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Sample records for neon flying squid

  1. Identifying Pelagic Habitat Hotspots of Neon Flying Squid in the Temperate Waters of the Central North Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Alabia, Irene D.; Saitoh, Sei-Ichi; Mugo, Robinson; Igarashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Usui, Norihisa; Kamachi, Masafumi; Awaji, Toshiyuki; Seito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    We identified the pelagic habitat hotspots of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) in the central North Pacific from May to July and characterized the spatial patterns of squid aggregations in relation to oceanographic features such as mesoscale oceanic eddies and the Transition Zone Chlorophyll-a Front (TZCF). The data used for the habitat model construction and analyses were squid fishery information, remotely-sensed and numerical model-derived environmental data from May to July 1999–2010. Squid habitat hotspots were deduced from the monthly Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) models and were identified as regions of persistent high suitable habitat across the 12-year period. The distribution of predicted squid habitat hotspots in central North Pacific revealed interesting spatial and temporal patterns likely linked with the presence and dynamics of oceanographic features in squid’s putative foraging grounds from late spring to summer. From May to June, the inferred patches of squid habitat hotspots developed within the Kuroshio-Oyashio transition zone (KOTZ; 37–40°N) and further expanded north towards the subarctic frontal zone (SAFZ; 40–44°N) in July. The squid habitat hotspots within the KOTZ and areas west of the dateline (160°W-180°) were likely influenced and associated with the highly dynamic and transient oceanic eddies and could possibly account for lower squid suitable habitat persistence obtained from these regions. However, predicted squid habitat hotspots located in regions east of the dateline (180°-160°W) from June to July, showed predominantly higher squid habitat persistence presumably due to their proximity to the mean position of the seasonally-shifting TZCF and consequent utilization of the highly productive waters of the SAFZ. PMID:26571118

  2. Identifying Pelagic Habitat Hotspots of Neon Flying Squid in the Temperate Waters of the Central North Pacific.

    PubMed

    Alabia, Irene D; Saitoh, Sei-Ichi; Mugo, Robinson; Igarashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Usui, Norihisa; Kamachi, Masafumi; Awaji, Toshiyuki; Seito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    We identified the pelagic habitat hotspots of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) in the central North Pacific from May to July and characterized the spatial patterns of squid aggregations in relation to oceanographic features such as mesoscale oceanic eddies and the Transition Zone Chlorophyll-a Front (TZCF). The data used for the habitat model construction and analyses were squid fishery information, remotely-sensed and numerical model-derived environmental data from May to July 1999-2010. Squid habitat hotspots were deduced from the monthly Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) models and were identified as regions of persistent high suitable habitat across the 12-year period. The distribution of predicted squid habitat hotspots in central North Pacific revealed interesting spatial and temporal patterns likely linked with the presence and dynamics of oceanographic features in squid's putative foraging grounds from late spring to summer. From May to June, the inferred patches of squid habitat hotspots developed within the Kuroshio-Oyashio transition zone (KOTZ; 37-40°N) and further expanded north towards the subarctic frontal zone (SAFZ; 40-44°N) in July. The squid habitat hotspots within the KOTZ and areas west of the dateline (160°W-180°) were likely influenced and associated with the highly dynamic and transient oceanic eddies and could possibly account for lower squid suitable habitat persistence obtained from these regions. However, predicted squid habitat hotspots located in regions east of the dateline (180°-160°W) from June to July, showed predominantly higher squid habitat persistence presumably due to their proximity to the mean position of the seasonally-shifting TZCF and consequent utilization of the highly productive waters of the SAFZ. PMID:26571118

  3. Characteristic of lipids and fatty acid compositions of the neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    The lipids and fatty acids of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) were an-alyzed to clarify its lipid physiology and health benefit as marine food. Triacylglycerols were the only major component in the digestive gland (liver). In all other organs (mantle, arm, integument, and ovary), sterols and phospholipids were the major components with noticeable levels of ceramide aminoethyl phosphonate and sphingomyelin. The significant levels of sphingolipids suggest the O. bartramii lipids is a useful source for cosmetics. Although the lipid content between the liver and all other tissues markedly differed from each other, the same nine dominant fatty acids in the triacylglycerols were found in all organs; 14:0, 16:0, 18:0, 18:1n-9, 20:1n-9, 20:1n-11, 22:1n-11, 20:5n-3 (icosapentaenoic acid, EPA), and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA). Unusually high 20:1n-11 levels in the O. bartramii triacylglycerols were probably characteristic for western Pacific animal depot lipids, compared with non-detectable levels of 20:1n-11 reported in other marine animals. O. bartramii concurrently has high levels of DHA in their triacylglycerols. The major fatty acids in the phospholipids were 16:0, 18:0, 20:1n-9, EPA, and DHA without 20:1n-11. Markedly high levels of both EPA and DHA were observed in phosphatidylethanolamine, while only DHA was found as the major one in phosphatidylcholine. In particular, high levels of DHA were found both in its depot triacylglycerols and tissue phospholipids in all organs of O. bartramii, similar to that in highly migratory fishes. The high DHA levels in all its organs suggest that O. bartramii lipids is a healthy marine source for DHA supplements. PMID:23018852

  4. A review of interaction between neon flying squid ( Ommastrephes bartramii) and oceanographic variability in the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian; Tian, Siquan

    2015-08-01

    The neon flying squid ( Ommastrephes bartramii) is a short-lived opportunistic species widely distributed in subtropical and temperate waters in the North Pacific Ocean. The life cycle of O. bartramii from planktonic eggs to nektonic adults is closely linked to oceanographic conditions. The fluctuations in O. bartramii abundance and distribution tend to increase and widen continuously due to the heavy influences of ocean-climate events on various spatio-temporal scales. In this study, we reviewed the interaction between O. bartramii and oceanography variability in the North Pacific with respect to large-scale climatic-oceanic phenomena including El Niño, La Niña, Kuroshio, Oyashio and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), as well as regional environmental variables such as sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface height (SSH), sea surface salinity (SSS), chlorophyll-a (Chl- a) concentration, and plankton density. The population dynamics of O. bartramii is mediated mainly by meso- and large-scale climatic-oceanic events ( e.g., Kuroshio and Oyashio Currents) rather than other local environmental conditions ( e.g., SST and Chl- a concentration), because all of the oceanographic influences are imposed on the context of large-scale climate changes ( e.g., PDO). An unstructured-grid finite-volume coastal ocean model coupled with an individual-based model is proposed to simulate relevant physical-biological oceanographic processes for identifying ocean-climate influence and predicting O. bartramii distribution and abundance in the North Pacific. Future research needs to be focused on improving the knowledge about early life history of O. bartramii and evaluating the relationship between marine physical environment and two separate passive drifting life stages of O. bartramii including free-floating eggs and planktonic paralarvae.

  5. Variability of Suitable Habitat of Western Winter-Spring Cohort for Neon Flying Squid in the Northwest Pacific under Anomalous Environments.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    We developed a habitat suitability index (HSI) model to evaluate the variability of suitable habitat for neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) under anomalous environments in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Commercial fisheries data from the Chinese squid-jigging vessels on the traditional fishing ground bounded by 35°-45°N and 150°-175°E from July to November during 1998-2009 were used for analyses, as well as the environmental variables including sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration, sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) and sea surface salinity (SSS). Two empirical HSI models (arithmetic mean model, AMM; geometric mean model, GMM) were established according to the frequency distribution of fishing efforts. The AMM model was found to perform better than the GMM model. The AMM-based HSI model was further validated by the fishery and environmental data in 2010. The predicted HSI values in 1998 (high catch), 2008 (average catch) and 2009 (low catch) indicated that the squid habitat quality was strongly associated with the ENSO-induced variability in the oceanic conditions on the fishing ground. The La Niña events in 1998 tended to yield warm SST and favorable range of Chl-a concentration and SSHA, resulting in high-quality habitats for O. bartramii. While the fishing ground in the El Niño year of 2009 experienced anomalous cool waters and unfavorable range of Chl-a concentration and SSHA, leading to relatively low-quality squid habitats. Our findings suggest that the La Niña event in 1998 tended to result in more favorable habitats for O. bartramii in the Northwest Pacific with the gravity centers of fishing efforts falling within the defined suitable habitat and yielding high squid catch; whereas the El Niño event in 2009 yielded less favorable habitat areas with the fishing effort distribution mismatching the suitable habitat and a dramatic decline of the catch of O. bartramii. This study might provide some potentially valuable insights into exploring the relationship between the underlying squid habitat and the inter-annual environmental change. PMID:25923519

  6. Variability of Suitable Habitat of Western Winter-Spring Cohort for Neon Flying Squid in the Northwest Pacific under Anomalous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    We developed a habitat suitability index (HSI) model to evaluate the variability of suitable habitat for neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) under anomalous environments in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Commercial fisheries data from the Chinese squid-jigging vessels on the traditional fishing ground bounded by 35°-45°N and 150°-175°E from July to November during 1998-2009 were used for analyses, as well as the environmental variables including sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration, sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) and sea surface salinity (SSS). Two empirical HSI models (arithmetic mean model, AMM; geometric mean model, GMM) were established according to the frequency distribution of fishing efforts. The AMM model was found to perform better than the GMM model. The AMM-based HSI model was further validated by the fishery and environmental data in 2010. The predicted HSI values in 1998 (high catch), 2008 (average catch) and 2009 (low catch) indicated that the squid habitat quality was strongly associated with the ENSO-induced variability in the oceanic conditions on the fishing ground. The La Niña events in 1998 tended to yield warm SST and favorable range of Chl-a concentration and SSHA, resulting in high-quality habitats for O. bartramii. While the fishing ground in the El Niño year of 2009 experienced anomalous cool waters and unfavorable range of Chl-a concentration and SSHA, leading to relatively low-quality squid habitats. Our findings suggest that the La Niña event in 1998 tended to result in more favorable habitats for O. bartramii in the Northwest Pacific with the gravity centers of fishing efforts falling within the defined suitable habitat and yielding high squid catch; whereas the El Niño event in 2009 yielded less favorable habitat areas with the fishing effort distribution mismatching the suitable habitat and a dramatic decline of the catch of O. bartramii. This study might provide some potentially valuable insights into exploring the relationship between the underlying squid habitat and the inter-annual environmental change. PMID:25923519

  7. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the purpleback flying squid (Sthenoteuthis oualaniensi).

    PubMed

    Lin, L; Li, P; Chen, Z Z; Xiao, Y Y; Xu, S N; Liu, Y; Li, C H

    2015-01-01

    The purpleback flying squid (Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis) is a pelagic squid with tremendous potential for commercial exploitation. We isolated and characterized 21 polymorphic microsatellite loci for S. oualaniensis using a (GT)13-enriched genomic library. The number of alleles per locus varied from 6 to 32. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.188 to 0.890, and 0.537 to 0.968, respectively. No significant linkage disequilibrium was detected at these loci. Five loci significantly deviated from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and four loci may have exhibited null alleles. These microsatellite markers will facilitate further studies in population genetics and the sustainable utilization of S. oualaniensis. PMID:26214442

  8. Fishery biology of jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas off Costa Rica Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjun; Li, Jianghua; Liu, Bilin; Li, Gang; Lu, Huajie

    2014-06-01

    The jumbo flying squid ( Dosidicus gigas) population was surveyed with the help of Chinese squid jigging vessels off the Costa Rica Dome (4°-11°N, 90°-100°W) in 2009 and 2010. The daily catch of D. gigas in the two survey cruises ranged from 0 to 5.5 t and was mostly obtained from the areas bounded by 6°-9°N and 91°-94°W and by 6°30'-7°30'N and 96°-97°W. The sea surface temperature in the areas yielding the most catch ranged from 27.5 to 29°C. The sex ratio of the total catch was 3.75:1 (female: male). The mantle length of the squid ranged from 211 to 355 mm (male) and from 204 to 429 mm (female) with an average of 297.9 and 306.7 mm, respectively. In the relationship of the mantle length (mm) and body weight (g) of the squid, there was no significant difference between sexes. The female and male were at a similar maturity, and most individuals are maturing or have matured with a few females being spent. The size (mantle length) and age at the first sexual maturity were 297 mm and 195 d in females, and less than 211 mm and 130 d in males, respectively. Most of the sampled stomachs (70.6%) had no food remains. The major preys of the squids were fish, cephalopods and crustaceans, with the most abundant Myctophum orientale and D. gigas. The preys in more than 65% of the non-empty sampled stomachs evidenced the cannibalism of D. gigas. The results improved current understanding of the fishery biology of D. gigas off the Costa Rica Dome, which may facilitate the assessment and management of relative fishery resources.

  9. A comparison of fishery biology of jumbo flying squid, Dosidicus gigas outside three Exclusive Economic Zones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bilin; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian

    2013-05-01

    Although many studies on the fishery biology of jumbo flying squid, Dosidicus gigas, have been conducted in the coastal areas within Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) of various countries due to its commercial and ecological importance, limited biological information is available from waters outside these EEZs. In this paper, we examined D. gigas fishery biology from waters outside Chilean, Peruvian and Costa Rican EEZs, based on the fishery data collected by Chinese jigging vessels during 2006 to 2010. The dominant mantle lengths of D. gigas were 350-450 mm, 250-400 mm and 250-350 mm outside Chilean, Peruvian and Costa Rican EEZs, respectively. Size structure analysis show that a medium-sized group existed mostly in the waters outside the Chilean and Peruvian EEZs, whereas a small-sized group occurred mainly in the waters outside the Costa Rican EEZ. The longevity of the squid outside the Costa Rican EEZ was less than 10 months, while most of those outside Chilean and Peruvian EEZs were about 1-1.5 years and very few large individuals were 1.5-2 years old. A higher percentage of mature individuals existed outside Costa Rican EEZ implying the region as a potential spawning ground, while lower proportions of mature squid outside the Peruvian and Chilean EEZs indicated that spawning may be occurring outside our study area. Spatial differences in sizes at maturity of the squid are thought to be result from different environmental factors especially different temperature and nutrition among the three areas. Stomach-content analysis showed that cannibalism was important in the diet of D. gigas. Stress generated by jigging may increase the incidence of cannibalism.

  10. A Comparative Study of Clam and Squid. Biting Flies of the Coastal Region. Diatoms: Nature's Aquatic Gems. Learning Experiences for Coastal and Oceanic Awareness Studies, Nos. 227, 231, 232. [Project COAST].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Coll. of Education.

    Included are three units related to coastal and oceanic awareness. The units are: (1) A Comparative Study of Clam and Squid; (2) Biting Flies of the Coastal Region; and (3) Diatoms: Nature's Aquatic Gems. All three units were designed for secondary school students. Each unit contains teacher background materials, student activity materials,…

  11. FLIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flies constitute a major group of nuisance species world wide in rural and urban situations. The public and health care officials can become more aware of the potential risks from flies and other urban pests by compiling the available information into an easily readable book form. Scientists from ...

  12. Squids of the family Ommastrephi-dae are a vital part of marine food

    E-print Network

    --from a few intact squids to New information from fish diets on the importance of glassy flying squid) are heavily preyed upon by top marine predators, i.e., birds, mammals, and fish, and currently support). Hyaloteuthis pelagica (Bosc, 1802), the glassy flying squid, is the smallest ommastrephid, reaching a maximum

  13. Squid rocket science: How squid launch into air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dor, Ron; Stewart, Julia; Gilly, William; Payne, John; Borges, Teresa Cerveira; Thys, Tierney

    2013-10-01

    Squid not only swim, they can also fly like rockets, accelerating through the air by forcefully expelling water out of their mantles. Using available lab and field data from four squid species, Sthenoteuthis pteropus, Dosidicus gigas, Illex illecebrosus and Loligo opalescens, including sixteen remarkable photographs of flying S. pteropus off the coast of Brazil, we compared the cost of transport in both water and air and discussed methods of maximizing power output through funnel and mantle constriction. Additionally we found that fin flaps develop at approximately the same size range as flight behaviors in these squids, consistent with previous hypotheses that flaps could function as ailerons whilst aloft. S. pteropus acceleration in air (265 body lengths [BL]/s2; 24.5m/s2) was found to exceed that in water (79BL/s2) three-fold based on estimated mantle length from still photos. Velocities in air (37BL/s; 3.4m/s) exceed those in water (11BL/s) almost four-fold. Given the obvious advantages of this extreme mode of transport, squid flight may in fact be more common than previously thought and potentially employed to reduce migration cost in addition to predation avoidance. Clearly squid flight, the role of fin flaps and funnel, and the energetic benefits are worthy of extended investigation.

  14. First SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Arnold

    2014-03-01

    The Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is the most sensitive magnetic flux sensor and the most widely applied superconductor electronic device, whose applications range from magnetocardiography to picovoltmeters, from digital logic to quantum computing, and from non-destructive testing to Gravity Probe B, a spaceborne test of Einstein's theory of gravity. In this presentation, I describe the initial experiments and device modeling at the Ford Scientific Laboratory that produced the early versions of the SQUID during the 1960's. That history originated in an anomalous observation during microwave ENDOR experiments and led to the first report of macroscopic quantum interference in superconductors in 1964 [Phys. Rev. Letters 12 (1964)]. The SQUID is based on London's electrodynamic theory of multiply-connected superconductors [Superfluids Wiley, New York (1950)], the magnetic flux quantum (h/2e=2.07E-15 Wb), and Josephson's theory of weakly-connected superconductors [Phys. Lett. 1 (1962)]. Physically, it incorporates Josephson tunnel junctions in a low inductance, superconducting ring. Two distinct types of SQUIDs were demonstrated: first the ``dc SQUID'' and then the ``rf SQUID.'' The former has two Josephson junctions and produces a dc frequency response; the latter has only one junction and responds only at rf and microwave frequencies. The first phase, conducted by Lambe, Jaklevic, Mercereau, and Silver, used type I thin film superconductors and Josephson tunnel junctions. The second phase, conducted by Silver and Zimmerman, used bulk niobium structures with ``cat whisker'' junction technology [Phys.Rev. 157 (1967)].

  15. Holographic SQUID

    E-print Network

    Takeuchi, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    We propose a holographic model of the SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) composed of two Josephson junctions connected each other in a circle with the magnetic flux penetrating the circuit of the SQUID and the supercurrents flowing in both Josephson junction. The gravity in this paper is the Einstein-Maxwell-complex scalar field model on the four-dimensional Anti-de Sitter Schwarzschild black brane geometry in which one space direction is compactified into a circle, and we arrange the profile of the coefficient of the time component of the gauge field having the role for the chemical potential of the cooper pair. The magnetic flux is involved by the rewriting of the surface integral of the magnetic field to the contour integral of the gauge field.

  16. NEON Airborne Remote Sensing of Terrestrial Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Karpowicz, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is the continental-scale research platform that will collect information on ecosystems across the United States to advance our understanding and ability to forecast environmental change at the continental scale. One of NEON's observing systems, the Airborne Observation Platform (AOP), will fly an instrument suite consisting of a high-fidelity visible-to-shortwave infrared imaging spectrometer, a full waveform small footprint LiDAR, and a high-resolution digital camera on a low-altitude aircraft platform. NEON AOP is focused on acquiring data on several terrestrial Essential Climate Variables including bioclimate, biodiversity, biogeochemistry, and land use products. These variables are collected throughout a network of 60 sites across the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico via ground-based and airborne measurements. Airborne remote sensing plays a critical role by providing measurements at the scale of individual shrubs and larger plants over hundreds of square kilometers. The NEON AOP plays the role of bridging the spatial scales from that of individual organisms and stands to the scale of satellite-based remote sensing. NEON is building 3 airborne systems to facilitate the routine coverage of NEON sites and provide the capacity to respond to investigator requests for specific projects. The first NEON imaging spectrometer, a next-generation VSWIR instrument, was recently delivered to NEON by JPL. This instrument has been integrated with a small-footprint waveform LiDAR on the first NEON airborne platform (AOP-1). A series of AOP-1 test flights were conducted during the first year of NEON's construction phase. The goal of these flights was to test out instrument functionality and performance, exercise remote sensing collection protocols, and provide provisional data for algorithm and data product validation. These test flights focused the following questions: What is the optimal remote sensing data collection protocol to meet NEON science requirements? How do aircraft altitude, spatial sampling, spatial resolution, and LiDAR instrument configuration affect data retrievals? What are appropriate algorithms to derive ECVs from AOP data? What methodology should be followed to validate AOP remote sensing products and how should ground truth data be collected? Early test flights were focused on radiometric and geometric calibration as well as processing from raw data to Level-1 products. Subsequent flights were conducted focusing on collecting vegetation chemistry and structure measurements. These test flights that were conducted during 2012 have proved to be extremely valuable for verifying instrument functionality and performance, exercising remote sensing collection protocols, and providing data for algorithm and science product validation. Results from these early flights are presented, including the radiometric and geometric calibration of the AOP instruments. These 2012 flight campaigns are just the first of a series of test flights that will take place over the next several years as part of the NEON observatory construction. Lessons learned from these early campaigns will inform both airborne and ground data collection methodologies for future campaigns as well as guide the AOP sampling strategy before NEON enters full science operations.

  17. The Squid Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillaume, Andrea M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an approach to the study of squid that helps students of all ages develop richer ideas about the structure of living things, how living things are adapted to their habitats, and how they interact with other organisms. Highlights include the external and internal features of the squid, squid statements and statistics, and writing…

  18. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  19. Chimeras in SQUID Metamaterials

    E-print Network

    N. Lazarides; G. Neofotistos; G. P. Tsironis

    2015-04-21

    Regular lattices comprising superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) form magnetic metamaterials exhibiting extraordinary properties, including tunability, dynamic multistability, and negative magnetic permeability. The SQUIDs in a metamaterial interact through nonlocal, magnetic dipole-dipole forces that makes it possible for counter-intuitive dynamic states referred to as chimera states to appear; the latter feature clusters of SQUIDs with synchronous dynamics which coexist with clusters exhibiting asynchronous behavior. The spontaneous appearance of chimera states is demonstrated numerically for one-dimensional SQUID metamaterials driven by an alternating magnetic field in which the fluxes threading the SQUID rings are randomly initialized; then, chimera states appear generically for sufficiently strong initial excitations, which exhibit relatively long lifetimes. The synchronization and metastability levels of the chimera states are discussed in terms of appropriate measures. Given that both one- and two-dimensional SQUID metamaterials have been already fabricated and investigated in the laboratory, the presence of a chimera state could in principle be detected with presently available experimental setups.

  20. Subranging scheme for SQUID sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A readout scheme for measuring the output from a SQUID-based sensor-array using an improved subranging architecture that includes multiple resolution channels (such as a coarse resolution channel and a fine resolution channel). The scheme employs a flux sensing circuit with a sensing coil connected in series to multiple input coils, each input coil being coupled to a corresponding SQUID detection circuit having a high-resolution SQUID device with independent linearizing feedback. A two-resolution configuration (course and fine) is illustrated with a primary SQUID detection circuit for generating a fine readout, and a secondary SQUID detection circuit for generating a course readout, both having feedback current coupled to the respective SQUID devices via feedback/modulation coils. The primary and secondary SQUID detection circuits function and derive independent feedback. Thus, the SQUID devices may be monitored independently of each other (and read simultaneously) to dramatically increase slew rates and dynamic range.

  1. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  2. Low-noise SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Dantsker, Eugene (Torrance, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high-transition-temperature superconducting device having low-magnitude low-frequency noise-characteristics in magnetic fields comprising superconducting films wherein the films have a width that is less than or equal to a critical width, w.sub.C, which depends on an ambient magnetic field. For operation in the Earth's magnetic field, the critical width is about 6 micrometers (.mu.m). When made with film widths of about 4 .mu.m an inventive high transition-temperature, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) excluded magnetic flux vortices up to a threshold ambient magnetic field of about 100 microTesla (.mu.T). SQUIDs were fabricated having several different film strip patterns. When the film strip width was kept at about 4 .mu.m, the SQUIDs exhibited essentially no increase in low-frequency noise, even when cooled in static magnetic fields of magnitude up to 100 .mu.T. Furthermore, the mutual inductance between the inventive devices and a seven-turn spiral coil was at least 85% of that for inductive coupling to a conventional SQUID.

  3. The Second NEON Observing Euroschool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-12-01

    The Network of European Observatories in the North (NEON) is pleased to announce its second observing school, sponsored by the European Community, which will take place at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (France) from July 9 to 21, 2001

  4. SQUIDs: Then and Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, John

    2014-03-01

    In 1964, Jaklevic, Lambe, Silver and Mercereau demonstrated quantum interference in a superconducting ring containing two Josephson tunnel junctions. This observation marked the birth of the SQUID--Superconducting QUantum Interference Device. The following year saw the appearance of the SLUG (Superconducting Low-inductance Undulatory Galvanometer)--a blob of solder frozen around a length of niobium wire--that was used as a voltmeter with femtovolt resolution. Although extremely primitive by today's standards, the SLUG was used successfully in a number of ultrasensitive experiments. Today, the square washer dc SQUID, fabricated on a wafer-scale from thin films with an integrated input coil, finds a wide range of applications. One example is the use of a SQUID amplifier to read out ADMX--Axion Dark Matter eXperiment--at the University of Washington, Seattle. This experiment, which involves a cooled microwave cavity surrounded by a superconducting magnet, searches for the axion, a candidate for cold dark matter. In the presence of a magnetic field the axion is predicted to decay into a photon, which is detected by the SQUID. In another example, the combination of a SQUID with prepolarized proton spins enables one to perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in magnetic fields of the order of 0.1 mT, four orders of magnitude lower than in conventional MRI systems. In vivo images of the human brain acquired at these ultralow fields are able distinguish brain tissue, blood, cerebrospinal fluid and scalp fat using a combination of inversion recovery and multiple echo sequences. Potential clinical applications are briefly discussed.

  5. Dissect Your Squid and Eat It Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a science lab activity in which students dissect fresh squids in groups of four and observe the anatomy. Parent volunteers cook the squid mantle for kids to taste. Includes directions for squid dissection. (YDS)

  6. SQUID With Integral Flux Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Sisk, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    In improved superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), change in size and shape of superconducting ring improves coupling to external signal coil and eases coil-positioning tolerances. More rugged and easier to manufacture than conventional SQUID's with comparable electrical characteristics. Thin-film superconducting flux concentrator utilizes Meissner effect to deflect magnetic field of signal coil into central hole of SQUID. Used in magnetometers, ammeters, analog-to-digital converters, and related electronic applications in which high signal-to-noise ratios required.

  7. Laboratory Astrophysics: Spectral Analysis of Photoionized Neon

    E-print Network

    Cohen, David

    Laboratory Astrophysics: Spectral Analysis of Photoionized Neon James MacArthur Advisor: David Cohen March 14, 2011 #12;Abstract A curve of growth analysis was applied to photoionized neon absorption, designed to pho- toionize neon up to helium and hydrogen-like species, produce a photoionized plasma

  8. The Neon DSEL for mining Helium programs

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    The Neon DSEL for mining Helium programs Jurriaan Hage Peter van Keeken Department of Information with the Helium compiler. In this paper we demonstrate a DSEL called Neon written in Haskell, for computing.g., are there parts of Haskell that students avoid. Central in this paper is the Neon domain specific embedded

  9. Japan's Squid Fishing Industry WILLIAM G. COURT

    E-print Network

    Japan's Squid Fishing Industry WILLIAM G. COURT .. Introduction Dried-squid (surume) has been an item of commerce, ceremony, and diet in Japan for hundreds of years, and squid is caught of labor, and the low capital investment required for squid jigging stimulated the rapid de- velopment

  10. Flying wings / flying fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper has documented the historical relationships between various classes of all lifting vehicles, which includes the flying wing, all wing, tailless, lifting body, and lifting fuselage. The diversity in vehicle focus was to ensure that all vehicle types that map have contributed to or been influenced by the development of the classical flying wing concept was investigated. The paper has provided context and perspective for present and future aircraft design studies that may employ the all lifting vehicle concept. The paper also demonstrated the benefit of developing an understanding of the past in order to obtain the required knowledge to create future concepts with significantly improved aerodynamic performance.

  11. Paleomagnetic Analysis Using SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.; Fong, Luis E.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.

    2007-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopes are a new generation of instruments that map magnetic fields with unprecedented spatial resolution and moment sensitivity. Unlike standard rock magnetometers, SQUID microscopes map magnetic fields rather than measuring magnetic moments such that the sample magnetization pattern must be retrieved from source model fits to the measured field data. In this paper, we presented the first direct comparison between paleomagnetic analyses on natural samples using joint measurements from SQUID microscopy and moment magnetometry. We demonstrated that in combination with apriori geologic and petrographic data, SQUID microscopy can accurately characterize the magnetization of lunar glass spherules and Hawaiian basalt. The bulk moment magnitude and direction of these samples inferred from inversions of SQUID microscopy data match direct measurements on the same samples using moment magnetometry. In addition, these inversions provide unique constraints on the magnetization distribution within the sample. These measurements are among the most sensitive and highest resolution quantitative paleomagnetic studies of natural remanent magnetization to date. We expect that this technique will be able to extend many other standard paleomagnetic techniques to previously inaccessible microscale samples.

  12. Squid – a simple bioinformatics grid

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Paulo C; Glória, Rafael V; de Miranda, Antonio B; Degrave, Wim M

    2005-01-01

    Background BLAST is a widely used genetic research tool for analysis of similarity between nucleotide and protein sequences. This paper presents a software application entitled "Squid" that makes use of grid technology. The current version, as an example, is configured for BLAST applications, but adaptation for other computing intensive repetitive tasks can be easily accomplished in the open source version. This enables the allocation of remote resources to perform distributed computing, making large BLAST queries viable without the need of high-end computers. Results Most distributed computing / grid solutions have complex installation procedures requiring a computer specialist, or have limitations regarding operating systems. Squid is a multi-platform, open-source program designed to "keep things simple" while offering high-end computing power for large scale applications. Squid also has an efficient fault tolerance and crash recovery system against data loss, being able to re-route jobs upon node failure and recover even if the master machine fails. Our results show that a Squid application, working with N nodes and proper network resources, can process BLAST queries almost N times faster than if working with only one computer. Conclusion Squid offers high-end computing, even for the non-specialist, and is freely available at the project web site. Its open-source and binary Windows distributions contain detailed instructions and a "plug-n-play" instalation containing a pre-configured example. PMID:16078998

  13. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  14. SQUID holder with high magnetic shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, K. W.; Marek, D.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A SQUID holder designed for high magnetic shielding is discussed. It is shown how to estimate the attenuation of the magnetic field from the normal magnetic modes for an approximate geometry. The estimate agrees satisfactorily with the attenuation measured with a commercial RF SQUID installed in the holder. The holder attenuates external magnetic fields by more than 10 to the 9th at the SQUID input. With the SQUID input shorted, the response to external fields is 0.00001 Phi(0)/G.

  15. Experimental Squid Jigging Off the Washington Coast

    E-print Network

    Experimental Squid Jigging Off the Washington Coast ROGER W. MERCER and MICHELE SUCY Introduction Service was contacted by Capta in Jerry Sweeney of the salmon charter vessel Tres Cher in regard to squid of existing literature on squid yielded several pieces of information which indicated some potential

  16. The Philippines Squid Fishery: A Review

    E-print Network

    The Philippines Squid Fishery: A Review ANICETO M. HERNANDO, Jr. and EFREN ED. C. FLORES Aniceto M not necessarily reflect the position of the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA. Introduction Squids were increasing squid production, it cannot meet the increasing demand of local, national, and foreign markets

  17. Tuesday, November 12, 2002 Squid Pro Quo

    E-print Network

    Mallin, Michael

    Tuesday, November 12, 2002 Squid Pro Quo: TheBehavioralEcologyofCephalopod Predators in a Fish-dominated Ocean Dr. Roger Hanlon #12;Squid Pro Quo: The Behavioral Ecology of Cephalopod Predators in a Fish-dominated Ocean with Dr. Roger Hanlon Please join us for the second seminar in the 2002-2003 series: Squid Pro Quo

  18. Developments in South American Squid Fisheries

    E-print Network

    Developments in South American Squid Fisheries Marcelo Juanico is with the Museo Nacional deI., 1975). Up to now squids have been only a minor and scarce resource in the Chilean fisheries, recorded gigante," Humboldt squid) with a man- tle length of up to I m and a weight of 35 kg. It is fished mainly

  19. Tracking Electromagnetic Energy With SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is a gadget used to measure extremely weak signals, specifically magnetic flux. It can detect subtle changes in energy, up to 100 billion times weaker than the electromagnetic energy required to move a compass needle. SQUIDs are used for a variety of testing procedures where extreme sensitivity is required and where the test instrument need not come into direct contact with the test subject. NASA uses SQUIDs for remote, noncontact sensing in a variety of venues, including monitoring the Earth s magnetic field and tracking brain activity of pilots. Scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have been making extensive use of this technology, from astrophysical research, to tracking the navigational paths of bees in flight to determine if they are using internal compasses. These very sensitive measurement devices have a wide variety of uses within NASA and even more uses within the commercial realm.

  20. A holographic model of SQUID

    E-print Network

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2013-01-01

    We construct a holographic model of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in the Einstein-Maxwell-complex scalar theory with a negative cosmological constant. The SQUID ring consists of two Josephson junctions which sit on two sides of a compactified spatial direction of a Schwarzschild-AdS black brane. These two junctions interfere with each other and then result in a total current depending on the magnetic flux, which can be deduced from the phase differences of the two Josephson junctions. The relation between the total current and the magnetic flux is obtained numerically.

  1. A holographic model of SQUID

    E-print Network

    Rong-Gen Cai; Yong-Qiang Wang; Hai-Qing Zhang

    2013-12-16

    We construct a holographic model of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in the Einstein-Maxwell-complex scalar theory with a negative cosmological constant. The SQUID ring consists of two Josephson junctions which sit on two sides of a compactified spatial direction of a Schwarzschild-AdS black brane. These two junctions interfere with each other and then result in a total current depending on the magnetic flux, which can be deduced from the phase differences of the two Josephson junctions. The relation between the total current and the magnetic flux is obtained numerically.

  2. SPIN EXCHANGE OPTICAL PUMPING OF NEON AND ITS APPLICATIONS

    E-print Network

    Romalis, Mike

    SPIN EXCHANGE OPTICAL PUMPING OF NEON AND ITS APPLICATIONS RAJAT K. GHOSH A DISSERTATION PRESENTED to neon would instigate an order of magnitude gain in sensitivity over 3He. In order to realize calculated. There are no quantitative predictions of the neon-neon quadrupolar relaxation rate quad

  3. Small scale demand type neon liquefaction plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dube, W. P.; Slifka, A. J.; Bitsy, R. M.; Sparks, L. L.; Johnson, K. B.

    1990-01-01

    Low-temperature measurement of the thermal conductivity of insulating materials is generally made using a boil-off calorimetry technique involving liquid hydrogen (LH2). Liquid neon (LNe) has nearly the same normal boiling point as LH2, but has a much larger heat of vaporization, allowing extended run times. The main drawback of using LNe has been its excessive cost; $170.00 versus $1.50/l for LH2 (1989 prices). A neon liquefaction plant has been designed and constructed to capture, purify, and refrigerate the neon boil-off from calorimetry experiments. Recycling the neon reduces operating costs to approximately $20/l. The system consists of a purification section, a heat exchanger, LNe and LH2 storage dewars, and a fully automated control system. After purification, neon is liquified in the heat exchanger by LH2 flowing countercurrently through stainless steel cooling coils. Hydrogen flow is automatically adjusted to keep the neon at its normal saturation temperature, 27 K. The liquid neon is then stored in a dewar placed directly below the heat exchanger.

  4. Cold SQUIDs and hot samples

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.C.

    1997-05-01

    Low transition temperature (low-{Tc}) and high-{Tc} Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have been used to perform high-resolution magnetic measurements on samples whose temperatures are much higher than the operating temperatures of the devices. Part 1 of this work focuses on measurements of the rigidity of flux vortices in high-{Tc} superconductors using two low-{Tc} SQUIDs, one on either side of a thermally-insulated sample. The correlation between the signals of the SQUIDs is a direct measure of the extent of correlation between the movements of opposite ends of vortices. These measurements were conducted under the previously-unexplored experimental conditions of nominally-zero applied magnetic field, such that vortex-vortex interactions were unimportant, and with zero external current. At specific temperatures, the authors observed highly-correlated noise sources, suggesting that the vortices moved as rigid rods. At other temperatures, the noise was mostly uncorrelated, suggesting that the relevant vortices were pinned at more than one point along their length. Part 2 describes the design, construction, performance, and applications of a scanning high-{Tc} SQUID microscope optimized for imaging room-temperature objects with very high spatial resolution and magnetic source sensitivity.

  5. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, S. J.; Henderson, S.; Gardiner, L. S.; Ward, D.; Gram, W.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of "human sensors." As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include "citizens" or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. Phenology was chosen as the focus of this citizen science campaign because it is a visible and comprehensible way of demonstrating the effects of climate change. In addition, plants are readily accessible in nearly every neighborhood and park, and wild area across the continent, so people can make observations whether they live near an inner city park or in the rural countryside. Recently, NEON developed data visualization tools for Project BudBurst to engage citizen science participants in "doing science" beyond data collection. By prototyping NEON citizen science through Project BudBurst, NEON is developing a better understanding of how to build a citizen science program that addresses areas of awareness, mastery, and leadership of scientific information like that which NEON will produce over the next 30 years.

  6. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-09-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and office supply stores. We also employ violet-blue and green laser pointers as excitation sources. We conclude with a brief discussion of neon pigments in terms of the "day glow" or "daylight fluorescence" phenomenon.

  7. Improved Sensing Coils for SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2007-01-01

    An improvement in the design and fabrication of sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers has been proposed to increase sensitivity. It has been estimated that, in some cases, it would be possible to increase sensitivity by about half or to reduce measurement time correspondingly. The pertinent aspects of the problems of design and fabrication can be summarized as follows: In general, to increase the sensitivity of a SQUID magnetometer, it is necessary to maximize the magnetic flux enclosed by the sensing coil while minimizing the self-inductance of this coil. It is often beneficial to fabricate the coil from a thicker wire to reduce its self-inductance. Moreover, to optimize the design of the coil with respect to sensitivity, it may be necessary to shape the wire to other than a commonly available circular or square cross-section. On the other hand, it is not practical to use thicker superconducting wire for the entire superconducting circuit, especially if the design of a specific device requires a persistent-current loop enclosing a remotely placed SQUID sensor. It may be possible to bond a thicker sensing-coil wire to thinner superconducting wires leading to a SQUID sensor, but it could be difficult to ensure reliable superconducting connections, especially if the bonded wires are made of different materials. The main idea is to mold the sensing coil in place, to more nearly optimum cross sectional shape, instead of making the coil by winding standard pre-fabricated wire. For this purpose, a thin superconducting wire loop that is an essential part of the SQUID magnetometer would be encapsulated in a form that would serve as a mold. A low-melting-temperature superconducting metal (e.g., indium, tin, or a lead/tin alloy) would be melted into the form, which would be sized and shaped to impart the required cross section to the coil thus formed.

  8. MFR PAPER 1257 Care and Maintenance of Squid Quality

    E-print Network

    MFR PAPER 1257 Care and Maintenance of Squid Quality INTRODUCTION The squid resources in the proper handling of squid at sea and through the processing and dis- tribution stages. Typically, squid for squid is primarily a small-boat fishery, and the catch is sometimes not iced at sea. In southern New

  9. Development of a Squid Skinning and Eviscerating System

    E-print Network

    commercially for cleaning squid. The development of an industrial-scale machine for economi- cal cleaning industry involve canning whole squid for foreign mar- kets and freezing whole squid for both domestic. ABSTRACT-A squid skinning and evis- cerating machine was designedfor Califor- nia market squid, Loligo

  10. Orthopositronium: Annihilation of positron in gaseous neon

    E-print Network

    B. M. Levin

    2003-04-08

    On the basis of phenomenological model of the orthopositronium annihilation "isotope anomaly" in gaseous neon (lifetime spectra, positrons source Na-22) the realistic estimation of an additinal mode ~0.2%) of the orthopositronium annihilation is received.

  11. Solar helium and neon in the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Mcdougall, I.; Patterson, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    Neon isotopic compositions in mantle-derived samples commonly are enriched in (20)Ne and (21)Ne relative to (22)Ne compared with atmospheric neon ((20)Ne/(22)Ne and (21)Ne/(22)Ne ratios in atmospheric neon are 9.8 and 0.029, respectively), together with significant primordial (3)He. Such results have been obtained on MORB's, intraplate plume-related oceanic island basalts, backarc basin basalts, mantle xenoliths, ancient diamonds and CO2 well gases (e.g., 1 - 8). The highest (20)Ne/(22)Ne ratio observed in MORB glasses (= 13.6 plus or minus 1.3 is close to the solar value (= 13.6, as observed in solar wind). In order to explain the enrichment of (20)Ne and (21)Ne relative to atmospheric neon for samples derived from the mantle, it is necessary to postulate the presence of at least two distinct non-atmospheric components. The two most likely candidates are solar and nucleogenic ((20)Ne/(22)Ne solar = 13.6 (21)Ne/(22)Ne solar = 0.032, (20)Ne/(22)Ne nucleogenic = 2.5 and (21)Ne/(22)Ne nucleogenic = 32). This is because solar neon is the only known component with a (20)Ne/(22)Ne ratio greater than both the atmospheric value and that observed in samples derived from the mantle. Nucleogenic neon is well known to elevate (21)Ne/(22)Ne ratios. Neon isotopic signatures observed in mantle-derived samples can be accounted for by mixing of the three neon end members: solar, nucleogenic and atmospheric.

  12. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gram, W.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of “human sensors.” As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include “citizens” or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. Phenology was chosen as the focus of this citizen science campaign because it is a visible and comprehensible way of demonstrating the effects of climate change. In addition, plants are readily accessible in nearly every neighborhood and park, and wild areas across the continent, so people can make observations whether they live near an inner city park or in the rural countryside. Recently, NEON built 3 web tools that enable users to visualize PBB data. The tools include a mapping function that displays selected PBB distributional data on a map, an animated map that shows “green up” through time and space, and a graphing tool that compares number of species flowering or leafing out with day length. This prototyping will help NEON better understand how to engage citizen science participants in “doing science” beyond data collection.

  13. Microwave-free manipulation of a SQUID qubit

    E-print Network

    Fominov, Yakov

    Microwave-free manipulation of a SQUID qubit S. Poletto1, J. Lisenfeld1, A. Lukashenko1 M/2 0=2.07·10-15 Wb 1-junction SQUID (rf SQUID) #12;I Vs JJ with tunable critical current 0 2I0 I0 l I0 s V I 2I0 s=0 2-junction SQUID (dc SQUID) #12;Qubit (double SQUID) x For x = 0/2 the potential

  14. Helium and Neon in Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1996-01-01

    Two comets were observed with EUVE in late 1994. Both comet Mueller and comet Borrelly are short-period comets having well established orbital elements and accurate ephemerides. Spectra of 40 ksec were taken of each. No evidence for emission lines from either Helium or Neon was detected. We calculated limits on the production rates of these atoms (relative to solar) assuming a standard isotropic outflow model, with a gas streaming speed of 1 km/s. The 3-sigma (99.7% confidence) limits (1/100,000 for He, 0.8 for Ne) are based on a conservative estimate of the noise in the EUVE spectra. They are also weakly dependent on the precise pointing and tracking of the EUVE field of view relative to the comet during the integrations. These limits are consistent with ice formation temperatures T greater than or equal to 30 K, as judged from the gas trapping experiments of Bar-Nun. For comparison, the solar abundances of these elements are He/O = 110, Ne/O = 1/16. Neither limit was as constraining as we had initially hoped, mainly because comets Mueller and Borrelly were intrinsically less active than anticipated.

  15. Drain Flies (Moth Flies or Filter Flies

    E-print Network

    Sansone, Chris; Minzenmayer, Rick

    2003-07-21

    an infestation is to deter- mine which of these pests is the problem. Fruit flies are usually yellowish with clear or lightly banded wings. They are most often found around fruit and vegetable peelings, rotting fruits and other similar foods. Eliminating... Drain fly life cycle. Chemical Drain Cleaners There are bacterial drain treatments that biodegrade organic matter. Follow the label directions carefully for best results. Many common drain and toilet bowl cleaners are effective. If you have a septic...

