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Sample records for neon flying squid

  1. [Trace elements in the statoliths of neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii in the Northwest Pacific Ocean].

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua-Jie; Chen, Xin-Jun; Ma, Jin

    2014-08-01

    Statolith is one of the most important hard tissues of cephalopods which is widely used in the research of fisheries ecology including population structure, life history reconstruction and so on. Trace elements of 18 statoliths of neon flying squid Ommastrephes bartramii collected in the Northwest Pacific Ocean in 2007 by Chinese jigging fishing fleets were analyzed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The results indicated that the statoliths of O. bartramii mainly contained 55 elements, and calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), sodium (Na), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), silicon (Si), magnesium (Mg), boron (B), iron (Fe), barium (Ba) were the 10 most abundant elements. The analysis of variance showed that there was no significant difference in each element distribution between different sexual squid except for P, Si and B. Significant differences existed in the contents of Sr and Na but no significant difference was found in the contents of Ca, P, K, Si, Mg, B, Fe and Ba between different hatching populations. There were significant differences in the contents of Ca, Sr, Na, P, Mg and Ba, but no significant difference was found in the contents of K, Fe, B and Si in the statoliths among different growth zones. This study presented Sr and Na could be the best two trace elements used in the research on the population structure and life history reconstruction for O. bartramii. PMID:25509097

  2. Identifying Pelagic Habitat Hotspots of Neon Flying Squid in the Temperate Waters of the Central North Pacific.

    PubMed

    Alabia, Irene D; Saitoh, Sei-Ichi; Mugo, Robinson; Igarashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Usui, Norihisa; Kamachi, Masafumi; Awaji, Toshiyuki; Seito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    We identified the pelagic habitat hotspots of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) in the central North Pacific from May to July and characterized the spatial patterns of squid aggregations in relation to oceanographic features such as mesoscale oceanic eddies and the Transition Zone Chlorophyll-a Front (TZCF). The data used for the habitat model construction and analyses were squid fishery information, remotely-sensed and numerical model-derived environmental data from May to July 1999-2010. Squid habitat hotspots were deduced from the monthly Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) models and were identified as regions of persistent high suitable habitat across the 12-year period. The distribution of predicted squid habitat hotspots in central North Pacific revealed interesting spatial and temporal patterns likely linked with the presence and dynamics of oceanographic features in squid's putative foraging grounds from late spring to summer. From May to June, the inferred patches of squid habitat hotspots developed within the Kuroshio-Oyashio transition zone (KOTZ; 37-40°N) and further expanded north towards the subarctic frontal zone (SAFZ; 40-44°N) in July. The squid habitat hotspots within the KOTZ and areas west of the dateline (160°W-180°) were likely influenced and associated with the highly dynamic and transient oceanic eddies and could possibly account for lower squid suitable habitat persistence obtained from these regions. However, predicted squid habitat hotspots located in regions east of the dateline (180°-160°W) from June to July, showed predominantly higher squid habitat persistence presumably due to their proximity to the mean position of the seasonally-shifting TZCF and consequent utilization of the highly productive waters of the SAFZ. PMID:26571118

  3. Identifying Pelagic Habitat Hotspots of Neon Flying Squid in the Temperate Waters of the Central North Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Alabia, Irene D.; Saitoh, Sei-Ichi; Mugo, Robinson; Igarashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Usui, Norihisa; Kamachi, Masafumi; Awaji, Toshiyuki; Seito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    We identified the pelagic habitat hotspots of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) in the central North Pacific from May to July and characterized the spatial patterns of squid aggregations in relation to oceanographic features such as mesoscale oceanic eddies and the Transition Zone Chlorophyll-a Front (TZCF). The data used for the habitat model construction and analyses were squid fishery information, remotely-sensed and numerical model-derived environmental data from May to July 1999–2010. Squid habitat hotspots were deduced from the monthly Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) models and were identified as regions of persistent high suitable habitat across the 12-year period. The distribution of predicted squid habitat hotspots in central North Pacific revealed interesting spatial and temporal patterns likely linked with the presence and dynamics of oceanographic features in squid’s putative foraging grounds from late spring to summer. From May to June, the inferred patches of squid habitat hotspots developed within the Kuroshio-Oyashio transition zone (KOTZ; 37–40°N) and further expanded north towards the subarctic frontal zone (SAFZ; 40–44°N) in July. The squid habitat hotspots within the KOTZ and areas west of the dateline (160°W-180°) were likely influenced and associated with the highly dynamic and transient oceanic eddies and could possibly account for lower squid suitable habitat persistence obtained from these regions. However, predicted squid habitat hotspots located in regions east of the dateline (180°-160°W) from June to July, showed predominantly higher squid habitat persistence presumably due to their proximity to the mean position of the seasonally-shifting TZCF and consequent utilization of the highly productive waters of the SAFZ. PMID:26571118

  4. Characteristic of lipids and fatty acid compositions of the neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    The lipids and fatty acids of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) were an-alyzed to clarify its lipid physiology and health benefit as marine food. Triacylglycerols were the only major component in the digestive gland (liver). In all other organs (mantle, arm, integument, and ovary), sterols and phospholipids were the major components with noticeable levels of ceramide aminoethyl phosphonate and sphingomyelin. The significant levels of sphingolipids suggest the O. bartramii lipids is a useful source for cosmetics. Although the lipid content between the liver and all other tissues markedly differed from each other, the same nine dominant fatty acids in the triacylglycerols were found in all organs; 14:0, 16:0, 18:0, 18:1n-9, 20:1n-9, 20:1n-11, 22:1n-11, 20:5n-3 (icosapentaenoic acid, EPA), and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA). Unusually high 20:1n-11 levels in the O. bartramii triacylglycerols were probably characteristic for western Pacific animal depot lipids, compared with non-detectable levels of 20:1n-11 reported in other marine animals. O. bartramii concurrently has high levels of DHA in their triacylglycerols. The major fatty acids in the phospholipids were 16:0, 18:0, 20:1n-9, EPA, and DHA without 20:1n-11. Markedly high levels of both EPA and DHA were observed in phosphatidylethanolamine, while only DHA was found as the major one in phosphatidylcholine. In particular, high levels of DHA were found both in its depot triacylglycerols and tissue phospholipids in all organs of O. bartramii, similar to that in highly migratory fishes. The high DHA levels in all its organs suggest that O. bartramii lipids is a healthy marine source for DHA supplements. PMID:23018852

  5. A review of interaction between neon flying squid ( Ommastrephes bartramii) and oceanographic variability in the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian; Tian, Siquan

    2015-08-01

    The neon flying squid ( Ommastrephes bartramii) is a short-lived opportunistic species widely distributed in subtropical and temperate waters in the North Pacific Ocean. The life cycle of O. bartramii from planktonic eggs to nektonic adults is closely linked to oceanographic conditions. The fluctuations in O. bartramii abundance and distribution tend to increase and widen continuously due to the heavy influences of ocean-climate events on various spatio-temporal scales. In this study, we reviewed the interaction between O. bartramii and oceanography variability in the North Pacific with respect to large-scale climatic-oceanic phenomena including El Niño, La Niña, Kuroshio, Oyashio and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), as well as regional environmental variables such as sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface height (SSH), sea surface salinity (SSS), chlorophyll-a (Chl- a) concentration, and plankton density. The population dynamics of O. bartramii is mediated mainly by meso- and large-scale climatic-oceanic events ( e.g., Kuroshio and Oyashio Currents) rather than other local environmental conditions ( e.g., SST and Chl- a concentration), because all of the oceanographic influences are imposed on the context of large-scale climate changes ( e.g., PDO). An unstructured-grid finite-volume coastal ocean model coupled with an individual-based model is proposed to simulate relevant physical-biological oceanographic processes for identifying ocean-climate influence and predicting O. bartramii distribution and abundance in the North Pacific. Future research needs to be focused on improving the knowledge about early life history of O. bartramii and evaluating the relationship between marine physical environment and two separate passive drifting life stages of O. bartramii including free-floating eggs and planktonic paralarvae.

  6. Interannual and seasonal variability of winter-spring cohort of neon flying squid abundance in the Northwest Pacific Ocean during 1995-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian

    2016-06-01

    The neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii, is a species of economically important cephalopod in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Its short lifespan increases the susceptibility of the distribution and abundance to the direct impact of the environmental conditions. Based on the generalized linear model (GLM) and generalized additive model (GAM), the commercial fishery data from the Chinese squid-jigging fleets during 1995 to 2011 were used to examine the interannual and seasonal variability in the abundance of O. bartramii, and to evaluate the influences of variables on the abundance (catch per unit effort, CPUE). The results from GLM suggested that year, month, latitude, sea surface temperature (SST), mixed layer depth (MLD), and the interaction term ( SST×MLD) were significant factors. The optimal model based on GAM included all the six significant variables and could explain 42.43% of the variance in nominal CPUE. The importance of the six variables was ranked by decreasing magnitude: year, month, latitude, SST, MLD and SST×MLD. The squid was mainly distributed in the waters between 40°N and 44°N in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. The optimal ranges of SST and MLD were from 14 to 20°C and from 10 to 30 m, respectively. The squid abundance greatly fluctuated from 1995 to 2011. The CPUE was low during 1995-2002 and high during 2003-2008. Furthermore, the squid abundance was typically high in August. The interannual and seasonal variabilities in the squid abundance were associated with the variations of marine environmental conditions and the life history characteristics of squid.

  7. Variability of Suitable Habitat of Western Winter-Spring Cohort for Neon Flying Squid in the Northwest Pacific under Anomalous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    We developed a habitat suitability index (HSI) model to evaluate the variability of suitable habitat for neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) under anomalous environments in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Commercial fisheries data from the Chinese squid-jigging vessels on the traditional fishing ground bounded by 35°-45°N and 150°-175°E from July to November during 1998-2009 were used for analyses, as well as the environmental variables including sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration, sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) and sea surface salinity (SSS). Two empirical HSI models (arithmetic mean model, AMM; geometric mean model, GMM) were established according to the frequency distribution of fishing efforts. The AMM model was found to perform better than the GMM model. The AMM-based HSI model was further validated by the fishery and environmental data in 2010. The predicted HSI values in 1998 (high catch), 2008 (average catch) and 2009 (low catch) indicated that the squid habitat quality was strongly associated with the ENSO-induced variability in the oceanic conditions on the fishing ground. The La Niña events in 1998 tended to yield warm SST and favorable range of Chl-a concentration and SSHA, resulting in high-quality habitats for O. bartramii. While the fishing ground in the El Niño year of 2009 experienced anomalous cool waters and unfavorable range of Chl-a concentration and SSHA, leading to relatively low-quality squid habitats. Our findings suggest that the La Niña event in 1998 tended to result in more favorable habitats for O. bartramii in the Northwest Pacific with the gravity centers of fishing efforts falling within the defined suitable habitat and yielding high squid catch; whereas the El Niño event in 2009 yielded less favorable habitat areas with the fishing effort distribution mismatching the suitable habitat and a dramatic decline of the catch of O. bartramii. This study might provide some potentially valuable

  8. Variability of Suitable Habitat of Western Winter-Spring Cohort for Neon Flying Squid in the Northwest Pacific under Anomalous Environments.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    We developed a habitat suitability index (HSI) model to evaluate the variability of suitable habitat for neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) under anomalous environments in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Commercial fisheries data from the Chinese squid-jigging vessels on the traditional fishing ground bounded by 35°-45°N and 150°-175°E from July to November during 1998-2009 were used for analyses, as well as the environmental variables including sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration, sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) and sea surface salinity (SSS). Two empirical HSI models (arithmetic mean model, AMM; geometric mean model, GMM) were established according to the frequency distribution of fishing efforts. The AMM model was found to perform better than the GMM model. The AMM-based HSI model was further validated by the fishery and environmental data in 2010. The predicted HSI values in 1998 (high catch), 2008 (average catch) and 2009 (low catch) indicated that the squid habitat quality was strongly associated with the ENSO-induced variability in the oceanic conditions on the fishing ground. The La Niña events in 1998 tended to yield warm SST and favorable range of Chl-a concentration and SSHA, resulting in high-quality habitats for O. bartramii. While the fishing ground in the El Niño year of 2009 experienced anomalous cool waters and unfavorable range of Chl-a concentration and SSHA, leading to relatively low-quality squid habitats. Our findings suggest that the La Niña event in 1998 tended to result in more favorable habitats for O. bartramii in the Northwest Pacific with the gravity centers of fishing efforts falling within the defined suitable habitat and yielding high squid catch; whereas the El Niño event in 2009 yielded less favorable habitat areas with the fishing effort distribution mismatching the suitable habitat and a dramatic decline of the catch of O. bartramii. This study might provide some potentially valuable

  9. Size increment of jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas mature females in Peruvian waters, 1989-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüelles, Juan; Tafur, Ricardo; Taipe, Anatolio; Villegas, Piero; Keyl, Friedeman; Dominguez, Noel; Salazar, Martín

    2008-10-01

    Changes in population structure of the jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas in Peruvian waters were studied based on size-at-maturity from 1989 to 2004. From 1989 to 1999, mature squid belonging to the medium-sized group prevailed, but from 2001 on, mature squids were larger. This change is not related to the changes in sea surface temperature and we hypothesized that it was caused by the population increase of mesopelagic fishes as prey.

  10. Fishery biology of jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas off Costa Rica Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjun; Li, Jianghua; Liu, Bilin; Li, Gang; Lu, Huajie

    2014-06-01

    The jumbo flying squid ( Dosidicus gigas) population was surveyed with the help of Chinese squid jigging vessels off the Costa Rica Dome (4°-11°N, 90°-100°W) in 2009 and 2010. The daily catch of D. gigas in the two survey cruises ranged from 0 to 5.5 t and was mostly obtained from the areas bounded by 6°-9°N and 91°-94°W and by 6°30'-7°30'N and 96°-97°W. The sea surface temperature in the areas yielding the most catch ranged from 27.5 to 29°C. The sex ratio of the total catch was 3.75:1 (female: male). The mantle length of the squid ranged from 211 to 355 mm (male) and from 204 to 429 mm (female) with an average of 297.9 and 306.7 mm, respectively. In the relationship of the mantle length (mm) and body weight (g) of the squid, there was no significant difference between sexes. The female and male were at a similar maturity, and most individuals are maturing or have matured with a few females being spent. The size (mantle length) and age at the first sexual maturity were 297 mm and 195 d in females, and less than 211 mm and 130 d in males, respectively. Most of the sampled stomachs (70.6%) had no food remains. The major preys of the squids were fish, cephalopods and crustaceans, with the most abundant Myctophum orientale and D. gigas. The preys in more than 65% of the non-empty sampled stomachs evidenced the cannibalism of D. gigas. The results improved current understanding of the fishery biology of D. gigas off the Costa Rica Dome, which may facilitate the assessment and management of relative fishery resources.

  11. A comparison of fishery biology of jumbo flying squid, Dosidicus gigas outside three Exclusive Economic Zones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bilin; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian

    2013-05-01

    Although many studies on the fishery biology of jumbo flying squid, Dosidicus gigas, have been conducted in the coastal areas within Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) of various countries due to its commercial and ecological importance, limited biological information is available from waters outside these EEZs. In this paper, we examined D. gigas fishery biology from waters outside Chilean, Peruvian and Costa Rican EEZs, based on the fishery data collected by Chinese jigging vessels during 2006 to 2010. The dominant mantle lengths of D. gigas were 350-450 mm, 250-400 mm and 250-350 mm outside Chilean, Peruvian and Costa Rican EEZs, respectively. Size structure analysis show that a medium-sized group existed mostly in the waters outside the Chilean and Peruvian EEZs, whereas a small-sized group occurred mainly in the waters outside the Costa Rican EEZ. The longevity of the squid outside the Costa Rican EEZ was less than 10 months, while most of those outside Chilean and Peruvian EEZs were about 1-1.5 years and very few large individuals were 1.5-2 years old. A higher percentage of mature individuals existed outside Costa Rican EEZ implying the region as a potential spawning ground, while lower proportions of mature squid outside the Peruvian and Chilean EEZs indicated that spawning may be occurring outside our study area. Spatial differences in sizes at maturity of the squid are thought to be result from different environmental factors especially different temperature and nutrition among the three areas. Stomach-content analysis showed that cannibalism was important in the diet of D. gigas. Stress generated by jigging may increase the incidence of cannibalism.

  12. A Comparative Study of Clam and Squid. Biting Flies of the Coastal Region. Diatoms: Nature's Aquatic Gems. Learning Experiences for Coastal and Oceanic Awareness Studies, Nos. 227, 231, 232. [Project COAST].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Coll. of Education.

    Included are three units related to coastal and oceanic awareness. The units are: (1) A Comparative Study of Clam and Squid; (2) Biting Flies of the Coastal Region; and (3) Diatoms: Nature's Aquatic Gems. All three units were designed for secondary school students. Each unit contains teacher background materials, student activity materials,…

  13. FLIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flies constitute a major group of nuisance species world wide in rural and urban situations. The public and health care officials can become more aware of the potential risks from flies and other urban pests by compiling the available information into an easily readable book form. Scientists from ...

  14. Squid rocket science: How squid launch into air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dor, Ron; Stewart, Julia; Gilly, William; Payne, John; Borges, Teresa Cerveira; Thys, Tierney

    2013-10-01

    Squid not only swim, they can also fly like rockets, accelerating through the air by forcefully expelling water out of their mantles. Using available lab and field data from four squid species, Sthenoteuthis pteropus, Dosidicus gigas, Illex illecebrosus and Loligo opalescens, including sixteen remarkable photographs of flying S. pteropus off the coast of Brazil, we compared the cost of transport in both water and air and discussed methods of maximizing power output through funnel and mantle constriction. Additionally we found that fin flaps develop at approximately the same size range as flight behaviors in these squids, consistent with previous hypotheses that flaps could function as ailerons whilst aloft. S. pteropus acceleration in air (265 body lengths [BL]/s2; 24.5m/s2) was found to exceed that in water (79BL/s2) three-fold based on estimated mantle length from still photos. Velocities in air (37BL/s; 3.4m/s) exceed those in water (11BL/s) almost four-fold. Given the obvious advantages of this extreme mode of transport, squid flight may in fact be more common than previously thought and potentially employed to reduce migration cost in addition to predation avoidance. Clearly squid flight, the role of fin flaps and funnel, and the energetic benefits are worthy of extended investigation.

  15. The Squid Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillaume, Andrea M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an approach to the study of squid that helps students of all ages develop richer ideas about the structure of living things, how living things are adapted to their habitats, and how they interact with other organisms. Highlights include the external and internal features of the squid, squid statements and statistics, and writing…

  16. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  17. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  18. Subranging scheme for SQUID sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A readout scheme for measuring the output from a SQUID-based sensor-array using an improved subranging architecture that includes multiple resolution channels (such as a coarse resolution channel and a fine resolution channel). The scheme employs a flux sensing circuit with a sensing coil connected in series to multiple input coils, each input coil being coupled to a corresponding SQUID detection circuit having a high-resolution SQUID device with independent linearizing feedback. A two-resolution configuration (course and fine) is illustrated with a primary SQUID detection circuit for generating a fine readout, and a secondary SQUID detection circuit for generating a course readout, both having feedback current coupled to the respective SQUID devices via feedback/modulation coils. The primary and secondary SQUID detection circuits function and derive independent feedback. Thus, the SQUID devices may be monitored independently of each other (and read simultaneously) to dramatically increase slew rates and dynamic range.

  19. Optical fiber feedback SQUID magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, S.; Sampei, Y.; Takahashi, T. )

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes an optical fiber feedback superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer which was developed to improve electromagnetic interference characteristics. The SQUID consists of an RF SQUID probe, an RF amplifier, two multimode fibers, and a SQUID control unit. Phase-locked pulse width modulation (PWM) was used to construct a flux locked loop (FLL) circuit in the SQUID control unit. The operation of the optical fiber feedback SQUID is stable when a common mode voltage of ac 100 V/50 Hz is applied. It has an energy resolution of 1 x 10/sup -28/ J/Hz. This paper also describes the measurement of an auditory evoked field from the human brain in a magnetically shielded room using the fiber feedback SQUID with a gradiometer type pickup coil.

  20. SQUIDs - ultimate magnetic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Gordon B.

    2005-03-01

    SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) have extreme electromagnetic energy sensitivity, which can be applied in a wide variety of ways. Some of these are covered in the papers representing the rest of this symposium: in this brief introductory paper we indicate the wide extent of the full range of applications to which they have been put, from bioscience to tests of General Relativity.

  1. Low-noise SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Dantsker, Eugene; Clarke, John

    2000-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high-transition-temperature superconducting device having low-magnitude low-frequency noise-characteristics in magnetic fields comprising superconducting films wherein the films have a width that is less than or equal to a critical width, w.sub.C, which depends on an ambient magnetic field. For operation in the Earth's magnetic field, the critical width is about 6 micrometers (.mu.m). When made with film widths of about 4 .mu.m an inventive high transition-temperature, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) excluded magnetic flux vortices up to a threshold ambient magnetic field of about 100 microTesla (.mu.T). SQUIDs were fabricated having several different film strip patterns. When the film strip width was kept at about 4 .mu.m, the SQUIDs exhibited essentially no increase in low-frequency noise, even when cooled in static magnetic fields of magnitude up to 100 .mu.T. Furthermore, the mutual inductance between the inventive devices and a seven-turn spiral coil was at least 85% of that for inductive coupling to a conventional SQUID.

  2. Geophysical applications of squids

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.

    1983-05-01

    Present and potential geophysical applications of Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) include remote reference magnetotellurics, controlledsource electromagnetic sounding, airborne gradiometry, gravity gradiometers, rock magnetism, paleomagnetism, piezomagnetism, tectonomagnetism, the location of hydrofractures for hot dry rock geothermal energy and enhanced oil and gas recovery, the detection of internal ocean waves, and underwater magnetotellurics.

  3. Low-noise SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Dantsker, E.; Clarke, J.

    2000-02-08

    The present invention comprises a high-transition-temperature superconducting device having low-magnitude low-frequency noise-characteristics in magnetic fields comprising superconducting films wherein the films have a width that is less than or equal to a critical width, w(C), which depends on an ambient magnetic field. For operation in the Earth's magnetic field, the critical width is about 6 micrometers ({mu}m). When made with film widths of about 4 {mu}m an inventive high transition-temperature, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) excluded magnetic flux vortices up to a threshold ambient magnetic field of about 100 microTesla ({mu}T). SQUIDs were fabricated having several different film strip patterns. When the film strip width was kept at about 4 {mu}m, the SQUIDs exhibited essentially no increase in low-frequency noise, even when cooled in static magnetic fields of magnitude up to 100 {mu}T. Furthermore, the mutual inductance between the inventive devices and a seven-turn spiral coil was at least 85% of that for inductive coupling to a conventional SQUID.

  4. SQUIDs: Then and Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, John

    2014-03-01

    In 1964, Jaklevic, Lambe, Silver and Mercereau demonstrated quantum interference in a superconducting ring containing two Josephson tunnel junctions. This observation marked the birth of the SQUID--Superconducting QUantum Interference Device. The following year saw the appearance of the SLUG (Superconducting Low-inductance Undulatory Galvanometer)--a blob of solder frozen around a length of niobium wire--that was used as a voltmeter with femtovolt resolution. Although extremely primitive by today's standards, the SLUG was used successfully in a number of ultrasensitive experiments. Today, the square washer dc SQUID, fabricated on a wafer-scale from thin films with an integrated input coil, finds a wide range of applications. One example is the use of a SQUID amplifier to read out ADMX--Axion Dark Matter eXperiment--at the University of Washington, Seattle. This experiment, which involves a cooled microwave cavity surrounded by a superconducting magnet, searches for the axion, a candidate for cold dark matter. In the presence of a magnetic field the axion is predicted to decay into a photon, which is detected by the SQUID. In another example, the combination of a SQUID with prepolarized proton spins enables one to perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in magnetic fields of the order of 0.1 mT, four orders of magnitude lower than in conventional MRI systems. In vivo images of the human brain acquired at these ultralow fields are able distinguish brain tissue, blood, cerebrospinal fluid and scalp fat using a combination of inversion recovery and multiple echo sequences. Potential clinical applications are briefly discussed.

  5. The Microwave SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mates, John Arthur Benson

    2011-12-01

    This thesis describes a multiplexer of Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) with low-noise, ultra-low power dissipation, and great scalability. The multiplexer circuit measures the magnetic flux in a large number of unshunted rf SQUIDs by coupling each SQUID to a superconducting microwave resonator tuned to a unique resonance frequency and driving the resonators from a common feedline. A superposition of microwave tones measures each SQUID simultaneously using only two coaxial cables between the cryogenic device and room temperature. This multiplexer will enable the instrumentation of arrays with hundreds of thousands of low-temperature detectors for new applications in cosmology, materials analysis, and nuclear non-proliferation. The driving application of the Microwave SQUID Multiplexer is the readout of large arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors, by some figures of merit the most sensitive detectors of electromagnetic signals over a span of more than nine orders of magnitude in energy, from 40 GHz microwaves to 200 keV gamma rays. Modern transition-edge sensors have noise-equivalent power as low as 10-20 W / Hz1/2 and energy resolution as good as 2 eV at 6 keV. These per-pixel sensitivities approach theoretical limits set by the underlying signals, motivating a rapid increase in pixel count to access new science. Compelling applications, like the non-destructive assay of nuclear material for treaty verification or the search for primordial gravity waves from inflation use arrays of these detectors to increase collection area or tile a focal plane. We developed three generations of SQUID multiplexers, optimizing the first for flux noise 0.17 muPhi0 / Hz1/2, the second for input current noise 19 pA / Hz1/2, and the last for practical multiplexing of large arrays of cosmic microwave background polarimeters based on transition-edge sensors. Using the last design we demonstrated multiplexed readout of prototype polarimeters with the

  6. Dissect Your Squid and Eat It Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a science lab activity in which students dissect fresh squids in groups of four and observe the anatomy. Parent volunteers cook the squid mantle for kids to taste. Includes directions for squid dissection. (YDS)

  7. SQUID With Integral Flux Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Sisk, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    In improved superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), change in size and shape of superconducting ring improves coupling to external signal coil and eases coil-positioning tolerances. More rugged and easier to manufacture than conventional SQUID's with comparable electrical characteristics. Thin-film superconducting flux concentrator utilizes Meissner effect to deflect magnetic field of signal coil into central hole of SQUID. Used in magnetometers, ammeters, analog-to-digital converters, and related electronic applications in which high signal-to-noise ratios required.

