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Sample records for neon 27

  1. Higher excited electronic transitions of polyacetylene cations HC2nH+ n = 2-7 in neon matrixes.

    PubMed

    Fulara, Jan; Grutter, Michel; Maier, John P

    2007-11-22

    The polyacetylene HC2nH+ n = 2-7 cations were produced from a mixture of diacetylene with helium in a hot cathode-discharge source. After a mass-selective deposition, their absorption spectra were studied in 6 K neon matrixes. Besides the known A2Pi <-- X2Pi system, several new transitions to higher excited 2Pi electronic states of these cations have been observed. In the case of HC4H+ and HC6H+, only one new weak absorption system has been detected with the onset at 336.1 and 417.2 nm, respectively. These C2Pi <-- X2Pi transitions form a series that extends to HC10H+. Two further electronic transitions are observed for HC8H+ through to HC14H+; a weaker B2Piu <-- X2Pig and a strong E2Piu <-- X2Pig in the UV. The integrated intensity of the UV system of the polyacetylene cations exceeds that of the A2Pi <-- X2Pi transition by an order of magnitude. PMID:17966999

  2. Higher energy electronic transitions of HC(2n+1)H+ (n=2-7) and HC(2n+1)H (n=4-7) in neon matrices.

    PubMed

    Fulara, Jan; Nagy, Adam; Garkusha, Iryna; Maier, John P

    2010-07-14

    Electronic absorption spectra of linear HC(2n+1)H(+) (n=2-7) were recorded in 6 K neon matrices following their mass-selective deposition. Four new electronic band systems are identified; the strongest E (2)Pi(g/u)<--X (2)Pi(u/g) lies in the UV and the second most intense C (2)Pi(g/u)<--X (2)Pi(u/g) is located in the visible range. The known A (2)Pi(g/u)<--X (2)Pi(u/g) absorption is an order of magnitude weaker than C (2)Pi(g/u)<--X (2)Pi(u/g). Transitions to the B and D states are also discussed. The wavelengths of the HC(2n+1)H(+) (n=2-7) electronic systems obey a linear relation as a function of the size of the cations, similar to other carbon chains. The B (3)Sigma(u)(-)<--X (3)Sigma(g)(-) transition in the UV of neutral HC(2n+1)H (n=4-7) has also been identified upon photobleaching of the cations trapped in the matrices. PMID:20632752

  3. Small scale demand type neon liquefaction plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dube, W. P.; Slifka, A. J.; Bitsy, R. M.; Sparks, L. L.; Johnson, K. B.

    1990-01-01

    Low-temperature measurement of the thermal conductivity of insulating materials is generally made using a boil-off calorimetry technique involving liquid hydrogen (LH2). Liquid neon (LNe) has nearly the same normal boiling point as LH2, but has a much larger heat of vaporization, allowing extended run times. The main drawback of using LNe has been its excessive cost; $170.00 versus $1.50/l for LH2 (1989 prices). A neon liquefaction plant has been designed and constructed to capture, purify, and refrigerate the neon boil-off from calorimetry experiments. Recycling the neon reduces operating costs to approximately $20/l. The system consists of a purification section, a heat exchanger, LNe and LH2 storage dewars, and a fully automated control system. After purification, neon is liquified in the heat exchanger by LH2 flowing countercurrently through stainless steel cooling coils. Hydrogen flow is automatically adjusted to keep the neon at its normal saturation temperature, 27 K. The liquid neon is then stored in a dewar placed directly below the heat exchanger.

  4. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  5. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  6. Method and apparatus for cooling high temperature superconductors with neon-nitrogen mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Laverman, Royce J.; Lai, Ban-Yen

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for cooling high temperature superconducting materials (HTSC) to superconductive temperatures within the range of 27.degree. K. to 77.degree. K. using a mixed refrigerant consisting of liquefied neon and nitrogen containing up to about ten mole percent neon by contacting and surrounding the HTSC material with the mixed refrigerant so that free convection or forced flow convection heat transfer can be effected.

  7. Rogue mantle helium and neon.

    PubMed

    Albarède, Francis

    2008-02-15

    The canonical model of helium isotope geochemistry describes the lower mantle as undegassed, but this view conflicts with evidence of recycled material in the source of ocean island basalts. Because mantle helium is efficiently extracted by magmatic activity, it cannot remain in fertile mantle rocks for long periods of time. Here, I suggest that helium with high 3He/4He ratios, as well as neon rich in the solar component, diffused early in Earth's history from low-melting-point primordial material into residual refractory "reservoir" rocks, such as dunites. The difference in 3He/4He ratios of ocean-island and mid-ocean ridge basalts and the preservation of solar neon are ascribed to the reservoir rocks being stretched and tapped to different extents during melting. PMID:18202257

  8. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  9. Neon Ion Beam Lithography (NIBL).

    PubMed

    Winston, Donald; Manfrinato, Vitor R; Nicaise, Samuel M; Cheong, Lin Lee; Duan, Huigao; Ferranti, David; Marshman, Jeff; McVey, Shawn; Stern, Lewis; Notte, John; Berggren, Karl K

    2011-10-12

    Existing techniques for electron- and ion-beam lithography, routinely employed for nanoscale device fabrication and mask/mold prototyping, do not simultaneously achieve efficient (low fluence) exposure and high resolution. We report lithography using neon ions with fluence <1 ion/nm(2), ∼1000× more efficient than using 30 keV electrons, and resolution down to 7 nm half-pitch. This combination of resolution and exposure efficiency is expected to impact a wide array of fields that are dependent on beam-based lithography. PMID:21899279

  10. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by...

  11. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by...

  12. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-09-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and office supply stores. We also employ violet-blue and green laser pointers as excitation sources. We conclude with a brief discussion of neon pigments in terms of the "day glow" or "daylight fluorescence" phenomenon.

  13. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, S. J.; Henderson, S.; Gardiner, L. S.; Ward, D.; Gram, W.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of "human sensors." As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include "citizens" or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. Phenology was

  14. Solar helium and neon in the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Mcdougall, I.; Patterson, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    Neon isotopic compositions in mantle-derived samples commonly are enriched in (20)Ne and (21)Ne relative to (22)Ne compared with atmospheric neon ((20)Ne/(22)Ne and (21)Ne/(22)Ne ratios in atmospheric neon are 9.8 and 0.029, respectively), together with significant primordial (3)He. Such results have been obtained on MORB's, intraplate plume-related oceanic island basalts, backarc basin basalts, mantle xenoliths, ancient diamonds and CO2 well gases (e.g., 1 - 8). The highest (20)Ne/(22)Ne ratio observed in MORB glasses (= 13.6 plus or minus 1.3 is close to the solar value (= 13.6, as observed in solar wind). In order to explain the enrichment of (20)Ne and (21)Ne relative to atmospheric neon for samples derived from the mantle, it is necessary to postulate the presence of at least two distinct non-atmospheric components. The two most likely candidates are solar and nucleogenic ((20)Ne/(22)Ne solar = 13.6 (21)Ne/(22)Ne solar = 0.032, (20)Ne/(22)Ne nucleogenic = 2.5 and (21)Ne/(22)Ne nucleogenic = 32). This is because solar neon is the only known component with a (20)Ne/(22)Ne ratio greater than both the atmospheric value and that observed in samples derived from the mantle. Nucleogenic neon is well known to elevate (21)Ne/(22)Ne ratios. Neon isotopic signatures observed in mantle-derived samples can be accounted for by mixing of the three neon end members: solar, nucleogenic and atmospheric.

  15. Capturing neon - the first experimental structure of neon trapped within a metal-organic environment.

    PubMed

    Wood, Peter A; Sarjeant, Amy A; Yakovenko, Andrey A; Ward, Suzanna C; Groom, Colin R

    2016-08-21

    Despite being the fifth most abundant element in the atmosphere, neon has never been observed in an organic or metal-organic environment. This study shows the adsorption of this highly unreactive element within such an environment and reveals the first crystallographic observation of an interaction between neon and a transition metal. PMID:27452474

  16. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gram, W.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of “human sensors.” As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include “citizens” or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process

  17. Helium and Neon in Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1996-01-01

    Two comets were observed with EUVE in late 1994. Both comet Mueller and comet Borrelly are short-period comets having well established orbital elements and accurate ephemerides. Spectra of 40 ksec were taken of each. No evidence for emission lines from either Helium or Neon was detected. We calculated limits on the production rates of these atoms (relative to solar) assuming a standard isotropic outflow model, with a gas streaming speed of 1 km/s. The 3-sigma (99.7% confidence) limits (1/100,000 for He, 0.8 for Ne) are based on a conservative estimate of the noise in the EUVE spectra. They are also weakly dependent on the precise pointing and tracking of the EUVE field of view relative to the comet during the integrations. These limits are consistent with ice formation temperatures T greater than or equal to 30 K, as judged from the gas trapping experiments of Bar-Nun. For comparison, the solar abundances of these elements are He/O = 110, Ne/O = 1/16. Neither limit was as constraining as we had initially hoped, mainly because comets Mueller and Borrelly were intrinsically less active than anticipated.

  18. The First NEON School in La Silla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennefeld, M.; Melo, C.; Selman, F.

    2016-06-01

    The NEON Observing Schools have long provided PhD students with practical experience in the preparation, execution and reduction of astronomical observations, primarily at northern observatories. The NEON School was held in Chile for the first time, with observations being conducted at La Silla. The school was attended by 20 students, all from South America, and observations were performed with two telescopes, including the New Technology Telescope. A brief description of the school is presented and the observing projects and their results are described.

  19. Rogue Mantle Helium and Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarede, F.

    2007-12-01

    mid- ocean ridges, the characteristic times of melt extraction in each of these two environments are 10,000 y and 1 My, respectively, and the maximum thickness of refractory layers contributing their He to the magmas are 10 m and 100 m, respectively. The difference in 3He/4He ratios of ocean-island and mid-ocean ridge basalts and the preservation of solar neon are ascribed to the reservoirs rocks being stretched to a different extent during melting. Old fragments of oceanic lithosphere, and possibly cumulates from the magma ocean, rather than primordial mantle 'nuggets', should host most of the primordial He and Ne presently observed in oceanic basalts. Helium with high 3He/4He ratios may contain a component of primordial origin, but not necessarily reflect the reservoir in which it has been residing for most of the Earth's history.

  20. ASA's Chandra Neon Discovery Solves Solar Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory survey of nearby sun-like stars suggests there is nearly three times more neon in the sun and local universe than previously believed. If true, this would solve a critical problem with understanding how the sun works. "We use the sun to test how well we understand stars and, to some extent, the rest of the universe," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "But in order to understand the sun, we need to know exactly what it is made of," he added. It is not well known how much neon the sun contains. This is critical information for creating theoretical models of the sun. Neon atoms, along with carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, play an important role in how quickly energy flows from nuclear reactions in the sun's core to its edge, where it then radiates into space. Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi The rate of this energy flow determines the location and size of a crucial stellar region called the convection zone. The zone extends from near the sun's surface inward approximately 125,000 miles. The zone is where the gas undergoes a rolling, convective motion much like the unstable air in a thunderstorm. "This turbulent gas has an extremely important job, because nearly all of the energy emitted at the surface of the sun is transported there by convection," Drake said. The accepted amount of neon in the sun has led to a paradox. The predicted location and size of the solar convection zone disagree with those deduced from solar oscillations. Solar oscillations is a technique astronomers previously relied on to probe the sun's interior. Several scientists have noted the problem could be fixed if the abundance of neon is in fact about three times larger than currently accepted. Attempts to measure the precise amount of neon in the Sun have been frustrated by a quirk of nature; neon atoms in the Sun give off no signatures in visible light. However, in a gas

  1. Nanofriction of neon films on superconducting lead.

    PubMed

    Pierno, M; Bruschi, L; Fois, G; Mistura, G; Boragno, C; de Mongeot, F Buatier; Valbusa, U

    2010-07-01

    With a quartz crystal microbalance technique we have studied the nanofriction of neon monolayers deposited on a lead surface at a temperature around 7 K. Unlike heavier adsorbates, Ne is found to systematically slide at such low temperatures without any evidence of pinning. The crossing of the Pb superconducting-metal transition is not accompanied by any change in dissipation, suggesting that the electronic contribution to friction is negligible for this system. PMID:20867468

  2. The NEON Soil Archive - A community resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, E.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a 30-year National Science Foundation-funded facility for understanding and forecasting the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on aspects of continental-scale ecology such as biodiversity, biogeochemistry, infectious diseases, and ecohydrology. NEON will measure a wide range of properties at 60 terrestrial and 36 aquatic sites throughout the US using in situ sensors, sample collection/lab analysis, and remote sensing, and all data will be made freely available. The Observatory is currently under construction and will be fully operational by 2017, however, limited data collection and release will begin in 2013. In addition, NEON is archiving large numbers of samples, including surface soils (top ~30 cm) collected from locations across each site, and soils collected by horizon to 2 m deep from a single soil pit at each site. Here I present information about the latter, focusing on sampling and processing, metadata, and currently available samples. At each terrestrial site the soil pit is dug in the locally dominant soil type and soil is collected by horizon, mixed, and ~4-8 liters soil is sent for processing. Soil samples are air-dried and sieved (mineral soil) or air-dried (organic soil) and 1.2 kg is split between 4 glass jars for archiving (protocol available upon request). To date 15 soil pits have been sampled, representing 7 soil orders, and soils from 110 horizons have been archived or are being processed. Metadata associated with each archive sample include a soil profile description, photos, and soil properties (total C, N, S, Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Sr, Ti, Zr, bulk density, pH, and texture). The procedure for requesting samples from the archive is under development and I encourage scientists to use the archive in their future research. Collecting and processing samples for the NEON Soil Archive

  3. Binary collision model for neon Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1986-01-01

    A model is developed to account for the angle-resolved Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface recently obtained by Pepper and Aron. The neon is assumed to be excited in a single asymmetric neon-aluminum-collision and scattered back into the vacuum where it emits an Auger electron. The velocity of the Auger electron acquires a Doppler shift by virtue of the emission from a moving source. The dependence of the Auger peak shape and energy on the incident ion energy, angle of incidence and on the angle of Auger electron emission with respect to the surface is presented. Satisfactory agreement with the angle resolved experimental observations is obtained. The dependence of the angle-integrated Auger yield on the incident ion energy and angle of incidence is also obtained and shown to be in satisfactory agreement with available experimental evidence.

  4. Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. . Inst. de Physique); Bailey, J.M. ); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. ); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. ); Huber, T.M. ); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.

    1992-01-01

    A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of [mu][sup [minus]p] atoms in each target. The rates [lambda][sub pp[mu

  5. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A...

  8. Dietary protein source and level alters growth in neon tetras.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional studies for aquarium fish like the neon tetra are sparse in comparison with those for food fish. To determine the optimum dietary protein level and source for growth of neon tetras, diets were formulated to contain 25, 35, 45 and 55% dietary protein from either marine animal protein or ...

  9. Scattering of electrons from neon atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, A.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    Scattering of electrons from neon atoms is investigated by the polarized-orbital method. The perturbed orbitals calculated with use of the Sternheimer approximation lead to the polarizability 2.803 a(0)-cube in fairly good agreement with the experimental value 2.66 a(0)-cube. Phase shifts for various partial waves are calculated in the exchange, exchange-adiabatic, and polarized-orbital approximations. They are compared with the previous results. The calculated elastic differential, total, and momentum-transfer cross sections are compared with the experimental results. The polarized-orbital approximation yields results which show general improvement over the exchange-adiabatic approximation.

  10. Coherence parameter measurements for neon and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Robert; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Stauffer, Al

    2015-09-01

    We present recent coherence parameter measurements for excitation of neon and hydrogen by 50 eV electrons. The measurements were made using a crossed electron/gas beam spectrometer, featuring a hemispherically selected electron energy analyzer for detecting scattered electrons and double-reflection VUV polarization analyzer to register fluorescence photons. Time-coincidence counting methods on the electron and photon signals were employed to determine Stokes Parameters at each scattering angle, with data measured at angles between 20 - 115 degrees. The data are compared with calculated results using the B-Spline R-Matrix (BSR) and Relativistic Distorted Wave (RDW) approaches. Measurements were made of both the linear (Plin and γ) and circular (Lperp) parameters for the lowest lying excited states in these two targets. We particularly focus on results in the Lperp parameter, which shows unusual behavior in these particular targets, including strong sign changes implying reversal of the angular momentum transfer. In the case of neon, the unusual behavior is well captured by the BSR, but not by other models.

  11. Diffusion of neon in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2010-12-01

    Sedimentation of the neutron rich isotope 22Ne may be an important source of gravitational energy during the cooling of white dwarf stars. This depends on the diffusion constant for 22Ne in strongly coupled plasma mixtures. We calculate self-diffusion constants D(i) from molecular dynamics simulations of carbon, oxygen, and neon mixtures. We find that D(i) in a mixture does not differ greatly from earlier one component plasma results. For strong coupling (coulomb parameter Γ> few), D(i) has a modest dependence on the charge Z(i) of the ion species, D(i)∝Z(i)(-2/3). However, D(i) depends more strongly on Z(i) for weak coupling (smaller Γ). We conclude that the self-diffusion constant D(Ne) for 22Ne in carbon, oxygen, and neon plasma mixtures is accurately known so that uncertainties in D(Ne) should be unimportant for simulations of white dwarf cooling. PMID:21230741

  12. Electron-impact excitation of neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, Connor; Griffin, Don

    2004-05-01

    A number of convergent close-coupling and R-matrix with pseudo-state (RMPS) calculations on H-like, He-like, Li-like, and Be-like ions have demonstrated that coupling to the target continuum can have large effects on the electron-impact excitation cross sections of neutral and low-charge species. However, no one has yet attempted such advanced calculations on a system as complex as neutral neon. We report on a series of RMPS calculations of electron-impact excitation of Ne using recently developed parallel Breit-Pauli (BP) R-matrix programs. Our largest calculation was a BP calculation with 235 spectroscopic and pseudo levels in the close-coupling expansion. Although the results of this calculation clearly reveal the importance of coupling to the target continuum in this atom, the pseudo-state expansion is not yet sufficiently complete to provide reliable cross sections for energies above the ionization limit. However, this is the largest BP calculation that can be performed with present computer resources. Thus, we have also carried out a series of RMPS calculations in LS coupling with different pseudo-state expansions. Comparisons of these results have allowed us to determine the approximate size of the pseudo-state expansion required to achieve convergence in future BP calculations for neon.

  13. A neon-E rich phase in Orgueil - Results obtained on density separates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, P.; Jungck, M. H. A.; Meier, F. O.; Niederer, F. R.

    1981-09-01

    A stepwise heating technique was used on eight density separates from the neon-E rich phase G4j of the carbonaceous chondrite Orgueil to measure He, Ne and Ar. The density separation technique was found to further enrich the Ne-E carrier phases, allowing the Ne-E to be identified as virtually pure Ne-22. At least two separable carrier phases exist: (1) the l-carrier phase, which releases its Ne-E at temperatures below 900 C and is heavily enriched in the low-density separate; and (2) the h-carrier phase. The h-carrier is found to be highly retentive, with release temperatures above 900 C, and is associated with higher-density material. It is concluded that Ne-E and its carrier phases are probably of presolar origin.

  14. Electron-helium and electron-neon scattering cross sections at low electron energies using a photoelectron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Vijay; Subramanian, K. P.; Krishnakumar, E.

    1987-01-01

    Absolute electron-helium and electron-neon scattering cross sections have been measured at low electron energies using the powerful technique of photoelectron spectroscopy. The measurements have been carried out at 17 electron energies varying from 0.7 to 10 eV with an accuracy of + or - 2.7 percent. The results obtained in the present work have been compared with other recent measurement and calculations.

  15. The prospects of a subnanometer focused neon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Rahman, F H M; McVey, Shawn; Farkas, Louis; Notte, John A; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Richard H

    2012-01-01

    The success of the helium ion microscope has encouraged extensions of this technology to produce beams of other ion species. A review of the various candidate ion beams and their technical prospects suggest that a neon beam might be the most readily achieved. Such a neon beam would provide a sputtering yield that exceeds helium by an order of magnitude while still offering a theoretical probe size less than 1-nm. This article outlines the motivation for a neon gas field ion source, the expected performance through simulations, and provides an update of our experimental progress. PMID:21796647

  16. Comprehensive Testing of a Neon Cryogenic Capillary Pumped Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobel, Mark C.; Ku, Jentung; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive test program of a cryogenic capillary pumped loop (CCPL) using neon as the working fluid in the temperature range between 30 K and 40 K. The test article was originally designed to be used with nitrogen in the 70 K to 100 K temperature range, and was refurbished for testing with neon. Tests performed included start up from a supercritical state, power cycle, sink temperature cycle, heat transport limit, low power limit, reservoir set point change and long duration operation. The neon CCPL has demonstrated excellent performance under various conditions.

  17. The NEON School Enters a New Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennefeld, M.

    2004-12-01

    THE NEON SCHOOL, a school on astronomical observations organised by a collaboration of observatories (Asiago, Calar Alto, ESO, La Palma and OHP) is well known by PhD students in astronomy all over Europe. It runs tutorial observations directly at the telescope for students in small groups, under the supervision of an experienced astronomer. This way, the participants can execute a real scientific program with all the steps needed in professional life: preparation of the program with selection of targets and feasibility estimates; set-up of the instrument and calibrations; running of the observations, in general both imaging/photometry and spectroscopy; data reductions; and, finally, the presentation of the results at the end of the school.

  18. Neon and Oxygen Abundances in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Nathan R.; Garnett, Donald R.; Massey, Philip; Jacoby, George

    2006-02-01

    We present new spectroscopic observations of 13 H II regions in the Local Group spiral galaxy M33. The regions observed range from 1 to 7 kpc in distance from the nucleus. Of the 13 H II regions observed, the [O III] λ4363 line was detected in six regions. Electron temperatures were thus able to be determined directly from the spectra using the [O III] λλ4959, 5007/λ4363 line ratio. Based on these temperature measurements, oxygen and neon abundances and their radial gradients were calculated. For neon, a gradient of -0.016+/-0.017 dex kpc-1 was computed, which agrees with the Ne/H gradient derived previously from ISO spectra. A gradient of -0.012+/-0.011 dex kpc-1 was computed for O/H, much shallower than was derived in previous studies. The newly calculated O/H and Ne/H gradients are in much better agreement with each other, as expected from predictions of stellar nucleosynthesis. We examine the correlation between the WC/WN ratio and metallicity, and find that the new M33 abundances do not impact the observed correlation significantly. We also identify two new He II-emitting H II regions in M33, the first to be discovered in a spiral galaxy other than the Milky Way. In both cases the nebular He II emission is not associated with Wolf-Rayet stars. Therefore, caution is warranted in interpreting the relationship between nebular He II emission and Wolf-Rayet stars when both are observed in the integrated spectrum of an H II region.

  19. 8. DETAIL OF NORTHEAST ELEVATION SHOWING NEON TWA SIGN AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF NORTHEAST ELEVATION SHOWING NEON TWA SIGN AND ROOF MASTS. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - TWA Maintenance Hangar, South side of Tinicum Island Road, Philadelphia International Airport, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  20. Light-curve Analysis of Neon Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed light curves of five neon novae, QU Vul, V351 Pup, V382 Vel, V693 CrA, and V1974 Cyg, and determined their white dwarf (WD) masses and distance moduli on the basis of theoretical light curves composed of free-free and photospheric emission. For QU Vul, we obtained a distance of d ˜ 2.4 kpc, reddening of E(B - V) ˜ 0.55, and WD mass of MWD = 0.82-0.96 {M}⊙ . This suggests that an oxygen-neon WD lost a mass of more than ˜ 0.1 {M}⊙ since its birth. For V351 Pup, we obtained d˜ 5.5 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.45, and {M}{{WD}}=0.98-1.1 {M}⊙ . For V382 Vel, we obtained d˜ 1.6 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.15, and {M}{{WD}}=1.13-1.28 {M}⊙ . For V693 CrA, we obtained d˜ 7.1 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.05, and {M}{{WD}}=1.15-1.25 {M}⊙ . For V1974 Cyg, we obtained d˜ 1.8 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.30, and {M}{{WD}}=0.95-1.1 {M}⊙ . For comparison, we added the carbon-oxygen nova V1668 Cyg to our analysis and obtained d˜ 5.4 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.30, and {M}{{WD}}=0.98-1.1 {M}⊙ . In QU Vul, photospheric emission contributes 0.4-0.8 mag at most to the optical light curve compared with free-free emission only. In V351 Pup and V1974 Cyg, photospheric emission contributes very little (0.2-0.4 mag at most) to the optical light curve. In V382 Vel and V693 CrA, free-free emission dominates the continuum spectra, and photospheric emission does not contribute to the optical magnitudes. We also discuss the maximum magnitude versus rate of decline relation for these novae based on the universal decline law.

  1. Laying the groundwork for NEON's continental-scale ecological research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethloff, G.; Denslow, M.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is designed to examine a suite of ecological issues. Field-collected data from 96 terrestrial and aquatic sites across the U.S. will be combined with remotely sensed data and existing continental-scale data sets. Field collections will include a range of physical and biological types, including soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, precipitation, plants, animals, insects, and microbes as well as biological sub-samples such as leaf material, blood and tissue samples, and DNA extracts. Initial data analyses and identifications of approximately 175,000 samples per year will occur at numerous external laboratories when all sites are fully staffed in 2017. Additionally, NEON will archive biotic and abiotic specimens at collections facilities where they will be curated and available for additional analyses by the scientific community. The number of archived specimens is currently estimated to exceed 130,000 per year by 2017. We will detail how NEON is addressing the complexities and challenges around this set of analyses and specimens and how the resulting high-quality data can impact ecological understanding. The raw data returned from external laboratories that is quality checked and served by NEON will be the foundation for many NEON data products. For example, sequence-quality nucleic acids extracted from surface waters, benthic biofilms, and soil samples will be building blocks for data products on microbial diversity. The raw sequence data will also be available for uses such as evolutionary investigations, and the extracts will be archived so others can acquire them for additional research. Currently, NEON is establishing contracts for the analysis and archiving of field-collected samples through 2017. During this period, NEON will gather information on the progress and success of this large-scale effort in order to determine the most effective course to pursue with external facilities. Two areas that NEON

  2. Multistage Zeeman deceleration of metastable neon.

    PubMed

    Wiederkehr, Alex W; Motsch, Michael; Hogan, Stephen D; Andrist, Markus; Schmutz, Hansjürg; Lambillotte, Bruno; Agner, Josef A; Merkt, Frédéric

    2011-12-01

    A supersonic beam of metastable neon atoms has been decelerated by exploiting the interaction between the magnetic moment of the atoms and time-dependent inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a multistage Zeeman decelerator. Using 91 deceleration solenoids, the atoms were decelerated from an initial velocity of 580 m/s to final velocities as low as 105 m/s, corresponding to a removal of more than 95% of their initial kinetic energy. The phase-space distribution of the cold, decelerated atoms was characterized by time-of-flight and imaging measurements, from which a temperature of 10 mK was obtained in the moving frame of the decelerated sample. In combination with particle-trajectory simulations, these measurements allowed the phase-space acceptance of the decelerator to be quantified. The degree of isotope separation that can be achieved by multistage Zeeman deceleration was also studied by performing experiments with pulse sequences generated for (20)Ne and (22)Ne. PMID:22149785

  3. Multistage Zeeman deceleration of metastable neon

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederkehr, Alex W.; Motsch, Michael; Hogan, Stephen D.; Andrist, Markus; Schmutz, Hansjuerg; Lambillotte, Bruno; Agner, Josef A.; Merkt, Frederic

    2011-12-07

    A supersonic beam of metastable neon atoms has been decelerated by exploiting the interaction between the magnetic moment of the atoms and time-dependent inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a multistage Zeeman decelerator. Using 91 deceleration solenoids, the atoms were decelerated from an initial velocity of 580 m/s to final velocities as low as 105 m/s, corresponding to a removal of more than 95% of their initial kinetic energy. The phase-space distribution of the cold, decelerated atoms was characterized by time-of-flight and imaging measurements, from which a temperature of 10 mK was obtained in the moving frame of the decelerated sample. In combination with particle-trajectory simulations, these measurements allowed the phase-space acceptance of the decelerator to be quantified. The degree of isotope separation that can be achieved by multistage Zeeman deceleration was also studied by performing experiments with pulse sequences generated for {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne.

  4. Graphene engineering by neon ion beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Iberi, Vighter; Ievlev, Anton V.; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Joy, David C.; Rondinone, Adam J.; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.

