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Sample records for neonatal familial evans

  1. Self limiting neonatal primary hyperparathyroidism associated with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, H; James, J

    1993-09-01

    A boy is described who presented aged 7 weeks with severe biochemical and radiological neonatal hyperparathyroidism that had completely resolved by the age of 6 months. His mother had a normal serum calcium concentration but his father, paternal aunt, and paternal cousin all had a raised serum calcium due to familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia. PMID:8215575

  2. Trends in Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care.

    PubMed

    Maree, Carin; Downes, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Family-centered care in neonatal intensive care changed over the last decades. Initially, parents and infants were separated and parents were even being blamed for cau-sing infections in their infants. The importance, though, of the parents being the constant in the infant's life emerged and with that the importance of early bonding and attachment for the parents to take on their role and responsibi-lities as primary caregivers. Facilitation of family-centered care includes involving the parents in daily care activities, kangaroo care, developmental care, interaction and communication with the infant, as well as involving grandparents and siblings. Implementation of family-centered care requires appropriate policies, facilities and resources, education of all involved, and a positive attitude. PMID:27465463

  3. Palliative care in neonatal neurology: robust support for infants, families and clinicians.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, M E; Bidegain, M; Boss, R D

    2016-05-01

    Infants with neurological injury and their families face unique challenges in the neonatal intensive care unit. As specialty palliative care support becomes increasingly available, we must consider how to intentionally incorporate palliative care principles into the care of infants with neurological injury. Here, we review data regarding neonatal symptom management, prognostic uncertainty, decision making, communication and parental support for neonatal neurology patients and their families. PMID:26658120

  4. Supporting families in neonatal loss: relationship and faith key to comfort.

    PubMed

    Holston, Jane Treadwell

    2015-01-01

    Around 20,000 neonatal deaths occur each year, many from congenital heart defects such as hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Nurses are on the frontline of caring for families experiencing neonatal loss. Careful spiritual and cultural assessment, attention to beliefs, focusing on relationship, and helping families create legacy can assist with grieving and making meaning out of loss. PMID:25585464

  5. Genetic recombination at the human RH locus: A family study of the red-cell Evans phenotype reveals a transfer of exons 2-6 from the RHD to the RHCE gene

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.H.; Chen, Y.; Reid, M.; Ghosh, S.

    1996-10-01

    The human RH locus appears to consist of two structural genes, D and CE, which map on the short arm p34-36 of chromosome 1 and specify a most complex system of blood-group genetic polymorphisms. Here we describe a family study of the Evans (also known as {open_quotes}D..{open_quotes}) phenotype, a codominant trait associated with both qualitative and quantitative changes in D-antigen expression. A cataract-causing mutation was also inherited in this family and was apparently cotransmitted with Evans, suggesting a chromosomal linkage of these two otherwise unrelated traits. Southern blot analysis and allele-specific PCR showed the linkage of Evans with a SphI RFLP marker and the presence of a hybrid gene in the RH locus. To delineate the pattern of gene expression, the composition and structure of Rh-polypeptide transcripts were characterized by reverse transcriptase-PCR and nucleotide sequencing. This resulted in the identification of a novel Rh transcript expressed only in the Evans-positive erythroid cells. Sequence analysis showed that the transcript maintained a normal open reading frame but occurred as a CE-D-CE composite in which exons 2-6 of the CE gene were replaced by the homologous counterpart of the D gene. This hybrid gene was predicted to encode a CE-D-CE fusion protein whose surface expression correlates with the Evans phenotype. The mode and consequence of such a recombination event suggest the occurrence, in the RH locus, of a segmental DNA transfer via the mechanism of gene conversion. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Tahereh; Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sabet Sarvestani, Raheleh; Moattari, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The concept of family- centered care in neonatal intensive care unit has changed drastically in protracted years and has been used in various contexts differently. Since we require clarity in our understanding, we aimed to analyze this concept. Methods: This study was done on the basis of developmental approach of Rodgers’s concept analysis. We reviewed the existing literature in Science direct, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Iran Medex databases from 1980 to 2012. The keywords were family-centered care, family-oriented care, and neonatal intensive care unit. After all, 59 out of 244 English and Persian articles and books (more than 20%) were selected. Results: The attributes of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit were recognized as care taking of family (assessment of family and its needs, providing family needs), equal family participation (participation in care planning, decision making, and providing care from routine to special ones), collaboration (inter-professional collaboration with family, family involvement in regulating and implementing care plans), regarding family’s respect and dignity (importance of families’ differences, recognizing families’ tendencies), and knowledge transformation (information sharing between healthcare workers and family, complete information sharing according to family learning style). Besides, the recognized antecedents were professional and management-organizational factors. Finally, the consequences included benefits related to neonate, family, and organization. Conclusion: The findings revealed that family centered-care was a comprehensive and holistic caring approach in neonatal intensive care. Therefore, it is highly recommended to change the current care approach and philosophy and provide facilities for conducting family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit.  PMID:25349870

  7. Relational Communications Strategies to Support Family-Centered Neonatal Intensive Care.

    PubMed

    Benzies, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    The philosophy of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care units is intended to facilitate parental involvement, shared decision-making, and improved outcomes for infants and families. To support family-centered care, there are multiple interventions with different components and associated outcomes that have been described in the research literature. This evidence leaves many unanswered questions about how best to implement and evaluate strategies to enhance family-centered care. This article provides a brief overview of interventions designed to support family-centered care in neonatal intensive care units and offers an evidence-informed staff education strategy to enhance family-centered care. The evidence-informed relational communications strategies of circular pattern diagrams, questioning, and commendations are described, along with specific examples of how nurses can use them in in their day-to-day practice in neonatal intensive care units. PMID:27465456

  8. Postdischarge Service Use by Families of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tien, Chia-Ling; Peterson, Carla A.; Shelley, Mack C., II

    2002-01-01

    A study examined patterns and predictors of service use by 85 families of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) graduates, specifically premature infants. Enabling variables (NICU contacts and follow-up services) and parents' perceptions of children's problems were major predictors of service use. No demographic characteristics predicted service…

  9. Measurement of Family-centered care perception and parental stress in a neonatal unit 1

    PubMed Central

    Balbino, Flávia Simphronio; Balieiro, Maria Magda Ferreira Gomes; Mandetta, Myriam Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effects of the implementation of the Patient and Family-Centered Care Model on parents and healthcare perceptions and parental stress. Method: a quasi-experimental study developed in a neonatal unit of a university hospital in the municipality of São Paulo, Brazil, with the implementation of this model of care. Data collection were performed by two sample groups, one using non-equivalent groups of parents, and another using equivalent groups of healthcare professionals. The instruments Perceptions of Family-Centered Care-Parent Brazilian Version, Perceptions of Family-Centered Care-Staff Brazilian Version and Parental Stress Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, were applied to 132 parents of newborns hospitalized and to 57 professionals. Results: there was a statistically significant improvement in the perceptions of the parents in most items assessed (p ≤0,05) and for the staff in relation to the family welcome in the neonatal unit (p = 0.041) and to the comprehension of the family's experience with the infant´s hospitalization (p = 0,050). There was a reduction in the average scores of parental stress, with a greater decrease in the Alteration in Parental Role from 4,2 to 3,8 (p = 0,048). Conclusion: the interventions improved the perceptions of parents and healthcare team related to patient and family-centered care and contributed to reducing parental stress. PMID:27508921

  10. Regulation of neonatal and adult mammalian heart regeneration by the miR-15 family

    PubMed Central

    Porrello, Enzo R.; Mahmoud, Ahmed I.; Simpson, Emma; Johnson, Brett A.; Grinsfelder, David; Canseco, Diana; Mammen, Pradeep P.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Olson, Eric N.; Sadek, Hesham A.

    2013-01-01

    We recently identified a brief time period during postnatal development when the mammalian heart retains significant regenerative potential after amputation of the ventricular apex. However, one major unresolved question is whether the neonatal mouse heart can also regenerate in response to myocardial ischemia, the most common antecedent of heart failure in humans. Here, we induced ischemic myocardial infarction (MI) in 1-d-old mice and found that this results in extensive myocardial necrosis and systolic dysfunction. Remarkably, the neonatal heart mounted a robust regenerative response, through proliferation of preexisting cardiomyocytes, resulting in full functional recovery within 21 d. Moreover, we show that the miR-15 family of microRNAs modulates neonatal heart regeneration through inhibition of postnatal cardiomyocyte proliferation. Finally, we demonstrate that inhibition of the miR-15 family from an early postnatal age until adulthood increases myocyte proliferation in the adult heart and improves left ventricular systolic function after adult MI. We conclude that the neonatal mammalian heart can regenerate after myocardial infarction through proliferation of preexisting cardiomyocytes and that the miR-15 family contributes to postnatal loss of cardiac regenerative capacity. PMID:23248315

  11. Neonatal Network: A Model for Interagency Service Coordination for Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmler, Caryl J.

    1986-01-01

    The Neonatal Network, a model program in Dallas for interagency service coordination for primarily indigent, minority, very-low-birth-weight infants and their families is described. The Neonatal Network has been an effective service delivery coordination system and training mechanism that should be applicable and easily replicable in other…

  12. [Individual neonatal end-of-life care and family-centred bereavement support].

    PubMed

    Garten, L; von der Hude, K; Rösner, B; Klapp, C; Bührer, C

    2013-06-01

    Neonatal end-of-life care and family-centred bereavement support in perinatal medicine are a multiprofessional challenge directed to the dying newborn and the parents as well as to the care-givers. Clinical experience shows that many aspects of individual neonatal end-of-life care and family-centred bereavement support are not well known to the health-care providers. This is especially true for a standardised quality management and the components of bereavement support offered to parents. An interdisciplinary concept for an individual neonatal end-of-life care and famlily-centred bereavement support has been developed at the Center of Perinatal Medicine at the Charité, Berlin. The concept aims for two main aspects: (1) meeting the individual medical, psychological, emotional and spiritual needs of the dying newborn, the parents and family, and (2) facilitating standardised and process-orientated preparation, evaluation and reflexion of every case of end-of-life care. In this article some recommendations for implementing a basic care concept for families and their dying newborns are presented. PMID:23812919

  13. Neonatal ethical issues: viability, advance directives, family centered care.

    PubMed

    Sudia-Robinson, Tanya

    2011-01-01

    Ethical issues in perinatal and NICU settings can arise from a variety of situations. This article focuses on issues surrounding viability and the incorporation of advance directives and family-centered care. Prenatal education about infant viability, probable scenarios, and parental involvement in decision-making are addressed. Considerations for advance directives for complex births and critical decisions at the time of birth are also discussed. Implications for nurses and suggested dialogue strategies are provided. PMID:21407121

  14. EXPRESSION OF THE TGF-BETA FAMILY OF LIGANDS IS DEVELOPMENTALLY REGULATED IN SKELETAL MUSCLE OF NEONATAL RATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To dissect the possible role of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) family in the regulation of skeletal muscle growth during the early postnatal period, the protein abundances of the TGF-beta family and their correlation with protein synthesis were determined in skeletal muscle of neonat...

  15. Training in Family-Focused Developmental Care: Bridging the Gap between Traditional and Family-Centered Care in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walburn, Kathleen S.; Balsillie, Lois J.; Heermann, Judith A.

    1997-01-01

    An educational program developed to prepare health professionals in a neonatal intensive care unit to initiate family-focused developmental care (FFDC) is described. The program was designed to support families with preterm infants. Findings suggest that the program was cost-efficient, prepared nurses to efficiently initiate FFDC, and improved…

  16. The Obstacles against Nurse-Family Communication in Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Rakhshan, Mahnaz; Pishva, Narjes; Jahanpour, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Communication is one of the key principles in Family-Centered Care (FCC). Studies have shown some drawbacks in communication between families and nurses. Therefore, the present study aimed to recognize the obstacles against nurse-family communication in FCC in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Methods: This qualitative study was conducted on 8 staff nurses in 2 NICUs affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences selected through purposive sampling. The data were collected using 8 deep semi-structured interviews and 3 observations. Then, they were analyzed through inductive content analysis. Results: Data analysis resulted in identification of 3 main categories and 7 subcategories. The first category was organizational factors with 2 subcategories of educational domain (inadequate education, lack of a system for nursing student selection, and poor professionalization) and clinical domain (difficult working conditions, lack of an efficient system for ongoing education and evaluation, and authoritarian management). The second category was familial factors with socio-cultural, psychological, and economic subcategories. The last category was the factors related to nurses with socio-cultural and psycho-physical subcategories. Conclusion: Identification of the obstacles against nurse-family communication helps managers of healthcare systems to plan and eliminate the challenges of effective communication. Besides, elimination of these factors leads to appropriate strategies in NICUs for effective application of FCC. PMID:26464837

  17. Genetic heterogeneity in benign familial neonatal convulsions: Identification of a new locus on chromosome 8q

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.B.; Leach, R.J.; O'Connell, P.; Ryan, S.G. ); Ward, K. )

    1993-09-01

    The syndrome of benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by unprovoked seizures in the first weeks of life. One locus for BFNC has been mapped to chromosome 20 in several pedigrees, but the authors have excluded linkage to chromosome 20 in one large kindred. In order to identify this novel BFNC locus, dinucleotide repeat markers distributed throughout the genome were used to screen this family. Maximum pairwise LOD scores of 4.43 were obtained with markers D8S284 and D8S256 on chromosome 8q. Multipoint analysis placed the BFNC locus in the interval spanned by D8S198-D8S274. This study establishes the presence of a new BFNC locus and confirms genetic heterogeneity of this disorder. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The Growing Burden of Neonatal Opiate Exposure on Children and Family Services in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    França, Urbano L; Mustafa, Shaheer; McManus, Michael L

    2016-02-01

    Increasing opiate use among women of reproductive age has led to a rise in adverse pregnancy outcomes, including neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Recent studies have documented the increased incidence of NAS, but subsequent impact on the chain of organizations within the social service system remains unexplored. In this article, we begin to estimate the reach of this issue by assessing the labor costs of caring for NAS infants within the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families (MA DCF). Based on a process map of services, we modeled social service hours using encounter-level hospital data as inputs. In this manner, we estimate that MA DCF professionals now devote more than 10,000 hours per month to this single problem. As opiate addiction increases across America, substantial additional investment in social service providers, foster care, Early Intervention Programs, and other family services will be required. PMID:26564910

  19. Obituary: David Stanley Evans, 1916-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bash, Frank N.

    2005-12-01

    headquartered in Cape Town, South Africa. David had designed and built a Newtonian spectrograph for the 74-inch Radcliffe Telescope with which he measured the first southern galaxy redshifts. David and his family spent 1965-66 in Austin, Texas, where he was a National Science Foundation Senior Visiting Scientist at the University of Texas and McDonald Observatory. They moved permanently to Austin in 1968 and David became a Professor of Astronomy and Associate Director of McDonald Observatory at the University of Texas at Austin. At McDonald Observatory, R. E. Nather had devised a high-speed photometer capable of measuring millisecond time-scale changes in brightness and with Brian Warner, he invented "high-speed astronomy". This instrument caused Evans to revive his occultation program and, over the next twenty years, he produced the major part of the angular diameters of late-type stars with his students and collaborators. In addition, David and collaborators used the extensive collections of the University of Texas to write "Herschel at the Cape". David was also involved in observing the occultation of ? Sco by Jupiter in 1972 and in observing, during a solar eclipse in 1973, the gravitational deflections in the positions of stars whose light passes near to the Sun. The eclipse was observed from Mauritania, and the observations confirmed Einstein's prediction again. David Evans and his students studied late-type stars that have large star-spots and others that flare. In addition, they studied stars whose lunar occultation observations had revealed them to be double or even more than two stars. David Evans's major scientific contribution was an application of his stellar angular diameters to deduce the surface brightness of stars with the result that with suitable color indices one could use photometry to deduce the angular diameter of stars. This is applicable to stars which can never be occulted by the Moon, and its application to Cepheid variable stars has yielded their

  20. Evans function and Fredholm determinants

    PubMed Central

    Karambal, Issa; Malham, Simon J. A.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the relationship between the Evans function, transmission coefficient and Fredholm determinant for systems of first-order linear differential operators on the real line. The applications we have in mind include linear stability problems associated with travelling wave solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations, for example reaction–diffusion or solitary wave equations. The Evans function and transmission coefficient, which are both finite determinants, are natural tools for both analytic and numerical determination of eigenvalues of such linear operators. However, inverting the eigenvalue problem by the free-state operator generates a natural linear integral eigenvalue problem whose solvability is determined through the corresponding infinite Fredholm determinant. The relationship between all three determinants has received a lot of recent attention. We focus on the case when the underlying Fredholm operator is a trace class perturbation of the identity. Our new results include (i) clarification of the sense in which the Evans function and transmission coefficient are equivalent and (ii) proof of the equivalence of the transmission coefficient and Fredholm determinant, in particular in the case of distinct far fields. PMID:25663806

  1. Using appreciative inquiry to bring neonatal nurses and parents together to enhance family-centred care: A collaborative workshop.

    PubMed

    Trajkovski, Suza; Schmied, Virginia; Vickers, Margaret; Jackson, Debra

    2015-06-01

    Family-centred care (FCC) has been well recognised, accepted and reported in the literature as an optimised way of caring for hospitalised children. While neonatal units strive to adopt this philosophy, published research suggests there are difficulties implementing FCC principles in daily practice. Appreciative inquiry (AI) is a philosophy and methodology that offers a unique, strength-based approach to promoting organisational learning and positive organisational change. As a participatory approach, AI facilitates change from the ground up and lends itself to building effective partnerships or collaborations. This article reports the findings of a one-day workshop using an AI methodology to bring neonatal nurses and parents together to enhance the FCC within a neonatal intensive care unit in Sydney, Australia. Participants (n = 15) developed collaborative insights of optimal FCC that can be built upon to support neonates and their families in the future. Shared visions were formed, strategies identified and a development plan made for ongoing collaborations and partnerships. AI provides a flexible framework that enables the mandatory collaboration needed to develop action plans that can form the catalyst for organizational change in health-care research and practice. PMID:24270986

  2. [Basedow disease associated with Evans syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Kida, Masaya; Watanabe, Hideki; Matsunaga, Takuya; Niitsu, Yoshiro; Matsumoto, Masanori

    2005-10-01

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted to a hospital complaining of dizziness and general fatigue in October, 2004. Because of heart failure and severe anemia, she was referred to our hospital. Based on a positive direct Coombs test and an elevated level of platelet-associated IgG (PAIgG), the patient was diagnosed as having autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), i.e., Evans syndrome. Basedow disease was also diagnosed due to hyperthyroidism with an elevation of anti-thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibodies. Both the Evans syndrome and Basedow disease were considerably ameliorated with plasma exchange, corticosteroid and thiamazole therapy. Although Basedow disease is known to be associated with hematological disorders such as AIHA or ITP, the combination of Basedow disease and Evans syndrome is rare. We report here a case of Basedow disease associated with Evans syndrome. PMID:16440774

  3. [Single-family rooms for neonatal intensive care units impacts on preterm newborns, families, and health-care staff. A systematic literature review].

    PubMed

    Servel, A-C; Rideau Batista Novais, A

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the environment is an essential point in the care of preterm newborns. The design of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) (open-bay, single-patient room, single-family room) directly affects both the preterm newborns and their caregivers (parents, healthcare staff). The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the impact of single-family rooms on the preterm newborn, its parents, and the staff. Single-family rooms improve outcome for the preterm newborn, with increasing parental involvement and better control of the environment (fewer inappropriate stimulations such as high levels of noise and illumination). This kind of NICU design also improves parental and staff satisfaction. PMID:27369099

  4. In vivo loss of slow potassium channel activity in individuals with benign familial neonatal epilepsy in remission.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Susan E; Bostock, Hugh; Grinton, Bronwyn; Hanna, Michael G; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Kiernan, Matthew C; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Burke, David

    2012-10-01

    Benign familial neonatal epilepsy is a neuronal channelopathy most commonly caused by mutations in KCNQ2, which encodes the K(v)7.2 subunit of the slow K(+) channel. K(v)7.2 is expressed in both central and peripheral nervous systems. Seizures occur in the neonatal period, often in clusters within the first few days of life, and usually remit by 12 months of age. The mechanism of involvement of K(v)7.2 mutations in the process of seizure generation has not been established in vivo. In peripheral axons, K(v)7.2 contributes to the nodal slow K(+) current. The present study aimed to determine whether axonal excitability studies could detect changes in peripheral nerve function related to dysfunction or loss of slow potassium channel activity. Nerve excitability studies were performed on eight adults with KCNQ2 mutations and a history of benign familial neonatal epilepsy, now in remission. Studies detected distinctive changes in peripheral nerve, indicating a reduction in slow K(+) current. Specifically, accommodation to long-lasting depolarizing currents was reduced in mutation carriers by 24% compared with normal controls, and the threshold undershoot after 100 ms depolarizing currents was reduced by 22%. Additional changes in excitability included a reduction in the relative refractory period, an increase in superexcitability and a tendency towards reduced sub-excitability. Modelling of the nerve excitability changes suggested that peripheral nerve hyperexcitability may have been ameliorated by upregulation of other potassium channels. We conclude that subclinical dysfunction of K(v)7.2 in peripheral axons can be reliably detected non-invasively in adulthood. Related alterations in neuronal excitability may contribute to epilepsy associated with KCNQ2 mutations. PMID:23065794

  5. Evans-Tishchenko coupling of heteroaryl aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Dorgan, Philip D; Durrani, Jamie; Cases-Thomas, Manuel J; Hulme, Alison N

    2010-11-01

    The low-temperature Evans-Tishchenko coupling of a range of functionalized heteroaryl aldehydes with β-hydroxy ketones in the presence of a Sm(III) catalyst has been achieved with high yields (90-99%) and good to excellent diastereoselectivity (90:10 → 95:5 dr). However, at room temperature a retro-aldol aldol-Tishchenko reaction was found to compete with the desired Evans-Tishchenko reaction. Identification of these byproducts has allowed the corresponding aldol-Tishchenko reaction to be optimized for several heteroaryl aldehydes. PMID:20929205

  6. Richard I. Evans (1922-2015).

    PubMed

    Neighbors, Clayton; Rozelle, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Presents an obituary for Richard I. Evans, who passed away on April 20, 2015, in Houston, Texas, at the age of 92. Evans was a noted social and health psychologist. He was one of the founding members of APA's division of Health Psychology and served a term as president of the division. He had a major impact on the history of psychology and media psychology, and was a central figure in the development of the fields of health psychology and behavioral medicine. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27504579

  7. Wolcott-Rallison Syndrome Is the Most Common Genetic Cause of Permanent Neonatal Diabetes in Consanguineous Families

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Patch, Ann-Marie; Minton, Jayne A. L.; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Edghill, Emma L.; Hussain, Khalid; Balafrej, Amina; Deeb, Asma; Buchanan, Charles R.; Jefferson, Ian G.; Mutair, Angham; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Ellard, Sian

    2009-01-01

    Context and Objective: Mutations in EIF2AK3 cause Wolcott-Rallison syndrome (WRS), a rare recessive disorder characterized by early-onset diabetes, skeletal abnormalities, and liver dysfunction. Although early diagnosis is important for clinical management, genetic testing is generally performed after the full clinical picture develops. We aimed to identify patients with WRS before any other abnormalities apart from diabetes are present and study the overall frequency of WRS among patients with permanent neonatal diabetes. Research Design and Methods: The coding regions of EIF2AK3 were sequenced in 34 probands with infancy-onset diabetes with a clinical phenotype suggestive of WRS (n = 28) or homozygosity at the WRS locus (n = 6). Results: Twenty-five probands (73.5%) were homozygous or compound heterozygous for mutations in EIF2AK3. Twenty of the 26 mutations identified were novel. Whereas a diagnosis of WRS was suspected before genetic testing in 22 probands, three patients with apparently isolated diabetes were diagnosed after identifying a large homozygous region encompassing EIF2AK3. In contrast to nonconsanguineous pedigrees, mutations in EIF2AK3 are the most common known genetic cause of diabetes among patients born to consanguineous parents (24 vs. < 2%). Age at diabetes onset and birth weight might be used to prioritize genetic testing in the latter group. Conclusions: WRS is the most common cause of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus in consanguineous pedigrees. In addition to testing patients with a definite clinical diagnosis, EIF2AK3 should be tested in patients with isolated neonatal diabetes diagnosed after 3 wk of age from known consanguineous families, isolated populations, or countries in which inbreeding is frequent. PMID:19837917

  8. Vitesses radiales - catalogue WEB: Wilson Evans Batten.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duflot, M.; Figon, P.; Meyssonnier, N.

    Les auteurs ont réuni, en une seule version, les catalogues de vitesses radiales moyennes de Wilson (1963) et de Evans (1978), qui ont de nombreuses étoiles en commun. Les étoiles doubles spectroscopiques, dont l'orbite est déterminée (catalogue de Batten et al. 1989), ont également été associées à ce travail.

  9. Letter to the Editor: Robert W. Evans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, A.

    2000-12-01

    I read the Letters page of the latest issue of the JBAA (2000 October) with some amusement. My very good friend Bob Evans had, according to the letter header, not only been elevated to the clergy, but had also transferred his nationality from Kiwi to Aussie. While he'll probably overlook the religious error he may not be so sanguine about being mistaken for an Australian.

  10. Study of the effects of a long acting injectable-progesterone on the ovarian and uterine histomorphology of the androgenised female rats of Long-Evans strain.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, F; Bari, M A

    1979-12-01

    The study was aimed at determining the possible role of long acting progesterone-DMPA in effecting reversal of the effect of TP on neonatally treated female Long-Evans rats. Five day-old female litters injected with 1.25 mg. TP went into persistent estrous on attaining maturity. DMPA when given in proper dosage and time reverted the condition. PMID:162173

  11. Does family-centred neonatal discharge planning reduce healthcare usage? A before and after study in South West England

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Jenny C; Powell, Jane E; Blair, Peter S; Pontin, David; Redshaw, Maggie; Manns, Sarah; Beasant, Lucy; Burden, Heather; Johnson, Debbie; Rose, Claire; Fleming, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To implement parent-oriented discharge planning (Train-to-Home) for preterm infants in neonatal care. Design Before and after study, investigating the effects of the intervention during two 11-month periods before and after implementation. Setting Four local neonatal units (LNUs) in South West England. Participants Infants without major anomalies born at 27–33 weeks’ gestation admitted to participating units, and their parents. Train-to-Home intervention A family-centred discharge package to increase parents’ involvement and understanding of their baby's needs, comprising a train graphic and supporting care pathways to facilitate parents’ understanding of their baby's progress and physiological maturation, combined with improved estimation of the likely discharge date. Main outcome measures Perceived Maternal Parenting Self-Efficacy (PMP S-E) scores, infant length of stay (LOS) and healthcare utilisation for 8 weeks following discharge. Results Parents reported that the Train-to-Home improved understanding of their baby's progress and their preparedness for discharge. Despite a lack of change in PMP S-E scores with the intervention, the number of post-discharge visits to emergency departments (EDs) fell from 31 to 20 (p<0.05), with a significant reduction in associated healthcare costs (£3400 to £2200; p<0.05) after discharge. In both study phases, over 50% of infants went home more than 3 weeks before their estimated date of delivery (EDD), though no reduction in LOS occurred. Conclusions Despite the lack of measurable effect on the parental self-efficacy scores, the reduction in ED attendances and associated costs supports the potential value of this approach. PMID:26966062

  12. Operations research to add postpartum family planning to maternal and neonatal health to improve birth spacing in Sylhet District, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Salahuddin; Norton, Maureen; Williams, Emma; Ahmed, Saifuddin; Shah, Rasheduzzaman; Begum, Nazma; Mungia, Jaime; Lefevre, Amnesty; Al-Kabir, Ahmed; Winch, Peter J; McKaig, Catharine; Baqui, Abdullah H

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Short birth intervals are associated with increased risk of adverse maternal and neonatal health (MNH) outcomes. Improving postpartum contraceptive use is an important programmatic strategy to improve the health and well-being of women, newborns, and children. This article documents the intervention package and evaluation design of a study conducted in a rural district of Bangladesh to evaluate the effects of an integrated, community-based MNH and postpartum family planning program on contraceptive use and birth-interval lengths. Intervention: The study integrated family planning counseling within 5 community health worker (CHW)-household visits to pregnant and postpartum women, while a community mobilizer (CM) led community meetings on the importance of postpartum family planning and pregnancy spacing for maternal and child health. The CM and the CHWs emphasized 3 messages: (1) Use of the Lactational Amenorrhea Method (LAM) during the first 6 months postpartum and transition to another modern contraceptive method; (2) Exclusive, rather than fully or nearly fully, breastfeeding to support LAM effectiveness and good infant breastfeeding practices; (3) Use of a modern contraceptive method after a live birth for at least 24 months before attempting another pregnancy (a birth-to-birth interval of about 3 years) to support improved infant health and nutrition. CHWs provided only family planning counseling in the original study design, but we later added community-based distribution of methods, and referrals for clinical methods, to meet women's demand. Methods: Using a quasi-experimental design, and relying primarily on pre/post-household surveys, we selected pregnant women from 4 unions to receive the intervention (n = 2,280) and pregnant women from 4 other unions (n = 2,290) to serve as the comparison group. Enrollment occurred between 2007 and 2009, and data collection ended in January 2013. Preliminary Results: Formative research showed

  13. Integrating family-centered developmental assessment and intervention into routine care in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J M; Conliffe-Torres, S

    1996-06-01

    Incorporating developmental intervention into routine practices requires time available during caregiving for continued infant assessment and intervention and requires time after and between caregiving for relief of infant distress. In an era of health-care reform, reorganization, and restructuring, this added caregiver time appears unavailable. However, nurses need to work together in meeting the developmental challenges of the NICU. Further research needs to be done to validate which interventions are appropriate for which babies and with what medical procedures. In addition, collaboration and sharing of responsibilities and resources with all care providers needs to be investigated. Moreover, research needs to be done that acknowledges that the environment of the NICU is also a world in which many adults work and live a large portion of their daily life. This environment must be supportive of their social needs as well as the needs of the high-risk infant. There are many pieces to the puzzle of providing developmentally supportive caregiving in the NICU. The number of different issues increases the complexity of changing the standard of care: Infant, family, environment. Each has its own challenges. However, with sensitivity, a collaborative approach, and a sincere effort to change, neonatal health-care professionals can integrate developmental practices into the NICU. PMID:8637813

  14. Evans Syndrome Secondary to Common Variable Immune Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Antoon, James W; Metropulos, Diana; Joyner, Benny L

    2016-04-01

    Evans syndrome is an underdiagnosed condition consisting of simultaneous or sequential combination of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. We report a case of severe Evans syndrome presenting as altered mental status, a rare presenting sign of the disease. This case highlights the difficulty in diagnosing Evans syndrome and provides a review of the literature and management strategies for treating the disorder. PMID:26950085

  15. Variations in both α-spectrin (SPTA1) and β-spectrin ( SPTB ) in a neonate with prolonged jaundice in a family where nine individuals had hereditary elliptocytosis.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Robert D; Nussenzveig, Roberto H; Reading, N Scott; Agarwal, Archana M; Prchal, Josef T; Yaish, Hassan M

    2014-01-01

    We cared for a neonate who had problematic hyperbilirubinemia born into a family where nine first-degree relatives had hereditary elliptocytosis (HE). As neonates, the nine relatives did not have any significant jaundice or anemia that was recognizable. Blood films on the proband suggested a diagnosis of pyropoikilocytosis. Analysis of the α-spectrin gene (SPTA1) in the proband revealed two previously reported low-frequency heterozygous polymorphisms of unknown clinical significance and the α(LELY) allele. In addition, a novel heterozygous mutation was identified in exon 2 of the β-spectrin gene SPTB. No mutations were identified in ANK1 (ankyrin-1), SLC4A1 (band 3), EPB41 (band 4.1), or EPB42 (band 4.2). PMID:24193021

  16. False Alarm: A Reply to Over and Evans. Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Kris N.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses Over and Evans' alternative interpretations to Kris N. Kirby's card-selection tasks and finds empirical difficulties. Cites the potentially important contribution of Over and Evans to understanding of the card-selection task by applying the notion of epistemic utility. (DR)

  17. GESTATIONAL MERCURY VAPOR EXPOSURE AND DIET CONTRIBUTE TO MERCURY ACCUMULATION IN NEONATAL RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of pregnant Long-Evans rats to elemental mercury (Hg0) vapor resulted in a significant

    accumulation of Hg in tissues of neonates. Because elevated Hg in neonatal tissues may adversely

    affect growth and development, we were interested in how rapidly Hg was...

  18. Astronaut Ronald Evans photographed during transearth coast EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Ronald E. Evans is photographed performing extravehicular activity (EVA) during the Apollo 17 spacecraft's transearth coast. During his EVA Command Module pilot Evans retrieved film cassettes from the Lunar Sounder, Mapping Camera, and Panoramic Camera. The cylindrical object at Evans left side is the mapping camera cassette. The total time for the transearth EVA was one hour seven minutes 19 seconds, starting at ground elapsed time of 257:25 (2:28 p.m.) amd ending at ground elapsed time of 258:42 (3:35 p.m.) on Sunday, December 17, 1972.

  19. TRIETHYLTIN-INDUCED NEURONAL DAMAGE IN NEONATALLY EXPOSE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neuropathological and biochemical effects of neonatal exposure to the alkyl metal triethyltin were examined in Long Evans juvenile male rats. Rats were injected intraperitoneally on post-natal day 5 with 6 mk/kg of triethyltin bromide and sampled on day 20. The brains of tin-trea...

  20. Struvite Urolithiasis in Long–Evans Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jassia; Borjeson, Tiffany M; Parry, Nicola MA; Fox, James G

    2015-01-01

    Struvite urinary calculi, which are composed of magnesium, ammonium, and phosphate, can cause complications including sepsis and renal failure. Struvite calculi were identified within the urinary bladder and renal pelvis of 2 Long-Evans rats that died within days after arrival from a commercial vendor. The remaining rats in the shipment were screened by physical examination, radiography, and ultrasonography, revealing an additional 2 animals that were clinically affected. These rats were euthanized, necropsied, and yielded similar findings to those from the first 2 rats. In addition, urine samples had an alkaline pH and contained numerous bacteria (predominantly Proteus mirabilis), leukocytes, and crystals. All calculi were composed completely of struvite. Another 7 rats in the shipment had alkaline urine with the presence of blood cells; 6 of these rats also had abundant struvite crystals, and P. mirabilis was cultured from the urine of 3 rats. Further investigation by the vendor identified 2 of 100 rats with struvite calculi from the same colony. Although no specific cause could be implicated, the fact that all the affected rats came from the same breeding area suggests a genetic or environmental triggering event; a contribution due to diet cannot be ruled out. Our findings suggest that the affected rats had metabolic disturbances coupled with bacterial infection that predisposed them to develop struvite calculi. During sudden increases of struvite urinary calculi cases in rats, urine cultures followed by appropriate surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy is warranted. Additional factors, including diet, merit attention as well. PMID:26678365

  1. Photocopy from Evan Leigh's Modern Cotton Spinning (Vol 2), Manchester, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy from Evan Leigh's Modern Cotton Spinning (Vol 2), Manchester, 1873 (PL XXIX top); illustration of full milll, as enlarged to south. - Harmony Manufacturing Company, Mill Number 3, 100 North Mohawk Street, Cohoes, Albany County, NY

  2. 11. Architect's rendering of the Arcade Building by Furness, Evans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Architect's rendering of the Arcade Building by Furness, Evans and Co., from Moses King's Philadelphia and Notable Philadelphians, published 1902 for the City's 220th birthday - Arcade Building, Fifteenth & Market Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. Lethal neonatal rigidity and multifocal seizure syndrome--report of another family with a BRAT1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Straussberg, Rachel; Ganelin-Cohen, Esther; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassah; Tzur, Shay; Behar, Doron M; Smirin-Yosef, Pola; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina

    2015-03-01

    We describe two siblings born to consanguineous Arab-Muslim parents who presented in early infancy with myoclonic seizures, hypertonia and contractures, arrested head growth, inability to swallow, and bouts of apnea-bradycardia, culminating in cardiac arrest and death. Whole-genome sequencing yielded a c.1173delG mutation in the BRAT1 gene. Three recent reports identified mutations in the same gene in three infants from three Amish sibships, one Mexican neonate and two Japanese siblings with similar clinical manifestations. The authors speculated that the destabilization of the encoded protein may underlie the catastrophic epilepsy and corticobasal neuronal degeneration. We suggest that BRAT1 be added to the growing list of genes that are related to severe early infantile (neonatal) epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:25500575

  4. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BE. Perinatal viral infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ... K. Postnatal bacterial infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ...

  5. Vitesses radiales. Catalogue WEB: Wilson Evans Batten. Subtittle: Radial velocities: The Wilson-Evans-Batten catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duflot, M.; Figon, P.; Meyssonnier, N.

    1995-12-01

    We give a common version of the two catalogues of Mean Radial Velocities by Wilson (1963) and Evans (1978) to which we have added the catalogue of spectroscopic binary systems (Batten et al. 1989). For each star, when possible, we give: 1) an acronym to enter SIMBAD (Set of Identifications Measurements and Bibliography for Astronomical Data) of the CDS (Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg). 2) the number HIC of the HIPPARCOS catalogue (Turon 1992). 3) the CCDM number (Catalogue des Composantes des etoiles Doubles et Multiples) by Dommanget & Nys (1994). For the cluster stars, a precise study has been done, on the identificator numbers. Numerous remarks point out the problems we have had to deal with.

  6. Family Nurture Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Improves Social-Relatedness, Attention, and Neurodevelopment of Preterm Infants at 18 Months in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Martha G.; Firestein, Morgan R.; Austin, Judy; Hane, Amie A.; Stark, Raymond I.; Hofer, Myron A.; Garland, Marianne; Glickstein, Sara B.; Brunelli, Susan A.; Ludwig, Robert J.; Myers, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Preterm infants are at high risk for adverse neurodevelopmental and behavioral outcomes. Family Nurture Intervention (FNI) in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is designed to counteract adverse effects of separation of mothers and their preterm infants. Here, we evaluate effects of FNI on neurobehavioral outcomes. Methods: Data…

  7. The presence of family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations, European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care and European Society of Cardiology Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions Joint Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Fulbrook, Paul; Latour, Jos; Albarran, John; de Graaf, Wouter; Lynch, Fiona; Devictor, Denis; Norekvål, Tone

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents the European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations, the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care, and the European Society of Cardiology Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions Joint Position Statement on The Presence of Family Members During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. PMID:17919981

  8. Global health and neonatal nursing: a personal journey.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole; Boykova, Marina

    2012-09-01

    The need for improvement of neonatal nursing care is a global issue. Neonatal nurses have an important role in optimizing these health outcomes for neonates and their families. This article describes the personal journey of one nurse and her mentee. It describes how a passion for neonates led to global policy work. PMID:22895204

  9. Astronaut Ronald Evans photographed during transearth coast EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Ronald E. Evans is photographed performing extravehicular activity (EVA) during the Apollo 17 spacecraft's transearth coast. During his EVA Command Module pilot Evans retrieved film cassettes from the Lunar Sounder, Mapping Camera, and Panoramic Camera. The total time for the transearth EVA was one hour seven minutes 19 seconds, starting at ground elapsed time of 257:25 (2:28 p.m.) amd ending at ground elapsed time of 258:42 (3:35 p.m.) on Sunday, December 17, 1972.

