberal deconstruction" in the undergraduate social foundations classroom. I engage the reader in a discussion concerning the need to make neoliberal agendas, as they pertain to corporate reform in education, salient to students.…

  15. Education as Recovery: Neoliberalism, School Reform, and the Politics of Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Graham B.

    2015-01-01

    Building upon critical education policy studies of crisis, disaster, and reform, this essay develops a theory of "recovery" that further elaborates the nature and operation of "crisis politics" in neoliberal education reform. Recovery is an integral process in capital accumulation, exploiting material, and subjective…

  16. High School Diversification against Educational Equality: A Critical Analysis of Neoliberal Education Reform in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Jeongran

    2011-01-01

    Recent reforms of high school education in Korea have focused on transforming the uniform and standardized system into a deregulated and diversified system that has an emphasis on school choice and competition. Situating the high school diversification policy in the context of the recent controversy of the neoliberal educational reform, this study…

  17. Globalisation, Neoliberalism, and the Reform of Teacher Education in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlong, John

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, teacher education has become a major area of government policy in many countries around the world. One of the key factors driving this change has been the growing significance of globalisation, "imagined" by most countries as necessitating the pursuit of neoliberal policies. But neoliberalism itself is not static;…

  18. Views from the Blackboard: Neoliberal Education Reforms and the Practice of Teaching in Ontario, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Sara; Weber, Nadya; Schugurensky, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses findings from two case studies examining the impact of neoliberal education reform on the classroom practice of teachers and adult educators in Ontario, Canada. We asked educators to comment on the impacts of 20 years of policy shifts in their classrooms. Teachers in public schools and adult literacy programmes echoed each…

  19. Reforming the World Bank: From Social-Liberalism to Neo-Liberalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girdwood, John

    2007-01-01

    Using an analytics of government perspective, it is argued that neo-liberalism as an art of government, especially its form as North American advanced liberal political reason, has shaped enterprise governance and managerial reform at the World Bank. With a focus on the World Bank as a financial banking enterprise, the article explores questions…

  20. Tensions between Teaching Sexuality Education and Neoliberal Policy Reform in Quebec's Professional Competencies for Beginning Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Dan; McGray. Robert

    2015-01-01

    This research draws into question the effects that neoliberal policy reforms--with an emphasis on individual and measurable "competencies"--has on new teachers teaching sexuality education in Quebec. While we examine professional competencies that teachers can use to define their mandate for teaching sexuality education as a beginning…

  1. (Ir)reconcilable differences? Local reactions to provincial neoliberal educational reform.

    PubMed

    Shoveller, Jean; Elliott, Danielle; Johnson, Joy

    2005-01-01

    In this case study, we explore the intersections of neoliberal educational reform and the everyday experiences of people living in a rural region in northern British Columbia, Canada. Reflecting on the provincial Ministry of Education's Strategic Plan, we explore one region's responses to a set of provincial promises, which include providing regional school districts with more autonomy and control over the delivery of education services and a mandate for a balanced budget. The region faced declining student enrolments and funding shortfalls. As a cost-saving measure, the local school district in the region launched a four-day school week. We used ethnographic fieldwork techniques to examine a set of local practices and consequences that arose following the implementation of this measure. The findings demonstrate how provincial promises of educational reform can conflict with local educational needs and create a set of problematic everyday realities with repercussions on youth health, amplifying health inequalities that are irreconcilable with the purported goals of advancing the interests of students and society. PMID:16161848

  2. Neoliberalism, Policy Reforms and Higher Education in Bangladesh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabir, Ariful Haq

    2013-01-01

    Bangladesh has introduced neoliberal policies since the 1970s. Military regimes, since the dramatic political changes in 1975, accelerated the process. A succession of military rulers made rigorous changes in policy-making in various sectors. This article uses a critical approach to document analysis and examines the perceptions of key…

  3. Gender Insurgency and Neoliberal Reform: The Academy Twice Transformed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I adopt an auto/biographical method and a critique of abstract social theories to explore how the neoliberal restructuring of universities interacts with the gender order. Many universities are being remoulded as businesses for other businesses, with profound effects on internal relations, the subjectivities of academics and…

  4. Dependency denied: health inequalities in the neo-liberal era.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Marian; Bissell, Paul; Owen, Jenny

    2014-10-01

    The ways in which inequality generates particular population health outcomes remains a major source of dispute within social epidemiology and medical sociology. Wilkinson and Pickett's The Spirit Level (2009), undoubtedly galvanised thinking across the disciplines, with its emphasis on how income inequality shapes the distribution of health and social problems. In this paper, we argue that their focus on income inequality, whilst important, understates the role of neoliberal discourses and practises in making sense of contemporary inequality and its health-related consequences. Many quantitative studies have demonstrated that more neoliberal countries have poorer health compared to less neoliberal countries, but there are few qualitative studies which explore how neoliberal discourses shape accounts and experiences and what protections and resources might be available to people. This article uses findings from a qualitative psycho-social study employing biographical-narrative interviews with women in Salford (England) to understand experiences of inequality as posited in The Spirit Level. We found evidence for the sorts of damages resulting from inequality as proposed in The Spirit Level. However, in addition to these, the most striking finding was the repeated articulation of a discourse which we have termed "no legitimate dependency". This was something both painful and damaging, where dependency of almost any sort was disavowed and responsibility was assumed by the self or "othered" in various ways. No legitimate dependency, we propose, is a partial (and problematic) internalisation of neoliberal discourses which becomes naturalised and unquestioned at the individual level. We speculate that these sorts of discourses in conjunction with a destruction of protective resources (both material and discursive), lead to an increase in strain and account in part for well-known damages consequent on life in an unequal society. We conclude that integrating understandings

  5. Constructivism and the Neoliberal Agenda in the Spanish Curriculum Reform of the 1980s and 1990s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Encarna

    2011-01-01

    This article challenges the assumption underlying most education reforms that constructivism is politically neutral and intrinsically democratic. It makes this argument by examining the curriculum reform in Spain during the 1980s and 1990s in light of the neoliberal politics that the country was experiencing at that time. This study employs the…

  6. "Turnaround" as Shock Therapy: Race, Neoliberalism, and School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Amanda Walker

    2013-01-01

    "Turnaround" strategies of educational reform promise that school closure, reconstitution, privatizing, and reopening them will bring miraculous results. Questioning the implications, this article situates "turnaround" strategies locally, following the closure of a predominantly minority high school in 2008, in Austin, Texas. The neoliberal…

  7. Neoliberal Justice and the Transformation of the Moral: The Privatization of the Right to Health Care in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Abadía-Barrero, César Ernesto

    2016-03-01

    Neoliberal reforms have transformed the legislative scope and everyday dynamics around the right to health care from welfare state social contracts to insurance markets administered by transnational financial capital. This article presents experiences of health care-seeking treatment, judicial rulings about the right to health care, and market-based health care legislation in Colombia. When insurance companies deny services, citizens petition the judiciary to issue a writ affirming their right to health care. The judiciary evaluates the finances of all relevant parties to rule whether a service should be provided and who should be responsible for the costs. A 2011 law claimed that citizens who demand, physicians who prescribe, and judges who grant uncovered services use the system's limited economic resources and undermine the state's capacity to expand coverage to the poor. This article shows how the consolidation of neoliberal ideology in health care requires the transformation of moral values around life. PMID:25335474

  8. Crisis, neoliberal health policy, and political processes in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Laurell, A C

    1991-01-01

    The Mexican case represents an orthodox neoliberal health policy in the context of the structural adjustment adopted by the Mexican government in 1983. The social costs of this strategy are very high, including an increase in unemployment, wage depression, regressive redistribution of wealth, and profound changes in social policies. These transformations are reflected in the health sector, where the four main axes of neoliberal policy--expenditure restrictions, targeting, decentralization, and privatization--have been implemented. This represents a change in social policy from a model based on citizens' social rights and the state's obligation to guarantee them, to a model characterized by selective public charity. This strategy has been imposed on society as a result of the Mexican corporative political regime based on a state party system. Since 1985, however, there has been a growing process of independent organization of civil society. This led in the presidential elections of 1988 to the defeat of the candidate of the governing party by the candidate of a popular-democratic opposition front. Although the government party imposed its candidate through electoral fraud, social mobilization against neoliberal policies continues in the midst of an important political crisis that can only be resolved by profound democratization of Mexican society. PMID:1917206

  9. Welfare Reform and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitler, Marianne P.; Gelback, Jonah B.; Hoynes, Hilary W.

    2005-01-01

    A study of the effect of state and federal welfare reforms over the period 1990-2000 on health insurance coverage and healthcare utilization by single women aged between 20-45 is presented. It is observed that Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act of 1996 which replaced the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program of 1990s with…

  10. The Quasi-Human Child: How Normative Conceptions of Childhood Enabled Neoliberal School Reform in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonu, Debbie; Benson, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that normative conceptions of the child, as a natural quasi-human being in need of guidance, enable current school reforms in the United States to directly link the child to neoliberal aims and objectives. In using Foucault's concept of governmentality and disciplinary power, we first present how the child is constructed as a…

  11. Curriculum Testing on the Persistent Fringes: Neoliberal Policy and the New Regime of Title I High School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturges, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    Neoliberal policies have opened the door to a steady stream of contract providers who assist struggling schools while producing market-ready reforms. This ethnographic example of Allport High School illustrates how constant aid, in combination with internal market expansion, destabilizes school structures, obscures curricula, and transfers local…

  12. Health reform in Mexico: the promotion of inequality.

    PubMed

    Laurell, A C

    2001-01-01

    The Mexican health reform can be understood only in the context of neoliberal structural adjustment, and it reveals some of the basic characteristics of similar reforms in the Latin American region. The strategy to transform the predominantly public health care system into a market-driven system has been a complex process with a hidden agenda to avoid political resistance. The compulsory social security system is the key sector in opening health care to private insurance companies, health maintenance organizations, and hospital enterprises mainly from abroad. Despite the government's commitment to universal coverage, equity, efficiency, and quality, the empirical data analyzed in this article do not confirm compliance with these objectives. Although an alternative health policy that gradually grants the constitutional right to health would be feasible, the new democratically elected government will continue the previous regressive health reform. PMID:11407172

  13. Prospects for Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Theodore

    1992-01-01

    This editorial reviews areas of health care reform including managed health care, diagnosis-related groups, and the Resource-Based Relative Value Scale for physician services. Relevance of such reforms to people with developmental disabilities is considered. Much needed insurance reform is not thought to be likely, however. (DB)

  14. Neoliberalism and indigenous knowledge: Māori health research and the cultural politics of New Zealand's "National Science Challenges".

    PubMed

    Prussing, Erica; Newbury, Elizabeth

    2016-02-01

    In 2012-13 the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) in New Zealand rapidly implemented a major restructuring of national scientific research funding. The "National Science Challenges" (NSC) initiative aims to promote greater commercial applications of scientific knowledge, reflecting ongoing neoliberal reforms in New Zealand. Using the example of health research, we examine the NSC as a key moment in ongoing indigenous Māori advocacy against neoliberalization. NSC rhetoric and practice through 2013 moved to marginalize participation by Māori researchers, in part through constructing "Māori" and "science" as essentially separate arenas-yet at the same time appeared to recognize and value culturally distinctive forms of Māori knowledge. To contest this "neoliberal multiculturalism," Māori health researchers reasserted the validity of culturally distinctive knowledge, strategically appropriated NSC rhetoric, and marshalled political resources to protect Māori research infrastructure. By foregrounding scientific knowledge production as an arena of contestation over neoliberal values and priorities, and attending closely to how neoliberalizing tactics can include moves to acknowledge cultural diversity, this analysis poses new questions for social scientific study of global trends toward reconfiguring the production of knowledge about health. Study findings are drawn from textual analysis of MBIE documents about the NSC from 2012 to 2014, materials circulated by Māori researchers in the blogosphere in 2014, and ethnographic interviews conducted in 2013 with 17 Māori health researchers working at 7 sites that included university-based research centers, government agencies, and independent consultancies. PMID:26735331

  15. Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

  16. Strengthening health systems by health sector reforms

    PubMed Central

    Senkubuge, Flavia; Modisenyane, Moeketsi; Bishaw, Tewabech

    2014-01-01

    Background The rising burden of disease and weak health systems are being compounded by the persistent economic downturn, re-emerging diseases, and violent conflicts. There is a growing recognition that the global health agenda needs to shift from an emphasis on disease-specific approaches to strengthening of health systems, including dealing with social, environmental, and economic determinants through multisectoral responses. Methods A review and analysis of data on strengthening health sector reform and health systems was conducted. Attention was paid to the goal of health and interactions between health sector reforms and the functions of health systems. Further, we explored how these interactions contribute toward delivery of health services, equity, financial protection, and improved health. Findings Health sector reforms cannot be developed from a single global or regional policy formula. Any reform will depend on the country's history, values and culture, and the population's expectations. Some of the emerging ingredients that need to be explored are infusion of a health systems agenda; development of a comprehensive policy package for health sector reforms; improving alignment of planning and coordination; use of reliable data; engaging ‘street level’ policy implementers; strengthening governance and leadership; and allowing a holistic and developmental approach to reforms. Conclusions The process of reform needs a fundamental rather than merely an incremental and evolutionary change. Without radical structural and systemic changes, existing governance structures and management systems will continue to fail to address the existing health problems. PMID:24560261

  17. [Health reform in Ecuador: never again the right to health as a privilege].

    PubMed

    Malo-Serrano, Miguel; Malo-Corral, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    The process of the health reform being experienced by Ecuador has had significant achievements because it occurs within the framework of a new Constitution of the Republic, which allowed the incorporation of historical social demands that arose from the criticism of neoliberalism in the restructure and modernization of the state. The backbone of the reform consists of three components: organization of a National Health System that overcomes the previous fragmentation and constitutes the Integral Public Health Network; development of policies to strengthen primary health care, articulating actions on the determinants of health, and finally, increasing funding to consolidate these changes. We conclude that challenges to the reform are related to the sustainability of the processes, financial sustainability of the system, greater activation of participatory mechanisms that enable citizen assessment of services and citizen empowerment regarding their right to health. PMID:25597730

  18. The rise of neoliberalism: how bad economics imperils health and what to do about it.

    PubMed

    Labonté, Ronald; Stuckler, David

    2016-03-01

    The 2008 global financial crisis, precipitated by high-risk, under-regulated financial practices, is often seen as a singular event. The crisis, its recessionary consequences, bank bailouts and the adoption of 'austerity' measures can be seen as a continuation of a 40-year uncontrolled experiment in neoliberal economics. Although public spending and recapitalisation of failing banks helped prevent a 1930s-style Great Depression, the deep austerity measures that followed have stifled a meaningful recovery for the majority of populations. In the short term, these austerity measures, especially cuts to health and social protection systems, pose major health risks in those countries under its sway. Meanwhile structural changes to the global labour market, increasing under-employment in high-income countries and economic insecurity elsewhere, are likely to widen health inequities in the longer term. We call for four policy reforms to reverse rising inequalities and their harms to public health. First is re-regulating global finance. Second is rejecting austerity as an empirically and ethically unjustified policy, especially given now clear evidence of its deleterious health consequences. Third, there is a need to restore progressive taxation at national and global scales. Fourth is a fundamental shift away from the fossil fuel economy and policies that promote economic growth in ways that imperil environmental sustainability. This involves redistributing work and promoting fairer pay. We do not suggest these reforms will be politically feasible or even achievable in the short term. They nonetheless constitute an evidence-based agenda for strong, public health advocacy and practice. PMID:26424847

  19. From apartheid to neoliberalism: health equity in post-apartheid South Africa.

    PubMed

    Baker, Peter A

    2010-01-01

    In 1994, the African National Congress (ANC) won South Africa's first ever democratic election. It inherited a health service that was indelibly marked with the inequities of the apartheid era, highly privatized and distorted toward the hospital needs of urban Whites. The ANC's manifesto promised major improvements, but this study finds only two significant health equity improvements: (1) primary care had funding increased by 83 percent and was better staffed; and (2) health care workers became significantly more race-representative of the population. These improvements, however, were outweighed by equity losses in the deteriorating public-private mix. Policy analysis of the elite actors attributes this failure to the dominance of the Treasury's neoliberal macroeconomic policy (GEAR), which severely limited any increases in public spending. The ANC's nationalist ideology underpinned GEAR and many of the health equity decisions. It united the ANC, international capital, African elites, and White capital in a desire for an African economic renaissance. And it swept the population along with it, becoming the new hegemonic ideology. As this study finds, the successful policies were those that could be made a part of this active hegemonic reformation, symbolically celebrating African nationalism, and did not challenge the interests of the major actors. PMID:20198805

  20. Contesting the City: Neoliberal Urbanism and the Cultural Politics of Education Reform in Chicago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipman, Pauline

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the intertwining of neoliberal urbanism and education policy in Chicago. Drawing on critical studies in geography, urban sociology and anthropology, education policy, and critical analyses of race, the author argues that education is constitutive of material and ideological processes of neoliberal restructuring, its…

  1. "Weg Da-Wir Wollen Lernen!" Education Reform in Hamburg, Germany in Neoliberal Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bale, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context: This paper is in dialogue with critical policy scholarship that has developed a certain consensus about what neoliberalism is and what its impact has been on recent education policy. A substantial part of the paper comprises a synthesis of recent German scholarship on neoliberal education policies in that country.…

  2. Agents' Social Imagination: The "Invisible" Hand of Neoliberalism in Taiwan's Curriculum Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Teng

    2012-01-01

    Neoliberalism has become the most dominant ideology in current world and educational researchers thus may need to disclose the ways in which neoliberalism affects education and curriculum and propose new strategies to cope with them. Through literature review, however, the author argues that perhaps because of the social and theoretical scope in…

  3. Pedagogy of the Consumer: The Politics of Neo-Liberal Welfare Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Situated against the backdrop of a widespread and growing interest in the linkages between neo-liberalism and welfare, this paper introduces the lens of neo-liberalism as a conceptual strategy for thinking about contemporary issues in education policy. Through charting the historic rise of unfettered market institutions and practices in the…

  4. Making the Blue Zones: Neoliberalism and nudges in public health promotion.

    PubMed

    Carter, Eric D

    2015-05-01

    This paper evaluates the ideological and political origins of a place-based and commercial health promotion effort, the Blue Zones Project (BZP), launched in Iowa in 2011. Through critical discourse analysis, I argue that the BZP does reflect a neoliberalization of public health, but as an "actually existing neoliberalism" it emerges from a specific policy context, including dramatic health sector policy changes due to the national Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare; a media discourse of health crisis for an aging Midwestern population; and an effort to refashion Iowa cities as sites of healthy and active living, to retain and attract a creative class of young entrepreneurs. The BZP employs many well-known mechanisms of neoliberal governance: the public-private partnership; competition among communities for "public" funds; promotion of an apolitical discourse on individual responsibility and ownership of health; decentralizing governance to the "community" level; and marketing, branding, and corporate sponsorship of public projects. The BZP exemplifies the process of "neoliberal governmentality," by which individuals learn to govern themselves and their "life projects" in line with a market-based rationality. However, with its emphasis on "nudging" individuals towards healthy behaviors through small changes in the local environment, the BZP reflects the rise of "libertarian paternalism," a variant of neoliberalism, as a dominant ideology underlying contemporary health promotion efforts. PMID:25605430

  5. Beyond the income inequality hypothesis: class, neo-liberalism, and health inequalities.

    PubMed

    Coburn, David

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes and critiques the income inequality approach to health inequalities. It then presents an alternative class-based model through a focus on the causes and not only the consequences of income inequalities. In this model, the relationship between income inequality and health appears as a special case within a broader causal chain. It is argued that global and national socio-political-economic trends have increased the power of business classes and lowered that of working classes. The neo-liberal policies accompanying these trends led to increased income inequality but also poverty and unequal access to many other health-relevant resources. But international pressures towards neo-liberal doctrines and policies are differentially resisted by various nations because of historically embedded variation in class and institutional structures. Data presented indicates that neo-liberalism is associated with greater poverty and income inequalities, and greater health inequalities within nations. Furthermore, countries with Social Democratic forms of welfare regimes (i.e., those that are less neo-liberal) have better health than do those that are more neo-liberal. The paper concludes with discussion of what further steps are needed to "go beyond" the income inequality hypothesis towards consideration of a broader set of the social determinants of health. PMID:14572920

  6. Environmental Health: Health Care Reform's Missing Pieces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadope, Cece Modupe; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A series of articles that examine environmental health and discuss health care reform; connections between chlorine, chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins and reproductive disorders and cancers; the rise in asthma; connections between poverty and environmental health problems; and organizations for health care professionals who want to address…

  7. Neo-liberal economic practices and population health: a cross-national analysis, 1980-2004.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Melissa; Kruk, Margaret E; Harper, Christine; Galea, Sandro

    2010-04-01

    Although there has been substantial debate and research concerning the economic impact of neo-liberal practices, there is a paucity of research about the potential relation between neo-liberal economic practices and population health. We assessed the extent to which neo-liberal policies and practices are associated with population health at the national level. We collected data on 119 countries between 1980 and 2004. We measured neo-liberalism using the Fraser Institute's Economic Freedom of the World (EFW) Index, which gives an overall score as well as a score for each of five different aspects of neo-liberal economic practices: (1) size of government, (2) legal structure and security of property rights, (3) access to sound money, (4) freedom to exchange with foreigners and (5) regulation of credit, labor and business. Our measure of population health was under-five mortality. We controlled for potential mediators (income distribution, social capital and openness of political institutions) and confounders (female literacy, total population, rural population, fertility, gross domestic product per capita and time period). In longitudinal multivariable analyses, we found that the EFW index did not have an effect on child mortality but that two of its components: improved security of property rights and access to sound money were associated with lower under-five mortality (p = 0.017 and p = 0.024, respectively). When stratifying the countries by level of income, less regulation of credit, labor and business was associated with lower under-five mortality in high-income countries (p = 0.001). None of the EFW components were significantly associated with under-five mortality in low-income countries. This analysis suggests that the concept of 'neo-liberalism' is not a monolithic entity in its relation to health and that some 'neo-liberal' policies are consistent with improved population health. Further work is needed to corroborate or refute these findings. PMID:19723354

  8. Battling for national health reform.

    PubMed

    DiVenere, L; Davis, M C

    1993-03-01

    At stake are the futures of all health care providers, including those that provide home care and hospice care. Who in Washington holds the ammunition to wage a winning war? Here is your insider's guide to the health reform leaders and their likely strategies. Be assured only that their battles will be intense. PMID:10123976

  9. Health insurance reform: labor versus health perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Walid; Awar, May

    2012-01-01

    The Ministry of Labor (MOL) has submitted to the Council of Ministers a social security reform plan. The Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) considers that health financing should be dealt with as part of a more comprehensive health reform plan that falls under its prerogatives. While a virulent political discussion is taking place, major stakeholders' inputs are very limited and civil society is totally put away from the whole policy making process. The role of the media is restricted to reproducing political disputes, without meaningful substantive debate. This paper discusses health insurance reform from labor market as well as public health perspectives, and aims at launching a serious public debate on this crucial issue that touches the life of every citizen. PMID:22645894

  10. Health insurance reform legislation.

    PubMed

    DiSimone, R L

    1997-01-01

    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), enacted on August 21, 1996 (Public Law 104-19), provides for improved access and renewability with respect to employment-related group health plans, to health insurance coverage sold in connection with group plans, and to the individual market (by amending the Public Health Service Act). The Act's provisions include improvements in portability and continuity of health insurance coverage; combatting waste, fraud, and abuse in health insurance and health care delivery; promoting the use of medical savings accounts; improving access to long-term care services and insurance coverage; administrative simplification; and addressing duplication and coordination of Medicare benefits. PMID:9483710

  11. District health systems in a neoliberal world: a review of five key policy areas.

    PubMed

    Segall, Malcolm

    2003-01-01

    District health systems, comprising primary health care and first referral hospitals, are key to the delivery of basic health services in developing countries. They should be prioritized in resource allocation and in the building of management and service capacity. The relegation in the World Health Report 2000 of primary health care to a 'second generation' reform--to be superseded by third generation reforms with a market orientation--flows from an analysis that is historically flawed and ideologically biased. Primary health care has struggled against economic crisis and adjustment and a neoliberal ideology often averse to its principles. To ascribe failures of primary health care to a weakness in policy design, when the political economy has starved it of resources, is to blame the victim. Improvement in the working and living conditions of health workers is a precondition for the effective delivery of public health services. A multidimensional programme of health worker rehabilitation should be developed as the foundation for health service recovery. District health systems can and should be financed (at least mainly) from public funds. Although in certain situations user fees have improved the quality and increased the utilization of primary care services, direct charges deter health care use by the poor and can result in further impoverishment. Direct user fees should be replaced progressively by increased public finance and, where possible, by prepayment schemes based on principles of social health insurance with public subsidization. Priority setting should be driven mainly by the objective to achieve equity in health and wellbeing outcomes. Cost effectiveness should enter into the selection of treatments for people (productive efficiency), but not into the selection of people for treatment (allocative efficiency). Decentralization is likely to be advantageous in most health systems, although the exact form(s) should be selected with care and implementation

  12. Creating Neoliberal Citizens in Morocco: Reproductive Health, Development Policy, and Popular Islamic Beliefs.

    PubMed

    Hughes Rinker, Cortney

    2015-01-01

    Self-governance and responsibility are two traits associated with neoliberal citizenship in scholarly and popular discourses, but little of the literature on this topic focuses on North Africa. My goal, in this article, is not only to fill this void but also to complicate understandings of neoliberalism through an examination of the relationship between reproductive health care, development policy, and popular Islamic beliefs in Morocco. My discussion is based on fieldwork in Rabat, Morocco, which included observations in health clinics, interviews with patients and staff, and visits to patients' homes. By analyzing the childbearing and childrearing practices of Moroccan women who visited the clinics, I pose that neoliberal logic cannot be predefined or understood as a monolithic concept. I demonstrate that women were active in their own governance and accountable for their reproductive behaviors, but they did so because of their understandings of what Islam says about fertility and motherhood. PMID:24892231

  13. Congress enacts health care reform.

    PubMed

    2010-03-01

    Health care reform at last: After nearly a century of effort by Presidents from Theodore Roosevelt on down, the Congress finally agreed on and President Barack Obama signed into law a system that covers most Americans, regulates sharp insurance practices, and embraces a paradigm shift from acute institutionally focused care to chronic disease management based on home and community-based care. PMID:20465039

  14. Income inequality, social cohesion and the health status of populations: the role of neo-liberalism.

    PubMed

    Coburn, D

    2000-07-01

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in the relationship between income inequality and health within nations and between nations. On the latter topic Wilkinson and others believe that, in the advanced capitalist countries, higher income inequality leads to lowered social cohesion which in turn produces poorer health status. I argue that, despite a by-now voluminous literature, not enough attention has been paid to the social context of income inequality--health relationships or to the causes of income inequality itself. In this paper I contend that there is a particular affinity between neo-liberal (market-oriented) political doctrines, income inequality and lowered social cohesion. Neo-liberalism, it is argued, produces both higher income inequality and lowered social cohesion. Part of the negative effect of neo-liberalism on health status is due to its undermining of the welfare state. The welfare state may have direct effects on health as well as being one of the underlying structural causes of social cohesion. The rise of neo-liberalism and the decline of the welfare state are themselves tied to globalization and the changing class structures of the advanced capitalist societies. More attention should be paid to understanding the causes of income inequalities and not just to its effects because income inequalities are neither necessary nor inevitable. Moreover, understanding the contextual causes of inequality may also influence our notion of the causal pathways involved in inequality-health status relationships (and vice versa). PMID:10817476

  15. Governance and Conflict in the University: The Mobilization of Italian Researchers against Neoliberal Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commisso, Giuliana

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to the debate on neoliberal governmentality in higher education by focusing its analysis on the constitution of conflictual subjectivities. Starting from the hypothesis that resistance is constitutive to any power relation and coextensive with it, the paper problematizes the production of conflictual subjectivities in…

  16. Neo-Liberal Reforms in Israel's Education System: The Dialectics of the State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonah, Yossi; Dahan, Yossi; Markovich, Dalya

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers a reading of the Dovrat Report with the aim of assessing the convoluted and dialectical manifestations of the state--"the weak and the strong state"--in the era of global neo-liberalism. The Dovrat Report (Ministry Of Education 2005) includes a set of recommendations aiming to bring about structural and comprehensive changes in…

  17. Conceptualizing Teacher Professional Identity in Neoliberal Times: Resistance, Compliance and Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, David; McGinity, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the dramatic implications of the turn towards neo-liberal education policies for teachers' professional identities. It begins with an analysis of some of the key features of this policy shift including marketization, metricization and managerialism and the accompanying elevation of performativity. This is followed by a…

  18. Health care reform: informing difficult choices.

    PubMed

    Maynard, A; Bloor, K

    1995-01-01

    During the last decade, policy makers in a large number of countries have attempted various reforms of their health care systems. Health care reform has been described as a 'global epidemic' (Klein, 1993). All health care reforms consist of very complex policy choices, some of which are examined in this article. After an introductory exploration of ideological issues, the objectives of health care reformers are considered. Three major policy objectives of health care reform are examined: cost containment; efficiency; and, equity. Three types of reform which have been advocated are also considered: public planning; market regulation; and provider-advocated reforms such as a 'basic package' with copayments and alternative means of finance. Finally, appropriate features of efficient health care reform are suggested, addressing explicit policy goals. PMID:10154305

  19. Health Reform and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Elwood, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    The era of the Obama Administration draws to a close at the end of 2016, leaving behind a signature achievement in the form of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) that became law in 2010. Beginning with that year, I have contributed an annual essay to the Journal of Allied Health describing various aspects of this legislation. The current essay initially will start down that same path, but then take a sharp detour to discuss related aspects of what is occurring in the broader health domain. PMID:27585611

  20. Biobanks in Oral Health: Promises and Implications of Post-Neoliberal Science and Innovation.

    PubMed

    Birch, Kean; Dove, Edward S; Chiappetta, Margaret; Gürsoy, Ulvi K

    2016-01-01

    While biobanks are established explicitly as scientific infrastructures, they are de facto political-economic ones too. Many biobanks, particularly population-based biobanks, are framed under the rubric of the bio-economy as national political-economic assets that benefit domestic business, while national populations are framed as a natural resource whose genomics, proteomics, and related biological material and national health data can be exploited. We outline how many biobanks epitomize this 'neoliberal' form of science and innovation in which research is driven by market priorities (e.g., profit, shareholder value) underpinned by state or government policies. As both scientific and political-economic infrastructures, biobanks end up entangled in an array of problems associated with market-driven science and innovation. These include: profit trumping other considerations; rentiership trumping entrepreneurship; and applied research trumping basic research. As a result, there has been a push behind new forms of 'post-neoliberal' science and innovation strategies based on principles of openness and collaboration, especially in relation to biobanks. The proliferation of biobanks and the putative transition in both scientific practice and political economy from neoliberalism to post-neoliberalism demands fresh social scientific analyses, particularly as biobanks become further established in fields such as oral health and personalized dentistry. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first analysis of biobanks with a view to what we can anticipate from biobanks and distributed post-genomics global science in the current era of oral health biomarkers. PMID:26584410

  1. Health Care Reform: A Values Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popko, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the crisis in health care, considering costs, lack of access, and system ineffectiveness. Reviews "Setting Relationships Right," the Catholic Health Association's proposal for health care reform. Advocates educators' awareness of children's health needs and health care reform issues and support for the Every Fifth Child Act of 1992. (DMM)

  2. Health care reforms in Poland.

    PubMed

    Baginska, Ewa

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the shape of the recently reformed health care system in Poland. Until December 31,1998 everyone had access to free health care and the medical institutions were financed by the State. Since January 1, 1999, under the provisions of the Universal Health Insurance Act, hospitals became independent from the State budget and gained more financial resources for their activities. 17 regional health insurance funds contract for medical services with hospitals and individual practices. Most services provided to the insured are paid by the funds that receive premiums, but some are still financed from the State budget. The revised legislation on Medical Care Establishments intended to create a better management of health care institutions and administrative control over the quality of care. The system has been severely criticised: it is too bureaucratic, there are too many insurance funds, patients have experienced problems with access to health care, particularly to special treatment or to treatment available outside the area of the health insurance fund to which the patient belongs. The new Minister for Health suggested that the 17 funds should be replaced by 5 "health funds" that would finance health care and be closely connected to the local government answerable for their activities. This paper will deal with the scope of health care packages, the conditions of provision of health services, obligations of health care providers, patient rights, and the quality of health care. PMID:15685913

  3. Health reform: examining the alternatives.

    PubMed

    Custer, W

    1994-03-01

    This Issue Brief examines the major issues of the health reform debate. The issues that must be resolved before reform can be enacted include: allocation of health care resources, universal coverage versus universal access, composition of risk pools, employer and individual mandates, and distribution of health care services' costs. This report also contains short descriptions and analyses of the following proposals: McDermott-Wellstone, Clinton administration, Cooper-Breaux, Chafee-Thomas, Michel-Lott, Nickles-Stearns, and Gramm. Proposals without an individual mandate will not achieve universal coverage. An individual mandate raises significant enforcement issues. An employer mandate will not achieve universal coverage by itself. Depending on the number of hours an employee must work to be included in a mandate, an employer mandate could potentially extend health insurance coverage to as many as 85 percent of the currently uninsured. Each individual has a risk of needing health care services. Restructuring the health insurance market is accomplished by changing the way individuals and their risks are pooled. The composition of these risk pools will determine the costs of health insurance and the distribution of these costs. The theory behind medical saving accounts is that the market for health insurance currently leads to health care cost inflation because many events covered under most health insurance plans are not truly insurable. There are two issues involved in medical savings accounts--the impact on low-income individuals and individuals' ability to evaluate the quality of care they receive. The present market does not provide individuals with adequate information for assessing the quality or effectiveness of medical care. Among the critical issues in health reform is how to reduce the rate of health care cost inflation. The effect of proposals that impose explicit budget caps or price controls on health care cost inflation can be more easily estimated than

  4. Health Care Reform: Out Greatest Opportunity...Ever!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keigher, Sharon M.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses inevitability of health care reform in United States, considers the reform process itself, and explains the plan of the President's Task Force on National Health Care Reform. Also considers the prospects for Congressional response to reform proposals. (NB)

  5. Unpacking "Health Reform" and "Policy Capacity"

    PubMed Central

    Legge, David; Gleeson, Deborah H

    2015-01-01

    Health reform is the outcome of dispersed policy initiatives in different sectors, at different levels and across time. Policy work which can drive coherent health reform needs to operate across the governance structures as well as the institutions that comprise healthcare systems. Building policy capacity to support health reform calls for clarity regarding the nature of such policy work and the elements of policy capacity involved; and for evidence regarding effective strategies for capacity building. PMID:26673185

  6. A fresh start for health reform?

    PubMed

    Kendall, D B

    1996-01-01

    Health reform isn't a popular subject in Washington these days, but problems of cost and access persist. The author, a senior health policy analyst for the Progressive Policy Institute, argues that in next year's debate of tax reform, a few modest changes could lead to a more effective and universal market for health care. PMID:10158552

  7. Let's make a deal: trading malpractice reform for health reform.

    PubMed

    Sage, William M; Hyman, David A

    2014-01-01

    Physician leadership is required to improve the efficiency and reliability of the US health care system, but many physicians remain lukewarm about the changes needed to attain these goals. Malpractice liability-a sore spot for decades-may exacerbate physician resistance. The politics of malpractice have become so lawyer-centric that recognizing the availability of broader gains from trade in tort reform is an important insight for health policy makers. To obtain relief from malpractice liability, physicians may be willing to accept other policy changes that more directly improve access to care and reduce costs. For example, the American Medical Association might broker an agreement between health reform proponents and physicians to enact federal legislation that limits malpractice liability and simultaneously restructures fee-for-service payment, heightens transparency regarding the quality and cost of health care services, and expands practice privileges for other health professionals. There are also reasons to believe that tort reform can make ongoing health care delivery reforms work better, in addition to buttressing health reform efforts that might otherwise fail politically. PMID:24395935

  8. Health economists, tobacco control and international development: On the economisation of global health beyond neoliberal structural adjustment policies

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, David

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the increasing influence of economic rationalities in global health over the past 30 years by examining the genealogy of one economic strategy – taxation – that has become central to international anti-smoking initiatives in the global South. It argues that this genealogy sits uncomfortably with the usual story about economics and global health, which reduces the economisation of international health to neoliberal structural adjustment policies aimed at stabilisation, liberalisation and privatisation and laments their detrimental effect on health. While not disputing these policies' importance and damaging impact, the genealogy of tobacco taxes outlined in this article shows that the economisation of global health is not only about neoliberal structural adjustment policies but also about sin taxes, market failures and health economics. By stressing how changes in health like the global South's epidemiological transition can impact on economics and how beneficial taxation can be for health, it also shows that the relation between economics and health is not always unidirectional and detrimental to the latter. In doing so, the article contributes to the critique of the often mechanical use of neo-liberalism to explicate change and calls for other stories about the economisation of global health to be told. PMID:23750175

  9. Health economists, tobacco control and international development: On the economisation of global health beyond neoliberal structural adjustment policies.

    PubMed

    Reubi, David

    2013-06-01

    This article addresses the increasing influence of economic rationalities in global health over the past 30 years by examining the genealogy of one economic strategy - taxation - that has become central to international anti-smoking initiatives in the global South. It argues that this genealogy sits uncomfortably with the usual story about economics and global health, which reduces the economisation of international health to neoliberal structural adjustment policies aimed at stabilisation, liberalisation and privatisation and laments their detrimental effect on health. While not disputing these policies' importance and damaging impact, the genealogy of tobacco taxes outlined in this article shows that the economisation of global health is not only about neoliberal structural adjustment policies but also about sin taxes, market failures and health economics. By stressing how changes in health like the global South's epidemiological transition can impact on economics and how beneficial taxation can be for health, it also shows that the relation between economics and health is not always unidirectional and detrimental to the latter. In doing so, the article contributes to the critique of the often mechanical use of neo-liberalism to explicate change and calls for other stories about the economisation of global health to be told. PMID:23750175

  10. The English and Swedish health care reforms.

    PubMed

    Glennerster, H; Matsaganis, M

    1994-01-01

    England and Sweden have two of the most advanced systems of universal access to health care in the world. Both have begun major reforms based on similar principles. Universal access and finance from taxation are retained, but a measure of competition between providers of health care is introduced. The reforms therefore show a movement toward the kind of approach advocated by some in the United States. This article traces the origins and early results of the two countries' reform efforts. PMID:8034391

  11. Marketing Small Schools in New York City: A Critique of Neoliberal School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiller, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to critically examine a school reform effort that has taken hold in New York City over the past seven years. A largely privately funded venture, the New Century Schools Initiative (NCSI), opened hundreds of new small high schools in poor urban communities in New York City starting in 2002. The theory behind opening…

  12. Health reform requires policy capacity

    PubMed Central

    Forest, Pierre-Gerlier; Denis, Jean-Louis; Brown, Lawrence D.; Helms, David

    2015-01-01

    Among the many reasons that may limit the adoption of promising reform ideas, policy capacity is the least recognized. The concept itself is not widely understood. Although policy capacity is concerned with the gathering of information and the formulation of options for public action in the initial phases of policy consultation and development, it also touches on all stages of the policy process, from the strategic identification of a problem to the actual development of the policy, its formal adoption, its implementation, and even further, its evaluation and continuation or modification. Expertise in the form of policy advice is already widely available in and to public administrations, to well-established professional organizations like medical societies and, of course, to large private-sector organizations with commercial or financial interests in the health sector. We need more health actors to join the fray and move from their traditional position of advocacy to a fuller commitment to the development of policy capacity, with all that it entails in terms of leadership and social responsibility. PMID:25905476

  13. Health reform requires policy capacity.

    PubMed

    Forest, Pierre-Gerlier; Denis, Jean-Louis; Brown, Lawrence D; Helms, David

    2015-05-01

    Among the many reasons that may limit the adoption of promising reform ideas, policy capacity is the least recognized. The concept itself is not widely understood. Although policy capacity is concerned with the gathering of information and the formulation of options for public action in the initial phases of policy consultation and development, it also touches on all stages of the policy process, from the strategic identification of a problem to the actual development of the policy, its formal adoption, its implementation, and even further, its evaluation and continuation or modification. Expertise in the form of policy advice is already widely available in and to public administrations, to well-established professional organizations like medical societies and, of course, to large private-sector organizations with commercial or financial interests in the health sector. We need more health actors to join the fray and move from their traditional position of advocacy to a fuller commitment to the development of policy capacity, with all that it entails in terms of leadership and social responsibility. PMID:25905476

  14. A reforming accountability: GPs and health reform in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, K

    1997-01-01

    Over the last ten years or so, many countries have undertaken public sector reforms. As a result of these changes, accounting has come to play a more important role. However, many of the studies have only discussed the reforms at a conceptual level and have failed to study how the reforms have been implemented and operated in practice. Based on the work of Lipsky (1980) and Gorz (1989), it can be argued that those affected by the reforms have a strong incentive to subvert the reforms. This prediction is explored via a case study of general practitioner (GP) response to the New Zealand health reforms. The creation of Independent Practice Associations (IPAs) allowed the State to impose contractual-accountability and to cap their budget exposure for subsidies. From the GP's perspective, the IPAs absorbed the changes initiated by the State, and managed the contracting, accounting and budgetary administration responsibilities that were created. This allowed individual GPs to continue practising as before and provided some collective protection against the threat of state intrusion into GP autonomy. The creation of IPAs also provided a new way to manage the professional/financial tension, the contradiction between the professional motivation noted by Gorz (1989) and the need to earn a living. PMID:10175302

  15. Massachusetts health care reform: is it working?

    PubMed

    McAdoo, Joshua; Irving, Julian; Deslich, Stacie; Coustasse, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Before 2006, Massachusetts had more than 500 000 residents who lacked health insurance. Governor Mitt Romney enacted landmark legislation requiring all residents to obtain health insurance. Also, the legislation established a health insurance exchange for the purpose of broadening the choices of insurance plans made available to individuals in the state. The purpose of this research was to assess the Massachusetts health care reform in terms of access, cost, and sustainability. The methodology used was a literature review from 2006 to 2013; a total of 43 references were used. Health reform resulted in additional overall state spending of $2.42 billion on Medicaid for Massachusetts. Since the 2006 reform, 401 000 additional residents have obtained insurance. The number of Massachusetts residents who had access to health care increased substantially after the health care reform was enacted, to 98.1% of residents. The Massachusetts health care reform has not saved money for the state; its funding has been covered by Federal spending. However, reform has been sustained over time because of the high percentage of state residents who have supported the state mandate to obtain health care coverage. PMID:24168866

  16. Beyond nursing nihilism, a Nietzschean transvaluation of neoliberal values.

    PubMed

    Krol, Pawel J; Lavoie, Mireille

    2014-04-01

    Like most goods-producing sectors in the West, modern health-care systems have been profoundly changed by globalization and the neoliberal policies that attend it. Since the 1970s, the role of the welfare state has been considerably reduced; funding and management of health systems have been subjected to wave upon wave of reorganization and assimilated to the private sector. At the same time, neoliberal policy has imposed the notion of patient empowerment, thus turning patients into consumers of health. The literature on nursing has accordingly reported on the significant repercussions on all aspects of the profession, from delivery of care and treatment, through training for new nurses, to legislated policy reforms regarding the role and responsibilities of modern nurses. In light of these developments, this paper analyses and theorizes about the way the injection of neoliberal policy is linked to and affects the practice of nursing. Drawing on a number of Nietzschean arguments, we begin with an exploration of the complex effects of neoliberalism, bureaucratization, and technocratization on the health system and the practice of nursing. Our main theoretical point here is that neoliberal policy engenders and promotes a neoliberal tide, which results in the conversion of the values that drive modern nursing practice. We then examine this tide in the light of Nietzsche's concepts. Starting with an analysis based on the ontology of the will to power, we show that nurses are dominated by neoliberal values embedded in technocratic and bureaucratic ideologies. Finally, we argue that the application of neoliberal policy constitutes a form of domestication from which one might potentially be freed through the Nietzschean concept of transvaluation of values. This transvaluation, as its freeing from some of the neoliberal tide, may be accomplished in accordance with a hierarchy of specific life-affirming values for nursing culture and practice. PMID:24517086

  17. Uneven health outcomes and political resistance under residual neoliberalism in Africa.

    PubMed

    Bond, Patrick; Dor, George

    2003-01-01

    Africa has suffered two decades of policy implementation associated with the "neoliberal" macroeconomic as well as micro-development paradigm, and the health status of this continent has deteriorated markedly. Notwithstanding the discrediting of such policies since the late 1990s, they continue to be applied in Africa, especially by the World Bank and IMF, through Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers and the Highly Indebted Poor Countries debt relief initiative. Evidence can be found in the inadequate fiscal allocations to the health sector; the inadequate conceptualization of health in relation to other sectors; insufficient consultation with civil society; ongoing implementation of cost-recovery and user-fee provisions; a failed strategy to access pharmaceutical products, by respecting unnecessary Trade in Intellectual Property Rights provisos; and, most importantly, glaring insufficiencies in reducing Africa's foreign debt. One reflection of the balance of forces between Washington financial agencies and African societies is the adoption of the New Partnership for Africa's Development at the urging of the South African and Nigerian governments. While the WHO has helped to research, publicize, and criticize the problems associated with durable neoliberalism in African health care, it also continues to make serious mistakes as it remains locked within the paradigm. A human rights perspective being developed by the African Social Forum is, in contrast, consistent with broader international trends in the opposition to corporate globalization. PMID:14582875

  18. Health financing and insurance reform in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah; Kress, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The government of Morocco approved two reforms in 2005 to expand health insurance coverage. The first is a payroll-based mandatory health insurance plan for public- and formal private-sector employees to extend coverage from the current 16 percent of the population to 30 percent. The second creates a publicly financed fund to cover services for the poor. Both reforms aim to improve access to high-quality care and reduce disparities in access and financing between income groups and between rural and urban dwellers. In this paper we analyze these reforms: the pre-reform debate, benefits covered, financing, administration, and oversight. We also examine prospects and future challenges for implementing the reforms. PMID:17630444

  19. Health care reform and the new economy.

    PubMed

    Starr, P

    2000-01-01

    The objectives and assumptions of health care reform have changed repeatedly during the past century and may now be entering a new historical phase as a result of the "new economy" rooted in information technology. In a high-growth context, proponents of reform may no longer feel obliged to bundle expanded coverage with tighter cost containment. At the same time, the new digital environment may facilitate innovations intended to inform and expand consumer choice and to improve quality. The new environment elevates "transparency" to a guiding principle. Health informatics has long been peripheral to reform and must now become more central. PMID:11192407

  20. Physician payments under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Abe; Shapiro, Adam Hale

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the impact of major health insurance reform on payments made in the health care sector. We study the prices of services paid to physicians in the privately insured market during the Massachusetts health care reform. The reform increased the number of insured individuals as well as introduced an online marketplace where insurers compete. We estimate that, over the reform period, physician payments increased at least 11 percentage points relative to control areas. Payment increases began around the time legislation passed the House and Senate-the period in which their was a high probability of the bill eventually becoming law. This result is consistent with fixed-duration payment contracts being negotiated in anticipation of future demand and competition. PMID:25497755

  1. Health Care Reform: Recommendations and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewit, Eugene M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Health care reform needs to assure coverage to all children regardless of income level or illnesses; address benefits, financing, administration, and delivery systems; provide substantial subsidies to low-income families; be equitable for all people; provide better monitoring of child health; protect and strengthen health providers who assist…

  2. Neoliberal and public health effects of failing to adopt OSHA's national secondhand tobacco smoke rule.

    PubMed

    Givel, Michael

    2006-01-01

    From the early 1980s to the present, neoliberal doctrine has called for government policies of privatization, funding cutbacks, and deregulation of public health and other domestic social programs in the belief that the market rather than the public sector can best organize and distribute crucial societal services. Proponents of a neoliberal and deregulatory mixed approach of command and control and self-regulation argue this approach provides the most adequate means to conduct regulation in the legalistic and adversarial U.S. regulatory process. In April 1994, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued a proposed rule to eliminate tobacco smoking in most workplace rooms, arguing secondhand tobacco smoke annually killed up to 13,700 nonsmokers. The tobacco industry purposely delayed public hearing procedures (later halted altogether by Congress and the president) primarily to advance unhindered private property rights and profits rather than submitting to a public command-and-control regulatory framework to reduce deaths due to secondhand tobacco smoke. PMID:16524168

  3. Health Care System Reforms in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a critical but non-systematic review of recent health care system reforms in developing countries. The literature reports mixed results as to whether reforms improve the financial protection of the poor or not. We discuss the reasons for these differences by comparing three representative countries: Mexico, Vietnam, and China. First, the design of the health care system reform, as well as the summary of its evaluation, is briefly described for each country. Then, the discussion is developed along two lines: policy design and evaluation methodology. The review suggests that i) background differences, such as social development, poverty level, and population health should be considered when taking other countries as a model; ii) although demand-side reforms can be improved, more attention should be paid to supply-side reforms; and iii) the findings of empirical evaluation might be biased due to the evaluation design, the choice of outcome, data quality, and evaluation methodology, which should be borne in mind when designing health care system reforms. PMID:25170464

  4. Health care system reforms in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei

    2012-12-28

    This article proposes a critical but non-systematic review of recent health care system reforms in developing countries. The literature reports mixed results as to whether reforms improve the financial protection of the poor or not. We discuss the reasons for these differences by comparing three representative countries: Mexico, Vietnam, and China. First, the design of the health care system reform, as well as the summary of its evaluation, is briefly described for each country. Then, the discussion is developed along two lines: policy design and evaluation methodology. The review suggests that i) background differences, such as social development, poverty level, and population health should be considered when taking other countries as a model; ii) although demand-side reforms can be improved, more attention should be paid to supply-side reforms; and iii) the findings of empirical evaluation might be biased due to the evaluation design, the choice of outcome, data quality, and evaluation methodology, which should be borne in mind when designing health care system reforms. PMID:25170464

  5. The McDonaldization of childhood: children's mental health in neo-liberal market cultures.

    PubMed

    Timimi, Sami

    2010-11-01

    As the failings of neo-liberalism have recently been revealed through the collapse of much of the banking and financial services sector, it seems an opportune time to think about the impact this economic, political, and social value system has had on the well-being of children. After analyzing how our beliefs and practices around children and families are shaped by a variety of economic, political, and cultural pressures, I discuss how policies that promote a particular form of aggressive capitalism lead to a narcissistic value system that permeates social institutions, including those that deal with children. Not only does this impact children's emotional well-being, but it also shapes the way we conceptualize children and their problems. These dynamics facilitate the rapid growth of child psychiatric diagnoses and the tendency to deal with aberrant behavior or emotions in children through technical--particularly pharmaceutical--interventions, a phenomenon I refer to as the 'McDonaldization' of children's mental health. The present article seeks to challenge many of the unhelpful cultural assumptions regarding childhood embedded within the narrow biomedical frame that neo-liberalism has encouraged. PMID:21088100

  6. Why Is Health Reform So Difficult?

    PubMed Central

    Brady, David W.; Kessler, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the possibilities for health care reform in the 111th Congress. It uses a simple model of policy making to analyze the failure of Congress to pass the Clinton health plan in 1993 – 1994. It concludes that the factors that created gridlock in the 103rd Congress are likely to have a similar impact in the present. PMID:20388865

  7. Health Care Reform and the Academic Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmey, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of the implications of health care reform for academic health centers (a complex of institutions which educate health professionals) looks at problems in the current system, the role of academic health centers in the current system, financial pressures, revenue sources other than patient care, impact on health research, and human…

  8. Health sector reform: lessons from China.

    PubMed

    Bloom, G; Xingyuan, G

    1997-08-01

    As a result of China's transition to a socialist market economy, its rural health services have undergone many of the changes commonly associated with health sector reform. These have included a decreased reliance on state funding, decentralisation of public health services, increased autonomy of health facilities, increased freedom of movement of health workers, and decreased political control. These changes have been associated with growing inequality in access to health services, increases in the cost of medical care, and the deterioration of preventive programmes in some poor areas. This paper argues that the government's strategy for addressing these problems has overemphasised the identification of new sources of revenue and has paid inadequate attention to factors that influence provider behaviour. The strategy also does not address contextual issues such as public sector employment practices and systems of local government finance. Other countries can learn from China's experience by taking a systematic approach to the formulation and implementation of strategies for health sector reform. PMID:9232730

  9. Issue ads and the health reform debate.

    PubMed

    Bergan, Daniel; Risner, Genevieve

    2012-06-01

    The public debate over health care reform in 2009 was carried out partly through issue advertisements aired online and on television. Did these advertisements alter the course of the debate over health care reform? While millions of dollars are spent each year on issue ads, little is known about their effects. Results from a naturalistic online experiment on the effects of issue ads suggest that they can influence the perceived importance of an issue and perceptions of politicians associated with the featured policy while influencing policy support only among those low in political awareness. PMID:22323237

  10. Mental Health under National Health Care Reform: The Empirical Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Christopher G.; DeVito, Jo Anne

    1994-01-01

    Reviews research pertinent to mental health services under health care reform proposals. Examines redistributional impact of inclusion of outpatient mental health benefits, optimal benefit packages, and findings that mental health services lower medical utilization costs. Argues that extending minimalist model of time-limited benefits to national…

  11. Primary care and health reform.

    PubMed

    Calman, Neil S; Golub, Maxine; Shuman, Saskia

    2012-01-01

    Skyrocketing health care costs are burdening our people and our economy, yet health care indicators show how little we are achieving with the money we spend. Federal and state governments, along with public-health experts and policymakers, are proposing a host of new initiatives to find solutions. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is designed to address both the quality and accessibility of health care, while reducing its cost. This article provides an overview of models supported by the Affordable Care Act that address one or more goals of the "Triple Aim": better health care for individuals, better health outcomes in the community, and lower health care costs. The models described below rely on the core principles of primary care: comprehensive, coordinated and continuous primary care; preventive care; and the sophisticated implementation of health information technology designed to promote communication between health care providers, enhance coordination of care, minimize duplication of services, and permit reporting on quality. These models will support better health care and reduced costs for people who access health care services but will not address health outcomes in the community at large. Health care professionals, working in concert with community-based organizations and advocates, must also address conditions that influence health in the broadest sense to truly improve the health of our communities and reduce health care costs. PMID:22976358

  12. The social relations of health care and household resource allocation in neoliberal Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background With the transition to neoliberalism, Nicaragua's once-critically acclaimed health care services have substantially diminished. Local level social formations have been under pressure to try to bridge gaps as the state's role in the provision of health care and other vital social services has decreased. This paper presents a case study of how global and national health policies reverberated in the social relations of an extended network of female kin in a rural community during late 2002 - 2003. Methods The qualitative methods used in this ethnographic study included semi-structured interviews completed during bi-weekly visits to 51 households, background interviews with 20 lay and professional health practitioners working in the public and private sectors, and participant-observation conducted in the region's government health centers. Interviews and observational field notes were manually coded and iteratively reviewed to identify and conceptually organize emergent themes. Three households of extended kin were selected from the larger sample to examine as a case study. Results The ongoing erosion of vital services formerly provided by the public sector generated considerable frustration and tension among households, networks of extended kin, and neighbors. As resource allocations for health care seeking and other needs were negotiated within and across households, longstanding ideals of reciprocal exchange persisted, but in conditions of poverty, expectations were often unfulfilled, exposing the tension between the need for social support, versus the increasingly oppositional positioning of social network members as sources of competition for limited resources. Conclusions In compliance with neoliberal structural adjustment policies mandated by multilateral and bilateral agencies, government-provided health care services have been severely restricted in Nicaragua. As the national safety net for health care has been eroded, the viability of local level

  13. A case study of health sector reform in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The impact of conflict on population health and health infrastructure has been well documented; however the efforts of the international community to rebuild health systems in post-conflict periods have not been systematically examined. Based on a review of relevant literature, this paper develops a framework for analyzing health reform in post-conflict settings, and applies this framework to the case study of health system reform in post-conflict Kosovo. The paper examines two questions: first, the selection of health reform measures; and second, the outcome of the reform process. It measures the success of reforms by the extent to which reform achieved its objectives. Through an examination of primary documents and interviews with key stakeholders, the paper demonstrates that the external nature of the reform process, the compressed time period for reform, and weak state capacity undermined the ability of the success of the reform program. PMID:20398389

  14. Health Reform Redux: Learning From Experience and Politics

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 presidential campaign season featured health care reform proposals. I discuss 3 approaches to health care reform and the tools for bringing about reform, such as insurance market reforms, tax credits, subsidies, individual and employer mandates, and public program expansions. I also discuss the politics of past and current health care reform efforts. Market-based reforms and mandates have been less successful than public program expansions at expanding coverage and controlling costs. New divisions among special interest groups increase the likelihood that reform efforts will succeed. Federal support for state efforts may be necessary to achieve national health care reform. History suggests that state-level success precedes national reform. History also suggests that an organized social movement for reform is necessary to overcome opposition from special interest groups. PMID:19299668

  15. "Waiting for Superman" to Save Black People: Racial Representation and the Official Antiracism of Neoliberal School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumas, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The author argues that the documentary, "Waiting for Superman," effectively employs bodies and texts in ways that reproduce hegemonic constructions of race, and more specifically, offers an image and imagination of black engagement in education that reinforces neoliberal-multicultural narratives about black disinterest in, and…

  16. [Perspectives of the Tunisian health system reform].