  8. Time-division SQUID multiplexers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, K. D.; Vale, L. R.; Bergren, N. E.; Deiker, S.; Grossman, E. N.; Hilton, G. C.; Nam, S. W.; Reintsema, C. D.; Rudman, D. A.; Huber, M. E.

    2002-02-01

    SQUID multiplexers make it possible to build arrays of thousands of low-temperature bolometers and microcalorimeters based on superconducting transition-edge sensors with a manageable number of readout channels. We discuss the technical tradeoffs between proposed time-division multiplexer and frequency-division multiplexer schemes and motivate our choice of time division. Our first-generation SQUID multiplexer is now in use in an astronomical instrument. We describe our second-generation SQUID multiplexer, which is based on a new architecture that significantly reduces the dissipation of power at the first stage, allowing thousands of SQUIDs to be operated at the base temperature of a cryostat. .

  9. Rogue mantle helium and neon.

    PubMed

    Albarède, Francis

    2008-02-15

    The canonical model of helium isotope geochemistry describes the lower mantle as undegassed, but this view conflicts with evidence of recycled material in the source of ocean island basalts. Because mantle helium is efficiently extracted by magmatic activity, it cannot remain in fertile mantle rocks for long periods of time. Here, I suggest that helium with high 3He/4He ratios, as well as neon rich in the solar component, diffused early in Earth's history from low-melting-point primordial material into residual refractory "reservoir" rocks, such as dunites. The difference in 3He/4He ratios of ocean-island and mid-ocean ridge basalts and the preservation of solar neon are ascribed to the reservoir rocks being stretched and tapped to different extents during melting. PMID:18202257

  10. SQUIDs: microscopes and nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, Michael

    2005-03-01

    SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) are magnetic field sensores with unsurpassed sensitivity. They are amazingly versatile, being able to measure all physical quantities which can be converted to magnetic flux. They are routinely fabricated in thin film technology from two classes of superconducting materials: high-temperature superconductors (HTS) which are usually cooled to 77 K, and low-temperature superconductors (LTS), which have to be cooled to 4.2 K. SQUIDs have many applications, two of which shall be discussed in this paper. In SQUID microscopy, a SQUID scans a sample, which preferrably is at room temperature, and measures the two-dimensional magnetic field distribution at the surface of the sample. In order to achieve a relatively high spatial resolution, the stand-off distance between the sample and the SQUID is made as small as possible. SQUIDs show also promising results in the field of nondestructive testing of various materials. For example, ferromagnetic impurities in stainless steel formed by aging processes in the material can be detected with high probability, and cracks in conducting materials, for example aircraft parts, can be located using eddy current methods. Especially for the case of thick, highly conductive, or ferromagnetic materials, as well as sintered materials, it can be shown that a SQUID-based NDE system exhibits a much higher sensitivity compared to conventional eddy current NDE and ultrasonic testing.

  11. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  12. Neon Ion Beam Lithography (NIBL).

    PubMed

    Winston, Donald; Manfrinato, Vitor R; Nicaise, Samuel M; Cheong, Lin Lee; Duan, Huigao; Ferranti, David; Marshman, Jeff; McVey, Shawn; Stern, Lewis; Notte, John; Berggren, Karl K

    2011-10-12

    Existing techniques for electron- and ion-beam lithography, routinely employed for nanoscale device fabrication and mask/mold prototyping, do not simultaneously achieve efficient (low fluence) exposure and high resolution. We report lithography using neon ions with fluence <1 ion/nm(2), ∼1000× more efficient than using 30 keV electrons, and resolution down to 7 nm half-pitch. This combination of resolution and exposure efficiency is expected to impact a wide array of fields that are dependent on beam-based lithography. PMID:21899279

  13. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by...

  14. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by...

  15. Small scale demand type neon liquefaction plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dube, W. P.; Slifka, A. J.; Bitsy, R. M.; Sparks, L. L.; Johnson, K. B.

    1990-01-01

    Low-temperature measurement of the thermal conductivity of insulating materials is generally made using a boil-off calorimetry technique involving liquid hydrogen (LH2). Liquid neon (LNe) has nearly the same normal boiling point as LH2, but has a much larger heat of vaporization, allowing extended run times. The main drawback of using LNe has been its excessive cost; $170.00 versus $1.50/l for LH2 (1989 prices). A neon liquefaction plant has been designed and constructed to capture, purify, and refrigerate the neon boil-off from calorimetry experiments. Recycling the neon reduces operating costs to approximately $20/l. The system consists of a purification section, a heat exchanger, LNe and LH2 storage dewars, and a fully automated control system. After purification, neon is liquified in the heat exchanger by LH2 flowing countercurrently through stainless steel cooling coils. Hydrogen flow is automatically adjusted to keep the neon at its normal saturation temperature, 27 K. The liquid neon is then stored in a dewar placed directly below the heat exchanger.

  16. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-09-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and office supply stores. We also employ violet-blue and green laser pointers as excitation sources. We conclude with a brief discussion of neon pigments in terms of the "day glow" or "daylight fluorescence" phenomenon.

  17. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, S. J.; Henderson, S.; Gardiner, L. S.; Ward, D.; Gram, W.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of "human sensors." As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include "citizens" or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. Phenology was

  18. Paleomagnetic Analysis Using SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.; Fong, Luis E.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.

    2007-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopes are a new generation of instruments that map magnetic fields with unprecedented spatial resolution and moment sensitivity. Unlike standard rock magnetometers, SQUID microscopes map magnetic fields rather than measuring magnetic moments such that the sample magnetization pattern must be retrieved from source model fits to the measured field data. In this paper, we presented the first direct comparison between paleomagnetic analyses on natural samples using joint measurements from SQUID microscopy and moment magnetometry. We demonstrated that in combination with apriori geologic and petrographic data, SQUID microscopy can accurately characterize the magnetization of lunar glass spherules and Hawaiian basalt. The bulk moment magnitude and direction of these samples inferred from inversions of SQUID microscopy data match direct measurements on the same samples using moment magnetometry. In addition, these inversions provide unique constraints on the magnetization distribution within the sample. These measurements are among the most sensitive and highest resolution quantitative paleomagnetic studies of natural remanent magnetization to date. We expect that this technique will be able to extend many other standard paleomagnetic techniques to previously inaccessible microscale samples.

  19. Recent developments in SQUID NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, H.-J.; Kreutzbruck, M. v.

    2002-03-01

    By presenting brief summaries of recent application highlights, an overview of NDE methods using SQUIDs is given. Bridge inspection with a SQUID array integrated with a yoke magnet excitation was shown by scanning along the pre-stressed steel of bridges and verified by opening the bridge deck. As the construction of the megaliner Airbus aircraft progresses, testing procedures for extremely thick-walled structures are needed. Defects at a depth of up to 40 mm were measured in a bolted three-layer aluminum sample with a total thickness of 62 mm. For the investigation of aircraft wheels, a remote eddy current (EC) excitation scheme yields better depth selectivity. Defects with an inside penetration of only 10% could be detected. SQUID magnetometers are well suited for pulsed EC techniques which cover a broader depth range than standard single frequency EC. An inversion procedure is presented providing a tomographic-like conductivity image of stacked aluminum samples. A recent SQUID application is nondestructive testing of niobium sheets used for superconducting cavities of particle accelerators. The detection of tantalum inclusions and other impurities which lower the cavity performance is based on the measurement of local current inhomogeneities caused by EC excitation or thermal gradients. Alternate techniques using SQUID sensors, such as modulated excitation arrays, rotating field schemes, sensor multiplexing, magnetic moment detection, and microscopy setups, are discussed.

  20. SQUID holder with high magnetic shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, K. W.; Marek, D.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A SQUID holder designed for high magnetic shielding is discussed. It is shown how to estimate the attenuation of the magnetic field from the normal magnetic modes for an approximate geometry. The estimate agrees satisfactorily with the attenuation measured with a commercial RF SQUID installed in the holder. The holder attenuates external magnetic fields by more than 10 to the 9th at the SQUID input. With the SQUID input shorted, the response to external fields is 0.00001 Phi(0)/G.

  1. Tracking Electromagnetic Energy With SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is a gadget used to measure extremely weak signals, specifically magnetic flux. It can detect subtle changes in energy, up to 100 billion times weaker than the electromagnetic energy required to move a compass needle. SQUIDs are used for a variety of testing procedures where extreme sensitivity is required and where the test instrument need not come into direct contact with the test subject. NASA uses SQUIDs for remote, noncontact sensing in a variety of venues, including monitoring the Earth s magnetic field and tracking brain activity of pilots. Scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have been making extensive use of this technology, from astrophysical research, to tracking the navigational paths of bees in flight to determine if they are using internal compasses. These very sensitive measurement devices have a wide variety of uses within NASA and even more uses within the commercial realm.

  2. Solar helium and neon in the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Mcdougall, I.; Patterson, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    Neon isotopic compositions in mantle-derived samples commonly are enriched in (20)Ne and (21)Ne relative to (22)Ne compared with atmospheric neon ((20)Ne/(22)Ne and (21)Ne/(22)Ne ratios in atmospheric neon are 9.8 and 0.029, respectively), together with significant primordial (3)He. Such results have been obtained on MORB's, intraplate plume-related oceanic island basalts, backarc basin basalts, mantle xenoliths, ancient diamonds and CO2 well gases (e.g., 1 - 8). The highest (20)Ne/(22)Ne ratio observed in MORB glasses (= 13.6 plus or minus 1.3 is close to the solar value (= 13.6, as observed in solar wind). In order to explain the enrichment of (20)Ne and (21)Ne relative to atmospheric neon for samples derived from the mantle, it is necessary to postulate the presence of at least two distinct non-atmospheric components. The two most likely candidates are solar and nucleogenic ((20)Ne/(22)Ne solar = 13.6 (21)Ne/(22)Ne solar = 0.032, (20)Ne/(22)Ne nucleogenic = 2.5 and (21)Ne/(22)Ne nucleogenic = 32). This is because solar neon is the only known component with a (20)Ne/(22)Ne ratio greater than both the atmospheric value and that observed in samples derived from the mantle. Nucleogenic neon is well known to elevate (21)Ne/(22)Ne ratios. Neon isotopic signatures observed in mantle-derived samples can be accounted for by mixing of the three neon end members: solar, nucleogenic and atmospheric.

  3. Capturing neon - the first experimental structure of neon trapped within a metal-organic environment.

    PubMed

    Wood, Peter A; Sarjeant, Amy A; Yakovenko, Andrey A; Ward, Suzanna C; Groom, Colin R

    2016-08-21

    Despite being the fifth most abundant element in the atmosphere, neon has never been observed in an organic or metal-organic environment. This study shows the adsorption of this highly unreactive element within such an environment and reveals the first crystallographic observation of an interaction between neon and a transition metal. PMID:27452474

  4. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gram, W.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of “human sensors.” As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include “citizens” or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process

  5. Cold SQUIDs and hot samples

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.C. |

    1997-05-01

    Low transition temperature (low-{Tc}) and high-{Tc} Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have been used to perform high-resolution magnetic measurements on samples whose temperatures are much higher than the operating temperatures of the devices. Part 1 of this work focuses on measurements of the rigidity of flux vortices in high-{Tc} superconductors using two low-{Tc} SQUIDs, one on either side of a thermally-insulated sample. The correlation between the signals of the SQUIDs is a direct measure of the extent of correlation between the movements of opposite ends of vortices. These measurements were conducted under the previously-unexplored experimental conditions of nominally-zero applied magnetic field, such that vortex-vortex interactions were unimportant, and with zero external current. At specific temperatures, the authors observed highly-correlated noise sources, suggesting that the vortices moved as rigid rods. At other temperatures, the noise was mostly uncorrelated, suggesting that the relevant vortices were pinned at more than one point along their length. Part 2 describes the design, construction, performance, and applications of a scanning high-{Tc} SQUID microscope optimized for imaging room-temperature objects with very high spatial resolution and magnetic source sensitivity.

  6. How the SQUID was born

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Arnold H.

    2006-05-01

    I was asked to speak about the discovery and invention of the SQUID at the International Superconducting Electronics Conference (ISEC) 2005 banquet. This narrative is based on my personal recollections of the sequence of events and the motivations. I have edited the text and added figures for clarity. Although it is an old story, it may contain some useful lessons.

  7. Helium and Neon in Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1996-01-01

    Two comets were observed with EUVE in late 1994. Both comet Mueller and comet Borrelly are short-period comets having well established orbital elements and accurate ephemerides. Spectra of 40 ksec were taken of each. No evidence for emission lines from either Helium or Neon was detected. We calculated limits on the production rates of these atoms (relative to solar) assuming a standard isotropic outflow model, with a gas streaming speed of 1 km/s. The 3-sigma (99.7% confidence) limits (1/100,000 for He, 0.8 for Ne) are based on a conservative estimate of the noise in the EUVE spectra. They are also weakly dependent on the precise pointing and tracking of the EUVE field of view relative to the comet during the integrations. These limits are consistent with ice formation temperatures T greater than or equal to 30 K, as judged from the gas trapping experiments of Bar-Nun. For comparison, the solar abundances of these elements are He/O = 110, Ne/O = 1/16. Neither limit was as constraining as we had initially hoped, mainly because comets Mueller and Borrelly were intrinsically less active than anticipated.

  8. Improved Sensing Coils for SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2007-01-01

    An improvement in the design and fabrication of sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers has been proposed to increase sensitivity. It has been estimated that, in some cases, it would be possible to increase sensitivity by about half or to reduce measurement time correspondingly. The pertinent aspects of the problems of design and fabrication can be summarized as follows: In general, to increase the sensitivity of a SQUID magnetometer, it is necessary to maximize the magnetic flux enclosed by the sensing coil while minimizing the self-inductance of this coil. It is often beneficial to fabricate the coil from a thicker wire to reduce its self-inductance. Moreover, to optimize the design of the coil with respect to sensitivity, it may be necessary to shape the wire to other than a commonly available circular or square cross-section. On the other hand, it is not practical to use thicker superconducting wire for the entire superconducting circuit, especially if the design of a specific device requires a persistent-current loop enclosing a remotely placed SQUID sensor. It may be possible to bond a thicker sensing-coil wire to thinner superconducting wires leading to a SQUID sensor, but it could be difficult to ensure reliable superconducting connections, especially if the bonded wires are made of different materials. The main idea is to mold the sensing coil in place, to more nearly optimum cross sectional shape, instead of making the coil by winding standard pre-fabricated wire. For this purpose, a thin superconducting wire loop that is an essential part of the SQUID magnetometer would be encapsulated in a form that would serve as a mold. A low-melting-temperature superconducting metal (e.g., indium, tin, or a lead/tin alloy) would be melted into the form, which would be sized and shaped to impart the required cross section to the coil thus formed.

  9. Flying wings / flying fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper has documented the historical relationships between various classes of all lifting vehicles, which includes the flying wing, all wing, tailless, lifting body, and lifting fuselage. The diversity in vehicle focus was to ensure that all vehicle types that map have contributed to or been influenced by the development of the classical flying wing concept was investigated. The paper has provided context and perspective for present and future aircraft design studies that may employ the all lifting vehicle concept. The paper also demonstrated the benefit of developing an understanding of the past in order to obtain the required knowledge to create future concepts with significantly improved aerodynamic performance.

  10. An X-band SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, I.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.; Weilert, M.; Day, P.

    2006-09-01

    We are developing a microwave readout multiplexer for arrays of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). A series of microwave resonators with frequencies ˜10 GHz are each loaded by a dc SQUID to a degree that depends on the flux state of the SQUID. By using resonators with high quality factors and slightly different resonance frequencies, many of these resonator-coupled SQUIDs may be read out with a single excitation line and cryogenic amplifier. Our multiplexer is similar to the one demonstrated by Irwin and Lehnert except for the use of higher-frequency, fully-lithographed transmission line resonators. We discuss a technique for modulating the SQUID array in series that alleviates the need to individually flux-bias the SQUIDs. The multiplexer has applications to the readout of detector arrays for astronomy as well as medical magnetic imaging.

  11. The First NEON School in La Silla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennefeld, M.; Melo, C.; Selman, F.

    2016-06-01

    The NEON Observing Schools have long provided PhD students with practical experience in the preparation, execution and reduction of astronomical observations, primarily at northern observatories. The NEON School was held in Chile for the first time, with observations being conducted at La Silla. The school was attended by 20 students, all from South America, and observations were performed with two telescopes, including the New Technology Telescope. A brief description of the school is presented and the observing projects and their results are described.

  12. Rogue Mantle Helium and Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarede, F.

    2007-12-01

    mid- ocean ridges, the characteristic times of melt extraction in each of these two environments are 10,000 y and 1 My, respectively, and the maximum thickness of refractory layers contributing their He to the magmas are 10 m and 100 m, respectively. The difference in 3He/4He ratios of ocean-island and mid-ocean ridge basalts and the preservation of solar neon are ascribed to the reservoirs rocks being stretched to a different extent during melting. Old fragments of oceanic lithosphere, and possibly cumulates from the magma ocean, rather than primordial mantle 'nuggets', should host most of the primordial He and Ne presently observed in oceanic basalts. Helium with high 3He/4He ratios may contain a component of primordial origin, but not necessarily reflect the reservoir in which it has been residing for most of the Earth's history.

  13. Analytical derivation of DC SQUID response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, I. I.; Klenov, N. V.; Schegolev, A. E.; Bakurskiy, S. V.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu

    2016-09-01

    We consider voltage and current response formation in DC superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with overdamped Josephson junctions in resistive and superconducting state in the context of a resistively shunted junction (RSJ) model. For simplicity we neglect the junction capacitance and the noise effect. Explicit expressions for the responses in resistive state were obtained for a SQUID which is symmetrical with respect to bias current injection point. Normalized SQUID inductance l=2{{eI}}{{c}}L/{\\hslash } (where I c is the critical current of Josephson junction, L is the SQUID inductance, e is the electron charge and ℏ is the Planck constant) was assumed to be within the range l ≤ 1, subsequently expanded up to l≈ 7 using two fitting parameters. SQUID current response in the superconducting state was considered for arbitrary value of the inductance. The impact of small technological spread of parameters relevant to low-temperature superconductor (LTS) technology was studied, using a generalization of the developed analytical approach, for the case of a small difference of critical currents and shunt resistances of the Josephson junctions, and inequality of SQUID inductive shoulders for both resistive and superconducting states. Comparison with numerical calculation results shows that developed analytical expressions can be used in practical LTS SQUIDs and SQUID-based circuits design, e.g. large serial SQIF, drastically decreasing the time of simulation.

  14. SQUID Multiplexers for Cryogenic Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Kent; Beall, James; Deiker, Steve; Doriese, Randy; Duncan, William; Hilton, Gene; Moseley, S. Harvey; Reintsema, Carl; Stahle, Caroline; Ullom, Joel; Vale, Leila

    2004-01-01

    SQUID multiplexers make it possible to build arrays of thousands of cryogenic detectors with a manageable number of readout channels. We are developing time-division SQUID multiplexers based on Nb trilayer SQUIDs to read arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors. Our first-generation, 8-channel SQUID multiplexer was used in FIBRE, a one-dimensional TES array for submillimeter astronomy. Our second-generation 32-pixel multiplexer, based on an improved architecture, has been developed for instruments including Constellation-X, SCUBA-2, and solar x-ray astronomy missions. SCUBA-2, which is being developed for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, will have more than 10,000 pixels. We are now developing a third-generation architecture based on superconducting hot-electron switches. The use of SQUID multiplexers in instruments operating at above 2 K will also be discussed.

  15. Biofunctional Properties of Enzymatic Squid Meat Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Sang Moo

    2015-01-01

    Squid is one of the most important commercial fishes in the world and is mainly utilized or consumed as sliced raw fish or as processed products. The biofunctional activities of enzymatic squid meat hydrolysate were determined to develop value-added products. Enzymatic squid hydrolysate manufactured by Alcalase effectively quenched 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide radical with IC50 values of 311, 3,410, and 111.5 μg/mL, respectively. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of squid hydrolysate was strong with an IC50 value of 145.1 μg/mL, while tyrosinase inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 4.72 mg/mL was moderately low. Overall, squid meat hydrolysate can be used in food or cosmetic industries as a bioactive ingredient and possibly be used in the manufacture of seasoning, bread, noodle, or cosmetics. PMID:25866752

  16. Low field electron paramagnetic resonance imaging with SQUID detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob (Inventor); Day, Peter K. (Inventor); Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Cohen, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    In one embodiment, a flux transformer with a gradiometer pickup coil is magnetically coupled to a SQUID, and a SQUID array amplifier comprising a plurality of SQUIDs, connected in series, is magnetically coupled to the output of the SQUID. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  17. ASA's Chandra Neon Discovery Solves Solar Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory survey of nearby sun-like stars suggests there is nearly three times more neon in the sun and local universe than previously believed. If true, this would solve a critical problem with understanding how the sun works. "We use the sun to test how well we understand stars and, to some extent, the rest of the universe," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "But in order to understand the sun, we need to know exactly what it is made of," he added. It is not well known how much neon the sun contains. This is critical information for creating theoretical models of the sun. Neon atoms, along with carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, play an important role in how quickly energy flows from nuclear reactions in the sun's core to its edge, where it then radiates into space. Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi The rate of this energy flow determines the location and size of a crucial stellar region called the convection zone. The zone extends from near the sun's surface inward approximately 125,000 miles. The zone is where the gas undergoes a rolling, convective motion much like the unstable air in a thunderstorm. "This turbulent gas has an extremely important job, because nearly all of the energy emitted at the surface of the sun is transported there by convection," Drake said. The accepted amount of neon in the sun has led to a paradox. The predicted location and size of the solar convection zone disagree with those deduced from solar oscillations. Solar oscillations is a technique astronomers previously relied on to probe the sun's interior. Several scientists have noted the problem could be fixed if the abundance of neon is in fact about three times larger than currently accepted. Attempts to measure the precise amount of neon in the Sun have been frustrated by a quirk of nature; neon atoms in the Sun give off no signatures in visible light. However, in a gas

  18. Genetic identification of a rare record of Ommastrephes Bartramii (Cephalopoda: Ommastrephidae) from the Eastern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Franjević, Damjan; Skaramuca, Daria; Katavić, Vedran; Rajević, Nives; Skaramuca, Boško

    2015-01-01

    The neon flying squid Ommastrephes bartramii Lesueur, 1821 belongs to the Ommastrephidae, Cephalopoda family. The family Ommastrephidae (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) includes many commercially important species, dispersed around the world. The Ommastrephidae family is conventionally divided into three subfamilies (Illicinae, Todarodinae, and Ommastrephinae). We report a specimen of neon flying squid caught in the winter 2013 at Luka Šipanska, Island of Šipan, Croatia and identified at the genetic level using the standard mitochondrial COI barcode region. This record represents the first genetic identification of a neon flying squid from the Adriatic Sea. PMID:26103681

  19. Nanofriction of neon films on superconducting lead.

    PubMed

    Pierno, M; Bruschi, L; Fois, G; Mistura, G; Boragno, C; de Mongeot, F Buatier; Valbusa, U

    2010-07-01

    With a quartz crystal microbalance technique we have studied the nanofriction of neon monolayers deposited on a lead surface at a temperature around 7 K. Unlike heavier adsorbates, Ne is found to systematically slide at such low temperatures without any evidence of pinning. The crossing of the Pb superconducting-metal transition is not accompanied by any change in dissipation, suggesting that the electronic contribution to friction is negligible for this system. PMID:20867468

  20. The NEON Soil Archive - A community resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, E.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a 30-year National Science Foundation-funded facility for understanding and forecasting the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on aspects of continental-scale ecology such as biodiversity, biogeochemistry, infectious diseases, and ecohydrology. NEON will measure a wide range of properties at 60 terrestrial and 36 aquatic sites throughout the US using in situ sensors, sample collection/lab analysis, and remote sensing, and all data will be made freely available. The Observatory is currently under construction and will be fully operational by 2017, however, limited data collection and release will begin in 2013. In addition, NEON is archiving large numbers of samples, including surface soils (top ~30 cm) collected from locations across each site, and soils collected by horizon to 2 m deep from a single soil pit at each site. Here I present information about the latter, focusing on sampling and processing, metadata, and currently available samples. At each terrestrial site the soil pit is dug in the locally dominant soil type and soil is collected by horizon, mixed, and ~4-8 liters soil is sent for processing. Soil samples are air-dried and sieved (mineral soil) or air-dried (organic soil) and 1.2 kg is split between 4 glass jars for archiving (protocol available upon request). To date 15 soil pits have been sampled, representing 7 soil orders, and soils from 110 horizons have been archived or are being processed. Metadata associated with each archive sample include a soil profile description, photos, and soil properties (total C, N, S, Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Sr, Ti, Zr, bulk density, pH, and texture). The procedure for requesting samples from the archive is under development and I encourage scientists to use the archive in their future research. Collecting and processing samples for the NEON Soil Archive

  1. Aperture effects in squid jet propulsion.

    PubMed

    Staaf, Danna J; Gilly, William F; Denny, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Squid are the largest jet propellers in nature as adults, but as paralarvae they are some of the smallest, faced with the inherent inefficiency of jet propulsion at a low Reynolds number. In this study we describe the behavior and kinematics of locomotion in 1 mm paralarvae of Dosidicus gigas, the smallest squid yet studied. They swim with hop-and-sink behavior and can engage in fast jets by reducing the size of the mantle aperture during the contraction phase of a jetting cycle. We go on to explore the general effects of a variable mantle and funnel aperture in a theoretical model of jet propulsion scaled from the smallest (1 mm mantle length) to the largest (3 m) squid. Aperture reduction during mantle contraction increases propulsive efficiency at all squid sizes, although 1 mm squid still suffer from low efficiency (20%) because of a limited speed of contraction. Efficiency increases to a peak of 40% for 1 cm squid, then slowly declines. Squid larger than 6 cm must either reduce contraction speed or increase aperture size to maintain stress within maximal muscle tolerance. Ecological pressure to maintain maximum velocity may lead them to increase aperture size, which reduces efficiency. This effect might be ameliorated by nonaxial flow during the refill phase of the cycle. Our model's predictions highlight areas for future empirical work, and emphasize the existence of complex behavioral options for maximizing efficiency at both very small and large sizes. PMID:24501132

  2. First demonstration of transcontinental SQUID magnetometry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourie, C.; Febvre, P.; Pozzo di Borgo, E.; Waysand, G.; Gouws, D.; Saunderson, E.; Henry, S.; Gaffet, S.; Janse van Vuuren, L.; Lochner, E. T.; Matladi, T.; Kwisanga, C.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first simultaneous measurements from an ultra-sensitive dual-node transcontinental SQUID magnetometer network, available in real time on the internet. A three-axis low temperature SQUID sensor at LSBB Underground Research Laboratory, Rustrel, France (43.841 N, 5.484 E) and a two-axis high temperature SQUID sensor at SANSA Space Science in Hermanus, South Africa (34.424 S, 19.223 E), form the sensitive nodes of the network. Data are measured and GPS time stamped continuously at 125 Hz. The low-Tc SQUID at LSBB URL (known as a [SQUID]2 system) is inside a shielded steel capsule underneath 500 meters of karstic rock, which allows a low magnetic noise floor. The less sensitive high-Tc SQUID at SANSA Space Science is completely unshielded, and housed only in a magnetically neutral hut, 50 metres from a calibrated fluxgate node of the INTERMAGNET network, to protect it against the weather. The network, which is more sensitive than observatory fluxgate magnetometers, detects Earth's magnetosphere pulsations, Schumann waves, mesopause resonance, breathing modes of the Earth and oceanic swell. Our goal is further to extract directional or polarization information if earthquake precursors are observed again, as with the Sichuan-Wenchuan earthquake on 12 May 2008. In the medium term, we are exploring the possibility to extend the network with more spatially distributed SQUID sensors, such as at the South African National Antarctic Expedition's SANAE IV base in Antarctica.