  16. SQUID magnetometers for low-frequency applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ryhaenen, T.; Seppae, H. ); Ilmoniemi, R.; Knuutila, J. )

    1989-09-01

    The authors present a novel formulation for SQUID operation, which enables them to evaluate and compare the sensitivity and applicability of different devices. SQUID magnetometers for low-frequency applications are analyzed, taking into account the coupling circuits and electronics. They discuss nonhysteretic and hysteretic single-junction rf SQUIDs, but the main emphasis is on the dynamics, sensitivity, and coupling considerations of dc-SQUID magnetometers. A short review of current ideas on thin-film, dc-SQUID design presents the problems in coupling and the basic limits of sensitivity. The fabrication technology of tunnel-junction devices is discussed with emphasis on how it limits critical current densities, specific capacitances of junctions, minimum linewidths, conductor separations, etc. Properties of high-temperature superconductors are evaluated on the basis of recently published results on increased flux creep, low density of current carriers, and problems in fabricating reliable junctions. The optimization of electronics for different types of SQUIDs is presented. Finally, the most important low-frequency applications of SQUIDs in biomagnetism, metrology, geomagnetism, and some physics experiments demonstrate the various possibilities that state-of-the-art SQUIDs can provide.

  17. Montgomery Modular Multiplication on ARM-NEON Revisited

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Montgomery Modular Multiplication on ARM-NEON Revisited Hwajeong Seo1 , Zhe Liu2 , Johann Großsch NEON) has initiated a massive body of research on vector-parallel implementations of Montgomery modular modular multiplication on ARM-NEON platforms. Detailed benchmarking results obtained on an ARM Cortex-A9

  18. Accelerating Software Radio on ARM: Adding NEON Support to VOLK

    E-print Network

    1 Accelerating Software Radio on ARM: Adding NEON Support to VOLK Nathan West1,2 and Douglas Geiger library to use SIMD instructions by creating optimized signal processing routines in NEON with both Radio) platforms. The current lowest hanging fruit is the NEON Media Processing Engine which has come

  19. Electronic absorption spectra of CCS and CCS in neon matrices

    E-print Network

    Maier, John Paul

    Electronic absorption spectra of CCSÀ and CCS in neon matrices Evgueni Riaplov,a Muriel Wyss,a John 2002; in revised form 30 October 2002 Abstract Mass selected C2SÀ ions have been co-deposited with neon is the most stable [13]. In this contribution electronic absorption spectra of C2SÀ and C2S in a neon matrix

  20. NEON crypto Daniel J. Bernstein1 and Peter Schwabe2

    E-print Network

    Bernstein, Daniel

    NEON crypto Daniel J. Bernstein1 and Peter Schwabe2 1 Department of Computer Science University Sinica, 128 Section 2 Academia Road, Taipei 115-29, Taiwan peter@cryptojedi.org Abstract. NEON shows that NEON supports high-security cryptography at surprisingly high speeds; normally data arrives

  1. ARM NEON support in the ARM compiler September 2008

    E-print Network

    Whaley, R. Clint

    - 1 - ARM NEON support in the ARM compiler September 2008 Introduction This paper provides a simple support for SIMD, both through automatic recognition and through the use of intrinsic functions. The NEON the same operation for all data. The NEON unit is positioned within the processor to enable it to share

  2. SQUID Multiplexers for Cryogenic Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Kent; Beall, James; Deiker, Steve; Doriese, Randy; Duncan, William; Hilton, Gene; Moseley, S. Harvey; Reintsema, Carl; Stahle, Caroline; Ullom, Joel; Vale, Leila

    2004-01-01

    SQUID multiplexers make it possible to build arrays of thousands of cryogenic detectors with a manageable number of readout channels. We are developing time-division SQUID multiplexers based on Nb trilayer SQUIDs to read arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors. Our first-generation, 8-channel SQUID multiplexer was used in FIBRE, a one-dimensional TES array for submillimeter astronomy. Our second-generation 32-pixel multiplexer, based on an improved architecture, has been developed for instruments including Constellation-X, SCUBA-2, and solar x-ray astronomy missions. SCUBA-2, which is being developed for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, will have more than 10,000 pixels. We are now developing a third-generation architecture based on superconducting hot-electron switches. The use of SQUID multiplexers in instruments operating at above 2 K will also be discussed.

  3. Biofunctional properties of enzymatic squid meat hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Sang Moo

    2015-03-01

    Squid is one of the most important commercial fishes in the world and is mainly utilized or consumed as sliced raw fish or as processed products. The biofunctional activities of enzymatic squid meat hydrolysate were determined to develop value-added products. Enzymatic squid hydrolysate manufactured by Alcalase effectively quenched 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide radical with IC50 values of 311, 3,410, and 111.5 ?g/mL, respectively. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of squid hydrolysate was strong with an IC50 value of 145.1 ?g/mL, while tyrosinase inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 4.72 mg/mL was moderately low. Overall, squid meat hydrolysate can be used in food or cosmetic industries as a bioactive ingredient and possibly be used in the manufacture of seasoning, bread, noodle, or cosmetics. PMID:25866752

  4. Biofunctional Properties of Enzymatic Squid Meat Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Sang Moo

    2015-01-01

    Squid is one of the most important commercial fishes in the world and is mainly utilized or consumed as sliced raw fish or as processed products. The biofunctional activities of enzymatic squid meat hydrolysate were determined to develop value-added products. Enzymatic squid hydrolysate manufactured by Alcalase effectively quenched 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide radical with IC50 values of 311, 3,410, and 111.5 ?g/mL, respectively. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of squid hydrolysate was strong with an IC50 value of 145.1 ?g/mL, while tyrosinase inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 4.72 mg/mL was moderately low. Overall, squid meat hydrolysate can be used in food or cosmetic industries as a bioactive ingredient and possibly be used in the manufacture of seasoning, bread, noodle, or cosmetics. PMID:25866752

  5. Biological Considerations Relevant to the Management of Squid

    E-print Network

    Biological Considerations Relevant to the Management of Squid (Loligo pealei and IIlex illecebrosus squid) and lllex illecebrosus (short-finned squid) are found in com- mercially exploited quantities aspects of the biology and population dynamics of these species relevant to the management of squid

  6. SCHOOL STRUCTURE OF THE SQUID LOLIGO OPALESCENS ANN C. HURLEY!

    E-print Network

    SCHOOL STRUCTURE OF THE SQUID LOLIGO OPALESCENS ANN C. HURLEY! ABSTRACT The squid Loligo opalescens that the main sensory modality regulating schooling is vision. Squid on opposite sides ofa clear rigid Plexiglas barrier readily schooled. The structure ofschools ofsix squid depended on size of individuals

  7. Squid Fishery in Texas: Biological, Economic, and Market Considerations

    E-print Network

    Squid Fishery in Texas: Biological, Economic, and Market Considerations RAYMOND F. HIXON, ROGER T. HANLON, SAMUEL M. GILLESPIE, and WADE L. GRIFFIN Introduction Squids are considered to be one for squids have provided the impetus to reexamine the squid resources of the U.S. continental shelf. Most

  8. Experimental Jigging for Squid off the Northeast United States

    E-print Network

    Experimental Jigging for Squid off the Northeast United States Figure 1.- Polish research vessel attraction jigging is a fishing technique specifically developed for catching squid. Jigging for squid is one of the most important methods used in coastal squid fisheries in Japan. In Japan about 95 percent

  9. A 200 # twostage dc SQUID amplifier for resonant detectors

    E-print Network

    A 200 # two­stage dc SQUID amplifier for resonant detectors . In a resonant GW detector/2 ) and the Bandwidth (µ[S vv /S ii ] 1/2 ) . The two­stage dc SQUID amplifier, based on commercial (Quantum Design . A feedback damping network suitable for both the resonator­SQUID system and the GW detector­SQUID system

  10. A Taste of Crispy Squid Syam Gadde, Jeff Chase

    E-print Network

    Rabinovich, Michael "Misha"

    A Taste of Crispy Squid Syam Gadde, Jeff Chase Dept. of Computer Science Duke University Durham NC cache structures in Crispy Squid, an extension to the Squid Internet Object Cache. We are evaluating] and the public­domain Squid caches [20]. Hierarchical Web caches are built as a collective of independent proxy

  11. Low field electron paramagnetic resonance imaging with SQUID detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob (Inventor); Day, Peter K. (Inventor); Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Cohen, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    In one embodiment, a flux transformer with a gradiometer pickup coil is magnetically coupled to a SQUID, and a SQUID array amplifier comprising a plurality of SQUIDs, connected in series, is magnetically coupled to the output of the SQUID. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  12. Genetic identification of a rare record of Ommastrephes Bartramii (Cephalopoda: Ommastrephidae) from the Eastern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Franjevi?, Damjan; Skaramuca, Daria; Katavi?, Vedran; Rajevi?, Nives; Skaramuca, Boško

    2015-01-01

    The neon flying squid Ommastrephes bartramii Lesueur, 1821 belongs to the Ommastrephidae, Cephalopoda family. The family Ommastrephidae (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) includes many commercially important species, dispersed around the world. The Ommastrephidae family is conventionally divided into three subfamilies (Illicinae, Todarodinae, and Ommastrephinae). We report a specimen of neon flying squid caught in the winter 2013 at Luka Šipanska, Island of Šipan, Croatia and identified at the genetic level using the standard mitochondrial COI barcode region. This record represents the first genetic identification of a neon flying squid from the Adriatic Sea. PMID:26103681

  13. Mining Helium programs with Neon Jurriaan Hage

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Mining Helium programs with Neon Jurriaan Hage Peter van Keeken Department of Information in a first-year functional programming course using the Helium compiler. The mining of such a collection to resolve a type error. 1 #12;1 Introduction and motivation When the Helium compiler for learning Haskell

  14. Flying Cars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, Steven

    1996-01-01

    Flying cars have nearly mythical appeal to nonpilots, a group that includes almost the whole human race. The appeal resides in the perceived utility of flying cars, vehicles that offer portal-to-portal transportation, yet break the bonds of road and traffic and travel freely through the sky at the drivers will. Part of the appeal is an assumption that flying cars can be as easy to fly as to drive. Flying cars have been part of the dream of aviation since the dawn of powered flight. Glenn Curtiss built, displayed, and maybe even flew a flying car in 1917, the Curtiss Autoplane. Many roadable airplanes were built in the 1930's, like the Waterman Arrowbile and the Fulton Airphibian. Two flying cars came close to production in the early 1950's. Ted Hall built a series of flying cars culminating in the Convaircar, sponsored by Consolidated Vultee, General Motors, and Hertz. Molt Taylor built and certified his Aerocar, and Ford came close to producing them. Three Aerocars are still flyable, two in museums in Seattle and Oshkosh, and the third owned and flown by Ed Sweeny. Flying cars do have problems, which so far have prevented commercial success. An obvious problem is complexity of the vehicle, the infrastructure, or both. Another is the difficulty of matching low power for normal driving with high power in flight. An automobile uses only about 20 hp at traffic speeds, while a personal airplane needs about 160 hp at speeds typical of flight. Many automobile engines can deliver 160 hp, but not for very long. A more subtle issue involves the drag of automobiles and airplanes. A good personal airplane can fly 30 miles per gallon of fuel at 200 mph. A good sports car would need 660 hp at the same speed and would travel only 3 miles per gallon. The difference is drag area, about 4.5 sq ft for the automobile and 1.4 sq ft for the airplane. A flying car better have the drag area of the airplane, not the car!

  15. Neon and oxygen in stellar coronae A unification with the Sun

    E-print Network

    Robrade, Jan

    Neon and oxygen in stellar coronae A unification with the Sun Jan Robrade Hamburger Sternwarte From Atoms to Stars, July 2011, Oxford #12;O v e r v i e w 1 Neon and the solar modeling problem 2 Data;Neon and oxygen Increase neon by a factor of 3 ­ 4 !! (e.g. Antia & Basu 2005, Bahcall 2005) Why neon

  16. Reef Squid at USGS Monitoring Station

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A curious reef squid hovers over a calcification-monitoring station used to measure calcification rates to determine impact of ocean acidification on coral growth at Fowey Rocks Light Reef in Biscayne National Park.  ...

  17. ASA's Chandra Neon Discovery Solves Solar Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory survey of nearby sun-like stars suggests there is nearly three times more neon in the sun and local universe than previously believed. If true, this would solve a critical problem with understanding how the sun works. "We use the sun to test how well we understand stars and, to some extent, the rest of the universe," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "But in order to understand the sun, we need to know exactly what it is made of," he added. It is not well known how much neon the sun contains. This is critical information for creating theoretical models of the sun. Neon atoms, along with carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, play an important role in how quickly energy flows from nuclear reactions in the sun's core to its edge, where it then radiates into space. Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi The rate of this energy flow determines the location and size of a crucial stellar region called the convection zone. The zone extends from near the sun's surface inward approximately 125,000 miles. The zone is where the gas undergoes a rolling, convective motion much like the unstable air in a thunderstorm. "This turbulent gas has an extremely important job, because nearly all of the energy emitted at the surface of the sun is transported there by convection," Drake said. The accepted amount of neon in the sun has led to a paradox. The predicted location and size of the solar convection zone disagree with those deduced from solar oscillations. Solar oscillations is a technique astronomers previously relied on to probe the sun's interior. Several scientists have noted the problem could be fixed if the abundance of neon is in fact about three times larger than currently accepted. Attempts to measure the precise amount of neon in the Sun have been frustrated by a quirk of nature; neon atoms in the Sun give off no signatures in visible light. However, in a gas heated to millions of degrees, neon shines brightly in X-rays. Stars like the sun are covered in this super-heated gas that is betrayed by the white corona around them during solar eclipses. However, observations of the sun's corona are very difficult to analyze. Labeled Illustration of Convection in Sun-like Star Labeled Illustration of Convection in Sun-like Star To probe the neon content, Drake and his colleague Paola Testa of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass., observed 21 sun-like stars within a distance of 400 light years from Earth. These local stars and the sun should contain about the same amount of neon when compared to oxygen. However, these close stellar kin were found to contain on average almost three times more neon than is believed for the sun. "Either the sun is a freak in its stellar neighborhood, or it contains a lot more neon than we think," Testa said. These Chandra results reassured astronomers the detailed physical theory behind the solar model is secure. Scientists use the model of the sun as a basis for understanding the structure and evolution of other stars, as well as many other areas of astrophysics. "If the higher neon abundance measured by Drake and Testa is right, then it is a simultaneous triumph for Chandra and for the theory of how stars shine," said John Bahcall of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, N.J. Bahcall is an expert in the field who was not involved in the Chandra study. Drake is lead author of the study published in this week's issue of the journal Nature. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass. Additional information and images are available at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov

  18. Diffusion of neon in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2010-12-01

    Sedimentation of the neutron rich isotope 22Ne may be an important source of gravitational energy during the cooling of white dwarf stars. This depends on the diffusion constant for 22Ne in strongly coupled plasma mixtures. We calculate self-diffusion constants D(i) from molecular dynamics simulations of carbon, oxygen, and neon mixtures. We find that D(i) in a mixture does not differ greatly from earlier one component plasma results. For strong coupling (coulomb parameter ?> few), D(i) has a modest dependence on the charge Z(i) of the ion species, D(i)?Z(i)(-2/3). However, D(i) depends more strongly on Z(i) for weak coupling (smaller ?). We conclude that the self-diffusion constant D(Ne) for 22Ne in carbon, oxygen, and neon plasma mixtures is accurately known so that uncertainties in D(Ne) should be unimportant for simulations of white dwarf cooling. PMID:21230741

  19. Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. . Inst. de Physique); Bailey, J.M. ); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. ); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. ); Huber, T.M. ); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.

    1992-01-01

    A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of [mu][sup [minus]p] atoms in each target. The rates [lambda][sub pp[mu

  20. Binary collision model for neon Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1986-01-01

    A model is developed to account for the angle-resolved Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface recently obtained by Pepper and Aron. The neon is assumed to be excited in a single asymmetric neon-aluminum-collision and scattered back into the vacuum where it emits an Auger electron. The velocity of the Auger electron acquires a Doppler shift by virtue of the emission from a moving source. The dependence of the Auger peak shape and energy on the incident ion energy, angle of incidence and on the angle of Auger electron emission with respect to the surface is presented. Satisfactory agreement with the angle resolved experimental observations is obtained. The dependence of the angle-integrated Auger yield on the incident ion energy and angle of incidence is also obtained and shown to be in satisfactory agreement with available experimental evidence.

  1. Genetic determinants of swimming motility in the squid light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Caitlin A; Mandel, Mark J; Gyllborg, Mattias C; Thomasgard, Krista A; Ruby, Edward G

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial flagellar motility is a complex cellular behavior required for the colonization of the light-emitting organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, by the beneficial bioluminescent symbiont Vibrio fischeri. We characterized the basis of this behavior by performing (i) a forward genetic screen to identify mutants defective in soft-agar motility, as well as (ii) a transcriptional analysis to determine the genes that are expressed downstream of the flagellar master regulator FlrA. Mutants with severe defects in soft-agar motility were identified due to insertions in genes with putative roles in flagellar motility and in genes that were unexpected, including those predicted to encode hypothetical proteins and cell division–related proteins. Analysis of mutants for their ability to enter into a productive symbiosis indicated that flagellar motility mutants are deficient, while chemotaxis mutants are able to colonize a subset of juvenile squid to light-producing levels. Thirty-three genes required for normal motility in soft agar were also downregulated in the absence of FlrA, suggesting they belong to the flagellar regulon of V. fischeri. Mutagenesis of putative paralogs of the flagellar motility genes motA motB, and fliL revealed that motA1 motB1, and both fliL1 and fliL2, but not motA2 and motB2, likely contribute to soft-agar motility. Using these complementary approaches, we have characterized the genetic basis of flagellar motility in V. fischeri and furthered our understanding of the roles of flagellar motility and chemotaxis in colonization of the juvenile squid, including identifying 11 novel mutants unable to enter into a productive light-organ symbiosis. PMID:23907990

  2. ICP and the Squid Web Cache \\Lambda Duane Wessels

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    ICP and the Squid Web Cache \\Lambda Duane Wessels k claffy August 13, 1997 Abstract We describe the structure and functionality of the Internet Cache Protocol (ICP) and its implementation in the Squid Web

  3. Boundary Field Theory Approach to the Renormalization of SQUID Devices

    E-print Network

    Domenico Giuliano; Pasquale Sodano

    2006-12-14

    We show that the quantum properties of some Josephson SQUID devices are described by a boundary sine Gordon model. Our approach naturally describes multi-junction SQUID devices and, when applied to a single junction SQUID (the rf-SQUID), it reproduces the known results of Glazman and Hekking. We provide a detailed analysis of the regimes accessible to an rf-SQUID and to a two-Josephson junction SQUID device (the dc-SQUID). We then compute the normal component of the current-response of a SQUID device to an externally applied voltage and show that the equation describing the current-voltage characteristic function reduces to well-known results when the infrared cutoff is suitably chosen. Our approach helps in establishing new and interesting connections between superconducting devices, quantum brownian motion, fermionic quantum wires and, more generally, quantum impurity problems.

  4. Visually guided eye growth in the squid.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Philip R K; Backhouse, Simon; Phillips, John R

    2015-09-21

    Eyes with refractive error have reduced visual acuity and are rarely found in the wild. Vertebrate eyes possess a visually guided emmetropisation process within the retina which detects the sign of defocus, and regulates eye growth to align the retina at the focal plane of the eye's optical components to avoid the development of refractive error, such as myopia, an increasing problem in humans [1]. However, the vertebrate retina is complex, and it is not known which of the many classes of retinal neurons are involved [2]. We investigated whether the camera-type eye of an invertebrate, the squid, displays visually guided emmetropisation, despite squid eyes having a simple photoreceptor-only retina [3]. We exploited inherent longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) to create disparate focal lengths within squid eyes. We found that squid raised under orange light had proportionately longer eyes and more myopic refractions than those raised under blue light, and when switched between wavelengths, eye size and refractive status changed appropriately within a few days. This demonstrates that squid eye growth is visually guided, and suggests that the complex retina seen in vertebrates may not be required for emmetropisation. PMID:26394098

  5. Abstract--The California market squid (Loligo opalescens) has been

    E-print Network

    46 Abstract--The California market squid (Loligo opalescens) has been harvested since the 1860s 1983. The California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG) collects information on landings of squid), and their respective anomalies. We found that the squid fishery in Monterey Bay expends twice the effort

  6. Information Panel The Embryonic Development of the Hawaiian Bobtail Squid

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Information Panel The Embryonic Development of the Hawaiian Bobtail Squid (Euprymna scolopes the growing interest in Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes) as a contemporary cephalopod developmental, and potential uses of E. scolopes as model organisms, see The Hawaiian Bobtail Squid (Euprymna scolopes

  7. Paleomagnetic analysis using SQUID microscopy Benjamin P. Weiss,1

    E-print Network

    Weiss, Benjamin P.

    Paleomagnetic analysis using SQUID microscopy Benjamin P. Weiss,1 Eduardo A. Lima,1,2 Luis E. Fong; published 19 September 2007. [1] Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopes are a new sensitivity. Unlike standard rock magnetometers, SQUID microscopes map magnetic fields rather than measuring

  8. The Foreign Squid Fishery Off the Northeast United States Coast

    E-print Network

    The Foreign Squid Fishery Off the Northeast United States Coast DAVID J. KOLATOR and DOUGLAS P LONG Introduction Squid has long been a popular food fish in the foreign market and thus a highly sought marine resource by the foreign fishing fleet. Foreign vessels began reporting incidental catches of squid off

  9. Dietary protein source and level alters growth in neon tetras.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional studies for aquarium fish like the neon tetra are sparse in comparison with those for food fish. To determine the optimum dietary protein level and source for growth of neon tetras, diets were formulated to contain 25, 35, 45 and 55% dietary protein from either marine animal protein or ...

  10. QUANTUM NOISE THEORY FOR THE dc SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Roger H.; Van Harlingen, D. J.; Clarke, John

    1980-10-01

    The noise temperature of a de SQUID coupled to a tuned input circuit is computed using the complete quantum expression for the equilibrium noise in the shunt resistance of each junction. At T=0, where the noise reduces to zero-point fluctuations. the noise temperature for an optimized system is h{nu}/k{sub B}ln2, where {nu} is the signal frequency. The computation is extended to non-zero temperatures, and it is shown that a SQUID operated at 1K can approach the quantum limit.

  11. Scattering of electrons from neon atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, A.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    Scattering of electrons from neon atoms is investigated by the polarized-orbital method. The perturbed orbitals calculated with use of the Sternheimer approximation lead to the polarizability 2.803 a(0)-cube in fairly good agreement with the experimental value 2.66 a(0)-cube. Phase shifts for various partial waves are calculated in the exchange, exchange-adiabatic, and polarized-orbital approximations. They are compared with the previous results. The calculated elastic differential, total, and momentum-transfer cross sections are compared with the experimental results. The polarized-orbital approximation yields results which show general improvement over the exchange-adiabatic approximation.

  12. OpenSQUID: a flexible open-source software framework for the control of SQUID electronics

    E-print Network

    Jaeckel, Felix T; Boyd, S T P

    2012-01-01

    Commercially available computer-controlled SQUID electronics are usually delivered with software providing a basic user interface for adjustment of SQUID tuning parameters, such as bias current, flux offset, and feedback loop settings. However, in a research context it would often be useful to be able to modify this code and/or to have full control over all these parameters from researcher-written software. In the case of the STAR Cryoelectronics PCI/PFL family of SQUID control electronics, the supplied software contains modules for automatic tuning and noise characterization, but does not provide an interface for user code. On the other hand, the Magnicon SQUIDViewer software package includes a public application programmer's interface (API), but lacks auto-tuning and noise characterization features. To overcome these limitations, we are developing an open-source framework for controlling SQUID electronics which should provide maximal interoperability with user software, a unified user interface for electron...

  13. Drag force and jet propulsion investigation of a swimming squid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, Mahdi; Bahad?r Olcay, Ali; Gokçen, Gökhan; Heperkan, Hasan A.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, CAD model of a squid was obtained by taking computer tomography images of a real squid. The model later placed into a computational domain to calculate drag force and performance of jet propulsion. The drag study was performed on the CAD model so that drag force subjected to real squid was revealed at squid's different swimming speeds and comparison has been made with other underwater creatures (e.g., a dolphin, sea lion and penguin). The drag coefficient (referenced to total wetted surface area) of squid is 0.0042 at Reynolds number 1.6x106 that is a %4.5 difference from Gentoo penguin. Besides, jet flow of squid was simulated to observe the flow region generated in the 2D domain utilizing dynamic mesh method to mimic the movement of squid's mantle cavity.

  14. Chromogenic behaviors of the Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) studied in situ with an animal-borne video package.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Hannah; Gilly, William; Bell, Lauren; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg

    2015-01-15

    Dosidicus gigas (Humboldt or jumbo flying squid) is an economically and ecologically influential species, yet little is known about its natural behaviors because of difficulties in studying this active predator in its oceanic environment. By using an animal-borne video package, National Geographic's Crittercam, we were able to observe natural behaviors in free-swimming D. gigas in the Gulf of California with a focus on color-generating (chromogenic) behaviors. We documented two dynamic displays without artificial lighting at depths of up to 70 m. One dynamic pattern, termed 'flashing' is characterized by a global oscillation (2-4 Hz) of body color between white and red. Flashing was almost always observed when other squid were visible in the video frame, and this behavior presumably represents intraspecific signaling. Amplitude and frequency of flashing can be modulated, and the phase relationship with another squid can also be rapidly altered. Another dynamic display termed 'flickering' was observed whenever flashing was not occurring. This behavior is characterized by irregular wave-like activity in neighboring patches of chromatophores, and the resulting patterns mimic reflections of down-welled light in the water column, suggesting that this behavior may provide a dynamic type of camouflage. Rapid and global pauses in flickering, often before a flashing episode, indicate that flickering is under inhibitory neural control. Although flashing and flickering have not been described in other squid, functional similarities are evident with other species. PMID:25609785

  15. Diffusion of Neon in White Dwarf Stars

    E-print Network

    C. J. Horowitz; J. Hughto; A. S. Schneider; D. K. Berry

    2010-11-29

    Sedimentation of the neutron rich isotope $^{22}$Ne may be an important source of gravitational energy during the cooling of white dwarf stars. This depends on the diffusion constant for $^{22}$Ne in strongly coupled plasma mixtures. We calculate self-diffusion constants $D_i$ from molecular dynamics simulations of carbon, oxygen, and neon mixtures. We find that $D_i$ in a mixture does not differ greatly from earlier one component plasma results. For strong coupling (coulomb parameter $\\Gamma>$ few), $D_i$ has a modest dependence on the charge $Z_i$ of the ion species, $D_i \\propto Z_i^{-2/3}$. However $D_i$ depends more strongly on $Z_i$ for weak coupling (smaller $\\Gamma$). We conclude that the self-diffusion constant $D_{\\rm Ne}$ for $^{22}$Ne in carbon, oxygen, and neon plasma mixtures is accurately known so that uncertainties in $D_{\\rm Ne}$ should be unimportant for simulations of white dwarf cooling.

  16. Resonant Radiation Transfer in Partially Ionized Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovi?, S.; Markhotok, A.; Brooke, G.; Vuškovi?, L.

    2002-05-01

    Transfer of resonant radiation is often present in partially ionized gases at elevated pressure, especially in the presence of strong density gradients. The resonant radiation across the density gradient is affected by several broadening mechanisms that produces a partial frequency redistribution. The result of this effect is an increase in the density of excited atoms and slowing effect is an increase in the density of excited atoms and slowing of radiation transfer in the vicinity of density gradients. The excessive excited state population was observedfootnote T. J. McIntyre, A. F. P. Houwing, R. J. Sandeman, and H.-A. Bachor, J. Fluid Mech. 227, 671 (1991). in the front of a shock wave propagating through neon. We introduced the partial redistribution approximation to the resonant radiation transfer across an ionizing shock wave and the associated density and temperature gradients. Thus corrected resonant radiation transfer, combined with the non-equilibrium ionization-recombination modelfootnote S. Popovi? and L. Vu\\vskovi?, AIAA, Paper 99-4905 (1999). was used for quantitative explanation of the excessive excited state population. We will present data on the 1s2 and 1s4 states in neon.

  17. is attributed to the presence of a solar neon component in the Earth410

    E-print Network

    Graham, David W.

    is attributed to the presence of a solar neon component in the Earth4­10 . A major goal.04). The primordial neon- isotope composition for the upper mantle strongly resembles the neon component (Ne such intense irradiation is likely to have occurred during an active phase of the Geochemistry Neon illuminates

  18. Molecular simulation of the vapourliquid phase coexistence of neon and argon using ab initio potentials

    E-print Network

    Molecular simulation of the vapour­liquid phase coexistence of neon and argon using ab initio are reported for the vapour�liquid phase coexistence of neon and argon. For neon two dierent quantum chemical interactions. In addition calculations are also reported for neon using a potential that includes three

  19. One Period of Exploration with the Squid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, James V.; Ng, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Presents a lab that can be offered after students have learned the basic anatomy and physiology of the various phyla, the primary objective of which is to explore and apply their acquired knowledge to a new situation. Involves exploring the anatomy and life-style of the squid. (JRH)

  20. Squid Dissection: From Pen to Ink.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cindy; Kisiel, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Introduces students to dissection, which is an important part of scientific discovery. Students not only gain an understanding of the anatomy of a squid, but also develop a sense of responsibility and respect for the animal that they are using as a learning tool. (Author/SOE)

  1. Practical dc SQUID system: Devices and electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guofeng; Zhang, Yi; Hong, Tao; Wang, Hai; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-11-01

    In order to set up a liquid helium-cooled practical dc SQUID system with acceptable noise figure, we employ a weakly damped dc SQUID with a large flux-to-voltage transfer coefficient ?V/?V in a direct readout scheme (DRS) without flux modulation. Two preamplifiers are utilized: (1) AD 797 for a so-called "single chip readout electronics" (SCRE); (2) 6 parallel-connected bipolar transistors (PCBT). The latter reduces the preamplifier voltage noise Vn but increases its current noise In, which plays a leading role in the system low-frequency noise. We introduce a current feedback circuit (CFC) consisting of an inductor Li coupled to the SQUID with mutual inductance Mi to improve the noise performance. In this work, the preamplifier In contribution and CFC are analyzed. To evaluate the In suppression with CFC, two criteria are presented. Furthermore, we establish a dimensionless parameter ? to describe CFC quantitatively. The system noise is compared with and without CFC using the two preamplifiers. For a dc SQUID with a loop inductance of 350 pH, an intrinsic noise of about 5 ?V0/?Hz and a corner frequency at 2 Hz are measured using PCBT with CFC.

  2. Multichannel SQUID systems for brain research

    SciTech Connect

    Ahonen, A.I.; Hamalainen, M.S.; Kajola, M.J.; Knuutila, J.E.F.; Lounasmaa, O.V.; Simola, J.T.; Vilkman, V.A. . Low Temperature Lab.); Tesche, C.D. . Thomas J. Watson Research Center)

    1991-03-01

    This paper reviews basis principles of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and neuromagnetic instrumentation. The authors' 24-channel system, based on planar gradiometer coils and dc-SQUIDs, is then described. Finally, recent MEG-experiments on human somatotopy and focal epilepsy, carried out in the authors' laboratory, are presented.

  3. Near-Quantum-Limited SQUID Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, John

    2009-03-01

    The SET (Single-Electron Transistor), which detects charge, is the dual of the SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device), which detects flux. In 1998, Schoelkopf and co-workers introduced the RFSET, which uses a resonance circuit to increase the frequency response to the 100-MHz range. The same year saw the introduction of the Microstrip SQUID Amplifier^1 (MSA) in which the input coil forms a microstrip with the SQUID washer, thereby extending the operating frequency to the gigahertz range. I briefly describe the theory of SQUID amplifiers involving a tuned input circuit with resonant frequency f. For an optimized SQUID at temperature T, the power gain and noise temperature are approximately G = fp/?f and TN = 20T(f/fp), respectively; fp is the plasma frequency of one of the Josephson junctions. Because the SQUID voltage and current noise are correlated, however, the optimum noise temperature is at a frequency below resonance. For a phase-preserving amplifier, TN = (.5ex1-.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 + A)hf/kB, where Caves' added noise number A = .5ex1-.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 at the quantum limit. Simulations based on the quantum Langevin equation (QLE) suggest that the SQUID amplifier should attain A = .5ex1-.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 . We have measured the gain and noise of an MSA in which the resistive shunts of the junctions are coupled to cooling fins to reduce hot electron effects. The minimum value A = 1.1 ± 0.2 occurs at a frequency below resonance. On resonance, the value A = 1.5 ± 0.3 is close to the predictions of the QLE, suggesting that this model may fail to predict the cross-correlated noise term correctly. Indeed, recent work suggests that a fully quantum mechanical theory is required to account properly for this term^2. This work is in collaboration with D. Kinion and supported by DOE BES. ^1M. Mueck, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 72, 2885 (1998). ^2A. Clerk, et al., http://arxiv.org/abs/0810.4729.

  4. Comprehensive Testing of a Neon Cryogenic Capillary Pumped Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobel, Mark C.; Ku, Jentung; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive test program of a cryogenic capillary pumped loop (CCPL) using neon as the working fluid in the temperature range between 30 K and 40 K. The test article was originally designed to be used with nitrogen in the 70 K to 100 K temperature range, and was refurbished for testing with neon. Tests performed included start up from a supercritical state, power cycle, sink temperature cycle, heat transport limit, low power limit, reservoir set point change and long duration operation. The neon CCPL has demonstrated excellent performance under various conditions.

  5. Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Bailey, J.M.; Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M.; Huber, T.M.; Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.; Kunselman, A.R.; Petitjean, C.

    1992-12-31

    A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of {mu}{sup {minus}p} atoms in each target. The rates {lambda}{sub pp{mu}} and {lambda}{sub pd} can be extracted.

  6. Collision induced light scattering by gaseous neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachet, F.; Chrysos, M.; Lothon, G.; Moszynski, R.; Milet, A.

    2002-12-01

    Binary collision induced light scattering by gaseous room temperature neon has been both experimentally and theoretically studied. Our experimental scattering cross sections have been calibrated on an absolute scale. The anisotropic spectrum and the depolarization ratio have been measured over the 5-300 cm-1 frequency domain, whereas the isotropic spectrum has been recorded over the domain 125-300 cm-1. In comparison with any previous work in the topic, our measurements provide a substantial extension of the probed far wing. An exhaustive study of the light scattering process has been made from the theoretical/numerical viewpoint also. This has been made possible by quantum mechanically computing scattering intensities via a rigorous numerical treatment (previously developed by the authors) accounting both for free Ne pairs and for stable Ne2 diatoms, which has been coupled to a novel ab initio incremental polarizability model based on Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory.

  7. Light Curve Analysis of Neon Novae

    E-print Network

    Hachisu, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed light curves of five neon novae, QU Vul, V351 Pup, V382 Vel, V693 CrA, and V1974 Cyg, and determined their white dwarf (WD) masses and distance moduli on the basis of theoretical light curves composed of free-free and photospheric emission. For QU Vul, we obtained a distance of d~2.4 kpc, reddening of E(B-V)~0.55, and WD mass of M_WD=0.82-0.96 M_sun. This suggests that an oxygen-neon WD lost a mass of more than ~0.1 M_sun since its birth. For V351 Pup, we obtained d~5.5 kpc, E(B-V)~0.45, and M_WD=0.98-1.1 M_sun. For V382 Vel, we obtained d~1.6 kpc, E(B-V)~0.15, and M_WD=1.13-1.28 M_sun. For V693 CrA, we obtained d~7.1 kpc, E(B-V)~0.05, and M_WD=1.15-1.25 M_sun. For V1974 Cyg, we obtained d~1.8 kpc, E(B-V)~0.30, and M_WD=0.95-1.1 M_sun. For comparison, we added the carbon-oxygen nova V1668 Cyg to our analysis and obtained d~5.4 kpc, E(B-V)~0.30, and M_WD=0.98-1.1 M_sun. In QU Vul, photospheric emission contributes 0.4-0.8 mag at most to the optical light curve compared with free-free emission only....

  8. Neon and Oxygen Abundances in M33

    E-print Network

    N. R. Crockett; D. R. Garnett; P. Massey; G. Jacoby

    2005-10-10

    We present new spectroscopic observations of 13 H II regions in the Local Group spiral galaxy M33. The regions observed range from 1 to 7 kpc in distance from the nucleus. Of the 13 H II regions observed, the [O III] 4363 Angstrom line was detected in six regions. Electron temperatures were thus able to be determined directly from the spectra using the [O III] 4959,5007 A/4363 A line ratio. Based on these temperature measurements, oxygen and neon abundances and their radial gradients were calculated. For neon, a gradient of -0.016 +/- 0.017 dex/kpc was computed, which agrees with the Ne/H gradient derived previously from ISO spectra. A gradient of -0.012 +/- 0.011 dex/kpc was computed for O/H, much shallower than was derived in previous studies. The newly calculated O/H and Ne/H gradients are in much better agreement with each other, as expected from predictions of stellar nucleosynthesis. We examine the correlation between the WC/WN ratio and metallicity, and find that the new M33 abundances do not impact the observed correlation significantly. We also identify two new He II-emitting H II regions in M33, the first to be discovered in a spiral galaxy other than the Milky Way. In both cases the nebular He II emission is not associated with Wolf-Rayet stars. Therefore, caution is warranted in interpreting the relationship between nebular He II emission and Wolf-Rayet stars when both are observed in the integrated spectrum of an H II region.

  9. 8. DETAIL OF NORTHEAST ELEVATION SHOWING NEON TWA SIGN AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF NORTHEAST ELEVATION SHOWING NEON TWA SIGN AND ROOF MASTS. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - TWA Maintenance Hangar, South side of Tinicum Island Road, Philadelphia International Airport, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. Neon time-of-flight backscattering spectrometry for surface analysis 

    E-print Network

    Garcia, Richard Michael

    2001-01-01

    Several time-of-flight backscattering spectrometry experiments using singly ionized neon for purposes of analyzing a bismuth coated silicon target were conducted. This work builds upon prior work, done with lighter ions, with the goal of comparing...

  11. Coupled Serial and Parallel Non-uniform SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhini, Patrick; Berggren, Susan; Palacios, Antonio; de Escobar, Anna Leese; In, Visarath

    2011-04-01

    In this work we numerical model series and parallel non-uniform superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array. Previous work has shown that series SQUID array constructed with a random distribution of loop sizes, (i.e. different areas for each SQUID loop) there exists a unique `anti-peak' at the zero magnetic field for the voltage versus applied magnetic field (V-B). Similar results extend to a parallel SQUID array where the difference lies in the arrangement of the Josephson junctions. Other system parameter such as bias current, the number of loops, and mutual inductances are varied to demonstrate the change in dynamic range and linearity of the V-B response. Application of the SQUID array as a low noise amplifier (LNA) would increase link margins and affect the entire communication system. For unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), size, weight and power are limited, the SQUID array would allow use of practical `electrically small' antennas that provide acceptable gain.

  12. A method for simulating a flux-locked DC SQUID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutt, G. M.; Kasdin, N. J.; Condron, M. R., II; Muhlfelder, B.; Lockhart, J. M.; Cromar, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a computationally efficient and accurate method for simulating a dc SQUID's V-Phi (voltage-flux) and I-V characteristics which has proven valuable in evaluating and improving various SQUID readout methods. The simulation of the SQUID is based on fitting of previously acquired data from either a real or a modeled device using the Fourier transform of the V-Phi curve. This method does not predict SQUID behavior, but rather is a way of replicating a known behavior efficiently with portability into various simulation programs such as SPICE. The authors discuss the methods used to simulate the SQUID and the flux-locking control electronics, and present specific examples of this approach. Results include an estimate of the slew rate and linearity of a simple flux-locked loop using a characterized dc SQUID.

  13. Coupled Serial and Parallel Non-uniform SQUIDs

    SciTech Connect

    Longhini, Patrick; In, Visarath; Berggren, Susan; Palacios, Antonio; Leese de Escobar, Anna

    2011-04-19

    In this work we numerical model series and parallel non-uniform superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array. Previous work has shown that series SQUID array constructed with a random distribution of loop sizes, (i.e. different areas for each SQUID loop) there exists a unique 'anti-peak' at the zero magnetic field for the voltage versus applied magnetic field (V-B). Similar results extend to a parallel SQUID array where the difference lies in the arrangement of the Josephson junctions. Other system parameter such as bias current, the number of loops, and mutual inductances are varied to demonstrate the change in dynamic range and linearity of the V-B response. Application of the SQUID array as a low noise amplifier (LNA) would increase link margins and affect the entire communication system. For unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), size, weight and power are limited, the SQUID array would allow use of practical 'electrically small' antennas that provide acceptable gain.

  14. Characterizing the Host and Symbiont Proteomes in the Association between the Bobtail Squid, Euprymna

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Characterizing the Host and Symbiont Proteomes in the Association between the Bobtail Squid Abstract The beneficial symbiosis between the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes within a natural microenvironment. Colonization of the squid light organ by V. fischeri begins a lifelong

  15. 77 FR 23635 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ...Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...2012 Specifications for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish fisheries...management measures for the Atlantic mackerel and squid fisheries, and the...

  16. 78 FR 14230 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ...Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...Framework Adjustment 7 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management...part of Amendment 10 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (MSB)...

  17. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions... Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession...

  18. 77 FR 74159 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ...Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...Framework Adjustment 7 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management...part of Amendment 10 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (MSB)...

  19. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions... Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession...

  20. 77 FR 7544 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ...Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...rule for Amendment 11 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management...rule for Amendment 11 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (MSB)...

  1. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions... Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession...

  2. 75 FR 37739 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ...Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries Management...Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

  3. Scintillation of liquid neon from electronic and nuclear recoils

    E-print Network

    J. A. Nikkel; R. Hasty; W. H. Lippincott; D. N. McKinsey

    2006-12-04

    We have measured the time dependence of scintillation light from electronic and nuclear recoils in liquid neon, finding a slow time constant of 15.4+-0.2 us. Pulse shape discrimination is investigated as a means of identifying event type in liquid neon. Finally, the nuclear recoil scintillation efficiency is measured to be 0.26+-0.03 for 387 keV nuclear recoils.

  4. Supersensitive SQUID/magnetostrictor detecting system

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, Aleksander I; Zherikhina, L N; Tskhovrebov, Andrei M; Izmailov, G N

    2012-12-31

    It is shown that using the state-of-the-art quantum interferometer (SQUID) with the resolution 10{sup -6} {Phi}{sub 0} Hz{sup -1/2} = 2.07 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -21} Wb Hz{sup -1/2}, coupled to a magnetostrictor, playing the role of tensomagnetic transducer, it is possible to construct a system for detecting pressure variations with the ultimate sensitivity of 10{sup -13} Pa Hz{sup -1/2} and for measuring specific elongation with the sensitivity of 10{sup -24} Hz{sup -1/2}. The analysis of physical grounds of the inverse magnetostriction effect demonstrates concrete ways to essentially higher efficiency of tensomagnetic conversion. The estimates performed demonstrate the possibility of using the SQUID/magnetostrictor system as a detector of gravitational waves. Other possibilities of using this system for solving both fundamental and applied problems are also considered. (experimental techniques)

  5. Low Temperature SQUID for NDE Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz (Technical Monitor); Selim, Raouf

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a low temperature SuperConducting Quantum Interference Device - SQUID measurement system for detection of defects deep under the surface of aluminum structures using eddy current techniques. The system uses a two dimensional planar inducer with two different excitation frequencies to induce a current in the sample. We have developed a data analysis software program that enabled us to distinguish between round defects (holes), straight defects (slots) and slots close to holes simulating cracks starting from rivets in aluminum structures. We were able to detect defects that are 8mm below the surface. We have also measured the change in phase of the detected signal as a function of depth of the defect. This relationship can be used to determine the depth of hidden flaws. Using this analysis software with the high temperature SQUID system at NASA Langley we were able to detect slots close to holes in layered aluminum sample.

  6. SQUID-based multichannel system for Magnetoencephalography

    E-print Network

    Rombetto, S; Vettoliere, A; Trebeschi, A; Rossi, R; Russo, M

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a multichannel system based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurements, developed and installed at Istituto di Cibernetica (ICIB) in Naples. This MEG system, consists of 163 full integrated SQUID magnetometers, 154 channels and 9 references, and has been designed to meet specifications concerning noise, dynamic range, slew rate and linearity through optimized design. The control electronics is located at room temperature and all the operations are performed inside a Magnetically Shielded Room (MSR). The system exhibits a magnetic white noise level of approximatively 5 fT/Hz1=2. This MEG system will be employed for both clinical and routine use. PACS numbers: 74.81.Fa, 85.25.Hv, 07.20.Mc, 85.25.Dq, 87.19.le, 87.85.Ng

  7. Practical SQUID Instrument for Nondestructive Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tralshawala, N.; Claycomb, J. R.; Miller, John H., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    We report on the development of a scanning eddy-current imaging system designed to detect deep subsurface flaws in conducting materials. A high transition temperature (high-T c) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer is employed to provide the required sensitivity at low frequencies, while a combination of small cylindrical high-Tc superconducting and A-metal shields enable the instrument to be scanned in a magnetically noisy environment, rather than the object under test. The shields are arranged to prevent unwanted excitation and ambient noise fields from reaching the SQUID, and to enhance spatial resolution and minimize undesirable edge effects. Thus far, the instrument has successfully detected cracks and pits through 10 layers of aluminum, with a combined thickness of 5 cm at room temperature.

