Science.gov

Sample records for neon fluorides

  1. Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    Fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay. It is taken up by teeth and helps to strengthen ... and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children and adults whose ...

  2. Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    Fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay. It is taken up by teeth and helps to strengthen teeth, resist acid, and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children ...

  3. Fluoridation Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Water Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Water Fluoridation Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... because of tooth decay. History of Fluoride in Water In the 1930s, scientists examined the relationship between ...

  4. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  5. Optimal Fluoridation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John R.

    1975-01-01

    Optimal fluoridation has been defined as that fluoride exposure which confers maximal cariostasis with minimal toxicity and its values have been previously determined to be 0.5 to 1 mg per day for infants and 1 to 1.5 mg per day for an average child. Total fluoride ingestion and urine excretion were studied in Marin County, California, children in 1973 before municipal water fluoridation. Results showed fluoride exposure to be higher than anticipated and fulfilled previously accepted criteria for optimal fluoridation. Present and future water fluoridation plans need to be reevaluated in light of total environmental fluoride exposure. PMID:1130041

  6. Systemic fluoride.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Levy, Steven Marc

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that fluoride, through different applications and formulas, works to control caries development. The first observations of fluoride's effects on dental caries were linked to fluoride naturally present in the drinking water, and then from controlled water fluoridation programs. Other systemic methods to deliver fluoride were later suggested, including dietary fluoride supplements such as salt and milk. These systemic methods are now being questioned due to the fact that many studies have indicated that fluoride's action relies mainly on its post-eruptive effect from topical contact with the tooth structure. It is known that even the methods of delivering fluoride known as 'systemic' act mainly through a topical effect when they are in contact with the teeth. The effectiveness of water fluoridation in many geographic areas is lower than in previous eras due to the widespread use of other fluoride modalities. Nevertheless, this evidence should not be interpreted as an indication that systemic methods are no longer relevant ways to deliver fluoride on an individual basis or for collective health programs. Caution must be taken to avoid excess ingestion of fluoride when prescribing dietary fluoride supplements for children in order to minimize the risk of dental fluorosis, particularly if there are other relevant sources of fluoride intake - such as drinking water, salt or milk and/or dentifrice. Safe and effective doses of fluoride can be achieved when combining topical and systemic methods. PMID:21701196

  7. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  8. Dentifrice Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakita, Philip E.

    2004-05-01

    The effectiveness of the fluoride ion in lowering the incidence of dental caries is a major factor in the field of dental health. Observations and research studies in the first half of the 20th century have lead to the widespread adoption of fluoridated water and the use of inorganic fluoride compounds in oral care products, such as toothpaste and dental rinses. This article provides a brief review of the types of compounds used and the chemistry involved.

  9. Bottled Water and Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Bottled Water Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Consumers drink ... questions about bottled water and fluoride. Does bottled water contain fluoride? Bottled water products may contain fluoride, ...

  10. Rogue mantle helium and neon.

    PubMed

    Albarède, Francis

    2008-02-15

    The canonical model of helium isotope geochemistry describes the lower mantle as undegassed, but this view conflicts with evidence of recycled material in the source of ocean island basalts. Because mantle helium is efficiently extracted by magmatic activity, it cannot remain in fertile mantle rocks for long periods of time. Here, I suggest that helium with high 3He/4He ratios, as well as neon rich in the solar component, diffused early in Earth's history from low-melting-point primordial material into residual refractory "reservoir" rocks, such as dunites. The difference in 3He/4He ratios of ocean-island and mid-ocean ridge basalts and the preservation of solar neon are ascribed to the reservoir rocks being stretched and tapped to different extents during melting. PMID:18202257

  11. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Sparrow, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  12. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  13. Neon Ion Beam Lithography (NIBL).

    PubMed

    Winston, Donald; Manfrinato, Vitor R; Nicaise, Samuel M; Cheong, Lin Lee; Duan, Huigao; Ferranti, David; Marshman, Jeff; McVey, Shawn; Stern, Lewis; Notte, John; Berggren, Karl K

    2011-10-12

    Existing techniques for electron- and ion-beam lithography, routinely employed for nanoscale device fabrication and mask/mold prototyping, do not simultaneously achieve efficient (low fluence) exposure and high resolution. We report lithography using neon ions with fluence <1 ion/nm(2), ∼1000× more efficient than using 30 keV electrons, and resolution down to 7 nm half-pitch. This combination of resolution and exposure efficiency is expected to impact a wide array of fields that are dependent on beam-based lithography. PMID:21899279

  14. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by...

  15. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by...

  16. Small scale demand type neon liquefaction plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dube, W. P.; Slifka, A. J.; Bitsy, R. M.; Sparks, L. L.; Johnson, K. B.

    1990-01-01

    Low-temperature measurement of the thermal conductivity of insulating materials is generally made using a boil-off calorimetry technique involving liquid hydrogen (LH2). Liquid neon (LNe) has nearly the same normal boiling point as LH2, but has a much larger heat of vaporization, allowing extended run times. The main drawback of using LNe has been its excessive cost; $170.00 versus $1.50/l for LH2 (1989 prices). A neon liquefaction plant has been designed and constructed to capture, purify, and refrigerate the neon boil-off from calorimetry experiments. Recycling the neon reduces operating costs to approximately $20/l. The system consists of a purification section, a heat exchanger, LNe and LH2 storage dewars, and a fully automated control system. After purification, neon is liquified in the heat exchanger by LH2 flowing countercurrently through stainless steel cooling coils. Hydrogen flow is automatically adjusted to keep the neon at its normal saturation temperature, 27 K. The liquid neon is then stored in a dewar placed directly below the heat exchanger.

  17. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-09-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and office supply stores. We also employ violet-blue and green laser pointers as excitation sources. We conclude with a brief discussion of neon pigments in terms of the "day glow" or "daylight fluorescence" phenomenon.

  18. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, S. J.; Henderson, S.; Gardiner, L. S.; Ward, D.; Gram, W.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of "human sensors." As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include "citizens" or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. Phenology was

  19. Fluoride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infants can only get fluoride through drinking infant formulas. Breast milk has a negligible amount of fluoride ... of water to use in concentrated or powdered formulas. DO NOT use any fluoride supplement without talking ...

  20. Solar helium and neon in the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Mcdougall, I.; Patterson, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    Neon isotopic compositions in mantle-derived samples commonly are enriched in (20)Ne and (21)Ne relative to (22)Ne compared with atmospheric neon ((20)Ne/(22)Ne and (21)Ne/(22)Ne ratios in atmospheric neon are 9.8 and 0.029, respectively), together with significant primordial (3)He. Such results have been obtained on MORB's, intraplate plume-related oceanic island basalts, backarc basin basalts, mantle xenoliths, ancient diamonds and CO2 well gases (e.g., 1 - 8). The highest (20)Ne/(22)Ne ratio observed in MORB glasses (= 13.6 plus or minus 1.3 is close to the solar value (= 13.6, as observed in solar wind). In order to explain the enrichment of (20)Ne and (21)Ne relative to atmospheric neon for samples derived from the mantle, it is necessary to postulate the presence of at least two distinct non-atmospheric components. The two most likely candidates are solar and nucleogenic ((20)Ne/(22)Ne solar = 13.6 (21)Ne/(22)Ne solar = 0.032, (20)Ne/(22)Ne nucleogenic = 2.5 and (21)Ne/(22)Ne nucleogenic = 32). This is because solar neon is the only known component with a (20)Ne/(22)Ne ratio greater than both the atmospheric value and that observed in samples derived from the mantle. Nucleogenic neon is well known to elevate (21)Ne/(22)Ne ratios. Neon isotopic signatures observed in mantle-derived samples can be accounted for by mixing of the three neon end members: solar, nucleogenic and atmospheric.

  1. Capturing neon - the first experimental structure of neon trapped within a metal-organic environment.

    PubMed

    Wood, Peter A; Sarjeant, Amy A; Yakovenko, Andrey A; Ward, Suzanna C; Groom, Colin R

    2016-08-21

    Despite being the fifth most abundant element in the atmosphere, neon has never been observed in an organic or metal-organic environment. This study shows the adsorption of this highly unreactive element within such an environment and reveals the first crystallographic observation of an interaction between neon and a transition metal. PMID:27452474

  2. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gram, W.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of “human sensors.” As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include “citizens” or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process

  3. Helium and Neon in Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1996-01-01

    Two comets were observed with EUVE in late 1994. Both comet Mueller and comet Borrelly are short-period comets having well established orbital elements and accurate ephemerides. Spectra of 40 ksec were taken of each. No evidence for emission lines from either Helium or Neon was detected. We calculated limits on the production rates of these atoms (relative to solar) assuming a standard isotropic outflow model, with a gas streaming speed of 1 km/s. The 3-sigma (99.7% confidence) limits (1/100,000 for He, 0.8 for Ne) are based on a conservative estimate of the noise in the EUVE spectra. They are also weakly dependent on the precise pointing and tracking of the EUVE field of view relative to the comet during the integrations. These limits are consistent with ice formation temperatures T greater than or equal to 30 K, as judged from the gas trapping experiments of Bar-Nun. For comparison, the solar abundances of these elements are He/O = 110, Ne/O = 1/16. Neither limit was as constraining as we had initially hoped, mainly because comets Mueller and Borrelly were intrinsically less active than anticipated.

  4. How Does Fluoride Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes How Does Fluoride Work? KidsHealth > For Kids > How Does Fluoride Work? Print A A A Text Size There's fluoride ... even in your water. But how does it work to keep teeth healthy? Let's find out. Fluoride ...

  5. The First NEON School in La Silla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennefeld, M.; Melo, C.; Selman, F.

    2016-06-01

    The NEON Observing Schools have long provided PhD students with practical experience in the preparation, execution and reduction of astronomical observations, primarily at northern observatories. The NEON School was held in Chile for the first time, with observations being conducted at La Silla. The school was attended by 20 students, all from South America, and observations were performed with two telescopes, including the New Technology Telescope. A brief description of the school is presented and the observing projects and their results are described.

  6. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Fluoride and Water KidsHealth > For Parents > Fluoride and Water Print A ... to 19-year-olds continue Fluoride and the Water Supply For more than 60 years, water fluoridation ...

  7. Rogue Mantle Helium and Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarede, F.

    2007-12-01

    mid- ocean ridges, the characteristic times of melt extraction in each of these two environments are 10,000 y and 1 My, respectively, and the maximum thickness of refractory layers contributing their He to the magmas are 10 m and 100 m, respectively. The difference in 3He/4He ratios of ocean-island and mid-ocean ridge basalts and the preservation of solar neon are ascribed to the reservoirs rocks being stretched to a different extent during melting. Old fragments of oceanic lithosphere, and possibly cumulates from the magma ocean, rather than primordial mantle 'nuggets', should host most of the primordial He and Ne presently observed in oceanic basalts. Helium with high 3He/4He ratios may contain a component of primordial origin, but not necessarily reflect the reservoir in which it has been residing for most of the Earth's history.

  8. Fluoridation update 2014.

    PubMed

    Allukian, Myron; Wong, Chloe

    2014-01-01

    This year more than 4 million people living in 140 communities in Massachusetts will have the health and economic benefits of community water fluoridation. However Massachusetts is ranked only 37th in the country for fluoridation, with just 62 percent of the population on a public water supply living in fluoridated communities. Nationally, more than 210 million Americans, about 74.6 percent of the U.S. population on a community water supply live in fluoridated communities. PMID:25226771

  9. ASA's Chandra Neon Discovery Solves Solar Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory survey of nearby sun-like stars suggests there is nearly three times more neon in the sun and local universe than previously believed. If true, this would solve a critical problem with understanding how the sun works. "We use the sun to test how well we understand stars and, to some extent, the rest of the universe," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "But in order to understand the sun, we need to know exactly what it is made of," he added. It is not well known how much neon the sun contains. This is critical information for creating theoretical models of the sun. Neon atoms, along with carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, play an important role in how quickly energy flows from nuclear reactions in the sun's core to its edge, where it then radiates into space. Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi The rate of this energy flow determines the location and size of a crucial stellar region called the convection zone. The zone extends from near the sun's surface inward approximately 125,000 miles. The zone is where the gas undergoes a rolling, convective motion much like the unstable air in a thunderstorm. "This turbulent gas has an extremely important job, because nearly all of the energy emitted at the surface of the sun is transported there by convection," Drake said. The accepted amount of neon in the sun has led to a paradox. The predicted location and size of the solar convection zone disagree with those deduced from solar oscillations. Solar oscillations is a technique astronomers previously relied on to probe the sun's interior. Several scientists have noted the problem could be fixed if the abundance of neon is in fact about three times larger than currently accepted. Attempts to measure the precise amount of neon in the Sun have been frustrated by a quirk of nature; neon atoms in the Sun give off no signatures in visible light. However, in a gas

  10. Nanofriction of neon films on superconducting lead.

    PubMed

    Pierno, M; Bruschi, L; Fois, G; Mistura, G; Boragno, C; de Mongeot, F Buatier; Valbusa, U

    2010-07-01

    With a quartz crystal microbalance technique we have studied the nanofriction of neon monolayers deposited on a lead surface at a temperature around 7 K. Unlike heavier adsorbates, Ne is found to systematically slide at such low temperatures without any evidence of pinning. The crossing of the Pb superconducting-metal transition is not accompanied by any change in dissipation, suggesting that the electronic contribution to friction is negligible for this system. PMID:20867468

  11. The NEON Soil Archive - A community resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, E.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a 30-year National Science Foundation-funded facility for understanding and forecasting the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on aspects of continental-scale ecology such as biodiversity, biogeochemistry, infectious diseases, and ecohydrology. NEON will measure a wide range of properties at 60 terrestrial and 36 aquatic sites throughout the US using in situ sensors, sample collection/lab analysis, and remote sensing, and all data will be made freely available. The Observatory is currently under construction and will be fully operational by 2017, however, limited data collection and release will begin in 2013. In addition, NEON is archiving large numbers of samples, including surface soils (top ~30 cm) collected from locations across each site, and soils collected by horizon to 2 m deep from a single soil pit at each site. Here I present information about the latter, focusing on sampling and processing, metadata, and currently available samples. At each terrestrial site the soil pit is dug in the locally dominant soil type and soil is collected by horizon, mixed, and ~4-8 liters soil is sent for processing. Soil samples are air-dried and sieved (mineral soil) or air-dried (organic soil) and 1.2 kg is split between 4 glass jars for archiving (protocol available upon request). To date 15 soil pits have been sampled, representing 7 soil orders, and soils from 110 horizons have been archived or are being processed. Metadata associated with each archive sample include a soil profile description, photos, and soil properties (total C, N, S, Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Sr, Ti, Zr, bulk density, pH, and texture). The procedure for requesting samples from the archive is under development and I encourage scientists to use the archive in their future research. Collecting and processing samples for the NEON Soil Archive

  12. Binary collision model for neon Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1986-01-01

    A model is developed to account for the angle-resolved Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface recently obtained by Pepper and Aron. The neon is assumed to be excited in a single asymmetric neon-aluminum-collision and scattered back into the vacuum where it emits an Auger electron. The velocity of the Auger electron acquires a Doppler shift by virtue of the emission from a moving source. The dependence of the Auger peak shape and energy on the incident ion energy, angle of incidence and on the angle of Auger electron emission with respect to the surface is presented. Satisfactory agreement with the angle resolved experimental observations is obtained. The dependence of the angle-integrated Auger yield on the incident ion energy and angle of incidence is also obtained and shown to be in satisfactory agreement with available experimental evidence.

  13. Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. . Inst. de Physique); Bailey, J.M. ); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. ); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. ); Huber, T.M. ); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.

    1992-01-01

    A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of [mu][sup [minus]p] atoms in each target. The rates [lambda][sub pp[mu

  14. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    PubMed

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature. PMID:27352462

  15. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A...

  16. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A...

  18. Dietary protein source and level alters growth in neon tetras.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional studies for aquarium fish like the neon tetra are sparse in comparison with those for food fish. To determine the optimum dietary protein level and source for growth of neon tetras, diets were formulated to contain 25, 35, 45 and 55% dietary protein from either marine animal protein or ...

  19. Scattering of electrons from neon atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, A.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    Scattering of electrons from neon atoms is investigated by the polarized-orbital method. The perturbed orbitals calculated with use of the Sternheimer approximation lead to the polarizability 2.803 a(0)-cube in fairly good agreement with the experimental value 2.66 a(0)-cube. Phase shifts for various partial waves are calculated in the exchange, exchange-adiabatic, and polarized-orbital approximations. They are compared with the previous results. The calculated elastic differential, total, and momentum-transfer cross sections are compared with the experimental results. The polarized-orbital approximation yields results which show general improvement over the exchange-adiabatic approximation.

  20. Fluoride in UK rivers.

    PubMed

    Neal, Colin; Neal, Margaret; Davies, Helen; Smith, Jennifer

    2003-10-01

    Fluoride concentrations in eastern UK rivers (the Humber, Tweed, Wear, Great Ouse and Thames) are described based on information collected within the Land-Ocean Interaction Study (LOIS) and by the Environment Agency (EA) of England and Wales. The results show varied fluoride concentrations across the region, with a range from <0.01 to >10 mg l(-1); and mean, median and range in mean concentrations of 0.30, 0.21 and 0.05-3.38 mg l(-1) (excluding one outlier point), respectively. Within the main rivers and tributaries, the mean fluoride concentration varied from approximately 0.5 to over 2 mg l(-1) and the highest values occurred within the Don basin (Don, Dearne and Rother) and parts of the Trent basin (upper Tame and mid-upper Derbyshire Derwent) in highly industrialised and urbanised areas (Sheffield and Rotherham in the Don basin; Birmingham and Derby on the Trent). For localised inputs to the rivers, fluoride concentrations were slightly higher, and considerably higher in one outlier case. Correspondingly, the other rivers examined typically had mean fluoride concentrations between approximately 0.2 and 0.5 mg l(-1), but fluoride concentrations were lower in the headwater areas. As there is much less information on fluoride levels in upland areas, extensive data collected as part of an acid waters survey are used to show that fluoride concentrations are generally less than 0.1 mg l(-1) for the upland UK. The data are summarised in terms of both fluoride concentrations and flux, and the values are cross-referenced to other determinands collected within LOIS. The high positive correlation with boron and negative correlation with flow show the importance of point source (sewage) inputs of fluoride, while strong positive correlations between fluoride and barium indicate the relative importance of vein mineralisation in the bedrock in supplying fluoride to the waters of the Yorkshire Ouse and its tributaries. There seems to be some process that limits the fluoride

  1. Fluorides and non-fluoride remineralization systems.

    PubMed

    Amaechi, Bennett T; van Loveren, Cor

    2013-01-01

    Caries develops when the equilibrium between de- and remineralization is unbalanced favoring demineralization. De- and remineralization occur depending on the degree of saturation of the interstitial fluids with respect to the tooth mineral. This equilibrium is positively influenced when fluoride, calcium and phosphate ions are added favoring remineralization. In addition, when fluoride is present, it will be incorporated into the newly formed mineral which is then less soluble. Toothpastes may contain fluoride and calcium ions separately or together in various compounds (remineralization systems) and may therefore reduce demineralization and promote remineralization. Formulating all these compounds in one paste may be challenging due to possible premature calcium-fluoride interactions and the low solubility of CaF2. There is a large amount of clinical evidence supporting the potent caries preventive effect of fluoride toothpastes indisputably. The amount of clinical evidence of the effectiveness of the other remineralization systems is far less convincing. Evidence is lacking for head to head comparisons of the various remineralization systems. PMID:23817057

  2. PRODUCTION OF THORIUM FLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Zachariasen, W.H.

    1959-08-11

    A process is presented for producing anhydrous thorium fluoride comprising the step of contacting a saturated aqueous solution of thorium nitrate with an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid having a concentration of about 45 to 50% by weight at a temperature above 70 deg C whereby anhydrous thorium fluoride precipitates.

  3. Massachusetts fluoridation update 2006.

    PubMed

    Allukian, Myron

    2006-01-01

    Massachusetts has a long history of activity with community water fluoridation. Although the state has 3.8 million people living in 137 fluoridated communities, there are more than 2 million people who do not have these benefits. The Bay State is ranked 35th in the country regarding the percent of people on public water supplies with fluoridation. We can do better than that. We have more than 60 years of experience receiving the health and economic benefits of fluoridation in our country; however, there is still a lot of misinformation about fluoridation, and the unreliable nature of information posted on the Internet exacerbates much of this misinformation. Dental professionals, their patients, and decision-makers must be continuously educated about the safety, health, and economic benefits of community water fluoridation. Patients from 6 months to 16 years of age living in nonfluoridated communities should be prescribed supplemental fluoride. Dental professionals in nonfluoridated communities should assist them to become fluoridated. All dental professionals need to become more involved in the leadership of their communities. PMID:16683510

  4. Coherence parameter measurements for neon and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Robert; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Stauffer, Al

    2015-09-01

    We present recent coherence parameter measurements for excitation of neon and hydrogen by 50 eV electrons. The measurements were made using a crossed electron/gas beam spectrometer, featuring a hemispherically selected electron energy analyzer for detecting scattered electrons and double-reflection VUV polarization analyzer to register fluorescence photons. Time-coincidence counting methods on the electron and photon signals were employed to determine Stokes Parameters at each scattering angle, with data measured at angles between 20 - 115 degrees. The data are compared with calculated results using the B-Spline R-Matrix (BSR) and Relativistic Distorted Wave (RDW) approaches. Measurements were made of both the linear (Plin and γ) and circular (Lperp) parameters for the lowest lying excited states in these two targets. We particularly focus on results in the Lperp parameter, which shows unusual behavior in these particular targets, including strong sign changes implying reversal of the angular momentum transfer. In the case of neon, the unusual behavior is well captured by the BSR, but not by other models.

  5. Diffusion of neon in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2010-12-01

    Sedimentation of the neutron rich isotope 22Ne may be an important source of gravitational energy during the cooling of white dwarf stars. This depends on the diffusion constant for 22Ne in strongly coupled plasma mixtures. We calculate self-diffusion constants D(i) from molecular dynamics simulations of carbon, oxygen, and neon mixtures. We find that D(i) in a mixture does not differ greatly from earlier one component plasma results. For strong coupling (coulomb parameter Γ> few), D(i) has a modest dependence on the charge Z(i) of the ion species, D(i)∝Z(i)(-2/3). However, D(i) depends more strongly on Z(i) for weak coupling (smaller Γ). We conclude that the self-diffusion constant D(Ne) for 22Ne in carbon, oxygen, and neon plasma mixtures is accurately known so that uncertainties in D(Ne) should be unimportant for simulations of white dwarf cooling. PMID:21230741

  6. Electron-impact excitation of neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, Connor; Griffin, Don

    2004-05-01

    A number of convergent close-coupling and R-matrix with pseudo-state (RMPS) calculations on H-like, He-like, Li-like, and Be-like ions have demonstrated that coupling to the target continuum can have large effects on the electron-impact excitation cross sections of neutral and low-charge species. However, no one has yet attempted such advanced calculations on a system as complex as neutral neon. We report on a series of RMPS calculations of electron-impact excitation of Ne using recently developed parallel Breit-Pauli (BP) R-matrix programs. Our largest calculation was a BP calculation with 235 spectroscopic and pseudo levels in the close-coupling expansion. Although the results of this calculation clearly reveal the importance of coupling to the target continuum in this atom, the pseudo-state expansion is not yet sufficiently complete to provide reliable cross sections for energies above the ionization limit. However, this is the largest BP calculation that can be performed with present computer resources. Thus, we have also carried out a series of RMPS calculations in LS coupling with different pseudo-state expansions. Comparisons of these results have allowed us to determine the approximate size of the pseudo-state expansion required to achieve convergence in future BP calculations for neon.