    PubMed

    Achouri, H

    2001-05-01

    Perspectives of development of the Tunisian health system are presented, in reference to the conceptual framework recommended by the World Health Organization, while a project of health insurance reform of the social security regimes is submitted to a dialogue with the different concerned parts. Recommended orientations articulate around five axes: 1. The promotion of care provision by improving the accessibility to services, notably in zones under served, by introducing new modes of dispensation, organization and management of care provision in the framework of a continuous quality assurance strategy. 2. The financing of health care, with the implementation of the health insurance reform, has to allow an improvement of the financial accessibility of the population to health care, while supervising the evolution of total health expenditures and by developing the system's management capacities. 3. Proposals relative to the mobilization of resources are advanced in areas of medicine, training of health professionals and research on the health system. 4. Adaptation of the health system governance to the new context is necessary and would have to be developed around evolving standards for the health system, on evaluation of its performances and on information and communication with its users. 5. The health system responsiveness, new motion whose contours are again blurred, would have to be analysed and adapted to the specific context of the country. PMID:11515474

  17. Bending the curve through health reform implementation.

    PubMed

    Antos, Joseph; Bertko, John; Chernew, Michael; Cutler, David; de Brantes, Francois; Goldman, Dana; Kocher, Bob; McClellan, Mark; McGlynn, Elizabeth; Pauly, Mark; Shortell, Stephen

    2010-11-01

    In September 2009, we released a set of concrete, feasible steps that could achieve the goal of significantly slowing spending growth while improving the quality of care. We stand by these recommendations, but they need to be updated in light of the new Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Reducing healthcare spending growth remains an urgent and unresolved issue, especially as the ACA expands insurance coverage to 32 million more Americans. Some of our reform recommendations were addressed completely or partially in ACA, and others were not. While more should be done legislatively, the current reform legislation includes important opportunities that will require decisive steps in regulation and execution to fulfill their potential for curbing spending growth. Executing these steps will not be automatic or easy. Yet doing so can achieve a healthcare system based on evidence, meaningful choice, balance between regulation and market forces, and collaboration that will benefit patients and the economy (see Appendix A for a description of these key themes). We focus on three concrete objectives to be reached within the next five years to achieve savings while improving quality across the health system: 1. Speed payment reforms away from traditional volume-based payment systems so that most health payments in this country align better with quality and efficiency. 2. Implement health insurance exchanges and other insurance reforms in ways that assure most Americans are rewarded with substantial savings when they choose plans that offer higher quality care at lower premiums. 3. Reform coverage so that most Americans can save money and obtain other meaningful benefits when they make decisions that improve their health and reduce costs. We believe these are feasible objectives with much progress possible even without further legislation (see Appendix B for a listing of recommendations). However, additional legislation is still needed to support consumers

  18. Health Care Reform: Opportunities for Improving Adolescent Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Charles E., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    Health care reform represents a major step toward achieving the goal of improved preventive and primary care services for all Americans, including children and adolescents. Adolescence is a unique developmental age district from both childhood and adulthood with special vulnerabilities, health concerns, and barriers to accessing health care. It is…

  19. Health system reform in the United States

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, John E

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the United States adopted its first-ever comprehensive set of health system reforms in the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Implementation of the law, though politically contentious and controversial, has now reached a stage where reversal of most elements of the law is no longer feasible. The controversial portions of the law that expand affordable health insurance coverage to most U.S. citizens and legal residents do not offer any important lessons for the global community. The portions of the law seeking to improve the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of medical care as delivered in the U.S., hold lessons for the global community as all nations struggle to gain greater value from the societal resources they invest in medical care for their peoples. Health reform is an ongoing process of planning, legislating, implementing, and evaluating system changes. The U.S. set of delivery system reforms has much for reformers around the globe to assess and consider. PMID:24596894

  20. Welfare Reform and Children's Health.

    PubMed

    Baltagi, Badi H; Yen, Yin-Fang

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of the Temporary Aid to Needy Families (TANF) program on children's health outcomes using data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation over the period 1994 to 2005. The TANF policies have been credited with increased employment for single mothers and a dramatic drop in welfare caseload. Our results show that these policies also had a significant effect on various measures of children's medical utilization among low-income families. These health measures include a rating of the child's health status reported by the parents, the number of times that parents consulted a doctor, and the number of nights that the child stayed in a hospital. We compare the overall changes of health status and medical utilization for children with working and nonworking mothers. We find that the child's health status as reported by the parents is affected by the maternal employment status. PMID:25533889

  1. The impact of health reform on health system spending.

    PubMed

    Cutler, David M; Davis, Karen; Stremikis, Kristof

    2010-05-01

    The health reform legislation passed in March 2010 will introduce a range of payment and delivery system changes designed to achieve a significant slowing of health care cost growth. Most assessments of the new reform law have focused only on the federal budgetary impact. This updated analysis projects the effect of national reform on total national health expenditures and the insurance premiums that American families would likely pay. We estimate that, on net, the combination of provisions in the new law will reduce health care spending by $590 billion over 2010-2019 and lower premiums by nearly $2,000 per family. Moreover, the annual growth rate in national health expenditures could be slowed from 6.3 percent to 5.7 percent. PMID:20491172

  2. Health sector reform in Pakistan: future directions.

    PubMed

    Islam, A

    2002-04-01

    The health care system in Pakistan is beset with numerous problems--structural fragmentation, gender insensitivity, resource scarcity, inefficiency and lack of functional specificity and accessibility. Faced with a precarious economic situation characterized by heavy external debt and faltering productivity, Pakistan's room to maneuver with health sector reform is quite limited. Although the recently announced Devolution Plan provides a window of opportunity, it must go beyond and introduce far-reaching changes in the health and social sectors. Regionalization of health care services in an integrated manner with functional specificity for each level of care is an essential step. Integration of current vertical programs within the framework of a need-based comprehensive primary health care system is another necessary step. Most importantly, fostering a public-private partnership to share the cost of basic primary health care and public health services must be an integral part of any reform. Pakistan must also make the health care system more gender sensitive through appropriate training programs for the service providers along with wide community participation in decision-making processes. Relevant WHO/World Bank/UNDP developed tools could be extremely useful in this respect. The article is based on a critical analysis of secondary data from the public domain as well as from various research projects undertaken by the Aga Khan University. It also draws from the experiences of health sector reform carried out in other countries, particularly those in the Asia-Pacific region. The purpose is to inform and hopefully influence, public policy as the country moves towards devolution. PMID:12174483

  3. Health services reforms in revolutionary Nicaragua.

    PubMed Central

    Garfield, R M; Taboada, E

    1984-01-01

    Before the Nicaraguan revolution of 1979, access to health services was largely limited to the affluent sectors of the urban population and the minority of workers with social security coverage. Repeated attempts at reform by organized medicine were ineffective. Since the revolution, a tremendous expansion in health services has occurred. The national health system receives approximately one-third of its funds from the social security system. Steadily increasing equity in access is a result of the promotion of primary care, health campaigns involving up to 10 per cent of the general population as volunteers, the use of paramedical aides, and foreign assistance. Private practice nevertheless remains strong. In the coming years, several complex issues must be examined, including: a balance in the number of nurses and doctors trained, the role of private practice, and the relationship of the Ministry of Health to the social security system. Further progress in health reforms may be delayed by the defensive war which Nicaragua is fighting on its northern and southern borders. Despite emergent health problems in the war zones, most of the innovative aspects of the health system remain intact as of this writing. PMID:6476169

  4. Health care reform: a short summary.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay

    2010-09-01

    The Health Care Reform legislation has many provisions of importance to the nuclear medicine community. This article is not a complete summary of the thousands of pages in the legislation, but emphasizes some relevant aspects of the bills. When the plan is fully implemented, about 32 million more Americans will have health insurance. Pre-existing medical conditions will no longer result in insurance denials. There are many initiatives to slow the growth of spending on health care in various ways, such as by setting up the new Medicare Advisory Board. There are also new fees, taxes, penalties, subsidies, and tax deduction changes. PMID:20706044

  5. Mandate-based health reform and the labor market: Evidence from the Massachusetts reform.

    PubMed

    Kolstad, Jonathan T; Kowalski, Amanda E

    2016-05-01

    We model the labor market impact of the key provisions of the national and Massachusetts "mandate-based" health reforms: individual mandates, employer mandates, and subsidies. We characterize the compensating differential for employer-sponsored health insurance (ESHI) and the welfare impact of reform in terms of "sufficient statistics." We compare welfare under mandate-based reform to welfare in a counterfactual world where individuals do not value ESHI. Relying on the Massachusetts reform, we find that jobs with ESHI pay $2812 less annually, somewhat less than the cost of ESHI to employers. Accordingly, the deadweight loss of mandate-based health reform was approximately 8 percent of its potential size. PMID:27037897

  6. Reforming the Israeli health care market.

    PubMed

    Chinitz, D P

    1994-11-01

    Israel's experience in attempting to implement a health system reform based in large measure on managed competition should provide important data to other countries considering reliance on competitive mechanisms for third-party purchase of health care. In this paper, current proposals for reform of the Israeli market for third-party purchase of health care are examined in light of ideal market structures, particularly the theory of managed competition. The relationship between the theory, the notion of a 'purchaser-provider split' and the Israeli case are explored. The current Israeli health care market, which features enrollment of 96% of the population in competing sick funds, is presented. The changes necessary to base third-party purchase of health-care on managed competition are discussed. Special conditions of the Israeli health care system likely to influence implementation of a managed competition strategy are considered. Beyond a 'purchaser-provider' split, the proposals call for other restructurings, such as a split between finance and insurance functions, which the standard theory of managed competition does not take into account. The implications of these proposals for smooth functioning of the health care market must be weighed against political and ethical considerations unique to the Israeli environment. PMID:7863357

  7. Health reform: getting the essentials right.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Victor R

    2009-01-01

    As the ninety-year history and failure of health care reform illustrates, it is easy for policymakers to disagree about the details of any new plan. In this Perspective, the author suggests trying a new approach this time: enacting a plan that encompasses four essential principles and then making midcourse adjustments later to get the details right. He defines the essentials as the Four Cs: coverage, cost control, coordinated care, and choice. PMID:19151005

  8. Reform of health care in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Jeremy W.

    1991-01-01

    For the past 45 years Germany has had two health care systems: one in the former Federal Republic of Germany and one in the former German Democratic Republic. The system in the Federal Republic was undergoing some important reforms when German reunification took place in October 1990. Now the system in eastern Germany is undergoing a major transformation to bring it more into line with that in western Germany. PMID:10110879

  9. Health care reform: motivation for discrimination?

    PubMed

    Navin, J C; Pettit, M A

    1995-01-01

    One of the major issues in the health care reform debate is the requirement that employers pay a portion of their employees' health insurance premiums. This paper examines the method for calculating the employer share of the health care premiums, as specified in the President's health care reform proposal. The calculation of the firm's cost of providing employee health care benefits is a function of marital status as well as the incidence of two-income earner households. This paper demonstrates that this method provides for lower than average premiums for married employees with no dependents in communities in which there is at least one married couple where both individuals participate in the labor market. This raises the non-wage labor costs of employing single individuals relative to individuals which are identical in every respect except their marital status. This paper explores the economic implications for hiring, as well as profits, for firms located in a perfectly-competitive industry. The results of the theoretical model presented here are clear. Under this proposed version of health care reform, ceteris paribus, firms have a clear preference for two-earner households. This paper also demonstrates that the incentive to discriminate is related to the size of the firm and to the size of the average wage of full-time employees for firms which employ fewer than fifty individuals. While this paper examines the specifics of President Clinton's original proposal, the conclusions reached here would apply to any form of employer-mandated coverage in which the premiums are a function of family status and the incidence of two-earner households. PMID:7613598

  10. Health Card: a new reform plan.

    PubMed

    Seidman, L S

    1995-01-01

    Health Card is a new reform plan. Every household, regardless of employment of health status, would receive a government-issued health credit card to use at the doctor's office or hospital like MasterCard. Later, it would be billed a percentage of the provider's charge--a percentage scaled to its last income tax return; its annual burden would never exceed a designated percentage of its income. Health Card would simply and directly achieve universal coverage and equitable patient cost-sharing. Like MasterCard, government would pay bills, not regulate providers. Each household would choose its medical provider (fee-for-service or HMO), bearing a percentage of the charge. Provider competition for cost-sharing consumers would help contain health care costs. PMID:10144242

  11. Health care reform and changes: the Malaysian experience.

    PubMed

    Merican, Mohd Ismail; bin Yon, Rohaizat

    2002-01-01

    Health care reform is an intentional, sustained and systematic process of structural change to one or more health subsystems to improve efficiency, effectiveness, patient choices and equity. Health care all over the world is continuously reforming with time. Health care reform has become an increasingly important agenda for policy change in both developed and developing countries including Malaysia. This paper provides an overview of the Malaysian health care system, its achievements, and issues and challenges leading to ongoing reform towards a more efficient and equitable health care system that possess a better quality of life for the population. PMID:12597513

  12. What Health Care Reform Means for Immigrants: Comparing the Affordable Care Act and Massachusetts Health Reforms.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Tiffany D

    2016-02-01

    The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed to provide more affordable health coverage to Americans beginning in 2014. Modeled after the 2006 Massachusetts health care reform, the ACA includes an individual mandate, Medicaid expansion, and health exchanges through which middle-income individuals can purchase coverage from private insurance companies. However, while the ACA provisions exclude all undocumented and some documented immigrants, Massachusetts uses state and hospital funds to extend coverage to these groups. This article examines the ACA reform using the Massachusetts reform as a comparative case study to outline how citizenship status influences individuals' coverage options under both policies. The article then briefly discusses other states that provide coverage to ACA-ineligible immigrants and the implications of uneven ACA implementation for immigrants and citizens nationwide. PMID:26567382

  13. [Health reform, equity and the right to health in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Mario

    2002-01-01

    The author develops a long-term perspective to assess advances in equity and the right to health in the Colombian health system reform. In a restricted political system, actors in the field of health in Colombia have chosen individualistic alternatives to legalize inequities in individual purchasing power for services. Despite the complex regulations established in the General System for Social Security in Health, there is a trend towards consolidating traditional inequities and to further restrict opportunities for achieving the right to health with full, equitable, universal guarantees. PMID:12118306

  14. Poverty, food security and universal access to sexual and reproductive health services: a call for cross-movement advocacy against neoliberal globalisation.

    PubMed

    Sundari Ravindran, T K

    2014-05-01

    Universal access to sexual and reproductive health services is one of the goals of the International Conference on Population and Development of 1994. The Millennium Development Goals were intended above all to end poverty. Universal access to health and health services are among the goals being considered for the post-2015 agenda, replacing or augmenting the MDGs. Yet we are not only far from reaching any of these goals but also appear to have lost our way somewhere along the line. Poverty and lack of food security have, through their multiple linkages to health and access to health care, deterred progress towards universal access to health services, including for sexual and reproductive health needs. A more insidious influence is neoliberal globalisation. This paper describes neoliberal globalisation and the economic policies it has engendered, the ways in which it influences poverty and food security, and the often unequal impact it has had on women as compared to men. It explores the effects of neoliberal economic policies on health, health systems, and universal access to health care services, and the implications for access to sexual and reproductive health. To be an advocate for universal access to health and health care is to become an advocate against neoliberal globalisation. PMID:24908453

  15. Shifting subjects of health-care: placing "medical tourism" in the context of Malaysian domestic health-care reform.

    PubMed

    Ormond, Meghann

    2011-01-01

    "Medical tourism" has frequently been held to unsettle naturalised relationships between the state and its citizenry. Yet in casting "medical tourism" as either an outside "innovation" or "invasion," scholars have often ignored the role that the neoliberal retrenchment of social welfare structures has played in shaping the domestic health-care systems of the "developing" countries recognised as international medical travel destinations. While there is little doubt that "medical tourism" impacts destinations' health-care systems, it remains essential to contextualise them. This paper offers a reading of the emergence of "medical tourism" from within the context of ongoing health-care privatisation reform in one of today's most prominent destinations: Malaysia. It argues that "medical tourism" to Malaysia has been mobilised politically both to advance domestic health-care reform and to cast off the country's "underdeveloped" image not only among foreign patient-consumers but also among its own nationals, who are themselves increasingly envisioned by the Malaysian state as prospective health-care consumers. PMID:22216474

  16. Health care reforms: the unfinished agenda.

    PubMed

    Defever, M

    1995-10-01

    A number of similar trends emerge in the development of major reform programs in all Western societies: (1) convergence and divergence: whether intentionally or not, the reform programs follow the proposed general directions across countries. This convergence is challenged by an opposite trend towards divergence through regionalization; (2) politics: the interference of the political process and of government coalitions is manifest in health policy making; (3) competition: the movement away from the public integrated model towards the public contract model is occurring in National Health Service type systems as well as in Health Insurance Systems; (4) privatization: the increase of the private sector is encouraged in all European countries by a variety of mechanisms such as opting-out and tax concessions; (5) inequity: gains in efficiency entail a decrease in availability and accessibility of high quality care among the different population groups; (6) management costs: cost-containment efforts lead to an increase in management costs especially of management information both in real money and human resources; (7) power shifts: there is a reorientation of the flux of money throughout the system with shifts in authority away from the traditional power groups; and (8) public deficits: concern about the reduction of public deficits prevails over cost-effectiveness, or macro-efficiency prevails over micro-efficiency. PMID:10151962

  17. Health reform and the quality assurance imperative.

    PubMed

    Webber, A

    The administration's blueprint for healthcare reform contains a number of positive features, including a national healthcare information database, quality "report cards," and state-based patient complaint offices. Missing from the plan, however, is "an active quality monitoring system that holds health plans and providers publicly accountable for improved performance," says Andrew Webber, Executive Vice President of the American Medical Peer Review Association, the national association of Peer Review Organizations (PROs). His antidote includes the creation of an independent, state-based network to coordinate quality assurance activities; a program to monitor compliance with practice guidelines; and a quality foundation to measure, manage, improve, and oversee quality. PMID:10131335

  18. School Readiness Goal Begins with Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1992-01-01

    Currently 59 bills are awaiting Congressional action. Meanwhile, a national coalition of economists and medical specialists (the National Leadership Coalition for Health Care Reform) are circulating a sensible consensus health reform plan proposing national practice guidelines; universal health care access; and efficient cost control, delivery,…

  19. Nursing leadership and health sector reform.

    PubMed

    Borthwick, C; Galbally, R

    2001-06-01

    The political, technological and economic changes that have occurred over the past decade are increasingly difficult to manage within the traditional framework of health-care, and the organisation of health-care is seen to need radical reform to sweep away many of the internal barriers that now divide one form of health-care, and one profession, from another. Nursing must equip itself with skills in advocacy and political action to influence the direction the system will take. Nursing currently suffers from a weakness in self-concept that goes hand in hand with a weakness in political status, and nursing leadership must build the foundations for both advocacy for others and self-advocacy for the nursing movement. The profession faces tensions between different conceptions of its role and status, its relationship to medicine, and its relationship to health. Health indices are tightly linked to status, and to trust, hope, and control of one's own life. Can nurses help empower others when they are not particularly good at empowering themselves? What will the role of the nurse be in creating the information flows that will guide people toward health? Nursing's long history of adaptation to an unsettled and negotiated status may mean that it is better fitted to make this adaptation than other more confident disciplines. PMID:11882205

  20. Regulatory reform proposals and the public health.

    PubMed Central

    Buffler, P A; Kyle, A D

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Congress is considering legislation that would change policy for environmental health in important ways. Current approaches have been criticized for addressing the wrong set of priorities and consuming too many resources. The legislation requires additional analyses and sets new decision criteria to be applied to federal agency actions taken to protect the environment and public health. Close review of the legislation suggests that though it is intended to address identified problems, it is unlikely to lead to an improved basis for public policy and is likely to paralyze the regulatory process. Reform proposals that reduce rather than increase fragmentation of decision-making and that address problems comprehensively rather than selectively are needed. PMID:8732938

  1. Health Education: What Can It Look Like after Health Care Reform? 1993 SOPHE Presidential Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Cynthia M.

    1994-01-01

    In plans for health care reform, the role of health education in reducing risk behaviors associated with leading causes of death must be recognized. Reform offers new opportunities for prevention programs in schools, worksites, and communities. (SK)

  2. The Potential Impact of Health Care Reform on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reace, Diana

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 522 colleges and universities investigated the impact of health care reform proposals. Results provide an overview of typical current medical plan design, including coverage for part- and full-time employees, and give insight into attitudes toward the idea of regional health alliances, a potentially useful reform approach. (MSE)

  3. Oncology payment reform to achieve real health care reform.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Mark B; Thoumi, Andrea I

    2015-05-01

    Cancer care is transforming, moving toward increasingly personalized treatment with the potential to save and improve many more lives. Many oncologists and policymakers view current fee-for-service payments as an obstacle to providing more efficient, high-quality cancer care. However, payment reforms create new uncertainties for oncologists and may be challenging to implement. In this article, we illustrate how accountable care payment reforms that directly align payments with quality and cost measures are being implemented and the opportunities and challenges they present. These payment models provide more flexibility to oncologists and other providers to give patients the personalized care they need, along with more accountability for demonstrating quality improvements and overall cost or cost growth reductions. Such payment reforms increase the importance of person-level quality and cost measures as well as data analysis to improve measured performance. We describe key features of quality and cost measures needed to support accountable care payment reforms in oncology. Finally, we propose policy recommendations to move incrementally but fundamentally to payment systems that support higher-value care in oncology. PMID:25901049

  4. Welfare reform, substance use, and mental health.

    PubMed

    Jayakody, R; Danziger, S; Pollack, H

    2000-08-01

    Reform has transformed traditional entitlement to cash welfare under Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) into a transitional program known as Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF). Because of the new work requirements and the time-limited nature of assistance, policy makers are increasingly confronted with what to do when welfare recipients do not effectively make the transition from welfare to work. Increasingly, the language of public health is being used to determine who is "employable" and who is not. Thus renewed attention is being focused on the individual characteristics of participants themselves, particularly specific diagnoses that might reduce employability. This article focuses on substance abuse and mental health problems among single mothers and examines their relationship to welfare receipt. We analyze data from the 1994 and 1995 National Household Survey of Drug Abuse (NHSDA) and find that 19 percent of welfare recipients meet the criteria for a DSM-III-R (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, third edition revised) psychiatric diagnosis. About the same percentage have used illicit drugs during the previous year. Logistic regression results indicate that mental and behavioral health problems that are significant barriers to self-sufficiency are increasingly important in this era of time-limited benefits. PMID:10979515

  5. Where does the insurance industry stand on health reform today?

    PubMed

    Bodaken, Bruce G

    2008-01-01

    With another national health care debate on the horizon, many assume that health plans will present a major source of opposition to universal coverage and other reforms. But a closer look reveals signs of change. Some plans continue their reflexive opposition to increasing government's role in health care; other plans have stepped forward to advocate meaningful reform. Experience in Massachusetts, California, Minnesota, and elsewhere suggests a clear lesson for policymakers. Sensible proposals and a genuine commitment to cooperation can not only neutralize opposition from a potentially powerful opponent, but can actually bring health plans on board to support coverage mandates, guaranteed issue, and other reforms. PMID:18474954

  6. Policy Capacity for Health Reform: Necessary but Insufficient: Comment on "Health Reform Requires Policy Capacity".

    PubMed

    Adams, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Forest and colleagues have persuasively made the case that policy capacity is a fundamental prerequisite to health reform. They offer a comprehensive life-cycle definition of policy capacity and stress that it involves much more than problem identification and option development. I would like to offer a Canadian perspective. If we define health reform as re-orienting the health system from acute care to prevention and chronic disease management the consensus is that Canada has been unsuccessful in achieving a major transformation of our 14 health systems (one for each province and territory plus the federal government). I argue that 3 additional things are essential to build health policy capacity in a healthcare federation such as Canada: (a) A means of "policy governance" that would promote an approach to cooperative federalism in the health arena; (b) The ability to overcome the "policy inertia" resulting from how Canadian Medicare was implemented and subsequently interpreted; and (c) The ability to entertain a long-range thinking and planning horizon. My assessment indicates that Canada falls short on each of these items, and the prospects for achieving them are not bright. However, hope springs eternal and it will be interesting to see if the July, 2015 report of the Advisory Panel on Healthcare Innovation manages to galvanize national attention and stimulate concerted action. PMID:26673650

  7. Politics, class actors, and health sector reform in Brazil and Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Qamar; Muntaner, Carles

    2013-03-01

    Universal access to healthcare has assumed renewed importance in global health discourse, along with a focus on strengthening health systems. These developments are taking place in the backdrop of concerted efforts to advocate moving away from vertical, disease-based approaches to tackling health problems. While this approach to addressing public health problems is a step in the right direction, there is still insufficient emphasis on understanding the socio-political context of health systems. Reforms to strengthen health systems and achieve universal access to healthcare should be cognizant of the importance of the socio-political context, especially state-society relations. That context determines the nature and trajectory of reforms promoting universality or any pro-equity change. Brazil and Venezuela in recent years have made progress in developing healthcare systems that aim to achieve universal access. These achievements are noteworthy given that, historically, both countries had a long tradition of healthcare systems which were highly privatized and geared towards access to healthcare for a small segment of the population while the majority was excluded. These achievements are also remarkable since they took place in an era of neoliberalism when many states, even those with universally-based healthcare systems, were moving in the opposite direction. We analyze the socio-political context in each of these countries and look specifically at how the changing state-society relations resulted in health being constitutionally recognized as a social right. We describe the challenges that each faced in developing and implementing healthcare systems embracing universality. Our contention is that achieving the principle of universality in healthcare systems is less of a technical matter and more a political project. It involves opposition from the socially conservative elements in the society. Navigation to achieve this goal requires a political strategy that

  8. Neoliberalism, Emotional Experience in Education and Adam Smith: Reading "The Theory of Moral Sentiments" Alongside "The Wealth of Nations"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanley, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines some critical accounts of emotional life shaped by neoliberalism. A range of literature concerned with neoliberalism and emotional experience in educational contexts is reviewed. I argue that neoliberal "reforms" in public institutions create an ever-increasing demand for emotional performance. Neoliberals often refer…

  9. Welfare Reform and Health Insurance of Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Neeraj; Kaestner, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) on the health insurance coverage of foreign- and U.S.-born families headed by low-educated women. Data Source Secondary data from the March series of the Current Population Surveys for 1994–2001. Study Design Multivariate regression methods and a pre- and post-test with comparison group research design (difference-in-differences) are used to estimate the effect of welfare reform on the health insurance coverage of low-educated, foreign- and U.S.-born unmarried women and their children. Heterogenous responses by states to create substitute Temporary Aid to Needy Families or Medicaid programs for newly arrived immigrants are used to investigate whether the estimated effect of PRWORA on newly arrived immigrants is related to the actual provisions of the law, or the result of fears engendered by the law. Principal Findings PRWORA increased the proportion of uninsured among low-educated, foreign-born, unmarried women by 9.9–10.7 percentage points. In contrast, the effect of PRWORA on the health insurance coverage of similar U.S.-born women is negligible. PRWORA also increased the proportion of uninsured among foreign-born children living with low-educated, single mothers by 13.5 percentage points. Again, the policy had little effect on the health insurance coverage of the children of U.S.-born, low-educated single mothers. There is some evidence that the fear and uncertainty engendered by the law had an effect on immigrant health insurance coverage. Conclusions This research demonstrates that PRWORA adversely affected the health insurance of low-educated, unmarried, immigrant women and their children. In the case of unmarried women, it may be partly because the jobs that they obtained in response to PRWORA were less likely to provide health insurance. The research also suggests that PRWORA may have engendered fear among immigrants and dampened their

  10. Where dentistry stands in light of health care reform.

    PubMed

    Collignon, B H

    1994-01-01

    The hot topic from Capitol Hill in Washington to Capitol Hill in Jefferson City is health care reform. President Clinton started the ball rolling during the campaign in 1992 by including health care reform in his platform. He continued the effort after his election by appointing his wife, Hillary, to chair a task force to present an outline for federal legislation. Since the package was presented to Congress, there has been much discussion, lobbying, and rumoring about the implications of health care reform and what it could mean to all of us as dentists. On the home front, Governor Carnahan has introduced legislation in Missouri to reform the health care system. This effort is known as the Missouri Health Assurance Plan (H.B. 1622). Missouri Dental Association members are vitally concerned about the impact of health care reform on their practice, their taxes, their relationship with their patients and employees, and on their ability to seek out health care services since each member is also a consumer of health care. This article represents answers to some of the questions being asked by MDA members in order that they might be more aware of the activities by the MDA, the ADA, and other levels of organized dentistry relating to health care reform. PMID:9564299

  11. Online Simulation of Health Care Reform: Helping Health Educators Learn and Participate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jecklin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Young and healthy undergraduates in health education were not predisposed to learn the complex sprawl of topics in a required course on U.S. Health Care. An online simulation of health care reform was used to encourage student learning about health care and participating in health care reform. Students applied their understanding of high costs,…

  12. Stakeholder learning for health sector reform in Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Simone; Pholsena, Soulivanh; Gao, Jun; Oliveira Cruz, Valeria

    2016-09-01

    Development organizations and academic institutions have expressed the need for increased research to guide the development and implementation of policies to strengthen health systems in low- and middle-income countries. The extent to which evidence-based policies alone can produce changes in health systems remains a point of debate; other factors, such as a country's political climate and the level of actor engagement, have been identified as influential variables in effective policy development and implementation. In response to this debate, this article contends that the success of health sector reform depends largely on policy learning-the degree to which research recommendations saturate a given political environment in order to successfully inform the ideas, opinions and perceived interests of relevant actors. Using a stakeholder analysis approach to analyze the case of health sector reform in Lao PDR, we examine the ways that actors' understanding and interests affect the success of reform-and how attitudes towards reform can be shaped by exposure to policy research and international health policy priorities. The stakeholder analysis was conducted by the WHO during the early stages of health sector reform in Lao PDR, with the purpose of providing the Ministry of Health with concrete recommendations for increasing actor involvement and strengthening stakeholder support. We found that dissemination of research findings to a broad array of actors and the inclusion of diverse stakeholder groups in policy design and implementation increases the probability of a sustainable and successful health sector reform. PMID:27008856

  13. Working on reform. How workers' compensation medical care is affected by health care reform.

    PubMed Central

    Himmelstein, J; Rest, K

    1996-01-01

    The medical component of workers' compensation programs-now costing over $24 billion annually-and the rest of the nation's medical care system are linked. They share the same patients and providers. They provide similar benefits and services. And they struggle over who should pay for what. Clearly, health care reform and restructuring will have a major impact on the operation and expenditures of the workers' compensation system. For a brief period, during the 1994 national health care reform debate, these two systems were part of the same federal policy development and legislative process. With comprehensive health care reform no longer on the horizon, states now are tackling both workers' compensation and medical system reforms on their own. This paper reviews the major issues federal and state policy makers face as they consider reforms affecting the relationship between workers' compensation and traditional health insurance. What is the relationship of the workers' compensation cost crisis to that in general health care? What strategies are being considered by states involved in reforming the medical component of workers compensation? What are the major policy implications of these strategies? Images p13-a p14-a p15-a p16-a p18-a p19-a p20-a p22-a p24-a PMID:8610187

  14. Evaluation of health care system reform in Hubei Province, China.

    PubMed

    Sang, Shuping; Wang, Zhenkun; Yu, Chuanhua

    2014-02-01

    This study established a set of indicators for and evaluated the effects of health care system reform in Hubei Province (China) from 2009 to 2011 with the purpose of providing guidance to policy-makers regarding health care system reform. The resulting indicators are based on the "Result Chain" logic model and include the following four domains: Inputs and Processes, Outputs, Outcomes and Impact. Health care system reform was evaluated using the weighted TOPSIS and weighted Rank Sum Ratio methods. Ultimately, the study established a set of indicators including four grade-1 indicators, 16 grade-2 indicators and 76 grade-3 indicators. The effects of the reforms increased year by year from 2009 to 2011 in Hubei Province. The health status of urban and rural populations and the accessibility, equity and quality of health services in Hubei Province were improved after the reforms. This sub-national case can be considered an example of a useful approach to the evaluation of the effects of health care system reform, one that could potentially be applied in other provinces or nationally. PMID:24566052

  15. Health reform in Finland: current proposals and unresolved challenges.

    PubMed

    Saltman, Richard B; Teperi, Juha

    2016-07-01

    The Finnish health care system is widely respected for its pilot role in creating primary-care-led health systems. In the early 1990s, however, a severe economic downturn in Finland reduced public funding and weakened the Finnish system's deeply decentralized model of health care administration. Recent Bank of Finland projections forecasting several decades of slow economic growth, combined with the impact of an aging population, appear to make major reform of the existing public system inevitable. Over the last several years, political attention has focused mostly on administrative consolidation inside the public sector, particularly integration of health and social services. Current proposals call for a reformed health sector governance structure based on a new meso-level configuration of public administration. In addition, Finland's national government has proposed replacing the current multi-channel public funding structure (which includes health insurance subsidies for occupational health services) with a single-channel public funding structure. This commentary examines several key issues involved in reforming the delivery structure of the Finnish health care system. It also explores possible alternative strategies to reform current funding arrangements. The article concludes with a brief discussion of implications from this Finnish experience for the wider health reform debate. PMID:26865494

  16. [Health system reforms in South America: an opportunity for UNASUR].

    PubMed

    Gomes-Temporão, José; Faria, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Health systems in South America still support segmentation, privatization and fragmentation. Health reforms of the structural adjustment programs in the 1980s and 1990s in South America followed different purposes and strategies ranging from privatization, commodification and state intervention for the implementation of a national public health service with universal access as a right of the citizens. Since the 2000s, many countries have expanded social policies, reduced poverty and social inequalities, and improved access to healthcare. This article proposes to discuss the health systems in South America from historical and political backgrounds, and the progress from the reforms in the last three decades. It also presents the three paradigmatic models of reform and their evolution, as well as the contrasts between universal coverage and universal systems. Finally, it presents current strengths and weaknesses of the twelve South American health systems as well as current opportunities and challenges in health for UNASUR. PMID:25597728

  17. The recent health reform in Croatia: true reforms or just a fundraising exercise?

    PubMed

    Svaljek, Sandra

    2014-03-01

    Croatia's most recent reform of the healthcare system was implemented in 2008. The aim of the reform was to enhance financial stability of the system by introducing additional sources of financing, as well as increase the efficiency of the system by reducing sick pay transfers to households, rationalising spending on pharmaceuticals, restructuring hospitals etc. This paper attempts to assess the success of the 2008 healthcare system reform in reaching financial stability and sustainability, and to evaluate the effects of the reform on equity in funding the system. It takes into account the fact that the reform coincided with a severe economic crisis and decline in the overall living standard of Croatian citizens. The paper shows that the reform ended up being expansionary and thus impaired the necessary fiscal adjustment. Finally, it is argued that in circumstances of declining disposable incomes, increased co-payments aimed at the financial stabilisation of the health system made health services less affordable and could have had detrimental effects on equity in the utilisation of health care. PMID:24138731

  18. The Chilean health system: 20 years of reforms.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Annick

    2002-01-01

    The Chilean health care system has been intensively reformed in the past 20 years. Reforms under the Pinochet government (1973-1990) aimed mainly at the decentralization of the system and the development of a private sector. Decentralization involved both a deconcentration process and the devolution of primary health care to municipalities. The democratic governments after 1990 chose to preserve the core organization but introduced reforms intended to correct the system's failures and to increase both efficiency and equity. The present article briefly explains the current organization of the Chilean health care system. It also reviews the different reforms introduced in the past 20 years, from the Pinochet regime to the democratic governments. Finally, a brief discussion describes the strengths and weaknesses of the system, as well as the challenges it currently faces. PMID:11910721

  19. An overview of changing agendas in health sector reforms.

    PubMed

    Standing, Hilary

    2002-11-01

    This paper discusses health sector reforms and what they have meant for sexual and reproductive health advocacy in low-income countries. Beginning in the late 1980s, it outlines the main macro-economic shifts and policy trends which affect countries dependent on external aid and the main health sector reforms taking place. It then considers the implications of successive macro-economic and reform agendas for reproductive and sexual health advocacy. International debate today is focused on the conditions necessary for socio-economic development and the role of governments in these, and how to improve the performance of health sector bureaucracies and delivery systems. A critical challenge is how to re-negotiate the policy and financial space for sexual and reproductive health services within national health systems and at international level. Advocacy for sexual and reproductive health has to tread the line between a vision of reproductive health for all and action on priority conditions, which means articulating an informed view on needs and priorities. In pressing for greater funding for reproductive health, advocates need to find an appropriate balance between concern with health systems strengthening and service delivery and programmes, and create alliances with progressive health sector reformers. PMID:12557639

  20. 75 FR 24470 - Health Care Reform Insurance Web Portal Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary 45 CFR Part 159 RIN 0991-AB63 Health Care Reform Insurance Web... that may be available to them in their State. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)...

  1. National Health Care Reform, Medicaid, and Children in Foster Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfon, Neal; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Outlines access to health care for children in out-of-home care under current law, reviews how health care access for these children would be affected by President Clinton's health care reform initiative, and proposes additional measures that could be considered to improve access and service coordination for children in the child welfare system.…

  2. Health Care Reform: How Will It Impact You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukaszewski, Thomas

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the impact of health care reform on child-care centers and child-care employees. Topics covered include requirements to provide health insurance for all employees; subsidies for businesses with fewer than 50 employees; subsidies for low income employees; family coverage; health are costs for 2 working parents; and costs to day-care…

  3. Mental health reform, economic globalization and the practice of citizenship.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Marina

    2004-01-01

    Drawing on research conducted in British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec it is argued that tension exists between mental health reforms born out of concern for the well-being and care of people and those that are being driven by cost-containment and efficiency. Contributing to this tension are competing discourses about mental health and mental illness. It is argued that progressive change requires the meaningful engagement of mental health care recipients in policy decision-making processes and ongoing analysis about the interconnections between economic globalization, social welfare state restructuring and mental health reform. PMID:16138645

  4. Health Care Reform and Social Movements in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Beatrix

    2003-01-01

    Because of the importance of grassroots social movements, or “change from below,” in the history of US reform, the relationship between social movements and demands for universal health care is a critical one. National health reform campaigns in the 20th century were initiated and run by elites more concerned with defending against attacks from interest groups than with popular mobilization, and grassroots reformers in the labor, civil rights, feminist, and AIDS activist movements have concentrated more on immediate and incremental changes than on transforming the health care system itself. However, grassroots health care demands have also contained the seeds of a wider critique of the American health care system, leading some movements to adopt calls for universal coverage. PMID:12511390

  5. Health Care Reform and Social Movements in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Beatrix

    2008-01-01

    Because of the importance of grassroots social movements, or “change from below,” in the history of US reform, the relationship between social movements and demands for universal health care is a critical one. National health reform campaigns in the 20th century were initiated and run by elites more concerned with defending against attacks from interest groups than with popular mobilization, and grassroots reformers in the labor, civil rights, feminist, and AIDS activist movements have concentrated more on immediate and incremental changes than on transforming the health care system itself. However, grassroots health care demands have also contained the seeds of a wider critique of the American health care system, leading some movements to adopt calls for universal coverage. PMID:18687625

  6. Final report of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission: will we get the health care governance reform we need?

    PubMed

    Stoelwinder, Johannes U

    2009-10-01

    The National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission (NHHRC) has recommended that Australia develop a "single health system", governed by the federal government. Steps to achieving this include: a "Healthy Australia Accord" to agree on the reform framework; the progressive takeover of funding of public hospitals by the federal government; and the possible implementation of a consumer-choice health funding model, called "Medicare Select". These proposals face significant implementation issues, and the final solution needs to deal with both financial and political sustainability. If the federal and state governments cannot agree on a reform plan, the Prime Minister may need to go to the electorate for a mandate, which may be shaped by other economic issues such as tax reform and intergenerational challenges. PMID:19807630

  7. Health reform: setting the agenda for long term care.

    PubMed

    Hatch, O G; Wofford, H; Willging, P R; Pomeroy, E

    1993-06-01

    The White House Task Force on National Health Care Reform, headed by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, is expected to release its prescription for health care reform this month. From the outset, Clinton's mandate was clear: to provide universal coverage while reining in costs for delivering quality health care. Before President Clinton was even sworn into office, he had outlined the major principles that would shape the health reform debate. Global budgeting would establish limits on all health care expenditures, thereby containing health costs. Under a system of managed competition, employers would form health alliances for consumers to negotiate for cost-effective health care at the community level. So far, a basic approach to health care reform has emerged. A key element is universal coverage--with an emphasis on acute, preventive, and mental health care. Other likely pieces are employer-employee contributions to health care plans, laws that guarantee continued coverage if an individual changes jobs or becomes ill, and health insurance alliances that would help assure individual access to low-cost health care. What still is not clear is the extent to which long term care will be included in the basic benefits package. A confidential report circulated by the task force last month includes four options for long term care: incremental Medicaid reform; a new federal/state program to replace Medicaid; a social insurance program for home and community-based services; or full social insurance for long term care. Some work group members have identified an additional option: prefunded long term care insurance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10126659

  8. Neoliberalism, Performance and the Assessment of Research Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besley, A. C.; Peters, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a critical discussion of the neoliberal reforms of higher education focusing on new managerialism and New Public Management. It also distinguishes between democratic and market accountability regimes, examining how the former arise from classical liberalism and the latter from neoliberalism. The article then examines…

  9. Implications of health reform for retiree health benefits.

    PubMed

    Fronstin, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This Issue Brief examines how current health reform legislation being debated in Congress will impact the future of retiree health benefits. In general, the proposals' provisions will have a mixed impact on retiree health benefits: In the short term, the reinsurance provisions would help shore up early retiree coverage and Medicare Part D coverage would become more valuable to retirees. In the longer term, insurance reform combined with new subsidies for individuals enrolling for coverage through insurance exchanges, the maintenance-of-effort provision affecting early retiree benefits, increases to the cost of providing drug benefits to retirees, and enhanced Medicare Part D coverage, would all create significant incentives for employers to drop coverage for early retirees and drug coverage for Medicare-eligible retirees. REINSURANCE PROGRAM FOR EARLY RETIREES: Proposed legislation includes a provision to create a temporary reinsurance program for employers providing health benefits to retirees over age 55 and not yet eligible for Medicare. Given the temporary nature of the program, it is intended to provide employers an incentive to maintain benefits until the health insurance exchange is fully operational. At that point, employers will have less incentive to provide health benefits to early retirees, and retirees will have less need for former employers to maintain a program. MEDICARE DRUG BENEFITS: The House-passed bill would initially reduce the coverage gap (the so-called "doughnut hole") for individuals in the Medicare Part D program by $500 and eliminate it altogether by 2019. The bill currently before the Senate would also reduce the coverage gap by $500, but does not call for eliminating it. Both would also provide a 50 percent discount to brand-name drug coverage in the coverage gap. These provisions increase the value of the Medicare Part D drug program to Medicare-eligible beneficiaries relative to drug benefits provided by employers. TAX TREATMENT OF

  10. The implications of health sector reform for human resources development.

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Ala'; Hornby, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The authors argue that "health for all" is not achievable in most countries without health sector reform that incorporates a process of coordinated health and human resources development. They examine the situation in countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region of the World Health Organization. Though advances have been made, further progress is inhibited by the limited adaptation of traditional health service structures and processes in many of these countries. National reform strategies are needed. These require the active participation of health professional associations and academic training institutions as well as health service managers. The paper indicates some of the initiatives required and suggests that the starting point for many countries should be a rigorous appraisal of the current state of human resources development in health. PMID:11884974

  11. Regulatory system reform of occupational health and safety in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenghong; Chi, Yan

    2015-01-01

    With the explosive economic growth and social development, China's regulatory system of occupational health and safety now faces more and more challenges. This article reviews the history of regulatory system of occupational health and safety in China, as well as the current reform of this regulatory system in the country. Comprehensive, a range of laws, regulations and standards that promulgated by Chinese government, duties and responsibilities of the regulatory departments are described. Problems of current regulatory system, the ongoing adjustments and changes for modifying and improving regulatory system are discussed. The aim of reform and the incentives to drive forward more health and safety conditions in workplaces are also outlined. PMID:25843565

  12. Health financing reform in sub-Saharan Africa: major constraints, goals, and strategies.

    PubMed

    Sekwat, Alex

    2003-01-01

    Health financing reform became a critical element of public sector reform in sub-Saharan Africa during the past decade. Within the framework of health sector reform, this article reviews the major constraints, goals, and strategies for health financing reform in sub-Saharan Africa. It identifies shrinking budgetary resources, increasing demand for health services, and rising health care costs as the primary factors driving the sub-region's health financing reform agenda. In light of these constraints, the article defines the major goals and the strategies for health care financing reform employed by many sub-Saharan African countries. PMID:12635996

  13. Report on Children's Mental Health Reform in Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petr, Christopher G.; Pierpont, John

    This study, which collected data through interviews and document review, was designed to identify strengths and weaknesses of Minnesota's Comprehensive Children's Mental Health Act (CCMHA) of 1989 and its implementation through December 1990. Three criteria for mental health reform were established for the study, including: care should be…

  14. Health Care Reform: Designing the Standard Benefits Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Frank B.

    1994-01-01

    Considerations in designing a standard health care benefits package as a part of national health care reform are discussed. Specific features examined include deductibles, employer contributions, regional variations, cost management techniques such as managed care and higher copayments, annual out-of-pocket maximums, and lifetime benefit maximums.…

  15. Public Opinion and Health Care Reform for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bales, Susan Nall

    1993-01-01

    Recent polling data suggest that there is a growing consensus to pay special attention to children's needs in the health care reform debate. The public generally desires children to have greater access to health care services, even if this would mean higher taxes, but is unsure that government is the best vehicle to provide such services. (MDM)

  16. Benefits for Infants and Toddlers in Health Care Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Routine health care can spell the difference between a strong beginning and a fragile start. After much public and Congressional debate, President Obama signed into law landmark health care reform legislation. Although many provisions will not go into effect this year, several important changes could benefit children within a few months. The…

  17. Reform, change, and continuity in Finnish health care.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Unto; Lehto, Juhani

    2005-01-01

    This article describes some essential aspects of the Finnish political and governmental system and the evolution of the basic institutional elements of the health care system. We examine the developments that gave rise to a series of health care reforms and reform proposals in the late 1980s and early 1990s and relate them to changes in health care expenditure, structure, and performance. Finally, we discuss the relationship between policy changes, reforms, and health system changes and the strength of neo-institutional theory in explaining both continuity and change. Much of the change in Finnish health care can be explained by institutional path dependency. The tradition of strong but small local authorities and the lack of legitimate democratic regional authorities as well as the coexistence of a dominant Beveridge-style health system with a marginal Bismarckian element explain the specific path of Finnish health care reform. Public responsibility for health care has been decentralized to smaller local authorities (known as municipalities) more than in any other country. Even an exceptionally deep economic recession in the early 1990s did not lead to systems change; rather, the economic imperative was met by the traditional centralized policy pattern. Some of the developments of the 1990s are, however, difficult to explain by institutional theory. Thus, there is a need for testing alternative theories as well. PMID:15943388

  18. Costs and coverage. Pressures toward health care reform.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, P R; Soffel, D; Luft, H S

    1992-01-01

    Signs of discontent with the health care system are growing. Calls for health care reform are largely motivated by the continued increase in health care costs and the large number of people without adequate health insurance. For the past 20 years, health care spending has risen at rates higher than the gross national product. As many as 35 million people are without health insurance. As proposals for health care reform are developed, it is useful to understand the roots of the cost problem. Causes of spiraling health care costs include "market failure" in the health care market, expansion in technology, excessive administrative costs, unnecessary care and defensive medicine, increased patient complexity, excess capacity within the health care system, and low productivity. Attempts to control costs, by the federal government for the Medicare program and then by the private sector, have to date been mostly unsuccessful. New proposals for health care reform are proliferating, and important changes in the health care system are likely. PMID:1441510

  19. Experiences and Lessons from Urban Health Insurance Reform in China.

    PubMed

    Xin, Haichang

    2016-08-01

    Health care systems often face competing goals and priorities, which make reforms challenging. This study analyzed factors influencing the success of a health care system based on urban health insurance reform evolution in China, and offers recommendations for improvement. Findings based on health insurance reform strategies and mechanisms that did or did not work can effectively inform improvement of health insurance system design and practice, and overall health care system performance, including equity, efficiency, effectiveness, cost, finance, access, and coverage, both in China and other countries. This study is the first to use historical comparison to examine the success and failure of China's health care system over time before and after the economic reform in the 1980s. This study is also among the first to analyze the determinants of Chinese health system effectiveness by relating its performance to both technical reasons within the health system and underlying nontechnical characteristics outside the health system, including socioeconomics, politics, culture, values, and beliefs. In conclusion, a health insurance system is successful when it fits its social environment, economic framework, and cultural context, which translates to congruent health care policies, strategies, organization, and delivery. No health system can survive without its deeply rooted socioeconomic environment and cultural context. That is why one society should be cautious not to radically switch from a successful model to an entirely different one over time. There is no perfect health system model suitable for every population-only appropriate ones for specific nations and specific populations at the right place and right time. (Population Health Management 2016;19:291-297). PMID:26565614

  20. Reforming health care financing in Bulgaria: the population perspective.

    PubMed

    Balabanova, Dina; McKee, Martin

    2004-02-01

    Health financing reform in Bulgaria has been characterised by lack of political consensus on reform direction, economic shocks, and, since 1998, steps towards social insurance. As in other eastern European countries, the reform has been driven by an imperative to embrace new ideas modelled on systems elsewhere, but with little attention to whether these reflect popular values. This study explores underlying values, such as views on the role of the state and solidarity, attitudes to, and understanding of compulsory and voluntary insurance, and co-payments. The study identifies general principles (equity, transparency) considered important by the population and practical aspects of implementation of reform. Data were obtained from a representative survey (n=1547) and from 58 in-depth interviews and 6 focus groups with users and health professionals, conducted in 1997 before the actual reform of the health financing system in Bulgaria. A majority supports significant state involvement in health care financing, ranging from providing safety net for the poor, through co-subsidising or regulating the social insurance system, to providing state-financed universal free care (half of all respondents). Collectivist values in Bulgaria remain strong, with support for free access to services regardless of income, age, or health status and progressive funding. There is strong support (especially among the well off) for a social insurance system based on the principle of solidarity and accountability rather than the former tax-based model. The preferred health insurance fund was autonomous, state regulated, financing only health care, and offering optional membership. Voluntary insurance and, less so, co-payments were acceptable if limited to selected services and better off groups. In conclusion, a health financing system under public control that fits well with values and population preferences is likely to improve compliance and be more sustainable. Universal health insurance

  1. Agents of Change for Health Care Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Larry M.

    2007-01-01

    It is widely recognized throughout the health care industry that the United States leads the world in health care spending per capita. However, the chilling dose of reality for American health care consumers is that for all of their spending, the World Health Organization ranks the country's health care system 37th in overall performance--right…

  2. Health Care Reform Tracking Project: Tracking State Health Care Reforms as They Affect Children and Adolescents with Emotional Disorders and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pires, Sheila A.; Stroul, Beth A.