  10. Integrated Psychological Services in the Greeley-Evans Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, R. Brett; Hoover, Michael; Young, Mary; Obrzut, Ann; D'Amato, Rik Carl; Copeland, Ellis P.

    2006-01-01

    Integrated school psychological services were implemented 12 years ago in the Greeley-Evans Public Schools by combining the positions of school psychologist and school social worker and placing each professional in an elementary school full-time. After 5 years, services were expanded to secondary schools such that all schools had a full-time…

  11. Photocopy from Evan Leigh's Modern Cotton Spinning (Vol 1), Manchester, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy from Evan Leigh's Modern Cotton Spinning (Vol 1), Manchester, 1873 (PL XX); illustration used by eminent British textile engineer to exemplify the ultimate development in American cotton mill technology. - Harmony Manufacturing Company, Mill Number 3, 100 North Mohawk Street, Cohoes, Albany County, NY

  12. AIRWAY STRUCTURE IN THE LONG EVANS RAT LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the degree of inter-animal variability among laboratory animals of the same strain and size, lengths and diameters of the same 200 airways were measured in solid casts in each of 10 male Long Evans rats. ntra-animal variability was substantially greater than interani...

  13. Characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae strains by multilocus enzyme genotype and serotype: identification of multiple virulent clone families that cause invasive neonatal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Quentin, R; Huet, H; Wang, F S; Geslin, P; Goudeau, A; Selander, R K

    1995-01-01

    The chromosomal genotypes of 277 isolates of 16 serotypes of Streptococcus agalactiae were characterized by analysis of electrophoretically demonstrable allele profiles at 12 metabolic enzyme loci. The collection comprised the type strain and 276 strains recovered from French symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. Sixty-one distinctive electrophoretic types (ETs), representing multilocus clonal genotypes, were identified. Cluster analysis of the ETs revealed two primary phylogenetic divisions separated by a genetic distance of 0.62, Division I contained 67 isolates which could be assigned to 13 ETs. Twenty-seven of these isolates were from samples of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from neonatal meningitis patients. Two ETs, separated by a genetic distance of 0.217, contained 26 of these 27 isolates. Division II contained 210 isolates, of which 27 were isolated from CSF. This division was more polymorphic and included 48 ETs. Spanning a genetic distance of 0.3, three clusters and one ET were identified within this group. Twenty-four of 27 strains isolated from CSF belonged to one cluster, and 19 of them belonged to two adjacent ETs with a genetic distance of 0.083. Fifty-five of the 68 serotype Ia strains and 24 of the 26 serotype Ib strains were each confined to one of the evolutionary lineages, and 85 of the 86 strains which carried protein antigen c belonged to phylogenetic division II. Most of the type III organisms were assigned to two clone families. The characteristics of this French population argue for the existence of particular groups of strains responsible for neonatal meningitis and demonstrate that serotyping can supply information about the genetic distribution of strains. PMID:8567885

  14. Transgender-approximate, lesbian-like, and genderqueer: writing about Edward De Lacy Evans.

    PubMed

    Chesser, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses the story of Edward De Lacy Evans, a person who was born female but who lived most of his life as a man, marrying three times. Evans' story is a well known one, but it is reconsidered here alongside recent theoretical interest from lesbian, queer, and transgendered historical perspectives. Although interest in Evans was and is considerable, the article outlines the ways in which Evans' subjectivity remains elusive. PMID:19830616

  15. NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF NEONATAL TRIETHYLTIN (TET) EXPOSURE ARE EXACERBATED WITH AGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neonatal Long-Evans rats dosed with TET (5 mg/kg; ip) or saline on postnatal day (PND) 10 were examined across the life span for neural damage and performance on spatial learning tasks. ubset of rats were sacrificed to assess early damage with Nissl-staining. imm's histochemistry...

  16. Aspartylglucosaminuria: unusual neonatal presentation in Qatari twins with a novel aspartylglucosaminidase gene mutation and 3 new cases in a Turkish family.

    PubMed

    Opladen, Thomas; Ebinger, Friedrich; Zschocke, Johannes; Sengupta, Devjani; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Shahbeck, Noora; Moog, Ute; Fischer, Christine; Bürger, Friederike; Haas, Dorothea; Ruef, Peter; Harting, Inga; Al-Rifai, Hilal; Hoffmann, Georg F

    2014-01-01

    Aspartylglucosaminuria is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder leading early to a progressive intellectual disability. Monozygous Qatari twins presented with an unusual perinatal manifestation characterized by severe muscular hypotonia, scarce spontaneous movements, multiple contractures, and respiratory insufficiency. Biochemical investigations suggested aspartylglucosaminuria, and a novel homozygous mutation c.439T>C (p.S147P) was found in the aspartylglucosaminidase gene. However, it cannot be excluded that the unusual neonatal presentation is due to an additional autosomal recessive disease in this multiply consanguineous family. The classical aspartylglucosaminuria phenotype (progressive speech delay, psychomotor retardation, and behavioral abnormalities) was observed in 3 Turkish siblings. Although aspartylglucosaminuria was suspected early, the definite diagnosis was not confirmed until the age of 18 years. A novel homozygous mutation c.346C>T (p.R116W) was found. These 5 cases emphasize that aspartylglucosaminuria is panethnic and may possibly present with prenatal manifestation. Screening for aspartylglucosaminuria should be done in all patients with unexplained psychomotor retardation. PMID:23271757

  17. Neonatal hypotonia.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Susan E

    2015-06-01

    Neonatal hypotonia is a common problem in the neonatal intensive care unit. The genetic differential diagnosis is broad, encompassing primary muscular dystrophies, chromosome abnormalities, neuropathies, and inborn errors of metabolism. Recognition of hypotonia is relatively straightforward, but determining the cause can be challenging. It is important for the neonatologist to have an organized approach to the assessment of neonatal hypotonia. Physical examination and history alongside basic laboratory testing and imaging aid in the differential diagnosis. Identification of the cause is essential for determining prognosis, associated morbidities, and recurrence risk. The prevailing therapeutic modality is physical, occupational, speech/feeding, and respiratory therapy. PMID:26042909

  18. Neonatal conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn conjunctivitis; Conjunctivitis of the newborn; Ophthalmia neonatorum; Eye infection - neonatal conjunctivitis ... diseases spread through sexual contact to prevent newborn conjunctivitis caused by these infections. Putting eye drops into ...

  19. Neonatal Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Neonatal death ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Complications & Loss ...

  20. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and some strains of streptococcus. Group B streptococcus (GBS) has been a major cause of neonatal sepsis. ... an infant's risk of early-onset bacterial sepsis: GBS colonization during pregnancy Preterm delivery Water breaking (rupture ...

  1. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  2. Neonatal transfusion.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Anne M; Williamson, Lorna M

    2013-11-01

    Neonates and particularly preterm neonates are frequent recipients of large volumes of blood products relative to their size. Good quality evidence for transfusion practice in this patient group has been lacking but is now increasing. Triggers for red cell transfusion are now better defined, with on-going trials of platelet transfusions likely to yield similar evidence. Transfusion is now extremely safe, but complications such as transfusion associated acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) are likely to be under recognised, particularly in the sick extremely preterm neonate with respiratory symptoms. This review summarises the rationale and current practice with regard to blood component therapy. Background data on component specifications and hazards of transfusion are provided. Indications for transfusion of specific products including red cells, platelets, and plasma are discussed, and their use is illustrated by case examples. PMID:24095206

  3. Neonatal Stridor

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Matija; Cheng, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal stridor is an important condition, in many cases implying an impending disaster with a very compromised airway. It is a sign that has to be considered with the rest of the history and examination findings, and appropriate investigations should then be undertaken to confirm the source of the noise. Neonates with stridor should be managed in a multidisciplinary setting, by clinicians familiar with the intricate physiology of these children, and with access to the multitude of medical and surgical investigative and therapeutic options required to provide first-rate care. PMID:22235209

  4. Neonatal iliopsoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Atsushi; Kameoka, Kazuhiro; Kuwabara, Jun; Watanabe, Yuji; Kawakami, Sanae; Tauchi, Hisamichi; Ishii, Eiichi

    2012-10-01

    Iliopsoas abscess (IPA) is rare in children, particularly in neonates. A male neonate was born at 38 weeks of gestation with a weight of 2915 g. On day 22 after birth, his family noticed that his right thigh was swollen. Abdominal computed tomography showed a mass extending to the right iliopsoas from the right thigh with thick septa. Puncture to the right groin yielded purulent fluid, and so a diagnosis of abscess was made. The puncture was followed by surgical drainage through a small inguinal incision, and the abscess cavity was irrigated thoroughly using normal saline. Culture of abscess fluid was positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, so intravenous ABPC infusion was continued. The postoperative magnetic resonance imaging indicate that the IPA was derived from arthritis of the hip, and the patients received Riemenbügel for the incomplete hip dislocation. He is doing well at 2 years of age. PMID:23005905

  5. Neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Heath, P T; Nik Yusoff, N K; Baker, C J

    2003-05-01

    Twelve years ago an annotation was published in Archives of Disease in Childhood regarding the antibiotic treatment of suspected neonatal meningitis. The authors recommended the use of cephalosporins rather than chloramphenicol and advocated intraventricular aminoglycoside treatment in selected cases. They noted the absence of clinical trials with third generation cephalosporins that showed an improvement in mortality or neurological outcome. PMID:12719388

  6. Neonatal Infectious Diseases: Evaluation of Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul W.; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. The following chapter reviews recent trends in epidemiology, and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods and management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:23481106

  7. Tosta Evans, 1953 (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae): a new species from northeast Brazil, first description of the female of Tosta tosta Evans, 1953, and placement of the genus within Achlyodini.

    PubMed

    Siewert, Ricardo Russo; Mielke, Olaf Hermann Hendrik; Casagrande, Mirna Martins

    2015-01-01

    A new species of Tosta Evans, 1953 from northeast Brazil is described: T. pseudospeculum Siewert, Mielke & Casagrande, sp. nov. Additionally, the female of Tosta tosta Evans, 1953, the type species of the genus, is described for the first time. Illustrations of adults and male and female genitalia for all studied species are provided, as well as a discussion of the placement of the genus within the tribe Achlyodini. PMID:26623589

  8. In normal aging ventricular system never attains pathological values of Evans' index

    PubMed Central

    Missori, Paolo; Rughetti, Aurelia; Peschillo, Simone; Gualdi, Gianfranco; Di Biasi, Claudio; Nofroni, Italo; Marinelli, Lucio; Fattapposta, Francesco; Currà, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Ventricular enlargement in normal aging frequently forces the radiological diagnosis of hydrocephalus, but the reliability of Evans' index as a radiological marker of abnormal ventricular enlargement (values > 0.30) during aging is not assessed. Here we analyze ventricular size during aging and the reliability of Evans' index as a radiological marker of abnormal ventricular enlargement. We calculated Evans' index in the axial Computed Tomography scans of 1221 consecutive individuals (aged 45-101 years) from an emergency department. Stratified analysis of one-year cohorts showed that the mean Evans' index value per class was invariably < 0.30. Roughly one out five Computed Tomography scans was associated with Evans' index values > 0.30 and Evans' index values increased with age. The risk of having an Evans' index value > 0.30 increased by 7.8% per year of age (p < 0.001) and males were at 83.9% greater risk than females (p < 0.001). Overall, this study shows that normal aging enlarges the ventricular system, but never causes abnormal ventricular enlargement. Evans' index values > 0.30 should reflect an underlying neurological condition in every individual. PMID:26919252

  9. In normal aging ventricular system never attains pathological values of Evans' index.

    PubMed

    Missori, Paolo; Rughetti, Aurelia; Peschillo, Simone; Gualdi, Gianfranco; Di Biasi, Claudio; Nofroni, Italo; Marinelli, Lucio; Fattapposta, Francesco; Currà, Antonio

    2016-03-15

    Ventricular enlargement in normal aging frequently forces the radiological diagnosis of hydrocephalus, but the reliability of Evans' index as a radiological marker of abnormal ventricular enlargement (values > 0.30) during aging is not assessed. Here we analyze ventricular size during aging and the reliability of Evans' index as a radiological marker of abnormal ventricular enlargement. We calculated Evans' index in the axial Computed Tomography scans of 1221 consecutive individuals (aged 45-101 years) from an emergency department. Stratified analysis of one-year cohorts showed that the mean Evans' index value per class was invariably < 0.30. Roughly one out five Computed Tomography scans was associated with Evans' index values > 0.30 and Evans' index values increased with age. The risk of having an Evans' index value > 0.30 increased by 7.8% per year of age (p < 0.001) and males were at 83.9% greater risk than females (p < 0.001). Overall, this study shows that normal aging enlarges the ventricular system, but never causes abnormal ventricular enlargement. Evans' index values > 0.30 should reflect an underlying neurological condition in every individual. PMID:26919252

  10. Neonatal circumcision.

    PubMed

    Lerman, S E; Liao, J C

    2001-12-01

    The merits of neonatal circumcision continue to be debated hotly. Some argue that circumcision is a "uniquely American medical enigma." Most of the world's male population remains uncircumcised; however, most boys born in the United States continue to undergo neonatal circumcision. Review of existing literature supports that most children who are uncircumcised do well from a medical standpoint and, thus, the question of whether US health care practitioners are subjecting neonates to an unnecessary surgical procedure remains. The medical benefits of circumcision are multiple, but most are small. The clearest medical benefit of circumcision is the relative reduction in the risk for a UTI, especially in early infancy. Although this risk [figure: see text] is real, the absolute numbers are small (risk ranges from 1 in 100 to 1 in 1000), and one investigator has estimated that it may take approximately 80 neonatal circumcisions to prevent one UTI. In the case of a patient with known urologic abnormalities that predispose to UTI, neonatal circumcision has a clearer role in terms of medical benefit to the patient. Most of the other medical benefits of circumcision probably can be realized without circumcision as long as access to clean water and proper penile hygiene are achieved. Proper penile hygiene should all but eliminate the risk for foreskin-related medical problems that will require circumcision. Moreover, proper hygiene and access to clean water has been shown to reduce the rate of development of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis in the uncircumcised population. Proper techniques on the care of the foreskin are illustrated in the American Academy of Pediatrics pamphlet titled "How to care for the uncircumcised penis." Regarding the relationship between STDs and circumcision, patient education and the practice of low-risk sexual behavior make a far greater impact than does routine circumcision in hopes of reducing the spread of HIV and other STDs. Nevertheless

  11. Neonatal hemochromatosis in monochorionic twins.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, L; Baştuğ, O; Daar, G; Doğanay, S; Deniz, K; Kurtoğlu, S

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is a form of neonatal liver failure caused by maternal-fetal alloimmune injury to hepatocytes. The etiology of neonatal hemochromatosis is not exactly understood. However, according to one theory neonatal hemochromatosis is believed to be an alloimmune disorder causing liver injury in the fetus. In order to diagnose neonatal hemochromatosis there are some criteria that should be taken into account, such as positive family history, high serum ferritin levels, high serum alpha-fetoprotein levels and siderosis demonstrated by histology or with magnetic resonance.We present a case of a monochorionic newborn twin who applied to our hospital with sepsis clinical symptoms like clinics, was diagnosed with NH and immediately treated with antioxidant therapy while the other twin with same clinical symptoms did not respond to therapy and passed away. NH should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cases with sepsis-like clinical symptoms that do not respond to antibiotics; early antioxidant therapy in these cases is lifesaving. PMID:26836824

  12. Photoacoustic microscopy using Evans Blue dye as a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Hu, Song; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    Complete and continuous imaging of microvascular networks is crucial for a wide variety of biomedical applications. Photoacoustic tomography can provide high resolution microvascular imaging using hemoglobin within red blood cells (RBC) as an endogenous contrast agent. However, intermittent RBC flow in capillaries results in discontinuous and fragmentary capillary images. To overcome this problem, we used Evans Blue (EB) dye as a contrast agent for in vivo photoacoustic imaging. EB has strong optical absorption at 610 nm and distributes uniformly in the blood stream by chemically binding to albumin. By intravenous injection of EB (6%, 200 μL), complete and continuous microvascular networks-especially capillaries-of the ears of nude mice were imaged. The diffusion of EB (3%, 100 μL) leaving the blood stream was monitored for 2 hours. At lower administration dose of EB (3%, 50 μL), the clearance of the EB-albumin complex was imaged for 10 days and quantitatively investigated using a two-compartment model.

  13. Optimization of Evans blue quantitation in limited rat tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hwai-Lee; Lai, Ted Weita

    2014-10-01

    Evans blue dye (EBD) is an inert tracer that measures plasma volume in human subjects and vascular permeability in animal models. Quantitation of EBD can be difficult when dye concentration in the sample is limited, such as when extravasated dye is measured in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) intact brain. The procedure described here used a very small volume (30 µl) per sample replicate, which enabled high-throughput measurements of the EBD concentration based on a standard 96-well plate reader. First, ethanol ensured a consistent optic path length in each well and substantially enhanced the sensitivity of EBD fluorescence spectroscopy. Second, trichloroacetic acid (TCA) removed false-positive EBD measurements as a result of biological solutes and partially extracted EBD into the supernatant. Moreover, a 1:2 volume ratio of 50% TCA ([TCA final] = 33.3%) optimally extracted EBD from the rat plasma protein-EBD complex in vitro and in vivo, and 1:2 and 1:3 weight-volume ratios of 50% TCA optimally extracted extravasated EBD from the rat brain and liver, respectively, in vivo. This procedure is particularly useful in the detection of EBD extravasation into the BBB-intact brain, but it can also be applied to detect dye extravasation into tissues where vascular permeability is less limiting.

  14. Straight talk with...James Ironside. [Interviewed by Jon Evans].

    PubMed

    Ironside, James

    2009-08-01

    Would you entrust your brain to a bank? Well, many people do after they die, and such brain banks-often funded by government agencies or disease charities-are essential for neuroscience research. They collect and store the healthy and diseased brain specimens that neuroscientists need to explore neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and autism. Each brain bank typically has a limited supply of samples and tends to operate fairly independently. This means that researchers often have to trawl through numerous brain banks to find their desired specimens. Furthermore, there is a general shortage of brain samples. To help resolve these issues in the UK, James Ironside, professor of clinical neuropathology at the University of Edinburgh, was appointed in June as the director of the new UK Brain Banks Network. An expert in human prion diseases, particularly Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Ironside knows all about brain banks. He established the Brain and Tissue Bank at the UK's National CJD Surveillance Unit and is involved in the Sudden Death Brain and Tissue Bank at the University of Edinburgh. Jon Evans recently caught up with Ironside to discuss his new leadership position and how the brain network will benefit neuroscience research. PMID:19661981

  15. [A neonate with pustules].

    PubMed

    Groot, Dominique T; van den Broek, Annique J M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a female neonate with non-grouped pustules directly postpartum without clinical signs of illness. There were no red maculae. At follow-up some pustules had turned to pigmented maculae, which confirmed the diagnosis of neonatal pustular melanosis. This benign transient condition occurs in 4-8% of dark-coloured neonates and in <1% of white neonates. PMID:26840934

  16. EVALUATION OF THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF SODIUM NITRITE IN LONG-EVANS RATS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sodium nitrite administered in the drinking water to Long-Evans rats during pregnancy and lactation severely affected arythropoietic development, growth and mortality in their offspring. There were no significant differences between treated and control litters at birth. Thereafte...

  17. Robert Leslie Evans: A Real-Life Model for Tayo in Silko's "Ceremony"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    The book "Ceremony" by Leslie Marmon Silko was written about the main character, Tayo, who was patterned after Robert Leslie Evans life. Tayo, a young American, was a prisoner of the Japanese during World War II.

  18. Australian Family Research Conference Proceedings (Canberra, Australia, November 23-25, 1983). Volume I: Family Formation, Structure, Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Family Studies, Melbourne (Australia).

    First in a series of seven volumes containing the proceedings of the 1983 Australian Family Research Conference, this publication deals with the formation, structure, and values of family life in Australia. Papers and authors included are: "Priorities in Family Research and Family Law" (Gareth Evans), "The Baby Boom Generation as Reproducers:…

  19. Neonatal resuscitation: Current issues

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Indu A

    2010-01-01

    The following guidelines are intended for practitioners responsible for resuscitating neonates. They apply primarily to neonates undergoing transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life. The updated guidelines on Neonatal Resuscitation have assimilated the latest evidence in neonatal resuscitation. Important changes with regard to the old guidelines and recommendations for daily practice are provided. Current controversial issues concerning neonatal resuscitation are reviewed and argued in the context of the ILCOR 2005 consensus. PMID:21189881

  20. [Neonatal cholestasis].

    PubMed

    Lacaille, F

    2016-03-01

    "Cholestasis" means abnormal synthesis or secretion of bile. The main symptom in a neonate or infant is jaundice. Urine is dark, staining diapers, and stools are variably pale or white. Vitamin K should be injected (to prevent coagulation disorders due to malabsorption). The two diagnoses requiring urgent treatment are urinary tract infection and biliary atresia. If stools are permanently white, biliary atresia is highly probable. A few genetic causes of intrahepatic cholestasis should be screened and corrective surgery organized. The diseases responsible for cholestasis in this age group are described as well as the investigations and treatments, including the management of non-specific complications of cholestasis. A delay in the diagnosis of biliary atresia can have such severe consequences that consultation with a hepatology unit or transfer should be easy and rapid. PMID:26850153

  1. Ventilatory impairment in the dysmyelinated Long Evans shaker (les) rat

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rebecca A.; Baker-Herman, Tracy L.; Duncan, Ian D.; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2010-01-01

    Although respiratory complications significantly contribute to morbidity/mortality in advanced myelin disorders, little is known concerning mechanisms whereby dysmyelination impairs ventilation, or how patients compensate (i.e. plasticity). To establish a model for studies concerning mechanisms of ventilatory impairment/compensation, we tested the hypotheses that respiratory function progressively declines in a model of CNS dysmyelination, the Long Evans shaker rat (les). The observed impairment is associated with abnormal inspiratory neural output. Minimal myelin staining was found throughout the CNS of les rats, including the brainstem and cervical bulbospinal tracts. Ventilation (via whole-body plethysmography) and phrenic motor output were assessed in les and wild-type (WT) rats during baseline, hypoxia (11% O2) and hypercapnia (7% CO2). Hypercapnic ventilatory responses were similar in young adult les and WT rats (2 months old); in hypoxia, rats exhibited seizure-like activity with sustained apneas. However, 5–6 month old les rats exhibited decreased breathing frequencies, mean inspiratory flow (VT/TI) and ventilation (V̇E) during baseline and hypercapnia. Although phrenic motor output exhibited normal burst frequency and amplitude in 5–6 month old les rats, intra-burst activity was abnormal. In WT rats, phrenic activity was progressive and augmenting; in les rats, phrenic activity was decrementing with asynchronized, multipeaked activity. Thus, although ventilatory capacity is maintained in young, dysmyelinated rats, ventilatory impairment develops with age, possibly through discoordination in respiratory motor output. This study is the first reporting age-related breathing abnormalities in a rodent dysmyelination model, and provides the foundation for mechanistic studies of respiratory insufficiency and therapeutic interventions. PMID:20542092

  2. Ventilatory impairment in the dysmyelinated Long Evans shaker rat.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R A; Baker-Herman, T L; Duncan, I D; Mitchell, G S

    2010-09-01

    Although respiratory complications significantly contribute to morbidity/mortality in advanced myelin disorders, little is known concerning mechanisms whereby dysmyelination impairs ventilation, or how patients compensate (i.e. plasticity). To establish a model for studies concerning mechanisms of ventilatory impairment/compensation, we tested the hypotheses that respiratory function progressively declines in a model of CNS dysmyelination, the Long Evans shaker rat (les). The observed impairment is associated with abnormal inspiratory neural output. Minimal myelin staining was found throughout the CNS of les rats, including the brainstem and cervical bulbospinal tracts. Ventilation (via whole-body plethysmography) and phrenic motor output were assessed in les and wild-type (WT) rats during baseline, hypoxia (11% O(2)) and hypercapnia (7% CO(2)). Hypercapnic ventilatory responses were similar in young adult les and WT rats (2 months old); in hypoxia, rats exhibited seizure-like activity with sustained apneas. However, 5-6 month old les rats exhibited decreased breathing frequencies, mean inspiratory flow (V(T)/T(I)) and ventilation (V (E)) during baseline and hypercapnia. Although phrenic motor output exhibited normal burst frequency and amplitude in 5-6 month old les rats, intra-burst activity was abnormal. In WT rats, phrenic activity was progressive and augmenting; in les rats, phrenic activity was decrementing with asynchronized, multipeaked activity. Thus, although ventilatory capacity is maintained in young, dysmyelinated rats, ventilatory impairment develops with age, possibly through discoordination in respiratory motor output. This study is the first reporting age-related breathing abnormalities in a rodent dysmyelination model, and provides the foundation for mechanistic studies of respiratory insufficiency and therapeutic interventions. PMID:20542092

  3. Neonatal euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Kon, Alexander A

    2009-12-01

    Despite advances in the care of infants, there remain many newborns whose medical conditions are incompatible with sustained life. At times, healthcare providers and parents may agree that prolonging life is not an appropriate goal of care, and they may redirect treatment to alleviate suffering. While pediatric palliative treatment protocols are gaining greater acceptance, there remain some children whose suffering is unrelenting despite maximal efforts. Due to the realization that some infants suffer unbearably (ie, the burdens of suffering outweigh the benefits of life), the Dutch have developed a protocol for euthanizing these newborns. In this review, I examine the ethical aspects of 6 forms of end of life care, explain the ethical arguments in support of euthanasia, review the history and verbiage of the United States regulations governing limiting and withdrawing life-prolonging interventions in infants, describe the 3 categories of neonates for whom the Dutch provide euthanasia, review the published analyses of the Dutch protocol, and finally present some practical considerations should some form of euthanasia ever be deemed appropriate. PMID:19914522

  4. Neonatal euthanasia: moral considerations and criminal liability.

    PubMed

    Sklansky, M

    2001-02-01

    Despite tremendous advances in medical care for critically ill newborn infants, caregivers in neonatal intensive care units still struggle with how to approach those patients whose prognoses appear to be the most grim, and whose treatments appear to be the most futile. Although the practice of passive neonatal euthanasia, from a moral perspective, has been widely (albeit quietly) condoned, those clinicians and families involved in such cases may still be found legally guilty of child abuse or even manslaughter. Passive neonatal euthanasia remains both a moral dilemma and a legal ambiguity. Even the definition of passive euthanasia remains unclear. This manuscript reviews the basic moral and legal considerations raised by the current practice of neonatal euthanasia, and examines the formal position statements of the American Medical Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The paper concludes by emphasising the need, at least in the United States, to clarify the legal status of this relatively common medical practice. PMID:11233379

  5. Routine neonatal circumcision?

    PubMed Central

    Tran, P. T.; Giacomantonio, M.

    1996-01-01

    Routine neonatal circumcision is still a controversial procedure. This article attempts to clarify some of the advantages and disadvantages of neonatal circumcision. The increased rate of penile cancer among uncircumcised men appears to justify the procedure, but that alone is not sufficient justification. The final decision on neonatal circumcision should be made by parents with balanced counsel from attending physicians. PMID:8939321

  6. Chan-Evans-Lam Amination of Boronic Acid Pinacol (BPin) Esters: Overcoming the Aryl Amine Problem.

    PubMed

    Vantourout, Julien C; Law, Robert P; Isidro-Llobet, Albert; Atkinson, Stephen J; Watson, Allan J B

    2016-05-01

    The Chan-Evans-Lam reaction is a valuable C-N bond forming process. However, aryl boronic acid pinacol (BPin) ester reagents can be difficult coupling partners that often deliver low yields, in particular in reactions with aryl amines. Herein, we report effective reaction conditions for the Chan-Evans-Lam amination of aryl BPin with alkyl and aryl amines. A mixed MeCN/EtOH solvent system was found to enable effective C-N bond formation using aryl amines while EtOH is not required for the coupling of alkyl amines. PMID:27045570

  7. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  8. X-linked mental retardation with neonatal hypotonia in a French family (MRX15): Gene assignment to Xp11.22-Xp21.1

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, M.; Dessay, B.; Ayrault, A.D.

    1996-07-12

    Linkage analysis was performed in a family with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX 15). Hypotonia in infancy was the most remarkable physical manifestation. The severity of mental deficiency was variable among the patients, but all of them had poor or absent speech. Significant lod scores at a recombination fraction of zero were detected with the marker loci DXS1126, DXS255, and DXS573 (Zmax = 2.01) and recombination was observed with the two flanking loci DXS164 (Xp21.1) and DXS988 (Xp11.22), identifying a 17 cM interval. This result suggests a new gene localization in the proximal Xp region. In numerous families with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX), the corresponding gene has been localized to the paracentromeric region in which a low recombination rate impairs the precision of mapping. 58 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. The effects of steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents on uptake of Evans blue in experimental metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, N B; Jacobs, R

    1988-01-01

    The effects of anti-inflammatory drugs on uptake of Evans blue were studied in solitary Walker carcinosarcomas implanted in the livers of Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were sacrificed at 5 min, 30 min, and 6 hr after administration of the anti-inflammatory drugs and Evans blue, and spectrophotometric measurements of the Evans blue in tumor and normal liver tissue were carried out. Uptake of Evans blue in the tumors was significantly decreased at all time periods after the injection of the following, as compared to controls: steroids (cortisol, methylprednisolone, and triamcinolone), the antihistamine diphenhydramine, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (naproxen, ibuprofen, indomethacin, and phenylbutazone). The effects of these drugs on uptake of Evans blue in the normal liver were more variable. PMID:3343934

  10. Choledocholithiases in a child with Hemoglobin Evans [alpha2 62(E11) Val→Met].

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    We present the first description of choledocholithiases in a 10-year-old boy with Hemoglobin Evans. Although biliary stones are much less common in children than in adults, epigastric pain in children with known hemolytic status should alert the physician to the possibility of biliary colic. PMID:27386123

  11. EVALUATION OF SENSORY EVOKED POTENTIALS IN LONG EVANS RATS GESTATIONALLY EXPOSED TO MERCURY (HGO) VAPOR.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to mercury vapor (Hg0) has been reported to result in sensory disturbances. Developmental exposure to toxicants may result in long-lasting changes in neural function. This manuscript describes the lack of effect of gestational exposure of Long Evans rats to Hg0 on ...

  12. Predatory Odor Disrupts Social Novelty Preference in Long-Evans Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Matthew J.; Layton, William B.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of predatory odor (cat urine) on social novelty preference in Long-Evans rats. Adult male subjects encountered a juvenile conspecific at training, were exposed to either clean cat litter (control) or litter soiled with cat urine (predatory odor), and were tested for social novelty preference. While the…

  13. Stability of Periodic Solutionsof Conservation Laws with Viscosity:Analysis of the Evans Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, M.; Zumbrun, K.

    We establish instability of periodic traveling waves arising in conservation laws featuring phase transition. The analysis uses the Evans function framework introduced by R.A. Gardner in the periodic case. The main new tool is a periodic generalization of the stability index introduced by Gardner and Zumbrun in the traveling front or pulse case.

  14. Academic Writing in Context: Implications and Applications. Papers in Honour of Tony Dudley-Evans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewings, Martin, Ed.

    The papers in this volume were collected to honor T. Dudley-Evans on his retirement from the University of Birmingham. They explore a number of themes of current interest to those engaged in English language teaching and academic writing. The papers are: (1) Introduction (Martin Hewings); (2) Distance and Refined Selves: Educational Tensions in…

  15. SODIUM CHLORITE ADMINISTRATION IN LONG-EVANS RATS: REPRODUCTIVE AND ENDOCRINE EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-Evans rats, 4-6 weeks of age, were given access to 0, 1, 10, or 100 ppm sodium chlorite in deionized water ad libitum as drinking water. Males were evaluated for sperm parameters and reproductive tract histopathology following the breeding. Females were exposed throughout ge...

  16. POSTNATAL DISPOSITION OF TCDD IN LONG EVANS RATS FOLLOWING GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    POSTNATAL DISPOSITION OF TCDD IN LONG EVANS RATS FOLLOWING GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE.
    J J Diliberto', J T Hamm'.2, F McQuaid', and L S Birnbaum'. 'US EPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD, RTP, NC; 2Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.
    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenz...

  17. TERATOGENIC EFFECTS OF TRICHLOROACETONITRILE IN THE LONG-EVANS RAT (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) is among a number of contaminants found in drinking water produced by reactions of chlorine with background organic material. Long-Evans rats were incubated with TCAN on gestation days 6-18. The highest dose tested (55 mg/kg) was lethal in 21% of the ...

  18. BROMATE-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTIONAL CHANGES IN LONG-EVANS RAT KIDNEYS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Bromate-Induced Transcriptional Changes in Long-Evans Rat Kidneys.

    Ozone disinfection of surface waters containing bromide ion (Br-) results in the oxidation of bromide to bromate, which can be found in finished drinking water as a by-product. Potassium bromate (KBrO3)...

  19. ADVERSE EFFECTS OF TCDD ON MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN LONG EVANS RATS: A TWO GENERATIONAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have demonstrated variable effects on mammary gland development in rat offspring exposed to TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 1 ug/kg, gavage) on day 15 of gestation. We have characterized these effects in Long Evans rats, in both one and two-generational...

  20. DEVELOPMENTAL EFFECTS OF TRICHLOROACETONITRILE ADMINISTERED IN CORN OIL TO PREGNANT LONG-EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) is a by-product of the chlorine disinfection of water containing natural organic material. When administered by gavage to pregnant Long-Evans rats in a medium-chain triglyceride vehicle, tricaprylin oil (Tricap), at a volume of 10 ml/kg, TCAN induced ...

  1. EVALUATION OF FERTILIZATION FOLLOWING OVULATORY DELAY WITH THIRAM IN THE LONG-EVANS HOODED RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of fertilization following ovulatory delay with thiram in the Long-Evans Hooded Rat

    1TE Stoker, 1* S Jeffay, and 1 SD Perreault.

    1Gamete and Early Embryogenesis Biology Branch and 2 Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, US EPA, R...

  2. Primary Neonatal Diaphragmatic Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Zouari, Mohamed; Jallouli, Mohamed; Ben Thabet, Afef; Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Gargouri, Abdellatif; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal diaphragmatic abscesses are extremely rare and they usually develop by direct extension from a liver abscess. The first case of primary diaphragmatic abscess in a neonate is reported and the difficulties of diagnosing this rare entity are discussed. PMID:26023529

  3. Family Support and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Lou Ann

    2013-01-01

    Family involvement is essential to the developmental outcome of infants born into Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). In this article, evidence has been presented on the parent's perspective of having an infant in the NICU and the context of family. Key points to an educational assessment are also reviewed. Throughout, the parent's concerns and…

  4. Futile care and the neonate.

    PubMed

    Romesberg, Tricia L

    2003-10-01

    The concept of futile care is controversial and difficult to define. Efforts to prolong life, once considered an outcome of healing, may now be viewed by some as harmful acts of prolonging suffering. This article reviews a number of cases representing this challenging ethical dilemma, such as Baby K and MacDonald v. Milleville. The Baby Doe regulations, the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA), and the Born-Alive Protection Act of 2001, also are discussed to provide an improved understanding of the legal framework that impacts ethical decision making. Nurses at the bedside must be equipped with the ethical knowledge and communication skills necessary to care for patients and families facing the ethical dilemma of futile care. An increased focus on neonatal palliative care is suggested to provide infants, families, and staff with the necessary tools to work through this painful process. PMID:14648518

  5. Modeling Ethanol Decomposition on Transition Metals: A Combined Application of Scaling and Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi Relations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrin, Peter A.; Simonetti, Dante A.; Kandoi, Shampa; Kunkes, Edward L.; Dumesic, James A.; Norskov, Jens K.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2009-04-29

    Applying density functional theory (DFT) calculations to the rational design of catalysts for complex reaction networks has been an ongoing challenge, primarily because of the high computational cost of these calculations. Certain correlations can be used to reduce the number and complexity of DFT calculations necessary to describe trends in activity and selectivity across metal and alloy surfaces, thus extending the reach of DFT to more complex systems. In this work, the well-known family of Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) correlations, connecting minima with maxima in the potential energy surface of elementary steps, in tandem with a scaling relation, connecting binding energies of complex adsorbates with those of simpler ones (e.g., C, O), is used to develop a potential-energy surface for ethanol decomposition on 10 transition metal surfaces. Using a simple kinetic model, the selectivity and activity on a subset of these surfaces are calculated. Experiments on supported catalysts verify that this simple model is reasonably accurate in describing reactivity trends across metals, suggesting that the combination of BEP and scaling relations may substantially reduce the cost of DFT calculations required for identifying reactivity descriptors of more complex reactions.

  6. Controlled Triol-Derivative Bonding and Decoration Transformation on Cu-Centered Anderson-Evans Polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Li, Bao; Qian, Hujun; Wu, Lixin

    2016-05-01

    To create new types of organic ligands covalently grafted onto polyoxometalates and identify the reaction mechanism, we selected Cu(II) as the central heteroatom for the synthesis of a series of disklike Anderson-Evans clusters bearing different triol derivatives on both their faces via one-pot and/or step-by-step routes. By using a [(n-C4H9)4N]4[Mo8O26] precursor cluster and copper acetate as the starting materials, several organically modified χ isomers with Cu(II) heteroatom centers were obtained. Starting from a [(n-C4H9)4N]2[Mo2O7] subcluster, however, a half-malposition coordination fashion of triol ligands with a δ isomer on one face and a χ isomer on the other face of the Anderson-Evans cluster was obtained. By changing the reaction solvent from acetonitrile to methanol, we realized a secondary organic modification of the triol-grafted clusters and obtained a triol ligand/methanol codecoration on the Anderson-Evans polyoxometalate. In addition, by changing the reaction environment, we succeeded in modulating the transformation of triol ligands from one site to another on the polyoxometalate cluster. Importantly, by control of the reaction condition, the methanol molecules were also taken off from the cluster. PMID:27074087

  7. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  8. Oral Lesions in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  9. [Neonatal herpes simplex infection].