  3. Binary collision model for neon Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1986-01-01

    A model is developed to account for the angle-resolved Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface recently obtained by Pepper and Aron. The neon is assumed to be excited in a single asymmetric neon-aluminum-collision and scattered back into the vacuum where it emits an Auger electron. The velocity of the Auger electron acquires a Doppler shift by virtue of the emission from a moving source. The dependence of the Auger peak shape and energy on the incident ion energy, angle of incidence and on the angle of Auger electron emission with respect to the surface is presented. Satisfactory agreement with the angle resolved experimental observations is obtained. The dependence of the angle-integrated Auger yield on the incident ion energy and angle of incidence is also obtained and shown to be in satisfactory agreement with available experimental evidence.

  4. Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. . Inst. de Physique); Bailey, J.M. ); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. ); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. ); Huber, T.M. ); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.

    1992-01-01

    A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of [mu][sup [minus]p] atoms in each target. The rates [lambda][sub pp[mu

  5. Structural and magnetic properties of zinc ferrite thin films irradiated by 90 keV neon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafton, E. V.; Bulai, G.; Caltun, O. F.; Cervera, S.; Macé, S.; Trassinelli, M.; Steydli, S.; Vernhet, D.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of 90 keV neon beam irradiation on the structure and magnetic properties of zinc ferrite thin films have been investigated through several methods, namely, X-ray diffraction technique, Vibrating Sample and SQUID magnetometers. Beforehand, the pristine have also been characterized using profilometry and microscopy techniques. In particular single-phase formation of the thin films deposited on monocrystalline Si (111) substrate by pulsed laser deposition technique was confirmed. Crystal lattice, coercivity, saturation magnetization have been studied for the first time, as a function of ion penetration depth and irradiation fluence. The chemical composition and the crystallinity of the films are not affected with the ion impact acting as a mechanical stress relief. On the contrary, both magnetization and coercivity are sensitive to Neq+ ion irradiation and exhibit different behaviours depending on the ion fluence range.

  6. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A...

  9. Dietary protein source and level alters growth in neon tetras.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional studies for aquarium fish like the neon tetra are sparse in comparison with those for food fish. To determine the optimum dietary protein level and source for growth of neon tetras, diets were formulated to contain 25, 35, 45 and 55% dietary protein from either marine animal protein or ...

  10. Scattering of electrons from neon atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, A.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    Scattering of electrons from neon atoms is investigated by the polarized-orbital method. The perturbed orbitals calculated with use of the Sternheimer approximation lead to the polarizability 2.803 a(0)-cube in fairly good agreement with the experimental value 2.66 a(0)-cube. Phase shifts for various partial waves are calculated in the exchange, exchange-adiabatic, and polarized-orbital approximations. They are compared with the previous results. The calculated elastic differential, total, and momentum-transfer cross sections are compared with the experimental results. The polarized-orbital approximation yields results which show general improvement over the exchange-adiabatic approximation.

  11. Coherence parameter measurements for neon and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Robert; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Stauffer, Al

    2015-09-01

    We present recent coherence parameter measurements for excitation of neon and hydrogen by 50 eV electrons. The measurements were made using a crossed electron/gas beam spectrometer, featuring a hemispherically selected electron energy analyzer for detecting scattered electrons and double-reflection VUV polarization analyzer to register fluorescence photons. Time-coincidence counting methods on the electron and photon signals were employed to determine Stokes Parameters at each scattering angle, with data measured at angles between 20 - 115 degrees. The data are compared with calculated results using the B-Spline R-Matrix (BSR) and Relativistic Distorted Wave (RDW) approaches. Measurements were made of both the linear (Plin and γ) and circular (Lperp) parameters for the lowest lying excited states in these two targets. We particularly focus on results in the Lperp parameter, which shows unusual behavior in these particular targets, including strong sign changes implying reversal of the angular momentum transfer. In the case of neon, the unusual behavior is well captured by the BSR, but not by other models.

  12. Diffusion of neon in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2010-12-01

    Sedimentation of the neutron rich isotope 22Ne may be an important source of gravitational energy during the cooling of white dwarf stars. This depends on the diffusion constant for 22Ne in strongly coupled plasma mixtures. We calculate self-diffusion constants D(i) from molecular dynamics simulations of carbon, oxygen, and neon mixtures. We find that D(i) in a mixture does not differ greatly from earlier one component plasma results. For strong coupling (coulomb parameter Γ> few), D(i) has a modest dependence on the charge Z(i) of the ion species, D(i)∝Z(i)(-2/3). However, D(i) depends more strongly on Z(i) for weak coupling (smaller Γ). We conclude that the self-diffusion constant D(Ne) for 22Ne in carbon, oxygen, and neon plasma mixtures is accurately known so that uncertainties in D(Ne) should be unimportant for simulations of white dwarf cooling. PMID:21230741

  13. Electron-impact excitation of neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, Connor; Griffin, Don

    2004-05-01

    A number of convergent close-coupling and R-matrix with pseudo-state (RMPS) calculations on H-like, He-like, Li-like, and Be-like ions have demonstrated that coupling to the target continuum can have large effects on the electron-impact excitation cross sections of neutral and low-charge species. However, no one has yet attempted such advanced calculations on a system as complex as neutral neon. We report on a series of RMPS calculations of electron-impact excitation of Ne using recently developed parallel Breit-Pauli (BP) R-matrix programs. Our largest calculation was a BP calculation with 235 spectroscopic and pseudo levels in the close-coupling expansion. Although the results of this calculation clearly reveal the importance of coupling to the target continuum in this atom, the pseudo-state expansion is not yet sufficiently complete to provide reliable cross sections for energies above the ionization limit. However, this is the largest BP calculation that can be performed with present computer resources. Thus, we have also carried out a series of RMPS calculations in LS coupling with different pseudo-state expansions. Comparisons of these results have allowed us to determine the approximate size of the pseudo-state expansion required to achieve convergence in future BP calculations for neon.

  14. Flying Cars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, Steven

    1996-01-01

    Flying cars have nearly mythical appeal to nonpilots, a group that includes almost the whole human race. The appeal resides in the perceived utility of flying cars, vehicles that offer portal-to-portal transportation, yet break the bonds of road and traffic and travel freely through the sky at the drivers will. Part of the appeal is an assumption that flying cars can be as easy to fly as to drive. Flying cars have been part of the dream of aviation since the dawn of powered flight. Glenn Curtiss built, displayed, and maybe even flew a flying car in 1917, the Curtiss Autoplane. Many roadable airplanes were built in the 1930's, like the Waterman Arrowbile and the Fulton Airphibian. Two flying cars came close to production in the early 1950's. Ted Hall built a series of flying cars culminating in the Convaircar, sponsored by Consolidated Vultee, General Motors, and Hertz. Molt Taylor built and certified his Aerocar, and Ford came close to producing them. Three Aerocars are still flyable, two in museums in Seattle and Oshkosh, and the third owned and flown by Ed Sweeny. Flying cars do have problems, which so far have prevented commercial success. An obvious problem is complexity of the vehicle, the infrastructure, or both. Another is the difficulty of matching low power for normal driving with high power in flight. An automobile uses only about 20 hp at traffic speeds, while a personal airplane needs about 160 hp at speeds typical of flight. Many automobile engines can deliver 160 hp, but not for very long. A more subtle issue involves the drag of automobiles and airplanes. A good personal airplane can fly 30 miles per gallon of fuel at 200 mph. A good sports car would need 660 hp at the same speed and would travel only 3 miles per gallon. The difference is drag area, about 4.5 sq ft for the automobile and 1.4 sq ft for the airplane. A flying car better have the drag area of the airplane, not the car!

  15. Visually guided eye growth in the squid.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Philip R K; Backhouse, Simon; Phillips, John R

    2015-09-21

    Eyes with refractive error have reduced visual acuity and are rarely found in the wild. Vertebrate eyes possess a visually guided emmetropisation process within the retina which detects the sign of defocus, and regulates eye growth to align the retina at the focal plane of the eye's optical components to avoid the development of refractive error, such as myopia, an increasing problem in humans. However, the vertebrate retina is complex, and it is not known which of the many classes of retinal neurons are involved. We investigated whether the camera-type eye of an invertebrate, the squid, displays visually guided emmetropisation, despite squid eyes having a simple photoreceptor-only retina. We exploited inherent longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) to create disparate focal lengths within squid eyes. We found that squid raised under orange light had proportionately longer eyes and more myopic refractions than those raised under blue light, and when switched between wavelengths, eye size and refractive status changed appropriately within a few days. This demonstrates that squid eye growth is visually guided, and suggests that the complex retina seen in vertebrates may not be required for emmetropisation. PMID:26394098

  16. Squid – a simple bioinformatics grid

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Paulo C; Glória, Rafael V; de Miranda, Antonio B; Degrave, Wim M

    2005-01-01

    Background BLAST is a widely used genetic research tool for analysis of similarity between nucleotide and protein sequences. This paper presents a software application entitled "Squid" that makes use of grid technology. The current version, as an example, is configured for BLAST applications, but adaptation for other computing intensive repetitive tasks can be easily accomplished in the open source version. This enables the allocation of remote resources to perform distributed computing, making large BLAST queries viable without the need of high-end computers. Results Most distributed computing / grid solutions have complex installation procedures requiring a computer specialist, or have limitations regarding operating systems. Squid is a multi-platform, open-source program designed to "keep things simple" while offering high-end computing power for large scale applications. Squid also has an efficient fault tolerance and crash recovery system against data loss, being able to re-route jobs upon node failure and recover even if the master machine fails. Our results show that a Squid application, working with N nodes and proper network resources, can process BLAST queries almost N times faster than if working with only one computer. Conclusion Squid offers high-end computing, even for the non-specialist, and is freely available at the project web site. Its open-source and binary Windows distributions contain detailed instructions and a "plug-n-play" instalation containing a pre-configured example. PMID:16078998

  17. Flux modulation scheme for direct current SQUID readout revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tao; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Braginski, Alex I.; Xie, Xiaoming; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Jiang, Mianheng

    2016-02-01

    The flux modulation scheme (FMS) is the standard readout technique of dc SQUIDs, where a step-up transformer links the SQUID to the preamplifier. The transformer's primary winding shunts the SQUID via a large capacitor while the secondary winding connects it to the preamplifier. A modulation flux having a frequency of typically 100 kHz generates an ac voltage across the SQUID, stepped up by the transformer. The SQUID with FMS is customarily operated in the current bias mode, because a constant dc bias current flows only through the SQUID due to the capacitor isolation. With FMS, however, the transformer ac shunts the SQUID so that in reality the operating mode is neither purely current-biased nor voltage-biased but rather nominal current-biased or "mixed biased." Our objective is to experimentally investigate the consequences of ac shunting of the dc SQUID in FMS and the transformer's transfer characteristics. For different shunt values we measure the change in the SQUID bias current due to the ac shunt using another SQUID in the two-stage readout scheme, and simultaneously monitor the SQUID output voltage signal. We then explain our measurements by a simplified graphic analysis of SQUID intrinsic current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Since the total current flowing through the SQUID is not constant due to the shunting effect of the transformer, the amplitude of SQUID flux-to-voltage characteristics V(Φ) is less as compared to the direct readout scheme (DRS). Furthermore, we analyze and compare V(Φ) obtained by DRS and FMS. We show that in FMS, the transfer characteristics of the SQUID circuit also depend on the isolation capacitance and the dynamic resistance of the SQUID.

  18. A neon-E rich phase in Orgueil - Results obtained on density separates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, P.; Jungck, M. H. A.; Meier, F. O.; Niederer, F. R.

    1981-09-01

    A stepwise heating technique was used on eight density separates from the neon-E rich phase G4j of the carbonaceous chondrite Orgueil to measure He, Ne and Ar. The density separation technique was found to further enrich the Ne-E carrier phases, allowing the Ne-E to be identified as virtually pure Ne-22. At least two separable carrier phases exist: (1) the l-carrier phase, which releases its Ne-E at temperatures below 900 C and is heavily enriched in the low-density separate; and (2) the h-carrier phase. The h-carrier is found to be highly retentive, with release temperatures above 900 C, and is associated with higher-density material. It is concluded that Ne-E and its carrier phases are probably of presolar origin.

  19. SQUID method of lung contamination testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinická, F.; Šimáček, I.; Jurdák, P.; Cigáň, A.; Maňka, J.

    2006-03-01

    We are reporting on the development of a SQUID magnetometric method of ferromagnetic dust quantification in the human lungs. In order to solve this problem we utilize a forward method of magnetized ferromagnetic particle (dipole) distribution 3D modeling in human lung torso and in an arc welder's lungs. We also solve the inverse problem, by which the amount of dust in the lungs is estimated using the results of the remanent magnetic induction Br measurement upon the human chest. We state the formula for SQUID measured output voltage U to Br conversion for the second order gradiometer, which is in a highly dipole position and density dependent. We utilize a low-Tc second order rf SQUID gradiometer with the sensitivity of 10-14 T in the unit frequency range.

  20. The prospects of a subnanometer focused neon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Rahman, F H M; McVey, Shawn; Farkas, Louis; Notte, John A; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Richard H

    2012-01-01

    The success of the helium ion microscope has encouraged extensions of this technology to produce beams of other ion species. A review of the various candidate ion beams and their technical prospects suggest that a neon beam might be the most readily achieved. Such a neon beam would provide a sputtering yield that exceeds helium by an order of magnitude while still offering a theoretical probe size less than 1-nm. This article outlines the motivation for a neon gas field ion source, the expected performance through simulations, and provides an update of our experimental progress. PMID:21796647

  1. Comprehensive Testing of a Neon Cryogenic Capillary Pumped Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobel, Mark C.; Ku, Jentung; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive test program of a cryogenic capillary pumped loop (CCPL) using neon as the working fluid in the temperature range between 30 K and 40 K. The test article was originally designed to be used with nitrogen in the 70 K to 100 K temperature range, and was refurbished for testing with neon. Tests performed included start up from a supercritical state, power cycle, sink temperature cycle, heat transport limit, low power limit, reservoir set point change and long duration operation. The neon CCPL has demonstrated excellent performance under various conditions.

  2. The NEON School Enters a New Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennefeld, M.

    2004-12-01

    THE NEON SCHOOL, a school on astronomical observations organised by a collaboration of observatories (Asiago, Calar Alto, ESO, La Palma and OHP) is well known by PhD students in astronomy all over Europe. It runs tutorial observations directly at the telescope for students in small groups, under the supervision of an experienced astronomer. This way, the participants can execute a real scientific program with all the steps needed in professional life: preparation of the program with selection of targets and feasibility estimates; set-up of the instrument and calibrations; running of the observations, in general both imaging/photometry and spectroscopy; data reductions; and, finally, the presentation of the results at the end of the school.

  3. Neon and Oxygen Abundances in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Nathan R.; Garnett, Donald R.; Massey, Philip; Jacoby, George

    2006-02-01

    We present new spectroscopic observations of 13 H II regions in the Local Group spiral galaxy M33. The regions observed range from 1 to 7 kpc in distance from the nucleus. Of the 13 H II regions observed, the [O III] λ4363 line was detected in six regions. Electron temperatures were thus able to be determined directly from the spectra using the [O III] λλ4959, 5007/λ4363 line ratio. Based on these temperature measurements, oxygen and neon abundances and their radial gradients were calculated. For neon, a gradient of -0.016+/-0.017 dex kpc-1 was computed, which agrees with the Ne/H gradient derived previously from ISO spectra. A gradient of -0.012+/-0.011 dex kpc-1 was computed for O/H, much shallower than was derived in previous studies. The newly calculated O/H and Ne/H gradients are in much better agreement with each other, as expected from predictions of stellar nucleosynthesis. We examine the correlation between the WC/WN ratio and metallicity, and find that the new M33 abundances do not impact the observed correlation significantly. We also identify two new He II-emitting H II regions in M33, the first to be discovered in a spiral galaxy other than the Milky Way. In both cases the nebular He II emission is not associated with Wolf-Rayet stars. Therefore, caution is warranted in interpreting the relationship between nebular He II emission and Wolf-Rayet stars when both are observed in the integrated spectrum of an H II region.

  4. A Three-Channel DC SQUID System Using Time-Domain Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Matthias; Mueck, Michael; Mugford, Chas; Kycia, Jan

    2004-03-01

    Conventional multichannel SQUID systems require SQUID readout electronics for each channel, as well as many wires connecting the individual SQUIDs and feedback coils to the room temperature electronics. We have studied a time domain multiplexed readout scheme which requires only a single SQUID readout which is successively switched between all SQUIDs. By connecting all SQUIDs and all feedback coils in series, the system requires only a few wires between SQUIDs and room temperature readout.

  5. 4.2K Cryocooled Scanning SQUID Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, S. P.; Knauss, L.; Lettsome, N.; Cawthorne, A.; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2003-03-01

    We have assembled a scanning SQUID microscope using a Nb SQUID and a cryocooler. The Nb SQUID is contained within a vacuum jacket while material being scanned is at room temperature and normal atmospheric pressure. A 25 micron thick sapphire window separates the SQUID in vacuum from the scanned material. The Nb DC SQUID, fabricated by Hypres Inc., has an inner dimension of 10 microns by 10 microns and the Josephson Junctions are resistively shunted. Cooling is provided by a Pulse Tube Cryocooler from Cryomech Inc. Temperatures as low as 3.8 K have been obtained while operating the SQUID microscope. Due to radiation heating, the temperature of the SQUID has been estimated to be 1.0 K to 1.5 K higher than sensor values. Flux-Locked-Loop electronics are used to take magnetic field data. Preliminary measurements of the flux noise indicated resolution to better than 10 micro Flux Quantum for one second averaging time.

  6. Drag force and jet propulsion investigation of a swimming squid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, Mahdi; Bahadır Olcay, Ali; Gokçen, Gökhan; Heperkan, Hasan A.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, CAD model of a squid was obtained by taking computer tomography images of a real squid. The model later placed into a computational domain to calculate drag force and performance of jet propulsion. The drag study was performed on the CAD model so that drag force subjected to real squid was revealed at squid's different swimming speeds and comparison has been made with other underwater creatures (e.g., a dolphin, sea lion and penguin). The drag coefficient (referenced to total wetted surface area) of squid is 0.0042 at Reynolds number 1.6x106 that is a %4.5 difference from Gentoo penguin. Besides, jet flow of squid was simulated to observe the flow region generated in the 2D domain utilizing dynamic mesh method to mimic the movement of squid's mantle cavity.

  7. 8. DETAIL OF NORTHEAST ELEVATION SHOWING NEON TWA SIGN AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF NORTHEAST ELEVATION SHOWING NEON TWA SIGN AND ROOF MASTS. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - TWA Maintenance Hangar, South side of Tinicum Island Road, Philadelphia International Airport, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: SQUID systems for biomagnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzella, Vittorio; Della Penna, Stefania; DelGratta, Cosimo; Luca Romani, Gian

    2001-07-01

    This review paper illustrates the different SQUID based systems used for biomagnetic imaging. The review is divided into nine sections. The first three sections are introductory: section 1 is a short overview of the topic; section 2 summarizes how the biomagnetic fields are generated and what are the basic mathematical models for the field sources; section 3 illustrates the principles of operation of the SQUID device. Sections 4-8 are specifically devoted to the description of the different systems used for biomagnetic measurements: section 4 discusses the different types of detection coils; section 5 illustrates the SQUID sensors specifically designed for biomagnetic applications together with the necessary driving electronics, with special emphasis on high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) SQUIDs, since HTS devices are still in a developing stage; section 6 illustrates the different noise reduction techniques; section 7 describes the different multichannel sensors presently operating; and, finally, section 8 gives a hint of what kind of physiological and/or clinical information may be gathered by the biomagnetic technique. Section 9 suggests some future trends for the biomagnetic technique.

  9. Multichannel SQUID systems for brain research

    SciTech Connect

    Ahonen, A.I.; Hamalainen, M.S.; Kajola, M.J.; Knuutila, J.E.F.; Lounasmaa, O.V.; Simola, J.T.; Vilkman, V.A. . Low Temperature Lab.); Tesche, C.D. . Thomas J. Watson Research Center)

    1991-03-01

    This paper reviews basis principles of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and neuromagnetic instrumentation. The authors' 24-channel system, based on planar gradiometer coils and dc-SQUIDs, is then described. Finally, recent MEG-experiments on human somatotopy and focal epilepsy, carried out in the authors' laboratory, are presented.

  10. One Period of Exploration with the Squid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, James V.; Ng, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Presents a lab that can be offered after students have learned the basic anatomy and physiology of the various phyla, the primary objective of which is to explore and apply their acquired knowledge to a new situation. Involves exploring the anatomy and life-style of the squid. (JRH)

  11. Squid Dissection: From Pen to Ink.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cindy; Kisiel, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Introduces students to dissection, which is an important part of scientific discovery. Students not only gain an understanding of the anatomy of a squid, but also develop a sense of responsibility and respect for the animal that they are using as a learning tool. (Author/SOE)

  12. High Resolution LTS-SQUID Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudenbacher, Franz; Peters, Nicholas; Wikswo, John

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope for imaging magnetic fields of room-temperature samples with sub-millimeter resolution. In our design, hand wound niobium pickup coils were coupled to commercially available low-temperature SQUID sensors. The SQUID sensor and the pickup coil are in the vacuum space of the cryostat separated typically less than 50μm by a thin sapphire window from the room-temperature sample. A computerized non-magnetic scanning stage with sub-micron resolution in combination with a tripod leveling system allows samples to be scanned within 10μm of the sapphire window. For a 20-turn 500μm diameter pickup coil, we achieved a field sensitivity of 350fT\\cdotHz-1/2 for frequencies above 1 Hz, and 1pT\\cdotHz-1/2 for a 10-turn 250mm coil. The SQUID microscope was used to image the distribution of time-dependent stimulus and action currents in anisotropic cardiac tissue, the remanent magnetization of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 during thermal demagnetisation, and the magnetic susceptibility of biogenic magnetite in the beak of homing pigeons.

  13. Chromogenic behaviors of the Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) studied in situ with an animal-borne video package.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Hannah; Gilly, William; Bell, Lauren; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg

    2015-01-15

    Dosidicus gigas (Humboldt or jumbo flying squid) is an economically and ecologically influential species, yet little is known about its natural behaviors because of difficulties in studying this active predator in its oceanic environment. By using an animal-borne video package, National Geographic's Crittercam, we were able to observe natural behaviors in free-swimming D. gigas in the Gulf of California with a focus on color-generating (chromogenic) behaviors. We documented two dynamic displays without artificial lighting at depths of up to 70 m. One dynamic pattern, termed 'flashing' is characterized by a global oscillation (2-4 Hz) of body color between white and red. Flashing was almost always observed when other squid were visible in the video frame, and this behavior presumably represents intraspecific signaling. Amplitude and frequency of flashing can be modulated, and the phase relationship with another squid can also be rapidly altered. Another dynamic display termed 'flickering' was observed whenever flashing was not occurring. This behavior is characterized by irregular wave-like activity in neighboring patches of chromatophores, and the resulting patterns mimic reflections of down-welled light in the water column, suggesting that this behavior may provide a dynamic type of camouflage. Rapid and global pauses in flickering, often before a flashing episode, indicate that flickering is under inhibitory neural control. Although flashing and flickering have not been described in other squid, functional similarities are evident with other species. PMID:25609785

  14. Superconducting Nanobridge SQUID Magnetometers for Spin Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antler, Natania

    As the cutting edge of science and technology pushes towards smaller length scales, sensing technologies with nanoscale precision become increasingly important. In this thesis I will discuss the optimization and application of a 3D nanobridge SQUID magnetometer for studying solid state spin systems, in particular for sensing impurity spins in diamond. Solid state spins have proposed applications in memory and computation for both classical and quantum computing. Isolated spins typically have longer coherence times, making them attractive qubit candidates, but necessitating the development of very sensitive detectors for readout. This 3D nanobridge SQUID combines the exquisite spatial sensitivity of a traditional nanoSQUID with a large non-linearity on par with a tunnel junction SQUID. This allows us to build a highly sensitive magnetometer which can act as both an efficient flux transducer as well as a nearly quantum limited lumped Josephson Parametric Amplifier. We show that the device has a minimum flux noise of 17 +/- 0.9 nphi0/Hz1/2 with only a factor of ˜2.5 increase in flux noise up to 61 mT. A second generation device with a smaller capacitor achieves field tolerance up to 75 mT. The maximal bandwidth values range from 25-40 MHz in the parametric amplification regime to 70 MHz in the linear regime. This combination of large bandwidth, low flux noise, large flux coupling and field tolerance make this sensor a promising candidate for near-single-spin dynamics measurements. In the last part of this thesis we begin to demonstrate the utility of a nanobridge SQUID magnetometer for characterizing spin systems in the solid state. We use the magnetometer to measure the decay characteristics of P1 centers in diamond. We find that the spin-lattice relaxation time varies with temperature, with an order of magnitude decrease in the decay time between 25 mK and 370 mK.