  7. Indium fluoride glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Mohammed

    2012-03-01

    Fluoride glasses are the only material that transmit light from ultraviolet to mid-infrared and can be drawn into industrial optical fibers. The mechanical and optical properties of new indium fluoride glass fibers have been investigated. Multimode fiber 190 microns, has very high mechanical strength greater than 100 kpsi and optical loss as low as 45 dB/km between 2 and 4 microns. Unlike chalcogenide glass fibers, indium fluoride fiber has a wide transmission window from 0.3 to 5.5 microns without any absorption peak. Indium fluoride glass fibers are the technology of choice for all application requiring transmission up to 5 micron such as infrared contour measure (IRCM) and chemical sensing. Furthermore, Indium fluoride glasses have low phonon energy and can be heavily doped and co-doped whit rare-earth elements. Therefore they are very promising candidates for infrared fiber lasers.

  8. A neon-E rich phase in Orgueil - Results obtained on density separates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, P.; Jungck, M. H. A.; Meier, F. O.; Niederer, F. R.

    1981-09-01

    A stepwise heating technique was used on eight density separates from the neon-E rich phase G4j of the carbonaceous chondrite Orgueil to measure He, Ne and Ar. The density separation technique was found to further enrich the Ne-E carrier phases, allowing the Ne-E to be identified as virtually pure Ne-22. At least two separable carrier phases exist: (1) the l-carrier phase, which releases its Ne-E at temperatures below 900 C and is heavily enriched in the low-density separate; and (2) the h-carrier phase. The h-carrier is found to be highly retentive, with release temperatures above 900 C, and is associated with higher-density material. It is concluded that Ne-E and its carrier phases are probably of presolar origin.

  9. The prospects of a subnanometer focused neon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Rahman, F H M; McVey, Shawn; Farkas, Louis; Notte, John A; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Richard H

    2012-01-01

    The success of the helium ion microscope has encouraged extensions of this technology to produce beams of other ion species. A review of the various candidate ion beams and their technical prospects suggest that a neon beam might be the most readily achieved. Such a neon beam would provide a sputtering yield that exceeds helium by an order of magnitude while still offering a theoretical probe size less than 1-nm. This article outlines the motivation for a neon gas field ion source, the expected performance through simulations, and provides an update of our experimental progress. PMID:21796647

  10. Comprehensive Testing of a Neon Cryogenic Capillary Pumped Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobel, Mark C.; Ku, Jentung; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive test program of a cryogenic capillary pumped loop (CCPL) using neon as the working fluid in the temperature range between 30 K and 40 K. The test article was originally designed to be used with nitrogen in the 70 K to 100 K temperature range, and was refurbished for testing with neon. Tests performed included start up from a supercritical state, power cycle, sink temperature cycle, heat transport limit, low power limit, reservoir set point change and long duration operation. The neon CCPL has demonstrated excellent performance under various conditions.

  11. The NEON School Enters a New Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennefeld, M.

    2004-12-01

    THE NEON SCHOOL, a school on astronomical observations organised by a collaboration of observatories (Asiago, Calar Alto, ESO, La Palma and OHP) is well known by PhD students in astronomy all over Europe. It runs tutorial observations directly at the telescope for students in small groups, under the supervision of an experienced astronomer. This way, the participants can execute a real scientific program with all the steps needed in professional life: preparation of the program with selection of targets and feasibility estimates; set-up of the instrument and calibrations; running of the observations, in general both imaging/photometry and spectroscopy; data reductions; and, finally, the presentation of the results at the end of the school.

  12. Neon and Oxygen Abundances in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Nathan R.; Garnett, Donald R.; Massey, Philip; Jacoby, George

    2006-02-01

    We present new spectroscopic observations of 13 H II regions in the Local Group spiral galaxy M33. The regions observed range from 1 to 7 kpc in distance from the nucleus. Of the 13 H II regions observed, the [O III] λ4363 line was detected in six regions. Electron temperatures were thus able to be determined directly from the spectra using the [O III] λλ4959, 5007/λ4363 line ratio. Based on these temperature measurements, oxygen and neon abundances and their radial gradients were calculated. For neon, a gradient of -0.016+/-0.017 dex kpc-1 was computed, which agrees with the Ne/H gradient derived previously from ISO spectra. A gradient of -0.012+/-0.011 dex kpc-1 was computed for O/H, much shallower than was derived in previous studies. The newly calculated O/H and Ne/H gradients are in much better agreement with each other, as expected from predictions of stellar nucleosynthesis. We examine the correlation between the WC/WN ratio and metallicity, and find that the new M33 abundances do not impact the observed correlation significantly. We also identify two new He II-emitting H II regions in M33, the first to be discovered in a spiral galaxy other than the Milky Way. In both cases the nebular He II emission is not associated with Wolf-Rayet stars. Therefore, caution is warranted in interpreting the relationship between nebular He II emission and Wolf-Rayet stars when both are observed in the integrated spectrum of an H II region.

  13. Fluoride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... broken through the gums have changes in the enamel that covers the teeth. Faint white lines or ... regarding fluoride intake from reconstituted infant formula and enamel fluorosis: a report of the American Dental Association ...

  14. Fluoridation: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Isman, R

    1981-07-01

    Of 19 referenda on community water fluoridation held in the first six months of 1980, 17 were defeated. Among the postulated reasons are a growing distrust of government and the health establishment. The public remains largely ignorant of the purpose and benefits of fluoridation. The emotionalism surrounding the issue has made it difficult to generate public support outside of the health professions. Opponents have also learned to fight fluoridation with increasingly sophisticated techniques. Some of the strategies used in recent successful campaigns in Oakland, California, and Portland, Oregon are described; recommendations that can be applied to communities considering fluoridation include careful wording of ballot measures so they are unequivocally clear and simple; timing ballot measures with elections likely to draw the largest voter turnout; broadening the base of political and financial support; using a figurehead if possible; and making maximum use of the media. PMID:7246838

  15. Fluoride toothpastes, rinses, and tablets.

    PubMed

    Stephen, K W

    1994-07-01

    Only from the mid-1950's has therapeutic benefit been obtained via dentifrices, initially with stannous fluoride-then monofluorophosphate-containing products which remained stable and efficacious. Altered abrasive systems followed, and both sodium fluoride and monofluorophosphate/sodium fluoride mixtures were introduced as active anti-caries agents, with recent meta-analysis indicating that sodium fluoride > monofluorophosphate/sodium fluoride > monofluorophosphate. With respect to fluoride levels, clear dose-response relationships have been demonstrated. However, at < 1000 ppm F, the situation is less certain. Since the mid-1980's, anticalculus fluoride dentifrices have been marketed, and have been shown to have similar caries-reducing potential as their non-calculus-inhibiting control formulae. Finally, one study has been described where a sodium fluoride dentifrice successfully reduced root caries. Of the many fluoride formulations used for caries-inhibiting mouthrinsing [e.g., acid phosphate fluoride (100-3000 ppm F), sodium fluoride (45-3000 ppm F), stannous fluoride (100-250 ppm F), ammonium fluoride (1000 ppm F), and amine fluoride (250 ppm F)], sodium fluoride would seem to be the preferred agent. Furthermore, rinse frequency is deemed more important than fluoride ion concentration, but caution is urged re the volumes and concentrations to be used by children, no rinsing being recommended below 4 years. Combination of a 440-pp-F sodium fluoride and 0.05% chlorhexidine school-administered rinse appears to have increased the caries-inhibiting benefit as compared with sodium fluoride alone. Fluoride supplements have reduced deciduous caries from 14 to 93%, and in the permanent dentition, from 20 to 81%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7865074

  16. 8. DETAIL OF NORTHEAST ELEVATION SHOWING NEON TWA SIGN AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF NORTHEAST ELEVATION SHOWING NEON TWA SIGN AND ROOF MASTS. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - TWA Maintenance Hangar, South side of Tinicum Island Road, Philadelphia International Airport, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. Process for converting magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Kreuzmann, A.B.; Palmer, D.A.

    1984-12-21

    This invention is a process for the conversion of magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride whereby magnesium fluoride is decomposed by heating in the presence of calcium carbonate, calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide. Magnesium fluoride is a by-product of the reduction of uranium tetrafluoride to form uranium metal and has no known commercial use, thus its production creates a significant storage problem. The advantage of this invention is that the quality of calcium fluoride produced is sufficient to be used in the industrial manufacture of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, steel mill flux or ceramic applications.

  18. Fluoride release from fissure sealants.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Godoy, F; Abarzua, I; De Goes, M F; Chan, D C

    1997-01-01

    This 30-day study, compared the amounts and patterns of fluoride release from 5 commercially available fluoride-containing pit and fissure sealants: FluroShield, Helioseal-F, Ultraseal XT, Baritone L3, and Teethmate-F; Delton without fluoride, was used as control. Disc-shaped samples of each sealant were immersed in distilled water and the fluoride release was measured periodically until day 30. All the fluoridated sealants tested released measurable fluoride throughout the test period in a similar pattern: the greatest amount of fluoride was released in the first 24 hours after mixing, fell sharply on the second day and decreased slowly for the last days. On day one, Baritone L3 released significantly more fluoride than all other materials. Teethmate-F released the highest amount of fluoride during all the other time intervals from day 2, until day 30. PMID:9643204

  19. Light-curve Analysis of Neon Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed light curves of five neon novae, QU Vul, V351 Pup, V382 Vel, V693 CrA, and V1974 Cyg, and determined their white dwarf (WD) masses and distance moduli on the basis of theoretical light curves composed of free-free and photospheric emission. For QU Vul, we obtained a distance of d ˜ 2.4 kpc, reddening of E(B - V) ˜ 0.55, and WD mass of MWD = 0.82-0.96 {M}⊙ . This suggests that an oxygen-neon WD lost a mass of more than ˜ 0.1 {M}⊙ since its birth. For V351 Pup, we obtained d˜ 5.5 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.45, and {M}{{WD}}=0.98-1.1 {M}⊙ . For V382 Vel, we obtained d˜ 1.6 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.15, and {M}{{WD}}=1.13-1.28 {M}⊙ . For V693 CrA, we obtained d˜ 7.1 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.05, and {M}{{WD}}=1.15-1.25 {M}⊙ . For V1974 Cyg, we obtained d˜ 1.8 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.30, and {M}{{WD}}=0.95-1.1 {M}⊙ . For comparison, we added the carbon-oxygen nova V1668 Cyg to our analysis and obtained d˜ 5.4 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.30, and {M}{{WD}}=0.98-1.1 {M}⊙ . In QU Vul, photospheric emission contributes 0.4-0.8 mag at most to the optical light curve compared with free-free emission only. In V351 Pup and V1974 Cyg, photospheric emission contributes very little (0.2-0.4 mag at most) to the optical light curve. In V382 Vel and V693 CrA, free-free emission dominates the continuum spectra, and photospheric emission does not contribute to the optical magnitudes. We also discuss the maximum magnitude versus rate of decline relation for these novae based on the universal decline law.

  20. Laying the groundwork for NEON's continental-scale ecological research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethloff, G.; Denslow, M.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is designed to examine a suite of ecological issues. Field-collected data from 96 terrestrial and aquatic sites across the U.S. will be combined with remotely sensed data and existing continental-scale data sets. Field collections will include a range of physical and biological types, including soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, precipitation, plants, animals, insects, and microbes as well as biological sub-samples such as leaf material, blood and tissue samples, and DNA extracts. Initial data analyses and identifications of approximately 175,000 samples per year will occur at numerous external laboratories when all sites are fully staffed in 2017. Additionally, NEON will archive biotic and abiotic specimens at collections facilities where they will be curated and available for additional analyses by the scientific community. The number of archived specimens is currently estimated to exceed 130,000 per year by 2017. We will detail how NEON is addressing the complexities and challenges around this set of analyses and specimens and how the resulting high-quality data can impact ecological understanding. The raw data returned from external laboratories that is quality checked and served by NEON will be the foundation for many NEON data products. For example, sequence-quality nucleic acids extracted from surface waters, benthic biofilms, and soil samples will be building blocks for data products on microbial diversity. The raw sequence data will also be available for uses such as evolutionary investigations, and the extracts will be archived so others can acquire them for additional research. Currently, NEON is establishing contracts for the analysis and archiving of field-collected samples through 2017. During this period, NEON will gather information on the progress and success of this large-scale effort in order to determine the most effective course to pursue with external facilities. Two areas that NEON

  1. Private Well Water and Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    ... from my well has less than the recommended level of fluoride for preventing tooth decay? The recommended ... if the water from my well has fluoride levels that are higher than the recommended level for ...

  2. Multistage Zeeman deceleration of metastable neon.

    PubMed

    Wiederkehr, Alex W; Motsch, Michael; Hogan, Stephen D; Andrist, Markus; Schmutz, Hansjürg; Lambillotte, Bruno; Agner, Josef A; Merkt, Frédéric

    2011-12-01

    A supersonic beam of metastable neon atoms has been decelerated by exploiting the interaction between the magnetic moment of the atoms and time-dependent inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a multistage Zeeman decelerator. Using 91 deceleration solenoids, the atoms were decelerated from an initial velocity of 580 m/s to final velocities as low as 105 m/s, corresponding to a removal of more than 95% of their initial kinetic energy. The phase-space distribution of the cold, decelerated atoms was characterized by time-of-flight and imaging measurements, from which a temperature of 10 mK was obtained in the moving frame of the decelerated sample. In combination with particle-trajectory simulations, these measurements allowed the phase-space acceptance of the decelerator to be quantified. The degree of isotope separation that can be achieved by multistage Zeeman deceleration was also studied by performing experiments with pulse sequences generated for (20)Ne and (22)Ne. PMID:22149785

  3. Multistage Zeeman deceleration of metastable neon

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederkehr, Alex W.; Motsch, Michael; Hogan, Stephen D.; Andrist, Markus; Schmutz, Hansjuerg; Lambillotte, Bruno; Agner, Josef A.; Merkt, Frederic

    2011-12-07

    A supersonic beam of metastable neon atoms has been decelerated by exploiting the interaction between the magnetic moment of the atoms and time-dependent inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a multistage Zeeman decelerator. Using 91 deceleration solenoids, the atoms were decelerated from an initial velocity of 580 m/s to final velocities as low as 105 m/s, corresponding to a removal of more than 95% of their initial kinetic energy. The phase-space distribution of the cold, decelerated atoms was characterized by time-of-flight and imaging measurements, from which a temperature of 10 mK was obtained in the moving frame of the decelerated sample. In combination with particle-trajectory simulations, these measurements allowed the phase-space acceptance of the decelerator to be quantified. The degree of isotope separation that can be achieved by multistage Zeeman deceleration was also studied by performing experiments with pulse sequences generated for {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne.

  4. Graphene engineering by neon ion beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Iberi, Vighter; Ievlev, Anton V.; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Joy, David C.; Rondinone, Adam J.; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.

    2016-02-18

    Achieving the ultimate limits of materials and device performance necessitates the engineering of matter with atomic, molecular, and mesoscale fidelity. While common for organic and macromolecular chemistry, these capabilities are virtually absent for 2D materials. In contrast to the undesired effect of ion implantation from focused ion beam (FIB) lithography with gallium ions, and proximity effects in standard e-beam lithography techniques, the shorter mean free path and interaction volumes of helium and neon ions offer a new route for clean, resist free nanofabrication. Furthermore, with the advent of scanning helium ion microscopy, maskless He+ and Ne+ beam lithography of graphenemore » based nanoelectronics is coming to the forefront. Here, we will discuss the use of energetic Ne ions in engineering graphene devices and explore the mechanical, electromechanical and chemical properties of the ion-milled devices using scanning probe microscopy (SPM). By using SPM-based techniques such as band excitation (BE) force modulation microscopy, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of the exact same devices can be quantitatively extracted. Additionally, the effect of defects inherent in ion beam direct-write lithography, on the overall performance of the fabricated devices is elucidated.« less

  5. Search for Metastability of 2s Muonic Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Bernard Wilhelm

    1995-01-01

    An experiment was performed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) to establish the conditions for the metastability of the 2S-state of muonic neon. The muonic atoms were formed by stopping negative muons in the neon-filled target chamber of the PSI cyclotron trap. A pair of intrinsic germanium detectors were used in coincidence to search for the two photon decay of the 2S-state. Both energy and time information from two photon events were written to disk for off-line analysis. Data were accumulated for neon pressures of 40 and 400 Torr. The data were then searched for evidence of two photon transitions from the 2S-state. The germanium detectors were sensitive to the K-, L- and M- series x-ray photons (with energies between 10 and 300 keV) emitted during the cascade of the muonic neon ion. The detectors were also used alone to record single photon events of the K- and L-series x rays. The observed intensity ratios of the K-series x rays provided a lower limit on the initial population of the 2S-state. For the pressure condition of 40 Torr of neon, the 2S population was found to be 1.75% +/- .15% of the total cascade. The number of events at 40 Torr that could be attributed to two photon decays of the 2S-state was found to be 30 +/- 52 corresponding to a 2S population of 3.8% +/- 6.5%. At 400 Torr of neon the observed number of 2S two photon decays was 7 +/- 41, placing an upper limit on the 2S population at 0.9% +/- 5.1% of the total cascade. These results, to within the experimental uncertainties, can neither establish nor exclude the metastability of 2S muonic neon.

  6. MOLTEN FLUORIDE NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Barton, C.J.; Grimes, W.R.

    1960-01-01

    Molten-salt reactor fuel compositions consisting of mixtures of fluoride salts are reported. In its broadest form, the composition contains an alkali fluoride such as sodium fluoride, zirconium tetrafluoride, and a uranium fluoride, the latter being the tetrafluoride or trifluoride or a mixture of the two. An outstanding property of these fuel compositions is a high coeffieient of thermal expansion which provides a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in reactors in which they are used.

  7. Neon color spreading in dynamic displays: temporal factors.

    PubMed

    Cicchini, Marco; Spillmann, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    When a red star is placed in the middle of an Ehrenstein figure so as to be collinear with the surrounding black rays, a reddish veil is perceived to fill the white center. This is called neon color spreading. To better understand the processes that give rise to this phenomenon, we studied the temporal properties of the effect. Specifically, we presented a "sustained" black Ehrenstein figure (rays) for 600 ms and a "transient" red star for 48 ms, or the converse pattern, at various stimulus onset asynchronies (-100-700 ms) and asked subjects to compare the strength of the neon color in the test stimulus to that of a reference pattern in which the transient star had an onset asynchrony of 300 ms. Additional exposure durations of 24 and 96 ms were used for each transient stimulus in order to study the effect of temporal integration. Simultaneity of the on- and off-transients of the star and the Ehrenstein rays were found to optimize neon color spreading, especially when both stimuli terminated together. Longer exposure durations of the transient stimulus up to 96 ms further improved the effect. Neon color spreading was much reduced when the transient stimulus was presented soon after the beginning of the sustained stimulus, with a gradual build-up towards the end. These results emphasize the importance of stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) and stimulus termination asynchrony (STA) for the perception of neon color spreading. PMID:24097045

  8. Equation of state of solid neon from x-ray diffraction measurements to 110 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Hemley, R.J.; Jephcoat, A.P.; Zha, C.S.; Mao, H.K.; Finger, L.W.; Cox, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the pressure-volume properties of condensed neon. X-ray diffraction techniques are used to determine solid neon equation of state and crystal structure. 16 refs., 2 figs. (LSP)

  9. Ferrimyoglobin-Fluoride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Steven O.; Hanania, George I. H.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an experiment which is designed to investigate the reaction of the protein ferrimyoglobin with fluoride. The activity uses readily available apparatus and the technique of optical absorbance for measurement of concentrations. Experimental design, procedures, and treatment of the equilibrium data are detailed. (CW)

  10. Other Fluoride Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... in preventing tooth decay in people of all ages. Use the information listed below to compare the other fluoride products ... even among children younger than 6 years of age. Proper application technique ... cleared for marketing by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as ...

  11. Fluorine (soluble fluoride)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fluorine ( soluble fluoride ) ; CASRN 7782 - 41 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for No

  12. NEON INSIGHTS FROM OLD SOLAR X-RAYS: A PLASMA TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE CORONAL NEON CONTENT

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Jeremy J.

    2011-12-10

    An analysis using modern atomic data of fluxes culled from the literature for O VIII and Ne IX lines observed in solar active regions by the P78 and Solar Maximum Mission satellites confirms that the coronal Ne/O abundance ratio varies by a factor of two or more, and finds an increase in Ne/O with increasing active region plasma temperature. The latter is reminiscent of evidence for increasing Ne/O with stellar activity in low-activity coronae that reaches a 'neon saturation' in moderately active stars at approximately twice the historically accepted solar value of about 0.15 by number. We argue that neon saturation represents the underlying stellar photospheric compositions, and that low-activity coronae, including that of the Sun, are generally depleted in neon. The implication would be that the solar Ne/O abundance ratio should be revised upward by a factor of about two to n(Ne)/n(O) {approx} 0.3. Diverse observations of neon in the local cosmos provide some support for such a revision. Neon would still be of some relevance for reconciling helioseismology with solar models computed using recently advocated chemical mixtures with lower metal content.

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of nanoscale focused neon ion beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Rack, Philip D

    2013-12-13

    A Monte Carlo simulation is developed to model the physical sputtering of aluminum and tungsten emulating nanoscale focused helium and neon ion beam etching from the gas field ion microscope. Neon beams with different beam energies (0.5-30 keV) and a constant beam diameter (Gaussian with full-width-at-half-maximum of 1 nm) were simulated to elucidate the nanostructure evolution during the physical sputtering of nanoscale high aspect ratio features. The aspect ratio and sputter yield vary with the ion species and beam energy for a constant beam diameter and are related to the distribution of the nuclear energy loss. Neon ions have a larger sputter yield than the helium ions due to their larger mass and consequently larger nuclear energy loss relative to helium. Quantitative information such as the sputtering yields, the energy-dependent aspect ratios and resolution-limiting effects are discussed. PMID:24231648

  14. Helium and neon isotopes in deep Pacific Ocean sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    Helium and neon concentration measurements, along with isotope ratio determinations, have been made for particles collected in the deep Pacific with a magnetic sled, and they are believed to be of extraterrestrial origin. Analyses were made for samples consisting of composites of many extremely fine particles and for several individual particles large enough to contain sufficient gas for analysis but small enough to escape melting in their passage through the atmosphere. Step-heating was employed to extract the gas. Cosmic-ray spallation products or solar-wind helium and neon, if present, were not abundant enough to account for the isotopic compositions measured. In the case of the samples of magnetic fines, the low temperature extractions provided elemental and isotopic ratios in the general range found for the primordial gas in carbonaceous chondrites and gas-rich meteorites. The isotopic ratios found in the high temperature extractions suggest the presence of solar-flare helium and neon.

  15. Experimental study on neon refrigeration system using commercial helium compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Junseok; Kim, Hyobong; Hong, Yong-Ju; Yeom, Hankil; Koh, Deuk-Yong; Park, Seong-Je

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we developed neon refrigeration system using commercial helium compressor which was originally designed for GM cryocooler. We performed this research as precedent study before developing neon refrigeration system for small-scale hydrogen liquefaction system. The developed system is based on precooled Linde-Hampson system with liquid nitrogen as precoolant. Design parameters of heat exchangers are determined from thermodynamic cycle analysis with operating pressure of 2 MPa and 0.4 MPa. Heat exchangers have concentric-tube heat exchanger configuration and orifice is used as Joule- Thomson expansion device. In experiments, pressure, temperature, mass flow rate and compressor input power are measured as charging pressure. With experimental results, the characteristics of heat exchanger, Joule-Thomson expansion and refrigeration effect are discussed. The developed neon refrigeration system shows the lowest temperature of 43.9 K.

  16. Purification and Liquefacttion of Neon Using a Helium Refrigeration Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeck, S.