    2016-02-18

    Achieving the ultimate limits of materials and device performance necessitates the engineering of matter with atomic, molecular, and mesoscale fidelity. While common for organic and macromolecular chemistry, these capabilities are virtually absent for 2D materials. In contrast to the undesired effect of ion implantation from focused ion beam (FIB) lithography with gallium ions, and proximity effects in standard e-beam lithography techniques, the shorter mean free path and interaction volumes of helium and neon ions offer a new route for clean, resist free nanofabrication. Furthermore, with the advent of scanning helium ion microscopy, maskless He+ and Ne+ beam lithography of graphenemore » based nanoelectronics is coming to the forefront. Here, we will discuss the use of energetic Ne ions in engineering graphene devices and explore the mechanical, electromechanical and chemical properties of the ion-milled devices using scanning probe microscopy (SPM). By using SPM-based techniques such as band excitation (BE) force modulation microscopy, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of the exact same devices can be quantitatively extracted. Additionally, the effect of defects inherent in ion beam direct-write lithography, on the overall performance of the fabricated devices is elucidated.« less

  5. Search for Metastability of 2s Muonic Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Bernard Wilhelm

    1995-01-01

    An experiment was performed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) to establish the conditions for the metastability of the 2S-state of muonic neon. The muonic atoms were formed by stopping negative muons in the neon-filled target chamber of the PSI cyclotron trap. A pair of intrinsic germanium detectors were used in coincidence to search for the two photon decay of the 2S-state. Both energy and time information from two photon events were written to disk for off-line analysis. Data were accumulated for neon pressures of 40 and 400 Torr. The data were then searched for evidence of two photon transitions from the 2S-state. The germanium detectors were sensitive to the K-, L- and M- series x-ray photons (with energies between 10 and 300 keV) emitted during the cascade of the muonic neon ion. The detectors were also used alone to record single photon events of the K- and L-series x rays. The observed intensity ratios of the K-series x rays provided a lower limit on the initial population of the 2S-state. For the pressure condition of 40 Torr of neon, the 2S population was found to be 1.75% +/- .15% of the total cascade. The number of events at 40 Torr that could be attributed to two photon decays of the 2S-state was found to be 30 +/- 52 corresponding to a 2S population of 3.8% +/- 6.5%. At 400 Torr of neon the observed number of 2S two photon decays was 7 +/- 41, placing an upper limit on the 2S population at 0.9% +/- 5.1% of the total cascade. These results, to within the experimental uncertainties, can neither establish nor exclude the metastability of 2S muonic neon.

  6. Neon color spreading in dynamic displays: temporal factors.

    PubMed

    Cicchini, Marco; Spillmann, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    When a red star is placed in the middle of an Ehrenstein figure so as to be collinear with the surrounding black rays, a reddish veil is perceived to fill the white center. This is called neon color spreading. To better understand the processes that give rise to this phenomenon, we studied the temporal properties of the effect. Specifically, we presented a "sustained" black Ehrenstein figure (rays) for 600 ms and a "transient" red star for 48 ms, or the converse pattern, at various stimulus onset asynchronies (-100-700 ms) and asked subjects to compare the strength of the neon color in the test stimulus to that of a reference pattern in which the transient star had an onset asynchrony of 300 ms. Additional exposure durations of 24 and 96 ms were used for each transient stimulus in order to study the effect of temporal integration. Simultaneity of the on- and off-transients of the star and the Ehrenstein rays were found to optimize neon color spreading, especially when both stimuli terminated together. Longer exposure durations of the transient stimulus up to 96 ms further improved the effect. Neon color spreading was much reduced when the transient stimulus was presented soon after the beginning of the sustained stimulus, with a gradual build-up towards the end. These results emphasize the importance of stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) and stimulus termination asynchrony (STA) for the perception of neon color spreading. PMID:24097045

  7. Equation of state of solid neon from x-ray diffraction measurements to 110 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Hemley, R.J.; Jephcoat, A.P.; Zha, C.S.; Mao, H.K.; Finger, L.W.; Cox, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the pressure-volume properties of condensed neon. X-ray diffraction techniques are used to determine solid neon equation of state and crystal structure. 16 refs., 2 figs. (LSP)

  8. NEON INSIGHTS FROM OLD SOLAR X-RAYS: A PLASMA TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE CORONAL NEON CONTENT

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Jeremy J.

    2011-12-10

    An analysis using modern atomic data of fluxes culled from the literature for O VIII and Ne IX lines observed in solar active regions by the P78 and Solar Maximum Mission satellites confirms that the coronal Ne/O abundance ratio varies by a factor of two or more, and finds an increase in Ne/O with increasing active region plasma temperature. The latter is reminiscent of evidence for increasing Ne/O with stellar activity in low-activity coronae that reaches a 'neon saturation' in moderately active stars at approximately twice the historically accepted solar value of about 0.15 by number. We argue that neon saturation represents the underlying stellar photospheric compositions, and that low-activity coronae, including that of the Sun, are generally depleted in neon. The implication would be that the solar Ne/O abundance ratio should be revised upward by a factor of about two to n(Ne)/n(O) {approx} 0.3. Diverse observations of neon in the local cosmos provide some support for such a revision. Neon would still be of some relevance for reconciling helioseismology with solar models computed using recently advocated chemical mixtures with lower metal content.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of nanoscale focused neon ion beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Rack, Philip D

    2013-12-13

    A Monte Carlo simulation is developed to model the physical sputtering of aluminum and tungsten emulating nanoscale focused helium and neon ion beam etching from the gas field ion microscope. Neon beams with different beam energies (0.5-30 keV) and a constant beam diameter (Gaussian with full-width-at-half-maximum of 1 nm) were simulated to elucidate the nanostructure evolution during the physical sputtering of nanoscale high aspect ratio features. The aspect ratio and sputter yield vary with the ion species and beam energy for a constant beam diameter and are related to the distribution of the nuclear energy loss. Neon ions have a larger sputter yield than the helium ions due to their larger mass and consequently larger nuclear energy loss relative to helium. Quantitative information such as the sputtering yields, the energy-dependent aspect ratios and resolution-limiting effects are discussed. PMID:24231648

  10. Helium and neon isotopes in deep Pacific Ocean sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    Helium and neon concentration measurements, along with isotope ratio determinations, have been made for particles collected in the deep Pacific with a magnetic sled, and they are believed to be of extraterrestrial origin. Analyses were made for samples consisting of composites of many extremely fine particles and for several individual particles large enough to contain sufficient gas for analysis but small enough to escape melting in their passage through the atmosphere. Step-heating was employed to extract the gas. Cosmic-ray spallation products or solar-wind helium and neon, if present, were not abundant enough to account for the isotopic compositions measured. In the case of the samples of magnetic fines, the low temperature extractions provided elemental and isotopic ratios in the general range found for the primordial gas in carbonaceous chondrites and gas-rich meteorites. The isotopic ratios found in the high temperature extractions suggest the presence of solar-flare helium and neon.

  11. Experimental study on neon refrigeration system using commercial helium compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Junseok; Kim, Hyobong; Hong, Yong-Ju; Yeom, Hankil; Koh, Deuk-Yong; Park, Seong-Je

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we developed neon refrigeration system using commercial helium compressor which was originally designed for GM cryocooler. We performed this research as precedent study before developing neon refrigeration system for small-scale hydrogen liquefaction system. The developed system is based on precooled Linde-Hampson system with liquid nitrogen as precoolant. Design parameters of heat exchangers are determined from thermodynamic cycle analysis with operating pressure of 2 MPa and 0.4 MPa. Heat exchangers have concentric-tube heat exchanger configuration and orifice is used as Joule- Thomson expansion device. In experiments, pressure, temperature, mass flow rate and compressor input power are measured as charging pressure. With experimental results, the characteristics of heat exchanger, Joule-Thomson expansion and refrigeration effect are discussed. The developed neon refrigeration system shows the lowest temperature of 43.9 K.

  12. Purification and Liquefacttion of Neon Using a Helium Refrigeration Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeck, S.

    2010-04-01

    The cryogenic plant developed by Linde Kryotechnik is used to extract neon out of a crude gas flow coming from an air separation plant. The crude gas is cooled down by a two stage helium refrigeration process using the Linde Kryotechnik dynamic gas bearing turbines. After the first cooling stage, nitrogen is liquefied and separated from the crude gas. The Cryogenic adsorbers located at a temperature level below 80 K clean the crude gas from remaining nitrogen traces before the neon-helium mixture enters the final cooling stage. In the second cooling stage neon is liquefied and separated from the helium. The final product quality will be achieved within a rectification column at low pressure level.

  13. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S K; Baylor, L R; Foust, C R; Lyttle, M S; Meitner, S J; Rasmussen, D A

    2014-11-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development. PMID:25430370

  14. Comparison of the incremental and hierarchical methods for crystalline neon.

    PubMed

    Nolan, S J; Bygrave, P J; Allan, N L; Manby, F R

    2010-02-24

    We present a critical comparison of the incremental and hierarchical methods for the evaluation of the static cohesive energy of crystalline neon. Both of these schemes make it possible to apply the methods of molecular electronic structure theory to crystalline solids, offering a systematically improvable alternative to density functional theory. Results from both methods are compared with previous theoretical and experimental studies of solid neon and potential sources of error are discussed. We explore the similarities of the two methods and demonstrate how they may be used in tandem to study crystalline solids. PMID:21386379

  15. Fast Imaging of Intact and Shattered Cryogenic Neon Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Baylor, Larry R; Foust, Charles R; Lyttle, Mark S; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A

    2014-01-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100- m- and sub- s-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of m to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  16. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S. K.; Baylor, L. R.; Foust, C. R.; Lyttle, M. S.; Meitner, S. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-11-15

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  17. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of + or - 15 percent.

  18. Stark Widths of Spectral Lines of Neutral Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, Milan S.; Simić, Zoran; Kovačević, Andjelka; Valjarević, Aleksandar; Sahal-Bréchot, Sylvie

    2015-12-01

    In order to complete Stark broadening data for Ne I spectral lines which are needed for analysis of stellar atmospheres, collisional widths and shifts (the so-called Stark broadening parameters) of 29 isolated spectral lines of neutral neon have been determined within the impact semiclassical perturbation method. Calculations have been performed for the broadening by collisions with electrons, protons and ionized helium for astrophysical applications, and for collisions with ionized neon and argon for laboratory plasma diagnostics. The shifts have been compared with existing experimental values. The obtained data will be included in the STARK-B database, which is a part of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center - VAMDC.

  19. The isotopic composition of solar flare accelerated neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Spalding, J. D.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The individual isotopes of neon in energetic solar-flare particles have been clearly resolved with a rms mass resolution of 0.20 amu. The ratios found are Ne-20/Ne-22 = 7.6 (+2.0, -1.8) and Ne-21/Ne-22 of no more than about 0.11 in the 11-26 MeV per nucleon interval. This isotopic composition is essentially the same as that of meteoritic planetary neon-A and is significantly different from that of the solar wind.

  20. A Wsbnd Ne interatomic potential for simulation of neon implantation in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, Marie; Juslin, Niklas; Huang, Guiyang; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-08-01

    An interatomic pair potential for Wsbnd Ne is developed for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of neon implantation in tungsten. The new potential predicts point defect energies and binding energies of small clusters that are in good agreement with electronic structure calculations. Molecular dynamics simulations of small neon clusters in tungsten show that trap mutation, in which an interstitial neon cluster displaces a tungsten atom from its lattice site, occurs for clusters of three or more neon atoms. However, near a free surface, trap mutation can occur at smaller sizes, including even a single neon interstitial in close proximity to a (100) or (110) surface.

  1. Elemental abundances of flaring solar plasma - Enhanced neon and sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmelz, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Elemental abundances of two flares observed with the SMM Flat Crystal Spectrometer are compared and contrasted. The first had a gradual rise and a slow decay, while the second was much more impulsive. Simultaneous spectra of seven bright soft X-ray resonance lines provide information over a broad temperature range and are available throughout both flares, making these events unique in the SMM data base. For the first flare, the plasma seemed to be characterized by coronal abundances but, for the second, the plasma composition could not be coronal, photospheric, or a linear combination of both. A good differential emission measure fit required enhanced neon such that Ne/O = 0.32 +/- 0.02, a value which is inconsistent with the current models of coronal abundances based on the elemental first-ionization potential. Similar values of enhanced neon are found for flaring plasma observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, in (He-3)-rich solar energetic particle events, and in the decay phase of several long duration soft X-ray events. Sulfur is also enhanced in the impulsive flare, but not as dramatically as neon. These events are compared with two models which attempt to explain the enhanced values of neon and sulfur.

  2. Neon and CO2 adsorption on open carbon nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Ziegler, Carl A; Banjara, Shree R; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, S; Migone, Aldo D

    2013-07-30

    We present the results of a thermodynamics and kinetics study of the adsorption of neon and carbon dioxide on aggregates of chemically opened carbon nanohorns. Both the equilibrium adsorption characteristics, as well as the dependence of the kinetic behavior on sorbent loading, are different for these two adsorbates. For neon the adsorption isotherms display two steps before reaching the saturated vapor pressure, corresponding to adsorption on strong and on weak binding sites; the isosteric heat of adsorption is a decreasing function of sorbent loading (this quantity varies by about a factor of 2 on the range of loadings studied), and the speed of the adsorption kinetics increases with increasing loading. By contrast, for carbon dioxide there are no substeps in the adsorption isotherms; the isosteric heat is a nonmonotonic function of loading, the value of the isosteric heat never differs from the bulk heat of sublimation by more than 15%, and the kinetic behavior is opposite to that of neon, with equilibration times increasing for higher sorbent loadings. We explain the difference in the equilibrium properties observed for neon and carbon dioxide in terms of differences in the relative strengths of adsorbate-adsorbate to adsorbate-sorbent interaction for these species. PMID:23802764

  3. Infrared absorption spectra of methylidene radicals in solid neon.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsiao-Chi; Lo, Jen-Iu; Lin, Meng-Yeh; Peng, Yu-Chain; Chou, Sheng-Lung; Cheng, Bing-Ming; Ogilvie, J F

    2014-07-28

    Infrared absorption lines of methylidene--(12)C(1)H, (13)C(1)H, and (12)C(2)H--dispersed in solid neon at 3 K, recorded after photolysis of methane precursors with vacuum-ultraviolet light at 121.6 nm, serve as signatures of these trapped radicals. PMID:24912563

  4. Capture of neon atoms by sup 4 He clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Scheidemann, A.; Toennies, J.P. ); Northby, J.A. )

    1990-04-16

    Neon atoms are captured by helium clusters in a crossed-beam experiment. The capture process depends strongly on the cluster beam source conditions. We identify a sharply defined region corresponding to expansions passing near the critical point for which the capture probability is anomalously large.

  5. A Closed Neon Liquefier System for Testing Superconducting Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchetti, M.; Al-Mosawi, M. K.; Yang, Y.; Beduz, C.; Giunchi, G.

    2006-04-01

    A Neon liquefier system has been developed by Southampton University (UK) and EDISON (Italy) with the aim to provide a facility for testing HTS superconducting devices using Magnesium Diboride materials, in the range 25-30K. The system consists of a liquid Neon cryostat coupled to a two stages cryocooler and a recovery system. The first stage of the cryocooler is connected to the thermal shield of the cryostat and a copper station positioned at mid point along the access neck to the liquid Neon bath to reduce heat leak and to provide pre-cooling of samples. The second stage, capable of 20W cooling power at 22K, is used to provide the cooling power for liquefaction and to refrigerate the liquid Neon bath and the superconducting device/sample during the steady state operation. The recovery system has been designed to automatically compress excess boil-off generated by a quench or a transient heating into a storage gas container. Transport measurement up to 900A can be carried out in the Ne cryostat using purposely build hybrid current leads. These leads have a copper upper section cooled by liquid Nitrogen and a superconducting lower section of Ag/AuBi2223 tapes. In this paper we report on the performance of the system and the initial measurement of superconducting samples.

  6. Cosmogenic neon from precompaction irradiation of Kapoeta and Murchison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Swindle, T. D.; Goswami, J. N.

    1983-01-01

    Neon from hand-picked Murchison and Kapoeta grains, selected on the basis of the presence or absence of solar flare particle tracks, was analyzed in order to delineate the precompaction history of this material. The irradiated grains showed large enrichments of cosmogenic neon relative to the unirradiated grains. Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure ages for the unirradiated grains yield the nominal values reported for the recent exposure history of these meteorites. Apparent minimum precompaction galactic exposure ages of 28 m.y. and 56 m.y. would have been obtained for Murchison and Kapoeta, respectively, if the cosmogenic effects in the irradiated grains were due to GCR irradiation. Since this seems unreasonably long, the cosmogenic neon in the irradiated grains may be due to spallation by solar cosmic rays. This, however, would require a more active early sun. The isotopic composition of the cosmogenic neon in these grains suggests a harder energy spectrum than is characteristic of present solar flares. Lack of apparent solar wind effects may require some kind of shielding, such as nebular gas.

  7. Molecular Iodine Fluorescence Using a Green Helium-Neon Laser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, J. Charles

    2011-01-01

    Excitation of molecular iodine vapor with a green (543.4 nm) helium-neon laser produces a fluorescence spectrum that is well suited for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory. Application of standard evaluation techniques to the spectrum yields ground electronic-state molecular parameters in good agreement with literature…

  8. The NEON Aquatic Network: Expanding the Availability of Biogeochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, J. M.; Bohall, C.; Fitzgerald, M.; Utz, R.; Parker, S. M.; Roehm, C. L.; Goodman, K. J.; McLaughlin, B.

    2013-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are facing unprecedented pressure from climate change and land-use practices. Invasive species, whether plant, animal, insect or microbe present additional threat to aquatic ecosystem services. There are significant scientific challenges to understanding how these forces will interact to affect aquatic ecosystems, as the flow of energy and materials in the environment is driven by multivariate and non-linear biogeochemical cycles. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect and provide observational data across multiple scales. Sites were selected to maximize representation of major North American ecosystems using a multivariate geographic clustering method that partitioned the continental US, AK, HI, and Puerto Rico into 20 eco-climatic domains. The NEON data collection systems and methods are designed to yield standardized, near real-time data subjected to rigorous quality controls prior to public dissemination through an online data portal. NEON will collect data for 30 years to facilitate spatial-temporal analysis of environmental responses and drivers of ecosystem change, ranging from local through continental scales. Here we present the NEON Aquatic Network, a multi-parameter network consisting of a combination of in situ sensor and observational data. This network will provide data to examine biogeochemical, biological, hydrologic and geomorphic metrics at 36 sites, which are a combination of small 1st/2nd order wadeable streams, large rivers and lakes. A typical NEON Aquatic site will host up to two in-stream sensor sets designed to collect near-continuous water quality data (e.g. pH/ORP, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, CDOM) along with up to 8 shallow groundwater monitoring wells (level, temp., cond.), and a local meteorological station (e.g. 2D wind speed, PAR, barometric pressure, temperature, net radiation). These coupled sensor suites will be complemented by observational data (e.g. water

  9. Fractionation of terrestrial neon by hydrodynamic hydrogen escape from ancient steam atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric neon is isotopically heavier than mantle neon. By contrast, nonradiogenic mantle Ar, Kr, and Xe are not known to differ from the atmosphere. These observations are most easily explained by selective neon loss to space; however, neon is much too massive to escape from the modern atmosphere. Steam atmospheres are a likely, if intermittent, feature of the accreting Earth. They occur because, on average, the energy liberated during accretion places Earth above the runaway greenhouse threshold, so that liquid water is not stable at the surface. It is found that steam atmospheres should have lasted some ten to fifty million years. Hydrogen escape would have been vigorous, but abundant heavy constituents would have been retained. There is no lack of plausible candidates; CO2, N2, or CO could all suffice. Neon can escape because it is less massive than any of the likely pollutants. Neon fractionation would have been a natural byproduct. Assuming that the initial Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio was solar, it was found that it would have taken some ten million years to effect the observed neon fractionation in a 30 bar steam atmosphere fouled with 10 bars of CO. Thicker atmospheres would have taken longer; less CO, shorter. This mechanism for fractionating neon has about the right level of efficiency. Because the lighter isotope escapes much more readily, total neon loss is pretty minimal; less than half of the initial neon endowment escapes.

  10. The energy dependence of the neon-22 excess in the cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrstroem, N. Y.; Lund, N.

    1985-01-01

    It has been recognized now for some time that the heavy neon isotope, neon-22, is overabundant by a factor of 3 to 4 with respect to neon-22 in the cosmic ray source compared to the ratio of these isotopes in the Solar System. In view of the otherwise remarkable similarity of the chemical composition of the cosmic ray source and the composition of the Solar Energetic Particles, the anomaly regarding the neon isotopes is so much more striking. The observed excess of neon-22 is too large to be explained as a result of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy since the formation of the Solar System. Further information on the origin of the neon-22 excess may come from a comparison of the energy spectra of the two neon isotopes. If the cosmic radiation in the solar neighborhood is a mixture of material from several sources, one of which has an excess of neon-22, then the source energy spectra of neon-20 and neon-22 may differ significantly.

  11. Evidence of weak plasma series resonance heating in the H-mode of neon and neon/argon inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffard, John B.; Jung, R. O.; Lin, Chun C.; Aneskavich, L. E.; Wendt, A. E.

    2012-09-01

    Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy measurements in argon and neon inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) have revealed a surplus of high-energy electrons in neon-containing plasmas. Differences between results of emission model analyses using neon and argon lines (as well as probe measurements) also indicate a high-energy enhancement in neon-containing plasmas. The abundance of these extra high-energy electrons is correlated with the sheath thickness near the rf antenna and can be reduced by either adding a Faraday shield (external shielding) or increasing the plasma density. A comparison of modelled and experimental values of the 13.56 MHz time modulation of select neon emission lines strongly suggests plasma series resonance heating adjacent to the ICP antenna as the source of the extra heating.

  12. Muon transfer from hydrogen and deuterium atoms to neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. )

    1995-03-01

    The muon exchange reactions from the ground state of muonic protium and deuterium atoms to neon are studied. Measurements have been performed in binary gas mixtures at room temperature. The transfer rate from thermalized muonic deuterium is found to exceed by about an order of magnitude the one from muonic protium. On the other hand, an energy dependence of the rate from [mu][ital d] is revealed, while none is observed from [mu][ital p]. The intensity patterns of the muonic Lyman series of neon resulting from the muon exchange differ from one hydrogen isotope to the other, the most obvious discrepancy being the presence of the muonic Ne(7-1) line after transfer from [mu][ital d], whereas this line is absent by transfer from [mu][ital p]. This indicates that the muon is transferred to the level [ital n][sub [ital p

  13. A dielectric barrier discharge in neon at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Junxia; Luo, Haiyun; Wang, Xinxin

    2011-08-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge in neon at atmospheric pressure is investigated with electrical measurement and fast photography. It is found that a stable diffuse discharge can be easily generated in a gap with a gap space of 0.5-6 mm and is identified with a glow discharge. The first breakdown voltage of the gap is considerably higher than that of the same gap working in a stable diffuse discharge mode, which indicates that Penning ionization of neon metastables from the previous discharge with inevitable gas impurities plays an important role in the decrease in the breakdown voltage. Discharge patterns are observed in a gap shorter than 1 mm. From the experiments with a wedge-like gap, it is found that the discharge patterns are formed in the area with a higher applied electric field, which suggests that a higher applied electric field may cause a transition from a diffuse glow to discharge patterns.

  14. A Cyberinfrastructure for the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimel, D.; Berukoff, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an NSF-funded project designed to provide physical and information infrastructure to support the development of continental-scale, quantitative ecological sciences. The network consists of sixty sites located in the continental US, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, each site hosting terrestrial and aquatic sensors and observational apparati that acquire data across multiple ecoclimatic domains. As well, an airborne remote sensing platform provides spectral and LiDAR data, and acquisition of data sets from external agencies allows for land-use studies. Together, this data is ingested, vetted, processed, and curated by a standards-based, provenance-driven, metadata-rich cyberinfrastructure, which will provide not only access to but discovery and manipulation of NEON data, and the construction of integrative data products and inputs for ecological forecasting that address fundamental processual questions in climate change, land use change, and invasive species.

  15. Discovery of solar wind neon in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Palma, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Insert gases have been measured in seven sieve fractions of a disaggregated sample of the Allende meteorite. The disaggregation was done by ultrasonic treatment in water and by freeze-thawing. This sample consititutes the first gas-rich portion known to occur in the Allende meteorite. The composition of the trapped neon is solar, i.e., Neon-B, and the gas-rich samples contain more trapped Ne-20 than Ar-36. The set of sieve fractions show an anticorrelation of Ne-20 content and grain size. Gas-richness seems to be quite common among the CV3 meteorites with Allende added to the earlier known cases of Mokoia, Vigarano, and Efremovka.

  16. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. This design precludes nucleate boiling in the flow channels as they are too small to handle vapor flow. Consequently, it was necessary to determine boiling incipience under the operating conditions of the magnet system. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of plus or minus 15 percent

  17. Charge radii of neon isotopes across the sd neutron shell

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, K.; Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Kloos, S.; Kotrotsios, G.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Kowalska, M.; Keim, M.; Blaum, K.; Lievens, P.; Simon, H.

    2011-09-15

    We report on the changes in mean square charge radii of unstable neon nuclei relative to the stable {sup 20}Ne, based on the measurement of optical isotope shifts. The studies were carried out using collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam of neutral neon atoms. High sensitivity on short-lived isotopes was achieved thanks to nonoptical detection based on optical pumping and state-selective collisional ionization, which was complemented by an accurate determination of the beam kinetic energy. The new results provide information on the structural changes in the sequence of neon isotopes all across the neutron sd shell, ranging from the proton drip line nucleus and halo candidate {sup 17}Ne up to the neutron-rich {sup 28}Ne in the vicinity of the ''island of inversion.'' Within this range the charge radius is smallest for {sup 24}Ne with N=14 corresponding to the closure of the neutron d{sub 5/2} shell, while it increases toward both neutron shell closures, N=8 and N=20. The general trend of the charge radii correlates well with the deformation effects which are known to be large for several neon isotopes. In the neutron-deficient isotopes, structural changes arise from the onset of proton-halo formation for {sup 17}Ne, shell closure in {sup 18}Ne, and clustering effects in {sup 20,21}Ne. On the neutron-rich side the transition to the island of inversion plays an important role, with the radii in the upper part of the sd shell confirming the weakening of the N=20 magic number. The results add new information to the radii systematics of light nuclei where data are scarce because of the small contribution of nuclear-size effects to the isotope shifts which are dominated by the finite-mass effect.

  18. Perception of neon color spreading in 3-6-month-old infants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiale; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K

    2009-12-01

    Although lots of studies about neon color spreading have been reported, few of these studies have focused on the perceptual development of it in human infants. Therefore, this study explores the perceptual development of neon color spreading in infants. In experiment 1, we examined 3-6-month-olds' perception of neon color spreading in static conditions. In experiment 2, we examined 3-6-month-olds' perception of neon color spreading in moving conditions. Our results suggest that while only 5-6-month-old infants show a preference for neon color spreading in the static condition, 3-4-month-old infants also prefer neon color spreading if motion information is available. PMID:19836080

  19. Nova LMC 1990 no. 1: The first extragalactic neon nova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Shore, Steven N.; Starrfield, Sumner G.

    1990-01-01

    International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of nova LMC (Large Magellanic Cloud) 1990 No. 1, the first neon (or ONeMg) nova observed outside the Galaxy are presented. The observations were obtained from 17 Jan. to Mar. 1990, with especially dense coverage during the first 25 days of the outburst. (The neon nova categorization is based on the detection of forbidden Ne 3-4 lines in optical spectra; the ultraviolet neon lines were not detected.) During the first 30 days of the outburst, the radiative losses were dominated by the N 5 delta 1240 and C 4 delta 1550 lines. The maximum ejection velocity was approximately 8000 km/s, based on the blue absorption edge of the C 4 P-Cygni profile. Early in the outburst of Nova LMC 1990 No. 1 the UV luminosity alone was approximately 3 times 10 to the 38th power erg/sec, implying that the bolometric luminosity was well in excess of the Eddington luminosity for a one solar mass object.