  15. Light-curve Analysis of Neon Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed light curves of five neon novae, QU Vul, V351 Pup, V382 Vel, V693 CrA, and V1974 Cyg, and determined their white dwarf (WD) masses and distance moduli on the basis of theoretical light curves composed of free-free and photospheric emission. For QU Vul, we obtained a distance of d ˜ 2.4 kpc, reddening of E(B - V) ˜ 0.55, and WD mass of MWD = 0.82-0.96 {M}⊙ . This suggests that an oxygen-neon WD lost a mass of more than ˜ 0.1 {M}⊙ since its birth. For V351 Pup, we obtained d˜ 5.5 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.45, and {M}{{WD}}=0.98-1.1 {M}⊙ . For V382 Vel, we obtained d˜ 1.6 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.15, and {M}{{WD}}=1.13-1.28 {M}⊙ . For V693 CrA, we obtained d˜ 7.1 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.05, and {M}{{WD}}=1.15-1.25 {M}⊙ . For V1974 Cyg, we obtained d˜ 1.8 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.30, and {M}{{WD}}=0.95-1.1 {M}⊙ . For comparison, we added the carbon-oxygen nova V1668 Cyg to our analysis and obtained d˜ 5.4 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.30, and {M}{{WD}}=0.98-1.1 {M}⊙ . In QU Vul, photospheric emission contributes 0.4-0.8 mag at most to the optical light curve compared with free-free emission only. In V351 Pup and V1974 Cyg, photospheric emission contributes very little (0.2-0.4 mag at most) to the optical light curve. In V382 Vel and V693 CrA, free-free emission dominates the continuum spectra, and photospheric emission does not contribute to the optical magnitudes. We also discuss the maximum magnitude versus rate of decline relation for these novae based on the universal decline law.

  16. High-Tc and low-Tc dc SQUID electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drung, Dietmar

    2003-12-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are commonly operated in a flux-locked loop (FLL). The SQUID electronics amplifies the small SQUID signal to an acceptable level without adding noise, and it linearizes the transfer function of the SQUID in order to provide sufficient dynamic range. In this paper, the fundamentals of SQUID readout are reviewed including a discussion of preamplifier noise. The basic FLL concepts, direct readout and flux modulation readout, are discussed both with dc bias and bias reversal. Alternative readout concepts such as additional positive feedback (APF), two-stage SQUIDs, SQUID series arrays, relaxation oscillation SQUIDs and digital SQUIDs are briefly described. The FLL dynamics are discussed on the basis of a simple model with finite loop delay. It is shown that with optimized SQUID electronics a system bandwidth of ap18 MHz and a corresponding slew rate of ap8 PHgr0 µs-1 are possible. A novel FLL scheme involving a Smith predictor is presented which allows one to increase the FLL bandwidth to about 100 MHz. The theoretical predictions are experimentally checked using a high-speed SQUID electronics prototype with a small-signal bandwidth of 300 MHz. Methods for increasing the dynamic range of SQUID systems are described: flux-quanta counting and dynamic field compensation (DFC). With DFC, the residual magnetic field at the SQUID can be kept close to zero even if the device is moved in the Earth's field. Therefore, the noise level of a high-Tc magnetometer measured inside a magnetically shielded room (60 fT Hz-1/2 with a 1/f corner at 2 Hz) remained unchanged after moving the device in the magnetic field outside the room (60 µT dc plus 0.8 µT peak-to-peak power line interference).

  17. Laying the groundwork for NEON's continental-scale ecological research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethloff, G.; Denslow, M.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is designed to examine a suite of ecological issues. Field-collected data from 96 terrestrial and aquatic sites across the U.S. will be combined with remotely sensed data and existing continental-scale data sets. Field collections will include a range of physical and biological types, including soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, precipitation, plants, animals, insects, and microbes as well as biological sub-samples such as leaf material, blood and tissue samples, and DNA extracts. Initial data analyses and identifications of approximately 175,000 samples per year will occur at numerous external laboratories when all sites are fully staffed in 2017. Additionally, NEON will archive biotic and abiotic specimens at collections facilities where they will be curated and available for additional analyses by the scientific community. The number of archived specimens is currently estimated to exceed 130,000 per year by 2017. We will detail how NEON is addressing the complexities and challenges around this set of analyses and specimens and how the resulting high-quality data can impact ecological understanding. The raw data returned from external laboratories that is quality checked and served by NEON will be the foundation for many NEON data products. For example, sequence-quality nucleic acids extracted from surface waters, benthic biofilms, and soil samples will be building blocks for data products on microbial diversity. The raw sequence data will also be available for uses such as evolutionary investigations, and the extracts will be archived so others can acquire them for additional research. Currently, NEON is establishing contracts for the analysis and archiving of field-collected samples through 2017. During this period, NEON will gather information on the progress and success of this large-scale effort in order to determine the most effective course to pursue with external facilities. Two areas that NEON

  18. Multistage Zeeman deceleration of metastable neon.

    PubMed

    Wiederkehr, Alex W; Motsch, Michael; Hogan, Stephen D; Andrist, Markus; Schmutz, Hansjürg; Lambillotte, Bruno; Agner, Josef A; Merkt, Frédéric

    2011-12-01

    A supersonic beam of metastable neon atoms has been decelerated by exploiting the interaction between the magnetic moment of the atoms and time-dependent inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a multistage Zeeman decelerator. Using 91 deceleration solenoids, the atoms were decelerated from an initial velocity of 580 m/s to final velocities as low as 105 m/s, corresponding to a removal of more than 95% of their initial kinetic energy. The phase-space distribution of the cold, decelerated atoms was characterized by time-of-flight and imaging measurements, from which a temperature of 10 mK was obtained in the moving frame of the decelerated sample. In combination with particle-trajectory simulations, these measurements allowed the phase-space acceptance of the decelerator to be quantified. The degree of isotope separation that can be achieved by multistage Zeeman deceleration was also studied by performing experiments with pulse sequences generated for (20)Ne and (22)Ne. PMID:22149785

  19. Multistage Zeeman deceleration of metastable neon

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederkehr, Alex W.; Motsch, Michael; Hogan, Stephen D.; Andrist, Markus; Schmutz, Hansjuerg; Lambillotte, Bruno; Agner, Josef A.; Merkt, Frederic

    2011-12-07

    A supersonic beam of metastable neon atoms has been decelerated by exploiting the interaction between the magnetic moment of the atoms and time-dependent inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a multistage Zeeman decelerator. Using 91 deceleration solenoids, the atoms were decelerated from an initial velocity of 580 m/s to final velocities as low as 105 m/s, corresponding to a removal of more than 95% of their initial kinetic energy. The phase-space distribution of the cold, decelerated atoms was characterized by time-of-flight and imaging measurements, from which a temperature of 10 mK was obtained in the moving frame of the decelerated sample. In combination with particle-trajectory simulations, these measurements allowed the phase-space acceptance of the decelerator to be quantified. The degree of isotope separation that can be achieved by multistage Zeeman deceleration was also studied by performing experiments with pulse sequences generated for {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne.

  20. Graphene engineering by neon ion beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Iberi, Vighter; Ievlev, Anton V.; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Joy, David C.; Rondinone, Adam J.; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.

    2016-02-18

    Achieving the ultimate limits of materials and device performance necessitates the engineering of matter with atomic, molecular, and mesoscale fidelity. While common for organic and macromolecular chemistry, these capabilities are virtually absent for 2D materials. In contrast to the undesired effect of ion implantation from focused ion beam (FIB) lithography with gallium ions, and proximity effects in standard e-beam lithography techniques, the shorter mean free path and interaction volumes of helium and neon ions offer a new route for clean, resist free nanofabrication. Furthermore, with the advent of scanning helium ion microscopy, maskless He+ and Ne+ beam lithography of graphenemore » based nanoelectronics is coming to the forefront. Here, we will discuss the use of energetic Ne ions in engineering graphene devices and explore the mechanical, electromechanical and chemical properties of the ion-milled devices using scanning probe microscopy (SPM). By using SPM-based techniques such as band excitation (BE) force modulation microscopy, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of the exact same devices can be quantitatively extracted. Additionally, the effect of defects inherent in ion beam direct-write lithography, on the overall performance of the fabricated devices is elucidated.« less

  1. Search for Metastability of 2s Muonic Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Bernard Wilhelm

    1995-01-01

    An experiment was performed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) to establish the conditions for the metastability of the 2S-state of muonic neon. The muonic atoms were formed by stopping negative muons in the neon-filled target chamber of the PSI cyclotron trap. A pair of intrinsic germanium detectors were used in coincidence to search for the two photon decay of the 2S-state. Both energy and time information from two photon events were written to disk for off-line analysis. Data were accumulated for neon pressures of 40 and 400 Torr. The data were then searched for evidence of two photon transitions from the 2S-state. The germanium detectors were sensitive to the K-, L- and M- series x-ray photons (with energies between 10 and 300 keV) emitted during the cascade of the muonic neon ion. The detectors were also used alone to record single photon events of the K- and L-series x rays. The observed intensity ratios of the K-series x rays provided a lower limit on the initial population of the 2S-state. For the pressure condition of 40 Torr of neon, the 2S population was found to be 1.75% +/- .15% of the total cascade. The number of events at 40 Torr that could be attributed to two photon decays of the 2S-state was found to be 30 +/- 52 corresponding to a 2S population of 3.8% +/- 6.5%. At 400 Torr of neon the observed number of 2S two photon decays was 7 +/- 41, placing an upper limit on the 2S population at 0.9% +/- 5.1% of the total cascade. These results, to within the experimental uncertainties, can neither establish nor exclude the metastability of 2S muonic neon.

  2. A method for simulating a flux-locked DC SQUID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutt, G. M.; Kasdin, N. J.; Condron, M. R., II; Muhlfelder, B.; Lockhart, J. M.; Cromar, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a computationally efficient and accurate method for simulating a dc SQUID's V-Phi (voltage-flux) and I-V characteristics which has proven valuable in evaluating and improving various SQUID readout methods. The simulation of the SQUID is based on fitting of previously acquired data from either a real or a modeled device using the Fourier transform of the V-Phi curve. This method does not predict SQUID behavior, but rather is a way of replicating a known behavior efficiently with portability into various simulation programs such as SPICE. The authors discuss the methods used to simulate the SQUID and the flux-locking control electronics, and present specific examples of this approach. Results include an estimate of the slew rate and linearity of a simple flux-locked loop using a characterized dc SQUID.

  3. Coupled Serial and Parallel Non-uniform SQUIDs

    SciTech Connect

    Longhini, Patrick; In, Visarath; Berggren, Susan; Palacios, Antonio; Leese de Escobar, Anna

    2011-04-19

    In this work we numerical model series and parallel non-uniform superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array. Previous work has shown that series SQUID array constructed with a random distribution of loop sizes, (i.e. different areas for each SQUID loop) there exists a unique 'anti-peak' at the zero magnetic field for the voltage versus applied magnetic field (V-B). Similar results extend to a parallel SQUID array where the difference lies in the arrangement of the Josephson junctions. Other system parameter such as bias current, the number of loops, and mutual inductances are varied to demonstrate the change in dynamic range and linearity of the V-B response. Application of the SQUID array as a low noise amplifier (LNA) would increase link margins and affect the entire communication system. For unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), size, weight and power are limited, the SQUID array would allow use of practical 'electrically small' antennas that provide acceptable gain.

  4. Multichannel applications of double relaxation oscillation SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Ho; Kwon, Hyukchan; Kim, Jin-Mok; Park, Yong-Ki

    2001-12-01

    Double relaxation oscillation SQUIDs (DROSs) provided high flux-to-voltage transfers of larger than 1 mV Φ0-1 and simple flux-locked loop circuits were used for SQUID operation. We constructed two multichannel systems based on DROSs. The first system is a 40-channel planar gradiometer system consisting of integrated first-order pickup coils. average noise level of the 40 channels is 1 fT cm-1 Hz-1/2 at 100 Hz, corresponding to a field noise of 4 fT Hz-1/2, operating inside a magnetically shielded room. The second one is a 37-channel magnetometer system with 37 integrated magnetometers distributed on a spherical surface and measures field component normal to the head surface. The average noise of the magnetometers is 3 fT Hz-1/2 at 100 Hz. The two systems were applied to measure neuromagnetic fields.

  5. Practical SQUID Instrument for Nondestructive Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tralshawala, N.; Claycomb, J. R.; Miller, John H., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    We report on the development of a scanning eddy-current imaging system designed to detect deep subsurface flaws in conducting materials. A high transition temperature (high-T c) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer is employed to provide the required sensitivity at low frequencies, while a combination of small cylindrical high-Tc superconducting and A-metal shields enable the instrument to be scanned in a magnetically noisy environment, rather than the object under test. The shields are arranged to prevent unwanted excitation and ambient noise fields from reaching the SQUID, and to enhance spatial resolution and minimize undesirable edge effects. Thus far, the instrument has successfully detected cracks and pits through 10 layers of aluminum, with a combined thickness of 5 cm at room temperature.

  6. Low Temperature SQUID for NDE Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz (Technical Monitor); Selim, Raouf

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a low temperature SuperConducting Quantum Interference Device - SQUID measurement system for detection of defects deep under the surface of aluminum structures using eddy current techniques. The system uses a two dimensional planar inducer with two different excitation frequencies to induce a current in the sample. We have developed a data analysis software program that enabled us to distinguish between round defects (holes), straight defects (slots) and slots close to holes simulating cracks starting from rivets in aluminum structures. We were able to detect defects that are 8mm below the surface. We have also measured the change in phase of the detected signal as a function of depth of the defect. This relationship can be used to determine the depth of hidden flaws. Using this analysis software with the high temperature SQUID system at NASA Langley we were able to detect slots close to holes in layered aluminum sample.

  7. Supersensitive SQUID/magnetostrictor detecting system

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, Aleksander I; Zherikhina, L N; Tskhovrebov, Andrei M; Izmailov, G N

    2012-12-31

    It is shown that using the state-of-the-art quantum interferometer (SQUID) with the resolution 10{sup -6} {Phi}{sub 0} Hz{sup -1/2} = 2.07 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -21} Wb Hz{sup -1/2}, coupled to a magnetostrictor, playing the role of tensomagnetic transducer, it is possible to construct a system for detecting pressure variations with the ultimate sensitivity of 10{sup -13} Pa Hz{sup -1/2} and for measuring specific elongation with the sensitivity of 10{sup -24} Hz{sup -1/2}. The analysis of physical grounds of the inverse magnetostriction effect demonstrates concrete ways to essentially higher efficiency of tensomagnetic conversion. The estimates performed demonstrate the possibility of using the SQUID/magnetostrictor system as a detector of gravitational waves. Other possibilities of using this system for solving both fundamental and applied problems are also considered. (experimental techniques)

  8. Practical SQUID instrument for nondestructive testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tralshawala, N.; Claycomb, J.R.; Miller, J.H. Jr.

    1997-09-01

    We report on the development of a scanning eddy-current imaging system designed to detect deep subsurface flaws in conducting materials. A high transition temperature (high-T{sub c}) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer is employed to provide the required sensitivity at low frequencies, while a combination of small cylindrical high-T{sub c} superconducting and {mu}-metal shields enable the instrument to be scanned in a magnetically noisy environment, rather than the object under test. The shields are arranged to prevent unwanted excitation and ambient noise fields from reaching the SQUID, and to enhance spatial resolution and minimize undesirable edge effects. Thus far, the instrument has successfully detected cracks and pits through 10 layers of aluminum, with a combined thickness of 5 cm at room temperature. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Investigation of noise sources in SQUID electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, T.R.; Goldstein, M.J.; Purpura, J.W.; Allen, L.H.; Claassen, J.H.; Gubser, D.U.; Wolf, S.A.

    1989-03-01

    The performance of SQUID-based electronics outside a laboratory-controlled environment may be degraded from that found in laboratory operation. Investigations on superconducting tubes, wires, and sheets have been conducted to identify contributions to such noise. Results have been obtained for bulk and thin film samples utilizing both the conventional low temperature materials, as well as the new high temperature oxide materials. Experiments have been conducted to quantify flux redistribution and flux motion in superconducting samples subjected to temperature changes, temperature gradients, and magnetic field gradients. These investigations have been conducted at magnetic fields typical of many SQUID applications, with field intensities much smaller than the critical values H/sub cl/. Penetration depth effects, flux pinning effects, and flux motion effects have been observed. The various types of experiments conducted along with specific results are described.

  10. Performance of multiplexed SQUID readout for Cryogenic Sensor Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervenak, J. A.; Grossman, E. N.; Irwin, K. D.; Martinis, John M.; Reintsema, C. D.; Allen, C. A.; Bergman, D. I.; Moseley, S. H.; Shafer, R.

    2000-04-01

    We report on the implementation of a multiplexer that uses superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) to read out low-impedance cryogenic detectors. Using prototype chips, a circuit was built which interfaces eight input SQUID channels with a close-packed array of eight transition-edge sensor (TES) infrared bolometers. Circuit elements were measured and crosstalk specifications are reported. Digital feedback is employed to flux-lock a single element in the array of SQUIDs.

  11. Neon color spreading in dynamic displays: temporal factors.

    PubMed

    Cicchini, Marco; Spillmann, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    When a red star is placed in the middle of an Ehrenstein figure so as to be collinear with the surrounding black rays, a reddish veil is perceived to fill the white center. This is called neon color spreading. To better understand the processes that give rise to this phenomenon, we studied the temporal properties of the effect. Specifically, we presented a "sustained" black Ehrenstein figure (rays) for 600 ms and a "transient" red star for 48 ms, or the converse pattern, at various stimulus onset asynchronies (-100-700 ms) and asked subjects to compare the strength of the neon color in the test stimulus to that of a reference pattern in which the transient star had an onset asynchrony of 300 ms. Additional exposure durations of 24 and 96 ms were used for each transient stimulus in order to study the effect of temporal integration. Simultaneity of the on- and off-transients of the star and the Ehrenstein rays were found to optimize neon color spreading, especially when both stimuli terminated together. Longer exposure durations of the transient stimulus up to 96 ms further improved the effect. Neon color spreading was much reduced when the transient stimulus was presented soon after the beginning of the sustained stimulus, with a gradual build-up towards the end. These results emphasize the importance of stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) and stimulus termination asynchrony (STA) for the perception of neon color spreading. PMID:24097045

  12. Ceramic HTSC SQUID-based galvanometer

    SciTech Connect

    Uchaikin, S.V.; Hiep, L.H. )

    1992-06-01

    A highly sensitive galvanometer operating at liquid-nitrogen temperature for direct and low-frequency current measurements was developed on the basis of a HTSC SQUID. The direct-current sensitivity of the galvanometer is approximately 0.5 nA at an internal resistance of about 20 ohms. Its energy resolution in the white noise region is 2 x 10 exp 21 J/Hz. 11 refs.

  13. Digital filter design approach for SQUID gradiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, A.C.; Ribeiro, P.C.

    1988-04-15

    A review of the traditional method for designing gradiometers is made. A nonrecursive digital filter model for the gradiometer is presented, giving a new set of parameters for the gradiometer identification. Some designs are analyzed using the proposed set. As an example, a true differentiator is designed to be used as the SQUID input coil. It is shown that the differentiator has the same noise rejection as the conventional gradiometer but provides more signal sensitivity.

  14. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  15. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  16. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  17. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  18. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. Results We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. Conclusions The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone. PMID:23418818

  19. Single SQUID frequency-domain multiplexer for large bolometer arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jongsoo; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J.M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Myers, M.J.; Skidmore, J.T.; Richards, P.L.; Spieler, H.G.

    2001-08-20

    We describe the development of a frequency-domain superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer which monitors a row of low-temperature sensors simultaneously with a single SQUID. Each sensor is ac biased with a unique frequency and all the sensor currents are added in a superconducting summing loop. A single SQUID measures the current in the summing loop, and the individual signals are lock-in detected after the room temperature SQUID electronics. The current in the summing loop is nulled by feedback to eliminate direct crosstalk. We have built an eight-channel prototype and demonstrated channel separation and signal recovery.

  20. A nanoscale SQUID operating at high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Simon K. H.; Clem, John R.; Yang, Wenrong

    2011-10-13

    A washer-free Nb nanoSQUID has been developed for measuring magnetization changes from nanoscale objects. The SQUID loop is etched into a 250 nm wide Au/Nb bilayer track and the diameter of the SQUID hole is {approx} 70 nm. In the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the SQUID, vortex penetration into the 250 nm wide track can be observed via the critical current-applied field characteristic and the value at which vortex first penetrates is consistent with the theoretical prediction. Upon removing the applied field, the penetrated vortices escape the track and the critical current at zero field is restored.

  1. A nanoscale SQUID operating at high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Simon K. H.; Clem, John R.; Yang, Wenrong

    2011-10-13

    A washer-free Nb nanoSQUID has been developed for measuring magnetization changes from nanoscale objects. The SQUID loop is etched into a 250 nm wide Au/Nb bilayer track and the diameter of the SQUID hole is ~ 70 nm. In the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the SQUID, vortex penetration into the 250 nm wide track can be observed via the critical current–applied field characteristic and the value at which vortex first penetrates is consistent with the theoretical prediction. Upon removing the applied field, the penetrated vortices escape the track and the critical current at zero field is restored.

  2. Transparency and Coherence in rf SQUID Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anlage, Steven; Trepanier, Melissa; Zhang, Daimeng

    We have developed active metamaterials capable of quickly tuning their electrical and magnetic responses over a wide frequency range. These metamaterials are based on superconducting elements to form low loss, physically and electrically small, highly tunable structures for fundamental studies of extraordinarily nonlinear media. The meta-atoms are rf superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) that incorporate the Josephson effect. RF SQUIDs have an inductance which is strongly tunable with dc and rf magnetic fields and currents. The rf SQUID metamaterial is a richly nonlinear effective medium introducing qualitatively new macroscopic quantum phenomena into the metamaterials community, namely magnetic flux quantization and the Josephson effect. The coherent oscillation of the meta-atoms is strongly sensitive to the environment and measurement conditions, and we have developed several strategies to improve the coherence experimentally by exploiting ideas from nonlinear dynamics. The metamaterials also display a unique form of transparency whose development can be manipulated through multiple parametric dependences. We discuss these qualitatively new metamaterial phenomena. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI and OISE Programs through Grant No. ECCS-1158644 and the Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM).

  3. Compartment-Specific Phosphorylation of Squid Neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the giant axon and synapse of third-order neurons in the squid stellate ganglion have provided a vast literature on neuronal physiology and axon transport. Large neuronal size also lends itself to comparative biochemical studies of cell body versus axon. These have focused on the regulation of synthesis, assembly, posttranslational modification and function of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins (microtubules (MTs) and neurofilaments (NFs)), the predominant proteins in axoplasm. These contribute to axonal organization, stability, transport, and impulse transmission responsible for rapid contractions of mantle muscles underlying jet propulsion. Studies of vertebrate NFs have established an extensive literature on NF structure, organization, and function; studies of squid NFs, however, have made it possible to compare compartment-specific regulation of NF synthesis, assembly, and function in soma versus axoplasm. Since NFs contain over 100 eligible sites for phosphorylation by protein kinases, the compartment-specific patterns of phosphorylation have been a primary focus of biochemical studies. We have learned that NF phosphorylation is tightly compartmentalized; extensive phosphorylation occurs only in the axonal compartment in squid and in vertebrate neurons. This extensive phosphorylation plays a key role in organizing NFs, in association with microtubules (MTs), into a stable, dynamic functional lattice that supports axon growth, diameter, impulse transmission, and synaptic activity. To understand how cytoskeletal phosphorylation is topographically regulated, the kinases and phosphatases, bound to NFs isolated from cell bodies and axoplasm, have also been studied. PMID:26795486

  4. Equation of state of solid neon from x-ray diffraction measurements to 110 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Hemley, R.J.; Jephcoat, A.P.; Zha, C.S.; Mao, H.K.; Finger, L.W.; Cox, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the pressure-volume properties of condensed neon. X-ray diffraction techniques are used to determine solid neon equation of state and crystal structure. 16 refs., 2 figs. (LSP)

  5. NEON INSIGHTS FROM OLD SOLAR X-RAYS: A PLASMA TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE CORONAL NEON CONTENT

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Jeremy J.