    PubMed

    van Ham-Borawitz, V E J; Stam, E D; Welborn, K M; Sas, T C J

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal encephalitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a familiar disease with a high mortality and morbidity rate. Isolated skin-eye-mouth infection is less familiar among professionals. In this article we present two neonates with an isolated skin lesion caused by an HSV infection. Of the neonates infected with HSV, 40-45% show isolated skin-eye-mouth disease. With correct treatment, the risk of spread to the central nervous system will decrease from 50-60% to 5-10%. Typical HSV skin lesions may present at a late stage of the disease or may be masked by a secondary bacterial infection. When a neonate presents with atypical skin lesions starting 7-12 days after the birth, immediate testing for HSV and immediate treatment are required, to decrease the risk of further progression of the disease. PMID:27122069

  10. Neonatal pain management

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Tarun; Shepherd, Ed; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    The past 2-3 decades have seen dramatic changes in the approach to pain management in the neonate. These practices started with refuting previously held misconceptions regarding nociception in preterm infants. Although neonates were initially thought to have limited response to painful stimuli, it was demonstrated that the developmental immaturity of the central nervous system makes the neonate more likely to feel pain. It was further demonstrated that untreated pain can have long-lasting physiologic and neurodevelopmental consequences. These concerns have resulted in a significant emphasis on improving and optimizing the techniques of analgesia for neonates and infants. The following article will review techniques for pain assessment, prevention, and treatment in this population with a specific focus on acute pain related to medical and surgical conditions. PMID:25538531

  11. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... Neonatal RDS occurs in infants whose lungs have not yet fully ... disease is mainly caused by a lack of a slippery substance in ...

  12. Neonatal abstinence syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    NAS; Neonatal abstinence symptoms ... may contribute to the severity of a baby's NAS symptoms. ... symptoms of withdrawal. Even after medical treatment for NAS is over and babies leave the hospital, they ...

  13. Maternal and neonatal tetanus.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, C Louise; Beeching, Nicholas J; Newton, Charles R

    2015-01-24

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surveillance, with specific approaches in high-risk areas, has meant that the incidence of the disease continues to fall. Despite this progress, an estimated 58,000 neonates and an unknown number of mothers die every year from tetanus. As of June, 2014, 24 countries are still to eliminate the disease. Maintenance of elimination needs ongoing vaccination programmes and improved public health infrastructure. PMID:25149223

  14. Neonatal polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Priya; Miyashita, Yosuke

    2014-09-01

    This article provides an up-to-date comprehensive review and summary on neonatal polycystic kidney disease (PKD) with emphasis on the differential diagnosis, clinical manifestations, diagnostic techniques, and potential therapeutic approaches for the major causes of neonatal PKD, namely hereditary disease, including autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant PKD and nonhereditary PKD, with particular emphasis on multicystic dysplastic kidney. A brief overview of obstructive cystic dysplasia and simple and complex cysts is also included. PMID:25155726

  15. Neonatal clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van de Velde, Marc; van den Anker, John

    2013-01-01

    Effective and safe drug administration in neonates should be based on integrated knowledge on the evolving physiological characteristics of the infant who will receive the drug, and the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a given drug. Consequently, clinical pharmacology in neonates is as dynamic and diverse as the neonates we admit to our units while covariates explaining the variability are at least as relevant as median estimates. The unique setting of neonatal clinical pharmacology will be highlighted based on the hazards of simple extrapolation of maturational drug clearance when only based on ‘adult’ metabolism (propofol, paracetamol). Secondly, maturational trends are not at the same pace for all maturational processes. This will be illustrated based on the differences between hepatic and renal maturation (tramadol, morphine, midazolam). Finally, pharmacogenetics should be tailored to neonates, not just mirror adult concepts. Because of this diversity, clinical research in the field of neonatal clinical pharmacology is urgently needed, and facilitated through PK/PD modeling. In addition, irrespective of already available data to guide pharmacotherapy, pharmacovigilance is needed to recognize specific side effects. Consequently, paediatric anesthesiologists should consider to contribute to improved pharmacotherapy through clinical trial design and collaboration, as well as reporting on adverse effects of specific drugs. PMID:23617305

  16. Neonatal surgery in Africa.

    PubMed

    Chirdan, Lohfa B; Ngiloi, Petronilla J; Elhalaby, Essam A

    2012-05-01

    The management of neonatal surgical problems continues to pose considerable challenges, particularly in low-resource settings. The burden of neonatal surgical diseases in Africa is not well documented. The characteristics of some neonatal surgical problems are highlighted. Late presentation coupled with poor understanding of the milieu interior of the neonates by incompetent health care providers and poorly equipped hospitals combine to give rise to the unacceptable high morbidity and mortality in most parts of Africa. Proper training of all staff involved in neonatal health care coupled with community awareness must be vigorously pursued by all stakeholders. Various governments throughout the continent of Africa, in conjunction with international donor agencies, must not only provide an adequate budget for health care services and improve infrastructures, but must also deliberately encourage and provide funding for neonatal surgical care and research across the continent. The well-established pediatric surgical training programs, particularly in North and South Africa, should hold the moral responsibility of training all possible numbers of young surgeons from other African countries that do not have any existing pediatric surgical training programs or those countries suffering from remarkable shortage of trained pediatric surgeons. PMID:22475121

  17. Genetics Home Reference: benign familial neonatal seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... and KCNQ3 proteins are active in nerve cells (neurons) in the brain, where they transport potassium ions ... signal called the M-current, which prevents the neuron from continuing to send signals to other neurons. ...

  18. Deciding the fate of disputed embryos: ethical issues in the case of Natallie Evans

    PubMed Central

    Smajdor, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Background A number of disputes have arisen in recent years over the status of non-transferred embryos cryopreserved during in vitro fertilisation. One such case is that of Natallie Evans who in April 2007 lost her final attempt to prevent the destruction of embryos created with the sperm of her former partner. Ms Evans had been rendered infertile by cancer treatment, and the embryos represented her only chance of having genetically related children. Discussion Arguments over stored embryos often conflate different concepts of parenthood. The effects of 'forcing' genetic parenthood on a man are mistakenly presented as being analogous with forcing women to bear children. Likewise, there is a tendency to assume that genetic parenthood necessarily involves legal, financial and psychological implications. Men (or women) who object to becoming parents should be encouraged to specify which aspects of parenthood they regard as being harmful. While the financial or physical burdens of forced parenthood involve objective harms, the putative psychological harms of enforced genetic parenthood are subjective, and this distinction should be recognised. Popular beliefs about genetic parenthood perpetuate the kinds of subjective concerns expressed by Ms Evans' partner, but the concept of genetic parenthood itself may come under pressure in the face of future technological developments. Summary Historical legal requirements obliging men to provide for their genetic offspring still pervade in the law. These perceptions are becoming outmoded in context of rapidly-moving reproductive technologies. To avoid disputes greater flexibility is required. The economic and legal components of parenthood should be negotiable in cases where disputes arise, and should not be assumed to flow inexorably from genetic paternity. To reduce the chances of disputes arising, consent protocols for cryopreservation of non-transferred embryos should be refined. Couples should address the possibility of

  19. Plasma volume methodology: Evans blue, hemoglobin-hematocrit, and mass density transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.

    1985-01-01

    Methods for measuring absolute levels and changes in plasma volume are presented along with derivations of pertinent equations. Reduction in variability of the Evans blue dye dilution technique using chromatographic column purification suggests that the day-to-day variability in the plasma volume in humans is less than + or - 20 m1. Mass density determination using the mechanical-oscillator technique provides a method for measuring vascular fluid shifts continuously for assessing the density of the filtrate, and for quantifying movements of protein across microvascular walls. Equations for the calculation of volume and density of shifted fluid are presented.

  20. Celiac disease with Evans syndrome and isolated immune thrombocytopenia in monozygotic twins: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Roganovic, Jelena

    2016-04-01

    Celiac disease is a multisystem immune-mediated disorder caused by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The clinical presentation is characterized by a multitude and diversity of symptoms and complications. The coexistence of celiac disease with other autoimmune disorders has been established, most frequently with type 1 diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroiditis. The association of celiac disease with immune-mediated hematologic conditions has been rarely reported. This case study describes a pair of identical twin sisters with celiac disease associated with Evans syndrome in one sibling, and with isolated immune thrombocytopenia in the other. PMID:27312169

  1. NEONATAL DESTRUCTION OF DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rats treated as neonates with 6-hydroxydopamine are proposed to model the dopamine deficiency associated with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS). o understand the neurobiological basis of specific behaviors in LNS, investigations were undertaken in these neonatally lesioned rats. everal ...

  2. [Treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M D

    2001-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the recent medical literature on the treatment of neonatal jaundice, focusing on practical aspects that are relevant to pediatricians and neonatologists. SOURCES: An extensive review of the related literature was performed, also including the authors clinical experience in this field of investigation. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: Jaundice is very common among infants during the first days of life. Several factors such as maternal and neonatal history have to be considered before implementing treatment. Significant advances have been made in the past few years concerning the treatment of jaundiced newborn infants. This review focuses on three forms of treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia: phototherapy, exchange transfusion and the use of drugs to reduce serum bilirubin concentration. CONCLUSIONS: Nowadays, the in-depth knowledge about the mechanism of action of phototherapy, the development of intensified phototherapy units and the use of drugs to reduce bilirubin formation, have contributed to significantly decrease the need for exchange transfusion. PMID:14676895

  3. Absence of diurnal variation in visceromotor response to colorectal distention in normal Long Evans rats

    PubMed Central

    Welting, Olaf; Cailotto, Cathy; Kalsbeek, Andries; van den Wijngaard, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enhanced colorectal sensitivity (i.e. visceral hypersensitivity) is thought to be a pathophysiological mechanism in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In healthy men a circadian variation in rectal perception to colonic distention was described. Disturbed day and night rhythms, which occur in shift work and trans meridian flights, are associated with the prevalence of IBS. This raises the question whether disruptions of circadian control are responsible for the observed pathology in IBS. Prior to investigating altered rhythmicity in relation to visceral hypersensitivity in a rat model for IBS, it is relevant to establish whether normal rats display circadian variation similar to healthy men.  Methodology and findings: In rodents colorectal distension leads to reproducible contractions of abdominal musculature. We used quantification of this so called visceromotor response (VMR) by electromyography (EMG) to assess visceral sensitivity in rats. We assessed the VMR in normal male Long Evans rats at different time points of the light/dark cycle. Although a control experiment with male maternal separated rats confirmed that intentionally inflicted (i.e. stress induced) changes in VMR can be detected, normal male Long Evans rats showed no variation in VMR along the light/dark cycle in response to colorectal distension. Conclusions: In the absence of a daily rhythm of colorectal sensitivity in normal control rats it is not possible to investigate possible aberrancies in our rat model for IBS. PMID:26925229

  4. An Evans-function approach to spectral stability of internal solitary waves in stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiber, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Frequently encountered in nature, internal solitary waves in stratified fluids have been investigated experimentally, theoretically, and numerically. Mathematically, these waves are exact solutions of the incompressible 2D Euler equations. Contrasting with a rich existence theory and the development of methods for their computation, their stability analysis has hardly received attention at a rigorous mathematical level. This paper proposes a new approach to the investigation of stability of internal solitary waves in a continuously stratified fluid and carries out the following four steps of this approach: (I) to formulate the eigenvalue problem as an infinite-dimensional spatial-dynamical system, (II) to introduce finite-dimensional truncations of the spatial-dynamics description, (III) to demonstrate that each truncation, of any order, permits a well-defined Evans function, (IV) to prove absence of small zeros of the Evans function in the small-amplitude limit. The latter notably implies the low-frequency spectral stability of small-amplitude waves to arbitrarily high truncation order.

  5. Neonatal epilepsy syndromes and GEFS+: mechanistic considerations.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Daniel L

    2005-01-01

    Genetic analyses of familial epilepsies over the past decade have identified mutations in several different ion channel genes that result in neonatal or early-onset seizure disorders, including benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC), generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), and severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI). These genes encode voltage-gated Na+ channel subunits (SCN1A, SCN2A, SCN1B), voltage-gated K+ channel subunits (KCNQ2, KCNQ3), and a ligand-gated neurotransmitter receptor subunit (GABRG2). While the opportunity to genotype patients for mutations in these genes can have an immediate and significant impact on our ability to diagnose and provide genetic counseling to patients, the ultimate goal is to use this molecular knowledge to develop effective treatments and cures for each disorder. This will necessitate elucidation of the molecular, cellular, and network mechanisms that translate ion channel defects into specific epilepsy phenotypes. The functional analysis of epileptogenic channel mutations in vitro and in vivo has already provided a vast amount of raw biophysical data, but attempts to interpret these data to explain clinical phenotypes so far appear to raise as many questions as they answer. Nevertheless, patterns are beginning to emerge from these early studies that will help define the full scope of the challenges ahead while simultaneously providing the foundation of future efforts to overcome them. Here, I discuss some of the potential mechanisms that have been uncovered recently linking mutant ion channel genes to neonatal epilepsy syndromes and GEFS+. PMID:16359473

  6. Neonatal herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Alberto; Lugli, Licia; Rossi, Cecilia; Maria, Chiara Laguardia; Guidotti, Isotta; Gallo, Claudio; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2011-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus is an important cause of neonatal infection, which can lead to death or long-term disabilities. Rarely in utero, the transmission frequently occurs during delivery. The disease may be disseminated, localized to the central nervous system, or involving skin, eye and/or mouth. Mortality rates markedly decreased with high-dose antiviral treatment. Diagnosis of neonatal infection is based on viral isolation from ulcerated vesicles or by scarifying mucocutaneous lesions. Recently polymerase chain reaction plays a central role for both viral detection (skin, mucosal, cerebrospinal fluid samples) and response to therapy. Vertical transmission may be decreased by prophylactic antiviral treatment. PMID:21942600

  7. The Mount Evans batholith in the Colorado Front Range: revision of its age and reinterpretation of its structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Reed, J.C., Jr.; Dewitt, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Mount Evans batholith is composed of a main phase of massive to conspicuously foliated monzogranite and granodiorite and undeformed aplite and pegmatite. The Mount Evans batholith was previously considered to be part of the 1.7 Ga Routt Plutonic Suite. New U-Pb zircon ages on four samples (granodiorite, monzogranite, and granite), however, indicate that the batholith was emplaced at 1442 ?? 2 Ma and belongs to the Berthoud Plutonic Suite. Most of the batholith has igneous textures and structures, except in the vicinity of the Idaho Springs-Ralston shear zone where those features are tectonically recrystallized and foliated. The Mount Evans batholith is anomalous in composition and structure compared to most other 1.4 Ga plutons of the southwestern US. The differences probably reflect different sources of partial melting; the specific tectonic setting where rocks of such disparate origin are temporally and spatially juxtaposed is not understood. -from Authors

  8. Scrotal Swelling in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Amaya M.; Courtier, Jesse; Phelps, Andrew; Copp, Hillary L.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of scrotal swelling in a neonate can be a source of anxiety for parents, clinicians, and sonologists alike. This pictorial essay provides a focused review of commonly encountered scrotal masses and mimics specific to the neonatal setting. Although malignancy is a concern, it is very uncommon, as most neonatal scrotal masses are benign. Key discriminating features and management options are highlighted to improve the radiologist’s ability to diagnose neonatal scrotal conditions and guide treatment decisions. Neonatal scrotal processes ranging from common to uncommon will be discussed. PMID:25715370

  9. Neonatal manifestations of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Khincha, Payal P; Savage, Sharon A

    2016-02-01

    The inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS) are a rare yet clinically important cause of neonatal hematological and non-hematological manifestations. Many of these syndromes, such as Fanconi anemia, dyskeratosis congenita and Diamond-Blackfan anemia, confer risks of multiple medical complications later in life, including an increased risk of cancer. Some IBMFS may present with cytopenias in the neonatal period whereas others may present only with congenital physical abnormalities and progress to pancytopenia later in life. A thorough family history and detailed physical examination are integral to the work-up of any neonate in whom there is a high index of suspicion for an IBMFS. Correct detection and diagnosis of these disorders is important for appropriate long-term medical surveillance and counseling not only for the patient but also for appropriate genetic counselling of their families regarding recurrence risks in future children and generations. PMID:26724991

  10. Phase Contrast Imaging in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Kai; Ernst, Thomas; Buchthal, Steve; Speck, Oliver; Anderson, Lynn; Chang, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance phase images can yield superior gray and white matter contrast compared to conventional magnitude images. However, the underlying contrast mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Previous studies have been limited to high field acquisitions in adult volunteers and patients. In this study, phase imaging in the neonatal brain is demonstrated for the first time. Compared to adults, phase differences between gray and white matter are significantly reduced but not inverted in neonates with little myelination and iron deposits in their brains. The remaining phase difference between the neonatal and adult brains may be due to different macromolecule concentration in the unmyelinated brain of the neonates and thus different frequency due to water macromolecule exchange. Additionally, the susceptibility contrast from brain myelination can be separately studied in neonates during brain development. Therefore, magnetic resonance phase imaging is suggested as a novel tool to study neonatal brain development and pathologies in neonates. PMID:21232619

  11. How to manage neonatal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Di Comite, A; Esposito, S; Villani, A; Stronati, M

    2016-02-01

    This article reports the recommendations for managing neonatal tuberculosis (TB) drawn up by a group of Italian scientific societies. The Consensus Conference method was used, and relevant publications in English were identified through a systematic review of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from their inception until 31 December 2014. Group experts concluded that if suspicion is aroused, it is necessary to undertake promptly all of the investigations useful for identifying the disease not only in the newborn, but also in the mother and family contacts because a diagnosis of TB in the family nucleus can guide its diagnosis and treatment in the newborn. If the suspicion is confirmed, empirical treatment should be started. Breast-fed newborns being treated with isoniazid should be given pyridoxine supplementation at a dose of 1 mg kg(-1) day(-1). Mothers with active-phase TB can breast-feed once they have become smear negative after having received appropriate treatment. PMID:26270256

  12. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    PubMed

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital. PMID:23434016

  13. Maternal, neonatal and community factors influencing neonatal mortality in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado, Carla Jorge; Hill, Kenneth

    2005-03-01

    Child mortality (the mortality of children less than five years old) declined considerably in the developing world in the 1990s, but infant mortality declined less. The reductions in neonatal mortality were not impressive and, as a consequence, there is an increasing percentage of infant deaths in the neonatal period. Any further reduction in child mortality, therefore, requires an understanding of the determinants of neonatal mortality. 209,628 birth and 2581 neonatal death records for the 1998 birth cohort from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, were probabilistically matched. Data were from SINASC and SIM, Information Systems on Live Births and Deaths of Brazil. Logistic regression was used to find the association between neonatal mortality and the following risk factors: birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes, delivery mode, plurality, sex, maternal education, maternal age, number of prior losses, prenatal care, race, parity and community development. Infants of older mothers were less likely to die in the neonatal period. Caesarean delivery was not found to be associated with neonatal mortality. Low birth weight, pre-term birth and low Apgar scores were associated with neonatal death. Having a mother who lives in the highest developed community decreased the odds of neonatal death, suggesting that factors not measured in this study are behind such association. This result may also indicate that other factors over and above biological and more proximate factors could affect neonatal death. PMID:15768774

  14. Evans blue dye-enhanced capillary-resolution photoacoustic microscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin; Hu, Song; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-09-01

    Complete and continuous imaging of microvascular networks is crucial for a wide variety of biomedical applications. Photoacoustic tomography can provide high resolution microvascular imaging using hemoglobin within red blood cells (RBCs) as an endogenic contrast agent. However, intermittent RBC flow in capillaries results in discontinuous and fragmentary capillary images. To overcome this problem, we use Evans blue (EB) dye as a contrast agent for in vivo photoacoustic imaging. EB has strong optical absorption and distributes uniformly in the blood stream by chemically binding to albumin. With the help of EB, complete and continuous microvascular networks--especially capillaries--are imaged. The diffusion dynamics of EB leaving the blood stream and the clearance dynamics of the EB-albumin complex are also quantitatively investigated.

  15. On the behavior of Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi Relations for Transition Metal Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2011-08-22

    Versatile Broensted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations are found from density functional theory for a wide range of transition metal oxides including rutiles and perovskites. For oxides, the relation depends on the type of oxide, the active site and the dissociating molecule. The slope of the BEP relation is strongly coupled to the adsorbate geometry in the transition state. If it is final state-like the dissociative chemisorption energy can be considered as a descriptor for the dissociation. If it is initial state-like, on the other hand, the dissociative chemisorption energy is not suitable as descriptor for the dissociation. Dissociation of molecules with strong intramolecular bonds belong to the former and molecules with weak intramolecular bonds to the latter group. We show, for the prototype system La-perovskites, that there is a 'cyclic' behavior in the transition state characteristics upon change of the active transition metal of the oxide.

  16. On the behavior of Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations for transition metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Vojvodic, A; Calle-Vallejo, F; Guo, W; Wang, S; Toftelund, A; Studt, F; Martínez, J I; Shen, J; Man, I C; Rossmeisl, J; Bligaard, T; Noørskov, J K; Abild-Pedersen, F

    2011-06-28

    Versatile Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations are found from density functional theory for a wide range of transition metal oxides including rutiles and perovskites. For oxides, the relation depends on the type of oxide, the active site, and the dissociating molecule. The slope of the BEP relation is strongly coupled to the adsorbate geometry in the transition state. If it is final state-like the dissociative chemisorption energy can be considered as a descriptor for the dissociation. If it is initial state-like, on the other hand, the dissociative chemisorption energy is not suitable as descriptor for the dissociation. Dissociation of molecules with strong intramolecular bonds belong to the former and molecules with weak intramolecular bonds to the latter group. We show, for the prototype system La-perovskites, that there is a "cyclic" behavior in the transition state characteristics upon change of the active transition metal of the oxide. PMID:21721645

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VFTS. B-type stars classification and RV (Evans+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. J.; Kennedy, M. B.; Dufton, P. L.; Howarth, I. D.; Walborn, N. R.; Markova, N.; Clark, J. S.; de Mink, S. E.; de Koter, A.; Dunstall, P. R.; Henault-Brunet, V.; Maiz Apellaniz, J.; McEvoy, C. M.; Sana, H.; Simon-Diaz, S.; Taylor, W. D.; Vink, J. S.

    2015-03-01

    All of the VFTS data discussed here were obtained using the Medusa-Giraffe mode of the Fibre Large Array Multi-Element Spectrograph (FLAMES) instrument on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The Medusa fibres (which subtend 1.2" on the sky) were used to relay light from up to 130 targets simultaneously to the Giraffe spectrograph (see Pasquini et al., 2002Msngr.110....1P). Full details of the observational strategy and reduction of the data are given in Paper I (Evans et al., 2011A&A...530A.108E). In brief, the ESO Common Pipeline Library FLAMES recipes were used to undertake bias subtraction, fibre location, summed extractions of each object, division by a normalised flat-field, and wavelength calibration. Subsequent processing included correction of the spectra to the heliocentric frame, sky subtraction, and rejection of significant cosmic rays. (5 data files).

  18. Plasma exudation. Correlation between Evans blue dye and radiolabeled albumin in guinea pig airways in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, D.F.; Boschetto, P.; Barnes, P.J. )

    1989-07-01

    We quantified the tissue exudation and luminal transudation of two plasma markers, Evans blue (EB) dye and ({sup 125}I)-human serum albumin (HSA), into the airways of the anesthetized guinea pig in response to platelet activating factor (PAF). There was a highly significant correlation between the tissue content of EB and ({sup 125}I)-HSA in all airways studied. Significant correlation for transudation of the two markers was limited to high rates of plasma leakage. ({sup 125}I)-HSA was the more sensitive marker for the association between exudation and transudation and the effect of PAF on transudation. EB was the better marker for assessing the relationship between the dose of PAF and plasma exudation.

  19. F-18 simulation with Simulation Group Lead Martha Evans at the controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Simulation Group Leader Martha Evans is seen here at the controls of the F-18 aircraft simulator at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Simulators offer a safe and economical alternative to actual flights to gather data, as well as being excellent facilities for pilot practice and training. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.

  20. Separation of Evans and Hiro currents in VDE of tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, Sergei A.; Svidzinski, V. A.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2014-10-01

    Progress on the Disruption Simulation Code (DSC-3D) development and benchmarking will be presented. The DSC-3D is one-fluid nonlinear time-dependent MHD code, which utilizes fully 3D toroidal geometry for the first wall, pure vacuum and plasma itself, with adaptation to the moving plasma boundary and accurate resolution of the plasma surface current. Suppression of fast magnetosonic scale by the plasma inertia neglecting will be demonstrated. Due to code adaptive nature, self-consistent plasma surface current modeling during non-linear dynamics of the Vertical Displacement Event (VDE) is accurately provided. Separation of the plasma surface current on Evans and Hiro currents during simulation of fully developed VDE, then the plasma touches in-vessel tiles, will be discussed. Work is supported by the US DOE SBIR Grant # DE-SC0004487.

  1. Increase in osteoclastogenesis in an obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty rat model.

    PubMed

    Ootsuka, Tomoyo; Nakanishi, Atsuko; Tsukamoto, Ikuyo

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the effects of obesity on bone metabolism were investigated using a hyperphagic and obese rat model, the Otsuka Long‑Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rat, which exhibits normal glycemic control at 8 weeks of age. Body weight, food intake, fat mass, markers of bone resorption, the activities of tartrate‑resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K, the number of osteoclasts in the proximal tibia, and the serum C‑terminal crosslinking telopeptide level were higher in OLETF rats than those in control rats (Long‑Evans Tokushima Otsuka; LETO). However, no differences in markers of bone formation, alkaline phosphatase activity, the number of osteoblasts in the proximal tibia or the serum osteocalcin level were observed. mRNA and protein levels of c‑fms, receptor for activation of nuclear factor‑κB (RANK), RANK ligand (RANKL), TRAP and cathepsin K were significantly increased in OLETF rats, although those levels of macrophage colony‑stimulating factor (M‑CSF) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were similar to those in LETO rats. The level of serum tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and that of TNFα mRNA in bone, increased in association with the activation of NFκB. Furthermore, a frequency analysis and a colony formation assay respectively showed that the number of osteoclast precursors and the number of colony‑forming cells induced by M‑CSF each increased in OLETF rats compared with the control group. These results suggested that hyperphagia‑induced obesity with normal glycemic control induces the upregulation of osteoclastogenesis that is associated with an increase in the expression of c‑fms, RANK and RANKL, which is induced by TNFα, via the activation of NFκB. PMID:25997439

  2. COMPARISON OF RATS OF THE FISCHER 344 AND LONG-EVANS STRAINS IN THEIR AUTONOMIC THERMOREGULATORY RESPONSE TO TRIMETHYLTIN ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of genetic strain on the acute and long-term thermoregulatory response to the neurotoxicant, trimethyltin (TNT) in rats of the Long-Evans (LE) and Fischer 344 (FCH) strains. n one study basic thermoregulatory responses including ...

  3. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR TOLUENE IN THE LONG EVANS RAT: BODY COMPOSITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for inhaled toluene was developed for Long-Evans rats as a component of an exposure-dose-response (EDR) model for volatile organic compounds. The PBPK model was needed to link airborne toluene exposure to its concentration in b...

  4. Mammary gland development and response to prenatal atrazine exposure in the Sprague Dawley and Long-Evans rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary gland (MG) tumor development in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats is increased by longterm dietary exposure to the chlorotriazine herbicide atrazine (ATR). ATR is proposed to cause these changes in the adult SD rat by altering hormonally-regulated estrous cyclicity. In Long-Evans...

  5. An aerial radiological survey of the Evans Area, US Army Communications-Electronics Command, Fort Monmouth, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, R.J.

    1989-12-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Evans Area, US Army Communications-Electronics Command, Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, during the period November 14--18, 1988. The purposes of the survey were to document the terrestrial gamma environment of the Evans site and surrounding area and to determine if there had been any radiological impact on the area due to past laboratory operations. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a contour map. The aerial data were compared to ground-based benchmark'' exposure rate measurements and radionuclide assay of soil samples obtained at sites outside the survey perimeter. Similar ground-based measurements were also made at several locations on the Evans site and at the bank of the Shark River bordering the Evans Area. No evidence for contamination was identified by either radionuclide assay of soil samples or the aerial survey. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. EXPOSURE PARAMETERS FOR DELAYED PUBERTY AND MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN LONG-EVANS RATS EXPOSED IN UTERO TO ATRAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure Parameters For Delayed Puberty And Mammary Gland Development In Long-Evans Rats Exposed In Utero To Atrazine

    Jennifer L. Rayner1 and Suzanne E. Fenton2

    1 UNC-Chapel Hill, DESE, Chapel Hill, NC, and 2 RTD, USEPA, NHEERL/ORD, RTP,NC

    Prenatal exposure ...

  7. EXPOSURE PARAMETERS NECESSARY FOR DELAYED PUBERTY AND MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN LONG-EVANS RATS EXPOSED IN UTERO TO ATRAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure Parameters Necessary For Delayed Puberty And Mammary Gland Development In Long-Evans Rats Exposed In Utero To Atrazine

    Jennifer L. Rayner1, 2, Carmen Wood2, and Suzanne E. Fenton2

    1 Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, School of Public Heal...

  8. Ann Hutchinson (as subject), Dr. Joan Vernikos (R), Dee O'Hara (L), J. Evans and E. Lowe pose for

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Ann Hutchinson (as subject), Dr. Joan Vernikos (R), Dee O'Hara (L), J. Evans and E. Lowe pose for pictures in the NASA Magazine aritcle 'How it Feels to be a Human Test Subject' as they prepare for a bed rest study to simulate the efects of microgravity on the human body.

  9. EVALUATION OF THE TERATOGENIC EFFECTS OF TRI-ORTHO-CRESYL PHOSPHATE IN THE LONG-EVANS HOODED RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The developmental toxicity of tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate (TOCP) was evaluated in Long-Evans rats. Pregnant rats were treated with 87.5, 175, and 350 mg/kg/day TOCP throughout organogenesis from gestation day 6 through 18 (day of sperm = day 0). The highest dose tested (350 mg/kg)...

  10. ATRAZINE INCREASES DIMETHYLBENZ[A]ANTHRACENE-INDUCED MAMMARY TUMOR INCIDENCE IN LONG EVANS OFFSPRING EXPOSED IN UTERO

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATRAZINE INCREASES DIMETHYLBENZ[A]ANTHRACENE-INDUCED MAMMARY TUMOR INCIDENCE IN LONG EVANS OFFSPRING EXPOSED IN UTERO.

    SE Fenton and CC Davis

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, Durham, NC, USA

    Recently, we found that ATR exposure during ma...

  11. THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF BROMOCHLOROACETONITRILE IN PREGNANT LONG-EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN) is a by-product of the chlorine disinfection of water containing natural organic material. Adverse effects of BCAN in an in vivo teratology screen (i.e. neonatal survival assay) gave reason for further investigation into the developmental toxicity o...

  12. Remifentanil: applications in neonates.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Mineto; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-06-01

    Remifentanil is a synthetic opioid derivative that was introduced into clinical practice in the United States in 1996. The unique modification of its chemical structure to include a methyl-ester ring allows its hydrolysis by non-specific plasma and tissue esterases. This molecular configuration results in its rapid metabolism thereby providing a rapid onset, easy titration by continuous infusion, and a short context-sensitive half-life with rapid elimination. These principles are stable and consistent across all age groups regardless of the infusion characteristics. Owing to these pharmacokinetic characteristics, it is an effective agent in the neonatal population allowing the provision of intense analgesia and anesthesia with a rapid recovery profile in various clinical scenarios. Here, we review the pharmacokinetics of remifentanil in neonates, discuss its clinical applications including intraoperative administration for anesthetic care, unique applications for procedural sedation including endotracheal intubation, and its potential use for sedation in the Intensive Care Unit setting during mechanical ventilation. PMID:26758072

  13. Neonatal mortality in Meerut district.

    PubMed

    Garg, S K; Mishra, V N; Singh, J V; Bhatnagar, M; Chopra, H; Singh, R B

    1993-09-01

    A study of neonatal mortality in Meerut district revealed an infant mortality rate of 50.1 per 1000 live births. Neonatal mortality accounted for 37.8% of infant mortality with a neonatal mortality rate of 19.0 per 1000 live births. 90.5% of these neonates were delivered at home largely by untrained personnel (57.2%). Only 28.6% of these neonates were treated by qualified doctors and only 30.9% of their mothers were fully immunized against tetanus. At least 2/3rd of neonatal mortality was due to exogenous factors with tetanus neonatorum and septicaemia being the principal causes of mortality each accounting for a mortality rate of 4.7 per 1000 live births. PMID:8112786

  14. [Physiopathology of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia].

    PubMed

    Vert, P

    1998-09-01

    The most important steps of bilirubin metabolism involved in the pathophysiology of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia are: 1) hemoglobin degradation by heme oxygenase; 2) bilirubin binding to serum albumin; 3) bilirubin conjugation to acid glucoronic by glucoronyl transferase. Progress in the knowledge of these metabolic steps allows to understanding of why massive hemolysis, infections, hypoxia and prematurity increase the risk of kernicterus and therefore justify adapted preventive and therapeutic measures. PMID:9789638

  15. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care: Identifying Parental Needs Through Participatory Design

    PubMed Central

    Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte; Clemensen, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background For the majority of preterm infants, the last weeks of hospital admission mainly concerns tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding. Neonatal home care (NH) was developed to allow infants to remain at home for tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding with regular home visits from neonatal nurses. For hospitals covering large regions, home visits may be challenging, time consuming, and expensive and alternative approaches must be explored. Objective To identify parental needs when wanting to provide neonatal home care supported by telemedicine. Methods The study used participatory design and qualitative methods. Data were collected from observational studies, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Two neonatal units participated. One unit was experienced in providing neonatal home care with home visits, and the other planned to offer neonatal home care with telemedicine support. A total of 9 parents with preterm infants assigned to a neonatal home care program and 10 parents with preterm infants admitted to a neonatal unit participated in individual interviews and focus group interviews, respectively. Results Three overall themes were identified: being a family, parent self-efficacy, and nurse-provided security. Parents expressed desire for the following: (1) a telemedicine device to serve as a “bell cord” to the neonatal unit, giving 24-hour access to nurses, (2) video-conferencing to provide security at home, (3) timely written email communication with the neonatal unit, and (4) an online knowledge base on preterm infant care, breastfeeding, and nutrition. Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of neonatal home care. NH provides parents with a feeling of being a family, supports their self-efficacy, and gives them a feeling of security when combined with nursing guidance. Parents did not request hands-on support for infant care, but instead expressed a need for communication and guidance, which could be met using

  16. Reappraisal of twinning: epidemiology and outcome in the early neonatal period

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priyanka; Faridi, Mohammad Moonis Akbar; Goel, Neerja; Zaidi, Zeashan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The present study aimed to determine the epidemiology, maternal complications and adverse neonatal outcomes associated with twin births at a tertiary care hospital in India. METHODS A prospective observational study was conducted on all successively born twin pairs (≥ 23 weeks of gestation) and their mothers from January to September 2005. Main outcome measures included maternal medical/obstetric complications, labour characteristics and the morbidities/mortality observed during the early neonatal period. RESULTS The twinning rate was 1 in 54 deliveries. Around 10% of mothers had a predisposition for twinning in the form of familial tendency or consumption of clomiphene. Anaemia (85%) was the most common maternal complication, followed by gestational hypertension (17%). Nearly one-third of births were delivered via Caesarean section. Prematurity (61%) was the most common neonatal complication followed by early-onset neonatal sepsis (21%). The risk of early neonatal death was 27%. Shorter gestation and low birth weight were significantly associated with adverse neonatal outcome (p < 0.05). Factors such as chorionicity, mode of delivery, birth order, inter-twin delivery time interval, gender and intra-pair birth weight discordance did not affect neonatal morbidity or mortality (p ≥ 0.05). CONCLUSION The rates of maternal complications and early neonatal morbidities/mortality were quite high in twin gestations. Except for the prematurity and low birth weight, none of the other factors, including inter-twin delivery time interval of more than 15 mins, were found to affect neonatal outcome. PMID:25017406

  17. Rapid Evolution of the CD8+ TCR Repertoire in Neonatal Mice.

    PubMed

    Carey, Alison J; Gracias, Donald T; Thayer, Jillian L; Boesteanu, Alina C; Kumova, Ogan K; Mueller, Yvonne M; Hope, Jennifer L; Fraietta, Joseph A; van Zessen, David B H; Katsikis, Peter D

    2016-03-15

    Currently, there is little consensus regarding the most appropriate animal model to study acute infection and the virus-specific CD8(+) T cell (CTL) responses in neonates. TCRβ high-throughput sequencing in naive CTL of differently aged neonatal mice was performed, which demonstrated differential Vβ family gene usage. Using an acute influenza infection model, we examined the TCR repertoire of the CTL response in neonatal and adult mice infected with influenza type A virus. Three-day-old mice mounted a greatly reduced primary NP(366-374)-specific CTL response when compared with 7-d-old and adult mice, whereas secondary CTL responses were normal. Analysis of NP(366-374)-specific CTL TCR repertoire revealed different Vβ gene usage and greatly reduced public clonotypes in 3-d-old neonates. This could underlie the impaired CTL response in these neonates. To directly test this, we examined whether controlling the TCR would restore neonatal CTL responses. We performed adoptive transfers of both nontransgenic and TCR-transgenic OVA(257-264)-specific (OT-I) CD8(+) T cells into influenza-infected hosts, which revealed that naive neonatal and adult OT-I cells expand equally well in neonatal and adult hosts. In contrast, nontransgenic neonatal CD8(+) T cells when transferred into adults failed to expand. We further demonstrate that differences in TCR avidity may contribute to decreased expansion of the endogenous neonatal CTL. These studies highlight the rapid evolution of the neonatal TCR repertoire during the first week of life and show that impaired neonatal CTL immunity results from an immature TCR repertoire, rather than intrinsic signaling defects or a suppressive environment. PMID:26873987

  18. Sexually dimorphic effects of neonatal immune system activation with lipopolysaccharide on the behavioural response to a homotypic adult immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Tenk, Christine M; Kavaliers, Martin; Ossenkopp, Klaus-Peter

    2008-01-01

    Research has shown that acute immune activation during the early postnatal period with the Gram-negative endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), alters a variety of physiological and behavioural processes in the adult animal. For example, neonatal LPS exposure affects disease susceptibility later in life, though these effects appear to be modulated by time of exposure, sex, and immune stimulus. The current study examined sex differences in the effect of neonatal LPS treatment on the locomotor activity response to adult LPS administration. Male and female Long-Evans rats were treated systemically with either LPS (50 microg/kg) or saline (0.9%) on postnatal days 3 and 5. Later in adulthood (postnatal day 92), all animals were subjected to an adult LPS challenge and were injected (i.p.) with 200 microg/kg LPS. Two hours after injection, animals were placed in a non-novel open-field and locomotor activity was assessed for 30 min. Body weights were determined both at the time of injection and 24h later to examine LPS-induced weight loss. Adult males treated neonatally with LPS exhibited significantly less horizontal and vertical activity in response to the LPS challenge relative to males treated neonatally with saline. This effect was not observed in females. Thus, the current study provides important evidence of sexual dimorphism in the long-term effects of neonatal LPS exposure on the responses to an adult homotypic immune challenge in rats. These findings have potential clinical significance given that neonatal exposure to pathogens is a fairly common occurrence and Gram-negative bacteria are a common cause of neonatal bacterial infections. PMID:18280690

  19. Neonatal intensive care unit lighting: update and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Roberto G; Pattini, Andrea E

    2016-08-01

    Achieving adequate lighting in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge: in addition to the usual considerations of visual performance, cost, energy and aesthetics, there appear different biological needs of patients, health care providers and family members. Communicational aspects of light, its role as a facilitator of the visual function of doctors and nurses, and its effects on the newborn infant physiology and development were addressed in order to review the effects of light (natural and artificial) within neonatal care with a focus on development. The role of light in regulating the newborn infant circadian cycle in particular and the therapeutic use of light in general were also reviewed. For each aspect, practical recommendations were specified for a proper well-lit environment in neonatal intensive care units. PMID:27399015

  20. Need for neonatal screening program in India: A national priority.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Pradhan, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    In India, out of 342 districts surveyed, 286 have been identified as endemic to iodine deficiency (ID). Research studies conducted in school age children (SAC), Adolescent girls, Pregnant Mothers (PMs) and Neonates have documented poor iodine nutritional status. As observed by total goiter rate of more than 5% and median urinary iodine concentration level of <100 μg/l in SAC and <150 μg/l in PMs as prescribed cutoff of World Health Organization. And higher thyroid stimulating hormone levels among neonates. ID leads to compromised mental development and hence which remain hidden and not visible to family, program managers and administrator. The present review describes the current status of ID in different parts of the country. With a view to strongly recommend the implementation of Neonatal screening program for ID so that the optimal mental development of children can be achieved. PMID:25729682

  1. Nursing supports neonatal porcine testicular development.

    PubMed

    Rahman, K M; Lovich, J E; Lam, C; Camp, M E; Wiley, A A; Bartol, F F; Bagnell, C A

    2014-07-01

    The lactocrine hypothesis suggests a mechanism whereby milk-borne bioactive factors delivered to nursing offspring affect development of neonatal tissues. The objective of this study was to assess whether nursing affects testicular development in neonatal boars as reflected by: (1) Sertoli cell number and proliferation measured by GATA-4 expression and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining patterns; (2) Leydig cell development and steroidogenic activity as reflected by insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3), and P450 side chain cleavage (scc) enzyme expression; and (3) expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A, and relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP) 1. At birth, boars were randomly assigned (n = 6-7/group) to nurse ad libitum or to be pan fed porcine milk replacer for 48 h. Testes were collected from boars at birth, before nursing and from nursed and replacer-fed boars at 50 h on postnatal day (PND) 2. Sertoli cell proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index increased (P < 0.01) from birth to PND 2 in nursed, but not in replacer-fed boars. Sertoli cell number and testicular GATA-4 protein levels increased (P < 0.01) from PND 0 to PND 2 only in nursed boars. Neither age nor nursing affected testicular INSL3, P450scc, ESR1, or VEGFA levels. However, testicular relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) levels increased (P < 0.01) with age and were greater in replacer-fed boars on PND 2. Results suggest that nursing supports neonatal porcine testicular development and provide additional evidence for the importance of lactocrine signaling in pigs. PMID:24906933

  2. Neonatal neurosonography: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Bhat, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Neurosonography is a simple, established non-invasive technique for the intracranial assessment of preterm neonate. Apart from established indication in the evaluation of periventricular haemorrhage, it provides clue to wide range of pathology. This presentation provides a quick roadmap to the technique, imaging anatomy and spectrum of pathological imaging appearances encountered in neonates. PMID:25489132

  3. Fetal and Neonatal Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Jaeggi, Edgar; Öhman, Annika

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an important aspect of fetal and neonatal medicine. Premature complexes of atrial or ventricular origin are the main cause of an irregular heart rhythm. The finding is typically unrelated to an identifiable cause and no treatment is required. Tachyarrhythmia most commonly relates to supraventricular reentrant tachycardia, atrial flutter, and sinus tachycardia. Several antiarrhythmic agents are available for the perinatal treatment of tachyarrhythmias. Enduring bradycardia may result from sinus node dysfunction, complete heart block and nonconducted atrial bigeminy as the main arrhythmia mechanisms. The management and outcome of bradycardia depend on the underlying mechanism. PMID:26876124

  4. Hyperbilirubinemia in Preterm Neonates.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Vinod K; Wong, Ronald J; Stevenson, David K

    2016-06-01

    Preterm neonates with increased bilirubin production loads are more likely to sustain adverse outcomes due to either neurotoxicity or overtreatment with phototherapy and/or exchange transfusion. Clinicians should rely on expert consensus opinions to guide timely and effective interventions until there is better evidence to refine bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction or benefits of bilirubin. In this article, we review the evolving evidence for bilirubin-induced brain injury in preterm infants and highlight the clinical approaches that minimize the risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity. PMID:27235203

  5. Hemolysis in Preterm Neonates.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Robert D; Yaish, Hassan M

    2016-06-01

    Hemolysis can be an important cause of hyperbilirubinemia in premature and term neonates. It can result from genetic abnormalities intrinsic to or factors exogenous to normal to red blood cells (RBCs). Hemolysis can lead to a relatively rapid increase in total serum/plasma bilirubin, hyperbilirubinemia that is somewhat slow to fall with phototherapy, or hyperbilirubinemia that is likely to rebound after phototherapy. Laboratory methods for diagnosing hemolysis are more difficult to apply, or less conclusive, in preterm infants. Transfusion of donor RBCs can present a bilirubin load that must be metabolized. Genetic causes can be identified by next-generation sequencing panels. PMID:27235204

  6. Challenging Expertise: Paul Feyerabend vs. Harry Collins & Robert Evans on democracy, public participation and scientific authority: Paul Feyerabend vs. Harry Collins & Robert Evans on scientific authority and public participation.