    2010-04-01

    The cryogenic plant developed by Linde Kryotechnik is used to extract neon out of a crude gas flow coming from an air separation plant. The crude gas is cooled down by a two stage helium refrigeration process using the Linde Kryotechnik dynamic gas bearing turbines. After the first cooling stage, nitrogen is liquefied and separated from the crude gas. The Cryogenic adsorbers located at a temperature level below 80 K clean the crude gas from remaining nitrogen traces before the neon-helium mixture enters the final cooling stage. In the second cooling stage neon is liquefied and separated from the helium. The final product quality will be achieved within a rectification column at low pressure level.

  17. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S K; Baylor, L R; Foust, C R; Lyttle, M S; Meitner, S J; Rasmussen, D A

    2014-11-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development. PMID:25430370

  18. Comparison of the incremental and hierarchical methods for crystalline neon.

    PubMed

    Nolan, S J; Bygrave, P J; Allan, N L; Manby, F R

    2010-02-24

    We present a critical comparison of the incremental and hierarchical methods for the evaluation of the static cohesive energy of crystalline neon. Both of these schemes make it possible to apply the methods of molecular electronic structure theory to crystalline solids, offering a systematically improvable alternative to density functional theory. Results from both methods are compared with previous theoretical and experimental studies of solid neon and potential sources of error are discussed. We explore the similarities of the two methods and demonstrate how they may be used in tandem to study crystalline solids. PMID:21386379

  19. Fast Imaging of Intact and Shattered Cryogenic Neon Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Baylor, Larry R; Foust, Charles R; Lyttle, Mark S; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A

    2014-01-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100- m- and sub- s-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of m to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  20. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S. K.; Baylor, L. R.; Foust, C. R.; Lyttle, M. S.; Meitner, S. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-11-15

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  1. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of + or - 15 percent.

  2. Stark Widths of Spectral Lines of Neutral Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, Milan S.; Simić, Zoran; Kovačević, Andjelka; Valjarević, Aleksandar; Sahal-Bréchot, Sylvie

    2015-12-01

    In order to complete Stark broadening data for Ne I spectral lines which are needed for analysis of stellar atmospheres, collisional widths and shifts (the so-called Stark broadening parameters) of 29 isolated spectral lines of neutral neon have been determined within the impact semiclassical perturbation method. Calculations have been performed for the broadening by collisions with electrons, protons and ionized helium for astrophysical applications, and for collisions with ionized neon and argon for laboratory plasma diagnostics. The shifts have been compared with existing experimental values. The obtained data will be included in the STARK-B database, which is a part of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center - VAMDC.

  3. The isotopic composition of solar flare accelerated neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Spalding, J. D.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The individual isotopes of neon in energetic solar-flare particles have been clearly resolved with a rms mass resolution of 0.20 amu. The ratios found are Ne-20/Ne-22 = 7.6 (+2.0, -1.8) and Ne-21/Ne-22 of no more than about 0.11 in the 11-26 MeV per nucleon interval. This isotopic composition is essentially the same as that of meteoritic planetary neon-A and is significantly different from that of the solar wind.

  4. Health Effects Associated with Water Fluoridation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Virginia L.

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is presented concerning fluoridation of water supplies. Correlation between fluoride in drinking water and improved dental health is reviewed. Relationship is expressed between fluoridation and reduced tooth decay. Use of fluoride in treating skeletal disorders is discussed. Author advocates fluoridating water supplies. (SA)

  5. A Wsbnd Ne interatomic potential for simulation of neon implantation in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, Marie; Juslin, Niklas; Huang, Guiyang; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-08-01

    An interatomic pair potential for Wsbnd Ne is developed for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of neon implantation in tungsten. The new potential predicts point defect energies and binding energies of small clusters that are in good agreement with electronic structure calculations. Molecular dynamics simulations of small neon clusters in tungsten show that trap mutation, in which an interstitial neon cluster displaces a tungsten atom from its lattice site, occurs for clusters of three or more neon atoms. However, near a free surface, trap mutation can occur at smaller sizes, including even a single neon interstitial in close proximity to a (100) or (110) surface.

  6. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Richard L.; McKenzie, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is contacted with an acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product. The particulate solid product is separated from the liquid and treated at least two more times with acid to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the acid treatment and preferably the acid is sulfuric acid having a strength of about 1.0 Normal.

  7. Elemental abundances of flaring solar plasma - Enhanced neon and sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmelz, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Elemental abundances of two flares observed with the SMM Flat Crystal Spectrometer are compared and contrasted. The first had a gradual rise and a slow decay, while the second was much more impulsive. Simultaneous spectra of seven bright soft X-ray resonance lines provide information over a broad temperature range and are available throughout both flares, making these events unique in the SMM data base. For the first flare, the plasma seemed to be characterized by coronal abundances but, for the second, the plasma composition could not be coronal, photospheric, or a linear combination of both. A good differential emission measure fit required enhanced neon such that Ne/O = 0.32 +/- 0.02, a value which is inconsistent with the current models of coronal abundances based on the elemental first-ionization potential. Similar values of enhanced neon are found for flaring plasma observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, in (He-3)-rich solar energetic particle events, and in the decay phase of several long duration soft X-ray events. Sulfur is also enhanced in the impulsive flare, but not as dramatically as neon. These events are compared with two models which attempt to explain the enhanced values of neon and sulfur.

  8. Neon and CO2 adsorption on open carbon nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Ziegler, Carl A; Banjara, Shree R; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, S; Migone, Aldo D

    2013-07-30

    We present the results of a thermodynamics and kinetics study of the adsorption of neon and carbon dioxide on aggregates of chemically opened carbon nanohorns. Both the equilibrium adsorption characteristics, as well as the dependence of the kinetic behavior on sorbent loading, are different for these two adsorbates. For neon the adsorption isotherms display two steps before reaching the saturated vapor pressure, corresponding to adsorption on strong and on weak binding sites; the isosteric heat of adsorption is a decreasing function of sorbent loading (this quantity varies by about a factor of 2 on the range of loadings studied), and the speed of the adsorption kinetics increases with increasing loading. By contrast, for carbon dioxide there are no substeps in the adsorption isotherms; the isosteric heat is a nonmonotonic function of loading, the value of the isosteric heat never differs from the bulk heat of sublimation by more than 15%, and the kinetic behavior is opposite to that of neon, with equilibration times increasing for higher sorbent loadings. We explain the difference in the equilibrium properties observed for neon and carbon dioxide in terms of differences in the relative strengths of adsorbate-adsorbate to adsorbate-sorbent interaction for these species. PMID:23802764

  9. Infrared absorption spectra of methylidene radicals in solid neon.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsiao-Chi; Lo, Jen-Iu; Lin, Meng-Yeh; Peng, Yu-Chain; Chou, Sheng-Lung; Cheng, Bing-Ming; Ogilvie, J F

    2014-07-28

    Infrared absorption lines of methylidene--(12)C(1)H, (13)C(1)H, and (12)C(2)H--dispersed in solid neon at 3 K, recorded after photolysis of methane precursors with vacuum-ultraviolet light at 121.6 nm, serve as signatures of these trapped radicals. PMID:24912563

  10. Capture of neon atoms by sup 4 He clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Scheidemann, A.; Toennies, J.P. ); Northby, J.A. )

    1990-04-16

    Neon atoms are captured by helium clusters in a crossed-beam experiment. The capture process depends strongly on the cluster beam source conditions. We identify a sharply defined region corresponding to expansions passing near the critical point for which the capture probability is anomalously large.

  11. A Closed Neon Liquefier System for Testing Superconducting Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchetti, M.; Al-Mosawi, M. K.; Yang, Y.; Beduz, C.; Giunchi, G.

    2006-04-01

    A Neon liquefier system has been developed by Southampton University (UK) and EDISON (Italy) with the aim to provide a facility for testing HTS superconducting devices using Magnesium Diboride materials, in the range 25-30K. The system consists of a liquid Neon cryostat coupled to a two stages cryocooler and a recovery system. The first stage of the cryocooler is connected to the thermal shield of the cryostat and a copper station positioned at mid point along the access neck to the liquid Neon bath to reduce heat leak and to provide pre-cooling of samples. The second stage, capable of 20W cooling power at 22K, is used to provide the cooling power for liquefaction and to refrigerate the liquid Neon bath and the superconducting device/sample during the steady state operation. The recovery system has been designed to automatically compress excess boil-off generated by a quench or a transient heating into a storage gas container. Transport measurement up to 900A can be carried out in the Ne cryostat using purposely build hybrid current leads. These leads have a copper upper section cooled by liquid Nitrogen and a superconducting lower section of Ag/AuBi2223 tapes. In this paper we report on the performance of the system and the initial measurement of superconducting samples.

  12. Cosmogenic neon from precompaction irradiation of Kapoeta and Murchison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Swindle, T. D.; Goswami, J. N.

    1983-01-01

    Neon from hand-picked Murchison and Kapoeta grains, selected on the basis of the presence or absence of solar flare particle tracks, was analyzed in order to delineate the precompaction history of this material. The irradiated grains showed large enrichments of cosmogenic neon relative to the unirradiated grains. Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure ages for the unirradiated grains yield the nominal values reported for the recent exposure history of these meteorites. Apparent minimum precompaction galactic exposure ages of 28 m.y. and 56 m.y. would have been obtained for Murchison and Kapoeta, respectively, if the cosmogenic effects in the irradiated grains were due to GCR irradiation. Since this seems unreasonably long, the cosmogenic neon in the irradiated grains may be due to spallation by solar cosmic rays. This, however, would require a more active early sun. The isotopic composition of the cosmogenic neon in these grains suggests a harder energy spectrum than is characteristic of present solar flares. Lack of apparent solar wind effects may require some kind of shielding, such as nebular gas.

  13. Molecular Iodine Fluorescence Using a Green Helium-Neon Laser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, J. Charles

    2011-01-01

    Excitation of molecular iodine vapor with a green (543.4 nm) helium-neon laser produces a fluorescence spectrum that is well suited for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory. Application of standard evaluation techniques to the spectrum yields ground electronic-state molecular parameters in good agreement with literature…

  14. The NEON Aquatic Network: Expanding the Availability of Biogeochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, J. M.; Bohall, C.; Fitzgerald, M.; Utz, R.; Parker, S. M.; Roehm, C. L.; Goodman, K. J.; McLaughlin, B.

    2013-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are facing unprecedented pressure from climate change and land-use practices. Invasive species, whether plant, animal, insect or microbe present additional threat to aquatic ecosystem services. There are significant scientific challenges to understanding how these forces will interact to affect aquatic ecosystems, as the flow of energy and materials in the environment is driven by multivariate and non-linear biogeochemical cycles. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect and provide observational data across multiple scales. Sites were selected to maximize representation of major North American ecosystems using a multivariate geographic clustering method that partitioned the continental US, AK, HI, and Puerto Rico into 20 eco-climatic domains. The NEON data collection systems and methods are designed to yield standardized, near real-time data subjected to rigorous quality controls prior to public dissemination through an online data portal. NEON will collect data for 30 years to facilitate spatial-temporal analysis of environmental responses and drivers of ecosystem change, ranging from local through continental scales. Here we present the NEON Aquatic Network, a multi-parameter network consisting of a combination of in situ sensor and observational data. This network will provide data to examine biogeochemical, biological, hydrologic and geomorphic metrics at 36 sites, which are a combination of small 1st/2nd order wadeable streams, large rivers and lakes. A typical NEON Aquatic site will host up to two in-stream sensor sets designed to collect near-continuous water quality data (e.g. pH/ORP, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, CDOM) along with up to 8 shallow groundwater monitoring wells (level, temp., cond.), and a local meteorological station (e.g. 2D wind speed, PAR, barometric pressure, temperature, net radiation). These coupled sensor suites will be complemented by observational data (e.g. water

  15. Fractionation of terrestrial neon by hydrodynamic hydrogen escape from ancient steam atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric neon is isotopically heavier than mantle neon. By contrast, nonradiogenic mantle Ar, Kr, and Xe are not known to differ from the atmosphere. These observations are most easily explained by selective neon loss to space; however, neon is much too massive to escape from the modern atmosphere. Steam atmospheres are a likely, if intermittent, feature of the accreting Earth. They occur because, on average, the energy liberated during accretion places Earth above the runaway greenhouse threshold, so that liquid water is not stable at the surface. It is found that steam atmospheres should have lasted some ten to fifty million years. Hydrogen escape would have been vigorous, but abundant heavy constituents would have been retained. There is no lack of plausible candidates; CO2, N2, or CO could all suffice. Neon can escape because it is less massive than any of the likely pollutants. Neon fractionation would have been a natural byproduct. Assuming that the initial Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio was solar, it was found that it would have taken some ten million years to effect the observed neon fractionation in a 30 bar steam atmosphere fouled with 10 bars of CO. Thicker atmospheres would have taken longer; less CO, shorter. This mechanism for fractionating neon has about the right level of efficiency. Because the lighter isotope escapes much more readily, total neon loss is pretty minimal; less than half of the initial neon endowment escapes.

  16. The energy dependence of the neon-22 excess in the cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrstroem, N. Y.; Lund, N.

    1985-01-01

    It has been recognized now for some time that the heavy neon isotope, neon-22, is overabundant by a factor of 3 to 4 with respect to neon-22 in the cosmic ray source compared to the ratio of these isotopes in the Solar System. In view of the otherwise remarkable similarity of the chemical composition of the cosmic ray source and the composition of the Solar Energetic Particles, the anomaly regarding the neon isotopes is so much more striking. The observed excess of neon-22 is too large to be explained as a result of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy since the formation of the Solar System. Further information on the origin of the neon-22 excess may come from a comparison of the energy spectra of the two neon isotopes. If the cosmic radiation in the solar neighborhood is a mixture of material from several sources, one of which has an excess of neon-22, then the source energy spectra of neon-20 and neon-22 may differ significantly.

  17. Fluoride Content in Alcoholic Drinks.

    PubMed

    Goschorska, Marta; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Rać, Monika Ewa; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of alcoholic drinks as a potential source of dietary fluoride by means of measuring fluoride levels in selected alcoholic drinks available on the Polish market that are also diverse in terms of the percentage content of ethanol. The study was conducted on 48 types of drinks with low, medium, and high alcohol content available on the Polish market and offered by various manufacturers, both Polish and foreign. Fluoride concentrations in individual samples were measured by potentiometric method with a fluoride ion-selective electrode. The highest fluoride levels were determined in the lowest percentage drinks (less than 10 % v/v ethanol), with the lowest fluoride levels observed in the highest percentage drinks (above 40 % v/v ethanol). In terms of types of alcoholic drinks, the highest fluoride levels were determined in beers and wines, while the lowest levels were observed in vodkas. These data confirm the fact that alcoholic beverages need to be considered as a significant source of fluoride delivered into the body. PMID:26475300

  18. WET FLUORIDE SEPARATION METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1958-11-25

    The separation of U/sup 233/ from thorium, protactinium, and fission products present in neutron-irradiated thorium is accomplished by dissolving the irradiated materials in aqueous nitric acid, adding either a soluble fluoride, iodate, phosphate, or oxalate to precipltate the thorium, separating the precipltate from the solution, and then precipitating uranlum and protactinium by alkalizing the solution. The uranium and protactinium precipitate is removcd from the solution and dissolved in nitric acid. The uranyl nitrate may then be extracted from the acid solution by means of ether, and the protactinium recovered from the aqueous phase.

  19. Topical fluoride for caries prevention

    PubMed Central

    Weyant, Robert J.; Tracy, Sharon L.; Anselmo, Theresa (Tracy); Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D.; Donly, Kevin J.; Frese, William A.; Hujoel, Philippe P.; Iafolla, Timothy; Kohn, William; Kumar, Jayanth; Levy, Steven M.; Tinanoff, Norman; Wright, J. Timothy; Zero, Domenick; Aravamudhan, Krishna; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Meyer, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A panel of experts convened by the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs presents evidence-based clinical recommendations regarding professionally applied and prescription-strength, home-use topical fluoride agents for caries prevention. These recommendations are an update of the 2006 ADA recommendations regarding professionally applied topical fluoride and were developed by using a new process that includes conducting a systematic review of primary studies. Types of Studies Reviewed The authors conducted a search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library for clinical trials of professionally applied and prescription-strength topical fluoride agents—including mouthrinses, varnishes, gels, foams and pastes—with caries increment outcomes published in English through October 2012. Results The panel included 71 trials from 82 articles in its review and assessed the efficacy of various topical fluoride caries-preventive agents. The panel makes recommendations for further research. Practical Implications The panel recommends the following for people at risk of developing dental caries: 2.26 percent fluoride varnish or 1.23 percent fluoride (acidulated phosphate fluoride) gel, or a prescription-strength, home-use 0.5 percent fluoride gel or paste or 0.09 percent fluoride mouthrinse for patients 6 years or older. Only 2.26 percent fluoride varnish is recommended for children younger than 6 years. The strengths of the recommendations for the recommended products varied from “in favor” to “expert opinion for.” As part of the evidence-based approach to care, these clinical recommendations should be integrated with the practitioner's professional judgment and the patient's needs and preferences. PMID:24177407

  20. Evidence of weak plasma series resonance heating in the H-mode of neon and neon/argon inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffard, John B.; Jung, R. O.; Lin, Chun C.; Aneskavich, L. E.; Wendt, A. E.

    2012-09-01

    Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy measurements in argon and neon inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) have revealed a surplus of high-energy electrons in neon-containing plasmas. Differences between results of emission model analyses using neon and argon lines (as well as probe measurements) also indicate a high-energy enhancement in neon-containing plasmas. The abundance of these extra high-energy electrons is correlated with the sheath thickness near the rf antenna and can be reduced by either adding a Faraday shield (external shielding) or increasing the plasma density. A comparison of modelled and experimental values of the 13.56 MHz time modulation of select neon emission lines strongly suggests plasma series resonance heating adjacent to the ICP antenna as the source of the extra heating.

  1. Muon transfer from hydrogen and deuterium atoms to neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. )

    1995-03-01

    The muon exchange reactions from the ground state of muonic protium and deuterium atoms to neon are studied. Measurements have been performed in binary gas mixtures at room temperature. The transfer rate from thermalized muonic deuterium is found to exceed by about an order of magnitude the one from muonic protium. On the other hand, an energy dependence of the rate from [mu][ital d] is revealed, while none is observed from [mu][ital p]. The intensity patterns of the muonic Lyman series of neon resulting from the muon exchange differ from one hydrogen isotope to the other, the most obvious discrepancy being the presence of the muonic Ne(7-1) line after transfer from [mu][ital d], whereas this line is absent by transfer from [mu][ital p]. This indicates that the muon is transferred to the level [ital n][sub [ital p

  2. A dielectric barrier discharge in neon at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Junxia; Luo, Haiyun; Wang, Xinxin

    2011-08-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge in neon at atmospheric pressure is investigated with electrical measurement and fast photography. It is found that a stable diffuse discharge can be easily generated in a gap with a gap space of 0.5-6 mm and is identified with a glow discharge. The first breakdown voltage of the gap is considerably higher than that of the same gap working in a stable diffuse discharge mode, which indicates that Penning ionization of neon metastables from the previous discharge with inevitable gas impurities plays an important role in the decrease in the breakdown voltage. Discharge patterns are observed in a gap shorter than 1 mm. From the experiments with a wedge-like gap, it is found that the discharge patterns are formed in the area with a higher applied electric field, which suggests that a higher applied electric field may cause a transition from a diffuse glow to discharge patterns.

  3. A Cyberinfrastructure for the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimel, D.; Berukoff, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an NSF-funded project designed to provide physical and information infrastructure to support the development of continental-scale, quantitative ecological sciences. The network consists of sixty sites located in the continental US, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, each site hosting terrestrial and aquatic sensors and observational apparati that acquire data across multiple ecoclimatic domains. As well, an airborne remote sensing platform provides spectral and LiDAR data, and acquisition of data sets from external agencies allows for land-use studies. Together, this data is ingested, vetted, processed, and curated by a standards-based, provenance-driven, metadata-rich cyberinfrastructure, which will provide not only access to but discovery and manipulation of NEON data, and the construction of integrative data products and inputs for ecological forecasting that address fundamental processual questions in climate change, land use change, and invasive species.

  4. Discovery of solar wind neon in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Palma, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Insert gases have been measured in seven sieve fractions of a disaggregated sample of the Allende meteorite. The disaggregation was done by ultrasonic treatment in water and by freeze-thawing. This sample consititutes the first gas-rich portion known to occur in the Allende meteorite. The composition of the trapped neon is solar, i.e., Neon-B, and the gas-rich samples contain more trapped Ne-20 than Ar-36. The set of sieve fractions show an anticorrelation of Ne-20 content and grain size. Gas-richness seems to be quite common among the CV3 meteorites with Allende added to the earlier known cases of Mokoia, Vigarano, and Efremovka.

  5. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. This design precludes nucleate boiling in the flow channels as they are too small to handle vapor flow. Consequently, it was necessary to determine boiling incipience under the operating conditions of the magnet system. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of plus or minus 15 percent

  6. Charge radii of neon isotopes across the sd neutron shell

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, K.; Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Kloos, S.; Kotrotsios, G.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Kowalska, M.; Keim, M.; Blaum, K.; Lievens, P.; Simon, H.

    2011-09-15

    We report on the changes in mean square charge radii of unstable neon nuclei relative to the stable {sup 20}Ne, based on the measurement of optical isotope shifts. The studies were carried out using collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam of neutral neon atoms. High sensitivity on short-lived isotopes was achieved thanks to nonoptical detection based on optical pumping and state-selective collisional ionization, which was complemented by an accurate determination of the beam kinetic energy. The new results provide information on the structural changes in the sequence of neon isotopes all across the neutron sd shell, ranging from the proton drip line nucleus and halo candidate {sup 17}Ne up to the neutron-rich {sup 28}Ne in the vicinity of the ''island of inversion.'' Within this range the charge radius is smallest for {sup 24}Ne with N=14 corresponding to the closure of the neutron d{sub 5/2} shell, while it increases toward both neutron shell closures, N=8 and N=20. The general trend of the charge radii correlates well with the deformation effects which are known to be large for several neon isotopes. In the neutron-deficient isotopes, structural changes arise from the onset of proton-halo formation for {sup 17}Ne, shell closure in {sup 18}Ne, and clustering effects in {sup 20,21}Ne. On the neutron-rich side the transition to the island of inversion plays an important role, with the radii in the upper part of the sd shell confirming the weakening of the N=20 magic number. The results add new information to the radii systematics of light nuclei where data are scarce because of the small contribution of nuclear-size effects to the isotope shifts which are dominated by the finite-mass effect.

  7. Urinary Fluoride Concentration in Children with Disabilities Following Long-Term Fluoride Tablet Ingestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Jung-Ren; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Hsiao, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shun-Te; Chen, Hong-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Urine is the most commonly utilized biomarker for fluoride excretion in public health and epidemiological studies. Approximately 30-50% of fluoride is excreted from urine in children. Urinary fluoride excretion reflects the total fluoride intake from multiple sources. After administering fluoride tablets to children with disabilities, urinary…

  8. Determination of Stability Constants of Hydrogen and Aluminum Fluorides with a Fluoride-Selective Electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.

    2003-01-06

    The ability to directly determine free fluoride ion concentration (or mean activity) simplifies gathering and interpretation of experimental data for studies of metal complexes. In this work, the new lanthanum fluoride electrode was used to measure free fluoride ion in an investigation of the hydrogen-fluoride and aluminum-fluoride systems in NH4NO3.

  9. Perception of neon color spreading in 3-6-month-old infants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiale; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K

    2009-12-01

    Although lots of studies about neon color spreading have been reported, few of these studies have focused on the perceptual development of it in human infants. Therefore, this study explores the perceptual development of neon color spreading in infants. In experiment 1, we examined 3-6-month-olds' perception of neon color spreading in static conditions. In experiment 2, we examined 3-6-month-olds' perception of neon color spreading in moving conditions. Our results suggest that while only 5-6-month-old infants show a preference for neon color spreading in the static condition, 3-4-month-old infants also prefer neon color spreading if motion information is available. PMID:19836080

  10. Nova LMC 1990 no. 1: The first extragalactic neon nova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Shore, Steven N.; Starrfield, Sumner G.