  8. MFR PAPER 1023 While the world squid etch octupl d

    E-print Network

    MFR PAPER 1023 While the world squid etch octupl d between 1938 and 1968, th r"SOlJrC potent/aIls stili enormous Northwest Atlantic Squids WARREN F. RATHJEN In 19 the \\\\{ fld \\..,Idl II qUId ,1Il1l" FAO f'isheries ircular o. 1~9) re- \\Ie\\\\ of v. orld squid ..Inu ,)CIl'PU" potentials. \\ oss andlcateu

  9. The Renormalization Effects in the Microstrip-SQUID Amplifier

    E-print Network

    G. P. Berman; A. A. Chumak; V. I. Tsifrinovich

    2011-10-25

    The peculiarities of the microstrip-DC SQUID amplifier caused by the resonant structure of the input circuit are analyzed. It is shown that the mutual inductance, that couples the input circuit and the SQUID loop, depends on the frequency of electromagnetic field. The renormalization of the SQUID parameters due to the screening effect of the input circuit vanishes when the Josephson frequency is much greater than the signal frequency.

  10. Ceramic HTSC SQUID-based galvanometer

    SciTech Connect

    Uchaikin, S.V.; Hiep, L.H. )

    1992-06-01

    A highly sensitive galvanometer operating at liquid-nitrogen temperature for direct and low-frequency current measurements was developed on the basis of a HTSC SQUID. The direct-current sensitivity of the galvanometer is approximately 0.5 nA at an internal resistance of about 20 ohms. Its energy resolution in the white noise region is 2 x 10 exp 21 J/Hz. 11 refs.

  11. Odorant Responsiveness of Squid Olfactory Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Arie Sitthichai; Michel, William C.; Lucero, Mary T.

    2008-01-01

    In the olfactory organ of the squid, Lolliguncula brevis there are five morphological types of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). Previous work to characterize odor sensitivity of squid ORNs was performed on only two of the five types in dissociated primary cell cultures. Here we sought to establish the odorant responsiveness of all five types. We exposed live squid or intact olfactory organs to excitatory odors plus the activity marker, agmatine (AGB), an arginine derivative that enters cells through non-selective cation channels. An antibody against AGB was used to identify odorant-activated neurons. We were able to determine the ORN types of AGB-labeled cells based on their location in the epithelium, morphology and immunolabeling by a set of metabolites: arginine, aspartate, glutamate, glycine and glutathione. Of 389 neurons identified from metabolite-labeled tissue, 3% were type 1, 32% type 2, 33% type 3, 15% type 4 and 17% type 5. Each ORN type had different odorant specificity with type 3 cells showing the highest percentages of odorant-stimulated AGB labeling. Type 1 cells were rare and none of the identified type 1 cells responded to the tested odorants, which included glutamate, alanine and AGB. Glutamate is a behaviorally attractive odorant and elicited AGB labeling in types 2 and 3. Glutamate-activated AGB labeling was significantly reduced in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor, SQ22536 (80 ?M). These data suggest that the five ORN types differ in their relative abundance and odor responsiveness and that the adenylate cyclase pathway is involved in squid olfactory transduction. PMID:18484602

  12. Dynamics of a spinor atom-SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Ranchu; Tiesinga, Eite

    2015-05-01

    Over the past few years, there has been a concerted effort at NIST studying the atomic analogue of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The atom-SQUID consists of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a ring trap with a rotating external weak link. The phenomena of persistent current and hysteresis have been experimentally observed in this system. We investigate the effect of the spin degree of freedom on the stability of persistent-current states and hysteresis in a spin-1 atom-SQUID. Inter-atomic interactions now allow coherent oscillations between the spin projections while conserving total magnetisation. We study the mean-field states of a spin-1 system within a two-mode approximation, where the two spatial modes are plane-wave modes with winding number zero and one. Furthermore, we calculate the Bogoliubov spectrum to study the combined effect of an external magnetic field and rotation rate on the stability and coupling of the spin and mass current.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of shunted ?-SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Nikhil; Fournier, T.; Courtois, H.; Gupta, Anjan K.

    2014-04-24

    In order to eliminate hysteresis, we have fabricated and characterized niobium based shunted micron size superconducting quantum interference devices (?-SQUIDs). We find a wide temperature range where these ?-SQUIDs are non-hysteretic in nature and show a very good I{sub c} vs. B oscillations in hysteretic regime and V vs. B oscillations in non-hysteretic regime. Here we report the characteristics of a shunted- ?-SQUID (Wf38LS72D5). In this device we have achieved a large voltage modulation, in non-hysteretic regime, at various temperatures including such as 1.1 mV at 6.62 K with a transfer function V{sub ?}?=?7.2mV/?{sub 0}. The figures within the original article PDF file, as supplied to AIP Publishing, were affected by a PDF-processing error. Consequently, the article re-flowed and pagination increased from 3 to 4 pages. This article was updated on 14 May 2014 to correct the PDF-processing error, with the scientific content remaining unchanged. Readers are advised that the replacement article PDF file contains an additional blank page to preserve the original pagination.

  14. A nanoscale SQUID operating at high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Simon K. H.; Clem, John R.; Yang, Wenrong

    2011-10-13

    A washer-free Nb nanoSQUID has been developed for measuring magnetization changes from nanoscale objects. The SQUID loop is etched into a 250 nm wide Au/Nb bilayer track and the diameter of the SQUID hole is {approx} 70 nm. In the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the SQUID, vortex penetration into the 250 nm wide track can be observed via the critical current-applied field characteristic and the value at which vortex first penetrates is consistent with the theoretical prediction. Upon removing the applied field, the penetrated vortices escape the track and the critical current at zero field is restored.

  15. A nanoscale SQUID operating at high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Simon K. H.; Clem, John R.; Yang, Wenrong

    2011-10-13

    A washer-free Nb nanoSQUID has been developed for measuring magnetization changes from nanoscale objects. The SQUID loop is etched into a 250 nm wide Au/Nb bilayer track and the diameter of the SQUID hole is ~ 70 nm. In the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the SQUID, vortex penetration into the 250 nm wide track can be observed via the critical current–applied field characteristic and the value at which vortex first penetrates is consistent with the theoretical prediction. Upon removing the applied field, the penetrated vortices escape the track and the critical current at zero field is restored.

  16. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  17. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  18. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  19. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  20. NEON Airborne Observatory Platform Internship Position Description Intern Duties: This section describes the primary work to be performed, listing duties

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    NEON Airborne Observatory Platform Internship Position Description Intern (AOP) following the guidance of the NEON AOP mentor. Work will involve operations in NEON Domain 3 and Domain 12. The selected intern will also have

  1. Light-curve Analysis of Neon Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed light curves of five neon novae, QU Vul, V351 Pup, V382 Vel, V693 CrA, and V1974 Cyg, and determined their white dwarf (WD) masses and distance moduli on the basis of theoretical light curves composed of free-free and photospheric emission. For QU Vul, we obtained a distance of d ˜ 2.4 kpc, reddening of E(B - V) ˜ 0.55, and WD mass of MWD = 0.82-0.96 {M}? . This suggests that an oxygen-neon WD lost a mass of more than ˜ 0.1 {M}? since its birth. For V351 Pup, we obtained d˜ 5.5 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.45, and {M}{{WD}}=0.98-1.1 {M}? . For V382 Vel, we obtained d˜ 1.6 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.15, and {M}{{WD}}=1.13-1.28 {M}? . For V693 CrA, we obtained d˜ 7.1 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.05, and {M}{{WD}}=1.15-1.25 {M}? . For V1974 Cyg, we obtained d˜ 1.8 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.30, and {M}{{WD}}=0.95-1.1 {M}? . For comparison, we added the carbon-oxygen nova V1668 Cyg to our analysis and obtained d˜ 5.4 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.30, and {M}{{WD}}=0.98-1.1 {M}? . In QU Vul, photospheric emission contributes 0.4-0.8 mag at most to the optical light curve compared with free-free emission only. In V351 Pup and V1974 Cyg, photospheric emission contributes very little (0.2-0.4 mag at most) to the optical light curve. In V382 Vel and V693 CrA, free-free emission dominates the continuum spectra, and photospheric emission does not contribute to the optical magnitudes. We also discuss the maximum magnitude versus rate of decline relation for these novae based on the universal decline law.

  2. Laying the groundwork for NEON's continental-scale ecological research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethloff, G.; Denslow, M.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is designed to examine a suite of ecological issues. Field-collected data from 96 terrestrial and aquatic sites across the U.S. will be combined with remotely sensed data and existing continental-scale data sets. Field collections will include a range of physical and biological types, including soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, precipitation, plants, animals, insects, and microbes as well as biological sub-samples such as leaf material, blood and tissue samples, and DNA extracts. Initial data analyses and identifications of approximately 175,000 samples per year will occur at numerous external laboratories when all sites are fully staffed in 2017. Additionally, NEON will archive biotic and abiotic specimens at collections facilities where they will be curated and available for additional analyses by the scientific community. The number of archived specimens is currently estimated to exceed 130,000 per year by 2017. We will detail how NEON is addressing the complexities and challenges around this set of analyses and specimens and how the resulting high-quality data can impact ecological understanding. The raw data returned from external laboratories that is quality checked and served by NEON will be the foundation for many NEON data products. For example, sequence-quality nucleic acids extracted from surface waters, benthic biofilms, and soil samples will be building blocks for data products on microbial diversity. The raw sequence data will also be available for uses such as evolutionary investigations, and the extracts will be archived so others can acquire them for additional research. Currently, NEON is establishing contracts for the analysis and archiving of field-collected samples through 2017. During this period, NEON will gather information on the progress and success of this large-scale effort in order to determine the most effective course to pursue with external facilities. Two areas that NEON already knows to evaluate are the need for geographic expertise in taxonomic identifications and the capacity necessary to handle the volume of samples. NEON is also addressing challenges associated with external entities and the logistics of sample movement, data formatting, data ingestion, and reporting. For example, NEON is considering tools, such as web APIs, which could allow efficient transfer of data from external facilities. Having a standard format in place for that data will be critical to transfer success and quality assessment. NEON is also working on the implementation of quality control measures for diverse analytical and taxonomic processes across laboratories, and is developing an external audit process. Additionally, given NEON's open access approach, the Network is focused on selecting a sample identification protocol that aids in tracking samples with more involved analytical needs and also allows maximum utility for the scientific community. Given the complex nature and breadth of the project, NEON will be developing novel sample management systems as well as metadata schemas. These efforts insure integrity and quality from field to external facility to archive for each sample taken, providing high-quality data now and confidence in future research stemming from raw data generated by NEON and its collection specimens.

  3. Estimating Orientation of Flying Fruit Flies

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xi En; Wang, Shuo Hong; Qian, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2015-01-01

    The recently growing interest in studying flight behaviours of fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, has highlighted the need for developing tools that acquire quantitative motion data. Despite recent advance of video tracking systems, acquiring a flying fly’s orientation remains a challenge for these tools. In this paper, we present a novel method for estimating individual flying fly’s orientation using image cues. Thanks to the line reconstruction algorithm in computer vision field, this work can thereby focus on the practical detail of implementation and evaluation of the orientation estimation algorithm. The orientation estimation algorithm can be incorporated into tracking algorithms. We rigorously evaluated the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed algorithm by running experiments both on simulation data and on real-world data. This work complements methods for studying the fruit fly’s flight behaviours in a three-dimensional environment. PMID:26173128

  4. Multistage Zeeman deceleration of metastable neon

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederkehr, Alex W.; Motsch, Michael; Hogan, Stephen D.; Andrist, Markus; Schmutz, Hansjuerg; Lambillotte, Bruno; Agner, Josef A.; Merkt, Frederic

    2011-12-07

    A supersonic beam of metastable neon atoms has been decelerated by exploiting the interaction between the magnetic moment of the atoms and time-dependent inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a multistage Zeeman decelerator. Using 91 deceleration solenoids, the atoms were decelerated from an initial velocity of 580 m/s to final velocities as low as 105 m/s, corresponding to a removal of more than 95% of their initial kinetic energy. The phase-space distribution of the cold, decelerated atoms was characterized by time-of-flight and imaging measurements, from which a temperature of 10 mK was obtained in the moving frame of the decelerated sample. In combination with particle-trajectory simulations, these measurements allowed the phase-space acceptance of the decelerator to be quantified. The degree of isotope separation that can be achieved by multistage Zeeman deceleration was also studied by performing experiments with pulse sequences generated for {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne.

  5. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Hatridge, Michael J.

    2010-06-28

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  6. "Saki-ika": Dried Squid Processing Equipment and Markets

    E-print Network

    · Introduction Squid has been widely recognized as an underutilized food fishery in the United States. Only 18 a portion of the current catch is canned or frozen for export, primarily to Europe and the Philippines consumer tastes, squid is a popular food in many countries in Europe and the Far East and is growing

  7. A Mechanical Device to Sort Market Squid, Loligo opalescens

    E-print Network

    . Indeed, high quality squid is regarded as a gourmet food in many countries, particularly in the Orient higher prices), to Japanese markets where the roe is part of several tradi tional dishes. This study pacificus, and others caught by Japanese fishermen. Market squid harvests in California average about 15

  8. Read-out electronics for DC squid magnetic measurements

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

    2002-01-01

    Read-out electronics for DC SQUID sensor systems, the read-out electronics incorporating low Johnson noise radio-frequency flux-locked loop circuitry and digital signal processing algorithms in order to improve upon the prior art by a factor of at least ten, thereby alleviating problems caused by magnetic interference when operating DC SQUID sensor systems in magnetically unshielded environments.

  9. 100 h SQUID AMPLIFIERS FOR THE ULTRACRYOGENIC GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS

    E-print Network

    100 �h SQUID AMPLIFIERS FOR THE ULTRACRYOGENIC GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS PAOLO FALFERI, MICHELE of the cryogenic resonant de­ tectors is the noise temperature of the dc SQUID amplifier used to detect the signal factor Q, the minimum detectable energy is given by the amplifier noise temperature times the Boltzmann

  10. INTRODUCTION Squid employ a complex locomotive approach involving two

    E-print Network

    Bartol, Ian

    of squid may play important roles in lift and thrust production at various speeds. In fact, based on force balance predictions by Bartol et al. (Bartol et al., 2001b), the fins of shallow- water squids may produce more lift and thrust forces than the jet at certain speeds. Both the morphometric form and function

  11. Cosmogenic neon in grains separated from individual chondrules: Evidence of precompaction exposure in chondrules

    E-print Network

    Cosmogenic neon in grains separated from individual chondrules: Evidence of precompaction exposure-mail: jdas@syr.edu (Received 30 April 2010; revision accepted 03 November 2012) Abstract­Neon was measured

  12. CRISSY PASCUAL / Union-Tribune Bruce Nauman's sculpture in neon, "Vices and

    E-print Network

    Bewley, Thomas

    CRISSY PASCUAL / Union-Tribune Bruce Nauman's sculpture in neon, "Vices and Virtues," switches configuration of seven pairs of words in seven- foot high neon letters, like FAITH/LUST and HOPE/ENVY, flash

  13. Precision measurement of the metastable 3 P2 lifetime of neon

    E-print Network

    Birkl, Gerhard

    it will modify the observed decay rate. To date, two different meth- ods making use of a variable MOT on-off duty- tions. The latter have only a minor effect for the case of neon, making neon specifically interesting

  14. A SQUID gradiometer module with large junction shunt resistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Shu-Lin; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Wang, Yong-Liang; Li, Hua; Zeng, Jia; Kong, Xiang-Yan; Xie, Xiao-Ming

    2014-08-01

    A dual-washer superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a loop inductance of 350 pH and two on-washer integrated input coils is designed according to conventional niobium technology. In order to obtain a large SQUID flux-to-voltage transfer coefficient, the junction shunt resistance is selected to be 33 ?. A vertical SQUID gradiometer module with a baseline of 100 mm is constructed by utilizing such a SQUID and a first-order niobium wire-wound antenna. The sensitivity of this module reaches about 0.2 fT/(cm·Hz1/2) in the white noise range using a direct readout scheme, i.e., the SQUID is directly connected to an operational amplifier, in a magnetically shielded room. Some magnetocardiography (MCG) measurements with a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are demonstrated.

  15. Planar thin film SQUID with integral flux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N. (inventor); Sisk, Robert C. (inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A thin film SQUID is disclosed having improved flux concentration combined with simplicity of design and fabrication. The SQUID starts with a wafer like substrate having simple planar geometry. A large area of superconducting film is coated on the substrate, with a small open or uncoated area remaining at its center to define a SQUID loop, and a gap in the film formed, beginning at the outer circumferential edge of the substrate and extending radially inward to the open area. A Josephson junction is formed across the gap near the open area to interrupt the electrical continuity of the SQUID loop. A coil is attached to the surface of the substrate, electrically insulated from the superconducting film, and is energized to induce flux within the SQUID which is concentrated within the open area.

  16. SQUID detection of magnetically-tagged microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Helene L.

    2001-03-01

    A fast and versatile technique has been developed for detecting small quantities of specific microorganisms or molecules. The target analytes are bound to a substrate and placed in the measurement cell of a ``microscope'' based on a high-transition temperature Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID). A solution containing nanometer-size magnetite particles, coated with antibodies specific to the target, is added. The particles, which bind to the target via the antibody-antigen interaction, are superparamagnetic with a Néel relaxation time of ~ 1 s. A pulsed magnetic field aligns the dipole moments, and the SQUID measures the magnetic relaxation signal when the field is turned off. Unbound magnetic particles relax rapidly ( ~ 15 ?s) by Brownian rotation and are not detected. On the other hand, particles bound to targets cannot rotate and instead relax slowly by the Néel mechanism. As a result, only bound particles contribute to the signal, allowing for quantification of the number of targets present without the need for a wash step. The current system can reproducibly detect as few as 5×10^4 magnetic particles - a sensitivity greater than that of the commonly used Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). A new SQUID microscope has been designed and built, which may improve the sensitivity by up to two orders of magnitude. This technique could be used to detect a wide range of bacteria, viruses, and molecules, with potential applications in the food industry, clinical settings, or research laboratories. Supported by U.S. DOE Contract DE-AC03-76SF00098

  17. Enhancements to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) Multiplexer Readout and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forgione, J.; Benford, D. J.; Buchanan, E. D.; Moseley, S. H.; Rebar, J.; Shafer, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Far-infrared detector arrays such as the 16x32 superconducting bolometer array for the SAFIRE instrument (flying on the SOFIA airborne observatory) require systems of readout and control electronics to provide translation between a user-driven, digital PC and the cold, analog world of the cryogenic detector. In 2001, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed their Mark III electronics for purposes of control and readout of their 1x32 SQUID Multiplexer chips. We at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center acquired a Mark 111 system and subsequently designed upgrades to suit our and our collaborators purposes. We developed an arbitrary, programmable multiplexing system that allows the user to cycle through rows in a SQUID array in an infinite number of combinations. We provided hooks in the Mark III system to allow readout of signals from outside the Mark 111 system, such as telescope status information. Finally, we augmented the heart of the system with a new feedback algorithm implementation, flexible diagnostic tools, and informative telemetry.

  18. Controlling Blow Flies 

    E-print Network

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

    2005-10-05

    Blow flies lay their eggs on animal remains and can spread disease. To control blow flies, it is important to remove dead animals and dispose of them properly, and to use effective insecticides when necessary.

  19. Controlling Blow Flies (Spanish) 

    E-print Network

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

    2007-10-08

    Blow flies lay their eggs on animal remains and can spread disease. To control blow flies, it is important to remove dead animals and dispose of them properly, and to use effective insecticides when necessary.

  20. Intrapopulation structure of winter-spawned Argentine shortfin squid, Illex argentinus

    E-print Network

    1 Intrapopulation structure of winter-spawned Argentine shortfin squid, Illex argentinus of the important commercial squid Illex argentinus were studied by using bio- logical data from about 25 thousand until April, composed predominantly of June- and July-hatched squid. Squid grow and mature rapidly

  1. Host/Microbe Interactions Revealed Through "Omics" in the Symbiosis Between the Hawaiian Bobtail Squid

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Squid Euprymna scolopes and the Bioluminescent Bacterium Vibrio fischeri BETHANY A. RADER AND SPENCER V., Storrs, Connecticut 06269 Abstract. The association between Euprymna scolopes, the Hawaiian bobtail squid: Squid/Vibrio symbiosis The association between the Hawaiian bobtail squid Eu- prymna scolopes

  2. A Single SQUID Multiplexer for Arrays of Low Temperature Sensors Jongsoo Yoona)

    E-print Network

    Richards, Paul L.

    1 A Single SQUID Multiplexer for Arrays of Low Temperature Sensors Jongsoo Yoona) , John Clarkea and experimental evaluation of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) mul- tiplexer for an array, in turn, is inductively coupled to the readout SQUID. The flux-locked loop of the SQUID is used to null

  3. NEON INSIGHTS FROM OLD SOLAR X-RAYS: A PLASMA TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE CORONAL NEON CONTENT

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Jeremy J.

    2011-12-10

    An analysis using modern atomic data of fluxes culled from the literature for O VIII and Ne IX lines observed in solar active regions by the P78 and Solar Maximum Mission satellites confirms that the coronal Ne/O abundance ratio varies by a factor of two or more, and finds an increase in Ne/O with increasing active region plasma temperature. The latter is reminiscent of evidence for increasing Ne/O with stellar activity in low-activity coronae that reaches a 'neon saturation' in moderately active stars at approximately twice the historically accepted solar value of about 0.15 by number. We argue that neon saturation represents the underlying stellar photospheric compositions, and that low-activity coronae, including that of the Sun, are generally depleted in neon. The implication would be that the solar Ne/O abundance ratio should be revised upward by a factor of about two to n(Ne)/n(O) {approx} 0.3. Diverse observations of neon in the local cosmos provide some support for such a revision. Neon would still be of some relevance for reconciling helioseismology with solar models computed using recently advocated chemical mixtures with lower metal content.

  4. Neon abundances in normal late-B and mercurymanganese stars M. M. Dworetsky1w

    E-print Network

    Dworetsky, Mike

    q 2000 RAS Neon abundances in normal late-B and mercury±manganese stars M. M. Dworetsky1w ² and J equilibrium calculations to deduce the abundances of neon from visible-region echelle spectra of selected Ne i potentially useful Ne i lines are found in the red region of the spectra of these stars. The mean neon

  5. Electronic Spectra and Reversible Photoisomerization of Protonated Naphthalenes in Solid Neon

    E-print Network

    Maier, John Paul

    Electronic Spectra and Reversible Photoisomerization of Protonated Naphthalenes in Solid Neon Iryna and fluorescence spectroscopies in 6 K neon matrixes using a mass-selected C10H9 + ion beam. The absorption spectra-phase measurements are available.16-19 Recently, a number of H-PAH+ s have been isolated in 6 K neon matrixes

  6. Electronic and infrared absorption spectra of linear and cyclic C6 in a neon matrix

    E-print Network

    Maier, John Paul

    Electronic and infrared absorption spectra of linear and cyclic C6 ¿ in a neon matrix Jan Fulara electron impact ionization of C6Cl6 and C6Br6 , have been recorded in 6 K neon matrices. Linear and cyclic transitions of mass-selected C6 ions isolated in 6 K neon matrices. EXPERIMENT The experimental setup has been

  7. Electronic Spectroscopy of a C7H4 in a Neon Matrix: Methyltriacetylene Cation

    E-print Network

    Maier, John Paul

    Electronic Spectroscopy of a C7H4 1 Isomer in a Neon Matrix: Methyltriacetylene Cation Arghya commencing at 602.6 nm are detected following deposition of mass-selected C7H4 þ in a 6 K neon matrix mass- selection with matrix isolation spectroscopy.[14] A particular m/z ion is co-depositedwith neon

  8. Author's personal copy Neon diffusion kinetics in olivine, pyroxene and feldspar

    E-print Network

    Shuster, David L.

    Author's personal copy Neon diffusion kinetics in olivine, pyroxene and feldspar: Retentivity of cosmogenic and nucleogenic neon Loraine Gourbet a,b , David L. Shuster b,c, , Greg Balco b , William S, pyroxene and feldspar to study diffusion kinetics of neon. This is important in evaluating the utility

  9. Laminar Cortical Dynamics of 3D Surface Perception: Stratification, Transparency, and Neon Color Spreading

    E-print Network

    Grossberg, Stephen

    Laminar Cortical Dynamics of 3D Surface Perception: Stratification, Transparency, and Neon Color, transparency, and neon color spreading in response to 2D pictures and 3D scenes. Such percepts are sensitive, Neon Color Spreading #12;2 1. Introduction 1.1 Depthful grouping of 2D cues. Refinement of the 3D

  10. Electronic Transitions of C6H4 Isomers: Neon Matrix and Theoretical

    E-print Network

    Maier, John Paul

    Electronic Transitions of C6H4 + Isomers: Neon Matrix and Theoretical Studies Jan Fulara,*, Adam detected following mass-selective trapping in 6 K neon matrixes. The open-chain cations 5-hexene-1,3-diyne in neon matrixes and in the gas phase.21,22 The geometry was established from the analysis

  11. PHYSICAL REVIE%' 8 VOLUME 37, NUMBER 2 15 JANUARY 1988-I Dynamics of solid neon monolayers

    E-print Network

    Glyde, Henry R.

    PHYSICAL REVIE%' 8 VOLUME 37, NUMBER 2 15 JANUARY 1988-I Dynamics of solid neon monolayers T. M July 1987) The dynamics of two-dimensional solid neon is investigated within the self-consistent phonon anharmonic term added. Two-dimensional solid neon is found to be highly anhar- monic. It becomes mechanically

  12. Efficient Arithmetic on ARM-NEON and Its Application for High-Speed RSA

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Efficient Arithmetic on ARM-NEON and Its Application for High-Speed RSA Implementation Hwajeong Seo-AVX, ARM-NEON) and a massive body of research on vector-parallel implementations of modular arithmetic. Keywords: Public-key cryptography, Modular arithmetic, SIMD-level parallelism, Vector instructions, ARM-NEON

  13. Hydrogen bonding between neon and hydrogen fluoride M. Losonczy and J. W. Moskowitz*

    E-print Network

    Stillinger, Frank

    Hydrogen bonding between neon and hydrogen fluoride M. Losonczy and J. W. Moskowitz* Chemistry out to characterize the potential energy surface for interaction of a neon atom with a molecule.234 kcal!mole), its strength exceeds that found earlier for the neon-water hydrogen bond. I. INTRODUCTION

  14. Fluorescence of protonated pyrene and coronene in neon matrices Iryna Garkusha, Jan Fulara 1

    E-print Network

    Maier, John Paul

    Fluorescence of protonated pyrene and coronene in neon matrices Iryna Garkusha, Jan Fulara 1 , John pyrene and coronene in solid neon have been observed. Laser excita- tion of the Sn S0 transitions in the gas phase and in neon matrices [16­20]. Recently, the electronic spectrum of an astrophysically model

  15. LBNL-42730 1 Collisional Perturbation of States in Atomic Ytterbium by Helium and Neon

    E-print Network

    Budker, Dmitry

    LBNL-42730 1 Collisional Perturbation of States in Atomic Ytterbium by Helium and Neon D in atomic ytterbium by helium and neon buffer gases are reported. We find upper limits for the quenching and neon. PACS numbers: 34, 11.30.Er, 42.62.Fi (Submitted to Phys. Rev. A) 1. INTRODUCTION The 6s2 1 S0 6s

  16. Experimental and simulation study of neon collision dynamics with a 1-decanethiol monolayer

    E-print Network

    Sibener, Steven

    Experimental and simulation study of neon collision dynamics with a 1-decanethiol monolayer N. Isa October 2003 A study of the energy accommodation of neon colliding with a crystalline self-assembled 1 of the scattered neon as a function of incident angle and energy were experimentally measured. Scattering

  17. Plumeridge interaction along the Galapagos Spreading Center: discerning between gas loss and source effects using neon

    E-print Network

    Graham, David W.

    and source effects using neon isotopic compositions and 4 He­40 Ar*­CO2 relative abundances A. Colin a, , P­ridge interaction at the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC), we present neon 3-isotope analyses performed on vesicles- sing effects. Neon isotopic compositions are in the MORB range with 21 Ne/22 Ne ratios extrapolated

  18. Mechanisms controlling the global oceanic distribution of the inert gases argon, nitrogen and neon

    E-print Network

    Emerson, Steven R.

    Mechanisms controlling the global oceanic distribution of the inert gases argon, nitrogen and neon formation. We present argon, nitrogen, and neon data from the subtropical and subpolar North Pacific of the inert gases argon, nitrogen and neon, Geophys. Res. Lett., 29(23), 2120, doi:10.1029/2002GL015273, 2002

  19. Helium and neon isotopes in deep Pacific Ocean sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    Helium and neon concentration measurements, along with isotope ratio determinations, have been made for particles collected in the deep Pacific with a magnetic sled, and they are believed to be of extraterrestrial origin. Analyses were made for samples consisting of composites of many extremely fine particles and for several individual particles large enough to contain sufficient gas for analysis but small enough to escape melting in their passage through the atmosphere. Step-heating was employed to extract the gas. Cosmic-ray spallation products or solar-wind helium and neon, if present, were not abundant enough to account for the isotopic compositions measured. In the case of the samples of magnetic fines, the low temperature extractions provided elemental and isotopic ratios in the general range found for the primordial gas in carbonaceous chondrites and gas-rich meteorites. The isotopic ratios found in the high temperature extractions suggest the presence of solar-flare helium and neon.

  20. Purification and Liquefacttion of Neon Using a Helium Refrigeration Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeck, S.

    2010-04-01

    The cryogenic plant developed by Linde Kryotechnik is used to extract neon out of a crude gas flow coming from an air separation plant. The crude gas is cooled down by a two stage helium refrigeration process using the Linde Kryotechnik dynamic gas bearing turbines. After the first cooling stage, nitrogen is liquefied and separated from the crude gas. The Cryogenic adsorbers located at a temperature level below 80 K clean the crude gas from remaining nitrogen traces before the neon-helium mixture enters the final cooling stage. In the second cooling stage neon is liquefied and separated from the helium. The final product quality will be achieved within a rectification column at low pressure level.

  1. The curvy photonics of squid camouflage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Alison; Holt, Amanda; Daniel, Morse; Stramski, Dariusz

    2013-03-01

    Cephalopods (squids and octopuses) ubiquitously possess reflective structures in their skin composed of ``reflectin'' proteins. Although a few simple laminar, Bragg-stack type optical structures have been known in a handful of common squid species for some time, our extensive survey of optically active tissues of exotic deep-sea species has revealed complex, extended curvatures and topologies in dermal reflectors of these rarely-studied animals. Molecular deep-sequencing has revealed these structures also to be composed of reflectin-like proteins. Here we show a survey of some of these deep-sea reflector structures, and present evidence that each novel structure may be a transform of the radiance in the optical niche in the ocean where each of these species live, such that light reflecting off the sides of these animals in their specific ocean habitat resembles the light that would be transmitted through the animals if they were transparent, from many different viewing angles and possible ocean depths.

  2. Anti-tumor activity of squid ink.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, J; Ishita, K; Takaya, Y; Uchisawa, H; Matsue, H

    1997-08-01

    The anti-tumor activity of a new type of peptidoglycan isolated from squid ink was shown to have a cure rate of 64% for Meth A tumor from BALB/c mice. The ink delipidated in acetone, which contained the peptidoglycan at 0.1% (w/w), was administered to tumor-transplanted mice so as to examine the anti-tumor activity. One-fifth of the tumor-bearing mice was cured with 3 injections (1 mg/head) of the acetone delipidated squid ink or a prolongation of survival was observed in the treated animals. Heat treatment at 100 degrees C for 10 min did not affect the anti-tumor activity of the delipidated ink, its potentiality being preserved. The acetone-extractable fraction of the ink also brought about a similar cure rate for Meth A tumor. The delipidated ink enhanced the phagocytic activity of macrophages but no direct cytotoxicity was observed for the Meth A tumor cells. Hence it may be said that the anti-tumor activity of the delipidated ink was mainly due to the augmented cellular immunity in vivo. PMID:9328864

  3. Base distance optimization for SQUID gradiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Garachtchenko, A.; Matlashov, A.; Kraus, R.

    1998-12-31

    The measurement of magnetic fields generated by weak nearby biomagnetic sources is affected by ambient noise generated by distant sources both internal and external to the subject under study. External ambient noise results from sources with numerous origins, many of which are unpredictable in nature. Internal noise sources are biomagnetic in nature and result from muscle activity (such as the heart, eye blinks, respiration, etc.), pulsation associated with blood flow, surgical implants, etc. Any magnetic noise will interfere with measurements of magnetic sources of interest, such as magnetoencephalography (MEG), in various ways. One of the most effective methods of reducing the magnetic noise measured by the SQUID sensor is to use properly designed superconducting gradiometers. Here, the authors optimized the baseline length of SQUID-based symmetric axial gradiometers using computer simulation. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was used as the optimization criteria. They found that in most cases the optimal baseline is not equal to the depth of the primary source, rather it has a more complex dependence on the gradiometer balance and the ambient magnetic noise. They studied both first and second order gradiometers in simulated shielded environments and only second order gradiometers in a simulated unshielded environment. The noise source was simulated as a distant dipolar source for the shielded cases. They present optimal gradiometer baseline lengths for the various simulated situations below.

  4. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S. K.; Baylor, L. R.; Foust, C. R.; Lyttle, M. S.; Meitner, S. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-11-15

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  5. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S K; Baylor, L R; Foust, C R; Lyttle, M S; Meitner, S J; Rasmussen, D A

    2014-11-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development. PMID:25430370

  6. Fast Imaging of Intact and Shattered Cryogenic Neon Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Baylor, Larry R; Foust, Charles R; Lyttle, Mark S; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A

    2014-01-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100- m- and sub- s-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of m to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  7. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of + or - 15 percent.

  8. The isotopic composition of solar flare accelerated neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Spalding, J. D.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The individual isotopes of neon in energetic solar-flare particles have been clearly resolved with a rms mass resolution of 0.20 amu. The ratios found are Ne-20/Ne-22 = 7.6 (+2.0, -1.8) and Ne-21/Ne-22 of no more than about 0.11 in the 11-26 MeV per nucleon interval. This isotopic composition is essentially the same as that of meteoritic planetary neon-A and is significantly different from that of the solar wind.

  9. Have a question? Ask anyone in a neon green or neon orange T-shirt , head over to an information tent, or call 732-445-info (4636). Saturday, April 25, 2015

    E-print Network

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    1 Have a question? Ask anyone in a neon green or neon orange T-shirt , head over to an information information tent or to any Rutgers Day staff member in a neon green or neon orange T-shirt. You can also call

  10. Recent Results of a New Microwave SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Limketkai, B.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a proof-of-concept microwave SQUID multiplexer containing four SQUIDs coupled to GHz frequency resonant circuits and fed with a single microwave readout line. The resonators are half-wave coplanar waveguide sections and are similar to the structures used for the microwave kinetic inductance detectors developed in our group. Optimal values for the interdigital gap capacitors were determined to maximize the sensitivity of the transmitted and reflected microwave signal with respect to changes in the dynamic resistance of the SQUID. The dc current-bias line for the SQUID has an in-line inductive high frequency filter to minimize coupling between the bias line and resonator. A high frequency modulation scheme is proposed to eliminate the need for individual flux biasing of the SQUIDs, which extends the dynamic range of the readout. In this scheme a common modulation signal is imposed on each SQUID and the received signal is demodulated at one and two times the modulation frequency to maintain sensitivity at any flux state. We present the recent results of the microwave SQUID multiplexer system operating at a readout frequency range of 10 - 11GHz.

  11. Ginzburg-Landau modeling of Nano-SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtley, John; Hazra, Dibyendu; Hasselbach, Klaus; Buisson, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    NanoSQUIDs are micron-sized Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices with narrow (50 nm) sized constrictions as weak links. They are used for, e.g., studying switching dynamics in magnetic nanoparticles and high spatial resolution magnetic microscopy. When the constriction dimensions become comparable to or larger than the superconducting coherence length, the current-phase relations become non-sinusoidal, reducing the flux modulation depth and increasing the thermally activated flux noise. We have numerically solved the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equations for the nanoSQUID geometry to obtain current-phase relations, the dependence of critical current on magnetic flux, and the thermally activated escape rates. We predict NanoSQUIDs with short coherence lengths to have critical current distribution widths, and therefore flux noises, proportional to T1/2, as opposed to tunnel junction SQUIDs, which are proportional to T2/3. Our GL simulations predict that the ultimate noise performance of Al nanoSQUIDs, with their longer coherence lengths, should be better than Nb nanoSQUIDs, with suspended bridge Al/Nb nanoSQUIDs intermediate between the two.

  12. Decoherence and Recoherence in a Vibrating RF SQUID

    E-print Network

    Eyal Buks; M. P. Blencowe

    2006-09-19

    We study an RF SQUID, in which a section of the loop is a freely suspended beam that is allowed to oscillate mechanically. The coupling between the RF SQUID and the mechanical resonator originates from the dependence of the total magnetic flux threading the loop on the displacement of the resonator. Motion of the latter affects the visibility of Rabi oscillations between the two lowest energy states of the RF SQUID. We address the feasibility of experimental observation of decoherence and recoherence, namely decay and rise of the visibility, in such a system.

  13. Martian paleomagnetism with the SQUID microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Benjamin Paul

    Rocks should preserve natural remanent magnetizations with stable directional and intensity information at levels ˜1000 times below that of the noise level on today's best moment magnetometers. The superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) Microscope is a new, high-resolution magnetometer that can now detect such weak signals. It maps the magnetic fields above samples with a spatial resolution of <100 mum and a moment sensitivity of <10 -15 Am2. It therefore provides data with a resolution directly comparable with that of other common petrographic techniques. This thesis describes applications of SQUID microscopy to a variety of problems in the planetary sciences. A SQUID microscope paleomagnetic conglomerate test demonstrates that ALH84001 has been cooler than ˜40°C since before its ejection from the surface of Mars at 15 Ma. Because this temperature cannot sterilize most bacteria or eukarya, these data support the hypothesis that meteorites could transfer life between planets in the solar system. These and other data on panspermia demand a re-evaluation of the long-held assumption that terrestrial life evolved in isolation on Earth. Subsequent magnetic and textural studies of the meteorite show that 4 Ga ALH84001 carbonates containing magnetite and pyrrhotite carry a stable natural remanent magnetization. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology demonstrates that this magnetization originated at 3.9--4.1 Ga on Mars. This magnetization is the oldest known for a planetary rock, and its strong intensity suggests that Mars had generated a geodynamo at or before 4 Ga. The intensity of the field that magnetized ALH84001 was roughly within an order of magnitude of that at the surface of the present-day Earth, sufficient for magnetotaxis by the bacteria whose magnetofossils have been reported in ALH84001 and possibly for the production of the strong crustal anomalies. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology calculations also provide an explanation for why ALH84001 contains a sample of an apparently ancient martian atmosphere. Because this gas is enriched in light isotopes of H and N relative to that on present-day Mars, this supports the hypothesis that the planet has experienced significant atmospheric loss since 4 Ga. These calculations also suggest that for the last 4 Gyr, average surface temperatures on Mars may not have been much higher than the present cold conditions.

  14. RF-SQUID to DC-SQUID upgrade of a 28-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diekmann, V.; Jürgens, R.; Becker, W.; Elias, H.; Ludwig, W.; Vodel, W.

    1996-05-01

    A Dornier 28-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system equipped with RF-SQUIDs and control electronics made by CTF (Port Coquitlam, BC, Canada) was upgraded by replacing the RF-SQUIDs with DC-SQUIDs developed at the University of Jena, Germany. New preamplifiers were designed that emulate the function of the system's original RF amplifiers. This allowed the continuing use of the system's control electronics without any modification. Retaining these control devices was instrumental for preserving the system's unique ability to derive software-defined gradiometer measurements from its magnetometer signals, and also saved a considerable investment of control software tailored to the characteristics of these devices. The performance of the upgraded system compares favourably to that of other multichannel instruments; its software gradiometer channels typically attain an overall sensitivity of 0957-0233/7/5/017/img7 (an improvement by a factor of three over the original RF system) and suppress residual noise inside the shielded room by 40 to 60 dB. Also described are the procedures used to calibrate the system, to eliminate crosstalk between neighbouring channels, and to determine the coefficients for optimum suppression of ambient noise by the software gradiometer.

  15. Cosmogenic neon from precompaction irradiation of Kapoeta and Murchison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Swindle, T. D.; Goswami, J. N.

    1983-01-01

    Neon from hand-picked Murchison and Kapoeta grains, selected on the basis of the presence or absence of solar flare particle tracks, was analyzed in order to delineate the precompaction history of this material. The irradiated grains showed large enrichments of cosmogenic neon relative to the unirradiated grains. Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure ages for the unirradiated grains yield the nominal values reported for the recent exposure history of these meteorites. Apparent minimum precompaction galactic exposure ages of 28 m.y. and 56 m.y. would have been obtained for Murchison and Kapoeta, respectively, if the cosmogenic effects in the irradiated grains were due to GCR irradiation. Since this seems unreasonably long, the cosmogenic neon in the irradiated grains may be due to spallation by solar cosmic rays. This, however, would require a more active early sun. The isotopic composition of the cosmogenic neon in these grains suggests a harder energy spectrum than is characteristic of present solar flares. Lack of apparent solar wind effects may require some kind of shielding, such as nebular gas.

  16. Elemental abundances of flaring solar plasma - Enhanced neon and sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmelz, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Elemental abundances of two flares observed with the SMM Flat Crystal Spectrometer are compared and contrasted. The first had a gradual rise and a slow decay, while the second was much more impulsive. Simultaneous spectra of seven bright soft X-ray resonance lines provide information over a broad temperature range and are available throughout both flares, making these events unique in the SMM data base. For the first flare, the plasma seemed to be characterized by coronal abundances but, for the second, the plasma composition could not be coronal, photospheric, or a linear combination of both. A good differential emission measure fit required enhanced neon such that Ne/O = 0.32 +/- 0.02, a value which is inconsistent with the current models of coronal abundances based on the elemental first-ionization potential. Similar values of enhanced neon are found for flaring plasma observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, in (He-3)-rich solar energetic particle events, and in the decay phase of several long duration soft X-ray events. Sulfur is also enhanced in the impulsive flare, but not as dramatically as neon. These events are compared with two models which attempt to explain the enhanced values of neon and sulfur.

  17. Electronic transitions of S 3 in neon matrixes

    E-print Network

    Maier, John Paul

    halide crystals [27,28,30,31] and absorption of SÀ 3 in such crystals and basic solvents [25,41]. SÀ 2 with a maximum around 620 nm [25,41], and is responsible for the blue color of the mineral lapis lazuli in neon matrixes are reported. Though these spectra agree with the reported ones in crystals, they reveal

  18. Molecular Iodine Fluorescence Using a Green Helium-Neon Laser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, J. Charles

    2011-01-01

    Excitation of molecular iodine vapor with a green (543.4 nm) helium-neon laser produces a fluorescence spectrum that is well suited for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory. Application of standard evaluation techniques to the spectrum yields ground electronic-state molecular parameters in good agreement with literature…

  19. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  20. The NEON Aquatic Network: Expanding the Availability of Biogeochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, J. M.; Bohall, C.; Fitzgerald, M.; Utz, R.; Parker, S. M.; Roehm, C. L.; Goodman, K. J.; McLaughlin, B.