    PubMed

    Sorgner, Helene

    2016-06-01

    This paper compares Feyerabend's arguments in Science in a Free Society to the controversial theory of expertise proposed by Harry Collins and Robert Evans as a Third Wave of Science Studies. Is the legitimacy of democratic decisions threatened by the unquestioned authority of scientific advice? Or does, on the contrary, science need protection from too much democratic participation in technical decisions? Where Feyerabend's political relativism envisions democratic society as inherently pluralist and demands equal contribution of all traditions and worldviews to public decision-making, Collins and Evans hold a conception of elective modernism, defending the reality and value of technical expertise and arguing that science deserves a privileged status in modern democracies, because scientific values are also democratic values. I will argue that Feyerabend's political relativism provides a valuable framework for the evaluation of Collins' and Evans' theory of expertise. By constructing a dialog between Feyerabend and this more recent approach in Science and Technology Studies, the aim of this article is not only to show where the two positions differ and in what way they might be reconciled, but also how Feyerabend's philosophy provides substantial input to contemporary debate. PMID:27269270

  7. Obesity in the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty Rat: Mechanisms and Discoveries

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Sheng; Moran, Timothy H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the neural systems underlying the controls of energy balance has been greatly advanced by identifying the deficits and underlying mechanisms in rodent obesity models. The current review focuses on the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat obesity model. Since its recognition in the 1990s, significant progress has been made in identifying the causes and consequences of obesity in this model. Fundamental is a deficit in the cholecystokinin (CCK)-1 receptor gene resulting in the absence of CCK-1 receptors in both the gastrointestinal track and the brain. OLETF rats have a deficit in their ability to limit the size of meals and in contrast to CCK-1 receptor knockout mice, do not compensate for this increase in the size of their spontaneous meals, resulting in hyperphagia. Prior to becoming obese and in response to pair feeding, OLETF rats have increased expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the compact region of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), and this overexpression contributes to their overall hyperphagia. Study of the OLETF rats has revealed important differences in the organization of the DMH in rats and mice and elucidated previously unappreciated roles for DMH NPY in energy balance and glucose homeostasis. PMID:27512691

  8. Evans Blue is not a suitable inhibitor of the epithelial sodium channel δ-subunit.

    PubMed

    Perniss, Alexander; Wolf, Annemarie; Wichmann, Lukas; Schönberger, Matthias; Althaus, Mike

    2015-10-23

    The Epithelial Sodium Channel (ENaC) is a heterotrimeric ion channel which can be either formed by assembly of its α-, β- and γ-subunits or, alternatively, its δ-, β- and γ-subunits. The physiological function of αβγ-ENaC is well established, but the function of δβγ-ENaC remains elusive. The azo-dye Evans Blue (EvB) has been routinely used to discriminate between the two channel isoforms by decreasing transmembrane currents and amiloride-sensitive current fractions of δβγ-ENaC expressing Xenopus oocytes. Even though these results could be reproduced, it was found by precipitation experiments and spectroscopic methods that the cationic amiloride and the anionic EvB directly interact in solution, forming a strong complex. Thereby a large amount of pharmacologically available amiloride is removed from physiological buffer solutions and the effective amiloride concentration is reduced. This interaction did not occur in the presence of albumin. In microelectrode recordings, EvB was able to abrogate the block of δβγ-ENaC by amiloride or its derivative benzamil. In sum, EvB reduces amiloride-sensitive ion current fractions in electrophysiological experiments. This is not a result of a specific inhibition of δβγ-ENaC but rather represents a pharmacological artefact. EvB should therefore not be used as an inhibitor of δ-ENaC. PMID:26365349

  9. Therapeutic effects of sericin on diabetic keratopathy in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2013-12-15

    An Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat provides a useful model for studies to develop corneal wound healing drugs for use in diabetic keratopathy resulting from type 2 diabetes mellitus. We investigated the effects of sericin on corneal wound healing in OLETF rats. Corneal wounds were prepared by removal of the corneal epithelium and documented using a TRC-50X. Sericin was instilled into the eyes of rats five times a day following corneal abrasion. The plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol and insulin in 38 wk old OLETF rats were significantly higher than in normal control rats (LETO rats), and the rate of corneal wound healing in OLETF rats was slower than in normal rat, probably due to the suppression of cell migration and proliferation caused by high plasma glucose levels. The corneal wounds of OLETF rats instilled with saline showed almost complete healing 72 h after corneal epithelial abrasion. On the other hand, the instillation of sericin has a potent effect in promoting wound healing and wound size reduction in OLETF rats and the wounds showed almost complete healing at 48 h after abrasion. The sericin may be an effective and safe drug to promote corneal wound healing in diabetic keratopathy. PMID:24379918

  10. Developmental Exposure to Polychlorinated Biphenyls Reduces Amphetamine Behavioral Sensitization in Long-Evans Rats

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Emily; Monaikul, Supida; Kostyniak, Paul J.; Chi, Lai Har; Schantz, Susan L.; Sable, Helen J. K.

    2013-01-01

    PCBs have long been known to affect dopamine (DA) function in the brain. The current study used an amphetamine behavioral sensitization paradigm in rats developmentally exposed to PCBs. Long-Evans rats were given perinatal exposure to 0, 3, or 6 mg/kg/day PCBs and behavioral sensitization to d-amphetamine (AMPH) was assessed in one adult male and female/litter. Non-exposed (control) males showed increasing locomotor activity to repeated injections of 0.5 mg/kg AMPH, typical of behavioral sensitization. PCB-exposed males showed greater activation to the initial acute AMPH injection, but sensitization occurred later and was blunted relative to controls. Sensitization in control females took longer to develop than in the males, but no exposure-related differences were observed. Analysis of whole brain and serum AMPH content following a final IP injection of 0.5 mg/kg revealed no differences among the exposure groups. Overall, these results indicated developmental PCB-exposure can alter the motor-stimulating effects of repeated AMPH injections. Males developmentally exposed to PCBs appeared to be pre-sensitized to AMPH, but quickly showed behavioral tolerance to the same drug dose. Results also revealed the behavioral effect was not due to exposure-induced alterations in AMPH metabolism following PCB exposure. PMID:23623962

  11. Early-onset Evans syndrome, immunodeficiency, and premature immunosenescence associated with tripeptidyl-peptidase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Stepensky, Polina; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Gather, Ruth; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Fischer, Ute; Nabhani, Schafiq; Beier, Fabian; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Fuchs, Sebastian; Zenke, Simon; Firat, Elke; Pessach, Vered Molho; Borkhardt, Arndt; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Eibel, Hermann; Niedermann, Gabriele; Elpeleg, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune cytopenia is a frequent manifestation of primary immunodeficiencies. Two siblings presented with Evans syndrome, viral infections, and progressive leukopenia. DNA available from one patient showed a homozygous frameshift mutation in tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP2) abolishing protein expression. TPP2 is a serine exopeptidase involved in extralysosomal peptide degradation. Its deficiency in mice activates cell death programs and premature senescence. Similar to cells from naïve, uninfected TPP2-deficient mice, patient cells showed increased major histocompatibility complex I expression and most CD8+ T-cells had a senescent CCR7-CD127−CD28−CD57+ phenotype with poor proliferative responses and enhanced staurosporine-induced apoptosis. T-cells showed increased expression of the effector molecules perforin and interferon-γ with high expression of the transcription factor T-bet. Age-associated B-cells with a CD21− CD11c+ phenotype expressing T-bet were increased in humans and mice, combined with antinuclear antibodies. Moreover, markers of senescence were also present in human and murine TPP2-deficient fibroblasts. Telomere lengths were normal in patient fibroblasts and granulocytes, and low normal in lymphocytes, which were compatible with activation of stress-induced rather than replicative senescence programs. TPP2 deficiency is the first primary immunodeficiency linking premature immunosenescence to severe autoimmunity. Determination of senescent lymphocytes should be part of the diagnostic evaluation of children with refractory multilineage cytopenias. PMID:25414442

  12. Evans syndrome secondary to chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: presentation, treatment, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Carli, Giuseppe; Visco, Carlo; Falisi, Erika; Perbellini, Omar; Novella, Elisabetta; Giaretta, Ilaria; Ferrarini, Isacco; Sandini, Alessandra; Alghisi, Alberta; Ambrosetti, Achille; Rodeghiero, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Evans syndrome (ES) is defined by the combination (either simultaneous or sequential) of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA). When related to secondary conditions, ES may arise in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), which is frequently associated to autoimmune cytopenias (AIC). We analysed 25 patients with ES secondary to CLL, which were identified from a large series of consecutive patients with CLL, diagnosed and followed up in two institutions. They represented 2.9 % of the whole series. Thirteen patients presented with concurrent ITP and AIHA (simultaneous ES), while others developed the two AIC sequentially. Occurrence of ES was associated with unfavourable biological prognostic factors like ZAP-70 expression, unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region gene status, 17-p13 deletion and TP53 gene mutations. Of note, the majority of patients with ES (66 %) had stereotyped B cell receptor configuration. Most patients had short-lasting remissions and required second-line treatments to control the autoimmune manifestations of ES. Patients with ES were associated with inferior survival compared to patients not developing AIC, especially when ES developed early in the course of CLL, although the reduced survival was not confirmed by multivariate analysis. In conclusion, ES secondary to CLL is a difficult-to-treat complication, characterised by adverse biological features and clinical outcome. PMID:27001309

  13. No evidence for Evans' holes in the A, B, C vibrational structure of potassium dihydrogen arsenate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomkinson, John; Parker, Stewart F.; Lennon, David

    2010-07-01

    We have used inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy to study the "A, B, C" region of the hydrogen bond in potassium dihydrogen arsenate. The broad spectral feature observed in infrared spectroscopy is shown to be associated with a ridge of constant intensity in the INS, which follows the recoil line for a unit-mass particle. The onset energy of the ridge is unclear but, we believe, is associated with the optical "C" feature at 1610 cm-1, and which we assign to ν(O-H). The "B" and "A" optical bands were both demonstrated to be two-quantum events and are, thus, not associated with the fundamental ν(O-H). They are readily assigned to the harmonic overtone δ(OH)(0-2) and the combination γ(OH)(0-1)+δ(OH)(0-1), which both sit astride the ridge and there is no evidence for Evans' holes. The other overtone, γ(OH)(0-2), has been assigned to a very weak feature, observed for the first time at 1900 cm-1. A simple model was used to describe the intensity distributions.

  14. Analysis of Zebrafish Larvae Skeletal Muscle Integrity with Evans Blue Dye

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Ann E.; Dowling, James

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish model is an emerging system for the study of neuromuscular disorders. In the study of neuromuscular diseases, the integrity of the muscle membrane is a critical disease determinant. To date, numerous neuromuscular conditions display degenerating muscle fibers with abnormal membrane integrity; this is most commonly observed in muscular dystrophies. Evans Blue Dye (EBD) is a vital, cell permeable dye that is rapidly taken into degenerating, damaged, or apoptotic cells; in contrast, it is not taken up by cells with an intact membrane. EBD injection is commonly employed to ascertain muscle integrity in mouse models of neuromuscular diseases. However, such EBD experiments require muscle dissection and/or sectioning prior to analysis. In contrast, EBD uptake in zebrafish is visualized in live, intact preparations. Here, we demonstrate a simple and straightforward methodology for performing EBD injections and analysis in live zebrafish. In addition, we demonstrate a co-injection strategy to increase efficacy of EBD analysis. Overall, this video article provides an outline to perform EBD injection and characterization in zebrafish models of neuromuscular disease. PMID:26649573

  15. Tempol protects sleep-deprivation induced behavioral deficits in aggressive male Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Naimesh; Atrooz, Fatin; Asghar, Saman; Salim, Samina

    2016-01-26

    Earlier, we reported that elevated anxiety-like behavior and high aggression in aged retired breeder Long-Evans (L-E) rats was associated with increased plasma corticosterone and elevated oxidative stress levels. In the present study, we examined how this aged aggressive and anxious rat strain responds to acute sleep deprivation (24h) and whether their behaviors can be modulated via antioxidant tempol treatment. Four groups of L-E rats were utilized: naïve control (NC), tempol treated control (T+NC), sleep deprived (SD), tempol treated and sleep deprived (T+SD). Thus, two groups were treated with tempol (1mM in drinking water for 2 weeks) while the other two were not. Two groups were subjected to acute sleep deprivation (24h) using the columns-in-water model while the other two were not. Sleep deprivation induced anxiety-like behavior, led to significant depression-like behavior and short-term memory impairment in SD rats. And, decision-making behavior also was compromised in SD rats. These behavioral and cognitive impairments were prevented with tempol treatment in T+SD rats. Tempol treatment also reduced SD-induced increase in corticosterone and oxidative stress levels in T+SD rats. These results suggest potential involvement of oxidative stress mechanisms in regulation of sleep deprivation induced behavioral and cognitive deficits in male aged-aggressive rats. PMID:26724222

  16. Working-Memory Training: Effects on Delay Discounting in Male Long Evans Rats

    PubMed Central

    Renda, C. Renee; Stein, Jeffrey S.; Madden, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Delay discounting describes the devaluation of a reward as the delay to the receipt of the reward increases. Because steep delay discounting is robustly correlated with a number of behavioral problems (e.g., substance dependence, gambling) and some evidence suggests steep discounting precedes and predicts drug-taking in humans and rats, this study sought to experimentally reduce rats' delay discounting. Human stimulant-dependent participants given working-memory training reportedly decreased their rates of discounting relative to a sham-training group (Bickel, Yi, Landes, Hill, & Baxter, 2011). To evaluate the cross-species generality of this effect, 38 male Long-Evans rats, matched on pretraining delay-discounting rates, were randomly assigned to receive 140 sessions of working-memory training or sham training (which required no memory of the sample stimulus). Large between-group differences in working memory were observed after training; however, posttraining delay-discounting rates were undifferentiated across groups. Potential explanations for these findings are discussed. PMID:25418508

  17. The effects of chronic photoperiod shifting on the physiology of female Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Deibel, Scott H; Hong, Nancy S; Himmler, Stephanie M; McDonald, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    As the prevalence of shift work is increasing, it is important to elucidate the impact that shift work has on health. Because of the alternating work schedules present in rotating shift work and working at night, shift workers are in a chronic state of circadian disruption. Animal models of circadian disruption are useful because they offer more experimental control than the largely correlational human shift work studies. The effects of chronic circadian disruption on food preference, glucose tolerance, corticosterone secretion, and performance in a stress-inducing task were investigated in female Long-Evans rats. A 64-day photoperiod shifting paradigm was used to induce circadian disruption. Surprisingly, neither the photoperiod shifted animals, nor the control animals demonstrated a preference for either an unhealthy or healthy diet. Nor was there a difference between the groups in weight gained during photoperiod shifting. However, the photoperiod shifted rats gained significantly more weight than control animals, without eating more food during discriminative fear conditioning to context (DFCTC). Surprisingly, chronic photoperiod shifting appeared to facilitate retention in the DFCTC task. The photoperiod shifted animals also had increased serum glucose values during fasting and after a glucose challenge test. The photoperiod shifted animals only had elevated corticosterone during the final two phases of photoperiod shifting. This study demonstrates that chronic photoperiod shifting elicits weight gain when exposed to a stressful event and impairs glucose tolerance in the same individual. PMID:24631903

  18. Update on Neonatal Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Rozance, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Neonatal hypoglycemia is one of the most common biochemical abnormalities encountered in the newborn. However, controversy remains surrounding its definition and management especially in asymptomatic patients. Recent Findings New information has been published that describes the incidence and timing of low glucose concentrations in the groups most at risk for asymptomatic neonatal hypoglycemia. Furthermore, one large prospective study failed to find an association between repetitive low glucose concentrations and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants. But hypoglycemia due to hyperinsulinism, especially genetic causes, continued to be associated with brain injury. New advances were made in the diagnosis and management of hyperinsulinism, including acquired hyperinsulinism in small for gestational age infants and others. Continuous glucose monitoring remains an attractive strategy for future research in this area. Summary The fundamental question of how best to manage asymptomatic newborns with low glucose concentrations remains unanswered. Balancing the risks of over treating newborns with low glucose concentrations who are undergoing a normal transition following birth against the risks of under treating those in whom low glucose concentrations are pathological, dangerous, and/or a harbinger of serious metabolic disease remains a challenge. PMID:24275620

  19. Neonatal Subventricular Zone Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, David M.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Bordey, Angélique

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) line the postnatal lateral ventricles and give rise to multiple cell types which include neurons, astrocytes, and ependymal cells1. Understanding the molecular pathways responsible for NSC self-renewal, commitment, and differentiation is critical for harnessing their unique potential to repair the brain and better understand central nervous system disorders. Previous methods for the manipulation of mammalian systems required the time consuming and expensive endeavor of genetic engineering at the whole animal level2. Thus, the vast majority of studies have explored the functions of NSC molecules in vitro or in invertebrates. Here, we demonstrate the simple and rapid technique to manipulate neonatal NPCs that is referred to as neonatal subventricular zone (SVZ) electroporation. Similar techniques were developed a decade ago to study embryonic NSCs and have aided studies on cortical development3,4 . More recently this was applied to study the postnatal rodent forebrain5-7. This technique results in robust labeling of SVZ NSCs and their progeny. Thus, postnatal SVZ electroporation provides a cost and time effective alternative for mammalian NSC genetic engineering. PMID:23426329

  20. Clinical characteristics of neonates with inborn errors of metabolism detected by Tandem MS analysis in Oman.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Surendra Nath; Venugopalan, Poothirikovil

    2007-10-01

    We reviewed the clinical profile of our neonates diagnosed to have inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) by Tandem Mass Spectrometry (TMS) over a seven years period, and compared the results with published reports. We also attempted to evaluate various clinical situations wherein the screening test would yield a high pick up rate. Among the 166 neonates studied (10 aged 1 day, 79 aged 2-7 days and 77 aged 8-28 days), significant abnormalities on TMS suggestive of IEM were detected in 38 babies (23%), most common diseases diagnosed were maple syrup urine disease (10 neonates), propionic acidemia (8 neonates), urea cycle diseases (6 neonates) and isovaleric acidemia (4 neonates). The detection incidence was calculated to be one positive case out of every 4 to 5 babies tested. A high prevalence of parental consanguinity and high level of positive family history of affected siblings were the highlights of this study. The major clinical situations where testing was helpful were (a) unexplained acute neonatal encephalopathy, (b) positive family history of known or suspected IEM and (c) new born presenting with abnormal serum biochemistry suggestive of IEM. PMID:17314022

  1. Neonates need tailored drug formulations

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Drugs are very strong tools used to improve outcome in neonates. Despite this fact and in contrast to tailored perfusion equipment, incubators or ventilators for neonates, we still commonly use drug formulations initially developed for adults. We would like to make the point that drug formulations given to neonates need to be tailored for this age group. Besides the obvious need to search for active compounds that take the pathophysiology of the newborn into account, this includes the dosage and formulation. The dosage or concentration should facilitate the administration of low amounts and be flexible since clearance is lower in neonates with additional extensive between-individual variability. Formulations need to be tailored for dosage variability in the low ranges and also to the clinical characteristics of neonates. A specific focus of interest during neonatal drug development therefore is a need to quantify and limit excipient exposure based on the available knowledge of their safety or toxicity. Until such tailored vials and formulations become available, compounding practices for drug formulations in neonates should be evaluated to guarantee the correct dosing, product stability and safety. PMID:25254168

  2. Bacillus species infections in neonates.

    PubMed

    Patrick, C C; Langston, C; Baker, C J

    1989-01-01

    A case of neonatal meningitis due to Bacillus cereus is presented. Postmortem histopathologic examination revealed an invasive disease involving the brain parenchyma, with a cellular composition consistent with an indolent process indicative of possible perinatally acquired infection. One other neonate from our institution with systemic disease due to a nonanthrax bacillus is described, and a review of the English-language literature since 1900 reveals four additional neonates infected with these unusual pathogens. Such Bacillus species infections are rare but should be suspected when gram-positive bacilli are noted on gram stain, especially in an immunocompromised host. PMID:2505353

  3. TURAN and EVAN Mediate Pollen Tube Reception in Arabidopsis Synergids through Protein Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Heike; Shimosato-Asano, Hiroko; Boisson-Dernier, Aurélien; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2015-01-01

    Pollen tube (PT) reception in flowering plants describes the crosstalk between the male and female gametophytes upon PT arrival at the synergid cells of the ovule. It leads to PT growth arrest, rupture, and sperm cell release, and is thus essential to ensure double fertilization. Here, we describe TURAN (TUN) and EVAN (EVN), two novel members of the PT reception pathway that is mediated by the FERONIA (FER) receptor-like kinase (RLK). Like fer, mutations in these two genes lead to PT overgrowth inside the female gametophyte (FG) without PT rupture. Mapping by next-generation sequencing, cytological analysis of reporter genes, and biochemical assays of glycoproteins in RNAi knockdown mutants revealed both genes to be involved in protein N-glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). TUN encodes a uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glycosyltransferase superfamily protein and EVN a dolichol kinase. In addition to their common role during PT reception in the synergids, both genes have distinct functions in the pollen: whereas EVN is essential for pollen development, TUN is required for PT growth and integrity by affecting the stability of the pollen-specific FER homologs ANXUR1 (ANX1) and ANX2. ANX1- and ANX2-YFP reporters are not expressed in tun pollen grains, but ANX1-YFP is degraded via the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway, likely underlying the anx1/2-like premature PT rupture phenotype of tun mutants. Thus, as in animal sperm–egg interactions, protein glycosylation is essential for the interaction between the female and male gametophytes during PT reception to ensure fertilization and successful reproduction. PMID:25919390

  4. Evans Blue as a Simple Method to Discriminate Mosquitoes’ Feeding Choice on Small Laboratory Animals

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Ceres; Fujita, André; Gueroni, Daniele I.; Ramos, Anderson D.; Capurro, Margareth L.; Sá-Nunes, Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Background Temperature, humidity, vision, and particularly odor, are external cues that play essential roles to mosquito blood feeding and oviposition. Entomological and behavioral studies employ well-established methods to evaluate mosquito attraction or repellency and to identify the source of the blood meal. Despite the efficacy of such methods, the costs involved in the production or acquisition of all parts, components and the chemical reagents involved are unaffordable for most researchers from poor countries. Thus, a simple and relatively low-cost method capable of evaluating mosquito preferences and the blood volume ingested is desirable. Principal Findings By using Evans blue (EB) vital dye and few standard laboratory supplies, we developed and validated a system capable of evaluating mosquito’s choice between two different host sources of blood. EB-injected and PBS-injected mice submitted to a number of situations were placed side by side on the top of a rounded recipient covered with tulle fabric and containing Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Homogenates from engorged mosquitoes clearly revealed the blood source (EB- or PBS-injected host), either visually or spectrometrically. This method was able to estimate the number of engorded mosquitoes, the volume of blood ingested, the efficacy of a commercial repellent and the attractant effects of black color and human sweat. Significance Despite the obvious limitations due to its simplicity and to the dependence of a live source of blood, the present method can be used to assess a number of host variables (diet, aging, immunity, etc) and optimized for several aspects of mosquito blood feeding and vector-host interactions. Thus, it is proposed as an alternative to field studies, and it could be used for initial screenings of chemical compound candidates for repellents or attractants, since it replicates natural conditions of exposure to mosquitoes in a laboratory environment. PMID:25333369

  5. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia in a Premature Neonate Mimicking Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Luen; Yen, Hsiu-Ju; Chen, Shu-Jen; Hung, Giun-Yi; Tsao, Pei-Chen; Soong, Wen-Jue

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare hematologic malignancy in children. Its presentations include anemia, thrombocytopenia, monocytosis, skin rash, marked hepatomegaly, and/or splenomegaly. Fever and respiratory involvement are common. Here, we report a case of a premature neonate with initial symptoms of respiratory distress. She gradually developed clinical manifestations of JMML that mimicked neonatal sepsis. Three weeks after birth, JMML was diagnosed. This is the first reported case of JMML presenting in a premature infant in Taiwan. PMID:24269860

  6. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  7. Neonatal sensitization to latex.

    PubMed

    Worth, J

    2000-05-01

    Babies born in delivery rooms of hospitals are exposed to latex through skin and mucous membrane contact with prepowdered latex gloves worn by midwives and doctors, and through the inhalation of latex-bound starch powder in the air of the delivery room. This paper examines the hypothesis that they are at risk for latex sensitization, and that part of the sharp increase of childhood asthma, eczema and anaphylaxis in the past 30-40 years may be linked. These possibilities seem hitherto unsuspected. In over 700 papers on latex allergy no mention of neonatal exposure to latex has been found. Even obstetric papers discussing the risks for an atopic mother (atopy - a tendency to develop allergies) do not seem to anticipate any risk for the baby, who might also be atopic. Latex allergy is primarily regarded as an occupational hazard. This paper suggests that it is a hazard for every baby handled by latex gloves at birth. PMID:10859678

  8. Neonatal pulmonary hemosiderosis.

    PubMed

    Limme, Boris; Nicolescu, Ramona; Misson, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare complex entity characterized clinically by acute or recurrent episodes of hemoptysis secondary to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. The radiographic features are variable, including diffuse alveolar-type infiltrates, and interstitial reticular and micronodular patterns. We describe a 3-week-old infant presenting with hemoptysis and moderate respiratory distress. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis was the first working diagnosis at the Emergency Department and was confirmed, 2 weeks later, by histological studies (bronchoalveolar lavage). The immunosuppressive therapy by 1 mg/kg/d prednisone was immediately started, the baby returned home on steroid therapy at a dose of 0,5 mg/kg/d. The diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis should be evocated at any age, even in the neonate, when the clinical presentation (hemoptysis and abnormal radiological chest images) is strongly suggestive. PMID:25389504

  9. Therapeutic drug monitoring in neonates.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Steven; Allegaert, Karel

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) aims to integrate drug measurement results into clinical decision making. The basic rules apply when using TDM in neonates (aminoglycosides, vancomycin, phenobarbital, digoxin), but additional factors should also be taken into account. First, due to both pharmacokinetic variability and non-pharmacokinetic factors, the correlation between dosage and concentration is poor in neonates, but can be overcome with the use of more complex, validated dosing regimens. Second, the time to reach steady state is prolonged, especially when no loading dose is used. Consequently, the timing of TDM sampling is important in this population. Third, the target concentration may be uncertain (vancomycin) or depend on specific factors (phenobarbital during whole body cooling). Finally, because of differences in matrix composition (eg, protein, bilirubin), assay-related inaccuracies may be different in neonates. We anticipate that complex validated dosing regimens, with subsequent TDM sampling and Bayesian forecasting, are the next step in tailoring pharmacotherapy to individual neonates. PMID:26803050

  10. Mastitis in a neonatal filly

    PubMed Central

    Gilday, Rebecca; Lewis, Danyse; Lohmann, Katharina L.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal mastitis is a rare occurrence in the horse. This report documents a case of mastitis caused by an organism within the Streptococcus dysgalactiae group in a 1-week-old Paint filly. PMID:25565717

  11. Neonatal and pediatric respiratory care

    SciTech Connect

    Koff, P.B. ); Eitzman, D.V.; Nev, J. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 23 chapters. Some of the titles are: Radiographic evaluations; Neonatal parenchymal diseases: physiologic development; Oxygen therapy; Pediatric parenchymal diseases; and Care of the neurologically injured child.

  12. Neonatal euthanasia: The Groningen Protocol*

    PubMed Central

    Vizcarrondo, Felipe E.

    2014-01-01

    For the past thirty years, voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide of adult patients have been common practice in the Netherlands. Neonatal euthanasia was recently legalized in the Netherlands and the Groningen Protocol (GP) was developed to regulate the practice. Supporters claim compliance with the GP criteria makes neonatal euthanasia ethically permissible. An examination of the criteria used by the Protocol to justify the euthanasia of seriously ill neonates reveals the criteria are not based on firm moral principles. The taking of the life of a seriously ill person is not the solution to the pain and suffering of the dying process. It is the role of the medical professional to care for the ailing patient with love and compassion, always preserving the person's dignity. Neonatal euthanasia is not ethically permissible. PMID:25473136

  13. Therapeutic hypothermia in neonatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Cornette, L.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a serious condition affecting newborn infants which can result in death and disability. There is now strong clinical evidence that moderate post-asphyxial total body cooling or hypothermia in full term neonates results in long-term neuroprotection, allowing us to proclaim this innovative therapy as “standard of care.” The treatment is a time-critical emergency and should be started within 6 hours after the insult. Such requires optimal collaboration among local hospitals, transport teams and the closest neonatal intensive care unit. The technique is only safe when applied according to published clinical trial protocols, and with admission of these patients to a neonatal intensive care unit. Future studies should be aimed at optimizing the onset, duration, and depth of hypothermia. Combination of hypothermia and drugs may further improve neuroprotection in asphyxiated full term neonates. PMID:24753900

  14. Neonatal euthanasia: The Groningen Protocol.

    PubMed

    Vizcarrondo, Felipe E

    2014-11-01

    For the past thirty years, voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide of adult patients have been common practice in the Netherlands. Neonatal euthanasia was recently legalized in the Netherlands and the Groningen Protocol (GP) was developed to regulate the practice. Supporters claim compliance with the GP criteria makes neonatal euthanasia ethically permissible. An examination of the criteria used by the Protocol to justify the euthanasia of seriously ill neonates reveals the criteria are not based on firm moral principles. The taking of the life of a seriously ill person is not the solution to the pain and suffering of the dying process. It is the role of the medical professional to care for the ailing patient with love and compassion, always preserving the person's dignity. Neonatal euthanasia is not ethically permissible. PMID:25473136

  15. Historical Trends in Neonatal Nursing: Developmental Care and NIDCAP.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Spence

    2016-01-01

    The focus of neonatal nursing has shifted from a highly technical approach to one of supportive interventions and a more individualized developmental approach. Developmental care is described as a philosophy of care that requires rethinking the relationships between infants, families, and healthcare professionals. Various models of developmental care exist; however, they all include a variety of activities designed to manage the environment and individualize the care provided to premature and/or sick infants. PMID:27465465

  16. Universal bilirubin screening for severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, V K; Vilms, R J; Hamerman-Johnson, L

    2010-10-01

    To reduce the incidence of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia affecting newborns with jaundice in the United States and to prevent kernicterus, there is a need to implement proven prevention strategies for severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia as recommended in the 2004 American Academy of Pediatrics Guidelines for newborns >35 weeks gestational age. The purpose of universal predischarge bilirubin screening is to identify infants with bilirubin levels >75th percentile for age in hours and track those with rapid rates of bilirubin rise (>0.2 mg per 100 ml per h). Early identification has been reported to predict severe hyperbilirubinemia and allow for evidence-based targeted interventions. A systems approach is likely to reduce the preventable causes of acute bilirubin encephalopathy. To do so, highest priority should be given to (i) designating extreme hyperbilirubinemia (total serum bilirubin >427 μmol l(-1) or >25 mg per 100 ml) as a reportable condition by laboratories and health-care providers through public health mandates; (ii) implementation of Joint Commission's Sentinel Report for kernicterus; (iii) nursing outreach to communities for education of prospective parents; (iv) development of clinical pathways to monitor, evaluate and track infants with extreme hyperbilirubinemia; and (v) societal awareness. These efforts should be monitored by a state and national surveillance system in order to critically improve the timeliness and completeness of notifications and to allow evaluation and interventions at the policy and individual family level. PMID:20877410

  17. Evans Syndrome in Children: Long-Term Outcome in a Prospective French National Observational Cohort.

    PubMed

    Aladjidi, Nathalie; Fernandes, Helder; Leblanc, Thierry; Vareliette, Amélie; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Bertrand, Yves; Chambost, Hervé; Pasquet, Marlène; Mazingue, Françoise; Guitton, Corinne; Pellier, Isabelle; Roqueplan-Bellmann, Françoise; Armari-Alla, Corinne; Thomas, Caroline; Marie-Cardine, Aude; Lejars, Odile; Fouyssac, Fanny; Bayart, Sophie; Lutz, Patrick; Piguet, Christophe; Jeziorski, Eric; Rohrlich, Pierre; Lemoine, Philippe; Bodet, Damien; Paillard, Catherine; Couillault, Gérard; Millot, Frédéric; Fischer, Alain; Pérel, Yves; Leverger, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Evans syndrome (ES) is a rare autoimmune disorder whose long-term outcome is not well known. In France, a collaborative pediatric network set up via the National Rare Disease Plan now provides comprehensive clinical data in children with this disease. Patients aged less than 18 years at the initial presentation of autoimmune cytopenia have been prospectively included into a national observational cohort since 2004. The definition of ES was restricted to the simultaneous or sequential association of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Cases were deemed secondary if associated with a primitive immunodeficiency or systemic lupus erythematosus. In December 2014, we analyzed the data pertaining to 156 children from 26 centers with ES whose diagnosis was made between 1981 and 2014. Median age (range) at the onset of cytopenia was 5.4 years (0.2-17.2). In 85 sequential cases, the time lapse between the first episodes of AIHA and ITP was 2.4 years (0.1-16.3). The follow-up period as from ES diagnosis was 6.5 years (0.1-28.8). ES was secondary, revealing another underlying disease, in 10% of cases; various associated immune manifestations (mainly lymphoproliferation, other autoimmune diseases, and hypogammaglobulinemia) were observed in 60% of cases; and ES remained primary in 30% of cases. Five-year ITP and AIHA relapse-free survival were 25 and 61%, respectively. Overall, 69% of children required one or more second-line immune treatments, and 15 patients (10%) died at the age of 14.3 years (1.7-28.1). To our knowledge, this is the first consistent long-term clinical description of this rare syndrome. It underscores the high rate of associated immune manifestations and the burden of long-term complications and treatment toxicity. Future challenges include (1) the identification of the underlying genetic defects inducing immune dysregulation and (2) the need to better characterize patient subgroups and second

  18. Dietary copper triggers onset of fulminant hepatitis in the Long-Evans cinnamon rat model

    PubMed Central

    Siaj, Ramsi; Sauer, Vanessa; Stöppeler, Sandra; Spiegel, Hans-Ullrich; Köhler, Gabriele; Zibert, Andree; Schmidt, Hartmut HJ

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of dietary copper given at different time points on the onset of fulminant hepatitis. METHODS: The Long-Evans cinnamon (LEC) rat model of Wilson’s disease (WD) was used to study the impact of high dietary copper (hCu) on the induction of fulminant hepatitis at early or late time points of life. High Cu diet was started in rat pups or in adults (month 5) for three months. Animals that received reduced dietary copper (rCu) throughout their lifetime served as a control. Hepatitis-associated serum markers (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin) were analyzed in animal groups receiving hCu or rCu. Liver copper content and liver histology were revealed at sacrifice. A set of 5 marker genes previously found to be affected in injured liver and which are related to angiogenesis (Vegfa), fat metabolism (Srebf1), extracellular matrix (Timp1), oxidative stress (Hmox1), and the cell cycle (Cdkn1a) were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Regardless of the time point when hCu was started, LEC rats (35/36) developed fulminant hepatitis and died. Animals receiving rCu (36/36) remained healthy, did not develop hepatitis, and survived long term without symptoms of overt disease, although liver copper accumulated in adult animals (477 ± 75 μg/g). With regard to start of hCu, onset of fulminant hepatitis was significantly (P < 0.001) earlier in adults (35 ± 9 d) that showed pre-accumulation of liver copper as compared to the pup group (77 ± 15 d). Hepatitis-associated serum markers, liver copper and liver histology, as well as gene expression, were affected in LEC rats receiving hCu. However, except for early and rapid onset of hepatitis, biochemical and molecular markers were similar at the early and late time points of disease. CONCLUSION: Rapid onset of fulminant hepatitis in asymptomatic LEC rats with elevated liver copper suggests that there is a critical threshold of liver copper which is important

  19. An efficient shooting algorithm for Evans function calculations in large systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpherys, Jeffrey; Zumbrun, Kevin

    2006-08-01

    In Evans function computations of the spectra of asymptotically constant-coefficient linear operators, a basic issue is the efficient and numerically stable computation of subspaces evolving according to the associated eigenvalue ODE. For small systems, a fast, shooting algorithm may be obtained by representing subspaces as single exterior products [J.C. Alexander, R. Sachs, Linear instability of solitary waves of a Boussinesq-type equation: A computer assisted computation, Nonlinear World 2 (4) (1995) 471-507; L.Q. Brin, Numerical testing of the stability of viscous shock waves, Ph.D. Thesis, Indiana University, Bloomington, 1998; L.Q. Brin, Numerical testing of the stability of viscous shock waves, Math. Comp. 70 (235) (2001) 1071-1088; L.Q. Brin, K. Zumbrun, Analytically varying eigenvectors and the stability of viscous shock waves, in: Seventh Workshop on Partial Differential Equations, Part I, 2001, Rio de Janeiro, Mat. Contemp. 22 (2002) 19-32; T.J. Bridges, G. Derks, G. Gottwald, Stability and instability of solitary waves of the fifth-order KdV equation: A numerical framework, Physica D 172 (1-4) (2002) 190-216]. For large systems, however, the dimension of the exterior-product space quickly becomes prohibitive, growing as (n/k), where n is the dimension of the system written as a first-order ODE and k (typically ˜n/2) is the dimension of the subspace. We resolve this difficulty by the introduction of a simple polar coordinate algorithm representing “pure” (monomial) products as scalar multiples of orthonormal bases, for which the angular equation is a numerically optimized version of the continuous orthogonalization method of Drury-Davey [A. Davey, An automatic orthonormalization method for solving stiff boundary value problems, J. Comput. Phys. 51 (2) (1983) 343-356; L.O. Drury, Numerical solution of Orr-Sommerfeld-type equations, J. Comput. Phys. 37 (1) (1980) 133-139] and the radial equation is evaluable by quadrature. Notably, the polar

  20. Spontaneous Resolution of Evans-Showell-Type Polyoxometalates in Constructing Chiral Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Architectures.