    1990-01-01

    International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of nova LMC (Large Magellanic Cloud) 1990 No. 1, the first neon (or ONeMg) nova observed outside the Galaxy are presented. The observations were obtained from 17 Jan. to Mar. 1990, with especially dense coverage during the first 25 days of the outburst. (The neon nova categorization is based on the detection of forbidden Ne 3-4 lines in optical spectra; the ultraviolet neon lines were not detected.) During the first 30 days of the outburst, the radiative losses were dominated by the N 5 delta 1240 and C 4 delta 1550 lines. The maximum ejection velocity was approximately 8000 km/s, based on the blue absorption edge of the C 4 P-Cygni profile. Early in the outburst of Nova LMC 1990 No. 1 the UV luminosity alone was approximately 3 times 10 to the 38th power erg/sec, implying that the bolometric luminosity was well in excess of the Eddington luminosity for a one solar mass object.

  11. Helium-neon laser improves skin repair in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Peccin, Maria Stella; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; de Oliveira, Flavia; Giusti, Paulo Ricardo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of helium-neon laser on skin injury in rabbits. For this purpose, 15 New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral skin damage in leg. Helium-neon laser light, at a fluence of 6 J∕cm2 and wavelength of 632.8 nm, was applied on the left legs (laser group). The right leg lesions (control group) served as negative control. All sections were histopathologically analyzed using HE sections. The results showed little infiltration of inflammatory cells, with proliferation of fibroblasts forming a few fibrous connective tissue after 1 week post-injury. The lesion on the 3rd week was characterized by granulation tissue, which formed from proliferated fibrous connective tissue, congested blood vessels and mild mononuclear cell infiltration. On the 5th week, it was observed that debris material surrounded by a thick layer of connective tissue and dense collage, fibroblasts cells present in the dermis covered by a thick epidermal layer represented by keratinized epithelium. Taken together, our results suggest that helium-neon laser is able to improve skin repair in rabbits at early phases of recovery. PMID:23057697

  12. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  13. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  14. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  15. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  16. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  17. Vapor-liquid equilibria for the systems difluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, dichlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorine + hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.

    1998-01-01

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for difluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, dichlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorine + hydrogen fluoride have been measured. The experimental data for the binary systems are correlated with the NRTL equation with the vapor-phase association model for the mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride, and the relevant parameters are presented. The binary system difluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride forms a homogeneous liquid phase, and the others form minimum boiling heterogeneous azeotropes at the experimental conditions.

  18. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  19. Strontium-90 fluoride data sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    This report is a compilation of available data and appropriate literature references on the properties of strontium-90 fluoride and nonradioactive strontium fluoride. The objective of the document is to compile in a single source pertinent data to assist potential users in the development, licensing, and use of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/-fueled radioisotope heat sources for terrestrial power conversion and thermal applications. The report is an update of the Strontium-90 Fluoride Data Sheet (BNWL-2284) originally issued in April 1977.

  20. On the mechanism of populating 3p levels of neon under pumping by a hard ioniser

    SciTech Connect

    Khasenov, M U

    2011-03-31

    The effect of quenching additives on the luminescence properties of helium - neon mixtures under pumping by {alpha} particles emitted from {sup 210}Po atoms is considered. It is concluded that, under excitation by a heavy charged particle, the population of the 3p'[1/2]{sub 0} level of neon is not related to the dissociative recombination of molecular ions. It is suggested that the most likely channels for populating the 3p level are the excitation transfer from metastable helium atoms to neon atoms and direct excitation of neon by nuclear particles and secondary electrons. (lasers and active media)

  1. Fluorination utilizing thermodynamically unstable fluorides and fluoride salts thereof

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Neil; Whalen, J. Marc; Chacon, Lisa

    2000-12-12

    A method for fluorinating a carbon compound or cationic carbon compound utilizes a fluorination agent selected from thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides and salts thereof in liquid anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. The desired carbon compound or cationic organic compound to undergo fluorination is selected and reacted with the fluorination agent by contacting the selected organic or cationic organic compound and the chosen fluorination agent in a reaction vessel for a desired reaction time period at room temperature or less.

  2. Do Fluoride Ions Protect Teeth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Begins with the procedure and results from an investigation on the effect of fluoride on the reaction between eggshell (substitute teeth) and dilute ethanoic acid. Describes an elegantly modified and improvised apparatus. (DDR)

  3. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  4. The NEON Science Commissioning Plan: Strategies for Confirming System Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, G. D.; Thorpe, A.; Buur, H.

    2015-12-01

    A transformation is underway in the field of ecological monitoring as compelling science questions motivate us to build ever-larger networks aiming to acquire uniform datasets over wide geographical ranges and long timescales. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), currently under construction across the U.S., represents the most ambitious such effort to characterize ecology at the continental scale. When completed in 2017, NEON will begin a 30-year program to monitor the state of North American ecosystems at scores of independent sites by employing a combination of terrestrial and aquatic sensors, organismal, biogeochemical, and hydrological sampling conducted by field staff, and airborne remote-sensing imaging and spectroscopy. Simply building and bringing such complex, long-term monitoring networks online is, however, insufficient to produce a useful result: the science team must also confirm that the system fulfills its essential mission to generate accurate and uniform data from all sites over time. This is the role of Science Commissioning, the process which completes the construction stage by confirming that the system operates as designed before entering full operations. Ideally, Science Commissioning involves simply testing the completed system against all applicable science requirements. In the real world of large, complex networks, planners of Science Commissioning must grapple with several key questions: How can we verify that the measurements from a given subsystem reflect "truth"? How can we ensure that similar subsystems at different sites return equivalent results? How can we confirm that data from the same site remain comparable over long periods of time? How can we conduct meaningful tests on a large system in a reasonable amount of time and effort? We describe the specific strategies NEON is developing to meet these challenges and the implications for other large ecological monitoring networks.

  5. Using NEON to Measure Adaptation of Vegetation to Changes in Environmental Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. H.; Kao, R.; Gibson, C.

    2009-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a national-scale research platform for documenting and analyzing the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on ecology. NEON features sensor networks and experiments linked by cyberinfrastructure to record and archive ecological data for at least 30 years. NEON partitions the United States into 20 ecoclimatic domains. Each domain hosts one fully instrumented core site in a wildland area and two re-locatable sites, which aims to capture ecologically significant gradients (e.g. landuse). Using standardized protocols and an open data policy, NEON data will be gathered from the level of the gene and organism to populations and communities, with extrapolations to the continental scale. In conjunction with environmental data, NEON will conduct field observations and analyses of biological specimens to track biodiversity, population dynamics, productivity, phenology, infectious disease, biogeochemistry and ecohydrology. Here we present a few examples of the type of research NEON will enable using this data. The NEON network will measure and scale many environmental factors that affect vegetation, e.g. temperature, precipitation, and nutrient availability. Direct monitoring of vegetation will enable the study of acclimatory and adaptive changes in vegetation properties over different time scales. Such data will improve the representation of vegetation responses to environmental change in models. The vision behind NEON aims to advance our ability to quantitatively predict ecological change.

  6. Periodic local-MP2 computational study of crystalline neon.

    PubMed

    Halo, Migen; Casassa, Silvia; Maschio, Lorenzo; Pisani, Cesare

    2009-01-21

    Face-centered-cubic crystalline Neon is taken as a test system to explore the influence of computational parameters on the quality of the MP2 solution provided by the Cryscor program using a local-correlation approach. The effect of the various approximations adopted is analyzed: basis set limitations, finite size of excitation domains, truncation of the tails of the local functions, approximate evaluation of two-electron integrals, estimate (by extrapolation) of long-range contributions are shown to play roles of different importance. The Ne2 dimer is used as an auxiliary test case in order to allow comparison with recent and accurate literature data. PMID:19283277

  7. The abundances of neon, sulfur, and argon in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. C.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Aller, L. H.; Geballe, T. R.; Baas, F.

    1981-01-01

    New infrared observations of Ne II, Ar III, and S IV are used in optical observations of other ionization states of the considered elements to evaluate the abundances of neon, argon, and sulfur in 18 planetary nebulae. Attention is also given to one or more of the infrared lines in 18 other nebulae. It is pointed out that S IV was detected in approximately 90% of the observed objects, while Ar III was found in about 80%, and Ne II in roughly one-third. It is noted that optical observations typically include only a limited region of the nebula, while the infrared measurements frequently involve integration over the entire nebular image.

  8. Noble gases in diamonds - Occurrences of solarlike helium and neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Reynolds, J. H.; Roedder, E.; Epstein, S.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen diamond samples from diverse locations were analyzed for the contents of He, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and of their isotopes, using a Reynolds (1956) type glass mass spectrometer. The results disclosed a large spread in the He-3/He-4 ratios, ranging from values below atmospheric to close to the solar ratio. In particular, solarlike He-3/He-4 ratios were seen for an Australian colorless diamond composite and an Arkansas diamond, which also displayed solarlike neon isotopic ratios. Wide variation was also observed in the He-4/Ar-40 ratios, suggesting a complex history for the source regions and the diamond crystallization processes.

  9. Expected intensities of solar neon-like ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the expected intensities of the stronger solar neon-like ion emission lines, some not yet observed, is carried out to compare with the observational situation. The potential usefulness of the 2p5 3s(3P2) - 2p6 forbidden line as a density diagnostic is discussed, and new electric quadrupole lines in the soft X-ray range are noted. 'Observability diagrams' are presented as a convenient overview of the known and unobserved lines. The S VII resonance lines appear to have anomalous intensities.

  10. Optimizing Sampling Efficiency for Biomass Estimation Across NEON Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abercrombie, H. H.; Meier, C. L.; Spencer, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the course of 30 years, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will measure plant biomass and productivity across the U.S. to enable an understanding of terrestrial carbon cycle responses to ecosystem change drivers. Over the next several years, prior to operational sampling at a site, NEON will complete construction and characterization phases during which a limited amount of sampling will be done at each site to inform sampling designs, and guide standardization of data collection across all sites. Sampling biomass in 60+ sites distributed among 20 different eco-climatic domains poses major logistical and budgetary challenges. Traditional biomass sampling methods such as clip harvesting and direct measurements of Leaf Area Index (LAI) involve collecting and processing plant samples, and are time and labor intensive. Possible alternatives include using indirect sampling methods for estimating LAI such as digital hemispherical photography (DHP) or using a LI-COR 2200 Plant Canopy Analyzer. These LAI estimations can then be used as a proxy for biomass. The biomass estimates calculated can then inform the clip harvest sampling design during NEON operations, optimizing both sample size and number so that standardized uncertainty limits can be achieved with a minimum amount of sampling effort. In 2011, LAI and clip harvest data were collected from co-located sampling points at the Central Plains Experimental Range located in northern Colorado, a short grass steppe ecosystem that is the NEON Domain 10 core site. LAI was measured with a LI-COR 2200 Plant Canopy Analyzer. The layout of the sampling design included four, 300 meter transects, with clip harvests plots spaced every 50m, and LAI sub-transects spaced every 10m. LAI was measured at four points along 6m sub-transects running perpendicular to the 300m transect. Clip harvest plots were co-located 4m from corresponding LAI transects, and had dimensions of 0.1m by 2m. We conducted regression analyses

  11. Multiply charged neon clusters: failure of the liquid drop model?

    PubMed

    Mähr, I; Zappa, F; Denifl, S; Kubala, D; Echt, O; Märk, T D; Scheier, P

    2007-01-12

    We have analyzed the stability and fission dynamics of multiply charged neon cluster ions. The critical sizes for the observation of long-lived ions are n2=284 and n3=656 for charge states 2 and 3, respectively, a factor 3 to 4 below the predictions of a previously successful liquid-drop model. The preferred fragment ions of fission reactions are surprisingly small (2

  12. Effect of neon plasma pre-irradiation on surface morphology and deuterium retention of tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P. A.; Ji, G.; Zhou, H. B.; Wang, B.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Lu, G. H.

    2015-08-01

    Neon and deuterium plasma irradiation of polycrystalline tungsten targets have been performed at high fluxes of ∼1024 ions m-2 s-1 to study the interaction of neon with tungsten and the influence of neon on deuterium retention. Tungsten exposure to neon plasma leads to the formation of wavy nanostructures on the surface. Subsequent exposure to high-flux deuterium plasma leads to blister formation of micrometer size on top of the wavy structures. The total deuterium retention is decreased by neon pre-irradiation for all surface temperatures used in the present experiments. It is suggested that a barrier of trapped Ne is formed that interrupts the D transport and reduces D retention.

  13. Atomistic simulations of tungsten surface evolution under low-energy neon implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, Marie; Hammond, Karl D.; Sefta, Faiza; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten is a candidate material for the divertor of fusion reactors, where it will be subject to a high flux of particles coming from the fusion plasma as well as a significant heat load. Under helium plasma exposure in fusion-reactor-like conditions, a nanostructured morphology is known to form on the tungsten surface in certain temperature and incident energy ranges, although the formation mechanism is not fully established. A recent experimental study (Yajima et al 2013 Plasma Sci. Technol. 15 282-6) using neon or argon exposure did not produce similar nanostructure. This article presents molecular dynamics simulations of neon implantation in tungsten aimed at investigating the surface evolution and elucidating the role of noble gas mass in fuzz formation. In contrast to helium, neon impacts can sputter both tungsten and previously implanted neon atoms. The shorter range of neon ions, along with sputtering, limit the formation of large bubbles and likely prevents nanostructure formation.

  14. Fluoride bioavailability in saliva and plaque

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Different fluoride formulations may have different effects on caries prevention. It was the aim of this clinical study to assess the fluoride content, provided by NaF compared to amine fluoride, in saliva and plaque. Methods Eight trained volunteers brushed their teeth in the morning for 3 minutes with either NaF or amine fluoride, and saliva and 3-day-plaque-regrowth was collected at 5 time intervals during 6 hours after tooth brushing. The amount of collected saliva and plaque was measured, and the fluoride content was analysed using a fluoride sensitive electrode. All subjects repeated all study cycles 5 times, and 3 cycles per subject underwent statistical analysis using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results Immediately after brushing the fluoride concentration in saliva increased rapidly and dropped to the baseline level after 360 minutes. No difference was found between NaF and amine fluoride. All plaque fluoride levels were elevated after 30 minutes until 120 minutes after tooth brushing, and decreasing after 360 minutes to baseline. According to the highly individual profile of fluoride in saliva and plaque, both levels of bioavailability correlated for the first 30 minutes, and the fluoride content of saliva and plaque was back to baseline after 6 hours. Conclusions Fluoride levels in saliva and plaque are interindividually highly variable. However, no significant difference in bioavailability between NaF and amine fluoride, in saliva, or in plaque was found. PMID:22230722

  15. Neon Isotope Fractionation in Ice Cores at Close-Off Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Analyzing trapped air bubbles in glacial ice is a well-established and useful method to reconstruct past atmospheric gas concentrations. However, trapped gas composition can be affected by fractionation during the closure of the air bubbles, complicating the reconstruction. Gases such as dioxygen (O2) and dihydrogen (H2) are known to leak out of the bubbles by permeation through the ice lattice at the close-off depth,where firn turns into ice. This process also can cause isotope fractionation, which obscures the past atmospheric isotope ratios in air bubbles in glacial ice. In order to establish the most accurate measurements of past atmospheric content, we need very detailed understanding of the permeation leakage mechanism in order to establish possible corrections. In this study, we propose the use of neon stable isotopes (neon-22 and neon-20) to place constraints on the mechanism of permeation leakage. Neon isotopes are an ideal system to explore because neon has a constant atmospheric isotope ratio, and thus only is affected by close-off fractionation. Neon permeation occurs via velocity-dependent hopping between sites within the ice lattice, because the neon atom is smaller than the critical size (3.6 Å) of the opening in the lattice. Theory predicts that neon isotope fractionation will occur due to the lower velocity of the heavier isotope, but this has never been experimentally verified and the theory is unable to quantitatively predict the magnitude of the fractionation. We will present the first results of high-precision neon isotope (22Ne/20Ne) measurements made in air pumped from the firm-to-ice transition in the Greenland Ice Sheet, where actively closing air bubbles drive permeation leakage. By measuring this natural neon isotope fractionation, we hope to learn about the mass dependence of the leakage mechanism and develop a more quantitative theory that is generalizable to biogeochemically- and climatically-active gases.

  16. Industrial fluoride pollution. Chronic fluoride poisoning in Cornwall Island cattle.

    PubMed

    Krook, L; Maylin, G A

    1979-04-01

    An aluminum plant on the south bank of the St. Lawrence river, southwest of Cornwall Island, Ontario, Canada, has emitted 0.816 metric tons of fluoride daily since 1973; considerably higher amounts were emitted from 1959 to 1973. The plant has been designated as the "major source of fluoride emissions impacting on Cornwall Island." Chronic fluoride poisoning in Cornwall island cattle was manifested clinically by stunted growth and dental fluorosis to a degree of severe interference with drinking and mastication. Cows died at or were slaughtered after the third pregnancy. The deterioration of cows did not allow further pregnancies. Fluoride concentrations in ash of biopsied coccygeal vertebrae increased significantly with age and were dependent on distance from and direction to the aluminum plant. Fluoride in bone ash of a 7-month old-fetus exceeded 500 ppm; fluoride thus was passed transplacentally. Analyses of fluoride in ash of bones obtained at necropsy of cattle from 4 months of age to 4 to 5 years of age showed increased amounts with age. Cancellous bone retained far higher amounts than cortical bone, a reflection of the normally higher metabolic rate of cancellous bone. Concentrations exceeding 10,000 ppm fluoride were recorded in cancellous bone of a 4-to 5-year-old cow. The target cells for fluoride in chronic fluorosis were shown to be the ameloblasts, the dental pulp cells and the odontoblasts and, in bone, primarily the resorbing osteocytes and also the osteoblasts. Atrophy and necrosis of the ameloblasts were responsible for enamel defects. The existing enamel showed brown discoloration from fluoride deposits. The pulp cells underwent fibrous and osseous metaplasia and necrosis of the ectopic bone occurred. The odontoblasts were atrophic and the dentin showed brown discoloration. The resorbing osteocytes were inactive and osteosclerosis resulted. This was especially pronounced in areas of normally great apposition, i.e. in the metaphyses. The epiphyseal

  17. Production rates of neon xenon isotopes by energetic neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leich, D. A.; Borg, R. J.; Lanier, V. B.

    1986-01-01

    As a first step in an experimental program to study the behavior of noble gases produced in situ in minerals, a suite of minerals and pure chemicals were irradiated with 14.5 MeV neutrons at LLNL's Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-II) and production rates for noble gases were determined. While neutron effects in meteorites and lunar samples are dominated by low-energy neutron capture, more energetic cosmic-ray secondary neutrons can provide significant depth-dependent contributions to production of cosmogenic nuclides through endothermic reactions such as (n,2n), (n,np), (n,d) and (n,alpha). Production rates for nuclides produced by cosmic-ray secondary neutrons are therefore useful in interpreting shielding histories from the relative abundances of cosmogenic nuclides. Absolute production cross sections were calculated from isotope dilution analyses of NaCl, Mg, CsCl, and Ba(NO3)2 samples, assuming purity, stoichiometry, and quantitative noble gas retention and extraction. Relative production cross sections determined from neon isotopic ratios in the mineral samples were also considered in evaluating the neon production cross sections. Results are presented.

  18. Population dynamics in a metastable neon magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, R. D.; Calvert, J. E.; Sang, R. T.

    2013-02-01

    We observe the population dynamics within a metastable neon magneto-optical trap (MOT) through the measurement of the average squared Clebsch-Gordan coefficient C2 over a range of laser detunings. The magnitude of C2 is dependent on the internal quantum state of an atom interacting with the light field and is found to show a strong dependence on the applied laser detuning. Previously it has been reported [Townsend , Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.52.1423 52, 1423 (1995)] that trapped atoms in a MOT are pumped towards the states that interact most strongly with the local field and therefore the measured value of C2 is larger than the average over all possible transitions. For the 3P2-to-3D3 cooling transition in metastable neon the average C2 value is equal to 0.46; however, we have measured 0.29±0.03

  19. Helium-neon laser treatment transforms fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Pourreau-Schneider, N.; Ahmed, A.; Soudry, M.; Jacquemier, J.; Kopp, F.; Franquin, J. C.; Martin, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    The differentiation of myofibroblastic cells from normal human gingival fibroblasts in vitro has been established by transmission electron microscopy and quantitated by immunohistochemistry, using antigelsolin monoclonal antibodies. Untreated control cultures were compared to cultures exposed to Helium-Neon (He-Ne) laser irradiation. A direct and massive transformation of the cultured fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was observed as early as 24 hours after laser treatment, whereas control cultures were comprised of only resting fibroblasts and active fibroblasts. This in vitro induction of myofibroblasts may be analogous to that which occurs in vivo. Therefore we undertook a similar study using biopsies from gingival tissues after wisdom tooth extraction. Myofibroblasts were present in the connective tissue of laser-treated gums 48 hours after irradiation, but not in untreated contralateral control tissues. These data provide evidence that the primary biologic effect of the Helium-Neon laser on connective tissue is the rapid generation of myofibroblasts from fibroblasts. The induction of a phenotype with contractile properties may have clinical significance in the acceleration of the wound-healing process. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2372040

  20. An accurate model potential for alkali neon systems.

    PubMed

    Zanuttini, D; Jacquet, E; Giglio, E; Douady, J; Gervais, B

    2009-12-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the ground and lowest excited states of M-Ne dimers, for M=Li, Na, and K. We show that the potential energy curves of these Van der Waals dimers can be obtained accurately by considering the alkali neon systems as one-electron systems. Following previous authors, the model describes the evolution of the alkali valence electron in the combined potentials of the alkali and neon cores by means of core polarization pseudopotentials. The key parameter for an accurate model is the M(+)-Ne potential energy curve, which was obtained by means of ab initio CCSD(T) calculation using a large basis set. For each MNe dimer, a systematic comparison with ab initio computation of the potential energy curve for the X, A, and B states shows the remarkable accuracy of the model. The vibrational analysis and the comparison with existing experimental data strengthens this conclusion and allows for a precise assignment of the vibrational levels. PMID:19968334

  1. Electron Scattering from Neon Via Effective Range Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedus, Kamil

    2014-12-01

    Elastic cross-sections for electron scattering on neon from 0 energy up to 16 eV are analyzed by an analytical approach to the modified effective range theory (MERT). It is shown that energy and angular variations of elastic differential, integral and momentum transfer cross-sections can be accurately parameterized by six MERT coefficients up to the energy threshold for the first Feshbach resonance. MERT parameters are determined empirically by numerical comparison with large collection of available experimental data of elastic total (integral) cross-sections. The present analysis is validated against numerous electron beams and swarm experiments. The comparison of derived MERT parameters with those found for other noble gases, helium, argon and krypton, is done. The derived scattering length (for the s-partial wave) in neon, 0.227 a 0, agrees well with recent theories; it is small but, differently from Ar and Kr, still positive. Analogue parameters for the p-wave and the d-wave are negative and positive respectively for all the four gases compared.

  2. Infrared spectra of small molecular ions trapped in solid neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacox, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-22

    The infrared spectrum of a molecular ion provides a unique signature for that species, gives information on its structure, and is amenable to remote sensing. It also serves as a comparison standard for refining ab initio calculations. Experiments in this laboratory trap molecular ions in dilute solid solution in neon at 4.2 K in sufficient concentration for observation of their infrared spectra between 450 and 4000 cm{sup !1}. Discharge-excited neon atoms produce cations by photoionization and/or Penning ionization of the parent molecule. The resulting electrons are captured by other molecules, yielding anions which provide for overall charge neutrality of the deposit. Recent observations of ions produced from C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and BF{sub 3} will be discussed. Because of their relatively large possibility of having low-lying excited electronic states, small, symmetric molecular cations are especially vulnerable to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Some phenomena which can result from this breakdown will be discussed. Ion-molecule reaction rates are sufficiently high that in some systems absorptions of dimer cations and anions are also observed. When H{sub 2} is introduced into the system, the initially-formed ion may react with it. Among the species resulting from such ion-molecule reactions that have recently been studied are O{sub 4}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, HOCO{sup +}, and HCO{sub 2}{sup !}.