    2013-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are facing unprecedented pressure from climate change and land-use practices. Invasive species, whether plant, animal, insect or microbe present additional threat to aquatic ecosystem services. There are significant scientific challenges to understanding how these forces will interact to affect aquatic ecosystems, as the flow of energy and materials in the environment is driven by multivariate and non-linear biogeochemical cycles. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect and provide observational data across multiple scales. Sites were selected to maximize representation of major North American ecosystems using a multivariate geographic clustering method that partitioned the continental US, AK, HI, and Puerto Rico into 20 eco-climatic domains. The NEON data collection systems and methods are designed to yield standardized, near real-time data subjected to rigorous quality controls prior to public dissemination through an online data portal. NEON will collect data for 30 years to facilitate spatial-temporal analysis of environmental responses and drivers of ecosystem change, ranging from local through continental scales. Here we present the NEON Aquatic Network, a multi-parameter network consisting of a combination of in situ sensor and observational data. This network will provide data to examine biogeochemical, biological, hydrologic and geomorphic metrics at 36 sites, which are a combination of small 1st/2nd order wadeable streams, large rivers and lakes. A typical NEON Aquatic site will host up to two in-stream sensor sets designed to collect near-continuous water quality data (e.g. pH/ORP, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, CDOM) along with up to 8 shallow groundwater monitoring wells (level, temp., cond.), and a local meteorological station (e.g. 2D wind speed, PAR, barometric pressure, temperature, net radiation). These coupled sensor suites will be complemented by observational data (e.g. water/sediment chemistry, aquatic organisms, geomorphology). The aquatic network will produce ~212 low-level data products for each site. NEON will produce several higher level data products such as measurements of whole-stream metabolism, gross primary productivity, ecosystem respiration, and fluxes of nitrogen, phosphorous and carbon that will enable users to analyze processes on a gross scale. These data may be integrated with NEON's terrestrial and airborne networks to bridge the gap between aquatic and terrestrial biogeochemical research. The NEON Aquatic Network is poised to greatly expand our ability to create more robust biogeochemical models. For example, hydrologic and stable isotope data will allow investigation of terrestrial-aquatic carbon flux. Constraints provided by NEON's terrestrial and atmospheric data concurrent with remotely sensed data will facilitate the scaling to regional and continental scales, potentially leading to greater accuracy in the global carbon budget. The NEON Aquatic Network represents a powerful tool that will give the scientific community access to standardized data over spatiotemporal scales that are needed to answer fundamental questions about natural ecological variability and responses to changes in the environment.

  1. Baseline optimization of SQUID gradiometer for magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua; Zhang, Shu-Lin; Qiu, Yang; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Chao-Xiang; Kong, Xiang-Yan; Xie, Xiao-Ming

    2015-02-01

    SQUID gradiometer techniques are widely used in noise cancellation for biomagnetic measurements. An appropriate gradiometer baseline is very important for the biomagnetic detection with high performance. By placing several magnetometers at different heights along the vertical direction, we could simultaneously obtain the synthetic gradiometers with different baselines. By using the traditional signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a performance index, we successfully obtain an optimal baseline for the magnetocardiography (MCG) measurement in a magnetically shielded room (MSR). Finally, we obtain an optimal baseline of 7 cm and use it for the practical MCG measurement in our MSR. The SNR about 38 dB is obtained in the recorded MCG signal. Project supported by the “Strategic Priority Research Program (B)” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB04020200) and the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KGCX2-EW-105).

  2. Experimental realization of Josephson junctions for an Atom SQUID

    E-print Network

    C. Ryu; A. A. Blinova; P. W. Blackburn; M. G. Boshier

    2013-11-20

    We report the creation of a pair of Josephson junctions on a toroidal dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), a configuration that is the cold atom analog of the well-known dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). We observe Josephson effects, measure the critical current of the junctions, and find dynamic behavior that is in good agreement with the simple Josephson equations for a tunnel junction with the ideal sinusoidal current-phase relation expected for the parameters of the experiment. The junctions and toroidal trap are created with the painted potential, a time-averaged optical dipole potential technique which will allow scaling to more complex BEC circuit geometries than the single atom-SQUID case reported here. Since rotation plays the same role in the atom SQUID as magnetic field does in the dc SQUID magnetometer, the device has potential as a compact rotation sensor.

  3. Development of a colorimetric sensor array for squid spoilage assessment.

    PubMed

    Zaragozá, Patricia; Fuentes, Ana; Ruiz-Rico, María; Vivancos, José-Luis; Fernández-Segovia, Isabel; Ros-Lis, José V; Barat, José M; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate a rapid, easy-to-use optoelectronic system for the shelf-life assessment of squid in cold storage. For this purpose, an optoelectronic nose was designed, which consisted of an array containing six sensing materials prepared by combining different dyes and two inorganic supports (aluminium oxide and silica gel). Samples were packaged with the colorimetric array and kept in cold storage for 12 days. Squid spoilage was monitored simultaneously by the colorimetric array and by the physico-chemical and microbial analyses during storage. Samples exceeded the acceptability limits for microbial counts on the third day. PCA analysis carried out with CIELab showed that the colorimetric array was able to discriminate between fresh squid fit for consumption and spoiled squid. The statistical models obtained by PLS, with the optoelectronic nose, successfully predicted CO2 and O2 content in the headspace as well as microbial growth. PMID:25577086

  4. Effects of pulse shape on rf SQUID quantum gates

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Zhongyuan; Chu, Shih-I; Han, Siyuan

    2003-06-01

    Effects of control-signal microwave pulse shapes on rf SQUID quantum gates are investigated. It is shown that the gate operations are mainly affected by microwave pulse area and are independent of pulse shape in the weak field limit....

  5. Weld quality evaluation using a high temperature SQUID array

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. D.; Espy, M. A.; Kraus, Robert H., Jr.; Matlachov, A. N.; Lamb, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary data for evaluating weld quality using high temperature SQUIDS. The SQUIDS are integrated into an instrument known as the SQUID Array Microscope, or SAMi. The array consists of ll SQUIDs evenly distributed over an 8.25 mm baseline. Welds are detected using SAMi by using an on board coil to induce eddy currents in a conducting sample and measuring the resulting magnetic fields. The concept is that the induced magnetic fields will differ in parts of varying weld quality. The data presented here was collected from three stainless steel parts using SAMi. Each part was either solid, included a good weld, or included a bad weld. The induced magnetic field's magnitude and phase relative to the induction signal were measured. For each sample considered, both the magnitude and phase data were measurably different than the other two samples. These results indicate that it is possible to use SAMi to evaluate weld quality.

  6. Nonstandard applications of superconducting quantum interferometers: SQUIDS (Review)

    SciTech Connect

    Odegnal, M.

    1985-01-01

    Some applications of superconducting quantum interferometers are studied. The problems of quantum noise in the Josephson junction are discussed, theoretical estimates of their magnitude are given, and ways for achieving the limiting sensitivity of SQUIDs are indicated. Applications of SQUIDs in checking some basic physical laws (Newton's law, the principle of equivalence of inertial and gravitational masses, general relativity), in elementary particle physics (search for quarks and magnetic monopoles), in geophysics (magnetotelluric measurements, gradiometric measurements, gravimetric experiments, etc.), and in ultra-low-temperature physics (nuclear gyroscope, SQUIDs and NMR, ultra-low-temperature thermometry) are described. Both past and future experiments are studied and some further applications of SQUID-based magnetometers are indicated.

  7. Squid as nutrient vectors linking Southwest Atlantic marine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, Alexander I.

    2013-10-01

    Long-term investigations of three abundant nektonic squid species from the Southwest Atlantic, Illex argentinus, Doryteuthis gahi and Onykia ingens, permitted to estimate important population parameters including individual growth rates, duration of ontogenetic phases and mortalities. Using production model, the productivity of squid populations at different phases of their life cycle was assessed and the amount of biomass they convey between marine ecosystems as a result of their ontogenetic migrations was quantified. It was found that squid are major nutrient vectors and play a key role as transient 'biological pumps' linking spatially distinct marine ecosystems. I. argentinus has the largest impact in all three ecosystems it encounters due to its high abundance and productivity. The variable nature of squid populations increases the vulnerability of these biological conveyers to overfishing and environmental change. Failure of these critical biological pathways may induce irreversible long-term consequences for biodiversity, resource abundance and spatial availability in the world ocean.

  8. Quantum analysis of a linear DC SQUID mechanical displacement detector

    E-print Network

    M. P. Blencowe; E. Buks

    2007-07-19

    We provide a quantum analysis of a DC SQUID mechanical displacement detector within the sub-critical Josephson current regime. A segment of the SQUID loop forms the mechanical resonator and motion of the latter is transduced inductively through changes in the flux threading the loop. Expressions are derived for the detector signal response and noise, which are used to evaluate the position and force detection sensitivity. We also investigate cooling of the mechanical resonator due to back reaction noise from the detector.

  9. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dantsker, E

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO{sub 3}-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room.

  10. High-T(c) squid application in medicine and geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polushkin, V. N.; Uchaikin, S. V.; Vasiliev, B. V.

    1991-01-01

    In our laboratory of high-T(sub c), a one-hole squid was built from Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics obtained by a standard procedure of solid state reaction. The ceramics with critical current density J(sub c) is greater than 100 A/sq cm was selected. In the middle of a 10 x 10 x 2 mm ceramics pellet, a 0.8 mm hole was drilled in which the superconducting loop of the squid was located. Between the hole and the edge of the pellet, a cut was mechanically filed out with a bridge inside it connecting the superconducting ring. A scheme of the magnetometer is presented. The resonant frequency shift of the tank circuit, the connection of the squid with this circuit, and the squid inductance are evaluated. One of the most interesting fields of the squid-based magnetometer application is biomagnetism, particularly, the human heart magnetocardiogram measuring. The low-temperature squids were used in this area and many interesting and important scientific results have been obtained. The observations have shown that the main noise contribution was not due to the squid but to the Earth's magnetic field variations, industrial inductions, and mainly to the vibrations caused by liquid nitrogen boiling and by vibrations of the box. Further attempts are needed to reduce the magnetic noise inductions. Nevertheless, the estimations promise the maximum signal/noise relation of the high-T(sub c) squid-magnetocardiometer to be not less than 10:1 in a bandwidth of 60 Hz. Apparently, such resolution would be enough not only for steady cardiogram reading but even for thin structure investigation at average technique application.

  11. A scanning SQUID microscope with 200 MHz bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanov, Vladimir V.; Lettsome, Nesco M., Jr.; Borzenets, Valery; Gagliolo, Nicolas; Cawthorne, Alfred B.; Orozco, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    We developed a scanning DC SQUID microscope with novel readout electronics capable of wideband sensing of RF magnetic fields from 50 to 200 MHz and simultaneously providing closed-loop response at kHz frequencies. To overcome the 20 MHz bandwidth limitation of traditional closed-loop SQUIDs, a flux-modulated closed-loop simultaneously locks the SQUID quasi-static flux and flux-biases the SQUID for amplification of the RF flux up to ?0/4 in amplitude. Demodulating the SQUID voltage with a double lock-in technique yields a signal representative of both the amplitude and phase of the RF flux. This provides 80 dB of a linear dynamic range with a flux noise density of 4 ??0 Hz-1/2 at 200 MHz for a Y Ba2Cu3O7 bi-crystal SQUID at 77 K. We describe the electronics’ performance and present images for RF magnetic field of the travelling wave in a coplanar waveguide, the standing wave in an open-circuited microstrip, and a surface mounted device antenna.

  12. DC and RF Measurements of Serial Bi-SQUID Arrays

    E-print Network

    Prokopenko, G V; de Escobar, A Leese; Taylor, B; de Andrade, M C; Berggren, S; Longhini, P; Palacios, A; Nisenoff, M; Fagaly, R L

    2012-01-01

    SQUID arrays are promising candidates for low profile antennas and low noise amplifier applications. We present the integrated circuit designs and results of DC and RF measurements of the wideband serial arrays based on integration of linear bi-SQUID cells forming a Superconducting Quantum Interference Filter (bi-SQUID SQIF). Various configurations of serial arrays designs are described. The measured linearity, power gain, and noise temperature are analyzed and compared. The experimental results are matched to results of mathematical modeling. A serial bi-SQUID SQIF arrays are mounted into a coplanar waveguide (CPW) and symmetrically grounded to corresponding sides of CPW. The RF output comes out from the central common line, which is also used for DC biasing and forms a symmetrical balanced output. The signal and DC flux biasing line is designed as coplanar lines passed in parallel over each bi-SQUID cell in a bidirectional fashion concentrating magnetic flux inside of each cell. Serial bi-SQUID SQIF arrays ...

  13. 78 FR 46903 - Control Date for Qualifying Landings History and to Limit Speculative Entry into the Illex Squid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ...Limit Speculative Entry into the Illex Squid Fishery; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan AGENCY: National...978-281-9135. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (MSB) Fishery Management...

  14. The energy dependence of the neon-22 excess in the cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrstroem, N. Y.; Lund, N.

    1985-01-01

    It has been recognized now for some time that the heavy neon isotope, neon-22, is overabundant by a factor of 3 to 4 with respect to neon-22 in the cosmic ray source compared to the ratio of these isotopes in the Solar System. In view of the otherwise remarkable similarity of the chemical composition of the cosmic ray source and the composition of the Solar Energetic Particles, the anomaly regarding the neon isotopes is so much more striking. The observed excess of neon-22 is too large to be explained as a result of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy since the formation of the Solar System. Further information on the origin of the neon-22 excess may come from a comparison of the energy spectra of the two neon isotopes. If the cosmic radiation in the solar neighborhood is a mixture of material from several sources, one of which has an excess of neon-22, then the source energy spectra of neon-20 and neon-22 may differ significantly.

  15. Fractionation of terrestrial neon by hydrodynamic hydrogen escape from ancient steam atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric neon is isotopically heavier than mantle neon. By contrast, nonradiogenic mantle Ar, Kr, and Xe are not known to differ from the atmosphere. These observations are most easily explained by selective neon loss to space; however, neon is much too massive to escape from the modern atmosphere. Steam atmospheres are a likely, if intermittent, feature of the accreting Earth. They occur because, on average, the energy liberated during accretion places Earth above the runaway greenhouse threshold, so that liquid water is not stable at the surface. It is found that steam atmospheres should have lasted some ten to fifty million years. Hydrogen escape would have been vigorous, but abundant heavy constituents would have been retained. There is no lack of plausible candidates; CO2, N2, or CO could all suffice. Neon can escape because it is less massive than any of the likely pollutants. Neon fractionation would have been a natural byproduct. Assuming that the initial Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio was solar, it was found that it would have taken some ten million years to effect the observed neon fractionation in a 30 bar steam atmosphere fouled with 10 bars of CO. Thicker atmospheres would have taken longer; less CO, shorter. This mechanism for fractionating neon has about the right level of efficiency. Because the lighter isotope escapes much more readily, total neon loss is pretty minimal; less than half of the initial neon endowment escapes.

  16. A SQUID gradiometer module with wire-wound pickup antenna and integrated voltage feedback circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guofeng; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Shulin; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Wang, Yongliang; Liu, Chao; Zeng, Jia; Qiu, Yang; Kong, Xiangyan; Dong, Hui; Xie, Xiaoming; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Jiang, Mianheng

    2012-10-01

    The performance of the direct readout schemes for dc SQUID, Additional Positive Feedback (APF), noise cancellation (NC) and SQUID bootstrap circuit (SBC), have been studied in conjunction with planar SQUID magnetometers. In this paper, we examine the NC technique applied to a niobium SQUID gradiometer module with an Nb wire-wound antenna connecting to a dual-loop SQUID chip with an integrated voltage feedback circuit for suppression of the preamplifier noise contribution. The sensitivity of the SQUID gradiometer module is measured to be about 1 fT/(cm ?Hz) in the white noise range in a magnetically shielded room. Using such gradiometer, both MCG and MEG signals are recorded.

  17. Protecting Cattle from Horn Flies 

    E-print Network

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

    2004-05-24

    Horn flies are the most damaging insect to cattle in Texas. This publication explains biological, cultural and chemical methods of controlling horn flies. Various insecticides used to suppress horn flies are listed...

  18. A Flying Summer Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurio, Frank X.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a five-day summer camp which provided 12 children, ages 9-14, with a complete flying experience. The training consisted of ground school and one hour actual flying time, including the basics of aircraft control and a flight prepared and executed by the students. (MLH)

  19. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  20. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, David R. (New Castle, DE); Velenyi, Louis J. (Lyndhurst, OH); Pepera, Marc A. (Northfield, OH); Dolhyj, Serge R. (Parma, OH)

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, M.B. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  2. Retrapping Current in Bridge-Type Nano-SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, D.; Kirtley, J. R.; Hasselbach, K.

    2015-08-01

    It is a challenge to fabricate bridge-type nano-superconducting quantum interference devices (bridge-type nano-SQUIDs) that operate without hysteresis over a broad temperature range. Hysteresis—defined by the difference between switching and retrapping current—is one of the foremost constraints to operating nano-SQUIDs with low noise. The quantum behavior of the switching current has been explored in bridge-type nano-SQUIDs, but studies exploring the parameters ruling the retrapping current are rare. Here, we study the temperature and magnetic-field dependence of the retrapping current in two different kinds of bridge-type nano-SQUID: trilayer aluminum-niobium-tungsten bridge-type nano-SQUIDs and suspended-bridge nano-SQUIDs. Our study confirms previous works showing that the retrapping current decreases as the bath temperature increases and is insensitive to the magnetic field. Using a thermal model originally proposed by Skocpol, Beasley, and Tinkham [J. Appl. Phys. 45, 4054 (1974)], we account for, and suggest a simple formula which describes, the temperature dependence of the retrapping current. Our calculations show that the magnitude of the retrapping current is mainly dependent on the superconducting transition temperature and the effective resistance of the weak link and that the temperature dependence of the retrapping current is ruled by the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity in the normal and superconducting state. Finally, we apply our calculation to newly fabricated shunted bridge-type nano-SQUIDs, which show nonhysteretic current-voltage characteristics down to at least 250 mK and display systematic voltage modulations as a function of externally applied magnetic fields.

  3. Discovery of solar wind neon in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Palma, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Insert gases have been measured in seven sieve fractions of a disaggregated sample of the Allende meteorite. The disaggregation was done by ultrasonic treatment in water and by freeze-thawing. This sample consititutes the first gas-rich portion known to occur in the Allende meteorite. The composition of the trapped neon is solar, i.e., Neon-B, and the gas-rich samples contain more trapped Ne-20 than Ar-36. The set of sieve fractions show an anticorrelation of Ne-20 content and grain size. Gas-richness seems to be quite common among the CV3 meteorites with Allende added to the earlier known cases of Mokoia, Vigarano, and Efremovka.

  4. The Neon Abundance of Galactic Wolf-Rayet Stars

    E-print Network

    J. D. T. Smith; J. R. Houck

    2004-12-17

    The fast, dense winds which characterize Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars obscure their underlying cores, and complicate the verification of evolving core and nucleosynthesis models. Core evolution can be probed by measuring abundances of wind-borne nuclear processed elements, partially overcoming this limitation. Using ground-based mid-infrared spectroscopy and the 12.81um [NeII] emission line measured in four Galactic WR stars, we estimate neon abundances and compare to long-standing predictions from evolved-core models. For the WC star WR121, this abundance is found to be >~11x the cosmic value, in good agreement with predictions. For the three less-evolved WN stars, little neon enhancement above cosmic values is measured, as expected. We discuss the impact of clumping in WR winds on this measurement, and the promise of using metal abundance ratios to eliminate sensitivity to wind density and ionization structure.

  5. Heteronuclear collisions between laser-cooled metastable neon atoms

    E-print Network

    Jan Schütz; Thomas Feldker; Holger John; Gerhard Birkl

    2012-08-28

    We investigate heteronuclear collisions in isotope mixtures of laser-cooled metastable 3P2 neon. Experiments are performed with spin-polarized atoms in a magnetic trap for all two-isotope combinations of the stable neon isotopes 20Ne, 21Ne, and 22Ne. We determine the rate coefficients for heteronuclear ionizing collisions to beta_{21,20}=(3.9+/-2.7) x 10^{-11} cm^3/s, beta_{22,20}=(2.6+/-0.7) x 10^{-11} cm^3/s, and beta_{21,22}=(3.9+/-1.9) x 10^{-11} cm^3/s. We also study heteronuclear elastic collision processes and give upper bounds for heteronuclear thermal relaxation cross sections. This work significantly extends the limited available experimental data on heteronuclear ionizing collisions for laser-cooled atoms involving one or more rare gas atoms in a metastable state.

  6. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. This design precludes nucleate boiling in the flow channels as they are too small to handle vapor flow. Consequently, it was necessary to determine boiling incipience under the operating conditions of the magnet system. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of plus or minus 15 percent

  7. Charge radii of neon isotopes across the sd neutron shell

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, K.; Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Kloos, S.; Kotrotsios, G.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Kowalska, M.; Keim, M.; Blaum, K.; Lievens, P.; Simon, H.

    2011-09-15

    We report on the changes in mean square charge radii of unstable neon nuclei relative to the stable {sup 20}Ne, based on the measurement of optical isotope shifts. The studies were carried out using collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam of neutral neon atoms. High sensitivity on short-lived isotopes was achieved thanks to nonoptical detection based on optical pumping and state-selective collisional ionization, which was complemented by an accurate determination of the beam kinetic energy. The new results provide information on the structural changes in the sequence of neon isotopes all across the neutron sd shell, ranging from the proton drip line nucleus and halo candidate {sup 17}Ne up to the neutron-rich {sup 28}Ne in the vicinity of the ''island of inversion.'' Within this range the charge radius is smallest for {sup 24}Ne with N=14 corresponding to the closure of the neutron d{sub 5/2} shell, while it increases toward both neutron shell closures, N=8 and N=20. The general trend of the charge radii correlates well with the deformation effects which are known to be large for several neon isotopes. In the neutron-deficient isotopes, structural changes arise from the onset of proton-halo formation for {sup 17}Ne, shell closure in {sup 18}Ne, and clustering effects in {sup 20,21}Ne. On the neutron-rich side the transition to the island of inversion plays an important role, with the radii in the upper part of the sd shell confirming the weakening of the N=20 magic number. The results add new information to the radii systematics of light nuclei where data are scarce because of the small contribution of nuclear-size effects to the isotope shifts which are dominated by the finite-mass effect.

  8. Electronic absorption spectra of linear and cyclic Cn in a neon matrix

    E-print Network

    Maier, John Paul

    Electronic absorption spectra of linear and cyclic Cn + n=7­9 in a neon matrix Jan Fulara, and their electronic absorption spectra in 6 K neon matrices recorded. The linear and cyclic isomers of C7 + and C8, spectroscopic data are scarce and limited to C2 + in the gas phase27,28 and C60 + and C70 + in neon matrices.29

  9. % Skeleton of a Hodgkin-Huxley model for the % electrophysiology of the squid giant axon.

    E-print Network

    Vetter, Frederick J.

    % Skeleton of a Hodgkin-Huxley model for the % electrophysiology of the squid giant axon('Hodgkin-Huxley squid axon model') display(' i time Jion Vm dVdt n m h') %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% % Start

  10. Quantum entanglement and controlled logical gates using coupled SQUID flux qubits

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Zhongyuan; Han, Siyuan; Chu, Shih-I

    2005-06-01

    We present an approach to realize universal two-bit quantum gates using two SQUID flux qubits. In this approach the basic unit consists of two inductively coupled SQUIDs with realistic device parameters. Quantum logical gates are implemented...

  11. 75 FR 1024 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ...0648-AY44 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Control Date for Loligo...NMFS announces a future proposed rulemaking for the Atlantic mackerel, squid, and butterfish (MSB) fisheries. This...

  12. 76 FR 45742 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ...Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...measures in Amendment 11 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (MSB) Fishery...limited access program for the Atlantic mackerel (mackerel) fishery, and to make...

  13. 77 FR 58507 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ...Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...Framework Adjustment 5 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management...Tier 1 and 2 limited access Atlantic mackerel permits. [[Page 58508

  14. 77 FR 40527 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ...0648-XC098 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the 2012 Trimester...foreign fishing for the species managed under the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan...

  15. 76 FR 74724 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ...Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...implementing Amendment 11 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (MSB) Fishery...648.4 and 648.7 (as it relates to mackerel permit holders) had not been...

  16. 76 FR 39313 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ...0648-XA523 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the Directed...foreign fishing for the species managed under the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan...

  17. 50 CFR 648.27 - Observer requirements for the longfin squid fishery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.27 Observer requirements for the longfin squid fishery. (a) A...

  18. 76 FR 51272 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ...0648-XA617 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the 2011 Trimester...foreign fishing for the species managed under the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan...

  19. 75 FR 51683 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...0648-XX82 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the Directed...foreign fishing for the species managed under the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan...

  20. 50 CFR 648.27 - Observer requirements for the longfin squid fishery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.27 Observer requirements for the longfin squid fishery. (a) A...

  1. Nova LMC 1990 no. 1: The first extragalactic neon nova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Shore, Steven N.; Starrfield, Sumner G.

    1990-01-01

    International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of nova LMC (Large Magellanic Cloud) 1990 No. 1, the first neon (or ONeMg) nova observed outside the Galaxy are presented. The observations were obtained from 17 Jan. to Mar. 1990, with especially dense coverage during the first 25 days of the outburst. (The neon nova categorization is based on the detection of forbidden Ne 3-4 lines in optical spectra; the ultraviolet neon lines were not detected.) During the first 30 days of the outburst, the radiative losses were dominated by the N 5 delta 1240 and C 4 delta 1550 lines. The maximum ejection velocity was approximately 8000 km/s, based on the blue absorption edge of the C 4 P-Cygni profile. Early in the outburst of Nova LMC 1990 No. 1 the UV luminosity alone was approximately 3 times 10 to the 38th power erg/sec, implying that the bolometric luminosity was well in excess of the Eddington luminosity for a one solar mass object.

  2. On the mechanism of populating 3p levels of neon under pumping by a hard ioniser

    SciTech Connect

    Khasenov, M U

    2011-03-31

    The effect of quenching additives on the luminescence properties of helium - neon mixtures under pumping by {alpha} particles emitted from {sup 210}Po atoms is considered. It is concluded that, under excitation by a heavy charged particle, the population of the 3p'[1/2]{sub 0} level of neon is not related to the dissociative recombination of molecular ions. It is suggested that the most likely channels for populating the 3p level are the excitation transfer from metastable helium atoms to neon atoms and direct excitation of neon by nuclear particles and secondary electrons. (lasers and active media)

  3. Scintillation yield and time dependence from electronic and nuclear recoils in liquid neon

    E-print Network

    W. H. Lippincott; K. J. Coakley; D. Gastler; E. Kearns; D. N. McKinsey; J. A. Nikkel

    2012-08-13

    We have performed measurements of scintillation light in liquid neon, observing a signal yield in our detector as high as (3.5 $\\pm$ 0.4) photoelectrons/keV. We measure pulse shape discrimination efficiency between electronic and nuclear recoils in liquid neon from 50 and 300 keV nuclear recoil energy. We also measure the \\leff\\, parameter in liquid neon between 30 and 370 keV nuclear recoil energy, observing an average \\leff$=0.24$ above 50 keV. We observe a dependence of the scintillation time distribution and signal yield on the pressure and temperature of the liquid neon.

  4. Coupled non-uniform bi-squid: A numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhini, Patrick; Berggren, Susan; Palacios, Antonio; In, Visarath; Leese de Escobar, Anna

    2012-06-01

    This work investigates through numerical simulations a novel device that improvesdynamic range and linearity. The standard DC SQUID can increase in linearity by adding athird junction, changing to a device known as the bi-SQUID. It is known that the dynamicrange can increase by connecting SQUIDs in series, and it has been shown that nonuniformityin the loops sizes in arrays of SQUIDs can produce a unique 'anti'-peak at thezero magnetic flux (device know as a SQIF). Thus, combining these ideas we can improvethe dynamic range and design a highly linear device with a unique 'anti'-peak. Hence, this device can be referred to as a bi-SQIF or non-uniform bi-SQUID array. Results have shown that the maximum voltage swing increase proportional to N, where N is the number of loops connected in series. The spur free dynamic range also improves as N increases, which is directly related to the linearity of the device. Therefore, we have designed a device which can lead to improvements which can be applicable to low noise amplifier (LNA), and provide a platform for creating "electrically" small antennas.

  5. Flying Robots and Flying Cars Heinrich H. Blthoff

    E-print Network

    ) robotic task (e.g., exploration, mapping, transport, pick and place) Group of Robots (slave) roleFlying Robots and Flying Cars Heinrich H. Bülthoff Biological Cybernetics Research at the Max Flying Robots -- Human Robot Interaction group at MPI Tübingen Flying Cars -- European Project (my

  6. Oregon Sea Grant Marine Education Program at Hatfield Marine Science Center Squid Dissection

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Oregon Sea Grant Marine Education Program at Hatfield Marine Science Center Squid Dissection The Squid Dissection program at Hatfield Marine Science Center is designed to be a 50- minute lab the directions of their marine educator, to systematically dissect a thawed squid and explore the many

  7. Reference: Bid. Bull. 192: 364-374. (June. 1997) Laboratory Culture of the Sepiolid Squid

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Reference: Bid. Bull. 192: 364-374. (June. 1997) Laboratory Culture of the Sepiolid Squid Eupvymna, was cultured through one complete life cycle in 4 months. Paralarval squid hatchlings were actively planktonic and diurnal quiescence. Squids were aggressive predators that preferred actively swimming prey up to 2- 4

  8. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF AN OBJECTIVE METHOD FOR CLASSIFYING LONG-FINNED SQUID, LOLIGO PEALEI,

    E-print Network

    DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF AN OBJECTIVE METHOD FOR CLASSIFYING LONG-FINNED SQUID, LOLIGO PEALEI, INTO SEXUAL MATURITY STAGES WILLIAM K. MACY III! ABSTRACT An objective method of classifying long-finned squid by an appli- cation of the method. Each summer schools of long-finned squid, Loli- go pealei Lesueur, 1821

  9. Ontogenetic Changes in Mantle Kinematics During Escape-Jet Locomotion in the Oval Squid,

    E-print Network

    Kier, William M.

    Ontogenetic Changes in Mantle Kinematics During Escape-Jet Locomotion in the Oval Squid of Sepioteuthis lessoniana, the oval squid. Changes in mantle diameter during the jet were measured from digi mantle diameter) during an escape jet was significantly greater in hatchlings than in older, larger squid

  10. ELIZABETH H. AMARAL and H. ARNOLD CARR Experimental Fishing for Squid

    E-print Network

    ELIZABETH H. AMARAL and H. ARNOLD CARR Experimental Fishing for Squid With Lights in Nantucket Sound Nantucket Sound squid survey areas. Elizabeth H. Amaral and H. Arnold Carr consecutive years and has caught squid in them each year. He first be- came interested in this type of project

  11. Motion detection of a micromechanical resonator embedded in a d.c. SQUID

    E-print Network

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Motion detection of a micromechanical resonator embedded in a d.c. SQUID S. ETAKI1,2 *, M.s.j.vanderzant@tudelft.nl Published online: 31 August 2008; doi:10.1038/nphys1057 Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs into SQUIDs to achieve controlled entanglement of the resonator ground state and a qubit3 as well

  12. Z .Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 11 1998 139156 SQUID detected NMR and NQR

    E-print Network

    Augustine, Mathew P.

    Z .Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 11 1998 139­156 SQUID detected NMR and NQR Matthew P dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device SQUID is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned

  13. MFR PAPER 128C Strandings of Shortfin Squid, II/ex

    E-print Network

    MFR PAPER 128C Strandings of Shortfin Squid, II/ex illecebrosus, in New England in Fall 1976 F. E 02642. Figure (.-Shore area of grealest strandings (shaded) of shon fin squid in Cape Cod Bay during fall 1976, and numbers of this squid caught per h-hour low at otter trawl stations in fall I975

  14. A 200 h two-stage dc SQUID amplifier for resonant gravitational wave detectors

    E-print Network

    A 200 h two-stage dc SQUID amplifier for resonant gravitational wave detectors Andrea Vinante1 commercial chips a two-stage dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) was developed in order to be used as low noise amplifier on the resonant gravitational wave detector AURIGA. The SQUID was coupled

  15. Jumbo squid beaks: Inspiration for design of robust organic composites Ali Miserez a

    E-print Network

    Zok, Frank

    Jumbo squid beaks: Inspiration for design of robust organic composites Ali Miserez a , Youli Li b of the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas). Its main constituents are chitin fibers (15­20 wt.%) and histidine of the present article is on another hard but unmineralized biomolecular material: the beaks of the jumbo squid

  16. The California market squid (Loligo opalescens Berry), also known as the

    E-print Network

    389 The California market squid (Loligo opalescens Berry), also known as the opalescent inshore squid (FAO), plays a central role in the nearshore ecological communities of the west coast Bay, the squids are fished directly on the egg beds, and the con- sequences of this practice

  17. GROWTH, BEHAVIOR, AND SEXUAL MATURATION OF THE MARKET SQUID, WLIGO OPALESCENS.

    E-print Network

    GROWTH, BEHAVIOR, AND SEXUAL MATURATION OF THE MARKET SQUID, WLIGO OPALESCENS. CULTURED THROUGH..Jagie' c..phalo.'pod t,) be cuJtur..d through th.. entire lifE' cytle. Squid WE'rE' cultured twie. with the highest mortality occurring in the first few weeks wht'n squid made thE' transi- tirJll from fe

  18. Stabilization and optimization of a two-stage dc SQUID coupled to a high Q resonator

    E-print Network

    1 Stabilization and optimization of a two-stage dc SQUID coupled to a high Q resonator Andrea Padova and INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova, Italy Abstract A two-stage dc SQUID the behaviour of the SQUID on a resonant gravitational wave detector. A capacitive damping network

  19. Physics 6, 123 (2013) A SQUID Analog with a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    E-print Network

    Sato, Yuki

    2013-01-01

    Physics 6, 123 (2013) Viewpoint A SQUID Analog with a Bose-Einstein Condensate Yuki Sato Rowland SQUID C. Ryu, P. W. Blackburn, A. A. Blinova, and M. G. Boshier Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 2013 ­ Published November 11, 2013 Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (specifically, dc-SQUIDs) are the world

  20. MFR PAPER 1275 Shortfin Squid, I/lex i/lecebrosus,

    E-print Network

    MFR PAPER 1275 Shortfin Squid, I/lex i/lecebrosus, Attacks on Trawl-Captured Fish SALVATORE A. TESTAVERDE Figure I.-Silver hake. Merluccius bilillearis, with wounds inflicted by shontin squid. commun.) increasingly large catches of shortfin squid, Illex illecebrosus, from the Gulf of Maine

  1. Although there are similarities in reproductive behavior among several squid species, our obser-

    E-print Network

    Although there are similarities in reproductive behavior among several squid species, our obser earlier who reported 12-15 pairs of squids in a semicircle (Turcol ), indi- cate that the social structure:53-57. 1965. Observations on the mating behavior of the squid Sepioteuthis sepioidea. Bull. Mar. Sci. 15

  2. Characterization of the input noise sources of a dc SQUID Paolo Falferi and Michele Bonaldi

    E-print Network

    1 Characterization of the input noise sources of a dc SQUID Paolo Falferi and Michele Bonaldi in a dc SQUID by Tesche and Clarke, we derive the expressions of the current and voltage input noise spectral densities in a dc SQUID current amplifier operated in a flux locked mode. The expected current

  3. FEEDING BEHAVIOR, FOOD CONSUMPTION, GROWTH, AND RESPIRATION OF THE SQUID LOLIGO OPALESCENS RAISED

    E-print Network

    FEEDING BEHAVIOR, FOOD CONSUMPTION, GROWTH, AND RESPIRATION OF THE SQUID LOLIGO OPALESCENS RAISED IN THE LABORATORY ANN C. HURLEY' ABSTRACT The squid Loligo opalescens was raised in the laboratory to a maximum age of 100 days on a diet of Artemia nauplii and adults. Newly hatched squid (2.7 mm mantle length) readily

  4. Video Article Obtaining Hemocytes from the Hawaiian Bobtail Squid Euprymna scolopes and

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Video Article Obtaining Hemocytes from the Hawaiian Bobtail Squid Euprymna scolopes and Observing.V. (2010). Obtaining Hemocytes from the Hawaiian Bobtail Squid Euprymna scolopes and Observing between the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes and the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri has

  5. Biodiversity among luminescent symbionts from squid of the genera Uroteuthis, Loliolus and Euprymna (Mollusca: Cephalopoda)

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Biodiversity among luminescent symbionts from squid of the genera Uroteuthis, Loliolus and Euprymna, bilobed light organs of sepiolid and loliginid squids. Although morphology of these organs in both families of squid is similar, the species of bacteria that inhabit each host has yet to be verified. We

  6. Squid Catches Resulting From Trawl Surveys off the Southeastern United States

    E-print Network

    Squid Catches Resulting From Trawl Surveys off the Southeastern United States J. DAVID WHITAKER Introduction The importance of the squid fishery off the northeastern United States has grown considerably since 1964 with re- cent squid catches by foreign fleets av- eraging 50,000 t (110,231 ,000 pounds

  7. Backaction Noise in Strongly Interacting Systems: The dc SQUID and the Interacting Quantum Point Contact

    E-print Network

    Clerk, Aashish

    Backaction Noise in Strongly Interacting Systems: The dc SQUID and the Interacting Quantum Point (i.e., noise temperature) of a dc SQUID amplifier and, equivalently, a quantum point-contact detector not been studied. A second correlated detector of obvious practical im- portance is the dc SQUID amplifier

  8. Protein synthesis in a solitary benthic cephalopod, the Southern dumpling squid (Euprymna tasmanica)

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Protein synthesis in a solitary benthic cephalopod, the Southern dumpling squid (Euprymna tasmanica-history Protein synthesis Squid Tissue protein synthesis Rates of protein synthesis were measured in the whole-dose of 3 H phenylalanine for the measurement of protein synthesis with different size squid and to make

  9. Signal detection in l/f noise of SQUID magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, B.; Anderson, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the variance on the SQUID power spectrum in the l/f low frequency region is well behaved, i.e., any small frequency band may be treated as white noise in standard power spectrum estimation theory. Specifically a calibration signal is examined at 0.017 Hz with an equivalent energy referred to the SQUID input coil of 1 times 10 to the -30th J and a digitally recorded and analyzed record of 140 hr duration obtained an optimum S/N better than 400. The results are in good agreement with theory. In addition no deviation from the l/f dependence of the noise energy spectrum is seen down to frequencies below 10 to the -5th Hz. A commercially available SQUID and electronics system were used.

  10. Application of SQUIDs for registration of biomagnetic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitovych, I. D.; Primin, M. A.; Sosnytskyy, V. N.

    2012-04-01

    Supersensitive magnetometric systems based on low-temperature SQUIDs have been designed to conduct research in cardiology (magnetocardiography) and to examine distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in biologic objects. Such SQUID magnetometric systems are distinguished by their noise immunity enabling research in nonscreened rooms. High repeatability of research outcomes has been confirmed. The use of magnetocardiographic systems has permitted a new screening information technology to be developed to diagnose heart diseases at early stages. Magnetic imaging of heart's action currents is an ideal way to test local electrical heterogeneity of myocardium. It is shown that magnetocardiography has a significant potential for both basic science of analysis of heart's biosignals and clinical cardiologic practice. A SQUID magnetometric system measuring magnetic signals radiated by the organs of laboratory animals is described. Information technology for automatic recording and transforming magnetometric data has been developed; the measurement of signals over rats' livers while injecting intravenously the nanoparticles of iron oxides and lead solutions are presented.

  11. NMR/MRI with hyperpolarized gas and high Tc SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Schlenga, Klaus (Eggenstein, DE); de Souza, Ricardo E. (Recife, BR); Wong-Foy, Annjoe (Berkeley, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals and production of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from samples combines the use of hyperpolarized inert gases to enhance the NMR signals from target nuclei in a sample and a high critical temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect the NMR signals. The system operates in static magnetic fields of 3 mT or less (down to 0.1 mT), and at temperatures from liquid nitrogen (77K) to room temperature. Sample size is limited only by the size of the magnetic field coils and not by the detector. The detector is a high Tc SQUID magnetometer designed so that the SQUID detector can be very close to the sample, which can be at room temperature.

  12. Improved Readout Scheme for SQUID-Based Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin

    2007-01-01

    An improved readout scheme has been proposed for high-resolution thermometers, (HRTs) based on the use of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) to measure temperature- dependent magnetic susceptibilities. The proposed scheme would eliminate counting ambiguities that arise in the conventional scheme, while maintaining the superior magnetic-flux sensitivity of the conventional scheme. The proposed scheme is expected to be especially beneficial for HRT-based temperature control of multiplexed SQUIDbased bolometer sensor arrays. SQUID-based HRTs have become standard for measuring and controlling temperatures in the sub-nano-Kelvin temperature range in a broad range of low-temperature scientific and engineering applications. A typical SQUIDbased HRT that utilizes the conventional scheme includes a coil wound on a core made of a material that has temperature- dependent magnetic susceptibility in the temperature range of interest. The core and the coil are placed in a DC magnetic field provided either by a permanent magnet or as magnetic flux inside a superconducting outer wall. The aforementioned coil is connected to an input coil of a SQUID. Changes in temperature lead to changes in the susceptibility of the core and to changes in the magnetic flux detected by the SQUID. The SQUID readout instrumentation is capable of measuring magnetic-flux changes that correspond to temperature changes down to a noise limit .0.1 nK/Hz1/2. When the flux exceeds a few fundamental flux units, which typically corresponds to a temperature of .100 nK, the SQUID is reset. The temperature range can be greatly expanded if the reset events are carefully tracked and counted, either by a computer running appropriate software or by a dedicated piece of hardware.

  13. Observations on the spawning behavior, egg masses and paralarval development of the ommastrephid squid Todarodes pacificus in a laboratory mesocosm.

    PubMed

    Puneeta, Pandey; Vijai, Dharmamony; Yoo, Hae-Kyun; Matsui, Hajime; Sakurai, Yasunori

    2015-12-01

    The spawning behavior of ommastrephid squids has never been observed under natural conditions. Previous laboratory observations of Japanese flying squid (Todarodes pacificus) suggest that pre-spawning females might rest on the continental shelf or slope before they ascend above the pycnocline to spawn, and that the egg masses might settle in the pycnocline. Here, two mesocosm experiments were conducted in a 300?m(3) tank that was 6 m deep to investigate this hypothesis. In the first experiment, a thermocline (2.5-3.5?m) was established in the tank by creating a thermally stratified (17-22°C) water column. In the second experiment, the temperature was uniform (22°C) at all depths. Prior to spawning, females did not rest on the tank floor. In the stratified water column, egg masses remained suspended in the thermocline, but in an unstratified water column, they settled on the tank bottom, collapsed and were infested by microbes, resulting in abnormal or nonviable embryos. Eleven females spawned a total of 18 egg masses (17-80?cm in diameter), indicating that females can spawn more than once when under stress. Paralarvae hatched at stage 30/31 and survived for up to 10?days, allowing us to observe the most advanced stage of paralarvae in captivity. Paralarvae survived after consumption of the inner yolk, suggesting they might have fed in the tank. PMID:26632456

  14. Autonomous Martian flying rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A remotely programmable, autonomous flying rover is proposed to extensively survey the Martian surface environment. A Mach .3, solar powered, modified flying wing could cover roughly a 2000 mile range during Martian daylight hours. Multiple craft launched from an orbiting mother ship could provide near-global coverage. Each craft is envisioned to fly at about 1 km above the surface and measure atmospheric composition, pressure and temperature, map surface topography, and remotely penetrate the near subsurface looking for water (ice) and perhaps evidence of life. Data collected are relayed to Earth via the orbiting mother ship. Near surface guidance and control capability is an adaptation of current cruise missile technology. A solar powered aircraft designed to fly in the low temperature, low density, carbon dioxide Martian atmosphere near the surface appears feasible.

  15. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  16. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  17. A Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS)

    E-print Network

    Delgado, Carlos Alberto Arguelles; Weaver, Christopher N

    2014-01-01

    Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS) is a C++ code designed to solve semi-analytically the evolution of a set of density matrices and scalar functions. This is done efficiently by expressing all operators in an SU(N) basis. SQuIDS provides a base class from which users can derive new classes to include new non-trivial terms from the right hand sides of density matrix equations. The code was designed in the context of solving neutrino oscillation problems, but can be applied to any problem that involves solving the quantum evolution of a collection of particles with Hilbert space of dimension up to six.

  18. Isolation and characterization of collagen from squid ( Ommastrephes bartrami) skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mingyan; Li, Bafang; Zhao, Xue

    2009-06-01

    Collagen of squid ( Ommastrephes bartrami) skin was examined in the present study. Histology showed that collagen fiber in the skin was partially cross-linked with muscle fiber. Acid-solubilized collagen (ASC) and pepsin-solubilized collagen (PSC) were extracted from the skin and characterized. The results of amino acid composition and electrophoretic patterns revealed that ASC and PSC were both type I collagen, containing ?1 and ?2 chains. FTIR (fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) investigations confirmed the existence of helical arrangements in PSC of squid skin. The denaturation temperature (Td) and shrinkage temperature (Ts) of PSC were 29.4°C and 52.8°C, respectively.