  20. Helium-neon laser improves skin repair in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Peccin, Maria Stella; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; de Oliveira, Flavia; Giusti, Paulo Ricardo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of helium-neon laser on skin injury in rabbits. For this purpose, 15 New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral skin damage in leg. Helium-neon laser light, at a fluence of 6 J∕cm2 and wavelength of 632.8 nm, was applied on the left legs (laser group). The right leg lesions (control group) served as negative control. All sections were histopathologically analyzed using HE sections. The results showed little infiltration of inflammatory cells, with proliferation of fibroblasts forming a few fibrous connective tissue after 1 week post-injury. The lesion on the 3rd week was characterized by granulation tissue, which formed from proliferated fibrous connective tissue, congested blood vessels and mild mononuclear cell infiltration. On the 5th week, it was observed that debris material surrounded by a thick layer of connective tissue and dense collage, fibroblasts cells present in the dermis covered by a thick epidermal layer represented by keratinized epithelium. Taken together, our results suggest that helium-neon laser is able to improve skin repair in rabbits at early phases of recovery. PMID:23057697

  1. On the mechanism of populating 3p levels of neon under pumping by a hard ioniser

    SciTech Connect

    Khasenov, M U

    2011-03-31

    The effect of quenching additives on the luminescence properties of helium - neon mixtures under pumping by {alpha} particles emitted from {sup 210}Po atoms is considered. It is concluded that, under excitation by a heavy charged particle, the population of the 3p'[1/2]{sub 0} level of neon is not related to the dissociative recombination of molecular ions. It is suggested that the most likely channels for populating the 3p level are the excitation transfer from metastable helium atoms to neon atoms and direct excitation of neon by nuclear particles and secondary electrons. (lasers and active media)

  2. The NEON Science Commissioning Plan: Strategies for Confirming System Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, G. D.; Thorpe, A.; Buur, H.

    2015-12-01

    A transformation is underway in the field of ecological monitoring as compelling science questions motivate us to build ever-larger networks aiming to acquire uniform datasets over wide geographical ranges and long timescales. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), currently under construction across the U.S., represents the most ambitious such effort to characterize ecology at the continental scale. When completed in 2017, NEON will begin a 30-year program to monitor the state of North American ecosystems at scores of independent sites by employing a combination of terrestrial and aquatic sensors, organismal, biogeochemical, and hydrological sampling conducted by field staff, and airborne remote-sensing imaging and spectroscopy. Simply building and bringing such complex, long-term monitoring networks online is, however, insufficient to produce a useful result: the science team must also confirm that the system fulfills its essential mission to generate accurate and uniform data from all sites over time. This is the role of Science Commissioning, the process which completes the construction stage by confirming that the system operates as designed before entering full operations. Ideally, Science Commissioning involves simply testing the completed system against all applicable science requirements. In the real world of large, complex networks, planners of Science Commissioning must grapple with several key questions: How can we verify that the measurements from a given subsystem reflect "truth"? How can we ensure that similar subsystems at different sites return equivalent results? How can we confirm that data from the same site remain comparable over long periods of time? How can we conduct meaningful tests on a large system in a reasonable amount of time and effort? We describe the specific strategies NEON is developing to meet these challenges and the implications for other large ecological monitoring networks.

  3. Using NEON to Measure Adaptation of Vegetation to Changes in Environmental Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. H.; Kao, R.; Gibson, C.

    2009-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a national-scale research platform for documenting and analyzing the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on ecology. NEON features sensor networks and experiments linked by cyberinfrastructure to record and archive ecological data for at least 30 years. NEON partitions the United States into 20 ecoclimatic domains. Each domain hosts one fully instrumented core site in a wildland area and two re-locatable sites, which aims to capture ecologically significant gradients (e.g. landuse). Using standardized protocols and an open data policy, NEON data will be gathered from the level of the gene and organism to populations and communities, with extrapolations to the continental scale. In conjunction with environmental data, NEON will conduct field observations and analyses of biological specimens to track biodiversity, population dynamics, productivity, phenology, infectious disease, biogeochemistry and ecohydrology. Here we present a few examples of the type of research NEON will enable using this data. The NEON network will measure and scale many environmental factors that affect vegetation, e.g. temperature, precipitation, and nutrient availability. Direct monitoring of vegetation will enable the study of acclimatory and adaptive changes in vegetation properties over different time scales. Such data will improve the representation of vegetation responses to environmental change in models. The vision behind NEON aims to advance our ability to quantitatively predict ecological change.

  4. Periodic local-MP2 computational study of crystalline neon.

    PubMed

    Halo, Migen; Casassa, Silvia; Maschio, Lorenzo; Pisani, Cesare

    2009-01-21

    Face-centered-cubic crystalline Neon is taken as a test system to explore the influence of computational parameters on the quality of the MP2 solution provided by the Cryscor program using a local-correlation approach. The effect of the various approximations adopted is analyzed: basis set limitations, finite size of excitation domains, truncation of the tails of the local functions, approximate evaluation of two-electron integrals, estimate (by extrapolation) of long-range contributions are shown to play roles of different importance. The Ne2 dimer is used as an auxiliary test case in order to allow comparison with recent and accurate literature data. PMID:19283277

  5. The abundances of neon, sulfur, and argon in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. C.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Aller, L. H.; Geballe, T. R.; Baas, F.

    1981-01-01

    New infrared observations of Ne II, Ar III, and S IV are used in optical observations of other ionization states of the considered elements to evaluate the abundances of neon, argon, and sulfur in 18 planetary nebulae. Attention is also given to one or more of the infrared lines in 18 other nebulae. It is pointed out that S IV was detected in approximately 90% of the observed objects, while Ar III was found in about 80%, and Ne II in roughly one-third. It is noted that optical observations typically include only a limited region of the nebula, while the infrared measurements frequently involve integration over the entire nebular image.

  6. Noble gases in diamonds - Occurrences of solarlike helium and neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Reynolds, J. H.; Roedder, E.; Epstein, S.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen diamond samples from diverse locations were analyzed for the contents of He, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and of their isotopes, using a Reynolds (1956) type glass mass spectrometer. The results disclosed a large spread in the He-3/He-4 ratios, ranging from values below atmospheric to close to the solar ratio. In particular, solarlike He-3/He-4 ratios were seen for an Australian colorless diamond composite and an Arkansas diamond, which also displayed solarlike neon isotopic ratios. Wide variation was also observed in the He-4/Ar-40 ratios, suggesting a complex history for the source regions and the diamond crystallization processes.

  7. Expected intensities of solar neon-like ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the expected intensities of the stronger solar neon-like ion emission lines, some not yet observed, is carried out to compare with the observational situation. The potential usefulness of the 2p5 3s(3P2) - 2p6 forbidden line as a density diagnostic is discussed, and new electric quadrupole lines in the soft X-ray range are noted. 'Observability diagrams' are presented as a convenient overview of the known and unobserved lines. The S VII resonance lines appear to have anomalous intensities.

  8. Optimizing Sampling Efficiency for Biomass Estimation Across NEON Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abercrombie, H. H.; Meier, C. L.; Spencer, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the course of 30 years, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will measure plant biomass and productivity across the U.S. to enable an understanding of terrestrial carbon cycle responses to ecosystem change drivers. Over the next several years, prior to operational sampling at a site, NEON will complete construction and characterization phases during which a limited amount of sampling will be done at each site to inform sampling designs, and guide standardization of data collection across all sites. Sampling biomass in 60+ sites distributed among 20 different eco-climatic domains poses major logistical and budgetary challenges. Traditional biomass sampling methods such as clip harvesting and direct measurements of Leaf Area Index (LAI) involve collecting and processing plant samples, and are time and labor intensive. Possible alternatives include using indirect sampling methods for estimating LAI such as digital hemispherical photography (DHP) or using a LI-COR 2200 Plant Canopy Analyzer. These LAI estimations can then be used as a proxy for biomass. The biomass estimates calculated can then inform the clip harvest sampling design during NEON operations, optimizing both sample size and number so that standardized uncertainty limits can be achieved with a minimum amount of sampling effort. In 2011, LAI and clip harvest data were collected from co-located sampling points at the Central Plains Experimental Range located in northern Colorado, a short grass steppe ecosystem that is the NEON Domain 10 core site. LAI was measured with a LI-COR 2200 Plant Canopy Analyzer. The layout of the sampling design included four, 300 meter transects, with clip harvests plots spaced every 50m, and LAI sub-transects spaced every 10m. LAI was measured at four points along 6m sub-transects running perpendicular to the 300m transect. Clip harvest plots were co-located 4m from corresponding LAI transects, and had dimensions of 0.1m by 2m. We conducted regression analyses

  9. Multiply charged neon clusters: failure of the liquid drop model?

    PubMed

    Mähr, I; Zappa, F; Denifl, S; Kubala, D; Echt, O; Märk, T D; Scheier, P

    2007-01-12

    We have analyzed the stability and fission dynamics of multiply charged neon cluster ions. The critical sizes for the observation of long-lived ions are n2=284 and n3=656 for charge states 2 and 3, respectively, a factor 3 to 4 below the predictions of a previously successful liquid-drop model. The preferred fragment ions of fission reactions are surprisingly small (2

  10. Effect of neon plasma pre-irradiation on surface morphology and deuterium retention of tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P. A.; Ji, G.; Zhou, H. B.; Wang, B.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Lu, G. H.

    2015-08-01

    Neon and deuterium plasma irradiation of polycrystalline tungsten targets have been performed at high fluxes of ∼1024 ions m-2 s-1 to study the interaction of neon with tungsten and the influence of neon on deuterium retention. Tungsten exposure to neon plasma leads to the formation of wavy nanostructures on the surface. Subsequent exposure to high-flux deuterium plasma leads to blister formation of micrometer size on top of the wavy structures. The total deuterium retention is decreased by neon pre-irradiation for all surface temperatures used in the present experiments. It is suggested that a barrier of trapped Ne is formed that interrupts the D transport and reduces D retention.

  11. Atomistic simulations of tungsten surface evolution under low-energy neon implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, Marie; Hammond, Karl D.; Sefta, Faiza; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten is a candidate material for the divertor of fusion reactors, where it will be subject to a high flux of particles coming from the fusion plasma as well as a significant heat load. Under helium plasma exposure in fusion-reactor-like conditions, a nanostructured morphology is known to form on the tungsten surface in certain temperature and incident energy ranges, although the formation mechanism is not fully established. A recent experimental study (Yajima et al 2013 Plasma Sci. Technol. 15 282-6) using neon or argon exposure did not produce similar nanostructure. This article presents molecular dynamics simulations of neon implantation in tungsten aimed at investigating the surface evolution and elucidating the role of noble gas mass in fuzz formation. In contrast to helium, neon impacts can sputter both tungsten and previously implanted neon atoms. The shorter range of neon ions, along with sputtering, limit the formation of large bubbles and likely prevents nanostructure formation.

  12. ESTIMATION OF THE NEON/OXYGEN ABUNDANCE RATIO AT THE HELIOSPHERIC TERMINATION SHOCK AND IN THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FROM IBEX OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bochsler, P.; Petersen, L.; Moebius, E.; Schwadron, N. A.; Wurz, P.; Scheer, J. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.; Bzowski, M.; Frisch, P. C.

    2012-02-01

    We report the first direct measurement of the Ne/O abundance ratio of the interstellar neutral gas flowing into the inner heliosphere. From the first year of Interstellar Boundary Explorer IBEX data collected in spring 2009, we derive the fluxes of interstellar neutral oxygen and neon. Using the flux ratio at the location of IBEX at 1 AU at the time of the observations, and using the ionization rates of neon and oxygen prevailing in the heliosphere during the period of solar minimum, we estimate the neon/oxygen ratios at the heliospheric termination shock and in the gas phase of the inflowing local interstellar medium. Our estimate is (Ne/O){sub gas,ISM} = 0.27 {+-} 0.10, which is-within the large given uncertainties-consistent with earlier measurements from pickup ions. Our value is larger than the solar abundance ratio, possibly indicating that a significant fraction of oxygen in the local interstellar medium is hidden in grains and/or ices.

  13. Neon Isotope Fractionation in Ice Cores at Close-Off Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Analyzing trapped air bubbles in glacial ice is a well-established and useful method to reconstruct past atmospheric gas concentrations. However, trapped gas composition can be affected by fractionation during the closure of the air bubbles, complicating the reconstruction. Gases such as dioxygen (O2) and dihydrogen (H2) are known to leak out of the bubbles by permeation through the ice lattice at the close-off depth,where firn turns into ice. This process also can cause isotope fractionation, which obscures the past atmospheric isotope ratios in air bubbles in glacial ice. In order to establish the most accurate measurements of past atmospheric content, we need very detailed understanding of the permeation leakage mechanism in order to establish possible corrections. In this study, we propose the use of neon stable isotopes (neon-22 and neon-20) to place constraints on the mechanism of permeation leakage. Neon isotopes are an ideal system to explore because neon has a constant atmospheric isotope ratio, and thus only is affected by close-off fractionation. Neon permeation occurs via velocity-dependent hopping between sites within the ice lattice, because the neon atom is smaller than the critical size (3.6 Å) of the opening in the lattice. Theory predicts that neon isotope fractionation will occur due to the lower velocity of the heavier isotope, but this has never been experimentally verified and the theory is unable to quantitatively predict the magnitude of the fractionation. We will present the first results of high-precision neon isotope (22Ne/20Ne) measurements made in air pumped from the firm-to-ice transition in the Greenland Ice Sheet, where actively closing air bubbles drive permeation leakage. By measuring this natural neon isotope fractionation, we hope to learn about the mass dependence of the leakage mechanism and develop a more quantitative theory that is generalizable to biogeochemically- and climatically-active gases.

  14. Production rates of neon xenon isotopes by energetic neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leich, D. A.; Borg, R. J.; Lanier, V. B.

    1986-01-01

    As a first step in an experimental program to study the behavior of noble gases produced in situ in minerals, a suite of minerals and pure chemicals were irradiated with 14.5 MeV neutrons at LLNL's Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-II) and production rates for noble gases were determined. While neutron effects in meteorites and lunar samples are dominated by low-energy neutron capture, more energetic cosmic-ray secondary neutrons can provide significant depth-dependent contributions to production of cosmogenic nuclides through endothermic reactions such as (n,2n), (n,np), (n,d) and (n,alpha). Production rates for nuclides produced by cosmic-ray secondary neutrons are therefore useful in interpreting shielding histories from the relative abundances of cosmogenic nuclides. Absolute production cross sections were calculated from isotope dilution analyses of NaCl, Mg, CsCl, and Ba(NO3)2 samples, assuming purity, stoichiometry, and quantitative noble gas retention and extraction. Relative production cross sections determined from neon isotopic ratios in the mineral samples were also considered in evaluating the neon production cross sections. Results are presented.

  15. Population dynamics in a metastable neon magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, R. D.; Calvert, J. E.; Sang, R. T.

    2013-02-01

    We observe the population dynamics within a metastable neon magneto-optical trap (MOT) through the measurement of the average squared Clebsch-Gordan coefficient C2 over a range of laser detunings. The magnitude of C2 is dependent on the internal quantum state of an atom interacting with the light field and is found to show a strong dependence on the applied laser detuning. Previously it has been reported [Townsend , Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.52.1423 52, 1423 (1995)] that trapped atoms in a MOT are pumped towards the states that interact most strongly with the local field and therefore the measured value of C2 is larger than the average over all possible transitions. For the 3P2-to-3D3 cooling transition in metastable neon the average C2 value is equal to 0.46; however, we have measured 0.29±0.03

  16. Helium-neon laser treatment transforms fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Pourreau-Schneider, N.; Ahmed, A.; Soudry, M.; Jacquemier, J.; Kopp, F.; Franquin, J. C.; Martin, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    The differentiation of myofibroblastic cells from normal human gingival fibroblasts in vitro has been established by transmission electron microscopy and quantitated by immunohistochemistry, using antigelsolin monoclonal antibodies. Untreated control cultures were compared to cultures exposed to Helium-Neon (He-Ne) laser irradiation. A direct and massive transformation of the cultured fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was observed as early as 24 hours after laser treatment, whereas control cultures were comprised of only resting fibroblasts and active fibroblasts. This in vitro induction of myofibroblasts may be analogous to that which occurs in vivo. Therefore we undertook a similar study using biopsies from gingival tissues after wisdom tooth extraction. Myofibroblasts were present in the connective tissue of laser-treated gums 48 hours after irradiation, but not in untreated contralateral control tissues. These data provide evidence that the primary biologic effect of the Helium-Neon laser on connective tissue is the rapid generation of myofibroblasts from fibroblasts. The induction of a phenotype with contractile properties may have clinical significance in the acceleration of the wound-healing process. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2372040

  17. An accurate model potential for alkali neon systems.

    PubMed

    Zanuttini, D; Jacquet, E; Giglio, E; Douady, J; Gervais, B

    2009-12-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the ground and lowest excited states of M-Ne dimers, for M=Li, Na, and K. We show that the potential energy curves of these Van der Waals dimers can be obtained accurately by considering the alkali neon systems as one-electron systems. Following previous authors, the model describes the evolution of the alkali valence electron in the combined potentials of the alkali and neon cores by means of core polarization pseudopotentials. The key parameter for an accurate model is the M(+)-Ne potential energy curve, which was obtained by means of ab initio CCSD(T) calculation using a large basis set. For each MNe dimer, a systematic comparison with ab initio computation of the potential energy curve for the X, A, and B states shows the remarkable accuracy of the model. The vibrational analysis and the comparison with existing experimental data strengthens this conclusion and allows for a precise assignment of the vibrational levels. PMID:19968334

  18. Electron Scattering from Neon Via Effective Range Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedus, Kamil

    2014-12-01

    Elastic cross-sections for electron scattering on neon from 0 energy up to 16 eV are analyzed by an analytical approach to the modified effective range theory (MERT). It is shown that energy and angular variations of elastic differential, integral and momentum transfer cross-sections can be accurately parameterized by six MERT coefficients up to the energy threshold for the first Feshbach resonance. MERT parameters are determined empirically by numerical comparison with large collection of available experimental data of elastic total (integral) cross-sections. The present analysis is validated against numerous electron beams and swarm experiments. The comparison of derived MERT parameters with those found for other noble gases, helium, argon and krypton, is done. The derived scattering length (for the s-partial wave) in neon, 0.227 a 0, agrees well with recent theories; it is small but, differently from Ar and Kr, still positive. Analogue parameters for the p-wave and the d-wave are negative and positive respectively for all the four gases compared.

  19. Infrared spectra of small molecular ions trapped in solid neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacox, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-22

    The infrared spectrum of a molecular ion provides a unique signature for that species, gives information on its structure, and is amenable to remote sensing. It also serves as a comparison standard for refining ab initio calculations. Experiments in this laboratory trap molecular ions in dilute solid solution in neon at 4.2 K in sufficient concentration for observation of their infrared spectra between 450 and 4000 cm{sup !1}. Discharge-excited neon atoms produce cations by photoionization and/or Penning ionization of the parent molecule. The resulting electrons are captured by other molecules, yielding anions which provide for overall charge neutrality of the deposit. Recent observations of ions produced from C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and BF{sub 3} will be discussed. Because of their relatively large possibility of having low-lying excited electronic states, small, symmetric molecular cations are especially vulnerable to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Some phenomena which can result from this breakdown will be discussed. Ion-molecule reaction rates are sufficiently high that in some systems absorptions of dimer cations and anions are also observed. When H{sub 2} is introduced into the system, the initially-formed ion may react with it. Among the species resulting from such ion-molecule reactions that have recently been studied are O{sub 4}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, HOCO{sup +}, and HCO{sub 2}{sup !}.

  20. Infrared spectra of small molecular ions trapped in solid neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacox, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    The infrared spectrum of a molecular ion provides a unique signature for that species, gives information on its structure, and is amenable to remote sensing. It also serves as a comparison standard for refining ab initio calculations. Experiments in this laboratory trap molecular ions in dilute solid solution in neon at 4.2 K in sufficient concentration for observation of their infrared spectra between 450 and 4000 cm!1. Discharge-excited neon atoms produce cations by photoionization and/or Penning ionization of the parent molecule. The resulting electrons are captured by other molecules, yielding anions which provide for overall charge neutrality of the deposit. Recent observations of ions produced from C2H4 and BF3 will be discussed. Because of their relatively large possibility of having low-lying excited electronic states, small, symmetric molecular cations are especially vulnerable to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Some phenomena which can result from this breakdown will be discussed. Ion-molecule reaction rates are sufficiently high that in some systems absorptions of dimer cations and anions are also observed. When H2 is introduced into the system, the initially-formed ion may react with it. Among the species resulting from such ion-molecule reactions that have recently been studied are O4+, NH4+, HOCO+, and HCO2!.

  1. NEON: Transforming Environmental Data into Free, Open Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, B.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect data across the United States on the impacts of climate change, land use change and invasive species on natural resources and biodiversity. NEON is a project of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), with many other U.S. agencies and NGOs cooperating. The Observatory’s construction plans call for 60 sites distributed across 20 ecoclimatic Domains. Data will be collected from strategically selected sites within each Domain and synthesized into information products that can be used to describe changes in the nation’s ecosystem through space and time. Sites are arrayed across different land-use types in order to understand large-scale environmental drivers affect biodiversity, ecohydrology, biogeochemistry, and disease ecology across the US continent. NEON is an instrument that listens to the pulse of the US continental ecosystem: infrastructure deployed at these sites will collect an average of over 500 primary measurements at each site, including annual high-resolution airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral data. These primary measurements will be transformed by a state-of-the-art cyberinfrastruture into over 100 higher-order data products. All measurements, data products, algorithms used to compute the data products, and protocols used to collect the primary measurements will be freely available to the public and assessable over the internet. The information products, including selected socio-economic datasets from cooperating Federal agencies, will be served in standard formats, grid-sizes, and geographical projections. This type of information is anticipated to have a wide range of uses, including ecological forecasting, education, public engagement, socio-economic analyses, decision support for climate-change adaptation and mitigation, resource management, and environmental risk management. Open data, interoperability, an open and integrated observation infrastructure, public engagement, and a

  2. NEON, Establishing a Standardized Network for Groundwater Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, M.; Schroeter, N.; Goodman, K. J.; Roehm, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is establishing a standardized set of data collection systems comprised of in-situ sensors and observational sampling to obtain data fundamental to the analysis of environmental change at a continental scale. NEON will be collecting aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric data using Observatory-wide standardized designs and methods via a systems engineering approach. This approach ensures a wealth of high quality data, data algorithms, and models that will be freely accessible to all communities such as academic researchers, policy makers, and the general public. The project is established to provide 30 years of data which will enable prediction and forecasting of drivers and responses of ecological change at scales ranging from localized responses through regional gradients and up to the continental scale. The Observatory is a distributed system of sites spread across the United States, including Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, which is subdivided into 20 statistically unique domains, based on a set of 18 ecologically important parameters. Each domain contains at least one core aquatic and terrestrial site which are located in unmanaged lands, and up to 2 additional sites selected to study domain specific questions such as nitrogen deposition gradients and responses of land use change activities on the ecosystem. Here, we present the development of NEON's groundwater observation well network design and the timing strategy for sampling groundwater chemistry. Shallow well networks, up to 100 feet in depth, will be installed at NEON aquatic sites and will allow for observation of localized ecohydrologic site conditions, by providing basic spatio-temporal near-real time data on groundwater parameters (level, temperature, conductivity) collected from in situ high-resolution instrumentation positioned in each well; and biannual sampling of geochemical and nutrient (N and P) concentrations in a subset of wells for each

  3. Predicting helium and neon adsorption and separation on carbon nanotubes by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Bolboli Nojini, Zabiollah; Abbas Rafati, Amir; Majid Hashemianzadeh, Seyed; Samiee, Sepideh

    2011-04-01

    The adsorption of helium and neon mixtures on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was investigated at various temperatures (subcritical and supercritical) and pressures using canonical Monte Carlo (CMC) simulation. Adsorption isotherms were obtained at different temperatures (4, 40, 77 and 130 K) and pressures ranging from 1 to 16 MPa. Separation factors and isosteric enthalpies of adsorption were also calculated. Moreover, the adsorption isotherms were obtained at constant specific temperatures (4 and 40 K) and pressures (0.2 and 1.0 MPa) as a function of the amount adsorbed. All of the adsorption isotherms for an equimolar mixture of helium and neon have a Langmuir shape, indicating that no capillary condensation occurs. Both the helium and the neon adsorption isotherms exhibit similar behavior, and slightly more of the helium and neon mixture is adsorbed on the inner surfaces of the SWCNTs than on their outer surfaces. More neon is adsorbed than helium within the specified pressure range. The data obtained show that the isosteric enthalpies for the adsorption of neon are higher than those for helium under the same conditions, which means that adsorption of neon preferentially occurs by (15, 15) SWCNTs. Furthermore, the isosteric enthalpies of adsorption of both gases decrease with increasing temperature. PMID:20559855

  4. Triple-Point Temperature and the Isotopic Composition of Three Commercial Neon Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, I.; Gam, K. S.; Joung, W.; Kim, Y.-G.

    2015-08-01

    The triple-point temperature of neon, , is known to have dependence on the isotopic composition. Recently, the Technical Annex for the International Temperature Scale of 1990 was updated to specify the method of correction for the isotopic reference ratio of neon. In this study, to confirm this correction in the Technical Annex independently, the effects of the isotopic composition of neon on for three commercial neon gas sources were studied. For the measurement of the isotopic composition, a gas mass spectrometer was used to compare the sample gases with a reference neon gas whose isotopic composition was known with high precision by a gravimetric method. For the measurement of , an open-cell type cryostat for the realization of low-temperature fixed points was used. The physical cell and the thermal environment around it remained very similar for all measurements with the neon gases due to the nature of the open-cell type system. Therefore, the difference in among different samples could be measured with a relatively low uncertainty, canceling many systematic effects that are common to all measurements. Our result was consistent with the correction in the Technical Annex. Furthermore, because one of the commercial neon gases was the bottle that was used for KRISS measurements in the international comparison CCT-K2, it is now possible to correct the measurement for the reference isotopic ratio and compare it with other measurements for which isotopic composition data are available.

  5. Mechanism of the tunable structural color of neon tetra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Shinya

    2010-03-01

    Many examples of the structural color can be found in butterfly wings, beetle's elytra and bird feathers. Since the color-producing microstructures of these examples mainly consist of stable materials, for example, dried cuticles in insects and keratin and melanin granules in bird feathers, it is impossible to actively change the microstructure. On the other hand, some fish have the tunability in their structural colors. For example, a small tropical fish, neon tetra, has a longitudinal stripe that looks blue-green in the day time, while it changes into deep violet at night. This fact clearly indicates the variability in the microstructure. It is known that the iridophore of the stripe part of neon tetra contains two stacks of thin light-reflecting platelets that are made of guanine crystal. Since the arrangement of the platelets is observed periodic, the stack is thought to cause the structural color through the multilayer thin-film interference. Consequently, the variability in the color is thought to originate from the variation in the distance between the platelets. Two explanations have been proposed so far for the distance variation. Lythoge and Shand considered that the distance is controlled by osmotic pressure that induces the inflow of the water into the iridophore[1]. On the other hand, Nagaishi et al. proposed a different model, called Venetian blind model, in which the inclination angle of the platelets is varied, resulting in the change in the distance[2]. Recently, we have performed detailed optical measurements on the iridophore of neon tetra. We have paid particular attention to the direction of the reflected light, since the Venetian blind model expects that the direction varies with the color change owing to the tilt of the platelets. We present the experimental results and quantitatively discuss the validity of the Venetian blind model. [4pt] [1] J. N. Lythgoe, and J. Shand, J Physiol. 325, 23-34 (1982). [0pt] [2] H. Nagaishi, N. Oshima, and R

  6. Isotopic effects in the neon fixed point: uncertainty of the calibration data correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steur, Peter P. M.; Pavese, Franco; Fellmuth, Bernd; Hermier, Yves; Hill, Kenneth D.; Seog Kim, Jin; Lipinski, Leszek; Nagao, Keisuke; Nakano, Tohru; Peruzzi, Andrea; Sparasci, Fernando; Szmyrka-Grzebyk, Anna; Tamura, Osamu; Tew, Weston L.; Valkiers, Staf; van Geel, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The neon triple point is one of the defining fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). Although recognizing that natural neon is a mixture of isotopes, the ITS-90 definition only states that the neon should be of ‘natural isotopic composition’, without any further requirements. A preliminary study in 2005 indicated that most of the observed variability in the realized neon triple point temperatures within a range of about 0.5 mK can be attributed to the variability in isotopic composition among different samples of ‘natural’ neon. Based on the results of an International Project (EUROMET Project No. 770), the Consultative Committee for Thermometry decided to improve the realization of the neon fixed point by assigning the ITS-90 temperature value 24.5561 K to neon with the isotopic composition recommended by IUPAC, accompanied by a quadratic equation to take the deviations from the reference composition into account. In this paper, the uncertainties of the equation are discussed and an uncertainty budget is presented. The resulting standard uncertainty due to the isotopic effect (k = 1) after correction of the calibration data is reduced to (4 to 40) μK when using neon of ‘natural’ isotopic composition or to 30 μK when using 20Ne. For comparison, an uncertainty component of 0.15 mK should be included in the uncertainty budget for the neon triple point if the isotopic composition is unknown, i.e. whenever the correction cannot be applied.