  3. Infrared spectra of small molecular ions trapped in solid neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacox, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    The infrared spectrum of a molecular ion provides a unique signature for that species, gives information on its structure, and is amenable to remote sensing. It also serves as a comparison standard for refining ab initio calculations. Experiments in this laboratory trap molecular ions in dilute solid solution in neon at 4.2 K in sufficient concentration for observation of their infrared spectra between 450 and 4000 cm!1. Discharge-excited neon atoms produce cations by photoionization and/or Penning ionization of the parent molecule. The resulting electrons are captured by other molecules, yielding anions which provide for overall charge neutrality of the deposit. Recent observations of ions produced from C2H4 and BF3 will be discussed. Because of their relatively large possibility of having low-lying excited electronic states, small, symmetric molecular cations are especially vulnerable to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Some phenomena which can result from this breakdown will be discussed. Ion-molecule reaction rates are sufficiently high that in some systems absorptions of dimer cations and anions are also observed. When H2 is introduced into the system, the initially-formed ion may react with it. Among the species resulting from such ion-molecule reactions that have recently been studied are O4+, NH4+, HOCO+, and HCO2!.

  4. NEON: Transforming Environmental Data into Free, Open Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, B.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect data across the United States on the impacts of climate change, land use change and invasive species on natural resources and biodiversity. NEON is a project of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), with many other U.S. agencies and NGOs cooperating. The Observatory’s construction plans call for 60 sites distributed across 20 ecoclimatic Domains. Data will be collected from strategically selected sites within each Domain and synthesized into information products that can be used to describe changes in the nation’s ecosystem through space and time. Sites are arrayed across different land-use types in order to understand large-scale environmental drivers affect biodiversity, ecohydrology, biogeochemistry, and disease ecology across the US continent. NEON is an instrument that listens to the pulse of the US continental ecosystem: infrastructure deployed at these sites will collect an average of over 500 primary measurements at each site, including annual high-resolution airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral data. These primary measurements will be transformed by a state-of-the-art cyberinfrastruture into over 100 higher-order data products. All measurements, data products, algorithms used to compute the data products, and protocols used to collect the primary measurements will be freely available to the public and assessable over the internet. The information products, including selected socio-economic datasets from cooperating Federal agencies, will be served in standard formats, grid-sizes, and geographical projections. This type of information is anticipated to have a wide range of uses, including ecological forecasting, education, public engagement, socio-economic analyses, decision support for climate-change adaptation and mitigation, resource management, and environmental risk management. Open data, interoperability, an open and integrated observation infrastructure, public engagement, and a

  5. NEON, Establishing a Standardized Network for Groundwater Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, M.; Schroeter, N.; Goodman, K. J.; Roehm, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is establishing a standardized set of data collection systems comprised of in-situ sensors and observational sampling to obtain data fundamental to the analysis of environmental change at a continental scale. NEON will be collecting aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric data using Observatory-wide standardized designs and methods via a systems engineering approach. This approach ensures a wealth of high quality data, data algorithms, and models that will be freely accessible to all communities such as academic researchers, policy makers, and the general public. The project is established to provide 30 years of data which will enable prediction and forecasting of drivers and responses of ecological change at scales ranging from localized responses through regional gradients and up to the continental scale. The Observatory is a distributed system of sites spread across the United States, including Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, which is subdivided into 20 statistically unique domains, based on a set of 18 ecologically important parameters. Each domain contains at least one core aquatic and terrestrial site which are located in unmanaged lands, and up to 2 additional sites selected to study domain specific questions such as nitrogen deposition gradients and responses of land use change activities on the ecosystem. Here, we present the development of NEON's groundwater observation well network design and the timing strategy for sampling groundwater chemistry. Shallow well networks, up to 100 feet in depth, will be installed at NEON aquatic sites and will allow for observation of localized ecohydrologic site conditions, by providing basic spatio-temporal near-real time data on groundwater parameters (level, temperature, conductivity) collected from in situ high-resolution instrumentation positioned in each well; and biannual sampling of geochemical and nutrient (N and P) concentrations in a subset of wells for each

  6. Microcratering in Polyvinylidene Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Anthony John

    Dust is defined as macroparticles as small as a few molecules up to several micrometers in diameter. In the context of space exploration, it was originally seen only as a technical obstacle to applications; dust can damage instrument surfaces, coat mating surfaces preventing proper seals, and impair or obstruct measurements. Because of the ubiquity of dust in the solar system and its role in the origin of planets and other bodies, the study of dust and related phenomena has evolved to a scientific subdiscipline which can provide us insight into the origins and evolution of our solar system. In order to facilitate this, a hypervelocity dust accelerator has been built at the University of Colorado at Boulder and is being used to probe impact phenomena, dust mitigation techniques, dust detection techniques, and more. One such dust detector is a Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) dust detector. The PVDF dust detector is very lightweight and consumes little power. Due to these properties, PVDF detectors can potentially be used on any spacecraft to gain information on the local dust environment. It is not fully understood how this PVDF dust detector signal is generated, so at present can only be used as a dust counter. In this thesis I discuss the importance of the study of dust phenomena, describe the accelerator experiment, and describe a study conducted to determine the underlying physical principles of PVDF dust detectors. This included measuring crater size scaling laws, measuring the detailed shape of craters, and applying this data to simulations of the signals being generated by PVDF detectors.

  7. A Manual for Rural School Fluoridation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprouse, Larman W.; Brooks, John

    The product of a 1972 Dental Health Branch contract with the U.S. Public Health Service, this manual is designed to aid in the development of school fluoridation programs and presents: background information on general concepts relating to the action of fluoride on teeth; discussions dealing with community and school fluoridation studies; and the…

  8. The Effect of Fluoride in Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedlund, L. R.; Gallagher, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of fluoride on bone tissue and the possible role of fluoride in the treatment of osteoporosis. At present, fluoride treatment should be restricted to clinical trials until its risks and benefits have been further evaluated. (Author/MT)

  9. Fluoride uptake by Streptococcus mutans 6715.

    PubMed Central

    Whitford, G M; Schuster, G S; Pashley, D H; Venkateswarlu, P

    1977-01-01

    The short-term kinetics of fluoride uptake by cells from 20- to 22-h cultures of Streptococcus mutans strain 6715 were studied using rapid filtration and centrifugation techniques. Saline-suspended organisms were diluted with fluoride-containing solutions buffered at four different pH values (2.0, 4.0, 5.5, and 8.2). Fluoride disappearance from the medium was inversely related to pH and to the duration of the exposure at any given pH. The uptake was rapid and extensive at the lower pH values and decreased as the pH increased. Media fluoride concentrations subsequently increased; i.e., fluoride was released from the cells. The presence of glucose, cyanide, or iodoacetate did not influence the results. However, preincubation of the cells in fluoride-free buffers, followed by the addition of fluoride, reduced fluoride uptake markedly. Cell-to-media pH gradients were determined by the distribution of 14C-labeled 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolidinedione. Fluoride uptake was found to be a function of the magnitude of the pH gradient (P less than 0.001). It is hypothesized that fluoride uptake occurs by the diffusion of hydrogen fluoride and the subsequent trapping of ionic fluoride. PMID:22490

  10. Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte battery. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1972-06-26

    It is an object of the invention to provide a primary cell or battery using ammonium fluoride--anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte having improved current and power production capabilities at low temperatures. It is operable at temperatures substantially above the boiling point of hydrogen fluoride. (GRA)

  11. METHOD OF PREPARING METAL FLUORIDES

    DOEpatents

    Katz, J.J.; Sheft, I.

    1959-08-11

    A method is presented for preparing the halides of elements which are relatively non-reactive with halogenating agents. The method involves reacting a mixture of an oxygen containing salt of a difficulty halogenated metal with an oxygen containing salt of an easily halogenated metal with a halogenating agent. Accordingly plutonium tetrafluoride is produced by reacting a mixture of plutonium dioxide and uranium octaoxide with bromine trifluoride. The reaction proceeds smoothly at moderate temperatures and the resulting plutonium trifluoride may be readily separated from many impurities which form volatile fluorides by volatilizing these volatile fluorides from the reaction chamber.

  12. Predicting helium and neon adsorption and separation on carbon nanotubes by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Bolboli Nojini, Zabiollah; Abbas Rafati, Amir; Majid Hashemianzadeh, Seyed; Samiee, Sepideh

    2011-04-01

    The adsorption of helium and neon mixtures on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was investigated at various temperatures (subcritical and supercritical) and pressures using canonical Monte Carlo (CMC) simulation. Adsorption isotherms were obtained at different temperatures (4, 40, 77 and 130 K) and pressures ranging from 1 to 16 MPa. Separation factors and isosteric enthalpies of adsorption were also calculated. Moreover, the adsorption isotherms were obtained at constant specific temperatures (4 and 40 K) and pressures (0.2 and 1.0 MPa) as a function of the amount adsorbed. All of the adsorption isotherms for an equimolar mixture of helium and neon have a Langmuir shape, indicating that no capillary condensation occurs. Both the helium and the neon adsorption isotherms exhibit similar behavior, and slightly more of the helium and neon mixture is adsorbed on the inner surfaces of the SWCNTs than on their outer surfaces. More neon is adsorbed than helium within the specified pressure range. The data obtained show that the isosteric enthalpies for the adsorption of neon are higher than those for helium under the same conditions, which means that adsorption of neon preferentially occurs by (15, 15) SWCNTs. Furthermore, the isosteric enthalpies of adsorption of both gases decrease with increasing temperature. PMID:20559855

  13. Triple-Point Temperature and the Isotopic Composition of Three Commercial Neon Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, I.; Gam, K. S.; Joung, W.; Kim, Y.-G.

    2015-08-01

    The triple-point temperature of neon, , is known to have dependence on the isotopic composition. Recently, the Technical Annex for the International Temperature Scale of 1990 was updated to specify the method of correction for the isotopic reference ratio of neon. In this study, to confirm this correction in the Technical Annex independently, the effects of the isotopic composition of neon on for three commercial neon gas sources were studied. For the measurement of the isotopic composition, a gas mass spectrometer was used to compare the sample gases with a reference neon gas whose isotopic composition was known with high precision by a gravimetric method. For the measurement of , an open-cell type cryostat for the realization of low-temperature fixed points was used. The physical cell and the thermal environment around it remained very similar for all measurements with the neon gases due to the nature of the open-cell type system. Therefore, the difference in among different samples could be measured with a relatively low uncertainty, canceling many systematic effects that are common to all measurements. Our result was consistent with the correction in the Technical Annex. Furthermore, because one of the commercial neon gases was the bottle that was used for KRISS measurements in the international comparison CCT-K2, it is now possible to correct the measurement for the reference isotopic ratio and compare it with other measurements for which isotopic composition data are available.

  14. Mechanism of the tunable structural color of neon tetra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Shinya

    2010-03-01

    Many examples of the structural color can be found in butterfly wings, beetle's elytra and bird feathers. Since the color-producing microstructures of these examples mainly consist of stable materials, for example, dried cuticles in insects and keratin and melanin granules in bird feathers, it is impossible to actively change the microstructure. On the other hand, some fish have the tunability in their structural colors. For example, a small tropical fish, neon tetra, has a longitudinal stripe that looks blue-green in the day time, while it changes into deep violet at night. This fact clearly indicates the variability in the microstructure. It is known that the iridophore of the stripe part of neon tetra contains two stacks of thin light-reflecting platelets that are made of guanine crystal. Since the arrangement of the platelets is observed periodic, the stack is thought to cause the structural color through the multilayer thin-film interference. Consequently, the variability in the color is thought to originate from the variation in the distance between the platelets. Two explanations have been proposed so far for the distance variation. Lythoge and Shand considered that the distance is controlled by osmotic pressure that induces the inflow of the water into the iridophore[1]. On the other hand, Nagaishi et al. proposed a different model, called Venetian blind model, in which the inclination angle of the platelets is varied, resulting in the change in the distance[2]. Recently, we have performed detailed optical measurements on the iridophore of neon tetra. We have paid particular attention to the direction of the reflected light, since the Venetian blind model expects that the direction varies with the color change owing to the tilt of the platelets. We present the experimental results and quantitatively discuss the validity of the Venetian blind model. [4pt] [1] J. N. Lythgoe, and J. Shand, J Physiol. 325, 23-34 (1982). [0pt] [2] H. Nagaishi, N. Oshima, and R

  15. Isotopic effects in the neon fixed point: uncertainty of the calibration data correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steur, Peter P. M.; Pavese, Franco; Fellmuth, Bernd; Hermier, Yves; Hill, Kenneth D.; Seog Kim, Jin; Lipinski, Leszek; Nagao, Keisuke; Nakano, Tohru; Peruzzi, Andrea; Sparasci, Fernando; Szmyrka-Grzebyk, Anna; Tamura, Osamu; Tew, Weston L.; Valkiers, Staf; van Geel, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The neon triple point is one of the defining fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). Although recognizing that natural neon is a mixture of isotopes, the ITS-90 definition only states that the neon should be of ‘natural isotopic composition’, without any further requirements. A preliminary study in 2005 indicated that most of the observed variability in the realized neon triple point temperatures within a range of about 0.5 mK can be attributed to the variability in isotopic composition among different samples of ‘natural’ neon. Based on the results of an International Project (EUROMET Project No. 770), the Consultative Committee for Thermometry decided to improve the realization of the neon fixed point by assigning the ITS-90 temperature value 24.5561 K to neon with the isotopic composition recommended by IUPAC, accompanied by a quadratic equation to take the deviations from the reference composition into account. In this paper, the uncertainties of the equation are discussed and an uncertainty budget is presented. The resulting standard uncertainty due to the isotopic effect (k = 1) after correction of the calibration data is reduced to (4 to 40) μK when using neon of ‘natural’ isotopic composition or to 30 μK when using 20Ne. For comparison, an uncertainty component of 0.15 mK should be included in the uncertainty budget for the neon triple point if the isotopic composition is unknown, i.e. whenever the correction cannot be applied.

  16. Imaging of the structure of the argon and neon dimer, trimer, and tetramer.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, B; Vredenborg, A; Malakzadeh, A; Schmidt, L Ph H; Havermeier, T; Meckel, M; Cole, K; Smolarski, M; Chang, Z; Jahnke, T; Dörner, R

    2011-06-30

    We Coulomb explode argon and neon dimers, trimers, and tetramers by multiple ionization in an ultrashort 800 nm laser pulse. By measuring all momentum vectors of the singly charged ions in coincidence, we determine the ground state nuclear wave function of the dimer, trimer, and tetramer. Furthermore we retrieve the bond angles of the trimer in position space by applying a classical numerical simulation. For the argon and neon trimer, we find a structure close to the equilateral triangle. The width of the distribution around the equilateral triangle is considerably wider for neon than for argon. PMID:21413773

  17. Special Report: Fluoridation of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hileman, Bette

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the controversy regarding water fluoridation in the United States during the last 50 years. Discusses the current status; benefits; and health risks including skeletal fluorosis, kidney disease, hypersensitivity, mutagenic effects, birth defects, and cancer. Presents statistics and anecdotal accounts. (CW)

  18. Spectral diversity crystalline fluoride lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Jenssen, H.P.; Gabbe, D.R.; Linz, A.; Naiman, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Within the realm of crystalline laser materials, the class of fluorides distinguishes itself mostly by the wide variety of laser wavelengths displayed. Laser operation has now been reported from 3.9 micrometers in the infrared to 286 nm in the ultraviolet. Many are operated flash-lamp pumped, while others have shown high utility as linear down conversion lasers and rare earth ion, while others are sensitized by other co-dopants which absorb the pump energy and transfer it to the active laser ions. The potential of large spectral diversity for laser operation is due both to the wide window of transparency that fluorides possess and the lower rates of nonradiative decay. The high band gap in the ultraviolet also leads to low linear absorption, low nonlinear refractive indices and multiphoton absorption. Additionally, the good chemical stability displayed by high-purity stoichiometric fluoride compounds allows their use with ultraviolet pump sources at high energies, without incurring UV-induced damage. The most recent research associated with such materials, particularly the host crystal, lithium yttrium fluoride, LiYF4 (YLF) is reviewed.

  19. [Absorption of fluorides by synthetic hydroxyapatites].

    PubMed

    Yévenes, I; Sánchez, U; Medina, M E

    1988-01-01

    We studied the adsorption of sodium fluoride, ammonium fluoride, tin fluoride and sodium monofluorophosphate to synthetic hydroxiapatite in function of the pH (pH 4.7, 5.5 and 6.1). In two models; in a first model was eluted the fluorides of the hydroxiapatite column with artificial saliva; in the second model were incubated the fluoride with bufferized hydroxiapatite to the above pH. The fluoride determination was done by potentiometric method with a specific ion activity electrode. The results in the elution indicated that the sodium and tin fluorides give elution levels different at the pH studied. By other hand ammonium fluoride did not present differences. The results with incubation demonstrated that ammonium fluoride gives the greater adsorption, the sodium fluoride is slightly lower, and the sodium monofluorophosphate the lowest. Also, was observed that the adsorption decrease with the increase of the pH for the three fluorides. The comparison of both models showed that the incubation presented higher values of adsorption than the elution for the pH studied. PMID:3155417

  20. The infrared spectrum of HOOH+ trapped in solid neon.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Warren E; Lugez, Catherine L; Jacox, Marilyn E

    2012-10-14

    When a Ne:H(2)O(2) mixture is codeposited at 4.3 K with a beam of neon atoms that have been excited in a microwave discharge, three new, photosensitive absorptions appear which can be assigned to the three infrared-active vibrational fundamentals of trans-HOOH(+). When the Ne:H(2)O(2) deposition system is pretreated with the vapors of D(2)O, the product absorptions include new peaks which can be attributed to vibrational fundamentals of trans-HOOD(+) and trans-DOOD(+). Density functional calculations of the vibrational fundamentals of the three hydrogen peroxide cation isotopologues support the proposed assignments. Broad, photosensitive product absorptions also appear near the positions of vibrational transitions of O(3)(-), and may be contributed by a weakly bound complex of that species with H(2)O. PMID:23061846

  1. Helium and neon abundances and compositions in cometary matter.

    PubMed

    Marty, Bernard; Palma, Russell L; Pepin, Robert O; Zimmermann, Laurent; Schlutter, Dennis J; Burnard, Peter G; Westphal, Andrew J; Snead, Christopher J; Bajt, Sasa; Becker, Richard H; Simones, Jacob E

    2008-01-01

    Materials trapped and preserved in comets date from the earliest history of the solar system. Particles captured by the Stardust spacecraft from comet 81P/Wild 2 are indisputable cometary matter available for laboratory study. Here we report measurements of noble gases in Stardust material. Neon isotope ratios are within the range observed in "phase Q," a ubiquitous, primitive organic carrier of noble gases in meteorites. Helium displays 3He/4He ratios twice those in phase Q and in Jupiter's atmosphere. Abundances per gram are surprisingly large, suggesting implantation by ion irradiation. The gases are probably carried in high-temperature igneous grains similar to particles found in other Stardust studies. Collectively, the evidence points to gas acquisition in a hot, high ion-flux nebular environment close to the young Sun. PMID:18174437

  2. Attainable superheat of argon-helium, argon-neon solutions.

    PubMed

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Kaverin, Aleksey M; Andbaeva, Valentina N

    2008-10-16

    The method of lifetime measurement has been used to investigate the kinetics of spontaneous boiling-up of superheated argon-helium and argon-neon solutions. Experiments were made at a pressure of p = 1.5 MPa and concentrations up to 0.33 mol% in the range of nucleation rates from 10 (4) to 10 (8) s (-1) m (-3). The homogeneous nucleation regime has been distinguished. With good agreement between experimental data and homogeneous nucleation theory in temperature and concentration dependences of the nucleation rate, a systematic underestimation by 0.25-0.34 K has been revealed in superheat temperatures over the saturated line attained by experiment as compared with theoretical values calculated in a macroscopic approximation. The revealed disagreement between theory and experiment is connected with the dependence of the properties of new-phase nuclei on their size. PMID:18798666

  3. Water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.; Frederick, E. B.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents the water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system. The results of initial base-line field test results of NASA airborne oceanographic lidar in the bathymetry mode are given, with water-truth measurements of depth and beam attenuation coefficients by boat taken at the same time as overflights to aid in determining the system's operational performance. The nadir-angle tests and field-of-view data are presented; this laser bathymetry system is an improvement over prior models in that (1) the surface-to-bottom pulse waveform is digitally recorded on magnetic tape, and (2) wide-swath mapping data may be routinely acquired using a 30 deg full-angle conical scanner.

  4. The role of fluoride in erosion therapy.

    PubMed

    Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Young, Alix; Ganss, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The role of fluoride in erosion therapy has long been questioned. However, recent research has yielded positive results. In this chapter, an overview of the literature is provided regarding the application of fluorides in the prevention and treatment of erosion and erosive wear. The results are presented and discussed for different fluoride sources such as monovalent and polyvalent fluorides, and for different vehicles such as toothpastes, solutions and rinses, as well as varnishes and gels. It is concluded that fluoride applications are very likely to be of use in the preventive treatment of erosive wear. Most promising are high-concentration, acidic formulations and the polyvalent fluoride sources, with the best evidence available for stannous fluoride. However, the evidence base for clinical effectiveness is still small. PMID:24993271

  5. Fluoride in groundwater: toxicological exposure and remedies.

    PubMed

    Jha, S K; Singh, R K; Damodaran, T; Mishra, V K; Sharma, D K; Rai, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride is a chemical element that is found most frequently in groundwater and has become one of the most important toxicological environmental hazards globally. The occurrence of fluoride in groundwater is due to weathering and leaching of fluoride-bearing minerals from rocks and sediments. Fluoride when ingested in small quantities (<0.5 mg/L) is beneficial in promoting dental health by reducing dental caries, whereas higher concentrations (>1.5 mg/L) may cause fluorosis. It is estimated that about 200 million people, from among 25 nations the world over, may suffer from fluorosis and the causes have been ascribed to fluoride contamination in groundwater including India. High fluoride occurrence in groundwaters is expected from sodium bicarbonate-type water, which is calcium deficient. The alkalinity of water also helps in mobilizing fluoride from fluorite (CaF2). Fluoride exposure in humans is related to (1) fluoride concentration in drinking water, (2) duration of consumption, and (3) climate of the area. In hotter climates where water consumption is greater, exposure doses of fluoride need to be modified based on mean fluoride intake. Various cost-effective and simple procedures for water defluoridation techniques are already known, but the benefits of such techniques have not reached the rural affected population due to limitations. Therefore, there is a need to develop workable strategies to provide fluoride-safe drinking water to rural communities. The study investigated the geochemistry and occurrence of fluoride and its contamination in groundwater, human exposure, various adverse health effects, and possible remedial measures from fluoride toxicity effects. PMID:23573940

  6. Alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The knowledge of background alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children is of utmost importance for introducing optimal and safe caries preventive measures for both individuals and communities. The aim of this study was to assess the daily fluoride intake analyzing duplicate samples of food and beverages. An attempt was made to calculate the daily intake of fluoride from food and swallowed toothpaste. Methods Daily alimentary fluoride intake was measured in a group of 36 children with an average age of 4.75 years and an average weight of 20.69 kg at baseline, by means of a double plate method. This was repeated after six months. Parents recorded their child's diet over 24 hours and collected duplicated portions of food and beverages received by children during this period. Pooled samples of food and beverages were weighed and solid food samples were homogenized. Fluoride was quantitatively extracted from solid food samples by a microdiffusion method using hexadecyldisiloxane and perchloric acid. The content of fluoride extracted from solid food samples, as well as fluoride in beverages, was measured potentiometrically by means of a fluoride ion selective electrode. Results Average daily fluoride intake at baseline was 0.389 (SD 0.054) mg per day. Six months later it was 0.378 (SD 0.084) mg per day which represents 0.020 (SD 0.010) and 0.018 (SD 0.008) mg of fluoride respectively calculated per kg bw/day. When adding the values of unwanted fluoride intake from the toothpaste shown in the literature (0.17-1.21 mg per day) the estimate of the total daily intake of fluoride amounted to 0.554-1.594 mg/day and recalculated to the child's body weight to 0.027-0.077 mg/kg bw/day. Conclusions In the children studied, observed daily fluoride intake reached the threshold for safe fluoride intake. When adding the potential fluoride intake from swallowed toothpaste, alimentary intake reached the optimum range for daily fluoride intake. These results showed that

  7. Dynamics of Fluoride Bioavailability in the Biofilms of Different Oral Surfaces after Amine Fluoride and Sodium Fluoride Application.