  19. A Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS)

    E-print Network

    Carlos Alberto Arguelles Delgado; Jordi Salvado; Christopher N. Weaver

    2014-12-11

    Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS) is a C++ code designed to solve semi-analytically the evolution of a set of density matrices and scalar functions. This is done efficiently by expressing all operators in an SU(N) basis. SQuIDS provides a base class from which users can derive new classes to include new non-trivial terms from the right hand sides of density matrix equations. The code was designed in the context of solving neutrino oscillation problems, but can be applied to any problem that involves solving the quantum evolution of a collection of particles with Hilbert space of dimension up to six.

  20. Polarization rotation by an rf-SQUID metasurface

    E-print Network

    Caputo, J -G; Maimistov, A I

    2015-01-01

    We study the transmission and reflection of a plane electromagnetic wave through a two dimensional array of rf-SQUIDs. The basic equations describing the amplitudes of the magnetic field and current in the split-ring resonators are developed. These yield in the linear approximation the reflection and transmission coefficients. The polarization of the reflected wave is independent of the frequency of the incident wave and of its polarization; it is defined only by the orientation of the split-ring. The reflection and transmission coefficients have a strong resonance that is determined by the parameters of the rf-SQUID; its strength depends essentially on the incident angle.

  1. SQUID-based Resonant Detection of Axion Dark Matter

    E-print Network

    Vladimir Popov

    2014-10-24

    A new method for searching for Dark Matter axions is proposed. It is shown that a two-contact SQUID can detect oscillating magnetic perturbations induced by the axions in a strong inhomogeneous magnetic field. A resonant signal is a steplike response in the SQUID current-voltage characteristic at a voltage corresponding to the axion mass with a height depending on the axion energy density near the Earth. The proposed experimental technique appears to be sensitive to the axions with masses $m_a\\lesssim 10^{-4}$ eV, which is well-motivated by current researches both in cosmology and in particle physics.

  2. Candidate Source of Flux Noise in SQUIDs: Adsorbed Oxygen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Chuntai; Hu, Jun; Han, Sungho; Yu, Clare C.; Wu, R. Q.

    2015-08-01

    A major obstacle to using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) as qubits is flux noise. We propose that the heretofore mysterious spins producing flux noise could be O2 molecules adsorbed on the surface. Using density functional theory calculations, we find that an O2 molecule adsorbed on an ?-alumina surface has a magnetic moment of ˜1.8 ?B . The spin is oriented perpendicular to the axis of the O-O bond, the barrier to spin rotations is about 10 mK. Monte Carlo simulations of ferromagnetically coupled, anisotropic X Y spins on a square lattice find 1 /f magnetization noise, consistent with flux noise in Al SQUIDs.

  3. SQUID-based Resonant Detection of Axion Dark Matter

    E-print Network

    Popov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    A new method for searching for Dark Matter axions is proposed. It is shown that a two-contact SQUID can detect oscillating magnetic perturbations induced by the axions in a strong inhomogeneous magnetic field. A resonant signal is a steplike response in the SQUID current-voltage characteristic at a voltage corresponding to the axion mass with a height depending on the axion energy density near the Earth. The proposed experimental technique appears to be sensitive to the axions with masses $m_a\\lesssim 10^{-4}$ eV, which is well-motivated by current researches both in cosmology and in particle physics.

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Radio-frequency amplifiers based on dc SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, Michael; McDermott, Robert

    2010-09-01

    SQUIDs are an attractive candidate for the amplification of low-level rf and microwave signals. Compared to semiconductor amplifiers, they offer lower noise and much lower power dissipation. Especially at frequencies below 1 GHz, the improvement in noise temperature compared to the best cold semiconductor amplifiers can be as high as 50; noise temperatures only slightly above the quantum limit have been achieved in this frequency range. This article will review the current status of radio-frequency amplifiers based on dc SQUIDs and provide detailed discussions of amplifier noise temperature, input and output impedance, and nonlinearities.

  5. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); McDermott, Robert (Louisville, CO); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz (CH-8006 Zurich, CH)

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  6. Magnetic flux noise in dc SQUIDs: temperature and geometry dependence.

    PubMed

    Anton, S M; Birenbaum, J S; O'Kelley, S R; Bolkhovsky, V; Braje, D A; Fitch, G; Neeley, M; Hilton, G C; Cho, H-M; Irwin, K D; Wellstood, F C; Oliver, W D; Shnirman, A; Clarke, John

    2013-04-01

    The spectral density S(?)(f) = A(2)/(f/1 Hz)(?) of magnetic flux noise in ten dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with systematically varied geometries shows that ? increases as the temperature is lowered; in so doing, each spectrum pivots about a nearly constant frequency. The mean-square flux noise, inferred by integrating the power spectra, grows rapidly with temperature and at a given temperature is approximately independent of the outer dimension of a given SQUID. These results are incompatible with a model based on the random reversal of independent, surface spins. PMID:25167026

  7. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); McDermott, Robert F. (Monona, WI); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  8. Polarization rotation by an rf-SQUID metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, J.-G.; Gabitov, I.; Maimistov, A. I.

    2015-03-01

    We study the transmission and reflection of a plane electromagnetic wave through a two-dimensional array of rf-SQUIDs. The basic equations describing the amplitudes of the magnetic field and current in the split-ring resonators are developed. These yield in the linear approximation the reflection and transmission coefficients. The polarization of the reflected wave is independent of the frequency of the incident wave and of its polarization; it is defined only by the orientation of the split ring. The reflection and transmission coefficients have a strong resonance that is determined by the parameters of the rf-SQUID; its strength depends essentially on the incident angle.

  9. Swimming dynamics and propulsive efficiency of squids throughout ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Bartol, Ian K; Krueger, Paul S; Thompson, Joseph T; Stewart, William J

    2008-12-01

    Squids encounter vastly different flow regimes throughout ontogeny as they undergo critical morphological changes to their two locomotive systems: the fins and jet. Squid hatchlings (paralarvae) operate at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers (Re) and typically have rounded bodies, small fins, and relatively large funnel apertures, whereas juveniles and adults operate at higher Re and generally have more streamlined bodies, larger fins, and relatively small funnel apertures. These morphological changes and varying flow conditions affect swimming performance in squids. To determine how swimming dynamics and propulsive efficiency change throughout ontogeny, digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and kinematic data were collected from an ontogenetic range of long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii and brief squid Lolliguncula brevis swimming in a holding chamber or water tunnel (Re = 20-20 000). Jet and fin wake bulk properties were quantified, and propulsive efficiency was computed based on measurements of impulse and excess kinetic energy in the wakes. Paralarvae relied predominantly on a vertically directed, high frequency, low velocity jet as they bobbed up and down in the water column. Although some spherical vortex rings were observed, most paralarval jets consisted of an elongated vortical region of variable length with no clear pinch-off of a vortex ring from the trailing tail component. Compared with paralarvae, juvenile and adult squid exhibited a more diverse range of swimming strategies, involving greater overall locomotive fin reliance and multiple fin and jet wake modes with better defined vortex rings. Despite greater locomotive flexibility, jet propulsive efficiency of juveniles/adults was significantly lower than that of paralarvae, even when juvenile/adults employed their highest efficiency jet mode involving the production of periodic isolated vortex rings with each jet pulse. When the fins were considered together with the jet for several juvenile/adult swimming sequences, overall propulsive efficiency increased, suggesting that fin contributions are important and should not be overlooked in analyses of the swimming performance of squids. The fins produced significant thrust and consistently had higher propulsive efficiency than did the jet. One particularly important area of future study is the determination of coordinated jet/fin wake modes that have the greatest impact on propulsive efficiency. Although such research would be technically challenging, requiring new, powerful, 3D approaches, it is necessary for a more comprehensive assessment of propulsive efficiency of the squid dual-mode locomotive system. PMID:21669828

  10. Towards a coronal unification with the SunTowards a coronal unification with the Sun Neon and oxygen in low activity starsNeon and oxygen in low activity stars

    E-print Network

    Robrade, Jan

    Towards a coronal unification with the SunTowards a coronal unification with the Sun Neon and oxygen in low activity starsNeon and oxygen in low activity stars The solar abundance / modeling problem & helioseismology neon not directly measured (no photospheric lines) use suitable reference element (O

  11. Two methods for a first order hardware gradiometer using two HTS SQUIDs

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Matlachov, A.

    1998-12-31

    Two different systems for noise cancellation (first order gradiometers) have been developed using two similar high temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUIDs. Analog gradiometry is accomplished in hardware by either (1) subtracting the signals from the sensor and background SQUIDs at a summing amplifier (parallel technique) or (2) converting the inverted background SQUID signal to a magnetic field at the sensor SQUID (series technique). Balance levels achieved are 2000 and 1000 at 20 Hz for the parallel and series methods respectively. The balance level as a function of frequency is also presented. The effect which time delays in the two sets of SQUID electronics have on this balance level is presented and discussed.

  12. Hysteresis and intermittency in a nano-bridge based suspended DC-SQUID

    E-print Network

    Eran Segev; Oren Suchoi; Oleg Shtempluck; Fei Xue; Eyal Buks

    2010-10-21

    We study voltage response of nano-bridge based DC-SQUID fabricated on a Si\\_{3}N\\_{4} membrane. Such a configuration may help in reducing 1/f noise, which originates from substrate fluctuating defects. We find that the poor thermal coupling between the DC-SQUID and the substrate leads to strong hysteretic response of the SQUID, even though it is biased by an alternating current. In addition, when the DC-SQUID is biased near a threshold of spontaneous oscillations, the measured voltage has an intermittent pattern, which depends on the applied magnetic flux through the SQUID.

  13. Mantle hotspot neon in basalts from the Northwest Lau Back-arc Basin

    E-print Network

    Graham, David W.

    Mantle hotspot neon in basalts from the Northwest Lau Back-arc Basin J. E. Lupton,1 R. J. Arculus,2 2012; published 28 April 2012. [1] The neon isotope compositions of basalts from the Northwest Lau Back-arc Basin reflect three-component mixing between an ocean island basalt (OIB) mantle hotspot component, mid

  14. X-ray spectral diagnostics of neon photoionization experiments on the Z-machine

    E-print Network

    Cohen, David

    X-ray spectral diagnostics of neon photoionization experiments on the Z-machine David H. Cohen on an initial spectroscopic study of low-density, x-ray photoionized neon with x-ray spectroscopy plasma, and to explore issues related to the rapid x-ray photoionization of relatively cold, low

  15. The melting curve of neon at high pressure W. L. Vos and J. A. Schouten

    E-print Network

    Vos, Willem L.

    from the point of view of melting, the most inter- esting elements are the rare gasesThe melting curve of neon at high pressure W. L. Vos and J. A. Schouten van der Waals Laboratorium October 1990; accepted 19 November 1990) We have measured the melting curve of neon to 54.5 kbar and 328 K

  16. Enhanced connement discharges in DIII-D with neon and argon induced radiation

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    Enhanced con®nement discharges in DIII-D with neon and argon induced radiation G.L. Jackson a,*, M in the DIII-D tokamak with neon and argon gas pung. These radiating mantle enhanced con®nement discharges have current ¯attop (1400 ms), argon injection (Fig. 1(b)) was started at t 1500 ms during the L-mode phase

  17. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS VOLUME 59, NUMBER 6 15 SEPTEMBER 1973 Hydrogen bonding between neon and water

    E-print Network

    Stillinger, Frank

    THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS VOLUME 59, NUMBER 6 15 SEPTEMBER 1973 Hydrogen bonding between neon (Received 10 May 1973) Portions of the neon-water ground-state potential hypersurface have been mapped chosen the neon-water and argon-water systems for examination in this paper. ill part, that choice stems

  18. PHYSICAL REVIE% B VOLUME 17, NUMBER 6 15 MARCH 1978 Two-phonon scattemig in solid neon

    E-print Network

    Glyde, Henry R.

    PHYSICAL REVIE% B VOLUME 17, NUMBER 6 15 MARCH 1978 Two-phonon scattemig in solid neon %. M neutron scattering from phonons in solid neon at 5 K, is calculated using the self-consistent phonon that the unusually shaped phonon groups they found for high-frequency phonons in neon is due to an unusually large

  19. Neon abundances in normal late-B and mercurymanganese stars M. M. Dworetsky 1# and J. Budaj 1,2#

    E-print Network

    Dworetsky, Mike

    # 2000 RAS Neon abundances in normal late-B and mercury±manganese stars M. M. Dworetsky 1# ² and J calculations to deduce the abundances of neon from visible-region echelle spectra of selected Ne # lines Ne # lines are found in the red region of the spectra of these stars. The mean neon abundance

  20. Neon: System Support for Derived Data Management Qing Zhang John McCullough Justin Ma Nabil Schear

    E-print Network

    Vahdat, Amin

    Neon: System Support for Derived Data Management Qing Zhang John McCullough Justin Ma Nabil Schear a virtual machine monitor sys- tem called Neon that transparently labels derived data using byte- level. Our goal with Neon is to explore the viability and utility of transparent information flow tracking

  1. JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS 23 (1967) 75-78. 0 NORTH-HOLLAND PUBLISHING CO., AMSTERDAM NEON DIFFUSION IN SILVER

    E-print Network

    Glyde, Henry R.

    1967-01-01

    JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS 23 (1967) 75-78. 0 NORTH-HOLLAND PUBLISHING CO., AMSTERDAM NEON. La diffusion du neon dens l'argent a 6th Btudie par bombardement d'une feuille d'argent par des ions Ne Bnergetiques et en observant le degagement du neon pendant des recuits isothermes. La diffusion en

  2. Expected intensities of solar neon-like ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the expected intensities of the stronger solar neon-like ion emission lines, some not yet observed, is carried out to compare with the observational situation. The potential usefulness of the 2p5 3s(3P2) - 2p6 forbidden line as a density diagnostic is discussed, and new electric quadrupole lines in the soft X-ray range are noted. 'Observability diagrams' are presented as a convenient overview of the known and unobserved lines. The S VII resonance lines appear to have anomalous intensities.

  3. The abundances of neon, sulfur, and argon in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. C.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Aller, L. H.; Geballe, T. R.; Baas, F.

    1981-01-01

    New infrared observations of Ne II, Ar III, and S IV are used in optical observations of other ionization states of the considered elements to evaluate the abundances of neon, argon, and sulfur in 18 planetary nebulae. Attention is also given to one or more of the infrared lines in 18 other nebulae. It is pointed out that S IV was detected in approximately 90% of the observed objects, while Ar III was found in about 80%, and Ne II in roughly one-third. It is noted that optical observations typically include only a limited region of the nebula, while the infrared measurements frequently involve integration over the entire nebular image.

  4. Noble gases in diamonds - Occurrences of solarlike helium and neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Reynolds, J. H.; Roedder, E.; Epstein, S.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen diamond samples from diverse locations were analyzed for the contents of He, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and of their isotopes, using a Reynolds (1956) type glass mass spectrometer. The results disclosed a large spread in the He-3/He-4 ratios, ranging from values below atmospheric to close to the solar ratio. In particular, solarlike He-3/He-4 ratios were seen for an Australian colorless diamond composite and an Arkansas diamond, which also displayed solarlike neon isotopic ratios. Wide variation was also observed in the He-4/Ar-40 ratios, suggesting a complex history for the source regions and the diamond crystallization processes.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics modulation in a neon glow discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Paul M.

    In dynamics modulation, two modes in a driven neon glow discharge alternate as the dominant mode as their response to the driving force alternates between spatiotemporal and temporal periodic pulling. This phenomenon was first noted by Koepke, Weltmann, and Selcher (Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 40, 1716 (1995)), who saw two limited but representative cases and proposed a mechanism (Phys. Rev. E 62, 2773 (2000)) by which it occurs. The intent of this dissertation is to document experimentally and test the dynamics modulation mechanism they proposed. Using a new extension of a previous mathematical treatment of periodic pulling, the resulting experimental data are used to verify the predicted mechanism. A numerical model is also presented that reproduces the signature of dynamics modulation and further supports the validity of the mechanism. For two pairs of mode frequencies, three complete data series as driving frequency is increased are presented. Each of these data series shows the progression of the system from pure spatiotemporal behavior, through dynamics modulation, and ending at entrainment in the upper mode. Ionization wave modes are examined using time series recorded using a photodiode with a narrow band filter that selectively passes the primary neon spectral line at 640 nm. The system was periodically driven using a narrow-band ring dye laser tuned to a wavelength near the metastable neon transition at 588.35 nm. The amplitude of the driving force was decreased (increased) by tuning the laser away from (nearer to) the center of the neon line, while the driving frequency was controlled by an acousto-optic modulator chopping the laser beam at the desired frequency. Arnol'd tongue boundaries identifying the edges of frequency entrainment regions in the driving amplitude-driving frequency plane were established for four different discharge currents. The (upward) dynamics modulation behavior seen by Koepke, Weltmann, and Selcher was reproduced and additional data were acquired for two additional representative cases of downward modulations, previously undocumented. The upward modulations are used to verify the mechanism, while the downward modulations exhibit qualitatively different behavior. These differences are discussed. Two coupled van der Pol equations were chosen to model the mechanism described by Koepke, Weltmann, and Selcher, and the resulting time series was solved with a Runge-Kutta routine whose parameters could be adjusted as the simulation proceeded. The model successfully reproduces the qualitative behavior of dynamics modulation and reinforces the experimental verification of the proposed mechanism, but lacks sufficient complexity for a complete quantitative comparison.

  6. In situ measurements of neon in the thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, W. E.; Kayser, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    The open source neutral mass spectrometer on the Atmosphere Explorer-C satellite has measured neon in the thermosphere. The absolute density of Ne is close to that predicted by using the ground level fraction by volume of Ne along with the assumption of diffusive equilibrium above 100 km. Data is presented for both geomagnetically quiet and disturbed circular orbits. At 290 km, a typical low latitude value of Ne is 3.0 x 10 to the 4th/cu cm. At this altitude Ne appears to be predominantly controlled by temperature except during magnetic disturbances, when offsetting forces due to wind systems may be present.

  7. A YBCO RF-SQUID magnetometer and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luwei, Zhou; Jingwu, Qiu; Xienfeng, Zhang; Zhiming, Tank; Yongjia, Qian

    1990-01-01

    An applicable RF-superconducting quantum interference detector (SQUID) magnetometer was made using a bulk sintered yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO). The temperature range of the magnetometer is 77 to 300 K and the field range 0 to 0.1T. At 77 K, the equivalent flux noise of the SQUID is 5 x 10 to minus 4 power theta sub o/square root of Hz at the frequency range of 20 to 200 Hz. The experiments show that the SQUID noise at low-frequency end is mainly from 1/f noise. A coil test shows that the magnetic moment sensitivity delta m is 10 to the minus 6th power emu. The RF-SQUID is shielded in a YBCO cylinder with a shielding ability B sub in/B sub ex of about 10 to the minus 6th power when external dc magnetic field is about a few Oe. The magnetometer is successfully used in characterizing superconducting thin films.

  8. High-Resolution Displacement Sensor Using a SQUID Array Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin; Barmatz, M.; Paik, Ho Jung

    2004-01-01

    Improvement in the measurement of displacement has profound implications for both exploration technologies and fundamental physics. For planetary exploration, the new SQUID-based capacitive displacement sensor will enable a more sensitive gravity gradiometer for mapping the interior of planets and moons. A new concept of a superfluid clock to be reported by Penanen and Chui at this workshop is also based on a high-resolution displacement sensor. Examples of high-impact physics projects that can benefit from a better displacement sensor are: detection of gravitational waves, test of the equivalence principle, search for the postulated "axion" particle, and test of the inverse square law of gravity. We describe the concept of a new displacement sensor that makes use of a recent development in the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) technology. The SQUID array amplifier, invented by Welty and Martinis (IEEE Trans. Appl. Superconductivity 3, 2605, 1993), has about the same noise as a conventional SQUID; however, it can work at a much higher frequency of up to 5 MHz. We explain how the higher bandwidth can be translated into higher resolution using a bridge-balancing scheme that can simultaneously balance out both the carrier signal at the bridge output and the electrostatic force acting on the test mass.

  9. Vampire squid: detritivores in the oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Hoving, Hendrik J T; Robison, Bruce H

    2012-11-22

    Vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis) are considered phylogenetic relics with cephalopod features of both octopods and squids. They lack feeding tentacles, but in addition to their eight arms, they have two retractile filaments, the exact functions of which have puzzled scientists for years. We present the results of investigations on the feeding ecology and behaviour of Vampyroteuthis, which include extensive in situ, deep-sea video recordings from MBARI's remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), laboratory feeding experiments, diet studies and morphological examinations of the retractile filaments, the arm suckers and cirri. Vampire squid were found to feed on detrital matter of various sizes, from small particles to larger marine aggregates. Ingested items included the remains of gelatinous zooplankton, discarded larvacean houses, crustacean remains, diatoms and faecal pellets. Both ROV observations and laboratory experiments led to the conclusion that vampire squid use their retractile filaments for the capture of food, supporting the hypothesis that the filaments are homologous to cephalopod arms. Vampyroteuthis' feeding behaviour is unlike any other cephalopod, and reveals a unique adaptation that allows these animals to spend most of their life at depths where oxygen concentrations are very low, but where predators are few and typical cephalopod food is scarce. PMID:23015627

  10. A Numerical Treatment of the Rf SQUID: II. Noise Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Clarke, John

    2007-01-15

    We investigate rf SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices), coupled to a resonant input circuit, a readout tank circuit and a preamplifier, by numerically solving the corresponding Langevin equations and optimizing model parameters with respect to noise temperature. We also give approximate analytic solutions for the noise temperature, which we reduce to parameters of the SQUID and the tank circuit in the absence of the input circuit. The analytic solutions agree with numerical simulations of the full circuit to within 10%, and are similar to expressions used to calculate the noise temperature of dc SQUIDs. The best device performance is obtained when {beta}{sub L}{prime} {triple_bond} 2{pi}LI{sub 0}/{Phi}{sub 0} is 0.6-0.8; L is the SQUID inductance, I{sub 0} the junction critical current and F{sub 0} the flux quantum. For a tuned input circuit we find an optimal noise temperature T{sub N,opt} {approx} 3Tf/f{sub c}, where T, f and f{sub c} denote temperature, signal frequency and junction characteristic frequency, respectively. This value is only a factor of 2 larger than the optimal noise temperatures obtained by approximate analytic theories carried out previously in the limit {beta}{sub L}{prime} << 1. We study the dependence of the noise temperature on various model parameters, and give examples using realistic device parameters of the extent to which the intrinsic noise temperature can be realized experimentally.

  11. Quorum Sensing in the Squid-Vibrio Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Subhash C.; Miyashiro, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing is an intercellular form of communication that bacteria use to coordinate group behaviors such as biofilm formation and the production of antibiotics and virulence factors. The term quorum sensing was originally coined to describe the mechanism underlying the onset of luminescence production in cultures of the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Luminescence and, more generally, quorum sensing are important for V. fischeri to form a mutualistic symbiosis with the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The symbiosis is established when V. fischeri cells migrate via flagella-based motility from the surrounding seawater into a specialized structure injuvenile squid called the light organ. The cells grow to high cell densities within the light organ where the infection persists over the lifetime of the animal. A hallmark of a successful symbiosis is the luminescence produced by V. fischeri that camouflages the squid at night by eliminating its shadow within the water column. While the regulatory networks governing quorum sensing are critical for properly regulating V. fischeri luminescence within the squid light organ, they also regulate luminescence-independent processes during symbiosis. In this review, we discuss the quorum-sensing network of V. fischeri and highlight its impact at various stages during host colonization. PMID:23965960

  12. Abstract--Three experiments were performed in an estuarine squid-

    E-print Network

    (Kennelly and Broadhurst, 2002). Much research into gear design to reduce bycatch has been undertaken of BRDs designed to separate organisms according to differences in behavior. In particular, versions). Experiments in gear configuration to reduce bycatch in an estuarine squid-trawl fishery James P. Scandol

  13. Orientation dependence of broadband acoustic backscattering from live squid

    E-print Network

    Stanton, Tim

    . Lavery, and Timothy K. Stanton Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering, Woods Hole, and suffer from the problem of avoidance and damage to the animals. These problems are exacerbated for squid, 1998), and do not suffer from the problem of avoidance or net-induced damage to the animals, though

  14. Crystallographic Study of the LUMI Intermediate of Squid Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Midori; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Upon absorption of light, the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin isomerizes from the 11-cis to the trans configuration, initiating a photoreaction cycle. The primary photoreaction state, bathorhodopsin (BATHO), relaxes thermally through lumirhodopsin (LUMI) into a photoactive state, metarhodopsin (META), which stimulates the conjugated G-protein. Previous crystallographic studies of squid and bovine rhodopsins have shown that the structural change in the primary photoreaction of squid rhodopsin is considerably different from that observed in bovine rhodopsin. It would be expected that there is a fundamental difference in the subsequent thermal relaxation process between vertebrate and invertebrate rhodopsins. In this work, we performed crystallographic analyses of the LUMI state of squid rhodopsin using the P62 crystal. When the crystal was illuminated at 100 K with blue light, a half fraction of the protein was converted into BATHO. This reaction state relaxed into LUMI when the illuminated crystal was warmed in the dark to 170 K. It was found that, whereas trans retinal is largely twisted in BATHO, it takes on a more planar configuration in LUMI. This relaxation of retinal is accompanied by reorientation of the Schiff base NH bond, the hydrogen-bonding partner of which is switched to Asn185 in LUMI. Unlike bovine rhodopsin, the BATHO-to-LUMI transition in squid rhodopsin was accompanied by no significant change in the position/orientation of the beta-ionone ring of retinal. PMID:26024518

  15. Magnetic biosensor using a high transition temperature SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Helene Lila

    A high transition temperature (Tc) Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is used to detect magnetically-labeled microorganisms. The targets are identified and quantified by means of magnetic relaxation measurements, with no need for unbound magnetic labels to be washed away. The binding rate between antibody-linked magnetic particles and targets can be measured with this technique. Installed in a "SQUID microscope," a YBa2Cu 3O7-delta SQUID is mounted on a sapphire rod thermally linked to a liquid nitrogen can; these components are enclosed in a fiberglass vacuum chamber. A thin window separates the vacuum chamber from the sample, which is at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. In one mode of the experiment, targets are immobilized on a substrate and immersed a suspension of ˜50 nm diameter superparamagnetic particles, coated with antibodies. A pulsed magnetic field aligns the magnetic dipole moments, and the SQUID measures the magnetic relaxation signal each time the field is turned off. Unbound particles relax within ˜50 mus by Brownian rotation, too fast for the SQUID system to measure. In contrast, particles bound to targets have their Brownian motion inhibited. These particles relax in ˜1 s by rotation of the internal dipole moment, and this Neel relaxation process is detected by the SQUID. This assay is demonstrated with a model system of liposomes carrying the FLAG epitope; the detection limit is (2.7 +/- 0.2) x 105 particles. The replacement of the SQUID with a gradiometer improves the detection limit to (7.0 +/- 0.7) x 103 particles. In an alternate mode of the experiment, freely suspended targets (larger than ˜1 mum diameter) are detected. Since the Brownian relaxation time of the targets is longer than the measurement time, particles bound to targets are effectively immobilized and exhibit Neel relaxation. Listeria monocytogenes are detected using this method; the sensitivity is (1.1 +/- 0.2) x 105 bacteria in 20 muL. For a 1 nL sample volume, the detection limit is expected to be 230 +/- 40 bacteria. Time-resolved measurements, which yield the binding rate between particles and bacteria, are reported. Also, potential improvements to the system and possible applications are discussed.

  16. SQUID-detected NMR and MRI in microtesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Robert Francis

    A low transition temperature do Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (low-Tc do SQUID) was used to perform liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments in magnetic fields from microtesla to tens of microtesla, corresponding to proton Larmor frequencies from tens of Hz to kHz. The spins were polarized in a magnetic field of the order of millitesla. Upon turnoff of the polarizing field, precession was induced in the much weaker measurement field. Because the SQUID magnetometer was operated with an untuned, superconducting, input circuit, the integrated intensity of the NMR lines was independent of the strength of the measurement field. On the other hand, the NMR linewidth scaled linearly with the measurement field strength. Narrowing of the NMR signal bandwidth through reduction of the strength of the measurement field led to an enhancement of both spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A novel cryogenic insert was constructed to allow SQUID measurement of NMR signals from room temperature samples with high filling factor. From samples with volume of a few milliliters and thermal polarization of order 10 -8, SNR of a few tens were achieved in a single shot. Heteronuclear scalar couplings were resolved in 1H-31P and 1H-13C systems. Furthermore, the frequency-independent sensitivity of the untuned SQUID magnetometer allowed simultaneous detection of NMR signals from nuclei with different magnetogyric ratios. A system based on a low-Tc SQUID gradiometer was used to acquire MRIs from distilled water and mineral oil phantoms in microtesla fields. The bandwidth-narrowing technique was exploited to enhance spatial resolution for a fixed strength of the encoding gradients. With magnetic field gradients of the order of tens of microtesla per meter, images with spatial resolution of a millimeter were achieved. The techniques described in this thesis could readily be adapted for use with multichannel SQUID systems designed for biomagnetic measurements at low frequency, and represent a first step toward the development of low cost, portable NMR and MRI scanners based on untuned SQUID magnetometers.

  17. Phases of Neon, Xenon, and Methane adsorbed on nanotube bundles

    E-print Network

    M. M. Calbi; S. M. Gatica; M. J. Bojan; M. W. Cole

    2001-07-09

    We explore the behavior of neon, xenon, and methane filmas adsorbed on the external surface of a bundle of carbon nanotubes. The methods used are classical: a ground state calculation, by grand potential energy minimization, and the grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) method of simulation. Our results are similar to those found recently in a GCMC study of Ar and Kr. At low chemical potential (pressure) the particles form a quasi-one dimensional phase within the groove formed by two contiguous tubes. At higher chemical potential, there occurs a "three-stripe" phase aligned parallel to the groove (except for xenon). This is followed by monolayer and bilayer phases. The low temperature monolayer phase is striped; the number of stripes per nanotube is a quantized function of the adatom size. In the neon case, the bilayer regime also includes a second layer groove phase. Our results are compared with recent thermal and diffraction experiments. We find no evidence of a zig-zag phase reported recently.

  18. New Design of Neon Refrigerator for Hts Power Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Hirai, H.; Takaike, A.; Hirokawa, M.; Aizawa, Y.; Kamioka, Y.; Okamoto, H.; Hayashi, H.; Shiohara, Y.

    2010-04-01

    In 2007, we developed a prototype refrigerator with a small turbo-expander to provide adequate cooling power (2 kW at 70 K) for HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) power machines. The reverse-Brayton cycle with neon gas as a working fluid was adopted in the refrigerator. The prototype refrigerator does not have enough COP (Coefficient of Performance) for practical HTS applications, and the purpose of this study is to research the information required for designing a new neon refrigerator with improved performance. We take the same refrigeration cycle and working fluid as the prototype one adopted, but a lower process pressure of 1 MPa/0.5 MPa is chosen instead of 2 MPa/1 MPa. The lower process pressure is required by the turbo-compressor design and the refrigeration process is analyzed by using a newly developed process simulator. Also, a heat-exchanger configuration is studied to make the refrigerator size small. The new refrigerator will have a cooling power of 2.5 kW at 65 K, and a COP of 0.06 at 80 K.

  19. Infrared spectra of small molecular ions trapped in solid neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacox, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-22

    The infrared spectrum of a molecular ion provides a unique signature for that species, gives information on its structure, and is amenable to remote sensing. It also serves as a comparison standard for refining ab initio calculations. Experiments in this laboratory trap molecular ions in dilute solid solution in neon at 4.2 K in sufficient concentration for observation of their infrared spectra between 450 and 4000 cm{sup !1}. Discharge-excited neon atoms produce cations by photoionization and/or Penning ionization of the parent molecule. The resulting electrons are captured by other molecules, yielding anions which provide for overall charge neutrality of the deposit. Recent observations of ions produced from C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and BF{sub 3} will be discussed. Because of their relatively large possibility of having low-lying excited electronic states, small, symmetric molecular cations are especially vulnerable to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Some phenomena which can result from this breakdown will be discussed. Ion-molecule reaction rates are sufficiently high that in some systems absorptions of dimer cations and anions are also observed. When H{sub 2} is introduced into the system, the initially-formed ion may react with it. Among the species resulting from such ion-molecule reactions that have recently been studied are O{sub 4}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, HOCO{sup +}, and HCO{sub 2}{sup !}.

  20. Flies and the mouth.

    PubMed

    Hassona, Yazan; Scully, Crispian; Aguida, Miranda; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2014-05-01

    Oral infections caused by flies are rarely encountered in clinical practice, and consequently, there is a paucity of information in the medical and dental literature about these conditions. In the present article, we present a concise review on oral myiasis or fly-blown disease. A variety of fly species can infest the oral tissues and produce an exotic clinical picture. Oral myiasis is mainly encountered in the tropics and subtropics, but can also be encountered in the western part of the world due to the increase of globalization, immigration, and global warming. Commonly-reported symptoms of oral myiasis include pain, swelling, itchy sensation, and feeling of something moving in the mouth. The surgical debridement of infected tissue with the removal of maggots is the treatment of choice in most cases of oral myiasis. PMID:24574273

  1. Autonomous Flying Controls Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    The Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) is a relatively small and inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches. The most recent version of the FLiC is configured with 16 independent aileron segments, supports the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers, and is capable of fully autonomous flight from takeoff roll to landing, including flight test maneuvers. The test vehicle is basically a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) at Fort Eustis,Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. Several vehicles have been constructed and collectively have flown over 600 successful test flights.

  2. NEON: Transforming Environmental Data into Free, Open Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, B.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect data across the United States on the impacts of climate change, land use change and invasive species on natural resources and biodiversity. NEON is a project of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), with many other U.S. agencies and NGOs cooperating. The Observatory’s construction plans call for 60 sites distributed across 20 ecoclimatic Domains. Data will be collected from strategically selected sites within each Domain and synthesized into information products that can be used to describe changes in the nation’s ecosystem through space and time. Sites are arrayed across different land-use types in order to understand large-scale environmental drivers affect biodiversity, ecohydrology, biogeochemistry, and disease ecology across the US continent. NEON is an instrument that listens to the pulse of the US continental ecosystem: infrastructure deployed at these sites will collect an average of over 500 primary measurements at each site, including annual high-resolution airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral data. These primary measurements will be transformed by a state-of-the-art cyberinfrastruture into over 100 higher-order data products. All measurements, data products, algorithms used to compute the data products, and protocols used to collect the primary measurements will be freely available to the public and assessable over the internet. The information products, including selected socio-economic datasets from cooperating Federal agencies, will be served in standard formats, grid-sizes, and geographical projections. This type of information is anticipated to have a wide range of uses, including ecological forecasting, education, public engagement, socio-economic analyses, decision support for climate-change adaptation and mitigation, resource management, and environmental risk management. Open data, interoperability, an open and integrated observation infrastructure, public engagement, and a deliberate approach to making sure that research data can be repurposed for operational purposes are the cornerstones of the NEON strategy: they facilitate the repurposing of credible, reliable data and information for multiple purposes. Often, the same data is useful in an undergraduate course on correlations as it is for public discourse on the effects of increased precipitation on stream water quality. This suggests a strategy for evolving an ecosystem of institutions whose primary responsibility is contributing to an open information commons that creates and curates credible sources of data and information products with clearly documented provenance, quality protocols, uncertainty estimates, and other qualitative descriptors. This information commons is deliberately designed to be tapped by another ecosystem of institutions whose individual missions revolve around some combination of discovery (e.g. research, forecasting, innovation), learning (e.g. public engagement, informal and formal learning, education research), and solutions (e.g. science and technology policy). This talk explores how the NEON information commons is envisioned to interact with this other community of institutions, and how the cornerstone principles enable that community to better focus their creative capabilities around their respective core missions.

  3. NEON, Establishing a Standardized Network for Groundwater Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, M.; Schroeter, N.; Goodman, K. J.; Roehm, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is establishing a standardized set of data collection systems comprised of in-situ sensors and observational sampling to obtain data fundamental to the analysis of environmental change at a continental scale. NEON will be collecting aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric data using Observatory-wide standardized designs and methods via a systems engineering approach. This approach ensures a wealth of high quality data, data algorithms, and models that will be freely accessible to all communities such as academic researchers, policy makers, and the general public. The project is established to provide 30 years of data which will enable prediction and forecasting of drivers and responses of ecological change at scales ranging from localized responses through regional gradients and up to the continental scale. The Observatory is a distributed system of sites spread across the United States, including Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, which is subdivided into 20 statistically unique domains, based on a set of 18 ecologically important parameters. Each domain contains at least one core aquatic and terrestrial site which are located in unmanaged lands, and up to 2 additional sites selected to study domain specific questions such as nitrogen deposition gradients and responses of land use change activities on the ecosystem. Here, we present the development of NEON's groundwater observation well network design and the timing strategy for sampling groundwater chemistry. Shallow well networks, up to 100 feet in depth, will be installed at NEON aquatic sites and will allow for observation of localized ecohydrologic site conditions, by providing basic spatio-temporal near-real time data on groundwater parameters (level, temperature, conductivity) collected from in situ high-resolution instrumentation positioned in each well; and biannual sampling of geochemical and nutrient (N and P) concentrations in a subset of wells for each site. These data will be used to calculate several higher level data products such as hydrologic gradients which drive nutrient fluxes and their change over time. When coupled with other NEON data products, these data will allow for examining surface water/groundwater interactions as well as additional terrestrial and aquatic linkages, such as riparian vegetation response to changing ecohydrologic conditions (i.e. groundwater withdraw for irrigation, land use change) and natural sources (i.e. drought and changing precipitation patterns). This work will present the well network arrays designed for the different types of aquatic sites (1st/2nd order streams, larger rivers, and lakes) including variations on the well network designs for sites where physical constraints hinder a consistent design due to topographic (steep topography, wetlands) or physical constraints (such as permafrost). A generalized sampling strategy for each type of environment will also be detailed indicating the time of year, largely governed by hydrologic conditions, when sampling should take place to provide consistent groundwater chemistry data to allow for analyzing geochemical trends spatially across the network and through time.

  4. Cooling performance of hybrid refrigerant of solid nitrogen and small amount of neon for the purpose of HTS power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashikawa, K.; Nakamura, T.

    2009-11-01

    We have investigated cooling performance of a hybrid refrigerant of solid nitrogen and small amount of neon by using a short sample of Bi-2223/Ag tape as a cooling target. Solid nitrogen is expected as a heat capacitor for HTS applications operated below triple point temperature of nitrogen, and we have proposed in our previous study a method for overcoming the problem of its thermal contact with a cooling target with the aid of small amount of liquid neon. This paper discusses the phase state as well as the quantity of neon required for such an improvement. Nitrogen gas was introduced into a sample chamber through a mass flow controller, and then was liquefied and solidified by a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. After that, in order to improve thermal contact of the solid nitrogen with the sample, neon gas was also introduced into the chamber at 25 K where neon can be liquefied. Cooling performance of such a hybrid refrigerant with different inputs of neon was evaluated by measuring temperature rise of the sample with the transportation of overcurrent. As a result, neon could suppress the temperature rise even in gas state, and the existence of liquid neon could additionally suppress the temperature rise. Furthermore, the required proportion of the liquid neon to the solid nitrogen was very small. From these results, we concluded that introducing neon until neon can be liquefied was the best way to make the most of the potential of the hybrid refrigerant.

  5. Flying and Your Child's Ears

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pregnant? What to Expect Flying and Your Child's Ears KidsHealth > Parents > General Health > Your Kid's Eyes, Ears, ... Tips for Easing Ear Pain Flying's Effects on Ears Many of us have felt that weird ear- ...

  6. Fat Fruit Flies

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi

    2010-08-11

    Broadcast Transcript: Breaking news from South Korea's hi-tech frontline. With the help of drosophila, or the fruit fly, scientists here have discovered strands of genetic material that control growth in the body. They're called micro-RNA and people...

  7. Wisdom from the fly.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Leila E; Larschan, Erica N

    2014-11-01

    Arguably, almost all research in Drosophila can be considered basic research, yet many of the most essential and fundamental concepts of human genetics were first decoded in the fly. Although the fly genome, which is organized into only four chromosomes, is approximately one-twentieth the size of the human genome, it contains roughly the same number of genes, and up to 75% of human disease-related genes have Drosophila homologues [1]. The fly was prized for its simplicity and utility even before such compelling homology with humans was apparent. Since Thomas Hunt Morgan began his seminal experiments over a century ago (Table 1), the Drosophila system has revealed countless key mechanisms by which cells function, including the factors that maintain chromatin and the signaling pathways that control cell fate determination and organism development. More recently, the fly has emerged as a critical neurobiological tool and disease model for a range of genetic disorders. In this review, we present a brief retrospective of Drosophila as an indispensable genetic system and discuss some of the many contributions, past and present, of this facile system to human genetics. PMID:25161083

  8. Go Fly a Kite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopack, Ken

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an "art kite" activity. The idea is to construct and decorate a non-flying kite that they could display for an art exhibit. Through the activity, students learn to give and take suggestions from one another, improve the quality of their work and set a wonderful atmosphere of collaboration. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  9. Flying High with Spring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Carolyn Lang

    2000-01-01

    Presents an art activity for first grade that uses multicolor scratch paper. Explains that students make scratch-drawings of bird nests, then, as a class, discuss types of birds and bird positions (such as sitting or flying), and finally each creates a bird to add to the nest. (CMK)

  10. Influence of dust particles on ionization and excitation in neon dc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumova, V. V.; Polyakov, D. N.; Vasilyak, L. M.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of dust particles on the concentration of metastable neon atoms and ionization was investigated using the developed drift/diffusion model for plasma of positive column of glow discharge. The detailed de-excitation in neon was considered. In addition to usual plasma losses in dusty plasmas, the quenching of metastable atoms on dust particle surface was considered. The strong influence of dust particles on the ionization rate and concentration of metastable neon atoms in a positive column of glow discharge is shown to result from the change in the longitudinal electric field strength.

  11. Dynamics of axial plasma jets in neon and argon plasma focus discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronova, E. O.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Maiorov, A. N.; Nikulin, V. Ya; Silin, P. V.; Stepanenko, A. M.; Suslin, S. V.; Vikhrev, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    Axial plasma jets at the final stage of plasma focus discharge filled by neon or argon were studied by the method of shearing interferometry. It was found that neon plasma is more stable than argon one and jets in neon are stronger than in argon. The velocity of current sheath, taken from experiment, is Vsh = (2-3) × 106 cm/s, while the velocity of cumulative jet is Vj = (3-4) × 107 cm/s. These features are supported by theoretical interpretation given in the frame of 2D MHD model.

  12. Mechanism of the tunable structural color of neon tetra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Shinya

    2010-03-01

    Many examples of the structural color can be found in butterfly wings, beetle's elytra and bird feathers. Since the color-producing microstructures of these examples mainly consist of stable materials, for example, dried cuticles in insects and keratin and melanin granules in bird feathers, it is impossible to actively change the microstructure. On the other hand, some fish have the tunability in their structural colors. For example, a small tropical fish, neon tetra, has a longitudinal stripe that looks blue-green in the day time, while it changes into deep violet at night. This fact clearly indicates the variability in the microstructure. It is known that the iridophore of the stripe part of neon tetra contains two stacks of thin light-reflecting platelets that are made of guanine crystal. Since the arrangement of the platelets is observed periodic, the stack is thought to cause the structural color through the multilayer thin-film interference. Consequently, the variability in the color is thought to originate from the variation in the distance between the platelets. Two explanations have been proposed so far for the distance variation. Lythoge and Shand considered that the distance is controlled by osmotic pressure that induces the inflow of the water into the iridophore[1]. On the other hand, Nagaishi et al. proposed a different model, called Venetian blind model, in which the inclination angle of the platelets is varied, resulting in the change in the distance[2]. Recently, we have performed detailed optical measurements on the iridophore of neon tetra. We have paid particular attention to the direction of the reflected light, since the Venetian blind model expects that the direction varies with the color change owing to the tilt of the platelets. We present the experimental results and quantitatively discuss the validity of the Venetian blind model. [4pt] [1] J. N. Lythgoe, and J. Shand, J Physiol. 325, 23-34 (1982). [0pt] [2] H. Nagaishi, N. Oshima, and R. Fujii, Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 95A, 337-341 (1990).

  13. Metastability in a nano-bridge based hysteretic DC-SQUID embedded in superconducting microwave resonator

    E-print Network

    Eran Segev; Oren Suchoi; Oleg Shtempluck; Fei Xue; Eyal Buks

    2010-07-29

    We study the metastable response of a highly hysteretic DC-SQUID made of a Niobium loop interrupted by two nano-bridges. We excite the SQUID with an alternating current and with direct magnetic flux, and find different stability zones forming diamond-like structures in the measured voltage across the SQUID. When such a SQUID is embedded in a transmission line resonator similar diamond structures are observed in the reflection pattern of the resonator. We have calculated the DC-SQUID stability diagram in the plane of the exciting control parameters, both analytically and numerically. In addition, we have obtained numerical simulations of the SQUID equations of motion, taking into account temperature variations and non-sinusoidal current-phase relation of the nano-bridges. Good agreement is found between experimental and theoretical results.