  7. Imaging of the structure of the argon and neon dimer, trimer, and tetramer.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, B; Vredenborg, A; Malakzadeh, A; Schmidt, L Ph H; Havermeier, T; Meckel, M; Cole, K; Smolarski, M; Chang, Z; Jahnke, T; Dörner, R

    2011-06-30

    We Coulomb explode argon and neon dimers, trimers, and tetramers by multiple ionization in an ultrashort 800 nm laser pulse. By measuring all momentum vectors of the singly charged ions in coincidence, we determine the ground state nuclear wave function of the dimer, trimer, and tetramer. Furthermore we retrieve the bond angles of the trimer in position space by applying a classical numerical simulation. For the argon and neon trimer, we find a structure close to the equilateral triangle. The width of the distribution around the equilateral triangle is considerably wider for neon than for argon. PMID:21413773

  8. The infrared spectrum of HOOH+ trapped in solid neon.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Warren E; Lugez, Catherine L; Jacox, Marilyn E

    2012-10-14

    When a Ne:H(2)O(2) mixture is codeposited at 4.3 K with a beam of neon atoms that have been excited in a microwave discharge, three new, photosensitive absorptions appear which can be assigned to the three infrared-active vibrational fundamentals of trans-HOOH(+). When the Ne:H(2)O(2) deposition system is pretreated with the vapors of D(2)O, the product absorptions include new peaks which can be attributed to vibrational fundamentals of trans-HOOD(+) and trans-DOOD(+). Density functional calculations of the vibrational fundamentals of the three hydrogen peroxide cation isotopologues support the proposed assignments. Broad, photosensitive product absorptions also appear near the positions of vibrational transitions of O(3)(-), and may be contributed by a weakly bound complex of that species with H(2)O. PMID:23061846

  9. Helium and neon abundances and compositions in cometary matter.

    PubMed

    Marty, Bernard; Palma, Russell L; Pepin, Robert O; Zimmermann, Laurent; Schlutter, Dennis J; Burnard, Peter G; Westphal, Andrew J; Snead, Christopher J; Bajt, Sasa; Becker, Richard H; Simones, Jacob E

    2008-01-01

    Materials trapped and preserved in comets date from the earliest history of the solar system. Particles captured by the Stardust spacecraft from comet 81P/Wild 2 are indisputable cometary matter available for laboratory study. Here we report measurements of noble gases in Stardust material. Neon isotope ratios are within the range observed in "phase Q," a ubiquitous, primitive organic carrier of noble gases in meteorites. Helium displays 3He/4He ratios twice those in phase Q and in Jupiter's atmosphere. Abundances per gram are surprisingly large, suggesting implantation by ion irradiation. The gases are probably carried in high-temperature igneous grains similar to particles found in other Stardust studies. Collectively, the evidence points to gas acquisition in a hot, high ion-flux nebular environment close to the young Sun. PMID:18174437

  10. Attainable superheat of argon-helium, argon-neon solutions.

    PubMed

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Kaverin, Aleksey M; Andbaeva, Valentina N

    2008-10-16

    The method of lifetime measurement has been used to investigate the kinetics of spontaneous boiling-up of superheated argon-helium and argon-neon solutions. Experiments were made at a pressure of p = 1.5 MPa and concentrations up to 0.33 mol% in the range of nucleation rates from 10 (4) to 10 (8) s (-1) m (-3). The homogeneous nucleation regime has been distinguished. With good agreement between experimental data and homogeneous nucleation theory in temperature and concentration dependences of the nucleation rate, a systematic underestimation by 0.25-0.34 K has been revealed in superheat temperatures over the saturated line attained by experiment as compared with theoretical values calculated in a macroscopic approximation. The revealed disagreement between theory and experiment is connected with the dependence of the properties of new-phase nuclei on their size. PMID:18798666

  11. Water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.; Frederick, E. B.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents the water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system. The results of initial base-line field test results of NASA airborne oceanographic lidar in the bathymetry mode are given, with water-truth measurements of depth and beam attenuation coefficients by boat taken at the same time as overflights to aid in determining the system's operational performance. The nadir-angle tests and field-of-view data are presented; this laser bathymetry system is an improvement over prior models in that (1) the surface-to-bottom pulse waveform is digitally recorded on magnetic tape, and (2) wide-swath mapping data may be routinely acquired using a 30 deg full-angle conical scanner.

  12. Microscopic Self-consistent Study of Neon Halos with Resonant Contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shisheng; Smith, Michael Scott; Kang, Zhong-Shu; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Recent reaction measurements have been interpreted as evidence of a halo structure in the exotic neutron-rich isotopes 29,31Ne. While theoretical studies of 31Ne generally agree on its halo nature, they differ significantly in their predictions of its properties and underlying cause (e.g., that 31Ne lies in an "island of inversion'"). We have made a systematic theoretical analysis of possible Neon halo signatures -- the first using a fully microscopic, relativistic mean field approach that properly treats positive energy orbitals (such as the valence neutron in 31Ne) self-consistently with bound levels, and that includes the pairing effect that keeps the nucleus loosely bound with negative Fermi energy. Our model is the analytical continuation of the coupling constant (ACCC) method based on a relativistic mean field (RMF) theory with Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) pairing approximation. We calculate neutron- and matter-radii, one-neutron separation energies, p- and f-orbital energies and occupation probabilities, and neutron densities for single-particle resonant orbitals in 27-31Ne. We analyze these results for evidence of neutron halo formation in 29,31Ne. Our model predicts a p-orbit 1n halo structure for 31Ne, based on a radius increase from 30Ne that is 7 - 8 times larger than the increase from 29Ne to 30Ne, as well as a decrease in the neutron separation energy by a factor of ~ 10 compared to that of 27-30Ne. In contrast to other studies, our inclusion of resonances yields an inverted ordering of p and f orbitals for small deformations. Furthermore, we find no evidence of an s-orbit 1n halo in 29Ne as recently claimed in the literature.

  13. Microscopic self-consistent study of neon halos with resonant contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Sheng; Smith, Michael S.; Kang, Zhong-Shu; Zhao, Jie

    2014-03-01

    Recent reaction measurements have been interpreted as evidence of a halo structure in the exotic neutron-rich isotopes 29,31Ne. While theoretical studies of 31Ne generally agree on its halo nature, they differ significantly in their predictions of its properties and underlying cause (e.g., that 31Ne has an inverted ordering of p-f orbitals). We have made a systematic theoretical analysis of possible Neon halo signatures - the first using a fully microscopic, relativistic mean field approach that properly treats positive energy orbitals (such as the valence neutron in 31Ne) self-consistently with bound levels, as well as the pairing effect that keeps the nucleus loosely bound with negative Fermi energy. Our model is the analytical continuation of the coupling constant (ACCC) method based on a relativistic mean field (RMF) theory with Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) pairing approximation. We calculate neutron- and matter-radii, one-neutron separation energies, p- and f-orbital energies and occupation probabilities, and neutron densities for single-particle resonant orbitals in 27-31Ne. We analyze these results for evidence of neutron halo formation in 29,31Ne. Our model predicts a p-orbit 1n halo structure for 31Ne, based on a radius increase from 30Ne that is 7-8 times larger than the increase from 29Ne to 30Ne, as well as a decrease in the neutron separation energy by a factor of ∼10 compared to that of 27-30Ne. In contrast to some other studies, our inclusion of resonances yields an inverted ordering of p and f orbitals for spherical and slightly deformed nuclei. Furthermore, we find no evidence of an s-orbit 1n halo in 29Ne as recently claimed in the literature.

  14. Neon as a Buffer Gas for a Mercury-Ion Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2008-01-01

    A developmental miniature mercury-ion clock has stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling components are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein a getter pump is used to maintain the partial vacuum, and the evacuated tube is backfilled with mercury vapor in a buffer gas. Neon was determined to be the best choice for the buffer gas: The pressure-induced frequency pulling by neon was found to be only about two-fifths of that of helium. Furthermore, because neon diffuses through solids much more slowly than does helium, the operational lifetime of a tube backfilled with neon could be considerably longer than that of a tube backfilled with helium.

  15. Equation of state of dense neon and krypton plasmas in the partial ionization regime

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q. F. Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, Z. G.

    2015-12-15

    The compression behaviors of dense neon and krypton plasmas over a wide pressure-temperature range are investigated by self-consistent fluid variational theory. The ionization degree and equation of state of dense neon and krypton are calculated in the density-temperature range of 0.01–10 g/cm{sup 3} and 4–50 kK. A region of thermodynamic instability is found which is related to the plasma phase transition. The calculated shock adiabat and principal Hugoniot of liquid krypton are in good agreement with available experimental data. The predicted results of shock-compressed liquid neon are presented, which provide a guide for dynamical experiments or numerical first-principle calculations aimed at studying the compression properties of liquid neon in the partial ionization regime.

  16. Experimental separation of virtual photon exchange and electron transfer in interatomic coulombic decay of neon dimers.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, T; Czasch, A; Schöffler, M; Schössler, S; Käsz, M; Titze, J; Kreidi, K; Grisenti, R E; Staudte, A; Jagutzki, O; Schmidt, L Ph H; Weber, Th; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Ueda, K; Dörner, R

    2007-10-12

    We investigate the interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) of neon dimers following photoionization with simultaneous excitation of the ionized atom (shakeup) in a multiparticle coincidence experiment. We find that, depending on the parity of the excited state, which determines whether ICD takes place via virtual dipole photon emission or overlap of the wave functions, the decay happens at different internuclear distances, illustrating that nuclear dynamics heavily influence the electronic decay in the neon dimer. PMID:17995162

  17. Quantum dynamical structure factor of liquid neon via a quasiclassical symmetrized method.

    PubMed

    Monteferrante, Michele; Bonella, Sara; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    We apply the phase integration method for quasiclassical quantum time correlation functions [M. Monteferrante, S. Bonella, and G. Ciccotti, Mol. Phys. 109, 3015 (2011)] to compute the dynamic structure factor of liquid neon. So far the method had been tested only on model systems. By comparing our results for neon with experiments and previous calculations, we demonstrate that the scheme is accurate and efficient also for a realistic model of a condensed phase system showing quantum behavior. PMID:23406109

  18. The origin of the neon isotopes in chondrites and on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Manuel; Charnoz, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the origin of the neon isotopic signatures in chondrites and in the terrestrial mantle. There are two primary possible origins for neon in the Earth's mantle. One origin is the dissolution of a dense primordial atmosphere with a solar composition of 20Ne/22Ne >13.4 into the mantle in a possible magma ocean stage during Earth's accretion. The second origin, developed in this study, is that mantle neon was already in Earth's parent bodies because of refractory grain irradiation by solar wind. We propose that solar wind implantation occurred early on dust within the accretion disk to allow such irradiation. Because solar wind implantation fractionates neon isotopes, the heavier isotopes are implanted deeper than the lighter ones because of different kinetic energies, and the process of implantation, if coupled with sputtering, leads to a steady state neon isotopic ratio (20Ne/22Ne ∼12.7) that is similar to what is observed in mantle-derived rocks (12.5-12.9), lunar soil grains (∼12.9) and certain gas-rich chondrites from all classes (enstatite, ordinary, rumuruti). Using a dust transport model in a turbulent and irradiated solar nebula, we estimated the equivalent irradiation age of a population of dust particles at three different distances from the sun (0.8, 1, 1.2 AU) and converted these ages into neon concentrations and isotopic ratios. The dust subsequently coagulated to form Earth's parent bodies, which have the mean neon isotopic composition of the irradiated dust (non-irradiated dust is assumed to be free of neon). If this scenario of solar wind implantation coupled with sputtering in the precursors of Earth's parent bodies is correct, it offers a simple alternative to the model of solar nebula gas incorporation by dissolution in a magma ocean.

  19. Emission anomalous optical magnetic resonances in a mixture of even neon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Saprykin, E. G.; Sorokin, V. A. Shalagin, A. M.

    2013-04-15

    Unusual resonances have been detected in the dependence of the discharge glow in neon on the longitudinal magnetic field. The resonances appear in fairly high magnetic fields and are observed only at low gas pressures and exclusively in a mixture of {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne isotopes. This phenomenon is an evidence of collective resonant radiation processes involving atoms of different neon isotopes.

  20. [The effect of helium-neon laser radiation on the energy metabolic indices of the myocardium].

    PubMed

    Chizhov, G K; Koval'skaia, N I; Kozlov, V I

    1991-03-01

    It was shown in experiments on white rats, that intravenous and direct myocardium helium-neon laser irradiation leads to the some activation of lactate, glucose-6-phosphate, succinate and reduced NAD degydrogenases. During direct myocardium irradiation these changes are in a less degree. It is suggested that helium-neon laser irradiation displays some active influence on the energy metabolism enzymes of the myocardium, and the mechanisms of this action are discussed. PMID:2054512

  1. Quantum dynamical structure factor of liquid neon via a quasiclassical symmetrized method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteferrante, Michele; Bonella, Sara; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    We apply the phase integration method for quasiclassical quantum time correlation functions [M. Monteferrante, S. Bonella, and G. Ciccotti, Mol. Phys. 109, 3015 (2011), 10.1080/00268976.2011.619506] to compute the dynamic structure factor of liquid neon. So far the method had been tested only on model systems. By comparing our results for neon with experiments and previous calculations, we demonstrate that the scheme is accurate and efficient also for a realistic model of a condensed phase system showing quantum behavior.

  2. Laser optogalvanic wavelength calibration with a commercial hollow cathode iron - neon discharge lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Xinming; Nur, Abdullahi H.; Misra, Prabhakar

    1994-01-01

    351 optogalvanic transitions have been observed in the 337 - 598 nm wavelength region using an iron - neon hollow cathode discharge lamp and a pulsed tunable dye laser. 223 of these have been identified as transitions associated with neon energy levels. These optogalvanic transitions have allowed, in conjunction with interference fringes recorded concomitantly with an etalon, the calibration of the dye laser wavelength with 0.3/cm accuracy.

  3. A comparison of neon versus helium ion beam induced deposition via Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Smith, Daryl A; Rack, Philip D

    2013-03-22

    The ion beam induced nanoscale synthesis of PtCx (where x ∼ 5) using the trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum(IV) (MeCpPt(IV)Me3) precursor is investigated by performing Monte Carlo simulations of helium and neon ions. The helium beam leads to more lateral growth relative to the neon beam because of its larger interaction volume. The lateral growth of the nanopillars is dominated by molecules deposited via secondary electrons in both the simulations. Notably, the helium pillars are dominated by SE-I electrons whereas the neon pillars are dominated by SE-II electrons. Using a low precursor residence time of 70 μs, resulting in an equilibrium coverage of ∼4%, the neon simulation has a lower deposition efficiency (3.5%) compared to that of the helium simulation (6.5%). At larger residence time (10 ms) and consequently larger equilibrium coverage (85%) the deposition efficiencies of helium and neon increased to 49% and 21%, respectively; which is dominated by increased lateral growth rates leading to broader pillars. The nanoscale growth is further studied by varying the ion beam diameter at 10 ms precursor residence time. The study shows that total SE yield decreases with increasing beam diameters for both the ion types. However, helium has the larger SE yield as compared to that of neon in both the low and high precursor residence time, and thus pillars are wider in all the simulations studied. PMID:23449368

  4. Development of a Neon Cryogenic Turbo-Expander with Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, H.; Hirokawa, M.; Yoshida, S.; Kamioka, Y.; Takaike, A.; Hayashi, H.; Okamoto, H.; Shiohara, Y.

    2010-04-01

    A cryogenic turbo-expander with active magnetic bearings was made and tested in a reverse-Brayton cycle refrigerator using neon as working fluid. Turbine isentropic efficiency is a very important factor for the refrigerator since it affects the performance of the refrigerator significantly. Properties of neon are suitable for the working fluid in a refrigerator to cool HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) applications. The neon refrigerator needs a very small and high speed turbo-expander. But there are few studies of isentropic efficiencies of cryogenic turbo-expander using neon gas. Thus the experiment to get the design information was carried out. A prototype of neon refrigerator was made for HTS applications in 2007. Its cooling power was 2 kW at temperature of 70 K and operated in process pressure between 2 MPa and 1 MPa. To improve the performance of the neon refrigerator, the process pressure was changed to 1 MPa˜0.5 MPa. Under this process pressure, isentropic efficiencies for two types of turbine impellers were obtained. The test results were included in to the turbine design program so that we could predict the isentropic efficiencies of the turbo-expander more accurately. Details of the turbo-expander design and test results are described in this report.

  5. Helium-neon laser therapy in the treatment of hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure: A superior option

    PubMed Central

    XU, QI-HUA; ZHAO, CHEN; ZHU, JIAN-GANG; CHEN, MEI-JUAN; LIU, QING-HUAI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of helium-neon laser therapy in the treatment of hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure and compare the results with those of a combined drugs and surgery regimen. A total of 70 patients with hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure in 70 eyes were randomly divided into two groups: Helium-neon laser therapy (group A) and drugs plus surgery (group B). Each group contained 35 patients. The healing rates and times of the conjunctival wound were recorded and compared following helium-neon laser treatment or the drugs plus surgery regimen. Changes in the hydroxyapatite orbital implant prior to and following helium-neon laser irradiation were analyzed. A similar animal study was conducted using 24 New Zealand white rabbits, which received orbital implants and were then received drug treatment or helium-neon therapy. In the human experiment, the rates for conjunctival wound healing were 97.14% in group A and 74.29% in group B, with a significant difference between the groups (χ2=5.71, P<0.05). Patients with mild exposure were healed after 7.22±2.11 days of helium-neon laser therapy and 14.33±3.20 days of drugs plus surgery. A statistically significant difference was found between the groups (t=8.97, P<0.05). Patients with moderate to severe exposure were healed after 18.19±2.12 days of helium-neon laser therapy and 31.25±4.21 days of drugs plus surgery. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (t=7.91, P<0.05). Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed that the helium-neon laser therapy significantly promoted vascularization of the hydroxyapatite orbital implant. These results, combined with pathological findings in animals, which showed that a helium-neon laser promoted vascularization and had anti-inflammatory effects, suggest that helium-neon laser irradiation is an effective method for treating hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure, thereby avoiding secondary surgery. PMID

  6. Effect of helium-neon laser on musculoskeletal trigger points

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder-Mackler, L.; Bork, C.; Bourbon, B.; Trumbore, D.

    1986-07-01

    Cold lasers have been proposed recently as a therapeutic tool for treating a wide variety of pathological conditions, including wounds, arthritis, orthopedic problems, and pain. These proposed therapeutic effects largely have been unsubstantiated by research. A randomized, double blind study was undertaken to ascertain the effect of a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser on the resistance of areas of skin overlying musculoskeletal trigger points. These areas usually demonstrate decreased skin resistance when compared with the surrounding tissue. Thirty patients with musculoskeletal trigger points were assigned randomly to either an experimental or a placebo group. In addition to standard physical therapy, each patient received three 15-second applications of a He-Ne laser or placebo stimulation from an identical unit that did not emit a laser. The results of a two-way analysis of covariance with one repeated measure showed a statistically significant increase (p less than .007) in skin resistance. This increase in an abnormal skin resistance pattern may accompany the resolution of pathological conditions.

  7. Quantum scattering of neon from a nanotextured surface.

    PubMed

    Levi, A C; Huang, C; Allison, W; Maclaren, D A

    2009-06-01

    Phonon exchange is the usual cause of decoherence in atom-surface scattering. By including quantum effects in the treatment of Debye-Waller scattering, we show that phonon exchange becomes ineffective when the relevant phonon frequencies are high. The result explains the surprising observation of strong elastic scattering of Ne from a Cu(100) surface nanotextured with a c(2 × 2) Li adsorbate structure. We extend a previous model to describe the phonon spectra by an Einstein oscillator component with an admixture of a Debye spectrum. The Einstein oscillator represents the dominant, high frequency vibration of the adsorbate, normal to the surface, while the Debye spectrum represents the substrate contribution. Neon scattering is so slow that exciting the adsorbate mode has a low probability and is impossible if the incident energy is below the threshold. Thus, adsorbate vibrations are averaged out. A theoretical discussion and calculation shows that under such circumstances the vibrations of a light adsorbate do not contribute to the Debye-Waller effect, with the result that Ne scattering at thermal energies is quantum mechanical and largely elastic, explaining the high reflectivity and the diffraction peaks observed experimentally. PMID:21715773

  8. Helium and neon in lunar ilmenites of different antiquities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Helium and neon were extracted from individual lunar ilmenite grains, approximately 100 micrometers in diameter, using a pulsed step-heating technique. Grains from lunar samples 71501 and 79035, believed to have been exposed to solar corpuscular radiation at greatly different times, were studied. The results found were consistent with the hypothesis that in addition to solar-wind-implanted gas, a second more deeply implanted component was present in both species of grains. Average isotopic ratios were determined giving equal weight to each of the particles. As found in depth studies employing chemical etching, both the He-3/He-4 and Ne-20/Ne-22 ratios were lower in the more deeply implanted gas than in the solar wind component. The He-3/He-4 ratio in the solar wind component of the more ancient grains was lower than that in the more recently exposed ones, whereas no difference was found for the more deeply embedded He. In the deeply embedded component of the ancient grains, the He-4/Ne-20 ratio was approx. 2x that found in the more recently exposed grains. In the shallowly implanted component, the ratio varied greatly from grain to grain, preventing comparison with the solar wind elemental composition.

  9. Interstellar oxygen, nitrogen and neon in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiss, J.; Gloeckler, G.; Mall, U.; Von Steiger, R.; Galvin, A. B.; Ogilvie, K. W.

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen, nitrogen and neon pick-up ions of interstellar origin were detected for the first time with the Solar Wind Ion Spectrometer (SWICS) on board Ulysses. The interstellar origin of these ions is established by the following criteria: (a) they are singly charged, (b) they have the broad velocity distributions characteristic of pick-up ions, with an upper limit of twice the solar wind speed, (c) their relative abundance as a function of distance from the sun corresponds to the theoretical expectation, and (d) there is no relation to a planetary or cometary source. The interstellar abundance ratios He(+)/O(+), N(+)/O(+), Ne(+)/O(+) were investigated. At approximately 5.25 AU in the outermost part of Ulysses' trajectory He(+)/O(+) = 175(sup +70 sub -50) N(+)/O(+) = 0.13(sup +0.05 sub -0.05) and Ne(+)/O(+) = 0.18(sup +0.10 sub -0.07) were determined. For the interstellar gas passing through the termination region and entering the heliosphere (He/O)(sub 0) = 290(sup +190 sub -100), (N/O)(sub 0) = 0.13(sup +0.06 sub -0.06) and (Ne/O)(sub 0) = 0.20(sup +0.12 sub -0.09) were obtained from the pick-up ion measurements. Upper limits for the relative abundances of C(+) and C were also determined.

  10. Strange particle production in neutrino-neon charged current interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Plano, R.; Baker, N.J.; Connolly, P.L.; Kahn, S.A.; Murtagh, M.J.; Palmer, R.B.; Samios, N.P.; Tanaka, M.; Baltay, C.; Bregman, M.

    1986-01-01

    Neutral strange particle production in charged-current muon-neutrino interactions have been studied in the Fermilab 15-foot neon bubble chamber. Associated production is expected to be the major source of strange particles in charged-current neutrino interactions. sigma-neutral and xi-minus production by neutrinos was observed. The dependence on various leptonic and hadronic variables is investigated. A fit to single and associated production of s, s/anti-s, and c quarks is described based on the number of single and double strange particle production events. Inclusive neutral strange particle decays (V/sup 0/) production rates as a fraction of all charged-current events are measured and are tabulated. The lambda/K ratio is found to be 0.39 +- 0.04 and the fraction of lambda coming from sigma-neutral is (16 +- 5)%. The single- and double V/sup 0/ production was used to determine the associated s anti-s production rate and single s-quark production rate. 13 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs. (LEW)

  11. Positron scattering and ionization of neon atoms — theoretical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harshit, N. Kothari; N. Joshipura, K.

    2010-10-01

    Although positron scattering with inert gas atoms has been studied in theory as well as in experiment, there are discrepancies. The present work reports all the major total cross sections of e+—neon scattering at incident energies above ionization threshold, originating from a complex potential formalism. Elastic and cumulative inelastic scatterings are treated in the complex spherical e+—atom potential. Our total inelastic cross section includes positronium formation together with ionization and excitation channels in Ne. Because of the Ps formation channel it is difficult to separate out ionization cross sections from the total inelastic cross sections. An approximate method similar to electron—atom scattering has been applied to bifurcate ionization and cumulative excitation cross sections at energies from threshold to 2000 eV. Comparisons of present results with available data are made. An important outcome of this work is the relative contribution of different scattering processes, which we have shown by a bar-chart at the ionization peak.

  12. Relativistic Effects in the Photoionization-Excitation of Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorczyca, T. W.; Felfli, Z.

    1998-05-01

    In a purely non-relativistic theoretical treatment of the neon 2p^43s(^2P) satellite, the angular distribution parameter and the ratio of populations of the ^2P_3/2 and ^2P_1/2 ionic fine structure levels are both independent of photon energy. Recent synchrotron measurements(A. A. Wills, N. Berrah, T. W. Gorczyca, B. Langer, Z. Felfli, M. Alsheri, O. Nayandin, and J. D. Bozek, unpublished) have observed marked deviation from this predicted behavior, however, indicating that spin-orbit effects are important. In order to study spin-orbit effects in this region of complex doubly-excited resonances, we have performed R-matrix calculations to determine MQDT scattering and dipole matrices. Important computational aspects are 1) an extensive configuration interaction (CI) for target and scattering wavefunctions, 2) a recoupling transformation from LS-coupled to JK-coupled matrices, 3) a second transformation using term coupling coefficients of the ionic targets, and 4) the MQDT reduction to physical scattering matrices using experimental fine structure target energies. The resultant differential cross sections, resolved into photoelectron angle and final ionic fine structure level, show many interesting deviations from the LS-predicted behavior, and are compared to the recent experimental results.^1

  13. Isotopes of cosmic ray elements from neon to nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, C. J.; Freier, P. S.; Fickle, R. K.; Brewster, N. R.

    1981-01-01

    Results obtained from a balloon exposure of a cosmic ray detector flown in 1977 are reported. The charge resolution ranged from 0.19 to 0.21 charge units between neon and nickel and the mass resolution for nuclei stopped in the emulsions ranged from 0.40 to 0.70 amu for A between 20 and 60 amu. This was enough to correctly identify almost all nuclei, but not to uniquely resolve neighboring mass peaks. Both Ne and Mg show evidence for neutron enrichment relative to the solar system abundance. Si and S are consistent with solar abundances, while Ar has no significant source abundances. P, Cl and K have essentially no primary component and the isotopic distribution observed is quite consistent with that expected from propagation. An excess of Ca-44 at the source is shown, indicating high metallicity in the source. The abundance of Fe-58 is nine percent or less, and Ni shows a one-to-one ratio for Ni-58 to 60, implying intermediate metallicity.

  14. The isotopes of neon in the galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Simpson, J. A.; Wefel, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines the results obtained by the University of Chicago instrument on board the IMP 7 satellite used to measure the abundances of Ne-20 and Ne-22 in the galactic cosmic rays during 1973-1977, over the general energy range of 60-230 MeV per nucleon. It is reported that the instrument shows a mass resolution of 0.7 amu(sigma) which was confirmed by calibrating a backup instrument at the LBL Bevalac with separated beams of neon isotopes. Through the use of standard solar modulation and cosmic-ray propagation models, the cosmic-ray source ratio inferred is Ne-22/Ne-20 = 0.38 = or -0.07 which is significantly greater than the present solar system ratio. It is concluded that propagation effects or cross-section uncertainties cannot account for such a large abundance of Ne-22, and thus this measurement provides evidence that the cosmic rays come from a source region where the Ne-22 abundance is substantially greater than in solar system material.

  15. Neon turbo-Brayton cycle refrigerator for HTS power machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Hirokazu; Hirokawa, M.; Yoshida, Shigeru; Nara, N.; Ozaki, S.; Hayashi, H.; Okamoto, H.; Shiohara, Y.