    PubMed

    Naumova, Ella A; Dickten, Christoph; Jung, Rico; Krauss, Florian; Rübesamen, Henrik; Schmütsch, Katharina; Sandulescu, Tudor; Zimmer, Stefan; Arnold, Wolfgang H

    2016-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate differences in fluoride bioavailability in different oral areas after the application of amine fluoride (AmF) and sodium fluoride (NaF). The null hypothesis suggested no differences in the fluoride bioavailability. The tongue coating was removed and biofilm samples from the palate, oral floor and cheeks were collected. All subjects brushed their teeth with toothpaste containing AmF or NaF. Specimens were collected before, as well as immediately after and at 30 and 120 minutes after tooth brushing. The fluoride concentration was determined. The area under the curve was calculated for each location and compared statistically. In the tongue coating, fluoride concentration increased faster after NaF application than after AmF application. After 30 minutes, the fluoride concentration decreased and remained stable until 120 minutes after AmF application and returned to baseline after NaF application. The difference between the baseline and the endpoint measurements was statistically significant. The fluoride concentration in the tongue coating remained at a higher level compared with the baseline for up to 120 minutes post-brushing. This may indicate that the tongue coating is a major reservoir for fluoride bioavailability. The results also indicate an unequal fluoride distribution in the oral cavity. PMID:26727989

  8. Dynamics of Fluoride Bioavailability in the Biofilms of Different Oral Surfaces after Amine Fluoride and Sodium Fluoride Application

    PubMed Central

    Naumova, Ella A.; Dickten, Christoph; Jung, Rico; Krauss, Florian; Rübesamen, Henrik; Schmütsch, Katharina; Sandulescu, Tudor; Zimmer, Stefan; Arnold, Wolfgang H.

    2016-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate differences in fluoride bioavailability in different oral areas after the application of amine fluoride (AmF) and sodium fluoride (NaF). The null hypothesis suggested no differences in the fluoride bioavailability. The tongue coating was removed and biofilm samples from the palate, oral floor and cheeks were collected. All subjects brushed their teeth with toothpaste containing AmF or NaF. Specimens were collected before, as well as immediately after and at 30 and 120 minutes after tooth brushing. The fluoride concentration was determined. The area under the curve was calculated for each location and compared statistically. In the tongue coating, fluoride concentration increased faster after NaF application than after AmF application. After 30 minutes, the fluoride concentration decreased and remained stable until 120 minutes after AmF application and returned to baseline after NaF application. The difference between the baseline and the endpoint measurements was statistically significant. The fluoride concentration in the tongue coating remained at a higher level compared with the baseline for up to 120 minutes post-brushing. This may indicate that the tongue coating is a major reservoir for fluoride bioavailability. The results also indicate an unequal fluoride distribution in the oral cavity. PMID:26727989

  9. Neon as a Buffer Gas for a Mercury-Ion Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2008-01-01

    A developmental miniature mercury-ion clock has stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling components are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein a getter pump is used to maintain the partial vacuum, and the evacuated tube is backfilled with mercury vapor in a buffer gas. Neon was determined to be the best choice for the buffer gas: The pressure-induced frequency pulling by neon was found to be only about two-fifths of that of helium. Furthermore, because neon diffuses through solids much more slowly than does helium, the operational lifetime of a tube backfilled with neon could be considerably longer than that of a tube backfilled with helium.

  10. Equation of state of dense neon and krypton plasmas in the partial ionization regime

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q. F. Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, Z. G.

    2015-12-15

    The compression behaviors of dense neon and krypton plasmas over a wide pressure-temperature range are investigated by self-consistent fluid variational theory. The ionization degree and equation of state of dense neon and krypton are calculated in the density-temperature range of 0.01–10 g/cm{sup 3} and 4–50 kK. A region of thermodynamic instability is found which is related to the plasma phase transition. The calculated shock adiabat and principal Hugoniot of liquid krypton are in good agreement with available experimental data. The predicted results of shock-compressed liquid neon are presented, which provide a guide for dynamical experiments or numerical first-principle calculations aimed at studying the compression properties of liquid neon in the partial ionization regime.

  11. Experimental separation of virtual photon exchange and electron transfer in interatomic coulombic decay of neon dimers.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, T; Czasch, A; Schöffler, M; Schössler, S; Käsz, M; Titze, J; Kreidi, K; Grisenti, R E; Staudte, A; Jagutzki, O; Schmidt, L Ph H; Weber, Th; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Ueda, K; Dörner, R

    2007-10-12

    We investigate the interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) of neon dimers following photoionization with simultaneous excitation of the ionized atom (shakeup) in a multiparticle coincidence experiment. We find that, depending on the parity of the excited state, which determines whether ICD takes place via virtual dipole photon emission or overlap of the wave functions, the decay happens at different internuclear distances, illustrating that nuclear dynamics heavily influence the electronic decay in the neon dimer. PMID:17995162

  12. Quantum dynamical structure factor of liquid neon via a quasiclassical symmetrized method.

    PubMed

    Monteferrante, Michele; Bonella, Sara; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    We apply the phase integration method for quasiclassical quantum time correlation functions [M. Monteferrante, S. Bonella, and G. Ciccotti, Mol. Phys. 109, 3015 (2011)] to compute the dynamic structure factor of liquid neon. So far the method had been tested only on model systems. By comparing our results for neon with experiments and previous calculations, we demonstrate that the scheme is accurate and efficient also for a realistic model of a condensed phase system showing quantum behavior. PMID:23406109

  13. Method and apparatus for cooling high temperature superconductors with neon-nitrogen mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Laverman, Royce J.; Lai, Ban-Yen

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for cooling high temperature superconducting materials (HTSC) to superconductive temperatures within the range of 27.degree. K. to 77.degree. K. using a mixed refrigerant consisting of liquefied neon and nitrogen containing up to about ten mole percent neon by contacting and surrounding the HTSC material with the mixed refrigerant so that free convection or forced flow convection heat transfer can be effected.

  14. The origin of the neon isotopes in chondrites and on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Manuel; Charnoz, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the origin of the neon isotopic signatures in chondrites and in the terrestrial mantle. There are two primary possible origins for neon in the Earth's mantle. One origin is the dissolution of a dense primordial atmosphere with a solar composition of 20Ne/22Ne >13.4 into the mantle in a possible magma ocean stage during Earth's accretion. The second origin, developed in this study, is that mantle neon was already in Earth's parent bodies because of refractory grain irradiation by solar wind. We propose that solar wind implantation occurred early on dust within the accretion disk to allow such irradiation. Because solar wind implantation fractionates neon isotopes, the heavier isotopes are implanted deeper than the lighter ones because of different kinetic energies, and the process of implantation, if coupled with sputtering, leads to a steady state neon isotopic ratio (20Ne/22Ne ∼12.7) that is similar to what is observed in mantle-derived rocks (12.5-12.9), lunar soil grains (∼12.9) and certain gas-rich chondrites from all classes (enstatite, ordinary, rumuruti). Using a dust transport model in a turbulent and irradiated solar nebula, we estimated the equivalent irradiation age of a population of dust particles at three different distances from the sun (0.8, 1, 1.2 AU) and converted these ages into neon concentrations and isotopic ratios. The dust subsequently coagulated to form Earth's parent bodies, which have the mean neon isotopic composition of the irradiated dust (non-irradiated dust is assumed to be free of neon). If this scenario of solar wind implantation coupled with sputtering in the precursors of Earth's parent bodies is correct, it offers a simple alternative to the model of solar nebula gas incorporation by dissolution in a magma ocean.

  15. Emission anomalous optical magnetic resonances in a mixture of even neon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Saprykin, E. G.; Sorokin, V. A. Shalagin, A. M.

    2013-04-15

    Unusual resonances have been detected in the dependence of the discharge glow in neon on the longitudinal magnetic field. The resonances appear in fairly high magnetic fields and are observed only at low gas pressures and exclusively in a mixture of {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne isotopes. This phenomenon is an evidence of collective resonant radiation processes involving atoms of different neon isotopes.

  16. [The effect of helium-neon laser radiation on the energy metabolic indices of the myocardium].

    PubMed

    Chizhov, G K; Koval'skaia, N I; Kozlov, V I

    1991-03-01

    It was shown in experiments on white rats, that intravenous and direct myocardium helium-neon laser irradiation leads to the some activation of lactate, glucose-6-phosphate, succinate and reduced NAD degydrogenases. During direct myocardium irradiation these changes are in a less degree. It is suggested that helium-neon laser irradiation displays some active influence on the energy metabolism enzymes of the myocardium, and the mechanisms of this action are discussed. PMID:2054512

  17. Quantum dynamical structure factor of liquid neon via a quasiclassical symmetrized method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteferrante, Michele; Bonella, Sara; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    We apply the phase integration method for quasiclassical quantum time correlation functions [M. Monteferrante, S. Bonella, and G. Ciccotti, Mol. Phys. 109, 3015 (2011), 10.1080/00268976.2011.619506] to compute the dynamic structure factor of liquid neon. So far the method had been tested only on model systems. By comparing our results for neon with experiments and previous calculations, we demonstrate that the scheme is accurate and efficient also for a realistic model of a condensed phase system showing quantum behavior.

  18. Laser optogalvanic wavelength calibration with a commercial hollow cathode iron - neon discharge lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Xinming; Nur, Abdullahi H.; Misra, Prabhakar

    1994-01-01

    351 optogalvanic transitions have been observed in the 337 - 598 nm wavelength region using an iron - neon hollow cathode discharge lamp and a pulsed tunable dye laser. 223 of these have been identified as transitions associated with neon energy levels. These optogalvanic transitions have allowed, in conjunction with interference fringes recorded concomitantly with an etalon, the calibration of the dye laser wavelength with 0.3/cm accuracy.

  19. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D.; Davis, Jared H.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Breaker, Ronald R.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, 18F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions. PMID:24173035

  20. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D; Davis, Jared H; Gordon, Patricia B; Breaker, Ronald R; Strobel, Scott A

    2013-11-19

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, (18)F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions. PMID:24173035

  1. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used... fluoride resins consist of basic resins produced by the polymerization of vinylidene fluoride. (b)...

  2. A comparison of neon versus helium ion beam induced deposition via Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Smith, Daryl A; Rack, Philip D

    2013-03-22

    The ion beam induced nanoscale synthesis of PtCx (where x ∼ 5) using the trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum(IV) (MeCpPt(IV)Me3) precursor is investigated by performing Monte Carlo simulations of helium and neon ions. The helium beam leads to more lateral growth relative to the neon beam because of its larger interaction volume. The lateral growth of the nanopillars is dominated by molecules deposited via secondary electrons in both the simulations. Notably, the helium pillars are dominated by SE-I electrons whereas the neon pillars are dominated by SE-II electrons. Using a low precursor residence time of 70 μs, resulting in an equilibrium coverage of ∼4%, the neon simulation has a lower deposition efficiency (3.5%) compared to that of the helium simulation (6.5%). At larger residence time (10 ms) and consequently larger equilibrium coverage (85%) the deposition efficiencies of helium and neon increased to 49% and 21%, respectively; which is dominated by increased lateral growth rates leading to broader pillars. The nanoscale growth is further studied by varying the ion beam diameter at 10 ms precursor residence time. The study shows that total SE yield decreases with increasing beam diameters for both the ion types. However, helium has the larger SE yield as compared to that of neon in both the low and high precursor residence time, and thus pillars are wider in all the simulations studied. PMID:23449368

  3. Development of a Neon Cryogenic Turbo-Expander with Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, H.; Hirokawa, M.; Yoshida, S.; Kamioka, Y.; Takaike, A.; Hayashi, H.; Okamoto, H.; Shiohara, Y.

    2010-04-01

    A cryogenic turbo-expander with active magnetic bearings was made and tested in a reverse-Brayton cycle refrigerator using neon as working fluid. Turbine isentropic efficiency is a very important factor for the refrigerator since it affects the performance of the refrigerator significantly. Properties of neon are suitable for the working fluid in a refrigerator to cool HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) applications. The neon refrigerator needs a very small and high speed turbo-expander. But there are few studies of isentropic efficiencies of cryogenic turbo-expander using neon gas. Thus the experiment to get the design information was carried out. A prototype of neon refrigerator was made for HTS applications in 2007. Its cooling power was 2 kW at temperature of 70 K and operated in process pressure between 2 MPa and 1 MPa. To improve the performance of the neon refrigerator, the process pressure was changed to 1 MPa˜0.5 MPa. Under this process pressure, isentropic efficiencies for two types of turbine impellers were obtained. The test results were included in to the turbine design program so that we could predict the isentropic efficiencies of the turbo-expander more accurately. Details of the turbo-expander design and test results are described in this report.

  4. Silicon oxidation in fluoride solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancier, K. M.; Kapur, V.

    1980-01-01

    Silicon is produced in a NaF, Na2SiF6, and Na matrix when SiF4 is reduced by metallic sodium. Hydrogen is evolved during acid leaching to separate the silicon from the accompanying reaction products, NaF and Na2SiF6. The hydrogen evolution reaction was studied under conditions simulating leaching conditions by making suspensions of the dry silicon powder in aqueous fluoride solutions. The mechanism for the hydrogen evolution is discussed in terms of spontaneous oxidation of silicon resulting from the cooperative effects of (1) elemental sodium in the silicon that reacts with water to remove a protective silica layer, leaving clean reactive silicon, and (2) fluoride in solution that complexes with the oxidized silicon in solution and retards formation of a protective hydrous oxide gel.

  5. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  6. Systematic review of water fluoridation

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, Marian S; Whiting, Penny F; Wilson, Paul M; Sutton, Alex J; Chestnutt, Ivor; Cooper, Jan; Misso, Kate; Bradley, Matthew; Treasure, Elizabeth; Kleijnen, Jos

    2000-01-01

    Objective To review the safety and efficacy of fluoridation of drinking water. Design Search of 25 electronic databases and world wide web. Relevant journals hand searched; further information requested from authors. Inclusion criteria were a predefined hierarchy of evidence and objectives. Study validity was assessed with checklists. Two reviewers independently screened sources, extracted data, and assessed validity. Main outcome measures Decayed, missing, and filled primary/permanent teeth. Proportion of children without caries. Measure of effect was the difference in change in prevalence of caries from baseline to final examination in fluoridated compared with control areas. For potential adverse effects, all outcomes reported were used. Results 214 studies were included. The quality of studies was low to moderate. Water fluoridation was associated with an increased proportion of children without caries and a reduction in the number of teeth affected by caries. The range (median) of mean differences in the proportion of children without caries was −5.0% to 64% (14.6%). The range (median) of mean change in decayed, missing, and filled primary/permanent teeth was 0.5 to 4.4 (2.25) teeth. A dose-dependent increase in dental fluorosis was found. At a fluoride level of 1 ppm an estimated 12.5% (95% confidence interval 7.0% to 21.5%) of exposed people would have fluorosis that they would find aesthetically concerning. Conclusions The evidence of a beneficial reduction in caries should be considered together with the increased prevalence of dental fluorosis. There was no clear evidence of other potential adverse effects. PMID:11021861

  7. Fluoride laser crystals: old and new

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenssen, Hans P.; Cassanho, Arlete

    2006-02-01

    The development of oxide and fluoride materials as gain materials of choice for solid state lasers ranges from early materials such as Calcium Fluoride and Calcium Tungstate crystals to the now ubiquitous Nd hosts YLF, YAG and Vanadate. Among Tunable laser materials, MgF II - an early favorite, gave way to superior oxides such as Alexandrite and Ti:Sapphire only to be followed by development of still newer tunable fluoride media, notably, fluoride colquiriites such as Cr-doped LiSAF and LiCaF. Newer fluoride crystals, such as Barium Yttrium Fluoride BaY II F 8 (BYF), KY 3F 10 (KYF) and the tunable Cr doped LiCaGaF 6 are attractive laser materials, but their growth has not been optimized. Key advantages of two of these new crystals are discussed. Crystal growth results for BYF and Cr:LiCaGaF 6 as well as some material characterization are presented.

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of fluoride in fluoride-bearing minerals after decomposition by fusion with sodium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Adelantado, J V; Martinez, V P; Moreno, A C; Reig, F B

    1985-03-01

    The decomposition of highly insoluble minerals (fluorspar and cryolite) by fusion with molten alkali-metal hydroxides is studied. The introduction of additives such as aluminium compounds or sodium peroxide to obtain total liberation of fluoride from calcium fluoride samples, is tested. The fusion is done in a silver crucible with a Bunsen burner. The cooled melt is easily soluble, giving solutions suitable for spectrophotometric fluoride determination by the Zr(IV)-fluoride-Erichrome Cyanine R method. PMID:18963832

  9. Properties of ThF(x) from infrared spectra in solid argon and neon with supporting electronic structure and thermochemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Thanthiriwatte, K Sahan; Wang, Xuefeng; Andrews, Lester; Dixon, David A; Metzger, Jens; Vent-Schmidt, Thomas; Riedel, Sebastian

    2014-03-20

    Laser-ablated Th atoms react with F2 in condensing noble gases to give ThF4 as the major product. Weaker higher frequency infrared absorptions at 567.2, 564.8 (576.1, 573.8) cm(-1), 575.1 (582.7) cm(-1) and 531.0, (537.4) cm(-1) in solid argon (neon) are assigned to the ThF, ThF2 and ThF3 molecules based on annealing and photolysis behavior and agreement with CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ vibrational frequency calculations. Bands at 528.4 cm(-1) and 460 cm(-1) with higher fluorine concentrations are assigned to the penta-coordinated species (ThF3)(F2) and ThF5(-). These bands shift to 544.2 and 464 cm(-1) in solid neon. The ThF5 molecule has the (ThF3)(F2) Cs structure and is essentially the unique [ThF3(+)][F2(-)] ion pair based on charge and spin density calculations. Electron capture by (ThF3)(F2) forms the trigonal bipyramidal ThF5(-) anion in a highly exothermic process. Extensive structure and frequency calculations were also done for thorium oxyfluorides and Th2F4,6,8 dimer species. The calculations provide the ionization potentials, electron affinities, fluoride affinities, Th-F bond dissociation energies, and the energies to bind F2 and F2(-) to a cluster as well as dimerization energies. PMID:24559371

  10. Helium-neon laser therapy in the treatment of hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure: A superior option

    PubMed Central

    XU, QI-HUA; ZHAO, CHEN; ZHU, JIAN-GANG; CHEN, MEI-JUAN; LIU, QING-HUAI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of helium-neon laser therapy in the treatment of hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure and compare the results with those of a combined drugs and surgery regimen. A total of 70 patients with hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure in 70 eyes were randomly divided into two groups: Helium-neon laser therapy (group A) and drugs plus surgery (group B). Each group contained 35 patients. The healing rates and times of the conjunctival wound were recorded and compared following helium-neon laser treatment or the drugs plus surgery regimen. Changes in the hydroxyapatite orbital implant prior to and following helium-neon laser irradiation were analyzed. A similar animal study was conducted using 24 New Zealand white rabbits, which received orbital implants and were then received drug treatment or helium-neon therapy. In the human experiment, the rates for conjunctival wound healing were 97.14% in group A and 74.29% in group B, with a significant difference between the groups (χ2=5.71, P<0.05). Patients with mild exposure were healed after 7.22±2.11 days of helium-neon laser therapy and 14.33±3.20 days of drugs plus surgery. A statistically significant difference was found between the groups (t=8.97, P<0.05). Patients with moderate to severe exposure were healed after 18.19±2.12 days of helium-neon laser therapy and 31.25±4.21 days of drugs plus surgery. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (t=7.91, P<0.05). Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed that the helium-neon laser therapy significantly promoted vascularization of the hydroxyapatite orbital implant. These results, combined with pathological findings in animals, which showed that a helium-neon laser promoted vascularization and had anti-inflammatory effects, suggest that helium-neon laser irradiation is an effective method for treating hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure, thereby avoiding secondary surgery. PMID

  11. FLUORIDATION CHEMISTRY: EQUILIBRIA AND KINETICS OF FLUORIDE AND FLUORO-COMPLEXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most common fluoridating agents used by major American waterworks are hexafluorosilicic acid (H2SiF6) and sodium hexxafluorosilicate (Na2SiF6). According to the 1992 Water Fluoridation Census where 10,002 utilities responded affirmatively to fluoridating their water, 59
    % ...

  12. PRECIPITATION OF URANIUM PEROXIDE OF LOW FLUORIDE CONTENT FROM SOLUTIONS CONTAINING FLUORIDES

    DOEpatents

    King, E.J.; Clark, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    S>A method is described for the preparation of fluoride free uraniunn peroxide precipitates, even though the solution from which the precipitation is made is contaminated with fluorides. This is accomplished by add ing aluminum ions to the solution, where they complex any fluoride present and prevent its precipitation with the uramum peroxide.

  13. Effect of helium-neon laser on musculoskeletal trigger points

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder-Mackler, L.; Bork, C.; Bourbon, B.; Trumbore, D.

    1986-07-01

    Cold lasers have been proposed recently as a therapeutic tool for treating a wide variety of pathological conditions, including wounds, arthritis, orthopedic problems, and pain. These proposed therapeutic effects largely have been unsubstantiated by research. A randomized, double blind study was undertaken to ascertain the effect of a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser on the resistance of areas of skin overlying musculoskeletal trigger points. These areas usually demonstrate decreased skin resistance when compared with the surrounding tissue. Thirty patients with musculoskeletal trigger points were assigned randomly to either an experimental or a placebo group. In addition to standard physical therapy, each patient received three 15-second applications of a He-Ne laser or placebo stimulation from an identical unit that did not emit a laser. The results of a two-way analysis of covariance with one repeated measure showed a statistically significant increase (p less than .007) in skin resistance. This increase in an abnormal skin resistance pattern may accompany the resolution of pathological conditions.