    The Health Care Reform Tracking Project is a 5-year national project to track and analyze state health care reform initiatives as they affect children and adolescents with emotional/behavioral disorders and their families. The study's first phase was a baseline survey of all 50 states to describe current state reforms as of 1995. Among findings of…

  3. Attitudes of Washington State physicians toward health care reform.

    PubMed Central

    Malter, A D; Emerson, L L; Krieger, J W

    1994-01-01

    Attitudes of Washington State physicians about health care reform and about specific elements of managed competition and single-payer proposals were evaluated. Opinions about President Clinton's reform plan were also assessed. Washington physicians (n = 1,000) were surveyed from October to November 1993, and responses were collected through January 1994; responses were anonymous. The response rate was 80%. Practice characteristics of respondents did not differ from other physicians in the state. Of physicians responding, 80% favored substantial change in the current system, 43% favored managed competition, and 40% preferred a single-payer system. Of physicians responding, 64% thought President Clinton's proposal would not adequately address current problems. Reduced administrative burden, a central element of single-payer plans, was identified by 89% of respondents as likely to improve the current system. Other elements of reform plans enjoyed less support. More procedure-oriented specialists than primary care physicians favored leaving the current system unchanged (28% versus 8%, P < .001). While physicians favor health care reform, there is no consensus on any single plan. It seems unlikely that physicians will be able to speak with a single voice during the current debates on health care reform. PMID:7941503

  4. Health sector reform and reproductive health in Latin America and the Caribbean: strengthening the links.

    PubMed Central

    Langer, A.; Nigenda, G.; Catino, J.

    2000-01-01

    Many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) are currently reforming their national health sectors and also implementing a comprehensive approach to reproductive health care. Three regional workshops to explore how health sector reform could improve reproductive health services have revealed the inherently complex, competing, and political nature of health sector reform and reproductive health. The objectives of reproductive health care can run parallel to those of health sector reform in that both are concerned with promoting equitable access to high quality care by means of integrated approaches to primary health care, and by the involvement of the public in setting health sector priorities. However, there is a serious risk that health reforms will be driven mainly by financial and/or political considerations and not by the need to improve the quality of health services as a basic human right. With only limited changes to the health systems in many Latin American and Caribbean countries and a handful of examples of positive progress resulting from reforms, the gap between rhetoric and practice remains wide. PMID:10859860

  5. Using accountability for mental health to drive reform.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Sebastian P; Hickie, Ian B; McGorry, Patrick D; Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Burns, Jane; Christensen, Helen; Mendoza, John; Rosen, Alan; Russell, Lesley M; Sinclair, Sally

    2015-10-19

    Greatly enhanced accountability can drive mental health reform. As extant approaches are ineffective, we propose a new approach. Australia spends around $7.6 billion on mental health services annually, but is anybody getting better? Effective accountability for mental health can reduce variation in care and increase effective service provision. Despite 20 years of rhetoric, Australia's approach to accountability in mental health is overly focused on fulfilling governmental reporting requirements rather than using data to drive reform. The existing system is both fragmented and outcome blind. Australia has failed to develop useful local and regional approaches to benchmarking in mental health. New approaches must address this gap and better reflect the experience of care felt by consumers and carers, as well as by service providers. There are important social priorities in mental health that must be assessed. We provide a brief overview of the existing system and propose a new, modest but achievable set of indicators by which to monitor the progress of national mental health reform. These indicators should form part of a new, system-wide process of continuous quality improvement in mental health care and suicide prevention. PMID:26465695

  6. [Intercultural aspects of the health system reform in Bolivia].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Hita, Susana

    2014-01-01

    This article is a reflection on how interculturality, understood as the way to improve the health of the Bolivian population and coupled with the concept of living well, is not contributing to improving the quality of life and health of the most vulnerable populations in the country. The discourse is coupled with the intention of saving lives in its broadest sense; however, for this it is necessary to make decisions about environmental health and extractivist policies that are not taken into account in the health issues affecting indigenous communities, a population targeted by the intercultural aspects of the health reform. PMID:25597731

  7. Health Care Reform and Its Implications for the Administrative Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolassa, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    It is argued that the discipline of pharmacoeconomics has much to offer the pharmacy field during a period of health care reform but that these specialists must let their colleagues in related fields know how they can assist in facilitating change. (MSE)

  8. Health Care Reform and Medical Education: Forces toward Generalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Edward H.; Seifer, Sarena D.

    1995-01-01

    Health care reforms will dramatically change the culture of medical schools in areas of patient care, research, and education programs. Academic medical centers must construct mutually beneficial partnerships that will position them to take advantage of the opportunities rather than leave them without the diversity of resources needed to make…

  9. Revisiting the Issues: Children and National Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, Sara

    1994-01-01

    Summarizes principal features of 6 bills on health care reform introduced in the 103rd Congress as they relate to children. Proposals are compared on 11 major issues, highlighting the degree to which each bill would achieve universal coverage, access to care, equity of treatment, and quality of comprehensive care. (SLD)

  10. Pharmacy Education in an Era of Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benet, Leslie Z.

    1994-01-01

    The president of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy outlines the association's position on national policy concerning health care reform, then looks at some related controversial issues, including changes in the dispensing of prescriptions, pharmacist-managed medication review, adequacy of pharmacy training, and the role of research.…

  11. The readiness of addiction treatment agencies for health care reform.

    PubMed

    Molfenter, Todd; Capoccia, Victor A; Boyle, Michael G; Sherbeck, Carol K

    2012-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) aims to provide affordable health insurance and expanded health care coverage for some 32 million Americans. The PPACA makes provisions for using technology, evidence-based treatments, and integrated, patient-centered care to modernize the delivery of health care services. These changes are designed to ensure effectiveness, efficiency, and cost-savings within the health care system.To gauge the addiction treatment field's readiness for health reform, the authors developed a Health Reform Readiness Index (HRRI) survey for addiction treatment agencies. Addiction treatment administrators and providers from around the United States completed the survey located on the http://www.niatx.net website. Respondents self-assessed their agencies based on 13 conditions pertinent to health reform readiness, and received a confidential score and instant feedback.On a scale of "Needs to Begin," "Early Stages," "On the Way," and "Advanced," the mean scores for respondents (n = 276) ranked in the Early Stages of health reform preparation for 11 of 13 conditions. Of greater concern was that organizations with budgets of < $5 million (n = 193) were less likely than those with budgets > $5 million to have information technology (patient records, patient health technology, and administrative information technology), evidence-based treatments, quality management systems, a continuum of care, or a board of directors informed about PPACA.The findings of the HRRI indicate that the addiction field, and in particular smaller organizations, have much to do to prepare for a future environment that has greater expectations for information technology use, a credentialed workforce, accountability for patient care, and an integrated continuum of care. PMID:22551101

  12. The informatics of health care reform.

    PubMed

    Masys, D R

    1996-01-01

    Health care in the United States has entered a period of economic upheaval. Episodic, fee-for-service care financed by indemnity insurance is being replaced by managed care financed by fixed-price, capitated health plans. The resulting focus on reducing costs, especially in areas where there is competition fueled by oversupply of health services providers and facilities, poses new threats to the livelihood of medical libraries and medical librarians but also offers new opportunities. Internet services, consumer health education, and health services research will grow in importance, and organizational mergers will provide librarians with opportunities to assume new roles within their organizations. PMID:8938325

  13. Universal health care, American style: a single fund approach to health care reform.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, D E

    1992-06-01

    With increasing momentum for health care reform, attention is shifting to finance reform that will provide for direct methods for controlling health care spending. This article outlines the two principal paths to direct cost control and outlines a national plan that retains our multiple sources of payment, yet also contains a powerful direct cost control technique: a single fund to finance all health care. PMID:10119318

  14. Health sector reforms and human resources for health in Uganda and Bangladesh: mechanisms of effect

    PubMed Central

    Ssengooba, Freddie; Rahman, Syed Azizur; Hongoro, Charles; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus; Mustafa, Ahmed; Kielmann, Tara; McPake, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite the expanding literature on how reforms may affect health workers and which reactions they may provoke, little research has been conducted on the mechanisms of effect through which health sector reforms either promote or discourage health worker performance. This paper seeks to trace these mechanisms and examines the contextual framework of reform objectives in Uganda and Bangladesh, and health workers' responses to the changes in their working environments by taking a 'realistic evaluation' approach. Methods The study findings were generated by triangulating both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis among policy technocrats, health managers and groups of health providers. Quantitative surveys were conducted with over 700 individual health workers in both Bangladesh and Uganda and supplemented with qualitative data obtained from focus group discussions and key interviews with professional cadres, health managers and key institutions involved in the design, implementation and evaluation of the reforms of interest. Results The reforms in both countries affected the workforce through various mechanisms. In Bangladesh, the effects of the unification efforts resulted in a power struggle and general mistrust between the two former workforce tracts, family planning and health. However positive effects of the reforms were felt regarding the changes in payment schemes. Ugandan findings show how the workforce responded to a strong and rapidly implemented system of decentralisation where the power of new local authorities was influenced by resource constraints and nepotism in recruitment. On the other hand, closer ties to local authorities provided the opportunity to gain insight into the operational constraints originating from higher levels that health staff were dealing with. Conclusion Findings from the study suggest that a) reform planners should use the proposed dynamic responses model to help design reform objectives

  15. Health care in China: improvement, challenges, and reform.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Rao, Keqin; Wu, Sinan; Liu, Qian

    2013-02-01

    Over the past 2 decades, significant progress has been made in improving the health-care system and people's health conditions in China. Following rapid economic growth and social development, China's health-care system is facing new challenges, such as increased health-care demands and expenditure, inefficient use of health-care resources, unsatisfying implementation of disease management guidelines, and inadequate health-care insurance. Facing these challenges, the Chinese government carried out a national health-care reform in 2009. A series of policies were developed and implemented to improve the health-care insurance system, the medical care system, the public health service system, the pharmaceutical supply system, and the health-care institution management system in China. Although these measures have shown promising results, further efforts are needed to achieve the ultimate goal of providing affordable and high-quality care for both urban and rural residents in China. This article not only covers the improvement, challenges, and reform of health care in general in China, but also highlights the status of respiratory medicine-related issues. PMID:23381317

  16. Regulatory system reform of occupational health and safety in China

    PubMed Central

    WU, Fenghong; CHI, Yan

    2015-01-01

    With the explosive economic growth and social development, China’s regulatory system of occupational health and safety now faces more and more challenges. This article reviews the history of regulatory system of occupational health and safety in China, as well as the current reform of this regulatory system in the country. Comprehensive, a range of laws, regulations and standards that promulgated by Chinese government, duties and responsibilities of the regulatory departments are described. Problems of current regulatory system, the ongoing adjustments and changes for modifying and improving regulatory system are discussed. The aim of reform and the incentives to drive forward more health and safety conditions in workplaces are also outlined. PMID:25843565

  17. In health care reform, who cares for the community?

    PubMed

    Sigmond, R; Seay, J D

    1994-01-01

    Health care reform has again focused the issues of ownership and mission of organizations in the health care field. Some believe that universal entitlement will eventually make both charitable patient care and the nonprofit form of organization obsolete. Others believe that special treatment of nonprofit organizations does not depend on charity at all; rather that the nonprofit form has social value in and of itself. The authors reflect a different point of view. They suggest that with reform, community benefit as the modern expression of a charitable mission will become ever more important in achieving the nation's health care goals. They believe that nonprofit organizations will continue to be entitled to special treatment only if their missions and programs extend beyond care of patients and entitled populations to focus also on care of communities. Any health organization's investment in disciplined community initiatives encompasses all the people in targeted communities, including those served by competing organizations. Without tax exemption, an organization committed to community care initiatives will be at a competitive disadvantage under the proposed community rated capitation payment system. Rather than abandoning the community benefit standard for tax exemption, health care reform calls for more systematic management of community care initiatives by nonprofit organizations and also of tax-exemption eligibility by the IRS. PMID:10135183

  18. Measuring the quality of care: reforming the health care system.

    PubMed

    Longo, D R; Daugird, A J

    1994-01-01

    Elements of meaningful health care reform must include the ability of patients, providers, and payers to select services offering quality care at an affordable price. To achieve this goal, an appropriate definition of quality needs to be articulated and adopted; data capturing the definition needs to be collected; and appropriate measures need to be selected to analyze that data. Results need to be publically available to assist in making informed choices. The health professions need to fulfill their social contract. And, government needs to ensure that public safety and accountability are maintained and preserved. While the goals and strategies of the different players in the health care arena may be different, there is one thing in common--the needs of citizens must be met through the provision of available, accessible, quality, equitable, and cost-effective health care. These values need to be incorporated into a reform plan. Currently, our ability to comprehensively, consistently, and uniformly perform these tasks is severely limited. While many diverse factors, such as the limitation of financial support and the lack of uniform information systems, contribute to this situation, we believe it is possible through the implementation of a series of recommendations to achieve these goals. This paper outlines the current situation, reviews insights derived from the literature and past and current experiences. Recommendations are made that apply equally to health reform efforts at the state and/or federal levels. PMID:7950482

  19. National Public Opinion on School Health Education: Implications for the Health Care Reform Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torabi, Mohammad R.; Crowe, James W.

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated national public opinion on school health education and the implications for health-care reform initiatives. Telephone surveys of 1,005 adults nationwide indicated that the public at large believes in the importance of health education to reduce health problems among children, considering it the responsibility of parents and…

  20. Delivering Health Care and Mental Health Care Services to Children in Family Foster Care after Welfare and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simms, Mark D.; Freundlich, Madelyn; Battistelli, Ellen S.; Kaufman, Neal D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the essential features of a health care system that can meet the special needs of children in out-of-home care. Discusses some of the major recent changes brought about by welfare and health care reform. Notes that it remains to be seen whether the quality of services will improve as a result of these reforms. (Author)

  1. Mental health reform under policy mainstreaming: needed, but uncertain.

    PubMed

    Hogan, M

    2014-03-01

    October 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's message to the US Congress on the need to reform mental healthcare. Much has changed in that time. In 2006, Frank and Glied summarized these changes and the forces behind them, finding that the well-being of people with mental illness was 'better but not well.' They also conclude that most improvements have been due to 'mainstreaming,' the inclusion of those with mental illness in broad reforms such as Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security. With the gradual assimilation of mental health concerns, leadership and resources into mainstream programmes and agencies, future improvements will require that these programmes are accessible and oriented to people with mental illness. The passage of broad health reform legislation in 2010 (the Affordable Care Act) reinforces this change; several of its provisions attempt to make healthcare more relevant to the population with mental illness. In this editorial, I discuss a set of challenges which remain for the population with mental illness in the healthcare system, and the prospects for change. These challenges include: (1) improving basic mental healthcare in primary care, (2) improving mental healthcare for children, (3) earlier detection and treatment of psychotic illness, (4) disability and unemployment and (5) the challenge of sustaining an adequate, speciality public mental healthcare system under conditions of mainstreaming. In general, I conclude that the prospects for successful reform are uncertain. Establishing mental healthcare specialization in mainstream systems has not been notably successful to date. PMID:24229608

  2. Private sector health reform in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Van Den Heever, A M

    1998-06-01

    This paper discusses some of the trends, debates and policy proposals in relation to the financing of the private health sector in South Africa. The public and private sectors in South Africa are of equivalent size in terms of overall expenditure, but cover substantially different population sizes. Within this context the government has reached the unavoidable conclusion that the private sector has to play some role in ensuring that equity, access and efficiency objectives are achieved for the health system as a whole. However, the private sector is some way off from taking on this responsibility. Substantial increases in per capita costs over the past 15 years, coupled with a degree of deregulation by the former government, have resulted in increasing instability and volatility. The development of a very competitive medical scheme (health insurance) market reinforced by intermediaries with commercial interests has accelerated trends toward excluding high health risks from cover. The approach taken by the government has been to define a new environment which leaves the market open for extensive competition, but removes from schemes the ability to compete by discriminating against high health risks. The only alternatives left to the private market, policy makers hope, will be to go out of business, or to survive through productivity improvements. PMID:9683089

  3. Progressive segmented health insurance: Colombian health reform and access to health services.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Fernando; Amaya, Liliana; Venegas, Stella

    2007-01-01

    Equal access for poor populations to health services is a comprehensive objective for any health reform. The Colombian health reform addressed this issue through a segmented progressive social health insurance approach. The strategy was to assure universal coverage expanding the population covered through payroll linked insurance, and implementing a subsidized insurance program for the poorest populations, those not affiliated through formal employment. A prospective study was performed to follow-up health service utilization and out-of-pocket expenses using a cohort design. It was representative of four Colombian cities (Cendex Health Services Use and Expenditure Study, 2001). A four part econometric model was applied. The model related medical service utilization and medication with different socioeconomic, geographic, and risk associated variables. Results showed that subsidized health insurance improves health service utilization and reduces the financial burden for the poorest, as compared to those non-insured. Other social health insurance schemes preserved high utilization with variable out-of-pocket expenditures. Family and age conditions have significant effect on medical service utilization. Geographic variables play a significant role in hospital inpatient service utilization. Both, geographic and income variables also have significant impact on out-of-pocket expenses. Projected utilization rates and a simulation favor a dual policy for two-stage income segmented insurance to progress towards the universal insurance goal. PMID:16929487

  4. Equity in health care access to: assessing the urban health insurance reform in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gordon G; Zhao, Zhongyun; Cai, Renhua; Yamada, Tetsuji; Yamada, Tadashi

    2002-11-01

    This study evaluates changes in access to health care in response to the pilot experiment of urban health insurance reform in China. The pilot reform began in Zhenjiang and Jiujiang cities in 1994, followed by an expansion to 57 other cities in 1996, and finally to a nationwide campaign in the end of 1998. Specifically, this study examines the pre- and post-reform changes in the likelihood of obtaining various health care services across sub-population groups with different socioeconomic status and health conditions, in an attempt to shed light on the impact of reform on both vertical and horizontal equity measures in health care utilization. Empirical estimates were obtained in an econometric model using data from the annual surveys conducted in Zhenjiang City from 1994 through 1996. The main findings are as follows. Before the insurance reform, the likelihood of obtaining basic care at outpatient setting was much higher for those with higher income, education, and job status at work, indicating a significant measure of horizontal inequity against the lower socioeconomic groups. On the other hand, there was no evidence suggesting vertical inequity against people of chronic disease conditions in access to care at various settings. After the reform, the new insurance plan led to a significant increase in outpatient care utilization by the lower socioeconomic groups, making a great contribution to achieving horizontal equity in access to basic care. The new plan also has maintained the measure of vertical equity in the use of all types of care. Despite reform, people with poor socioeconomic status continue to be disadvantaged in accessing expensive and advanced diagnostic technologies. In conclusion, the reform model has demonstrated promising advantages over pre-reform insurance programs in many aspects, especially in the improvement of equity in access to basic care provided at outpatient settings. It also appears to be more efficient overall in allocating health

  5. Liking Health Reform But Turned Off By Toxic Politics.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Lawrence R; Mettler, Suzanne

    2016-05-01

    Six years after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) became law, the number of nonelderly Americans with health insurance has expanded by twenty million, and the uninsurance rate has declined nearly 9 percentage points. Nevertheless, public opinion about the law remains deeply divided. We investigated how individuals may be experiencing and responding to health reform implementation by analyzing three waves of a panel study we conducted in 2010, 2012, and 2014. While public opinion about the ACA remains split (45.6 percent unfavorable and 36.2 percent favorable), there have been several detectable shifts. The share of respondents believing that reform had little or no impact on access to health insurance or medical care diminished by 18 percentage points from 2010 to 2014, while those considering reform to have some or a great impact increased by 19 percentage points. Among individuals who held unfavorable views toward the law in 2010, the percentage who supported repeal-while still high, at 72 percent-shrank by 9 percentage points from 2010 to 2014. We found that party affiliation and distrust in government were influential factors in explaining the continuing divide over the law. The ACA has delivered discernible benefits, and some Americans are increasingly recognizing that it is improving access to health insurance and medical care. PMID:27076227

  6. Behavioral Health and Health Care Reform Models: Patient-Centered Medical Home, Health Home, and Accountable Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-01-01

    Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools – accountability measures and payment designs – to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs. PMID:23188486

  7. The new institutionalist approaches to health care reform: lessons from reform experiences in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Sitek, Michał

    2010-08-01

    This article discusses the applicability of the new institutionalism to the politics of health care reform in postcommunist Central Europe. The transition to a market economy and democracy after the fall of communism has apparently strengthened the institutional approaches. The differences in performance of transition economies have been critical to the growing understanding of the importance of institutions that foster democracy, provide security of property rights, help enforce contracts, and stimulate entrepreneurship. From a theoretical perspective, however, applying the new institutionalist approaches has been problematic. The transitional health care reform exposes very well some inherent weaknesses of existing analytic frameworks for explaining the nature and mechanisms of institutional change. The postcommunist era in Central Europe has been marked by spectacular and unprecedented radical changes, in which the capitalist system was rebuilt in a short span of time and the institutions of democracy became consolidated. Broad changes to welfare state programs were instituted as well. However, the actual results of the reform processes represent a mix of change and continuity, which is a challenge for the theories of institutional change. PMID:21057098

  8. Health policy thoughtleaders' views of the health workforce in an era of health reform.

    PubMed

    Donelan, Karen; Buerhaus, Peter I; DesRoches, Catherine; Burke, Sheila P

    2010-01-01

    Although registered nurses rank similarly with physicians in the public's esteem, physicians are more visible than nurses in media coverage, public policy, and political spheres. Thus, nursing workforce issues are overshadowed by those of other health priorities, including Medicare and health reform. The purpose of this research was to understand the visibility and salience of the health workforce in general, gain an understanding about the effectiveness of messages concerning the nursing workforce in particular, and to understand why nursing workforce issues do not appear to have gained more traction in national health care policymaking. The National Survey of Thoughtleaders about the Health Workforce was administered via mail, telephone and online to health workforce and policy thoughtleaders from August 2009-October 2009. Of 301 thoughtleaders contacted, 123 completed questionnaires for a response rate of 41%. Thoughtleaders agree that nurses are critical to the quality and safety of our healthcare system, that there are current nursing shortages, and that nursing shortages will be intensified by health reform. Thoughtleaders reported that while they do hear about nursing issues frequently, they do not view most sources of information as proposing effective policy solutions. This study highlights a critical gap in effective policy advocacy and leadership to advance nurse workforce issues higher on the national health agenda. PMID:20637930

  9. Community Participation in New Mexico's Behavioral Health Care Reform

    PubMed Central

    Kano, Miria; Willging, Cathleen E.; Rylko-Bauer, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    In 2005, New Mexico implemented a unique reform in managed behavioral health services that seeks to ensure delivery of consumer-driven, recovery-oriented care to low-income individuals. Distinguishing features of the reform are the Local Collaboratives (LCs), regionally based community organizations designed by state government to represent behavioral health concerns of New Mexico's diverse cultural populations. We examine community response to the LCs, focusing on two broad sets of themes derived from 18 months of ethnographic fieldwork. The first set—structure and function—encompasses several issues: predominance of provider versus consumer voice; insufficient resources to support internal operations; imposition of state administrative demands; and perceived lack of state response to LC efforts. The second set—participation and collaboration—reveals how problems of information flow and other logistical factors impact involvement in LCs and how the construction of “community” introduced under this initiative exacerbates tensions across localities with varied histories and populations. PMID:19764315

  10. Consumer-directed health care: understanding its value in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kristina L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the importance of consumer-directed health care as the essential strategy needed to lower health care costs and support its widespread adoption for making significant strides in health care reform. The pros and cons of health care consumerism are discussed. The intent is to show that the viability of the US health care system depends on the application of appropriate consumer-directed health care strategies. PMID:20145464

  11. Health Care Reform: Lessons From Canada

    PubMed Central

    Deber, Raisa Berlin

    2003-01-01

    Although Canadian health care seems to be perennially in crisis, access, quality, and satisfaction in Canada are relatively high, and spending is relatively well controlled. The Canadian model is built on a recognition of the limits of markets in distributing medically necessary care. Current issues in financing and delivering health care in Canada deserve attention. Key dilemmas include intergovernmental disputes between the federal and provincial levels of government and determining how to organize care, what to pay for (comprehensiveness), and what incentive structures to put in place for payment. Lessons for the United States include the importance of universal coverage, the advantages of a single payer, and the fact that systems can be organized on a subnational basis. PMID:12511378

  12. Welfare reform, time limits, and infant health.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Jonathan; Mas, Alexandre

    2008-12-01

    This paper offers evidence that welfare time limits contributed to a deterioration of infant health. We use the fact that the dates at which TANF recipients were first subject to timing out varied by state. We show that by 2000 there was a marked difference in TANF duration spells depending on whether the state employed the 60-month Federally imposed time limit, or a shorter limit, differences that were not present under AFDC. There were significant increases in infant mortality when time limits became binding in a state. These increases occurred primarily among mothers who could have plausibly timed-out of TANF: poorly educated and unmarried women with at least one previous live-birth. There is some evidence that the population of mothers affected by time limits were less likely to seek prenatal care in the first trimester, suggesting a possible role for reduced medical care in explaining the deterioration in infant health. PMID:18947892

  13. Future Directions for Public Health Education Reforms in India

    PubMed Central

    Zodpey, Sanjay P.; Negandhi, Himanshu; Yeravdekar, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Health systems globally are experiencing a shortage of competent public health professionals. Public health education across developing countries is stretched by capacity generation and maintaining an adequate ‘standard’ and ‘quality’ of their graduate product. We analyzed the Indian public health education scenario using the institutional and instructional reforms framework advanced by the Lancet Commission report on Education of Health Professionals. The emergence of a new century necessitates a re-visit on the institutional and instructional challenges surrounding public health education. Currently, there is neither an accreditation council nor a formal structure or system of collaboration between academic stakeholders. Health systems have little say in health professional training with limited dialogue between health systems and public health education institutions. Despite a recognized shortfall of public health professionals, there are limited job opportunities for public health graduates within the health system and absence of a structured career pathway for them. Public health institutions need to evolve strategies to prevent faculty attrition. A structured development program in teaching–learning methods and pedagogy is the need of the hour. PMID:25295242

  14. Reviewing and reforming policy in health enterprise information security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sostrom, Kristen; Collmann, Jeff R.

    2001-08-01

    Health information management policies usually address the use of paper records with little or no mention of electronic health records. Information Technology (IT) policies often ignore the health care business needs and operational use of the information stored in its systems. Representatives from the Telemedicine & Advanced Technology Research Center, TRICARE and Offices of the Surgeon General of each Military Service, collectively referred to as the Policies, Procedures and Practices Work Group (P3WG), examined military policies and regulations relating to computer-based information systems and medical records management. Using a system of templates and matrices created for the purpose, P3WG identified gaps and discrepancies in DoD and service compliance with the proposed Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Security Standard. P3WG represents an unprecedented attempt to coordinate policy review and revision across all military health services and the Office of Health Affairs. This method of policy reform can identify where changes need to be made to integrate health management policy and IT policy in to an organizational policy that will enable compliance with HIPAA standards. The process models how large enterprises may coordinate policy revision and reform across broad organizational and work domains.

  15. Evaluating the Labour Government's English NHS health system reforms: the 2008 Darzi reforms.

    PubMed

    Mays, Nicholas

    2013-10-01

    Starting in 2002, the UK Labour Government of 1997-2010 introduced a series of changes to the National Health Service (NHS) in England designed to increase patients' choices of the place of elective hospital care and encourage competition among public and private providers of elective hospital services for NHS-funded patients. In 2006, the Department of Health initiated the Health Reform Evaluation Programme (HREP) to assess the impact of the changes. In June 2008, the White Paper, High quality care for all, was published. It represented the government's desire to focus the next phase of health care system reform in England as much on the quality of care as on improving its responsiveness and efficiency. The 2008 White Paper led to the commissioning of a further wave of evaluative research under the auspices of HREP, as follows: an evaluation of the implementation and outcomes of care planning for people with long-term conditions; an evaluation of the personal health budget pilots; an evaluation of the implementation and outcomes of the Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) framework; and an evaluation of cultural and behavioural change in the NHS focused on ensuring high quality care for all. This Supplement includes papers from each project. The evaluations present a mixed picture of the impact and success of the 2008 reforms. All the studies identify some limitations of the policies in the White Paper. The introduction of personal health budgets appears to have been the least problematic and, depending on assumptions, likely to be cost-effective for the sorts of patients involved in the pilot. For the rest of the changes, impacts ranged from little or none (CQUIN and care planning for people with chronic conditions) to patchy and highly variable (instilling a culture of quality in acute hospitals) in the three years following the publication of the White Paper. On the other hand, each of the studies identifies important insights relevant to modifying

  16. Health sector reforms in Kenya: an examination of district level planning.

    PubMed

    Oyaya, Charles O; Rifkin, Susan B

    2003-04-01

    The paper examines health sector reforms in Kenya at the district level based on the Government of Kenya's Health Policy Framework of 1994. The authors present the context of and historical perspective to health sector reforms in Kenya and discuss the major reform policies including decentralization to the district level. The authors then review intended policy outcomes, investigating assumptions on which the implementation and effectiveness of the reform agenda at the local level are based. The authors argue that emphasis on outcomes rather than process has not supported sustainable reforms or achieved the government's goal of improving health and ensuring equity for the citizens of the country. PMID:12644333

  17. Benefits and Systems of Care for Maternal and Child Health under Health Care Reform: Workshop Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Cynthia H., Ed.

    This report discusses the health care needs of and benefits for women, children, and adolescents in light of national health care reform proposals put forth in 1994, and is based on presentations and discussions at an invitational workshop on maternal and child health. The report asserts that since women and children are disproportionately…

  18. The interface between health sector reform and human resources in health

    PubMed Central

    Rigoli, Felix; Dussault, Gilles

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between health sector reform and the human resources issues raised in that process has been highlighted in several studies. These studies have focused on how the new processes have modified the ways in which health workers interact with their workplace, but few of them have paid enough attention to the ways in which the workers have influenced the reforms. The impact of health sector reform has modified critical aspects of the health workforce, including labor conditions, degree of decentralization of management, required skills and the entire system of wages and incentives. Human resources in health, crucial as they are in implementing changes in the delivery system, have had their voice heard in many subtle and open ways – reacting to transformations, supporting, blocking and distorting the proposed ways of action. This work intends to review the evidence on how the individual or collective actions of human resources are shaping the reforms, by spotlighting the reform process, the workforce reactions and the factors determining successful human resources participation. It attempts to provide a more powerful way of predicting the effects and interactions in which different "technical designs" operate when they interact with the human resources they affect. The article describes the dialectic nature of the relationship between the objectives and strategies of the reforms and the objectives and strategies of those who must implement them. PMID:14613523

  19. Neoliberalism and the Academic as Critic and Conscience of Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harland, Tony; Tidswell, Toni; Everett, David; Hale, Leigh; Pickering, Neil

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a critique of academic experiences of neoliberal economic reform at a New Zealand (NZ) university. The authors engaged in a collaborative inquiry that was based upon a developing theoretical perspective of the reform process and how this affected their academic lives. We were keen to develop an understanding of liberal…

  20. Introducing a complex health innovation--primary health care reforms in Estonia (multimethods evaluation).

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat Ali; Menabde, Nata; Saluvere, Katrin; Jesse, Maris; Habicht, Jarno

    2006-11-01

    All post-Soviet countries are trying to reform their primary health care (PHC) systems. The success to date has been uneven. We evaluated PHC reforms in Estonia, using multimethods evaluation: comprising retrospective analysis of routine health service data from Estonian Health Insurance Fund and health-related surveys; documentary analysis of policy reports, laws and regulations; key informant interviews. We analysed changes in organisational structure, regulations, financing and service provision in Estonian PHC system as well as key informant perceptions on factors influencing introduction of reforms. Estonia has successfully implemented and scaled-up multifaceted PHC reforms, including new organisational structures, user choice of family physicians (FPs), new payment methods, specialist training for family medicine, service contracts for FPs, broadened scope of services and evidence-based guidelines. These changes have been institutionalised. PHC effectiveness has been enhanced, as evidenced by improved management of key chronic conditions by FPs in PHC setting and reduced hospital admissions for these conditions. Introduction of PHC reforms - a complex innovation - was enhanced by strong leadership, good co-ordination between policy and operational level, practical approach to implementation emphasizing simplicity of interventions to be easily understood by potential adopters, an encircling strategy to roll-out which avoided direct confrontations with narrow specialists and opposing stakeholders in capital Tallinn, careful change-management strategy to avoid health reforms being politicized too early in the process, and early investment in training to establish a critical mass of health professionals to enable rapid operationalisation of policies. Most importantly, a multifaceted and coordinated approach to reform - with changes in laws; organisational restructuring; modifications to financing and provider payment systems; creation of incentives to enhance

  1. Policy Capacity for Health Reform: Necessary but Insufficient

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Forest and colleagues have persuasively made the case that policy capacity is a fundamental prerequisite to health reform. They offer a comprehensive life-cycle definition of policy capacity and stress that it involves much more than problem identification and option development. I would like to offer a Canadian perspective. If we define health reform as re-orienting the health system from acute care to prevention and chronic disease management the consensus is that Canada has been unsuccessful in achieving a major transformation of our 14 health systems (one for each province and territory plus the federal government). I argue that 3 additional things are essential to build health policy capacity in a healthcare federation such as Canada: (a) A means of "policy governance" that would promote an approach to cooperative federalism in the health arena; (b) The ability to overcome the "policy inertia" resulting from how Canadian Medicare was implemented and subsequently interpreted; and (c) The ability to entertain a long-range thinking and planning horizon. My assessment indicates that Canada falls short on each of these items, and the prospects for achieving them are not bright. However, hope springs eternal and it will be interesting to see if the July, 2015 report of the Advisory Panel on Healthcare Innovation manages to galvanize national attention and stimulate concerted action. PMID:26673650

  2. Leveraging the military health system as a laboratory for health care reform.

    PubMed

    Dorrance, Kevin A; Ramchandani, Suneil; Neil, Nancy; Fisher, Harry

    2013-02-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act recently passed into law is poised to profoundly affect the provision of medical care in the United States. In today's environment, the foundation for most ongoing comparative effectiveness research is financial claims data. However, there is an alternative that possesses much richer data. That alternative, uniquely positioned to serve as a test system for national health reform efforts, is the Department of Defense Military Health System. This article describes how to leverage the Military Health System and provide effective solutions to current health care reform challenges in the United States. PMID:23495458

  3. The aftermath of health sector reform in the Republic of Georgia: effects on people's health.

    PubMed

    Collins, Téa

    2003-04-01

    After the collapse of the Former Soviet Union a health reform process was undertaken in Georgia beginning in 1994. This process was intended to encompass all aspects of the health-care sector and to transform the Soviet-style health system into one that was directed towards quality of care, improved access, efficiency, and a strengthened focus on Primary Health Care (PHC). Health sector reform fundamentally changed the ways health care is financed in Georgia. There has been a transition to program-based financing, and payroll-tax-based social insurance schemes have been introduced. Despite these measures, the performance of the health system is still disappointing. All health programs are severely under-funded, and when the majority of the population is unemployed or self-employed, collection of taxes seems impossible. Overall, Georgian consumers are uninformed about the basic principles of health reforms and their entitlements and therefore do not support them. The analysis introduced in this paper of the current situation in Georgia establishes that the rush to insurance-based medicine was more a rush from the previous system than a well-thought-out policy direction. After 70 years of a Soviet rule, the country had no institutional capacity to provide insurance-based health care. To achieve universal coverage, or at least ensure that the majority of the population has access to basic health services, government intervention is essential. In addition, educating the public on reforms would allow the reform initiators to fundamentally change the nature of the reform process from a "top-down" centralized process to one that is demand-driven and collaborative. PMID:12705312

  4. Health care reform in Croatia: for better or for worse?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, M S; Mastilica, M

    1998-01-01

    Along with the rest of Central and Eastern Europe, Croatia has begun to dismantle its long-standing socialist health care system and to replace it with a market-based approach. Marketization's advocates maintain that the market will bring efficiency and quality to the Croatian health care system. Nevertheless, data from consumer surveys and official statistics reflect the reform's hidden costs: limited access to care, heightened costs, growing inequality, and the deemphasis of preventive and proactive care in favor of costly therapeutic medicine. PMID:9702140

  5. EPIDEMIOLOGY and Health Care Reform The National Health Survey of 1935-1936

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The National Health Survey undertaken in 1935 and 1936 was the largest morbidity survey until that time. It was also the first national survey to focus on chronic disease and disability. The decision to conduct a survey of this magnitude was part of the larger strategy to reform health care in the United States. The focus on morbidity allowed reformers to argue that the health status of Americans was poor, despite falling mortality rates that suggested the opposite. The focus on chronic disease morbidity proved to be an especially effective way of demonstrating the poor health of the population and the strong links between poverty and illness. The survey, undertaken by a small group of reform-minded epidemiologists led by Edgar Sydenstricker, was made possible by the close interaction during the Depression of agencies and actors in the public health and social welfare sectors, a collaboration which produced new ways of thinking about disease burdens. PMID:21233434

  6. [Colombia: what has happened with its health reform?].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Arias, Rubén Darío; Nieto, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The health reform adopted in Colombia in 1993 was promoted by different agencies as the model to follow in matters of health policy. Following the guidelines of the Washington Consensus and the World Bank, the Government of Colombia, with the support of national political and economic elites, reorganized the management of health services based on market principles, dismantled the state system, increased finances of the sector, assigned the management of the system to the private sector, segmented the provision of services, and promoted interaction of actors in a competitive scheme of low regulation. After 20 years of implementation, the Colombian model shows serious flaws and is an object of controversy. The Government has weakened as the governing entity for health; private groups that manage the resources were established as strong centers of economic and political power; and violations of the right to health increased. Additionally, corruption and service cost overruns have put a strain on the sustainability of the system, and the state network is in danger of closing. Despite its loss of prestige at the internal level, various actors within and outside the country tend to keep the model based on contextual reforms. PMID:25597727

  7. [The main directions of public health reforms in the Republic of Uzbekistan].

    PubMed

    Ibragimov, A Iu; Asadov, D A; Menlikulov, P R

    2012-01-01

    The article covers the directive documents regulating the development of public health. The main directions of reforms of public health system of the Republic of Uzbekistan are covered too. The statistical data reflecting the structural changes in public health is presented. The purpose and tasks of reformation of the key public health issues in the Republic of Uzbekistan are explained. PMID:23373349

  8. The independence of international civil servants during the neoliberal decades: implications of the work stoppage involving 700 staff of the World Health Organization in November 2005.

    PubMed

    Katz, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The independence of international civil servants is critical to the fulfillment of their organizations' mandates, but it has been seriously undermined during 25 years of neoliberal influence in U.N. agencies, including the World Health Organization. In November 2005, 700 staff at WHO headquarters participated in a one-hour work stoppage--the first industrial action in the organization's history. Hierarchical and arbitrary management, abuse of rules and procedures, nepotism and harassment, and undue influence of international financial institutions, powerful member states, and transnational corporations have exhausted morale and motivation, creating a conformist environment and interfering with technical health work. In the neoliberal era, WHO staff confront conflicting duties of loyalty to a handful of member states and their private interests and loyalty to WHO's constitutional mandate. International civil servants need support from governing bodies and from the world's people in finding the correct balance. A first essential step would be respect for international labor standards within the U.N. family and, in particular, negotiation status and collective bargaining--human rights in the workplace and prerequisites for staff independence, integrity, and competence, qualities required to serve the world's people. PMID:18341128

  9. What have health care reforms achieved in Turkey? An appraisal of the "Health Transformation Programme".

    PubMed

    Ökem, Zeynep Güldem; Çakar, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    Poor health status indicators, low quality care, inequity in the access to health services and inefficiency due to fragmented health financing and provision have long been problems in Turkey's health system. To address these problems a radical reform process known as the Health Transformation Programme (HTP) was initiated in 2003. The health sector reforms in Turkey are considered to have been among the most successful of middle-income countries undergoing reform. Numerous articles have been published that review these reforms in terms of, variously, financial sustainability, efficiency, equity and quality. Evidence suggests that Turkey has indeed made significant progress, yet these achievements are uneven among its regions, and their long-term financial sustainability is unresolved due to structural problems in employment. As yet, there is no comprehensive evidence-based analysis of how far the stated reform objectives have been achieved. This article reviews the empirical evidence regarding the outcomes of the HTP during 10 years of its implementation. Strengthening the strategic purchasing function of the Social Security Institution (SSI) should be a priority. Overall performance can be improved by linking resource allocation to provider performance. More emphasis on prevention rather than treatment, with an effective referral chain, can also bring better outcomes, greater efficiency gains and contribute to sustainability. PMID:26183890

  10. Neoliberalism, welfare policy and health: a qualitative meta-synthesis of single parents' experience of the transition from welfare to work.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kay

    2012-09-01

    Following the United States' lead, the emergence of neoliberal welfare policy across the western world has resulted in employment programmes for single parents, who are predominantly single mothers. While some governments claim that employment will improve single parents' incomes and well-being, researchers dispute that single parents can unproblematically move into the workforce, with net positive effects. While researchers have quantified the socio-economic effect of these programmes, in particular on participant health, no study has yet synthesized participants' experiences of welfare-to-work. Here, I present a meta-synthesis of eight qualitative health-related studies of single parents' (and exclusively single mothers') welfare-to-work transition. I report that single mothers faced a combination of health and economic issues which made their transition from welfare to work difficult, including degrees of poor physical and mental health. For participants in the United States, these health issues were often compounded by a loss of health benefits on moving into low-wage employment. In countries where a return to employment was required before children reached school age, a lack of affordable and appropriate child care, especially for children with health problems, exacerbated these difficulties. As a result of scarce resources, single mothers in receipt of welfare benefits often relied on food banks or went without food. A return to the workforce did not alleviate this problem as additional child care and reduced government subsidies depleted the funds available for food. I conclude that welfare-to-work policies are underpinned by the neoliberal assumption that the market more efficiently distributes resources than the State. However, for the women in the studies examined here, labour market participation often depleted access to essential resources. Interventions to address the 'problem' of welfare dependency must recognize the complex interplay between work

  11. Draft Clinton health reform proposal is circulated as alternatives surface.

    PubMed

    1993-09-20

    A brief summary is provided of the Clinton draft health reform proposal (a 240-page draft outline) that predated the presidential address before Congress on September 22, 1993, and the complete health reform plan. Hillary Rodham Clinton will present a statement before the Senate Finance Committee and the Labor and Human Resources Committee on September 28, as the chairperson of the President's Task Force on Health Care Reform. Top policy aide Ira Magaziner believes that a coalition of moderate Republicans, liberal Democrats, and moderate Democrats will be to pass the bill. Observers see the battle as one of the most difficult for the Clinton administration. The outlined plan would require employers to pay about 80% of health insurance coverage for their employees, including part-time workers and their dependents. Families would pay the remaining 20%. All individuals would be covered, and special subsidies would be available for those under a specified income threshold. Regional health alliances would mediate between consumer and health plans. Premiums would be paid to the alliances, which would have a discrete geographic territory. Alliances would negotiate with health insurance companies for the best care at the lowest prices. Preexisting medical conditions would not prevent coverage. A standard benefit package would be provided and there would be comparability across plans. For instance, covered care would include hospital care, physician and health professional services, clinical preventive services, mental health and substance abuse, family planning services, pregnancy-related services, and drugs. Prevention coverage would include prenatal and well-baby care and routine physical examinations, and reproductive health service procedures such as mammogram and pelvic examinations. Family planning and pregnancy-related services were not defined, and although contraceptive pills would be covered as prescriptions, it is unclear whether diaphragms or IUDs would be

  12. Health reform and the constitutionality of the individual mandate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeffrey J; Kelly, Deena; McHugh, Matthew D

    2011-11-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 is landmark legislation designed to expand access to health care for virtually all legal U.S. residents. A vital but controversial provision of the ACA requires individuals to maintain health insurance coverage or face a tax penalty-the individual mandate. We examine the constitutionality of the individual mandate by analyzing relevant court decisions. A critical issue has been defining the "activities" Congress is authorized to regulate. Some judges determined that the mandate was constitutional because the decision to go without health insurance, that is, to self-insure, is an activity with substantial economic effects within the overall scheme of the ACA. Opponents suggest that Congress overstepped its authority by regulating "inactivity," that is, compelling people to purchase insurance when they otherwise would not. The U.S. Supreme Court is set to review the issues and the final ruling will shape the effectiveness of health reform. PMID:22454219

  13. Commentary: Medicaid reform issues affecting the Indian health care system.

    PubMed

    Wellever, A; Hill, G; Casey, M

    1998-02-01

    Substantial numbers of Indian people rely on Medicaid for their primary health insurance coverage. When state Medicaid programs enroll Indians in managed care programs, several unintended consequences may ensue. This paper identifies some of the perverse consequences of Medicaid reform for Indians and the Indian health care system and suggests strategies for overcoming them. It discusses the desire of Indian people to receive culturally appropriate services, the need to maintain or improve Indian health care system funding, and the duty of state governments to respect tribal sovereignty. Because of their relatively small numbers, Indians may be treated differently under Medicaid managed care systems without significantly endangering anticipated program savings. Failure of Medicaid programs to recognize the uniqueness of Indian people, however, may severely weaken the Indian health care system. PMID:9491006

  14. Disentangling Chile's Authoritarian Neoliberalism and Its Effects: The Downfall of Public Higher Education and Its Implications for Equitable Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitton, Viviana

    2007-01-01

    In recent decades, neoliberal reforms have spread across Latin America. Despite different accounts showing the adverse social impact of these reforms, what seems lacking are historical analyses of why and how neoliberal policies occurred in this region. For instance, there are only rare accounts of how dictatorships in the 1970s prepared the…

  15. Health Behaviors, Mental Health, and Health Care Utilization Among Single Mothers After Welfare Reforms in the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Rehkopf, David H; Siddiqi, Arjumand; Glymour, M Maria; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2016-03-15

    We studied the health of low-income US women affected by the largest social policy change in recent US history: the 1996 welfare reforms. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (1993-2012), we performed 2 types of analysis. First, we used difference-in-difference-in-differences analyses to estimate associations between welfare reforms and health outcomes among the most affected women (single mothers aged 18-64 years in 1997; n = 219,469) compared with less affected women (married mothers, single nonmothers, and married nonmothers of the same age range in 1997; n = 2,422,265). We also used a synthetic control approach in which we constructed a more ideal control group for single mothers by weighting outcomes among the less affected groups to match pre-reform outcomes among single mothers. In both specifications, the group most affected by welfare reforms (single mothers) experienced worse health outcomes than comparison groups less affected by the reforms. For example, the reforms were associated with at least a 4.0-percentage-point increase in binge drinking (95% confidence interval: 0.9, 7.0) and a 2.4-percentage-point decrease in the probability of being able to afford medical care (95% confidence interval: 0.1, 4.8) after controlling for age, educational level, and health care insurance status. Although the reforms were applauded for reducing welfare dependency, they may have adversely affected health. PMID:26946395

  16. Consumer subjectivity and U.S. health care reform.

    PubMed

    West, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Health care consumerism is an important frame in U.S. health care policy, especially in recent media and policy discourse about federal health care reform. This article reports on qualitative fieldwork with health care users to find out how people interpret and make sense of the identity of "health care consumer." It proposes that while the term consumer is normally understood as a descriptive label for users who purchase health care and insurance services, it should actually be understood as a metaphor, carrying with it a host of associations that shape U.S. health care policy debates in particular ways. Based on interviews with 36 people, patient was the dominant term people used to describe themselves, but consumer was the second most popular. Informants interpreted the health care consumer as being informed, proactive, and having choices, but there were also "semiotic traps," or difficult-to-resolve tensions for this identity. The discourse of consumerism functions in part as code for individual responsibility, and therefore as a classed moral discourse, with implications for U.S. health care policy. PMID:23631595

  17. Payment reform and changes in health care in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chen; Xu, Fei; Liu, Gordon G

    2014-06-01

    This paper is intended to assess the primary effects on cost, utilization and quality of care from payment reform of capitation and open enrollment in Changde city, Hunan Province of China. Open enrollment policy was introduced to deal with possible cream skimming associated with capitation. Based on the longitudinal Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) Household Survey, this study analyses the URBMI data through a set of regression models. The original data included over five thousand inpatient admissions during the study period between 2008 and 2010. The study finds the payment reform to reduce its inpatient out-of-pocket cost by 19.7%, out-of-pocket ratio by 9.5%, and length of stay by 17.7%. However, the total inpatient cost, drug cost ratio, treatment effect, and patient satisfaction showed little difference between Fee-For-Service and capitation models. We conclude that the payment reform in Changde did not reduce overall inpatient expenditure, but it decreased the financial risk and length of stay of inpatient patients without compromising quality of care. The findings would contribute to the health care payment literatures from developing countries and open further research tracks on the ability of open enrollment to compensate for capitation drawbacks. PMID:24735721

  18. Health-system reform and universal health coverage in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat; de Andrade, Luiz Odorico Monteiro; Almeida, Gisele; Cotlear, Daniel; Dmytraczenko, T; Frenz, Patricia; Garcia, Patrícia; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio; Knaul, Felicia M; Muntaner, Carles; de Paula, Juliana Braga; Rígoli, Felix; Serrate, Pastor Castell-Florit; Wagstaff, Adam

    2015-03-28

    Starting in the late 1980s, many Latin American countries began social sector reforms to alleviate poverty, reduce socioeconomic inequalities, improve health outcomes, and provide financial risk protection. In particular, starting in the 1990s, reforms aimed at strengthening health systems to reduce inequalities in health access and outcomes focused on expansion of universal health coverage, especially for poor citizens. In Latin America, health-system reforms have produced a distinct approach to universal health coverage, underpinned by the principles of equity, solidarity, and collective action to overcome social inequalities. In most of the countries studied, government financing enabled the introduction of supply-side interventions to expand insurance coverage for uninsured citizens--with defined and enlarged benefits packages--and to scale up delivery of health services. Countries such as Brazil and Cuba introduced tax-financed universal health systems. These changes were combined with demand-side interventions aimed at alleviating poverty (targeting many social determinants of health) and improving access of the most disadvantaged populations. Hence, the distinguishing features of health-system strengthening for universal health coverage and lessons from the Latin American experience are relevant for countries advancing universal health coverage. PMID:25458725

  19. The Interface of School, Community, and Health Care Reform: Organizational Directions toward Effective Services for Children and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoff, Howard M.