    2011-12-10

    An analysis using modern atomic data of fluxes culled from the literature for O VIII and Ne IX lines observed in solar active regions by the P78 and Solar Maximum Mission satellites confirms that the coronal Ne/O abundance ratio varies by a factor of two or more, and finds an increase in Ne/O with increasing active region plasma temperature. The latter is reminiscent of evidence for increasing Ne/O with stellar activity in low-activity coronae that reaches a 'neon saturation' in moderately active stars at approximately twice the historically accepted solar value of about 0.15 by number. We argue that neon saturation represents the underlying stellar photospheric compositions, and that low-activity coronae, including that of the Sun, are generally depleted in neon. The implication would be that the solar Ne/O abundance ratio should be revised upward by a factor of about two to n(Ne)/n(O) {approx} 0.3. Diverse observations of neon in the local cosmos provide some support for such a revision. Neon would still be of some relevance for reconciling helioseismology with solar models computed using recently advocated chemical mixtures with lower metal content.

  6. Monte Carlo simulations of nanoscale focused neon ion beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Rack, Philip D

    2013-12-13

    A Monte Carlo simulation is developed to model the physical sputtering of aluminum and tungsten emulating nanoscale focused helium and neon ion beam etching from the gas field ion microscope. Neon beams with different beam energies (0.5-30 keV) and a constant beam diameter (Gaussian with full-width-at-half-maximum of 1 nm) were simulated to elucidate the nanostructure evolution during the physical sputtering of nanoscale high aspect ratio features. The aspect ratio and sputter yield vary with the ion species and beam energy for a constant beam diameter and are related to the distribution of the nuclear energy loss. Neon ions have a larger sputter yield than the helium ions due to their larger mass and consequently larger nuclear energy loss relative to helium. Quantitative information such as the sputtering yields, the energy-dependent aspect ratios and resolution-limiting effects are discussed. PMID:24231648

  7. Helium and neon isotopes in deep Pacific Ocean sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    Helium and neon concentration measurements, along with isotope ratio determinations, have been made for particles collected in the deep Pacific with a magnetic sled, and they are believed to be of extraterrestrial origin. Analyses were made for samples consisting of composites of many extremely fine particles and for several individual particles large enough to contain sufficient gas for analysis but small enough to escape melting in their passage through the atmosphere. Step-heating was employed to extract the gas. Cosmic-ray spallation products or solar-wind helium and neon, if present, were not abundant enough to account for the isotopic compositions measured. In the case of the samples of magnetic fines, the low temperature extractions provided elemental and isotopic ratios in the general range found for the primordial gas in carbonaceous chondrites and gas-rich meteorites. The isotopic ratios found in the high temperature extractions suggest the presence of solar-flare helium and neon.

  8. Experimental study on neon refrigeration system using commercial helium compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Junseok; Kim, Hyobong; Hong, Yong-Ju; Yeom, Hankil; Koh, Deuk-Yong; Park, Seong-Je

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we developed neon refrigeration system using commercial helium compressor which was originally designed for GM cryocooler. We performed this research as precedent study before developing neon refrigeration system for small-scale hydrogen liquefaction system. The developed system is based on precooled Linde-Hampson system with liquid nitrogen as precoolant. Design parameters of heat exchangers are determined from thermodynamic cycle analysis with operating pressure of 2 MPa and 0.4 MPa. Heat exchangers have concentric-tube heat exchanger configuration and orifice is used as Joule- Thomson expansion device. In experiments, pressure, temperature, mass flow rate and compressor input power are measured as charging pressure. With experimental results, the characteristics of heat exchanger, Joule-Thomson expansion and refrigeration effect are discussed. The developed neon refrigeration system shows the lowest temperature of 43.9 K.

  9. Purification and Liquefacttion of Neon Using a Helium Refrigeration Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeck, S.

    2010-04-01

    The cryogenic plant developed by Linde Kryotechnik is used to extract neon out of a crude gas flow coming from an air separation plant. The crude gas is cooled down by a two stage helium refrigeration process using the Linde Kryotechnik dynamic gas bearing turbines. After the first cooling stage, nitrogen is liquefied and separated from the crude gas. The Cryogenic adsorbers located at a temperature level below 80 K clean the crude gas from remaining nitrogen traces before the neon-helium mixture enters the final cooling stage. In the second cooling stage neon is liquefied and separated from the helium. The final product quality will be achieved within a rectification column at low pressure level.

  10. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S K; Baylor, L R; Foust, C R; Lyttle, M S; Meitner, S J; Rasmussen, D A

    2014-11-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development. PMID:25430370

  11. Comparison of the incremental and hierarchical methods for crystalline neon.

    PubMed

    Nolan, S J; Bygrave, P J; Allan, N L; Manby, F R

    2010-02-24

    We present a critical comparison of the incremental and hierarchical methods for the evaluation of the static cohesive energy of crystalline neon. Both of these schemes make it possible to apply the methods of molecular electronic structure theory to crystalline solids, offering a systematically improvable alternative to density functional theory. Results from both methods are compared with previous theoretical and experimental studies of solid neon and potential sources of error are discussed. We explore the similarities of the two methods and demonstrate how they may be used in tandem to study crystalline solids. PMID:21386379

  12. Fast Imaging of Intact and Shattered Cryogenic Neon Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Baylor, Larry R; Foust, Charles R; Lyttle, Mark S; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A

    2014-01-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100- m- and sub- s-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of m to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  13. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S. K.; Baylor, L. R.; Foust, C. R.; Lyttle, M. S.; Meitner, S. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-11-15

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  14. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of + or - 15 percent.

  15. Stark Widths of Spectral Lines of Neutral Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, Milan S.; Simić, Zoran; Kovačević, Andjelka; Valjarević, Aleksandar; Sahal-Bréchot, Sylvie

    2015-12-01

    In order to complete Stark broadening data for Ne I spectral lines which are needed for analysis of stellar atmospheres, collisional widths and shifts (the so-called Stark broadening parameters) of 29 isolated spectral lines of neutral neon have been determined within the impact semiclassical perturbation method. Calculations have been performed for the broadening by collisions with electrons, protons and ionized helium for astrophysical applications, and for collisions with ionized neon and argon for laboratory plasma diagnostics. The shifts have been compared with existing experimental values. The obtained data will be included in the STARK-B database, which is a part of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center - VAMDC.

  16. The isotopic composition of solar flare accelerated neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Spalding, J. D.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The individual isotopes of neon in energetic solar-flare particles have been clearly resolved with a rms mass resolution of 0.20 amu. The ratios found are Ne-20/Ne-22 = 7.6 (+2.0, -1.8) and Ne-21/Ne-22 of no more than about 0.11 in the 11-26 MeV per nucleon interval. This isotopic composition is essentially the same as that of meteoritic planetary neon-A and is significantly different from that of the solar wind.

  17. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Hatridge, Michael J.

    2010-06-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  18. Peripheral injury alters schooling behavior in squid, Doryteuthis pealeii.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Megumi; di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Carroll, Julia; Hanlon, Roger T; Walters, Edgar T; Crook, Robyn J

    2016-07-01

    Animals with detectable injuries are at escalated threat of predation. The anti-predation tactic of schooling reduces individual predation risk overall, but it is not known how schooling behavior affects injured animals, or whether risks are reduced equally for injured animals versus other school members. In this laboratory study we examined the effects of minor fin injury on schooling decisions made by squid. Schooling behavior of groups of squid, in which one member was injured, was monitored over 24h. Injured squid were more likely to be members of a school shortly after injury (0.5-2h), but there were no differences compared with sham-injured squid at longer time points (6-24h). Overall, the presence of an injured conspecific increased the probability that a school would form, irrespective of whether the injured squid was a member of the school. When groups containing one injured squid were exposed to a predator cue, injured squid were more likely to join the school, but their position depended on whether the threat was a proximate visual cue or olfactory cue. We found no evidence that injured squid oriented themselves to conceal their injury from salient threats. Overall we conclude that nociceptive sensitization after injury changes grouping behaviors in ways that are likely to be adaptive. PMID:27108689

  19. Read-out electronics for DC squid magnetic measurements

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-01-01

    Read-out electronics for DC SQUID sensor systems, the read-out electronics incorporating low Johnson noise radio-frequency flux-locked loop circuitry and digital signal processing algorithms in order to improve upon the prior art by a factor of at least ten, thereby alleviating problems caused by magnetic interference when operating DC SQUID sensor systems in magnetically unshielded environments.

  20. A Wsbnd Ne interatomic potential for simulation of neon implantation in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, Marie; Juslin, Niklas; Huang, Guiyang; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-08-01

    An interatomic pair potential for Wsbnd Ne is developed for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of neon implantation in tungsten. The new potential predicts point defect energies and binding energies of small clusters that are in good agreement with electronic structure calculations. Molecular dynamics simulations of small neon clusters in tungsten show that trap mutation, in which an interstitial neon cluster displaces a tungsten atom from its lattice site, occurs for clusters of three or more neon atoms. However, near a free surface, trap mutation can occur at smaller sizes, including even a single neon interstitial in close proximity to a (100) or (110) surface.

  1. Planar thin film SQUID with integral flux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N. (Inventor); Sisk, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A thin film SQUID is disclosed having improved flux concentration combined with simplicity of design and fabrication. The SQUID starts with a wafer like substrate having simple planar geometry. A large area of superconducting film is coated on the substrate, with a small open or uncoated area remaining at its center to define a SQUID loop, and a gap in the film formed, beginning at the outer circumferential edge of the substrate and extending radially inward to the open area. A Josephson junction is formed across the gap near the open area to interrupt the electrical continuity of the SQUID loop. A coil is attached to the surface of the substrate, electrically insulated from the superconducting film, and is energized to induce flux within the SQUID which is concentrated within the open area.

  2. A SQUID gradiometer module with large junction shunt resistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Shu-Lin; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Wang, Yong-Liang; Li, Hua; Zeng, Jia; Kong, Xiang-Yan; Xie, Xiao-Ming

    2014-08-01

    A dual-washer superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a loop inductance of 350 pH and two on-washer integrated input coils is designed according to conventional niobium technology. In order to obtain a large SQUID flux-to-voltage transfer coefficient, the junction shunt resistance is selected to be 33 Ω. A vertical SQUID gradiometer module with a baseline of 100 mm is constructed by utilizing such a SQUID and a first-order niobium wire-wound antenna. The sensitivity of this module reaches about 0.2 fT/(cm·Hz1/2) in the white noise range using a direct readout scheme, i.e., the SQUID is directly connected to an operational amplifier, in a magnetically shielded room. Some magnetocardiography (MCG) measurements with a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are demonstrated.

  3. Elemental abundances of flaring solar plasma - Enhanced neon and sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmelz, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Elemental abundances of two flares observed with the SMM Flat Crystal Spectrometer are compared and contrasted. The first had a gradual rise and a slow decay, while the second was much more impulsive. Simultaneous spectra of seven bright soft X-ray resonance lines provide information over a broad temperature range and are available throughout both flares, making these events unique in the SMM data base. For the first flare, the plasma seemed to be characterized by coronal abundances but, for the second, the plasma composition could not be coronal, photospheric, or a linear combination of both. A good differential emission measure fit required enhanced neon such that Ne/O = 0.32 +/- 0.02, a value which is inconsistent with the current models of coronal abundances based on the elemental first-ionization potential. Similar values of enhanced neon are found for flaring plasma observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, in (He-3)-rich solar energetic particle events, and in the decay phase of several long duration soft X-ray events. Sulfur is also enhanced in the impulsive flare, but not as dramatically as neon. These events are compared with two models which attempt to explain the enhanced values of neon and sulfur.

  4. Neon and CO2 adsorption on open carbon nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Ziegler, Carl A; Banjara, Shree R; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, S; Migone, Aldo D

    2013-07-30

    We present the results of a thermodynamics and kinetics study of the adsorption of neon and carbon dioxide on aggregates of chemically opened carbon nanohorns. Both the equilibrium adsorption characteristics, as well as the dependence of the kinetic behavior on sorbent loading, are different for these two adsorbates. For neon the adsorption isotherms display two steps before reaching the saturated vapor pressure, corresponding to adsorption on strong and on weak binding sites; the isosteric heat of adsorption is a decreasing function of sorbent loading (this quantity varies by about a factor of 2 on the range of loadings studied), and the speed of the adsorption kinetics increases with increasing loading. By contrast, for carbon dioxide there are no substeps in the adsorption isotherms; the isosteric heat is a nonmonotonic function of loading, the value of the isosteric heat never differs from the bulk heat of sublimation by more than 15%, and the kinetic behavior is opposite to that of neon, with equilibration times increasing for higher sorbent loadings. We explain the difference in the equilibrium properties observed for neon and carbon dioxide in terms of differences in the relative strengths of adsorbate-adsorbate to adsorbate-sorbent interaction for these species. PMID:23802764

  5. Infrared absorption spectra of methylidene radicals in solid neon.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsiao-Chi; Lo, Jen-Iu; Lin, Meng-Yeh; Peng, Yu-Chain; Chou, Sheng-Lung; Cheng, Bing-Ming; Ogilvie, J F

    2014-07-28

    Infrared absorption lines of methylidene--(12)C(1)H, (13)C(1)H, and (12)C(2)H--dispersed in solid neon at 3 K, recorded after photolysis of methane precursors with vacuum-ultraviolet light at 121.6 nm, serve as signatures of these trapped radicals. PMID:24912563

  6. Capture of neon atoms by sup 4 He clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Scheidemann, A.; Toennies, J.P. ); Northby, J.A. )

    1990-04-16

    Neon atoms are captured by helium clusters in a crossed-beam experiment. The capture process depends strongly on the cluster beam source conditions. We identify a sharply defined region corresponding to expansions passing near the critical point for which the capture probability is anomalously large.

  7. A Closed Neon Liquefier System for Testing Superconducting Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchetti, M.; Al-Mosawi, M. K.; Yang, Y.; Beduz, C.; Giunchi, G.

    2006-04-01

    A Neon liquefier system has been developed by Southampton University (UK) and EDISON (Italy) with the aim to provide a facility for testing HTS superconducting devices using Magnesium Diboride materials, in the range 25-30K. The system consists of a liquid Neon cryostat coupled to a two stages cryocooler and a recovery system. The first stage of the cryocooler is connected to the thermal shield of the cryostat and a copper station positioned at mid point along the access neck to the liquid Neon bath to reduce heat leak and to provide pre-cooling of samples. The second stage, capable of 20W cooling power at 22K, is used to provide the cooling power for liquefaction and to refrigerate the liquid Neon bath and the superconducting device/sample during the steady state operation. The recovery system has been designed to automatically compress excess boil-off generated by a quench or a transient heating into a storage gas container. Transport measurement up to 900A can be carried out in the Ne cryostat using purposely build hybrid current leads. These leads have a copper upper section cooled by liquid Nitrogen and a superconducting lower section of Ag/AuBi2223 tapes. In this paper we report on the performance of the system and the initial measurement of superconducting samples.

  8. Cosmogenic neon from precompaction irradiation of Kapoeta and Murchison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Swindle, T. D.; Goswami, J. N.

    1983-01-01

    Neon from hand-picked Murchison and Kapoeta grains, selected on the basis of the presence or absence of solar flare particle tracks, was analyzed in order to delineate the precompaction history of this material. The irradiated grains showed large enrichments of cosmogenic neon relative to the unirradiated grains. Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure ages for the unirradiated grains yield the nominal values reported for the recent exposure history of these meteorites. Apparent minimum precompaction galactic exposure ages of 28 m.y. and 56 m.y. would have been obtained for Murchison and Kapoeta, respectively, if the cosmogenic effects in the irradiated grains were due to GCR irradiation. Since this seems unreasonably long, the cosmogenic neon in the irradiated grains may be due to spallation by solar cosmic rays. This, however, would require a more active early sun. The isotopic composition of the cosmogenic neon in these grains suggests a harder energy spectrum than is characteristic of present solar flares. Lack of apparent solar wind effects may require some kind of shielding, such as nebular gas.

  9. Molecular Iodine Fluorescence Using a Green Helium-Neon Laser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, J. Charles

    2011-01-01

    Excitation of molecular iodine vapor with a green (543.4 nm) helium-neon laser produces a fluorescence spectrum that is well suited for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory. Application of standard evaluation techniques to the spectrum yields ground electronic-state molecular parameters in good agreement with literature…

  10. Presynaptic calcium currents in squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, R; Steinberg, I Z; Walton, K

    1981-01-01

    A voltage clamp study has been performed in the presynaptic terminal of the squid stellate ganglion. After blockage of the voltage-dependent sodium and potassium conductances, an inward calcium current is demonstrated. Given a step-depolarization pulse, this voltage- and time-dependent conductance has an S-shaped onset. At the "break" of the voltage step, a rapid tail current is observed. From these results a kinetic model is generated which accounts for the experimental results and predicts for the time course and amplitude a possible calcium entry during presynaptic action potentials. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7225510

  11. Moderately shielded high-Tc SQUID system for rat MCG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechstein, S.; Kim, I.-S.; Drung, D.; Novikov, I.; Schurig, Th

    2010-06-01

    Recently, we have developed a 5-channel high-Tc SQUID system with one signal channel intended for rat magnetocardiography (MCG) in moderately shielded or "quiet" real environment. This system is an adapted version of a human MCG system which has been improved with respect to user-friendliness and stability. A dewar with a cold-warm distance of 7 mm and a refill cycle time of up to one week is utilized. The implemented high-Tc SQUIDs are single-layer devices with grain boundary junctions fabricated at KRISS with laser ablation on 10 mm × 10 mm STO substrates. In order to cancel environmental magnetic noise, three of the five SQUIDs are arranged to build an axial software first-order or second-order gradiometer with a base line of 35 mm. The other two SQUIDs are used for balancing. To overcome previous system instabilities, we have implemented an Earth field compensation for each SQUID. For this, the SQUIDs were mounted in capsules containing integrated field compensation coils. The three Earth field components are measured with an additional triaxial fluxgate, and compensated at the SQUID locations using the low-noise current source of the SQUID readout electronics. This way, the SQUIDs can be cooled and operated in a low residual field that improves system stability and reduces low-frequency SQUID noise. It is even possible to slowly move the dewar in the Earth field (dynamic field compensation). Different noise cancellation procedures were optimized and compared employing a periodic signal source.

  12. The NEON Aquatic Network: Expanding the Availability of Biogeochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, J. M.; Bohall, C.; Fitzgerald, M.; Utz, R.; Parker, S. M.; Roehm, C. L.; Goodman, K. J.; McLaughlin, B.

    2013-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are facing unprecedented pressure from climate change and land-use practices. Invasive species, whether plant, animal, insect or microbe present additional threat to aquatic ecosystem services. There are significant scientific challenges to understanding how these forces will interact to affect aquatic ecosystems, as the flow of energy and materials in the environment is driven by multivariate and non-linear biogeochemical cycles. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect and provide observational data across multiple scales. Sites were selected to maximize representation of major North American ecosystems using a multivariate geographic clustering method that partitioned the continental US, AK, HI, and Puerto Rico into 20 eco-climatic domains. The NEON data collection systems and methods are designed to yield standardized, near real-time data subjected to rigorous quality controls prior to public dissemination through an online data portal. NEON will collect data for 30 years to facilitate spatial-temporal analysis of environmental responses and drivers of ecosystem change, ranging from local through continental scales. Here we present the NEON Aquatic Network, a multi-parameter network consisting of a combination of in situ sensor and observational data. This network will provide data to examine biogeochemical, biological, hydrologic and geomorphic metrics at 36 sites, which are a combination of small 1st/2nd order wadeable streams, large rivers and lakes. A typical NEON Aquatic site will host up to two in-stream sensor sets designed to collect near-continuous water quality data (e.g. pH/ORP, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, CDOM) along with up to 8 shallow groundwater monitoring wells (level, temp., cond.), and a local meteorological station (e.g. 2D wind speed, PAR, barometric pressure, temperature, net radiation). These coupled sensor suites will be complemented by observational data (e.g. water

  13. Enhancements to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer readout and control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgione, Joshua B.; Benford, Dominic J.; Buchanan, Ernest D.; Moseley, S. H., Jr.; Rebar, Joyce; Shafer, Richard A.

    2004-10-01

    Far-infrared detector arrays such as the 16x32 superconducting bolometer array for the SAFIRE instrument (flying on the SOFIA airborne observatory) require systems of readout and control electronics to provide translation between a user-driven, digital PC and the cold, analog world of the cryogenic detector. In 2001, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed their Mark III electronics for purposes of control and readout of their 1x32 SQUID Multiplexer chips. We at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center acquired a Mark III system and subsequently designed upgrades to suit our and our collaborators' purposes. We developed an arbitrary, programmable multiplexing system that allows the user to cycle through rows in a SQUID array in an infinite number of combinations. We provided 'hooks' in the Mark III system to allow readout of signals from outside the Mark III system, such as telescope status information. Finally, we augmented the heart of the system with a new feedback algorithm implementation, flexible diagnostic tools, and informative telemetry.

  14. Enhancements to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) Multiplexer Readout and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forgione, J.; Benford, D. J.; Buchanan, E. D.; Moseley, S. H.; Rebar, J.; Shafer, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Far-infrared detector arrays such as the 16x32 superconducting bolometer array for the SAFIRE instrument (flying on the SOFIA airborne observatory) require systems of readout and control electronics to provide translation between a user-driven, digital PC and the cold, analog world of the cryogenic detector. In 2001, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed their Mark III electronics for purposes of control and readout of their 1x32 SQUID Multiplexer chips. We at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center acquired a Mark 111 system and subsequently designed upgrades to suit our and our collaborators purposes. We developed an arbitrary, programmable multiplexing system that allows the user to cycle through rows in a SQUID array in an infinite number of combinations. We provided hooks in the Mark III system to allow readout of signals from outside the Mark 111 system, such as telescope status information. Finally, we augmented the heart of the system with a new feedback algorithm implementation, flexible diagnostic tools, and informative telemetry.

  15. A simple three-channel dc SQUID system using time domain multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, M.; Korn, M.; Mugford, C. G. A.; Kycia, J. B.

    2004-08-01

    Conventional multichannel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) systems require a SQUID read-out circuit for each channel, as well as many wires connecting each individual SQUID and feedback coil to the room temperature electronics. We present a simple time domain multiplexed read-out scheme which requires only a single SQUID read-out circuit that is successively switched between all the SQUIDs. By connecting all the SQUIDs and all the feedback coils in series, this time domain multiplexed system requires many fewer wires between the SQUIDs and the room temperature read-out circuit than other multichannel systems.

  16. Cross-linking Chemistry of Squid Beak*

    PubMed Central

    Miserez, Ali; Rubin, Daniel; Waite, J. Herbert

    2010-01-01

    In stark contrast to most aggressive predators, Dosidicus gigas (jumbo squids) do not use minerals in their powerful mouthparts known as beaks. Their beaks instead consist of a highly sclerotized chitinous composite with incremental hydration from the tip to the base. We previously reported l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa)-histidine (dopa-His) as an important covalent cross-link providing mechanical strengthening to the beak material. Here, we present a more complete characterization of the sclerotization chemistry and describe additional cross-links from D. gigas beak. All cross-links presented in this report share common building blocks, a family of di-, tri-, and tetra-histidine-catecholic adducts, that were separated by affinity chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and identified by tandem mass spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). The data provide additional insights into the unusually high cross-link density found in mature beaks. Furthermore, we propose both a low molecular weight catechol, and peptidyl-dopa, to be sclerotization agents of squid beak. This appears to represent a new strategy for forming hard tissue in animals. The interplay between covalent cross-linking and dehydration on the graded properties of the beaks is discussed. PMID:20870720

  17. Cross-linking chemistry of squid beak.

    PubMed

    Miserez, Ali; Rubin, Daniel; Waite, J Herbert

    2010-12-01

    In stark contrast to most aggressive predators, Dosidicus gigas (jumbo squids) do not use minerals in their powerful mouthparts known as beaks. Their beaks instead consist of a highly sclerotized chitinous composite with incremental hydration from the tip to the base. We previously reported l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa)-histidine (dopa-His) as an important covalent cross-link providing mechanical strengthening to the beak material. Here, we present a more complete characterization of the sclerotization chemistry and describe additional cross-links from D. gigas beak. All cross-links presented in this report share common building blocks, a family of di-, tri-, and tetra-histidine-catecholic adducts, that were separated by affinity chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and identified by tandem mass spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). The data provide additional insights into the unusually high cross-link density found in mature beaks. Furthermore, we propose both a low molecular weight catechol, and peptidyl-dopa, to be sclerotization agents of squid beak. This appears to represent a new strategy for forming hard tissue in animals. The interplay between covalent cross-linking and dehydration on the graded properties of the beaks is discussed. PMID:20870720

  18. The curvy photonics of squid camouflage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Alison; Holt, Amanda; Daniel, Morse; Stramski, Dariusz

    2013-03-01

    Cephalopods (squids and octopuses) ubiquitously possess reflective structures in their skin composed of ``reflectin'' proteins. Although a few simple laminar, Bragg-stack type optical structures have been known in a handful of common squid species for some time, our extensive survey of optically active tissues of exotic deep-sea species has revealed complex, extended curvatures and topologies in dermal reflectors of these rarely-studied animals. Molecular deep-sequencing has revealed these structures also to be composed of reflectin-like proteins. Here we show a survey of some of these deep-sea reflector structures, and present evidence that each novel structure may be a transform of the radiance in the optical niche in the ocean where each of these species live, such that light reflecting off the sides of these animals in their specific ocean habitat resembles the light that would be transmitted through the animals if they were transparent, from many different viewing angles and possible ocean depths.

  19. Crystallization and crystal properties of squid rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Midori; Kitahara, Rei; Gotoh, Toshiaki; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2007-06-01

    Truncated rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was extracted and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. Rhodopsin, a photoreceptor membrane protein in the retina, is a prototypical member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. In this study, rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was treated with V8 protease to remove the C-terminal extension. Truncated rhodopsin was selectively extracted from the microvillar membranes using alkyl glucoside in the presence of zinc ions and was then crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Of the various crystals obtained, hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. The diffraction data suggested that the crystal belongs to space group P6{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 122.1, c = 158.6 Å. Preliminary crystallographic analysis, together with linear dichroism results, suggested that the rhodopsin dimers are packed in such a manner that their transmembrane helices are aligned nearly parallel to the c axis.