    PubMed

    An, Haiyan; Wang, Lin; Hu, Ying; Xu, Tieqi; Hou, Yujiao

    2016-01-01

    Six new hybrid compounds based on [Co2Mo10H4O38](6-) polyoxoanion, (4-H2pya)6Co2Mo10H4O38·10H2O 1 (4-Hpya =3-(4-pyridyl)acrylic acid) and (4-H2pya)4[M(H2O)6][Co2Mo10H4O38]·5H2O (M = Co 2, Ni 3, Cu 4, Zn 5, Cd 6), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, TG analysis, solid diffuse reflective spectrum, powder X-ray diffraction, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in the centrosymmetric space group P-1, which is built up of protonated 4-H2pya molecules and isolated [Co2Mo10H4O38](6-) polyoxoanions. Isostructural compounds 2-6 crystallize in the chiral space group P1 by spontaneous resolution, as a conglomerate of two enantiomerically pure crystals, which were obtained by adding different metal cations to the reaction system of compound 1. The structures of 2-6 comprise chiral [Co2Mo10H4O38](6-) anions, cationic [M(H2O)6](2+) units, and protonated 4-H2pya ligands. The chiral [Co2Mo10H4O38](6-) polyoxoanions can be connected up together by directional hydrogen-bonding interactions among terminal oxygen atoms of anions, coordinated water molecules and organic ligands to construct a 3D supramolecular chiral framework in 2-6. The absolute configuration of 2-6 was determined from the Flack parameter by X-ray crystallography and solid state circular dichroism spectroscopy. As far as we know, compounds 2-6 represent the first examples of chiral inroganic-organic hybrid species based on Evans-Showell-type polyoxometalates. Furthermore, the second harmonic generation (SHG) activities for 2 and 4 were measured, showing an SHG efficiency of approximately 0.9 × KH2PO4. PMID:26678714

  1. The effect of RMP-7 and its derivative on transporting Evans blue liposomes into the brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaobin; Xie, Ying; Jin, Yiguang; Hou, Xinpu; Ye, Liya; Lou, Jinning

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the effect of RMP-7 and its derivative on drug transport across blood brain barrier (BBB), RMP-7 and DSPE-PEG-NHS [1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-n-[poly(ethyleneglycol)]-hydroxy succinamide, PEG M 3400] were conjugated under mild conditions and the reaction ratio was determined using MALDI-TOF-MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry). An endothelial cell monolayer in vitro BBB model was established and used to determine the bioactivity of RMP-7 and its derivative "opening BBB." Horse radish peroxide (HRP), liposome (HRP-L-PEG), and Evans blue (EB) liposome (EB-L-PEG) were prepared using the reverse-phase evaporation method. HRP-L-PEG-RMP-7 and EB-L-PEG-RMP-7 were obtained by inserting DSPE-PEG-RMP-7 into the surface of liposome. The bioactivity of RMP-7 and DSPE-PEG-RMP-7 opening BBB were evaluated to determine their effect on the permeation ratio of HRP and HRP liposome across the in vitro BBB model. To evaluate the in vivo bioactivity of RMP-7 and DSPE-PEG-RMP-7 on EB transport across BBB into the brain, the indicated compounds were administered to rats. Then, brain slices were analyzed using confocal laser scanning microcopy and the EB concentration in the brain, liver, spleen, lung, and kidney was determined using the formamide-extraction-ultraviolet-spectrophotometric method. The results demonstrated that RMP-7 was conjugated with DSPE-PEG-NHS at the molecular ratio of 1:1 and the product is DSPE-PEG-RMP-7. Compared with adding HRP alone, RMP-7 and DSPE-PEG-RMP-7 improved 2- to 3-fold the transport of HRP in the in vitro BBB model. The in vivo experiments showed that DSPE-PEG-RMP-7 was better at facilitating EB transport into brain than RMP-7. The reason may be that DSPE-PEG-RMP-7 can "open BBB" as soon as the EB-L-PEG-RMP-7 reaches BBB. PMID:15742555

  2. Evans Syndrome in Children: Long-Term Outcome in a Prospective French National Observational Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Aladjidi, Nathalie; Fernandes, Helder; Leblanc, Thierry; Vareliette, Amélie; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Bertrand, Yves; Chambost, Hervé; Pasquet, Marlène; Mazingue, Françoise; Guitton, Corinne; Pellier, Isabelle; Roqueplan-Bellmann, Françoise; Armari-Alla, Corinne; Thomas, Caroline; Marie-Cardine, Aude; Lejars, Odile; Fouyssac, Fanny; Bayart, Sophie; Lutz, Patrick; Piguet, Christophe; Jeziorski, Eric; Rohrlich, Pierre; Lemoine, Philippe; Bodet, Damien; Paillard, Catherine; Couillault, Gérard; Millot, Frédéric; Fischer, Alain; Pérel, Yves; Leverger, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Evans syndrome (ES) is a rare autoimmune disorder whose long-term outcome is not well known. In France, a collaborative pediatric network set up via the National Rare Disease Plan now provides comprehensive clinical data in children with this disease. Patients aged less than 18 years at the initial presentation of autoimmune cytopenia have been prospectively included into a national observational cohort since 2004. The definition of ES was restricted to the simultaneous or sequential association of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Cases were deemed secondary if associated with a primitive immunodeficiency or systemic lupus erythematosus. In December 2014, we analyzed the data pertaining to 156 children from 26 centers with ES whose diagnosis was made between 1981 and 2014. Median age (range) at the onset of cytopenia was 5.4 years (0.2–17.2). In 85 sequential cases, the time lapse between the first episodes of AIHA and ITP was 2.4 years (0.1–16.3). The follow-up period as from ES diagnosis was 6.5 years (0.1–28.8). ES was secondary, revealing another underlying disease, in 10% of cases; various associated immune manifestations (mainly lymphoproliferation, other autoimmune diseases, and hypogammaglobulinemia) were observed in 60% of cases; and ES remained primary in 30% of cases. Five-year ITP and AIHA relapse-free survival were 25 and 61%, respectively. Overall, 69% of children required one or more second-line immune treatments, and 15 patients (10%) died at the age of 14.3 years (1.7–28.1). To our knowledge, this is the first consistent long-term clinical description of this rare syndrome. It underscores the high rate of associated immune manifestations and the burden of long-term complications and treatment toxicity. Future challenges include (1) the identification of the underlying genetic defects inducing immune dysregulation and (2) the need to better characterize patient subgroups and second

  3. Clinical Features of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients Complicated With Evans Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Wu, Xiuhua; Wang, Laifang; Li, Jing; Chen, Hua; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical features of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) complicated with Evans syndrome (ES). We conducted a retrospective case–control study to compare the clinical and laboratory features of age- and gender-matched lupus patients with and without ES in 1:3 ratios. In 5724 hospitalized SLE patients, we identified 27 (0.47%, 22 women and 5 men, average age 34.2 years) SLE patients complicated with ES. Fifteen patients (55.6%) presented with hematologic abnormalities initially, including 6 (22.2%) cases of isolated ITP, 4 (14.8%) cases of isolated AIHA, and 5 (18.5%) cases of classical ES. The median intervals between hematological presentations the diagnosis of SLE was 36 months (range 0–252). ES developed after the SLE diagnosis in 4 patients (14.8%), and concomitantly with SLE diagnosis in 8 patients (29.6%). Systemic involvements are frequently observed in SLE patients with ES, including fever (55.6%), serositis (51.9%), hair loss (40.7%), lupus nephritis (37%), Raynaud phenomenon (33.3%), neuropsychiatric (33.3%) and pulmonary involvement (25.9%), and photosensitivity (25.9%). The incidence of photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, elevated serum IgG level, and lupus nephritis in patients with ES or without ES was 25.9% vs 6.2% (P = 0.007), 88.9% vs 67.1% (P = 0.029), 48.1% vs 24.4% (P = 0.021), and 37% vs 64.2% (P = 0.013), respectively. Twenty-five (92.6%) patients achieved improvement following treatment of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants as well as splenectomy, whereas 6 patients experienced the relapse and 1 patient died from renal failure during the follow-up. ES is a relatively rare complication of SLE. Photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, and elevated serum IgG level were frequently observed in ES patients, but lupus nephritis was less observed. More than half of patients presented with hematological manifestation at onset, and progress to typical lupus over months to years

  4. Oxygen consumption and distribution in the Long-Evans rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jennifer C.M.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oxygen distribution and consumption in the pigmented Long-Evans rat retina in vivo during dark and light adaptation, and to compare these results to previous work on cat and albino rat. Double-barreled microelectrodes recorded both intraretinal PO2 depth profiles and the electroretinogram (ERG), which was used to identify the boundaries of the retina. Light adaptation decreased photoreceptor oxygen consumption per unit volume (Qav) from 3.0±0.4 ml•100 g−1•min−1 (mean ± SEM) in darkness to 1.8±0.2 ml•100 g−1•min−1 and increased minimum outer retinal PO2 at the inner segments (Pmin) from 17.4±3.0 to 29.9±5.3 mmHg. The effects of light on outer retinal PO2 and Qav were similar to those previously observed in cat, monkey, and albino rats; however, dark-adapted Pmin was higher in rat than cat. The parameters derived from fitting the oxygen diffusion model to the rat data were compared to those from cat. Oxygen consumption of the inner segments (Q2) and choroidal PO2 (PC) in rat and cat were similar. Pmin was higher in rat than in cat for two reasons: first, rat photoreceptors have a shorter oxygen consuming region; and second, the retinal circulation supplied a greater fraction of consumed oxygen to rat photoreceptors. The average PO2 across the inner retina (PIR) was not different in dark adaptation (25.4±4.8 mm Hg) and light adaptation (28.8±5.4 mmHg) when measured from PO2 profiles. However, with the microelectrode stationary at 9–18% retinal depth, a small consistent decrease in PO2 occurred during illumination. Flickering light at 6 Hz decreased inner retinal PO2 significantly more than an equivalent steady illumination, suggesting that changes in blood flow did not completely compensate for increased metabolism. This study comprehensively characterized rat retinal oxygenation in both light and dark, and determined the similarities and differences between rat and cat retinas. PMID:22828049

  5. The expression and function of human CD300 receptors on blood circulating mononuclear cells are distinct in neonates and adults.

    PubMed

    Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Vitallé, Joana; García-Obregón, Susana; Astigarraga, Itziar; Eguizabal, Cristina; Santos, Silvia; Simhadri, Venkateswara R; Borrego, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neonates are more susceptible to infections than adults. This susceptibility is thought to reflect neonates' qualitative and quantitative defects in the adaptive and innate immune responses. Differential expression of cell surface receptors may result in altered thresholds of neonatal immune cell activation. We determined whether the expression and function of the lipid-binding CD300 family of receptors are different on neonatal immune cells compared to adult immune cells. A multiparametric flow cytometry analysis was performed to determine the expression of CD300 receptors on adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neonatal cord blood mononuclear cells. The expression of the CD300a inhibitory receptor was significantly reduced on cells from the newborn adaptive immune system, and neonatal antigen presenting cells exhibited a different CD300 receptors expression pattern. We also found differential LPS-mediated regulation of CD300 receptors expression on adult monocytes compared to cord blood monocytes, and that CD300c and CD300e-mediated activation was quantitatively different in neonatal monocytes. This is the first complete study examining the expression of CD300 receptors on human neonatal immune cells compared with adult immune cells. Significant differences in the expression and function of CD300 receptors may help to explain the peculiarities and distinctness of the neonatal immune responses. PMID:27595670

  6. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Jeican, Ionuţ Isaia; Ichim, Gabriela; Gheban, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison's disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis. PMID:27547054

  7. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children

    PubMed Central

    JEICAN, IONUŢ ISAIA; ICHIM, GABRIELA; GHEBAN, DAN

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison’s disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis. PMID:27547054

  8. Changes in plasma glucose in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats after oral administration of maple syrup.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Tanabe, Wataru; Ito, Yoshimasa; Kurabuchi, Satoshi; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether maple syrup is a suitable sweetener in the management of type 2 diabetes using the Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat. The enhancement in plasma glucose (PG) and glucose absorption in the small intestine were lower after the oral administration of maple syrup than after sucrose administration in OLETF rats, and no significant differences were observed in insulin levels. These data suggested that maple syrup might inhibit the absorption of glucose from the small intestine and preventing the enhancement of PG in OLETF rats. Therefore, maple syrup might help in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25757438

  9. Functional Neonatal Echocardiography: Indian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Suryawanshi, Pradeep B.; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Patnaik, Suprabha; Malshe, Nandini; Kalrao, Vijay; Lalwani, Sanjay; Surwade, Jitendra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Functional echocardiography, as opposed to echocardiography as performed by the cardiologist, is the bedside utilization of cardiac ultrasound to take after functional and haemodynamic changes longitudinally. Information reflecting cardiovascular capacity and systemic and pulmonary blood flow in sick preterm and term neonates can be observed utilizing this strategy. Information is lacking on its use in neonatal units in India. Aim To characterize the impact of Functional neonatal echocardiography (FnECHO) programme on decision making in a tertiary care centre in India by evaluating its frequency of use, patient characteristics, and indications. Materials and Methods Prospective observational study of neonates in a tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in Pune (India) from February 2014 to January 2015. All the neonates undergoing FnECHO during this 12 month period based on clinical findings were included in the study. Data extracted from the review of the clinical notes included gestational age, birth-weight, mode of delivery, Apgar scores, details of respiratory and cardiovascular support, timing of FnECHO and any other clinical diagnosis. The findings of echocardiography were recorded and correlated with the clinical and other laboratory or X-ray findings. If these findings indicated a change in management, it was instituted. Results A total of 348 echocardiographic studies were performed in 187 neonates (mean 1.86; SD 2.02). The most frequent indication was Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) assessment (n= 174, 50%), followed by haemodynamic instability (n=43, 12.36%). The results of FnECHO modified treatment in 148 cases (42.50%) in the form of addition and/or change in the treatment or avoidance of unnecessary intervention. Conclusion FnECHO is frequently used in the NICU setting and may be a useful tool to guide treatment. PDA assessment and haemodynamic instability are the most frequent indications. To validate its usefulness, well co

  10. Overview of neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benay

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal lupus (NL) is defined by the presentation of the fetus and the newborn who possess autoantibodies received from the mother. It is the dysfunction of the maternal immune system that leads to the production of autoantibodies to anti-Sjögren syndrome-A, anti-Sjögren syndrome-B, and anti-ribonuclear protein antigens. These antibodies are shared through the placenta and produce bodily changes in the fetal skin and heart, as well as potential changes in other body systems. Congenital complete heart block is the most dangerous manifestation of NL that can occur in utero or after birth. This article will provide an overview the presentation of NL and current therapies. Prenatal steroids have been the mainstay of therapy to try to reverse first- and second-degree congenital heart block and to prevent progression to a more advanced stage. New therapies are combining steroids with intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. This article will provide guidelines for practitioners so they can consider NL as a differential diagnosis when presented with cutaneous lesions, congenital heart block, or abnormal findings in the hematologic, hepatobiliary, neurologic, and musculoskeletal systems. PMID:24100008

  11. [Neonatal mucolipidosis type II].

    PubMed

    Hmami, F; Oulmaati, A; Bouharrou, A

    2016-01-01

    Mucolipidosis type II (ML II, OMIM 252,500) is an autosomal recessive disorder clinically characterized by facial dysmorphia similar to Hurler syndrome and pronounced gingival hypertrophy. The disorder is caused by a defect in targeting acid hydrolases on the surface of lysosomes, which impede their entry and lead to accumulation of undigested substrates in lysosomes. The onset of the symptoms is usually in infancy, beginning in the 6th month of life. Early onset, at birth or even in utero, is a sign of severity and involves the specific dysmorphia as well as skeletal dysplasia related to hyperparathyroidism. We report on a severe neonatal form of this disorder revealed by respiratory distress with severe chest deformity. The dysmorphic syndrome, combining coarse features, pronounced gingival hypertrophy, with diffuse bone demineralization and secondary hyperparathyroidism associating significant elevation of parathyroid hormone and alkaline phosphatase with normal levels of vitamin D and calcium were characteristics of mucolipidosis type II. Recognizing this specific association of anomalies helps eliminate the differential diagnosis and establish appropriate diagnosis and care. PMID:26552632

  12. A new neurological focus in neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Sonia L; Glass, Hannah C; Peloquin, Susan; Ferriero, Donna M

    2011-09-01

    Advances in the care of high-risk newborn babies have contributed to reduced mortality rates for premature and term births, but the surviving neonates often have increased neurological morbidity. Therapies aimed at reducing the neurological sequelae of birth asphyxia at term have brought hypothermia treatment into the realm of standard care. However, this therapy does not provide complete protection from neurological complications and a need to develop adjunctive therapies for improved neurological outcomes remains. In addition, the care of neurologically impaired neonates, regardless of their gestational age, clearly requires a focused approach to avoid further injury to the brain and to optimize the neurodevelopmental status of the newborn baby at discharge from hospital. This focused approach includes, but is not limited to, monitoring of the patient's brain with amplitude-integrated and continuous video EEG, prevention of infection, developmentally appropriate care, and family support. Provision of dedicated neurocritical care to newborn babies requires a collaborative effort between neonatologists and neurologists, training in neonatal neurology for nurses and future generations of care providers, and the recognition that common neonatal medical problems and intensive care have an effect on the developing brain. PMID:21808297

  13. Expansion of the neonatal platelet mass is achieved via an extension of platelet lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Jian; Hoffmeister, Karin M.; Hu, Zhongbo; Mager, Donald E.; Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Debrincat, Marlyse A.; Pleines, Irina; Josefsson, Emma C.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Italiano, Joseph; Ramsey, Haley; Grozovsky, Renata; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chavda, Chaitanya

    2014-01-01

    The fetal/neonatal hematopoietic system must generate enough blood cells to meet the demands of rapid growth. This unique challenge might underlie the high incidence of thrombocytopenia among preterm neonates. In this study, neonatal platelet production and turnover were investigated in newborn mice. Based on a combination of blood volume expansion and increasing platelet counts, the platelet mass increased sevenfold during the first 2 weeks of murine life, a time during which thrombopoiesis shifted from liver to bone marrow. Studies applying in vivo biotinylation and mathematical modeling showed that newborn and adult mice had similar platelet production rates, but neonatal platelets survived 1 day longer in circulation. This prolonged lifespan fully accounted for the rise in platelet counts observed during the second week of murine postnatal life. A study of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins showed that neonatal platelets had higher levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and were more resistant to apoptosis induced by the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 than adult platelets. However, genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of Bcl-2 alone did not shorten neonatal platelet survival or reduce platelet counts in newborn mice, indicating the existence of redundant or alternative mechanisms mediating the prolonged lifespan of neonatal platelets. PMID:24599546

  14. Primary repair of symptomatic neonates with tetralogy of Fallot with or without pulmonary atresia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Ha; Kwak, Jae Gun; Lee, Cheul

    2014-01-01

    Recently, surgical outcomes of repair of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) have improved. For patients with TOF older than 3 months, primary repair has been advocated regardless of symptoms. However, a surgical approach to symptomatic TOF in neonates or very young infants remains elusive. Traditionally, there have been two surgical options for these patients: primary repair versus an initial aortopulmonary shunt followed by repair. Early primary repair provides several advantages, including avoidance of shunt-related complications, early relief of hypoxia, promotion of normal lung development, avoidance of ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, and psychological comfort to the family. Because of advances in cardiopulmonary bypass techniques and accumulated experience in neonatal cardiac surgery, primary repair in neonates with TOF has been performed with excellent early outcomes (early mortality<5%), which may be superior to the outcomes of aortopulmonary shunting. A remaining question regarding surgical options is whether shunts can preserve the pulmonary valve annulus for TOF neonates with pulmonary stenosis. Symptomatic neonates and older infants have different anatomies of right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstructions, which in neonates are nearly always caused by a hypoplastic pulmonary valve annulus instead of infundibular obstruction. Therefore, a shunt is less likely to preserve the pulmonary valve annulus than is primary repair. Primary repair of TOF can be performed safely in most symptomatic neonates. Patients who have had primary repair should be closely followed up to evaluate the RVOT pathology and right ventricular function. PMID:24578712

  15. Neonatal Screening Part 2: Neonatal Screening in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Brian A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Neonatal screening is a widely accepted, cost-effective method for early detection of various inborn errors of metabolism. This series of three articles examines different aspects of neonatal screening. In the first article, the author discussed general principles of screening and its function in the spectrum of diagnostic techniques for genetic disease. In this, the second article, the author reviews the history and current practices of neonatal screening in Canada. The individual diseases for which screening is used and particular points of interest for each of these diseases are briefly described. The author also outlines the benefits of screening and treatment. In the final article of this series, the author will examine controversial topics that represent the possible future of screening. PMID:21234041

  16. Length of stay and cost analysis of neonates undergoing surgery at a tertiary neonatal unit in England.

    PubMed

    Shetty, S; Kennea, N; Desai, P; Giuliani, S; Richards, J

    2016-01-01

    complications, associated anomalies). These data will enable us to give more detailed information to families following prenatal or postnatal diagnosis. They also allow more detailed planning of resource allocation for neonatal admissions. PMID:26688402

  17. The Effects of Increased Maternal Visual Regard of Neonate Upon the Neonate-Mother Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcastro, Christina M.; And Others

    This study attempts to investigate the effects of increased maternal visual regard on neonatal social visual behavior and upon patterns of mother-neonate interaction within the context of a learning theory paradigm. Subjects were 3-day-old neonates and their mothers; with 10 of the 15 mother-neonate pairs as the experimental group, and 5 as the…

  18. S-Allyl cysteine improves nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in type 2 diabetes Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats via regulation of hepatic lipogenesis and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Shigekazu; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Kodai, Shintaro; Shinkawa, Hiroji; Tsukioka, Takuma; Okada, Shigeru; Azuma, Hideki; Kubo, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    It is important to prevent and improve diabetes mellitus and its complications in a safe and low-cost manner. S-Allyl cysteine, an aged garlic extract with antioxidant activity, was investigated to determine whether S-allyl cysteine can improve type 2 diabetes in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Male Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats and age-matched Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats were used and were divided into two groups at 29 weeks of age. S-Allyl cysteine (0.45% diet) was administered to rats for 13 weeks. Rats were killed at 43 weeks of age, and detailed analyses were performed. S-Allyl cysteine improved hemoglobinA1c, blood glucose, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Furthermore, S-allyl cysteine normalized plasma insulin levels. S-Allyl cysteine activated the mRNA and protein expression of both peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and γ, as well as inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rat liver. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c and forkhead box O1 proteins were normalized by S-allyl cysteine in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rat liver. In conclusions, these findings support the hypothesis that S-allyl cysteine has diabetic and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease therapeutic potential as a potent regulating agent against lipogenesis and glucose metabolism. PMID:24062606

  19. Neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Nisha; Knorr, Aimee; Muldrew, Kenneth L

    2008-09-01

    The classic organisms associated with central nervous system infection in the neonate are herpes simplex, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus agalactiae; we describe an unusual case of neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by Bacillus cereus. PMID:18679155

  20. Adverse Prenatal, Perinatal and Neonatal Experiences in Children with Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Johnco, Carly; Lewin, Adam B; Salloum, Alison; Murphy, Tanya K; Crawford, Erika A; Dane, Brittney F; McBride, Nicole M; Storch, Eric A

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the incidence of adverse prenatal, perinatal, and neonatal experiences amongst children with anxiety disorders, and the relationship to clinical symptomology and functional impairment in treatment-seeking children (N = 107) with a primary anxiety disorder. Anxious children had higher rates of reported maternal prescription medication use during pregnancy, maternal smoking and illness during pregnancy and neonatal complications (including neonatal intensive care and feeding issues) compared with population base rates and non-affected children. Almost one-third had early problems with sleep. Developmental problems were common with more than half having at least one area of delay. More than three quarters of anxious children had a first-degree family member with a psychiatric history. There were several associations between neonatal complications and subsequent clinical symptomology, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and depressive comorbidity, anxiety severity and functional impairment. Findings suggest higher rates of perinatal complications in anxious children. PMID:26206734

  1. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of neonatal hypocalcemia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Im; Yu, Hyeoh Won; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won; Choi, Chang Won; Kim, Beyong Il

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical characteristics of full-term neonates with hypocalcemia and to suggest factors associated with neonatal hypocalcemia Methods The medical records of full-term neonates with hypocalcemia were reviewed. Hypocalcemia was defined as an ionized calcium (iCa) concentration of <4 mg/dL. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) insufficiency was defined as a serum PTH level of <60 pg/mL or a serum phosphorus level higher than the serum calcium level in the presence of hypocalcemia. Results Fifty-three neonates were enrolled. The median age at diagnosis of hypocalcemia was 3 days. In all the neonates, formula feeding predominance was observed. Thirty-eight neonates (69.8%) were compatible with PTH insufficiency. The number of formula-fed neonates was significantly higher than that of breast-fed patients among neonates with PTH insufficiency (P=0.017). Intact PTH was negatively correlated with serum phosphorus levels. Twelve out of 14 neonates (85.7%) had 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD) levels <20 ng/mL and 9 neonates (64.3%) had 25OHD levels <10 ng/mL. Twenty-one neonates had hypocalcemic tetany. The serum calcium and iCa concentrations of neonates with tetany were 4.2-8.3 mg/dL and 1.85-3.88 mg/dL, respectively. Three neonates showed symptomatic hypocalcemia with calcium levels over 7.5 mg/dL. Among the 16 neonates who underwent electroencephalography (EEG), 12 had abnormalities, which normalized after 1-2 months. Conclusion Formula milk feeding, PTH insufficiency and low serum vitamin D concentration are associated with the development of neonatal hypocalcemia. Symptoms such as tetany and QT interval prolongation can develop in relatively mild hypocalcemia. Moreover, transient neonatal hypocalcemia can cause transient EEG abnormalities. PMID:26191512

  2. Biliary atresia and neonatal hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wynchank, S.; Guillet, J.; Leccia, F.; Soubiran, G.; Blanquet, P.

    1984-03-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m diethyl IDA was performed on 14 jaundiced neonates. It aided greatly the differential diagnosis between neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia. Limitations in the interpretation of the results are described, as neonatal hepatitis may be accompanied by biliary excretion ranging from zero to normal. Also both biliary atresia (intra- and extrahepatic) and neonatal hepatitis may show no biliary excretion within 24 hours.

  3. Low susceptibility to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced transplacental carcinogenesis in Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuchigauchi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Ohnishi, Takamasa; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Bando, Yoshimi; Uehara, Hisanori; Takizawa, Tamotsu; Kaneda, Shinya; Nakai, Tokiko; Shiota, Hiroshi; Izumi, Keisuke

    2009-08-01

    The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat, an animal model of Wilson's disease, is resistant to a variety of chemical carcinogenesis except liver and colon. In the present study, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced transplacental carcinogenesis was examined in male and female LEC, Long-Evans Agouti (LEA), a sibling line of the LEC rat, and F344 rats (n=21). ENU was administered to pregnant rats as a single s.c. injection at a dose of 60 mg/kg body weight on the 17th day after conception. Cerebral/spinal gliomas and trigeminal/spinal nerve schwannomas developed in both LEA and F344 rats at 30 weeks of age, but no nervous system tumors developed in LEC rats, the difference being statistically significant. Lung adenomas also developed in LEA and F344 rats, but not in LEC rats. Semiquantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that metallothionein (MT)1a, MT2 and O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) mRNA levels in the liver of LEC rats were higher than those in F344 and LEA rats. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that MT (MT1 plus MT2) in the liver of LEC rats was also higher than that in other strains. Present results suggest that high levels of MT and/or MGMT contribute to the resistance to nitrosamine-induced carcinogenesis in LEC rats. PMID:19763020

  4. Effects of Moderate Alcohol Intake in the Bladder of the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Woong Jin; Choi, Yong Sun; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Kim, Sae Woong; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Kim, Dai Jin

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is related with a number of cystopathic complications. However, there have been no studies about the influence of alcohol consumption in the bladder of type 2 diabetes. Thus, we investigated the effect of moderate alcohol intake in the bladder of the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) diabetic rat. The non-diabetic Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO, n=14) and the OLETF control group (n=14) were fed an isocaloric diet; the LETO (n=14) and the OLETF ethanol group (n=14) were fed 36% ethanol 7 g/kg/day. After ten weeks, muscarinic receptors, RhoGEFs, myogenic change, and the level of oxidative stress were evaluated. Moderate alcohol intake significantly decreased excessive muscarinic receptor and Rho kinase expressions in the OLETF rats compared with the LETO rats. In addition, iNOS and collagen expression were not changed in the OLETF rats in spite of alcohol consumption. Superoxide dismutase levels, which is involved in antioxidant defense, in the LETO rats were significantly decreased after alcohol consumption, however those in the OLETF rats were similar. Moderate alcohol consumption reduces the oxidative stress, and may prevent molecular and pathologic changes of the bladder of rats with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26339173

  5. Neonatal Jaundice Detection System.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Mustafa; Hardalaç, Fırat; Ural, Berkan; Karap, Serhat

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a common condition that occurs in newborn infants in the first week of life. Today, techniques used for detection are required blood samples and other clinical testing with special equipment. The aim of this study is creating a non-invasive system to control and to detect the jaundice periodically and helping doctors for early diagnosis. In this work, first, a patient group which is consisted from jaundiced babies and a control group which is consisted from healthy babies are prepared, then between 24 and 48 h after birth, 40 jaundiced and 40 healthy newborns are chosen. Second, advanced image processing techniques are used on the images which are taken with a standard smartphone and the color calibration card. Segmentation, pixel similarity and white balancing methods are used as image processing techniques and RGB values and pixels' important information are obtained exactly. Third, during feature extraction stage, with using colormap transformations and feature calculation, comparisons are done in RGB plane between color change values and the 8-color calibration card which is specially designed. Finally, in the bilirubin level estimation stage, kNN and SVR machine learning regressions are used on the dataset which are obtained from feature extraction. At the end of the process, when the control group is based on for comparisons, jaundice is succesfully detected for 40 jaundiced infants and the success rate is 85 %. Obtained bilirubin estimation results are consisted with bilirubin results which are obtained from the standard blood test and the compliance rate is 85 %. PMID:27229489

  6. Environmental enrichment attenuates the blood brain barrier dysfunction induced by the neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Ramiro; Miguel, Patrícia Maidana; Deniz, Bruna Ferrary; Confortim, Heloísa Deola; Barbosa, Sílvia; Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Pereira, Lenir Orlandi

    2016-10-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is considered an efficient neuroprotector against neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved are not yet clear. In this context, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of neonatal HI and environmental stimulation in the hippocampus of rats at 3 different time points (PND 8, 22 and 60), evaluating some aspects of BBB structure and function. Seven-day-old Wistar rats were divided into four groups: a control group maintained in a standard environment (CTSE), a control group maintained in an enrichment environment (CTEE), an HI group maintained in a standard environment (HISE) and an HI group maintained in an enrichment environment (HIEE). At the 7th postnatal day (PND), rats were submitted to the Levine-Rice model of neonatal HI. This method consists of permanent occlusion of the right common carotid artery with subsequent exposure to hypoxia. Rats from CTEE and HIEE were stimulated with environmental enrichment. The EE protocol started 24h after HI, in which pup rats with their dams were stimulated in a maintained EE (PND 8-22). Subsequently, animals were submitted to daily EE (1h/day, PND 23-60). The expression of some proteins involved in BBB structure (β-catenin, occludin, connexin-43, aquaporin-4, glut-1 and GFAP) were quantified by western blotting in the hippocampi of rats in three periods, at PND 8, 22 and 60. The BBB permeability and integrity was assessed by Evans blue staining and the immunohistochemistry for GFAP in the CA1 region of the hippocampus were also performed. The results showed an HI-induced decreased occludin expression at PND 22 and low levels of occludin, β-catenin and GFAP at PND 60 in the hippocampus of the hypoxic-ischemic rats. Interestingly, in young and adult rats, EE reversed these effects. Evans blue extravasation into the brain parenchyma confirmed the BBB dysfunction brought on by HI. No differences were observed at PND 8, probably due to the immaturity of the

  7. Cardiogenic shock in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Viveiros, Eulália; Aveiro, Ana Cristina; Costa, Edite; Nunes, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of a healthy male full-term neonate, 21 days old, admitted to the emergency room, presenting a severe cardiovascular collapse with an initial sinus rhythm. The first diagnostic hypothesis was of septic shock, having antibiotics, fluid resuscitation, inotropic drugs and ventilatory support started immediately. After achieving haemodynamic stability, a new cardiovascular collapse occurred with supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). The latter was successfully treated and the neonate did not suffer any organ damage. Cardiogenic shock should be considered despite being a much rarer cause of shock in neonates. SVT is promptly diagnosed when a cardiorespiratory monitor is available; however, the intermittent occurrence of the tachycardia episodes makes this diagnosis more difficult to recognise and manage. PMID:23737567

  8. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  9. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  10. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  11. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  12. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  13. Regulation of muscle growth in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review reports recent findings on the multiple factors that regulate skeletal muscle growth in neonates. Skeletal muscle is the fastest growing protein mass in neonates. The high rate of neonatal muscle growth is due to accelerated rates of protein synthesis accompanied by the rapid accumulatio...

  14. Amino acids and insulin in neonatal growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rate of growth during the neonatal period is greater than at any other stage of postnatal life, and a majority of the mass increase is skeletal muscle. The rapid growth of skeletal muscle in the neonate is driven by an elevated rate of protein synthesis. Neonates are very efficient at utilizin...