    1996-01-01

    Three areas of reform have been under national scrutiny: school reform, community services reform, and health-care reform. Few have discussed how these three areas interface and can be organized toward more effective services for children and youth. Describes organizational and planning methodology that coordinates these three reform areas into a…

  20. The ways and means of national health care reform, 1974 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Wainess, F J

    1999-04-01

    Little attention has been paid in the health policy and welfare state literature to the politics of health care reform in the 1970s. Drawing on newspaper accounts and archival material collected from the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and the National Archives, I outline the political history of health care reform in the 93rd Congress. In doing so, I highlight critical institutional, environmental, and strategic lessons that today's reformers can learn from the experience of 1974. PMID:10321359

  1. Health reform in Canada: Enabling perspectives for health leadership.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Graham

    2016-03-01

    Canadian healthcare leaders are experiencing unprecedented change. In Canada and worldwide, efforts are being made to create patient-centred service delivery models. In order to participate fully in that transformation, leaders must embrace the new leadership responsibilities vital to patient-centred change. To fail to do so will marginalize their role or render them irrelevant. This article reviews literature in the past 5 years to outline the change context for leaders and what they can do to enhance their effectiveness. Leaders are encouraged to redouble their efforts to develop their leadership capacity, engage physicians as partners, embrace complexity, engage the patient and public in reform efforts, and embrace appropriate technological trends within the consumer community. To reinvent leadership supportive of patient-centred change, healthcare leaders need to act individually to grow their own capacity and collectively to take control of the leadership needed in order to fulfill their role in change. PMID:26872798

  2. Generalism and the need for health professional educational reform.

    PubMed

    Bulger, R J

    1995-01-01

    Powerful forces are intensifying change in health care delivery: population-based thinking about health care, especially emphasis on prevention; the reemergence of the biopsychosocial mode of thinking in health care; the need to increase capacity for health services research; and the knowledge that reductions may be needed in the use of high-priced physicians, the number of acute-care hospital beds, and the duplication of expensive equipment. Academic health centers are being forced to adjust their educational offerings to these realities of the service sector. Yet, institutional obstacles stand in the way of needed education reform: fragmentation of the sense of community in health professions schools, turf-related forces that separate various health professions, inflexible institutional structures that prevent adequate responses to a changing environment, an increasingly acute shortage of money to support education, and the devalued status of teaching within our institutions. Universities must develop centers to determine regional and local workforce needs and subsequently establish regionally based educational networks of academic and community health centers. Further, academic centers must demonstrate a real commitment to multiprofessional, interdisciplinary team approaches to a patient-centered system. In parallel, the institution must create a student-centered value system. PMID:7826454

  3. Payment system reform for health care providers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soonman

    2003-03-01

    Since its introduction in 1977, the national health insurance programme in Korea has paid health care providers on a fee-for-service basis. Regulated fee-for-service payment has resulted in an increased volume and intensity of medical care. It has also distorted the input mix of treatment because physicians have substituted more profitable and uninsured (no coverage) medical services for those with lower margins, as is evidenced by the sharp increase in the caesarean delivery rate. This paper examines two recent supply-side reforms in Korea: Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) and Resource-based Relative Value (RBRV). Since 1997, through a pilot programme covering a selected group of diseases for voluntarily participating health care institutions, the DRG-based prospective payment system has proven to be effective in containing cost with little negative effect on quality. RBRV-based payment was implemented in 2001, but led to an almost uniform increase in fees for physician services without a mechanism to control the volume and expenditure. Challenges and future issues in the reform of the payment system in Korea include the expansion of benefit coverage, quality monitoring and improvement, strategic plans to overcome the strong opposition of providers and the introduction of global budgeting. PMID:12582111

  4. Health reform: the good, the bad, and the bottom line.

    PubMed

    Hadley, J; Zuckerman, S

    1994-01-01

    The Health Security Act is a pragmatic plan for achieving universal health insurance coverage for a broad package of benefits at reasonable cost. It proposes necessary and reasonable changes in insurance market practices and administrative structure. It finances the reformed system with a credible combination of achievable cost savings, mandatory private-sector payments, and limited "sin" taxes. Political constraints-the inability to tax openly or redistribute tax subsidies-result in weak incentives for consumers to choose low-cost plans and an inefficient scheme for providing subsidies to the poor. The act also unnecessarily restricts and regulates fee-for-service plans and the training of health workers. We propose changes to correct the act's weaknesses without compromising its basic objectives. PMID:8188131

  5. Evidence-based medicine in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Gordon B

    2011-10-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 mandates a national comparative outcomes research project agenda. Comparative effectiveness research includes both clinical trials and observational studies and is facilitated by electronic health records. A national network of electronic health records will create a vast electronic data "warehouse" with exponential growth of observational data. High-quality associations will identify research topics for pragmatic clinical trials, and systematic reviews of clinical trials will provide optimal evidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicine is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. Thus, health care reform will provide a robust environment for comparative effectiveness research, systematic reviews, and evidence-based medicine, and implementation of evidence-based medicine should lead to improved quality of care. PMID:21860057

  6. Financing reforms for the Thai health card scheme.

    PubMed

    Pannarunothai, S; Srithamrongsawat, S; Kongpan, M; Thumvanna, P

    2000-09-01

    The Thai health card scheme originated from a pilot study on community financing and primary health care in maternal and child health in 1983. The scheme later changed to one of voluntary health insurance and finally received a matching subsidy from the government. The coverage of the scheme is described by a U-curve, i.e. it started with 5% of the total population in 1987, declined to 3% in 1992, with an upturn to 14% in 1997. The upturn has been the result of concerns about universal coverage policy, together with reforms of fund management. The provincial fund is responsible for basic health, basic medical, referral, and accident and emergency services. The central fund takes 2.5% of the total fund to manage cross-boundary services and high cost care (a reinsurance policy). On average, the utilization rate of the voluntary health card was higher than that of the compulsory (social security) scheme. And amongst three variants of health cards, the voluntary health card holders used health services twice to three times more than the community and health volunteer card holders. Cost recovery was low, especially in the provinces with low coverage. In the province with highest coverage, cost recovery was as high as 90% of the non-labour recurrent cost. Only 10% of the budgeted fund for reinsurance was disbursed, implying considerable management inefficiency. The management information system as well as the management capacity of the Health Insurance Office should be strengthened. After comparing the health card with other insurance schemes in terms of coverage, cost recovery, utilization and management cost, it is recommended that this voluntary health insurance should be modified to be a compulsory insurance, with some other means of premium collection and minimal co-payment at the point of delivery. PMID:11012405

  7. The political challenges that may undermine health reform.

    PubMed

    Skocpol, Theda

    2010-07-01

    As with all major social legislation, years of decisions and disputes over implementation lie ahead for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Opponents at the state and national levels may seek the law's judicial overturn or repeal. However, a far more serious effort to undermine the law will come about through challenges to various administrative arrangements, taxes, and subsidies to fund expansions of coverage. The redistributive aspects of health reform will be especially at risk, as business interests and groups of more-privileged citizens press for lower taxes, looser regulations, and reduced subsidies for low-income people. PMID:20606175

  8. The Role of Informatics in Health Care Reform

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yueyi I.

    2012-01-01

    Improving healthcare quality while simultaneously reducing cost has become a high priority of healthcare reform. Informatics is crucial in tackling this challenge. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 mandates adaptation and “meaningful use (MU)” of health information technology. In this review, we will highlight several areas in which informatics can make significant contributions, with a focus on radiology. We also discuss informatics related to the increasing imperatives of state and local regulations (such as radiation dose tracking) and quality initiatives. PMID:22771052

  9. Health sector reforms in Argentina and the performance of the health financing system.

    PubMed

    Cavagnero, Eleonora

    2008-10-01

    In Argentina, health sector reforms put particular emphasis on decentralization and self-management of the tax-funded health sector, and the restructuring of the social health insurance during the 1990s. Unlike other countries in the region, there was no comprehensive plan to reform and unify the sector. In order to assess the effects of the reforms on the performance of the health financing system, this study looks at impacts on the three inter-related functions of revenue collection, pooling, and purchasing/provision of health services. Data from various sources are used to illustrate the findings. It was found that the introduction of cost recovery by self-managed hospitals increased their budgets only marginally and competition among social health insurance funds did not reduce fragmentation as expected. Although reforming the Solidarity Redistribution Fund and implementing a single basic package for the insured was an important step towards equity and transparency, the extent of risk pooling is still very limited. This study also provides recommendations regarding strengthening reimbursement mechanisms for public hospitals, and regulating the private sector as approaches to improving the fairness of the health financing system and protecting people from financial hardship as a result of illness. PMID:18378350

  10. Moving towards universal health coverage: health insurance reforms in nine developing countries in Africa and Asia.

    PubMed

    Lagomarsino, Gina; Garabrant, Alice; Adyas, Atikah; Muga, Richard; Otoo, Nathaniel

    2012-09-01

    We analyse nine low-income and lower-middle-income countries in Africa and Asia that have implemented national health insurance reforms designed to move towards universal health coverage. Using the functions-of-health-systems framework, we describe these countries' approaches to raising prepaid revenues, pooling risk, and purchasing services. Then, using the coverage-box framework, we assess their progress across three dimensions of coverage: who, what services, and what proportion of health costs are covered. We identify some patterns in the structure of these countries' reforms, such as use of tax revenues to subsidise target populations, steps towards broader risk pools, and emphasis on purchasing services through demand-side financing mechanisms. However, none of the reforms purely conform to common health-system archetypes, nor are they identical to each other. We report some trends in these countries' progress towards universal coverage, such as increasing enrolment in government health insurance, a movement towards expanded benefits packages, and decreasing out-of-pocket spending accompanied by increasing government share of spending on health. Common, comparable indicators of progress towards universal coverage are needed to enable countries undergoing reforms to assess outcomes and make midcourse corrections in policy and implementation. PMID:22959390

  11. 75 FR 62684 - Health Insurance Reform; Announcement of Maintenance Changes to Electronic Data Transaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... Register (65 FR 50312) entitled ``Health Insurance Reform: Standards for Electronic Transactions... the Federal Register (73 FR 49742) entitled ``Health Insurance Reform: Modifications to Electronic... January 16, 2009, we published a final rule in the Federal Register (74 FR 3296) entitled Health...

  12. The politics of paying for health reform: zombies, payroll taxes, and the holy grail.

    PubMed

    Oberlander, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the politics of paying for health care reform. It surveys the political strengths and weaknesses of major options to fund universal coverage and explores obstacles to changing how the United States finances health care. Finding a politically viable means to finance universal coverage remains a central barrier to enacting health reform. PMID:18940835

  13. Going beyond triage in Tajikistan. Health reform in the former Soviet Union.

    PubMed

    Alidina, S; Annett, H

    2000-01-01

    Tajikistan is among the few countries where life expectancy diminished during the 1990's. To rebuild a health system fractured by economic collapse, political disintegration and civil war, the Essential Hospital Services Project was initiated to restore essential hospital services, encourage structural reform and build the health system's capacity to sustain itself. The article provides an overview of these reform efforts, outlines some of the challenges of health reform in Tajikistan and illustrates the benefits global partnerships can achieve when sharing creative new approaches to health reform. PMID:11214986

  14. Comprehensive health care reform in Vermont: a conversation with Governor Jim Douglas. Interview by James Maxwell.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Jim

    2007-01-01

    In this conversation, Vermont's Republican governor, Jim Douglas, discusses his role in and views on the state's comprehensive health reforms adopted in 2006. The reforms are designed to provide universal access to coverage, improve the quality and performance of the health care system, and promote health and wellness across the lifespan. He describes the specific features of the reforms, the plan for their financing, and the difficult compromises that had to be reached with the Democratically controlled legislature. He talks about his need, as governor, to balance the goals of health reform against other state priorities such as education and economic development. PMID:17940086

  15. Innovation in Medicare and Medicaid will be central to health reform's success.

    PubMed

    Guterman, Stuart; Davis, Karen; Stremikis, Kristof; Drake, Heather

    2010-06-01

    The health reform legislation signed into law by President Barack Obama contains numerous payment reform provisions designed to fundamentally transform the nation's health care system. Perhaps the most noteworthy of these is the establishment of a Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation within the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. This paper presents recommendations that would maximize the new center's effectiveness in promoting reforms that can improve the quality and value of care in Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children's Health Insurance Program, while helping achieve health reform's goals of more efficient, coordinated, and effective care. PMID:20530353

  16. [Impact of health care reform on human resources and employment management].

    PubMed

    Brito Quintana, P E

    2000-01-01

    According to those in charge of health sector reform, human resources are the key component of health sector reform processes and offer health services their greatest competitive advantage. With the help of the Observatory for Human Resources within Health Sector Reform promoted by the Pan American Health Organization and other groups, countries of the Region of the Americas have now begun to gather, in a methodical fashion, tangible evidence of the decisive importance of human resources within health sector reform initiatives and particularly of the impact of these initiatives on health personnel. This mutual influence is the main theme of this article, which explores the most disturbing aspects of health sector reform from a human resources perspective, including job instability and conflicting interests of employers and employees. PMID:11026774

  17. Health sector reform in Brazil: a case study of inequity.

    PubMed

    Almeida, C; Travassos, C; Porto, S; Labra, M E

    2000-01-01

    Health sector reform in Brazil built the Unified Health System according to a dense body of administrative instruments for organizing decentralized service networks and institutionalizing a complex decision-making arena. This article focuses on the equity in health care services. Equity is defined as a principle governing distributive functions designed to reduce or offset socially unjust inequalities, and it is applied to evaluate the distribution of financial resources and the use of health services. Even though in the Constitution the term "equity" refers to equal opportunity of access for equal needs, the implemented policies have not guaranteed these rights. Underfunding, fiscal stress, and lack of priorities for the sector have contributed to a progressive deterioration of health care services, with continuing regressive tax collection and unequal distribution of financial resources among regions. The data suggest that despite regulatory measures to increase efficiency and reduce inequalities, delivery of health care services remains extremely unequal across the country. People in lower income groups experience more difficulties in getting access to health services. Utilization rates vary greatly by type of service among income groups, positions in the labor market, and levels of education. PMID:10707303

  18. Health Reform and Academic Health Centers: Commentary on an Evolving Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Wartman, Steven A; Zhou, Yingying; Knettel, Anthony J

    2015-12-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), both directly and indirectly, has had a demonstrable impact on academic health centers. Given the highly cross-subsidized nature of institutional funds flows, the impact of health reform is not limited to the clinical care mission but also extends to the research and education missions of these institutions. This Commentary discusses how public policy and market-based health reforms have played out relative to expectations. The authors identify six formidable challenges facing academic health centers in the post-ACA environment: finding the best mission balance; preparing for the era of no open-ended funding; developing an integrated, interprofessional vision; broadening the institutional perspective; addressing health beyond clinical care; and finding the right leadership for the times. Academic health centers will be well positioned for success if they can focus on 21st-century realities, reengineer their business models, and find transformational leaders to change institutional culture and behavior. PMID:26422592

  19. Does Australia have the appropriate health reform agenda to close the gap in Indigenous health?

    PubMed

    Donato, Ronald; Segal, Leonie

    2013-05-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the national Indigenous reform strategy - known as Closing the Gap - in the context of broader health system reforms underway to assess whether current attempts at addressing Indigenous disadvantage are likely to be successful. Drawing upon economic theory and empirical evidence, the paper analyses key structural features necessary for securing system performance gains capable of reducing health disparities. Conceptual and empirical attention is given to the features of comprehensive primary healthcare, which encompasses the social determinants impacting on Indigenous health. An important structural prerequisite for securing genuine improvements in health outcomes is the unifying of all funding and policy responsibilities for comprehensive primary healthcare for Indigenous Australians within a single jurisdictional framework. This would provide the basis for implementing several key mutually reinforcing components necessary for enhancing primary healthcare system performance. The announcement to introduce a long-term health equality plan in partnership with Aboriginal people represents a promising development and may provide the window of opportunity needed for implementing structural reforms to primary healthcare. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC? Notwithstanding the intention of previous policies, considerable health disparity exists between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Australia has now embarked on its most ambitious national Indigenous health reform strategy, but there has been little academic analysis of whether such reforms are capable of eliminating health disadvantage for Aboriginal people.WHAT DOES THE PAPER ADD? This paper provides a critical analysis of Indigenous health reforms to assess whether such policy initiatives are likely to be successful and outlines key structural changes to primary healthcare system arrangements that are necessary to secure genuine system performance gains and improve health

  20. Opportunities in Reform: Bioethics and Mental Health Ethics.

    PubMed

    Williams, Arthur Robin

    2016-05-01

    Last year marks the first year of implementation for both the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act in the United States. As a result, healthcare reform is moving in the direction of integrating care for physical and mental illness, nudging clinicians to consider medical and psychiatric comorbidity as the expectation rather than the exception. Understanding the intersections of physical and mental illness with autonomy and self-determination in a system realigning its values so fundamentally therefore becomes a top priority for clinicians. Yet Bioethics has missed opportunities to help guide clinicians through one of medicine's most ethically rich and challenging fields. Bioethics' distancing from mental illness is perhaps best explained by two overarching themes: 1) An intrinsic opposition between approaches to personhood rooted in Bioethics' early efforts to protect the competent individual from abuses in the research setting; and 2) Structural forces, such as deinstitutionalization, the Patient Rights Movement, and managed care. These two themes help explain Bioethics' relationship to mental health ethics and may also guide opportunities for rapprochement. The potential role for Bioethics may have the greatest implications for international human rights if bioethicists can re-energize an understanding of autonomy as not only free from abusive intrusions but also with rights to treatment and other fundamental necessities for restoring freedom of choice and self-determination. Bioethics thus has a great opportunity amid healthcare reform to strengthen the important role of the virtuous and humanistic care provider. PMID:26424211

  1. OPPORTUNITIES IN REFORM: BIOETHICS AND MENTAL HEALTH ETHICS

    PubMed Central

    WILLIAMS, ARTHUR ROBINSON

    2015-01-01

    This year marks the first year of implementation for both the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act in the United States. Resultantly healthcare reform is moving in the direction of integrating care for physical and mental illness, nudging clinicians to consider medical and psychiatric comorbidity as the expectation rather than the exception. Understanding the intersections of physical and mental illness with autonomy and self-determination in a system realigning its values so fundamentally therefore becomes a top priority for clinicians. Yet Bioethics has missed opportunities to help guide clinicians through one of medicine’s most ethically rich and challenging fields. Bioethics’ distancing from mental illness is perhaps best explained by two overarching themes: 1) an intrinsic opposition between approaches to personhood rooted in Bioethics’ early efforts to protect the competent individual from abuses in the research setting; and 2) structural forces, such as deinstitutionalization, the Patient Rights Movement, and managed care. These two themes help explain Bioethics’ relationship to mental health ethics and may also guide opportunities for rapprochement. The potential role for Bioethics may have the greatest implications for international human rights if bioethicists can re-energize an understanding of autonomy as not only free from abusive intrusions but also with rights to treatment and other fundamental necessities for restoring freedom of choice and self-determination. Bioethics thus has a great opportunity amid healthcare reform to strengthen the important role of the virtuous and humanistic care provider. PMID:26424211

  2. Conspirators in a Neo-Liberal Agenda? Adult Educators in Second-Chance Private Training Establishments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Judith

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study that explored the impact of neo-liberal policy and ideology on educators and directors working in second-chance Private Training Establishments (PTEs) which were created at the height of the neo-liberal reforms in New Zealand. By examining the experiences of 14 educators and directors in four…

  3. Refusing to Settle for Pigeons and Parks: Urban Environmental Education in the Age of Neoliberalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, Michael W.; Piersol, Laura; Blenkinsop, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The institutionalization of neoliberal reforms that began to take hold in the 1970s were by and large "common-sense governance" by the 1990s. While the growing predominance of neoliberal discourse and marginalization of alternatives in environmental education is disconcerting on the level of policy, this paper explores an equally…

  4. [The French health care system and its reform].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, S; Motohashi, Y

    1998-10-01

    various social experiments. It is very meaningful for the Japanese government to analyze this process of health reform occurring in France in order to discuss the health system reforms in Japan. PMID:9916488

  5. Change of government: one more big bang health care reform in England's National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Hunter, David J

    2011-01-01

    Once again the National Health Service (NHS) in England is undergoing major reform, following the election of a new coalition government keen to reduce the role of the state and cut back on big government. The NHS has been undergoing continuous reform since the 1980s. Yet, despite the significant transaction costs incurred, there is no evidence that the claimed benefits have been achieved. Many of the same problems endure. The reforms follow the direction of change laid down by the last Conservative government in the early 1990s, which the recent Labour government did not overturn despite a commitment to do so. Indeed, under Labour, the NHS was subjected to further market-style changes that have paved the way for the latest round of reform. The article considers the appeal of big bang reform, questions its purpose and value, and critically appraises the nature and extent of the proposed changes in this latest round of reform. It warns that the NHS in its current form may not survive the changes, as they open the way to privatization and a weakening of its public service ethos. PMID:21319727

  6. Memphis Business Group on Health: a model for health care reform and cost containment.

    PubMed

    Miller, D

    1994-01-01

    A market-driven, community-based, competitive health care model has effectively assisted Memphis employers to achieve their cost containment and health care reform objectives. Members of the Memphis Business Group on Health joined forces and successfully implemented a variety of programs and services that resulted in dramatic cost savings and reform of health care delivery systems. Programs included development of a purchasing alliance for negotiating contracts for hospital, medical, workers' compensation, psychiatric, and substance abuse care and other service and product options. Utilization management programs focused on appropriate consumption of resources and intensive management of critical cases. While increases in per employee costs averaged 14.7 percent per year for five years nationally, members of the Memphis Business Group on Health held their increases to an average of 6 percent per year. PMID:10132786

  7. Health sector reforms for 21(st) century healthcare.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Darshan

    2015-01-01

    The form of the public health system in India is a three tiered pyramid-like structure consisting primary, secondary, and tertiary healthcare services. The content of India's health system is mono-cultural and based on western bio-medicine. Authors discuss need for health sector reforms in the wake of the fact that despite huge investment, the public health system is not delivering. Today, 70% of the population pays out of pocket for even primary healthcare. Innovation is the need of the hour. The Indian government has recognized eight systems of healthcare viz., Allopathy, Ayurveda, Siddha, Swa-rigpa, Unani, Naturopathy, Homeopathy, and Yoga. Allopathy receives 97% of the national health budget, and 3% is divided amongst the remaining seven systems. At present, skewed funding and poor integration denies the public of advantage of synergy and innovations arising out of the richness of India's Medical Heritage. Health seeking behavior studies reveal that 40-70% of the population exercise pluralistic choices and seek health services for different needs, from different systems. For emergency and surgery, Allopathy is the first choice but for chronic and common ailments and for prevention and wellness help from the other seven systems is sought. Integrative healthcare appears to be the future framework for healthcare in the 21(st) century. A long-term strategy involving radical changes in medical education, research, clinical practice, public health and the legal and regulatory framework is needed, to innovate India's public health system and make it both integrative and participatory. India can be a world leader in the new emerging field of "integrative healthcare" because we have over the last century or so assimilated and achieved a reasonable degree of competence in bio-medical and life sciences and we possess an incredibly rich and varied medical heritage of our own. PMID:25878456

  8. Health sector reforms for 21st century healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Darshan

    2015-01-01

    The form of the public health system in India is a three tiered pyramid-like structure consisting primary, secondary, and tertiary healthcare services. The content of India's health system is mono-cultural and based on western bio-medicine. Authors discuss need for health sector reforms in the wake of the fact that despite huge investment, the public health system is not delivering. Today, 70% of the population pays out of pocket for even primary healthcare. Innovation is the need of the hour. The Indian government has recognized eight systems of healthcare viz., Allopathy, Ayurveda, Siddha, Swa-rigpa, Unani, Naturopathy, Homeopathy, and Yoga. Allopathy receives 97% of the national health budget, and 3% is divided amongst the remaining seven systems. At present, skewed funding and poor integration denies the public of advantage of synergy and innovations arising out of the richness of India's Medical Heritage. Health seeking behavior studies reveal that 40–70% of the population exercise pluralistic choices and seek health services for different needs, from different systems. For emergency and surgery, Allopathy is the first choice but for chronic and common ailments and for prevention and wellness help from the other seven systems is sought. Integrative healthcare appears to be the future framework for healthcare in the 21st century. A long-term strategy involving radical changes in medical education, research, clinical practice, public health and the legal and regulatory framework is needed, to innovate India's public health system and make it both integrative and participatory. India can be a world leader in the new emerging field of “integrative healthcare” because we have over the last century or so assimilated and achieved a reasonable degree of competence in bio-medical and life sciences and we possess an incredibly rich and varied medical heritage of our own. PMID:25878456

  9. HealthPathways: creating a pathway for health systems reform.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Suzanne; Varhol, Richard; Bell, Colin; Quirk, Frances; Durrington, Learne

    2015-02-01

    Inefficiencies in the co-ordination and integration of primary and secondary care services in Australia, have led to increases in waiting times, unnecessary presentations to emergency departments and issues around poor discharge of patients. HealthPathways is a program developed in Canterbury, New Zealand, that builds relationships between General Practitioners and Specialists and uses information technology so that efficiency is maximised and the right patient is given the right care at the right time. Healthpathways is being implemented by a number of Medicare Locals across Australia however, little is known about the impact HealthPathways may have in Australia. This article provides a short description of HealthPathways and considers what it may offer in the Australian context and some of the barriers and facilitators to implementation. PMID:25433515

  10. Health care reform, behavioral health, and the criminal justice population.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Alison Evans; Cheema, Jehanzeb

    2014-10-01

    The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) has a number of important features for individuals who are involved with the criminal justice system. Among the most important changes is the expansion of Medicaid to more adults. The current study estimates that 10% of the total Medicaid expansion could include individuals who have experienced recent incarceration. The ACA also emphasizes the importance of mental health and substance abuse benefits, potentially changing the landscape of behavioral health treatment providers willing to serve criminal justice populations. Finally, it seeks to promote coordinated care delivery. New care delivery and appropriate funding models are needed to address the behavioral health and other chronic conditions experienced by those in criminal justice and to coordinate care within the complex structure of the justice system itself. PMID:24807645

  11. [Reflections on health planning and on health reform in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Lana, F C; Gomes, E L

    1996-01-01

    The authors considered carefully the brazilian social policies at the regimes of populism and militarism as well as at the democratic transition following the presupposition that the social planning in Latin America emerged as an instrument for social policies formulation. The authors also considered some tendencies of the Latin America Planning, emphasizing the Strategic Focus of the Health Program formulated by the Public Health School of Medellin; the Strategic Thought elaborated by Mario Testa; and the Strategic Situational Planning developed by Carlos Matus. PMID:8807976

  12. Viewpoint: Prevention is missing: is China's health reform reform for health?

    PubMed

    Yang, Le; Zhang, Xiaoli; Tan, Tengfei; Cheng, Jingmin

    2015-02-01

    Ancient China emphasized disease prevention. As a Chinese saying goes, 'it is more important to prevent the disease than to cure it'. Traditional Chinese medicine posits that diseases can be understood, thus, prevented. In today's China, the state of people's health seems worse than in the past. Thus the Chinese government undertook the creation of a new health system. Alas, we believe the results are not very satisfactory. The government seems to have overlooked rational allocation between resources for treatment and prevention. Public investment has been gradually limited to the domain of treatment. We respond to this trend, highlighting the importance of prevention and call for government and policymakers to adjust health policy and work out a solution suitable for improving the health of China's people. PMID:25274124

  13. Comparison of health care financing in Egypt and Cuba: lessons for health reform in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Gericke, C A

    2005-01-01

    Egypt and Cuba are both lower-middle income countries with a history of socialist rule, which have embarked on economic liberalization since the 1990s. Cuba has achieved exemplary health status whereas health status in Egypt is lower than could be expected for its level of income. In this article, health care financing mechanisms in both countries are analysed on their effectiveness, efficiency, and equity, with the objective of identifying the determinants of success in the Cuban health system from which valuable lessons for current health reforms in Egypt may be derived. PMID:16761679

  14. More Promises To Keep: Sustaining Arizona's Capacity for Welfare and Health Reform (December 1, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Univ., Tempe. Morrison Inst. for Public Policy.

    This publication presents the views expressed by the major speakers at "More Promises to Keep: Sustaining Arizona's Capacity for Welfare and Health Reform," concluding a 3-year study of welfare and health reform in the state. The publication also summarizes the discussions of three special interest sessions. The speakers' op-ed-style pieces and…

  15. Telemental health: responding to mandates for reform in primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kathleen M; Lieberman, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Telemental health (TMH) has established a niche as a feasible, acceptable, and effective service model to improve the mental healthcare and outcomes for individuals who cannot access traditional mental health services. The Accountability Care Act has mandated reforms in the structure, functioning, and financing of primary care that provide an opportunity for TMH to move into the mainstream healthcare system. By partnering with the Integrated Behavioral Healthcare Model, TMH offers a spectrum of tools to unite primary care physicians and mental health specialist in a mind-body view of patients' healthcare needs and to activate patients in their own care. TMH tools include video-teleconferencing to telecommute mental health specialists to the primary care setting to collaborate with a team in caring for patients' mental healthcare needs and to provide direct services to patients who are not progressing optimally with this collaborative model. Asynchronous tools include online therapies that offer an efficient first step to treatment for selected disorders such as depression and anxiety. Patients activate themselves in their care through portals that provide access to their healthcare information and Web sites that offer on-demand information and communication with a healthcare team. These synchronous and asynchronous TMH tools may move the site of mental healthcare from the clinic to the home. The evolving role of social media in facilitating communication among patients or with their healthcare team deserves further consideration as a tool to activate patients and provide more personalized care. PMID:23611641

  16. Health Reform and the Constitutionality of the Individual Mandate

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeffrey J.; Kelly, Deena; McHugh, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 is landmark legislation designed to expand access to health care for virtually all legal U.S. residents. A vital but controversial provision of the ACA requires individuals to maintain health insurance coverage or face a tax penalty—the individual mandate. We examine the constitutionality of the individual mandate by analyzing relevant court decisions. A critical issue has been defining the “activities” Congress is authorized to regulate. Some judges determined that the mandate was constitutional because the decision to go without health insurance, that is, to self-insure, is an activity with substantial economic effects within the overall scheme of the ACA. Opponents suggest that Congress overstepped its authority by regulating “inactivity,” that is, compelling people to purchase insurance when they otherwise would not. The U.S. Supreme Court is set to review the issues and the final ruling will shape the effectiveness of health reform. PMID:22454219

  17. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mroz, Tracy M; Pitonyak, Jennifer S; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy's rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy's perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy's research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. PMID:26356651

  18. Health care reform: what history doesn't teach.

    PubMed

    Jecker, Nancy S

    2005-01-01

    The paper begins by tracing the historical development of American medicine as practice, profession, and industry from the eighteenth century to the present. This historical outline emphasizes shifting conceptions of physicians and physician ethics. It lays the basis for showing, in the second section, how contemporary controversies about the physician's role in managed care take root in medicine's past. In the final two sections, I revisit both the historical analysis and its application to contemporary debates. I argue that historical narratives can function as "master narratives" that suppress or leave out historical facts. I bring to the surface what is covered up by the master narrative approach, and show its relevance to contemporary ethical debates. I conclude by proposing that preserving the integrity of medicine will require modifying the master narratives we tell about physicians. The integrity of medicine also offers new perspectives for thinking about managed care and the broader topic of health care reform. PMID:16180111

  19. Health in China. From Mao to market reform.

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, T.; Wei, X. Z.

    1997-01-01

    After the Liberation by Mao Ze Dong's Communist army in 1949, China experienced massive social and economic change. The dramatic reductions in mortality and morbidity of the next two decades were brought about through improvements in socioeconomic conditions, an emphasis on prevention, and almost universal access to basic health care. The economic mismanagement of the Great Leap Forward brought about a temporary reversal in these positive trends. During the Cultural Revolution there was a sustained attack on the privileged position of the medical profession. Most city doctors were sent to work in the countryside, where they trained over a million barefoot doctors. Deng Xiao Ping's radical economic reforms of the late 1970s replaced the socialist system with a market economy. Although average incomes have increased, the gap between rich and poor has widened. PMID:9183206

  20. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pitonyak, Jennifer S.; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E.

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy’s rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy’s perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy’s research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. PMID:26356651

  1. A democratic responsiveness approach to real reform: an exploration of health care systems' resilience.

    PubMed

    Grignon, Michel

    2012-08-01

    Real reforms attempt to change how health care is financed and how it is rationed. Three main explanations have been offered to explain why such reforms are so difficult: institutional gridlock, path dependency, and societal preferences. The latter posits that choices made regarding the health care system in a given country reflect the broader societal set of values in that country and that as a result public resistance to real reform may more accurately reflect citizens' personal convictions, self-interest, or even active social choices. "Conscientious objectors" may do more to derail reform than previously recognized. PMID:22466049

  2. The Impact of Health Care Reform on Hospital and Preventive Care: Evidence from Massachusetts☆

    PubMed Central

    Kolstad, Jonathan T.; Kowalski, Amanda E.

    2012-01-01

    In April 2006, Massachusetts passed legislation aimed at achieving near-universal health insurance coverage. The key features of this legislation were a model for national health reform, passed in March 2010. The reform gives us a novel opportunity to examine the impact of expansion to near-universal coverage state-wide. Among hospital discharges in Massachusetts, we find that the reform decreased uninsurance by 36% relative to its initial level and to other states. Reform affected utilization by decreasing length of stay, the number of inpatient admissions originating from the emergency room, and preventable admissions. At the same time, hospital cost growth did not increase. PMID:23180894

  3. Winning Policy Change to Promote Community Health Workers: Lessons From Massachusetts in The Health Reform Era

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Terry; Wilkinson, Geoffrey W.; Nannini, Angela; Martin, Cindy Marti; Fox, Durrell J.

    2011-01-01

    There is a national movement among community health workers (CHWs) to improve compensation, working conditions, and recognition for the workforce through organizing for policy change. As some of the key advocates involved, we describe the development in Massachusetts of an authentic collaboration between strong CHW leaders of a growing statewide CHW association and their public health allies. Collaborators worked toward CHW workforce and public health objectives through alliance building and organizing, legislative advocacy, and education in the context of opportunities afforded by health care reform. This narrative of the path to policy achievements can inform other collaborative efforts attempting to promote a policy agenda for the CHW workforce across the nation. PMID:22021281

  4. Genetics in the reformed health service. Changes for the better?

    PubMed

    Harris, R

    1992-10-01

    The practical value of medical genetics, in particular the development of molecular genetics complemented by clinical diagnosis and counselling, is widely recognised. There is strong independent support from government and patient organisations for augmenting genetics services in all health regions; this support gives much reason for optimism. But there appears to be a hiatus following the reform of the Health Service: no genetics centre has, as yet, adequate resources and there has been no increase in clinical genetic manpower in the last two years. Even worse, Wales and at least one English region have devolved genetic services to districts, which appears to be contrary to government policy for genetic services. These factors have inevitably limited the implementation of many opportunities for improved patient care and the prevention of genetic disease. However, medical geneticists, assisted by the Royal College of Physicians and others, want to respond positively to the changes in the Health Service. Recommendations are made for strategies which promise to maintain integrated regional clinical and laboratory services and to achieve well evaluated developments. PMID:1432886

  5. Values and health care: the Confucian dimension in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Lim, Meng-Kin

    2012-12-01

    Are values and social priorities universal, or do they vary across geography, culture, and time? This question is very relevant to Asia's emerging economies that are increasingly looking at Western models for answers to their own outmoded health care systems that are in dire need of reform. But is it safe for them to do so without sufficient regard to their own social, political, and philosophical moorings? This article argues that historical and cultural legacies influence prevailing social values with regard to health care financing and resource allocation, and that the Confucian dimension provides a helpful entry point for a deeper understanding of ongoing health care reforms in East Asia--as exemplified by the unique case of Singapore. PMID:23175795

  6. Medicaid and State Health Care Reform: Process, Programs, and Policy Options

    PubMed Central

    Rotwein, Suzanne; Boulmetis, Maria; Boben, Paul J.; Fingold, Helaine I.; Hadley, James P.; Rama, Kathy L.; Van Hoven, Debbie

    1995-01-01

    Health care reform is a continuously evolving process. The States and the Federal Government have struggled with policy issues to combat escalating Medicaid expenditures while ensuring access and quality of care to an ever-expanding population. In the absence of national health care reform, States are increasingly relying on Federal waivers to develop innovative approaches to address a myriad of issues associated with the present health care delivery system. This article provides a summary of State health care reform efforts that have been initiated under Federal waiver authority. PMID:10142572

  7. [Global lessons of the Mexican health reform: empowerment through the use of evidence].

    PubMed

    Frenk, Julio; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio

    2010-09-01

    This paper illustrates, using as an example the recent reform of the Mexican health system, the potential of knowledge in the design and implementation of public policies. In the first part the relationship between knowledge and health is described. In part two, the efforts in Mexico to generate evidence that would eventually nourish the design and implementation of health policies are discussed. In the following sections the content and the guiding concept of the reform, the democratization of health, are analyzed. The paper concludes with the discussion of the main global lessons of this reform experience. PMID:21152734

  8. The debate on climate change and health in the context of ecological public health: a necessary corrective to Costello et al.'s 'biggest global health threat', or co-opted apologists for the neoliberal hegemony?

    PubMed

    Goodman, B

    2014-12-01

    The threat posed to global health by climate change has been widely discussed internationally. The United Kingdom public health community seem to have accepted this as fact and have called for urgent action on climate change, often through state interventionist mitigation strategies and the adoption of a risk discourse. Putting aside the climate change deniers' arguments, there are critics of this position who seem to accept climate change as a fact but argue that the market and/or economic development should address the issue. Their view is that carbon reduction (mitigation) is a distraction, may be costly and is ineffective. They argue that what is required is more economic development and progress even if that means a warmer world. Both positions however accept the fact of growth based capitalism and thus fail to critique neoliberal market driven capitalism or posit an alternative political economy that eschews growth. Ecological public health, however, appears to be a way forward in addressing not only social determinants of health but also the political and ecological determinants. This might allow us to consider not just public health but also planetary health and health threats that arise from growth based capitalism. PMID:25443102

  9. Human resources: the Cinderella of health sector reform in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Homedes, Núria; Ugalde, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Human resources are the most important assets of any health system, and health workforce problems have for decades limited the efficiency and quality of Latin America health systems. World Bank-led reforms aimed at increasing equity, efficiency, quality of care and user satisfaction did not attempt to resolve the human resources problems that had been identified in multiple health sector assessments. However, the two most important reform policies – decentralization and privatization – have had a negative impact on the conditions of employment and prompted opposition from organized professionals and unions. In several countries of the region, the workforce became the most important obstacle to successful reform. This article is based on fieldwork and a review of the literature. It discusses the reasons that led health workers to oppose reform; the institutional and legal constraints to implementing reform as originally designed; the mismatch between the types of personnel needed for reform and the availability of professionals; the deficiencies of the reform implementation process; and the regulatory weaknesses of the region. The discussion presents workforce strategies that the reforms could have included to achieve the intended goals, and the need to take into account the values and political realities of the countries. The authors suggest that autochthonous solutions are more likely to succeed than solutions imported from the outside. PMID:15659241

  10. Reproductive health and health sector reform in developing countries: establishing a framework for dialogue.

    PubMed Central

    Lubben, Marianne; Mayhew, Susannah H.; Collins, Charles; Green, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    It is not clear how policy-making in the field of reproductive health relates to changes associated with programmes for the reform of the health sector in developing countries. There has been little communication between these two areas, yet policy on reproductive health has to be implemented in the context of structural change. This paper examines factors that limit dialogue between the two areas and proposes the following framework for encouraging it: the identification of policy groups and the development of bases for collaborative links between them; the introduction of a common understanding around relevant policy contexts; reaching agreement on compatible aims relating to reproductive health and health sector change; developing causal links between policy content in reproductive health and health sector change as a basis for evidence-based policy-making; and strengthening policy-making structures, systems, skills, and values. PMID:12219159

  11. Rents From the Essential Health Benefits Mandate of Health Insurance Reform.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Roger Lee

    2015-01-01

    The essential health benefits mandate constitutes one of the most controversial health care reforms introduced under the U.S. Affordable Care Act of 2010. It bears important theoretical and practical implications for health care risk and insurance management. These essential health benefits are examined in this study from a rent-seeking perspective, particularly in terms of three interrelated questions: Is there an economic rationale for standardized, minimum health care coverage? How is the scope of essential health services and treatments determined? What are the attendant and incidental costs and benefits of such determination/s? Rents offer ample incentives to business interests to expend considerable resources for health care marketing, particularly when policy processes are open to contestation. Welfare losses inevitably arise from these incentives. We rely on five case studies to illustrate why and how rents are created, assigned, extracted, and dissipated in equilibrium. We also demonstrate why rents depend on persuasive marketing and the bargained decisions of regulators and rentiers, as conditioned by the Tullock paradox. Insights on the intertwining issues of consumer choice, health care marketing, and insurance reform are offered by way of conclusion. PMID:26075546

  12. New Zealand's mental health legislation needs reform to avoid discrimination.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sarah E; O'Brien, Anthony

    2014-09-26

    New Zealand's Mental Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act (the Act) is now over 20 years old. As has occurred historically our conceptualisation of humane treatment of people with mental illness has altered significantly over the period in which the Act has been in force. The emergence of the philosophy of recovery, and its subsequent policy endorsement, has seen a significant shift in mental health service delivery towards a greater emphasis on autonomy. Human rights developments such as New Zealand's ratification of the 2006 United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities have resulted in compulsory treatment, where it is justified in whole or part by a person's mental illness, now being considered antithetical to best practice, and discriminatory. However the number of people subject to the Act is increasing, especially in community settings, and it is questionable how effective the mechanisms for challenging compulsion are in practice. Moreover, monitoring of the situation at the systemic level lacks critical analysis. Complacency, including no indication that review and reform of this now antiquated legislation is nigh, continues a pattern of old where the situation of people with experience of mental illness is largely ignored and neglected. PMID:25290499

  13. Reform of financing for health coverage: what can reinsurance accomplish?

    PubMed

    Bovbjerg, R R

    1992-01-01

    Reinsurance is one way that insurance companies pool risk, in this case, across insurance companies. Under conventional private practice, primary health insurers, including self-insured groups and HMOs, voluntarily contract with reinsurers to share some risk and some premiums. Because the primary carrier mainly wants to protect its solvency against unpredictable variation in claims experience, it normally reinsures only the "high end" of claims risk. This retrospective coverage of unusually high losses helps primary insurers take on more risk than they otherwise could. But it does not help secure affordable coverage for people with prospectively known high risks. Some plans for reforming private health insurance also invoke reinsurance-like mechanisms, especially in the markets for individual and small group coverage. There, reinsurance serves as part of a strategy for requiring that primary insurance be made available to all applicants, regardless of risk. Reinsurance or similar rules for allocating the burden of unusually high risks can help keep any one private insurer from having to bear a disproportionate share of high risks, and thus extend the reach of private insurance markets through regulation. But reinsurance alone does not reduce the underlying high cost of providing such primary coverage. Nor can reinsurance alone provide the resources to cover the uninsured, ensure that insurers will want to cover them, or make them voluntarily buy private coverage. Only some combination of new subsidies and mandates can do that. PMID:1612717

  14. Support for National Health Insurance Seven Years Into Massachusetts Healthcare Reform: Views of Populations Targeted by the Reform.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Sonali; Zallman, Leah; Nardin, Rachel; Bor, David; Woolhandler, Steffie; Himmelstein, David U; McCormick, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Before the Affordable Care Act (ACA), many surveys showed majority support for national health insurance (NHI), also known as single payer; however, little is currently known about views of the ACA's targeted population. Massachusetts residents have had seven years of experience with state health care reform that became the model for the ACA. We surveyed 1,151 adults visiting safety-net emergency departments in Massachusetts in late 2013 on their preference for NHI or the Massachusetts reform and on their experiences with insurance. Most of the patients surveyed were low-income and non-white. The majority of patients (72.0%) preferred NHI to the Massachusetts reform. Support for NHI among those with public insurance, commercial insurance, and no insurance was 68.9%, 70.3%, and 86.3%, respectively (p < .001). Support for NHI was higher among patients dissatisfied with their insurance plan (83.3% vs. 68.9%, p = .014), who delayed medical care (81.2% vs. 69.6%, p < .001) or avoided purchasing medications due to cost (87.3% vs. 71.4%; p = .01). Majority support for NHI was observed in every demographic subgroup. Given the strong support for NHI among disadvantaged Massachusetts patients seven years after state health reform, a reappraisal of the ACA's ability to meet the needs of underserved patients is warranted. PMID:26536912

  15. Academic Perceptions of Higher Education Assessment Processes in Neoliberal Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raaper, Rille

    2016-01-01

    Neoliberal higher education reforms in relation to quality assurance, managerialist practices, accountability and performativity are receiving increasing attention and criticism. In this article, I will address student assessment as part of the technologies that increasingly govern academics and their work in universities. I will draw on…

  16. English, Tracking, and Neoliberalization of Education in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byean, Hyera

    2015-01-01

    Drawing upon the experiences and dilemmas of the author, a middle school English teacher in South Korea, this article illuminates the ways in which neoliberal reforms in education intersect with English, and how such links have entailed the class-based polarization of education in Korean society. Given the prominent role that English plays in…

  17. Global Education Inc.: New Policy Networks and the Neoliberal Imaginary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Do private and philanthropic solutions to the problems of education signal the end of state education in its "welfare" form? Education policy is being reformed and re-worked on a global scale. Policies are flowing and converging to produce a singular vision of "best practice" based on the methods and tenets of the "neo-liberal imaginary".…

  18. The Impact of State Behavioral Health Reform on Native American Individuals, Families, and Communities

    PubMed Central

    Willging, Cathleen E.; Goodkind, Jessica; Lamphere, Louise; Saul, Gwendolyn; Fluder, Shannon; Seanez, Paula

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the State of New Mexico undertook a sweeping transformation of all publicly funded behavioral health services. The reform was intended to enhance the cultural responsiveness and appropriateness of these services. To examine achievement of this objective, we conducted a qualitative study of the involvement of Native Americans in reform efforts and the subsequent impacts of reform on services for Native Americans. We found that the reform was relatively unsuccessful at creating mechanisms for genuine community input or improving behavioral health care for this population. These shortcomings were related to limited understandings of administrators concerning how tribal governments and health care systems operate, and the structural limitations of a managed care system that does not allow flexibility for culturally appropriate utilization review, screening, or treatment. However, interaction between the State and tribes increased, and we conclude that aspects of the reform could be strengthened to achieve more meaningful involvement and service improvements. PMID:22427455

  19. Physicians' Plan for a healthy Minnesota. The MMA proposal for health care reform. The report of the Minnesota Medical Association Health Care Reform Task Force.