  14. Quantum scattering of neon from a nanotextured surface.

    PubMed

    Levi, A C; Huang, C; Allison, W; Maclaren, D A

    2009-06-01

    Phonon exchange is the usual cause of decoherence in atom-surface scattering. By including quantum effects in the treatment of Debye-Waller scattering, we show that phonon exchange becomes ineffective when the relevant phonon frequencies are high. The result explains the surprising observation of strong elastic scattering of Ne from a Cu(100) surface nanotextured with a c(2 × 2) Li adsorbate structure. We extend a previous model to describe the phonon spectra by an Einstein oscillator component with an admixture of a Debye spectrum. The Einstein oscillator represents the dominant, high frequency vibration of the adsorbate, normal to the surface, while the Debye spectrum represents the substrate contribution. Neon scattering is so slow that exciting the adsorbate mode has a low probability and is impossible if the incident energy is below the threshold. Thus, adsorbate vibrations are averaged out. A theoretical discussion and calculation shows that under such circumstances the vibrations of a light adsorbate do not contribute to the Debye-Waller effect, with the result that Ne scattering at thermal energies is quantum mechanical and largely elastic, explaining the high reflectivity and the diffraction peaks observed experimentally. PMID:21715773

  15. Helium and neon in lunar ilmenites of different antiquities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Helium and neon were extracted from individual lunar ilmenite grains, approximately 100 micrometers in diameter, using a pulsed step-heating technique. Grains from lunar samples 71501 and 79035, believed to have been exposed to solar corpuscular radiation at greatly different times, were studied. The results found were consistent with the hypothesis that in addition to solar-wind-implanted gas, a second more deeply implanted component was present in both species of grains. Average isotopic ratios were determined giving equal weight to each of the particles. As found in depth studies employing chemical etching, both the He-3/He-4 and Ne-20/Ne-22 ratios were lower in the more deeply implanted gas than in the solar wind component. The He-3/He-4 ratio in the solar wind component of the more ancient grains was lower than that in the more recently exposed ones, whereas no difference was found for the more deeply embedded He. In the deeply embedded component of the ancient grains, the He-4/Ne-20 ratio was approx. 2x that found in the more recently exposed grains. In the shallowly implanted component, the ratio varied greatly from grain to grain, preventing comparison with the solar wind elemental composition.

  16. Interstellar oxygen, nitrogen and neon in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiss, J.; Gloeckler, G.; Mall, U.; Von Steiger, R.; Galvin, A. B.; Ogilvie, K. W.

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen, nitrogen and neon pick-up ions of interstellar origin were detected for the first time with the Solar Wind Ion Spectrometer (SWICS) on board Ulysses. The interstellar origin of these ions is established by the following criteria: (a) they are singly charged, (b) they have the broad velocity distributions characteristic of pick-up ions, with an upper limit of twice the solar wind speed, (c) their relative abundance as a function of distance from the sun corresponds to the theoretical expectation, and (d) there is no relation to a planetary or cometary source. The interstellar abundance ratios He(+)/O(+), N(+)/O(+), Ne(+)/O(+) were investigated. At approximately 5.25 AU in the outermost part of Ulysses' trajectory He(+)/O(+) = 175(sup +70 sub -50) N(+)/O(+) = 0.13(sup +0.05 sub -0.05) and Ne(+)/O(+) = 0.18(sup +0.10 sub -0.07) were determined. For the interstellar gas passing through the termination region and entering the heliosphere (He/O)(sub 0) = 290(sup +190 sub -100), (N/O)(sub 0) = 0.13(sup +0.06 sub -0.06) and (Ne/O)(sub 0) = 0.20(sup +0.12 sub -0.09) were obtained from the pick-up ion measurements. Upper limits for the relative abundances of C(+) and C were also determined.

  17. Strange particle production in neutrino-neon charged current interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Plano, R.; Baker, N.J.; Connolly, P.L.; Kahn, S.A.; Murtagh, M.J.; Palmer, R.B.; Samios, N.P.; Tanaka, M.; Baltay, C.; Bregman, M.

    1986-01-01

    Neutral strange particle production in charged-current muon-neutrino interactions have been studied in the Fermilab 15-foot neon bubble chamber. Associated production is expected to be the major source of strange particles in charged-current neutrino interactions. sigma-neutral and xi-minus production by neutrinos was observed. The dependence on various leptonic and hadronic variables is investigated. A fit to single and associated production of s, s/anti-s, and c quarks is described based on the number of single and double strange particle production events. Inclusive neutral strange particle decays (V/sup 0/) production rates as a fraction of all charged-current events are measured and are tabulated. The lambda/K ratio is found to be 0.39 +- 0.04 and the fraction of lambda coming from sigma-neutral is (16 +- 5)%. The single- and double V/sup 0/ production was used to determine the associated s anti-s production rate and single s-quark production rate. 13 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs. (LEW)

  18. Positron scattering and ionization of neon atoms — theoretical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harshit, N. Kothari; N. Joshipura, K.

    2010-10-01

    Although positron scattering with inert gas atoms has been studied in theory as well as in experiment, there are discrepancies. The present work reports all the major total cross sections of e+—neon scattering at incident energies above ionization threshold, originating from a complex potential formalism. Elastic and cumulative inelastic scatterings are treated in the complex spherical e+—atom potential. Our total inelastic cross section includes positronium formation together with ionization and excitation channels in Ne. Because of the Ps formation channel it is difficult to separate out ionization cross sections from the total inelastic cross sections. An approximate method similar to electron—atom scattering has been applied to bifurcate ionization and cumulative excitation cross sections at energies from threshold to 2000 eV. Comparisons of present results with available data are made. An important outcome of this work is the relative contribution of different scattering processes, which we have shown by a bar-chart at the ionization peak.

  19. Relativistic Effects in the Photoionization-Excitation of Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorczyca, T. W.; Felfli, Z.

    1998-05-01

    In a purely non-relativistic theoretical treatment of the neon 2p^43s(^2P) satellite, the angular distribution parameter and the ratio of populations of the ^2P_3/2 and ^2P_1/2 ionic fine structure levels are both independent of photon energy. Recent synchrotron measurements(A. A. Wills, N. Berrah, T. W. Gorczyca, B. Langer, Z. Felfli, M. Alsheri, O. Nayandin, and J. D. Bozek, unpublished) have observed marked deviation from this predicted behavior, however, indicating that spin-orbit effects are important. In order to study spin-orbit effects in this region of complex doubly-excited resonances, we have performed R-matrix calculations to determine MQDT scattering and dipole matrices. Important computational aspects are 1) an extensive configuration interaction (CI) for target and scattering wavefunctions, 2) a recoupling transformation from LS-coupled to JK-coupled matrices, 3) a second transformation using term coupling coefficients of the ionic targets, and 4) the MQDT reduction to physical scattering matrices using experimental fine structure target energies. The resultant differential cross sections, resolved into photoelectron angle and final ionic fine structure level, show many interesting deviations from the LS-predicted behavior, and are compared to the recent experimental results.^1

  20. Isotopes of cosmic ray elements from neon to nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, C. J.; Freier, P. S.; Fickle, R. K.; Brewster, N. R.

    1981-01-01

    Results obtained from a balloon exposure of a cosmic ray detector flown in 1977 are reported. The charge resolution ranged from 0.19 to 0.21 charge units between neon and nickel and the mass resolution for nuclei stopped in the emulsions ranged from 0.40 to 0.70 amu for A between 20 and 60 amu. This was enough to correctly identify almost all nuclei, but not to uniquely resolve neighboring mass peaks. Both Ne and Mg show evidence for neutron enrichment relative to the solar system abundance. Si and S are consistent with solar abundances, while Ar has no significant source abundances. P, Cl and K have essentially no primary component and the isotopic distribution observed is quite consistent with that expected from propagation. An excess of Ca-44 at the source is shown, indicating high metallicity in the source. The abundance of Fe-58 is nine percent or less, and Ni shows a one-to-one ratio for Ni-58 to 60, implying intermediate metallicity.

  1. The isotopes of neon in the galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Simpson, J. A.; Wefel, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines the results obtained by the University of Chicago instrument on board the IMP 7 satellite used to measure the abundances of Ne-20 and Ne-22 in the galactic cosmic rays during 1973-1977, over the general energy range of 60-230 MeV per nucleon. It is reported that the instrument shows a mass resolution of 0.7 amu(sigma) which was confirmed by calibrating a backup instrument at the LBL Bevalac with separated beams of neon isotopes. Through the use of standard solar modulation and cosmic-ray propagation models, the cosmic-ray source ratio inferred is Ne-22/Ne-20 = 0.38 = or -0.07 which is significantly greater than the present solar system ratio. It is concluded that propagation effects or cross-section uncertainties cannot account for such a large abundance of Ne-22, and thus this measurement provides evidence that the cosmic rays come from a source region where the Ne-22 abundance is substantially greater than in solar system material.

  2. Neon turbo-Brayton cycle refrigerator for HTS power machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Hirokazu; Hirokawa, M.; Yoshida, Shigeru; Nara, N.; Ozaki, S.; Hayashi, H.; Okamoto, H.; Shiohara, Y.

    2012-06-01

    We developed a prototype turbo-Brayton refrigerator whose working fluid is neon gas. The refrigerator is designed for a HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power transformer and its cooling power is more than 2 kW at 65 K. The refrigerator has a turboexpander and a turbo-compressor, which utilize magnetic bearings. These rotational machines have no rubbing parts and no oil-components. Those make a long maintenance interval of the refrigerator. The refrigerator is very compact because our newly developed turbo-compressor is volumetrically smaller than a displacement type compressor in same operating specification. Another feature of the refrigerator is a wide range operation capability for various heat-loads. Cooling power is controlled by the input-power of the turbo-compressor instead of the conventional method of using an electric heater. The rotational speed of the compressor motor is adjusted by an inverter. This system is expected to be more efficient. We show design details, specification and cooling test results of the new refrigerator in this paper.

  3. Fluoride coatings make effective lubricants in molten sodium environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Coating bearing surfaces with calcium fluoride-barium fluoride film provides effective lubrication against sliding friction in molten sodium and other severe environments at high and low temperatures.

  4. Fluorescent sensing of fluoride in cellular system.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F(-) detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F(-) including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F(-) are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F(-), mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be

  5. Fluoride in drinking water and dental fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Mandinic, Zoran; Curcic, Marijana; Antonijevic, Biljana; Carevic, Momir; Mandic, Jelena; Djukic-Cosic, Danijela; Lekic, Charles P

    2010-08-01

    In this study we determined the fluoride content in drinking water and hair of 12-year-old schoolchildren from different Serbian municipalities, i.e. Valjevo, Veliko Gradiste, Kacarevo and Vranjska Banja. The analyses were performed using composite fluoride ion-selective electrode. Average fluoride levels were 0.10, 0.15, 0.79 and 11 ppm in well water, 0.07, 0.10, 0.17 and 0.15 ppm in tap water, 19.3, 21.5, 25.4, and 32.5 ppm in hair samples, in Valjevo, Veliko Gradiste, Kacarevo and Vranjska Banja, respectively. Correlation analysis indicated statistically significant positive relationship between fluoride in wells water and fluoride in hair, for all municipalities: correlation coefficients were 0.54 (p < 0.05), 0.89, 0.97 and 0.99 (p < 0.001), in Vranjska Banja, Valjevo, Veliko Gradiste, and Kacarevo, respectively. Positive correlation was obtained also between fluoride in tap water and hair samples in all regions under the study, with statistical significance only in Valjevo municipality, p < 0.05. Dental examination of schoolchildren confirmed dental fluorosis only in the region of Vranjska Banja. Moreover, in endemic fluorotic region of Vranjska Banja, positive and statistically significant correlations were confirmed between fluoride in well water and dental fluorosis level (r = 0.61; p < 0.01) and additionally between fluoride in hair and dental fluorosis level (0.62; p < 0.01). The primary findings from this study have shown that fluoride content in hair is highly correlated with fluoride content in drinking water and dental fluorosis level, indicating that hair may be regarded as biomaterial of high informative potential in evaluating prolonged exposure to fluorides and to individuate children at risk of fluorosis regardless of the phase of teeth eruption. PMID:20580811

  6. Fluorescent Sensing of Fluoride in Cellular System

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F- detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F- including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F- are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F-, mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be developed

  7. Fluoride metabolism in Acacia georginae Gidyea

    PubMed Central

    Peters, R. A.; Murray, L. R.; Shorthouse, M.

    1965-01-01

    1. The metabolism of fluoride in seedlings and small plants of Acacia georginae has been studied with the idea of finding the conditions under which the plant makes fluoroacetate in the laboratory. 2. Individual seedlings vary in the extent to which they take up fluoride and convert it into a form other than inorganic which is here called `organic' fluoride, F(org.). The differences between the toxicity of A. georginae Gidyea trees may therefore be genetic in origin. 3. The uptake of fluoride from solutions 0·525–1·05mm (10–20p.p.m.) was not large. In 1–4 days it reached 8 p.p.m. in the aerial parts and 16 p.p.m. in the roots. Unlike the distribution of the halogen in grass, total fluoride was greater than inorganic fluoride. It was almost a rule that more `organic' fluoride was present in the roots than in the aerial parts. 4. With higher concentrations of fluoride 10·5–15·75mm (200–300p.p.m.) much larger amounts of fluoride were taken up, especially by the roots, and much more apparent organic fluoride was formed. 5. pH had a large influence upon the intake, this being lowest at an initial pH8·4 and highest at pH4·0. The pH outside this range was not investigated. Some observations have been made with a view to clarifying the biochemical paths for the synthesis of the C–F bond. 6. There is no evidence that chloride is an intermediary in synthesis. 7. Succinate is not accumulated in fluoride-stressed plants, suggesting that succinate dehydrogenase is not inhibited. 8. Enolase does not appear to be inhibited in vivo. PMID:14342508

  8. Fluoride concentration in dentin of exfoliated primary teeth as a biomarker for cumulative fluoride exposure.

    PubMed

    dela Cruz, G G; Rozier, R G; Bawden, J W

    2008-01-01

    A biomarker for lifetime fluoride exposure would facilitate population-based research and policy making but currently does not exist. This study examined the suitability of primary tooth dentin as a biomarker by comparing dentin fluoride concentration and fluoride exposures. Ninety-nine children's exfoliated primary teeth were collected from 2 fluoridated and 2 fluoride-deficient communities in North Carolina. Coronal dentin was isolated by microdissection and fluoride concentration assayed using the microdiffusion, ion-specific electrode technique. Information on children's fluoride exposures since birth from drinking water, toothpaste, supplements, rinses, food and beverages was collected by a self-reported questionnaire administered to caregivers. Only a small portion of the variance (10%) in incisor dentin fluoride (mean 792, SD 402 mg/kg) was accounted for by the best linear regression model as evaluated by the adjusted R(2). A moderate portion of the variance (60%) of molar dentin fluoride (mean 768, SD 489 mg/kg) was predicted by dietary fluoride supplement exposures, community of residence, and frequent tea consumption. Results for molars suggest that primary tooth dentin concentration may prove to be a satisfactory biomarker for fluoride exposure. PMID:18832828

  9. Fluoride Concentration in Dentin of Exfoliated Primary Teeth as a Biomarker for Cumulative Fluoride Exposure

    PubMed Central

    dela Cruz, G.G.; Rozier, R.G.; Bawden, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    A biomarker for lifetime fluoride exposure would facilitate population-based research and policy making but currently does not exist. This study examined the suitability of primary tooth dentin as a biomarker by comparing dentin fluoride concentration and fluoride exposures. Ninety-nine children's exfoliated primary teeth were collected from 2 fluoridated and 2 fluoride-deficient communities in North Carolina. Coronal dentin was isolated by microdissection and fluoride concentration assayed using the microdiffusion, ion-specific electrode technique. Information on children's fluoride exposures since birth from drinking water, toothpaste, supplements, rinses, food and beverages was collected by a self-reported questionnaire administered to caregivers. Only a small portion of the variance (10%) in incisor dentin fluoride (mean 792, SD 402 mg/kg) was accounted for by the best linear regression model as evaluated by the adjusted R2. A moderate portion of the variance (60%) of molar dentin fluoride (mean 768, SD 489 mg/kg) was predicted by dietary fluoride supplement exposures, community of residence, and frequent tea consumption. Results for molars suggest that primary tooth dentin concentration may prove to be a satisfactory biomarker for fluoride exposure. PMID:18832828

  10. Development of a Domain Map for Nodes of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrove, W. W.; Hoffman, F. M.; Hayden, B. P.; Urban, D. L.; MacMahon, J. A.; Franklin, J. F.

    2005-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be the first ecological measurement system designed both to answer regional- to national-scale scientific questions and to have the interdisciplinary participation necessary to achieve credible ecological forecasting and prediction. Capabilities provided by this infrastructural investment will transform the science of ecology by enabling the integration of research and education from natural and human systems. A National Network Design Committee (NNDC) of 15 individuals has been tasked with providing a baseline design for NEON, including the continental-scale deployment of NEON network resources. A system of identical nodes, each representing environments within a mother geographic "domain" was envisioned. Each node would itself consist of sub-node components, and all nodes would be focused in unison on a few transformational ecological questions of national relevance. The NNDC adopted a strategy of pre-stratification to help determine an optimum number of nodes and to maximize node representativeness. To better sample a phenomenon as diverse as the ecological environments of the United States, those environments were first divided into a set of more homogeneous "strata." Samples could then be arrayed within each stratum, ensuring that NEON nodes are representative of the entire range of environments within the United States. Ecoregions have classically been used by ecologists for such national stratification. Ecoregions have historically been drawn using human expertise in a qualitative, weight-of-evidence approach. To construct NEON domains, a more transparent and repeatable process was needed. Multivariate clustering based on national maps of 9 ecologically relevant climatic "state" variables was used to repeatably define 25 national climatic zones. These 25 climate zones were combined with dynamic air mass seasonality data to create 20 NEON domains, each having similar climate. Such domains are defensible

  11. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of about 3 x 10 (exp -10) relative to H, If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for about 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (about 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 mm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H, that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  12. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  13. A strategy to sample nutrient dynamics across the terrestrial-aquatic interface at NEON sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, E. S.; Goodman, K. J.; Roehm, C. L.; Meier, C. L.; Luo, H.; Ayres, E.; Parnell, J.; Krause, K.; Fox, A. M.; SanClements, M.; Fitzgerald, M.; Barnett, D.; Loescher, H. W.; Schimel, D.

    2012-12-01

    The construction of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) across the U.S. creates the opportunity for researchers to investigate biogeochemical transformations and transfers across ecosystems at local-to-continental scales. Here, we examine a subset of NEON sites where atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic observations will be collected for 30 years. These sites are located across a range of hydrological regimes, including flashy rain-driven, shallow sub-surface (perched, pipe-flow, etc), and deep groundwater, which likely affect the chemical forms and quantities of reactive elements that are retained and/or mobilized across landscapes. We present a novel spatial and temporal sampling design that enables researchers to evaluate long-term trends in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus biogeochemical cycles under these different hydrological regimes. This design focuses on inputs to the terrestrial system (atmospheric deposition, bulk precipitation), transfers (soil-water and groundwater sources/chemistry), and outputs (surface water, and evapotranspiration). We discuss both data that will be collected as part of the current NEON design, as well as how the research community can supplement the NEON design through collaborative efforts, such as providing additional datasets, including soil biogeochemical processes and trace gas emissions, and developing collaborative research networks. Current engagement with the research community working at the terrestrial-aquatic interface is critical to NEON's success as we begin construction, to ensure that high-quality, standardized and useful data are not only made available, but inspire further, cutting-edge research.

  14. National Ecological Observatory Network's (NEON) future role in US carbon cycling and budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loescher, H. W.

    2015-12-01

    The US National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a National Science Foundation investment designed to observe the impacts of large-scale environment changes on the nation's ecosystems for 30 years with rigorous consistency. NEON does this through the construction (and operations) of new physical infrastructure and data infrastructure distributed across the North American Continent. This includes 47 terrestrial and 32 aquatic sites. Key to its design is its ability to provide ecosystem-scale carbon measurements of carbon stores, fluxes, processes—and the means to scale them from the local-to regional scales via remote sensed aircraft. NEON design NEON will be collecting these carbon data as a facility and providing openly providing them. NEON will not preform any high-level synthesis, rather the carbon data is an open resource for research, private and public communities, alike. Overall, these data are also harmonized with other international carbon-based infrastructures to facilitate cross-continental understanding and global carbon syntheses. Products, engagement and harmonization of data to facilitate syntheses will be discussed.

  15. Xenon fluoride solutions effective as fluorinating agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, H. H.; Quarterman, L. A.; Sheft, I.

    1967-01-01

    Solutions of xenon fluorides in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride have few disruptive effects and leave a residue consisting of gaseous xenon, which can be recovered and refluorinated. This mild agent can be used with materials which normally must be fluorinated with fluorine alone at high temperatures.

  16. Method of making porous ceramic fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Reiner, Robert H.; Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1990-01-01

    A process for making a porous ceramic composite where fumed silica particles are coated with a nitrate, preferably aluminum nitrate. Next the nitrate is converted to an oxide and formed into a desired configuration. This configuration is heated to convert the oxide to an oxide silicate which is then react with HF, resulting in the fluoride ceramic, preferably aluminum fluoride.

  17. Growth of hollow nickel fluoride whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S. V.; Orekhov, Yu. F.; Fedorov, P. P.

    2009-07-15

    Hollow nickel fluoride whiskers have been obtained by condensation from the vapor phase onto a platinum substrate in a flow of hydrogen fluoride. Crystals up to 5 mm in length have a square cross section with a 300 {+-} 30-{mu}m side. The wall thickness is 85 {+-} 20 {mu}m.

  18. Welsh water should reinstate fluoridation on Anglesey.

    PubMed

    Hulse, G; Kenrick, A; Thomas, C H; Thomas, A; Davies, D J; Lennon, M A

    1995-01-21

    In 1992, Welsh Water withdrew the successful water fluoridation scheme on Anglesey. Despite evidence of the benefits of water fluoridation and the rise in number of children with tooth decay since the scheme's withdrawal, Welsh Water is still not prepared to re-establish the scheme. PMID:7848746

  19. Photoelastic properties of magnesium fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; Carleton, H.R.

    1980-05-01

    Magnesium fluoride (MgF/sub 2/) has the rutile crystal structure with a tetragonal space lattice (P4/mnm). The crystal is uniaxial positive with n/sub omega/ = 1.378 and n/sub epsilon/ = 1.390 for sodium D light. A single crystal of MgF/sub 2/ grown by the Materials Research Corporation was used in this study. The crystal was approximately 1 cm/sup 3/ with polished faces in the (001), (110), and (anti 110) crystal planes as verified by the back-reflection Laue method. Sample preparations and measurements are described.

  20. Thermodynamic data for uranium fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Self-consistent thermodynamic data have been tabulated for uranium fluorides between UF/sub 4/ and UF/sub 6/, including UF/sub 4/ (solid and gas), U/sub 4/F/sub 17/ (solid), U/sub 2/F/sub 9/ (solid), UF/sub 5/ (solid and gas), U/sub 2/F/sub 10/ (gas), and UF/sub 6/ (solid, liquid, and gas). Included are thermal function - the heat capacity, enthalpy, and free energy function, heats of formation, and vaporization behavior.

  1. Manufacture and properties of fluoride cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malata-Chirwa, Charles David

    This research work aimed at characterising composition, hydration and physical properties of fluoride cement, by studying samples of the cement obtained from Malawi, and comparing them to ordinary Portland cement. By confirming the suitable characteristics of fluoride cement through this work, the results of the research work provide a good basis for the wider adoption of fluoride cement as an alternative to ordinary Portland cement, especially in developing economies. Numerous accounts have been cited regarding the production and use of fluoride cement. Since there have not been conclusive agreement as to its properties, this study was limited to the theories of successful incorporation of fluoride compounds in the manufacture of fluoride cement. Hence, the properties and characteristics reported in this study relate to the cement currently manufactured in Malawi, and, on a comparative basis only, to that manufactured in other parts of the world. Samples of the fluoride cement used in the study were obtained by synthetic manufacture of the cement using common raw materials for the manufacture of fluoride cement that is limestone, silica sand, and fluorspar. These samples were subjected to several comparative tests used to characterise cements including examination under x-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and tests for setting time and compressive strength. Under similar laboratory conditions, it was possible to prove that fluoride cement hardens more rapidly than ordinary Portland cement. Also observed during the experimental work is that fluoride cement develops higher compressive strengths than ordinary Portland cement. The hardening and setting times are significantly different between the two cements. Also the nature of the hydration products, that is the microstructural development is significantly different in the two cements. The differences brought about between the two cements are because of the presence of fluorine during the clinkering

  2. Recent advancements in fluoride: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ankita; Ingle, Navin Anand; Kaur, Navpreet; Ingle, Ekta

    2015-01-01

    To review advancements of fluoride in dentistry, a search of 21 electronic databases and World Wide Web was conducted. Relevant journals were hand searched and further information was requested from authors. Inclusion criteria were a predefined hierarchy of evidence and objectives. Study validity was assessed with checklists. Two reviewers independently screened sources, extracted data, and assessed validity. Fluoride has become an important tool in preventive dentistry. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. Fluoride therapy in the form of varnish, gel, mouth rinse, or toothpaste has been used extensively as a caries-preventive intervention for over three decades. The purpose of this review is to inform the reader about new research related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. PMID:26539383

  3. Method of treating fluoride contaminated wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.K.; Kakaria, V.K.

    1988-04-05

    A method for treating spent aluminum smelting potliner material containing fluoride contaminants is described which comprises: adding silica to the material to form a mixture thereof; elevating the temperature of the mixture within the range of 1,000/sup 0/ to 1,700/sup 0/C. to form a slag; providing sufficient silica in the mixture and forming the slag in the presence of sufficient water for pyrohydrolysis conditions resulting in the volatilization of substantially all of the fluoride contaminants mostly in the form of hydrogen fluoride; and cooling the slag remaining after volatilizatiion of substantially all of the fluoride contaminants to produce an insoluble silicate glass-residue containing any remaining portion of the fluoride contaminants in an immobile state.