  15. Family Preservation & Family Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCroskey, Jacquelyn; Meezan, William

    This book reports a study of the outcomes of home-based family preservation services for abusive and neglectful families in Los Angeles County. Using the Family Assessment Form, the research project evaluated services provided by two voluntary agencies, and focused on changes in family functioning between the opening and closing of services during…

  16. Neonatal records and the computer.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, C H

    1977-01-01

    To use a combined single document clinical case sheet/computer record which can form the basic document for a life medical record is a practical proposition. With adequate briefing doctors and nurses soon become familiar with the record and appreciate its value. Secretarial and clerical requirements are reduced to a minimum as transcription of medical data is eliminated, so greatly speeding up processing and feed back to the medical services. A few illustrations of trends in neonatal statistics and of computer linked maternal/neonatal data are presented. PMID:879830

  17. Interprofessional Education in Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education is not a new concept. Yet, the operationalization of interprofessional education with related competencies for collaborative team-based practice in neonatal units is often difficult. Changes in healthcare with an emphasis on patient-focused care and the concern for patient safety and quality care are accelerating the need for more interprofessional education. This article briefly outlines the evolution of interprofessional education to support collaborative team-based practice and how that facilitates safety and quality care in neonatal units. PMID:27465448

  18. Role of Mitochondria in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujiao; Tucker, Donovan; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Ningjun; Zhuo, Xiaoying; Zhang, Quanguang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) causes severe brain injury in neonates. It’s one of the leading causes to neonatal death and pediatric disability, resulting in devastating consequences, emotionally and economically, to their families. A series of events happens in this process, e.g. excitatory transmitter release, extracelluar Ca2+ influxing, mitochondrial dysfunction, energy failure, and neuron death. There are two forms of neuron death after HI insult: necrosis and apoptosis, apoptosis being the more prevalent form. Mitochondria handle a series of oxidative reactions, and yield energy for various cellular activities including the maintainance of membrane potential and preservation of intracellular ionic homeostasis. Therefore mitochondria play a critical role in neonatal neurodegeneration following HI, and mitochondrial dysfunction is the key point in neurodegenerative evolution. Because of this, exploring effective mitochondria-based clinical strategies is crucial. Today the only efficacious clinic treatment is hypothermia. However, due to its complex management, clinical complication and autoimmune decrease, its clinical application is limited. So far, many mitochondria-based strategies have been reported neuroprotective in animal models, which offers promise on neonatal therapy. However, since their clinical effectiveness are still unclear, plenty of studies need to be continued in the future. According to recent reports, two novel strategies have been proposed: methylene blue (MB) and melatonin. Although they are still in primary stage, the underlying mechanisms indicate promising clinical applications. Every neurological therapeutic strategy has its intrinsic deficit and limited efficacy, therefore in the long run, the perfect clinical therapy for hypoxic-ischemic neonatal brain injury will be based on the combination of multiple strategies. PMID:27441209

  19. First Outbreak with MRSA in a Danish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Risk Factors and Control Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Ramsing, Benedicte Grenness Utke; Arpi, Magnus; Andersen, Erik Arthur; Knabe, Niels; Mogensen, Dorthe; Buhl, Dorte; Westh, Henrik; Østergaard, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of the study was to describe demographic and clinical characteristics and outbreak handling of a large methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Denmark June 25th–August 8th 2008, and to identify risk factors for MRSA transmission. Methods Data were collected retrospectively from medical records and the Danish Neobase database. All MRSA isolates obtained from neonates, relatives and NICU health care workers (HCW) as well as environmental cultures were typed. Results During the 46 day outbreak period, 102 neonates were admitted to the two neonatal wards. Ninety-nine neonates were subsequently sampled, and 32 neonates (32%) from 25 families were colonized with MRSA (spa-type t127, SCCmec V, PVL negative). Thirteen family members from 11 of those families (44%) and two of 161 HCWs (1%) were colonized with the same MRSA. No one was infected. Five environmental cultures were MRSA positive. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (nCPAP) treatment (p = 0.006) and Caesarean section (p = 0.016) were independent risk factors for MRSA acquisition, whereas days of exposure to MRSA was a risk factors in the unadjusted analysis (p = 0.04). Conclusions MRSA transmission occurs with high frequency in the NICU during hospitalization with unidentified MRSA neonates. Caesarean section and nCPAP treatment were identified as risk factors for MRSA colonization. The MRSA outbreak was controlled through infection control procedures. PMID:23825581

  20. The expression and function of human CD300 receptors on blood circulating mononuclear cells are distinct in neonates and adults

    PubMed Central

    Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Vitallé, Joana; García-Obregón, Susana; Astigarraga, Itziar; Eguizabal, Cristina; Santos, Silvia; Simhadri, Venkateswara R.; Borrego, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neonates are more susceptible to infections than adults. This susceptibility is thought to reflect neonates’ qualitative and quantitative defects in the adaptive and innate immune responses. Differential expression of cell surface receptors may result in altered thresholds of neonatal immune cell activation. We determined whether the expression and function of the lipid-binding CD300 family of receptors are different on neonatal immune cells compared to adult immune cells. A multiparametric flow cytometry analysis was performed to determine the expression of CD300 receptors on adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neonatal cord blood mononuclear cells. The expression of the CD300a inhibitory receptor was significantly reduced on cells from the newborn adaptive immune system, and neonatal antigen presenting cells exhibited a different CD300 receptors expression pattern. We also found differential LPS-mediated regulation of CD300 receptors expression on adult monocytes compared to cord blood monocytes, and that CD300c and CD300e-mediated activation was quantitatively different in neonatal monocytes. This is the first complete study examining the expression of CD300 receptors on human neonatal immune cells compared with adult immune cells. Significant differences in the expression and function of CD300 receptors may help to explain the peculiarities and distinctness of the neonatal immune responses. PMID:27595670

  1. Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    CONSTANTINESCU, Simona; ZAMFIRESCU, Vlad; VLADAREANU, Prof. Radu

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is the commonest cause of severe neonatal thrombocytopenia. FNAIT is usually suspected in neonates with bleeding or severe, unexplained, and/or isolated postnatal thrombocytopenia. Affected fetuses should be managed in referral centers with experience in the ante-natal management of FNAIT. Close collaboration is required between specialists in fetal medicine, obstetrics, hematology/transfusion medicine, and pediatrics. The mother and her partner should be provided with detailed information about FNAIT and its potential clinical consequences, and the benefits and risks of different approaches to ante-natal management. There has been huge progress in the ante-natal management of FNAIT over the last 20 years. However, the ideal effective treatment without significant side effects to the mother or fetus has yet to be determined. Key issues: Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is a condition that is underdiagnosed. Immunization seldom occurs in the first pregnancy. Immunization takes place in association with delivery in most cases. Anti-HPA-1a level is a predictor for the severity of thrombocytopenia. PMID:23482913

  2. Microbiome Development in Neonatal Calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The initial colonization of eukaryotic hosts by microbial populations is poorly understood, yet this remains a critical time for growth and development. The goals of this study were to characterize the microbiome of neonatal calves. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis...

  3. Eruption cysts in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Hérica Adad; Parisotto, Thaís Manzano; Giro, Elisa Maria Aparecida; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances of the dental development may result in anomalies, which may be apparent as soon as the child is born. Eruption cysts are rarely observed in neonates considering that at this stage of the child's life teeth eruption is uncommon. Thus, the aim of this report is to describe a case of eruption cysts in a neonate. A male neonate was brought to the emergency service with the chief complaint of an elevated area on the anterior region of the inferior alveolar ridge. The lesion was clinically characterized as a compressive and floating swelling. Through a radiographic exam two mandibular primary incisors could be seen superficially located. Due to the patient's age and the initial diagnosis of eruption cysts the conduct adopted was clinical surveillance. Forty-five days after the first visit the lesions had significantly decreased in size, and completely disappeared after 4 months. At that age, both mandibular central incisors were already in the oral cavity exhibiting small hypoplastic areas in the incisal edges. The clinical and radiographic follow-up of eruption cysts in neonates appears to be an adequate conduct without differing from that recommended for older children. PMID:18524277

  4. [Top five neonatal articles 2015].

    PubMed

    Flamant, C; Fischer Fumeaux, C J

    2016-09-01

    This review includes five randomized controlled trials, published in the Medline database in 2015, which were selected by the Scientific commission of the French society of neonatology, taking into account their influence in perinatology. This selection was presented during the specific "Top five" session in the French congress of neonatal research. PMID:27431853

  5. Is Cronobacter sakazakii infection possible in an exclusively breastfed premature neonate in the neonatal intensive care unit?

    PubMed

    Ravisankar, S; Syed, S S; Garg, P; Higginson, J

    2014-05-01

    Cronobacter species are Gram-negative rods that may cause life-threatening infections in neonates and infants. They belong to the family of Enterobacteriaceae. The first case was published in 1961 in England and about 150 cases have been reported thus far in the literature. The worst form of infection results in meningitis, leaving survivors with devastating neurological sequelae. We present the case of a premature neonate who was exclusively gavage fed with non-fortified breast milk and developed culture positive sepsis for Cronobacter sakazakii with clinical signs of meningitis at 18 days of life. She had a very traumatic course and survived the illness, but questions remain as to how she obtained this infection and her future neurodevelopmental outcomes. PMID:24776603

  6. Arginine production in the neonate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous arginine synthesis in adults is a complex multiorgan process, in which citrulline is synthesized in the gut, enters the general circulation, and is converted into arginine in the kidney, by what is known as the intestinal-renal axis. In neonates, the enzymes required to convert citrulline...

  7. Photodegradation of riboflavin in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Sisson, T.R.

    1987-04-01

    The biologically most important flavins are riboflavin and its related nucleotides, all highly sensitive to light. It is because of its photoreactivity and its presence in almost all body fluids and tissues that riboflavin assumes importance in phototherapy of neonatal jaundice. The absorption maxima of both bilirubin and riboflavin in the body are nearly identical: 445-450 (447) nm. In consequence, blue visible light will cause photoisomerization of bilirubin accompanied by photodegradation of riboflavin. This results in diminished erythrocyte glutathione reductase, which indicates generalized tissue riboflavin deficiency and red cell lysis. Single- and double-strand breaks in intracellular DNA have occurred with phototherapy. This light exposure of neonates may result also in alterations of bilirubin-albumin binding in the presence of both riboflavin and theophylline (the latter frequently given to prevent neonatal apnea). Many newborns, especially if premature, have low stores of riboflavin at birth. The absorptive capacity of premature infants for enteral riboflavin is likewise reduced. Consequently, inherently low stores and low intake of riboflavin plus phototherapy for neonatal jaundice will cause a deficiency of riboflavin at a critical period for the newborn. Supplementation to those infants most likely to develop riboflavin deficiency is useful, but dosage, time, and mode of administration to infants undergoing phototherapy must be carefully adjusted to avoid unwanted side effects.

  8. Hydrology, microbiology and carbon cycling at a high Arctic polythermal glacier, (John Evans Glacier, Ellesmere Island, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, Mark Leslie

    Analysis of the hydrology, hydrochemistry and microbiology at polythermal John Evans Glacier and geochemical and isotopic data from Haut Glacier d'Arolla demonstrates that certain subglacial chemical weathering processes are microbially mediated. Subglacial drainage is likely an annual occurrence beneath John Evans Glacier and solute rich subglacial waters indicate over winter storage at the glacier bed. Subglacial microbial populations are also present, and are viable under simulated near in situ conditions at 0.3°C. This suggests that temperate subglacial environments at a polythermal glacier, which are isolated by cold ice above and around them, provide a viable habitat for life where basal water and organic carbon are present throughout the year. Thus, a subglacial microbial ecosystem based upon legacy carbon, (from old soils or surface inputs) rather than primary production may exist, where redox processes are a key component, and seasonal anoxia may occur. The existence of anoxic environments is supported by the presence of strictly anaerobic bacteria (sulphate reducing bacteria and methanogens) in the basal sediments---which are viable in culture at 4°C---and also argues that these bacteria are not washed in with oxygenated surface meltwaters, but are present in the subglacial environment. During the summer meltseason there is a large input of surficial waters to the subglacial system and water residence times are drastically reduced. Hence, kinetic weathering processes dominate, resulting in light delta 13C-DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon) in glacial runoff, as verified by experimental work on CaCO3 and John Evans Glacier sediments. The experiments demonstrate kinetic bedrock fractionation (KBF) during carbonate hydrolysis and that kinetic fractionation of CO2 (KFC) is proportional to the rate of CO2 draw down during the carbonation of carbonates. This results in significantly depleted delta13C-DIC values (≤-16 ‰) relative to the bedrock carbonate

  9. Genetic disorders of neonatal respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Cole, F S; Hamvas, A; Nogee, L M

    2001-08-01

    Genetic risk for respiratory distress in infancy has been recognized with increasing frequency in neonatal intensive care units. Reports of family clusters of affected infants and of ethnic- and gender-based respiratory phenotypes point to the contribution of inheritance. Similarly, different outcomes among gestationally matched infants with comparable exposures to oxygen, mechanical ventilation, or nutritional deficiency also suggest a genetic risk for respiratory distress. Examples of inherited deficiency of surfactant protein B in both humans and genetically engineered murine lineages illustrate the importance of identifying markers of genetic risk. In contrast to developmental, inflammatory, or nutritional causes of respiratory distress that may resolve as infants mature, genetic causes result in both acute and chronic (and potentially irreversible) respiratory failure. The availability of clinically useful genetic markers of risk for respiratory distress in infancy will permit development of rational strategies for treatment of genetic lung disorders of infancy and more accurate counseling of families whose infants are at genetic risk for development of respiratory distress at birth or during early childhood. We review examples of genetic variations known to be associated with or cause respiratory distress in infancy. PMID:11477198

  10. Myths and verities in protein folding theories: from Frank and Evans iceberg-conjecture to explanation of the hydrophobic effect.

    PubMed

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2013-10-28

    Starting from the seminal article by Frank and Evans where the "iceberg formation" idea was first expressed, we follow the evolution of this idea to the explanation of the hydrophobic effect. We show that the idea of iceberg formation can provide an explanation to the entropy, and enthalpy of solvation of non-polar solutes in water, provided one first explains why a simple non-polar solute would form icebergs in the first place. Having done that, the questions regarding the outstanding large hydrophobic solvation Gibbs energy remains unexplained. This conclusion follows from the exact entropy-enthalpy-compensation pertaining to any structural changes induced in the solvent. We also comment on some misinterpretation of the partial molar heat capacity of non-polar solutes in water. PMID:24182086

  11. Myths and verities in protein folding theories: From Frank and Evans iceberg-conjecture to explanation of the hydrophobic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the seminal article by Frank and Evans where the "iceberg formation" idea was first expressed, we follow the evolution of this idea to the explanation of the hydrophobic effect. We show that the idea of iceberg formation can provide an explanation to the entropy, and enthalpy of solvation of non-polar solutes in water, provided one first explains why a simple non-polar solute would form icebergs in the first place. Having done that, the questions regarding the outstanding large hydrophobic solvation Gibbs energy remains unexplained. This conclusion follows from the exact entropy-enthalpy-compensation pertaining to any structural changes induced in the solvent. We also comment on some misinterpretation of the partial molar heat capacity of non-polar solutes in water.

  12. Electrocardiogram and cardiac function in a longitudinal study of copper deficiency in the Long-Evans rat

    SciTech Connect

    Zhiming Liao, Hamlin, R.; Medeiros, D.M. )

    1991-03-11

    Weanling Long-Evans rats were fed either copper-adequate or -restricted diets for varying periods of time up to 6 wk. Beginning at 2 wk after weaning, and weekly thereafter, 5 rats from each diet were evaluated for cardiac function and ECG activity and sacrificed. ECG traces revealed indications of cardiac failure at week 3 in rats fed the copper-restricted diet at which time concentric cardiac hypertrophy was evident. Prolonged P-R and Q-T intervals and greater QRS height and higher voltages were observed in copper-restricted rats. However, + and {minus} dP/dt max did not differ by diet copper treatment for any of the time intervals studied, nor was any notable difference in total left developed ventricular pressure apparent. These results suggest that the onset of cardiac dysfunction in copper deficiency is rapid, with both dysfunction and hypertrophy apparent within 3 weeks after copper restriction.

  13. Chemical Conjugation of Evans Blue Derivative: A Strategy to Develop Long-Acting Therapeutics through Albumin Binding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haojun; Wang, Guohao; Lang, Lixin; Jacobson, Orit; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Liu, Yi; Ma, Ying; Zhang, Xianzhong; Wu, Hua; Zhu, Lei; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of therapeutic drugs is highly dependent on their optimal in vivo pharmacokinetics. Albumin conjugation is considered to be one of the most effective means of protracting the short lifespan of peptides and proteins. In this study, we proposed a novel platform for developing long lasting therapeutics by conjugating a small molecular albumin binding moiety, truncated Evans blue, to either peptides or proteins. Using the anti-diabetic peptide drug Exendin-4 as a model peptide, we synthesized a new long-acting Exendin-4 derivative (denoted as Abextide). Through complexation with albumin in situ, the biological half-life of Abextide was significantly extended. The hypoglycemic effect of Abextide was also improved remarkably over Exendin-4. Thus, Abextide has considerable potential to treat type 2 diabetes. This strategy as a general technology platform can be applied to other small molecules and biologics for the development of long-acting therapeutic drugs. PMID:26877782

  14. Additional information for “TREMOR: A Wireless, MEMS Accelerograph for Dense Arrays” (Evans et al., 2003)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, John R.; Hamstra, Robert H., Jr.; Spudich, Paul; Kundig, Christoph; Camina, Patrick; Rogers, John A.

    2003-01-01

    The length of Evans et al. (2003) necessitated transfer of several less germane sections to this alternate forum to meet that venue’s needs. These sections include a description of the development of Figure 1, the plot of spatial variability so critical to the argument for dense arrays of strong-motion instruments; the description of the rapid, integer, computational method for PGV used in the TREMOR instrument (the Oakland instrument, the commercial prototype, and the commercial instrument); siting methods and strategies used for Class B TREMOR instruments and those that can be used for Class C instruments to preserve the cost advantages of such systems; and some general discussion of MEMS accelerometers, including a comparative Table with representative examples of Class A, B and C MEMS devices. (“MEMS” means “Micro-ElectroMechanical” Systems—“micromachined” sensors, generally of silicon. Classes A, B, and C are defined in Table 1.)

  15. Molecular Correlates of Age-Dependent Seizures in an Inherited Neonatal-Infantile Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Yunxiang; Deprez, Liesbet; Maljevic, Snezana; Pitsch, Julika; Claes, Lieve; Hristova, Dimitrina; Jordanova, Albena; Ala-Mello, Sirpa; Bellan-Koch, Astrid; Blazevic, Dragica; Schubert, Simone; Thomas, Evan A.; Petrou, Steven; Becker, Albert J.; De Jonghe, Peter; Lerche, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Many idiopathic epilepsy syndromes have a characteristic age dependence, the underlying molecular mechanisms of which are largely unknown. Here we propose a mechanism that can explain that epileptic spells in benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures occur almost exclusively during the first days to months of life. Benign familial…

  16. Materials on Nursing in the Clearinghouse: Bibliography #16, and Neonatal Intensive Care Units: Bibliography #17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Public Health Association, Springfield.

    The first of the two bibliographies in this document contains 38 entries on neonatal nursing, including books and journal articles (originally published from 1973 to 1986) dealing with such topics as high-risk pregnancy and delivery, home care of developmentally disabled newborns, and family dynamics. The second bibliography, titled "Neonatal…

  17. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork. PMID:27455363

  18. Mid-Calcaneal Length After Evans Calcaneal Osteotomy: A Retrospective Comparison of Wedge Locking Plates and Tricortical Allograft Wedges.

    PubMed

    Protzman, Nicole M; Wobst, Garrett M; Storts, Eric C; Mulhern, Jennifer L; McCarroll, Raymond E; Brigido, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Evans calcaneal osteotomy remains a cornerstone in the correction of the flexible flatfoot. Although multiple techniques have been used to maintain the length of the lateral column, a low profile wedge locking plate was recently introduced as an alternative to the traditional tricortical allograft wedge. We hypothesized that the wedge locking plate would better maintain the mid-calcaneal length compared with the tricortical allograft wedge. To test this hypothesis, after Evans osteotomy, the mid-calcaneal length was measured in the immediate postoperative period and again at 3 and 6 months. A total of 24 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 48.1 years (range 11 to 66). Of the 24 patients, 9 (37.5%) were treated with a tricortical allograft wedge and 15 (62.5%) with a wedge locking plate. At 3 months postoperatively, the mean decrease in mid-calcaneal length was similar for the tricortical allograft wedge group (1.3 ± 1.9 mm) and the wedge locking plate group (0.5 ± 0.9 mm, p = .275). At 6 months postoperatively, however, the mean decrease in mid-calcaneal length was greater for the tricortical allograft wedge group (2.8 ± 1.7 mm) than for the wedge locking plate group (0.6 ± 0.7 mm, p = .004). The 2 groups demonstrated a similar incidence of dorsally displaced distal calcaneal fragments throughout the study endpoint (p ≥ .052). These results suggest that the wedge locking plate better maintains the mid-calcaneal length over time compared with the tricortical allograft wedge. PMID:25998470

  19. Redox regulation of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 activity in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats during spontaneous hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Karmahapatra, Soumendra Krishna; Saha, Tapas; Adhikari, Sanjay; Woodrick, Jordan; Roy, Rabindra

    2014-03-01

    The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat is an animal model for Wilson's disease. This animal is genetically predisposed to copper accumulation in the liver, increased oxidative stress, accumulation of DNA damage, and the spontaneous development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, this animal model is useful for studying the relationship of endogenous DNA damage to spontaneous carcinogenesis. In this study, we have investigated the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1)-mediated excision repair of endogenous DNA damage, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP)-sites, which is highly mutagenic and implicated in human cancer. We found that the activity was reduced in the liver extracts from the acute hepatitis period of LEC rats as compared with extracts from the age-matched Long-Evans Agouti rats. The acute hepatitis period had also a heightened oxidative stress condition as assessed by an increase in oxidized glutathione level and loss of enzyme activity of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a key redox-sensitive protein in cells. Interestingly, the activity reduction was not due to changes in protein expression but apparently by reversible protein oxidation as the addition of reducing agents to extracts of the liver from acute hepatitis period reactivated APE1 activity and thus, confirmed the oxidation-mediated loss of APE1 activity under increased oxidative stress. These findings show for the first time in an animal model that the repair mechanism of AP-sites is impaired by increased oxidative stress in acute hepatitis via redox regulation which contributed to the increased accumulation of mutagenic AP-sites in liver DNA. PMID:24337968

  20. Strain Differences in Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-Induced Mammary Tumor Incidence in Long Evans and Sprague Dawley Rat Offspring Following Prenatal Atrazine Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been shown that prenatal exposure to the chlorotriazine herbicide atrazine (ATR) during mammary bud outgrowth (late gestation) delays postnatal mammary epithelial progression in Long Evans (LE) rats. Our laboratory has recently found that prenatal exposure to ATR also effe...

  1. Effects of prenatal exposure to a low dose atrazine metabolite mixture onpubertal timing and prostate development of male Long-Evans rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atrazine (ATR) is a chlorotriazine herbicide extensively used in the US and other countries. Studies examining the effects of adult or developmental ATR exposure on the mammary gland (MG) have used either the Sprague Dawley (SD) or Long-Evans (LE) rat, but no strain comparisons h...

  2. Age-related dose response of selected reproductive parameters to acute cadmium chloride exposure in the male Long-Evans rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groups of Long Evans rats 30, 50, or 70 days old were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with a single dose of between 0 and 52 micromoles Cd/Kg as cadmium (CD) chloride. Sixty days post dosing and two hours prior to sacrifice the rats were injected s.c. with 100 IU of hCG to stimula...

  3. THE EFFECT OF TARGETED KNOCKOUT MUTATION ON THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILE OF THE KIDNEY IN TSC2 MUTANT LONG-EVANS (EKER) RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of a targeted knockout mutation on the transcriptional profile of the kidney in
    Tsc2 mutant Long-Evans (Eker) rats.

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common tumor of the adult kidney, accounting
    for up to 80% of malignant renal neoplasms. Hereditary...

  4. Neonatal Hyperglycemia due to Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Fargas-Berríos, N.; García-Fragoso, L.; García-García, I.; Valcárcel, M.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hyperglycemia is a metabolic disorder found in the neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a very uncommon cause of hyperglycemia in the newborn, occurring in 1 in every 400,000 births. There are two subtypes of neonatal diabetes mellitus: permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) and transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM). We describe a term, small for gestational age, female neonate with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus who presented with poor feeding tolerance and vomiting associated with hyperglycemia (385 mg/dL), glycosuria, and metabolic acidosis within the first 12 hours of life. The neonate was treated with intravenous insulin, obtaining a slight control of hyperglycemia. An adequate glycemia was achieved at 5 weeks of life. The molecular studies showed complete loss of maternal methylation at the TND differentially methylated region on chromosome 6q24. The etiology of this neonate's hyperglycemia was a hypomethylation of the maternal TND locus. A rare cause of neonatal diabetes mellitus must be considered if a neonate presents refractory hyperglycemia. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in Puerto Rico of transient neonatal mellitus due to the uncommon mechanism of maternal hypomethylation of the TND locus. Its prevalence in Puerto Rico is unknown. PMID:26576310

  5. Neonatal Hyperglycemia due to Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Fargas-Berríos, N; García-Fragoso, L; García-García, I; Valcárcel, M

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hyperglycemia is a metabolic disorder found in the neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a very uncommon cause of hyperglycemia in the newborn, occurring in 1 in every 400,000 births. There are two subtypes of neonatal diabetes mellitus: permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) and transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM). We describe a term, small for gestational age, female neonate with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus who presented with poor feeding tolerance and vomiting associated with hyperglycemia (385 mg/dL), glycosuria, and metabolic acidosis within the first 12 hours of life. The neonate was treated with intravenous insulin, obtaining a slight control of hyperglycemia. An adequate glycemia was achieved at 5 weeks of life. The molecular studies showed complete loss of maternal methylation at the TND differentially methylated region on chromosome 6q24. The etiology of this neonate's hyperglycemia was a hypomethylation of the maternal TND locus. A rare cause of neonatal diabetes mellitus must be considered if a neonate presents refractory hyperglycemia. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in Puerto Rico of transient neonatal mellitus due to the uncommon mechanism of maternal hypomethylation of the TND locus. Its prevalence in Puerto Rico is unknown. PMID:26576310

  6. Danger signs of neonatal illnesses: perceptions of caregivers and health workers in northern India.

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Shally; Verma, Tuhina; Agarwal, Monica

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess household practices that can affect neonatal health, from the perspective of caregivers and health workers; to identify signs in neonates leading either to recognition of illness or health-care seeking; and to ascertain the proportion of caregivers who recognize the individual items of the integrated management of neonatal and childhood illnesses (IMNCI) programme. METHODS: The study was carried out in a rural community in Sarojininagar Block, Uttar Pradesh, India, using qualitative and quantitative research designs. Study participants were mothers, grandmothers, grandfathers, fathers or "nannies" (other female relatives) caring for infants younger than 6 months of age and recognized health-care providers serving the area. Focus group discussions (n = 7), key informant interviews (n = 35) and structured interviews (n = 210) were conducted with these participants. FINDINGS: Many household practices were observed which could adversely affect maternal and neonatal health. Among 200 caregivers, 70.5% reported home deliveries conducted by local untrained nurses or relatives, and most mothers initiated breastfeeding only on day 3. More than half of the caregivers recognized fever, irritability, weakness, abdominal distension/vomiting, slow breathing and diarrhoea as danger signs in neonates. Seventy-nine (39.5%) of the caregivers had seen a sick neonate in the family in the past 2 years, with 30.38% in whom illness manifested as continuous crying. Health care was sought for 46 (23%) neonates. Traditional medicines were used for treatment of bulging fontanelle, chest in-drawing and rapid breathing. CONCLUSION: Because there is no universal recognition of danger signs in neonates, and potentially harmful antenatal and birthing practices are followed, there is a need to give priority to implementing IMNCI, and possible incorporation of continuous crying as an additional danger sign. PMID:17128362

  7. [Creating baby-friendly neonatal intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Fang; Gau, Meei-Ling

    2013-02-01

    Most expectant parents anticipate giving birth to a healthy newborn. Admission of a neonate to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is thus nearly always a significant and negative shock to parents and family members. We derived core concepts for this article from the World Health Organization/United Nations Children's Fund (WHO/UNICEF)'s Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative: Revised, updated, and expanded for integrated care (2009). This framework document advocates expanding to NICUs guidelines that were originally developed for maternity units. This paper reviews the importance of breastfeeding to the mother-baby dyad and family integration. We suggest how to build a breastfeeding-friendly environment within the NICU using 10 steps that adhere to the NEO-BFHI's three "Guiding Principles". The proposed environment gives special emphasis to providing continued and unlimited kangaroo care, creating a family-centered NICU design, implementing an effective milk expression and monitoring plan, and respecting mothers' individual needs. Suggestions are provided as a reference to government policymakers and medical centers to facilitate the creation of breastfeeding-friendly environments in NICUs. PMID:23386520

  8. Neonatal Pustular Dermatosis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal pustular eruption is a group of disorders characterized by various forms of pustulosis seen in first 4 weeks of life. Its presentation is often similar with some subtle differences, which can be further established by few simple laboratory aids, to arrive at a definite diagnosis. Given their ubiquitous presentation, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate among self-limiting, noninfectious, pustular dermatosis such as erythema toxicum neonatorum, transient neonatal pustular melanosis, miliaria pustulosa, etc., and potentially life threatening infections such as herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus infections. This review article tries to address the chronological, clinical, morphological, and histological differences among the various pustular eruptions in a newborn, in order to make it easier for a practicing dermatologist to diagnose and treat these similar looking but different entities of pustulation with a clear demarcation between the physiological benign pustular rashes and the infectious pustular lesions. PMID:25814724

  9. Pain Perception in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Midmer, Deana K.

    1989-01-01

    Pain expression in both pre-term and term infants is a little understood phenomenon. Recent research has generated data documenting that the newborn can feel pain, can act to avoid the pain, and may form memory traces of the experience. ”Nociceptive activity” or ”noxious stimuli” are better terms to use when addressing aversive stimulation of the neonate because they encourage scrutiny of the behavioural and physiologic responses of the newborn without placing emphasis on the emotional and subjective associations of the word ”pain”. Many invasive procedures are performed on infants with little or no provision for adequate pain management. The general and specific responses of the neonate to pain must be recognized. Analgesia and anesthesia should be made available to all infants, pre-term or term, sick or well, on the same basis on which they are made available to older children and adults. PMID:21248938

  10. Neonatal haemochromatosis associated with gastroschisis.

    PubMed

    Thornton, M P; Marven, S S; Tanner, M S; Gürtl-Lackner, B

    2008-05-01

    We describe, to our knowledge, the first case of progressive neonatal liver failure due to neonatal haemochromatosis (NH) occurring in an infant with a gastroschisis and review the literature regarding these two conditions. A 1,665 g male infant with antenatally diagnosed gastroschisis was born with a severe coagulopathy, anaemia, thrombocytopenia, hypoglycaemia and jaundice. He developed progressive liver failure, complicated by necrotising enterocolitis. Serum ferritin was elevated at 1,459 microg/L. He died on day 40 and a limited post-mortem examination confirmed significant hepatic siderosis with fibrosis and cholestasis, and siderosis of the pancreas. Although no genetic aetiology for gastroschisis has been identified, an occasional inherited tendency has been observed. There is also evidence to support an autosomal recessive inheritance in NH. PMID:18338135

  11. Neonatal `Brain Damage'—An Analysis of 250 Claims

    PubMed Central

    Cornblath, Marvin; Clark, Russell L.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in perinatal care have resulted in decreased neonatal mortality. Increasingly, damage in survivors has been attributed to alleged negligence. We analyzed the 250 claims (1957 to 1982) from one major insurance company for factors to characterize high-risk pregnancies and then to distinguish preventable from nonpreventable causes within the group. Using predetermined criteria, 77 (31%) were classified preventable, 105 (42%) nonpreventable and 68 (27%) indeterminate. Preventable actions could be attributed to family members as well as health care providers. Twenty risk factors were significantly increased in the study group compared with those in a general population and included maternal, gestational, delivery and postdelivery risks. Furthermore, 13 of 25 factors differed significantly between preventable and nonpreventable cases. Those with significantly higher prevalence in preventable cases included prolonged gestation, the use of mid or high forceps, cesarean sections, meconium staining, low one- and five-minute Apgar scores, birth weight exceeding 4.5 kg (10 lb), poor tone, seizures and transfers to neonatal intensive care units. Increased in prevalence in the nonpreventable cases were congenital infections and malformations and the late onset of neurologic abnormalities. These findings suggest preventive measures to reduce unwarranted litigation and certain cases of neonatal brain damage. PMID:6730485

  12. Neuroimaging in Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Pradeep; Shroff, Manohar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is emerging as one of the most important tools in identifying the etiology of neonatal encephalopathy as well as in predicting long-term outcomes. This makes it imperative to have a broader understanding of normal myelination of the neonatal brain on MR imaging and to be familiar with the spectrum of imaging features in ischemic and non-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. Hypoxic ischemic injury (HIE) is one of the most common causes of neonatal encephalopathy and imaging appearances are influenced by factors such as the stage of maturation of the neonatal brain and severity as well as duration of ischemic insult. Other common causes of neonatal encephalopathy include infectious diseases, congenital disorders and inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:26909496

  13. Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, J P; Caradeux, J; Norwitz, Errol R; Illanes, S E

    2013-01-01

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FMAIT) is a relatively uncommon disease, but is the leading cause of severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn. It can cause severe complications and long-term disabilities. The main objective of screening is to reduce both the morbidity and mortality associated with FMAIT, primarily by preventing intracranial hemorrhage. However, controversy surrounds both pre- and antenatal management. This article discusses pathogenesis, screening, diagnosis, and both pre- and neonatal management of FMAIT. PMID:23687553

  14. [A neonate with ambiguous genitalia].

    PubMed

    Jansen, Burgo J; van Rijn, Rick R; van Trotsenburg, A S P Paul

    2015-01-01

    In a neonate with ambiguous genitalia, physical examination revealed a phallus. Ultrasonography showed a vagina and uterus, but no gonads. Because of severe undervirilisation in the presence of a uterus, probably due to 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis, parents were advised female sex assignment. When after a few weeks the phallus had increased in size, abdominal laparoscopy showed an underdeveloped uterus. Gonadal biopsy confirmed gonadal dysgenesis. Sex assignment was reconsidered and changed into the male gender. PMID:26200425

  15. Neonatal resuscitation: improving the outcome.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Autumn P

    2014-03-01

    Prudent veterinary intervention in the prenatal, parturient, and postpartum periods can increase neonatal survival by controlling or eliminating factors contributing to puppy morbidity and mortality. Postresuscitation or within the first 24 hours of a natural delivery, a complete physical examination should be performed by a veterinarian, technician, or knowledgeable breeder. Adequate ingestion of colostrum must occur promptly (within 24 hours) postpartum for puppies and kittens to acquire passive immunity. PMID:24580986

  16. [Fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Díaz, E; Ginovart Galiana, G

    2003-06-01

    Fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is the commonest cause of severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn. This disorder is due to the destruction of fetal platelets by a maternal platelet-specific antibody caused by fetal-maternal incompatibility. The most serious complication is intracranial hemorrhage (10-30 % of newborns), which may cause death (10 % of the reported cases) or irreversible neurological sequelae (20 %). The diagnosis is usually made after birth when most affected neonates have petechiae, purpura or overt bleeding. The degree of severity varies according to platelet count. Current methods allow detection of maternal platelet alloantibodies (usually HPA-1a). Clinical grounds and the exclusion of other causes of neonatal thrombocytopenia are required to establish an accurate diagnosis. Recurrence of this disease is very high and has prompted clinicians to develop antenatal prophylactic programs in subsequent pregnancies. However, the optimal treatment of at-risk pregnancies remains controversial. The early diagnosis of this process allows effective therapy based on the infusion of compatible platelets and IgG immunoglobulins when hemorrhage is not obvious. Antenatal management of subsequent pregnancies can prevent recurrence of thrombocytopenia and intracranial hemorrhage. The aim of this review is to draw pediatricians' attention to the importance of this probably under-diagnosed disease in which early diagnosis can prevent potentially severe complications. PMID:12781112

  17. Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Kari A.; Anderson-Berry, Ann L.; Delair, Shirley F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS. PMID:24396135

  18. Strategies to reduce neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Singh, M

    1990-01-01

    In India, 60% of deaths in infants under 1 year of age occur in the 1st 4 weeks after birth. The neonatal mortality rate is currently 76/1000 live births in rural areas and 39/1000 in urban areas. The Government if India has launched a plan of action of address the cycle of poorly spaced pregnancies, inadequate maternal health care and nutrition, and high incidence of low birthweight babies that contributes to this high neonatal mortality phenomenon. Crucial to such a plan is the expansion, strengthening, and improved organization of maternal-child health services. At the level of maternal health services, efforts will be made to identify pregnant women early, arrange a minimum of 4 prenatal visits, provide dietary supplementation and immunization against tetanus toxoid, create more sterile conditions for home deliveries, identify and refer high-risk pregnancies and deliveries, and provide postnatal follow-up care. Child health service staff are motivating mothers to breastfeed and screening newborns for jaundice and bacterial infection. A risk approach, in which there is a minimum necessary level of care for all pregnant women but more intensive management and follow-up of those at high risk, is most cost-efficient given the lack of human and financial resources. Attention must also be given to the determinants of low birthweight (maternal undernutrition, closely spaced pregnancies, severe anemia, adolescent childbearing, prenatal infections, strenuous work responsibilities, and maternal hypertension), which is a co-factor in neonatal mortality. PMID:12316586

  19. Neonatal asphyxia and forensic medicine.

    PubMed

    d'Aloja, E; Müller, M; Paribello, F; Demontis, R; Faa, A

    2009-01-01

    In the last decades, the scientific literature addressing neonatal encephalopathy has grown in a logarithmic way and malpractice claims in obstetrics and neonatology have become a major threat to the health service. At the moment, scientific evidence are insufficient to clearly identify in each single case whether the hypoxic insult has developed in the course of labor or in the first few hours after the birth or, otherwise, whether the damage has to recognize a remote and long-lasting cause acting during pregnancy. Several authors feel that this scientific uncertainty leads to a higher percentage of civil suit decisions prone to recognizing a guilty medical behavior, and they wish a more in-depth analysis of all these cases to clearly identify all the data either in favor or in contrary to the assumption of the existence of a causal correlation between neonatal encephalopathy and medical misbehavior. This article will focus on the medico-legal approach to a hypoxic-ischemic event in the perinatal period, addressing the relevant data to be collected in order to establish the medical and juridical cause of the neonatal damage. PMID:19757333

  20. Supporting Families of Children With Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Riley, Cheryl; Rubarth, Lori Baas

    2015-01-01

    Advanced technology combined with improvements in neonatal care have increased the survival rates of low-birth-weight infants and infants born with severe birth defects. These infants are at greater risk for long-term health and developmental problems. The effect of having a child with a disability on the family is described, and emerging interventions and resources available for these families are provided. PMID:26017090

  1. Clinical trials of medicines in neonates: the influence of ethical and practical issues on design and conduct

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    In the past, there has been a perception that ethical and practical problems limit the opportunities for research in neonates. This perception is no longer appropriate. It is now clear that research about the medicines used in neonates is an ethical requirement. It is possible to conduct high quality research in neonates if the research team adapt to the characteristics of this population. Good practice involves respecting the specific needs of newborn babies and their families by adopting relevant approaches to study design, recruitment, pharmacokinetic studies and safety assessment. Neonatal units have a unique culture that requires careful development in a research setting. Clinical investigators need to recognize the clinical and ethical imperative to conduct rigorous research. Industry needs to engage with neonatal networks early in the process of drug development, preferably before contacting regulatory agencies. Follow-up over 3–5 years is essential for the evaluation of medicines in neonates and explicit funding for this is required for the assessment of the benefit and risk of treatments given to sick newborn babies. The views of parents must be central to the development of studies and the research agenda. Ethical and practical problems are no longer barriers to research in neonates. The current challenges are to disseminate good practice and maximize capacity in order to meet the need for research among newborn babies. PMID:25041601

  2. The myth of the miracle baby: how neonatal nurses interpret media accounts of babies of extreme prematurity.

    PubMed

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2015-09-01

    Improved life sustaining technology in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has resulted in an increased probability of survival in extremely premature babies. Miracle baby stories in the popular press are a regular occurrence and these reports are often the first source from which the general public learn about extremely premature babies. The research from which this paper is drawn sought to explore the care-giving and ethical dilemmas of neonatal nurses when caring for extremely premature babies 24 weeks gestation and less. This current paper aims to outline the views of neonatal nurses on miracle baby stories in the media. Data were collected via a questionnaire to 760 Australian neonatal nurses with 414 returned, representing a response rate of 54.4%. Narrative was collected from semi-structured interviews with 24 experienced neonatal nurses in NSW, Australia. A qualitative approach utilising thematic analysis was utilised to analyse the data. The theme the myth of the miracle baby is seen as generating myths and unrealistic expectations on the part of vulnerable families and the public. Neonatal nurses, as the primary caregivers for tiny babies and their families, viewed popular media publications with suspicion, believing published reports to be incomplete, inaccurate and biased towards the positive. PMID:25824907

  3. [An autopsy case of neonatal lactic acidosis].