  14. An annotated checklist of the horse flies, deer flies, and yellow flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Tabanidae includes the horse flies, deer flies, and yellow flies and is considered a significant pest of livestock throughout the United States, including Florida. Tabanids can easily become a major pest of man, especially salt marsh species which are known to readily feed on humans and o...

  15. Laboratory evaluation of novaluron for controlling larval horn flies, house flies, and stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A granular formulation of novaluron (Novaluron 0.2G, 0.2% AI), a newer benzoylphenyl urea insecticide, was evaluated for its efficacy in controlling the larval stage of horn flies, Haematobia irritans (Linnaeus), house flies, Musca domestica Linnaeus, and stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (Linnaeus)...

  16. TES Detector Noise Limited Readout Using SQUID Multiplexers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, J. G.; Benford, D. J.; Chervenak, J. A.; Khan, S. A.; Moseley, S. H.; Shafer, R. A.; Deiker, S.; Grossman, E. N.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TES) with large numbers of individual detector pixels requires multiplexers for efficient readout. The use of multiplexers reduces the number of wires needed between the cryogenic electronics and the room temperature electronics and cuts the number of required cryogenic amplifiers. We are using an 8 channel SQUID multiplexer to read out one-dimensional TES arrays which are used for submillimeter astronomical observations. We present results from test measurements which show that the low noise level of the SQUID multiplexers allows accurate measurements of the TES Johnson noise, and that in operation, the readout noise is dominated by the detector noise. Multiplexers for large number of channels require a large bandwidth for the multiplexed readout signal. We discuss the resulting implications for the noise performance of these multiplexers which will be used for the readout of two dimensional TES arrays in next generation instruments.

  17. A SQUID NDE system for the investigation of pinch welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C.; Espy, M. A.; Kraus, Robert H., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    We present preliminary results for a magnetic flow spectrometer for magnetic microparticle separation, and a magnetic flow cytometer for particle identification. The application of the instrument is to high-throughput bioassay. Here we report on the first application of our magnetic spectrometer to the sorting of ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic microspheres in flow. The system is based on a permanent magnet quadrupole and separates the polymer coated magnetic microspheres based on their magnetic moments. The cryogenic section of our magnetic flow cytometer, which involves SQUID-based detection of the sorted magnetic microspheres based on their magnetic moments, has been re-engineered to permit a smaller standoff between the SQUID array and the flowing magnetic particles. We present preliminary results with the new experimental setup, with an emphasis on both spatial and signal resolution.

  18. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Schönau, T; Zakosarenko, V; Schmelz, M; Stolz, R; Anders, S; Linzen, S; Meyer, M; Meyer, H-G

    2015-10-01

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth's magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz(1/2). The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 ?m in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 ?T amplitude without the need for recalibration. PMID:26520976

  19. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönau, T.; Zakosarenko, V.; Schmelz, M.; Stolz, R.; Anders, S.; Linzen, S.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth's magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz1/2. The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 ?m in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 ?T amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  20. Energetics of an rf SQUID Coupled to Two Thermal Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Gardas, B.; ?uczka, J.; Ptok, A.; Dajka, J.

    2015-01-01

    We study energetics of a Josephson tunnel junction connecting a superconducting loop pierced by an external magnetic flux (an rf SQUID) and coupled to two independent thermal reservoirs of different temperature. In the framework of the theory of quantum dissipative systems, we analyze energy currents in stationary states. The stationary energy flow can be periodically modulated by the external magnetic flux exemplifying the rf SQUID as a quantum heat interferometer. We also consider the transient regime and identify three distinct regimes: monotonic decay, damped oscillations and pulse-type behavior of energy currents. The first two regimes can be controlled by the external magnetic flux while the last regime is robust against its variation. PMID:26641890

  1. Whole-head SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, H.; Matsui, T.

    A whole-head 64-channel SQUID magnetometer of SNS (Superconductor/ Normal metal / Superconductor) junctions has been constructed to be operated in a superconducting magnetic shield of Bi(Pb)SrCaCuO x demonstrating the sensitivity of 5 femto Tesla in our laboratory only 10 meter far from both an elevator and power transformer banks. Signal-to-noise ratio of data in neuromagnetic measurements is excellent because a SQUID of SNS junctions has a smaller telegraph noise than that of SIS tunnel junctions and because shielding factors of the superconducting magnetic shield does not reduce even at as low frequencies as 0.05 Hz unlike that of Permalloy shield room. A movie is made to compare the evoked current dipole in the MEG data with the MRI images.

  2. Apparatus for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by squid gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    DOEpatents

    Overton, Jr., William C. (Los Alamos, NM); Steyert, Jr., William A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.

  3. High-brightness ultra-cold metastable neon-beam

    E-print Network

    Shimizu, Fujio

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents detailed characteristics of an ultra-cold bright metastable neon atomic beam which we have been using for atom-interferometric applications. The basis of the device is an atomic beam released from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) which is operated with a high intensity trapping laser, high magnetic quadrupole field, and large laser detuining. Mainly due to the complex structure of three dimensional magnetic field and laser beams, a bright small spot of atoms is formed near the center of the quadrupole magnetic field under an appropriate operating condition. We obtained the minimum trap diameter of 50 micron meter, the atomic density nearly 10^{13}cm^{-3}, and the atomic temperature slightly less than the Doppler limited temperature of 200 micro-K. By releasing trapped atoms we obtained an bright cold atomic beam which is not far from the collision limited atomic density.

  4. Research Into a Neon Spectral Line Profile of Dusty Plasma

    E-print Network

    Pikalev, Aleksandr

    2014-01-01

    Ordered dusty structures influence plasma conditions. This influence can be revealed, when plasma spectral characteristics change, as dusty particles are injected. For example, a variation in the atomic temperature leads to a variation in the profiles of spectral lines. We studied the profile of a 585 nm neon spectral line in the dusty structures. The structures levitated in a positive column of a glow discharge at a pressure of 50-150 Pa and with a current of 1-9 mA. We scanned the profile with the use of a Fabry-Perot interferometer, by changing the air pressure between the interferometer mirrors. To process the data, a special algorithm was developed. The algorithm is resistant to a noise and a scanning speed instability. We have found an upper bound of the impact of dusty structures on the profile width. The appearance of macroparticles changes the atomic plasma temperature less than by 10 K.

  5. Collisional Properties of Cold Spin-Polarized Metastable Neon Atoms

    E-print Network

    P. Spoden; M. Zinner; N. Herschbach; W. van Drunen; W. Ertmer; G. Birkl

    2005-08-08

    We measure the rates of elastic and inelastic two-body collisions of cold spin-polarized neon atoms in the metastable 3P2 state for 20^Ne and 22^Ne in a magnetic trap. From particle loss, we determine the loss parameter of inelastic collisions beta=6.5(18)x10^{-12} cm^3s^{-1} for 20^Ne and beta=1.2(3)x10^{-11}cm^3{s}^{-1} for 22^Ne. These losses are caused by ionizing (i.e. Penning) collisions %to more than and occur less frequently than for unpolarized atoms. This proves the suppression of Penning ionization due to spin-polarization. From cross-dimensional relaxation measurements, we obtain elastic scattering lengths of a=-180(40) a_0 for 20^Ne and a=+150(+80/-50) a_0 for 22^Ne, where a_0=0.0529 nm.

  6. Quasiparticles in Neon using the Faddeev Random Phase Approximation

    E-print Network

    C. Barbieri; D. Van Neck; W. H. Dickhoff

    2007-09-12

    The spectral function of the closed-shell Neon atom is computed by expanding the electron self-energy through a set of Faddeev equations. This method describes the coupling of single-particle degrees of freedom with correlated two-electron, two-hole, and electron-hole pairs. The excitation spectra are obtained using the Random Phase Approximation, rather than the Tamm-Dancoff framework employed in the third-order algebraic diagrammatic contruction [ADC(3)] method. The difference between these two approaches is studied, as well as the interplay between ladder and ring diagrams in the self-energy. Satisfactory results are obtained for the ionization energies as well as the energy of the ground state with the Faddeev-RPA scheme that is also appropriate for the high-density electron gas.

  7. Solid neon moderated electrostatic or magnetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.; Schwab, A.; Becker, D.; Lynn, K.G.

    1991-12-31

    A high intensity variable energy positron beam has been constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Positrons from a 97mCi {sup 22}Na source are moderated by a thin layer of solid neon. A magnetic guiding system delivered up to 5{times}10{sup 6}e{sup +}/sec to an experiment. Currently tests are under way to facilitate the operation with the magnetic guiding system or -- for other experimental sites -- with an electrostatic beam transport. The electrostatic lenses are fabricated from {mu}-metal. No compensation of the earth magnetic field is required. Several experiments can utilize the beam on a time sharing basis. In the near future the source will be replaced by {sup 64}Cu which has a much higher activity. Beam intensities up to 10{sup 9}e{sup +}/sec are expected.

  8. Solid neon moderated electrostatic or magnetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.; Schwab, A. . Fakultaet fuer Physik); Becker, D.; Lynn, K.G. )

    1991-01-01

    A high intensity variable energy positron beam has been constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Positrons from a 97mCi {sup 22}Na source are moderated by a thin layer of solid neon. A magnetic guiding system delivered up to 5{times}10{sup 6}e{sup +}/sec to an experiment. Currently tests are under way to facilitate the operation with the magnetic guiding system or -- for other experimental sites -- with an electrostatic beam transport. The electrostatic lenses are fabricated from {mu}-metal. No compensation of the earth magnetic field is required. Several experiments can utilize the beam on a time sharing basis. In the near future the source will be replaced by {sup 64}Cu which has a much higher activity. Beam intensities up to 10{sup 9}e{sup +}/sec are expected.

  9. Water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.; Frederick, E. B.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents the water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system. The results of initial base-line field test results of NASA airborne oceanographic lidar in the bathymetry mode are given, with water-truth measurements of depth and beam attenuation coefficients by boat taken at the same time as overflights to aid in determining the system's operational performance. The nadir-angle tests and field-of-view data are presented; this laser bathymetry system is an improvement over prior models in that (1) the surface-to-bottom pulse waveform is digitally recorded on magnetic tape, and (2) wide-swath mapping data may be routinely acquired using a 30 deg full-angle conical scanner.

  10. Modeling and Simulation of a Microstrip-SQUID Amplifier

    E-print Network

    G. P. Berman; O. O. Chumak; D. I. Kamenev; D. Kinion; V. I. Tsifrinovich

    2011-09-23

    Using a simple lumped-circuit model, we numerically study the dependence of the voltage gain and noise on the amplifier's parameters. Linear, quasi-linear, and nonlinear regimes are studied. We have shown that the voltage gain of the amplifier cannot exceed a characteristic critical value, which decreases with the increase of the input power. We have also shown that the spectrum of the voltage gain depends significantly on the level of the Johnson noise generated by the SQUID resistors.

  11. Macroscopic quantum interference phenomena in a 4-terminal SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vleeming, B. J.; Zakarian, A. V.; Omelyanchouk, A. N.; de Bruyn Ouboter, R.

    1996-02-01

    A new kind of superconducting device, a 4-terminal SQUID, has been fabricated. It consists of a Josephson 4-terminal junction of which two terminals are short-circuited by a superconducting ring and the other are connected to a current source, forming the transport circuit. Oscillations in the voltage at constant currents through the transport circuit are observed when a magnetic field applied to the ring changes.

  12. Electromagnetic Field Scattering on rf-SQUID Based Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raputo, J. G.; Gabitov, I. R.; Kudyshev, Zh.; Kupaev, T.; Maimistov, A. I.

    2015-09-01

    Electromagnetic field scattering on a 2D array of rf-SQUIDs is considered. We show that the scattering changes for large amplitudes of the incident electromagnetic wave; above a critical amplitude, two different refraction states occur (bistability). In particular, for these two states, the transmitted wave polarization and angle of refraction are different. One could then switch the direction of propagation of the electromagnetic wave and its polarization with a "thin film", whose thickness is much smaller than the wavelength.

  13. Parasitic effects in SQUID-based radiation comb generators

    E-print Network

    Riccardo Bosisio; Francesco Giazotto; Paolo Solinas

    2015-05-23

    We study several parasitic effects on the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator (JRCG) based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) driven by an external magnetic field. This system can be used as a radiation generator similarly to what is done in optics and metrology, and allows one to generate up to several hundreds of harmonics of the driving frequency. First we take into account how assuming a finite loop geometrical inductance and junction capacitance in each SQUID may alter the operation of this device. Then, we estimate the effect of imperfections in the fabrication of an array of SQUIDs, which is an unavoidable source of errors in practical situations. We show that the role of the junction capacitance is in general negligible, whereas the geometrical inductance has a beneficial effect on the performance of the device. The errors on the areas and junction resistance asymmetries may deteriorate the performance, but their effect can be limited up to a large extent with a suitable choice of fabrication parameters.

  14. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Parasitic effects in SQUID-based radiation comb generators

    E-print Network

    Riccardo Bosisio; Francesco Giazotto; Paolo Solinas

    2015-11-26

    We study several parasitic effects on the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator (JRCG) based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) driven by an external magnetic field. This system can be used as a radiation generator similarly to what is done in optics and metrology, and allows one to generate up to several hundreds of harmonics of the driving frequency. First we take into account how assuming a finite loop geometrical inductance and junction capacitance in each SQUID may alter the operation of this device. Then, we estimate the effect of imperfections in the fabrication of an array of SQUIDs, which is an unavoidable source of errors in practical situations. We show that the role of the junction capacitance is in general negligible, whereas the geometrical inductance has a beneficial effect on the performance of the device. The errors on the areas and junction resistance asymmetries may deteriorate the performance, but their effect can be limited up to a large extent with a suitable choice of fabrication parameters.

  16. 50 CFR 648.22 - Atlantic mackerel, squid, and butterfish specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Monitoring Committee (Monitoring Committee) shall meet annually to develop... world export potential of mackerel producing countries. (2) Total world import demand of...

  17. 50 CFR 648.22 - Atlantic mackerel, squid, and butterfish specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Monitoring Committee (Monitoring Committee) shall meet annually to develop... include: (1) Total world export potential of mackerel producing countries. (2) Total world import...

  18. Trophic niche of squids: Insights from isotopic data in marine systems worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Joan; Coll, Marta; Somes, Christoper J.; Olson, Robert J.

    2013-10-01

    Cephalopods are an important prey resource for fishes, seabirds, and marine mammals, and are also voracious predators on crustaceans, fishes, squid and zooplankton. Because of their high feeding rates and abundance, squids have the potential to exert control on the recruitment of commercially important fishes. In this review, we synthesize the available information for two intrinsic markers (?15N and ?13C isotopic values) in squids for all oceans and several types of ecosystems to obtain a global view of the trophic niches of squids in marine ecosystems. In particular, we aimed to examine whether the trophic positions and trophic widths of squid species vary among oceans and ecosystem types. To correctly compare across systems, we adjusted squid ?15N values for the isotopic variability of phytoplankton at the base of the food web provided by an ocean circulation-biogeochemistry-isotope model. Studies that focused on the trophic ecology of squids using isotopic techniques were few, and most of the information on squids was from studies on their predators. Our results showed that squids occupy a large range of trophic positions and exploit a large range of trophic resources, reflecting the versatility of their feeding behavior and confirming conclusions from food-web models. Clear differences in both trophic position and trophic width were found among oceans and ecosystem types. The study also reinforces the importance of considering the natural variation in isotopic values when comparing the isotopic values of consumers inhabiting different ecosystems.

  19. Upgrade of the neon soft X-ray spectrometer for Alcator C-Mod

    E-print Network

    Podpaly, Yuri Anatoly

    2007-01-01

    In order to study plasma rotation, temperature, and impurity density, a Neon Soft X-ray Spectrometer (NeSoXs) was installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. This spectrometer used a spherically bent mica crystal as the ...

  20. Neon as a Buffer Gas for a Mercury-Ion Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2008-01-01

    A developmental miniature mercury-ion clock has stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling components are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein a getter pump is used to maintain the partial vacuum, and the evacuated tube is backfilled with mercury vapor in a buffer gas. Neon was determined to be the best choice for the buffer gas: The pressure-induced frequency pulling by neon was found to be only about two-fifths of that of helium. Furthermore, because neon diffuses through solids much more slowly than does helium, the operational lifetime of a tube backfilled with neon could be considerably longer than that of a tube backfilled with helium.

  1. Flies with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vanhauwaert, Roeland; Verstreken, Patrik

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is an incurable neurodegenerative disease. Most cases of the disease are of sporadic origin, but about 10% of the cases are familial. The genes thus far identified in Parkinson's disease are well conserved. Drosophila is ideally suited to study the molecular neuronal cell biology of these genes and the pathogenic mutations in Parkinson's disease. Flies reproduce quickly, and their elaborate genetic tools in combination with their small size allow researchers to analyze identified cells and neurons in large numbers of animals. Furthermore, fruit flies recapitulate many of the cellular and molecular defects also seen in patients, and these defects often result in clear locomotor and behavioral phenotypes, facilitating genetic modifier screens. Hence, Drosophila has played a prominent role in Parkinson's disease research and has provided invaluable insight into the molecular mechanisms of this disease. PMID:25708988

  2. Test What You Fly?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolies, Don

    2002-01-01

    It was the first time on any NASA project I know of that all the instruments on an observatory came off for rework or calibration after the full range of environmental tests, and then were reintegrated at the launch center without the benefit of an observatory environmental retest. Perhaps you've heard the expression, 'Test what you fly, fly what you test'? In theory, it's hard to argue with that. In this case, I was willing to take the risk of not testing what I flew. As the project manager for the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission, I was the one who ultimately decided what risks to take, just as it was my responsibility to get buy-in from the stakeholders.

  3. Emission anomalous optical magnetic resonances in a mixture of even neon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Saprykin, E. G.; Sorokin, V. A. Shalagin, A. M.

    2013-04-15

    Unusual resonances have been detected in the dependence of the discharge glow in neon on the longitudinal magnetic field. The resonances appear in fairly high magnetic fields and are observed only at low gas pressures and exclusively in a mixture of {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne isotopes. This phenomenon is an evidence of collective resonant radiation processes involving atoms of different neon isotopes.

  4. Method and apparatus for cooling high temperature superconductors with neon-nitrogen mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Laverman, Royce J. (South Holland, IL); Lai, Ban-Yen (Hinsdale, IL)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for cooling high temperature superconducting materials (HTSC) to superconductive temperatures within the range of 27.degree. K. to 77.degree. K. using a mixed refrigerant consisting of liquefied neon and nitrogen containing up to about ten mole percent neon by contacting and surrounding the HTSC material with the mixed refrigerant so that free convection or forced flow convection heat transfer can be effected.

  5. Laser optogalvanic wavelength calibration with a commercial hollow cathode iron - neon discharge lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Xinming; Nur, Abdullahi H.; Misra, Prabhakar

    1994-01-01

    351 optogalvanic transitions have been observed in the 337 - 598 nm wavelength region using an iron - neon hollow cathode discharge lamp and a pulsed tunable dye laser. 223 of these have been identified as transitions associated with neon energy levels. These optogalvanic transitions have allowed, in conjunction with interference fringes recorded concomitantly with an etalon, the calibration of the dye laser wavelength with 0.3/cm accuracy.

  6. The origin of the neon isotopes in chondrites and on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Manuel; Charnoz, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the origin of the neon isotopic signatures in chondrites and in the terrestrial mantle. There are two primary possible origins for neon in the Earth's mantle. One origin is the dissolution of a dense primordial atmosphere with a solar composition of 20Ne/22Ne >13.4 into the mantle in a possible magma ocean stage during Earth's accretion. The second origin, developed in this study, is that mantle neon was already in Earth's parent bodies because of refractory grain irradiation by solar wind. We propose that solar wind implantation occurred early on dust within the accretion disk to allow such irradiation. Because solar wind implantation fractionates neon isotopes, the heavier isotopes are implanted deeper than the lighter ones because of different kinetic energies, and the process of implantation, if coupled with sputtering, leads to a steady state neon isotopic ratio (20Ne/22Ne ?12.7) that is similar to what is observed in mantle-derived rocks (12.5-12.9), lunar soil grains (?12.9) and certain gas-rich chondrites from all classes (enstatite, ordinary, rumuruti). Using a dust transport model in a turbulent and irradiated solar nebula, we estimated the equivalent irradiation age of a population of dust particles at three different distances from the sun (0.8, 1, 1.2 AU) and converted these ages into neon concentrations and isotopic ratios. The dust subsequently coagulated to form Earth's parent bodies, which have the mean neon isotopic composition of the irradiated dust (non-irradiated dust is assumed to be free of neon). If this scenario of solar wind implantation coupled with sputtering in the precursors of Earth's parent bodies is correct, it offers a simple alternative to the model of solar nebula gas incorporation by dissolution in a magma ocean.

  7. Hydrodynamic fin function of brief squid, Lolliguncula brevis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, William J; Bartol, Ian K; Krueger, Paul S

    2010-06-15

    Although the pulsed jet is often considered the foundation of a squid's locomotive system, the lateral fins also probably play an important role in swimming, potentially providing thrust, lift and dynamic stability as needed. Fin morphology and movement vary greatly among squid species, but the locomotive role of the fins is not well understood. To begin to elucidate the locomotive role of the fins in squids, fin hydrodynamics were studied in the brief squid Lolliguncula brevis, a species that exhibits a wide range of fin movements depending on swimming speed. Individual squid were trained to swim in both the arms-first and tail-first orientations against currents in a water tunnel seeded with light-reflective particles. Particle-laden water around the fins was illuminated with lasers and videotaped so that flow dynamics around the fins could be analyzed using digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). Time-averaged forces generated by the fin were quantified from vorticity fields of the fin wake. During the low swimming speeds considered in this study [<2.5 dorsal mantle lengths (DML) per second], L. brevis exhibited four unique fin wake patterns, each with distinctive vortical structures: (1) fin mode I, in which one vortex is shed with each downstroke, generally occurring at low speeds; (2) fin mode II, an undulatory mode in which a continuous linked chain of vortices is produced; (3) fin mode III, in which one vortex is shed with each downstroke and upstroke, and; (4) fin mode IV, in which a discontinuous chain of linked double vortex structures is produced. All modes were detected during tail-first swimming but only fin modes II and III were observed during arms-first swimming. The fins produced horizontal and vertical forces of varying degrees depending on stroke phase, swimming speed, and swimming orientation. During tail-first swimming, the fins functioned primarily as stabilizers at low speeds before shifting to propulsors as speed increased, all while generating net lift. During arms-first swimming, the fins primarily provided lift with thrust production playing a reduced role. These results demonstrate the lateral fins are an integral component of the complex locomotive system of L. brevis, producing lift and thrust forces through different locomotive modes. PMID:20511514

  8. Flies With Skin Blisters.

    PubMed

    Simons, Matias

    2015-08-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) belongs to a family of genetic conditions that cause the skin to be fragile and to blister easily. Although most of the genes involved are known, the molecular mechanisms underlying keratin aggregation remain obscure. In this issue of the Journal, Bohnekamp et al. report on a novel EBS model that is based on the de novo formation of keratin filaments in "keratin null flies." PMID:26174537

  9. Flying Saucer? Aliens?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    No, it's not a flying saucer, it is the domed top to a 70 foot long vacuum tank at the Lewis Research Center's Electric Propulsion Laboratory, Cleveland, Ohio. The three technicians shown here in protective clothing had just emerged from within the tank where they had been cleaning in the toxic mercury atmosphere, left after ion engine testing in the tank. Lewis has since been renamed the John H. Glenn Research Center.

  10. Fly-scan ptychography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Xiaojing; Lauer, Kenneth; Clark, Jesse N.; Xu, Weihe; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian K.; Chu, Yong S.

    2015-03-13

    We report an experimental ptychography measurement performed in fly-scan mode. With a visible-light laser source, we demonstrate a 5-fold reduction of data acquisition time. By including multiple mutually incoherent modes into the incident illumination, high quality images were successfully reconstructed from blurry diffraction patterns. This approach significantly increases the throughput of ptychography, especially for three-dimensional applications and the visualization of dynamic systems.

  11. Development of a Neon Cryogenic Turbo-Expander with Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, H.; Hirokawa, M.; Yoshida, S.; Kamioka, Y.; Takaike, A.; Hayashi, H.; Okamoto, H.; Shiohara, Y.

    2010-04-01

    A cryogenic turbo-expander with active magnetic bearings was made and tested in a reverse-Brayton cycle refrigerator using neon as working fluid. Turbine isentropic efficiency is a very important factor for the refrigerator since it affects the performance of the refrigerator significantly. Properties of neon are suitable for the working fluid in a refrigerator to cool HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) applications. The neon refrigerator needs a very small and high speed turbo-expander. But there are few studies of isentropic efficiencies of cryogenic turbo-expander using neon gas. Thus the experiment to get the design information was carried out. A prototype of neon refrigerator was made for HTS applications in 2007. Its cooling power was 2 kW at temperature of 70 K and operated in process pressure between 2 MPa and 1 MPa. To improve the performance of the neon refrigerator, the process pressure was changed to 1 MPa˜0.5 MPa. Under this process pressure, isentropic efficiencies for two types of turbine impellers were obtained. The test results were included in to the turbine design program so that we could predict the isentropic efficiencies of the turbo-expander more accurately. Details of the turbo-expander design and test results are described in this report.

  12. Fly Head Sections Using Martin Heisenberg Fly Collars

    E-print Network

    /13/2002 Information can also be found on the Fischbach Lab Home Page at the following links. Technique in German: http://brain.biologie.uni-freiburg.de/text/Methoden/Kragentechnik.html Examples of fly head sections obtained from paraffin-embedded tissue: http://brain.biologie.uni-freiburg.de/text the neck of the fly. Be careful to be gentle, otherwise you will damage the fly or decapitate it

  13. Pest Control on the "Fly"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    FlyCracker(R), a non-toxic and environmentally safe pesticide, can be used to treat and control fly problems in closed environments such as milking sheds, cattle barns and hutches, equine stables, swine pens, poultry plants, food-packing plants, and even restaurants, as well as in some outdoor animal husbandry environments. The product can be applied safely in the presence of animals and humans, and was recently permitted for use on organic farms as livestock production aids. FlyCracker's carbohydrate technology kills fly larvae within 24 hours. By killing larvae before they reach the adult stages, FlyCracker eradicates another potential breeding population. Because the process is physical-not chemical-flies and other insects never develop resistance to the treatment, giving way to unlimited use of product, while still keeping the same powerful effect.

  14. Electronic Transitions of CsC2, CsC2 -, and CsC4 in Neon Matrixes

    E-print Network

    Maier, John Paul

    Electronic Transitions of CsC2, CsC2 -, and CsC4 in Neon Matrixes Jan Fulara,,§ Patrick Freivogel by sputtering a graphite surface with Cs+ were mass-selected and trapped in neon matrixes at 6 K. The electronic - isolated in a neon matrix are reported for the first time and the spectroscopic data on CsC2 which refine

  15. Electronic Absorption Spectra of the Protonated Polyacetylenes H2CnH+ (n ) 4, 6, 8) in Neon Matrixes

    E-print Network

    Maier, John Paul

    Electronic Absorption Spectra of the Protonated Polyacetylenes H2CnH+ (n ) 4, 6, 8) in Neon) and the neutral H2C8H have been observed in 6 K neon matrixes after mass selection. The wavelength of the H2Cn of which has been measured in a neon matrix.15 The next member, H2C4H+, of this homolo- gous series has

  16. Blood feeding behavior of the stable fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable fly is a fly that looks similar to a house fly but both sexes are blood feeders. Blood is required for successful fertilization and development of eggs. Bites are painful but there is usually no pain after the fly stops feeding. The stable fly is a persistent feeder and will continue trying t...

  17. Helium-neon laser therapy in the treatment of hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure: A superior option

    PubMed Central

    XU, QI-HUA; ZHAO, CHEN; ZHU, JIAN-GANG; CHEN, MEI-JUAN; LIU, QING-HUAI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of helium-neon laser therapy in the treatment of hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure and compare the results with those of a combined drugs and surgery regimen. A total of 70 patients with hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure in 70 eyes were randomly divided into two groups: Helium-neon laser therapy (group A) and drugs plus surgery (group B). Each group contained 35 patients. The healing rates and times of the conjunctival wound were recorded and compared following helium-neon laser treatment or the drugs plus surgery regimen. Changes in the hydroxyapatite orbital implant prior to and following helium-neon laser irradiation were analyzed. A similar animal study was conducted using 24 New Zealand white rabbits, which received orbital implants and were then received drug treatment or helium-neon therapy. In the human experiment, the rates for conjunctival wound healing were 97.14% in group A and 74.29% in group B, with a significant difference between the groups (?2=5.71, P<0.05). Patients with mild exposure were healed after 7.22±2.11 days of helium-neon laser therapy and 14.33±3.20 days of drugs plus surgery. A statistically significant difference was found between the groups (t=8.97, P<0.05). Patients with moderate to severe exposure were healed after 18.19±2.12 days of helium-neon laser therapy and 31.25±4.21 days of drugs plus surgery. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (t=7.91, P<0.05). Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed that the helium-neon laser therapy significantly promoted vascularization of the hydroxyapatite orbital implant. These results, combined with pathological findings in animals, which showed that a helium-neon laser promoted vascularization and had anti-inflammatory effects, suggest that helium-neon laser irradiation is an effective method for treating hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure, thereby avoiding secondary surgery.

  18. [Medical supply of long flies].

    PubMed

    Belevitin, A B; Tsygan, V N; Blagitin, A A; Lizogub, I N

    2010-05-01

    The article presents a characteristics of main negative factors, disimproving a functional condition and working capacity of airmen in long flies: long stay in a working pose, necessity of using of summer form, of defense form and oxygen-breath means, peculiarities of eating in fly, solving of nature-imposed necessity, relative sensor deprivation, sameliness of environment, high level of noise, hypokinesia, high nervous-emotional tension in conditions of air refueling, temperature fall, difference of barometric pressure, desynchronisms. Were given practical recommendations on maintenance of functional and working capacity of members of flying staff, realizing long flies. PMID:20698321

  19. Enhancement of SQUID-Detected NMR Signals with Hyperpolarized Liquid 129 in a 1 T Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    Romalis, Mike

    Enhancement of SQUID-Detected NMR Signals with Hyperpolarized Liquid 129 Xe in a 1 T Magnetic Field using a commercial high-Tc SQUID magnetometer with a signal-to-noise ratio of up to 1000 from a single-to-noise ratio (SNR) still decreases linearly with the magnetic field. Here we report on the first use of SQUIDs

  20. Ontogeny of Squid Mantle Function: Changes in the Mechanics of Escape-Jet Locomotion in the Oval

    E-print Network

    Kier, William M.

    Ontogeny of Squid Mantle Function: Changes in the Mechanics of Escape-Jet Locomotion in the Oval Squid, Sepioteuthis lessoniana Lesson, 1830 JOSEPH T. THOMPSON* AND WILLIAM M. KIER Department. In Sepioteuthis lessoniana, the oval squid, on- togenetic changes in the kinematics of the mantle during escape

  1. Extreme plasticity in life-history strategy allows a migratory predator (jumbo squid) to cope with a changing

    E-print Network

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

    Extreme plasticity in life-history strategy allows a migratory predator (jumbo squid) to cope (jumbo or Humboldt squid) is a semelparous, major predator of the eastern Pacific that is ecologically years. An El Ni~no event in 2009­2010, was accompanied by a collapse of this fishery, and squid

  2. Suppression of energy-relaxation-induced decoherence in -type three-level SQUID flux qubits: A dark-state approach

    E-print Network

    Chu, Shih-I

    Suppression of energy-relaxation-induced decoherence in -type three-level SQUID flux qubits: A dark level in the -type three-level SQUID flux qubits. We show that the energy-relaxation-induced decoherence quantum inter- ference device (SQUID), decoherence induced by energy re- laxation does not pose a serious

  3. Analysis of the Optimal Channel Density of the Squid Giant Axon Using a Reparameterized HodgkinHuxley Model

    E-print Network

    Levy, William B.

    Analysis of the Optimal Channel Density of the Squid Giant Axon Using a Reparameterized Hodgkin Friesen, and William B Levy. Analysis of the optimal channel density of the squid giant axon using optimal channel density is more than twice as high as the actual squid channel density. When the available

  4. Whole-Mount In Situ Hybridization of Hawaiian Bobtail Squid (Euprymna scolopes) Embryos with DIG-Labeled

    E-print Network

    Ruby, Edward G.

    Protocol Whole-Mount In Situ Hybridization of Hawaiian Bobtail Squid (Euprymna scolopes) Embryos in preparing Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes) embryos, hybridizing a DIG-labeled riboprobe in whole Hybridization of Hawaiian Bobtail Squid (Euprymna scolopes) Embryos with DIG- Labeled Riboprobes: I. DNA

  5. Noise sources and dissipation mechanisms of a 120 # SQUID amplifier Paolo Falferi, a) Michele Bonaldi, and Antonella Cavalleri

    E-print Network

    Noise sources and dissipation mechanisms of a 120 # SQUID amplifier Paolo Falferi, a) Michele device #SQUID#, based on a commercial sensor, is strongly coupled to an electrical resonator at 11 k of the noise generated by this system, the back action noise of the SQUID amplifier is estimated. The minimum

  6. Many squid rely on jet propulsion for locomotion, which is inherently less efficient than the undulatory/oscillatory

    E-print Network

    Horth, Lisa

    Many squid rely on jet propulsion for locomotion, which is inherently less efficient than to be inefficient because jetters, such as squid, fill a cavity of limited volume with water and eject that water, such as Salmo spp., and certain squid that rely heavily on jet propulsion for locomotion, such as Illex

  7. 76 FR 3044 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Sculpins, Sharks, Squid, and Octopus in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ...Alaska; Sculpins, Sharks, Squid, and Octopus in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National...fishing for sculpins, sharks, squid, and octopus in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action...TAC) of sculpins, sharks, squid, and octopus in the GOA. DATES: Effective 1200...

  8. Abstract Vibrio fischeri strains isolated from light or-gans of the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolpes are non-vis-

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Abstract Vibrio fischeri strains isolated from light or- gans of the sepiolid squid Euprymna for their pleiotropic conversion upon colonization of the squid. Key words Vibrio fischeri · Spontaneous variant between Vibrio fischeri and the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes (McFall-Ngai and Ruby 1991), the bacteria

  9. Culture of Hawaiian Bobtail Squid (Euprymna scolopes) Embryos and Observation of Normal Development

    E-print Network

    Ruby, Edward G.

    Protocol Culture of Hawaiian Bobtail Squid (Euprymna scolopes) Embryos and Observation of Normal@hawaii.edu). INTRODUCTION The ability to rear Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes) embryos under controlled of development (thereby facilitating collection of embryos at specific stages), and allows comparisons between

  10. Z-Gate Operation on a Superconducting Flux Qubit via Its Readout SQUID

    E-print Network

    Jin, X.?Y.

    Detuning a superconducting qubit from its rotating frame is one means to implement a Z-gate operation. In this work, we implement a Z gate by pulsing a current through the qubit’s readout dc SQUID. While the dc SQUID acts ...

  11. A YBCO RF-squid variable temperature susceptometer and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Luwei; Qiu, Jinwu; Zhang, Xianfeng; Tang, Zhimin; Cai, Yimin; Qian, Yongjia

    1991-01-01

    The Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) susceptibility using a high-temperature radio-frequency (rf) SQUID and a normal metal pick-up coil is employed in testing weak magnetization of the sample. The magnetic moment resolution of the device is 1 x 10(exp -6) emu, and that of the susceptibility is 5 x 10(exp -6) emu/cu cm.

  12. Ordinary SQUID interferometers and superfluid helium matter wave interferometers: The role of quantum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, A. I.; Zherikhina, L. N. Tskhovrebov, A. M.; Izmailov, G. N.; Ozolin, V. V.

    2010-08-15

    When comparing the operation of a superfluid helium matter wave quantum interferometer (He SQUID) with that of an ordinary direct-current quantum interferometer (dc SQUID), we estimate their resolution limitation that correspond to quantum fluctuations. An alternative mode of operation of the interferometer as a unified macroquantum system is considered.

  13. 77 FR 58507 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ...-9135. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Amendment 11 to the MSB FMP (76 FR 68642, November 7, 2011... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Framework Adjustment 5 AGENCY... Adjustment 5 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan (MSB FMP), which...

  14. The Quality of Squid Held in Chilled Seawater Versus Conventional Shipboard Handling

    E-print Network

    caught squid were frozen in dry ice. I Mention of trade names or commercial firms does not imply. AMPOLA liest tow of each trip were always placed in Pen A, and the squid/ice/ seawater ratio was adjusted). Some reasons for using seawater cooled either by mechanical means (re- frigerated = RSW) or by ice

  15. 27 SQUID amplifier operating with high-Q resonant input load Paolo Falferia

    E-print Network

    is lossless or when an optimal matching network between the bar, the sensing element of the detector of the SQUID amplifier coupled to a high-Q macroscopic electrical resona- tor that simulates the input load SQUID see Fig. 1 b .7 A cold damping network8 between the input coil and the feedback line permits

  16. 76 FR 8306 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ...This final rule implements 2011 specifications and management measures for the Atlantic mackerel, squid, and butterfish (MSB) fisheries. Specifically, this action sets quotas for the MSB fisheries, modifies the measure that transfers Loligo squid (Loligo) quota underages from Trimester I to Trimesters II and III by limiting the Trimester II quota increase to no more than 50 percent, and......

  17. Role of Aerobic and Anaerobic Circular Mantle Muscle Fibers in Swimming Squid: Electromyography

    E-print Network

    Horth, Lisa

    Role of Aerobic and Anaerobic Circular Mantle Muscle Fibers in Swimming Squid: Electromyography IAN muscle of squids and cuttle- fishes consists of distinct zones of aerobic and anaerobic muscle fibers recorded from electrodes intersecting both the central anaerobic and pe- ripheral aerobic circular mantle

  18. Quantum entanglement of two flux qubits induced by an auxiliary SQUID

    E-print Network

    T. Shi; Z. Song

    2006-11-08

    We revisit a theoretical scheme to create quantum entanglement of two three-levels superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with the help of an auxiliary SQUID. In this scenario, two three-levels systems are coupled to a quantized cavity field and a classical external field and thus form dark states. The quantum entanglement can be produced by a quantum measurement on the auxiliary SQUID. Our investigation emphasizes the quantum effect of the auxiliary SQUID. For the experimental feasibility and accessibility of the scheme, we calculate the time evolution of the whole system including the auxiliary SQUID. To ensure the efficiency of generating quantum entanglement, relations between the measurement time and dominate parameters of the system are analyzed according to detailed calculations.

  19. Noise of dc-SQUIDs with planar sub-micrometer Nb/HfTi/Nb junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, J.; Klemm, M.; Storm, J. H.; Kieler, O.; Weimann, T.; Morosh, V.

    2015-08-01

    We have fabricated Nb-based dc-SQUIDs with sub-micrometer planar Nb/HfTi/Nb junctions in order to investigate their noise performance. The SQUIDs are of simple coplanar design, their nominal inductance is ca. 15 pH. Electron beam lithography and chemical-mechanical polishing have been used to realize junctions with cross sections areas as low as about 100 × 100 nm2. The SQUIDs exhibit pronounced excess noise increasing towards lower frequencies. This apparent flux noise arises from fluctuations of the junction critical currents or resistances. The Nb/HfTi/Nb junction critical currents are found to be strongly temperature dependent. Upon cooling below ca. 4 K the SQUIDs start to show current-voltage characteristics with negative differential resistances, and their flux noise increases significantly. Estimation of the HfTi barrier electron temperature indicates that the degradation of the SQUID properties towards lower temperature is caused by self-heating effects.

  20. Quantum analysis of a nonlinear microwave cavity-embedded dc SQUID displacement detector

    E-print Network

    P. D. Nation; M. P. Blencowe; E. Buks

    2008-06-25

    We carry out a quantum analysis of a dc SQUID mechanical displacement detector, comprising a SQUID with mechanically compliant loop segment, which is embedded in a microwave transmission line resonator. The SQUID is approximated as a nonlinear, current dependent inductance, inducing an external flux tunable, nonlinear Duffing self-interaction term in the microwave resonator mode equation. Motion of the compliant SQUID loop segment is transduced inductively through changes in the external flux threading SQUID loop, giving a ponderomotive, radiation pressure type coupling between the microwave and mechanical resonator modes. Expressions are derived for the detector signal response and noise, and it is found that a soft-spring Duffing self-interaction enables a closer approach to the displacement detection standard quantum limit, as well as cooling closer to the ground state.

  1. Technical and commerical challenges in high Tc SQUIDs and their industrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, D. F.

    1995-01-01

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device for measuring changes in magnetic flux. Since its discovery in the sixties, scientists have made consistent efforts to apply SQUID's to various applications. Instruments that are the most sensitive in their respective categories have been built, such as SQUID DC susceptometer that is now manufactured by Quantum Design, pico-voltmeter which could measure 10(exp -14) volts, and gravitational wave detectors. One of the most successful applications of SQUID's is in magnetoencephalography, a non-invasive technique for investigating neuronal activity in the living human brain. This technique employs a multi-channel SQUID magnetometer that maps the weak magnetic field generated by small current when information is processed in brain, and its performance is marvelous.

  2. Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters with On-Chip dc-SQUID Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, S.; Ferring, A.; Fleischmann, A.; Wegner, M.; Enss, C.

    2015-09-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are low-temperature particle detectors that are typically read out by using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). But since MMCs are sensitive to the input circuitry and the noise performance of the SQUID, the energy resolution of MMCs have not yet reached their fundamental limit. A possible solution to overcome present limits is to maximize the flux coupling by minimizing parasitic inductance in the input circuit. To show the suitability of this approach, we realized a 64 pixel MMC detector array with integrated dc-SQUID readout, i.e., detector and SQUID are on the same chip. We observed an influence of the power dissipation of the SQUID on the detector temperature. We achieved a baseline energy resolution of ? E_{FWHM} = 25 {eV} and ? E_{FWHM} = 30 {eV} for X-rays with energies up to 6 {keV}.

  3. The fabrication and characterization of nano-SQUIDs based on Nb thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xixi; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Hao; Chen, Lei; Wang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    SQUIDs with nano-junctions (or nano-SQUIDs) are able to be miniaturized into nanoscale to measure a single Bohr magneton. Here, we reported the development of a fabrication process for Nb (niobium) nano-SQUIDs using the thin film deposition and the electron-beam lithography technology. The developed process started from a high-quality superconducting thin film so that it is compatible with a variety of film growing techniques. The as-fabricated nano-SQUIDs exhibited functional flux modulation depth up to 10.3% at 4.6 K, in agreement with the numerical simulation based on the Ginzburg-Landau equation. By further comparing the results from both experiments and simulations, we found that a small critical current below ?50 ?A played a leading role in order to obtain a decent flux-modulation depth for Nb nano-SQUIDs.

  4. Flying wires at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, J.; Crawford, C.; Finley, D.; Flora, R.; Groves, T.; MacPherson, M.

    1989-03-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement systems called ''Flying Wires'' have been installed and made operational in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron accelerators. These devices are used routinely to measure the emittance of both protons and antiprotons throughout the fill process, and for emittance growth measurements during stores. In the Tevatron, the individual transverse profiles of six proton and six antiproton bunches are obtained simultaneously, with a single pass of the wire through the beam. Essential features of the hardware, software, and system operation are explained in the rest of the paper. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Flying by Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, Frederic J.; Antreasian, Peter G.; Ardalan, Shadan M.; Criddle, Kevin E.; Ionasescu, Rodica; Jacobson, Robert A.; Jones, Jeremy B.; Parcher, Daniel W.; Roth, Duane C.; Thompson, Paul F.; Vaughan, Andrew T.

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft encounters the massive Titan about once every month. These encounters are essential to the mission as Titan is the only satellite of Saturn that can provide enough gravity assist to shape the orbit tour and allow outstanding science for many years. From a navigation point of view, these encounters provide many challenges, in particular those that fly close enough to the surface for the atmospheric drag to perturb the orbit. This paper discusses the dynamics models developed to successfully navigate Cassini and determine its trajectory. This includes the moon's gravity pull with its second degree zonal harmonics J2, the attitude thrust control perturbations and the acceleration of drag.