  20. Base distance optimization for SQUID gradiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Garachtchenko, A.; Matlashov, A.; Kraus, R.

    1998-12-31

    The measurement of magnetic fields generated by weak nearby biomagnetic sources is affected by ambient noise generated by distant sources both internal and external to the subject under study. External ambient noise results from sources with numerous origins, many of which are unpredictable in nature. Internal noise sources are biomagnetic in nature and result from muscle activity (such as the heart, eye blinks, respiration, etc.), pulsation associated with blood flow, surgical implants, etc. Any magnetic noise will interfere with measurements of magnetic sources of interest, such as magnetoencephalography (MEG), in various ways. One of the most effective methods of reducing the magnetic noise measured by the SQUID sensor is to use properly designed superconducting gradiometers. Here, the authors optimized the baseline length of SQUID-based symmetric axial gradiometers using computer simulation. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was used as the optimization criteria. They found that in most cases the optimal baseline is not equal to the depth of the primary source, rather it has a more complex dependence on the gradiometer balance and the ambient magnetic noise. They studied both first and second order gradiometers in simulated shielded environments and only second order gradiometers in a simulated unshielded environment. The noise source was simulated as a distant dipolar source for the shielded cases. They present optimal gradiometer baseline lengths for the various simulated situations below.

  1. Flying qualities research challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, Steven M.; George, Frank L.

    1987-01-01

    Traditional flying qualities requirements for airplane dynamics are based on airplane modal response characteristics derived from linear small-perturbation analysis. These requirements are supported by a large experimental data base. The challenge to the flying qualities community is to demonstrate how flying qualities, the control system and aircraft configuration are still closely linked. This is evident in the definition of flying qualities and, as far as pilots are concerned, that flying qualities are still the measure of overall design success.

  2. Whole-head SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield.

    PubMed

    Ohta, H; Matsui, T; Uchikawa, Y

    2004-01-01

    We have constructed a mobile whole-head SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield - a cylinder of high Tc superconductor BSCCO of 65 cm in diameter and 160 cm in length. We compared the noise spectra of several SQUID sensors of SNS Josephson junctions in the superconducting magnetic shield with those of the same SQUID sensors in a magnetically shielded room of Permalloy. The SQUID sensors in the superconducting magnetic shield are more than 100 times more sensitive than those in a magnetically shielded room of Permalloy below 1 Hz. We tested the whole-head SQUID system in the superconducting magnetic shield observing somatosensory signals evoked by stimulating the median nerve in the right wrist of patients by current pulses. We present data of 64 and 128 traces versus the common time axis for comparison. Most sensory responses of human brains phase out near 250 ms. However monotonic rhythms still remain even at longer latencies than 250 ms. The nodes of these rhythm are very narrow even at these longer latencies just indicating low noise characteristics of the SQUID system at low-frequencies. The current dipoles at the secondary somatosensory area SII are evoked at longer latencies than 250 ms contributing to a higher-level brain function. The SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield will also have advantages when it is used as a DC MEG to study very slow activities and function of the brain. PMID:16012595

  3. High speed non-latching SQUID binary ripple counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, A. H.; Phillips, R. R.; Sandell, R. D.

    1985-03-01

    High speed, single flux quantum (SFQ) binary scalers are important components in superconducting analog-to-digital converters (ADC). This paper reviews the concept for a SQUID ADC and the design of an SFQ binary ripple counter, and reports the simulation of key components, and fabrication and performance of non-latching SQUID scalers and SFQ binary ripple counters. The SQUIDs were fabricated with Nb/Nb2O5/PbIn junctions and interconnected by monolithic superconducting transmission lines and isolation resistors. Each SQUID functioned as a bistable flip-flop with the input connected to the center of the device and the output across one junction. All junctions were critically damped to optimize the pulse response. Operation was verified by observing the dc I-V curves of successive SQUIDs driven by a cw pulse train generated on the same chip. Each SQUID exhibited constant-voltage current steps at 1/2 the voltage of the preceding device as expected from the Josephson voltage-to-frequency relation. Steps were observed only for the same voltage polarity of successive devices and for proper phase bias of the SQUID. Binary frequency division was recorded up to 40GHz for devices designed to operate to 28GHz.

  4. High speed non-latching squid binary ripple counter

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, A.H.; Phillips, R.R.; Sandell, R.D.

    1985-03-01

    High speed, single flux quantum (SFQ) binary scalers are important components in superconducting analog-to-digital converters (ADC). This paper reviews the concept for a SQUID ADC and the design of an SFQ binary ripple counter, and reports the simulation of key components, and fabrication and performance of non-latching SQUID scalers and SFQ binary ripple counters. The SQUIDs were fabricated with Nb/Nb/sub 2/O/sub 5//PbIn junctions and interconnected by monolithic superconducting transmission lines and isolation resistors. Each SQUID functioned as a bistable flip-flop with the input connected to the center of the device and the output across one junction. All junctions were critically damped to optimize the pulse response. Operation was verified by observing the dc I-V curves of successive SQUIDs driven by a cw pulse train generated on the same chip. Each SQUID exhibited constant-voltage current steps at 1/2 the voltage of the preceding device as expected from the Josephson voltage-to-frequency relation. Steps were observed only for the same voltage polarity of successive devices and for proper phase bias of the SQUID. Binary frequency division was recorded up to 40GHz for devices designed to operate to 28GHz.

  5. Recent Results of a New Microwave SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Limketkai, B.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a proof-of-concept microwave SQUID multiplexer containing four SQUIDs coupled to GHz frequency resonant circuits and fed with a single microwave readout line. The resonators are half-wave coplanar waveguide sections and are similar to the structures used for the microwave kinetic inductance detectors developed in our group. Optimal values for the interdigital gap capacitors were determined to maximize the sensitivity of the transmitted and reflected microwave signal with respect to changes in the dynamic resistance of the SQUID. The dc current-bias line for the SQUID has an in-line inductive high frequency filter to minimize coupling between the bias line and resonator. A high frequency modulation scheme is proposed to eliminate the need for individual flux biasing of the SQUIDs, which extends the dynamic range of the readout. In this scheme a common modulation signal is imposed on each SQUID and the received signal is demodulated at one and two times the modulation frequency to maintain sensitivity at any flux state. We present the recent results of the microwave SQUID multiplexer system operating at a readout frequency range of 10 - 11GHz.

  6. Ginzburg-Landau modeling of Nano-SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtley, John; Hazra, Dibyendu; Hasselbach, Klaus; Buisson, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    NanoSQUIDs are micron-sized Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices with narrow (50 nm) sized constrictions as weak links. They are used for, e.g., studying switching dynamics in magnetic nanoparticles and high spatial resolution magnetic microscopy. When the constriction dimensions become comparable to or larger than the superconducting coherence length, the current-phase relations become non-sinusoidal, reducing the flux modulation depth and increasing the thermally activated flux noise. We have numerically solved the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equations for the nanoSQUID geometry to obtain current-phase relations, the dependence of critical current on magnetic flux, and the thermally activated escape rates. We predict NanoSQUIDs with short coherence lengths to have critical current distribution widths, and therefore flux noises, proportional to T1/2, as opposed to tunnel junction SQUIDs, which are proportional to T2/3. Our GL simulations predict that the ultimate noise performance of Al nanoSQUIDs, with their longer coherence lengths, should be better than Nb nanoSQUIDs, with suspended bridge Al/Nb nanoSQUIDs intermediate between the two.

  7. Fractionation of terrestrial neon by hydrodynamic hydrogen escape from ancient steam atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric neon is isotopically heavier than mantle neon. By contrast, nonradiogenic mantle Ar, Kr, and Xe are not known to differ from the atmosphere. These observations are most easily explained by selective neon loss to space; however, neon is much too massive to escape from the modern atmosphere. Steam atmospheres are a likely, if intermittent, feature of the accreting Earth. They occur because, on average, the energy liberated during accretion places Earth above the runaway greenhouse threshold, so that liquid water is not stable at the surface. It is found that steam atmospheres should have lasted some ten to fifty million years. Hydrogen escape would have been vigorous, but abundant heavy constituents would have been retained. There is no lack of plausible candidates; CO2, N2, or CO could all suffice. Neon can escape because it is less massive than any of the likely pollutants. Neon fractionation would have been a natural byproduct. Assuming that the initial Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio was solar, it was found that it would have taken some ten million years to effect the observed neon fractionation in a 30 bar steam atmosphere fouled with 10 bars of CO. Thicker atmospheres would have taken longer; less CO, shorter. This mechanism for fractionating neon has about the right level of efficiency. Because the lighter isotope escapes much more readily, total neon loss is pretty minimal; less than half of the initial neon endowment escapes.

  8. The energy dependence of the neon-22 excess in the cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrstroem, N. Y.; Lund, N.

    1985-01-01

    It has been recognized now for some time that the heavy neon isotope, neon-22, is overabundant by a factor of 3 to 4 with respect to neon-22 in the cosmic ray source compared to the ratio of these isotopes in the Solar System. In view of the otherwise remarkable similarity of the chemical composition of the cosmic ray source and the composition of the Solar Energetic Particles, the anomaly regarding the neon isotopes is so much more striking. The observed excess of neon-22 is too large to be explained as a result of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy since the formation of the Solar System. Further information on the origin of the neon-22 excess may come from a comparison of the energy spectra of the two neon isotopes. If the cosmic radiation in the solar neighborhood is a mixture of material from several sources, one of which has an excess of neon-22, then the source energy spectra of neon-20 and neon-22 may differ significantly.

  9. Two-stage series array SQUID amplifier for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, J. G.; DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.; Welty, R. P.; Radparvar, M.

    We present test results for a two-stage integrated SQUID amplifier which uses a series array of d.c. SQUIDS to amplify the signal from a single input SQUID. The device was developed by Welty and Martinis at NIST and recent versions have been manufactured by HYPRES, Inc. Shielding and filtering techniques were employed during the testing to minimize the external noise. Energy resolution of 300 h was demonstrated using a d.c. excitation at frequencies above 1 kHz, and better than 500 h resolution was typical down to 300 Hz.

  10. Dynamics of a SQUID with topologically nontrivial barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Dawood, R.

    2016-03-01

    The phase dynamics of a SQUID consisting of Josephson junctions with topologically nontrivial barriers has been studied. Its comparative analysis with the dynamics of a conventional SQUID has been performed. The current-voltage characteristics have been calculated. The dependence of the return current on the magnetic field has been found. It has been shown that the branch of the current-voltage characteristic corresponding to the resonance frequency in the case of the SQUID with nontrivial barriers is displaced by √ 2 over voltage. This effect can be used for the detection of Majorana fermions.

  11. Resonance detection of dark matter axions using a DC SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    A method for detecting dark matter axions in which a dc SQUID serves as a detector is proposed. The SQUID is shown to be able to detect the magnetic field perturbations induced by its interaction with axions. The resonance signal appears as a current step in the SQUID current-voltage characteristic. The voltage of the step corresponds to the axion mass, while its height depends on the axion energy density in near-Earth space. The proposed method is aimed at detecting axions with masses m a ≲ 10-4 eV, which are of interest for both cosmology and particle physics.

  12. Martian paleomagnetism with the SQUID microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Benjamin Paul

    Rocks should preserve natural remanent magnetizations with stable directional and intensity information at levels ˜1000 times below that of the noise level on today's best moment magnetometers. The superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) Microscope is a new, high-resolution magnetometer that can now detect such weak signals. It maps the magnetic fields above samples with a spatial resolution of <100 mum and a moment sensitivity of <10 -15 Am2. It therefore provides data with a resolution directly comparable with that of other common petrographic techniques. This thesis describes applications of SQUID microscopy to a variety of problems in the planetary sciences. A SQUID microscope paleomagnetic conglomerate test demonstrates that ALH84001 has been cooler than ˜40°C since before its ejection from the surface of Mars at 15 Ma. Because this temperature cannot sterilize most bacteria or eukarya, these data support the hypothesis that meteorites could transfer life between planets in the solar system. These and other data on panspermia demand a re-evaluation of the long-held assumption that terrestrial life evolved in isolation on Earth. Subsequent magnetic and textural studies of the meteorite show that 4 Ga ALH84001 carbonates containing magnetite and pyrrhotite carry a stable natural remanent magnetization. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology demonstrates that this magnetization originated at 3.9--4.1 Ga on Mars. This magnetization is the oldest known for a planetary rock, and its strong intensity suggests that Mars had generated a geodynamo at or before 4 Ga. The intensity of the field that magnetized ALH84001 was roughly within an order of magnitude of that at the surface of the present-day Earth, sufficient for magnetotaxis by the bacteria whose magnetofossils have been reported in ALH84001 and possibly for the production of the strong crustal anomalies. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology calculations also provide an explanation for why ALH84001 contains a sample of

  13. Evidence of weak plasma series resonance heating in the H-mode of neon and neon/argon inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffard, John B.; Jung, R. O.; Lin, Chun C.; Aneskavich, L. E.; Wendt, A. E.

    2012-09-01

    Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy measurements in argon and neon inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) have revealed a surplus of high-energy electrons in neon-containing plasmas. Differences between results of emission model analyses using neon and argon lines (as well as probe measurements) also indicate a high-energy enhancement in neon-containing plasmas. The abundance of these extra high-energy electrons is correlated with the sheath thickness near the rf antenna and can be reduced by either adding a Faraday shield (external shielding) or increasing the plasma density. A comparison of modelled and experimental values of the 13.56 MHz time modulation of select neon emission lines strongly suggests plasma series resonance heating adjacent to the ICP antenna as the source of the extra heating.

  14. Muon transfer from hydrogen and deuterium atoms to neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. )

    1995-03-01

    The muon exchange reactions from the ground state of muonic protium and deuterium atoms to neon are studied. Measurements have been performed in binary gas mixtures at room temperature. The transfer rate from thermalized muonic deuterium is found to exceed by about an order of magnitude the one from muonic protium. On the other hand, an energy dependence of the rate from [mu][ital d] is revealed, while none is observed from [mu][ital p]. The intensity patterns of the muonic Lyman series of neon resulting from the muon exchange differ from one hydrogen isotope to the other, the most obvious discrepancy being the presence of the muonic Ne(7-1) line after transfer from [mu][ital d], whereas this line is absent by transfer from [mu][ital p]. This indicates that the muon is transferred to the level [ital n][sub [ital p

  15. A dielectric barrier discharge in neon at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Junxia; Luo, Haiyun; Wang, Xinxin

    2011-08-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge in neon at atmospheric pressure is investigated with electrical measurement and fast photography. It is found that a stable diffuse discharge can be easily generated in a gap with a gap space of 0.5-6 mm and is identified with a glow discharge. The first breakdown voltage of the gap is considerably higher than that of the same gap working in a stable diffuse discharge mode, which indicates that Penning ionization of neon metastables from the previous discharge with inevitable gas impurities plays an important role in the decrease in the breakdown voltage. Discharge patterns are observed in a gap shorter than 1 mm. From the experiments with a wedge-like gap, it is found that the discharge patterns are formed in the area with a higher applied electric field, which suggests that a higher applied electric field may cause a transition from a diffuse glow to discharge patterns.

  16. A Cyberinfrastructure for the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimel, D.; Berukoff, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an NSF-funded project designed to provide physical and information infrastructure to support the development of continental-scale, quantitative ecological sciences. The network consists of sixty sites located in the continental US, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, each site hosting terrestrial and aquatic sensors and observational apparati that acquire data across multiple ecoclimatic domains. As well, an airborne remote sensing platform provides spectral and LiDAR data, and acquisition of data sets from external agencies allows for land-use studies. Together, this data is ingested, vetted, processed, and curated by a standards-based, provenance-driven, metadata-rich cyberinfrastructure, which will provide not only access to but discovery and manipulation of NEON data, and the construction of integrative data products and inputs for ecological forecasting that address fundamental processual questions in climate change, land use change, and invasive species.

  17. Discovery of solar wind neon in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Palma, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Insert gases have been measured in seven sieve fractions of a disaggregated sample of the Allende meteorite. The disaggregation was done by ultrasonic treatment in water and by freeze-thawing. This sample consititutes the first gas-rich portion known to occur in the Allende meteorite. The composition of the trapped neon is solar, i.e., Neon-B, and the gas-rich samples contain more trapped Ne-20 than Ar-36. The set of sieve fractions show an anticorrelation of Ne-20 content and grain size. Gas-richness seems to be quite common among the CV3 meteorites with Allende added to the earlier known cases of Mokoia, Vigarano, and Efremovka.

  18. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. This design precludes nucleate boiling in the flow channels as they are too small to handle vapor flow. Consequently, it was necessary to determine boiling incipience under the operating conditions of the magnet system. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of plus or minus 15 percent

  19. Realizing and optimizing an atomtronic SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathey, Amy C.; Mathey, L.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate how a toroidal Bose–Einstein condensate with a movable barrier can be used to realize an atomtronic SQUID. The magnitude of the barrier height, which creates the analogue of an SNS junction, is of crucial importance, as well as its ramp-up and -down protocol. For too low of a barrier, the relaxation of the system is dynamically suppressed, due to the small rate of phase slips at the barrier. For a higher barrier, the phase coherence across the barrier is suppressed due to thermal fluctuations, which are included in our Truncated Wigner approach. Furthermore, we show that the ramp-up protocol of the barrier can be improved by ramping up its height first, and its velocity after that. This protocol can be further improved by optimizing the ramp-up and ramp-down time scales, which is of direct practical relevance for on-going experimental realizations.

  20. Charge radii of neon isotopes across the sd neutron shell

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, K.; Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Kloos, S.; Kotrotsios, G.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Kowalska, M.; Keim, M.; Blaum, K.; Lievens, P.; Simon, H.

    2011-09-15

    We report on the changes in mean square charge radii of unstable neon nuclei relative to the stable {sup 20}Ne, based on the measurement of optical isotope shifts. The studies were carried out using collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam of neutral neon atoms. High sensitivity on short-lived isotopes was achieved thanks to nonoptical detection based on optical pumping and state-selective collisional ionization, which was complemented by an accurate determination of the beam kinetic energy. The new results provide information on the structural changes in the sequence of neon isotopes all across the neutron sd shell, ranging from the proton drip line nucleus and halo candidate {sup 17}Ne up to the neutron-rich {sup 28}Ne in the vicinity of the ''island of inversion.'' Within this range the charge radius is smallest for {sup 24}Ne with N=14 corresponding to the closure of the neutron d{sub 5/2} shell, while it increases toward both neutron shell closures, N=8 and N=20. The general trend of the charge radii correlates well with the deformation effects which are known to be large for several neon isotopes. In the neutron-deficient isotopes, structural changes arise from the onset of proton-halo formation for {sup 17}Ne, shell closure in {sup 18}Ne, and clustering effects in {sup 20,21}Ne. On the neutron-rich side the transition to the island of inversion plays an important role, with the radii in the upper part of the sd shell confirming the weakening of the N=20 magic number. The results add new information to the radii systematics of light nuclei where data are scarce because of the small contribution of nuclear-size effects to the isotope shifts which are dominated by the finite-mass effect.

  1. Squid as nutrient vectors linking Southwest Atlantic marine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, Alexander I.

    2013-10-01

    Long-term investigations of three abundant nektonic squid species from the Southwest Atlantic, Illex argentinus, Doryteuthis gahi and Onykia ingens, permitted to estimate important population parameters including individual growth rates, duration of ontogenetic phases and mortalities. Using production model, the productivity of squid populations at different phases of their life cycle was assessed and the amount of biomass they convey between marine ecosystems as a result of their ontogenetic migrations was quantified. It was found that squid are major nutrient vectors and play a key role as transient 'biological pumps' linking spatially distinct marine ecosystems. I. argentinus has the largest impact in all three ecosystems it encounters due to its high abundance and productivity. The variable nature of squid populations increases the vulnerability of these biological conveyers to overfishing and environmental change. Failure of these critical biological pathways may induce irreversible long-term consequences for biodiversity, resource abundance and spatial availability in the world ocean.

  2. Integrated SQUID sensors for low cross-talk multichannel systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granata, C.; Vettoliere, A.; Luiso, M.; Russo, M.

    2006-06-01

    We present a fully integrated dc-SQUID magnetometer based on niobium technology including a new feedback coil design. In respect to a standard SQUID design, such a feedback-coil design was optimized in order to reduce the mutual inductance with the neighbours and to increase the coupling with the pick-up coil of the SQUID itself. In such a way, it is possible to reduce cross-talks due to both feedback coil and wires. Experimental results about the characterization of the device and the crosstalk measurements are reported. The measurements have been performed in liquid helium using a low noise readout electronics specifically designed for large multichannel SQUID based instrumentations. The experimental data have shown a substantial reduction of cross-talk between neighbouring sensors.

  3. Magnetic Field Sampling using a Pulsed Hysteretic SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, S. P.; Vlahacos, C. P.; Berkley, A. J.; Gubrud, M. A.; Wellstood, F. C.; Cawthorne, A.

    2004-03-01

    Weak magnetic field detection using a non-hysteretic DC SQUID with Flux-Locked-Loop electronics is typically limited to 1MHz bandwidth or less. However, there is demand for larger bandwidth magnetic field detection for use in the semiconductor industry. We have studied the possibility of using a 4.2K hysteretic trilayer Nb DC SQUID, fabricated by Hypres Inc., with pulsed bias current to increase the bandwidth by an order of magnitude or more. The technique is based on the fast switching of a hysteretic SQUID from the superconducting state to the normal conducting state. By observing the switching of the SQUID, the applied magnetic field at the time of a pulse can be followed. Experimental results show that the technique can be used to follow magnetic fields of up to 60MHz with 5ns pulses. With shorter pulses and better electronics, the technique could further increase the bandwidth by another order of magnitude.

  4. Development of a colorimetric sensor array for squid spoilage assessment.

    PubMed

    Zaragozá, Patricia; Fuentes, Ana; Ruiz-Rico, María; Vivancos, José-Luis; Fernández-Segovia, Isabel; Ros-Lis, José V; Barat, José M; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate a rapid, easy-to-use optoelectronic system for the shelf-life assessment of squid in cold storage. For this purpose, an optoelectronic nose was designed, which consisted of an array containing six sensing materials prepared by combining different dyes and two inorganic supports (aluminium oxide and silica gel). Samples were packaged with the colorimetric array and kept in cold storage for 12 days. Squid spoilage was monitored simultaneously by the colorimetric array and by the physico-chemical and microbial analyses during storage. Samples exceeded the acceptability limits for microbial counts on the third day. PCA analysis carried out with CIELab showed that the colorimetric array was able to discriminate between fresh squid fit for consumption and spoiled squid. The statistical models obtained by PLS, with the optoelectronic nose, successfully predicted CO2 and O2 content in the headspace as well as microbial growth. PMID:25577086

  5. Perception of neon color spreading in 3-6-month-old infants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiale; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K

    2009-12-01

    Although lots of studies about neon color spreading have been reported, few of these studies have focused on the perceptual development of it in human infants. Therefore, this study explores the perceptual development of neon color spreading in infants. In experiment 1, we examined 3-6-month-olds' perception of neon color spreading in static conditions. In experiment 2, we examined 3-6-month-olds' perception of neon color spreading in moving conditions. Our results suggest that while only 5-6-month-old infants show a preference for neon color spreading in the static condition, 3-4-month-old infants also prefer neon color spreading if motion information is available. PMID:19836080

  6. Nova LMC 1990 no. 1: The first extragalactic neon nova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Shore, Steven N.; Starrfield, Sumner G.

    1990-01-01

    International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of nova LMC (Large Magellanic Cloud) 1990 No. 1, the first neon (or ONeMg) nova observed outside the Galaxy are presented. The observations were obtained from 17 Jan. to Mar. 1990, with especially dense coverage during the first 25 days of the outburst. (The neon nova categorization is based on the detection of forbidden Ne 3-4 lines in optical spectra; the ultraviolet neon lines were not detected.) During the first 30 days of the outburst, the radiative losses were dominated by the N 5 delta 1240 and C 4 delta 1550 lines. The maximum ejection velocity was approximately 8000 km/s, based on the blue absorption edge of the C 4 P-Cygni profile. Early in the outburst of Nova LMC 1990 No. 1 the UV luminosity alone was approximately 3 times 10 to the 38th power erg/sec, implying that the bolometric luminosity was well in excess of the Eddington luminosity for a one solar mass object.

  7. Helium-neon laser improves skin repair in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Peccin, Maria Stella; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; de Oliveira, Flavia; Giusti, Paulo Ricardo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of helium-neon laser on skin injury in rabbits. For this purpose, 15 New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral skin damage in leg. Helium-neon laser light, at a fluence of 6 J∕cm2 and wavelength of 632.8 nm, was applied on the left legs (laser group). The right leg lesions (control group) served as negative control. All sections were histopathologically analyzed using HE sections. The results showed little infiltration of inflammatory cells, with proliferation of fibroblasts forming a few fibrous connective tissue after 1 week post-injury. The lesion on the 3rd week was characterized by granulation tissue, which formed from proliferated fibrous connective tissue, congested blood vessels and mild mononuclear cell infiltration. On the 5th week, it was observed that debris material surrounded by a thick layer of connective tissue and dense collage, fibroblasts cells present in the dermis covered by a thick epidermal layer represented by keratinized epithelium. Taken together, our results suggest that helium-neon laser is able to improve skin repair in rabbits at early phases of recovery. PMID:23057697

  8. ELECTROPHORETIC AND IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDIES OF SQUID AXOPLASM PROTEINS.

    PubMed

    HUNEEUS-COX, F

    1964-03-01

    By disc electrophoresis of the axoplasm of Dosidicus gigas, 14 protein bands have been resolved. Anti-bodies to the intra-axonal proteins and to squid blood proteins were produced in rabbits. By Ouchterlony's technique, six antigenic components can be demonstrated in axoplasm; the combined use of disc electrophoresis and immune diflusion in agar resolves seven antigenic components in axoplasm; none of these components is detectable in squid blood. PMID:14107426

  9. SQUID magnetometry applied as non-invasive electroanalytic chemical technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, B.D.; MacVicar, M.L.A. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on a SQUID magnetometer, employed as a highly sensitive ammeter, used to perform standard electroanalytic chemical measurements non- invasively. Specifically, the magnetic fields generated by the net ionic movement in the solution of a driven electrochemical system is detected by the gradiometer coils. The SQUID signal can then be compared to conventional current measurements. One such standard measurement investigated is Cyclic Voltametry (CV) which determines the I-V characteristics of an electrochemical system yielding critical kinetic parameters.