    PubMed

    Giordano, G; Corradi, D; D'Adda, T; Melissari, M

    2001-02-01

    Defects in mitochondrial enzymes, such as pyruvate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase, cause hereditary disorders which lead to modifications in cellular pH due to the accumulation of pyruvate and lactic acid. Mitochondrial diseases include severe neonatal diseases and less severe forms of adult diseases. We report the case of lactic acidosis in a newborn girl who was delivered at 36 weeks of gestation and who died 3 months after birth. Her family history revealed a relative with tetraparesis and mental retardation. Her clinical findings, such as tonic-clonic convulsions and accumulation of pyruvate and lactic acid in blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid, were refractory to treatment and developed soon after birth. Ultrasound scans of the brain some days before death revealed cerebral atrophy with ventricular dilatation and thinning of the corpus callosum and septum pellucidum. The clinical diagnosis of metabolic lactic acidosis was confirmed by macroscopic, microscopic and ultrastructural findings seen at autopsy. On macroscopic examination, the heart was hypertrophic, and the brain was atrophic with ventricular dilatation and thinning of corpus callosum. Small cystic lesions were present in the basal ganglia. On microscopic examination, the latter were characterized by loss of neurons, gliosis and capillary proliferation. Ultrastructural examination of the heart and skeletal muscle showed lysis of myofibrils, mitochondrial pleomorphism and hyperplasia, and crystalline inclusion in mitochondria and in the matrix compartment. In reporting this case, we emphasize the importance of accurate postmortem examination and clinical data for the diagnosis of metabolic lactic acidosis. PMID:11294018

  4. [Convulsions in neonatal period and infancy with rare etiology (neurogenetic disease)].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Andrea; Szever, Zsuzsa; Kormos, Zsuzsa; Székely, Emoke; Tóth, Edit; Smidéliusz, Lajos; Horváth, Rita; Karcagi, Vera; Schuler, Agnes; Jávorszky, Eszter

    2008-11-30

    Authors summarized the etiology of convulsions in neonatal period and infancy (hypoxia, intracranial hemorrhage, infections of central nervous system, metabolic background, chromosomal abnormalities, brain developmental abnormalities, benign neonatal convulsions, benign neonatal familial convulsions, drug withdrawal, inborn error of metabolism). They suggest screening examinations after convulsion, summarized the basic principle of tandem examination and review a proposal at suspicion of inborn error of enzyme defects (aminoacidemias, defects of fatty acid oxidation, organic acidemias). They present case history of two patients suffered in extraordinary inborn error of enzyme defect (SCO2 gene mutation, propionic acidemia). Diagnosis originated in Helm P61 Hospital (settlement Madarász Hospital) with a Hungarian and international cooperation. PMID:19070318

  5. Aspects of the Development of Housing for the Spaceflight of Pregnant and Lactating Rats with Neonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinds, William E.; Mayer, David J.; Evans, Juli; Spratt, Shahn; Lane, Philip K.; Rodriguez, Shari L.; Navidi, Meena; Armstrong, Rachel; Lemos, Bonnie; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Recent and upcoming spaceflights are investigating the effect of weightlessness on developing neural and organ systems. Pregnant rats and dams with neonates have to be accommodated in cages that support the special requirements of these animals. Extensive ground testing of cage concepts, the effect of launch and landing stresses on the maintenance of pregnancy and maternal behavior at different neonatal ages, and techniques for monitoring adaptability to change are discussed. A spaceflight opportunity for the NlH.R3 payload of rat families at three different postnatal ages demonstrated that the survival of very young animals was not good but that older newborns could be returned to Earth in reasonably good health. The development of cages for the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF) to support the flight of neonates on Neurolab was continued and incorporated modifications that were demonstrated by the NIH.R3 flight. Other modifications to the RAHF are discussed. Data from biocompatibility and experiment verification testing are presented.

  6. Maternal and Neonatal Care. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains the materials required to teach a course in maternal and neonatal care that will prepare students for employment as practical nurses. The course's five instructional units cover procedures for caring for the following: prenatal patients, patients in labor and delivery, postpartum patients, healthy neonates, and…

  7. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  8. Rural Hospital Preparedness for Neonatal Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukkala, Angela; Henly, Susan J.; Lindeke, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Context: Neonatal resuscitation is a critical component of perinatal services in all settings. Purpose: To systematically describe preparedness of rural hospitals for neonatal resuscitation, and to determine whether delivery volume and level of perinatal care were associated with overall preparedness or its indicators. Methods: We developed the…

  9. Neonate with hypoglycemia for pancreatectomy: Anesthetic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Alka; Kohli, Jasvinder Kaur; Senapati, Nihar Nalini; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) is rare and an important cause of hypoglycemia in neonates. It can lead to brain damage or death secondary to severe hypoglycemia. We present the anesthetic management in a diagnosed case of PHHI in an 8-day-old male neonate for total pancreatectomy. PMID:26957713

  10. Mechanisms of Neonatal Mucosal Antibody Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following an abrupt transition at birth from the sterile uterus to an environment with abundant commensal and pathogenic microbes, neonatal mammals are protected by maternal antibodies at mucosal surfaces. We show in mice that different antibody isotypes work in distinct ways to protect the neonatal...

  11. Brazelton Neonatal Assessment for School Psychologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoudt, Calvin L.

    This speech addresses the "What,""Why," and "How" of Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Training for school psychologists. "What" concerns the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale, its administration, and what it assesses. Based on the best performance, the infant's score on this scale is scored in the context of six states of consciousness…

  12. Neonatal Seizures: Impact on Neurodevelopmental Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok Kyu; Kadam, Shilpa D.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal period is the most vulnerable time for the occurrence of seizures, and neonatal seizures often pose a clinical challenge both for their acute management and frequency of associated long-term co-morbidities. Etiologies of neonatal seizures are known to play a primary role in the anti-epileptic drug responsiveness and the long-term sequelae. Recent studies have suggested that burden of acute recurrent seizures in neonates may also impact chronic outcomes independent of the etiology. However, not many studies, either clinical or pre-clinical, have addressed the long-term outcomes of neonatal seizures in an etiology-specific manner. In this review, we briefly review the available clinical and pre-clinical research for long-term outcomes following neonatal seizures. As the most frequent cause of acquired neonatal seizures, we focus on the studies evaluating long-term effects of HIE-seizures with the goal to evaluate (1) what parameters evaluated during acute stages of neonatal seizures can reliably be used to predict long-term outcomes? and (2) what available clinical and pre-clinical data are available help determine importance of etiology vs. seizure burdens in long-term sequelae. PMID:26636052

  13. Acute neonatal appendicitis in a preterm.

    PubMed

    Mammou, Sihem; Ayadi, Imen; Ben Hamida, Emira; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Acute neonatal appendicitis is very rare in the neonatal period. It is usually associated with comorbidity including prematurity. Symptoms are non-specific. The prognosis is marked by high risk of mortality and morbidity. Here, we report a case of preterm new born who presented with sepsis, apnoea, and digestive signs. The laparotomy revealed perforated appendicitis complicated with peritonitis. PMID:26712299

  14. Murine neonatal intravascular injections: Modeling newborn disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to perform murine neonatal intravascular injections likely will prove useful in studying many newborn-specific disease states that are modeled in mice. Unfortunately, effective intravascular injection in the neonatal mouse has been limited by developmental immaturity and small size. To e...

  15. Acute neonatal appendicitis in a preterm

    PubMed Central

    Mammou, Sihem; Ayadi, Imen; Hamida, Emira Ben; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Acute neonatal appendicitis is very rare in the neonatal period. It is usually associated with comorbidity including prematurity. Symptoms are non-specific. The prognosis is marked by high risk of mortality and morbidity. Here, we report a case of preterm new born who presented with sepsis, apnoea, and digestive signs. The laparotomy revealed perforated appendicitis complicated with peritonitis. PMID:26712299

  16. Neurological Complications after Neonatal Bacteremia: The Clinical Characteristics, Risk Factors, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shih-Ming; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lien, Reyin; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Fu, Ren-Huei; Tsai, Ming-Horng

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonates with bacteremia are at risk of neurologic complications. Relevant information warrants further elucidation. Study Design This was a retrospective cohort study of neonates with bacteremia-related neurologic complications (BNCs) in a tertiary-level neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A systemic chart review was performed conducted to identify clinical characteristics and outcomes. A cohort of related conditions was constructed as the control group. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for BNC. Results Of 1037 bacteremia episodes, 36 (3.5%) had BNCs. Twenty-four cases of BNCs were related to meningitis, five were presumed meningitis, and seven occurred after septic shock. The most common causative pathogens were Group B streptococcus (41.7%) and E. coli (16.7%). The major BNCs consisted of seizures (28), hydrocephalus (20), encephalomalacia (11), cerebral infarction (7), subdural empyema (6), ventriculitis (8), and abscess (4). Eight (22.8%) neonates died and six (16.7%) were discharged in critical condition when the family withdrew life-sustaining treatment. Among the 22 survivors, eight had neurologic sequelae upon discharge. After multivariate logistic regression analysis, neonates with meningitis caused by Group B streptococcus (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 8.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.20–36.08; p = 0.002) and combined meningitis and septic shock (OR, 5.94; 95% CI: 1.53–23.15; p = 0.010) were independently associated with BNCs. Conclusions Neonates with bacteremia-related neurologic complications are associated with adverse outcomes or sequelae. Better strategies aimed at early detection and reducing the emergence of neurologic complications and aggressive treatment of Group B streptococcus sepsis are needed in neonates with meningitis and septic shock. PMID:25364821

  17. Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Cecile

    2006-01-01

    Foetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia (NAIT) results from maternal alloimmunisation against foetal platelet antigens inherited from the father and different from those present in the mother, and usually presents as a severe isolated thrombocytopaenia in otherwise healthy newborns. The incidence has been estimated at 1/800 to 1/1 000 live births. NAIT has been considered to be the platelet counterpart of Rh Haemolytic Disease of the Newborn (RHD). Unlike RHD, NAIT can occur during a first pregnancy. The spectrum of the disease may range from sub-clinical moderate thrombocytopaenia to life-threatening bleeding in the neonatal period. Mildly affected infants may be asymptomatic. In those with severe thrombocytopaenia, the most common presentations are petechiae, purpura or cephalohaematoma at birth, associated with major risk of intracranial haemorrhage (up to 20% of reported cases), which leads to death or neurological sequelae. Alloimmune thrombocytopaenia is more often unexpected and is usually diagnosed after birth. Once suspected, the diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of maternal antiplatelet alloantibodies directed against a paternal antigen inherited by the foetus/neonate. Post-natal management involves transfusion of platelets devoid of this antigen, and should not be delayed by biological confirmation of the diagnosis (once the diagnosis is suspected), especially in case of severe thrombocytopaenia. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to reduce the chances of death and disability due to haemorrhage. Due to the high rate of recurrence and increased severity of the foetal thrombocytopaenia in successive pregnancies, antenatal therapy should be offered. However, management of high-risk pregnancies is still a matter of discussion. PMID:17032445

  18. [Neonatal intermittent hypoxia and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Sukhova, G K; Nozdrachev, A D; Gozal, D

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive apnea during sleep is accompanied by intermittent hypoxia (IH) leading to hypertension and other cardiovascular disturbances. A comparative evaluation of long-term effects of the neonatal IH on the cardiovascular function was performed in normotensive Sprague-Dawley and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The newborn rats were placed for 30 days to conditions of IH (8 and 21% O2, alternating every 90 s for 12 h/day). Control groups of rats were constantly kept in normoxia. By 6 months, in the spontaneously hypertensive rats submitted to IH at the period of wakefulness there was a statistically significant increase (as compared with control) of the systolic (correspondingly 185.8 +/- 1.7 and 169.9 +/- 1.4 mm Hg, p < 0.01) and diastolic pressure (correspondingly 96.2 +/- 4.9 and 86.0 +/- 2.6 mm Hg, p < 0.01). During sleep, the systolic and diastolic pressure in these rats was higher than in control animals by 10 mm Hg (p < 0.01) and 12 mm Hg (p < 0.01), its decrease during sleep being absent. SHR submitted to IH had an increase in low- to the high-frequency power ratio of the heart rate variability from 0.9 +/- 0.15 to 1.5 +/- 0.17, which indicates a shift of the sympatho-parasympathetic balance in this group towards predominance of the sympathetic component. In the Sprague-Dawley rats submitted to neonatal hypoxia, the above changes were not pronounced. These peculiarities of the hypertensive rats allow establishing connection of the genetic factor with the sympathetic mechanism providing long-term consequences of the neonatal IH for the cardiovascular control in these rats. PMID:19435263

  19. By the way knowledge: grandparents, stillbirth and neonatal death.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Samantha; Jones, Kerry Sian

    2014-09-01

    Over the past 50 years, academic interest in the experiences of parents who lose a baby to stillbirth or neonatal death has grown. Stillbirth is defined in the UK as the death of a baby after 24 weeks' gestation and neonatal death is death within the first 4 weeks of life. Less is known about the experience of grandparents after such an event. As grandparents might expect to play an important role in their putative grandchild's life, including the provision of childcare to support parental employment, it seems likely that the baby's death will impact upon them. We argue that existing academic knowledge of grandparents' experiences of reproductive loss is 'by the way' knowledge, garnered incidentally from other research projects, for example, losing a grandchild per se or where researchers have interviewed grandparents as part of wider family research. The experience of grandparents who lose a grandchild at or around the time of birth should not go unnoticed. Research into their experiences can inform about the place in the family, if any, that is afforded to the unborn child before birth and whether, like fathers and the siblings of babies who have died, grandparents are also 'forgotten mourners'. PMID:25003481

  20. Supporting Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Parents Through Social Media.

    PubMed

    Dzubaty, Dolores R

    2016-01-01

    Parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit may often find themselves seeking healthcare information from online and social media sources. Social media applications are available to healthcare consumers and their families, as well as healthcare providers, in a variety of formats. Information that parents gather on their own, and information that is explained by providers, is then used when parents make healthcare decisions regarding their infants. Parents also seek support from peers and family while making healthcare decisions. The combination of knowledge obtained and social support given may empower the parent to feel more confident in their decision making. Healthcare professionals can guide parents to credible resources. The exchange of information between providers and parents can occur using a variety of communication methods. Misperceptions can be corrected, support given, open sharing of information occurs, and parent empowerment may result. PMID:27465452

  1. Technics of touch in the neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    van Manen, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Medical technologies, although often crucial for the provision of healthcare, may carry unintended significance for patients and their families. The highly technicised neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is the place where parents of hospitalised baby have their early encounters with their child. The aim of this study is to investigate phenomenologically how the contact and relation between parent and child may be affected by the mediating presence and use of the techno-medical features and equipments of the NICU. Three common technologies are examined for the ways they condition the kinds of contact afforded between parents and child: the isolette, the feeding tube and the brain imaging equipment. The concluding recommendations speak of the need for understanding the relational experiences of parents of hospitalised babies, and the tactful sensitivities required of the healthcare teams who provide care to these families. PMID:22774005

  2. Early and late neonatal septicaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Placzek, M M; Whitelaw, A

    1983-01-01

    Between 1979 and 1982 we reviewed 1000 consecutive admissions to the neonatal intensive care unit of this hospital. Sixty five infants had positive blood cultures. Mortality was 70% among 17 infants who had septicaemia in the first 48 hours of life and for whom appropriate treatment may have been too late because of difficulties of early diagnosis. In the remaining 48 infants mortality was 12%, septicaemia occurred later, and was associated with Staphylococcus epidermidis (56%) and with the presence of an intravascular catheter (50%). PMID:6625634

  3. The future of neonatal BCG.

    PubMed

    Odent, Michel R

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesise that neonatal BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) might be used to adapt to a new phase in the history of human births. Among most mammals, the placenta is not effective at transferring antibodies to the fetus: antibodies are transferred immediately after birth via the colostrum. Among humans (and other mammals with hemochorial placentas) the transplacental transfer of antibodies (namely IgG) is effective. In humans, foetal concentrations of IgG sub-classes approximate to maternal concentrations at 38weeks and continue to increase thereafter. These facts explain inter-species differences regarding the basic needs of neonates. Among most mammals, the early colostrum is, strictly speaking, vital. Among humans, the main questions are about the bacteriological environment in the birthing place and how familiar it is to the mother. Today, most human beings are born in unfamiliar bacteriological environments characterized by a low microbial diversity. The effects of clinical environments may be amplified by the use of antibiotics and birth by caesarean, i.e. by-passing the bacteriologically rich perineal zone. There is already an accumulation of data confirming that the maturation of a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response is affected by the mode of delivery. There is also an accumulation of epidemiological studies detecting risk factors in the perinatal period for health conditions such as type 1 diabetes (and other autoimmune diseases), atopy, autism and obesity. In such a context there are reasons to plan randomized controlled trials with long term follow-up of the effects of BCG given immediately after birth, as a modulator of Th-1/Th-2 responses. A follow-up period in the region of 6-10years would be long enough to evaluate the prevalence of several nosologically well defined diseases. These studies would be ethically acceptable, since BCG is the only infancy vaccine that has been evaluated through randomised controlled trials with long term follow

  4. [Successful treatment with rituximab and romiplostim for thrombocytopenia associated with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia initially presenting as Evans syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yumi; Koshiishi, Megumi; Sueki, Yuki; Kawashima, Ichirou; Yamamoto, Takeo; Nakajima, Kei; Mitsumori, Toru; Kirito, Keita

    2015-03-01

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with anemia and thrombocytopenia. Serum testing showed platelet-associated IgG elevation and she was positive on the direct and indirect Coombs tests. Together with bone marrow examination, these findings indicated a diagnosis of Evans syndrome. At diagnosis, she also had an IgM-κ type of monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance. Initially, we administered steroids and her hemolytic anemia showed improvement. In contrast, only transient recovery of platelet counts was observed and her platelet counts rapidly decreased after steroid dose reduction. Thus, we treated her with a TPO-agonist, romiplostim. During the clinical course, she showed gradual serum IgM elevation. We thus performed another bone marrow biopsy and diagnosed her as having Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). We started treatment with rituximab for WM. Together with the serum IgM reduction, she showed marked improvement of thrombocytopenia. This is a very rare case of WM initially presenting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia and immunethrombocytopenia associated with IgG class auto-antibody. Our experience suggests the usefulness of rituximab and romiplostim for the treatment of immunethrombocytopenia associated with WM. PMID:25876786

  5. Catastrophic relapse of Evans syndrome five years after allogeneic BMT notwithstanding full donor chimerism. Terminal hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marmont, A M; Gualandi, F; Occhini, D; Morandi, F; Ferretti, E; Pezzolo, A; Strada, P; Ravetti, J L; Pistoia, V; Falanga, A; Bacigalupo, A

    2006-09-01

    A patient with severe Evans syndrome received an allo-BMT from his HLA-identical sister on November, 2000. Full marrow and blood donor chimerism were achieved only after 5 donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI), and coincided with complete clinical remission and disappearence of auto-antibodies. Five years later, hemolytic anemia recurred with rapid increase of serum bilirubin to over 50 mg%: he responded to combined therapy, but died on day +17 from admission of an acute hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). All circulating blood cells, including erythrocytes, were 100% donor. Ex vivo cultured and expanded T and B cells from the peripheral blood were also 100% donor. The supernatants from B cell cultures, containing either IgM or IgG, did not react with a panel of erythrocytes. Thus in this typical autoimmune disease with a predominant B cell pathogenesis the donor immune system resulted "innocent of autoimmunity". The persistence of long-lived recipient autoreactive plasma-cell lines in survival niches, still producing autoantibodies, may be hypothesized for this and similar cases. The postulated graft-versus-autoimmunity (GVA) effect was apparently not sufficient to eradicate autoimmunity in this patient. PMID:17060030

  6. Efficiency of Phytoseiulus longipes Evans as a control agent of Tetranychus evansi Baker & Pritchard (Acari: Phytoseiidae: Tetranychidae) on screenhouse tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fernando R da; Moraes, Gilberto J de; Gondim, Manoel G C; Knapp, Markus; Rouam, Sigrid L; Paes, Jefferson L A; Oliveira, Guilherme M de

    2010-01-01

    The spider mite Tetranychus evansi Baker & Pritchard can cause severe damage to tomato crops. The predatory mite Phytoseiulus longipes Evans was recently reported in association with T. evansi in Uruguaiana, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of P. longipes on the population of T. evansi on tomatoes under screenhouse condition. The study consisted on four experiments, in each of which 80 potted plantlets were distributed in two plots of 40 plantlets each. Two weeks later, each plantlet of both plots was infested with eight adult females of T. evansi; one week after, four adult females of P. longipes were released onto each plant of one plot. The population levels of T. evansi and the damage caused by these mites were significantly lower (P < 0.05; linear mixed-effect model) in the plots where P. longipes had been released. The results indicate the potential of this predator as a candidate for classical biological control of T. evansi by inoculative releases on tomato plants. PMID:21271069

  7. Neonatal tetanus associated with skin infection.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, M; Dungwa, N

    2016-09-01

    A 1-week-old infant was brought to a regional hospital with a history of recurrent seizures following lower abdominal septic skin infection. She was found to have neonatal tetanus, and a spatula test was positive. The tetanus infection was associated with a superficial skin infection, common in neonates. Treatment included sedatives (diazepam, chlorpromazine, phenobarbitone and morphine), muscle relaxants, antibiotics and ventilation in the neonatal intensive care unit. Intrathecal and intramuscular immunoglobulin were given, and the wound was treated. The infant recovered, with no seizures by the 16th day from admission, and was off the ventilator by the 18th day. This was shorter than the usual 3 - 4 weeks for neonates with tetanus at the hospital. The question arises whether tetanus immunisation should be considered in infants with skin infections, which frequently occur in the neonatal period. PMID:27601113

  8. Stem Cells for Neonatal Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ahn, So Yoon; Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Won Soon

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in neonatal intensive care medicine, neonatal brain injury resulting from intraventricular hemorrhage or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy remains a major cause of neonatal mortality and neurologic morbidities in survivors. Several studies have indicated that stem cell therapy is a promising novel therapy for neonatal brain injury resulting from these disorders. This review summarizes recent advances in stem cell research for treating neonatal brain injury due to intraventricular hemorrhage or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with a particular focus on preclinical data, covering important issues for clinical translation such as optimal cell type, route, dose and timing of stem cell therapy, and translation of these preclinical results into a clinical trial. PMID:27251746

  9. Conflict resolution in end-of-life decisions in the neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Laing, Ian A

    2013-04-01

    End-of-life decisions are always stressful for families and professionals. As the decades pass, ethics and the law both change, even in one society, and cannot always provide perfect choices for each individual patient. Conflict should rarely arise in the neonatal unit. High-quality communication and compassion should allow professionals and families to build a team approach to the care of their child, even when the infant is imperilled. Each unit should have structures in place to deal with conflict, and every senior professional must be trained in conflict resolution so that the care of the family is outstanding. PMID:23084607

  10. The Family Care Center: Transitional Care for the Sick Infant and His Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldson, Edward

    1981-01-01

    A hospital-based transitional care medical program for infants discharged from a neonatal intensive care unit is described. Family involvement is emphasized, as is interdisciplinary teamwork. Concerns that the program would encourage unnecessary hospitalization and increase vulnerability to infection have been proven unjustified. (Author/DB)

  11. Arrhythmias presenting in neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Brucato, A; Previtali, E; Ramoni, V; Ghidoni, S

    2010-09-01

    Perfusion of human foetal heart with anti-Ro/SSA antibodies induces transient heart block. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies may cross-react with T- and L-type calcium channels, and anti-p200 antibodies may cause calcium to accumulate in rat heart cells. These actions may explain a direct electrophysiological effect of these antibodies. Congenital complete heart block is the more severe manifestation of so-called "Neonatal Lupus". In clinical practice, it is important to distinguish in utero complete versus incomplete atrioventricular (AV) block, as complete AV block to date is irreversible, while incomplete AV block has been shown to be potentially reversible after fluorinated steroid therapy. Another issue is the definition of congenital AV block, as cardiologists have considered congenital blocks detected months or years after birth. We propose as congenital blocks detected in utero or within the neonatal period (0-27 days after birth). The possible detection of first degree AV block in utero, with different techniques, might be a promising tool to assess the effects of these antibodies. Other arrhythmias have been described in NL or have been linked to anti-Ro/SSA antibodies: first degree AV block, in utero and after birth, second degree (i.e. incomplete block), sinus bradycardia and QT prolongation, both in infants and in adults, ventricular arrhythmias (in adults). Overall, these arrhythmias have not a clinical relevance, but are important for research purposes. PMID:20696016

  12. Neonatal Incidence of Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Eli; Eidelman, Mark; Katzman, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The advantages of sonographic examination are well known, but its main disadvantage is that it might lead to overdiagnosis, which might cause overtreatment. Variations in the incidence of developmental dysplasia of the hip are well known. We ascertained the incidence of neonatal sonographic developmental dysplasia of the hip without considering the development of those joints during followup. All 45,497 neonates (90,994 hips) born in our institute between January 1992 and December 2001 were examined clinically and sonographically during the first 48 hours of life. Sonography was performed according to Graf’s method, which considers mild hip sonographic abnormalities as Type IIa. We evaluated the different severity type incidence pattern and its influence on the total incidence during and between the investigated years. According to our study, sonographic Type IIa has major effects on the incidence of overall developmental dysplasia of the hip with a correlation coefficient of 0.95, whereas more severe sonographic abnormalities show relatively stable incidence patterns. Level of Evidence: Level I, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18288551

  13. Book Review: Evans, Arthur V. 2014. Beetles of Eastern North America. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A. 560 pp. ISBN 978-0-691-13304-1 (paperback). Price: US $35.00

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A book review is presented for “Beetles of Eastern North America” by Arthur V. Evans. This 560 page book was published in 2014 and treats over 1,400 species of beetles distributed in eastern North America....

  14. Timing of neonatal seizures and intrapartum obstetrical factors.

    PubMed

    Scher, Mark S; Steppe, Doris A; Beggarly, Marquita

    2008-06-01

    One hundred ninety-three neonates with seizures were available on a neonatal seizure database, which included intrapartum and neonatal factors such as labor duration, fetal heart rate abnormalities, cord blood gas values, Apgar scores and clinical signs of encephalopathy. Regression analyses (analysis of variance) were performed on the entire cohort as well as specific subsets of neonates (eg, neonatal encephalopathy vs no encephalopathy) to assess the relationship between seizure timing and intrapartum/neonatal factors. Seizures were noted earlier for the encephalopathic group than for the nonencephalopathic group. No significant differences were noted for any intrapartum or neonatal factors. Timing of neonatal seizures, with or without an encephalopathy occurs within the first 2 days after birth and is independent of selected intrapartum and neonatal factors, underscoring recent task force recommendations concerning neonatal encephalopathy. Factors other than intrapartum events more likely contribute to the encephalopathic repertoire of the newborn, including seizures. PMID:18281619

  15. The impact of neonatal bisphenol-A exposure on sexually dimorphic hypothalamic nuclei in the female rat

    PubMed Central

    Adewale, Heather B.; Todd, Karina L.; Mickens, Jillian A.; Patisaul, Heather B.

    2010-01-01

    Now under intense scrutiny, due to its endocrine disrupting properties, the potential threat the plastics component bisphenol-a (BPA) poses to human health remains unclear. Found in a multitude of polycarbonate plastics, food and beverage containers, and medical equipment, BPA is thought to bind to estrogen receptors (ERs), thereby interfering with estrogen-dependent processes. Our lab has previously shown that exposure to BPA (50mg/kg bw or 50μg/kg bw) during the neonatal critical period is associated with advancement of puberty, early reproductive senescence and ovarian malformations in female Long-Evans rats. Here, using neural tissue obtained from the same animals, we explored the impact of neonatal BPA exposure on the development of sexually dimorphic hypothalamic regions critical for female reproductive physiology and behavior. Endpoints included quantification of oxytocin-immunoreactive neurons (OT-ir) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), serotonin (5-HT-ir) fiber density in the ventrolateral subdivision of the ventromedial nucleus (VMNvl) as well as ERα-ir neuron number in the medial preoptic area (MPOA), the VMNvl, and the arcuate nucleus (ARC). Both doses of BPA increased the number of OT-ir neurons within the PVN, but no significant effects were seen on 5-HT-ir fiber density or ERα-ir neuron number in any of the areas analyzed. In addition to hypothalamic development, we also assessed female sex behavior and body weight. No effect of BPA on sexual receptivity or proceptive behavior in females was observed. Females treated with BPA, however, weighed significantly more than control females by postnatal day 99. This effect of BPA on weight is critical because alterations in metabolism, are frequently associated with reproductive dysfunction. Collectively, the results of this and our prior study indicate that the impact of neonatal BPA exposure within the female rat hypothalamus is region specific and support the hypothesis that developmental BPA

  16. The Korean Neonatal Network: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Hyun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Currently, in the Republic of Korea, despite the very-low-birth rate, the birth rate and number of preterm infants are markedly increasing. Neonatal deaths and major complications mostly occur in premature infants, especially very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWIs). VLBWIs weigh less than 1,500 g at birth and require intensive treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The operation of the Korean Neonatal Network (KNN) officially started on April 15, 2013, by the Korean Society of Neonatology with support from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The KNN is a national multicenter neonatal network based on a prospective web-based registry for VLBWIs. About 2,000 VLBWIs from 60 participating hospital NICUs are registered annually in the KNN. The KNN has built unique systems such as a web-based real-time data display on the web site and a site-visit monitoring system for data quality surveillance. The KNN should be maintained and developed further in order to generate appropriate, population-based, data-driven, health-care policies; facilitate active multicenter neonatal research, including quality improvement of neonatal care; and ultimately lead to improvement in the prognosis of high-risk newborns and subsequent reduction in health-care costs through the development of evidence-based neonatal medicine in Korea. PMID:26566355

  17. Laser Photoradiation Therapy For Neonatal Jaundice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Mostafa; Hamza, Mohammad

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes our leading experience in the clinical application of laser in the treatment of neonatal jaundice. Currently, the irradiation of jaundiced infants during neonatal life to fluorescent light is the most common treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The authors have investigated the photodegradation of bilirubin by laser in vitro and in Gunn rats before embarking on its clinical application in the treatment of jaundice in the new born child. This work was done to study the theraputic effect of laser compared to the currently used phototherapy in the treatment of neonatal jaundice. We selected 16 full term neonates with jaundice to be the subject of this study. The neonates of the study were devided into two groups. The first group was treated with continuous phototherapy . The second group recieved photoradiation therapy with gas laser The laser used was a CW argon-ion laser tuned to oscillate at 488.0 nm wavelength. This wavelength selection was based on our previous studies on the effect of laser irradiation of Gunn rats at different wavelengths. Comparison of the results of both methods of treatment will be reported in detail. The advantages and limitations of laser photoradiation therapy for neonatal jaundice will be discussed.

  18. Methaemoglobinaemia among neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hjelt, K; Lund, J T; Scherling, B; Bendixen, S; Lundstrøm, K; Støvring, S; Voldsgaard, P; Linnet, K

    1995-04-01

    After detection of a few clinical cases of methaemoglobinaemia (methb) in our NICU, a prospective clinical study was undertaken to determine the extent of the problem and to identify the causes. Consequently, during the following 8 months all haemoglobin tests included simultaneous measurements of methb on an OSM 3 hemoximeter (Radiometer): 8% (n = 33) of 415 neonates were found to be methb positive (defined as > or = 6% methb). Mean methb was 19% (range 6.5-45.5%). Maximum methb concentrations were found on day 4-31 postpartum (mean 12 days) and the number of days with a positive methb sample ranged from 1 to 18 days (mean 6 days). About 40% of the neonates born at 25-30 weeks of gestation and 60% with a birth weight < 1000 g were methb positive. Also, there was a negative correlation between the size of the methb positive concentration and gestational age (r = -0.38, p = 0.02). Measurements of C-reactive protein and leucocytes, NADH reductase, pH, Cl, nitrate and nitrite were carried out in methb positive patients. The tests were repeated 1 week after cessation of methb. The only significant difference was an increase in NADH reductase at the second measurement. Likewise, a wide range of clinical parameters were registered and they occurred with a higher frequency among the methb positive patients when compared with a methb negative control group matched with regard to gestational age and the closest possible birth weight. The mean birth weight of methb positive patients was 1170 g and that of negative controls 1380 g (p < 0.006).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7795342

  19. Behavioral Phenotyping of Juvenile Long-Evans and Sprague-Dawley Rats: Implications for Preclinical Models of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Katherine M.; Weir, Ruth K.; Silverman, Jill L.; Berman, Robert F.; Bauman, Melissa D.

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory rat is emerging as an attractive preclinical animal model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), allowing investigators to explore genetic, environmental and pharmacological manipulations in a species exhibiting complex, reciprocal social behavior. The present study was carried out to compare two commonly used strains of laboratory rats, Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Long-Evans (LE), between the ages of postnatal day (PND) 26–56 using high-throughput behavioral phenotyping tools commonly used in mouse models of ASD that we have adapted for use in rats. We detected few differences between young SD and LE strains on standard assays of exploration, sensorimotor gating, anxiety, repetitive behaviors, and learning. Both SD and LE strains also demonstrated sociability in the 3-chamber social approach test as indexed by spending more time in the social chamber with a constrained age/strain/sex matched novel partner than in an identical chamber without a partner. Pronounced differences between the two strains were, however, detected when the rats were allowed to freely interact with a novel partner in the social dyad paradigm. The SD rats in this particular testing paradigm engaged in play more frequently and for longer durations than the LE rats at both juvenile and young adult developmental time points. Results from this study that are particularly relevant for developing preclinical ASD models in rats are threefold: (i) commonly utilized strains exhibit unique patterns of social interactions, including strain-specific play behaviors, (ii) the testing environment may profoundly influence the expression of strain-specific social behavior and (iii) simple, automated measures of sociability may not capture the complexities of rat social interactions. PMID:27351457

  20. Atrazine-induced reproductive tract alterations after transplacental and/or lactational exposure in male Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rayner, Jennifer L.; Enoch, Rolondo R.; Wolf, Douglas C.; Fenton, Suzanne E. . E-mail: fenton.suzanne@epa.gov

    2007-02-01

    Studies showed that early postnatal exposure to the herbicide atrazine (ATR) delayed preputial separation (PPS) and increased incidence of prostate inflammation in adult Wistar rats. A cross-fostering paradigm was used in this study to determine if gestational exposure to ATR would also result in altered puberty and reproductive tissue effects in the male rat. Timed-pregnant Long-Evans (LE) rats were dosed by gavage on gestational days (GD) 15-19 with 100 mg ATR/kg body weight (BW) or 1% methylcellulose (controls, C). On postnatal day (PND)1, half litters were cross-fostered, creating 4 treatment groups; C-C, ATR-C, C-ATR, and ATR-ATR (transplacental-milk as source, respectively). On PND4, male offspring in the ATR-ATR group weighed significantly less than the C-C males. ATR-ATR male pups had significantly delayed preputial separation (PPS). BWs at PPS for C-ATR and ATR-ATR males were reduced by 6% and 9%, respectively, from that of C-C. On PND120, lateral prostate weights of males in the ATR-ATR group were significantly increased over C-C. Histological examination of lateral and ventral prostates identified an increased distribution of inflammation in the lateral prostates of C-ATR males. By PND220, lateral prostate weights were significantly increased for ATR-C and ATR-ATR, but there were no significant changes in inflammation in either the lateral or ventral prostate. These results suggest that in LE rats, gestational ATR exposure delays PPS when male offspring suckle an ATR dam, but leads to increased lateral prostate weight via transplacental exposure alone. Inflammation present at PND120 does not increase in severity with time.

  1. In vivo cerebral incorporation of radiolabeled fatty acids after acute unilateral orbital enucleation in adult hooded Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, S.; Freed, L.M.; Bell, J.M.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1994-03-01

    We examined effects of acute unilateral enucleation on incorporation from blood of intravenously injected unsaturated [1-{sup 14}C]arachidonic acid ([{sup 14}C]AA) and [1-{sup 14}C]docosahexaenoic acid ([{sup 14}C]DHA), and of saturated [9,10-{sup 3}H]palmitic acid ([{sup 3}H]PA), into visual and nonvisual brain areas of awake adult Long-Evans hooded rats. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMR{sub glc}) values also were assessed with 2-deoxy-D-[1-{sup 14}C]glucose ([{sup 14}C]DG). One day after unilateral enucleation, an awake rat was placed in a brightly lit visual stimulation box with black and white striped walls, and a radiolabeled fatty acid was infused for 5 min or [{sup 14}C]DG was injected as a bolus. [{sup 14}C]DG also was injected in a group of rats kept in the dark for 4 h. Fifteen minutes after starting an infusion of a radiolabeled fatty acid, or 45 min after injecting [{sup 14}C]DG, the rat was killed and the brain was prepared for quantitative autoradiography. Incorporation coefficients k* of fatty acids, or rCMR{sub glc} values, were calculated in homologous brain regions contralateral and ipsilateral to enucleation. As compared with ipsilateral regions, rCMR{sub glc} was reduced significantly (by as much as -39%) in contralateral visual areas, including the superior colliculus, lateral geniculate body, and layers I, IV, and V of the primary (striate) and secondary (association, extrastriate) visual cortices. These results indicate that enucleation acutely reduces neuronal activity in contralateral visual areas of the awake rat and that the reductions are coupled to reduced incorporation of unsaturated fatty acids into sn-2 regions of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Reduced fatty acid incorporation likely reflects reduced activity of phospholipases A{sub 2} and/or phospholipase C. 65 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Stress facilitates late reversal learning using a touchscreen-based visual discrimination procedure in male Long Evans rats

    PubMed Central

    Bryce, Courtney A.; Howland, John G.