    2012-06-01

    We developed a prototype turbo-Brayton refrigerator whose working fluid is neon gas. The refrigerator is designed for a HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power transformer and its cooling power is more than 2 kW at 65 K. The refrigerator has a turboexpander and a turbo-compressor, which utilize magnetic bearings. These rotational machines have no rubbing parts and no oil-components. Those make a long maintenance interval of the refrigerator. The refrigerator is very compact because our newly developed turbo-compressor is volumetrically smaller than a displacement type compressor in same operating specification. Another feature of the refrigerator is a wide range operation capability for various heat-loads. Cooling power is controlled by the input-power of the turbo-compressor instead of the conventional method of using an electric heater. The rotational speed of the compressor motor is adjusted by an inverter. This system is expected to be more efficient. We show design details, specification and cooling test results of the new refrigerator in this paper.

  16. Development of a Domain Map for Nodes of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrove, W. W.; Hoffman, F. M.; Hayden, B. P.; Urban, D. L.; MacMahon, J. A.; Franklin, J. F.

    2005-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be the first ecological measurement system designed both to answer regional- to national-scale scientific questions and to have the interdisciplinary participation necessary to achieve credible ecological forecasting and prediction. Capabilities provided by this infrastructural investment will transform the science of ecology by enabling the integration of research and education from natural and human systems. A National Network Design Committee (NNDC) of 15 individuals has been tasked with providing a baseline design for NEON, including the continental-scale deployment of NEON network resources. A system of identical nodes, each representing environments within a mother geographic "domain" was envisioned. Each node would itself consist of sub-node components, and all nodes would be focused in unison on a few transformational ecological questions of national relevance. The NNDC adopted a strategy of pre-stratification to help determine an optimum number of nodes and to maximize node representativeness. To better sample a phenomenon as diverse as the ecological environments of the United States, those environments were first divided into a set of more homogeneous "strata." Samples could then be arrayed within each stratum, ensuring that NEON nodes are representative of the entire range of environments within the United States. Ecoregions have classically been used by ecologists for such national stratification. Ecoregions have historically been drawn using human expertise in a qualitative, weight-of-evidence approach. To construct NEON domains, a more transparent and repeatable process was needed. Multivariate clustering based on national maps of 9 ecologically relevant climatic "state" variables was used to repeatably define 25 national climatic zones. These 25 climate zones were combined with dynamic air mass seasonality data to create 20 NEON domains, each having similar climate. Such domains are defensible

  17. A strategy to sample nutrient dynamics across the terrestrial-aquatic interface at NEON sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, E. S.; Goodman, K. J.; Roehm, C. L.; Meier, C. L.; Luo, H.; Ayres, E.; Parnell, J.; Krause, K.; Fox, A. M.; SanClements, M.; Fitzgerald, M.; Barnett, D.; Loescher, H. W.; Schimel, D.

    2012-12-01

    The construction of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) across the U.S. creates the opportunity for researchers to investigate biogeochemical transformations and transfers across ecosystems at local-to-continental scales. Here, we examine a subset of NEON sites where atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic observations will be collected for 30 years. These sites are located across a range of hydrological regimes, including flashy rain-driven, shallow sub-surface (perched, pipe-flow, etc), and deep groundwater, which likely affect the chemical forms and quantities of reactive elements that are retained and/or mobilized across landscapes. We present a novel spatial and temporal sampling design that enables researchers to evaluate long-term trends in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus biogeochemical cycles under these different hydrological regimes. This design focuses on inputs to the terrestrial system (atmospheric deposition, bulk precipitation), transfers (soil-water and groundwater sources/chemistry), and outputs (surface water, and evapotranspiration). We discuss both data that will be collected as part of the current NEON design, as well as how the research community can supplement the NEON design through collaborative efforts, such as providing additional datasets, including soil biogeochemical processes and trace gas emissions, and developing collaborative research networks. Current engagement with the research community working at the terrestrial-aquatic interface is critical to NEON's success as we begin construction, to ensure that high-quality, standardized and useful data are not only made available, but inspire further, cutting-edge research.

  18. National Ecological Observatory Network's (NEON) future role in US carbon cycling and budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loescher, H. W.

    2015-12-01

    The US National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a National Science Foundation investment designed to observe the impacts of large-scale environment changes on the nation's ecosystems for 30 years with rigorous consistency. NEON does this through the construction (and operations) of new physical infrastructure and data infrastructure distributed across the North American Continent. This includes 47 terrestrial and 32 aquatic sites. Key to its design is its ability to provide ecosystem-scale carbon measurements of carbon stores, fluxes, processes—and the means to scale them from the local-to regional scales via remote sensed aircraft. NEON design NEON will be collecting these carbon data as a facility and providing openly providing them. NEON will not preform any high-level synthesis, rather the carbon data is an open resource for research, private and public communities, alike. Overall, these data are also harmonized with other international carbon-based infrastructures to facilitate cross-continental understanding and global carbon syntheses. Products, engagement and harmonization of data to facilitate syntheses will be discussed.

  19. Photochemistry of the ozone-water complex in cryogenic neon, argon, and krypton matrixes.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Masashi; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2013-12-12

    The photochemistry of ozone-water complexes and the wavelength dependence of the reactions were studied by matrix isolation FTIR spectrometry in neon, argon, and krypton matrixes. Hydrogen peroxide was formed upon the irradiation of UV light below 355 nm. Quantitative analyses of the reactant and product were performed to evaluate the matrix cage effect of the photoreaction. In argon and krypton matrixes, a bimolecular O((1)D) + H2O → H2O2 reaction was found to occur to form hydrogen peroxide, where the O((1)D) atom generated by the photolysis of ozone diffused in the cryogenic solids to encounter water. In a neon matrix, hydrogen peroxide was generated through intracage photoreaction of the ozone-water complex, indicating that a neon matrix medium is most appropriate to study the photochemistry of the ozone-water complex. PMID:24252115

  20. Essential features of optical processes in neon-buffered submicron-thin Rb vapor cell.

    PubMed

    Hakhumyan, Grant; Sargsyan, Armen; Leroy, Claude; Pashayan-Leroy, Yevgenya; Papoyan, Aram; Sarkisyan, David

    2010-07-01

    A new submicron thin cell (STC) filled with Rb and neon gas is developed and comparison of resonant absorption with STC containing pure Rb is provided. The effect of collapse and revival of Dicke-type narrowing is still observable for the thickness L = lambda /2 and L = lambda , where lambda is a resonant laser wavelength 794 nm (D(1) line). For an ordinary Rb cm-size cell with addition of buffer gas, the velocity selective optical pumping/saturation (VSOP) resonances in saturated absorption spectra are fully suppressed if neon pressure > 0.5 Torr. A spectacular difference is that for L = lambda , VSOP resonances are still observable even when neon pressure is > or = 6 Torr. Narrow fluorescence spectra at L = lambda /2 allow one to realize online buffer gas pressure monitoring. A good agreement with theoretical model is observed. PMID:20639943

  1. A stochastic, local mode study of neon-liquid surface collision dynamics.

    PubMed

    Packwood, Daniel M; Phillips, Leon F

    2011-01-14

    Equations of motion for a fast, light rare gas atom passing over a liquid surface are derived and used to infer the dynamics of neon collisions with squalane and perfluorinated polyether surfaces from experimental data. The equations incorporate the local mode model of a liquid surface via a stochastic process and explicitly account for impulsive collisional energy loss to the surface. The equations predict angular distributions for scattering of neon that are in good quantitative agreement with experimental data. Our key dynamical conclusions are that experimental angular distributions derive mainly from local mode surface topography rather than from structural features of individual surface molecules, and that the available data for these systems can be accounted for almost exclusively by single collisions between neon atoms and the liquid surface. PMID:21042647

  2. Demonstrating a directional detector based on neon for characterizing high energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexley, Allie

    2016-03-01

    MITPC is a gas-based time projection chamber used for detecting fast, MeV-scale neutrons. The standard version of the detector relies on a mixture of 600 torr gas composed of 87.5% helium-4 and 12.5% tetrafluoromethane for precisely measuring the energy and direction of neutron-induced nuclear recoils. I describe studies performed with a prototype detector investigating the use of neon, as a replacement for helium-4, in the gas mixture. My discussion focuses on the advantages of neon as the fast neutron target for high energy neutron events (100 MeV) and a demonstration that the mixture will be effective for this event class. I show that the achievable gain and transverse diffusion of drifting electrons in the neon mixture are acceptable and that the detector uptime lost due to voltage breakdowns in the amplification plane is negligible, compared to 20% with the helium-4 mixture.

  3. NEON: Developing a Platform for Regional to Continental Scale Biological Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, J.

    2004-05-01

    Climate variation, introductions of alien species, and patterns of land use are some of the important interacting drivers of biological change that are affecting our nation's ecosystems. Many of these drivers operate over large spatial and temporal scales, and our understanding of how these phenomena interact to drive biological change is limited by our inability to link traditionally local and short-term ecological approaches to larger and longer scales. Similarly, our ability to forecast such changes and respond to their consequences is constrained. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a proposed shared-use research and education platform intended to improve our capacity to understand and predict biological phenomena operating from regional to continental scales. NEON is envisioned as a system of field and laboratory-based facilities distributed across the United States, which will provide the physical infrastructure and human capabilities necessary to coordinate and integrate research and education campaigns on the following types of issues: (1) biodiversity, species composition, and ecosystem functioning; (2) ecological aspects of biogeochemical cycles; (3) ecological implications of climate change; (4) ecology and evolution of infectious disease; (5) invasive species; and (6) land use and habitat alteration. Themes such as data sharing, multidisciplinary collaboration, and the development of technologies for sensing, forecasting, and visualizing biological information are central to the NEON concept. Development of the NEON science plan and the design of the network itself are proceeding through a variety of workshops and community planning meetings. A national project office is expected to form toward the end of 2004 to lead the development and creation of NEON. Ultimately, the project office will reside within an independent national organization devoted to the coordinated operation of NEON for the scientific community.

  4. Big Data and Ecological Forecasting: Integrating NEON Observational and Sensor Data from Reach to Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, J. M.; Goodman, K. J.; Lunch, C. K.; Fitzgerald, M.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to forecast the response of varied ecosystems to changes in climate and land use will be crucial for the management of resources and ecosystem services. Ecological forecasting presents many significant challenges within each of the aspects of data capture, assimilation, and modeling. High space-time resolution sampling is required to address the challenges of scaling from the site level to the continent. Determining the uncertainty of data used for model input and parameterization is critical for constraining the model for accurate representation. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is poised to greatly expand the scale and availability of biogeochemical and aquatic ecological data. NEON is a continental-scale facility designed to collect and disseminate data that addresses the impacts of climate change, land-use, and invasive species on ecosystem structure and function. Using a combination of standardized observational sampling and sensor measurements, NEON will provide a rich source of biogeochemical and biophysical data from 34 aquatic and 47 terrestrial sites spatially distributed across the US, including Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico for 30 years. Sites were selected to be representative of major ecosystems and maximize scalability. In addition to standardizing measurements, NEON is determining the quantitative uncertainty of each data product making them well suited to constrain models. NEON aquatic data will not only serve to baseline aquatic ecology in major ecosystems but also presents opportunities to bolster Hydrologic Models as well as incorporate aquatic biogeochemical cycling into Land Surface Models. Here we present examples of published and provisional data currently available from deployed aquatic sites, as well as an overview of the full scope and release schedule of the open source ecological data to be published on the NEON web portal. Several use cases, such as whole stream metabolism, groundwater exchange, high

  5. A cost-effective approach to microporate mammalian cells with the Neon Transfection System.

    PubMed

    Brees, Chantal; Fransen, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation is one of the most efficient nonviral methods for transferring exogenous DNA into mammalian cells. However, the relatively high costs of electroporation kits and reagents temper the routine use of this fast and easy to perform technique in many laboratories. Several years ago, a new flexible and easy to operate electroporation device was launched under the name Neon Transfection System. This device uses specialized pipette tips containing gold-plated electrodes as electroporation chamber. Here we report a protocol to regenerate these expensive tips as well as some other Neon kit accessories, thereby reducing the cost of electroporation at least 10-fold. PMID:25172131

  6. Fully differential single-photon double ionization of neon and argon.

    PubMed

    Yip, F L; Rescigno, T N; McCurdy, C W; Martín, F

    2013-04-26

    Triply differential cross sections are calculated for one-photon double ionization of neon and argon at various photon energies and electron energy sharings by using a frozen-core treatment to represent the remaining electrons of the residual ion. Angular distributions agree well with all existing experimental data, showing that in spite of its simplicity the method can treat the double ionization of complex targets reliably. A comparison of the cross sections for helium, neon, and argon into the same final state symmetry at the same relative excess energies reveals a distinctive signature of the role of electron correlation in each target. PMID:23679717

  7. Cooperative lifetime reduction of single acene molecules attached to the surface of neon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Izadnia, Sharareh; Vlaming, Sebastiaan M.; Eisfeld, Alexander; LaForge, Aaron; Stienkemeier, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Tetracene and pentacene molecules attached to the surface of neon clusters have been spectroscopically investigated. The fluorescence spectra indicate that the molecules are immobilized on the surface and, to a large extent, do not form complexes. By varying the number of attached molecules, laser power, or neon cluster size, we find a systematic fluorescence lifetime reduction up to a factor of 20 indicating a cooperative coupling in our system. For averaged intermolecular distances greater than 33 Å, we attribute the reduction in fluorescence lifetime to Dicke superradiance, while for smaller intermolecular distances, nonradiative decay mechanisms cause additional lifetime reduction.

  8. Boundary conditions on the early Sun from ancient cosmogenic neon in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenberg, C. M.; Caffee, M. W.; Swindle, T. D.; Goswami, J.

    1986-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of neon from individual grains of the meteorites Murchison (CM) and Kapoeta (howardite) shows large enrichments of cosmogenic neon in grains with solar flare tracks. The quantity of this component is incompatible with galactic cosmic ray or solar cosmic ray irradiation under present conditions and is attributed to irradiation by energetic flares from an early active Sun. Handpicked grains from each meteorite were grouped according to the presence or absence of solar flare heavy ion tracks, and these four samples were analyzed with an ion counting noble gas mass spectrometer.

  9. Liquid neon heat transfer as applied to a 30 tesla cryomagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    A 30-tesla magnet design is studied which calls for forced convection liquid neon heat transfer in small coolant channels. The design also requires suppressing boiling by subjecting the fluid to high pressures through use of magnet coils enclosed in a pressure vessel which is maintained at the critical pressure of liquid neon. This high pressure reduces the possibility of the system flow instabilities which may occur at low pressures. The forced convection heat transfer data presented were obtained by using a blowdown technique to force the fluid to flow vertically through a resistance heated, instrumented tube.

  10. Evidence of weak plasma series resonance heating in the H-mode of neon and neon/argon inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, A. E.; Boffard, John B.; Jung, R. O.; Lin, Chun C.; Aneskavich, L. E.

    2012-10-01

    The shape of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in low-temperature plasmas governs the relative rates of electron-impact processes that determine key discharge properties. Comparison of EEDFs measured with probes and optical emission [1] in argon and neon inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) has revealed a surplus of high-energy electrons in neon-containing plasmas. The abundance of these extra high energy electrons is correlated with the sheath thickness near the rf antenna and can be reduced by either adding a Faraday shield or increasing the plasma density. These trends suggest an association of the surplus high-energy electrons with stochastic heating of electrons in capacitively-coupled electric fields in the sheath adjacent to the antenna. Conventional stochastic heating, however, is found to be insufficient to account for the EEDF observations, and a comparison of modeled and experimental values of the 13.56 MHz time modulation of select neon emission lines strongly suggests plasma series resonance (PSR) heating adjacent to the ICP antenna as the source of the extra high-energy electrons. [4pt] [1] Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20, (2011) 055006.

  11. A theoretical study of the rovibrational levels of the bosonic van der Waals neon trimer.

    PubMed

    Salci, Moses; Levin, Sergey B; Elander, Nils; Yarevsky, Evgeny

    2008-10-01

    The eigenenergies and root mean square radii of the rovibrational levels (J = 0-3) of the weakly bound bosonic van der Waals neon trimer were calculated using a full angular momentum three-dimensional finite element method. The differing results of three previous studies for zero angular momentum are discussed, explained, and compared with the results presented here. PMID:19045087

  12. Linear Zeff scaling of the anomalous inward drift and enhanced proportionality factor during neon inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1996-12-01

    The origin of density profile peaking due to impurity puffing and the anomalous particle pinch are explored by computer simulations with special versions of the 1.5-D BALDUR predictive transport code. Transport analysis of high density H mode plasmas with strong neon puffing and density profile peaking yields a new scaling law for the anomalous inward drift velocity, upsilon in(x)=Cupsilon 2xD(x)/( rho wxs2), with C upsilon =FZeff(x), where D is the diffusion coefficient. This scaling implies that upsilon in/D varies as Zeff and results in upsilon in varies as Zeff since D is found to be independent of this parameter. The strong density profile peaking is caused by the increase in Zeff and by an enhanced factor F discovered during neon puffing. The time evolution of F correlates with the neon influx rate, but not with the neon content and the power losses due to line radiation and ionization. The factor F rises with growing influx rate and depends non-locally on the region where inelastic collisions prevail. One plausible mechanism for the enhancement of F is that inelastic collisions between fluctuating electrons and impurity ions change the dissipative part of the fluctuating electron distribution

  13. Continental-Scale Stable Isotope Measurements at NEON to Address Ecological Processes Across Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Goodman, K. J.; Hinckley, E. S.; West, J. B.; Williams, D. G.; Bowen, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a national-scale research platform. The overarching goal of NEON is to enable understanding and forecasting of the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on aspects of continental-scale ecology (such as biodiversity, biogeochemistry, infectious diseases, ecohydrology, etc.). NEON focuses explicitly on questions that relate to grand challenges in environmental science, are relevant to large regions, and would otherwise be very difficult to address with traditional ecological approaches. The use of stable isotope approaches in ecological research has grown steadily during the last two decades. Stable isotopes at natural abundances in the environment trace and integrate the interaction between abiotic and biotic components across temporal and spatial scales. In this poster, we will present the NEON data products that incorporate stable isotope measurements in atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic ecosystems in North America. We further outline current questions in the natural sciences community and how these data products can be used to address continental-scale ecological questions, such as the ecological impacts of climate change, terrestrial-aquatic system linkages, land-atmosphere exchange, landscape ecohydrological processes, and linking biogeochemical cycles across systems. Specifically, we focus on the use of stable isotopes to evaluate water availability and residence times in terrestrial systems, as well as nutrient sources to terrestrial systems, and cycling across ecosystem boundaries.

  14. X-ray diffraction and equation of state of solid neon to 110 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Zha, C. S.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Mao, H. K.; Finger, L. W.; Cox, D. E.

    1989-06-01

    Solid neon was compressed under static conditions at 300 K to pressures in the 100 GPa (megabar) range using diamond-anvil cell techniques. The crystal structure and P-V equation of state were determined by energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction with microcollimated synchrotron radiation. Pressures were determined from ruby fluorescence spectra and from x-ray diffraction of tungsten powder contained within the sample. Solid neon remains an insulator with the fcc structure to the maximum pressure of 110 GPa at 300 K, where the compression V/V0 is 0.28. The 300-K P-V isotherm measured at high pressure is in excellent agreement with the results of electronic structure calculations but is incorrectly described by pure pair potentials recently developed for neon. These results indicate that there is a significant softening of the material by many-body interactions at high pressures. Finally, the measurements of ruby fluorescence and tungsten x-ray diffraction in the neon medium obtained in this study provide an extension of the quasihydrostatic ruby pressure scale above 100 GPa.

  15. X-ray diffraction and equation of state of solid neon to 110 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Hemley, R. J.; Zha, C. S.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Mao, H. K.; Finger, L. W.; Cox, D. E.

    1989-06-01

    Solid neon was compressed under static conditions at 300 K to pressures in the 100 GPa (megabar) range using diamond-anvil cell techniques. The crystal structure and /ital P/-/ital V/ equation of state were determined by energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction with microcollimated synchrotron radiation. Pressures were determined from ruby fluorescence spectra and from x-ray diffraction of tungsten powder contained within the sample. Solid neon remains an insulator with the fcc structure to the maximum pressure of 110 GPa at 300 K, where the compression /ital V///ital V//sub 0/ is 0.28. The 300-K /ital P/-/ital V/ isotherm measured at high pressure is in excellent agreement with the results of electronic structure calculations but is incorrectly described by pure pair potentials recently developed for neon. These results indicate that there is a significant softening of the material by many-body interactions at high pressures. Finally, the measurements of ruby fluorescence and tungsten x-ray diffraction in the neon medium obtained in this study provide an extension of the quasihydrostatic ruby pressure scale above 100 GPa.

  16. Belowground Biomass Sampling to Estimate Fine Root Mass across NEON Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, J. J.; Meier, C. L.; Abercrombie, H.; Everhart, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Production of belowground biomass is an important and relatively uncharacterized component of the net primary productivity (NPP) of ecosystems. Fine root productivity makes up a significant portion of total belowground production because fine roots turn over rapidly, and therefore contribute disproportionately to annual estimates of belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). One of the major goals of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is to quantify above- and below-ground NPP at 60 sites within 20 different eco-climactic regions. NEON's Terrestrial Observation System will carry out belowground biomass sampling throughout the life of the observatory to estimate fine root production. However, belowground biomass sampling during NEON operations will be constrained to a maximum depth of 50cm. This limited depth range leaves the question of what proportion of total fine root mass is being collected and how to optimally characterize belowground biomass given sampling depth limitations. During the construction period, NEON is characterizing fine root biomass distribution at depth down to 2m at each site, as well as physical and chemical properties in each soil horizon. Each sampling unit is a pit (2m deep and approximately 1.5m wide), dug in the site's dominant vegetation type where fine root biomass sampling will also occur during Operations. To sample fine root biomass in each pit, soil samples of a known volume are taken from three vertical profiles down the face of the pit. Samples are then wet sieved to extract fine root mass, and roots are dried at 65°C for 48 hours and then weighed. The soil pit data are used to estimate the proportion of total fine root biomass from each site as a function of depth. Non-linear curves are fitted to the data to calculate total fine root mass at depth and to provide estimates of the proportion of the total fine root mass that is sampled at each site during NEON's 30 year operational sampling. The belowground

  17. NEON Collaborative Data Collection Campaign at Pacific South West Site in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Musinsky, J.; Petroy, S. B.; Wasser, L. A.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.; van Aardt, J. A.; Schaaf, C.; Strahler, A. H.; Serbin, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale observatory that will collect biological, chemical and geophysical data over the continental United States in order to study biodiversity, landcover change, climate change and invasive species. In June 2013, a large-scale data collection took place over NEON's Pacific South West (PSW) site 17 in CA, USA. Data were collected in the San Joaquin Experimental Range and the Sierra National Forest. NEON's AOP (Airborne Observation Platform) acquired high spatial resolution hyperspectral data (~1m pixels), waveform lidar, discrete lidar, and RGB imagery over all three sites. A field team simultaneously collected atmospheric and vegetation inventory data, including tree locations, height, diameter-at-breast-height (DBH), species, and spectral data. The NEON collect was centered within a collaboration of multiple research entities, including NASA, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), University of Massachusetts (Boston; UMB, and Lowell; UML), Boston University (BU), and the University of Wisconsin, Madison (UWM). NASA's AVIRIS and MASTER sensors were flown over a wider area encompassing the NEON sites, with AVIRIS acquiring hyperspectral data (224 bands) at approximately 30m spatial resolution, and MASTER acquiring multispectral thermal data (50 bands) at approximately 50m spatial resolution. These data will be downscaled to approximate theoretical HyspIRI data (60m spatial resolution) as part of a large collection of preparatory research. Concurrently, a variety of university teams were active in the field: RIT collected ground-based lidar, leaf area index (LAI), herbaceous biomass measurements, wide-angle photographs, and spectral measurements. Data were collected over 20 80x80m sites, centered on existing 20x20m NEON sites. This data set will be used to inform synthetic scene design and to study the impact of sub-pixel structural variation on pixel-level spectral response; The BU, UMB, and UML

  18. NEON: High Frequency Monitoring Network for Watershed-Scale Processes and Aquatic Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, J. M.; Fitzgerald, M.; Parker, S. M.; Roehm, C. L.; Goodman, K. J.; Bohall, C.; Utz, R.

    2014-12-01

    Networked high frequency hydrologic and water quality measurements needed to investigate physical and biogeochemical processes at the watershed scale and create robust models are limited and lacking standardization. Determining the drivers and mechanisms of ecological changes in aquatic systems in response to natural and anthropogenic pressures is challenging due to the large amounts of terrestrial, aquatic, atmospheric, biological, chemical, and physical data it requires at varied spatiotemporal scales. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale infrastructure project designed to provide data to address the impacts of climate change, land-use, and invasive species on ecosystem structure and function. Using a combination of standardized continuous in situ measurements and observational sampling, the NEON Aquatic array will produce over 200 data products across its spatially-distributed field sites for 30 years to facilitate spatiotemporal analysis of the drivers of ecosystem change. Three NEON sites in Alabama were chosen to address linkages between watershed-scale processes and ecosystem changes along an eco-hydrological gradient within the Tombigbee River Basin. The NEON Aquatic design, once deployed, will include continuous measurements of surface water physical, chemical, and biological parameters, groundwater level, temperature and conductivity and local meteorology. Observational sampling will include bathymetry, water chemistry and isotopes, and a suite of organismal sampling from microbes to macroinvertebrates to vertebrates. NEON deployed a buoy to measure the temperature profile of the Black Warrior River from July - November, 2013 to determine the spatiotemporal variability across the water column from a daily to seasonal scale. In July 2014 a series of water quality profiles were performed to assess the contribution of physical and biogeochemical drivers over a diurnal cycle. Additional river transects were performed

  19. NEON: Contributing continental-scale long-term environmental data for the benefit of society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, B.; Aulenbach, S.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a NSF funded national investment in physical and information infrastructure. Large-scale environmental changes pose challenges that straddle environmental, economic, and social boundaries. As we develop climate adaptation strategies at the Federal, state, local, and tribal levels, accessible and usable data are essential for implementing actions that are informed by the best available information. NEON's goal is to enable understanding and forecasting of the impacts of climate change, land use change and invasive species on continental-scale ecology by providing physical and information infrastructure. The NEON framework will take standardized, long-term, coordinated measurements of related environmental variables at each of its 62 sites across the nation. These observations, collected by automated instruments, field crews, and airborne instruments, will be processed into more than 700 data products that are provided freely over the web to support research, education, and environmental management. NEON is envisioned to be an integral component of an interoperable ecosystem of credible data and information sources. Other members of this information ecosystem include Federal, commercial, and non-profit entities. NEON is actively involved with the interoperability community via forums like the Foundation for Earth Science Information Partners and the USGS Community for Data Integration in a collective effort to identify the technical standards, best practices, and organizational principles that enable the emergence of such an information ecosystem. These forums have proven to be effective innovation engines for the experimentation of new techniques that evolve into emergent standards. These standards are, for the most part, discipline agnostic. It is becoming increasingly evident that we need to include socio-economic and public health data sources in interoperability initiatives, because the dynamics of coupled

  20. Shattering the myth of the resonantly photo-pumped neon-like titanium laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J.; MacGowan, B.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Moreno, J.C.; Koch, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    Several years ago neon-like titanium (Z = 22) was made to lase at 326 {angstrom} on the 3p {yields} 3s (J = 0 {yields} 1) transition. At the time it was suggested that the lasing may be due to resonantly photo-pumping the neon-like titanium 2p {yields} 4d lines using 3s {yields} 2p and 3d {yields} 2p lines in carbon-like and nitrogen-like titanium which results in lasing on the 3p {yields} 3s transition in neon-like titanium. The strongest argument for this explanation was that adjacent elements (scandium and vanadium) did not lase while titanium was unique in having the above mentioned resonance. In addition a prepulse was required to make the titanium lase, suggestive of the formation of a low density plasma, and the plasma was very overstripped, so the above mentioned pump lines should be quite strong for photo-pumping. We have reinvestigated this laser system and will present results which show lasing on the 3p {yields} 3s (J = 0 {yields} 1) transition in neon-like chromium (Z = 24), iron (Z = 26), and nickel (Z = 28) at 285, 255, and 231 {angstrom} respectively. This destroys the myth of titanium being unique and makes highly unlikely that the previously mentioned photo-pumping mechanism is playing a significant role in the titanium laser. The chromium, iron, and nickel experiments all require a prepulse in order to lase and our calculations suggest that the prepulse is an exciting new way to create a uniform low density plasma when illuminating a thick slab target. This allows the proper conditions for gain and laser propagation for low Z neon-like ions and may also be applicable to other systems such as low Z nickel-like ions. We also will present experiments done on other low-Z materials and offer an explanation as to how the hyperfine effect is destroying the gain of neon-like ions with odd Z.