  10. High-T(c) squid application in medicine and geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polushkin, V. N.; Uchaikin, S. V.; Vasiliev, B. V.

    1991-01-01

    In our laboratory of high-T(sub c), a one-hole squid was built from Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics obtained by a standard procedure of solid state reaction. The ceramics with critical current density J(sub c) is greater than 100 A/sq cm was selected. In the middle of a 10 x 10 x 2 mm ceramics pellet, a 0.8 mm hole was drilled in which the superconducting loop of the squid was located. Between the hole and the edge of the pellet, a cut was mechanically filed out with a bridge inside it connecting the superconducting ring. A scheme of the magnetometer is presented. The resonant frequency shift of the tank circuit, the connection of the squid with this circuit, and the squid inductance are evaluated. One of the most interesting fields of the squid-based magnetometer application is biomagnetism, particularly, the human heart magnetocardiogram measuring. The low-temperature squids were used in this area and many interesting and important scientific results have been obtained. The observations have shown that the main noise contribution was not due to the squid but to the Earth's magnetic field variations, industrial inductions, and mainly to the vibrations caused by liquid nitrogen boiling and by vibrations of the box. Further attempts are needed to reduce the magnetic noise inductions. Nevertheless, the estimations promise the maximum signal/noise relation of the high-T(sub c) squid-magnetocardiometer to be not less than 10:1 in a bandwidth of 60 Hz. Apparently, such resolution would be enough not only for steady cardiogram reading but even for thin structure investigation at average technique application.

  11. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dantsker, E

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO{sub 3}-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room.

  12. High-performance DC SQUID read-out electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drung, Dietmar

    2002-03-01

    The dynamic behavior of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) operated in a flux-locked loop (FLL) is discussed using a simple mathematical description. It is shown that the slew rate of any FLL is limited by the linear flux range of the SQUID Φlin and the effective loop delay td to approximately Φ˙f, max=Φ lin/(4t d) if a one-pole integrator is used. This allows one to estimate the dynamic limits of both analog SQUIDs with flux modulation or direct read-out and digital SQUIDs with on-chip read-out. In addition to theoretical limits, practically achievable performance is presented using our latest direct-coupled FLL electronics as an example of state-of-the-art SQUID read-out. This electronics is designed for both low-critical temperature (low- Tc) and high- Tc SQUIDs. It combines low noise with high bandwidth and slew rate. All functions are computer controlled using a LabVIEW ® program. An automatic bias voltage tuning circuit increases the system stability in case of large cryogenic temperature fluctuations. Furthermore, an ultra-low-noise current source is integrated into the FLL board which can be used to supply a coil system compensating the Earth's magnetic field of about 60 μT while producing only 17 fT/ Hz extra noise at 1 kHz and 41 fT/ Hz at 1 Hz, respectively.

  13. [Biochemistry and functional characterization of squid mantle meat (Dosidicus gigas)].

    PubMed

    Abugoch, L; Guarda, A; María Pérez, L; Isabel Donghi, M

    2000-12-01

    A study for the characterization of frozen giant squid mantle (meat) protein stored at -25 degrees C for 8 month was started. In the present research, the following functional properties were investigate: emulsifying, water holding and gel forming capacities. Optimal conditions for the separation and differentiation of miofibrillar and sarcoplasmatic proteins were also studied. It was found that the unfrozen giant squid mantle meat es capable of emulifying 2.817,4 g of oil/g of protein and holding capacity was 3.64 g of water/g of protein. Related to the gel forming capacity, it was not obtain, probably due to excessive storage of the meat. With regard to miofibrilar protein obtention of the squid mantle meat, it was found that two low ionic strength washings (I = 0.05), the sarcoplasmic proteins were practically eliminated from the protein matrix. The differentiation of miofibrilar and sarcoplasmatic proteins was obtained by PAGE-SDS of the squid mantle meat extracted at two different ionic strength (I = 0.05 and I = 0.5). This work demonstrates that the giant squid mantle protein has a high emulsifying and water holding capacity, and it can be used, as a raw material, for the improvement of sausage products. About the gelling products, more studies will be necessary with fresh squid mantle meat to conclude about this functional property. PMID:11464670

  14. A scanning SQUID microscope with 200 MHz bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanov, Vladimir V.; Lettsome, Nesco M., Jr.; Borzenets, Valery; Gagliolo, Nicolas; Cawthorne, Alfred B.; Orozco, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    We developed a scanning DC SQUID microscope with novel readout electronics capable of wideband sensing of RF magnetic fields from 50 to 200 MHz and simultaneously providing closed-loop response at kHz frequencies. To overcome the 20 MHz bandwidth limitation of traditional closed-loop SQUIDs, a flux-modulated closed-loop simultaneously locks the SQUID quasi-static flux and flux-biases the SQUID for amplification of the RF flux up to Φ0/4 in amplitude. Demodulating the SQUID voltage with a double lock-in technique yields a signal representative of both the amplitude and phase of the RF flux. This provides 80 dB of a linear dynamic range with a flux noise density of 4 μΦ0 Hz-1/2 at 200 MHz for a Y Ba2Cu3O7 bi-crystal SQUID at 77 K. We describe the electronics’ performance and present images for RF magnetic field of the travelling wave in a coplanar waveguide, the standing wave in an open-circuited microstrip, and a surface mounted device antenna.

  15. An investigation of pinch welds using HTS SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Chris; Espy, Michelle A.; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Kraus, Robert H., Jr.

    2006-05-01

    To contain high-pressure gases inside a pressure vessel a seal is often made in a thin-walled tube, known as the stem tube, that connects the gas reservoir and the vessel. This seal can be achieved through the use of a resistance pinch weld that forms with only a limited amount of melting occurring. The lack of melting makes applying traditional post-weld nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques extremely difficult. The welds of interest here are made from 304L stainless steel (typically 3.8 mm diameter and 38 mm long) and have a non-uniform geometry that does not inherently lend itself to either eddy current or static field SQUID-based measurement techniques. We perform these NDE measurements with both the sample and the SQUID located inside local electromagnetic shielding. SQUID data are presented as individual time series traces for a set of welds that were fabricated using a broad range of fabrication parameters, and a comparison is made between the SQUID-based results and the known parameters. With the limited spatial resolution offered by our present SQUID system, it is not clear if weld quality can be evaluated from purely SQUID-based results.

  16. On the mechanism of populating 3p levels of neon under pumping by a hard ioniser

    SciTech Connect

    Khasenov, M U

    2011-03-31

    The effect of quenching additives on the luminescence properties of helium - neon mixtures under pumping by {alpha} particles emitted from {sup 210}Po atoms is considered. It is concluded that, under excitation by a heavy charged particle, the population of the 3p'[1/2]{sub 0} level of neon is not related to the dissociative recombination of molecular ions. It is suggested that the most likely channels for populating the 3p level are the excitation transfer from metastable helium atoms to neon atoms and direct excitation of neon by nuclear particles and secondary electrons. (lasers and active media)

  17. Stable Fly Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult stable flies feed on the blood of humans, pets and livestock, inflicting painful bites. Stable flies need one and sometimes two bloodmeals each day to develop their eggs. Unlike mosquitoes where only the females bloodfeed, both male and female stable flies require blood to reproduce. Stable fl...

  18. SQUID use for Geophysics: finding billions of dollars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    Soon after their discovery, Jim Zimmerman saw the potential of using Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, SQUIDs, for the study of Geophysics and undertook experiments to understand the magnetic phenomena of the Earth. However his early experiments were not successful. Nevertheless up to the early 1980's, some research effort in the use of SQUIDs for geophysics continued and many ideas of how you could use SQUIDs evolved. Their use was not adopted by the mining industry at that time for a range of reasons. The discovery of high temperature superconductors started a reinvigoration in the interest to use SQUIDs for mineral exploration. Several groups around the world worked with mining companies to develop both liquid helium and nitrogen cooled systems. The realisation of the achievable sensitivity that contributed to successful mineral discoveries and delineation led to real financial returns for miners. By the mid 2000's, SQUID systems for geophysics were finally being offered for sale by several start-up companies. This talk will tell the story of SQUID use in geophysics. It will start with the early work of the SQUID pioneers including that of Jim Zimmerman and John Clarke and will also cover the development since the early 1990's up to today of a number of magnetometers and gradiometers that have been successfully commercialised and used to create significant impact in the global resources industry. The talk will also cover some of the critical technical challenges that had to be overcome to succeed. It will focus mostly on magnetically unshielded systems used in the field although some laboratory-based systems will be discussed.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, M.B. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  20. SQUID detected NMR in microtesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlachov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Espy, Michelle A.; George, John S.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2004-09-01

    We have built an NMR system that employs a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector and operates in measurement fields of 2-25 μT. The system uses a pre-polarizing field from 4 to 30 mT generated by simple room-temperature wire-wound coils that are turned off during measurements. The instrument has an open geometry with samples located outside the cryostat at room-temperature. This removes constraints on sample size and allows us to obtain signals from living tissue. We have obtained 1H NMR spectra from a variety of samples including water, mineral oil, and a live frog. We also acquired gradient encoded free induction decay (FID) data from a water-plastic phantom in the μT regime, from which simple projection images were reconstructed. NMR signals from samples inside metallic containers have also been acquired. This is possible because the penetration skin depth is much greater at the low operating frequencies of this system than for conventional systems. Advantages to ultra-low field NMR measurements include lower susceptibility artifacts caused by high strength polarizing and measurement fields, and negligible line width broadening due to measurement field inhomogeneity, reducing the burden of producing highly homogeneous fields.

  1. Processing of polarized light by squid photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Saidel, W M; Lettvin, J Y; MacNichol, E F

    Behavioural tests have demonstrated that cephalopods can discriminate light polarized in different planes, and the receptors have been localized by electrophysiological studies of the eye. Discrimination of the plane of polarization is a consequence of both the structure of the microvilli in the outer segments of the photoreceptors and the orientation of the photosensitive chromophore on these membranes. However, between the depolarizing receptor response resulting from photoreception and the behaviour of the animal, nothing is known about neuronal processing of polarized light by cephalopods. Here we show that some squid photoreceptors discriminate the plane of polarization within the spike train, and that any particular plane is seen as a variable intensity. Given the well known orthogonal orientation of microvilli in outer segments of adjacent photoreceptors and the physiological preference for one of two mutually perpendicular planes of polarization by single photoreceptors, we conclude that cephalopod vision is based on two complementary views of the world, each determined by the transformation of polarization-sensitive receptors into complementary intensity scales. A visual system based on this transformation would lead to enhanced contrast underwater and visualization of object details obscured by confounding highlights. PMID:6877374

  2. The NEON Science Commissioning Plan: Strategies for Confirming System Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, G. D.; Thorpe, A.; Buur, H.

    2015-12-01

    A transformation is underway in the field of ecological monitoring as compelling science questions motivate us to build ever-larger networks aiming to acquire uniform datasets over wide geographical ranges and long timescales. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), currently under construction across the U.S., represents the most ambitious such effort to characterize ecology at the continental scale. When completed in 2017, NEON will begin a 30-year program to monitor the state of North American ecosystems at scores of independent sites by employing a combination of terrestrial and aquatic sensors, organismal, biogeochemical, and hydrological sampling conducted by field staff, and airborne remote-sensing imaging and spectroscopy. Simply building and bringing such complex, long-term monitoring networks online is, however, insufficient to produce a useful result: the science team must also confirm that the system fulfills its essential mission to generate accurate and uniform data from all sites over time. This is the role of Science Commissioning, the process which completes the construction stage by confirming that the system operates as designed before entering full operations. Ideally, Science Commissioning involves simply testing the completed system against all applicable science requirements. In the real world of large, complex networks, planners of Science Commissioning must grapple with several key questions: How can we verify that the measurements from a given subsystem reflect "truth"? How can we ensure that similar subsystems at different sites return equivalent results? How can we confirm that data from the same site remain comparable over long periods of time? How can we conduct meaningful tests on a large system in a reasonable amount of time and effort? We describe the specific strategies NEON is developing to meet these challenges and the implications for other large ecological monitoring networks.

  3. Using NEON to Measure Adaptation of Vegetation to Changes in Environmental Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. H.; Kao, R.; Gibson, C.

    2009-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a national-scale research platform for documenting and analyzing the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on ecology. NEON features sensor networks and experiments linked by cyberinfrastructure to record and archive ecological data for at least 30 years. NEON partitions the United States into 20 ecoclimatic domains. Each domain hosts one fully instrumented core site in a wildland area and two re-locatable sites, which aims to capture ecologically significant gradients (e.g. landuse). Using standardized protocols and an open data policy, NEON data will be gathered from the level of the gene and organism to populations and communities, with extrapolations to the continental scale. In conjunction with environmental data, NEON will conduct field observations and analyses of biological specimens to track biodiversity, population dynamics, productivity, phenology, infectious disease, biogeochemistry and ecohydrology. Here we present a few examples of the type of research NEON will enable using this data. The NEON network will measure and scale many environmental factors that affect vegetation, e.g. temperature, precipitation, and nutrient availability. Direct monitoring of vegetation will enable the study of acclimatory and adaptive changes in vegetation properties over different time scales. Such data will improve the representation of vegetation responses to environmental change in models. The vision behind NEON aims to advance our ability to quantitatively predict ecological change.

  4. Periodic local-MP2 computational study of crystalline neon.

    PubMed

    Halo, Migen; Casassa, Silvia; Maschio, Lorenzo; Pisani, Cesare

    2009-01-21

    Face-centered-cubic crystalline Neon is taken as a test system to explore the influence of computational parameters on the quality of the MP2 solution provided by the Cryscor program using a local-correlation approach. The effect of the various approximations adopted is analyzed: basis set limitations, finite size of excitation domains, truncation of the tails of the local functions, approximate evaluation of two-electron integrals, estimate (by extrapolation) of long-range contributions are shown to play roles of different importance. The Ne2 dimer is used as an auxiliary test case in order to allow comparison with recent and accurate literature data. PMID:19283277

  5. The abundances of neon, sulfur, and argon in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. C.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Aller, L. H.; Geballe, T. R.; Baas, F.

    1981-01-01

    New infrared observations of Ne II, Ar III, and S IV are used in optical observations of other ionization states of the considered elements to evaluate the abundances of neon, argon, and sulfur in 18 planetary nebulae. Attention is also given to one or more of the infrared lines in 18 other nebulae. It is pointed out that S IV was detected in approximately 90% of the observed objects, while Ar III was found in about 80%, and Ne II in roughly one-third. It is noted that optical observations typically include only a limited region of the nebula, while the infrared measurements frequently involve integration over the entire nebular image.

  6. Noble gases in diamonds - Occurrences of solarlike helium and neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Reynolds, J. H.; Roedder, E.; Epstein, S.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen diamond samples from diverse locations were analyzed for the contents of He, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and of their isotopes, using a Reynolds (1956) type glass mass spectrometer. The results disclosed a large spread in the He-3/He-4 ratios, ranging from values below atmospheric to close to the solar ratio. In particular, solarlike He-3/He-4 ratios were seen for an Australian colorless diamond composite and an Arkansas diamond, which also displayed solarlike neon isotopic ratios. Wide variation was also observed in the He-4/Ar-40 ratios, suggesting a complex history for the source regions and the diamond crystallization processes.

  7. Expected intensities of solar neon-like ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the expected intensities of the stronger solar neon-like ion emission lines, some not yet observed, is carried out to compare with the observational situation. The potential usefulness of the 2p5 3s(3P2) - 2p6 forbidden line as a density diagnostic is discussed, and new electric quadrupole lines in the soft X-ray range are noted. 'Observability diagrams' are presented as a convenient overview of the known and unobserved lines. The S VII resonance lines appear to have anomalous intensities.

  8. Optimizing Sampling Efficiency for Biomass Estimation Across NEON Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abercrombie, H. H.; Meier, C. L.; Spencer, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the course of 30 years, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will measure plant biomass and productivity across the U.S. to enable an understanding of terrestrial carbon cycle responses to ecosystem change drivers. Over the next several years, prior to operational sampling at a site, NEON will complete construction and characterization phases during which a limited amount of sampling will be done at each site to inform sampling designs, and guide standardization of data collection across all sites. Sampling biomass in 60+ sites distributed among 20 different eco-climatic domains poses major logistical and budgetary challenges. Traditional biomass sampling methods such as clip harvesting and direct measurements of Leaf Area Index (LAI) involve collecting and processing plant samples, and are time and labor intensive. Possible alternatives include using indirect sampling methods for estimating LAI such as digital hemispherical photography (DHP) or using a LI-COR 2200 Plant Canopy Analyzer. These LAI estimations can then be used as a proxy for biomass. The biomass estimates calculated can then inform the clip harvest sampling design during NEON operations, optimizing both sample size and number so that standardized uncertainty limits can be achieved with a minimum amount of sampling effort. In 2011, LAI and clip harvest data were collected from co-located sampling points at the Central Plains Experimental Range located in northern Colorado, a short grass steppe ecosystem that is the NEON Domain 10 core site. LAI was measured with a LI-COR 2200 Plant Canopy Analyzer. The layout of the sampling design included four, 300 meter transects, with clip harvests plots spaced every 50m, and LAI sub-transects spaced every 10m. LAI was measured at four points along 6m sub-transects running perpendicular to the 300m transect. Clip harvest plots were co-located 4m from corresponding LAI transects, and had dimensions of 0.1m by 2m. We conducted regression analyses

  9. Multiply charged neon clusters: failure of the liquid drop model?

    PubMed

    Mähr, I; Zappa, F; Denifl, S; Kubala, D; Echt, O; Märk, T D; Scheier, P

    2007-01-12

    We have analyzed the stability and fission dynamics of multiply charged neon cluster ions. The critical sizes for the observation of long-lived ions are n2=284 and n3=656 for charge states 2 and 3, respectively, a factor 3 to 4 below the predictions of a previously successful liquid-drop model. The preferred fragment ions of fission reactions are surprisingly small (2

  10. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  11. Environmental effects on recreational squid jigging fishery catches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanellas-Reboredo, Miguel; Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Morales-Nin, Beatriz

    2012-08-01

    Experimental fishing sessions simulating the operating procedures of the recreational fishery for the European squid that operates at inshore Palma Bay (Balearic Islands, Spain) were conducted to investigate the effects of environmental variables on squid catches. The catch per unit of effort (cpue) of recreational-like jigging sessions showed a seasonal pattern (higher cpue during colder months). Two alternative hypotheses can explain such a pattern. First, squid could migrate inshore during colder months to seek spatio-temporal windows within which the sea temperature maximize spawning success. Second, the timing of the seasonal reproductive peak and the growth rate of any given cohort would result in a higher percentage of squid whose body size is greater than the gear-specific vulnerability threshold during the colder months. The combination of environmental variables that maximized cpue was a low sea surface temperature, a low windspeed, low atmospheric pressure, and days close to the new moon. A specific period of the day, narrowly around sunset, favoured the catches. Within this narrow period, the sunlight is still sufficient to allow the recreational fishing lures to be effective, and the squid have already shifted to a more active pattern of movement characteristic of the night-time period.

  12. Mobile HTS SQUID System for Nondestructive Evaluation of Aircraft Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Hans-Joachim; Hohmann, Rainer; Grueneklee, Michael; Zhang, Yi; Braginski, Alex I.

    1997-03-01

    For the detection of deep-lying flaws in aircraft structures, a mobile eddy-current system is being developed in conjunction with a high-temperature superconductor (Yba_2Cu_3O_7) thin-film HTS SQUID gradiometer. The challenge is to operate the SQUID sensor during movement in strong ambient fields, independent of orientation. A planar rf double hole gradiometer with a gradient sensitivity of 500 fT/(cm √Hz) was designed for that purpose. Two different cooling concepts were successfully implemented: the SQUID operation in the vacuum region of a lightweight nitrogen cryostat, constructed for operation in any orientation, and the use of a commercial Joule-Thomson cryocooler for liquid-nitrogen-free SQUID cooling. With a SQUID integration scheme using a sapphire cold finger, motion-related additional noise is nearly eliminated. Using a system equipped with a differential eddy current excitation, two-dimensional scans were performed to find fatigue cracks and corrosion pits hidden below several layers of aluminum. For demonstration in the Lufthansa maintenance facility at Frankfurt Airport, the system was used to detect flaws in aircraft wheels. Work in progress includes developing longer base gradiometers for detection of deep flaws.

  13. Eddy current nondestructive material evaluation based on HTS SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, M.; Kreutzbruck, M. v.; Baby, U.; Tröll, J.; Heiden, C.

    1997-08-01

    High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) are promising sensors for applications in eddy current nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Due to their high field sensitivity at low frequencies, they are especially suitable for applications, where a large penetration depth is required. We have investigated two different SQUID-based NDE systems, one of which is optimised for testing felloes of aircraft wheels. The second system allows for testing planar structures using a motorised x-y-stage, which moves the cryostat above the planar samples. As sensors 3 GHz rf SQUIDs made from YBCO were used, having a field noise of about 1 pT/√Hz. This results in a dynamic range of our SQUID system of about 155 dB/√Hz. In most cases, the SQUIDs have been cooled by immersing them in liquid nitrogen. We have however also developed a cryosystem, which allows for cooling the sensors by a Ne-gas flow. In planar test structures we could detect flaws with lengths of 10 mm, having a height of 0.6 mm in a depth of 13 mm. In aircraft felloes, flaws located at the inner surface of the felloe (thickness 8 mm) were easily detectable despite a high static background field of up to 0.5 G caused by ferromagnetic structures inside the felloe. For flaws in a depth of 5 mm, the spatial resolution of both systems was about 8 mm without applying image postprocessing.

  14. Cryogenic Integrated Offset Compensation for Time Domain SQUID Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prêle, D.; Voisin, F.; Martino, J.; Bréelle, E.; Bordier, G.; Piat, M.

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) multiplexing is a common technique in the use of large arrays of Transition Edge Sensors (TES). A Time Domain Multiplexer (TDM) combines input TES signals into one output signal using several SQUIDs. Different TES, SQUID and amplifier characteristics induce unavoidable different offsets on the multiplexed signal. Additionally, given the periodicity of the SQUID characteristic, the Flux Locked Loop (FLL) operating point is only defined modulo Φ 0. This can lead to a large output offset. In multiplexed mode, the difference between offsets associated with different pixels can induce a parasitic signal which is often larger than that of the TES. These offset signals drastically constrain the readout dynamic range and thus the maximum gain allowed. They also limit the signal-to-noise ratio, the FLL stability and the multiplexing frequency. Offsets in SQUID readout are discussed and offset compensation for TDM is presented. The dynamic calibration and compensation on a simplified 4:1 TDM are demonstrated in simulation. Dynamic offset compensation is being implemented on a cryogenic SiGe integrated circuit operated at 4 K for 128:1 TDM.

  15. Calibration of SQUID vector magnetometers in full tensor gradiometry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffler, M.; Queitsch, M.; Stolz, R.; Chwala, A.; Krech, W.; Meyer, H.-G.; Kukowski, N.

    2014-08-01

    Measurement of magnetic vector or tensor quantities, namely of field or field gradient, delivers more details of the underlying geological setting in geomagnetic prospection than a scalar measurement of a single component or of the scalar total magnetic intensity. Currently, highest measurement resolutions are achievable with superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based systems. Due to technological limitations, it is necessary to suppress the parasitic magnetic field response from the SQUID gradiometer signals, which are a superposition of one tensor component and all three orthogonal magnetic field components. This in turn requires an accurate estimation of the local magnetic field. Such a measurement can itself be achieved via three additional orthogonal SQUID reference magnetometers. It is the calibration of such a SQUID reference vector magnetometer system that is the subject of this paper. A number of vector magnetometer calibration methods are described in the literature. We present two methods that we have implemented and compared, for their suitability of rapid data processing and integration into a full tensor magnetic gradiometry, SQUID-based, system. We conclude that the calibration routines must necessarily model fabrication misalignments, field offset and scale factors, and include comparison with a reference magnetic field. In order to enable fast processing on site, the software must be able to function as a stand-alone toolbox.

  16. High-sensitivity SQUIDs with dispersive readout for scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol, J. M.; Foroughi, F.; Arps, J.; Kammerloher, E.; Bethke, P.; Gibson, G. W., Jr.; Fung, Y. K. K.; Klopfer, B.; Nowack, K.; Kratz, P. A.; Huber, M. E.; Moler, K. A.; Kirtley, J. R.; Bluhm, H.

    2014-03-01

    In a scanning SQUID microscope, the high magnetic flux sensitivity is utilized to image magnetic properties of sample surfaces. As an alternative to the widely used DC SQUIDs, we present Nb SQUIDs for scanning with dispersive microwave readout, featuring significantly higher bandwidth and sensitivity. An on-chip shunt capacitor in parallel with the junction and flux pickup loops forms an LC resonator whose resonance depends on the flux in the SQUID. The readout utilizes a phase-sensitive detection of the reflected drive signal at the SQUID's resonance frequency. Highest sensitivities are achieved by making use of the inherent nonlinearity of the device at high excitation powers. We present a study of the characteristics and noise measurements of our sensors at 4 K. Extrapolations from our results to 300 mK indicate that flux sensitivities as low as 50 nΦ0Hz- 1 / 2 could be possible. Using high-resolution lithography, our sensors promise sub-micron spatial resolution. Integrated into a scanning microscope, they will provide a powerful tool for the study of weak magnetic effects and quantum coherent phenomena. This work was supported by NSF IMR-MIP grant No. 0957616 and the Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach - Foundation.