    PubMed

    2005-03-01

    The health care system in the United States, according to some, is on the verge of imploding. The rapidly rising cost of services is causing more and more Minnesotans to forego needed care. At the same time, the increasing costs are placing additional pressure on families, businesses, and state and local government budgets. The Minnesota Medical Association's (MMA) Health Care Reform Task Force has proposed a bold new approach that seeks to ensure affordable health care for all Minnesotans. The proposal is a roadmap to provide all Minnesotans with affordable insurance for essential health care services. In creating this plan, the task force strove to achieve three common reform goals: expand access to care, improve quality, and control costs. To achieve those ends, it has proposed a model built on four key features: (1) A strong public health system, (2) A reformed insurance market that delivers universal coverage, (3) A reformed health care delivery market that creates incentives for increasing value, (4) Systems that fully support the delivery of high-quality care. The task force believes that these elements will provide the foundation for a system that serves everyone and allows Minnesotans to purchase better health care at a relatively lower price. Why health care reform again? The average annual cost of health care for an average Minnesota household is about 11,000 dollars--an amount that's projected to double by 2010, if current trends continue. Real wages are not growing fast enough to absorb such cost increases. If unabated, these trends portend a reduction in access to and quality of care, and a heavier economic burden on individuals, employers, and the government. Furthermore, Minnesota and the United States are not getting the best value for their health care dollars. The United States spends 50 percent more per capita than any other country on health care but lags far behind other countries in the health measures of its population. PMID:15853031

  20. "We Can't Let Them Fail for One More Day": School Reform Urgency and the Politics of Reformer-Community Alliances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Hava Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a critical examination of neoliberal urgency in education reform. While critics of neoliberal reform policies have argued that these reforms exclude low-income community participation almost entirely, I argue that in practice this exclusion is not as total or as overt as macro-analyses would suggest. These macro analyses do…

  1. Price elasticities in the German Statutory Health Insurance market before and after the health care reform of 2009.

    PubMed

    Pendzialek, Jonas B; Danner, Marion; Simic, Dusan; Stock, Stephanie

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the change in price elasticity of health insurance choice in Germany after a reform of health insurance contributions. Using a comprehensive data set of all sickness funds between 2004 and 2013, price elasticities are calculated both before and after the reform for the entire market. The general price elasticity is found to be increased more than 4-fold from -0.81 prior to the reform to -3.53 after the reform. By introducing a new kind of health insurance contribution the reform seemingly increased the price elasticity of insured individuals to a more appropriate level under the given market parameters. However, further unintended consequences of the new contribution scheme were massive losses of market share for the more expensive sickness funds and therefore an undivided focus on pricing as the primary competitive element to the detriment of quality. PMID:25670009

  2. Lessons learned from health sector reform: a four-country comparison.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Md Noorunnabi; Rob, Ubaidur; Mahabub-Ul-Anwar, Md

    Various reforms have been undertaken to improve the functioning of health systems in developing countries, but there is limited comparative analysis of reform initiatives. This article discusses health sector reform experiences of four developing countries and identifies the lessons learned. The article is based on the review of background papers on Bangladesh, Pakistan, Indonesia, and Tanzania prepared as part of a multi-country study on health sector reform. Findings suggest that decentralization works effectively while implementing primary and secondary health programs. Decentralization of power and authority to local authorities requires strengthening and supporting these units. Along with the public sector, the private sector plays an effective role in institutional and human resources development as well as in improving service delivery. Community participation facilitates recruitment and development of field workers, facility improvement, and service delivery. For providing financial protection to the poor, there is a need to review user fees and develop affordable health insurance with an exemption mechanism. There is no uniform health sector reform approach; therefore, the experiences of other countries will help countries undertake appropriate reforms. Here, it is important to examine the context and determine the reform measures that constitute the best means in terms of equity, efficiency, and sustainability. PMID:19131306

  3. Health reform in New Zealand: short-term gain but long-term pain?

    PubMed

    Ashton, Toni; Tenbensel, Tim

    2012-10-01

    Following a period of quite radical structural reform during the 1990s, health reform in New Zealand is now more incremental and often 'under the radar' of public scrutiny and debate. However, many changes have been made to the roles and functions of key agencies and this could have a profound effect on the direction and performance of the public health system. In particular, the objective of reform at the national level has shifted away from improving population health and reducing health disparities towards improving the performance of service providers. This article describes some of the reforms that have been introduced in recent years and discusses some implications of these changes. We argue that policy settings that are concerned only with getting the right services to the right people at the right time are inherently short-sighted if they fail to tackle the long-term causes of increasing demand for future health services. PMID:23186398

  4. Implementing Family Health Nursing in Tajikistan: from policy to practice in primary health care reform.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, Barbara Ann; Cornish, Flora

    2007-10-01

    The health systems of former Soviet Union countries are undergoing reform away from the highly centralised, resource-intensive, specialised and hierarchical Soviet system, towards a more generalist, efficient health service with greater focus on primary health care. Family Health Nursing is a new model designed by WHO Europe in which skilled generalist community nurses deliver primary health care to local communities. This paper presents a qualitative evaluation of the implementation of Family Health Nursing in Tajikistan. Using Stufflebeam's 'Context, Input, Process, and Product' model, the paper aims to evaluate the progress of this reform, and to understand the factors that help or hinder its implementation. A four-phase research design investigates the development of the Family Health Nurse role over time. In 5 rural areas, 6 focus groups and 18 interviews with Family Health Nurses, 4 observations of their practice, 7 interviews with families and 9 interviews with physicians were carried out. Data were analysed according to the components of Stufflebeam's model. Although the legacy of the Soviet health system did not set a precedent for a nurse who is capable of decision-making and who works in partnership with the physician, Family Health Nurses were successfully implementing new practices. Crucial to their ability to do so were the co-operation of physicians and families. Physicians were impressed by the nurses' development of knowledge, and families were impressed that the nurses could offer real solutions to their problems. However, failure to pay the nurses regular salaries had led to serious attrition of the workforce. We conclude that the success of the Family Health Nurse role in other countries will depend upon its position in relation to the historical health care system. PMID:17651876

  5. Australian Curriculum Reform II: Health and Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    It is implied by governing organizations that Australia is presently experiencing its first national curriculum reform, when as the title suggests it is the second. However, until now Australian states and territories have been responsible for the education curriculum delivered within schools. The present national curriculum reform promises one…

  6. Diffusion of complex health innovations--implementation of primary health care reforms in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat A; Kyratsis, Ioannis; Jelic, Gordan; Rados-Malicbegovic, Drazenka; Gurol-Urganci, Ipek

    2007-01-01

    Most transition countries in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia are engaged in health reform initiatives aimed at introducing primary health care (PHC) centred on family medicine to enhance performance of their health systems. But, in these countries the introduction of PHC reforms has been particularly challenging; while some have managed to introduce pilots, many have failed to these scale up. Using an innovation lens, we examine the introduction and diffusion of family-medicine-centred PHC reforms in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), which experienced bitter ethnic conflicts that destroyed much of the health systems infrastructure. The study was conducted in 2004-05 over a 18-month period and involved both qualitative and quantitative methods of inquiry. In this study we report the findings of the qualitative research, which involved in-depth interviews in three stages with key informants that were purposively sampled. In our research, we applied a proprietary analytical framework which enables simultaneous and holistic analysis of the context, the innovation, the adopters and the interactions between them over time. While many transition countries have struggled with the introduction of family-medicine-centred PHC reforms, in spite of considerable resource constraints and a challenging post-war context, within a few years, BiH has managed to scale up multifaceted reforms to cover over 25% of the country. Our analysis reveals a complex setting and bidirectional interaction between the innovation, adopters and the context, which have collectively influenced the diffusion process. Family-medicine-centred PHC reform is a complex innovation-involving organizational, financial, clinical and relational changes-within a complex adaptive system. An important factor influencing the adoption of this complex innovation in BiH was the perceived benefits of the innovation: benefits which accrue to the users, family physicians, nurses and policy makers. In the case of Bi

  7. Health care reform: understanding individuals' attitudes and information sources.

    PubMed

    Shue, Carolyn K; McGeary, Kerry Anne; Reid, Ian; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Fan, Maoyong

    2014-01-01

    Since passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law by President Barrack Obama, little is known about state-level perceptions of residents on the ACA. Perceptions about the act could potentially affect implementation of the law to the fullest extent. This 3-year survey study explored attitudes about the ACA, the types of information sources that individuals rely on when creating those attitudes, and the predictors of these attitudes among state of Indiana residents. The respondents were split between favorable and unfavorable views of the ACA, yet the majority of respondents strongly supported individual components of the act. National TV news, websites, family members, and individuals' own reading of the ACA legislation were identified as the most influential information sources. After controlling for potential confounders, the respondent's political affiliation, age, sex, and obtaining ACA information from watching national television news were the most important predictors of attitudes about the ACA and its components. These results mirror national-level findings. Implications for implementing health care reform at the state-level are discussed. PMID:25045705

  8. Health Care Reform: Ethical Foundations, Policy, and Law

    PubMed Central

    Sade, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Health care system reform has enormous implications for the future of American society and economic life. Since the early days of the republic, 2 world views have vied for determination of this country’s political system: the view of the individual as sovereign vs government as sovereign. As they developed the foundations of our nation’s governance, the founders were heavily influenced by the Enlightenment philosophy of the late 17th and 18th centuries—the US Constitution sharply limited the power of central government to specific narrowly defined functions, and the economic system was largely laissez faire, that is, economic exchange was mostly free of government regulation and securing individual liberty was a high priority. This situation has slowly reversed—the federal government originally was narrowly limited, but now it dominates states and individuals. The economic system has followed, lagging by several decades, so although it still retains some features of laissez faire capitalism, federal and state regulation have produced a decidedly mixed economy. PMID:22626914

  9. Health Care Reform: Understanding Individuals' Attitudes and Information Sources

    PubMed Central

    Shue, Carolyn K.; McGeary, Kerry Anne; Reid, Ian; Fan, Maoyong

    2014-01-01

    Since passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law by President Barrack Obama, little is known about state-level perceptions of residents on the ACA. Perceptions about the act could potentially affect implementation of the law to the fullest extent. This 3-year survey study explored attitudes about the ACA, the types of information sources that individuals rely on when creating those attitudes, and the predictors of these attitudes among state of Indiana residents. The respondents were split between favorable and unfavorable views of the ACA, yet the majority of respondents strongly supported individual components of the act. National TV news, websites, family members, and individuals' own reading of the ACA legislation were identified as the most influential information sources. After controlling for potential confounders, the respondent's political affiliation, age, sex, and obtaining ACA information from watching national television news were the most important predictors of attitudes about the ACA and its components. These results mirror national-level findings. Implications for implementing health care reform at the state-level are discussed. PMID:25045705

  10. Colombia and Cuba, contrasting models in Latin America's health sector reform.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Pol; De Ceukelaire, Wim; Van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    Latin American national health systems were drastically overhauled by the health sector reforms the 1990s. Governments were urged by donors and by the international financial institutions to make major institutional changes, including the separation of purchaser and provider functions and privatization. This article first analyses a striking paradox of the far-reaching reform measures: contrary to what is imposed on public health services, after privatization purchaser and provider functions are reunited. Then we compare two contrasting examples: Colombia, which is internationally promoted as a successful--and radical--example of 'market-oriented' health care reform, and Cuba, which followed a highly 'conservative' path to adapt its public system to the new conditions since the 1990s, going against the model of the international institutions. The Colombian reform has not been able to materialize its promises of universality, improved equity, efficiency and better quality, while Cuban health care remains free, accessible for everybody and of good quality. Finally, we argue that the basic premises of the ongoing health sector reforms in Latin America are not based on the people's needs, but are strongly influenced by the needs of foreign--especially North American--corporations. However, an alternative model of health sector reform, such as the Cuban one, can probably not be pursued without fundamental changes in the economic and political foundations of Latin American societies. PMID:17002735

  11. Health system reform and the role of field sites based upon demographic and health surveillance.

    PubMed Central

    Tollman, S. M.; Zwi, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    Field sites for demographic and health surveillance have made well-recognized contributions to the evaluation of new or untested interventions, largely through efficacy trials involving new technologies or the delivery of selected services, e.g. vaccines, oral rehydration therapy and alternative contraceptive methods. Their role in health system reform, whether national or international, has, however, proved considerably more limited. The present article explores the characteristics and defining features of such field sites in low-income and middle-income countries and argues that many currently active sites have a largely untapped potential for contributing substantially to national and subnational health development. Since the populations covered by these sites often correspond with the boundaries of districts or subdistricts, the strategic use of information generated by demographic surveillance can inform the decentralization efforts of national and provincial health authorities. Among the areas of particular importance are the following: making population-based information available and providing an information resource; evaluating programmes and interventions; and developing applications to policy and practice. The question is posed as to whether their potential contribution to health system reform justifies arguing for adaptations to these field sites and expanded investment in them. PMID:10686747

  12. Neo-Liberalism and Universal State Education: The Cases of Denmark, Norway and Sweden 1980-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiborg, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates neo-liberal policy on education in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Traditionally, the edifice of the education system in these Scandinavian countries has been built on egalitarian values, but over the last 20 years they have increasingly adopted market-led reforms of education. The extent of neo-liberal policy varies between…

  13. Using Michael Young's Analysis on Curriculum Studies to Examine the Effects of Neoliberalism on Curricula in Mozambique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavale, Nelson Casimiro

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author seeks to examine the effects of neoliberalism on curricula in Mozambique. Despite the fact that the introduction of neoliberal policies in Mozambique has affected the whole system of education, the focus in this article is only on curriculum reforms in secondary and technical/vocational education. The description and…

  14. Japan's Ministry of Education "Becoming the Right": Neo-Liberal Restructuring and the Ministry's Struggles for Political Legitimacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takayama, Keita

    2008-01-01

    This article first examines the controversial revision of the Fundamental Law of Education (FLE) by situating it in the larger global context of neo-liberal and neo-conservative state-restructuring and education reform. It then focuses on the domestic politics behind what seems to be the global convergence of education policy along neo-liberal and…

  15. Health Reform in Ceará: the process of decentralisation in the 1990s

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Regianne Leila Rolim; Atkinson, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to offer an overview of the health reform in Ceará focusing on the decentralisation process in the 1990s. The driving factor behind the Brazilian health reform movement was the necessity to reorganise the national health system and overcome inequalities. For the reformists, decentralisation, and together with it the idea of popular participation, is seen as essential to guarantee the fulfilment of the people’s needs and to incorporate their voice in the decision-making processes of the health system. In the state of Ceará, after the 1986 elections, health reform movement members took control over the management of the state Health Secretariat. This is the main cause of the acceleration of the decentralisation process with the transference of responsibility over the management of health care delivery to municipalities. PMID:25729333

  16. Policy Capacity Meets Politics: Comment on "Health Reform Requires Policy Capacity".

    PubMed

    Fafard, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    It is difficult to disagree with the general argument that successful health reform requires a significant degree of policy capacity or that all players in the policy game need to move beyond self-interested advocacy. However, an overly broad definition of policy capacity is a problem. More important perhaps, health reform inevitably requires not just policy capacity but political leadership and compromise. PMID:26673186

  17. Health Reform and the Obama Administration: Reflections in Mid-2010

    PubMed Central

    Marmor, Theodore R.

    2010-01-01

    The reforms that finally emerged from the Obama administration's initiative were the result of a year of nasty, demagogic and misleading claims in the US public forum, coupled with the complexities of crafting legislation that stood a chance of passing both the House of Representatives and the Senate. The resulting “hybrid” approach to healthcare reform produced a conservative strategy that ignores the experience of other wealthy democracies. More significantly, its long period of implementation, given a possible change of administration in 2012, increases uncertainty regarding whether and how reforms will be rolled out by 2014 and after. PMID:21804835

  18. Mental health policy and development in Egypt - integrating mental health into health sector reforms 2001-9

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Following a situation appraisal in 2001, a six year mental health reform programme (Egymen) 2002-7 was initiated by an Egyptian-Finnish bilateral aid project at the request of a former Egyptian minister of health, and the work was incorporated directly into the Ministry of Health and Population from 2007 onwards. This paper describes the aims, methodology and implementation of the mental health reforms and mental health policy in Egypt 2002-2009. Methods A multi-faceted and comprehensive programme which combined situation appraisal to inform planning; establishment of a health sector system for coordination, supervision and training of each level (national, governorate, district and primary care); development workshops; production of toolkits, development of guidelines and standards; encouragement of intersectoral liaison at each level; integration of mental health into health management systems; and dedicated efforts to improve forensic services, rehabilitation services, and child psychiatry services. Results The project has achieved detailed situation appraisal, epidemiological needs assessment, inclusion of mental health into the health sector reform plans, and into the National Package of Essential Health Interventions, mental health masterplan (policy guidelines) to accompany the general health policy, updated Egyptian mental health legislation, Code of Practice, adaptation of the WHO primary care guidelines, primary care training, construction of a quality system of roles and responsibilities, availability of medicines at primary care level, public education about mental health, and a research programme to inform future developments. Intersectoral liaison with education, social welfare, police and prisons at national level is underway, but has not yet been established for governorate and district levels, nor mental health training for police, prison staff and teachers. Conclusions The bilateral collaboration programme initiated a reform programme

  19. Financing of health care in four Caribbean territories: a comparison with reforms in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rutten, F; Lapré, R; Antonius, R; Dokoui, S; Haqq, E; Roberts, R; Mills, A

    2002-10-01

    This paper considers health care finance in four Caribbean territories and plans for reform in comparison with developments in European countries, to which these territories are historically linked. European health care reforms are aimed at making resource allocation in health care more efficient and more responsive to consumers' demands and preferences. These reforms in Europe have been continuing without appearing to have influenced the developments in the Caribbean very much, except in Martinique. In Trinidad and Tobago current reform entails delegation of responsibility for providing services to four regional health authorities and no purchaser/provider split at the regional or facility level as in the UK has been implemented. In the Bahamas, managed care arrangements are likely to emerge given the proximity of the United States. Recent universal coverage reform in Martinique was aimed at harmonisation of finance by bringing social security and social aid functions together under one management structure and may provide more opportunities for contracting and other initiatives towards greater efficiency. The first priority in Suriname is to restore proper functioning of the current system. Reforms in the four Caribbean territories have a largely administrative character and affect the organisation of the third party role in health care rather than fundamentally changing the relationship between this third party and the various other parties in health care. PMID:12151137

  20. Primary care and reform of health systems: a framework for the analysis of Latin American experiences.

    PubMed

    Frenk, J; González-Block, M A

    1992-03-01

    The article first proposes a framework within which to assess the potential of health sector reforms in Latin America for primary health care (PHC). Two dimensions are recognized: the scope of the reforms, content, and the means of participation that are put into play. This framework is then complemented through a critique of the often-sought but little-analyzed PHC reform strategies of decentralization and health sector integration. The analytical framework is next directed to the financing of health services, a chief aspect of any reform aiming toward PHC. Two facets of health service finance are first distinguished: its formal aspect as a means for economic subsistence and growth, and its substantive aspect as a means to promote the rational use of services and thus improvement of health. Once finance is understood in this microeconomic perspective, the focus shifts to the analysis of health care reforms at the macro, health policy level. The article concludes by positing that PHC is in essence a new health care paradigm, oriented by the values of universality, redistribution, integration, plurality, quality, and efficiency. PMID:10118440

  1. Primary care and the maelstrom of health care reform in the United States of America.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, P

    1995-01-01

    Recent reform in the National Health Service has moved general practice towards a more intense market and competition structure. Meanwhile in the United States of America there has been an attempt to modify the free enterprise approach to medical care towards a more socially responsive system. This discussion paper provides a family doctor's perspective of primary care and the maelstrom of health care reform in the USA. The cultural, economic and organizational issues underlying the need for reform are considered in turn, and the current situation with regard to health care provision, medical research, medical education and primary care are outlined. General practitioners in the United Kingdom would do well to pay attention to the effects of market reform occurring in general practice among their American counterparts. PMID:7576850

  2. Neoliberal Mechanisation of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sancar, Can; Sancar, Mine

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at examining how neoliberalism actually functions in universities and whether human instruction can actually be replaced by computerized instruction. The study reported in this paper is a qualitative study since it takes reality as a subjective human experience happening in a social context, and in historical time. It mainly…

  3. Reforms and Challenges of Post-conflict Kosovo Health System

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Mybera; Berisha, Merita; Lenjani, Basri

    2014-01-01

    Before its collapse, Kosovo's healthcare system was an integrated part of the Former Yugoslav Republics System (known as relatively well advanced for its time). Standstill had begun in the last decade of the twentieth century as the result of political disintegration of the former state. The enthusiasm of the healthcare professionals and the people of Kosovo that at the end of the conflict healthcare services will consolidate did not prove just right. Although we can claim that reorganization of Kosovo healthcare was a serious push (especially in the first years after the conflict), the intensity of development begun to fall at the latter stages. Although the basic legislation for the operation of the Healthcare System today in Kosovo does exist, the largest cause for the reform stagnation is where the law is not implemented properly and measures are not set as to a meaningful system of accountability. Twelve years have passed by since the 1999 war-conflict and, although, Kosovo has made progress in many other spheres, it has not yet reached to consolidate a health system comparable to those of other European countries. Intending to get out of difficult situation, several healthcare strategic plans have been developed in the past decade in Kosovo, but attempts in this direction have not been particularly fruitful. This script describes the actual Healthcare complexity of a situation in Kosovo 12 years after the end of the 1999 war-conflict. Interconnection and historical background is also looked upon and is described in the flow of events. Finally, the description of transfer competencies from international administrators to the local authorities as well as the flow of strategic planning that took place since 1999 has also been analyzed. PMID:24944539

  4. Reforms and Challenges of Post-conflict Kosovo Health System.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mybera; Berisha, Merita; Lenjani, Basri

    2014-04-01

    Before its collapse, Kosovo's healthcare system was an integrated part of the Former Yugoslav Republics System (known as relatively well advanced for its time). Standstill had begun in the last decade of the twentieth century as the result of political disintegration of the former state. The enthusiasm of the healthcare professionals and the people of Kosovo that at the end of the conflict healthcare services will consolidate did not prove just right. Although we can claim that reorganization of Kosovo healthcare was a serious push (especially in the first years after the conflict), the intensity of development begun to fall at the latter stages. Although the basic legislation for the operation of the Healthcare System today in Kosovo does exist, the largest cause for the reform stagnation is where the law is not implemented properly and measures are not set as to a meaningful system of accountability. Twelve years have passed by since the 1999 war-conflict and, although, Kosovo has made progress in many other spheres, it has not yet reached to consolidate a health system comparable to those of other European countries. Intending to get out of difficult situation, several healthcare strategic plans have been developed in the past decade in Kosovo, but attempts in this direction have not been particularly fruitful. This script describes the actual Healthcare complexity of a situation in Kosovo 12 years after the end of the 1999 war-conflict. Interconnection and historical background is also looked upon and is described in the flow of events. Finally, the description of transfer competencies from international administrators to the local authorities as well as the flow of strategic planning that took place since 1999 has also been analyzed. PMID:24944539

  5. Health Care Reform: America's Dilemma. Report on the National Meeting (Boston, Massachusetts, November 28-29, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labor/Higher Education Council, Washington, DC.

    Health care reform's direct effect on higher education and labor is the subject of this conference report. Individual, panel, and interactive work group presentations addressing the values and options on health care issues are included. Following an introduction, three papers discuss the U.S. health care system: (1) "National Health Care Reform:…

  6. Systemization of leadership for the systemization health care of health care: the unaddressed issue in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Degeling, Pieter; Carr, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    The case literature strongly suggests that both in England and in Australia health care reforms have had very little impact in terms of "improved performance". It is in the context of a perceived failure in the implementation of the reforms that an interest has arisen in leadership at the level of individual clinical units (e.g an orthopaedics unit or birth unit), as the possible "fix" for bridging the promise-performance gap. Drawing upon extensive case studies that highlight the problem and context for appropriate forms of leadership, this paper argues that the appropriate discourse, in terms of leadership in health reform, needs to focus upon the issue of authorization. In making this argument, addresses the current conceptions of leadership that have been advanced in the discourse before offering some case study material that is suggestive of why attention should be focused on the issue of authorization. Illustrates how and why the processes of leading, central to implementing reform, cannot be construed as socially disembodied processes. Rather, leading and following are partial and partisan processes whose potential is circumscribed by participants' position-takings and what is authorized in the institutional settings in which they are located Argues that the "following" that clinical unit managers could command was shaped by the sub-cultures and "regulatory ideals" with which staff of each profession are involved In the interests of reform, policy players in health should not be focusing attention solely upon the performative qualities and potential leadership abilities of middle level management, but also on their own performance. They should consider how their actions affect what is authorized institutionally and which sets the scope and limits of the leadership-followership dialectic in clinical settings. PMID:15588011

  7. From Wall Street to Main Street: how will the economic meltdown impact health care reform?

    PubMed

    Gardner, Deborah B

    2008-01-01

    What will happen to health care in the wake of the financial market crisis? Many health policy and economic experts are asking whether it is possible for any of the promises for health care reform to be realized. We could find ourselves in a catastrophic collision between national security priorities and domestic policy goals. Nurses must be vocal regarding the need to reform health care or it may be sidestepped if budgeting continues to prioritize the war abroad and not the crisis at home. PMID:19330976

  8. The reorientation of market-oriented reforms in Swedish health-care.

    PubMed

    Harrison, M I; Calltorp, J

    2000-01-01

    Sweden was an important pioneer of market-oriented reform in publicly funded health-care systems. Yet by the mid-1990s the county councils, which fund and manage most health-care, had substantially scaled back reforms based on provider competition while continuing to constrain health budgets. As policy makers faced new issues, they turned increasingly to longer-term and more cooperative contracts to define relations between hospitals and the county councils. Growing regionalization of government and hospital mergers further reconfigured acute care and limited opportunities for competition between hospitals. We seek to explain this reorientation of market-oriented reforms between 1989 and 1996 in terms of shifts in the positions taken by powerful policy actors, and in particular by county council politicians. During this period, elections moved liberal and conservative politicians, who were the most enthusiastic supporters of market-oriented reform, in and out of control of most county governments. Meanwhile many Social Democratic politicians gradually turned from initial support of competitive reform toward opposition. Politicians and county administrators from all parties were particularly concerned about controlling health expenditures during a period of recession. In addition, the public, politicians in the counties and municipalities, and health professionals resisted steps that threatened health sector employment and would have allowed market mechanisms, rather than governments, to determine the prices and distribution of health services. During the years under study Sweden's market-oriented reforms followed a course of development similar to that taken by other management and policy fashions (Abrahamson E. Management fashion, Academy of Management Review 1996;21: 254-85). At first the reforms enjoyed uncritical support by a broad spectrum of stakeholders. Gradually participants in the reform process recognized inherent tensions among the goals of the reform

  9. Health Care Reform in Massachusetts: Implementation of Coverage Expansions and a Health Insurance Mandate

    PubMed Central

    Doonan, Michael T; Tull, Katharine R

    2010-01-01

    Context: Much can be learned from Massachusetts's experience implementing health insurance coverage expansions and an individual health insurance mandate. While achieving political consensus on reform is difficult, implementation can be equally or even more challenging. Methods: The data in this article are based on a case study of Massachusetts, including interviews with key stakeholders, state government, and Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector Authority officials during the first three years of the program and a detailed analysis of primary and secondary documents. Findings: Coverage expansion and an individual mandate led Massachusetts to define affordability standards, establish a minimum level of insurance coverage, adopt insurance market reforms, and institute incentives and penalties to encourage coverage. Implementation entailed trade-offs between the comprehensiveness of benefits and premium costs, the subsidy levels and affordability, and among the level of mandate penalties, public support, and coverage gains. Conclusions: National lessons from the Massachusetts experience come not only from the specific decisions made but also from the process of decision making, the need to keep stakeholders engaged, the relationship of decisions to existing programs and regulations, and the interactions among program components. PMID:20377758

  10. Neo-Liberal Policy Agendas and the Problem of Inequality in Higher Education: The Ethiopian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molla, Tebeje

    2014-01-01

    Under the influence of the external policy pressure of donors such as the World Bank, higher education in Ethiopia has witnessed a series of institutional and system-wide reforms. This article reviews selected policy documents to show key neo-liberal policy agendas endorsed in the reforms and explicate how they have affected social equity in the…

  11. When State Centralism Meets Neo-Liberalism: Managing University Governance Change in Singapore and Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Ka Ho

    2010-01-01

    With strong intention to enhance the global competitiveness of their university systems, both the Singapore and Malaysia governments have introduced reforms along the lines of ideas and practices embedded in neo-liberalism. In the last decade or so, we have witnessed reforms being introduced to the higher education sectors in these Asian states,…

  12. The Impacts of State Health Reform Initiatives on Adults in New York and Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Long, Sharon K; Stockley, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyze the effects of health reform efforts in two large states—New York and Massachusetts. Data Sources/Study Setting National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data from 1999 to 2008. Study Design We take advantage of the “natural experiments” that occurred in New York and Massachusetts to compare health insurance coverage and health care access and use for adults before and after the implementation of the health policy changes. To control for underlying trends not related to the reform initiatives, we subtract changes in the outcomes over the same time period for comparison groups of adults who were not affected by the policy changes using a differences-in-differences framework. The analyses are conducted using multiple comparison groups and different time periods as a check on the robustness of the findings. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Nonelderly adults ages 19–64 in the NHIS. Principal Findings We find evidence of the success of the initiatives in New York and Massachusetts at expanding insurance coverage, with the greatest gains reported by the initiative that was broadest in scope—the Massachusetts push toward universal coverage. There is no evidence of improvements in access to care in New York, reflecting the small gains in coverage under that state's reform effort and the narrow focus of the initiative. In contrast, there were significant gains in access to care in Massachusetts, where the impact on insurance coverage was greater and a more comprehensive set of reforms were implemented to improve access to a full array of health care services. The estimated gains in coverage and access to care reported here for Massachusetts were achieved in the early period under health reform, before the state's reform initiative was fully implemented. Conclusions Comprehensive reform initiatives are more successful at addressing gaps in coverage and access to care than are narrower efforts, highlighting the potential gains under national

  13. Massachusetts Health Reform was Cost Saving for Individuals with New Venous Thromboembolism: A Cost-effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Alok; Shaffer, Nicholas; Hanchate, Amresh; Roberts, Mark; Smith, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) require access to comprehensive physician and pharmacy benefits to prevent recurrence and hemorrhage. Prior to 2006, Massachusetts provided these benefits through a program restricted to safety net hospitals called Free Care. Providing portable health insurance through Massachusetts health reform could improve outcomes for uninsured with VTE but its cost-effectiveness is unknown. Methods and Results We constructed a Markov decision analysis model comparing our conceptualization of the Massachusetts health reform (“health reform strategy”) to no health reform strategy for a patient beginning warfarin for new episode of VTE. In the model, a patient may develop recurrent VTE or develop hemorrhage or stop warfarin after 6 months if no event occurs. To measure effectiveness, we analyzed laboratory data from Boston Medical Center, the largest safety net hospital in Massachusetts. Specifically, we measured the probability of having a subtherapeutic warfarin level for patients newly insured compared to those on Free Care pre-reform adjusting for secular trends. To calculate inpatient costs, we used the Health Care Utilization Project (HCUP). We then calculated the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) for the health reform strategy adjusted to 2014 USD per quality adjusted life year (QALY) and performed sensitivity analyses. The health reform strategy cost less and gained more QALYS than the no health reform strategy. Our result was most sensitive to the odds that Health Reform protected against a subtherapeutic warfarin level, the cost of Health Reform, and the percentage of total health care costs attributable to VTE in Massachusetts. Conclusions The health reform strategy cost less and was more effective than the no health reform strategy for patients with VTE. PMID:26908086

  14. [Governance and health: the rise of the managerialism in public sector reform].

    PubMed

    Denis, Jean L; Lamothe, Lise; Langley, Ann; Stéphane, Guérard

    2010-01-01

    The article examines various healthcare systems reform projects in Canada and some Canadian provinces and reveals some tendencies in governance renewal. The analisis is based on the hypothesis that reform is an exercise aiming at the renewal of governance conception and practices. In renewing governance, reform leaders hope to use adequate and effective levers to attain announced reform objectives. The article shows that the conceptions and operational modalities of governance have changed over time and that they reveal tensions inherent to the transformation and legitimation process of public healthcare systems. The first section discusses the relationships between reform and change. The second section defines the conception of gouvernance used for the analisis. Based on a content analisis of the various reform reports, the third section reveals the evolution of the conception of governance in healthcare systems in Canada. In order to expose the new tendencies, ideologies and operational principles at the heart of the reform projects are analysed. Five ideologies are identified: the democratic ideology, the "population health" ideology, the business ideology, the managerial ideology and the ideology of equity and humanism. This leads to a discussion on the dominant influence of the managerial ideology in the current reform projects. PMID:20963305

  15. Health reform in the US: what will shape the future debate?

    PubMed

    Helms, Robert B

    2006-12-01

    The question has been asked about what kind of health reform will occur in the US. Will it be a radical transformation or muddling through? Muddling through in health policy is clearly the approach that is more consistent with American history and political traditions than radical reform. But how, and how fast, we muddle through is itself an interesting question. This paper explores the market and public policy forces that are likely to affect the future of health policy in the US. Will the US follow the example of the European countries by expanding public financing and control, or will it take a different approach based more on consumer choice and provider competition? As background, the paper reviews some important events that shaped the US healthcare system and explains why our current market situation complicates our ability to achieve efficient reform. It also discusses why the future of reform will be strongly influenced by how the market for health insurance develops over the next decade. If the new forms of high deductible, catastrophic plans combined with personal savings accounts meet the market test and are considered successful, this will give policy makers new options for expanding coverage to the uninsured and reforming Medicare and Medicaid. But, as we know from the history of other markets, much can go wrong. Some predictions about the future course of reform are offered. PMID:23389484

  16. National health insurance or incremental reform: aim high, or at our feet?

    PubMed

    Himmelstein, David U; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2003-01-01

    Single-payer national health insurance could cover the uninsured and upgrade coverage for most Americans without increasing costs; savings on insurance overhead and other bureaucracy would fully offset the costs of improved care. In contrast, proposed incremental reforms are projected to cover a fraction of the uninsured, at great cost. Moreover, even these projections are suspect; reforms of the past quarter century have not stemmed the erosion of coverage. Despite incrementalists' claims of pragmatism, they have proven unable to shepherd meaningful reform through the political system. While national health insurance is often dismissed as ultra left by the policy community, it is dead center in public opinion. Polls have consistently shown that at least 40%, and perhaps 60%, of Americans favor such reform. PMID:12511395

  17. [Health care reform in the Obama administration: difficulties of reaching a similar agreement in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Belmartino, Susana

    2014-04-01

    This article presents a comparative analysis of the processes leading to health care reform in Argentina and in the USA. The core of the analysis centers on the ideological references utilized by advocates of the reform and the decision-making processes that support or undercut such proposals. The analysis begins with a historical summary of the issue in each country. The political process that led to the sanction of the Obama reform is then described. The text defends a hypothesis aiming to show that deficiencies in the institutional capacities of Argentina's decision-making bodies are a severe obstacle to attaining substantial changes in this area within the country. PMID:24823603

  18. Changing emphases in public health and medical education in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Walter K; Cadman, Edwin C

    2002-01-01

    Globalisation of economies, diseases and disasters with poverty, emerging infectious diseases, ageing and chronic conditions, violence and terrorism has begun to change the face of public health and medical education. Escalating costs of care and increasing poverty have brought urgency to professional training to improve efficiency, cut costs and maintain gains in life expectancy and morbidity reduction. Technology, genetics research and designer drugs have dramatically changed medical practice. Creatively, educational institutions have adopted the use of: (1) New educational and communication technologies: internet and health informatics; (2) Problem based learning approaches; Integrated Practice and Theory Curricula; Research and Problem Solving methodologies and (3) Partnership and networking of institutions to synergise new trends (e.g. core competencies). Less desirably, changes are inadequate in key areas, e.g., Health Economics, Poverty and Health Development, Disaster Management & Bioterrorism and Ethics. Institutions have begun to adjust and develop new programs of study to meet challenges of emerging diseases, design methodologies to better understand complex social and economic determinants of disease, assess the effects of violence and address cost containment strategies in health. Besides redesigning instruction, professional schools need to conduct research to assess the impact of health reform. Such studies will serve as sentinels for the public's health, and provide key indicators for improvements in training, service provision and policy. PMID:12597516

  19. Integrated specialty service readiness in health reform: connections in haemophilia comprehensive care.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, A M; Page, D

    2008-05-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified primary healthcare reform as a global priority whereby innovative practice changes are directed at improving health. This transformation to health reform in haemophilia service requires clarification of comprehensive care to reflect the WHO definition of health and key elements of primary healthcare reform. While comprehensive care supports effective healthcare delivery, comprehensive care must also be regarded beyond immediate patient management to reflect the broader system purpose in the care continuum with institutions, community agencies and government. Furthermore, health reform may be facilitated through integrated service delivery (ISD). ISD in specialty haemophilia care has the potential to reduce repetition of assessments, enhance care plan communication between providers and families, provide 24-h access to care, improve information availability regarding care quality and outcomes, consolidate access for multiple healthcare encounters and facilitate family self-efficacy and autonomy [1]. Three core aspects of ISD have been distinguished: clinical integration, information management and technology and vertical integration in local communities [2]. Selected examples taken from Canadian haemophilia comprehensive care illustrate how practice innovations are bridged with a broader system level approach and may support initiatives in other contexts. These innovations are thought to indicate readiness regarding ISD. Reflecting on the existing capacity of haemophilia comprehensive care teams will assist providers to connect and direct their existing strengths towards ISD and health reform. PMID:18331561

  20. Has solidarity survived? A comparative analysis of the effect of social health insurance reform in four European countries.

    PubMed

    Maarse, Hans; Paulus, Aggie

    2003-08-01

    Social health insurance reform has evolved as an important public policy issue in several European countries. Some of the most important reform programs have been the introduction of managed competition, a shift from full retrospective reimbursement of health insurers to prospective reimbursement, an increase of private payments, and a change in the health benefits of social health insurance. The article investigates the widespread assumption that reform programs have adverse effects on solidarity in social health insurance by looking at the concrete experience of four European countries (Belgium, Germany, The Netherlands, and Switzerland) over the past decade. A distinction is made between risk solidarity and income solidarity, and the scope of solidarity is shown to have two dimensions: entitlements and membership. The analysis consists of three parts: description of the structure of health insurance of each of the four countries in the early 1990s; discussion of health insurance reform; determination of the impact on each dimension of solidarity. The findings are mixed. There are indeed some examples of solidarity having declined as the result of health insurance reform. But, more important, many examples also were found of an increase in solidarity due to health insurance reform. In some cases, reform was explicitly intended to improve solidarity. If a reform program had a negative impact on solidarity (e.g., an increase in private payments), accompanying measures often were taken to keep solidarity intact as much as possible. Thus the assumption of a negative impact as a result of health insurance reform is not confirmed. PMID:12956517

  1. The influence of health sector reform and external assistance in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Bodart, C; Servais, G; Mohamed, Y L; Schmidt-Ehry, B

    2001-03-01

    Despite health reform and increasing public investment in the health sector, utilization of curative health services, immunization coverage and patient satisfaction with the public health care system are steadily decreasing in Burkina Faso. It seems that the health care system itself is "ill". This paper examines the major symptoms associated with this illness. The central thesis suggests that any further improvement of health care performance in Burkina Faso will be subject to profound central reform in the area of human resources and financial management of the sector. Such a broad reform package cannot be achieved through the current project approach, but a sector-wide approach (SWAp) does not seem to be realistic at the present time. Policy discussions at a level higher than the Ministry of Health could be beneficial for achieving better donor coordination and increasing the commitment of the Ministry of Health to a sector-wide approach. Health sector reform issues and priorities and the role of international cooperation are reviewed and discussed. PMID:11238434

  2. Pharmaceuticals--strategic considerations in health reforms in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Nishtar, Sania

    2006-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals are critical to the functioning of healthcare systems which require a sustainable supply of quality, efficacious, and safe essential medicines. With this as a context, the Gateway Paper in its capacity as a suggested roadmap for health reforms within Pakistan stressed on the need for a pharmaceutical policy to be directed towards improving people's access to medicines; within this framework a number of issues have been highlighted. Weaknesses in the current legislation on drugs, in particular gaps, which have emerged contemporaneously with reference to the post WTO situation and the technology boom, have been discussed and the incongruity between the drug policies and policies in the other sectors addressed. The Gateway Paper makes a strong case to establish a statutory semi-autonomous drug regulatory authority in order to ensure stricter implementation of the Drug Law, which needs to be amended to bridge the current gaps. The paper lays emphasis on a formal quality assurance mechanism and the need to build capacity to implement regulation in this regard. Lack of clarity in the current pricing formula has been flagged as a key issue and the need highlighted to develop a pricing formula that is predictable, transparent and acceptable to the stakeholders, yet one that does not create access and affordability issues for the poor and disadvantaged. The paper addresses gaps in the process of drug registration in Pakistan and stresses on the need to redefine its scope and ensure its stricter enforcement. Unethical market practices and irrational use of drugs have been discussed and the need for transparently implementing standard operating procedures for drug selecting, procurement, storage, dispensing and rational prescribing and the introduction of appropriate evidence based education, managerial and regulatory interventions in this regard, highlighted. The myriad of reasons which lead to the shortage of drugs and to the mushrooming of spurious

  3. State mental health policy: It's never too late to do it right: lessons from behavioral health reform in New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Willging, Cathleen E; Semansky, Rafael M

    2010-07-01

    This column describes an initiative to reform the public behavioral health system in New Mexico, which has placed publicly funded services under the management of a single for-profit private corporation. The authors discuss problems that they attribute to the state's "top-down model of planning and implementation": complex documentation requirements that increase administrative burden on providers, unrealistically high expectations for a comprehensive information technology system, inadequate monitoring that hampers assessment of reform, and insufficient attention to the rural safety net. They call on other states to better incorporate experiences of those delivering and receiving services into the design and timing of reform initiatives. PMID:20591994

  4. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010: reforming the health care reform for the new decade.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Caraway, David L; Parr, Allan T; Fellows, Bert; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2011-01-01

    accounted for, we will be facing a significant increase in deficits rather than a reduction. When posed as a global question, polls suggest that public opinion continues to be against the health insurance reform. The newly elected Republican congress is poised to pass a bill aimed at repealing health care reform. However, advocates of the repeal of health care reform have been criticized for not providing a meaningful alternative approach. Those criticisms make clear that it is not sufficient to provide vague arguments against the ACA without addressing core issues embedded in health care reform. It is the opinion of the authors that while some parts of the ACA may be reformed, it is unlikely to be repealed. Indeed, the ACA already is growing roots. Consequently, it will be extremely difficult to repeal. In this manuscript, we look at reducing the regulatory burden on the public and providers and elimination of IPAB and PCORI. The major solution lies in controlling the drug and durable medical supply costs with appropriate negotiating capacity for Medicare, and consequently for other insurers. PMID:21267047

  5. Toward a 21st-century health care system: recommendations for health care reform.

    PubMed

    Arrow, Kenneth; Auerbach, Alan; Bertko, John; Brownlee, Shannon; Casalino, Lawrence P; Cooper, Jim; Crosson, Francis J; Enthoven, Alain; Falcone, Elizabeth; Feldman, Robert C; Fuchs, Victor R; Garber, Alan M; Gold, Marthe R; Goldman, Dana; Hadfield, Gillian K; Hall, Mark A; Horwitz, Ralph I; Hooven, Michael; Jacobson, Peter D; Jost, Timothy Stoltzfus; Kotlikoff, Lawrence J; Levin, Jonathan; Levine, Sharon; Levy, Richard; Linscott, Karen; Luft, Harold S; Mashal, Robert; McFadden, Daniel; Mechanic, David; Meltzer, David; Newhouse, Joseph P; Noll, Roger G; Pietzsch, Jan B; Pizzo, Philip; Reischauer, Robert D; Rosenbaum, Sara; Sage, William; Schaeffer, Leonard D; Sheen, Edward; Silber, B Michael; Skinner, Jonathan; Shortell, Stephen M; Thier, Samuel O; Tunis, Sean; Wulsin, Lucien; Yock, Paul; Nun, Gabi Bin; Bryan, Stirling; Luxenburg, Osnat; van de Ven, Wynand P M M

    2009-04-01

    The coverage, cost, and quality problems of the U.S. health care system are evident. Sustainable health care reform must go beyond financing expanded access to care to substantially changing the organization and delivery of care. The FRESH-Thinking Project (www.fresh-thinking.org) held a series of workshops during which physicians, health policy experts, health insurance executives, business leaders, hospital administrators, economists, and others who represent diverse perspectives came together. This group agreed that the following 8 recommendations are fundamental to successful reform: 1. Replace the current fee-for-service payment system with a payment system that encourages and rewards innovation in the efficient delivery of quality care. The new payment system should invest in the development of outcome measures to guide payment. 2. Establish a securely funded, independent agency to sponsor and evaluate research on the comparative effectiveness of drugs, devices, and other medical interventions. 3. Simplify and rationalize federal and state laws and regulations to facilitate organizational innovation, support care coordination, and streamline financial and administrative functions. 4. Develop a health information technology infrastructure with national standards of interoperability to promote data exchange. 5. Create a national health database with the participation of all payers, delivery systems, and others who own health care data. Agree on methods to make de-identified information from this database on clinical interventions, patient outcomes, and costs available to researchers. 6. Identify revenue sources, including a cap on the tax exclusion of employer-based health insurance, to subsidize health care coverage with the goal of insuring all Americans. 7. Create state or regional insurance exchanges to pool risk, so that Americans without access to employer-based or other group insurance could obtain a standard benefits package through these exchanges

  6. Designing HIGH-COST medicine: hospital surveys, health planning, and the paradox of progressive reform.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Barbara Bridgman

    2010-02-01

    Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas' hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs. PMID:20019312

  7. Designing HIGH-COST Medicine Hospital Surveys, Health Planning, and the Paradox of Progressive Reform

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas’ hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs. PMID:20019312

  8. State Perspectives on Health Care Reform: Oregon, Hawaii, Tennessee, and Rhode Island

    PubMed Central

    Thome, Jean I.; Bianchi, Barbara; Bonnyman, Gordon; Greene, Clark; Leddy, Tricia

    1995-01-01

    The general consensus among States which have had their section 1115 demonstration projects approved is that there is no one best way to implement State health care reform. The Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), however, wished to discern how States were accomplishing the task of implementing the demonstrations, and solicited responses from State representatives whose section 1115 demonstration waivers had been approved. The resulting article gives an overview of this implementation process from four State perspectives. Written by representatives from Oregon, Hawaii, Tennessee, and Rhode Island, the ideas presented here are indicative of the complex undertaking of State health care reform. PMID:10142573

  9. Health, welfare reform, and narratives of uncertainty among Cambodian refugees.

    PubMed

    Becker, G; Beyene, Y; Ken, P

    2000-06-01

    Massive disruptions to a way of life, such as those brought on by widespread violence, terror, and genocide, disorder the body as well as the social order. When they flee their homelands, refugees bring their experiences of violence and terror with them. Drawing on an ethnographic study of 40 Cambodian refugees between the ages of 50 and 79 who suffered from one or more chronic illnesses, we explore how refugees who live with chronic illnesses and are dependent on government support were affected by the threat of welfare reform. When welfare reform threatened to cut Cambodian refugees' income, it posed a new crisis for those who were chronically in limbo and placed further constraints on their lives. Through their narratives, Cambodian refugees enacted their bodily distress and resisted the threat of welfare reform. The story of threatened welfare reform in the U.S. and its possible consequences for refugees is a story of quixotic U.S. politics, policies and antidotes for refugeeism gone awry. PMID:10885785

  10. The national health service plan: further reform of British health care?

    PubMed

    Lewis, R; Gillam, S

    2001-01-01

    Less than three years after initiating a series of health service reforms, the Blair government has launched another plan for the U.K. National Health Service. This article considers the origins and contents of the plan. A major investment program is designed to bring health care spending up to European averages over the next five years. In return, the government seeks to challenge the existing settlement between organized medicine and the state through tighter regulatory control, altered contractual frameworks, and a new public-private concordat. The plan does not represent a radical change in government policy but rather reaffirms existing approaches to increasing access to health services, integrating health and social care, and empowering users. Notwithstanding arrangements to increase the autonomy of health service organizations, the plan increases central control through a range of new bodies and regulatory frameworks. It represents an incremental adjustment of the existing tax-funded system. Should this reinvigoration of the state monopoly fail, alternative sources of funding will no doubt have to be reconsidered. PMID:11271638

  11. Health maintenance organizations: critical issues raised by restructuring delivery for health systems reform.

    PubMed

    Gold, M

    1993-10-01

    In sum, the potential that managed care will grow under health systems reform creates an opportunity for the HMO industry but also serves as a challenge and a threat. Faced with greater scrutiny and growing demands, HMOs increasingly are being forced to demonstrate their potential and live up to their expectation. At the same time, the changing nature of the health care system creates a challenge for HMOs. Cost pressures create needs to review the entire delivery system, including the ambulatory component, with a focus on enhancing cost-effectiveness. Greater visibility also creates demands; growing market penetration argues for the creation of a new paradigm to define an appropriate structure for public accountability and management. Finally, the transformation of an HMO industry into a managed care industry is not without its risks as HMO performance becomes evaluated not only against itself but as part of the performance of the broader managed care industry in which HMOs have become embedded. PMID:10128419

  12. Evidence is good for your health system: policy reform to remedy catastrophic and impoverishing health spending in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Knaul, Felicia Marie; Arreola-Ornelas, Héctor; Méndez-Carniado, Oscar; Bryson-Cahn, Chloe; Barofsky, Jeremy; Maguire, Rachel; Miranda, Martha; Sesma, Sergio

    2006-11-18

    Absence of financial protection in health is a recently diagnosed "disease" of health systems. The most obvious symptom is that families face economic ruin and poverty as a consequence of financing their health care. Mexico was one of the first countries to diagnose the problem, attribute it to lack of financial protection, and propose systemic therapy through health reform. In this article we assess how Mexico turned evidence on catastrophic and impoverishing health spending into a catalyst for institutional renovation through the reform that created Seguro Popular (Popular Health Insurance). We present 15-year trends on the evolution of catastrophic and impoverishing health spending, including evidence on how the situation is improving. The results of the Mexican experience suggest an important role for the organisation and financing of the health system in reducing impoverishment and protecting households during periods of individual and collective financial crisis. PMID:17113432

  13. [Evidence is good for your health system: policy reform to remedy catastrophic and impoverishing health spending in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Knaul, Felicia Marie; Arreola-Ornelas, Héctor; Méndez-Carniado, Oscar; Bryson-Cahn, Chloe; Barofsky, Jeremy; Maguire, Rachel; Miranda, Martha; Sesma, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Absence of financial protection in health is a recently diagnosed "disease" of health systems. The most obvious symptom is that families face economic ruin and poverty as a consequence of financing their health care. Mexico was one of the first countries to diagnose the problem, attribute it to lack of financial protection, and propose systemic therapy through health reform. In this article we assess how Mexico turned evidence on catastrophic and impoverishing health spending into a catalyst for institutional renovation through the reform that created Seguro Popular de Salud (Popular Health Insurance). We present 15-year trends on the evolution of catastrophic and impoverishing health spending, including evidence on how the situation is improving. The results of the Mexican experience suggest an important role for the organisation and financing of the health system in reducing impoverishment and protecting households during periods of individual and collective financial crisis. PMID:17469400

  14. Insights on a New Era Under a Reforming Health Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvihill, James E.

    1995-01-01

    Economic and social trends that will affect the health care system are examined, including federal health care reform efforts, federal budget trimming through managed care and cost-cutting, declines in state spending, adoption of single-payer systems, growing competition in the private sector (mergers, alliances, acquisitions), dominance of health…

  15. Health Care Reform: How Will It Affect Nursing?--Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zalon, Margarete Lieb

    Nursing educators have the opportunity to advance nursing's agenda for health care reform to ensure effective health care for all members of society. They have a key role in fostering the political involvement of student nurses and nurses who have returned to school for baccalaureate or graduate education. Role modeling is critical to increasing…

  16. Mental Health Law Reform: The Impact on Children and Young People in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niwa, Laura

    2007-01-01

    The Bamford Review of Mental Health and Learning Disability (Northern Ireland) was established in October 2002 to examine all aspects of the law, policy and provisions that affect people with mental health needs or a learning disability in Northern Ireland. Its report "A Comprehensive Legislative Framework," which deals with the reform of law in…

  17. [Regional initiative on health care reform in Latin America and the Caribbean].