  6. Vision in flying insects.

    PubMed

    Egelhaaf, Martin; Kern, Roland

    2002-12-01

    Vision guides flight behaviour in numerous insects. Despite their small brain, insects easily outperform current man-made autonomous vehicles in many respects. Examples are the virtuosic chasing manoeuvres male flies perform as part of their mating behaviour and the ability of bees to assess, on the basis of visual motion cues, the distance travelled in a novel environment. Analyses at both the behavioural and neuronal levels are beginning to unveil reasons for such extraordinary capabilities of insects. One recipe for their success is the adaptation of visual information processing to the specific requirements of the behavioural tasks and to the specific spatiotemporal properties of the natural input. PMID:12490262

  7. Flying in, Flying out: Offshore Teaching in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seah, Wee Tiong; Edwards, Julie

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the relatively new phenomenon of university education faculties offering offshore education. The analogy, "flying in, flying out" captures the intensity of such offshore experiences for visiting academics, and contrasts their professional experiences against expatriate academics. This paper reports on case studies of two…

  8. Multiplexing of Hot-Electron Nanobolometers Using Microwave SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; Day, Peter K.; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.

    2009-01-01

    We have obtained the first data on the multiplexed operation of titanium hot-electron bolometers (HEB). Because of their low thermal conductance and small electron heat capacity nanobolometers are particularly interesting as sensors for far-infrared spectroscopy and mid- and near-IR calorimetry. However, the short time constant of these devices (approximately microseconds at 300-400 mK) makes time domain or audio-frequency domain multiplexing impractical. The Microwave SQUID (MSQUID) approach pursued in this work uses dc SQUIDs coupled to X-band microresonators which are, in turn, coupled to a transmission line. We used a 4-element array of Ti HEBs operated at 415 mK in a He3 dewar with an optical fiber access. The microwave signal exhibited 10-MHz wide resonances at individual MSQUD frequencies between 9 GHz and 10 GHz. The resonance depth is modulated by the current through the bolometer via a change of the SQUID flux state. The transmitted signal was amplified by a cryogenic amplifier and downconverted to baseband using an IQ mixer. A 1-dB per ??/2 responsivity was sufficient for keeping the system noise at the level of 2 pA/Hz1/2. This is more than an order of magnitude smaller than phonon noise in the HEB. The devices were able to detect single near- IR photons (1550 nm) with a time constant of 3.5 ?s. Follow-on work will scale the array to larger size and will address the microwave frequency signal generation and processing using a digital transceiver.

  9. Resonance eigenstates of the SQUID-qubit system

    E-print Network

    Alec Maassen van den Brink

    2006-06-14

    We study the complex-valued resonance spectrum of a dc-SQUID coupled to a flux qubit, where the former is treated in the cubic and the latter in the two-level approximation. It is shown that this spectrum is well-defined and contains most of the relevant information on the escape process. Thus, the language of resonance states is precise and well-adapted to switching- (or trigger-) type qubit readout, and a worthwhile complement to the various descriptions of continuous qubit measurement. Initial progress is analytic, but nonperturbative numerical methods have been formulated and should soon yield accurate results for all parameter values.

  10. Cephalopod coloration model. I. Squid chromatophores and iridophores.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Richard L; Mäthger, Lydia M; Hanlon, Roger T; Urbas, Augustine M; Stone, Morley O

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a mathematical model of skin coloration in cephalopods, a class of aquatic animals. Cephalopods utilize neurological and physiological control of various skin components to achieve active camouflage and communication. Specific physical processes of this coloration are identified and modeled, utilizing available biological materials data, to simulate active spectral changes in pigment-bearing organs and structural iridescent cells. Excellent agreement with in vitro measurements of squid skin is obtained. A detailed understanding of the physical principles underlying cephalopod coloration is expected to yield insights into the behavioral ecology of these animals. PMID:18311226

  11. Isotopes of cosmic ray elements from neon to nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, C. J.; Freier, P. S.; Fickle, R. K.; Brewster, N. R.

    1981-01-01

    Results obtained from a balloon exposure of a cosmic ray detector flown in 1977 are reported. The charge resolution ranged from 0.19 to 0.21 charge units between neon and nickel and the mass resolution for nuclei stopped in the emulsions ranged from 0.40 to 0.70 amu for A between 20 and 60 amu. This was enough to correctly identify almost all nuclei, but not to uniquely resolve neighboring mass peaks. Both Ne and Mg show evidence for neutron enrichment relative to the solar system abundance. Si and S are consistent with solar abundances, while Ar has no significant source abundances. P, Cl and K have essentially no primary component and the isotopic distribution observed is quite consistent with that expected from propagation. An excess of Ca-44 at the source is shown, indicating high metallicity in the source. The abundance of Fe-58 is nine percent or less, and Ni shows a one-to-one ratio for Ni-58 to 60, implying intermediate metallicity.

  12. Type Ia supernovae from exploding oxygen-neon white dwarfs

    E-print Network

    Marquardt, Kai S; Ruiter, Ashley J; Seitenzahl, Ivo R; Ohlmann, Sebastian T; Kromer, Markus; Pakmor, Ruediger; Roepke, Friedrich K

    2015-01-01

    The progenitor problem of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still unsolved. Most of these events are thought to be explosions of carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs), but for many of the explosion scenarios, particularly those involving the externally triggered detonation of a sub-Chandrasekhar mass WD (sub-M Ch WD), there is also a possibility of having an oxygen-neon (ONe) WD as progenitor. We simulate detonations of ONe WDs and calculate synthetic observables from these models. The results are compared with detonations in CO WDs of similar mass and observational data of SNe Ia. We perform hydrodynamic explosion simulations of detonations in initially hydrostatic ONe WDs for a range of masses below the Chandrasekhar mass (M Ch), followed by detailed nucleosynthetic postprocessing with a 384-isotope nuclear reaction network. The results are used to calculate synthetic spectra and light curves, which are then compared with observations of SNe Ia. We also perform binary evolution calculations to determine the nu...

  13. Helium and neon in lunar ilmenites of different antiquities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Helium and neon were extracted from individual lunar ilmenite grains, approximately 100 micrometers in diameter, using a pulsed step-heating technique. Grains from lunar samples 71501 and 79035, believed to have been exposed to solar corpuscular radiation at greatly different times, were studied. The results found were consistent with the hypothesis that in addition to solar-wind-implanted gas, a second more deeply implanted component was present in both species of grains. Average isotopic ratios were determined giving equal weight to each of the particles. As found in depth studies employing chemical etching, both the He-3/He-4 and Ne-20/Ne-22 ratios were lower in the more deeply implanted gas than in the solar wind component. The He-3/He-4 ratio in the solar wind component of the more ancient grains was lower than that in the more recently exposed ones, whereas no difference was found for the more deeply embedded He. In the deeply embedded component of the ancient grains, the He-4/Ne-20 ratio was approx. 2x that found in the more recently exposed grains. In the shallowly implanted component, the ratio varied greatly from grain to grain, preventing comparison with the solar wind elemental composition.

  14. Interstellar oxygen, nitrogen and neon in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiss, J.; Gloeckler, G.; Mall, U.; Von Steiger, R.; Galvin, A. B.; Ogilvie, K. W.

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen, nitrogen and neon pick-up ions of interstellar origin were detected for the first time with the Solar Wind Ion Spectrometer (SWICS) on board Ulysses. The interstellar origin of these ions is established by the following criteria: (a) they are singly charged, (b) they have the broad velocity distributions characteristic of pick-up ions, with an upper limit of twice the solar wind speed, (c) their relative abundance as a function of distance from the sun corresponds to the theoretical expectation, and (d) there is no relation to a planetary or cometary source. The interstellar abundance ratios He(+)/O(+), N(+)/O(+), Ne(+)/O(+) were investigated. At approximately 5.25 AU in the outermost part of Ulysses' trajectory He(+)/O(+) = 175(sup +70 sub -50) N(+)/O(+) = 0.13(sup +0.05 sub -0.05) and Ne(+)/O(+) = 0.18(sup +0.10 sub -0.07) were determined. For the interstellar gas passing through the termination region and entering the heliosphere (He/O)(sub 0) = 290(sup +190 sub -100), (N/O)(sub 0) = 0.13(sup +0.06 sub -0.06) and (Ne/O)(sub 0) = 0.20(sup +0.12 sub -0.09) were obtained from the pick-up ion measurements. Upper limits for the relative abundances of C(+) and C were also determined.

  15. Neutrino oscillation signatures of oxygen-neon-magnesium supernovae

    E-print Network

    C. Lunardini; B. Mueller; H. -Th. Janka

    2008-06-16

    We discuss the flavor conversion of neutrinos from core collapse supernovae that have oxygen-neon-magnesium (ONeMg) cores. Using the numerically calculated evolution of the star up to 650 ms post bounce, we find that, for the normal mass hierarchy, the electron neutrino flux in a detector shows signatures of two typical features of an ONeMg-core supernova: a sharp step in the density profile at the base of the He shell and a faster shock wave propagation compared to iron core supernovae. Before the shock hits the density step (t ~ 150 ms), the survival probability of electron neutrinos is about 0.68, in contrast to values of 0.32 or less for an iron core supernova. The passage of the shock through the step and its subsequent propagation cause a decrease of the survival probability and a decrease of the amplitude of oscillations in the Earth, reflecting the transition to a more adiabatic propagation inside the star. These changes affect the lower energy neutrinos first; they are faster and more sizable for larger theta_13. They are unique of ONeMg-core supernovae, and give the possibility to test the speed of the shock wave. The time modulation of the Earth effect and its negative sign at the neutronization peak are the most robust signatures in a detector.

  16. Neon turbo-Brayton cycle refrigerator for HTS power machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Hirokazu; Hirokawa, M.; Yoshida, Shigeru; Nara, N.; Ozaki, S.; Hayashi, H.; Okamoto, H.; Shiohara, Y.

    2012-06-01

    We developed a prototype turbo-Brayton refrigerator whose working fluid is neon gas. The refrigerator is designed for a HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power transformer and its cooling power is more than 2 kW at 65 K. The refrigerator has a turboexpander and a turbo-compressor, which utilize magnetic bearings. These rotational machines have no rubbing parts and no oil-components. Those make a long maintenance interval of the refrigerator. The refrigerator is very compact because our newly developed turbo-compressor is volumetrically smaller than a displacement type compressor in same operating specification. Another feature of the refrigerator is a wide range operation capability for various heat-loads. Cooling power is controlled by the input-power of the turbo-compressor instead of the conventional method of using an electric heater. The rotational speed of the compressor motor is adjusted by an inverter. This system is expected to be more efficient. We show design details, specification and cooling test results of the new refrigerator in this paper.

  17. Effect of helium-neon laser on musculoskeletal trigger points

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder-Mackler, L.; Bork, C.; Bourbon, B.; Trumbore, D.

    1986-07-01

    Cold lasers have been proposed recently as a therapeutic tool for treating a wide variety of pathological conditions, including wounds, arthritis, orthopedic problems, and pain. These proposed therapeutic effects largely have been unsubstantiated by research. A randomized, double blind study was undertaken to ascertain the effect of a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser on the resistance of areas of skin overlying musculoskeletal trigger points. These areas usually demonstrate decreased skin resistance when compared with the surrounding tissue. Thirty patients with musculoskeletal trigger points were assigned randomly to either an experimental or a placebo group. In addition to standard physical therapy, each patient received three 15-second applications of a He-Ne laser or placebo stimulation from an identical unit that did not emit a laser. The results of a two-way analysis of covariance with one repeated measure showed a statistically significant increase (p less than .007) in skin resistance. This increase in an abnormal skin resistance pattern may accompany the resolution of pathological conditions.

  18. The isotopes of neon in the galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Simpson, J. A.; Wefel, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines the results obtained by the University of Chicago instrument on board the IMP 7 satellite used to measure the abundances of Ne-20 and Ne-22 in the galactic cosmic rays during 1973-1977, over the general energy range of 60-230 MeV per nucleon. It is reported that the instrument shows a mass resolution of 0.7 amu(sigma) which was confirmed by calibrating a backup instrument at the LBL Bevalac with separated beams of neon isotopes. Through the use of standard solar modulation and cosmic-ray propagation models, the cosmic-ray source ratio inferred is Ne-22/Ne-20 = 0.38 = or -0.07 which is significantly greater than the present solar system ratio. It is concluded that propagation effects or cross-section uncertainties cannot account for such a large abundance of Ne-22, and thus this measurement provides evidence that the cosmic rays come from a source region where the Ne-22 abundance is substantially greater than in solar system material.

  19. Flux-coherent series SQUID array magnetometers operating above 77 K with superior white flux noise than single-SQUIDs at 4.2 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesca, Boris; John, Daniel; Mellor, Christopher J.

    2015-10-01

    A very promising direction to improve the sensitivity of magnetometers based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is to build a series-array of N non-interacting SQUIDs operating flux-coherently, because in this case their voltage modulation depth, ?V, linearly scales with N whereas the white flux noise S?1/2 decreases as 1/N1/2. Here, we report the realization of both these improvements in an advanced layout of very large SQUID arrays made of YBa2Cu3O7. Specially designed with large area narrow flux focusers for increased field sensitivity and improved flux-coherency, our arrays have extremely low values for S?1/2 between (0.25 and 0.44) ??0/Hz1/2 for temperatures in the range (77-83) K. In this respect, they outperform niobium/aluminium trilayer technology-based single-SQUIDs operating at 4.2 K. Moreover, with values for ?V and transimpedance in the range of (10-17) mV and (0.3-2.5) k?, respectively, a direct connection to a low-noise room temperature amplifier is allowed, while matching for such readout is simplified and the available bandwidth is greatly increased. These landmark performances suggest such series SQUID arrays are ideal candidates to replace single-SQUIDs operating at 4.2 K in many applications.

  20. Assessing the trophic position and ecological role of squids in marine ecosystems by means of food-web models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, Marta; Navarro, Joan; Olson, Robert J.; Christensen, Villy

    2013-10-01

    We synthesized available information from ecological models at local and regional scales to obtain a global picture of the trophic position and ecological role of squids in marine ecosystems. First, static food-web models were used to analyze basic ecological parameters and indicators of squids: biomass, production, consumption, trophic level, omnivory index, predation mortality diet, and the ecological role. In addition, we developed various dynamic temporal simulations using two food-web models that included squids in their parameterization, and we investigated potential impacts of fishing pressure and environmental conditions for squid populations and, consequently, for marine food webs. Our results showed that squids occupy a large range of trophic levels in marine food webs and show a large trophic width, reflecting the versatility in their feeding behaviors and dietary habits. Models illustrated that squids are abundant organisms in marine ecosystems, and have high growth and consumption rates, but these parameters are highly variable because squids are adapted to a large variety of environmental conditions. Results also show that squids can have a large trophic impact on other elements of the food web, and top-down control from squids to their prey can be high. In addition, some squid species are important prey of apical predators and may be keystone species in marine food webs. In fact, we found strong interrelationships between neritic squids and the populations of their prey and predators in coastal and shelf areas, while the role of squids in open ocean and upwelling ecosystems appeared more constrained to a bottom-up impact on their predators. Therefore, large removals of squids will likely have large-scale effects on marine ecosystems. In addition, simulations confirm that squids are able to benefit from a general increase in fishing pressure, mainly due to predation release, and quickly respond to changes triggered by the environment. Squids may thus be very sensitive to the effects of fishing and climate change.

  1. Physics of flying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrone, Jim

    2015-05-01

    Column editor's note: As the school year comes to a close, it is important to start thinking about next year. One area that you want to consider is field trips. Many institutions require that teachers plan for a field trip well in advance. Keeping that in mind, I asked Jim Vetrone to write an article about the fantastic field trip he takes his AP Physics students on. I had the awesome opportunity to attend a professional development day that Jim arranged at iFLY in the Chicago suburbs. The experience of "flying" in a wind tunnel was fabulous. Equally fun was watching the other physics teachers come up with experiments to have the professional "flyers" perform in the tube. I could envision my students being similarly excited about the experience and about the development of their own experiments. After I returned to school, I immediately began the process of trying to get this field trip approved for the 2015-16 school year. I suggest that you start your process as well if you hope to try a new field trip next year. The key to getting the approval, in my experience, is submitting a proposal early that includes supporting documentation from sources. Often I use NGSS or state standards as justifications for my field trips. I have also quoted College Board expectations for AP Physics 1 and 2 in my documents when requesting an unusual field trip.

  2. Hessian Fly in Texas Wheat 

    E-print Network

    Morgan, Gaylon; Sansone, Chris; Knutson, Allen E.

    2005-07-01

    The Hessian fly came from Russia and may have been introduced into the United States during the Revolutionary War. It has since spread to many parts of the country. By 2005, more than 67 counties in Texas reported Hessian fly infestations...

  3. Passive Baited Sequential Fly Trap

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sampling fly populations associated with human populations is needed to understand diel behavior and to monitor population densities before and after control operations. Population control measures are dependent on the results of monitoring efforts as they may provide insight into the fly behavior ...

  4. Energy-transfer processes in neon-hydrogen mixtures excited by electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A.; Kruecken, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wieser, J.; McCarthy, T.

    2005-12-15

    Energy- and charge-transfer processes in neon-hydrogen mixtures (500-1400 hPa neon and 0.001-3 hPa hydrogen partial pressures) excited by a pulsed low-energy ({approx}10 keV) electron beam were investigated using time-resolved spectroscopy. Time spectra of the hydrogen Lyman-{alpha} line, neon excimer emission (second continuum), and neon atomic lines (3p-3s transitions) were recorded. The time-integrated intensity of the Lyman-{alpha} emission was measured for the same range of gas mixtures. It is shown that direct energy transfer from Ne{sub 2}* excimers and neon atoms in the four lowest excited states as well as recombination of H{sub 3}{sup +} ions are the main channels populating atomic hydrogen in the n=2 state. A rate constant of (4.2{+-}1.4)x10{sup -11} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} was obtained for the charge transfer from Ne{sub 2}{sup +} ions to molecular hydrogen. A lower limit for the depopulation rate constant of Ne{sub 2}* excimers by molecular hydrogen (combination of energy transfer and ionization) was found to be 1.0x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}.

  5. The Laminar Flame Speedup by Neon-22 Enrichment in White Dwarf Supernovae

    E-print Network

    David A. Chamulak; Edward F. Brown; Francis X. Timmes

    2006-12-18

    Carbon-oxygen white dwarfs contain neon-22 formed from alpha-captures onto nitrogen during core He burning in the progenitor star. In a white dwarf (type Ia) supernova, the neon-22 abundance determines, in part, the neutron-to-proton ratio and hence the abundance of radioactive nickel-56 that powers the lightcurve. The neon-22 abundance also changes the burning rate and hence the laminar flame speed. We tabulate the flame speedup for different initial carbon and neon-22 abundances and for a range of densities. This increase in the laminar flame speed--about 30% for a neon-22 mass fraction of 6%--affects the deflagration just after ignition near the center of the white dwarf, where the laminar speed of the flame dominates over the buoyant rise, and in regions of lower density ~ 10^7 g/cm3 where a transition to distributed burning is conjectured to occur. The increase in flame speed will decrease the density of any transition to distributed burning.

  6. Neon and Sulfur Abundances of Planetary Nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds

    E-print Network

    J. Bernard-Salas; S. R. Pottasch; S. Gutenkunst; P. W. Morris; J. R. Houck

    2007-09-20

    The chemical abundances of neon and sulfur for 25 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Magellanic Clouds are presented. These abundances have been derived using mainly infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope. The implications for the chemical evolution of these elements are discussed. A comparison with similarly obtained abundances of Galactic PNe and HII regions and Magellanic Clouds HII regions is also given. The average neon abundances are 6.0x10(-5) and 2.7x10(-5) for the PNe in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds respectively. These are ~1/3 and 1/6 of the average abundances of Galactic planetary nebulae to which we compare. The average sulfur abundances for the LMC and SMC are respectively 2.7x10(-6) and 1.0x10(-6). The Ne/S ratio (23.5) is on average higher than the ratio found in Galactic PNe (16) but the range of values in both data sets is similar for most of the objects. The neon abundances found in PNe and HII regions agree with each other. It is possible that a few (3-4) of the PNe in the sample have experienced some neon enrichment, but for two of these objects the high Ne/S ratio can be explained by their very low sulfur abundances. The neon and sulfur abundances derived in this paper are also compared to previously published abundances using optical data and photo-ionization models.

  7. NEON Data Products: Supporting the Validation of GCOS Essential Climate Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroy, S. B.; Fox, A. M.; Metzger, S.; Thorpe, A.; Meier, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale ecological observation platform designed to collect and disseminate data that contributes to understanding and forecasting the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on ecology. NEON will collect in-situ and airborne data over 60 sites across the US, including Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. The NEON Biomass, Productivity, and Biogeochemistry protocols currently direct the collection of samples from distributed, gradient, and tower plots at each site, with sampling occurring either multiple times during the growing season, annually, or on three- or five-year centers (e.g. for coarse woody debris). These data are processed into a series of field-derived data products (e.g. Biogeochemistry, LAI, above ground Biomass, etc.), and when combined with the NEON airborne hyperspectral and LiDAR imagery, are used support validation efforts of algorithms for deriving vegetation characteristics from the airborne data. Sites are further characterized using airborne data combined with in-situ tower measurements, to create additional data products of interest to the GCOS community, such as Albedo and fPAR. Presented here are a summary of tower/field/airborne sampling and observation protocols and examples of provisional datasets collected at NEON sites that may be used to support the ongoing validation of GCOS Essential Climate Variables.

  8. Defect detection in thick aircraft samples using HTS SQUID magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzbruck, M. v.; Allweins, K.; Gierelt, G.; Krause, H.-J.; Gärtner, S.; Wolf, W.

    2002-03-01

    Although the sensitivity of the magnetic field sensor is important for many applications in electromagnetic testing, SQUID sensors are usually employed for other reasons. For successful defect detection, properties such as high linearity, large dynamic range, and good spatial resolution are required. We present the implementation of a SQUID magnetometer in an eddy current testing system for the measurement of very thick structures of large aircrafts. A three-layer aluminium sample from EADS Airbus was measured, with a total thickness of 62 mm, resembling the projected outer wing splice of the Airbus A-380. The sample has bolted joints and second-layer cracks adjacent to the titanium bolts. The combination of field sensitivities of a few pT/?Hz and a large dynamic range of about 140 dB/?Hz at low frequencies enables us to detect defects at a depth of up to 40 mm in aluminium. For sufficient current penetration into the layered aluminium sample, remarkably low excitation frequencies in the range of 10-40 Hz are required. The small field variations caused by the defects are superimposed on the current distortions and the corresponding field changes in the vicinity of the titanium bolts. Separation of these two contributions requires additional efforts in signal processing and simulations. The measurements were complemented by 3D-FEM calculations in order to find proper excitation frequencies, thus providing an easier separation of flaw signatures from structural background signals.

  9. Impact of SQUIDs on functional imaging in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Penna, Stefania; Pizzella, Vittorio; Romani, Gian Luca

    2014-04-01

    This paper provides an overview on the basic principles and applications of magnetoencephalography (MEG), a technique that requires the use of many SQUIDs and thus represents one of the most important applications of superconducting electronics. Since the development of the first SQUID magnetometers, it was clear that these devices could be used to measure the ultra-low magnetic signals associated with the bioelectric activity of the neurons of the human brain. Forty years on from the first measurement of magnetic alpha rhythm by David Cohen, MEG has become a fundamental tool for the investigation of brain functions. The simple localization of cerebral sources activated by sensory stimulation performed in the early years has been successively expanded to the identification of the sequence of neuronal pool activations, thus decrypting information of the hierarchy underlying cerebral processing. This goal has been achieved thanks to the development of complex instrumentation, namely whole head MEG systems, allowing simultaneous measurement of magnetic fields all over the scalp with an exquisite time resolution. The latest trends in MEG, such as the study of brain networks, i.e. how the brain organizes itself in a coherent and stable way, are discussed. These sound applications together with the latest technological developments aimed at implementing systems able to record MEG signals and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head with the same set-up pave the way to high performance systems for brain functional investigation in the healthy and the sick population.

  10. SQUID-Detected In Vivo MRI at Microtesla Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Moble, Michael; Myers, Whittier R; Lee, SeungKyun; Kelso, Nathan; Hatridge, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2005-06-01

    We use a low transition temperature (T{sub c}) Super-conducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) to perform in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at magnetic fields around 100 microtesla, corresponding to proton Larmor frequencies of about 5 kHz. In such low fields, broadening of the nuclear magnetic resonance lines due to inhomogeneous magnetic fields and susceptibility variations of the sample are minimized, enabling us to obtain high quality images. To reduce environmental noise the signal is detected by a second-order gradiometer, coupled to the SQUID, and the experiment is surrounded by a 3-mm thick Al shield. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we prepolarize the samples in a field up to 100 mT. Three-dimensional images are acquired in less than 6 minutes with a standard spin-echo phase-encoding sequence. Using encoding gradients of {approx}100 {micro}T/m we obtain three-dimensional images of bell peppers with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 8 mm{sup 3}. Our system is ideally suited to acquiring images of small, peripheral parts of the human body such as hands and arms. In vivo images of an arm, acquired at 132 {micro}T, show 24-mm sections of the forearm with a resolution of 3 x 3 mm{sup 2} and a SNR of 10. We discuss possible applications of MRI at these low magnetic fields.

  11. SQUID measurements of magnetization for a magnetically tagged composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu Pei; Wikswo, John P.; Fitzpatrick, Gerald

    2001-04-01

    Magnetic anomalies produced by a magnetically tagged composite material under stress may provide useful information for non-destructive inspection of the material. Magneto-optic methods (MOI) have been used previously to demonstrate that for a fiberglass and epoxy composite sample that is tagged with the magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D, tensile stress above a critical value alters the initial magnetization in regions near a structural defect. We have used a vector SQUID gradiometer, which can measure three components of the magnetic field, to study the stress response of the material. The SQUID detected a large remnant magnetization near the crack after degaussing without any applied tension. After the sample was magnetized, mainly in the z direction, the tensile stress reduces the magnetization Mz throughout the sample length, except that it increased (or decreased) the magnetization in the y direction in the immediate vicinity of the crack. For better understanding of the measured data, we also simulated three components of the magnetic field.

  12. Neural control of tuneable skin iridescence in squid

    PubMed Central

    Wardill, T. J.; Gonzalez-Bellido, P. T.; Crook, R. J.; Hanlon, R. T.

    2012-01-01

    Fast dynamic control of skin coloration is rare in the animal kingdom, whether it be pigmentary or structural. Iridescent structural coloration results when nanoscale structures disrupt incident light and selectively reflect specific colours. Unlike animals with fixed iridescent coloration (e.g. butterflies), squid iridophores (i.e. aggregations of iridescent cells in the skin) produce dynamically tuneable structural coloration, as exogenous application of acetylcholine (ACh) changes the colour and brightness output. Previous efforts to stimulate iridophores neurally or to identify the source of endogenous ACh were unsuccessful, leaving researchers to question the activation mechanism. We developed a novel neurophysiological preparation in the squid Doryteuthis pealeii and demonstrated that electrical stimulation of neurons in the skin shifts the spectral peak of the reflected light to shorter wavelengths (greater than 145 nm) and increases the peak reflectance (greater than 245%) of innervated iridophores. We show ACh is released within the iridophore layer and that extensive nerve branching is seen within the iridophore. The dynamic colour shift is significantly faster (17 s) than the peak reflectance increase (32 s), revealing two distinct mechanisms. Responses from a structurally altered preparation indicate that the reflectin protein condensation mechanism explains peak reflectance change, while an undiscovered mechanism causes the fast colour shift. PMID:22896651

  13. Model of Auctioneer Estimation of Swordtip Squid (Loligo edulis) Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Makoto; Matsumoto, Keisuke; Morimoto, Eiji; Ezoe, Satoru; Maeda, Toshimichi; Hirano, Takayuki

    The knowledge of experienced auctioneers regarding the circulation of marine products is an essential skill and is necessary for evaluating product quality and managing aspects such as freshness. In the present study, the ability of an auctioneer to quickly evaluate the freshness of swordtip squid (Loligo edulis) at fish markets was analyzed. Evaluation characteristics used by an auctioneer were analyzed and developed using a fuzzy logic model. Forty boxes containing 247 swordtip squid with mantles measuring 220 mm that had been evaluated and assigned to one of five quality categories by an auctioneer were used for the analysis and the modeling. The relationships between the evaluations of appearance, body color, and muscle freshness were statistically analyzed. It was found that a total of four indexes of the epidermis color strongly reflected evaluations of appearance: dispersion ratio of the head, chroma on the head-end mantle and the difference in the chroma and brightness of the mantle. The fuzzy logic model used these indexes for the antecedent-part of the linguistic rules. The results of both simulation and evaluations demonstrate that the model is robust, with the predicted results corresponding with more than 96% of the quality assignments of the auctioneers.

  14. SQUID readout multiplexers for transition-edge sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Adrian T.

    2006-04-01

    Two classes of SQUID multiplexer are being developed for large arrays of cryogenic sensors, distinguished by their operation in either the time domain or frequency domain. Several systems optimized for use with Transition-Edge Sensors (TES) are reaching a high level of maturity, and will be deployed on funded astrophysics experiments in the next several years. A useful technical figure of merit is the product of the number of detectors multplexed multipled by the bandwidth of the detectors, which can be termed the "total signal bandwidth" of a multiplexer system. This figure of merit is comparable within a factor of two for the mature systems. Several new concepts for increasing the total bandwidth are being developed in the broad class of frequency domain multiplexers. Another notable area of progress is in the level of integration of muliplexer and detector array. The time domain system for SCUBA-II is a sophisticated bump-bonded sandwich structure, and the Jena/MPI group is integrating detectors and a time domain multiplexer on one substrate. Finally, the Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID)/HEMT (non-SQUID) detector/multiplexer system, will be discussed briefly.

  15. Electronic absorption spectrum of titanium dioxide in neon matrices I. Garkusha, A. Nagy, Z. Guennoun *, J.P. Maier

    E-print Network

    Maier, John Paul

    Electronic absorption spectrum of titanium dioxide in neon matrices I. Garkusha, A. Nagy, Z online 15 August 2008 Keywords: Titanium dioxide Electronic spectrum Solid cryogenic matrix a b s t r a c t Anions of titanium dioxide produced by sputtering TiO2/graphite composite rods were trapped in 6 K neon

  16. Electric-dipole, electric-quadrupole, magnetic-dipole, and magnetic-quadrupole transitions in the neon isoelectronic sequence

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Walter R.

    in the neon isoelectronic sequence U. I. Safronova,1,2 C. Namba,1 I. Murakami,1 W. R. Johnson,2 and M. S for 2s2 2p5 3l and 2s2p6 3l states along the neon isoelectronic sequence have been studied theoretically

  17. High concentrations of dimethylamine and methylamine in squid and octopus and their implications in tumour aetiology.

    PubMed

    Lin, J K; Lee, Y J; Chang, H W

    1983-04-01

    The levels of the common secondary amines in various squid, in octopus and in 17 other seafoods were determined by HPLC. Ammonia and dimethylamine were found in all of the seafoods tested and some of them also contained methylamine and/or ethylamine. Particularly high levels of dimethylamine (946-2043 ppm) and methylamine (38-255 ppm) were detected in various species of squid and in the octopus. Reaction of nitrite in acidic medium with aqueous extract of squid yielded appreciable amounts of N-nitrosodimethylamine. The optimum pH for this reaction was around 2.4. Dimethylamine in dried squid tissues was readily extracted with water or 1% sodium carbonate solution. Heat treatment of dried squid at 200 degrees C was found to increase its amine content dramatically. It appeared that pyrolytic decarboxylation of some amino acids might cause this increase. Squid is a popular seafood in Japan and other oriental countries. The high incidence of stomach cancer in Japan and China is thought by epidemiologists to be associated with traditional Japanese and Chinese diets. Our present finding that squid and other seafoods contain unusually high levels of dimethylamine and other amines adds to the evidence that dietary factors may have an important role in the aetiology of stomach cancer and other gastro-intestinal tumours. PMID:6682076

  18. Observation of square array of nickel dots by using high- Tc SQUID microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sata, Kuniaki; Tsuji, Mitsuyuki; Nakata, Shin'ichiro; Ishida, Takekazu

    2003-10-01

    We have developed a SQUID microscope using a high- Tc SQUID sensor. The SQUID sensor is cooled by liquid nitrogen down to 77 K. The distance between the sensor and a sapphire window is less than 100 ?m. The distance between a sample and the window along the Z-direction can be adjusted to less than 200 ?m manually by monitoring with a CCD camera. A motion controller and a computer interface drive the stage. A SQUID sensor operates at the level near the critical current. A digital multimeter can read a SQUID output voltage coming from a local magnetic field. A sample is scanned in the two dimensions while the SQUID sensor is fixed to the bottom of the liquid nitrogen Dewar. The performance of the SQUID microscope is examined by a regular array of Ni dots. The sample is made by evaporating nickel on to a cover glass with a mask of metallic mesh (17 ?m), and then magnetized in a magnetic field of 0.8 T.

  19. Development of an image processing system in splendid squid quality classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunee, Niyada; Chaiprapat, Supapan; Waiyagan, Kriangkrai

    2013-07-01

    Agricultural products typically exhibit high variance in quality characteristics. To assure customer satisfaction and control manufacturing productivity, quality classification is necessary to screen off defective items and to grade the products. This article presents an application of image processing techniques on squid grading and defect discrimination. A preliminary study indicated that surface color was an efficient determinant to justify quality of splendid squids. In this study, a computer vision system (CVS) was developed to examine the characteristics of splendid squids. Using image processing techniques, squids could be classified into three different quality grades as in accordance with an industry standard. The developed system first sifted through squid images to reject ones with black marks. Qualified squids were graded on a proportion of white, pink, and red regions appearing on their bodies by using fuzzy logic. The system was evaluated on 100 images of squids at different quality levels. It was found that accuracy obtained by the proposed technique was 95% compared with sensory evaluation of an expert.

  20. Multielemental analysis of purpleback flying squad using high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HR ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, H; Kohno, H; Kannan, K; Tsumura, A; Yamasaki, S I

    2001-08-01

    Forty-four elements were analyzed in 21 tissues of purpleback flying squid, Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis, by high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HR ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometry (ICP-AES). Greater concentrations of V, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag, Cd, Pb, and Bi were found in liver, pancreas, and ink sac than in other tissues. Ink sac concentrated remarkable levels of Ca and Sr in addition to the above-mentioned elements. Several alkalis, alkaline earth, and rare earth elements preferentially accumulated in muscle. Among the hard tissues, accumulation of V and U in beak, Ni, Zn, and Cd in gladius and Cr in skin was prominent. K, Rb, Cs, Pb, Bi and some transition elements (V, Co, Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the livers of adult than in juvenile squids. Sodium, alkaline earth, and rare earth elements were higher in the livers of juveniles than in adult squids. PMID:11505984

  1. The flying radiation case

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, J.H.; Bowers, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    The Los Alamos foil implosion program has the goal of producing an intense, high-energy density x-ray source by converting the energy of a magnetically imploded plasma into radiation and material energy. One of the methods for converting the plasma energy into thermal energy and radiation and utilizing it for experiments is called the flying radiation case (FRC). In this paper the authors shall model the FRC and provide a physical description of the processes involved. An analytic model of a planar FRC in the hydrodynamic approximation is used to describe the assembly and shock heating of a central cushion by a conducting liner driver. The results are also used to benchmark a hydrodynamics code for modeling an FRC. They then use a radiation-hydrodynamics computational model to explore the effects of radiation production and transport when a gold plasma assembles on a CH cushion. Results are presented for the structure and evolution of the radiation hohlraum.

  2. Flying radio frequency undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Vikharev, A. A.; Savilov, A. V.

    2014-07-21

    A concept for the room-temperature rf undulator, designed to produce coherent X-ray radiation by means of a relatively low-energy electron beam and pulsed mm-wavelength radiation, is proposed. The “flying” undulator is a high-power short rf pulse co-propagating together with a relativistic electron bunch in a helically corrugated waveguide. The electrons wiggle in the rf field of the ?1st spatial harmonic with the phase velocity directed in the opposite direction in respect to the bunch velocity, so that particles can irradiate high-frequency Compton's photons. A high group velocity (close to the speed of light) ensures long cooperative motion of the particles and the co-propagating rf pulse.

  3. Flying radio frequency undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Savilov, A. V.; Vikharev, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    A concept for the room-temperature rf undulator, designed to produce coherent X-ray radiation by means of a relatively low-energy electron beam and pulsed mm-wavelength radiation, is proposed. The "flying" undulator is a high-power short rf pulse co-propagating together with a relativistic electron bunch in a helically corrugated waveguide. The electrons wiggle in the rf field of the -1st spatial harmonic with the phase velocity directed in the opposite direction in respect to the bunch velocity, so that particles can irradiate high-frequency Compton's photons. A high group velocity (close to the speed of light) ensures long cooperative motion of the particles and the co-propagating rf pulse.

  4. Ekctron spin resonance investigation of SC& in neon matrices and assignment of its ground electronic state as X 4I;-. Comparison with

    E-print Network

    Morse, Michael D.

    Ekctron spin resonance investigation of SC& in neon matrices and assignment of its ground27 May 1993;accepted5 August 1993) +The discandium radical cation, ScZ, has beenisolated in neon. It was producedby the x-irradiation of neon matrix samplescontaining neutral ScZwhich was formed by trapping

  5. Laser vaporization generation of Y "B+, Y "B+, and Y/U+ for electron spin resonance studies in neon matrices at 4 K: Comparison

    E-print Network

    Morse, Michael D.

    Laser vaporization generation of Y "B+, Y "B+, and Y/U+ for electron spin resonance studies in neon- electronic ground states. The ions were generated by three high energy techniques in combination with neon. The magnetic parameters for Y "B+ in neon at 4 K are gl =1.959(l), A, (Y) =33.6(4) MHz, and AL ("B) =65

  6. Electronic Absorption Spectra of C4O-and C4S-in Neon Matrixes Evgueni Riaplov, Muriel Wyss, Nicholas M. Lakin, and John P. Maier*

    E-print Network

    Maier, John Paul

    Electronic Absorption Spectra of C4O- and C4S- in Neon Matrixes Evgueni Riaplov, Muriel Wyss- and C4S- have been observed by absorption spectroscopy in a neon matrix using mass selection. This paper reports the electronic absorption spectra of mass-selected C4O- and C4S- in neon matrixes

  7. Electronic Absorption Spectra of C3Cl, C4Cl, and Their Ions in Neon Matrices Jennifer van Wijngaarden, Ivan Shnitko, Anton Batalov, Przemyslaw Kolek, Jan Fulara, and

    E-print Network

    Maier, John Paul

    Electronic Absorption Spectra of C3Cl, C4Cl, and Their Ions in Neon Matrices Jennifer van been recorded in 6 K neon matrices following mass selection. Ab initio calculations were performed of the longer chainssC5Cl, C5Cl+, C6Cl, and C6Cl+swere reported in neon matrices.15 Spectroscopic investigations

  8. Field Operations Manager-Domain 3 The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a $430 million dollar observatory project dedicated to

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    Field Operations Manager- Domain 3 Overview The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON and invasive species impact ecology. For the next three decades NEON will collect a comprehensive range of ecological data on a continental scale across 20 eco-climatic domains representing US ecosystems. NEON

  9. Type Ia supernovae from exploding oxygen-neon white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, Kai S.; Sim, Stuart A.; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Kromer, Markus; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Röpke, Friedrich K.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The progenitor problem of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still unsolved. Most of these events are thought to be explosions of carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs), but for many of the explosion scenarios, particularly those involving the externally triggered detonation of a sub-Chandrasekhar mass WD (sub-MCh WD), there is also a possibility of having an oxygen-neon (ONe) WD as progenitor. Aims: We simulate detonations of ONe WDs and calculate synthetic observables from these models. The results are compared with detonations in CO WDs of similar mass and observational data of SNe Ia. Methods: We perform hydrodynamic explosion simulations of detonations in initially hydrostatic ONe WDs for a range of masses below the Chandrasekhar mass (MCh), followed by detailed nucleosynthetic postprocessing with a 384-isotope nuclear reaction network. The results are used to calculate synthetic spectra and light curves, which are then compared with observations of SNe Ia. We also perform binary evolution calculations to determine the number of SNe Ia involving ONe WDs relative to the number of other promising progenitor channels. Results: The ejecta structures of our simulated detonations in sub-MCh ONe WDs are similar to those from CO WDs. There are, however, small systematic deviations in the mass fractions and the ejecta velocities. These lead to spectral features that are systematically less blueshifted. Nevertheless, the synthetic observables of our ONe WD explosions are similar to those obtained from CO models. Conclusions: Our binary evolution calculations show that a significant fraction (3-10%) of potential progenitor systems should contain an ONe WD. The comparison of our ONe models with our CO models of comparable mass (~1.2 M?) shows that the less blueshifted spectral features fit the observations better, although they are too bright for normal SNe Ia.

  10. Interatomic Coulombic decay of fixed-in-space neon dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, S. K.; Kreidi, K.; Jahnke, T.; Weber, Th.; Havermeier, T.; Grisenti, R. E.; Liu, X.; Morisita, Y.; Schmidt, L. Ph. H.; Schöffler, M. S.; Odenweller, M.; Neumann, N.; Foucar, L.; Titze, J.; Ulrich, B.; Sturm, F.; Kim, H. K.; Ueda, K.; Czasch, A.; Jagutzki, O.; Cherepkov, N. A.; Dörner, R.

    2012-04-01

    The detailed theoretical and experimental analysis of the angular distributions of electrons from interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) of the Ne dimer in the molecular frame is performed. In the initial state the doubly charged dimer ion has one 2s vacancy and one 2p vacancy on one atom. After the ICD process the neutral neon atom is ionized and the triply charged molecular ion dissociates into singly and doubly charged atomic ions, Ne2+(2p-2)+Ne+(2p-1). From the coincident measurement of kinetic energy release (KER) of the ions and the ICD electron the decay channel can be identified unambiguously. The most detailed experimental data have been obtained for the singlet dicationic state Ne2+(2p-2)[1D]. Different KER energies correspond to different internuclear distances at which the ICD process takes place. In experiment the data have been presented for three regions of KER energies, and the corresponding calculations have been performed for three fixed internuclear distances. In calculations we imply that all the electrons in Ne2 to a good approximation are localized. However, we need to retain the molecular character of the dimer wave functions which opens the possibility for the ICD process. To do it, we calculate at first the Hartree-Fock ground state wave functions of the neutral Ne2 dimer using the standard procedure for homonuclear diatomic molecules corresponding to the D?h symmetry group. For the doubly charged ion Ne22+ with two vacancies on one atom the symmetry is lowered to C?v, and we are looking now for the set of one-electron Hartree-Fock wave functions which are localized either on the left or on the right atom as a linear combination of symmetry-adopted wave functions. The theory correctly reproduces the experimental data and predicts the sharp variation of the angular distributions as a function of internuclear distance.

  11. Nova LMC (Large Magellanic Cloud) 1990 No. 1: The first extragalactic neon Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Sonneborn, G. . Goddard Space Flight Center Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO . IUE Regional Data Analysis Facility); Shore, S.N. Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO . IUE Regional Data Analysis Facility); Starrfield, S.G. . Dept. of Physics and Astron

    1990-01-01

    IUE observations of Nova LMC 1990 No. 1, the first neon (or ONeMg) nova observed outside the Galaxy, were obtained from 17 January 1990 through March 1990, with especially dense coverage during the first 25 days of the outburst. (The neon'' nova categorization is based on the detection of forbidden Ne III-V lines in optical spectra; the ultraviolet neon lines were not detected.) During the first 30 days of the outburst, the radiative losses were dominated by the N V {lambda}1240 and C IV {lambda}1550 lines. The maximum ejection velocity was approximately 8000 km/s, based on the blue absorption edge of the C IV P-Cygni profile. Early in the outburst of Nova LMC 1990 No. 1 the UV luminosity alone was {approximately} 3 {times} 10{sup 38} erg/sec, implying that the bolometric luminosity was well in excess of the Eddington luminosity for a one solar mass object. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  12. The Neon Abundance in the Ejecta of QU Vul From Late-Epoch IR Spectra

    E-print Network

    Robert D. Gehrz; Charles E. Woodward; L. Andrew Helton; Elisha F. Polomski; Thomas L. Hayward; James R. Houck; A. Evans; Joachim Krautter; Steven N. Shore; Sumner Starrfield; James Truran; G. J. Schwarz; R. Mark Wagner

    2007-09-17

    We present ground-based SpectroCam-10 mid-infrared, MMT optical, and Spitzer Space Telescope IRS mid-infrared spectra taken 7.62, 18.75, and 19.38 years respectively after the outburst of the old classical nova QU Vulpeculae (Nova Vul 1984 #2). The spectra of the ejecta are dominated by forbidden line emission from neon and oxygen. Our analysis shows that neon was, at the first and last epochs respectively, more than 76 and 168 times overabundant by number with respect to hydrogen compared to the solar value. These high lower limits to the neon abundance confirm that QU Vul involved a thermonuclear runaway on an ONeMg white dwarf and approach the yields predicted by models of the nucleosynthesis in such events.