  17. Effect of neon plasma pre-irradiation on surface morphology and deuterium retention of tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P. A.; Ji, G.; Zhou, H. B.; Wang, B.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Lu, G. H.

    2015-08-01

    Neon and deuterium plasma irradiation of polycrystalline tungsten targets have been performed at high fluxes of ∼1024 ions m-2 s-1 to study the interaction of neon with tungsten and the influence of neon on deuterium retention. Tungsten exposure to neon plasma leads to the formation of wavy nanostructures on the surface. Subsequent exposure to high-flux deuterium plasma leads to blister formation of micrometer size on top of the wavy structures. The total deuterium retention is decreased by neon pre-irradiation for all surface temperatures used in the present experiments. It is suggested that a barrier of trapped Ne is formed that interrupts the D transport and reduces D retention.

  18. Atomistic simulations of tungsten surface evolution under low-energy neon implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, Marie; Hammond, Karl D.; Sefta, Faiza; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten is a candidate material for the divertor of fusion reactors, where it will be subject to a high flux of particles coming from the fusion plasma as well as a significant heat load. Under helium plasma exposure in fusion-reactor-like conditions, a nanostructured morphology is known to form on the tungsten surface in certain temperature and incident energy ranges, although the formation mechanism is not fully established. A recent experimental study (Yajima et al 2013 Plasma Sci. Technol. 15 282-6) using neon or argon exposure did not produce similar nanostructure. This article presents molecular dynamics simulations of neon implantation in tungsten aimed at investigating the surface evolution and elucidating the role of noble gas mass in fuzz formation. In contrast to helium, neon impacts can sputter both tungsten and previously implanted neon atoms. The shorter range of neon ions, along with sputtering, limit the formation of large bubbles and likely prevents nanostructure formation.

  19. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions. (a) Atlantic mackerel. (1) A vessel must be...

  20. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions. (a) Atlantic mackerel. (1) A vessel must be...

  1. 77 FR 74159 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (MSB) Fishery Management Plan (FMP) (75 FR 11441, March 11, 2010) as a... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Framework Adjustment 7 AGENCY... on the longfin squid fishery from a catch cap to a discard cap in Framework Adjustment 7 to...

  2. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions. (a) Atlantic mackerel. (1) A vessel must be...

  3. 50 CFR 648.23 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... fishery. Owners or operators of otter trawl vessels possessing 2,500 lb (1.13 mt) or more of butterfish...) Longfin squid fishery. Owners or operators of otter trawl vessels possessing longfin squid harvested in or... constriction. Owners or operators of otter trawl vessels fishing for and/or possessing longfin squid shall...

  4. Neon Isotope Fractionation in Ice Cores at Close-Off Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Analyzing trapped air bubbles in glacial ice is a well-established and useful method to reconstruct past atmospheric gas concentrations. However, trapped gas composition can be affected by fractionation during the closure of the air bubbles, complicating the reconstruction. Gases such as dioxygen (O2) and dihydrogen (H2) are known to leak out of the bubbles by permeation through the ice lattice at the close-off depth,where firn turns into ice. This process also can cause isotope fractionation, which obscures the past atmospheric isotope ratios in air bubbles in glacial ice. In order to establish the most accurate measurements of past atmospheric content, we need very detailed understanding of the permeation leakage mechanism in order to establish possible corrections. In this study, we propose the use of neon stable isotopes (neon-22 and neon-20) to place constraints on the mechanism of permeation leakage. Neon isotopes are an ideal system to explore because neon has a constant atmospheric isotope ratio, and thus only is affected by close-off fractionation. Neon permeation occurs via velocity-dependent hopping between sites within the ice lattice, because the neon atom is smaller than the critical size (3.6 Å) of the opening in the lattice. Theory predicts that neon isotope fractionation will occur due to the lower velocity of the heavier isotope, but this has never been experimentally verified and the theory is unable to quantitatively predict the magnitude of the fractionation. We will present the first results of high-precision neon isotope (22Ne/20Ne) measurements made in air pumped from the firm-to-ice transition in the Greenland Ice Sheet, where actively closing air bubbles drive permeation leakage. By measuring this natural neon isotope fractionation, we hope to learn about the mass dependence of the leakage mechanism and develop a more quantitative theory that is generalizable to biogeochemically- and climatically-active gases.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of hybrid Nb-YBCO dc SQUIDs

    SciTech Connect

    Frack, E.K.; Drake, R.E.; Patt, R.; Radparvar, M. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication of hybrid low T{sub c}/high T{sub c} dc SQUIDs of two flavors. The first kind utilizes niobium tunnel junctions and a YBCO film strip as the most inductive portion of the SQUID loop. This configuration allows a direct measurement of the inductance of the YBCO microstrip from which the effective penetration depth can be calculated. The successful fabrication of these SQUIDs has required 1. superconducting Nb-to-YBCO contacts, 2. deposition and patterning of an SiO{sub 2} insulation layer over YBCO, and 3. selective patterning of niobium and SiO{sub 2} relative to YBCO. All these process steps are pertinent to the eventual use of YBCO thin films in electronic devices.

  6. Application of SQUIDs for registration of biomagnetic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitovych, I. D.; Primin, M. A.; Sosnytskyy, V. N.

    2012-04-01

    Supersensitive magnetometric systems based on low-temperature SQUIDs have been designed to conduct research in cardiology (magnetocardiography) and to examine distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in biologic objects. Such SQUID magnetometric systems are distinguished by their noise immunity enabling research in nonscreened rooms. High repeatability of research outcomes has been confirmed. The use of magnetocardiographic systems has permitted a new screening information technology to be developed to diagnose heart diseases at early stages. Magnetic imaging of heart's action currents is an ideal way to test local electrical heterogeneity of myocardium. It is shown that magnetocardiography has a significant potential for both basic science of analysis of heart's biosignals and clinical cardiologic practice. A SQUID magnetometric system measuring magnetic signals radiated by the organs of laboratory animals is described. Information technology for automatic recording and transforming magnetometric data has been developed; the measurement of signals over rats' livers while injecting intravenously the nanoparticles of iron oxides and lead solutions are presented.

  7. Signal detection in l/f noise of SQUID magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, B.; Anderson, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the variance on the SQUID power spectrum in the l/f low frequency region is well behaved, i.e., any small frequency band may be treated as white noise in standard power spectrum estimation theory. Specifically a calibration signal is examined at 0.017 Hz with an equivalent energy referred to the SQUID input coil of 1 times 10 to the -30th J and a digitally recorded and analyzed record of 140 hr duration obtained an optimum S/N better than 400. The results are in good agreement with theory. In addition no deviation from the l/f dependence of the noise energy spectrum is seen down to frequencies below 10 to the -5th Hz. A commercially available SQUID and electronics system were used.

  8. NMR/MRI with hyperpolarized gas and high Tc SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Schlenga, Klaus; de Souza, Ricardo E.; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals and production of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from samples combines the use of hyperpolarized inert gases to enhance the NMR signals from target nuclei in a sample and a high critical temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect the NMR signals. The system operates in static magnetic fields of 3 mT or less (down to 0.1 mT), and at temperatures from liquid nitrogen (77K) to room temperature. Sample size is limited only by the size of the magnetic field coils and not by the detector. The detector is a high Tc SQUID magnetometer designed so that the SQUID detector can be very close to the sample, which can be at room temperature.

  9. Production rates of neon xenon isotopes by energetic neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leich, D. A.; Borg, R. J.; Lanier, V. B.

    1986-01-01

    As a first step in an experimental program to study the behavior of noble gases produced in situ in minerals, a suite of minerals and pure chemicals were irradiated with 14.5 MeV neutrons at LLNL's Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-II) and production rates for noble gases were determined. While neutron effects in meteorites and lunar samples are dominated by low-energy neutron capture, more energetic cosmic-ray secondary neutrons can provide significant depth-dependent contributions to production of cosmogenic nuclides through endothermic reactions such as (n,2n), (n,np), (n,d) and (n,alpha). Production rates for nuclides produced by cosmic-ray secondary neutrons are therefore useful in interpreting shielding histories from the relative abundances of cosmogenic nuclides. Absolute production cross sections were calculated from isotope dilution analyses of NaCl, Mg, CsCl, and Ba(NO3)2 samples, assuming purity, stoichiometry, and quantitative noble gas retention and extraction. Relative production cross sections determined from neon isotopic ratios in the mineral samples were also considered in evaluating the neon production cross sections. Results are presented.

  10. Population dynamics in a metastable neon magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, R. D.; Calvert, J. E.; Sang, R. T.

    2013-02-01

    We observe the population dynamics within a metastable neon magneto-optical trap (MOT) through the measurement of the average squared Clebsch-Gordan coefficient C2 over a range of laser detunings. The magnitude of C2 is dependent on the internal quantum state of an atom interacting with the light field and is found to show a strong dependence on the applied laser detuning. Previously it has been reported [Townsend , Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.52.1423 52, 1423 (1995)] that trapped atoms in a MOT are pumped towards the states that interact most strongly with the local field and therefore the measured value of C2 is larger than the average over all possible transitions. For the 3P2-to-3D3 cooling transition in metastable neon the average C2 value is equal to 0.46; however, we have measured 0.29±0.03

  11. Helium-neon laser treatment transforms fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Pourreau-Schneider, N.; Ahmed, A.; Soudry, M.; Jacquemier, J.; Kopp, F.; Franquin, J. C.; Martin, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    The differentiation of myofibroblastic cells from normal human gingival fibroblasts in vitro has been established by transmission electron microscopy and quantitated by immunohistochemistry, using antigelsolin monoclonal antibodies. Untreated control cultures were compared to cultures exposed to Helium-Neon (He-Ne) laser irradiation. A direct and massive transformation of the cultured fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was observed as early as 24 hours after laser treatment, whereas control cultures were comprised of only resting fibroblasts and active fibroblasts. This in vitro induction of myofibroblasts may be analogous to that which occurs in vivo. Therefore we undertook a similar study using biopsies from gingival tissues after wisdom tooth extraction. Myofibroblasts were present in the connective tissue of laser-treated gums 48 hours after irradiation, but not in untreated contralateral control tissues. These data provide evidence that the primary biologic effect of the Helium-Neon laser on connective tissue is the rapid generation of myofibroblasts from fibroblasts. The induction of a phenotype with contractile properties may have clinical significance in the acceleration of the wound-healing process. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2372040

  12. An accurate model potential for alkali neon systems.

    PubMed

    Zanuttini, D; Jacquet, E; Giglio, E; Douady, J; Gervais, B

    2009-12-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the ground and lowest excited states of M-Ne dimers, for M=Li, Na, and K. We show that the potential energy curves of these Van der Waals dimers can be obtained accurately by considering the alkali neon systems as one-electron systems. Following previous authors, the model describes the evolution of the alkali valence electron in the combined potentials of the alkali and neon cores by means of core polarization pseudopotentials. The key parameter for an accurate model is the M(+)-Ne potential energy curve, which was obtained by means of ab initio CCSD(T) calculation using a large basis set. For each MNe dimer, a systematic comparison with ab initio computation of the potential energy curve for the X, A, and B states shows the remarkable accuracy of the model. The vibrational analysis and the comparison with existing experimental data strengthens this conclusion and allows for a precise assignment of the vibrational levels. PMID:19968334

  13. Electron Scattering from Neon Via Effective Range Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedus, Kamil

    2014-12-01

    Elastic cross-sections for electron scattering on neon from 0 energy up to 16 eV are analyzed by an analytical approach to the modified effective range theory (MERT). It is shown that energy and angular variations of elastic differential, integral and momentum transfer cross-sections can be accurately parameterized by six MERT coefficients up to the energy threshold for the first Feshbach resonance. MERT parameters are determined empirically by numerical comparison with large collection of available experimental data of elastic total (integral) cross-sections. The present analysis is validated against numerous electron beams and swarm experiments. The comparison of derived MERT parameters with those found for other noble gases, helium, argon and krypton, is done. The derived scattering length (for the s-partial wave) in neon, 0.227 a 0, agrees well with recent theories; it is small but, differently from Ar and Kr, still positive. Analogue parameters for the p-wave and the d-wave are negative and positive respectively for all the four gases compared.

  14. Infrared spectra of small molecular ions trapped in solid neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacox, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-22

    The infrared spectrum of a molecular ion provides a unique signature for that species, gives information on its structure, and is amenable to remote sensing. It also serves as a comparison standard for refining ab initio calculations. Experiments in this laboratory trap molecular ions in dilute solid solution in neon at 4.2 K in sufficient concentration for observation of their infrared spectra between 450 and 4000 cm{sup !1}. Discharge-excited neon atoms produce cations by photoionization and/or Penning ionization of the parent molecule. The resulting electrons are captured by other molecules, yielding anions which provide for overall charge neutrality of the deposit. Recent observations of ions produced from C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and BF{sub 3} will be discussed. Because of their relatively large possibility of having low-lying excited electronic states, small, symmetric molecular cations are especially vulnerable to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Some phenomena which can result from this breakdown will be discussed. Ion-molecule reaction rates are sufficiently high that in some systems absorptions of dimer cations and anions are also observed. When H{sub 2} is introduced into the system, the initially-formed ion may react with it. Among the species resulting from such ion-molecule reactions that have recently been studied are O{sub 4}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, HOCO{sup +}, and HCO{sub 2}{sup !}.

  15. Infrared spectra of small molecular ions trapped in solid neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacox, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    The infrared spectrum of a molecular ion provides a unique signature for that species, gives information on its structure, and is amenable to remote sensing. It also serves as a comparison standard for refining ab initio calculations. Experiments in this laboratory trap molecular ions in dilute solid solution in neon at 4.2 K in sufficient concentration for observation of their infrared spectra between 450 and 4000 cm!1. Discharge-excited neon atoms produce cations by photoionization and/or Penning ionization of the parent molecule. The resulting electrons are captured by other molecules, yielding anions which provide for overall charge neutrality of the deposit. Recent observations of ions produced from C2H4 and BF3 will be discussed. Because of their relatively large possibility of having low-lying excited electronic states, small, symmetric molecular cations are especially vulnerable to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Some phenomena which can result from this breakdown will be discussed. Ion-molecule reaction rates are sufficiently high that in some systems absorptions of dimer cations and anions are also observed. When H2 is introduced into the system, the initially-formed ion may react with it. Among the species resulting from such ion-molecule reactions that have recently been studied are O4+, NH4+, HOCO+, and HCO2!.

  16. Improved Readout Scheme for SQUID-Based Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin

    2007-01-01

    An improved readout scheme has been proposed for high-resolution thermometers, (HRTs) based on the use of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) to measure temperature- dependent magnetic susceptibilities. The proposed scheme would eliminate counting ambiguities that arise in the conventional scheme, while maintaining the superior magnetic-flux sensitivity of the conventional scheme. The proposed scheme is expected to be especially beneficial for HRT-based temperature control of multiplexed SQUIDbased bolometer sensor arrays. SQUID-based HRTs have become standard for measuring and controlling temperatures in the sub-nano-Kelvin temperature range in a broad range of low-temperature scientific and engineering applications. A typical SQUIDbased HRT that utilizes the conventional scheme includes a coil wound on a core made of a material that has temperature- dependent magnetic susceptibility in the temperature range of interest. The core and the coil are placed in a DC magnetic field provided either by a permanent magnet or as magnetic flux inside a superconducting outer wall. The aforementioned coil is connected to an input coil of a SQUID. Changes in temperature lead to changes in the susceptibility of the core and to changes in the magnetic flux detected by the SQUID. The SQUID readout instrumentation is capable of measuring magnetic-flux changes that correspond to temperature changes down to a noise limit .0.1 nK/Hz1/2. When the flux exceeds a few fundamental flux units, which typically corresponds to a temperature of .100 nK, the SQUID is reset. The temperature range can be greatly expanded if the reset events are carefully tracked and counted, either by a computer running appropriate software or by a dedicated piece of hardware.

  17. Patch voltage clamp of squid axon membrane.

    PubMed

    Fishman, H M

    1975-12-01

    A small area (patch) of the external surface of a squid axon can be "isolated" electrically from the surrounding bath by means of a pair of concentric glass pipettes. The seawater-filled inner pipette makes contact with the axon and constitutes the external access to the patch. The outer pipette is used to direct flowing sucrose solution over the area surrounding the patch of membrane underlying the inner pipette. Typically, sucrose isolated patches remain in good condition (spike amplitude greater than 90 mV) for periods of approximately one half hour. Patches of axon membrane which had previously been exposed to sucrose solution were often excitable. Membrane survival of sucrose treatment apparently arises from an outflow of ions from the axon and perhaps satellite cells into the interstitial cell space surrounding the exolemma. Estimate of the total access resistance (electrode plus series resistance) to the patch is about 100 komega (7 omega cm2). Patch capacitance ranges from 10-100 pF, which suggests areas of 10(-4) to 10(-5) cm2 and resting patch resistances of 10-100 Momega. Shunt resistance through the interstitial space exposed to sucrose solution, which isolates the patch, is typically 1-2 Momega. These parameters indicate that good potential control and response times can be achieved on a patch. Furthermore, spatial uniformity is demonstrated by measurement of an exoplasmic isopotential during voltage clamp of an axon patch. The method may be useful for other preparations in which limited membrane area is available or in special instances such as in the measurement of membrane conduction noise. PMID:1214276

  18. NEON: Transforming Environmental Data into Free, Open Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, B.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect data across the United States on the impacts of climate change, land use change and invasive species on natural resources and biodiversity. NEON is a project of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), with many other U.S. agencies and NGOs cooperating. The Observatory’s construction plans call for 60 sites distributed across 20 ecoclimatic Domains. Data will be collected from strategically selected sites within each Domain and synthesized into information products that can be used to describe changes in the nation’s ecosystem through space and time. Sites are arrayed across different land-use types in order to understand large-scale environmental drivers affect biodiversity, ecohydrology, biogeochemistry, and disease ecology across the US continent. NEON is an instrument that listens to the pulse of the US continental ecosystem: infrastructure deployed at these sites will collect an average of over 500 primary measurements at each site, including annual high-resolution airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral data. These primary measurements will be transformed by a state-of-the-art cyberinfrastruture into over 100 higher-order data products. All measurements, data products, algorithms used to compute the data products, and protocols used to collect the primary measurements will be freely available to the public and assessable over the internet. The information products, including selected socio-economic datasets from cooperating Federal agencies, will be served in standard formats, grid-sizes, and geographical projections. This type of information is anticipated to have a wide range of uses, including ecological forecasting, education, public engagement, socio-economic analyses, decision support for climate-change adaptation and mitigation, resource management, and environmental risk management. Open data, interoperability, an open and integrated observation infrastructure, public engagement, and a

  19. NEON, Establishing a Standardized Network for Groundwater Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, M.; Schroeter, N.; Goodman, K. J.; Roehm, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is establishing a standardized set of data collection systems comprised of in-situ sensors and observational sampling to obtain data fundamental to the analysis of environmental change at a continental scale. NEON will be collecting aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric data using Observatory-wide standardized designs and methods via a systems engineering approach. This approach ensures a wealth of high quality data, data algorithms, and models that will be freely accessible to all communities such as academic researchers, policy makers, and the general public. The project is established to provide 30 years of data which will enable prediction and forecasting of drivers and responses of ecological change at scales ranging from localized responses through regional gradients and up to the continental scale. The Observatory is a distributed system of sites spread across the United States, including Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, which is subdivided into 20 statistically unique domains, based on a set of 18 ecologically important parameters. Each domain contains at least one core aquatic and terrestrial site which are located in unmanaged lands, and up to 2 additional sites selected to study domain specific questions such as nitrogen deposition gradients and responses of land use change activities on the ecosystem. Here, we present the development of NEON's groundwater observation well network design and the timing strategy for sampling groundwater chemistry. Shallow well networks, up to 100 feet in depth, will be installed at NEON aquatic sites and will allow for observation of localized ecohydrologic site conditions, by providing basic spatio-temporal near-real time data on groundwater parameters (level, temperature, conductivity) collected from in situ high-resolution instrumentation positioned in each well; and biannual sampling of geochemical and nutrient (N and P) concentrations in a subset of wells for each

  20. Application of squids in the Iwate create project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, M.; He, D. F.; Nakai, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Yaegashi, M.; Ito, M.; Yashiro, H.; Daibo, M.; Simizu, T.; Uchikawa, Y.; Noto, K.

    2005-10-01

    We have developed a 64-channel magnetocardiograph (MCG) system for the diagnosis of heart disease. The MCG is characterized by its display of a unique three-dimensional image of bio-currents flowing inside the human body. The outline of the heart can be displayed without use of MRI. A mobile SQUID-based non-distractive evaluation apparatus was realized by the active shielding technique. The system can offer information from beneath the surface of the specimen by using a saw-wave excitation method. This mobile technology enables us to inspect ferromagnetic materials, whose high magnetic field rules out the use of a conventional SQUID apparatus near them.

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Radio-frequency amplifiers based on dc SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, Michael; McDermott, Robert

    2010-09-01

    SQUIDs are an attractive candidate for the amplification of low-level rf and microwave signals. Compared to semiconductor amplifiers, they offer lower noise and much lower power dissipation. Especially at frequencies below 1 GHz, the improvement in noise temperature compared to the best cold semiconductor amplifiers can be as high as 50; noise temperatures only slightly above the quantum limit have been achieved in this frequency range. This article will review the current status of radio-frequency amplifiers based on dc SQUIDs and provide detailed discussions of amplifier noise temperature, input and output impedance, and nonlinearities.

  2. A Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüelles Delgado, Carlos A.; Salvado, Jordi; Weaver, Christopher N.

    2015-11-01

    Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS) is a C++ code designed to solve semi-analytically the evolution of a set of density matrices and scalar functions. This is done efficiently by expressing all operators in an SU(N) basis. SQuIDS provides a base class from which users can derive new classes to include new non-trivial terms from the right hand sides of density matrix equations. The code was designed in the context of solving neutrino oscillation problems, but can be applied to any problem that involves solving the quantum evolution of a collection of particles with Hilbert space of dimension up to six.

  3. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  4. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  5. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  6. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander; McDermott, Robert F.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  7. Swimming dynamics and propulsive efficiency of squids throughout ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Bartol, Ian K; Krueger, Paul S; Thompson, Joseph T; Stewart, William J

    2008-12-01

    Squids encounter vastly different flow regimes throughout ontogeny as they undergo critical morphological changes to their two locomotive systems: the fins and jet. Squid hatchlings (paralarvae) operate at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers (Re) and typically have rounded bodies, small fins, and relatively large funnel apertures, whereas juveniles and adults operate at higher Re and generally have more streamlined bodies, larger fins, and relatively small funnel apertures. These morphological changes and varying flow conditions affect swimming performance in squids. To determine how swimming dynamics and propulsive efficiency change throughout ontogeny, digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and kinematic data were collected from an ontogenetic range of long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii and brief squid Lolliguncula brevis swimming in a holding chamber or water tunnel (Re = 20-20 000). Jet and fin wake bulk properties were quantified, and propulsive efficiency was computed based on measurements of impulse and excess kinetic energy in the wakes. Paralarvae relied predominantly on a vertically directed, high frequency, low velocity jet as they bobbed up and down in the water column. Although some spherical vortex rings were observed, most paralarval jets consisted of an elongated vortical region of variable length with no clear pinch-off of a vortex ring from the trailing tail component. Compared with paralarvae, juvenile and adult squid exhibited a more diverse range of swimming strategies, involving greater overall locomotive fin reliance and multiple fin and jet wake modes with better defined vortex rings. Despite greater locomotive flexibility, jet propulsive efficiency of juveniles/adults was significantly lower than that of paralarvae, even when juvenile/adults employed their highest efficiency jet mode involving the production of periodic isolated vortex rings with each jet pulse. When the fins were considered together with the jet for several

  8. Common trends in northeast Atlantic squid time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuur, A. F.; Pierce, G. J.

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, dynamic factor analysis is used to estimate common trends in time series of squid catch per unit effort in Scottish (UK) waters. Results indicated that time series of most months were related to sea surface temperature measured at Millport (UK) and a few series were related to the NAO index. The DFA methodology identified three common trends in the squid time series not revealed by traditional approaches, which suggest a possible shift in relative abundance of summer- and winter-spawning populations.

  9. Sound radiation around a flying fly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueur, Jérôme; Tuck, Elizabeth J.; Robert, Daniel

    2005-07-01

    Many insects produce sounds during flight. These acoustic emissions result from the oscillation of the wings in air. To date, most studies have measured the frequency characteristics of flight sounds, leaving other acoustic characteristics-and their possible biological functions-unexplored. Here, using close-range acoustic recording, we describe both the directional radiation pattern and the detailed frequency composition of the sound produced by a tethered flying (Lucilia sericata). The flapping wings produce a sound wave consisting of a series of harmonics, the first harmonic occurring around 190 Hz. In the horizontal plane of the fly, the first harmonic shows a dipolelike amplitude distribution whereas the second harmonic shows a monopolelike radiation pattern. The first frequency component is dominant in front of the fly while the second harmonic is dominant at the sides. Sound with a broad frequency content, typical of that produced by wind, is also recorded at the back of the fly. This sound qualifies as pseudo-sound and results from the vortices generated during wing kinematics. Frequency and amplitude features may be used by flies in different behavioral contexts such as sexual communication, competitive communication, or navigation within the environment.

  10. Development of a Two-Dimensional Micro-SQUID Array for Investigation of Magnetization Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Daisuke; Shinozaki, Tomoya; Nago, Yusuke; Ishiguro, Ryosuke; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Nomura, Shintaro; Kono, Kimitoshi; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    We developed a two-dimensional array of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for investigation of fine spatial distribution of magnetization in superconducting Sr2RuO4. Micrometer-sized SQUIDs based on homogeneously formed Al/AlOx/Al tunnel-type Josephson junctions were fabricated using shadow evaporation technique. Unnecessary electrodes formed by the shadow evaporation were removed by inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching, in order to realize a dense array of SQUIDs. We measured the magnetic modulation of the maximum Josephson current of each SQUID in the array and evaluated the interaction among the SQUIDs.