    PubMed

    Crocco, P; Schroeder, P; Villen, M T; Yen, E

    2000-01-01

    Many countries throughout Latin America and the Caribbean are introducing reforms that can profoundly influence how health services are provided and who receives them. Governments in the region identified the need for a network to support health reform by building capacity in analysis and training, both at the Summit of the Americas in 1994 and at the Special Meeting on Health Sector Reform, which was convened in 1995 by an interagency committee of the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization, the Inter-American Development Bank, the World Bank, and other multilateral and bilateral agencies. In response, in 1997 the Pan American Health Organization and the United States Agency for the International Development launched the Latin America and Caribbean Regional Health Sector Reform Initiative. The Initiative has approximately US$ 10 million in funding through the year 2002 to support activities in Bolivia, Brazil, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, and Peru. Now in its third year of implementation, the Initiative supports regional activities seeking to promote more equitable and effective delivery of basic health services. PMID:11026784

  18. The 2009 Health Confidence Survey: public opinion on health reform varies; strong support for insurance market reform and public plan option, mixed response to tax cap.

    PubMed

    Fronstin, Paul; Helman, Ruth

    2009-07-01

    PUBLIC SUPPORT FOR HEALTH REFORM: Findings from the 2009 Health Confidence Survey--the 12th annual HCS--indicate that Americans have already formed strong opinions regarding various aspects of health reform, even before details have been released regarding various key factors. These issues include health insurance market reform, the availability of a public plan option, mandates on employers and individuals, subsidized coverage for the low-income population, changes to the tax treatment of job-based health benefits, and regulatory oversight of health care. These opinions may change as details surface, especially as they concern financing options. In the absence of such details, the 2009 HCS finds generally strong support for the concepts of health reform options that are currently on the table. U.S. HEALTH SYSTEM GETS POOR MARKS, BUT SO DOES A MAJOR OVERHAUL: A majority rate the nation's health care system as fair (30 percent) or poor (29 percent). Only a small minority rate it excellent (6 percent) or very good (10 percent). While 14 percent of Americans think the health care system needs a major overhaul, 51 percent agree with the statement "there are some good things about our health care system, but major changes are needed." NATIONAL HEALTH PLAN ELEMENTS RATED HIGHLY: Between 68 percent and 88 percent of Americans either strongly or somewhat support health reform ideas such as national health plans, a public plan option, guaranteed issue, expansion of Medicare and Medicaid, and employer and individual mandates. MIXED REACTION TO HEALTH BENEFITS TAX CAP: Reaction to capping the current tax exclusion of employment-based health benefits is mixed. Nearly one-half of Americans (47 percent) would switch to a lower-cost plan if the tax exclusion were capped, 38 percent would stay on their current plan and pay the additional taxes, and 9 percent don't know. CONTINUED FAITH IN EMPLOYMENT-BASED BENEFITS, BUT DOUBTS ON AFFORDABILITY: Individuals with employment

  19. Toward an Anthropology of Insurance and Health Reform: An Introduction to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Dao, Amy; Mulligan, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    This article introduces a special issue of Medical Anthropology Quarterly on health insurance and health reform. We begin by reviewing anthropological contributions to the study of financial models for health care and then discuss the unique contributions offered by the articles of this collection. The contributors demonstrate how insurance accentuates--but does not resolve tensions between granting universal access to care and rationing limited resources, between social solidarity and individual responsibility, and between private markets and public goods. Insurance does not have a single meaning, logic, or effect but needs to be viewed in practice, in context, and from multiple vantage points. As the field of insurance studies in the social sciences grows and as health reforms across the globe continue to use insurance to restructure the organization of health care, it is incumbent on medical anthropologists to undertake a renewed and concerted study of health insurance and health systems. PMID:26698645

  20. (Re)form with substance? Restructuring and governance in the Australian health system 2004/05.

    PubMed

    Rix, Mark; Owen, Alan; Eagar, Kathy

    2005-08-24

    The Australian health system has been the subject of multiple reviews and reorganisations over the last twenty years or more. The year 2004-2005 was no different. This paper reviews the reforms, (re)structures and governance arrangements in place at both the national and state/territory levels in the last year. At the national level some progress has been made in 2004/05 through the Australian Health Ministers' Council and there is now a national health reform agenda, albeit not a comprehensive one, endorsed by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) in June 2005. Quality and safety was an increasing focus in 2004-2005 at both the national and jurisdictional levels, as was the need for workforce reform. Although renewed policy attention was given to the need to better integrate and coordinate health care, there is little evidence of any real progress this last year. More progress was made on a national approach to workforce reform. At the jurisdictional level, the usual rounds of reviews and restructuring occurred in several jurisdictions and, in 2005, they are organisationally very different from each other. The structure and effectiveness of jurisdictional health authorities are now more important. All health authorities are being expected to drive an ambitious set of national and local reforms. At the same time, most have now blurred the boundary between policy and service delivery and are devoting significant resources to centrally 'crisis managing' their service systems. These same reasons led to decentralisation in previous restructuring cycles. While there were many changes in 2004-2005, and a new national report to COAG on health reform is expected at the end of 2005, based on current evidence there is little room for optimism about the prospects for real progress. PMID:16120207

  1. Stepwise expansion of evidence-based care is needed for mental health reform.

    PubMed

    McGorry, Patrick D; Hamilton, Matthew P

    2016-05-16

    Mortality from mental illnesses is increasing and, because they frequently occur early in the life cycle, they are the largest source of disability and reduced economic productivity of all non-communicable diseases. Successful mental health reform can reduce the mortality, morbidity, growing welfare costs and losses in economic productivity caused by mental illness. The government has largely adopted the recommendations of the National Mental Health Commission focusing on early intervention and stepwise care and will implement a reform plan that involves devolving commissioning of federally funded mental health services to primary health networks, along with a greater emphasis on e-mental health. Stepwise expanded investment in and structural support (data collection, evaluation, model fidelity, workforce training) for evidence-based care that rectifies high levels of undertreatment are essential for these reforms to succeed. However, the reforms are currently constrained by a cost-containment policy framework that envisages no additional funding. The early intervention reform aim requires financing for the next stage of development of Australia's youth mental health system, rather than redirecting funds from existing evidence-based programs. People with complex, enduring mental disorders need more comprehensive care. In the context of the National Disability Insurance Scheme, there is a risk that these already seriously underserved patients may paradoxically receive a reduction in coverage. E-health has a key role to play at all stages of illness but must be integrated in a complementary way, rather than as a barrier to access. Research and evaluation are the keys to cost-effective, sustainable reform. PMID:27169969

  2. School-Based Health Centers in an Era of Health Care Reform: Building on History

    PubMed Central

    Keeton, Victoria; Soleimanpour, Samira; Brindis, Claire D.

    2013-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide a variety of health care services to youth in a convenient and accessible environment. Over the past 40 years, the growth of SBHCs evolved from various public health needs to the development of a specific collaborative model of care that is sensitive to the unique needs of children and youth, as well as to vulnerable populations facing significant barriers to access. The SBHC model of health care comprises of on-school site health care delivery by an interdisciplinary team of health professionals, which can include primary care and mental health clinicians. Research has demonstrated the SBHCs’ impacts on delivering preventive care, such as immunizations; managing chronic illnesses, such as asthma, obesity, and mental health conditions; providing reproductive health services for adolescents; and even improving youths’ academic performance. Although evaluation of the SBHC model of care has been complicated, results have thus far demonstrated increased access to care, improved health and education outcomes, and high levels of satisfaction. Despite their proven success, SBHCs have consistently faced challenges in securing adequate funding for operations and developing effective financial systems for billing and reimbursement. Implementation of health care reform (The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act [P.L. 111-148]) will profoundly affect the health care access and outcomes of children and youth, particularly vulnerable populations. The inclusion of funding for SBHCs in this legislation is momentous, as there continues to be increased demand and limited funding for affordable services. To better understand how this model of care has and could further help promote the health of our nation’s youth, a review is presented of the history and growth of SBHCs and the literature demonstrating their impacts. It may not be feasible for SBHCs to be established in every school campus in the country. However, the lessons

  3. Electoral reform and public policy outcomes in Thailand: the politics of the 30-Baht health scheme.

    PubMed

    Selway, Joel Sawat

    2011-01-01

    How do changes in electoral rules affect the nature of public policy outcomes? The current evidence supporting institutional theories that answer this question stems almost entirely from quantitative cross-country studies, the data of which contain very little within-unit variation. Indeed, while there are many country-level accounts of how changes in electoral rules affect such phenomena as the number of parties or voter turnout, there are few studies of how electoral reform affects public policy outcomes. This article contributes to this latter endeavor by providing a detailed analysis of electoral reform and the public policy process in Thailand through an examination of the 1997 electoral reforms. Specifically, the author examines four aspects of policy-making: policy formulation, policy platforms, policy content, and policy outcomes. The article finds that candidates in the pre-1997 era campaigned on broad, generic platforms; parties had no independent means of technical policy expertise; the government targeted health resources to narrow geographic areas; and health was underprovided in Thai society. Conversely, candidates in the post-1997 era relied more on a strong, detailed national health policy; parties created mechanisms to formulate health policy independently; the government allocated health resources broadly to the entire nation through the introduction of a universal health care system, and health outcomes improved. The author attributes these changes in the policy process to the 1997 electoral reform, which increased both constituency breadth (the proportion of the population to which politicians were accountable) and majoritarianism. PMID:21591306

  4. The health care reform in Mexico: before and after the 1985 earthquakes.

    PubMed Central

    Soberón, G; Frenk, J; Sepúlveda, J

    1986-01-01

    The earthquakes that hit Mexico City in September 1985 caused considerable damage both to the population and to important medical facilities. The disaster took place while the country was undertaking a profound reform of its health care system. This reform had introduced a new principle for allocating and distributing the benefits of health care, namely, the principle of citizenship. Operationally, the reform includes an effort to decentralize the decision-making authority, to modernize the administration, to achieve greater coordination within the health sector and among sectors, and to extend coverage to the entire population through an ambitious primary care program. This paper examines the health context in which the reform was taking place when the September earthquakes hit. After presenting the damages caused by the quakes, the paper analyzes the characteristics of the immediate response by the health system. Since many facilities within the system were severely damaged, a series of options for reconstruction are posited. The main lesson to be learned from the Mexican case is that cuts in health care programs are not the inevitable response to economic or natural crises. On the contrary, it is precisely when the majority of the population is undergoing difficulties that a universal and equitable health system becomes most necessary. PMID:3706595

  5. Ethical and Human Rights Foundations of Health Policy: Lessons from Comprehensive Reform in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Frenk, Julio; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of an explicit ethical and human rights framework to guide a reform intended to provide universal and comprehensive social protection in health for all Mexicans, independently of their socio-economic status or labor market condition. This reform was designed, implemented, and evaluated by making use of what Michael Reich has identified as the three pillars of public policy: technical, political, and ethical. The use of evidence and political strategies in the design and negotiation of the Mexican health reform is briefly discussed in the first part of this paper. The second part examines the ethical component of the reform, including the guiding concept and values, as well as the specific entitlements that gave operational meaning to the right to health care that was enshrined in Mexico's 1983 Constitution. The impact of this rights-based health reform, measured through an external evaluation, is discussed in the final section. The main message of this paper is that a clear ethical framework, combined with technical excellence and political skill, can deliver major policy results. PMID:26766859

  6. Patients' rights to care under Clinton's Health Security Act: the structure of reform.

    PubMed Central

    Mariner, W K

    1994-01-01

    Like most reform proposals, President Clinton's proposed Health Security Act offers universal access to care but does not significantly alter the nature of patients' legal rights to services. The act would create a system of delegated federal regulation in which the states would act like federal administrative agencies to carry out reform. To achieve uniform, universal coverage, the act would establish a form of mandatory health insurance, with federal law controlling the minimum services to which everyone would be entitled. Because there is no constitutionally protected right to health care and no independent constitutional standard for judging what insurance benefits are appropriate, the federal government would retain considerable freedom to decide what services would and would not be covered. If specific benefits are necessary for patients, they will have to be stated in the legislation that produces reform. PMID:8059899

  7. Patients' rights to care under Clinton's Health Security Act: the structure of reform.

    PubMed

    Mariner, W K

    1994-08-01

    Like most reform proposals, President Clinton's proposed Health Security Act offers universal access to care but does not significantly alter the nature of patients' legal rights to services. The act would create a system of delegated federal regulation in which the states would act like federal administrative agencies to carry out reform. To achieve uniform, universal coverage, the act would establish a form of mandatory health insurance, with federal law controlling the minimum services to which everyone would be entitled. Because there is no constitutionally protected right to health care and no independent constitutional standard for judging what insurance benefits are appropriate, the federal government would retain considerable freedom to decide what services would and would not be covered. If specific benefits are necessary for patients, they will have to be stated in the legislation that produces reform. PMID:8059899

  8. Citizen participation in the reform of health care policy: a case example.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, D

    1996-01-01

    The trend toward greater citizen participation in health care policy reform has its roots in the consumerism of the 1960s. This era witnessed the beginning of a dispersion of power in health care and an increase in the number and variety of stakeholders involved in the policy development process. Using the reform Ontario's long-term care policy as a case example, this paper offers observations about the benefits and challenges of participative policy-making. Despite the challenges and the paucity of hard evidence pointing to benefits, the author concludes that broad citizen participation in health care policy reform is a desirable goal. However, the capacity for genuine collaboration remains underdeveloped and requires more systematic refinement. PMID:10159410

  9. The effect of market reforms and new public management mechanisms on the Swiss health care system.

    PubMed

    Moresi-Izzo, Stefania; Bankauskaite, Vaida; Gericke, Christian A

    2010-01-01

    In 1996, the Federal Law on Health Insurance (LAMal) was adopted in order to contain costs in Swiss health care. At the same time, the reform aimed to maintain or even improve solidarity and encourage institutional reform through new public management (NPM) and market mechanisms. More freedom in contractual conditions between insurers and providers and a clearer distinction of responsibilities between federal and regional (cantonal) authorities were stipulated to achieve efficiency, effectiveness, and transparency. The focus of this paper is an analysis of the effects of market reforms and NPM mechanisms introduced with the LAMal on the cost-containment, quality of care and equity objectives in the Swiss health care system. PMID:20540084

  10. Social democracy and social policy in neoliberal times

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article considers the path of social policy and democracy in Australia and the latest set of welfare reforms under Labor. The reforms can be seen to mark a reaction to the excesses of neoliberal government on the one hand, but they also represent continuity in neoliberal thought and policy on the other. As we shall see, engrained ideas about individualist wage-earning welfare, that were established during the formative years of the 20th century, continue to shape, if not constrain collectivist solutions to some of the inherent social risks faced by Australian citizens today. In this light, efforts to create a welfare state geared towards meeting the needs of ‘hard-working’ Australian families appear much sharper. PMID:25473376

  11. Are we there yet? A journey of health reform in Australia.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Christine C

    2013-08-19

    • Five years on from the establishment of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission, it is timely to review the context for reform and some of the actions taken to date, and to highlight remaining areas of concern and priority. • The Commission's final report was released in July 2009 and presented 123 recommendations organised under four reform themes: Taking responsibility: individual and collective action to build good health and wellbeing - by people, families, communities, health professionals, employers, health funders and governments Connecting care: comprehensive care for people over their lifetime Facing inequities: recognise and tackle the causes and impacts of health inequities Driving quality performance: leadership and systems to achieve best use of people, resources and evolving knowledge. • Overall, the Australian Government's response to the Commission's report has been very positive, but challenges remain in some key areas: Financial sustainability and the vertical fiscal imbalance between the federal and state governments Getting the best value from the health dollar by reducing inefficiency and waste and using value-based purchasing across the public and private health sectors National leadership across the system as a whole Getting the right care in the right place at the right time Health is about more than health care - increasing focus on prevention and recognising and tackling the broader social determinants of health. PMID:23984781

  12. The past and present of the Polish National Health Services. Reform project.

    PubMed

    Smoleń, M M

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a short historical outline of the national health service (NHS) system in Poland. Consecutive stages of the NHS system reform are described (up to October 1991), including the period of early 80's and the Round Table Conference. The general principles of the project of the Polish NHS system reform, which is intended to be implemented with support from the World Bank, are presented. These principles are related particularly to the scope of the questions assigned to the task forces established to solve the basic problems of the present system. Those include: 1. Health Promotion Task Force, 2. Primary Health Care Task Force, 3. Occupational Health Task Force, 4. Health Information System Task Force, 5. Cost Accounting Task Force, 6. Resource Allocation Task Force, 7. Pharmaceutical Monitoring and Drug Control Task Force, 8. Management Development Task Force, 9. Regional Health Services (Consortia) Task Force. PMID:1392648

  13. On the path to healthcare reform. The 78th Annual Catholic Health Assembly.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    A healthcare revolution is at hand, and not just in Washington, DC. The 78th Annual Catholic Health Assembly, held June 6 to 9 in New Orleans, drew 1,300 Catholic health providers from across the nation to explore the progress of healthcare reform--at the federal level, in state initiatives, and in cities across the nation where providers are collaborating to provide more comprehensive, cost-effective care. Culminating in an affirming address by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, the assembly afforded attendees opportunities to discuss the operational opportunities ahead, innovative care approaches, and strategies to maintain their Catholic identity and values under a reformed system. PMID:10183912

  14. Presidents and health reform: from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Barack Obama.

    PubMed

    Morone, James A

    2010-06-01

    The health care reforms that President Barack Obama signed into law in March 2010 were seventy-five years in the making. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt, U.S. presidents have struggled to enact national health care reform; most failed. This article explores the highly charged political landscape in which Obama maneuvered and the skills he brought to bear. It contrasts his accomplishments with the experiences of his Oval Office predecessors. Going forward, implementation poses formidable challenges for Democrats, Republicans, and the political process itself. PMID:20530336

  15. Reframing the debate over health care reform: the role of system performance and affordability.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Kenneth E

    2007-01-01

    The failure to pass comprehensive national health care reform requires a new approach for framing and structuring the debate. Since 85 percent of Americans have health insurance, framing the debate around the affordability of coverage is important. More important is understanding the factors responsible for driving growth in spending, and crafting effective interventions. Our work shows that much of the rise in spending is linked to the rise in the prevalence of treated disease--much of which is preventable. Reform strategies that address this issue are not inherently partisan and may prove to be a fruitful starting point for launching the debate. PMID:17978375

  16. [Health maintenance organizations: starting point of a market economical reform of health care].

    PubMed

    Hauser, H

    1981-05-01

    The present work was based on the observations that, as regards health care costs, the major problem in most present systems is that those who are responsible for the treatment decision (physician and patient) do not bear a direct financial responsibility for it, and that the overall system is very fragmented, which leads to numerous externalities. In accordance with this diagnosis, a reform strategy should particularly aim at creating units which are responsible for the provision and the financial coverage of comprehensive health services to a given population. Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) are a private economy oriented solution in this direction. They have proved to be a real possibility in the USA over years, at least for part of the population, and show interesting performances as regards costs. They were able to develop and evolve in the largely open US institutional framework. In Switzerland, we have more strongly structured systems, which appear to stand in relative contradiction to the HMO solution. A potential adaptation of the concept to our country would therefore require a preliminary in depth discussion about the meaning of the present collective (insurance) contract structure, the position of hospitals in a private economy health care system as well as about the conditions of the sought for competition in the HMO model. PMID:7303928

  17. Embedded Neoliberalism within Faculty Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, John S.; Aliyeva, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Although there are claims that neoliberalism has not only commandeered the agenda and actions of universities and colleges but also become identified with the work of academic professionals, there is little empirical evidence to show that neoliberalism has infiltrated the work of faculty. This qualitative field work investigation of three…

  18. Massachusetts Health Reform At Ten Years: Great Progress, But Coverage Gaps Remain.

    PubMed

    Long, Sharon K; Skopec, Laura; Shelto, Audrey; Nordahl, Katharine; Walsh, Kaitlyn Kenney

    2016-09-01

    Massachusetts's 2006 health reform legislation was intended to move the state to near-universal health insurance coverage and to improve access to affordable health care. Ten years on, a large body of research demonstrates sustained gains in coverage. But many vulnerable populations and communities in the state have high uninsurance rates, and among those with coverage, gaps in access and affordability persist. PMID:27605643

  19. What Can Massachusetts Teach Us about National Health Insurance Reform?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couch, Kenneth A., Ed.; Joyce, Theodore J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is the most significant health policy legislation since Medicare in 1965. The need to address rising health care costs and the lack of health insurance coverage is widely accepted. Health care spending is approaching 17 percent of gross domestic product and yet 45 million Americans remain…

  20. Steering without navigation equipment: the lamentable state of Australian health policy reform

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Commentary on health policy reform in Australia often commences with an unstated logical error: Australians' health is good, therefore the Australian Health System is good. This possibly explains the disconnect between the options discussed, the areas needing reform and the generally self-congratulatory tone of the discussion: a good system needs (relatively) minor improvement. Results This paper comments on some issues of particular concern to Australian health policy makers and some areas needing urgent reform. The two sets of issues do not overlap. It is suggested that there are two fundamental reasons for this. The first is the failure to develop governance structures which promote the identification and resolution of problems according to their importance. The second and related failure is the failure to equip the health services industry with satisfactory navigation equipment - independent research capacity, independent reporting and evaluation - on a scale commensurate with the needs of the country's largest industry. These two failures together deprive the health system - as a system - of the chief driver of progress in every successful industry in the 20th Century. Conclusion Concluding comment is made on the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission (NHHRC). This continued the tradition of largely evidence free argument and decision making. It failed to identify and properly analyse major system failures, the reasons for them and the form of governance which would maximise the likelihood of future error leaning. The NHHRC itself failed to error learn from past policy failures, a key lesson from which is that a major - and possibly the major - obstacle to reform, is government itself. The Commission virtually ignored the issue of governance. The endorsement of a monopolised system, driven by benevolent managers will miss the major lesson of history which is illustrated by Australia's own failures. PMID:19948044

  1. Is health care a right or a commodity? Implementing mental health reform in a recession.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan; Rowe, Michael; Sernyak, Michael A

    2010-11-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, signed into law by President Obama in March 2010, contains elements of two seemingly contradictory positions: health care as a commodity and as a right. The commodity argument posits that the marketplace should govern demand, supply, and costs of care. The law's establishment of state insurance exchanges reflects this position. The argument that health care is a right posits that it is a need, not a choice, and that government should regulate care standards that may be compromised as insurers attempt to minimize costs. The law's requirement for coverage of mental and substance use disorders reflects this position. This Open Forum examines these arguments in light of current state fiscal crises and impending reforms. Despite the federal government's interest in expanding prevention and treatment of mental illness, states may demonstrate varying levels of commitment, based in part on their perception of health care as a right or a commodity. The federal government should outline clear performance standards, with minimum services specified to maximize state commitments to services. PMID:21041355

  2. Neoliberalism, Performativity and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Peter

    2007-07-01

    This paper provides a critical analysis of New Zealand's Performance Based Research Fund (PBRF). The first section sketches the development and implementation of the PBRF. The second section evaluates the scheme, concentrating on three themes: the relationship between privatization, competition and research performance; the standardization of research; and motivations for research. The paper acknowledges the thorough work completed by the Tertiary Education Advisory Commission and other policy groups in laying the foundation for the adoption of performance-based research funding in New Zealand. It is argued, however, that when viewed in its larger context, the PBRF constitutes a continuation of neoliberal trends already well established in New Zealand's tertiary education system.

  3. The Health Care System Under French National Health Insurance: Lessons for Health Reform in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rodwin, Victor G.

    2003-01-01

    The French health system combines universal coverage with a public–private mix of hospital and ambulatory care and a higher volume of service provision than in the United States. Although the system is far from perfect, its indicators of health status and consumer satisfaction are high; its expenditures, as a share of gross domestic product, are far lower than in the United States; and patients have an extraordinary degree of choice among providers. Lessons for the United States include the importance of government’s role in providing a statutory framework for universal health insurance; recognition that piecemeal reform can broaden a partial program (like Medicare) to cover, eventually, the entire population; and understanding that universal coverage can be achieved without excluding private insurers from the supplementary insurance market. PMID:12511380

  4. Population Policies and Education: Exploring the Contradictions of Neo-Liberal Globalisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bovill, Catherine; Leppard, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    The world is increasingly characterised by profound income, health and social inequalities (Appadurai, 2000). In recent decades development initiatives aimed at reducing these inequalities have been situated in a context of increasing globalisation with a dominant neo-liberal economic orthodoxy. This paper argues that neo-liberal globalisation…

  5. Is the Colombian health system reform improving the performance of public hospitals in Bogotá?

    PubMed

    McPake, Barbara; Yepes, Francisco Jose; Lake, Sally; Sanchez, Luz Helena

    2003-06-01

    Many countries are experimenting with public hospital reform - both increasing the managerial autonomy with which hospitals conduct their affairs, and separating 'purchaser' and 'provider' sides of the health system, thus increasing the degree of market pressure brought to bear on hospitals. Evidence suggesting that such reform will improve hospital performance is weak. From a theoretical perspective, it is not clear why public hospitals should be expected to behave like firms and seek to maximize profits as this model requires. Empirically, there is very slight evidence that such reforms may improve efficiency, and reason to be concerned about their equity implications. In Colombia, an ambitious reform programme includes among its measures the attempt to universalize a segmented health system, the creation of a purchaser-provider split and the transformation of public hospitals into 'autonomous state entities'. By design, the Colombian reform programme avoids the forces that produce equity losses in other developing countries. This paper reports the results of a study that has tried to track hospital performance in other dimensions in the post-reform period in Bogotá. Trends in hospital inputs, production and productivity, quality and patient satisfaction are presented, and qualitative data based on interviews with hospital workers are analyzed. The evidence we have been able to collect is capable of providing only a partial response to the study question. There is some evidence of increased activity and productivity and sustained quality despite declining staffing levels. Qualitative data suggest that hospital workers have noticed considerable changes, which include greater responsiveness to patients but also a heavier administrative burden. It is difficult to attribute specific causality to all of the changes measured and this reflects the inherent difficulty of judging the effects of large-scale reform programmes as well as weaknesses and gaps in the data

  6. Benchmarks of fairness for health care reform: a policy tool for developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, N.; Bryant, J.; Castano, R. A.; Dantes, O. G.; Khan, K. S.; Pannarunothai, S.

    2000-01-01

    Teams of collaborators from Colombia, Mexico, Pakistan, and Thailand have adapted a policy tool originally developed for evaluating health insurance reforms in the United States into "benchmarks of fairness" for assessing health system reform in developing countries. We describe briefly the history of the benchmark approach, the tool itself, and the uses to which it may be put. Fairness is a wide term that includes exposure to risk factors, access to all forms of care, and to financing. It also includes efficiency of management and resource allocation, accountability, and patient and provider autonomy. The benchmarks standardize the criteria for fairness. Reforms are then evaluated by scoring according to the degree to which they improve the situation, i.e. on a scale of -5 to 5, with zero representing the status quo. The object is to promote discussion about fairness across the disciplinary divisions that keep policy analysts and the public from understanding how trade-offs between different effects of reforms can affect the overall fairness of the reform. The benchmarks can be used at both national and provincial or district levels, and we describe plans for such uses in the collaborating sites. A striking feature of the adaptation process is that there was wide agreement on this ethical framework among the collaborating sites despite their large historical, political and cultural differences. PMID:10916911

  7. Oregon's experiment in health care delivery and payment reform: coordinated care organizations replacing managed care.

    PubMed

    Howard, Steven W; Bernell, Stephanie L; Yoon, Jangho; Luck, Jeff; Ranit, Claire M

    2015-02-01

    To control Medicaid costs, improve quality, and drive community engagement, the Oregon Health Authority introduced a new system of coordinated care organizations (CCOs). While CCOs resemble traditional Medicaid managed care, they have differences that have been deliberately designed to improve care coordination, increase accountability, and incorporate greater community governance. Reforms include global budgets integrating medical, behavioral, and oral health care and public health functions; risk-adjusted payments rewarding outcomes and evidence-based practice; increased transparency; and greater community engagement. The CCO model faces several implementation challenges. If successful, it will provide improved health care delivery, better health outcomes, and overall savings. PMID:25480844

  8. The Gateway Paper--financing health in Pakistan and its linkage with health reforms.

    PubMed

    Nishtar, Sania

    2006-12-01

    Pakistan currently principally uses three modes of financing health--taxation, out of pocket payments and donor contributions of which the latter is the least significant in terms of size. Less than 3.6% of the employees are covered under the social security scheme and there is a limited social protection mechanism, which collectively serves the health needs of 3.4% of the population. The main issues in health financing include low spending, lack of attention to alternate sources of financing and issues with fund mobilization and utilization. With respect to the first, health reforms proposed as part of the Gateway Paper make a strong case for promoting the reallocation of tax-based revenues and developing sustainable alternatives to low levels of public spending on health. With respect to alternative sources of health financing, the Gateway Paper lays stress on exploring policy options for private health insurance, broadening the base of Employees Social Security, creating a Federal Employees Social Security Programme, developing social health insurance within the framework of a broad-based social protection strategy, which scopes beyond the formally employed sector, establishing a widely inclusive safety net for the poor; mainstreaming philanthropic grants as a major source of health financing; developing a conducive tax configuration; generating greater corporate support for social sector causes within the framework of the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility and developing cost-sharing programmes, albeit with safeguards. The Gateway Paper regards efficient fund utilization a priority and lays stress on striking a balance between minimizing costs, controlling costs and using resources more efficiently and equitably--in other words, getting the best value for the money, on the one hand, and increasing the pool of available resources, on the other. Specific interventions such as the promotion of transparent financial administration, budgeting and cost

  9. Managing Medical Costs by Reducing Demand for Services: The Missing Element in Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Edward K.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    It is argued that higher education institutions can play a major role in health care reform by providing campus cultures that foster healthy lifestyle choices and in turn reduce medical costs. Specific issues discussed include elimination of unnecessary tests, focus on special high-risk populations, and use of advance directives. (MSE)

  10. Health sector reform in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (OPT): targeting the forest or the trees?

    PubMed Central

    GIACAMAN, RITA; ABDUL-RAHIM, HANAN F; WICK, LAURA

    2006-01-01

    Since the signing of the Oslo Peace Accords and the establishment of the Palestinian Authority in 1994, reform activities have targeted various spheres, including the health sector. Several international aid and UN organizations have been involved, as well as local and international non-governmental organizations, with considerable financial and technical investments. Although important achievements have been made, it is not evident that the quality of care has improved or that the most pressing health needs have been addressed, even before the second Palestinian Uprising that began in September 2000. The crisis of the Israeli re-invasion of Palestinian-controlled towns and villages since April 2002 and the attendant collapse of state structures and services have raised the problems to critical levels. This paper attempts to analyze some of the obstacles that have faced reform efforts. In our assessment, those include: ongoing conflict, frail Palestinian quasi-state structures and institutions, multiple and at times inappropriate donor policies and practices in the health sector, and a policy vacuum characterized by the absence of internal Palestinian debate on the type and direction of reform the country needs to take. In the face of all these considerations, it is important that reform efforts be flexible and consider realistically the political and economic contexts of the health system, rather than focus on mere narrow technical, managerial and financial solutions imported from the outside. PMID:12582108

  11. What Does Health Care Reform Mean to Children with Special Needs and Their Families?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minoux, Ankeny

    2010-01-01

    After the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, thousands of families across the U.S. breathed a sigh of relief at the White House's reassurance: "Reform will eliminate health insurance discrimination against people with disabilities." However, the actual language of the law and the proposed implementation timeline of the…

  12. The Impact of Health Care and Immigration Reform on Latino Support for President Obama and Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Gabriel R.; Medeiros, Jillian; Sanchez-Youngman, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    At the start of their term, the Obama administration pledged to reform two failing policy systems in the United States: immigration and health care. The Latino populations' attitudes toward these two critical policy areas are particularly relevant due to the large foreign born population in the Latino community and the large number of Latinos who…

  13. Is Welfare Reform Responsible for Low Skilled Women's Declining Health Insurance Coverage in the 1990s?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLeire, Thomas; Levine, Judith A.; Levy, Helen

    2006-01-01

    We use data from the 1989-2001 March Supplements to the Current Population Survey to determine whether welfare reform contributed to declines in health insurance coverage experienced by low-skilled women. Between 1988 and 2000, women with less than a high school education experienced an 8.0 percentage point decline in the probability of having…

  14. Assessing & Developing Primary Care for Children: Reforms in Health Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grason, Holly Allen, Ed.; Guyer, Bernard, Ed.

    This publication is a compilation of papers presented at an April 1994 workshop sponsored by the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and the Bureau-funded Johns Hopkins Child and Adolescent Health Policy Center (CAHPC). The papers are as follows: (1) "Defining the Issues and Planning for Change: Health Care Systems, Primary…

  15. Latin American health policy and additive reform: the case of Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, J L

    1985-01-01

    Until the mid-1960s, the market-based, dependent-development-conditioned structure of Latin American health systems reflected the skewed distribution of wealth in the region: most (including government) health resources were found in curative care medicine and were concentrated in the capital cities, where they primarily served the needs of the elite. But for many countries of the area, the 1964 PAHO-led efforts to introduce health planning, intended as a first step in rationalizing the health sector, marked a fundamental turning point in the structural development of their delivery systems. Since then, this commitment has been reaffirmed in the Latin American Ministers of Health's 1973 adoption of the primary care approach as the cornerstone of their national health plans, and their ongoing endorsement and pursuit of "Health For All by 2000." Guatemala, however, was and remains an exception. Guatemalan technocrats have proven unable to plan effectively. But, far more fundamentally, the Guatemalan oligarchy has proven unwilling to appropriate the resources necessary to effect change. The reforms that have been made have been the products of bilateral and multilateral agencies, which have conceptualized, promoted, designed, built, and underwritten them. Those changes have not altered the fundamental structure of the system, but instead have been tacked onto it, and exemplify what may be termed "additive reform." Evidence suggests that without the continued sponsorship, support, and guidance of the bilateral and multilateral agencies, even these "reforms" will prove evanescent. PMID:3888870

  16. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and Health Care Reform in the United States.

    PubMed

    McCanne, Don R

    2009-01-01

    Among OECD nations, the United States is an outlier in having the highest per capita health care costs in a system that unnecessarily exposes many individuals to financial hardship, physical suffering, and even death. President Obama and Congress are currently involved in a process to reform the flawed health care system. The OECD has contributed to that process by releasing a paper, "Health Care Reform in the United States," which describes some of the problems that must be addressed, but then provides proposed solutions that omit consideration of a more equitable and efficient universal public insurance program. The same omission is taking place in Washington, DC. By reinforcing proposals that support the private insurance industry, the source of much of the waste and inequities in health care, the authors of the OECD paper have failed in their responsibility to inform on policies rather than politics. PMID:19927410

  17. Health care reform and job satisfaction of primary health care physicians in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Buciuniene, Ilona; Blazeviciene, Aurelija; Bliudziute, Egle

    2005-01-01

    Background The aim of this research paper is to study job satisfaction of physicians and general practitioners at primary health care institutions during the health care reform in Lithuania. Methods Self-administrated anonymous questionnaires were distributed to all physicians and general practitioners (N = 243, response rate – 78.6%), working at Kaunas primary health care level establishments, in October – December 2003. Results 15 men (7.9%) and 176 women (92.1%) participated in the research, among which 133 (69.6%) were GPs and 58 (30.4%) physicians. Respondents claimed to have chosen to become doctors, as other professions were of no interest to them. Total job satisfaction of the respondents was 4.74 point (on a 7 point scale). Besides 75.5% of the respondents said they would not recommend their children to choose a PHC level doctor's profession. The survey also showed that the respondents were most satisfied with the level of autonomy they get at work – 5.28, relationship with colleagues – 5.06, and management quality – 5.04, while compensation (2.09), social status (3.36), and workload (3.93) turned to be causing the highest dissatisfaction among the respondents. The strongest correlation (Spearmen's ratio) was observed between total job satisfaction and such factors as the level of autonomy – 0.566, workload – 0.452, and GP's social status – 0.458. Conclusion Total job satisfaction of doctors working at primary health care establishments in Lithuania is relatively low, and compensation, social status, and workload are among the key factors that condition PHC doctors' dissatisfaction with their job. PMID:15748299

  18. What can we learn from international comparisons of health systems and health system reform?

    PubMed Central

    McPake, B.; Mills, A.

    2000-01-01

    Most commonly, lessons derived from comparisons of international health sector reform can only be generalized in a limited way to similar countries. However, there is little guidance as to what constitutes "similarity" in this respect. We propose that a framework for assessing similarity could be derived from the performance of individual policies in different contexts, and from the cause and effect processes related to the policies. We demonstrate this process by considering research evidence in the "public-private mix", and propose variables for an initial framework that we believe determine private involvement in the public health sector. The most influential model of public leadership places the private role in a contracting framework. Research in countries that have adopted this model suggests an additional list of variables to add to the framework. The variables can be grouped under the headings "demand factors", "supply factors", and "strength of the public sector". These illustrate the nature of a framework that could emerge, and which would help countries aiming to learn from international experience. PMID:10916918

  19. Health Care Reform in South Korea: Success or Failure?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Chan

    2003-01-01

    South Korea is one of the world’s most rapidly industrializing countries. Along with industrialization has come universal health insurance. Within the span of 12 years, South Korea went from private voluntary health insurance to government-mandated universal coverage. Since 1997, with the intervention of the International Monetary Fund, Korean national health insurance (NHI) has experienced deficits and disruption. However, there are lessons to be drawn for the United States from the Korean NHI experience. PMID:12511383

  20. Risk avoidance and missed opportunities in mental health reform: the case of Israel.

    PubMed

    Aviram, Uri; Guy, Dalia; Sykes, Israel

    2007-01-01

    Passage of the National Health Insurance Law (NHI) [National Health Insurance Law (NHI) (1994). Israel Law Code, 1469, 156 (Hebrew).] provided a window of opportunity for mental health reform in Israel. The reform called for transfer, within a period of 3 years, of responsibility for psychiatric services formerly provided mostly by the Ministry of Health, to Israel's four major healthcare providers. Planners of mental health reform in Israel saw in the NHI Law an opportunity to bring about far-reaching structural changes in mental health policy and service provision, shifting the locus of care from psychiatric hospitals to the community. This paper reports results of a case study assessing factors that hindered or promoted the planned reform. The theoretical and conceptual framework of the study was derived from public policy theories and in particular on those related to public agenda and agenda setting processes. The study was also informed by organizational and interorganizational theories and exchange theory. Data was gathered from documents and interviews of key informants. Sources of data included official reports, proceedings of Knesset's Labor and Social Affairs (LSA) Committee, Ministry of Health documents, healthcare providers' reports, budget documents, newspaper analysis, and about 60 interviews with persons who played important roles in the process of the negotiations regarding the reform efforts. Analysis identified the major stakeholders and their concerns, distinguishing between the key stakeholders involved directly in the negotiations and secondary or additional stakeholders outside the main circle, some of whom were very involved and influential in the process. The study identified the major issues and the problems that emerged during the process of negotiations. Analysis of the failure of the attempt to implement the reform reveals a combination of obstacles emanating from the process of negotiation, on the one hand, and from the larger

  1. Translating ideas into actions: entrepreneurial leadership in state health care reforms.

    PubMed

    Oliver, T R; Paul-Shaheen, P

    1997-06-01

    States are often touted as "laboratories" for developing national solutions to social problems. In this article we examine the appropriateness of this metaphor for comprehensive health care reform and attempt to draw lessons about policy innovation from recent state actions. We present evidence from six states that enacted major pieces of health care legislation in the late 1980s or early 1990s: Massachusetts, Oregon, Florida, Minnesota, Vermont, and Washington State. The variation in design casts doubt on the proposition that states can invent plans and programs for other states and the federal government to adopt for themselves. Instead, we argue that it is more accurate to think of states as specialized political markets in which individuals and groups develop and promote innovative products. We examine the factors that might create receptive markets for comprehensive health care reforms and conclude that the critical factor these states shared in common was skilled and committed leadership from "policy entrepreneurs" who formulated the plans for system reform and prominent "investors" who contributed substantial political capital to the development of the reforms. We illustrate different strategies that leaders in these states used to carry out the entrepreneurial tasks of identifying a market opportunity, designing an innovation, attracting political investment, marketing the innovation, and monitoring its early production. PMID:9185017

  2. Effect of health system reforms in Turkey on user satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Jonathan; Gurol–Urganci, Ipek; Hone, Thomas; Atun, Rifat

    2015-01-01

    In 2003, the Turkish government introduced major health system changes, the Health Transformation Programme (HTP), to achieve universal health coverage (UHC). The HTP leveraged changes in all parts of the health system, organization, financing, resource management and service delivery, with a new family medicine model introducing primary care at the heart of the system. This article examines the effect of these health system changes on user satisfaction, a key goal of a responsive health system. Utilizing the results of a nationally representative yearly survey introduced at the baseline of the health system transformation, multivariate logistic regression analysis is used to examine the yearly effect on satisfaction with health services. During the 9–year period analyzed (2004–2012), there was a nearly 20% rise in reported health service use, coinciding with increased access, measured by insurance coverage. Controlling for factors known to contribute to user satisfaction in the literature, there is a significant (P < 0.001) increase in user satisfaction with health services in almost every year (bar 2006) from the baseline measure, with the odds of being satisfied with health services in 2012, 2.56 (95% confidence interval (CI) of 2.01–3.24) times that in 2004, having peaked at 3.58 (95% CI 2.82–4.55) times the baseline odds in 2011. Additionally, those who used public primary care services were slightly, but significantly (P < 0.05) more satisfied than those who used any other services, and increasingly patients are choosing primary care services rather than secondary care services as the provider of first contact. A number of quality indicators can probably help account for the increased satisfaction with public primary care services, and the increase in seeking first–contact with these providers. The implementation of primary care focused UHC as part of the HTP has improved user satisfaction in Turkey. PMID:26528391

  3. Implementing health care reform in the United States: intergovernmental politics and the dilemmas of institutional design.

    PubMed

    Béland, Daniel; Rocco, Philip; Waddan, Alex

    2014-05-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was enacted, and continues to operate, under conditions of political polarization. In this article, we argue that the law's intergovernmental structure has amplified political conflict over its implementation by distributing governing authority to political actors at both levels of the American federal system. We review the ways in which the law's demands for institutional coordination between federal and state governments (and especially the role it preserves for governors and state legislatures) have created difficulties for rolling out health-insurance exchanges and expanding the Medicaid program. By way of contrast, we show how the institutional design of the ACA's regulatory reforms of the insurance market, which diminish the reform's political salience, has allowed for considerably less friction during the implementation process. This article thus highlights the implications of multi-level institutional designs for the post-enactment politics of major reforms. PMID:24508181

  4. Generalism and the Need for Health Professional Educational Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulger, Roger J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper outlines forces that are intensifying change in health care delivery and describes institutional obstacles preventing medical schools' adjustment of their educational offerings. Health professions education institutions are urged to develop centers for determining regional and local workforce needs and subsequently establish regionally…

  5. "Diagnosing" Saudi health reforms: is NHIS the right "prescription"?

    PubMed

    Al-Sharqi, Omar Zayan; Abdullah, Muhammad Tanweer

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines the health context of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). It reviews health systems development in the KSA from 1925 through to contemporary New Health Insurance System (NHIS). It also examines the consistency of NHIS in view of the emerging challenges. This paper identifies the determinants and scope of contextual consistency. First, it indicates the need to evolve an indigenous, integrated, and comprehensive insurance system. Second, it highlights the access and equity gaps in service delivery across the rural and remote regions and suggests how to bring these under insurance coverage. Third, it suggests how inputs from both the public and private sectors should be harmonized - the "quality" of services in the private healthcare industry to be regulated by the state and international standards, its scope to be determined primarily by open-market dynamics and the public sector welfare-model to ensure "access" of all to essential health services. Fourth, it states the need to implement an evidence-based public health policy and bridge inherent gaps in policy design and personal-level lifestyles. Fifth, it points out the need to produce a viable infrastructure for health insurance. Because social research and critical reviews in the KSA health scenario are rare, this paper offers insights into the mainstream challenges of NHIS implementation and identifies the inherent weaknesses that need attention. It guides health policy makers, economists, planners, healthcare service managers, and even the insurance businesses, and points to key directions for similar research in future. PMID:23047768

  6. Health complaints and regulatory reform: Implications for vulnerable populations?

    PubMed

    Carney, Terry; Beaupert, Fleur; Chiarella, Mary; Bennett, Belinda; Walton, Merrilyn; Kelly, Patrick J; Satchell, Claudette S

    2016-03-01

    Complaints and disciplinary processes play a significant role in health professional regulation. Many countries are transitioning from models of self-regulation to greater external oversight through systems including meta-regulation, responsive (risk-based) regulation, and "networked governance". Such systems harness, in differing ways, public, private, professional and non-governmental bodies to exert influence over the conduct of health professionals and services. Interesting literature is emerging regarding complainants' motivations and experiences, the impact of complaints processes on health professionals, and identification of features such as complainant and health professional profiles, types of complaints and outcomes. This article concentrates on studies identifying vulnerable groups and their participation in health care regulatory systems. PMID:27323641

  7. Why is health care reform faltering? Delaware's experience.

    PubMed

    Frelick, R W

    1996-02-01

    Many managed care plans propose short-term economics, without stressing quality, assuring universal access, supporting research, or caring for the poor. None provide much in the way of preventive services. In the absence of any major national changes to assure universal access to health services, local health care providers and state regulatory agencies need to be freed from many restrictive federal laws and regulations. Relief is needed from well-intended federal controls which have usually made the health care system more expensive 1) by applying federal anti-trust regulations to prevent physicians from self-regulation and working to improve the health care system, 2) by making it difficult for physicians to do office laboratory work for their patients' convenience, 3) by making "safe" drugs expensive because of FDA regulations, 4) by sequentially spawning PRO, PSRO, and now the Health Care Quality Improvement Program (HCQIP) to "assure quality control" (they probably have not paid for themselves), 5) by not using the RBRVS system (accepted by HCFA as a way to relate a physician's fees to the resources required to perform a service) to stimulate physicians to enter primary care practice, 6) by giving tax breaks for insurance costs to big corporations but not to small businesses, and 7) by protecting self-insured businesses from state regulations. States should be allowed to obtain waivers from ERISA (which incidentally would improve competition) so states could regulate health insurers, try such proposals as a single payer system, or at least restore community rating and equity. This should improve access to technological advances in prevention and health care for all. More commissions and studies and federal laws are not the answer. Health care providers should be able to work together freely to deliver efficient, cost-effective health care. States should be able to assure preventive services, clinical research, public health support, professional education and

  8. Disordered eating and the contradictions of neoliberal governance.

    PubMed

    Pirie, Iain

    2016-07-01

    The last decade has seen the development of an important literature on the contradictions between neoliberal norms of corporal citizenship and the forms of consumption that market-based food systems promote. This paper seeks to contribute to the literature by exploring the relationship between these contradictions and the increased prevalence of particular eating disorders (binge eating disorder (BED) and bulimia nervosa). Within contemporary neoliberal food systems bingeing is increasingly normalised and consumption temporally disorganised. At the same time, neoliberal public health policy, and the wider 'health' entertainment media it legitimates, focuses on the promotion of 'correct' forms of consumer agency. Individuals who fail to manage consumption 'appropriately' are stigmatised. The growth of bulimia and BED can be related to the contradictory pressures that the food system and regime of corporal governance place on individuals. The paper also seeks to explore how the increased medicalisation and biomedicalisation of eating since the 1980s fits within a broader neoliberal governance strategy. By medicalising key social problems the neoliberal state depoliticises these issues. Medicalisation and biomedicalisation obscure the role of capitalism in generating these problems and encourage a focus on individual dysfunction. PMID:26896419

  9. Do health sector reforms have their intended impacts? The World Bank's Health VIII project in Gansu province, China.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Adam; Yu, Shengchao

    2007-05-01

    This paper combines differences-in-differences with propensity score matching to estimate the impacts of a health reform project in China that combined supply-side interventions aimed at improving the effectiveness and quality of care with demand-side measures aimed at expanding health insurance and providing financial support to the very poor. Data from household, village and facility surveys suggest the project reduced out-of-pocket spending, and the incidence of catastrophic spending and impoverishment through health expenses. Little impact is detected on the use of services, and while the evidence points to the project reducing sickness days, the evidence on health outcomes is mixed. PMID:17112613

  10. The health-care system: an assessment and reform agenda.

    PubMed

    Mataria, Awad; Khatib, Rana; Donaldson, Cam; Bossert, Thomas; Hunter, David J; Alsayed, Fahed; Moatti, Jean-Paul

    2009-04-01

    Attempts to establish a health plan for the occupied Palestinian territory were made before the 1993 Oslo Accords. However, the first official national health plan was published in 1994 and aimed to regulate the health sector and integrate the activities of the four main health-care providers: the Palestinian Ministry of Health, Palestinian non-governmental organisations, the UN Relief and Works Agency, and a cautiously developing private sector. However, a decade and a half later, attempts to create an effective, efficient, and equitable system remain unsuccessful. This failure results from arrangements for health care established by the Israeli military government between 1967 and 1994, the nature of the Palestinian National Authority, which has little authority in practice and has been burdened by inefficiency, cronyism, corruption, and the inappropriate priorities repeatedly set to satisfy the preferences of foreign aid donors. Although similar problems exist elsewhere, in the occupied Palestinian territory they are exacerbated and perpetuated under conditions of military occupation. Developmental approaches integrated with responses to emergencies should be advanced to create a more effective, efficient, and equitable health system, but this process would be difficult under military occupation. PMID:19268349

  11. [Economic assessment of the epidemiological profile change: information for health care reforms].