  1. Opportunities and Challenges for Education and Outreach at NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network), a new NSF Large Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gram, W.; Henderson, S.; Wasser, L. A.; Goehring, L.

    2015-12-01

    As a new NSF Large Facility, NEON (the National Ecological Observatory Network) collects continental-scale ecological and environmental data to support research and education on large-scale ecological processes. The Observatory provides data, infrastructure and educational resources to scientific, educational and general public audiences. We designed NEON's Education and Outreach (E & O) activities to meet several high-level goals, including (1) facilitating public understanding of ecological science, (2) providing tools to use NEON data, (3) educating the next generation of ecologists, and (4) enhancing diversity within the ecological community. The suite of activities we developed ranges from online resources for using NEON data to a Citizen Science project to traditional undergraduate internship programs and workshops for graduate students/early career scientists. The NEON Construction Project represents one of the first large facilities that included E & O activities as set of deliverables with defined requirements in parallel to other components of construction. This approach proved to be both an opportunity to build a multifaceted E & O program in collaboration with NEON science and engineering, and a challenge as competing priorities sometimes left E & O resource development teams without necessary technical expertise. The result, however, is a robust suite of online educational resources, citizen science opportunities, and in-person training programs. Early evaluation efforts have helped us fine tune our programming to meet the needs of target audiences, including diverse undergraduate students, graduate students, scientists, faculty, edcuators, and citizen scientists. Moving into Operations, we envision an evolving suite of resources and programs that further NEON's mission and engage audiences in "doing science," both by using NEON data in a diversity of contexts and participating in our citizen science opportunities.

  2. Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 112 Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å (Web, free access)   Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å contains wavelengths and intensities for about 5600 lines in the region 4330 Å. An atlas plot of the spectrum is given, with the spectral lines marked and their intensities, wavelengths, and classifications listed.

  3. The infrared spectrum of NN···CO+ trapped in solid neon.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Warren E; Jacox, Marilyn E

    2011-12-14

    Codeposition of a Ne:N(2):CO = 200:1:1 mixture at 4.3 K with a beam of very pure neon atoms excited to their energy levels between 16.6 and 16.85 eV leads to stabilization in the resulting solid of sufficient NNCO(+) for detection of its NN- and CO-stretching vibration fundamentals. Detailed isotopic substitution studies and density functional calculations for the various isotopologues support the identification of NNCO(+) and permit estimation of the positions of two of its low-frequency fundamentals. A sufficient concentration of NOCN is also stabilized in the neon matrix for detection of its NO-stretching vibrational fundamental. PMID:22168694

  4. Prediction of thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs) in the CLAES solid CO2/neon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradley, I. E.; Yuan, S. W. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of a study initiated to investigate the possibility that the existence of thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs) in the Cryogenic Limb Atmospheric Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) neon plumbing system ground configuration could be the cause of higher-than-predicted heat rates measured during thermal ground testing. Tests were conducted between warm boundary temperatures ranging from 40 to 100 K, which simulated the actual test conditions of the CLAES CO2/neon system. TAOs were observed between 6 and 106 Torr, which agreed with the analytical predictions, and verified the possible existence of TAOs in the CLAES system during ground testing. The presence of TAOs was eventually confirmed in the CLAES system during a subsequent thermal test and were determined to have caused the higher heat rates measured during the prior thermal test.

  5. Up to fourth virial coefficients from simple and efficient internal-coordinate sampling: application to neon.

    PubMed

    Wiebke, Jonas; Pahl, Elke; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2012-07-01

    A simple and efficient internal-coordinate importance sampling protocol for the Monte Carlo computation of (up to fourth-order) virial coefficients ̅B(n) of atomic systems is proposed. The key feature is a multivariate sampling distribution that mimics the product structure of the dominating pairwise-additive parts of the ̅B(n). This scheme is shown to be competitive over routine numerical methods and, as a proof of principle, applied to neon: The second, third, and fourth virial coefficients of neon as well as equation-of-state data are computed from ab initio two- and three-body potentials; four-body contributions are found to be insignificant. Kirkwood-Wigner quantum corrections to first order are found to be crucial to the observed agreement with recent ab initio and experimental reference data sets but are likely inadequate at very low temperatures. PMID:22779666

  6. Electronic absorption spectra of protonated pyrene and coronene in neon matrixes.

    PubMed

    Garkusha, Iryna; Fulara, Jan; Sarre, Peter J; Maier, John P

    2011-10-13

    Protonated pyrene and coronene have been isolated in 6 K neon matrixes. The cations were produced in the reaction of the parent aromatics with protonated ethanol in a hot-cathode discharge source, mass selected, and co-deposited with neon. Three electronic transitions of the most stable isomer of protonated pyrene and four of protonated coronene were recorded. The strongest, S(1) ← S(0) transitions, are in the visible region, with onset at 487.5 nm for protonated pyrene and 695.6 nm for protonated coronene. The corresponding neutrals were also observed. The absorptions were assigned on the basis of ab initio coupled-cluster and time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The astrophysical relevance of protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed. PMID:21861507

  7. Crystal structure and encapsulation dynamics of ice II-structured neon hydrate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Du, Shiyu; Xu, Hongwu; Vogel, Sven C; Han, Jiantao; Germann, Timothy C; Zhang, Jianzhong; Jin, Changqing; Francisco, Joseph S; Zhao, Yusheng

    2014-07-22

    Neon hydrate was synthesized and studied by in situ neutron diffraction at 480 MPa and temperatures ranging from 260 to 70 K. For the first time to our knowledge, we demonstrate that neon atoms can be enclathrated in water molecules to form ice II-structured hydrates. The guest Ne atoms occupy the centers of D2O channels and have substantial freedom of movement owing to the lack of direct bonding between guest molecules and host lattices. Molecular dynamics simulation confirms that the resolved structure where Ne dissolved in ice II is thermodynamically stable at 480 MPa and 260 K. The density distributions indicate that the vibration of Ne atoms is mainly in planes perpendicular to D2O channels, whereas their distributions along the channels are further constrained by interactions between adjacent Ne atoms. PMID:25002464

  8. Crystal structure and encapsulation dynamics of ice II-structured neon hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Du, Shiyu; Xu, Hongwu; Vogel, Sven C.; Han, Jiantao; Germann, Timothy C.; Zhang, Jianzhong; Jin, Changqing; Francisco, Joseph S.; Zhao, Yusheng

    2014-01-01

    Neon hydrate was synthesized and studied by in situ neutron diffraction at 480 MPa and temperatures ranging from 260 to 70 K. For the first time to our knowledge, we demonstrate that neon atoms can be enclathrated in water molecules to form ice II-structured hydrates. The guest Ne atoms occupy the centers of D2O channels and have substantial freedom of movement owing to the lack of direct bonding between guest molecules and host lattices. Molecular dynamics simulation confirms that the resolved structure where Ne dissolved in ice II is thermodynamically stable at 480 MPa and 260 K. The density distributions indicate that the vibration of Ne atoms is mainly in planes perpendicular to D2O channels, whereas their distributions along the channels are further constrained by interactions between adjacent Ne atoms. PMID:25002464

  9. Trapping hydrogen atoms from a neon-gas matrix: a theoretical simulation.

    PubMed

    Bovino, S; Zhang, P; Kharchenko, V; Dalgarno, A

    2009-08-01

    Hydrogen is of critical importance in atomic and molecular physics and the development of a simple and efficient technique for trapping cold and ultracold hydrogen atoms would be a significant advance. In this study we simulate a recently proposed trap-loading mechanism for trapping hydrogen atoms released from a neon matrix. Accurate ab initio quantum calculations are reported of the neon-hydrogen interaction potential and the energy- and angular-dependent elastic scattering cross sections that control the energy transfer of initially cold atoms are obtained. They are then used to construct the Boltzmann kinetic equation, describing the energy relaxation process. Numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation predict the time evolution of the hydrogen energy distribution function. Based on the simulations we discuss the prospects of the technique. PMID:19673557

  10. Evidence of strong projectile-target-core interaction in single ionization of neon by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, S.; Zhang, P.; Xu, S.; Ma, X.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Liu, H. P.

    2010-11-15

    The momentum distributions of recoil ions were measured in the single ionization of neon by electron impact at incident energies between 80 and 2300 eV. It was found that there are a noticeable number of recoil ions carrying large momenta, and the relative contributions of these ions becomes more pronounced with the further decrease of incident electron energy. These observed behaviors indicate that there is a strong projectile-target-core interaction in the single-ionization reaction. By comparing our results with those of electron-neon elastic scattering, we concluded that the elastic scattering of the projectile electron on the target core plays an important role at low and intermediate collision energies.

  11. Design study of steady-state 30-tesla liquid-neon-cooled magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    A design for a 30-tesla, liquid-neon-cooled magnet was reported which is capable of continuous operation. Cooled by nonboiling, forced-convection heat transfer to liquid neon flowing at 2.8 cu m/min in a closed, pressurized heat-transfer loop and structurally supported by a tapered structural ribbon, the tape-wound coils with a high-purity-aluminum conductor will produce over 30 teslas for 1 minute at 850 kilowatts. The magnet will have an inside diameter of 7.5 centimeters and an outside diameter of 54 centimeters. The minimum current density at design field will be 15.7 kA/sq cm.

  12. Effects of helio-neon laser radiation upon cellular cycle in a plant model

    SciTech Connect

    de Barioglio, S.R.; Fiol de Cuneo, M.; Lacuara, J.L.; Juri, H.

    1989-01-01

    The scope of this study was to investigate possible relationships between He-Neon laser radiation and mitotic and phase indices in meristematic cells of Allium cepa L. bulbs. Our results indicate that mitotic index increased after irradiation depending this modification on the time exposure and the potency of the He-Neon beam. Phase indices were also modified: frequency of prophase increased, while inter- meta- and anaphase decreased: telophases remain unchanged. These variations were significative only when the preparations were irradiated (a) with 5 mW for 10 min. or more, (b) with 10 mW or (c) when the preparations were processed 60 min. after irradiation. These findings could not be attributed to thermal changes. Modifications in RNA or protein synthesis could be responsible.

  13. Angle-resolved Auger electron spectra induced by neon ion impact on aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.; Aron, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    Auger electron emission from aluminum bombarded with 1 to 5 keV neon ions was studied by angle-resolved electron spectroscopy. The position and shape of the spectral features depended on the incident ion energy, angle of ion incidence, and electron take-off angle with respect to the aluminum surface. These spectral dependencies were interpreted in terms of the Doppler shift given to the Auger electron velocity by the excited atom ejected into the vacuum. For oblique ion incidence it is concluded that a flux of high energy atoms are ejected in a direction close to the projection of the ion beam on the target surface. In addition, a new spectral feature was found and identified as due to Auger emission from excited neon in the aluminum matrix.

  14. The isotopic and elemental abundances of neon nuclei accelerated in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, W. F.; Simpson, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The relative isotopic abundances of Ne-20 and Ne-22 in seven solar flares were determined from measurements of the satellite IMP 8, yielding the ratio Ne-20/Ne-22 = 7.7 (+2.3, -1.5) for solar chromospheric matter. This value is in agreement with the ratio for the component neon-A (the 'primordial' component) found in carbonaceous chondrites. An elemental abundance ratio Ne/O = 0.14 + or - 0.01 also has been obtained which agrees closely with earlier reported measurements. It is shown that the effects of preferential acceleration relative to solar-system abundances with increasing charge number observed for some solar flares - though biasing the elemental ratio - does not appear to influence the neon isotopic abundances.

  15. Translating the Science of Measuring Ecosystems at a National Scale: Developing NEON's Online Learning Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasser, L. A.; Gram, W.; Goehring, L.

    2014-12-01

    "Big Data" are becoming increasingly common in many fields. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be collecting data over the 30 years, using consistent, standardized methods across the United States. These freely available new data provide an opportunity for increased understanding of continental- and global scale processes such as changes in vegetation structure and condition, biodiversity and landuse. However, while "big data" are becoming more accessible and available, integrating big data into the university courses is challenging. New and potentially unfamiliar data types and associated processing methods, required to work with a growing diversity of available data, may warrant time and resources that present a barrier to classroom integration. Analysis of these big datasets may further present a challenge given large file sizes, and uncertainty regarding best methods to properly statistically summarize and analyze results. Finally, teaching resources, in the form of demonstrative illustrations, and other supporting media that might help teach key data concepts, take time to find and more time to develop. Available resources are often spread widely across multi-online spaces. This presentation will overview the development of NEON's collaborative University-focused online education portal. Portal content will include 1) videos and supporting graphics that explain key concepts related to NEON data products including collection methods, key metadata to consider and consideration of potential error and uncertainty surrounding data analysis; and 2) packaged "lab" activities that include supporting data to be used in an ecology, biology or earth science classroom. To facilitate broad use in classrooms, lab activities will take advantage of freely and commonly available processing tools, techniques and scripts. All NEON materials are being developed in collaboration with existing labs and organizations.

  16. Translating the Science of Measuring Ecosystems at a National Scale: NEON's Online Learning Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasser, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    "Big Data" are becoming increasingly common in many fields. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect data over the 30 years, using consistent, standardized methods across the United States. These freely available new data provide an opportunity for increased understanding of continental- and global scale processes such as changes in vegetation structure and condition, biodiversity and landuse. However, while "big data" are becoming more accessible and available, working with big data is challenging. New and potentially unfamiliar data types and associated processing methods, required to work with a growing diversity of available data take time and resources to learn. Analysis of these big datasets may further present a challenge given large file sizes, and uncertainty regarding best methods to properly statistically summarize and analyze results. Finally, resources that support learning these concepts and approaches, are distributed widely across multiple online spaces and may take time to find. This presentation will overview the development of NEON's collaborative University-focused online education portal. It will also cover content testing, community feedback and results from workshops using online content. Portal content is hosted in github to facilitate community input, accessibility version control. Content includes 1) videos and supporting graphics that explain key concepts related to NEON and related big spatio-temporal and 2) data tutorials that include subsets of spatio-temporal data that can be used to learn key big data skills in a self-paced approach, or that can be used as a teaching tool in the classroom or in a workshop. All resources utilize free and open data processing, visualization and analysis tools, techniques and scripts. All NEON materials are being developed in collaboration with the scientific community and are being tested via in-person workshops. Visit the portal online: www.neondataskills.org.

  17. Differential cross sections for ionization of helium, neon, and argon by fast electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Manson, S.T.

    1984-05-01

    Ionization cross sections, differential in the energy of secondary electrons, are presented for high-energy electrons incident on helium, neon, and argon. The results are based on Bethe's theory for inelastic scattering of fast charged particles using photoabsorption data and proton-impact differential ionization cross sections to determine the coefficients of this asymptotic expansion of the first Born approximation. The model cross sections are compared with experimental data for primary-electron energies between 100 and 5000 eV.

  18. Energy levels in helium and neon atoms by an electron-impact method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N.; Bartle, K. D.; Mills, D.; Beard, D. S.

    1981-03-01

    Electronic energy levels in noble gas atoms may be determined with a simple teaching apparatus incorporating a resonance potentials tube in which the electron beam intensity is held constant. The resulting spectra are little inferior to those obtained by more elaborate electron-impact methods and complement optical emission spectra. Singlet-triplet energy differences may be resolved, and the spectra of helium and neon may be used to illustrate the applicability of Russell-Saunders and other, ''intermediate,'' coupling schemes.

  19. Helium-neon laser improves bone repair in rabbits: comparison at two anatomic sites.

    PubMed

    Peccin, Maria Stella; de Oliveira, Flavia; Muniz Renno, Ana Claudia; Pacheco de Jesus, Gustavo Protasio; Pozzi, Renan; Gomes de Moura, Carolina Foot; Giusti, Paulo Ricardo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of helium-neon laser on bone repair of femur and tibia in rabbits. For this purpose, 15 New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral bone damage (tibia and femur) using a spherical bur. Helium-neon laser light, at a fluency of 6 J∕cm(2) and wavelength of 632.8 nm was applied on the left legs (laser group). The right tibia or femur lesions (control group) served as negative control. All sections were histopathologically analyzed using HE sections and the morphometric data from bone tissue and hyaline cartilage were achieved. Histopathological analysis showed regular bone trabeculae covered by osteoblastic cells after 1 week in the group exposed to laser therapy from femur and tibia indistinctly. After 3 weeks, the laser group showed new bone formation coming from the bony walls in the femur and tibia as well. On the 5th week, well-defined trabecula undergoing remodeling process was detected for the most intense pattern in tibia only. Morphometric analysis revealed significant statistical differences (p < 0.05) in the bone tissue for the laser-exposed group on 1st and 3rd weeks. After 5th week, bone formation was increased to tibia only. Taken together, such findings suggest that helium-neon laser is able to improve bone repair in rabbits being the most pronounced effect in tibia. PMID:23053246

  20. On the stability of cationic complexes of neon with helium--solving an experimental discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Peter; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2013-10-21

    Helium nanodroplets are doped with neon and ionized by electrons. The size-dependence of the ion abundance of HenNex(+), identified in high-resolution mass spectra, is deduced for complexes containing up to seven neon atoms and dozens of helium atoms. Particularly stable ions are inferred from anomalies in the abundance distributions. Two pronounced anomalies at n = 11 and 13 in the HenNe(+) series confirm drift-tube data reported by Kojima et al. [T. M. Kojima et al., Z. Phys. D, 1992, 22, 645]. The discrepancy with previously published spectra of neon-doped helium droplets, which did not reveal any abundance anomalies [T. Ruchti et al., J. Chem. Phys., 1998, 109, 10679-10687; C. A. Brindle et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2005, 123, 064312], is most likely due to limited mass resolution, which precluded unambiguous analysis of contributions from different ions with identical nominal mass. However, calculated dissociation energies of HenNe(+) reported so far do not correlate with the present data, possibly because of challenges in correctly treating the linear, asymmetric [He-Ne-He](+) ionic core in HenNe(+). Anomalies identified in the distributions of HenNex(+) for x > 1, including prominent ones at He12Ne2(+) and He14Ne2(+), may help to better understand solvation of Ne(+) and Nex(+) in helium. PMID:23958826

  1. The Bremen mass spectrometric facility for the measurement of helium isotopes, neon, and tritium in water.

    PubMed

    Sültenfuss, Jürgen; Roether, Wolfgang; Rhein, Monika

    2009-06-01

    We describe the mass spectrometric facility for measuring helium isotopes, neon, and tritium that has been operative at this institute since 1989, and also the sampling and sample preparation steps that precede the mass spectrometric analysis. For water samples in a near-equilibrium with atmospheric air, the facility achieves precision for (3)He/(4)He ratios of+/-0.4% or better, and+/-0.8 % or better for helium and neon concentrations. Tritium precision is typically+/-3 % and the detection limit 10 mTU ( approximately 1.2.10(-3) Bq/kg of pure water). Sample throughputs can reach some thousands per year. These achievements are enabled, among other features, by automation of the measurement procedure and by elaborate calibration, assisted by continual development in detail. To date, we have measured more than 15,000 samples for tritium and 23,000 for helium isotopes and neon, mostly in the context of oceanographic and hydrologic work. Some results of such work are outlined. Even when atmospheric tritium concentrations have become rather uniform, tritium provides water ages if (3)He data are taken concurrently. The technique can resolve tritium concentrations in waters of the pre-nuclear era. PMID:20183223

  2. Low energy (e,2e) measurements of CH4 and neon in the perpendicular plane.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Kate L; Murray, Andrew James; Chaluvadi, Hari; Amami, Sadek; Madison, Don H; Ning, Chuangang

    2012-03-01

    Low energy experimental and theoretical triple differential cross sections for the highest occupied molecular orbital of methane (1t(2)) and for the 2p atomic orbital of neon are presented and compared. These targets are iso-electronic, each containing 10 electrons and the chosen orbital within each target has p-electron character. Observation of the differences and similarities of the cross sections for these two species hence gives insight into the different scattering mechanisms occurring for atomic and molecular targets. The experiments used perpendicular, symmetric kinematics with outgoing electron energies between 1.5 eV and 30 eV for CH(4) and 2.5 eV and 25 eV for neon. The experimental data from these targets are compared with theoretical predictions using a distorted-wave Born approximation. Reasonably good agreement is seen between the experiment and theory for neon while mixed results are observed for CH(4). This is most likely due to approximations of the target orientation made within the model. PMID:22401435

  3. The infrared spectroscopy and photochemistry of NO(3) trapped in solid neon.

    PubMed

    Jacox, Marilyn E; Thompson, Warren E

    2008-11-28

    NO(3) can be stabilized in solid neon either by codeposition at 4.3 K of a Ne:O(2) mixture with a Ne:NO mixture that has been passed through a microwave discharge or, in higher yield, by codeposition of a Ne:NO mixture with a Ne:O(2) mixture, followed by annealing of the deposit at approximately 7 K and exposure of the solid to near ultraviolet radiation. All of the previously reported bands of NO(3) between 700 and 3000 cm(-1) were observed, most with neon-matrix shifts of less than 2.5 cm(-1). The infrared spectra of eight isotopic species of NO(3) were obtained. The observed isotopic shifts demonstrate the occurrence of extensive mixing of ground-state levels of e(') symmetry and their strong vibronic interaction with the B (2)E(') state. Photodissociation of NO(3) by irradiation of the deposit at wavelengths longer than 520 nm leads to new absorptions near the fundamentals of NO and O(2) and other new absorptions at relatively low frequencies. These absorptions were depleted and NO(3) regenerated by subsequent near ultraviolet irradiation of the deposit, suggesting the stabilization of a weakly bound NO(O(2)) complex in solid neon. PMID:19045863

  4. Laser-induced optogalvanic signal oscillations in miniature neon glow discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Saini, V K

    2013-06-20

    Laser-induced optogalvanic (OG) signal oscillations detected in miniature neon glow discharge plasma are investigated using a discharge equivalent-circuit model. The damped oscillations in OG signal are generated when a pulsed dye laser is tuned to a specific neon transition (1s5→2p2) at 588.2 nm under the discharge conditions where dynamic resistance changes its sign. Penning ionization via quasi-resonant energy transfer collisions between neon gas atoms in metastable state and sputtered electrode atoms in ground state is discussed to explain the negative differential resistance properties of discharge plasma that are attributed to oscillations in the OG signal. The experimentally observed results are simulated by analyzing the behavior of an equivalent discharge-OG circuit. Good agreement between theoretically calculated and experimental results is observed. It is found that discharge plasma is more sensitive and less stable in close vicinity to dynamic resistance sign inversion, which can be useful for weak-optical-transition OG detection. PMID:23842186

  5. NEON's Citizen Science Academy: Exploring online professional development courses for educators to enhance participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Ward, D.; Wasser, L.; Meymaris, K.; Newman, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    The NEON Citizen Science Academy (CSA) (citizenscienceacademy.org) was created to explore the need for online professional development (PD) resources and opportunities that explicitly focused on citizen science in diverse educational settings. In the past decade, there has been more widespread acceptance of online PD courses as viable alternatives to face to face classes and workshops. This acceptance, along with the current proliferation of online based citizen science programs, spurred the development of the CSA dedicated to providing online courses and resources to facilitate effective implementation of citizen science programs. For the pilot, an online, self paced course for informal and formal educators was developed based on NEON' Project BudBurst (budburst.org). An intended outcome of this pilot project was the development of best practices based on lessons learned that could be used for the development of future NEON online courses and shared with the citizen science community, The pilot clearly demonstrated the interest in an online citizen science course. Initial registration far exceeded expectations and additional sessions had to be offered to meet demand. A second online course was developed and offered in the fall to similar interest. Additional courses will be offered in the winter of 2013. We will report on lessons learned and early best practices based, in large part, from field testing and feedback of over 400 educators who have taken participated in the CSA to date.

  6. Investigation of compression of puffing neon by deuterium current and plasma sheath in plasma focus discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kubes, P.; Cikhardt, J.; Cikhardtova, B.; Rezac, K.; Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Kortanek, J.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents the results of the research of the influence of compressed neon, injected by the gas-puff nozzle in front of the anode axis by the deuterium current and plasma sheath on the evolution of the pinch, and neutron production at the current of 2 MA. The intense soft X-ray emission shows the presence of neon in the central region of the pinch. During the implosion and stopping of the plasma sheath, the deuterium plasma penetrates into the internal neon layer. The total neutron yield of 10{sup 10}–10{sup 11} has a similar level as in the pure deuterium shots. The neutron and hard X-ray pulses from fusion D-D reaction are as well emitted both in the phase of the stopping implosion and during the evolution of instabilities at the transformation of plasmoidal structures and constrictions composed in this configuration from both gases. The fast deuterons can be accelerated at the decay of magnetic field of the current filaments in these structures.

  7. Testing of a Neon Loop Heat Pipe for Large Area Cryocooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin Lee

    2014-01-01

    Cryocooling of large areas such as optics, detector arrays, and cryogenic propellant tanks is required for future NASA missions. A cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP) can provide a closed-loop cooling system for this purpose and has many advantages over other devices in terms of reduced mass, reduced vibration, high reliability, and long life. A neon CLHP was tested extensively in a thermal vacuum chamber using a cryopump as the heat sink to characterize its transient and steady performance and verify its ability to cool large areas or components. Tests conducted included loop cool-down from the ambient temperature, startup, power cycle, heat removal capability, loop capillary limit and recovery from a dry-out, low power operation, and long duration steady state operation. The neon CLHP demonstrated robust operation. The loop could be cooled from the ambient temperature to subcritical temperatures very effectively, and could start successfully by applying power to both the pump and evaporator without any pre-conditioning. It could adapt to changes in the pump power andor evaporator power, and reach a new steady state very quickly. The evaporator could remove heat loads between 0.25W and 4W. When the pump capillary limit was exceeded, the loop could resume its normal function by reducing the pump power. Steady state operations were demonstrated for up to 6 hours. The ability of the neon loop to cool large areas was therefore successfully verified.

  8. PRESOLAR GRAINS FROM NOVAE: EVIDENCE FROM NEON AND HELIUM ISOTOPES IN COMET DUST COLLECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pepin, Robert O.; Palma, Russell L.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Starrfield, Sumner

    2011-12-01

    Presolar grains in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles carry non-solar isotopic signatures pointing to origins in supernovae, giant stars, and possibly other stellar sources. There have been suggestions that some of these grains condensed in the ejecta of classical nova outbursts, but the evidence is ambiguous. We report neon and helium compositions in particles captured on stratospheric collectors flown to sample materials from comets 26P/Grigg-Skjellerup and 55P/Tempel-Tuttle that point to condensation of their gas carriers in the ejecta of a neon (ONe) nova. The absence of detectable {sup 3}He in these particles indicates space exposure to solar wind irradiation of a few decades at most, consistent with origins in cometary dust streams. Measured {sup 4}He/{sup 20}Ne, {sup 20}Ne/{sup 22}Ne, {sup 21}Ne/{sup 22}Ne, and {sup 20}Ne/{sup 21}Ne isotope ratios, and a low upper limit on {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He, are in accord with calculations of nucleosynthesis in neon nova outbursts. Of these, the uniquely low {sup 4}He/{sup 20}Ne and high {sup 20}Ne/{sup 22}Ne ratios are the most diagnostic, reflecting the large predicted {sup 20}Ne abundances in the ejecta of such novae. The correspondence of measured Ne and He compositions in cometary matter with theoretical predictions is evidence for the presence of presolar grains from novae in the early solar system.

  9. Investigation of compression of puffing neon by deuterium current and plasma sheath in plasma focus discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubes, P.; Paduch, M.; Cikhardt, J.; Cikhardtova, B.; Rezac, K.; Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Kortanek, J.; Zielinska, E.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the results of the research of the influence of compressed neon, injected by the gas-puff nozzle in front of the anode axis by the deuterium current and plasma sheath on the evolution of the pinch, and neutron production at the current of 2 MA. The intense soft X-ray emission shows the presence of neon in the central region of the pinch. During the implosion and stopping of the plasma sheath, the deuterium plasma penetrates into the internal neon layer. The total neutron yield of 1010-1011 has a similar level as in the pure deuterium shots. The neutron and hard X-ray pulses from fusion D-D reaction are as well emitted both in the phase of the stopping implosion and during the evolution of instabilities at the transformation of plasmoidal structures and constrictions composed in this configuration from both gases. The fast deuterons can be accelerated at the decay of magnetic field of the current filaments in these structures.