  13. Optical and mid-infrared neon abundance determinations in star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dors, Oli L.; Hägele, Guillermo F.; Cardaci, Mónica V.; Pérez-Montero, Enrique; Krabbe, Ângela C.; Vílchez, José M.; Sales, Dinalva A.; Riffel, Rogério; Riffel, Rogemar A.

    2013-07-01

    We have used observational spectroscopic data of star-forming regions compiled from the literature and photoionization models to analyse the neon ionic abundances obtained using both optical and mid-infrared emission lines. Comparing Ne++/H+ ionic abundances from distinct methods, we have found that, on average, the abundances obtained via infrared emission lines are higher than those obtained via optical lines, by a factor of 4. Photoionization models with abundance variations along the radius of the hypothetical nebula provide a possible explanation for a large part of the difference between ionic abundances via optical and infrared emission lines. The ionization correction factor (ICF) for the neon is obtained from direct determinations of ionic fractions using infrared emission lines. We derive a constant Ne/O ratio (log Ne/O ? -0.70) for a large range of metallicities, independently of the ICF used to compute the neon total abundance.

  14. Photochemistry of the ozone-water complex in cryogenic neon, argon, and krypton matrixes.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Masashi; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2013-12-12

    The photochemistry of ozone-water complexes and the wavelength dependence of the reactions were studied by matrix isolation FTIR spectrometry in neon, argon, and krypton matrixes. Hydrogen peroxide was formed upon the irradiation of UV light below 355 nm. Quantitative analyses of the reactant and product were performed to evaluate the matrix cage effect of the photoreaction. In argon and krypton matrixes, a bimolecular O((1)D) + H2O ? H2O2 reaction was found to occur to form hydrogen peroxide, where the O((1)D) atom generated by the photolysis of ozone diffused in the cryogenic solids to encounter water. In a neon matrix, hydrogen peroxide was generated through intracage photoreaction of the ozone-water complex, indicating that a neon matrix medium is most appropriate to study the photochemistry of the ozone-water complex. PMID:24252115

  15. Generation of N-qubit W state with rf-SQUID qubits by adiabatic passage

    E-print Network

    Z. J. Deng; K. L. Gao; M. Feng

    2006-12-19

    A simple scheme is presented to generate n-qubit W state with rf-superconducting quantum interference devices (rf-SQUIDs) in cavity QED through adiabatic passage. Because of the achievable strong coupling for rf-SQUID qubits embedded in cavity QED, we can get the desired state with high success probability. Furthermore, the scheme is insensitive to position inaccuracy of the rf-SQUIDs. The numerical simulation shows that, by using present experimental techniques, we can achieve our scheme with very high success probability, and the fidelity could be eventually unity with the help of dissipation.

  16. A SQUID readout system for a superconducting gyroscope. [superconducting quantum interference device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    A design of a read out system for a superconducting gyroscope to be used in an orbiting gyroscope relativity experiment is discussed. The 'London Moment' of the superconducting rotor, which lies along the spin axis of the rotor, will be measured with a SQUID-type magnetometer. The SQUID will be built around the gyro rotor, with a very close spacing to give an inductance between 10 millionths and 1 millionth Hy. A SQUID of this design should resolve 2.07 times 10 to the minus 19th weber. The angular resolution of the gyroscope will then be 0.0035 arc-second, which is sufficient for the intended experiment.

  17. Magnetic calorimeter with a SQUID for detecting weak radiations and recording the ultralow energy release

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, Aleksander I; Zherikhina, L N; Kuleshova, G V; Tskhovrebov, A M; Izmailov, G N

    2006-12-31

    The scheme of a magnetic calorimeter for recording extremely low energy releases is developed. The calorimeter is activated by the method of adiabatic demagnetisation and its response to the energy release is measured with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The estimate of the ultimate sensitivity of the calorimeter with the SQUID demonstrates the possibilities of its application for detecting ultralow radiation intensity, recording single X-ray quanta in the proportional regime and other events with ultralow energy releases. The scheme of the calorimeter with the SQUID on matter waves in superfluid {sup 4}He is proposed. (radiation detectors)

  18. Generation of N-qubit W states with rf SQUID qubits by adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Z. J.; Gao, K. L.; Feng, M.

    2006-12-15

    A simple scheme is presented to generate N-qubit W states with rf superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in cavity QED through adiabatic passage. Because of the achievable strong coupling for rf SQUID qubits embedded in cavity QED, we can get the desired state with high success probability. Furthermore, the scheme is insensitive to the position inaccuracy of the rf SQUID. Numerical simulation shows that, by using present experimental techniques, we can achieve our scheme with very high success probability, and the fidelity could eventually be unity with the help of dissipation.

  19. A SQUID-based microwave cavity search for dark-matter axions

    SciTech Connect

    Asztalos, S J; Carosi, G; Hagmann, C; Kinion, D; van Bibber, K; Hotz, M; Rosenberg, L; Rybka, G; Hoskins, J; Hwang, J; Sikivie, P; Tanner, D B; Bradley, R; Clarke, J

    2009-10-21

    Axions in the {mu}eV mass range are a plausible cold dark matter candidate and may be detected by their conversion into microwave photons in a resonant cavity immersed in a static magnetic field. The first result from such an axion search using a superconducting first-stage amplifier (SQUID) is reported. The SQUID amplifier, replacing a conventional GaAs field-effect transistor amplifier, successfully reached axion-photon coupling sensitivity in the band set by present axion models and sets the stage for a definitive axion search utilizing near quantum-limited SQUID amplifiers.

  20. Roll Control in Fruit Flies

    E-print Network

    Beatus, Tsevi; Cohen, Itai

    2014-01-01

    Due to aerodynamic instabilities, stabilizing flapping flight requires ever-present fast corrective actions. Here we investigate how flies control body roll angle, their most susceptible degree of freedom. We glue a magnet to each fly, apply a short magnetic pulse that rolls it in mid-air, and film the corrective maneuver. Flies correct perturbations of up to $100^{\\circ}$ within $30\\pm7\\mathrm{ms}$ by applying a stroke-amplitude asymmetry that is well described by a linear PI controller. The response latency is $\\sim5\\mathrm{ms}$, making the roll correction reflex one of the fastest in the animal kingdom.

  1. A cost-effective approach to microporate mammalian cells with the Neon Transfection System.

    PubMed

    Brees, Chantal; Fransen, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation is one of the most efficient nonviral methods for transferring exogenous DNA into mammalian cells. However, the relatively high costs of electroporation kits and reagents temper the routine use of this fast and easy to perform technique in many laboratories. Several years ago, a new flexible and easy to operate electroporation device was launched under the name Neon Transfection System. This device uses specialized pipette tips containing gold-plated electrodes as electroporation chamber. Here we report a protocol to regenerate these expensive tips as well as some other Neon kit accessories, thereby reducing the cost of electroporation at least 10-fold. PMID:25172131

  2. Liquid neon heat transfer as applied to a 30 tesla cryomagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    A 30-tesla magnet design is studied which calls for forced convection liquid neon heat transfer in small coolant channels. The design also requires suppressing boiling by subjecting the fluid to high pressures through use of magnet coils enclosed in a pressure vessel which is maintained at the critical pressure of liquid neon. This high pressure reduces the possibility of the system flow instabilities which may occur at low pressures. The forced convection heat transfer data presented were obtained by using a blowdown technique to force the fluid to flow vertically through a resistance heated, instrumented tube.

  3. Cooperative lifetime reduction of single acene molecules attached to the surface of neon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Izadnia, Sharareh; Vlaming, Sebastiaan M.; Eisfeld, Alexander; LaForge, Aaron; Stienkemeier, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Tetracene and pentacene molecules attached to the surface of neon clusters have been spectroscopically investigated. The fluorescence spectra indicate that the molecules are immobilized on the surface and, to a large extent, do not form complexes. By varying the number of attached molecules, laser power, or neon cluster size, we find a systematic fluorescence lifetime reduction up to a factor of 20 indicating a cooperative coupling in our system. For averaged intermolecular distances greater than 33 Å, we attribute the reduction in fluorescence lifetime to Dicke superradiance, while for smaller intermolecular distances, nonradiative decay mechanisms cause additional lifetime reduction.

  4. Molecular Studies of Fly-Borne Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vector-borne diseases are among the most significant threats to agriculture and human health. Mosquitoes are the most significant vectors of disease, but other biting and blood feeding flies such as black flies (Simuliidae), keds (Hippoboscidae), bot flies (Oestridae), and stable flies (Muscidae) a...

  5. Dewatered sewage biosolids provide a productive larval habitat for stable flies and house flies (Diptera: Muscidae).

    PubMed

    Doud, C W; Taylor, D B; Zurek, L

    2012-03-01

    Species diversity and seasonal abundance of muscoid flies (Diptera: Muscidae) developing in biosolid cake (dewatered biosolids) stored at a wastewater treatment facility in northeastern Kansas were evaluated. Emergence traps were deployed 19 May through 20 October 2009 (22 wk) and 27 May through 18 November 2010 (25 wk). In total, 11,349 muscoid flies were collected emerging from the biosolid cake. Stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans (L.)) and house flies (Musca domestica (L.)), represented 80 and 18% of the muscoid flies, respectively. An estimated 550 stable flies and 220 house flies per square-meter of surface area developed in the biosolid cake annually producing 450,000 stable flies and 175,000 house flies. Stable fly emergence was seasonally bimodal with a primary peak in mid-July and a secondary peak in late August. House fly emergence peaked with the first stable fly emergence peak and then declined gradually for the remainder of the year. House flies tended to emerge from the biosolid cake sooner after its deposition than did stable flies. In addition, house fly emergence was concentrated around midsummer whereas stable fly emergence began earlier in the spring and continued later into the fall. Biosolid age and temperature were the most important parameters affecting emergence for house flies and stable flies, whereas precipitation was not important for either species. This study highlights the importance of biosolid cake as a larval developmental habitat for stable flies and house flies. PMID:22493845

  6. Subtropical Fruit Fly Invasions into Temperate Fruit Fly Territory in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subtropical fruit fly species including peach fruit fly, Bactrocera zonata (Saunders); melon fly, B. cucurbitae (Coquillett); oriental fruit fly, B. dorsalis (Hendel); and Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata Weidemann, have been detected in the past decade in the San Joaquin Valley of Califo...

  7. Managing the Fruit Fly Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeszenszky, Arleen W.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a sophisticated version of the fruit fly experiment for teaching concepts about genetics to biology students. Provides students with the opportunity to work with live animals over an extended period. (JRH)

  8. SQUID-Detected Microtesla MRI in the presence of Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Moessle, Michael; Han, Song-I.; Myers, Whittier; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Kelso, Nathan; Hatridge, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2006-09-06

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed at fields of 1 T and above, the presence of a metal insert can distort the image because of susceptibility differences within the sample and modification of the radiofrequency fields by screening currents. Furthermore, it is not feasible to perform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or acquire a magnetic resonance image if the sample is enclosed in a metal container. Both problems can be overcome by substantially lowering the NMR frequency. Using a microtesla imaging system operating at 2.8 kHz, with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) as the signal detector, we have obtained distortion-free images of a phantom containing a titanium bar and three-dimensional images of an object enclosed in an aluminum can; in both cases high-field images are inaccessible.

  9. Thermal and Magnetic Responses of Spin Ice via SQUID Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlax, K. W.; Moyer, J. A.; Thaler, A.; Sendgikoski, K.; MacDougall, G. J.; Schiffer, P.; van Harlingen, D. J.

    2015-03-01

    The spin ice pyrochlore class of frustrated magnets exhibits quasiparticle excitations that behave like Dirac monopoles on the pyrochlore lattice. We are studying single crystals of the spin ice Dy2Ti2O7 using dc SQUID magnetometry to look for thermal fluctuations in the monopole density. Specifically, we are seeking to observe a local excess of monopole magnetic charge induced by the simultaneous application of a temperature gradient, which should create a gradient in the monopole density, and a parallel magnetic field, which drives the flow and counterflow of oppositely-charged monopoles. This configuration should allow us to investigate the distribution, dynamics, and relaxation of the monopole-like excitations in spin ice pyrochlores. Work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant DMR-1341793.

  10. Anatomical basis for camouflaged polarized light communication in squid.

    PubMed

    Mäthger, Lydia M; Hanlon, Roger T

    2006-12-22

    Camouflage is a means to defeat visual detection by predators, whereas visual communication involves a signal that is conspicuous to a receiver (usually a conspecific). However, most intraspecific visual signals are also conspicuous to predators, so that signalling can lead to the serious consequence of predation. Could an animal achieve visual camouflage and simultaneously send a hidden visual message to a conspecific? Here, we present evidence that the polarized aspect of iridescent colour in squid skin is maintained after it passes through the overlying pigmented chromatophores, which produce the highly evolved--and dynamically changeable--camouflaged patterns in cephalopods. Since cephalopods are polarization sensitive, and can regulate polarization via skin iridescence, it is conceivable that they could send polarized signals to conspecifics while staying camouflaged to fish or mammalian predators, most of which are not polarization sensitive. PMID:17148271

  11. An investigation of the antitumor peptidoglycan fraction from squid ink.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Y; Uchisawa, H; Matsue, H; Okuzaki, B; Narumi, F; Sasaki, J; Ishida, K

    1994-06-01

    Squid ink, which has little commercial use and is usually discarded, was extracted using a Tris-HCl buffer (pH 6.8). The extract was fractionated using DEAE Sephacel ion-exchange chromatography and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration to give a peptidoglycan fraction which exhibited strong antitumor activity against Meth-A fibrosarcoma in BALB/c mice following intraperitoneal administration. The fraction was composed of 7.8% peptide, 57% polysaccharide and 30% pigment. The polysaccharide component had a unique structure with equimolar ratios of GlcA, GalNAc and Fuc. Since the fraction has no direct cytotoxic effect on Meth-A cells, inhibition of tumor growth may be due to stimulation of host-mediated responses. PMID:7951152

  12. Multichannel DC SQUID sensor array for biomagnetic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenig, H.E.; Daalmans, G.M.; Bar, L.; Bommel, F.; Paulus, A.; Uhl, D.; Weisse, H.J. ); Schneider, S.; Seifert, H.; Reichenberger, H.; Abraham-Fuchs, K. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on a biomagnetic multichannel system for medical diagnosis of brain and heart KRENIKON has been developed. 37 axial 2st order gradiometers - manufactured as flexible superconducting printed circuits - are arranged in a circular flat array of 19 cm diameter. Additionally, 3 orthogonal magnetometers are provided. The DC SQUIDs are fabricated in all-Nb technology, ten on a chip. The sensor system is operated in a shielded room with two layers of soft magnetic material and one layer of Al. The every day noise level is 10 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} at frequencies above 10 Hz. Within 2 years of operation in a normal urban surrounding, useful clinical applications have been demonstrated (e.g. for epilepsy and heart arrhythmias).

  13. Permeability of Squid Axon Membrane to Various Ions

    PubMed Central

    Tasaki, Ichiji

    1963-01-01

    The permeability of the squid axon membrane was determined by the use of radioisotopes of Na, K, Ca, Cs, and Br. Effluxes of these isotopes were measured mainly by the method of intracellular injection. Measurements of influxes were carried out under continuous intracellular perfusion with an isotonic solution of potassium sulfate. The Na permeability of the resting (excitable) axonal membrane was found to be roughly equal to the K permeability. The permeability to anion was far smaller than that to cations. It is emphasized that the axonal membrane has properties of a cation exchanger. The physicochemical nature of the "two stable states" of the excitable membrane is discussed on the basis of ion exchange isotherms. PMID:13993401

  14. Features governing symbiont persistence in the squid-vibrio association

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Eric J.; Miyashiro, Tim; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.; Ruby, Edward G.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies of the interaction between host and symbiont in a maturing symbiotic organ have presented a challenge for most animal-bacterial associations. Advances in the rearing of the host squid Euprymna scolopes have enabled us to explore the relationship between a defect in symbiont light production and late-stage development (e.g., symbiont persistence and tissue morphogenesis) by experimental colonization with specific strains of the symbiont Vibrio fischeri. During the first four weeks post-inoculation of juvenile squid, the population of wild-type V. fischeri increased 100-fold; in contrast, a strain defective in light production (?lux) colonized normally the first day, but exhibited an exponential decline to undetectable levels over subsequent weeks. Co-colonization of organs by both strains affected neither the trajectory of colonization by wild type, nor the decline of ?lux levels. Uninfected animals retained the ability to be colonized for at least two weeks post-hatch. However, once colonized by the wild-type strain for 5 days, a subsequent experimentally induced loss of the symbionts could not be followed by a successful recolonization, indicating the host’s entry into a refractory state. However, animals colonized by the ?lux before the loss of their symbionts were receptive to recolonization. Analyses of animals colonized with either a wild-type or a ?lux strain revealed slight, if any, differences in the developmental regression of the ciliated light-organ tissues that facilitate the colonization process. Thus, some other feature(s) of the ?lux strain’s defect also may be responsible for its inability to persist, and its failure to induce a refractory state in the host. PMID:24118200

  15. Non-linear dynamics, entanglement and the quantum-classical crossover of two coupled SQUID rings

    E-print Network

    M. J. Everitt

    2009-09-24

    We explore the quantum-classical crossover of two coupled, identical, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) rings. We note that the motivation for this work is based on a study of a similar system comprising two coupled Duffing oscillators. In that work we showed that the entanglement characteristics of chaotic and periodic (entrained) solutions differed significantly and that in the classical limit entanglement was preserved only in the chaotic-like solutions. However, Duffing oscillators are a highly idealised toy model. Motivated by a wish to explore more experimentally realisable systems we now extend our work to an analysis of two coupled SQUID rings. We observe some differences in behaviour between the system that is based on SQUID rings rather than on Duffing oscillators. However, we show that the two systems share a common feature. That is, even when the SQUID ring's trajectories appear to follow (semi) classical orbits entanglement persists.

  16. Imaging of current density distributions with a Nb weak-link scanning nano-SQUID microscope.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yusuke; Nomura, Shintaro; Kashiwaya, Hiromi; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Ishiguro, Ryosuke; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are accepted as one of the highest magnetic field sensitive probes. There are increasing demands to image local magnetic fields to explore spin properties and current density distributions in a two-dimensional layer of semiconductors or superconductors. Nano-SQUIDs have recently attracting much interest for high spatial resolution measurements in nanometer-scale samples. Whereas weak-link Dayem Josephson junction nano-SQUIDs are suitable to miniaturization, hysteresis in current-voltage (I-V) characteristics that is often observed in Dayem Josephson junction is not desirable for a scanning microscope. Here we report on our development of a weak-link nano-SQUIDs scanning microscope with small hysteresis in I-V curve and on reconstructions of two-dimensional current density vector in two-dimensional electron gas from measured magnetic field. PMID:26459874

  17. Imaging of current density distributions with a Nb weak-link scanning nano-SQUID microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Yusuke; Nomura, Shintaro; Kashiwaya, Hiromi; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Ishiguro, Ryosuke; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2015-10-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are accepted as one of the highest magnetic field sensitive probes. There are increasing demands to image local magnetic fields to explore spin properties and current density distributions in a two-dimensional layer of semiconductors or superconductors. Nano-SQUIDs have recently attracting much interest for high spatial resolution measurements in nanometer-scale samples. Whereas weak-link Dayem Josephson junction nano-SQUIDs are suitable to miniaturization, hysteresis in current-voltage (I-V) characteristics that is often observed in Dayem Josephson junction is not desirable for a scanning microscope. Here we report on our development of a weak-link nano-SQUIDs scanning microscope with small hysteresis in I-V curve and on reconstructions of two-dimensional current density vector in two-dimensional electron gas from measured magnetic field.

  18. 76 FR 68642 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ...via specifications to best meet the objectives of...Assessment scientists are working to better incorporate ecosystem...Council will now use the common name ``longfin squid...lower Tiers because their best years of...

  19. Imaging of current density distributions with a Nb weak-link scanning nano-SQUID microscope

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yusuke; Nomura, Shintaro; Kashiwaya, Hiromi; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Ishiguro, Ryosuke; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are accepted as one of the highest magnetic field sensitive probes. There are increasing demands to image local magnetic fields to explore spin properties and current density distributions in a two-dimensional layer of semiconductors or superconductors. Nano-SQUIDs have recently attracting much interest for high spatial resolution measurements in nanometer-scale samples. Whereas weak-link Dayem Josephson junction nano-SQUIDs are suitable to miniaturization, hysteresis in current-voltage (I-V) characteristics that is often observed in Dayem Josephson junction is not desirable for a scanning microscope. Here we report on our development of a weak-link nano-SQUIDs scanning microscope with small hysteresis in I-V curve and on reconstructions of two-dimensional current density vector in two-dimensional electron gas from measured magnetic field. PMID:26459874

  20. A shot in the dark: same-sex sexual behaviour in a deep-sea squid

    PubMed Central

    Hoving, Hendrik J. T.; Bush, Stephanie L.; Robison, Bruce H.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the reproductive habits of deep-living squids. Using remotely operated vehicles in the deep waters of the Monterey Submarine Canyon, we have found evidence of mating, i.e. implanted sperm packages, on similar body locations in males and females of the rarely seen mesopelagic squid Octopoteuthis deletron. Equivalent numbers of both sexes were found to have mated, indicating that male squid routinely and indiscriminately mate with both males and females. Most squid species are short-lived, semelparous (i.e. with a single, brief reproductive period) and promiscuous. In the deep, dark habitat where O. deletron lives, potential mates are few and far between. We suggest that same-sex mating behaviour by O. deletron is part of a reproductive strategy that maximizes success by inducing males to indiscriminately and swiftly inseminate every conspecific that they encounter. PMID:21937492

  1. Multiplexed readout of MMC detector arrays using non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs

    E-print Network

    Kempf, S; Gastaldo, L; Fleischmann, A; Enss, C

    2013-01-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are widely used for various experiments in fields ranging from atomic and nuclear physics to x-ray spectroscopy, laboratory astrophysics or material science. Whereas in previous experiments single pixel detectors or small arrays have been used, for future applications large arrays are needed. Therefore, suitable multiplexing techniques for MMC arrays are currently under development. A promising approach for the readout of large arrays is the microwave SQUID multiplexer that operates in the frequency domain and that employs non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs to transduce the detector signals into a frequency shift of high $Q$ resonators which can be monitored by using standard microwave measurement techniques. In this paper we discuss the design and the expected performance of a recently developed and fabricated 64 pixel detector array with integrated microwave SQUID multiplexer. First experimental data were obtained characterizing dc-SQUIDs with virtually identical washer design.

  2. 75 FR 43090 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ...CFR Part 648 [Docket No. 0907301206-0032-02] RIN 0648-XW95 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Adjustment to the Loligo Trimester 2 and 3 Quota; Correction AGENCY: National...

  3. Impact of high hydrostatic pressure on non-volatile and volatile compounds of squid muscles.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jin; Zhang, Yifeng; Jin, Yafang; Deng, Yun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2016-03-01

    The effects of high hydrostatic pressure processing (HHP at 200, 400 or 600MPa) on non-volatile and volatile compounds of squid muscles during 10-day storage at 4°C were investigated. HHP increased the concentrations of Cl(-) and volatile compounds, reduced the level of PO4(3-), but did not affect the contents of 5'-uridine monophosphate (UMP), 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP), 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP), Na(+) and Ca(2+) in squids on Day 0. At 600MPa, squids had the highest levels of 5'-adenosine monophosphate, Cl(-) and lactic acid, but the lowest contents of CMP and volatile compounds on Day 10. Essential free amino acids and succinic acids were lower on Day 0 than on Day 10. HHP at 200MPa caused higher equivalent umami concentration (EUC) on Day 0, and the EUC decreased with increasing pressure on Day 10. Generally, HHP at 200MPa was beneficial for improving EUC and volatile compounds of squids. PMID:26471521

  4. SQUID-Detected Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MicroteslaFields

    SciTech Connect

    Moessle, Michael; Hatridge, Michael; Clarke, John

    2006-08-14

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed into a powerful clinical tool for imaging the human body (1). This technique is based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of protons (2, 3) in a static magnetic field B{sub 0}. An applied radiofrequency pulse causes the protons to precess about B{sub 0} at their Larmor frequency {nu}{sub 0} = ({gamma}/2{pi})B{sub 0}, where {gamma} is the gyromagnetic ratio; {gamma}/2{pi} = 42.58 MHz/tesla. The precessing protons generate an oscillating magnetic field and hence a voltage in a nearby coil that is amplified and recorded. The application of three-dimensional magnetic field gradients specifies a unique magnetic field and thus an NMR frequency in each voxel of the subject, so that with appropriate encoding of the signals one can acquire a complete image (4). Most clinical MRI systems involve magnetic fields generated by superconducting magnets, and the current trend is to higher magnetic fields than the widely used 1.5-T systems (5). Nonetheless, there is ongoing interest in the development of less expensive imagers operating at lower fields. Commercially available 0.2-T systems based on permanent magnets offer both lower cost and a more open access than their higher-field counterparts, at the expense of signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution. At the still lower field of 0.03 mT maintained by a conventional, room-temperature solenoid, Connolly and co-workers (6, 7) obtain good spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by prepolarizing the protons in a field B{sub p} of 0.3 T. Prepolarization (8) enhances the magnetic moment of an ensemble of protons over that produced by the lower precession field; after the polarizing field is removed, the higher magnetic moment produces a correspondingly larger signal during its precession in B{sub 0}. Using the same method, Stepisnik et al. (9) obtained MR images in the Earth's magnetic field ({approx} 50 {micro}T). Alternatively, one can enhance the signal amplitude in MRI using laser polarized noble gases such as {sup 3}He or {sup 129}Xe (10-12). Hyperpolarized gases were used successfully to image the human lung in fields on the order of several mT (13-15). To overcome the sensitivity loss of Faraday detection at low frequencies, ultrasensitive magnetometers based on the Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) (16) are used to detect NMR and MRI signals (17-24). Recently, SQUID-based MRI systems capable of acquiring in vivo images have appeared. For example, in the 10-mT system of Seton et al. (18) signals are coupled to a SQUID via a superconducting tuned circuit, while Clarke and coworkers (22, 25, 26) developed a system at 132 {micro}T with an untuned input circuit coupled to a SQUID. In a quite different approach, atomic magnetometers have been used recently to detect the magnetization (27) and NMR signal (28) of hyperpolarized gases. This technique could potentially be used for low-field MRI in the future. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state-of-the-art of MRI in microtesla fields detected with SQUIDs. The principles of SQUIDs and NMR are briefly reviewed. We show that very narrow NMR linewidths can be achieved in low magnetic fields that are quite inhomogeneous, with illustrative examples from spectroscopy. After describing our ultralow-field MRI system, we present a variety of images. We demonstrate that in microtesla fields the longitudinal relaxation T{sub 1} is much more material dependent than is the case in high fields; this results in a substantial improvement in 'T{sub 1}-weighted contrast imaging'. After outlining the first attempts to combine microtesla NMR with magnetoencephalography (MEG) (29), we conclude with a discussion of future directions.

  5. Flying in Two Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Prakash, Manu

    2011-01-01

    Diversity and specialization of behavior in insects is unmatched. Insects hop, walk, run, jump, row, swim, glide and fly to propel themselves in a variety of environments. We have uncovered an unusual mode of propulsion of aerodynamic flight in two dimensions in Waterlilly Beetles \\emph{(Galerucella)}. The adult beetles, often found in water lilly ponds, propel themselves strictly in a two-dimensional plane on the surface of water via flapping wing flight. Here we analyze the aerodynamics of this peculiar flight mode with respect to forces exerted on the organism during flight. The complexity of 2-D flight is captured by accounting for additional forces beyond gravitational, thrust, lift and drag, exerted on the insect body in 3D flight. Understanding this constrained propulsion mode requires accounting for viscous drag, surface tension, buoyancy force, and capillary-wave drag. Moreover, dramatic differences exist in the magnitude of the resultant forces in 2D vs. 3D flight. Here, in this fluid dynamics video...

  6. Detection of Fatigue Damage Prior Crack Initiation with Scanning SQUID Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Morris, J. W. Jr.; Lee, Seungkyun; Clarke, John

    2006-03-06

    The remanence fields of fatigued ferritic steel specimens were measured using a scanning microscope based on a high transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The results show an overall increase of remanence until dislocation density saturates and an additional local remanence increase after saturation during cyclic loading. Because of the combined magnetic and spatial resolution of the SQUID microscope, these local changes of dislocation structures can be detected before a crack actually initiates, and identify the sites where crack nucleation will occur.

  7. Detection of Fatigue Damage Prior to Crack Initiation withScanning SQUID Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Morris Jr., J.W.; Lee, Seungkyun; Clarke, John

    2005-11-07

    The remanence fields of fatigued ferritic steel specimens were measured using a scanning microscope based on a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). The results show an overall increase of remanence until dislocation density saturates and an additional local remanence increase after saturation during cyclic loading. Because of the combined magnetic and spatial resolution of the SQUID microscope, these local changes of dislocation structures can be detected before a crack actually initiates, and identify the sites where crack nucleation will occur.

  8. Foraging ecology and movement patterns of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, John C.; Elliger, Carl; Baltz, Ken; Gillespie, Graham E.; Gilly, William F.; Ruiz-Cooley, R. I.; Pearse, Devon; Stewart, Julia S.; Matsubu, William; Walker, William A.

    2013-10-01

    From 2002 to 2010, the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) has been regularly encountered in large numbers throughout the California Current System (CCS). This species, usually found in subtropical waters, could affect coastal pelagic ecosystems and fisheries as both predator and prey. Neither the abundance of jumbo squid nor the optimal ocean conditions in which they flourish are well known. To understand better the potential impacts of this species on both commercial fisheries and on food-web structure we collected nearly 900 specimens from waters of the CCS, covering over 20° of latitude, over a range of depths and seasons. We used demographic information (size, sex, and maturity state) and analyzed stomach contents using morphological and molecular methods to best understand the foraging ecology of this species in different habitats of the CCS. Squid were found to consume a broad array of prey. Prey in offshore waters generally reflected the forage base reported in previous studies (mainly mesopelagic fishes and squids), whereas in more coastal waters (shelf, shelf break and slope habitats) squid foraged on a much broader mix that included substantial numbers of coastal pelagic fishes (Pacific herring and northern anchovy, as well as osmerids and salmonids in northern waters) and groundfish (Pacific hake, several species of rockfish and flatfish). We propose a seasonal movement pattern, based on size and maturity distributions along with qualitative patterns of presence or absence, and discuss the relevance of both the movement and distribution of jumbo squid over space and time. We find that jumbo squid are a generalist predator, which feeds primarily on small, pelagic or mesopelagic micronekton but also on larger fishes when they are available. We also conclude that interactions with and potential impacts on ecosystems likely vary over space and time, in response to both seasonal movement patterns and highly variable year-to-year abundance of the squid themselves.

  9. Molecular identification of anisakid nematodes third stage larvae isolated from common squid ( Todarodes pacificus) in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyobudi, Eko; Jeon, Chan-Hyeok; Choi, Kwangho; Lee, Sung Il; Lee, Chung Il; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2013-06-01

    The occurrence of Genus Anisakis nematode larvae in marine fishes and cephalopods is epidemiologically important because Anisakis simplex larval stage can cause a clinical disease in humans when infected hosts are consumed raw. Common squid ( Todarodes pacificus) from Korean waters were investigated for anisakid nematodes infection during 2009˜2011. In total, 1,556 larvae were collected from 615 common squids and 732 of them were subsequently identified by PCR-RFLP analysis of ITS rDNA. Depending on the sampling locations, the nematode larvae from common squid showed different prevalence, intensity and species distribution. A high prevalence (P) and mean intensity (MI) of infection were observed in the Yellow Sea (n = 250, P = 86.0%, MI = 5.99 larvae/host) and the southern sea of Korea (n = 126, P = 57.1%, MI = 3.36 larvae/host). Anisakis pegreffii was dominantly found in common squid from the southern sea (127/ 140, 90.7%) and the Yellow Sea (561/565, 98.9%). In contrast, the P and MI of infection were relatively low in the East Sea (n = 239, P = 8.37%, MI = 1.25 larvae/host). A. pegreffii was not found from the East Sea and 52.0% (13/25) of the nematodes were identified as A. simplex. Most of them were found in the body cavity or digestive tract of common squid, which are rarely consumed raw by humans. Considering the differenences in anisakid nematode species distribution and their microhabitat in common squid, it remains unclear whether common squid plays an important role in the epidemiology of human anisakis infection in Korea. Further extensive identification of anisakid nematodes in common squid, with geographical and seasonal information will be necessary.

  10. Gradiometer Using Middle Loops as Sensing Elements in a Low-Field SQUID MRI System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2009-01-01

    A new gradiometer scheme uses middle loops as sensing elements in lowfield superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This design of a second order gradiometer increases its sensitivity and makes it more uniform, compared to the conventional side loop sensing scheme with a comparable matching SQUID. The space between the two middle loops becomes the imaging volume with the enclosing cryostat built accordingly.

  11. High-T(sub c) squid application in medicine and geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polushkin, V. N.; Uchaikin, S. V.; Vasiliev, B. V.

    1990-01-01

    In the Laboratory a high-T(sub c) one-hole squid was built from Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics obtained by a standard procedure of solid state reaction. The ceramics with critical current density J(sub c) is greater than 100 A/sq cm was selected. In the middle of 10 x 10 x 2 mm ceramics pellet a 0.8 mm hole was drilled in which superconducting loop of the squid was located. Between the hole and the edge of the pellet a cut was mechanically filed out with a bridge inside it connecting the superconducting ring. A scheme of the magnetometer is presented. The resonant frequency shift of the tank circuit, the connection of the squid with this circuit, and the squid inductance are evaluated. One of the most interesting fields of the squid-based magnetometer application is biomagnetism, particularly, the human heart magnetocardiogram measuring. The low-temperature squids were used in this area and many interesting and important scientific results have been obtained. The observations have shown that the main noise contribution was not due to the squid but to the Earth's magnetic field variations, industrial inductions, and mainly to the vibrations caused by liquid nitrogen boiling and by vibrations of the box. Further attempts are needed to reduce the magnetic noise inductions. Nevertheless, the estimations promise the maximum signal/noise relation of the high-T(sub c) squid-magnetocardiometer to be not less than 10:1 in a bandwidth of 60 Hz. Apparently, such resolution would be enough not only for steady cardiogram reading but even for thin structure investigation at average technique application.

  12. Neon abundances in normal late-B and mercury-manganese stars

    E-print Network

    M. M. Dworetsky; J. Budaj

    2000-09-04

    We make new Non-LTE calculations to deduce abundances of neon from visible-region echelle spectra of selected Ne I lines in 7 normal stars and 20 HgMn stars. We find that the best strong blend-free Ne line which can be used at the lower end of the Teff range is 6402 A, although several other potentially useful Ne I lines are found in the red region of the spectra of these stars. The mean neon abundance in the normal stars (log A =8.10) is in excellent agreement with the standard abundance of neon (8.08). However, in HgMn stars, neon is almost universally underabundant, ranging from marginal deficits of 0.1-0.3 dex to underabundances of an order of magnitude or more. In many cases, the lines are so weak that only upper limits can be established. The most extreme example found is upsilon Her with an underabundance of at least 1.5 dex. These underabundances are qualitatively expected from radiative acceleration calculations, which show that Ne has a very small radiative acceleration in the photosphere and is expected to undergo gravitational settling if mixing processes are sufficiently weak, and there is no strong stellar wind. According to the theoretical predictions of Landstreet et al. (1998), the low Ne abundances place an important constraint on the intensity of such stellar winds, which must be less than $10^-14 M_sun per yr if they are non-turbulent.

  13. Neon Lights Up a Controversy: the Solar Ne/O Abundance

    E-print Network

    J. T. Schmelz; K. Nasraoui; J. K. Roames; L. A. Lippner; J. W. Garst

    2005-10-07

    The standard solar model was so reliable that it could predict the existence of the massive neutrino. Helioseismology measurements were so precise that they could determine the depth of the convection zone. This agreement between theory and observation was the envy of all astrophysics -- until recently when sophisticated three-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations of the solar atmosphere reduced the metal content by a factor of almost two. Antia & Basu (2005) suggested that a higher value of the solar neon abundance, Ne/O = 0.52, would resolve this controversy. Drake & Testa (2005) presented strong evidence in favor of this idea from a sample of 21 Chandra stars with enhanced values of the neon abundance, Ne/O = 0.41. In this paper, we have analyzed solar active region spectra from the archive of the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on Solar Maximum Mission, a NASA mission from the 1980s, as well as full-Sun spectra from the pioneering days of X-ray astronomy in the 1960s. These data seem consistent with the standard neon-to-oxygen abundance value, Ne/O = 0.15 (Grevesse & Sauval 1998). If these results prove to be correct, than the enhanced-neon hypothesis will not resolve the current controversy.

  14. Chemical abundances of planetary nebulae from optical recombination lines II. The neon abundance of NGC 7009

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xiaowei

    Chemical abundances of planetary nebulae from optical recombination lines ­ II. The neon abundance Saturn Nebula NGC 7009. The measured line fluxes are used to determine Ne21 /H1 abundance ratios ­ a pattern also seen in other nebulae analysed by us previously. The ORL Ne21 /H1 abundance ratios of NGC

  15. Building complex heterogeneous measurement and data systems: Combining ecology and systems engineering at NEON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berukoff, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an NSF-funded facility to enable the understanding of how ecological processes occurring on multiple spatial and temporal scales are inter-related, through the deployment of measurement and observation infrastructure across the continental US, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Two overriding features of NEON's design are an emphasis on the integration of system engineering principles with this infrastructure deployment, and the deep involvement, since its inception, of the ecological community in helping to define, shape, and realize NEON's potential. This synergy is being leveraged to build a novel, unique facility that will be both nimble and long-lived. We discuss first how traditional systems engineering principles, typically applied only to instrumental systems, are being applied to the wide array of NEON measurement and observation infrastructure, both to achieve construction completion but also to serve as a consistent and informative guide to building infrastructure for ecological and environmental research. We also describe how the scientific and engineering community has contributed to these activities, and derive some important guiding principles within their synergy.

  16. Experimental verification of dynamics modulation in a periodically-driven neon glow discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, P. M.; Koepke, M. E.; Gunell, H.

    2010-11-01

    Two ionization wave modes in a driven neon glow discharge alternate as the dominant mode as their response to the driving force alternates between spatiotemporal and temporal periodic pulling. This phenomenon, termed dynamics modulation, was first noted by Koepke, Weltmann, and Selcher [1], who saw two limited but representative cases and proposed a mechanism [2] by which it occurs. Dynamics modulation is reproduced experimentally in a neon glow discharge plasma. The system is periodically driven near a non-dominant mode using a narrow-band ring dye laser tuned to a wavelength near the metastable neon transition at 588.35 nm. A spatially-fixed photodiode with a narrow band filter that selectively passes the primary neon spectral line at 640 nm is used to acquire the time series of luminosity oscillations. These experimental data are used to verify the proposed mechanism and explore the resulting implications for spontaneous unidirectional mode transitions that occur with a change in discharge current.[4pt] [1] M. E. Koepke, K.-D. Weltmann, and C. A. Selcher, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 40, 1716 (1995).[0pt] [2] K. -D. Weltmann, M. E. Koepke, and C. A. Selcher, Phys. Rev. E 62, 2773, (2000).

  17. Design Constraints for a WIMP Dark Matter and pp Solar Neutrino Liquid Neon Scintillation Detector

    E-print Network

    M. G. Boulay; A. Hime; J. Lidgard

    2004-10-18

    Detailed Monte-Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the performance of a liquid neon scintillation detector for dark matter and low-energy solar neutrino interactions. A maximum-likelihood event vertex fitter including PMT time information was developed, which significantly improves position resolution over spatial-only algorithms, and substantially decreases the required detector size and achievable analysis energy threshold. The ultimate sensitivity to WIMP dark matter and the pp flux uncertainty are evaluated as a function of detector size. The dependence on the neon scintillation and PMT properties are evaluated. A 300 cm radius detector would allow a ~13 keV threshold, a pp flux uncertainty of ~1%, and limits on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section of ~10^{-46} cm^2 for a 100 GeV WIMP, using commercially available PMTs. Detector response calibration and background requirements for a precision pp measurement are defined. Internal radioactivity requirements for uranium, thorium, and krypton are specified, and it is shown that the PMT data could be used for an in-situ calibration of the troublesome krypton-85. A set of measurements of neon scintillation properties and PMT characteristics are outlined which will be needed in order to evaluate feasibility and fully optimize the design of a neon-based detector.

  18. A HTS dc SQUID-NMR: fabrication of the SQUID and application to low-field NMR for fruit quality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isingizwe Nturambirwe, J. Frédéric; Perold, Willem J.; Opara, Linus U.

    2014-06-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have made the detection of low-field (LF) and ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (ULF-NMR) a reality. The latter has been proven to be a potential tool for non-destructive quality testing of horticultural products, amongst many other applications. High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) dc SQUIDS are likely to allow for the development of not only low-cost NMR systems but also prototypes that are mobile and easily maintainable. A HTS dc SQUID was manufactured on an YBCO thin film, using a novel laser based lithography method. The lithography was implemented by a new laser system developed in-house, as a model of low-cost lithography systems. The junctions of the dc SQUID were tested and displayed normal I-V characteristics in the acceptable range for the application. In order to determine the viability of low-field NMR for non-destructive quality measurement of horticultural products, a commercial HTS dc SQUID-NMR system was used to measure quality parameters of banana during ripening. The trend of color change and sugar increase of the banana during ripening were the most highly correlated attributes to the SQUID-NMR measured parameter, average T1 (spin-lattice relaxation time). Further studies were done, that involved processing of the NMR signal into relaxation time resolved spectra. A spectral signature of banana was obtained, where each peak is a T1 value corresponding to a proton pool, and is reported here. These results will potentially lead to deeper understanding of the quality of the samples under study.

  19. Development of 2D Bi-SQUID Arrays with High Linearity

    E-print Network

    Berggren, S; Longhini, P; Palacios, A; Mukhanov, O A; de Escobar, A Leese; Taylor, B J; de Andrade, M C; Nisenoff, M; Fagaly, R L; Wong, T; Cho, E; Wong, E; In, V

    2013-01-01

    We develop a two-dimensional (2D) Superconducting Quantum Interference Filter (SQIF) array based on recently introduced high-linearity tri-junction bi-SQUIDs. Our bi-SQUID SQIF array design is based on a tight integration of individual bi- SQUID cells sharing inductances with adjacent cells. We provide extensive computer simulations, analysis and experimental measurements, in which we explore the phase dynamics and linearity of the array voltage response. The non-uniformity in inductances of the bi-SQUIDs produces a pronounced zero-field single antipeak in the voltage response. The anti-peak linearity and size can be optimized by varying the critical current of the additional junction of each bi-SQUID. The layout implementation of the tight 2D array integration leads to a distinct geometrical diamond shape formed by the merged dual bi-SQUID cells. Different size 2D arrays are fabricated using standard HYPRES niobium 4.5 kA/cm2 fabrication process. The measured linearity, power gain, and noise properties will ...

  20. Single SQUID multiplexer for arrays of voltage-biased superconducting bolometers

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jongsoo; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J.M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Myers, M.J.; Richards, P.L.; Skidmore, J.T.; Spieler, H.G.

    2001-08-20

    We describe a frequency domain superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer which monitors a row of low-temperature sensors simultaneously with a single SQUID. Each sensor is ac biased with a unique frequency and all the sensor currents are added in a superconducting summing loop. A single SQUID measures the current in the summing loop, and the individual signals are lock-in detected after the room temperature SQUID electronics. The current in the summing loop is nulled by feedback to eliminate direct crosstalk. In order to avoid the accumulation of Johnson noise in the summing loop, a tuned bandpass filter is inserted in series with each sensor. For a 32-channel multiplexer for Voltage-biased Superconducting Bolometer (VSB) with a time constant {approx}1msec, we estimate that bias frequencies in the range from {approx}500kHz to {approx}600kHz are practical. The major limitation of our multiplexing scheme is in the slew rate of a readout SQUID. We discuss a ''carrier nulling'' technique which could be used to increase the number of sensors in a row or to multiplex faster bolometers by reducing the required slew rate for a readout SQUID.