    PubMed

    Arredondo, A

    1997-02-01

    Taking into account the information needed to implement the reform process of the health sector, we present the results of an analysis of costs and the financial consequences of the epidemiological change of four tracer diseases in Mexico, two chronic (diabetes and hypertension) and two infectious diseases (pneumonias and diarrheas). The hospital cost-case management of diabetes expected for 1998 represents the same amount of hospital and ambulatory case management of diarrheas and pneumonias for the same year. The internal competition for resource allocations that is expected, among other factors, is one of the results that permits the argument that changes in the epidemiological profile generate relevant financial consequences in the planning and implementing of structural reforms of the health systems, particularly with regards to the patterns of resource allocation for specific health programs. PMID:9430948

  12. [Managed care in Latin America: transnationalization of the health sector in the context of reform].

    PubMed

    Iriart, C; Merhy, E E; Waitzkin, H

    2000-01-01

    This article presents the results of the comparative research project "Managed Care in Latin America: Its Role in Health Reform". The project was conducted by teams in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, and the United States. The study's objective was to analyze the process by which managed care is exported, especially from the United States, and how managed care is adopted in Latin American countries. Our research methods included qualitative and quantitative techniques. Adoption of managed care reflects transnationalization of the health sector. Our findings demonstrate the entrance of large multinational financial capital into the private insurance and health services sectors and their intention of participating in the administration of government institutions and medical/social security funds. We conclude that this basic change involving the slow adoption of managed care is facilitated by ideological changes with discourses accepting the inexorable nature of public sector reform. PMID:10738154

  13. Integrating Continuing Professional Development With Health System Reform: Building Pillars of Support.

    PubMed

    Davis, David A; Rayburn, William F

    2016-01-01

    Clinical failures sparked a widespread desire for health system reform at the beginning of the 21st century, but related efforts have resulted in changes that are either slow or nonexistent. In response, academic medicine has moved in two directions: (1) system-wide reform using electronic health records, practice networks, and widespread data applications (a macro pathway); and (2) professional development of individual clinicians through continuous performance improvement (a micro pathway). Both pathways exist to improve patient care and population health, yet each suffers from limitations in widespread implementation. The authors call for a better union between these two parallel pathways through four pillars of support: (1) an acknowledgment that both pathways are essential to each other and to the final outcome they intend to achieve, (2) a strong faculty commitment to educate about quality improvement and patient safety at all education levels, (3) a reengineering of tools for professional development to serve as effective change agents, and (4) the development of standards to sustain this alignment of pathways. With these pillars of support integrating continuing professional development with health system reform, the authors envision a better functioning system, with improved metrics and value to enhance patient care and population health. PMID:26556296

  14. Health-care reforms in the People's Republic of China--strategies and social implications.

    PubMed

    Wong, V C; Chiu, S W

    1998-01-01

    Analyses the features, strategies and characteristics of health-care reforms in the People's Republic of China. Since the 14th Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party held in 1992, an emphasis has been placed on reform strategies such as cost recovery, profit making, diversification of services, and development of alternative financing strategies in respect of health-care services provided in the public sector. Argues that the reform strategies employed have created new problems before solving the old ones. Inflation of medical cost has been elevated very rapidly. The de-linkage of state finance bureau and health service providers has also contributed to the transfer of tension from the state to the enterprises. There is no sign that quasi-public health-care insurance is able to resolve these problems. Finally, cooperative medicine in the rural areas has been largely dismantled, though this direction is going against the will of the state. Argues that a new balance of responsibility has to be developed as a top social priority between the state, enterprises and service users in China in order to meet the health-care needs of the people. PMID:10351255

  15. Consumer choice in Dutch health insurance after reform.

    PubMed

    Maarse, Hans; Meulen, Ruud Ter

    2006-03-01

    This article investigates the scope and effects of enhanced consumer choice in health insurance that is presented as a cornerstone of the new health insurance legislation in the Netherlands that will come into effect in 2006. The choice for choice marks the current libertarian trend in Dutch health care policymaking. One of our conclusions is that the scope of enhanced choice should not be overstated due to many legal and non-legal restrictions to it. The consumer choice advocates have great expectations of the impact of enhanced choice. A critical analysis of its impact demonstrates that these expectations may not become true and that enhanced consumer choice should not be perceived as the 'magic bullet' for many problems in health care. PMID:17137018

  16. Urban health insurance reform and coverage in China using data from National Health Services Surveys in 1998 and 2003

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ling; Wang, Yan; Collins, Charles D; Tang, Shenglan

    2007-01-01

    Background In 1997 there was a major reform of the government run urban health insurance system in China. The principal aims of the reform were to widen coverage of health insurance for the urban employed and contain medical costs. Following this reform there has been a transition from the dual system of the Government Insurance Scheme (GIS) and Labour Insurance Scheme (LIS) to the new Urban Employee Basic Health Insurance Scheme (BHIS). Methods This paper uses data from the National Health Services Surveys of 1998 and 2003 to examine the impact of the reform on population coverage. Particular attention is paid to coverage in terms of gender, age, employment status, and income levels. Following a description of the data between the two years, the paper will discuss the relationship between the insurance reform and the growing inequities in population coverage. Results An examination of the data reveals a number of key points: a) The overall coverage of the newly established scheme has decreased from 1998 to 2003. b) The proportion of the urban population without any type of health insurance arrangement remained almost the same between 1998 and 2003 in spite of the aim of the 1997 reform to increase the population coverage. c) Higher levels of participation in mainstream insurance schemes (i.e. GIS-LIS and BHIS) were identified among older age groups, males and high income groups. In some cases, the inequities in the system are increasing. d) There has been an increase in coverage of the urban population by non-mainstream health insurance schemes, including non-commercial and commercial ones. The paper discusses three important issues in relation to urban insurance coverage: institutional diversity in the forms of insurance, labour force policy and the non-mainstream forms of commercial and non-commercial forms of insurance. Conclusion The paper concludes that the huge economic development and expansion has not resulted in a reduced disparity in health insurance

  17. Health insurance reform: modifications to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) electronic transaction standards. Proposed rule.

    PubMed

    2008-08-22

    This rule proposes to adopt updated versions of the standards for electronic transactions originally adopted in the regulations entitled, "Health Insurance Reform: Standards for Electronic Transactions," published in the Federal Register on August 17, 2000, which implemented some of the requirements of the Administrative Simplification subtitle of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). These standards were modified in our rule entitled, "Health Insurance Reform: Modifications to Electronic Data Transaction Standards and Code Sets," published in the Federal Register on February 20, 2003. This rule also proposes the adoption of a transaction standard for Medicaid Pharmacy Subrogation. In addition, this rule proposes to adopt two standards for billing retail pharmacy supplies and professional services, and to clarify who the "senders" and "receivers" are in the descriptions of certain transactions. PMID:18958949

  18. Healthcare financing reform in Latvia: switching from social health insurance to NHS and back?

    PubMed

    Mitenbergs, Uldis; Brigis, Girts; Quentin, Wilm

    2014-11-01

    In the 1990s, Latvia aimed at introducing Social Health Insurance (SHI) but later changed to a National Health Service (NHS) type system. The NHS is financed from general taxation, provides coverage to the entire population, and pays for a basic service package purchased from independent public and private providers. In November 2013, the Cabinet of Ministers passed a draft Healthcare Financing Law, aiming at increasing public expenditures on health by introducing Compulsory Health Insurance (CHI) and linking entitlement to health services to the payment of income tax. Opponents of the reform argue that linking entitlement to health services to the payment of income tax does not have the potential to increase public expenditures on health but that it can contribute to compromising universal coverage and access to health services of certain population groups. In view of strong opposition, it is unlikely that the law will be adopted before parliamentary elections in October 2014. Nevertheless, the discussion around the law is interesting because of three main reasons: (1) it can illustrate why the concept of SHI remains attractive - not only for Latvia but also for other countries, (2) it shows that a change from NHS to SHI does not imply major institutional reforms, and (3) it demonstrates the potential problems of introducing SHI, i.e. of linking entitlement to health services to the payment of contributions. PMID:25445111

  19. The current state of health care in the former Soviet Union: implications for health care policy and reform.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, D A; Field, M G

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Given the many profound health care problems facing Russia and the other former Soviet republics, there are a number of fundamental policy questions that deserve close attention as part of the reform process. METHODS. Summary data regarding Soviet health care issues were drawn from government agency reports, scholarly books and journals, recent press reports, and the authors' personal research. RESULTS. Smoking, alcohol, accidents, poor sanitation, inadequate nutrition, and extensive environmental pollution contribute to illness and premature mortality in Russia and the other newly independent states. Hospitals and clinics are poorly maintained and equipped; most physicians are poorly trained and inadequately paid; and there is essentially no system of quality management. While efforts at reform, which emphasize shifting to a system of "insurance medicine," have been largely unsuccessful, they have raised several important policy issues that warrant extensive research and discussion. CONCLUSIONS. Without considering the implications and consequences of alternative policy directions, Russia and the other states face the very real possibility of developing health care systems that improve the overall level of care but also incorporate limited access and escalating costs. Russian health care reform leaders can learn from the health care successes in the West and avoid repeating our mistakes. PMID:8604753

  20. Privatizing the welfarist state: health care reforms in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Khoon, Chan Chee

    2003-01-01

    In Malaysia, the shifting balance between market and state has many nuances. Never a significant welfare state in the usual mold, the Malaysian state nonetheless has been a dominant social and economic presence dictated by its affirmative action-type policies, which eventually metamorphosed into state-led indigenous capitalism. Privatisation is also intimately linked with emergence of an indigenous bourgeoisie with favored access to the vast accumulation of state assets and prerogatives. Internationally, it is conditioned by the fluid relationships of converging alliances and contested compromise with international capital, including transnational health services industries. As part of its vision of a maturing, diversified economy, the Malaysian government is fostering a private-sector advanced health care industry to cater to local demand and also aimed at regional and international patrons. The assumption is that, as disposable incomes increase, a market for such services is emerging and citizens can increasingly shoulder their own health care costs. The government would remain the provider for the indigent. But the key assumption remains: the growth trajectory will see the emergence of markets for an increasingly affluent middle class. Importantly, the health care and social services market would be dramatically expanded as the downsizing of public-sector health care proceeds amid a general retreat of government from its provider and financing roles. PMID:17208722

  1. Addressing the epidemiologic transition in the former Soviet Union: strategies for health system and public health reform in Russia.

    PubMed Central

    Tulchinsky, T H; Varavikova, E A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This paper reviews Russia's health crisis, financing, and organization and public health reform needs. METHODS. The structure, policy, supply of services, and health status indicators of Russia's health system are examined. RESULTS. Longevity is declining; mortality rates from cardiovascular diseases and trauma are high and rising; maternal and infant mortality are high. Vaccine-preventable diseases have reappeared in epidemic form. Nutrition status is problematic. CONCLUSIONS. The crisis relates to Russia's economic transition, but it also goes deep into the former Soviet health system. The epidemiologic transition from a predominance of infectious to noninfectious diseases was addressed by increasing the quantity of services. The health system lacked mechanisms for epidemiologic or economic analysis and accountability to the public. Policy and funding favored hospitals over ambulatory care and individual routine checkups over community-oriented preventive approaches. Reform since 1991 has centered on national health insurance and decentralized management of services. A national health strategy to address fundamental public health problems is recommended. PMID:8604754

  2. Small-business winners and losers under health care reform.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, C G; Zellers, W K; Frick, K D

    To meet its goal of universal health insurance coverage, the Clinton health plan requires all employers to offer health insurance to their employees. Using survey data on more than 2,200 small businesses, we estimate how many firms and employees would be affected by this mandate and calculate the financial burden, adjusting for the small-business subsidies recommended in the Clinton plan. Because of the payroll caps, almost 60 percent of small businesses that now offer insurance will experience a reduction in premiums. The average reduction is approximately $1,500 per full-time equivalent (FTE) per year. The majority of firms that offer insurance and face an increase in liability under the Clinton plan will incur an increase of less than $1,000 per FTE per year. Firms that do not now offer insurance will incur, on average, a liability of $500 to $900 per FTE. PMID:8056376

  3. Accretion, reform, and crisis: a theory of public health politics in New York City.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Standard interpretations of the history of public health in New York City in the twentieth century describe either the decline or the growth of the importance accorded to public health activities. To the contrary, public health has, paradoxically, both declined in salience and attracted increasing resources. This article describes the politics of public health in New York City since the 1920s. First it describes events in the history of public health in the context of events in the economy and in city, state, and national politics. Then it proposes three descriptive models for arraying the data about public health politics: accretion, reform, and crisis. Next it describes how the politics of AIDS in New York City in the 1980s was a consequence of the history that produced these three political styles. Finally, it argues that the three political styles are generalizable to the history of public health throughout the United States in the twentieth century. PMID:1814059

  4. Equitable financing, out-of-pocket payments and the role of health care reform in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castano, Ramon A; Arbelaez, Jose J; Giedion, Ursula B; Morales, Luis G

    2002-12-01

    For a health care system to be considered equitable in its financing, the financial burden of contributions has to be progressive or at least proportional. Out-of-pocket financing takes a larger proportion of poor than of non-poor households' income. To remedy this regressive burden, among other goals, Colombia launched a health care reform based on social insurance as a means to reduce health care financing through out-of-pocket payments, and to reduce financial barriers to access. This paper analyzes the evolution of regressivity in out-of-pocket financing from 1984 to 1997, in order to detect if the 1993 health care reform had an impact on such regressivity. The Kakwani index of progressivity was estimated using three national household surveys. Kakwani indices showed a constant trend towards more regressivity (-0.126 in 1984, to -0.3498 in 1997) when using income to build the index, but a trend towards progressivity (-0.0092 in 1984, to 0.0026 in 1997) when using expenses. Our findings suggest that there was a progressive impact of the reform on out-of-pocket financing when household expenses are used to build the Kakwani index; however, due to issues of comparability between surveys, the findings are not conclusive. PMID:12477736

  5. [The cardiology community and health reform. Some reflections to open a debate].

    PubMed

    Schweiger, C

    2000-01-01

    A recently introduced health care reform in Italy will modify substantially the scenario in which all physicians and also the cardiac specialists working in and out of the hospitals will operate. Therefore it is important that the cardiological community, who manages a large proportion of human and financial resources of the Italian National Health Service, knows the reform and interacts with the national and local authorities for the best implementation of the basic principles on which the reform has been founded. These principles are the following: the Italian health service will guarantee all citizens the so-called "essential levels of care" identified in accordance with four distinctive features. They must: 1) safeguard real needs of care (i.e. cosmetic surgery is not considered), 2) be evidence based, 3) be appropriate for individual patients, 4) be cost-effective. In a context of scarce resources and rapidly increasing demand of care this basic strategy seems to be the only one suitable for a National Health Service, but the application of this principle in the real world of care seems a very difficult task, and the role of medical associations is obviously crucial for a good outcome. This report illustrates some articles of the law that deal with the medical profession: guidelines and appropriateness of the criteria; accreditation, clinical competence and quality control; continuing medical education. PMID:10832116

  6. Governance, transparency and alignment in the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) 2011 National Health Reform Agreement.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Gianluca; Harley, Kirsten; Dugdale, Paul; Short, Stephanie D

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE This article provides a policy analysis of the Australian government's National Health Reform Agreement (NHRA) by bringing to the foreground the governance arrangements underpinning the two arms of the national reforms, to primary health care and hospital services. METHODS The article analyses the NHRA document and mandate, and contextualises the changes introduced vis-à-vis the complex characteristics of the Australian health care system. Specifically, it discusses the coherence of the agreement and its underlying objectives, and the consistency and logic of the governance arrangements introduced. RESULTS The policy analysis highlights the rationalisation of the responsibilities between the Commonwealth and states and territories, the commitment towards a funding arrangement based on uniform measures of performance and the troubled emergence of a more decentralised nation-wide homogenisation of governance arrangements, plus efforts to improve transparency, accountability and statutory support to increase the standards of quality of care and safety. CONCLUSIONS It is suggested that the NHRA falls short of adequately supporting integration between primary, secondary and tertiary health care provision and facilitating greater integration in chronic disease management in primary care. Successfully addressing this will unlock further value from the reforms. PMID:24807128

  7. The impact of health-care reform on the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Knox, W A

    1993-11-01

    Reform of the United States' health-care system as we know it will require a reevaluation of the methods used in health-care delivery. Many changes are emerging in the health-care marketplace, and there is a prevailing trend toward universal coverage through managed care/competition. Global cost-control measures will become more prevalent, as we have seen already in the Clinton Administration's plan to become the sole and price-controlling customer for all childhood vaccines. Health-care delivery is evolving toward local care networks involving managed competition, a system in which patient groups will trade volume for price. Legal barriers presently include antitrust laws, which restrict collaboration among health providers, fraud and abuse laws, and tax considerations. Licensure and regulatory issues also may have an impact on reforms. The benefits most likely will include guaranteed health care, reduced health-care costs, and a better, more efficient quality of medical care. With these changes, however, there will be less freedom of choice in health care and a greater burden on certain sectors of the economy. PMID:8402518

  8. Reforms in Pakistan: Decisive Times for Improving Maternal and Child Health

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Arslan; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem

    2012-01-01

    Pakistan is a struggling economy with poor maternal and child health indicators that have affected attainment of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 (under-five child and maternal mortality). Recent health reforms have abolished the federal Ministry of Health and devolved administrative and financial powers to the provinces. Ideally, devolution tends to simplify a healthcare system's management structure and ensure more efficient delivery of health services to underserved populations, in this case women and children. In this time of transition, it is appropriate to outline prerequisites for the efficient management of maternal and child health (MCH) services. This paper examines the six building blocks of health systems in order to improve the utilization of MCH services in rural Pakistan. The targeted outcomes of recent reforms are devolved participatory decision-making regarding distribution of MCH-related services, improved deployment of the healthcare workforce, prioritization of pro-poor strategies for health financing and integration of various health information systems. Given this window of opportunity, the provinces need to guarantee fairness and equity through their stewardship of the healthcare system so as to protect vulnerable mothers and their children, especially in rural, remote and disadvantaged areas of Pakistan. PMID:23968601

  9. Health sector reform in central and eastern Europe: the professional dimension.

    PubMed

    Healy, J; Mckee, M

    1997-12-01

    The success or failure of health sector reform in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe depends, to a large extent, on their health care staff. Commentators have focused on the structures to be put in place, such as mechanisms of financing or changes in ownership of facilities, but less attention has been paid to the role and status of the different groups working in health care services. This paper draws on a study of trends in staffing and working conditions throughout the region. It identifies several key issues including the traditionally lower status and pay of health sector workers compared to the West, the credibility crisis of trade unions, and the under-developed roles of professional associations. In order to implement health sector reforms and to address the deteriorating health status of the population, the health sector workforce has to be restructured and training programmes reoriented towards primary care. Finally, the paper identifies emerging issues such as the erosion of 'workplace welfare' and its adverse effects upon a predominantly female health care workforce. PMID:10176264

  10. Economic crisis and counter-reform of universal health care systems: Spanish case.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Paulo Antônio de Carvalho; Carvalho, Regina Ribeiro Parizi; Louvison, Marília Cristina Prado

    2015-01-01

    The economic crisis that has been affecting Europe in the 21st century has modified social protection systems in the countries that adopted, in the 20th century, universal health care system models, such as Spain. This communication presents some recent transformations, which were caused by changes in Spanish law. Those changes relate to the access to health care services, mainly in regards to the provision of care to foreigners, to financial contribution from users for health care services, and to pharmaceutical assistance. In crisis situations, reforms are observed to follow a trend which restricts rights and deepens social inequalities. PMID:26083942

  11. Economic crisis and counter-reform of universal health care systems: Spanish case

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, Paulo Antônio de Carvalho; Carvalho, Regina Ribeiro Parizi; Louvison, Marília Cristina Prado

    2015-01-01

    The economic crisis that has been affecting Europe in the 21st century has modified social protection systems in the countries that adopted, in the 20th century, universal health care system models, such as Spain. This communication presents some recent transformations, which were caused by changes in Spanish law. Those changes relate to the access to health care services, mainly in regards to the provision of care to foreigners, to financial contribution from users for health care services, and to pharmaceutical assistance. In crisis situations, reforms are observed to follow a trend which restricts rights and deepens social inequalities. PMID:26083942

  12. Constructing options for health care reform in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Au, D K

    1999-12-01

    The Harvard Report, published in April 1999 for public consultation in Hong Kong, proposed a fundamental restructuring in its health care delivery and financing systems. The Report claims to be evidence-based in its approach (Hsiao et al., 1999a). While 'evidence' has been widely collected by the consultancy team through surveys, consultations and focus groups, the recommendations put forth are not value-free. They carry clear ideological preferences. The value assumptions and ethical presuppositions underlying the report are discussed in this paper. The Harvard consultancy study is in favor of a positive government role in regulation and control, a single central body to administer compulsory health insurance for all citizens, and a purchaser-provider split to induce competition. Such preference is based on pre-existing ideology and generic health care management concepts, which are still in the experimental phase internationally. While value and ideology are inevitable factors in any policy choice, the challenge is to lay these values open for reflection and public debate. For Hong Kong, the challenge is also to take on local substantive issues in health care and deal with them head-on, rather than putting hope in a universal, generic solution. PMID:10709772

  13. A regional approach to health care reform: the Texas border.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Jose Luis Manzanares; Zuniga, Genny Carrillo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze health insurance disparities related to labor environment factors in the Texas-Mexico border region. A logistic regression model was performed using microdata from the 2010 American Community Survey to estimate the probability of having employer-based insurance, controlling labor environment factors such as hours worked, occupation industry, and the choice of private, nonprofit or public sector jobs. Industries primarily employing the Mexican American population are less likely to offer employer-based health insurance. These industries have the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 770 construction, including cleaning, and NAICS code 8680, restaurants and other food services. Although it was found that working in public sector industries such as code 9470, administration of justice, public order, and safety, or NAICS code 7860, elementary and secondary schools, improved by 60% the probability of the Mexican American population having employer-based health insurance, these occupations ranked at the bottom of the main occupation list for Mexican Americans. These findings provide evidence that the labor environment plays an important role in understanding current health insurance access limitations within the Mexican American community under 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provisions, which are directed to small business and lower-income individuals. PMID:25627854

  14. [A reform proposal to strengthen public health care].

    PubMed

    Vergara I, Marcos

    2015-02-01

    Currently, there is no discussion on the need to improve and strengthen the institutional health care modality of FONASA (MAI), the health care system used by the public services net and by most of the population, despite the widely known and long lasting problems such as waiting lists, hospital debt with suppliers, lack of specialists and increasing services purchase transference to the private sector, etc. In a dichotomous sectorial context, such as the one of health’s social security in Chile (the state on one side and the market on the other), points of view are polarized and stances tend to seek refuge within themselves. As a consequence, to protect the public solution is commonly associated with protecting the “status quo”, creating an environment that is reluctant to change. The author proposes a solution based on three basic core ideas, which, if proven effective, can strengthen each other if combined properly. These are: network financing management, governance of health care services in MAI and investments and human resources in networked self-managed institutions. The proposal of these core ideas was done introducing a reality testing that minimizes the politic complexity of their implementation. PMID:25860366

  15. School Health Reform: Investigating the Role of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snelling, Anastasia M.; Belson, Sarah Irvine; Young, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    National and local polices have positioned schools to play an integral role in addressing the obesity epidemic by establishing preventive activities. Teachers are ideally suited to have a role in this process because teachers have direct and indirect impacts on student health outcomes. The purpose of this exploratory study was to assess the health…

  16. Mothercraft: Birth work and the making of neoliberal mothers.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Katharine

    2016-08-01

    The literature on neoliberal health governance explores how macro-economic neoliberal policies as well as individual attitudes and behaviors reflect an increasingly individualized construction of health and citizens' responsibility over it. This study contributes to this literature and expands it in important ways. Drawing on qualitative interviews from 22 midwives and birth workers (doulas, childbirth educators, lactation consultants) practicing in the US, this study explores how midwives and birth workers act as "experts of conduct" who promote certain neoliberal values in their logics of care and interactions with clientele. The findings reveal that midwives and birth workers promote a form of maternal neoliberal health governance by: 1) making distinctions between their clientele that signal differences in health competence and resources, 2) encouraging autonomy and responsibility over birth experiences, and 3) promoting an empowerment discourse that hinges implicitly on an exclusionary consumer choice rhetoric. Midwives and birth workers are crucially implicated in shaping maternal subjectivities through pedagogical interactions I refer to as "mothercraft." This study illustrates how the promotion of certain health identities by experts further stratifies patient populations, exacerbating differences between women based on their socioeconomic status, racial-ethnic, and cultural positions. PMID:27367898

  17. Malaria control reinvented: health sector reform and strategy development in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Axel; Ordoñez-Gonzalez, José; Aviña, Ana Isabel

    2002-05-01

    The consequences of health sector reforms on control of malaria were analysed using Colombia as an example. One of the most complex health sector reform programmes in Latin America took place in the 1990s; it included transferring the vertical vector-borne disease control (VBDC) programme into health systems at state and district levels. A series of studies was undertaken in 1998-2000 at the national level (Ministry of Health Study), at the state level (Departamento Study) and at the health district level (District Study) using formal and informal interviews among control staff and document analysis as data collection tools. A government-financed national training programme for VBDC staff - which included direct observation of control operations - was also used to analyse health workers' performance in the postreform period (longitudinal study). The results showed that some shortcomings of the old vertical system, such as the negative aspects of trade union activity, have not been overcome while some positive aspects of the old system, such as capacity building, operational planning and supervision have been lost. This has contributed to a decrease in control activity which, in turn, has been associated with more malaria cases. Malaria control had to be reinvented at a much larger scale than anticipated by the reformers caused by a whole series of problems: complex financing of public health interventions in the new system, massive staff reductions, the difficulty of gaining access to district and state budgets, redefining entire organizations and - in addition to the reforms - introducing alternative strategies based on insecticide-treated materials and the growth of areas of general insecurity in many parts of Colombia itself. However, positive signs in the transformed system include: the strengthening of central control staff (albeit insufficient in numbers) when transferred from the Ministry of Health to the National Institute of Health, the opportunities

  18. Implementing the Affordable Care Act: The Promise and Limits of Health Care Reform.

    PubMed

    Oberlander, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    The Obama administration has confronted a formidable array of obstacles in implementing the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA has overcome those obstacles to substantially expand access to health insurance, though significant problems with its approach have emerged. What does the ACA's performance to date tell us about the possibilities and limits of health care reform in the United States? I identify key challenges in ACA implementation-the inherently disruptive nature of reform, partisan polarization, the limits of "near universal" coverage, complexity, and divided public opinion-and analyze how these issues have shaped its evolution. The article concludes by exploring the political and policy challenges that lie ahead for the ACA. PMID:27127261

  19. Physician payment disclosure under health care reform: will the sun shine?

    PubMed

    Mackey, Tim K; Liang, Bryan A

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical marketing has become a mainstay in U.S. health care delivery and traditionally has been directed toward physicians. In an attempt to address potential undue influence of industry and conflicts of interest that arise, states and the recently upheld health care reform act have passed transparency, or "sunshine," laws requiring disclosure of industry payments to physicians. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recently announced the final rule for the Sunshine Provisions as part of the reform act. However, the future effectiveness of these provisions are questionable and may be limited given the changing landscape of pharmaceutical marketing away from physician detailing to other forms of promotion. To address this changing paradigm, more proactive policy solutions will be necessary to ensure adequate and ethical regulation of pharmaceutical promotion. PMID:23657702

  20. Nursing and health care reform: implications for curriculum development.

    PubMed

    Bowen, M; Lyons, K J; Young, B E

    2000-01-01

    The health care system is undergoing profound changes. Cost containment efforts and restructuring have resulted in cutbacks in registered nurse (RN) positions. These changes are often related to the increased market penetration by managed care companies. To determine how RN graduates perceive these changes and their impact on the delivery of patient care, Healthcare Environment Surveys were mailed to graduates of the classes of 1986 and 1991. Using the Survey's 5-point Likert Scale, we measured the graduates' satisfaction with their salary, quality of supervision they received, opportunities for advancement, recognition for their job, working conditions, the overall job and the changes in their careers over the previous five year period. Our study suggests that the changes in the health care system are having an impact on how health care is being delivered and the way nurses view their jobs. Respondents reported that insurance companies are exerting increased control over patient care and perceive that the quality of patient care is declining. Increased workloads and an increase in the amount of paperwork were reported. Participants perceived that there were fewer jobs available and that job security was decreasing. The percentage of nurses who see job satisfaction as remaining the same or increasing are a majority. However, the relatively high percent of nurses who see job satisfaction as declining should provide a note of warning. The major implications of this study are that the professional nursing curriculum must be modified to include content on communication, organization, legislative/policy skills, and leadership. The nation's health care system is undergoing profound changes. There are numerous forces at work that are effecting the delivery of care and, consequently, the work of health professionals. These forces include significant efforts at cost containment, restructuring and downsizing of hospitals, and the movement of health care delivery out of acute

  1. [Equity issues in health care reform in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Belmartino, Susana

    2002-01-01

    This article analyzes the historical and contemporary development of the Argentine health care system from the viewpoint of equity, a principle which is not explicitly mentioned in the system's founding documents. However, other values can be identified such as universal care, accessibility, and solidarity, which are closely related to equity. Nevertheless, the political dynamics characterizing the development of the country's health care system led to the suppression of more universalistic approaches, with group solidarity the only remaining principle providing structure to the system. The 1980s financial crisis highlighted the relative value of this principle as the basis for an equitable system. The authors illustrate the current situation with data on coverage under the medical social security system. PMID:12118311

  2. Back to the future: 10 years of European health reforms.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Anna; Poteliakhoff, Emmi

    2012-01-01

    The challenges facing European health systems have changed little over 30 years but the responses to them have. Policy ideas that emerged in some countries spread to others; however, the way policies were implemented and the impact they have had has been shaped by specific national contexts. Comparative policy analysis has evolved in response to this, moving away from simple classifications of health systems and crude rankings to studies that try and understand more deeply what works, where and why. For policymakers interested in how other countries have dealt with common challenges, it is important that they avoid the naïve transplantation of policy solutions but understand the need to translate policies to fit the institutional context of a particular country. Policies that cross borders will necessarily be shaped by the social and political institutions of a country. These dimensions should not be ignored in comparative research. The next decade will require health systems to deliver improved care for people with complex needs while at the same time delivering greater value. Policymakers will benefit from looking backwards as well as to their neighbours in order to develop appropriate policy solutions. PMID:22221926

  3. Management of health system reform: a view of changes within New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, D

    1998-08-01

    This paper reports on the context and process of health system reform in New Zealand. The study is based on interviews conducted with 31 managers from three Crown Health Enterprises (publicly funded hospital-based health care organizations). A number of countries with publicly funded health services (e.g., UK, Australia and New Zealand) have sought to shift from the traditional 'passive' health management style (using transactional management skills to balance historically-based expenditure budgets) to 'active' transformational leadership styles that reflect a stronger 'private sector' orientation (requiring active management of resources--including a return on 'capital' investment, identification of costs and returns on 'product lines', 'marketing' a 'product mix', reducing non-core activities and overhead costs, and a closer relationship with 'shareholders', suppliers and customers/clients). Evidence of activities and processes associated with transformational leadership are identified. Success of the New Zealand health reforms will be determined by the approach the new managers adopt to improve their organization's performance. Transformational leadership has been frequently linked to the successful implementation of significant organizational change in other settings (Kurz et al., 1988; Dunphy and Stace, 1990) but it is too early to assess whether this is applicable in a health care context. PMID:10181886

  4. Health care reforms on the European scene: evolution, revolution or seesaw?

    PubMed

    Vienonen, M A; Wlodarczyk, W C

    1993-01-01

    In rough terms a tripartite picture characterized the European health care delivery map until the late 1980s. The Beveridge model has its roots in the British National Health Service, the Bismarck model for sickness insurance arose in Germany, and the centrally controlled Semashko model was developed in the USSR All three modes are undergoing reforms with similar aims expressed in similar language. Differences in the content and speed of reforms stem from the different circumstances and models of health care organization and financing in the countries. Practically all of the CCEE/NIS have declared their determination to change their health services financing from a centrally run system into a health insurance based structure, meaning a switch from the Semashko to the Bismarck models. Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and some other CCEE have already passed and implemented health insurance legislation, but considerable problems have arisen in the form of budget deficit, which has had to be filled by state budgets. The NIS are following behind, but no practical change has so far has come in sight. Going beyond the popular slogans of privatization and market economy is difficult during a situation of political instability, when the real transition will inevitably mean readjustment in the form of cuts and constraints, and painful reorganization in the priorities of health services. PMID:8017073

  5. How has health care reform affected professional chaplaincy programs and how are department directors responding?

    PubMed

    VandeCreek, L

    2000-01-01

    No published studies were identified that describe the impact of health care reform on professional chaplaincy departments in hospital settings. Results from a random sample (N = 370) of department directors indicate that 45 percent report no budgetary consequences, 27 percent have experienced budgetary cutbacks, and 17 percent describe departmental growth. The cutbacks most often involve the loss of staff chaplain positions. Directors also describe past and future strategies for resisting downsizing trends. PMID:11184329

  6. Health care in China: a rural-urban comparison after the socioeconomic reforms.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, L.

    1993-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the current Chinese health care system with particular emphasis on rural-urban differences. China's post-1978 economic reforms, although they improved general living standards, created some unintended consequences, as evidenced by the disintegration of the rural cooperative medical system and the sharp reduction in the number of "barefoot doctors", both of which were essential elements in the improvement of health status in rural China. The increase in the elderly population and their lack of health insurance and pensions will also place enormous pressure on services for their care. These changes have disproportionately affected the rural health care system, leaving the urban system basically intact, and have contributed to the rural-urban disparity in health care. Based on recent data the article compares current rural-urban differences in health care policy, systems, resources, and outcomes, and proposes potential solutions to reduce them. PMID:8313490

  7. Rising to the challenge of health care reform with entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial nursing initiatives.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Anne; Whitaker, Nancy; Whitford, Deirdre

    2012-05-01

    Health reform worldwide is required due to the largely aging population, increase in chronic diseases, and rising costs. To meet these needs, nurses are being encouraged to practice to the full extent of their skills and take significant leadership roles in health policy, planning, and provision. This can involve entrepreneurial or intrapreneurial roles. Although nurses form the largest group of health professionals, they are frequently restricted in their scope of practice. Nurses can help to improve health services in a cost effective way, but to do so, they must be seen as equal partners in health service provision. This article provides a global perspective on evolving nursing roles for innovation in health care. A historical overview of entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship is offered. Included also is discussion of a social entrepreneurship approach for nursing, settings for nurse entre/intrapreneurship, and implications for research and practice. PMID:22686113

  8. Privatization of Public Services: Organizational Reform Efforts in Public Education and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Gollust, Sarah E.; Jacobson, Peter D.

    2006-01-01

    The public health and the public education systems in the United States have encountered problems in quality of service, accountability, and availability of resources. Both systems are under pressure to adopt the general organizational reform of privatization. The debate over privatization in public education is contentious, but in public health, the shift of functions from the public to the private sector has been accepted with limited deliberation. We assess the benefits and concerns of privatization and suggest that shifting public health functions to the private sector raises questions about the values and mission of public health. Public health officials need to be more engaged in a public debate over the desirability of privatization as the future of public health. PMID:17008563

  9. Massachusetts health reform and disparities in joint replacement use: difference in differences study

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Alok; Katz, Jeffrey N; McCormick, Danny; Lasser, Karen E; Feng, Chen; Manze, Meredith G; Kressin, Nancy R

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the impact of the insurance expansion in 2006 on use of knee and hip replacement procedures by race/ethnicity, area income, and the use of hospitals that predominantly serve poor people (“safety net hospitals”). Design Quasi-experimental difference in differences study examining change after reform in the share of procedures performed in safety net hospitals by race/ethnicity and area income, with adjustment for patients’ residence, demographics, and comorbidity. Setting State of Massachusetts, United States. Participants Massachusetts residents aged 40-64 as the target beneficiaries of reform and similarly aged residents of New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania as the comparison (control) population. Main outcomes measures Number of knee and hip replacement procedures per 10 000 population and use of safety net hospitals. Procedure counts from state discharge data for 2.5 years before and after reform, and multivariate difference in differences. Poisson regression was used to adjust for demographics, economic conditions, secular time, and geographic factors to estimate the change in procedure rate associated with health reform by race/ethnicity and area income. Results Before reform, the number of procedures (/10 000) in Massachusetts was lower among Hispanic people (12.9, P<0.001) than black people (28.1) and white people (30.1). Overall, procedure use increased 22.4% during the 2.5 years after insurance expansion; reform in Massachusetts was associated with a 4.7% increase. The increase associated with reform was significantly higher among Hispanic people (37.9%, P<0.001) and black people (11.4%, P<0.05) than among white people (2.8%). Lower income was not associated with larger increases in procedure use. The share of knee and hip replacement procedures performed in safety net hospitals in Massachusetts decreased by 1.0% from a level of 12.7% before reform. The reduction was larger among Hispanic people (−6.4%, P<0.001) than white

  10. Teachers' Professional Identity, Educational Change and Neo-Liberal Pressures on Education in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Sylvia Yee Fan

    2011-01-01

    Education reforms underpinned by neo-liberal values have been criticised for bringing an adverse impact on teachers' professional identity. This article presents a qualitative study of teachers' professional identity in three historical periods in Hong Kong: Phase 1: 1965-84; Phase 2: 1984-97; and Phase 3: the post-1997 period. By juxtaposing the…

  11. Confronting the Contradictions: A Case Study of Early Childhood Teacher Development in Neoliberal Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    As neoliberal polices that emphasize governing the modern state through market-based principles expand across the globe, they are altering the training of early childhood teacher candidates. This creates a range of challenges for those teacher educators who are critical of this reform process. This article presents an instrumental case study that…

  12. Teaching for Humanity in a Neoliberal World: Visions of Education in Serbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dull, Laura J.

    2012-01-01

    In Serbia, teachers and policy makers express different and sometimes competing visions of education. Teachers express their desire to "awaken" students by using progressive pedagogies, while European Union and World Bank reformers appropriate progressive education in the service of neoliberal goals. The research findings presented here indicate…

  13. Two Different Organizational Reactions: The University Sector in Argentina and Colombia and the Neoliberal Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabossi, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    The neoliberal reform arrived at the market of higher education with the intention of introducing private dynamics into public organizations. Through this strategy, the objective was to improve efficiency by promoting intra- and intersectoral competition. The introduction of performance funding shifted the concept of accountability for…

  14. Working the "Shady Spaces": Resisting Neoliberal Hegemony in New Zealand Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMaster, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    While the chill winds of neoliberalism blow, it seems some cultures are better equipped to weather the storm. The London fog raincoat or the American Levi's denim jacket has left little insulation against the effects of a quarter century of so-called "reforms". New Zealand's Swanndri bush shirt, though not as efficient as the…

  15. Neo-Liberalism and the Politics of Higher Education Policy in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosser, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines Indonesia's experience with neo-liberal higher education reform. It argues that this agenda has encountered strong resistance from the dominant predatory political, military, and bureaucratic elements who occupy the state apparatus, their corporate clients, and popular forces, leading to continuation of the centralist and…

  16. Beginning to Untangle the Strange Coupling of Power within a Neoliberal Early Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Christopher P.; Lan, Yi-Chin; Jeong, Hye In

    2015-01-01

    Policymakers across the globe continue to promote access to early education programmes as a means to improve children's readiness for school. Many of their reforms are rooted in a neoliberal conception of governance that frames policy solutions through economic rather than democratic terms. Such policies foster an image of the successful learner…

  17. Making Art Invisible: Visual Education and the Cultural Stagnation of Neo-Liberal Rationality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peers, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The popularity of visual literacy may have resulted, in part, from some school authorities rushing the process of determining school curriculum. This article argues that the haste is reflective of pressure placed on educational discourse to conform to neo-liberal reforms of the sector, and is not the result of a careful and complex debate within…

  18. Implementing Internationalization Policy in Higher Education Explained by Regulatory Control in Neoliberal Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Dian-Fu

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated the internationalization policy and involved evaluating the effects of policy-driven reform on universities in the context of neoliberal theory. In this study, 293 professors from various universities were invited to express their opinions on the selected indicators reflected the implementation of internationalization in…

  19. Greek mental health reform: views and perceptions of professionals and service users.

    PubMed

    Loukidou, E; Mastroyiannakis, A; Power, T; Craig, T; Thornicroft, G; Bouras, N

    2013-01-01

    The Greek mental health system has been undergoing radical reforms for over the past twenty years. In congruence with trends and practices in other European countries, Greek mental health reforms were designed to develop a community-based mental health service system. The implementation of an extensive transformation became possible through the "Psychargos" program, a national strategic and operational plan, which was developed by the Ministry of Health and Social Solidarity. The Psychargos program was jointly funded by the European Union by 75% of the cost over a period of 5 years and the Greek State. After the period of 5 years, the entire cost of the new services became the responsibility of the Greek National Budget. Over the years the Psychargos program became almost synonymous with the deinstitutionalisation of long term psychiatric patients with the development of a wide range of community mental health services. The Psychargos program ended in December 2009. This article presents the views of service providers and service users as part an ex-post evaluation of the Psychargos program carried out in 2010. Data derived for this part of the evaluation are from the application of the qualitative method of focus groups. The outcomes of the study identified several positive and noteworthy achievements by the reforms of the Greek mental health system as well as weaknesses. There was considerable similarity of the views expressed by both focus groups. In addition the service users' focus group emphasized more issues related to improving their mental health wellbeing and living a satisfying, hopeful, and contributing life. PMID:23603267

  20. Using economic levers to change behaviour: the case of Thailand's universal coverage health care reforms.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David; Leethongdee, Songkramchai; Osiri, Sunantha

    2010-02-01

    Thailand's universal coverage health care policy has been presented as a knowledge-based reform involving substantial pre-planning, including expert economic analysis of the financing mechanism. This paper describes the new financing system introduced from 2001 in which the Ministry of Public Health allocated monies to local Contracted Units for Primary Care (CUPs) on the basis of population. It discusses the policy intention to use capitation funding to change incentive structures and engineer a transfer of professional staff from over-served urban areas to under-served rural areas. The paper utilises qualitative data from national policy makers and health service staff in three north-eastern provinces to tell the story of the reforms. We found that over time government moved away from the original capitation funding model as the result of (a) a macro-allocation problem arising from system disturbance and professional opposition, and (b) a micro-allocation problem that emerged when local budgets were not shared equitably. In many CUPs, the hospital directors controlling resource allocation channelled funds more towards curative services than community facilities. Taken together the macro and micro problems led to the dilution of capitation funding and reduced the re-distributive effects of the reforms. This strand of policy foundered in the face of structural and institutional barriers to change. PMID:19914757

  1. Private sector approach to health care reform. Interview by Thomas G. Goodwin.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, R

    1991-01-01

    The Healthcare Leadership Council (HLC) was formed in 1990 by 50 CEOs of hospitals, hospital systems, pharmaceutical companies, medical device manufacturers, Insurers and medical professionals. HLC is a coalition to develop the necessary consensus to realistically influence health care reforms. HLC urges that the "U.S. public policy goal should be to seek the best mechanism for balancing quality, access and affordability." As for access for the poor, the HLC would standardize eligibility for Medicaid at the federal poverty level, establishing a minimum basic benefit and payment plan with funding to come from specific taxes. For the employed uncovered, HLC would extend the exemption from state mandates to small employers; enact appropriate market reforms and provide income-related subsidies for those near the poverty line and for small employers; encourage employer-provided coverage for all employees on a voluntary basis.... HLC also backs state subsidized uninsurable risk pools for people whose conditions would make premiums too expensive. As for affordability of health care, HLC says consumers should become involved in cost-effective health care plans, appropriate employee cost sharing, lifestyle incentives/penalties, etc. Also, legislation should be overridden that inhibits innovation, creativity (state-mandated benefits, restrictions on selective contracting, CON requirements...), and medical malpractice tort reform measures also should be enacted. What follows is an in-depth interview with HLC Chairman G. Robert O'Brien, president of CIGNA Employee Benefits Companies. PMID:10109943

  2. Positioning advanced practice registered nurses for health care reform: consensus on APRN regulation.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Joan M; Werner, Kathryn E; Apple, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) have positioned themselves to serve an integral role in national health care reform. This article addresses both the policy and the process to develop this policy that has placed them in a strategic position. A successful transformation of the nation's health system will require utilization of all clinicians, particularly primary care providers, to the full extent of their education and scope of practice. APRNs are highly qualified clinicians who provide cost-effective, accessible, patient-centered care and have the education to provide the range of services at the heart of the reform movement, including care coordination, chronic care management, and wellness and preventive care. The APRN community faces many challenges amidst the opportunities of health reform. However, the APRN community's triumph in reaching consensus on APRN regulation signifies a cohesive approach to overcoming the obstacles. The consensus model for APRN regulation, endorsed by 44 national nursing organizations, will serve as a beacon for nursing, as well as a guidepost for consumers and policymakers, on titling, education, certification, accreditation, and licensing for all four APRN roles. PMID:19942200

  3. [The democratic movement, cholera epidemic and public health reform in the Zurich canton (1867)].

    PubMed

    Condrau, F

    1996-01-01

    In the summer of 1867 Zurich, Switzerland, was struck by a severe Cholera outbreak. Recent research suggests that the Cholera epidemic had such an influence on the municipal policy makers that they pushed through a major reform of the public health system, namely of water supply and sewerage. This paper adopts a theoretical conception of crisis and social change to evaluate the plausibility of this hypothesis. The basic idea is that structural change can be usually understood as the consequence of a major social crisis. Exactly this was the case in Zurich during the 1860s. After a decade of economic stability and progress, a severe crisis simultaneously stuck Zurich's agriculture, textile industry and railway companies. The so called Democratic Movement threatened the existing political system; the old political establishment feared a political revolution. On top of all this, Cholera struck Zurich, precipitating a crisis in the public health system. Suddenly, old concepts and institutions were felt to be outdated. The democrats put through political reforms, the economic downswing ended and a large program to reshape the urban environment was initiated. It can be concluded that the Cholera epidemic alone did not cause the public health reform. But together with other crisis phenomena it played a major role in weakening the stability of the old system, and thus contributed to the society's ability to put in place new political, economic, and social structures. PMID:9092134

  4. Impediments to employment under welfare reform: the importance of physical health and psychosocial characteristics.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, S M; Kerker, B D

    2001-01-01

    The impact of Connecticut's welfare reform program (Jobs First), physical and mental health status, personal resources and household violence on employment was examined 18 months after women were randomized to either the welfare reform or the older AFDC program. Multivariate analyses showed that although the Jobs First program was statistically significantly associated with women having worked sometime since assignment to the welfare reform program, the Jobs First program was not associated with women currently working or having worked at some point but no longer working. Rather, women were more likely to be working at the 18 month interview if they reported frequent help from their social networks (OR = 1.52; p = .009), they had at least a high school degree (OR = 1.65; p =.002) and they were in good physical health (OR = 3.41; p = .009). Women who had worked sometime since random assignment but were no longer working at the 18 month interview reported few social contacts (OR = 1.33; p = .042), did not pay rent or own their own homes (OR = 6.94; p = .025), reported receiving AFDC for 2 years or more prior to randomization (OR = 1.83; p = .035) and reported high levels of household violence (OR = 1.52; p = .035). The need for attention to be focused on the importance of health problems, household violence and personal resources for the successful transitioning from public income support to employment is discussed. PMID:11459365

  5. The Public Mind: Views of Pennsylvania Citizens. Smoking, Education, Tax Reform, Crime Control, Welfare Reform, Health Care Reform. Report No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield Univ., PA. Rural Services Inst.