  10. Data Collection, Access and Presentation Technologies in the National Ecological Observatory (NEON) Design (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulenbach, S. M.; Berukoff, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect data across the United States on the impacts of climate change, land use change and invasive species on ecosystem functions and biodiversity. In-situ sampling and distributed sensor networks, linked by an advanced cyberinfrastructure, will collect site-based data on a variety of organisms, soils, aquatic systems, atmosphere and climate. Targeted airborne remote sensing observations made by NEON as well as geographical data sets and satellite resources produced by Federal agencies will provide data at regional and national scales. The resulting data streams, collected over a 30-year period, will be synthesized into fully traceable information products that are freely and openly accessible to all users. We provide an overview of several collection, access and presentation technologies evaluated for use by observatory systems throughout the data product life cycle. Specifically, we discuss smart phone applications for citizen scientists as well as the use of handheld devices for sample collection and reporting from the field. Protocols for storing, queuing, and retrieving data from observatory sites located throughout the nation are highlighted as are the application of standards throughout the pipelined production of data products. We discuss the automated incorporation of provenance information and digital object identifiers for published data products. The use of widgets and personalized user portals for the discovery and dissemination of NEON data products are also presented.

  11. Neon isotopic composition of the mantle constrained by single vesicle analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péron, Sandrine; Moreira, Manuel; Colin, Aurélia; Arbaret, Laurent; Putlitz, Benita; Kurz, Mark D.

    2016-09-01

    The origin of volatiles on Earth is still a matter of debate. Noble gases are an efficient geochemical tool to constrain Earth formation processes due to their inertness. Several studies have focused on the neon isotopic composition of the lower mantle because the 20Ne/22Ne ratio is thought to reflect that of Earth's primordial components. Two models to explain the origin of light noble gases on Earth have been proposed: either solar wind implantation onto the Earth's solid precursors or dissolution into the mantle of a primordial atmosphere captured from solar nebula gas. In order to test these two models, we analyzed the noble gas compositions (helium, neon and argon) of two submarine oceanic island basalt glasses from Fernandina volcano (Galápagos archipelago), which have among the most primitive/unradiogenic terrestrial helium and neon isotopic compositions. Several sample pieces are studied both by step-crushing and by laser ablation analyses of single vesicles. Results of step-crushing are consistent with those of laser ablation analyses, but the latter results provide new insights into the origin of atmospheric contamination. The single-vesicle laser-ablation measurements overlap with the step crushing results, but have systematically higher 40Ar/36Ar, and 3He/36Ar, suggesting less atmospheric contamination using this method. The single vesicle data therefore suggest that atmospheric contamination is introduced by exposure to the modern atmosphere, after sample collection. 3He/4He values are about 23 times the atmospheric ratio (R/Ra) for the two Fernandina (Galápagos) samples, in agreement with previous studies. We obtain 20Ne/22Ne and 40Ar/36Ar isotopic ratios as high as 12.91 and 9400, respectively, for the mantle source of the Galápagos hotspot. The new data show that step-crushing and laser ablation analyses are complementary methods that should be used together to derive the noble gas ratios in uncontaminated samples. The results of neon

  12. Neon and Oxygen Abundances and Abundance Ratio in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Testa, P.

    2015-02-01

    In this work we determine the Ne/O abundance ratio from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) off-disk observations of quiescent streamers over the 1996-2008 period. We find that the Ne/O ratio is approximately constant over solar cycle 23 from 1996 to 2005, at a value of 0.099 ± 0.017 this value is lower than the transition region determinations from the quiet Sun used to infer the neon photospheric abundance from the oxygen photospheric abundance. Also, the Ne/O ratio we determined from SUMER is in excellent agreement with in situ determinations from ACE/SWICS. In 2005-2008, the Ne/O abundance ratio increased with time and reached 0.25 ± 0.05, following the same trend found in the slowest wind analyzed by ACE/SWICS. Further, we measure the absolute abundance in the corona for both oxygen and neon from the data set of 1996 November 22, obtaining A o = 8.99 ± 0.04 and A Ne = 7.92 ± 0.03, and we find that both elements are affected by the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, with oxygen being enhanced by a factor of 1.4-2.1 over its photospheric abundance, and neon being changed by a factor of 0.75-1.20. We conclude that the Ne/O ratio is not constant in the solar atmosphere, both in time and at different heights, and that it cannot be reliably used to infer the neon abundance in the photosphere. Also, we argue that the FIP effect was less effective during the minimum of solar cycle 24, and that the Ne/O = 0.25 ± 0.05 value measured at that time is closer to the true photospheric value, leading to a neon photospheric abundance larger than assumed by ≈40%. We discuss the implications of these results for the solar abundance problem, for the FIP effect, and for the identification of the source regions of the solar wind.

  13. Developing a Scalable Remote Sampling Design for the NEON Airborne Observation Platform (AOP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musinsky, J.; Wasser, L. A.; Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Petroy, S. B.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.; van Aardt, J. A.; Serbin, S.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) airborne observation platform (AOP) will collect co-registered high-resolution hyperspectral imagery, discrete and waveform LiDAR, and high-resolution digital photography for more than 60 terrestrial and 23 aquatic sites spread across the continental United States, Puerto Rico, Alaska and Hawaii on an annual basis over the next 30 years. These data, to be made freely available to the public, will facilitate the scaling of field-based biological, physical and chemical measurements to regional and continental scales, enabling a better understanding of the relationships between climate variability and change, land use change and invasive species, and their ecological consequences in areas not directly sampled by the NEON facilities. However, successful up-scaling of in situ measurements requires a flight sampling design that captures environmental heterogeneity and diversity (i.e., ecological and topographic gradients), is sensitive to temporal system variation (e.g., phenology), and can respond to major disturbance events. Alignment of airborne campaigns - composed of two payloads for nominal science acquisitions and one payload for PI-driven rapid-response campaigns -- with other ground, airborne (e.g., AVIRIS) and satellite (e.g., Landsat, MODIS) collections will further facilitate scaling between sensors and data sources of varying spatial and spectral resolution and extent. This presentation will discuss the approach, challenges and future goals associated with the development of NEON AOP's sampling design, using examples from the 2013 nominal flight campaigns in the Central Plains (NEON Domain 10) and the Pacific Southwest (Domain 17), and the rapid response flight campaign of the High Park Fire site outside of Fort Collins, CO. Determination of the specific flight coverage areas for each campaign involved analysis of the landscape scale ecological, geophysical and bioclimatic attributes and trends most closely

  14. Mystery #27

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-22

    article title:  MISR Mystery Image Quiz #27     View Larger ... describe these features? 3.   The name of the body of water partially shown at the bottom of the image is actually a ... to the surrounding aridity.  What is the name the body of water? 4.   At the bottom left of the image, small city ...

  15. Are oxygen and neon enriched in PNe and is the current solar Ne/O abundance ratio underestimated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Liu, X.-W.

    2008-09-01

    A thorough critical literature survey has been carried out for reliable measurements of oxygen and neon abundances of planetary nebulae (PNe) and HII regions. By contrasting the results of PNe and of HII regions, we aim to address the issues of the evolution of oxygen and neon in the interstellar medium (ISM) and in the late evolutionary phases of low- and intermediate-mass stars (LIMS), as well as the currently hotly disputed solar Ne/O abundance ratio. Through the comparisons, we find that neon abundance and Ne/O ratio increase with increasing oxygen abundance in both types of nebulae, with positive correlation coefficients larger than 0.75. The correlations suggest different enrichment mechanisms for oxygen and neon in the ISM, in the sense that the growth of neon is delayed compared to oxygen. The differences of abundances between PNe and HII regions are mainly attributed to the results of nucleosynthesis and dredge-up processes that occurred in the progenitor stars of PNe. We find that both these α-elements are significantly enriched at low metallicity (initial oxygen abundance <~8.0) but not at metallicity higher than the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The fact that Ne/O ratios measured in PNe are almost the same as those in HII regions, regardless of the metallicity, suggest a very similar production mechanism of neon and oxygen in intermediate-mass stars (IMS) of low initial metallicities and in more massive stars, a conjecture that requires verification by further theoretical studies. This result also strongly suggests that both the solar neon abundance and the Ne/O ratio should be revised upwards by ~0.22dex from the Asplund, Grevesse & Sauval values or by ~0.14dex from the Grevesse & Sauval values.

  16. Canopy Biomass Lidar (CBL) Acquisitions at NEON and TERN Forest Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, C.; Paynter, I.; Saenz, E.; Peri, F.; Wang, Z.; Erb, A.; Yang, X.; Strahler, A. H.; Li, Z.; van Aardt, J. A.; Kelbe, D.; Romanczyk, P.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.; Krause, K.; Leisso, N.; Kampe, T. U.; Meier, C. L.; Ritz, C.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Howe, G.; Martel, J.; Hewawasam, K.; Douglas, E. S.; Newnham, G.; Schaefer, M.; Armston, J.; Muir, J.; Tindall, D.; Phinn, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) offers the ability to capture complex forest structure through 3D reconstruction of multiple laser return point clouds. These reconstructions provide detailed information on understory, mid-story and canopy structure and allow quantification of important ecosystem factors such as biomass, vegetation productivity, forest health and response to disturbance. Used in conjunction with airborne lidar and satellite imaging, TLS is a powerful calibration/validation tool for improved regional scale ecological surveying and modeling. Repeated deployments facilitate the estimation of growth rates, nutrient fluxes, and other essential parameters in global scale climate and biogeochemic modeling. Routine TLS acquisitions at long-term research sites provide an opportunity to capture temporal variations due to natural and anthropogenic effects. While discrete return and full waveform TLS instruments (such as the Dual Wavelength Echidna Lidar (DWEL)) are increasingly being deployed, there is also a need for high speed, low-cost, highly portable TLS instruments to augment these more powerful, high resolution lidars. The Canopy Biomass Lidar (CBL) is a light, fast-scanning, time-of-flight, 905nm, TLS instrument, conceived by the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KUL) and refined by the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). Two CBLs, constructed by the University of Massachusetts Boston, were deployed alongside the full waveform DWEL (developed by Boston University, University of Massachusetts Lowell, University of Massachusetts Boston, and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)) during the June 2013 NEON Airborne Observation Platform (AOP) campaign in the Sierra National Forest, CA. Three sites were characterized by both the CBLs and the DWEL in the Soaproot and Teakettle regions (where relocatable NEON towers will be situated). Up to 5 multiple scans were acquired by the DWEL, with an additional 8-12 scans obtained

  17. Quantum path-integral study of the phase diagram and isotope effects of neon.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, R; Herrero, C P

    2008-11-28

    The phase diagram of natural neon has been calculated for temperatures in the range of 17-50 K and pressures between 10(-2) and 2 x 10(3) bar. The phase coexistence between solid, liquid, and gas phases has been determined by the calculation of the separate free energy of each phase as a function of temperature. Thus, for a given pressure, the coexistence temperature was obtained by the condition of equal free energy of coexisting phases. The free energy was calculated by using nonequilibrium techniques such as adiabatic switching and reversible scaling. The phase diagram obtained by classical Monte Carlo simulations has been compared to that obtained by quantum path-integral simulations. Quantum effects related to the finite mass of neon cause that coexistence lines are shifted toward lower temperatures when compared to the classical limit. The shift found in the triple point amounts to 1.5 K, i.e., about 6% of the triple-point temperature. The triple-point isotope effect has been determined for (20)Ne, (21)Ne, (22)Ne, and natural neon. The simulation data show satisfactory agreement to previous experimental results, which report a shift of about 0.15 K between triple-point temperatures of (20)Ne and (22)Ne. The vapor pressure isotope effect has been calculated for both solid and liquid phases at triple-point conditions. The quantum simulations predict that this isotope effect is larger in the solid than in the liquid phase, and the calculated values show nearly quantitative agreement to available experimental data. PMID:19045868

  18. Angular Correlation of Electrons Emitted by Double Auger Decay of K-Shell Ionized Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew Philip

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated in detail the 4-body continuum state produced when core-ionized neon undergoes Double-Auger (DA) decay, using COLd Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS ). We conducted the experiment at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source (LBNL-ALS) beamline 11.0.2. The synchrotron operated in 2-bunch mode and outputted an elliptically polarized, pulsed photon beam (hn=872.9eV), sufficient to K-shell ionize neon just above threshold. Our analysis supports research showing that Auger electrons tend to share energy asymmetrically. We qualitatively compared this result to Photo-Double Ionization (PDI) of helium. Further, we confirm research that shows how Auger electrons that share energy symmetrically can be modeled by the elastic-like knock-out process plus Post-Collision Interaction ( PCI) effects. New observations include the angular correlation between the photo-electron and each respective Auger electron, for specific ranges of energy sharing. We identify a broad feature in the asymmetric case that shows a level of interaction between electrons that until recently, has disagreed with theory. Additionally, we consider the angular correlation between the photo-electron and the momentum sum of the Auger electrons. We observe that the angular correlation between this sum and the photo-electron in the highly asymmetric case is nearly identical to the correlation between just the fast-Auger and the photo-electron - as expected. In the case of symmetric energy sharing, the sum momentum vector appears to be isotropic, particularly for small angles of interaction. Finally, we acknowledge two novel methods of calibration. The first, uses well known line-energies to calibrate the spectrometer. These lines correspond to the decay channels of core-excited neon, Ne(1 s-13p). The second, describes a method to statistically weight list-mode data in order to calibrate it to well known physical features (e.g., isotropic distributions).

  19. Experimental study of the effects of helium-neon laser radiation on repair of injured tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong-Qing; Li, Zhu-Yi; Weng, Long-Jiang; An, Mei; Li, Kai-Yun; Chen, Shao-Rong; Wang, Jian-Xin; Lu, Yu

    1993-03-01

    Despite extensive research into the biology of tendon healing, predictably restoring normal function to a digit after a flexor tendon laceration remains one of the most difficult problems facing the hand surgeon. The challenge of simultaneously achieving tendon healing while minimizing the peritendinous scar formation, which limits tendon gliding, has captured the attention of investigators for many years. It has been said that low-power density helium-neon laser radiation had effects on anti-inflammation, detumescence, progressive wound healing, and reducing intestinal adhesions. This experimental study aims at whether helium-neon laser can reduce injured tendon adhesions and improve functional recovery of the injured tendon. Fifty white Leghorn hens were used. Ten were randomly assigned as a normal control group, the other forty were used in the operation. After anesthetizing them with Amytal, a half of the profundus tendons of the second and third foretoes on both sides of the feet were cut. Postoperatively, the hens moved freely in the cages. One side of the toes operated on were randomly chosen as a treatment group, the other side served as an untreated control group. The injured tendon toes in the treatment group were irradiated for twenty minutes daily with a fiber light needle of helium-neon laser therapeutic apparatus (wavelength, 6328 angstroms) at a constant power density of 12.74 mW/cm2, the first exposure taking place 24 hours after the operation. The longest course of treatment was 3 weeks. The control group was not irradiated. At 3 days, 1, 2, 3, and 5 weeks after surgery, 8 hens were sacrificed and their tendons were examined. The experimental results: (1) active, passive flexion and tendon gliding functional recovery were significantly better in the treatment group (p < 0.01); (2) width and thickness of the tendon at the cut site were significantly smaller in the treatment group (p < 0.01); (3) degrees of tendon adhesions were significantly lighter

  20. Coverage-dependent quantum versus classical scattering of thermal neon atoms from Li/Cu(100).

    PubMed

    Maclaren, D A; Huang, C; Levi, A C; Allison, W

    2008-09-01

    We show that subtle variations in surface structure can enhance quantum scattering and quench atom-surface energy transfer. The scattering of thermal energy neon atoms from a lithium overlayer on a copper substrate switches between a classical regime, dominated by multiphonon interactions, and a quantum regime, dominated by elastic diffraction. The transition is achieved by simple tailoring of the lithium coverage and quantum scattering dominates only in the narrow coverage range of theta=0.3-0.6 ML. The results are described qualitatively using a modified Debye-Waller model that incorporates an approximate quantum treatment of the adsorbate-substrate vibration. PMID:19044885

  1. Another neon nova - Early infrared photometry and spectroscopy of Nova Cygni 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, T. L.; Gehrz, R. D.; Miles, J. W.; Houck, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared photometry and spectrophotometry of Nova Cygni 1992 taken within 54 days of its eruption show a strong 12.8-micron Ne II forbidden emission line as well as hydrogen recombination lines. Spectra with lambda/Delta lambda of about 2000 resolve the Ne II forbidden and 12.37-micron Hu-alpha lines with about 2200 km/s (FWHM). The Ne II forbidden line shows multiple velocity components. The amount of forbidden Ne II required to produce the observed emission feature exceeds the solar abundance of neon by at least a factor of 4.

  2. Equilibrium thickness of carbon target interacting with nitrogen and neon ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkova, Yu. A.; Novikov, N. V.; Teplova, Ya. A.

    2016-04-01

    The method for calculation of the target thickness which is required for the formation of equilibrium charge distribution of ions is proposed. The description of nonequilibrium processes is based on empirical estimations of charge-exchange cross sections, taking the density effect for solids into account. The variation of the average charge and the width of the nonequilibrium charge distribution as a function of the target thickness is analyzed. The results of calculations for nitrogen and neon ions in carbon are compared with experimental data.

  3. Impact excitation of neon atoms by heated seed electrons in filamentary plasma gratings.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liping; Li, Wenxue; Zhou, Hui; Ding, Liang'en; Zeng, Heping

    2013-02-15

    We demonstrate impact ionization and dissociative recombination of neon (Ne) atoms by means of seeded-electron heating and subsequent electron-atom collisions in an ultraviolet plasma grating, allowing for a substantial fraction of the neutral Ne atomic population to reside in high-lying excited states. A buffer gas with relatively low ionization potential (nitrogen or argon) was used to provide high-density seed electrons. A three-step excitation model is verified by the fluorescence emission from the impact excitation of Ne atoms. PMID:23455081

  4. Optical excitation and decay dynamics of ytterbium atoms embedded in a solid neon matrix.

    PubMed

    Xu, C-Y; Hu, S-M; Singh, J; Bailey, K; Lu, Z-T; Mueller, P; O'Connor, T P; Welp, U

    2011-08-26

    Neutral ytterbium atoms embedded in solid neon qualitatively retain the structure of free atoms. Despite the atom-solid interaction, the 6s6p ³P(0) level is found to remain metastable with its lifetimes determined to be in the range of ten to hundreds of seconds. The atomic population can be almost completely transferred between the ground level and the metastable level via optical excitation and spontaneous decay. The dynamics of this process is examined and is used to explicitly demonstrate that the transition broadening mechanism is homogeneous. PMID:21929234

  5. Correlation energy and dispersion interaction in the ab initio potential energy curve of the neon dimer.

    PubMed

    Bytautas, Laimutis; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    A close approximation to the empirical potential energy curve of the neon dimer is obtained by coupled-cluster singles plus doubles plus noniterative triples calculations by using nonaugmented correlation-consistent basis sets without counterpoise corrections and complementing them by three-term extrapolations to the complete basis set limit. The potential energy is resolved into a self-consistent-field Hartree-Fock contribution and a correlation contribution. The latter is shown to decay in the long-range region in accordance with the empirical dispersion expansion. PMID:18537423

  6. RADIATION CHEMISTRY OF HIGH ENERGY CARBON, NEON AND ARGON IONS: INTEGRAL YIELDS FROM FERROUS SULFATE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Christman, E.A.; Appleby, A.; Jayko, M.

    1980-07-01

    Chemical yields of Fe{sup 3+} have been measured from FeSO{sub 4} solutions irradiated in the presence and absence of oxygen with carbon, neon, and argon ions from the Berkeley Bevalac facility. G(Fe{sup 3+}) decreases with increasing beam penetration and with increasing atomic number of the incident ion. The results are compared with current theoretical expectations of the behavior of these particles in an aqueous absorber. The chemical yields are consistently higher than theoretically predicted, by amounts varying from <6.2% (carbon ions) to <13.2% (argon ions). The additional yields are possibly attributable to fragmentation of the primary particle beams.

  7. Observations of multiple stationary striation phenomena in an atmospheric pressure neon plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yutaka; Sakakita, Hajime; Yamada, Hiromasa; Yamagishi, Yusuke; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Kiyama, Satoru; Fujiwara, Masanori; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Kim, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    The formation of multiple stationary striations between a nozzle exit and a conductive target plate was clearly observed at regular intervals using a digital camera along an atmospheric pressure plasma jet of dielectric barrier discharge using a neon gas into ambient air. From the results of measuring using a high-speed camera during the positive current phase, the emission initially started in the middle between the nozzle and the target, and striations progressed in both upward and downward directions. During the negative current phase, the emission initially started in a region near the target, and the striations rapidly progressed to the nozzle.

  8. Correlation energy and dispersion interaction in the ab initio potential energy curve of the neon dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Bytautas, L.; Ruedenberg, K.

    2008-06-06

    A close approximation to the empirical potential energy curve of the neon dimer is obtained by coupled-cluster singles plus doubles plus noniterative triples calculations by using nonaugmented correlation-consistent basis sets without counterpoise corrections and complementing them by three-term extrapolations to the complete basis set limit. The potential energy is resolved into a self-consistent-field Hartree-Fock contribution and a correlation contribution. The latter is shown to decay in the long-range region in accordance with the empirical dispersion expansion.

  9. Generation of electron beams from a laser wakefield acceleration in pure neon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A. M. Mirzaie, Mohammad; Elsied, Ahmed M. M.; Ge, Xulei; Liu, Feng; Sokollik, Thomas; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie; Tao, Mengze; Chen, Liming

    2014-08-15

    We report on the generation of quasimonoenergetic electron beams by the laser wakefield acceleration of 17–50 TW, 30 fs laser pulses in pure neon gas jet. The generated beams have energies in the range 40–120 MeV and up to ∼430 pC of charge. At a relatively high density, we observed multiple electron beamlets which has been interpreted by simulations to be the result of breakup of the laser pulse into multiple filaments in the plasma. Each filament drives its own wakefield and generates its own electron beamlet.

  10. Optical excitation and decay dynamics of ytterbium atoms embedded in a solid neon matrix.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.-Y.; Hu, S.-M.; Singh, J.; Bailey, K.; Lu, Z.-T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Welp, U.

    2011-09-01

    Neutral ytterbium atoms embedded in solid neon qualitatively retain the structure of free atoms. Despite the atom-solid interaction, the 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} level is found to remain metastable with its lifetimes determined to be in the range of ten to hundreds of seconds. The atomic population can be almost completely transferred between the ground level and the metastable level via optical excitation and spontaneous decay. The dynamics of this process is examined and is used to explicitly demonstrate that the transition broadening mechanism is homogeneous.

  11. Optical Excitation and Decay Dynamics of Ytterbium Atoms Embedded in a Solid Neon Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.-Y.; Lu, Z.-T.; Hu, S.-M.; Singh, J.; Bailey, K.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Welp, U.

    2011-08-26

    Neutral ytterbium atoms embedded in solid neon qualitatively retain the structure of free atoms. Despite the atom-solid interaction, the 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} level is found to remain metastable with its lifetimes determined to be in the range of ten to hundreds of seconds. The atomic population can be almost completely transferred between the ground level and the metastable level via optical excitation and spontaneous decay. The dynamics of this process is examined and is used to explicitly demonstrate that the transition broadening mechanism is homogeneous.

  12. Application of gas chromatographic method in simultaneous measurements of helium, argon and neon concentration in groundwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najman, J.; Bielewski, J.; Sliwka, I.

    2012-04-01

    Helium concentration in groundwater is a fine indicator in water dating in a range from a hundred to tens of thousands of years. Gas chromatography (GC) measurements of helium can be used as an alternative to mass spectrometry (MS) determinations of 4He for groundwater dating [1]. Argon and neon concentrations mainly serve for determining the temperature of recharge and the air excess which is needed to correct measured values of helium concentration [2] . A chromatographic measurement system of helium, argon and neon concentration in groundwater is presented [3]. Water samples are taken from groundwater with a precise procedure without contamination with air in a special stainless steel vessels of volume equal to 2900 cm3. Helium is extracted from water samples using the head-space method. After enrichment by cryotrap method helium is analyzed in the gas chromatograph equipped with the thermal conductivity detector (TCD) with detection limit of about 2.8 ng He. The helium limit of detection of presented method is 1,2·10-8 cm3STP/gH2O [4]. We are currently working on adapting the method of cryogenic enrichment of helium concentration for simultaneous measurements of the concentration of helium, argon and neon using single sample of groundwater. Neon will be measured with the thermal conductivity detector and capillary column filled with molecular sieve 5A. Argon will be analyzed also with the thermal conductivity detector and packed column filled with molecular sieve 5A. This work was supported by grant No. N N525 3488 38 from the polish National Science Centre. [1] A. Zuber, W. Ciężkowski, K. Różański (red.), Tracer methods in hydrogeological studies - a methodological guide. Wroclaw University of Technology Publishing House, Wroclaw, 2007 (in polish). [2] P. Mochalski, Chromatographic method for the determination of Ar, Ne and N2 in water, Ph.D. thesis, Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences in Krakow, 2003 (in polish). [3] A. Żurek, P

  13. [Combined helium-neon laser therapy in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Korochkin, I M; Kartelishev, A V; Babushkina, G V; Kapustina, G M

    1990-03-01

    The paper describes the combined helium-neon-laser (HNL) therapy (intravenous and topical) developed by the authors to treat patients with coronary heart disease. A high efficacy of this therapy mode was demonstrated in patients over 70 years of age with Functional Classes III-IV angina refractory to antianginal agents. The mechanisms responsible for therapeutic efficiency of laser irradiation were studied at the membraneous and cellular levels. There is evidence that the combined HNL-therapy had advantages over topical HNL exposure in terms of higher clinical efficiency and patterns of abnormal chemical changes. PMID:2381119

  14. Exploring the use of Citizen Science Phenology Data to Inform the Development of NEON Aquatic Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Parker, S.; Roehm, C. L.

    2012-12-01

    The proliferation of citizen science programs and activities in recent years has resulted in data sets at varying geographic scales representing many aspects of environmental science that are having an impact on scientific research. Citizen science programs are uniquely situated at the interface of science and education and therefore, can help advance the needs and goals of both communities. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) has incorporated citizen science as a cornerstone of its Education and Public Engagement Program. Data from its flagship citizen science program, Project BudBurst (budburst.org) is being used to help inform the NEON Aquatic team as it develops sampling strategies. Project BudBurst is a national citizen science initiative designed to engage the public in observations of plant phenology events with the intent of raising awareness of climate change, and create a cadre of informed citizen scientists. Citizen science programs such as Project BudBurst provide the opportunity for students and interested laypersons to actively participate in scientific research. Such programs are important not only from an educational perspective, but because they also enable scientists to broaden the geographic and temporal scale of their observations. Using scientifically vetted protocols, Project BudBurst participants have submitted thousands of observations from all 50 states. The Aquatic team at NEON is using the "First Leaf" and "Leaf Fall" data from Project BudBurst to help inform temporal sampling strategies for aquatic biological measurements. The spatial coverage of the Project BudBurst dataset has allowed us to predict a range of spring and fall dates in each of the NEON domains with which we can coordinate plant, algae, and invertebrate sampling efforts in streams and lakes. Using phenological characteristics combined with the identification of leaf on and leaf off dates, multiple regression and cluster analyses are being performed against

  15. The isotopic composition of neon and magnesium in the low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Simpson, J. A.; Wefel, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    The ratios Ne-22/Ne-20 and Mg-26/Mg-24 were measured in galactic cosmic rays by the IMP-7 satellite in the 60 to 230 MeV/nucleon range. The neon cosmic ray source ratio Ne-22/Ne-20 is about 0.38, which is much larger than the current solar system relationship; the Mg data agrees with the solar system isotopic ratio of 0.14 at the cosmic ray source. The Ne and Mg source ratios are explained by supernova models, and become a new constraint which should be satisfied by any model of cosmic ray origin.

  16. Sub-cooled liquid nitrogen cryogenic system with neon turbo-refrigerator for HTS power equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Hirai, H.; Nara, N.; Ozaki, S.; Hirokawa, M.; Eguchi, T.; Hayashi, H.; Iwakuma, M.; Shiohara, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a prototype sub-cooled liquid nitrogen (LN) circulation system for HTS power equipment. The system consists of a neon turbo-Brayton refrigerator with a LN sub-cooler and LN circulation pump unit. The neon refrigerator has more than 2 kW cooling power at 65 K. The LN sub-cooler is a plate-fin type heat exchanger and is installed in a refrigerator cold box. In order to carry out the system performance tests, a dummy cryostat having an electric heater was set instead of a HTS power equipment. Sub-cooled LN is delivered into the sub-cooler by the LN circulation pump and cooled within it. After the sub-cooler, sub-cooled LN goes out from the cold box to the dummy cryostat, and comes back to the pump unit. The system can control an outlet sub-cooled LN temperature by adjusting refrigerator cooling power. The refrigerator cooling power is automatically controlled by the turbo-compressor rotational speed. In the performance tests, we increased an electric heater power from 200 W to 1300 W abruptly. We confirmed the temperature fluctuation was about ±1 K. We show the cryogenic system details and performance test results in this paper.