  4. The structure of trimethyltin fluoride.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Praveen; Bieringer, Mario; Hazendonk, Paul; Gerken, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The solid-state structure of (CH3)3SnF was reinvestigated by X-ray diffraction techniques as well as by multi-nuclear solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Trimethyltin fluoride crystallizes from hot ethanol in the orthorhombic space group Pnma at room temperature and changes to a low-temperature orthorhombic phase (space group: Cmcm) below -70 °C. In both modifications, trimethyltin fluoride adopts a linear chain structure with symmetric fluorine bridges, in contrast to previous reports. During its synthesis, (CH3)3SnF precipitates in another, poorly crystalline modification, as shown by powder X-ray diffraction. Solid-state MAS NMR experiments of both room-temperature phases of (CH3)3SnF (non-recrystallized and recrystallized) were carried out for the (1)H, (13)C, (19)F, and (119)Sn nuclei. The (119)Sn{(19)F, (1)H} and (19)F{(1)H} NMR spectra offer unambiguous determination for the (19)F and (119)Sn shielding tensors. The (119)Sn{(1)H} solid-state NMR spectra are in agreement with pentacoordination of Sn in this compound for the non-recrystallized and the recrystallized modifications. Based on the solid-state NMR results, the non-recrystallized modification of (CH3)3SnF also consists of linear, symmetrically fluorine-bridged chains, and differs from the recrystallized orthorhombic phase only in packing of the chains. PMID:26300008

  5. Photochemistry of the ozone-water complex in cryogenic neon, argon, and krypton matrixes.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Masashi; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2013-12-12

    The photochemistry of ozone-water complexes and the wavelength dependence of the reactions were studied by matrix isolation FTIR spectrometry in neon, argon, and krypton matrixes. Hydrogen peroxide was formed upon the irradiation of UV light below 355 nm. Quantitative analyses of the reactant and product were performed to evaluate the matrix cage effect of the photoreaction. In argon and krypton matrixes, a bimolecular O((1)D) + H2O → H2O2 reaction was found to occur to form hydrogen peroxide, where the O((1)D) atom generated by the photolysis of ozone diffused in the cryogenic solids to encounter water. In a neon matrix, hydrogen peroxide was generated through intracage photoreaction of the ozone-water complex, indicating that a neon matrix medium is most appropriate to study the photochemistry of the ozone-water complex. PMID:24252115

  6. Essential features of optical processes in neon-buffered submicron-thin Rb vapor cell.

    PubMed

    Hakhumyan, Grant; Sargsyan, Armen; Leroy, Claude; Pashayan-Leroy, Yevgenya; Papoyan, Aram; Sarkisyan, David

    2010-07-01

    A new submicron thin cell (STC) filled with Rb and neon gas is developed and comparison of resonant absorption with STC containing pure Rb is provided. The effect of collapse and revival of Dicke-type narrowing is still observable for the thickness L = lambda /2 and L = lambda , where lambda is a resonant laser wavelength 794 nm (D(1) line). For an ordinary Rb cm-size cell with addition of buffer gas, the velocity selective optical pumping/saturation (VSOP) resonances in saturated absorption spectra are fully suppressed if neon pressure > 0.5 Torr. A spectacular difference is that for L = lambda , VSOP resonances are still observable even when neon pressure is > or = 6 Torr. Narrow fluorescence spectra at L = lambda /2 allow one to realize online buffer gas pressure monitoring. A good agreement with theoretical model is observed. PMID:20639943

  7. A stochastic, local mode study of neon-liquid surface collision dynamics.

    PubMed

    Packwood, Daniel M; Phillips, Leon F

    2011-01-14

    Equations of motion for a fast, light rare gas atom passing over a liquid surface are derived and used to infer the dynamics of neon collisions with squalane and perfluorinated polyether surfaces from experimental data. The equations incorporate the local mode model of a liquid surface via a stochastic process and explicitly account for impulsive collisional energy loss to the surface. The equations predict angular distributions for scattering of neon that are in good quantitative agreement with experimental data. Our key dynamical conclusions are that experimental angular distributions derive mainly from local mode surface topography rather than from structural features of individual surface molecules, and that the available data for these systems can be accounted for almost exclusively by single collisions between neon atoms and the liquid surface. PMID:21042647

  8. Demonstrating a directional detector based on neon for characterizing high energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexley, Allie

    2016-03-01

    MITPC is a gas-based time projection chamber used for detecting fast, MeV-scale neutrons. The standard version of the detector relies on a mixture of 600 torr gas composed of 87.5% helium-4 and 12.5% tetrafluoromethane for precisely measuring the energy and direction of neutron-induced nuclear recoils. I describe studies performed with a prototype detector investigating the use of neon, as a replacement for helium-4, in the gas mixture. My discussion focuses on the advantages of neon as the fast neutron target for high energy neutron events (100 MeV) and a demonstration that the mixture will be effective for this event class. I show that the achievable gain and transverse diffusion of drifting electrons in the neon mixture are acceptable and that the detector uptime lost due to voltage breakdowns in the amplification plane is negligible, compared to 20% with the helium-4 mixture.

  9. Dental fluorosis and skeletal fluoride content as biomarkers of excess fluoride exposure in marsupials.

    PubMed

    Death, Clare; Coulson, Graeme; Kierdorf, Uwe; Kierdorf, Horst; Morris, William K; Hufschmid, Jasmin

    2015-11-15

    Particulate and gaseous fluoride emissions contaminate vegetation near fluoride-emitting industries, potentially impacting herbivorous wildlife in neighboring areas. Dental fluorosis has been associated with consumption of fluoride-contaminated foliage by juvenile livestock and wildlife in Europe and North America. For the first time, we explored the epidemiology and comparative pathology of dental fluorosis in Australian marsupials residing near an aluminium smelter. Six species (Macropus giganteus, Macropus rufogriseus, Wallabia bicolor, Phascolarctos cinereus, Trichosurus vulpecula, Pseudocheirus peregrinus) demonstrated significantly higher bone fluoride levels in the high (n=161 individuals), compared to the low (n=67 individuals), fluoride areas (p<0.001). Necropsy examinations of all six species from the high-fluoride area near the smelter revealed dental lesions considered characteristic of dental fluorosis in eutherian mammals. Within the high-fluoride area, 67% of individuals across the six species showed dental enamel lesions, compared to 3% in the low-fluoride areas. Molars that erupted before weaning were significantly less likely to display pathological lesions than those developing later, and molars in the posterior portion of the dental arcade were more severely fluorotic than anterior molars in all six species. The severity of dental lesions was positively associated with increasing bone fluoride levels in all species, revealing a potential biomarker of excess fluoride exposure. PMID:26188404

  10. NEON: Developing a Platform for Regional to Continental Scale Biological Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, J.

    2004-05-01

    Climate variation, introductions of alien species, and patterns of land use are some of the important interacting drivers of biological change that are affecting our nation's ecosystems. Many of these drivers operate over large spatial and temporal scales, and our understanding of how these phenomena interact to drive biological change is limited by our inability to link traditionally local and short-term ecological approaches to larger and longer scales. Similarly, our ability to forecast such changes and respond to their consequences is constrained. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a proposed shared-use research and education platform intended to improve our capacity to understand and predict biological phenomena operating from regional to continental scales. NEON is envisioned as a system of field and laboratory-based facilities distributed across the United States, which will provide the physical infrastructure and human capabilities necessary to coordinate and integrate research and education campaigns on the following types of issues: (1) biodiversity, species composition, and ecosystem functioning; (2) ecological aspects of biogeochemical cycles; (3) ecological implications of climate change; (4) ecology and evolution of infectious disease; (5) invasive species; and (6) land use and habitat alteration. Themes such as data sharing, multidisciplinary collaboration, and the development of technologies for sensing, forecasting, and visualizing biological information are central to the NEON concept. Development of the NEON science plan and the design of the network itself are proceeding through a variety of workshops and community planning meetings. A national project office is expected to form toward the end of 2004 to lead the development and creation of NEON. Ultimately, the project office will reside within an independent national organization devoted to the coordinated operation of NEON for the scientific community.

  11. Big Data and Ecological Forecasting: Integrating NEON Observational and Sensor Data from Reach to Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, J. M.; Goodman, K. J.; Lunch, C. K.; Fitzgerald, M.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to forecast the response of varied ecosystems to changes in climate and land use will be crucial for the management of resources and ecosystem services. Ecological forecasting presents many significant challenges within each of the aspects of data capture, assimilation, and modeling. High space-time resolution sampling is required to address the challenges of scaling from the site level to the continent. Determining the uncertainty of data used for model input and parameterization is critical for constraining the model for accurate representation. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is poised to greatly expand the scale and availability of biogeochemical and aquatic ecological data. NEON is a continental-scale facility designed to collect and disseminate data that addresses the impacts of climate change, land-use, and invasive species on ecosystem structure and function. Using a combination of standardized observational sampling and sensor measurements, NEON will provide a rich source of biogeochemical and biophysical data from 34 aquatic and 47 terrestrial sites spatially distributed across the US, including Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico for 30 years. Sites were selected to be representative of major ecosystems and maximize scalability. In addition to standardizing measurements, NEON is determining the quantitative uncertainty of each data product making them well suited to constrain models. NEON aquatic data will not only serve to baseline aquatic ecology in major ecosystems but also presents opportunities to bolster Hydrologic Models as well as incorporate aquatic biogeochemical cycling into Land Surface Models. Here we present examples of published and provisional data currently available from deployed aquatic sites, as well as an overview of the full scope and release schedule of the open source ecological data to be published on the NEON web portal. Several use cases, such as whole stream metabolism, groundwater exchange, high

  12. Fluoridation and Defluoridation. Training Module 2.230.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullen, L. D.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with fluoridation and fluoride feeding equipment. Enclosed are objectives, an instructor guide, student handouts and transparency masters. The module considers the principles and purposes of fluoridation, methods of feeding fluoride,…

  13. 21 CFR 872.6870 - Disposable fluoride tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Disposable fluoride tray. 872.6870 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6870 Disposable fluoride tray. (a) Identification. A disposable fluoride tray is a device made of styrofoam intended to apply fluoride topically...

  14. Fluoride Programs in the School Setting: Preventive Dental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebich, Theodore, Jr.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Two types of school-based programs that increase students' use of fluoride for preventive dental health are described. In fluoride mouthrinse programs, teachers give their students a fluoride solution once a week in a paper cup. In areas where the level of fluoride in the water supply is insufficient, the flouride tablet program is used. (JN)

  15. 21 CFR 872.6870 - Disposable fluoride tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Disposable fluoride tray. 872.6870 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6870 Disposable fluoride tray. (a) Identification. A disposable fluoride tray is a device made of styrofoam intended to apply fluoride topically...

  16. 21 CFR 872.6870 - Disposable fluoride tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Disposable fluoride tray. 872.6870 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6870 Disposable fluoride tray. (a) Identification. A disposable fluoride tray is a device made of styrofoam intended to apply fluoride topically...

  17. A cost-effective approach to microporate mammalian cells with the Neon Transfection System.

    PubMed

    Brees, Chantal; Fransen, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation is one of the most efficient nonviral methods for transferring exogenous DNA into mammalian cells. However, the relatively high costs of electroporation kits and reagents temper the routine use of this fast and easy to perform technique in many laboratories. Several years ago, a new flexible and easy to operate electroporation device was launched under the name Neon Transfection System. This device uses specialized pipette tips containing gold-plated electrodes as electroporation chamber. Here we report a protocol to regenerate these expensive tips as well as some other Neon kit accessories, thereby reducing the cost of electroporation at least 10-fold. PMID:25172131

  18. Fully differential single-photon double ionization of neon and argon.

    PubMed

    Yip, F L; Rescigno, T N; McCurdy, C W; Martín, F

    2013-04-26

    Triply differential cross sections are calculated for one-photon double ionization of neon and argon at various photon energies and electron energy sharings by using a frozen-core treatment to represent the remaining electrons of the residual ion. Angular distributions agree well with all existing experimental data, showing that in spite of its simplicity the method can treat the double ionization of complex targets reliably. A comparison of the cross sections for helium, neon, and argon into the same final state symmetry at the same relative excess energies reveals a distinctive signature of the role of electron correlation in each target. PMID:23679717

  19. Cooperative lifetime reduction of single acene molecules attached to the surface of neon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Izadnia, Sharareh; Vlaming, Sebastiaan M.; Eisfeld, Alexander; LaForge, Aaron; Stienkemeier, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Tetracene and pentacene molecules attached to the surface of neon clusters have been spectroscopically investigated. The fluorescence spectra indicate that the molecules are immobilized on the surface and, to a large extent, do not form complexes. By varying the number of attached molecules, laser power, or neon cluster size, we find a systematic fluorescence lifetime reduction up to a factor of 20 indicating a cooperative coupling in our system. For averaged intermolecular distances greater than 33 Å, we attribute the reduction in fluorescence lifetime to Dicke superradiance, while for smaller intermolecular distances, nonradiative decay mechanisms cause additional lifetime reduction.

  20. Boundary conditions on the early Sun from ancient cosmogenic neon in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenberg, C. M.; Caffee, M. W.; Swindle, T. D.; Goswami, J.

    1986-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of neon from individual grains of the meteorites Murchison (CM) and Kapoeta (howardite) shows large enrichments of cosmogenic neon in grains with solar flare tracks. The quantity of this component is incompatible with galactic cosmic ray or solar cosmic ray irradiation under present conditions and is attributed to irradiation by energetic flares from an early active Sun. Handpicked grains from each meteorite were grouped according to the presence or absence of solar flare heavy ion tracks, and these four samples were analyzed with an ion counting noble gas mass spectrometer.

  1. Liquid neon heat transfer as applied to a 30 tesla cryomagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    A 30-tesla magnet design is studied which calls for forced convection liquid neon heat transfer in small coolant channels. The design also requires suppressing boiling by subjecting the fluid to high pressures through use of magnet coils enclosed in a pressure vessel which is maintained at the critical pressure of liquid neon. This high pressure reduces the possibility of the system flow instabilities which may occur at low pressures. The forced convection heat transfer data presented were obtained by using a blowdown technique to force the fluid to flow vertically through a resistance heated, instrumented tube.

  2. Current status of fluoride volatility method development

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, J.; Marecek, M.; Skarohlid, J.

    2013-07-01

    The Fluoride Volatility Method is based on a separation process, which comes out from the specific property of uranium, neptunium and plutonium to form volatile hexafluorides whereas most of fission products (mainly lanthanides) and higher transplutonium elements (americium, curium) present in irradiated fuel form nonvolatile tri-fluorides. Fluoride Volatility Method itself is based on direct fluorination of the spent fuel, but before the fluorination step, the removal of cladding material and subsequent transformation of the fuel into a powdered form with a suitable grain size have to be done. The fluorination is made with fluorine gas in a flame fluorination reactor, where the volatile fluorides (mostly UF{sub 6}) are separated from the non-volatile ones (trivalent minor actinides and majority of fission products). The subsequent operations necessary for partitioning of volatile fluorides are the condensation and evaporation of volatile fluorides, the thermal decomposition of PuF{sub 6} and the finally distillation and sorption used for the purification of uranium product. The Fluoride Volatility Method is considered to be a promising advanced pyrochemical reprocessing technology, which can mainly be used for the reprocessing of oxide spent fuels coming from future GEN IV fast reactors.

  3. Fluoride Plus Functionalized β-TCP

    PubMed Central

    Karlinsey, R.L.; Pfarrer, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    With more than 50 years of clinical success, fluoride serves as the gold standard agent for preventing tooth decay. In particular, the action of fluoride facilitates saliva-driven remineralization of demineralized enamel and alters solubility beneficially. Still, tooth decay remains problematic, and one way to address it may be through the development of new mineralizing agents. Laboratory and clinical studies have demonstrated that the combination of fluoride and functionalized β-tricalcium phosphate (fTCP) produces stronger, more acid-resistant mineral relative to fluoride, native β-TCP, or fTCP alone. In contrast to other calcium-based approaches that seem to rely on high levels of calcium and phosphate to drive remineralization, fTCP is a low-dose system designed to fit within existing topical fluoride preparations. The functionalization of β-TCP with organic and/or inorganic molecules provides a barrier that prevents premature fluoride-calcium interactions and aids in mineralization when applied via common preparations and procedures. While additional clinical studies are warranted, supplementing with fTCP to enhance fluoride-based nucleation activity, with subsequent remineralization driven by dietary and salivary calcium and phosphate, appears to be a promising approach. PMID:22899679

  4. Deposition of fluoride on enamel surfaces released from varnishes is limited to vicinity of fluoridation site

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, A. M.; Yakin, M.; Becker, K.; Buchalla, W.; Attin, R.; Wiegand, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the in-situ study was to determine fluoride uptake in non-fluoridated, demineralized enamel after application of fluoride varnishes on enamel samples located at various distances from the non-fluoridated samples. All enamel samples used were demineralized with acidic hydroxyethylcellulose before the experiment. Intra-oral appliances were worn by ten volunteers in three series: (1, Mirafluorid, 0.15% F; 2, Duraphat, 2.3% F and 3, unfluoridated controls) of 6 days each. Each two enamel samples were prepared from 30 bovine incisors. One sample was used for the determination of baseline fluoride content (BFC); the other was treated according to the respective series and fixed in the intra-oral appliance for 6 days. Additionally, from 120 incisors, each four enamel samples were prepared (one for BFC). Three samples (a–c) were placed into each appliance at different sites: (a) directly neighboured to the fluoridated specimen (=next), (b) at 1-cm distance (=1 cm) and (c) in the opposite buccal aspect of the appliance (=opposite). At these sites, new unfluoridated samples were placed at days 1, 3 and 5, which were left in place for 1 day. The volunteers brushed their teeth and the samples with fluoridated toothpaste twice per day. Both the KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride were determined in all samples to determine fluoride uptake and were statistically analyzed. One day, after fluoridation with Duraphat, KOH-soluble fluoride uptake in specimen a (=next) was significantly higher compared to the corresponding samples of both the control and Mirafluorid series, which in turn were not significantly different from each other. At all other sites and time points, fluoride uptake in the enamel samples were not different from controls for both fluoride varnishes. Within the first day after application, intra-oral-fluoride release from the tested fluoride varnish Duraphat leads to KOH-soluble fluoride uptake only in enamel samples located in close

  5. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Sauerheber, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings. PMID:23840230

  6. PROCESS FOR TREATING VOLATILE METAL FLUORIDES

    DOEpatents

    Rudge, A.J.; Lowe, A.J.

    1957-10-01

    This patent relates to the purification of uranium hexafluoride, made by reacting the metal or its tetrafluoride with fluorine, from the frequently contained traces of hydrofluoric acid. According to the present process, UF/sub 6/ containing as an impurity a small amount of hydrofluoric acid, is treated to remove such impurity by contact with an anhydrous alkali metal fluoride such as sodium fluoride. In this way a non-volatile complex containing hydrofluoric acid and the alkali metal fluoride is formed, and the volatile UF /sub 6/ may then be removed by distillation.

  7. Evidence of weak plasma series resonance heating in the H-mode of neon and neon/argon inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, A. E.; Boffard, John B.; Jung, R. O.; Lin, Chun C.; Aneskavich, L. E.

    2012-10-01

    The shape of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in low-temperature plasmas governs the relative rates of electron-impact processes that determine key discharge properties. Comparison of EEDFs measured with probes and optical emission [1] in argon and neon inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) has revealed a surplus of high-energy electrons in neon-containing plasmas. The abundance of these extra high energy electrons is correlated with the sheath thickness near the rf antenna and can be reduced by either adding a Faraday shield or increasing the plasma density. These trends suggest an association of the surplus high-energy electrons with stochastic heating of electrons in capacitively-coupled electric fields in the sheath adjacent to the antenna. Conventional stochastic heating, however, is found to be insufficient to account for the EEDF observations, and a comparison of modeled and experimental values of the 13.56 MHz time modulation of select neon emission lines strongly suggests plasma series resonance (PSR) heating adjacent to the ICP antenna as the source of the extra high-energy electrons. [4pt] [1] Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20, (2011) 055006.

  8. Containerless processing of fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-based experiments on glass formation, crystallization, surface tension, vaporization, and chemical durability of a zirconium-barium-lanthanum (ZBL) fluoride glass are summarized. In a container large, columnar grains grew out from the container-glass interface during cooling. The main crystalline phase was alpha BaZrF6. A ZBL glass sphere was levitated acoustically during Shuttle flight STS-11. The glass was melted and then cooled while being levitated (containerless). Crystallization in the recovered sample was very fine and mainly beta BaZr2F10, showing the influence of the container on the nucleation and microstructure of crystallization in the glass. Glass formation should be easier for a containerless glass than in a container.

  9. REDUCTION OF FLUORIDE TO METAL

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, O.N.; Schmidt, F.A.; Spedding, F.H.

    1960-08-30

    A process is given for making yttrium metal by reducing yttrium fluoride with calcium plus magnesium. Calcium is added in an excess of from 10 to 20% and magnesium in a quantity to yield a magnesium--yttrium alloy containing from 12 to 25% magnesium when the reaction mass is heated in an inert atmosphere at from 900 to 1106 deg C, but preferably above the melting point of the alloy. Calcium chloride may be added so as to obtain a less viscous slag containing from 30 to 60% calcium chloride. After removal of the slag the alloy is vacuum-heated at about 1100 deg C for volatilization of the magnesium and calcium.

  10. Daily Fluoride Intake from Iranian Green Tea: Evaluation of Various Flavorings on Fluoride Release

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Afshin; Daraei, Hiua; Mohammadi, Elham; Zandi, Shiva; Teymouri, Pari; Mahvi, Amir Hossien; Gharibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    With increased awareness of the health benefits of the compounds in green tea, especially polyphenols, its consumption is rising. The main purpose of this study is to determine the effect of different additives on the released fluoride into tea liquor and also daily fluoride intake. The concentrations of fluoride, nitrate, sulfate, and chloride were measured in 15 different flavored green teas (Refah-Lahijan). The fluoride and other anion concentrations were measured by ion chromatography method. The data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16.0. The results showed that the minimum and maximum concentrations of fluoride in the green tea infusions were 0.162 mg/L (cinnamon-flavored green tea) and 3.29 mg/L (bagged peach-flavored green tea), respectively. The mean concentration of fluoride in the green tea leaves was 52 mg/kg, and approximately 89% of the fluoride was released from the green tea leaves into the infusions after brewing. The fluoride concentrations varied significantly among the examined green teas (P < 0.05). However, the additives had no significant effect on the fluoride release into the infusions (P > 0.05). Finally, drinking of the studied green teas cannot make a significant contribution to the daily dietary intake of F for consumers. PMID:27042093