    The sixth annual survey conducted by the Rural Services Institute examined the opinions of Pennsylvania residents on crime control, welfare reform, smoking, and education reform proposals. Sixty percent of respondents believed that the most urgent issue facing Pennsylvania was violent crime and strongly supported measures to reduce the…

  6. How will health reform affect demand for RNs?

    PubMed

    Spetz, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasts demand for registered nurses (RNs) will result in 3.5 million nursing jobs by 2020, marking a 26% increase over 10 years. RN employment is expected to grow most rapidly in outpatient settings--particularly physician offices--and home health care. The Affordable Care Act will likely impact the places where RNs work, and the skills they need to be successful in these settings. RNs will be expected to serve as care coordinators, case managers, patient educators, and chronic care specialists. RNs with strong skills will be in high demand in the labor market. PMID:24689158

  7. Political economy and population health: is Australia exceptional?

    PubMed Central

    Boxall, Anne-marie; Short, Stephanie D

    2006-01-01

    Background It is accepted knowledge that social and economic conditions – like education and income – affect population health. What remains uncertain is whether the degree of inequality in these conditions influences population health and if so, how. Some researchers who argue that inequalities are important, say there is a relationship between political economy, inequality and population health. Their evidence comes from comparative studies showing that countries with neo-liberal political economies generally have poorer population health outcomes than those with social or Christian democratic political economies. According to these researchers, neo-liberal political economies adopt labour market and welfare state policies that lead to greater levels of inequality and poorer population health outcomes for us all. Discussion Australia has experienced considerable social and economic reforms over the last 20 years, with both major political parties increasingly adopting neo-liberal policies. Despite these reforms, population health outcomes are amongst the best in the world. Summary Australia appears to contest theories suggesting a link between political economy and population health. To progress our understanding, researchers need to concentrate on policy areas outside health – such as welfare, economics and industrial relations. We need to do longitudinal studies on how reforms in these areas affect levels of social and economic inequality, as well population health. We need to draw on social scientific methods, especially concerning case selection, to advance our understanding of casual relationships in policy studies. It is important to find out if, and why, Australia has resisted the affects of neo-liberalism on population health so we ensure our high standards are maintained in the future. PMID:16737549

  8. New systems of care for substance use disorders: treatment, finance, and technology under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Pating, David R; Miller, Michael M; Goplerud, Eric; Martin, Judith; Ziedonis, Douglas M

    2012-06-01

    This article outlined ways in which persons with addiction are currently underserved by our current health care system. However, with the coming broad scale reforms to our health care system, the access to and availability of high-quality care for substance use disorders will increase. Addiction treatments will continue to be offered through traditional substance abuse care systems, but these will be more integrated with primary care, and less separated as treatment facilities leverage opportunities to blend services, financing mechanisms, and health information systems under federally driven incentive programs. To further these reforms, vigilance will be needed by consumers, clinicians, and policy makers to assure that the unmet treatment needs of individuals with addiction are addressed. Embedded in this article are essential recommendations to facilitate the improvement of care for substance use disorders under health care reform. Ultimately, as addiction care acquires more of the “look and feel” of mainstream medicine, it is important to be mindful of preexisting trends in health care delivery overall that are reflected in recent health reform legislation. Within the world of addiction care, clinicians must move beyond their self-imposed “stigmatization” and sequestration of specialty addiction treatment. The problem for addiction care, as it becomes more “mainstream,” is to not comfortably feel that general slogans like “Treatment Works,” as promoted by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment during its annual Recovery Month celebrations, will meet the expectations of stakeholders outside the specialty addiction treatment community. Rather, the problem is to show exactly how addiction treatment works, and to what extent it works-there have to be metrics showing changes in symptom level or functional outcome, changes in health care utilization, improvements in workplace attendance and

  9. Critical interactionism: an upstream-downstream approach to health care reform.

    PubMed

    Martins, Diane Cocozza; Burbank, Patricia M

    2011-01-01

    Currently, per capita health care expenditures in the United States are more than 20% higher than any other country in the world and more than twice the average expenditure for European countries, yet the United States ranks 37th in life expectancy. Clearly, the health care system is not succeeding in improving the health of the US population with its focus on illness care for individuals. A new theoretical approach, critical interactionism, combines symbolic interactionism and critical social theory to provide a guide for addressing health care problems from both an upstream and downstream approach. Concepts of meaning from symbolic interactionism and emancipation from critical perspective move across system levels to inform and reform health care for individuals, organizations, and societies. This provides a powerful approach for health care reform, moving back and forth between the micro and macro levels. Areas of application to nursing practice with several examples (patients with obesity; patients who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender; workplace bullying and errors), nursing education, and research are also discussed. PMID:22067231

  10. Health Care Reform, Care Coordination, and Transformational Leadership.

    PubMed

    Steaban, Robin Lea

    2016-01-01

    This article is meant to spur debate on the role of the professional nurse in care coordination as well as the role of nursing leaders for defining and leading to a future state. This work highlights the opportunity and benefits associated with transformation of professional nursing practice in response to the mandates of the Affordable Care Act of 2010. An understanding of core concepts and the work of care coordination are used to propose a model of care coordination based on the population health pyramid. This maximizes the roles of nurses across the continuum as transformational leaders in the patient/family and nursing relationship. The author explores the role of the nurse in a transactional versus transformational relationship with patients, leading to actualization of the nurse in care coordination. Focusing on the role of the nurse leader, the challenges and necessary actions for optimization of the professional nurse role are explored, using principles of transformational leadership. PMID:26938188

  11. Arkansas: a leading laboratory for health care payment and delivery system reform.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, Deborah; du Pont, Lammot; Lipson, Mindy

    2014-08-01

    As states' Medicaid programs continue to evolve from traditional fee-for-service to value-based health care delivery, there is growing recognition that systemwide multipayer approaches provide the market power needed to address the triple aim of improved patient care, improved health of populations, and reduced costs. Federal initiatives, such as the State Innovation Model grant program, make significant funds available for states seeking to transform their health care systems. In crafting their reform strategies, states can learn from early innovators. This issue brief focuses on one such state: Arkansas. Insights and lessons from the Arkansas Health Care Payment Improvement Initiative (AHCPII) suggest that progress is best gained through an inclusive, deliberative process facilitated by committed leadership, a shared agreement on root problems and opportunities for improvement, and a strategy grounded in the state's particular health care landscape. PMID:25204031

  12. Relief, restoration and reform: economic upturn yields modest and uneven health returns.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Robert; Katz, Aaron; Felland, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    The sensitivity of state budgets to economic cycles contributes to fluctuations in health coverage, eligibility, benefits and provider payment levels in public programs, as well as support for safety net hospitals and community health centers (CHCs). The aftershocks of the 2001 recession on state budgets were felt well into 2004. More recently, the economic recovery allowed many states to restore cuts and, in some cases, expand health services for low-income people, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2007 site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. Along with bolstering support of safety net providers and raising Medicaid payments for private physicians, some states advanced even more ambitious health reform proposals. Yet across communities, safety net systems face mounting challenges of caring for more uninsured patients, and these pressures will likely increase given the current economic downturn. PMID:18396571

  13. Turkish health system reform from the people’s perspective: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2003, Turkey has implemented major health care reforms to develop easily accessible, high-quality, efficient, and effective healthcare services for the population. The purpose of this study was to bring out opinions of the Turkish people on health system reform process, focusing on several aspects of health system and assessing whether the public prefer the current health system or that provided a decade ago. Methods A cross sectional survey study was carried out in Turkey to collect data on people’s opinions on the healthcare reforms. Data was collected via self administered household’s structured questionnaire. A five-point Likert-type scale was used to score the closed comparative statements. Each statement had response categories ranging from (1) “strongly agree” to (5) “strongly disagree.” A total of 482 heads of households (response rate: 71.7%) with the mean age of (46.60 years) were selected using a multi stage sampling technique from seven geographical regions in Turkey from October 2011 to January 2012. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to identify significant contributing factors in this study. Results Employing descriptive statistics it is observed that among the respondents, more than two third of the population believes that the changes have had positive effects on the health system. A vast majority of respondents (82.0%) believed that there was an increase in accessibility, 73.7% thought more availability of health resources, 72.6% alleged improved quality of care, and 72.6% believed better attitude of politician/mass media due to the changes in the last 10 years. Indeed, the majority of respondents (77.6%) prefer the current health care system than the past. In multivariate analysis, there was a statistically significant relationship between characteristics and opinions of the respondents. The elderly, married females, perceived themselves healthy and those who believe that people are happier now than 10 years

  14. Brundtland's World Health Organization: A Test Case for United Nations Reform

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Gro Harlem Brundtland, who became Director General of the World Health Organization in July 1998, has created a small revolution at the WHO headquarters in Geneva. She is in the process of changing how WHO works, how it interacts with other parts of the United Nations system, and how it enlists ministries, whole governments, universities, and other private organizations to improve health in the world. Here, the Editor describes the reorganization, the new people and resources, and prospects for setting a precedent in United Nations reform. Imagesp30-ap31-ap39-a PMID:9925169

  15. Policy Capacity in the Learning Healthcare System Comment on "Health Reform Requires Policy Capacity".

    PubMed

    Gardner, William

    2015-01-01

    Pierre-Gerlier Forest and his colleagues make a strong argument for the need to expand policy capacity among healthcare actors. In this commentary, I develop an additional argument in support of Forest et al view. Forest et al rightly point to the need to have embedded policy experts to successfully translate healthcare reform policy into healthcare change. Translation of externally generated innovation policy into local solutions is only one source of healthcare system change. We also need to build learning healthcare systems that can discover new health solutions at the frontline of care. Enhanced policy capacity staffing in those organizations will be key to building continuously learning health systems. PMID:26673470

  16. The metamorphosis of managed care: implications for health reform internationally.

    PubMed

    Rodwin, Marc A

    2010-01-01

    The conventional wisdom is that managed care's brief life is over and we are now in a post-managed care era. In fact, managed care has a long history and continues to thrive. Writers also often assume that managed care is a fixed thing. They overlook that managed care has evolved and neglect to examine the role that it plays in the health system. Furthermore, private actors and the state have used managed care tools to promote diverse goals. These include the following: increasing access to medical care; restricting physician entrepreneurialism; challenging professional control over the medical economy; curbing medical spending; managing medical practice and markets; furthering the growth of medical markets and private insurance; promoting for-profit medical facilities and insurers; earning bounties for reducing medical expenditures: and reducing governmental responsibility for, and oversight of, medical care. Struggles over these competing goals spurred the metamorphosis of managed care. This article explores how managed care transformed physicians' conflicts of interests and responses to them. It also examines how managed care altered the opportunities for patients/medical consumers to use exit and voice to spur change. PMID:20579232

  17. Creating incentives to move upstream: developing a diversified portfolio of population health measures within payment and health care reform.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, John

    2015-03-01

    I examined the feasibility of developing a balanced portfolio of population health measures that would be useful within the current deliberations about health care and payment reform. My commentary acknowledges that an obstacle to the selection of population health metrics is the differing definitions of population health. Rather than choosing between these definitions, I identified five categories of indicators, ranging from traditional clinical care prevention interventions to those that measure investment in community-level nonclinical services, that in various combinations might yield the most promising results. I offer concrete examples of markers in each of the categories and show that there is a growing number of individuals eager to receive concrete recommendations and implement population health pilot programs. PMID:25602896

  18. Changing trends in mental health legislation: anatomy of reforming a civil commitment law.

    PubMed

    Aviram, U; Weyer, R A

    1996-01-01

    In this article, we discuss changing trends of mental health legislation in the United States using a case study of the process of reforming the civil commitment law in New Jersey. That state's new commitment law, commonly called the "screening law," was enacted after a thirteen-year legislative process. Changes in the orientation of the proposed legislation and the dynamics of the process of reforming the commitment law in the state exemplify changing national trends in civil commitment legislation. We consider how the proposed legislation shifted in emphasis from a strong civil libertarian orientation to a social service approach. We assess the role of various interest groups, their negotiations, and the compromises that emerged. Our analysis of the process shows that changes in the social and political environment were the decisive factors that stimulated the process of reforming the civil commitment laws. Many of these changes occurred outside the mental health system and could be neither anticipated nor controlled by the various parties. Our examination of the process and the final outcome of this legislation reveals how organizations and interest groups, in their efforts to adapt to changing conditions, shaped the legislative outcome according to their interests. PMID:8892006

  19. 77 FR 43773 - Wireline Competition Bureau Seeks Further Comment on Issues in the Rural Health Care Reform...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... a more robust record in the pending Rural Health Care reform rulemaking proceeding, which will allow the Commission to craft an efficient permanent program that will help health care providers exploit the potential of broadband to make health care better, more widely available, and less expensive...

  20. Americans on health care reform: results from polls conducted with Zogby International, Inc.

    PubMed

    Casscells, S Ward; Critchley, Hiliary P; Herbst-Greer, Stephanie M; Kaiser, Larry; Zogby, John

    2010-01-01

    During a time of uncertainty regarding the future of the American health care system, an assessment, over time, of Americans' opinion on different legislative or health policy directions is a valuable asset to decision makers. After polling over 10,000 Americans via three polls on these topics over four months, a few distinct trends have emerged. When it comes to health care reform, Americans want a "tune-up," not a "trade-in" of their health care system by implementing reforms that allow the system to work more efficiently for the largest number of people possible, paying for it through savings found by reducing extraneous and wasteful spending and by increasing the quality of care. A clear sense of equity is also evident, as a majority do not agree with insurance companies using pre-existing health conditions as a metric in determining eligibility and believe in mandating that those who are employed, except for the smallest companies, should be covered. PMID:20697567

  1. Health-financing reforms in southeast Asia: challenges in achieving universal coverage.

    PubMed

    Tangcharoensathien, Viroj; Patcharanarumol, Walaiporn; Ir, Por; Aljunid, Syed Mohamed; Mukti, Ali Ghufron; Akkhavong, Kongsap; Banzon, Eduardo; Huong, Dang Boi; Thabrany, Hasbullah; Mills, Anne

    2011-03-01

    In this sixth paper of the Series, we review health-financing reforms in seven countries in southeast Asia that have sought to reduce dependence on out-of-pocket payments, increase pooled health finance, and expand service use as steps towards universal coverage. Laos and Cambodia, both resource-poor countries, have mostly relied on donor-supported health equity funds to reach the poor, and reliable funding and appropriate identification of the eligible poor are two major challenges for nationwide expansion. For Thailand, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Vietnam, social health insurance financed by payroll tax is commonly used for formal sector employees (excluding Malaysia), with varying outcomes in terms of financial protection. Alternative payment methods have different implications for provider behaviour and financial protection. Two alternative approaches for financial protection of the non-poor outside the formal sector have emerged-contributory arrangements and tax-financed schemes-with different abilities to achieve high population coverage rapidly. Fiscal space and mobilisation of payroll contributions are both important in accelerating financial protection. Expanding coverage of good-quality services and ensuring adequate human resources are also important to achieve universal coverage. As health-financing reform is complex, institutional capacity to generate evidence and inform policy is essential and should be strengthened. PMID:21269682

  2. Key findings from HSC's 2010 site visits: health care markets weather economic downturn, brace for health reform.

    PubMed

    Felland, Laurie E; Grossman, Joy M; Tu, Ha T

    2011-05-01

    Lingering fallout--loss of jobs and employer coverage--from the great recession slowed demand for health care services but did little to slow aggressive competition by dominant hospital systems for well-insured patients, according to key findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2010 site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. Hospitals with significant market clout continued to command high payment rate increases from private insurers, and tighter hospital-physician alignment heightened concerns about growing provider market power. High and rising premiums led to increasing employer adoption of consumer-driven health plans and continued increases in patient cost sharing, but the broader movement to educate and engage consumers in care decisions did not keep pace. State and local budget deficits led to some funding cuts for safety net providers, but an influx of federal stimulus funds increased support to community health centers and shored up Medicaid programs, allowing many people who lost private insurance because of job losses to remain covered. Hospitals, physicians and insurers generally viewed health reform coverage expansions favorably, but all worried about protecting revenues as reform requirements phase in. PMID:21614861

  3. Challenges facing the finance reform of the health system in Chile.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Tania

    2014-01-01

    Financing is one of the key functions of health systems, which includes the processes of revenue collection, fund pooling and acquisitions in order to ensure access to healthcare for the entire population. The article analyzes the financing model of the Chilean health system in terms of the first two processes, confirming low public spending on healthcare and high out-of-pocket expenditure, in addition to an appropriation of public resources by private insurers and providers. Insofar as pooling, there is lack of solidarity and risk sharing leading to segmentation of the population that is not consistent with the concept of social security, undermines equity and reduces system-wide efficiency. There is a pressing need to jumpstart reforms that address these issues. Treatments must be considered together with public health concerns and primary care in order to ensure the right to health of the entire population. PMID:25384029

  4. The Neo-Liberal Turn in Understanding Teachers' and School Leaders' Work Practices in Curriculum Innovation and Change: A Critical Discourse Analysis of a Newly Proposed Reform Policy in Lower Secondary Education in the Republic of Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmie, Geraldine Mooney

    2014-01-01

    The study in this article involved a critical discourse analysis of five policy documents in relation to a curriculum reform proposed for lower secondary education in the Republic of Ireland. It examined the (re)positioning of governance in relation to curriculum and teacher education. Findings indicate a predominant clinical discourse closely…

  5. Reform of the health care service system in Israel 1995-2000.

    PubMed

    Hart, J

    2001-01-01

    In January, 1995, a national health insurance law was enacted which allowed for the registration of every resident with one of the four public health funds. These funds provide medical services directly to their insured members, or purchase them from public or private hospitals or other health service providers. A basket of medical services was defined which guaranteed readily available comprehensive health care throughout the country. As part of the reform, a number of personal participation charges were established: a nominal fee for medications, and a service charge for a limited number of medical services (visits to specialist doctors, periodic fee for mother and child clinics, participation in the cost of chronic nursing hospitalization). In spite of the Government's commitment to finance the basket of services, the budget is not sufficient to cover costs, and there is an inherent shortfall deliberately introduced into the system by the Ministry of Finance. Since the introduction of the Law the sources for financing the basket of services have been eroded by 16%. Complementary health insurance programs are being developed by the health funds as well as by private insurance companies. The national expenditure on health is some 8.4% of GDP, with an average annual expenditure of $1,384 per person. 72% of health expenditures are public and 28% private. Life expectancy is continually rising, and stood at 75.9 years for men and 80.1 years for women in 1999. Infant mortality is decreasing: in 1996 the rate was 6.3 per 1,000 live births. There is an ever increasing use of new technologies, even though at the same time there seems to be somewhat of a decrease in customer satisfaction. The achievements of the reform are considerable, but there is need for improvement in the areas of budgeting, return of the employer parallel tax, and in other areas if these achievements are not to be undone. PMID:11858011

  6. Investigating the health care delivery system in Japan and reviewing the local public hospital reform

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Oyama, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Japan’s health care system is considered one of the best health care systems in the world. Hospitals are one of the most important health care resources in Japan. As such, we investigate Japanese hospitals from various viewpoints, including their roles, ownership, regional distribution, and characteristics with respect to the number of beds, staff, doctors, and financial performance. Applying a multivariate analysis and regression model techniques, we show the functional differences between urban populated prefectures and remote ones; the equality gap among all prefectures with respect to the distribution of the number of beds, staff, and doctors; and managerial differences between private and public hospitals. We also review and evaluate the local public hospital reform executed in 2007 from various financial aspects related to the expenditure and revenue structure by comparing public and private hospitals. We show that the 2007 reform contributed to improving the financial situation of local public hospitals. Strategic differences between public and private hospitals with respect to their management and strategy to improve their financial situation are also quantitatively analyzed in detail. Finally, the remaining problems and the future strategy to further improve the Japanese health care system are described. PMID:27051323

  7. Situational analysis of the health insurance market and related educational needs in the era of health care reform in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sriratanaban, J; Supapong, S; Kamolratanakul, P; Tatiyakawee, K; Srithamrongsawat, S

    2000-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to explore the situation of health insurance in Thailand, to compare public and private perspectives and to identify related educational needs. Between March and April of 1998, the study employed in-depth interviews of 12 public and private major stakeholders of the health insurance systems, including policy makers, providers and insurers. Additional inputs were gathered in a brainstorming session with 41 participants from organizations with important roles in regulating, monitoring, paying, or providing health care services, as well as research and education. The findings indicated the health insurance market was expanding. But there was no national policy on health insurance. Insurance-related law was outdated. Public and private schemes overlapped, and were generally characterized by inadequate risk diversification, overutilization of services, lack of effective cost containment, inconsistent service quality, and poor understanding of health insurance principles. There were needs for more education and training in various aspects of health services management and health-insurance related functions. Consequently, continuing education and training related to health insurance services for policy makers, system administrators, managers, providers and insurers are strongly recommended during the health-care reform process. PMID:11253889

  8. Which moral hazard? Health care reform under the Affordable Care Act of 2010.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Roger Lee

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - Moral hazard is a concept that is central to risk and insurance management. It refers to change in economic behavior when individuals are protected or insured against certain risks and losses whose costs are borne by another party. It asserts that the presence of an insurance contract increases the probability of a claim and the size of a claim. Through the US Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010, this study seeks to examine the validity and relevance of moral hazard in health care reform and determine how welfare losses or inefficiencies could be mitigated. Design/methodology/approach - This study is divided into three sections. The first contrasts conventional moral hazard from an emerging or alternative theory. The second analyzes moral hazard in terms of the evolution, organization, management, and marketing of health insurance in the USA. The third explains why and how salient reform measures under the ACA might induce health care consumption and production in ways that could either promote or restrict personal health and safety as well as social welfare maximization. Findings - Insurance generally induces health care (over) consumption. However, not every additional consumption, with or without adverse selection, can be considered wasteful or risky, even if it might cost insurers more in the short run. Moral hazard can generate welfare and equity gains. These gains might vary depending on which ACA provisions, insured population, covered illnesses, treatments, and services, as well as health outcomes are taken into account, and because of the relative ambiguities surrounding definitions of "health." Actuarial risk models can nonetheless benefit from incorporating welfare and equity gains into their basic assumptions and estimations. Originality/value - This is the first study which examines the ACA in the context of the new or alternative theory of moral hazard. It suggests that containing inefficient moral hazard, and encouraging its desirable

  9. The quest for equity in Latin America: a comparative analysis of the health care reforms in Brazil and Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Brazil and Colombia have pursued extensive reforms of their health care systems in the last couple of decades. The purported goals of such reforms were to improve access, increase efficiency and reduce health inequities. Notwithstanding their common goals, each country sought a very different pathway to achieve them. While Brazil attempted to reestablish a greater level of State control through a public national health system, Colombia embraced market competition under an employer-based social insurance scheme. This work thus aims to shed some light onto why they pursued divergent strategies and what that has meant in terms of health outcomes. Methods A critical review of the literature concerning equity frameworks, as well as the health care reforms in Brazil and Colombia was conducted. Then, the shortfall inequality values of crude mortality rate, infant mortality rate, under-five mortality rate, and life expectancy for the period 1960-2005 were calculated for both countries. Subsequently, bivariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed and controlled for possibly confounding factors. Results When controlling for the underlying historical time trend, both countries appear to have experienced a deceleration of the pace of improvements in the years following the reforms, for all the variables analyzed. In the case of Colombia, some of the previous gains in under-five mortality rate and crude mortality rate were, in fact, reversed. Conclusions Neither reform seems to have had a decisive positive impact on the health outcomes analyzed for the defined time period of this research. This, in turn, may be a consequence of both internal characteristics of the respective reforms and external factors beyond the direct control of health reformers. Among the internal characteristics: underfunding, unbridled decentralization and inequitable access to care seem to have been the main constraints. Conversely, international economic adversities

  10. [Gender equity in health sector reform policies in Latin America and the Caribbean].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Elsa Gómez

    2002-01-01

    Gender equity is increasingly being acknowledged as an essential aspect of sustainable development and more specifically, of health development. The Pan American Health Organization's Program for Women, Health, and Development has been piloting for a year now a project known as Equidad de género en las políticas de reforma del sector de salud, whose objective is to promote gender equity in the health sector reform efforts in the Region. The first stage of the project is being conducted in Chile and Peru, along with some activities throughout the Region. The core of the project is the production and use of information as a tool for introducing changes geared toward achieving greater gender equity in health, particularly in connection with malefemale disparities that are unnecessary, avoidable, and unfair in health status, access to health care, and participation in decision-making within the health system. We expect that in three years the project will have brought about changes in the production of information and knowledge, advocacy, and information dissemination, as well as in the development, appropriation, and identification of intersectoral mechanisms that will make it possible for key figures in government and civil society to work together in setting and surveying policy on gender equity in health. PMID:12162842

  11. A retrospective content analysis of studies on factors constraining the implementation of health sector reform in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sakyi, E Kojo

    2008-01-01

    Ghana has undertaken many public service management reforms in the past two decades. But the implementation of the reforms has been constrained by many factors. This paper undertakes a retrospective study of research works on the challenges to the implementation of reforms in the public health sector. It points out that most of the studies identified: (1) centralised, weak and fragmented management system; (2) poor implementation strategy; (3) lack of motivation; (4) weak institutional framework; (5) lack of financial and human resources and (6) staff attitude and behaviour as the major causes of ineffective reform implementation. The analysis further revealed that quite a number of crucial factors obstructing reform implementation which are particularly internal to the health system have either not been thoroughly studied or overlooked. The analysis identified lack of leadership; weak communication and consultation; lack of stakeholder participation, corruption and unethical professional behaviour as some of the missing variables in the literature. The study, therefore, indicated that there are gaps in the literature that needed to be filled through rigorous reform evaluation based on empirical research particularly at district, sub-district and community levels. It further suggested that future research should be concerned with the effects of both systems and structures and behavioural factors on reform implementation. PMID:18536006

  12. Stuck in the middle?: A perspective on ongoing pro-competitive reforms in Dutch mental health care.

    PubMed

    Westra, Daan; Wilbers, Gloria; Angeli, Federica

    2016-04-01

    Pro-competitive reforms have been implemented in many Western healthcare systems, of which the Netherlands is a prominent example. While the pro-competitive reforms in the Dutch specialized care sector have drawn considerable academic attention, mental health care is often excluded. However, in line with other segments of specialized care, pro-competitive legislation has formed the core of mental health care reforms, albeit with several notable differences. Ever since mental health services were included in the Health Insurance Act in 2008, the Dutch mental healthcare sector has been in an ongoing state of reform. Numerous major and minor adaptations have continuously altered the services covered by the basic insurance package, the actors responsible for providing and contracting care, and definitions and measurements of quality. Most notably, insurers and municipalities, which are responsible for selectively contracting those providers that offer high value-for-money, seem insensitive to quality aspects. The question whether the Dutch mental health sector has inherited the best or the worst of a competitive and non-competitive system lingers and international policy makers contemplating reforming their mental health sector should take note. PMID:26994866

  13. Mongolia's system-wide health reforms: lessons for other developing countries.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, M; Hindle, D

    2001-01-01

    Mongolia is a poor country that lost 30% of its GDP when the Soviet Bloc collapsed in 1990. Its health care system had the typical weaknesses of centrally planned economies--quantity rather than quality, excessive medical specialisation, dominance of the hospital sector, weak policy and management capabilities, little community participation in decision making, and so on. This paper describes Mongolia's attempts to resolve these problems through a radical program of reform that began in 1998. There have been significant successes in spite of almost overwhelming difficulties, and this may be a consequence of the strong sense of community that has been present for five hundred years and re-emerged intact at the end of 70 years of Soviet dominance. We argue, however, that good design and skillful implementation of the reform program may have made a contribution. Its notable features have included the use of a comprehensive and integrated model rather than piecemeal reform, the generation of political support for change through social marketing campaigns, a team approach using local and international experts, and co-ordination of international donor activities. Some of these features may be relevant to other transitional and developing countries. PMID:11496458

  14. The financial crisis and health care systems in Europe: universal care under threat? Trends in health sector reforms in Germany, the United Kingdom, and Spain.

    PubMed

    Giovanella, Lígia; Stegmüller, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    The paper analyzes trends in contemporary health sector reforms in three European countries with Bismarckian and Beveridgean models of national health systems within the context of strong financial pressure resulting from the economic crisis (2008-date), and proceeds to discuss the implications for universal care. The authors examine recent health system reforms in Spain, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Health systems are described using a matrix to compare state intervention in financing, regulation, organization, and services delivery. The reforms' impacts on universal care are examined in three dimensions: breadth of population coverage, depth of the services package, and height of coverage by public financing. Models of health protection, institutionality, stakeholder constellations, and differing positions in the European economy are factors that condition the repercussions of restrictive policies that have undermined universality to different degrees in the three dimensions specified above and have extended policies for regulated competition as well as commercialization in health care systems. PMID:25493982

  15. Challenging Neoliberalism through Gandhian Trusteeship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshee, Reva

    2012-01-01

    This paper begins from a position of critique of the dominant neo-liberal, human capital framing of education policy today. However, unlike most critiques of this kind, the paper argues that schooling's role in the preparation of workers and consumers is nonetheless important. Education does, of necessity, have economic purposes. To this end, the…

  16. Feminism, Neoliberalism, and Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmeichel, Mardi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the sparse presence of women in social studies education and to consider the possibility of a confluence of feminism and neoliberalism within the most widely distributed National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) publication, "Social Education." Using poststructural conceptions of discourse, the author…

  17. Basing care reforms on evidence: The Kenya health sector costing model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Government of the Republic of Kenya is in the process of implementing health care reforms. However, poor knowledge about costs of health care services is perceived as a major obstacle towards evidence-based, effective and efficient health care reforms. Against this background, the Ministry of Health of Kenya in cooperation with its development partners conducted a comprehensive costing exercise and subsequently developed the Kenya Health Sector Costing Model in order to fill this data gap. Methods Based on standard methodology of costing of health care services in developing countries, standard questionnaires and analyses were employed in 207 health care facilities representing different trustees (e.g. Government, Faith Based/Nongovernmental, private-for-profit organisations), levels of care and regions (urban, rural). In addition, a total of 1369 patients were randomly selected and asked about their demand-sided costs. A standard step-down costing methodology was applied to calculate the costs per service unit and per diagnosis of the financial year 2006/2007. Results The total costs of essential health care services in Kenya were calculated as 690 million Euros or 18.65 Euro per capita. 54% were incurred by public sector facilities, 17% by Faith Based and other Nongovernmental facilities and 23% in the private sector. Some 6% of the total cost is due to the overall administration provided directly by the Ministry and its decentralised organs. Around 37% of this cost is absorbed by salaries and 22% by drugs and medical supplies. Generally, costs of lower levels of care are lower than of higher levels, but health centres are an exemption. They have higher costs per service unit than district hospitals. Conclusions The results of this study signify that the costs of health care services are quite high compared with the Kenyan domestic product, but a major share are fixed costs so that an increasing coverage does not necessarily increase the health

  18. Health Care Reform for Children with Public Coverage: How Can Policymakers Maximize Gains and Prevent Harm? Timely Analysis of Immediate Health Policy Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Genevieve M.; Dorn, Stan

    2009-01-01

    Moving toward universal coverage has the potential to increase access to care and improve the health and well-being of uninsured children and adults. The effects of health care reform on the more than 25 million children who currently have coverage under Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) are less clear. Increased parental…

  19. Mental Health Reform at a Systems Level: Widening the Lens on Recovery-Oriented Care

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Sean A; McKenzie, Kwame J; Virdee, Gursharan

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an initial attempt to collate the literature on psychiatric inpatient recovery-based care and, more broadly, to situate the inpatient care sector within a mental health reform dialogue that, to date, has focused almost exclusively on outpatient and community practices. We make the argument that until an evidence base is developed for recovery-oriented practices on hospital wards, the effort to advance recovery-oriented systems will stagnate. Our scoping review was conducted in line with the 2009 Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (commonly referred to as PRISMA) guidelines. Among the 27 papers selected for review, most were descriptive or uncontrolled outcome studies. Studies addressing strategies for improving care quality provide some modest evidence for reflective dialogue with former inpatient clients, role play and mentorship, and pairing general training in recovery oriented care with training in specific interventions, such as Illness Management and Recovery. Relative to some other fields of medicine, evidence surrounding the question of recovery-oriented care on psychiatric wards and how it may be implemented is underdeveloped. Attention to mental health reform in hospitals is critical to the emergence of recovery-oriented systems of care and the realization of the mandate set forward in the Mental Health Strategy for Canada. PMID:25007277

  20. The impact of health care reform on innovation and new technology.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Health care reform has created special challenges and hurdles to the introduction of new technology and innovative medical devices in gastroenterology and other medical fields. The implication of new regulations will be enormous as we begin to see venture-capital funding flee our specialty for more lucrative and "sure bets." This article, written by an experienced entrepreneur and practicing gastroenterologist, outlines some of the implications of this emerging challenge. Few other sources of information are available that truly articulate the insider view of coming changes. PMID:22099717

  1. Market reforms in health care and sustainability of the welfare state: lessons from Sweden.

    PubMed

    Diderichsen, F

    1995-01-01

    Reforming health care systems which are predominantly publicly provided and financed has usually been motivated as a way of increasing efficiency even if it seldom is explicit whether it is in the official sense related to individual utility or in the unofficial sense related to health outcomes. In the case of Sweden the welfare state has been made politically sustainable through a construction where cash benefits and service provision are tailored to satisfy not only the basic needs but even the more discriminating needs of the middle classes. Their loyalty with the taxes is politically crucial and therefore their evaluation of the services in the welfarist sense equally important. That loyalty was however threatened in a situation where cost-containment policies were applied while equity principles were still a strong priority. Health care utilization was increasing among the very old and chronically ill while it was decreasing for other groups. The reforms introduced in some counties during the 1990s have been focussing on a purchaser-provider split and fee-for-service payment of providers. They have increased productivity sharply, increased utilization even among the groups that previously were 'pressed out' and reduced waiting lists. Increased efficiency however, threatens equity in some specific aspects. Fee-for-service payment means increased production and so far even increased costs. If they are to be met with increased private financing, rather than with present tax financing, it will bring the risk of inequities. Payment of hospitals through DRG systems means payment to providers for medical interventions with no incentives to deal with social consequences of illness. Inequities in health care can be related to the way health care deals with inequalities in health due to inequalities in living conditions or inequalities in living conditions due to ill health. In the short perspective the reforms may threaten equity in the second aspect, in the longer

  2. Rates of Insurance for Injured Patients Before and After Health Care Reform in Massachusetts: A Possible Case of Double Jeopardy

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Courtney E.; Wiseman, Jason T.; Psoinos, Charles M.; Flahive, Julie M.; Kiefe, Catarina I.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We determined how preinjury insurance status and injury-related outcomes among able-bodied, community-dwelling adults treated at a Level I Trauma Center in central Massachusetts changed after health care reform. Methods. We compared insurance status at time of injury among non-Medicare-eligible adult Massachusetts residents before (2004–2005) and after (2009–2010) health care reform, adjusted for demographic and injury covariates, and modeled associations between insurance status and trauma outcomes. Results. Among 2148 patients before health care reform and 2477 patients after health care reform, insurance rates increased from 77% to 84% (P < .001). Younger patients, men, minorities, and penetrating trauma victims were less likely to be insured irrespective of time period. Uninsured patients were more likely to be discharged home without services (adjusted odds ratio = 3.46; 95% confidence interval = 2.65, 4.52) compared with insured patients. Conclusions. Preinjury insurance rates increased for trauma patients after health care reform but remained lower than in the general population. Certain Americans may be in “double jeopardy” of both higher injury incidence and worse outcomes because socioeconomic factors placing them at risk for injury also present barriers to compliance with an individual insurance mandate. PMID:24825208

  3. The states and health care reform: the road traveled and lessons learned from seven that took the lead.

    PubMed

    Paul-Shaheen, P A

    1998-04-01

    During the past decade, an area of major policy activity among the states has been that of health care reform. As of May 1993, seven states--Florida, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington--had progressed the furthest in enacting comprehensive statutes designed to expand health insurance coverage and slow the growth of health care costs. This article reviews the activities of these states to achieve health care reform and the lessons learned from those activities. The analysis focuses specifically on identifying the common problems addressed and determining the common factors that maximized states' opportunities for success. In all, some nine lessons are identified that have relevance for other states wishing to follow a similar road to reform. Most important among these are a "window of opportunity" for policy action, having entrepreneurial leadership to push the reform agenda forward, and support from key stakeholder interests. If these conditions of opportunity, policy entrepreneurship, and stakeholder commitment are met, a state can move forward in addressing key aspects of its health care reform agenda. PMID:9565896

  4. Cultures for mental health care of young people: an Australian blueprint for reform.

    PubMed

    McGorry, Patrick D; Goldstone, Sherilyn D; Parker, Alexandra G; Rickwood, Debra J; Hickie, Ian B

    2014-12-01

    Mental ill health is now the most important health issue facing young people worldwide. It is the leading cause of disability in people aged 10-24 years, contributing 45% of the overall burden of disease in this age group. Despite their manifest need, young people have the lowest rates of access to mental health care, largely as a result of poor awareness and help-seeking, structural and cultural flaws within the existing care systems, and the failure of society to recognise the importance of this issue and invest in youth mental health. We outline the case for a specific youth mental health stream and describe the innovative service reforms in youth mental health in Australia, using them as an example of the processes that can guide the development and implementation of such a service stream. Early intervention with focus on the developmental period of greatest need and capacity to benefit, emerging adulthood, has the potential to greatly improve the mental health, wellbeing, productivity, and fulfilment of young people, and our wider society. PMID:26361315

  5. Healthcare, Intergovernmentalism and Population Health: The Challenge of Reform in an Era of Disengagement.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The model proposed by Gardner, Fierlbeck and Levy offers an innovative and compelling framework for moving past the dysfunction of the current intergovernmental relationship in health. It provides a viable role for the federal government and a means to shift our attention on improving health outcomes relative to past provincial performance. At the same time there are important questions about how both federal leadership and population health is understood and justified within the model. The history of federal leadership in health reform is questioned as to both its necessity and its effectiveness. One must also confront the possibility that federal disengagement from contentious intergovernmental issues may be emerging as a more permanent feature of federal-provincial relations in Canada. For the focus on population health to be effective, it must, in the first instance, take into account the necessity of focussing population health interventions for the most marginalized populations and the need to focus those interventions on the socio-economic determinants of health that exist outside of the healthcare system. PMID:26187561

  6. International assistance and health care reform in Poland: barriers to project development and implementation.

    PubMed

    Sabbat, J

    1997-09-01

    The restoration of democracy in Poland initiated a major system transformation including reform of the health sector. The international community were quick to respond to the need for assistance. Polish proposals were supported by international experts and projects were developed together with international development agencies and donors. Donors had no experience of central and eastern Europe, these countries had never been beneficiaries of aid and neither side had experience working together. Progress and absorption of funds was slow. Comparative experience from developing countries was used to analyze the barriers encountered in project development and implementation in Poland. The conditions necessary for implementation were not satisfied. Insufficient attention was paid to the project process. Barriers originate on the side of both donors and recipients and additionally from programme characteristics. The most serious problems experience in Poland were lack of government commitment to health care reform leading to failure to provide counterpart funds and low capacity for absorption of aid. Rent seeking attitudes were important. Donor paternalistic attitudes, complex procedures and lack of innovative approach were also present. Poor coordination was a problem on both sides. Multi-lateral projects were too complex and it was not always possible to integrate project activities with routine ones. External consultants played an excessive role in project development and implementation, absorbing a large portion of funds. The barriers have been operationalised to create a checklist which requires validation elsewhere and may be useful for those working in this field. PMID:10170090

  7. Structured pluralism: towards an innovative model for health system reform in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Londoño, J L; Frenk, J

    1997-07-01

    groups. In this model, modulation would become the central mission of the ministry of health, which would move out of the direct provision of personal health services. Financing would be the main function of social security institutes, which would be gradually extended to protect the entire population. The articulation function would be made explicit by fostering the establishment of 'organizations for health services articulation', which would perform a series of crucial activities, including the competitive enrollment of populations into health plans in exchange for a risk-adjusted capitation, the specification of explicit packages of benefits or interventions, the organization of networks of providers so as to structure consumer choices, the design and implementation of incentives to providers through payment mechanisms, and the management of quality of care. Finally, the delivery function would be open to pluralism that would be adapted to differential needs of urban and rural populations. After examining the convergence of various reform initiatives towards elements of the structured pluralism model, the paper reviews both the technical instruments and the political strategies for implementing changes. The worldwide health reform movement needs to sustain a systematic sharing of the unique learning opportunity that each reform experience represents. PMID:10169060

  8. Commentary: Sense and sensibility: the role of specialists in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Schwann, Nanette M; Nester, Brian A; McLoughlin, Thomas M

    2012-03-01

    How to redesign the incentives structure in the United States to reward effective coordinated care rather than production volume is a staggering public health policy challenge. In the mind of the public, there is a fine distinction between health care rationing and rational health care. Specialists have a vital but underappreciated role in reining in health care costs, but specific incentives to elicit behavior change with positive social outcomes remain ambiguous. It is imperative, therefore, that redesigning the incentives structure is thoughtfully considered, modeled, and tested prior to implementation, lest an inferior-quality model is inadvertently adopted and costs are only marginally contained. Quality metrics need to be universal and reflect real patient outcomes instead of the degree of investment by the institution in the reporting tools. Still, specialists should take immediate action to implement safe and efficient procedures and to assess their long-term impact on patients' quality of life. Scientific evaluations should guide both the assessment of the appropriateness and the safe delivery of care. Investment in high-quality data architecture and the science of health delivery implementation is an imperative if health care reform is to achieve its goals. Coordination and collaboration between specialists and primary care physicians is essential to this enterprise. Specialists can champion these efforts as they pertain to their areas of expertise by considering their care episodes in the context of the patient as a whole, working closely with generalists, and returning to the mindset of the specialist as a family doctor. PMID:22373614

  9. A long and winding road: federally qualified health centers, community variation and prospects under reform.

    PubMed

    Katz, Aaron B; Felland, Laurie E; Hill, Ian; Stark, Lucy B

    2011-11-01

    Community health centers have evolved from fringe providers to mainstays of many local health care systems. Those designated as federally qualified health centers (FQHCs), in particular, have largely established themselves as key providers of comprehensive, efficient, high-quality primary care services to low-income people, especially Medicaid and uninsured patients. The Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC's) site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities since 1996 document substantial growth in FQHC capacity, based on growing numbers of Medicaid enrollees and uninsured people, increased federal support, and improved managerial acumen. At the same time, FQHC development has varied considerably across communities because of several important factors, including local health system characteristics and financial and political support at federal, state and local levels. Some communities--Boston; Syracuse, N.Y.; Miami; and Seattle--have relatively extensive FQHC capacity for their Medicaid and uninsured populations, while other communities--Lansing, Mich.; northern New Jersey; Indianapolis; and Greenville, S.C.--fall in the middle. FQHC growth in Phoenix; Little Rock, Ark.; Cleveland; and Orange County, Calif.; has lagged in comparison. Today, FQHCs seem poised to play a key role in federal health care reform, including coverage expansions and the emphasis on primary care and medical homes. PMID:23155547

  10. Transitioning to a national health system in Cyprus: a stakeholder analysis of pharmaceutical policy reform

    PubMed Central

    Kanavos, Panos G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the pharmaceutical sector in Cyprus in terms of the availability and affordability of medicines and to explore pharmaceutical policy options for the national health system finance reform expected to be introduced in 2016. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews in April 2014 with senior representatives from seven key national organizations involved in pharmaceutical care. The captured data were coded and analysed using the predetermined themes of pricing, reimbursement, prescribing, dispensing and cost sharing. We also examined secondary data provided by the Cypriot Ministry of Health; these data included the prices and volumes of prescription medicines in 2013. Findings We identified several key issues, including high medicine prices, underuse of generic medicines and high out-of-pocket drug spending. Most stakeholders recommended that the national government review existing pricing policies to ensure medicines within the forthcoming national health system are affordable and available, introduce a national reimbursement system and incentivize the prescribing and dispensing of generic medicines. There were disagreements over how to (i) allocate responsibilities to governmental agencies in the national health system, (ii) reconcile differences in opinion between stakeholders and (iii) raise awareness among patients, physicians and pharmacists about the benefits of greater generic drug use. Conclusion In Cyprus, if the national health system is going to provide universal health coverage in a sustainable fashion, then the national government must address the current issues in the pharmaceutical sector. Importantly, the country will need to increase the market share of generic medicines to contain drug spending. PMID:26478624

  11. The group employed model as a foundation for health care delivery reform.

    PubMed

    Minott, Jenny; Helms, David; Luft, Harold; Guterman, Stuart; Weil, Henry

    2010-04-01

    With a focus on delivering low-cost, high-quality care, several organizations using the group employed model (GEM)-with physician groups whose primary and specialty care physicians are salaried or under contract-have been recognized for creating a culture of patient-centeredness and accountability, even in a toxic fee-for-service environment. The elements that leaders of such organizations identify as key to their success are physician leadership that promotes trust in the organization, integration that promotes teamwork and coordination, governance and strategy that drive results, transparency and health information technology that drive continual quality improvement, and a culture of accountability that focuses providers on patient needs and responsibility for effective care and efficient use of resources. These organizations provide important lessons for health care delivery system reform. PMID:20411624

  12. Policy entrepreneurship in the development of public sector strategy: the case of London health reform.

    PubMed

    Oborn, Eivor; Barrett, Michael; Exworthy, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The development of health policy is recognized as complex; however, there has been little development of the role of agency in this process. Kingdon developed the concept of policy entrepreneur (PE) within his ‘windows’ model. He argued inter-related ‘policy streams' must coincide for important issues to become addressed. The conjoining of these streams may be aided by a policy entrepreneur. We contribute by clarifying the role of the policy entrepreneur and highlighting the translational processes of key actors in creating and aligning policy windows. We analyse the work in London of Professor Sir Ara Darzi as a policy entrepreneur. An important aspect of Darzi's approach was to align a number of important institutional networks to conjoin related problems. Our findings highlight how a policy entrepreneur not only opens policy windows but also yokes together a network to make policy agendas happen. Our contribution reveals the role of clinical leadership in health reform. PMID:22069793

  13. Policy Capacity Is Necessary but Not Sufficient Comment on "Health Reform Requires Policy Capacity".

    PubMed

    Gen, Sheldon; Wright, Amy Conley

    2015-01-01

    Policy capacity focuses on the managerial and organizational abilities to inform policy decisions with sound research and analysis, and facilitate policy implementation with operational efficiency. It stems from a view of the policy process that is rational and positivistic, in which optimal policy choices can be identified, selected, and implemented with objectivity. By itself, however, policy capacity neglects the political aspects of policy-making that can dominate the process, even in health policies. These technical capabilities are certainly needed to advance reforms in health policies, but they are not sufficient. Instead, they must be complemented with public engagement and policy advocacy to ensure support from the public that policies are meant to serve. PMID:26673469

  14. Health Care Access among Latinos: Implications for Social and Health Care Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine, health care access is defined as "the degree to which people are able to obtain appropriate care from the health care system in a timely manner." Two key components of health care access are medical insurance and having access to a usual source of health care. Recent national data show that 34% of Latino…

  15. Increase in Caesarean Deliveries after the Australian Private Health Insurance Incentive Policy Reforms

    PubMed Central

    Einarsdóttir, Kristjana; Kemp, Anna; Haggar, Fatima A.; Moorin, Rachael E.; Gunnell, Anthony S.; Preen, David B.; Stanley, Fiona J.; Holman, C. D’Arcy J

    2012-01-01

    Background The Australian Private Health Insurance Incentive (PHII) policy reforms implemented in 1997–2000 increased PHI membership in Australia by 50%. Given the higher rate of obstetric interventions in privately insured patients, the reforms may have led to an increase in surgical deliveries and deliveries with longer hospital stays. We aimed to investigate the effect of the PHII policy introduction on birth characteristics in Western Australia (WA). Methods and Findings All 230,276 birth admissions from January 1995 to March 2004 were identified from administrative birth and hospital data-systems held by the WA Department of Health. Average quarterly birth rates after the PHII introduction were estimated and compared with expected rates had the reforms not occurred. Rate and percentage differences (including 95% confidence intervals) were estimated separately for public and private patients, by mode of delivery, and by length of stay in hospital following birth. The PHII policy introduction was associated with a 20% (−21.4 to −19.3) decrease in public birth rates, a 51% (45.1 to 56.4) increase in private birth rates, a 5% (−5.3 to −5.1) and 8% (−8.9 to −7.9) decrease in unassisted and assisted vaginal deliveries respectively, a 5% (−5.3 to −5.1) increase in caesarean sections with labour and 10% (8.0 to 11.7) increase in caesarean sections without labour. Similarly, birth rates where the infant stayed 0–3 days in hospital following birth decreased by 20% (−21.5 to −18.5), but rates of births with >3 days in hospital increased by 15% (12.2 to 17.1). Conclusions Following the PHII policy implementation in Australia, births in privately insured patients, caesarean deliveries and births with longer infant hospital stays increased. The reforms may not have been beneficial for quality obstetric care in Australia or the burden of Australian hospitals. PMID:22844477

  16. Health care reformers hear from pro-choice colleagues, Catholic bishops.

    PubMed

    1994-07-22

    On July 13, more than 6 dozen House members signed their names to a letter sent to Speaker Thomas Foley (D-WA) indicating that they would not support a health care reform measure if it did not include abortion coverage. Drafted by Representatives Patricia Schroeder (D-CO) and Peter DeFazio (D-OR), the letter stated that "...any health care reform package that comes before the House must contain coverage for contraceptive and abortion services if it is to gain our support." Speaking at a news conference releasing the letter, Representative Don Edwards (D-CA) said, "I resent that certain religious groups are entering this political fight in Congress." Rep. Edwards was referring to a National Conference of Catholic Bishops (NCCB) campaign to oppose "any health care bill that requires coverage of abortion" announced on the same day. The NCCB represents the top leaders in the nation's Roman Catholic church, which has 25,000 parishes across the country. In a letter sent to 30 Congressional leaders, the NCCB reaffirmed its support for universal coverage in a national health plan, but only if abortion is not included. Although not well publicized, an additional component of the NCCB campaign is the push to have Congress allow employers to opt out of coverage for contraception. The Bishops claim to have garnered 5 million cards from people who say they have told their lawmakers of their opposition to any coverage for abortion. The NCCB strategy calls for further grassroots action--including lobbying legislators, a telegram-writing campaign, and town meetings--and a national advertising campaign. In Cleveland, Ohio, the Catholic Diocese's Pro-Life Office announced on July 14 that it would start urging pastors and parishioners to speak out against abortion coverage. PMID:12287948

  17. Evaluation techniques in Punjab, Pakistan: eight years of reforms in health professional education.

    PubMed

    Khan, Junaid Sarfraz; Biggs, John S G; Mubbashar, Malik Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Pakistan, the most populated country in the WHO Eastern Mediterranean region has a population of over 170 million, spread over five provinces and four federally administered areas. It has a growth rate of 1.9%. Punjab is the most populous and developed province with an estimated population in 2010 of 81 million. In 2008, Punjab's development index of 0.60 and a literacy rate of 80% were the highest in the country. In Pakistan, the number of doctors and nurses has risen from 48 to 71 per 100,000 and from 16 to 30 per 100,000, respectively between 1990 and 2003. The major challenge, still, is the imbalance of the population to health-care workers ratio. At the time of creation of Pakistan, King Edward Medical College was the only fully functioning medical college. Over the years, as a result of health reform initiatives, a number of government medical colleges were established in the country. University of Health Sciences, Lahore was established in 2002, having sole jurisdiction over all medical, dental and allied health institutes in the province with the aim of moving medical education towards an outcome-based patient and community-oriented competency-driven system. This paper attempts to clarify how initiatives and reforms in the evaluation process have helped the UHS realise its aims. Evaluation in all branches of higher education has long been taken as a means to an end. The focus of UHS on teacher-training, introduction of behavioural sciences as a compulsory subject and setting up an outcome-based evaluation process, has established a knowledge-acquisition medical education atmosphere. The challenges in the future relate to sustainability through capacity-building and staying abreast with the Best Evidence Medical Education practices worldwide, implementing them to fit our local needs and resources. PMID:22830173

  18. Health Care Reform and the Federal Transformation Initiatives: Capitalizing on the Potential of Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Delaney, Kathleen; Merwin, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade the US federal government proposed a transformation vision of mental health service delivery; patient-centered, evidence-based and recovery oriented treatment models. Health care reform brings additional expectations for innovation in mental/substance use service delivery, particularly the idea of creating systems where physical health, mental health and substance use treatment is fully integrated. Psychiatric nurses, as one of the four core US mental health professions, have the potential to play a significant role in the both the transformation initiative and health care reform vision. However, psychiatric nurses, particularly advanced practice psychiatric nurses, are an untapped resource due in part to significant state regulatory barriers that limit their scope of practice in many states. The purpose of this paper is to document what is currently known about advanced practice psychiatric nurses and discuss policy implications for tapping into the strengths of this workforce. Strategies for facilitating utilization of advanced practice psychiatric nurses discussed. PMID:21233135

  19. Leveraging health information technology to achieve the “triple aim” of healthcare reform

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Harpreet S; Bates, David W

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate experiences with leveraging health information technology (HIT) to improve patient care and population health, and reduce healthcare expenditures. Materials and methods In-depth qualitative interviews with federal government employees, health policy, HIT and medico-legal experts, health providers, physicians, purchasers, payers, patient advocates, and vendors from across the United States. Results The authors undertook 47 interviews. There was a widely shared belief that Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) had catalyzed the creation of a digital infrastructure, which was being used in innovative ways to improve quality of care and curtail costs. There were however major concerns about the poor usability of electronic health records (EHRs), their limited ability to support multi-disciplinary care, and major difficulties with health information exchange, which undermined efforts to deliver integrated patient-centered care. Proposed strategies for enhancing the benefits of HIT included federal stimulation of competition by mandating vendors to open-up their application program interfaces, incenting development of low-cost consumer informatics tools, and promoting Congressional review of the The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) to optimize the balance between data privacy and reuse. Many underscored the need to “kick the legs from underneath the fee-for-service model” and replace it with a data-driven reimbursement system that rewards high quality care. Conclusions The HITECH Act has stimulated unprecedented, multi-stakeholder interest in HIT. Early experiences indicate that the resulting digital infrastructure is being used to improve quality of care and curtail costs. Reform efforts are however severely limited by problems with usability, limited interoperability and the persistence of the fee-for-service paradigm—addressing these issues therefore needs to be the federal

  20. The Colombian health insurance system and its effect on access to health care.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Luz Stella; Salmon, J Warren; Swartzman, Dan

    2011-01-01

    In 1993, the Colombian government sought to reform its health care system under the guidance of international financial institutions (the World Bank and International Monetary Fund). These institutions maintain that individual private health insurance systems are more appropriate than previously established national public health structures for overcoming inequities in health care in developing countries. The reforms carried out following international financial institution guidelines are known as "neoliberal reforms." This qualitative study explores consumer health choices and associated factors, based on interviews with citizens living in Medellin, Colombia, in 2005-2006. The results show that most study participants belonging to low-income and middle-income strata, even with medical expense subsidies, faced significant barriers to accessing health care. Only upper-income participants reported a selection of different options without barriers, such as complementary and alternative medicines, along with private Western biomedicine. This study is unique in that the informal health system is linked to overall neo-liberal policy change. PMID:21563628