  17. Triple point temperature of neon isotopes: Dependence on nitrogen impurity and sealed-cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Pavese, F.; Steur, P. P. M.; Giraudi, D.

    2013-09-11

    This paper illustrates a study conducted at INRIM, to further check how some quantities influence the value of the triple point temperature of the neon high-purity isotopes {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne. The influence of nitrogen as a chemical impurity in neon is critical with regard to the present best total uncertainty achieved in the measurement of these triple points, but only one determination is available in the literature. Checks are reported, performed on two different samples of {sup 22}Ne known to contain a N{sub 2} amount of 157⋅10{sup −6}, using two different models of sealed cells. The model of the cell can, in principle, have some effects on the shape of the melting plateau or on the triple point temperature observed for the sample sealed in it. This can be due to cell thermal parameters, or because the INRIM cell element mod. c contains many copper wires closely packed, which can, in principle, constrain the interface and induce a premelting-like effect. The reported results on a cell mod. Bter show no evident effect from the cell model and provide a value for the effect of N{sub 2} in Ne liquidus point of 8.6(1.9) μK ppm N{sub 2}{sup −1}, only slightly different from the literature datum.

  18. Charge state of anomalous cosmic-ray nitrogen, oxygen, and neon: SAMPEX observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klecker, B.; Mcnab, M. C.; Blake, J. B.; Hamilton, D. C.; Hovestadt, D.; Kaestle, H.; Looper, M. D.; Mason, G. M.; Mazur, J. E.; Scholer, M.

    1995-01-01

    We report observations of the ionization state of anomalous cosmic-ray (ACR) nitrogen, oxygen, and neon during the period 1992 October to 1993 May, carried out with instrumentation on the Solar, Anomalous & Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) spacecraft. The low-altitude (510 x 675 km) and high-inclination (82 deg) orbit enables SAMPEX to sample the interplanetary ACR fluxes on each polar pass and then to observe the cutoff of these fluxes by the geomagnetic field at lower latitudes. The arrival time and direction of each ion is recorded by the instruments, allowing detailed calculations of the particle's trajectory through the Earth's magnetic field and thereby placing upper limits on the ionization state of the particles. We find (a) that ACR nitrogen, oxygen, and neon each contain singly ionized particles and (b) that ACR oxygen is predominantly singly ionized with an upper limit of 10% for higher ionization states. These ionization states confirm theories of ACR origin as neutral interstellar material that is singly ionized near the Sun by UV or charge exchange with the solar wind, and is subsequently accelerated in the outer heliosphere.

  19. Control of coherent excitation of neon in the extreme ultraviolet regime.

    PubMed

    Plenge, Jürgen; Wirsing, Andreas; Raschpichler, Christopher; Wassermann, Bernhard; Rühl, Eckart

    2011-01-01

    Coherent excitation of a superposition of Rydberg states in neon by the 13th harmonic of an intense 804 nm pulse and the formation of a wave packet is reported. Pump-probe experiments are performed, where the 3d-manifold of the 2p6-->2p5 (2P3/2) 3d [1/2]1- and 2p6-->2p5 (2P3/2) 3d [3/2]1-transitions are excited by an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation pulse, which is centered at 20.05 eV photon energy. The temporal evolution of the excited state population is probed by ionization with a time-delayed 804 nm pulse. Control of coherent transient excitation and wave packet dynamics in the XUV-regime is demonstrated, where the spectral phase of the 13th harmonic is used as a control parameter. Modulation of the phase is achieved by propagation of the XUV-pulse through neon of variable gas density. The experimental results indicate that phase-shaped high-order harmonics can be used to control fundamental coherent excitation processes in the XUV-regime. PMID:22452090

  20. Experimental evidence of chemical components in the bonding of helium and neon with neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, David; Bartocci, Alessio; Grandinetti, Felice; Falcinelli, Stefano; Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2015-04-13

    The complexes of helium and neon with gaseous neutral molecules are generally perceived to be van der Waals adducts held together by physical (non-covalent) forces, owing to the combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. Molecular beam experiments confirm that this is the case for He-CF4 , Ne-CF4 adducts, but revealed that the interaction of He and Ne with CCl4 features an appreciable contribution of chemical components that arise from the anisotropy of the electron density of CCl4 that enhances a charge transfer from Ng (Ng=He, Ne). These findings furnish a novel assay of the bonding capabilities of helium and neon, and invite to revisit the neutral complexes of these elements as systems of chemical relevance. The CCl4 -Ng are also peculiar examples of halogen bonds, a group of interactions of major current concern. Finally, this investigation is a prelude to the development of semi-empirical models for force fields aimed to the unified description of static and dynamical properties of systems of comparable or higher complexity. PMID:25755007

  1. The perception of subjective contours and neon color spreading figures in young infants.

    PubMed

    Kavsek, Michael

    2009-02-01

    The goal of the present habituation-dishabituation study was to explore sensitivity to subjective contours and neon color spreading patterns in infants. The first experiment was a replication of earlier investigations that showed evidence that even young infants are capable of perceiving subjective contours. Participants 4 months of age were habituated to a subjective Kanizsa square and were tested afterward for their ability to differentiate between the subjective square and a nonsubjective pattern that was constructed by rotating some of the inducing elements. Data analysis indicated a significant preference for the nonsubjective pattern. A control condition ensured that this result was not generated by the difference in figural symmetry or by the local differences between the test displays. In the second experiment, infant perception of a neon color spreading display was analyzed. Again, 4-month-old infants could discriminate between the illusory figure and a nonillusory pattern. Furthermore, infants in a control group did not respond to the difference in symmetry and the local differences between two nonillusory targets. Overall, the results show that young infants respond to illusory figures that are generated by either implicit T-junctions (Experiment 1) or implicit X-junctions (Experiment 2). The findings are interpreted against the background of the neurophysiological model proposed by Grossberg and Mingolla (1985). PMID:19304630

  2. Optical absorption of small copper clusters in neon: Cu(n), (n = 1-9).

    PubMed

    Lecoultre, S; Rydlo, A; Félix, C; Buttet, J; Gilb, S; Harbich, W

    2011-02-21

    We present optical absorption spectra in the UV-visible range (1.6 eV < ℏω < 5.5 eV) of mass selected neutral copper clusters Cu(n)(n = 1-9) embedded in a solid neon matrix at 7 K. The atom and the dimer have already been measured in neon matrices, while the absorption spectra for sizes between Cu(3) and Cu(9) are entirely (n = 6-9) or in great part new. They show a higher complexity and a larger number of transitions distributed over the whole energy range compared to similar sizes of silver clusters. The experimental spectra are compared to the time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) implemented in the TURBOMOLE package. The analysis indicates that for energies larger than 3 eV the transitions are mainly issued from d-type states; however, the TD-DFT scheme does not reproduce well the detailed structure of the absorption spectra. Below 3 eV the agreement for transitions issued from s-type states is better. PMID:21341840

  3. Mechanism of variable structural colour in the neon tetra: quantitative evaluation of the Venetian blind model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, S.; Matsuhana, B.; Tanaka, S.; Inouye, Y.; Oshima, N.; Kinoshita, S.

    2011-01-01

    The structural colour of the neon tetra is distinguishable from those of, e.g., butterfly wings and bird feathers, because it can change in response to the light intensity of the surrounding environment. This fact clearly indicates the variability of the colour-producing microstructures. It has been known that an iridophore of the neon tetra contains a few stacks of periodically arranged light-reflecting platelets, which can cause multilayer optical interference phenomena. As a mechanism of the colour variability, the Venetian blind model has been proposed, in which the light-reflecting platelets are assumed to be tilted during colour change, resulting in a variation in the spacing between the platelets. In order to quantitatively evaluate the validity of this model, we have performed a detailed optical study of a single stack of platelets inside an iridophore. In particular, we have prepared a new optical system that can simultaneously measure both the spectrum and direction of the reflected light, which are expected to be closely related to each other in the Venetian blind model. The experimental results and detailed analysis are found to quantitatively verify the model. PMID:20554565

  4. Mechanism of variable structural colour in the neon tetra: quantitative evaluation of the Venetian blind model.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, S; Matsuhana, B; Tanaka, S; Inouye, Y; Oshima, N; Kinoshita, S

    2011-01-01

    The structural colour of the neon tetra is distinguishable from those of, e.g., butterfly wings and bird feathers, because it can change in response to the light intensity of the surrounding environment. This fact clearly indicates the variability of the colour-producing microstructures. It has been known that an iridophore of the neon tetra contains a few stacks of periodically arranged light-reflecting platelets, which can cause multilayer optical interference phenomena. As a mechanism of the colour variability, the Venetian blind model has been proposed, in which the light-reflecting platelets are assumed to be tilted during colour change, resulting in a variation in the spacing between the platelets. In order to quantitatively evaluate the validity of this model, we have performed a detailed optical study of a single stack of platelets inside an iridophore. In particular, we have prepared a new optical system that can simultaneously measure both the spectrum and direction of the reflected light, which are expected to be closely related to each other in the Venetian blind model. The experimental results and detailed analysis are found to quantitatively verify the model. PMID:20554565

  5. The solar wind neon abundance observed with ACE/SWICS and ULYSSES/SWICS

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, Paul; Raines, Jim M.; Lepri, Susan T.; Thomas, Jonathan W.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Landi, Enrico; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Von Steiger, Rudolf

    2014-07-01

    Using in situ ion spectrometry data from ACE/SWICS, we determine the solar wind Ne/O elemental abundance ratio and examine its dependence on wind speed and evolution with the solar cycle. We find that Ne/O is inversely correlated with wind speed, is nearly constant in the fast wind, and correlates strongly with solar activity in the slow wind. In fast wind streams with speeds above 600 km s{sup –1}, we find Ne/O = 0.10 ± 0.02, in good agreement with the extensive polar observations by Ulysses/SWICS. In slow wind streams with speeds below 400 km s{sup –1}, Ne/O ranges from a low of 0.12 ± 0.02 at solar maximum to a high of 0.17 ± 0.03 at solar minimum. These measurements place new and significant empirical constraints on the fractionation mechanisms governing solar wind composition and have implications for the coronal and photospheric abundances of neon and oxygen. The results are made possible by a new data analysis method that robustly identifies rare elements in the measured ion spectra. The method is also applied to Ulysses/SWICS data, which confirms the ACE observations and extends our view of solar wind neon into the three-dimensional heliosphere.

  6. Double deuterated acetylacetone in neon matrices: infrared spectroscopy, photoreactivity and the tunneling process.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Quintanilla, Alejandro; Chevalier, Michèle; Crépin, Claudine

    2016-07-27

    The effect of deuteration of acetylacetone (C5O2H8) is explored by means of IR spectroscopy of its single and double deuterated isotopologues trapped in neon matrices. The whole vibrational spectra of chelated enols are very sensitive to the H-D exchange of the hydrogen atom involved in the internal hydrogen bond. UV excitation of double deuterated acetylacetone isolated in neon matrices induces the formation of four open enol isomers which can be divided into two groups of two conformers, depending on their formation kinetics. Within each group, one conformer is more stable than the other: slow conformer interconversion due to a tunneling process is observed in the dark at low temperature. Moreover, IR laser irradiation at the OD stretching overtone frequency is used to induce interconversion either from the most stable to the less stable conformer or the opposite, depending on the excitation wavelength. The interconversion process is of great help to assign conformers which are definitively identified by comparison between experimental and calculated IR spectra. Kinetic constants of the tunneling process at play are theoretically estimated and agree perfectly with experiments, including previous experiments with the totally hydrogenated acetylacetone [Lozada García et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 3450]. PMID:27412624

  7. Biostimulation of wound healing in vivo by a helium-neon laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, R.F.; Abergel, R.P.; White, R.A.; Dwyer, R.M.; Castel, J.C.; Uitto, J.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical observations have suggested that low-energy lasers might stimulate wound healing. To understand the mechanism of the biostimulation, we previously examined the effects of low-energy lasers on collagen production by human skin fibroblasts and reported an increase of collagen synthesis in vitro. To examine the effects of low-energy lasers in vivo, hairless mice were experimentally wounded, sutured, and subjected to laser irradiation by a helium-neon laser with a power output of 1.56 mW and an energy fluence of 1.22 Joules/cm2. Experimental wounds were subjected to laser treatment every other day for 2 months; control wounds remained untreated. Specimens from the wounds were then examined for histological findings, tensile strength, and total collagen content. Results demonstrated a considerable improvement in the tensile strength of the laser-irradiated wounds at 1 and 2 weeks. Furthermore, the total collagen content was significantly increased at 2 months when compared with control wounds. These results suggest a beneficial effect of the helium-neon laser on wound healing in vivo.

  8. Hydrodynamic models for novae with ejecta rich in oxygen, neon and magnesium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Sparks, W. M.; Truran, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics of a new class of novae are identified and explained. This class consists of those objects that have been observed to eject material rich in oxygen, neon, magnesium, and aluminum at high velocities. We propose that for this class of novae the outburst is occurring not on a carbon-oxygen white dwarf but on an oxygen-neon-magnesium white dwarf which has evolved from a star which had a main sequence mass of approx. 8 solar masses to approx. 12 solar masses. An outburst was simulated by evolving 1.25 solar mass white dwarfs accreting hydrogen rich material at various rates. The effective enrichment of the envelope by ONeMg material from the core is simulated by enhancing oxygen in the accreted layers. The resulting evolutionary sequences can eject the entire accreted envelope plus core material at high velocities. They can also become super-Eddington at maximum bolometric luminosity. The expected frequency of such events (approx. 1/4) is in good agreement with the observed numbers of these novae.

  9. Abundance ratios of oxygen, neon, and magnesium in solar active regions and flares: The FIP effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widing, K. G.; Feldman, U.

    1995-01-01

    Relative abundances of oxygen, neon, and magnesium have been derived for a sample of nine solar active regions, flares, and an erupting prominance by combining plots of the ion differential emission measures. The observations were photographed in the 300-600 A range by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) spectroheliograph on Skylab. Methods for deriving the Mg/Ne abundance ratio-which measures the separation between the low- first ionization potential (FIP) and high-FIP abundnace plateaus-have been described in previous papers. In this paper we describe the spectroscopic methods for deriving the O/Ne abundance ratio, which gives the ratio between two high-FIP elements. The plot of the O/Ne ratio versus the Mg/Ne ratio in the sample of nine Skylab events is shown. The variation in the Mg/Ne ratio by a factor of 6 is associated with a much smaller range in the O/Ne ratio. This is broadly consistent with the presence of the standard FIP pattern of abundances in the outer atmosphere of the Sun. However, a real change in the relative abundances of oxygen and neon by a factor of 1.5 cannot be excluded.

  10. Chronic myofascial pain: management by low-output helium-neon laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Waylonis, G W; Wilke, S; O'Toole, D; Waylonis, D A; Waylonis, D B

    1988-12-01

    Therapeutic benefits of low-output helium-neon laser therapy have not been established, but laser therapy has been suggested as an effective means of treating many acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain syndromes. Although not released for general clinical use by the FA, the helium-neon laser has been promoted to physical therapists and athletic trainers as potentially useful for the treatment of pain syndromes. In particular, it has been proposed that it may be more effective than conventional measures such as medication and conventional physical therapy in the treatment of myofascial pain syndromes (fibrositis, fibromyalgia). The citations in the literature include only case reports. Sixty-two patients were treated by using acupuncture points. Two sessions of five treatments were given six weeks apart. A crossover double-blind technique was used in the treatments. The clinical responses were assessed using portions of the McGill Pain Questionnaire. No statistical difference between the treatment and the placebo groups could be determined. PMID:3063230

  11. Time delay between photoemission from the 2p and 2s subshells of neon

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, L. R.; Lysaght, M. A.; Parker, J. S.; Hart, H. W. van der; Taylor, K. T.

    2011-12-15

    The R-matrix incorporating time (RMT) method is a method developed recently for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for multielectron atomic systems exposed to intense short-pulse laser light. We have employed the RMT method to investigate the time delay in the photoemission of an electron liberated from a 2p orbital in a neon atom with respect to one released from a 2s orbital following absorption of an attosecond xuv pulse. Time delays due to xuv pulses in the range 76-105 eV are presented. For an xuv pulse at the experimentally relevant energy of 105.2 eV, we calculate the time delay to be 10.2{+-}1.3 attoseconds (as), somewhat larger than estimated by other theoretical calculations, but still a factor of 2 smaller than experiment. We repeated the calculation for a photon energy of 89.8 eV with a larger basis set capable of modeling correlated-electron dynamics within the neon atom and the residual Ne{sup +} ion. A time delay of 14.5{+-}1.5 as was observed, compared to a 16.7{+-}1.5 as result using a single-configuration representation of the residual Ne{sup +} ion.

  12. Electron-impact excitation of neon: a pseudo-state convergence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, C. P.; Griffin, D. C.

    2004-07-01

    A number of convergent close-coupling and R-matrix with pseudo-state (RMPS) calculations for H-like, He-like, Li-like and Be-like ions have demonstrated that coupling to the target continuum can have large effects on the electron-impact excitation cross sections of neutral and low-charge species. However, no one has yet attempted such advanced calculations on a system as complex as neutral neon. We report on a series of RMPS calculations of electron-impact excitation of Ne using recently developed parallel Breit-Pauli R-matrix programs. Our largest calculation included 235 spectroscopic and pseudo-state levels in the close-coupling expansion of the target. Although the results clearly reveal the importance of coupling to the target continuum in this atom, the pseudo-state expansion is not yet sufficiently complete to provide reliable cross sections for energies above the ionization limit. However, this is the largest intermediate-coupling calculation that can be performed with present computer resources. Thus, we have also carried out a series of RMPS calculations in LS coupling with different pseudo-state expansions. Comparisons of these results have allowed us to determine the approximate size of the pseudo-state expansion required to achieve convergence in future intermediate-coupling calculations for neon.

  13. Helium and neon implantation and memory observed in a quadrupole mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Ingo; Putzka, Alfred

    1999-07-01

    High accuracy static quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) measurement of helium and neon may be impaired by implantation and long lasting thermal desorption effects of the previously trapped atoms. A QMS produces only moderately accelerated ions of 100-200 eV. The ions decelerate at stainless steel surfaces somewhere in the QMS and a part of them will be trapped in surface near sites. For helium and neon most of these trapped atoms are able to desorb with time constants of several hours. This causes an memory effect which hinders high precision measurements. The trapping and desorption experiments reported here indicate that these time constants for the desorption are about 90-477 min for temperatures between 330 and 470 K. 20-60% (330 K) and 450% (470 K) of the atoms which have been trapped desorb subsequently. This could be explained by assuming self-sputtering processes. From the desorption behaviour a binding energy of 1.1 and 1.6 eV for these atoms has been estimated.

  14. Analysis of trace impurities in neon by a customized gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yin, Min Kyo; Lim, Jeong Sik; Moon, Dong Min; Lee, Gae Ho; Lee, Jeongsoon

    2016-09-01

    Excimer lasers, widely used in the semiconductor industry, are crucial for analyzing the purity of premix laser gases for the purpose of controlling stable laser output power. In this study, we designed a system for analyzing impurities in pure neon (Ne) base gas by customized GC. Impurities in pure neon (H2 and He), which cannot be analyzed at the sub-μmol/mol level using commercial GC detectors, were analyzed by a customized pulsed-discharge Ne ionization detector (PDNeD) and a pressurized injection thermal conductivity detector using Ne as the carrier gas (Pres. Inj. Ne-TCD). From the results, trace species in Ne were identified with the following detection limits: H2, 0.378μmol/mol; O2, 0.119μmol/mol; CH4, 0.880μmol/mol; CO, 0.263μmol/mol; CO2, 0.162μmol/mol (PDNeD); and He, 0.190μmol/mol (Pres. Inj. Ne-TCD). This PDNeD and pressurized injection Ne-TCD technique thus developed permit the quantification of trace impurities present in high-purity Ne. PMID:27527880

  15. Analysis of neon soft x-ray spectra from short-pulse laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Abare, A.C.; Keane, C.J.; Crane, J.K.; DaSilva, L.B.; Lee, R.W.; Perry, M.D.; Falcone, R.W.

    1993-04-01

    We report preliminary results from the analysis of streaked soft x-ray neon spectra obtained from the interaction of a picosecond Nd:glass laser with a gas jet target. In these experiments streaked spectra show prompt harmonic emission followed by longer time duration soft x-ray line emission. The majority of the line emission observed was found to originate from Li- and Be-like Ne and the major transitions in the observed spectra have been identified. Li-like emission lines were observed to decay faster in time than Be-like transitions, suggesting that recombination is taking place. Line ratios of n=4-2 and n=3-2 transitions supported the view that these lines were optically thin and thick, respectively. The time history of Li-like Ne 2p-4d and 2p-3d lines is in good agreement with a simple adiabatic expansion model coupled to a time dependent collisional-radiative code. Further x-ray spectroscopic analysis is underway which is aimed at diagnosing plasma conditions and assessing the potential of this recombining neon plasma as a quasi-steady-state recombination x-ray laser medium.

  16. Two-photon double ionization of neon using an intense attosecond pulse train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manschwetus, B.; Rading, L.; Campi, F.; Maclot, S.; Coudert-Alteirac, H.; Lahl, J.; Wikmark, H.; Rudawski, P.; Heyl, C. M.; Farkas, B.; Mohamed, T.; L'Huillier, A.; Johnsson, P.

    2016-06-01

    We present a demonstration of two-photon double ionization of neon using an intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse train (APT) in a photon energy regime where both direct and sequential mechanisms are allowed. For an APT generated through high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in argon we achieve a total pulse energy close to 1 μ J , a central energy of 35 eV, and a total bandwidth of ˜30 eV. The APT is focused by broadband optics in a neon gas target to an intensity of 3 ×1012W cm-2 . By tuning the photon energy across the threshold for the sequential process the double ionization signal can be turned on and off, indicating that the two-photon double ionization predominantly occurs through a sequential process. The demonstrated performance opens up possibilities for future XUV-XUV pump-probe experiments with attosecond temporal resolution in a photon energy range where it is possible to unravel the dynamics behind direct versus sequential double ionization and the associated electron correlation effects.

  17. Destruction cross sections for fast hydrogen molecules incident on helium, neon, and argon

    SciTech Connect

    de Castro Faria, N.V.; Borges, I. Jr.; Coelho, L.F.S.; Jalbert, G.

    1995-05-01

    We measured the destruction cross sections of fast H{sub 2} molecules (3.0{le}{ital v}{le}7.0 a.u.) in helium, neon, and argon targets. We also measured, complementing previously published data, the H{sub 2}{sup +} destruction cross sections in neon for 3.0{le}{ital v}{le}7.0 a.u. and in helium and argon for {ital v}=3.0 a.u. The H{sub 2} beam was obtained from fast {ital H}{sub 3} molecules dissociated in an auxiliary target. These H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}{sup +} destruction cross sections were compared with the previous ones for H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} ions and also with the H electron-loss cross section, and a simple description is able to explain quantitatively the observed trends for these four sets of experiments, giving also information about the main destruction channels for the H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}{sup +} molecules.

  18. 27 CFR 27.205 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false 27.205 Section 27.205 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS IMPORTATION OF DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER Requirements for Liquor Bottles § 27.205...

  19. 27 CFR 27.205 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 27.205 Section 27.205 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS IMPORTATION OF DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER Requirements for Liquor Bottles § 27.205...

  20. 27 CFR 6.27 - Proprietary interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proprietary interest. 6.27 Section 6.27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail License § 6.27 Proprietary interest. (a) Complete...

  1. 27 CFR 6.27 - Proprietary interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Proprietary interest. 6.27 Section 6.27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail License § 6.27 Proprietary interest. (a) Complete...

  2. 27 CFR 6.27 - Proprietary interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Proprietary interest. 6.27 Section 6.27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail License § 6.27 Proprietary interest. (a) Complete...

  3. 27 CFR 6.27 - Proprietary interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Proprietary interest. 6.27 Section 6.27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail License § 6.27 Proprietary interest. (a) Complete...

  4. 27 CFR 6.27 - Proprietary interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Proprietary interest. 6.27 Section 6.27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail License § 6.27 Proprietary interest. (a) Complete...

  5. 27 CFR 4.27 - Vintage wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vintage wine. 4.27 Section 4.27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Standards of Identity for Wine § 4.27 Vintage wine. (a) General. Vintage wine is wine...

  6. Term values of even parity np‧ (n=10-16) states of neon determined by two-step optogalvanic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ami, Norihiro; Wada, Akihide; Adachi, Yukio; Hirose, Chiaki

    1988-12-01

    Term values of even parity np' ( n = 10-16 with primed letter denoting the electronic states on the 2P 1/2 ion core state) levels of neon have been determined from the observation of Stark-induced np'-3p' transitions by two-step optogalvanic spectroscopy.

  7. Electron spin resonance investigation of H2(+), HD(+), and D2(+) isolated in neon matrices at 2 K.

    PubMed

    Correnti, Matthew D; Dickert, Kyle P; Pittman, Mark A; Felmly, John W; Banisaukas, John J; Knight, Lon B

    2012-11-28

    Various isotopologues of nature's simplest molecule, namely H(2)(+), HD(+), and D(2)(+), have been isolated in neon matrices at 2 K for the first time and studied by electron spin resonance (ESR). Over many years, hundreds of matrix isolation experiments employing a variety of deposition conditions and ion generation methods have been tried to trap the H(2)(+) cation radical in our laboratory. The molecule has been well characterized in the gas phase and by theoretical methods. The observed magnetic parameters for H(2)(+) in neon at 2 K are: g(∥) ≈ g(⊥) = 2.0022(1); A(iso)(H) = 881(7) MHz; and A(dip)(H) = 33(3) MHz. Reasonable agreement with gas phase values of the isotropic hyperfine interaction (A(iso)) is observed; however, the neon matrix dipolar hyperfine interaction (A(dip)) is noticeably below the gas phase value. The smaller matrix value of A(dip) is attributable to motional averaging of the H(2)(+) radical in the neon matrix trapping site--an occurrence that would prevent the full extent of the hyperfine anisotropy from being measured for a powder pattern type ESR sample. PMID:23206004

  8. Auger and radiative deexcitation of the 1s2l3l prime configurations of lithium-like neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M. H.

    1976-01-01

    The three-electron configurations of 1s2lambda3lambda of neon are observed in ion-atom collisions and beam foil excitation. Multiplet Auger and x ray transition rates obtained in intermediate coupling are calculated. Fluorescence yields are also computed.

  9. Utilizing Neon Ion Microscope for GaSb nanopatterning studies: Nanostructure formation and comparison with low energy nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atwani, Osman; Huynh, Chuong; Norris, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Low energy irradiation of GaSb surfaces has been shown to lead to nanopillar formation. Being performed ex-situ, controlling the parameters of the ion beam for controlled nanopattern formation is challenging. While mainly utilized for imaging and cutting purposes, the development of multibeam (helium/neon) ion microscopes has opened the path towards the use of these microscopes for in-situ ion irradiation and nanopatterning studies. In this study, in-situ irradiation (neon ions)/imaging (helium ions) of GaSb surfaces is performed using Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope at low energies (5 and 10 keV). Imaging with helium ions, nanodots were shown to form at particular fluences after which are smoothed. Ex-situ imaging with SEM showed nanopore formation of size controlled by the ion energy and fluence. Compared to lower energy ex-situ neon ion irradiation at similar fluxes, where nanopillars are formed, the results demonstrated a transition in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. Simulations show an increase in the ballistic diffusion and a decrease in the strength of phase separation as a function of ion energy in agreement with the suppression of nanopillar formation at higher energies. Collision cascade simulations suggest a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms.

  10. Infrared transmission at the 3.39 micron helium-neon laser wavelength in liquid-core quartz fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, A. K.; Hinkley, E. D.; Menzies, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared transmission at the 3.39 micron helium-neon laser wavelength has been measured in a tetrachloroethylene-filled fused-quartz fiber. The loss measurements were taken for three different settings of laser light intensity using a series of neutral density filters. The average value of transmission loss at this wavelength was found to be 56 dB/km.