    2015-01-01

    The stress response is essential to the survival of all species as it maintains internal equilibrium and allows organisms to respond to threats in the environment. Most stress research has focused on the detrimental impacts of stress on cognition and behavior. Reversal learning, which requires a change in response strategy based on one dimension of the stimuli, is one type of behavioral flexibility that is facilitated following some brief stress procedures. The current study investigated a potential mechanism underlying this facilitation by blocking glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) during stress. Thirty-seven male Long Evans rats learned to discriminate between two images on a touchscreen, one of which was rewarded. Once a criterion was reached, rats received stress (30 min of restraint stress or no stress) and drug (GR antagonist RU38486 or vehicle) administration prior to each of the first 3 days of reversal learning. We expected that stress would facilitate reversal learning and RU38486 (10 mg/kg) would prevent this facilitation in both early (<50% correct in one session) and late (>50% correct in one session) stages of reversal learning. Results showed that stressed rats performed better than unstressed rats (fewer days for late reversal, fewer correction trials, and fewer errors) in the late but not early stage of reversal learning. RU38486 did not block the facilitation of RL by stress, although it dramatically increased response, but not reward, latencies. These results confirm the facilitation of late reversal by stress in a touchscreen-based operant task in rats and further our understanding of how stress affects higher level cognitive functioning and behavior. PMID:25251839

  3. Influence of gender on thermoregulation and cholinesterase inhibition in the long-evans rat exposed to diazinon.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Mack, Cina M

    2003-02-14

    Diazinon is an organophosphate (OP)-based, anticholinesterase insecticide that irreversibly inhibits acetylcholinesterase activity and produces cholinergic stimulation in central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues. Our laboratory has found that OPs administered orally in rats induce a transient period of hypothermia followed by a delayed fever that persists for several days after exposure. There is little information on the thermoregulatory effects of diazinon. Core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA) were monitored by radiotelemetry in male and female rats of the Long-Evans strain dosed orally with diazinon (0 [corn-oil vehicle], 100, 200, or 300 mg/kg in males and 0, 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg in females). There was a dose-dependent decrease in Tc during the first night after treatment, with females exhibiting slightly greater sensitivity than males. MA was unaffected in females exposed to diazinon at doses of 50 to 200 mg/kg; MA of males was reduced during the first night after dosing with 300 mg/kg. There was a delayed elevation in Tc of males dosed with 200 and 300 mg/kg and females dosed with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg diazinon. The elevated Tc was only manifested during d 2 and 3 after diazinon. Administration of 200 mg/kg sodium salicylate to females 48 h after being treated with 200 mg/kg diazinon led to a rapid abatement of the fever. Diazinon doses of 50 to 300 mg/kg led to 40% to 50% inhibition in plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity 4 h after dosing, and females displayed a significantly slower recovery of ChE activity compared to males. When compared on a molar basis, the hypothermic response to diazinon was relatively small compared to other OPs such as chlorpyrifos. The delayed fever and efficacy of sodium salicylate to block diazinon-induced fever are similar to the effects of OPs chlorpyrifos and diisopropyl fluoro-phosphate (DFP). PMID:12521673

  4. Behavioral Phenotyping of Juvenile Long-Evans and Sprague-Dawley Rats: Implications for Preclinical Models of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ku, Katherine M; Weir, Ruth K; Silverman, Jill L; Berman, Robert F; Bauman, Melissa D

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory rat is emerging as an attractive preclinical animal model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), allowing investigators to explore genetic, environmental and pharmacological manipulations in a species exhibiting complex, reciprocal social behavior. The present study was carried out to compare two commonly used strains of laboratory rats, Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Long-Evans (LE), between the ages of postnatal day (PND) 26-56 using high-throughput behavioral phenotyping tools commonly used in mouse models of ASD that we have adapted for use in rats. We detected few differences between young SD and LE strains on standard assays of exploration, sensorimotor gating, anxiety, repetitive behaviors, and learning. Both SD and LE strains also demonstrated sociability in the 3-chamber social approach test as indexed by spending more time in the social chamber with a constrained age/strain/sex matched novel partner than in an identical chamber without a partner. Pronounced differences between the two strains were, however, detected when the rats were allowed to freely interact with a novel partner in the social dyad paradigm. The SD rats in this particular testing paradigm engaged in play more frequently and for longer durations than the LE rats at both juvenile and young adult developmental time points. Results from this study that are particularly relevant for developing preclinical ASD models in rats are threefold: (i) commonly utilized strains exhibit unique patterns of social interactions, including strain-specific play behaviors, (ii) the testing environment may profoundly influence the expression of strain-specific social behavior and (iii) simple, automated measures of sociability may not capture the complexities of rat social interactions. PMID:27351457

  5. Effects of prenatal and postnatal maternal ethanol on offspring response to alcohol and psychostimulants in long evans rats.

    PubMed

    Barbier, E; Houchi, H; Warnault, V; Pierrefiche, O; Daoust, M; Naassila, M

    2009-06-30

    An important factor that may influence addiction liability is exposure during the early life period. Exposure to ethanol, early in life, can have long-lasting implications on brain function and drugs of abuse response later in life. In the present study we investigated the behavioral responses to ethanol and to psychostimulants in Long Evans rats that have been exposed to pre- and postnatal ethanol. Since a relationship between heightened drug intake and susceptibility to drug-induced locomotor activity/sensitization has been demonstrated, we tested these behavioral responses, in control and early life ethanol-exposed animals. The young adult male and female progeny were tested for locomotor response to alcohol, cocaine and d-amphetamine. Sedative, rewarding effects of alcohol and alcohol consumption were measured. Our results show that early life ethanol exposure behaviorally sensitized animals to subsequent ethanol and psychostimulants exposure. Ethanol-exposed animals were also more sensitive to the hyperlocomotor effects of all drugs of abuse tested and to those of the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine. Locomotor sensitization to repeated injections of cocaine was facilitated in ethanol-exposed animals. Ethanol-induced conditioned place preference was also facilitated in ethanol-exposed animals. Ethanol consumption and preference were increased after early life ethanol exposure and this was associated with decreased sensitivity to the sedative effects of ethanol. The altered behavioral responses to drugs of abuse were associated with decreased striatal dopamine transporter and hippocampal NMDAR binding. Our results outline an increased vulnerability to rewarding and stimulant effects of ethanol and psychostimulants and support the epidemiological and clinical data that suggested that early chronic exposure to ethanol may increase the propensity for later self-administration of ethanol or other substances. PMID:19348874

  6. Regional and cardiac haemodynamic effects of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester in conscious, Long Evans rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, S. M.; Compton, A. M.; Kemp, P. A.; Bennett, T.

    1990-01-01

    1. Regional haemodynamic responses to i.v. bolus doses (0.1-10.0 mg kg-1) of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were measured in conscious, Long Evans rats (n = 8) chronically instrumented with renal, mesenteric and hindquarters pulsed Doppler flow probes and intravascular catheters. 2. L-NAME caused dose-dependent pressor effects associated with renal, mesenteric and hindquarters vasoconstrictions. The mesenteric vascular bed showed earlier onset with more rapid, and greater, maximum vasoconstrictions than the renal or hindquarters vascular beds; however, the hindquarters vasoconstriction was more persistent. D-NAME was without significant effects (n = 2). 3. Primed infusion of L-arginine (100 mg kg-1 bolus followed by 100 mg kg-1 h-1 infusion), starting 10 min after an i.v. bolus injection of L-NAME (10 mg kg-1), caused significant reversal of the pressor responses, and renal and mesenteric vasoconstrictions, but not of the hindquarters vasoconstriction. Primed infusions of L-arginine (100 mg kg-1, 100 mg kg-1 h-1) starting 5 min after L-NAME (1 mg kg-1) additionally caused some reversal of the hindquarters vasoconstriction, but this effect was transient. 4. Primed infusion of L-arginine (100 mg kg-1, 100 mg kg-1 h-1) starting 30 min before i.v. bolus injection of L-NAME (10 mg kg-1) caused significant attenuation of the pressor effects and the renal and mesenteric vasoconstrictions but not of the hindquarters vasoconstriction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2076481

  7. Predicting Infant Maltreatment in Low-Income Families: The Interactive Effects of Maternal Attributions and Child Status at Birth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugental, Daphne Blunt; Happaney, Keith

    2004-01-01

    Maternal attributions and child neonatal status at birth were assessed as predictors of infant maltreatment (harsh parenting and safety neglect). The population included low-income, low-education families who were primarily Hispanic. Child maltreatment during the 1st year of life (N = 73) was predicted by neonatal status (low Apgar scores, preterm…

  8. Neonatal medicine in ancient art.

    PubMed

    Yurdakök, Murat

    2010-01-01

    There are a limited number of artistic objects from ancient times with particular importance in neonatal medicine. The best examples are figurines from ancient Egypt of Isis nursing Horus, showing the importance of breastfeeding. The earliest images of the human fetus were made by the Olmecs in Mexico around 1200- 400 BCE. One of the earliest representations of congenital anomalies is a figurine of diencephalic twins thought to be the goddess of Anatolia, dated to around 6500 BCE. In addition to these figurines, three sets of twins in the ancient world have medical importance, and Renaissance artists often used them as a subject for their paintings: "direct suckling animals" (Romulus and Remus), "heteropaternal superfecundation" (mother: Leda, fathers: Zeus, the king of the Olympian gods, and Leda's husband, Tyndareus), and "twin-to-twin transfusion" in monozygotic twins (Jacob and Esau). PMID:20560265

  9. Neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone level is influenced by neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy factors.

    PubMed

    Trumpff, Caroline; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Moreno-Reyes, Rodrigo; Vanderpas, Jean; Tafforeau, Jean; Van Oyen, Herman; De Schepper, Jean

    2015-11-01

    The percentage of newborns with a neonatal whole blood thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) greater than 5 mIU/L has been used as an indicator of iodine deficiency at the population level. However, TSH levels in newborns may be influenced by many factors other than iodine status. The objective of this study was to identify neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy-related determinants of neonatal TSH levels in a retrospective cohort study. The study sample included 313 Belgian mothers and their 4- to 5-year-old children. The children had a neonatal TSH concentration between 0 and 15 mIU/L at neonatal screening, and blood samples were collected 3 to 5 days after birth. Children with suspected congenital hypothyroidism (neonatal TSH level >15 mIU/L), prematurely born (i.e., <37 weeks), or with a low birth weight (i.e., <2500 g) were excluded. Information about maternal and birth-related determinants was collected from the neonatal screening center via a self-administered questionnaire filled in by the mother together with the child's health booklet. Higher TSH levels were found in spring and winter compared to summer and autumn (P = .011). Higher TSH levels were associated with lifetime smoking behavior (up to child birth) in the mother (P = .005), lower weight gain during pregnancy (P = .014), and longer pregnancies (P = .003). This study showed that several neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy-related determinants are influencing neonatal TSH level. PMID:26428622

  10. A burden of knowledge: A qualitative study of experiences of neonatal intensive care nurses' concerns when keeping information from parents.

    PubMed

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2015-12-01

    Improved life-sustaining technology in the neonatal intensive care has resulted in an increased probability of survival for extremely premature babies. In the neonatal intensive care, the condition of a baby can deteriorate rapidly. Nurses and parents are together for long periods at the bedside and so form close and trusting relationships. Neonatal nurses as the constant caregivers may be presented with contradictory demands in attempting to meet the baby's needs and being a patient and family advocate. This article aims to explore the issues arising for neonatal nurses when holding information about changes to a condition of a baby that they are unable to share with parents. Data were collected via interviews with 24 neonatal nurses in New South Wales, Australia. A qualitative approach was used to analyse the data. The theme 'keeping secrets' was identified and comprised of three sub-themes 'coping with potentially catastrophic news', 'fear of inadvertent disclosure' and 'a burden that could damage trust'. Keeping secrets and withholding information creates internal conflict in the nurses as they balance the principle of confidentiality with the parent's right to know information. The neonatal nurses experienced guilt and shame when they were felt forced by circumstances to keep secrets or withhold information from the parents of extremely premature babies. PMID:24821077

  11. Neonatal care practices in a tribal community of Odisha, India: a cultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Pati, Sanghamitra; Chauhan, Abhimanyu S; Panda, Madhusmita; Swain, Subhashish; Hussain, Mohammad A

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal care practices have been shown to vary across tribal communities. This cross-sectional study was conducted in tribal block in Nabarangpur district of Odisha, India, to measure perinatal and antenatal practices by qualitative inquiries of 55 mothers who had babies aged <60 days and from 11 traditional birth attendants. Reasons for home deliveries were cited as easy availability of traditional birth attendants and family preferences. Application of indigenously made substances on umbilical stump and skin of the baby, bathing baby immediately after birth, late initiation of breast-feeding and 'Budu practices' were common. Cultural issues, decision of family members and traditional beliefs still play a crucial role in shaping neonatal care practice in tribal communities. Awareness on child care, ethnographic understanding of health-seeking behavior of tribal community and mobilization of community by health workers can be useful in improving health status of mothers and newborn babies in tribal population. PMID:24519674

  12. Integrating a sense of coherence into the neonatal environment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Family centred care (FCC) is currently a valued philosophy within neonatal care; an approach that places the parents at the heart of all decision-making and engagement in the care of their infant. However, to date, there is a lack of clarity regarding the definition of FCC and limited evidence of FCCs effectiveness in relation to parental, infant or staff outcomes. Discussion In this paper we present a new perspective to neonatal care based on Aaron Antonovksy’s Sense of Coherence (SOC) theory of well-being and positive health. Whilst the SOC was originally conceptualised as a psychological-based construct, the SOCs three underpinning concepts of comprehensibility, manageability and meaningfulness provide a theoretical lens through which to consider and reflect upon meaningful care provision in this particular care environment. By drawing on available FCC research, we consider how the SOC concepts considered from both a parental and professional perspective need to be addressed. The debate offered in this paper is not presented to reduce the importance or significance of FCC within neonatal care, but, rather, how consideration of the SOC offers the basis through which meaningful and effective FCC may be delivered. Practice based implications contextualised within the SOC constructs are also detailed. Summary Consideration of the SOC constructs from both a parental and professional perspective need to be addressed in FCC provision. Service delivery and care practices need to be comprehensible, meaningful and manageable in order to achieve and promote positive well-being and health for all concerned. PMID:23697687

  13. Whole blood viscosity of preterm infants - differences to term neonates.

    PubMed

    Kuss, N; Bauknecht, E; Felbinger, C; Gehm, J; Gehm, L; Pöschl, J; Ruef, P

    2015-01-01

    Determination of shear stresses at given shear rates with the LS 300 allows approximation of flow curves by mathematical models and to calculate viscosities of non-Newtonian fluids across the entire physiological shear range. Particular in preterm neonates, which in comparison to term neonates and adults have a substantially lower mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), rheological blood properties play a decisive role to maintain the perfusion. Whole blood viscosity was measured in umbilical cord blood taken from 34 preterm neonates using the LS 300 viscometer. In addition aggregation index, plasma viscosity, hematocrit and red blood cell (RBC) deformability was determined. The highest quality of approximation of the flow curve of whole blood was achieved by the method of Ostwald. Shear stresses of whole blood of preterm neonates were significantly lower compared to term neonates at similar shear rates (velocity range 6.16 s-1-50 s-1). With hematocrit calculated to 0.40 the related exponent (n) of the viscosity of preterm neonates (by Ostwald) showed a significant lower exponent (n) (0.71 ± 0.07) than term neonates (0.76 ± 0.06). The highest quality of approximation of the flow curve of plasma was achieved with the model of Ostwald in preterm neonates as well as in term neonates. The viscosity of plasma determined by Newton was lower for preterm neonates (0.89 ± 0.19) than for term neonates (1.04 ± 0.16). Concurrent to term neonates the whole blood of preterm neonates showed a very low aggregation index (term neonates 2.97 ± 2.10; preterm neonates 2.37 ± 1.32) and preterm neonates showed higher RBC deformability than term neonates. Because of the physiologically lower MAP and the particular viscous properties of neonatal blood special attention should be given when treating neonates with conventional blood products derived from adult donors. PMID:26444619

  14. Family Meals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Family Meals KidsHealth > For Parents > Family Meals Print A ... even more important as kids get older. Making Family Meals Happen It can be a big challenge ...

  15. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  16. Family Arguments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  17. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Family Health History Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Family Health History The Basics Family Health History & Chronic Disease Planning ...

  18. Family Folklore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotkin, Amy J.; Baker, Holly C.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the Family Folklore Program of the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife, in which the whole family can be involved in tracing family history through story telling, photographs, etc. (MS)

  19. Sound production in neonate sperm whales (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, P. T.; Carder, D. A.; Au, W. W. L.; Nachtigall, P. E.; Møhl, B.; Ridgway, S. H.

    2003-06-01

    Acoustic data from two sperm whale neonates (Physeter macrocephalus) in rehabilitation are presented and implications for sound production and function are discussed. The clicks of neonate sperm whale are very different from usual clicks of adult specimens in that neonate clicks are of low directionality [SL anomaly (0°-90°) <8 dB], long duration (2-12 ms), and low frequency (centroid frequency between 300 and 1700 Hz) with estimated SLs between 140 and 162 dB//1 μPa (rms). Such neonate clicks are unsuited for biosonar, but can potentially convey homing information between calves and submerged conspecifics in open ocean waters at ranges of some 2 km. Moreover, it is demonstrated that sperm whale clicks are produced at the anterior placed monkey lips, thereby substantiating a key point in the modified Norris and Harvey theory and supporting the unifying theory of sound production in odontocetes.

  20. Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis in Neonates and Children.

    PubMed

    Chung, Melissa G

    2016-03-01

    Investigators from Erasmus University Hospital in Belgium and Gustave-Dron Hospital and Roger-Salengro Hospital in France studied the clinical and neuroradiologic characteristics of cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) in neonates and children. PMID:27396366

  1. The many etiologies of neonatal hypocalcemic seizures.

    PubMed

    Levy-Shraga, Yael; Dallalzadeh, Keren; Stern, Keren; Paret, Gideon; Pinhas-Hamiel, Orit

    2015-03-01

    Seizures during the neonatal period have a broad differential diagnosis. Unlike in developing countries where hypovitaminosis D and hypocalcemia constitutes a major cause of infantile seizures, the number of neonatal seizures attributed to hypocalcemia in developed countries has decreased dramatically due to the improvement of infant formulas and vitamin D supplementation. In these countries, most infants that present with hypocalcemic seizures have underlying endocrinological etiologies rather than dietary insufficiencies. Here, we describe 3 cases of neonatal seizures due to hypocalcemia. Although the symptoms and calcium concentrations at presentation were similar in all 3 cases, the course of the disease and the final diagnosis for each were distinct. The cases are presented along with a brief review of the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment of neonatal hypocalcemia. PMID:25738238

  2. Effect of vitamin K on neonatal erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shahal, Y; Zmora, E; Katz, M; Mazor, D; Meyerstein, N

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated the possible oxidative effect of vitamin K3 (menadione) and Vitamin K1 (Konakion) on neonatal erythrocytes by controlled in vitro exposure. Menadione caused only mild morphological changes and did not decrease ATP levels. However, it oxidized intracellular hemoglobin to methemoglobin in neonatal cells more than in adult cells. Reduced glutathione contents were higher in neonatal cells, but less available for antioxidant protection. Konakion did not increase methemoglobin levels in newborn infants after a prophylactic injection. In vitro exposure to Konakion did not affect reduced glutathione and ATP levels, nor did it oxidize hemoglobin. However, extensive morphological changes were observed, attributed to the effect of its solvent. Therefore, it seems that menadione, which is no longer administered to newborns, causes oxidative stress in neonatal cells whereas Konakion, the current vitamin K1, does not, either in in vitro studies or by therapeutic administration. PMID:1472579

  3. Trends in stillbirths, early and late neonatal mortality in rural Bangladesh: the role of public health interventions.

    PubMed

    Ronsmans, Carine; Chowdhury, Mahbub Elahi; Alam, Nurul; Koblinsky, Marge; El Arifeen, Shams

    2008-05-01

    Trends were examined in a cohort study of stillbirths and early and late neonatal deaths in Matlab, a rural area of Bangladesh between 1975 and 2002, using routinely collected demographic surveillance data. Main outcome measures were stillbirths per 1000 births, early neonatal deaths per 1000 livebirths, and late neonatal deaths per 1000 children surviving after 1 week. We performed a logistic regression examining trends over time and between two areas in the three outcome measures, controlling for the effects of parental education, religion, time, geography, parity, maternal age and birth spacing. There was a marked decline in stillbirths, early and late neonatal mortality over time in both areas, though the pace of decline was somewhat faster in the ICDDR,B (International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh) service area. Stillbirths declined by 24% overall in the ICDDR,B service area (crude OR comparing 1996-2002 with 1975-81: 0.76 [95% CI 0.68, 0.84]), compared with 15% in the Government service area (crude OR comparing 1996-2002 with 1975-81: 0.85 [0.76, 0.94]). The overall reduction in early and late neonatal mortality comparing the same periods was 39% and 73%, respectively, in the ICDDR,B area, compared with 30% and 63%, respectively, in the Government service area. Adjusting for socio-economic or demographic factors did not substantially alter the time or area differentials. The dramatic decline in neonatal mortality was, in large part, due to a fall in deaths from neonatal tetanus. The pace of decline was faster in the area receiving intense maternal and child health and family planning interventions, but stillbirths, early and late neonatal deaths also declined in the area not receiving such intense attention, suggesting that factors outside the formal health sector play an important role. PMID:18426522

  4. Providing immediate neonatal care and resuscitation at birth beside the mother: parents’ views, a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Alexandra; Ayers, Susan; Bertullies, Sophia; Thomas, Margaret; Weeks, Andrew D; Yoxall, Charles W; Duley, Lelia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to assess parents’ views of immediate neonatal care and resuscitation at birth being provided beside the mother, and their experiences of a mobile trolley designed to facilitate this bedside care. Design Qualitative study with semistructured interviews. Results were analysed using thematic analysis. Setting Large UK maternity hospital. Participants Mothers whose baby received initial neonatal care in the first few minutes of life at the bedside, and their birth partners, were eligible. 30 participants were interviewed (19 mothers, 10 partners and 1 grandmother). 5 babies required advanced neonatal resuscitation. Results 5 themes were identified: (1) Reassurance, which included ‘Baby is OK’, ‘Having baby close’, ‘Confidence in care’, ‘Knowing what's going on’ and ‘Dad as informant’; (2) Involvement of the family, which included ‘Opportunity for contact’, ‘Family involvement’ and ‘Normality’; (3) Staff communication, which included ‘Communication’ and ‘Experience’; (4) Reservations, which included ‘Reservations about witnessing resuscitation’, ‘Negative emotions’ and ‘Worries about the impact on staff’ and (5) Experiences of the trolley, which included ‘Practical issues’ and ‘Comparisons with standard resuscitation equipment’. Conclusions Families were positive about neonatal care being provided at the bedside, and felt it gave reassurance about their baby's health and care. They also reported feeling involved as a family. Some parents reported experiencing negative emotions as a result of witnessing resuscitation of their baby. Parents were positive about the trolley. PMID:26384723

  5. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period. PMID:12199947

  6. Periventricular leukomalacia in a neonatal calf.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kenji; Fujita, Riku; Maezawa, Masaki; Fukumoto, Natsuko; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Inokuma, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2016-08-01

    A 10-day-old, Japanese Black, female calf had shown astasia since just after birth. Focal symmetrical periventricular malacic lesions of the cerebrum and suppurative arthritis of the left hip joint were observed in macroscopic examination. Histologically, the cerebral lesions were confirmed as periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The location and histological features of the lesions were similar to PVL in humans, caused by neonatal ischemia/hypovolemia. This is the first report of PVL in a neonatal calf. PMID:27010465

  7. Maternal and neonatal outcomes of macrosomic pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann-Brenner, Alina; Simchen, Michal J.; Zilberberg, Eran; Kalter, Anat; Weisz, Boaz; Achiron, Reuven; Dulitzky, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To compare maternal and neonatal outcomes of term macrosomic and adequate for gestational age (AGA) pregnancies. Material/Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on all term singleton macrosomic (birth weight ≥4000 g) and AGA (birth weight >10th percentile and <4000 g) pregnancies delivered at our hospital between 2004 and 2008. Data collected included maternal age, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, birth weight, fetal gender, maternal and neonatal complications. Comparisons were made between macrosomic and AGA pregnancies and between different severities of macrosomia (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g). Results The study population comprised of 34,685 pregnancies. 2077 neonates had birth weight ≥4000 g. Maternal age and gestational age at delivery were significantly higher for macrosomic neonates. Significantly more macrosomic neonates were born by cesarean section, and were complicated with shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and had longer hospitalization period (both in vaginal and cesarean deliveries). Specifically, the odds ratio (OR) relative to AGA pregnancies for each macrosomic category (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g) of shoulder dystocia was 2.37, 2.24, 7.61, respectively, and for neonatal hypoglycemia 4.24, 4.41, 4.15, respectively. The risk of post partum hemorrhage was statistically increased when birth weight was >4500 g (OR=5.23) but not for birth weight between 4000–4500 g. No differences were found in the rates of extensive perineal lacerations between AGA and the different macrosomic groups. Conclusions Macrosomia is associated with increased rate of cesarean section, shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and longer hospitalization, but not associated with excessive perineal tears. Increased risk of PPH was found in the >4500g group. PMID:22936200

  8. Legal and ethical issues in neonatal nursing.

    PubMed

    2016-09-12

    Neonatal nurses regularly face complex legal and ethical dilemmas. This article discusses the hypothetical case of Jack, a two-day-old infant, born at 39 weeks' gestation, and diagnosed with trisomy 13 (syndrome), a life-limiting condition and being cared for in a neonatal intensive care unit. Jack's prognosis is poor and he is not expected to live past two weeks of age. PMID:27615591

  9. Fading kitten syndrome and neonatal isoerythrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bücheler, J

    1999-07-01

    Fading kitten syndrome includes noninfectious and infectious causes for neonatal death (birth to weaning age). Noninfectious causes are mostly responsible for mortality in the first week of life and include congenital disorders, low birth weights, trauma, malnutrition, environmental causes, and neonatal isoerythroylsis. Infectious causes are more prevalent at 3-4 weeks of age. This article discusses the causes, clinical signs, and management of fading kitten syndrome. PMID:10390788

  10. Neonatal osteomyelitis examined by bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bressler, E.L.; Conway, J.J.; Weiss, S.C.

    1984-09-01

    Thirty-three infants less than six weeks of age and suspected of having osteomyelitis were examined by bone scintigraphy. Each of the 25 sites of proved osteomyelitis in 15 individuals demonstrated abnormal radionuclide localization. Ten additional scintigraphically positive but radiographically normal sites were detected. Optimal quality scintigrams of the growth plate complex and osteomyelitis in neonates appeared similar to those in older children. All neonates suspected of having osteomyelitis should be studied with bone scintigraphy following initial radiographs.

  11. Conjugation Inhibitors and Early Neonatal Hyperbilirubinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Cole, A. P.; Hargreaves, T.

    1972-01-01

    Milk and serum were obtained from 50 mothers on the 6th day post partum and examined for inhibitory activity against bilirubin conjugation in rat liver slices. Neonatal serum bilirubin levels were also analysed at this time. There was no relation between the amount of inhibitory substance in breast milk or serum and the degree of neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia. It was observed that inhibitory activity increased in frozen breast milk but not in frozen autoclaved breast milk. PMID:5034671

  12. Periventricular leukomalacia in a neonatal calf

    PubMed Central

    KOYAMA, Kenji; FUJITA, Riku; MAEZAWA, Masaki; FUKUMOTO, Natsuko; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; INOKUMA, Hisashi; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu

    2016-01-01

    A 10-day-old, Japanese Black, female calf had shown astasia since just after birth. Focal symmetrical periventricular malacic lesions of the cerebrum and suppurative arthritis of the left hip joint were observed in macroscopic examination. Histologically, the cerebral lesions were confirmed as periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The location and histological features of the lesions were similar to PVL in humans, caused by neonatal ischemia/hypovolemia. This is the first report of PVL in a neonatal calf. PMID:27010465

  13. Milk allergy in the neonatal intensive care unit: comparison between premature and full-term neonates

    PubMed Central

    Iwakura, Hideo; Ohtsuka, Harumi; Kohno, Yoichi; Shimojo, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Background There have been several reports on neonates with milk allergy in a neonatal ward. This type of allergy is mostly categorized as a non-IgE-mediated food allergy. Although most cases of milk allergy occur in the first few months of life, the differences in clinical characteristics between premature and full-term neonates are still unclear. Objective This study aimed to clarify the differences in clinical characteristics of milk allergy between premature and full-term neonates. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 2,116 neonates admitted to the Department of Neonatology, Chiba Kaihin Municipal Hospital, between 2001 and 2007. Results We identified 24 neonates strongly suspected of having milk allergy because of symptoms, such as bloody stools, repeated vomiting, diminished sucking and abdominal distension, as well as objective laboratory findings of eosinophilia in stool cytology and/or positive results for a rectal milk challenge test. Twelve of these 24 neonates were premature (median gestational age, 31 ± 3 weeks; median birth weight, 1,656 ± 592 g) and the other 12 were full-term (median gestational age, 38 ± 1 weeks; median birth weight, 2,760 ± 560 g). There were no differences in symptoms and time to start of feeding between premature and full-term neonates, but there was a significant difference in the median postnatal age at onset (premature neonates: 23 days; vs. full-term neonates: 3.5 days; p < 0.01). Conclusion All premature neonates developed a milk allergy after 32 weeks of corrected gestational age, suggesting that the development of milk allergy requires a certain degree of immunological maturation. PMID:23403887

  14. Nutrition support after neonatal cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Owens, Joyce L; Musa, Ndidiamaka

    2009-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect in the United States, with an estimated frequency of approximately 12-14 of 1000 live births per year. Neonates with congenital heart disease often need palliative or corrective surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass during the first weeks of life. The neonate undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery experiences a more profound metabolic response to stress than that seen in older children and adults undergoing surgery. However, compared with older children and adults, the neonate has less metabolic reserves and is extremely vulnerable to the negative metabolic impact induced by stress, which can lead to suboptimal wound healing and growth failure. There are complications associated with the metabolic derangements of neonatal surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass, including but not limited to acute renal failure, chylothorax, and neurological dysfunction. This article discusses the importance of nutrition and metabolic support for the neonate undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass and the immediate postoperative nutrition needs of such a patient. Also, this article uses a case study to examine the feeding methodology used at one particular institution after neonatal cardiac surgery. The purpose of the case study is to provide an illustration of the many factors and obstacles that clinicians often face in the provision and timing of nutrition support. PMID:19321898

  15. Selenium status in neonates with connatal infection.

    PubMed

    Wiehe, Lennart; Cremer, Malte; Wisniewska, Monika; Becker, Niels-Peter; Rijntjes, Eddy; Martitz, Janine; Hybsier, Sandra; Renko, Kostja; Bührer, Christoph; Schomburg, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Infectious diseases impair Se metabolism, and low Se status is associated with mortality risk in adults with critical disease. The Se status of neonates is poorly characterised, and a potential impact of connatal infection is unknown. We hypothesised that an infection negatively affects the Se status of neonates. We conducted an observational case-control study at three intensive care units at the Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. Plasma samples were collected from forty-four neonates. On the basis of clinical signs for bacterial infection and concentrations of IL-6 or C-reactive protein, neonates were classified into control (n 23) and infected (n 21) groups. Plasma Se and selenoprotein P (SePP) concentrations were determined by X-ray fluorescence and ELISA, respectively, at day of birth (day 1) and 48 h later (day 3). Se and SePP showed a positive correlation in both groups of neonates. Se concentrations indicative of Se deficit in adults (500 ng/l). During antibiotic therapy, SePP increased significantly from day 1 (1·03 (sd 0·10) mg/l) to day 3 (1·34 (sd 0·10) mg/l), indicative of improved hepatic Se metabolism. We conclude that both Se and SePP are suitable biomarkers for assessing Se status in neonates and for identifying subjects at risk of deficiency. PMID:27267586

  16. Antiepileptic drug treatment strategies in neonatal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hernan, A E; Holmes, G L

    2016-01-01

    The highest risk of seizures across the lifespan is in the neonatal period. The enhanced excitability of the immature brain compared to the mature brain is related to the sequential development and expression of essential neurotransmitter signaling pathways. During the neonatal period there is an overabundance of excitatory receptors, and γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) is potentially depolarizing, as opposed to hyperpolarizing in the older brain. While this enhanced excitability is required for regulation of activity-dependent synapse formation and refining of synaptic connections that are necessary for normal brain development, enhanced excitability predisposes the immature brain to seizures. In addition to being common, neonatal seizures are very difficult to treat; antiepileptic drugs used in older children and adults are less efficacious, and possibly detrimental to brain development. In an effort to target the unique features of neurotransmission in the neonate, bumetanide, an NKCC1 inhibitor which reduces intraneuronal Cl(-) and induces a significant shift of EGABA toward more hyperpolarized values in vitro, has been used to treat neonatal seizures. As the understanding of the pathophysiology of genetic forms of neonatal epilepsy has evolved there have been a few successful attempts to pharmacologically target the mutated protein. This approach, while promising, is challenging due to the findings that the genetic syndromes presenting in infancy demonstrate genetic heterogeneity in regard to both the mutated gene and its function. PMID:27323943

  17. In vivo cerebral incorporation of radiolabeled fatty acids after acute unilateral orbital enucleation in adult hooded Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, S; Freed, L M; Bell, J M; Rapoport, S I

    1994-03-01

    We examined effects of acute unilateral enucleation on incorporation from blood of intravenously injected unsaturated [1-14C]arachidonic acid ([14C]AA) and [1-14C]docosahexaenoic acid ([14C]DHA), and of saturated [9,10-3H]palmitic acid ([3H]PA), into visual and nonvisual brain areas of awake adult Long-Evans hooded rats. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglc) values also were assessed with 2-deoxy-D-[1-14C]glucose ([14C]DG). One day after unilateral enucleation, an awake rat was placed in a brightly lit visual stimulation box with black and white striped walls, and a radiolabeled fatty acid was infused for 5 min or [14C]DG was injected as a bolus. [14C]DG also was injected in a group of rats kept in the dark for 4 h. Fifteen minutes after starting an infusion of a radiolabeled fatty acid, or 45 min after injecting [14C]DG, the rat was killed and the brain was prepared for quantitative autoradiography. Incorporation coefficients k* of fatty acids, or rCMRglc values, were calculated in homologous brain regions contralateral and ipsilateral to enucleation. As compared with ipsilateral regions, rCMRglc was reduced significantly (by as much as -39%) in contralateral visual areas, including the superior colliculus, lateral geniculate body, and layers I, IV, and V of the primary (striate) and secondary (association, extrastriate) visual cortices. Enucleation did not affect incorporation of [3H]PA into contralateral visual regions, but reduced incorporation of [14C]AA and of [14C]DHA by -18.5 to -2.1%. Percent reductions were correlated with percent reductions in rCMRglc in most but not all regions. No effects were noted at any of nine non-visual structures that were examined. These results indicate that enucleation acutely reduces neuronal activity in contralateral visual areas of the awake rat and that the reductions are coupled to reduced incorporation of unsaturated fatty acids into sn-2 regions of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and

  18. Neonatal vocal cord paralysis-an early presentation of hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy due to a mutation in the SEPT9 gene.

    PubMed

    Leshinsky-Silver, E; Ginzberg, M; Dabby, R; Sadeh, M; Lev, D; Lerman-Sagie, T

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy is a rare autosomal dominant disorder involving recurrent episodes of painful brachial plexus neuropathies. Involvement of other nerves has been described in some families. The age of onset is from infancy to adulthood. Mutations in the SEPT9 gene were identified in approximately half of the hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy families. We evaluated a family with six affected members from three generations with a point mutation in the SEPT9 gene. One of the patients presented in the neonatal period with vocal cord paralysis necessitating intubation and prolonged ventilation. The neonatal presentation of vocal cord paralysis broadens the phenotypic spectrum of hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy. The identification of a SEPT9 mutation in a neonate with respiratory distress due to vocal cord paralysis expands the differential diagnosis in these patients. PMID:22981636

  19. Cause-specific neonatal mortality: analysis of 3772 neonatal deaths in Nepal, Bangladesh, Malawi and India

    PubMed Central

    Fottrell, Edward; Osrin, David; Alcock, Glyn; Azad, Kishwar; Bapat, Ujwala; Beard, James; Bondo, Austin; Colbourn, Tim; Das, Sushmita; King, Carina; Manandhar, Dharma; Manandhar, Sunil; Morrison, Joanna; Mwansambo, Charles; Nair, Nirmala; Nambiar, Bejoy; Neuman, Melissa; Phiri, Tambosi; Saville, Naomi; Sen, Aman; Seward, Nadine; Shah Moore, Neena; Shrestha, Bhim Prasad; Singini, Bright; Tumbahangphe, Kirti Man; Costello, Anthony; Prost, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Objective Understanding the causes of death is key to tackling the burden of three million annual neonatal deaths. Resource-poor settings lack effective vital registration systems for births, deaths and causes of death. We set out to describe cause-specific neonatal mortality in rural areas of Malawi, Bangladesh, Nepal and rural and urban India using verbal autopsy (VA) data. Design We prospectively recorded births, neonatal deaths and stillbirths in seven population surveillance sites. VAs were carried out to ascertain cause of death. We applied descriptive epidemiological techniques and the InterVA method to characterise the burden, timing and causes of neonatal mortality at each site. Results Analysis included 3772 neonatal deaths and 3256 stillbirths. Between 63% and 82% of neonatal deaths occurred in the first week of life, and males were more likely to die than females. Prematurity, birth asphyxia and infections accounted for most neonatal deaths, but important subnational and regional differences were observed. More than one-third of deaths in urban India were attributed to asphyxia, making it the leading cause of death in this setting. Conclusions Population-based VA methods can fill information gaps on the burden and causes of neonatal mortality in resource-poor and data-poor settings. Local data should be used to inform and monitor the implementation of interventions to improve newborn health. High rates of home births demand a particular focus on community interventions to improve hygienic delivery and essential newborn care. PMID:25972443

  20. Strain-dependent effects of acute caffeine on anxiety-related behavior in PVG/c, Long-Evans and Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Robert N; Hancock, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    To assess the possibility that acute caffeine's behavioral action might depend on rats' strain, effects of 50mg/kg of the drug were observed on activity, anxiety-related behavior and habituation learning in male and female rats from three different strains, namely PVG/c, Long-Evans and Wistar. All subjects were tested in an open field, an elevated plus maze and a light-dark box. For the three strains combined, increased occupancy of the center of the open field and entries of the open plus-maze arms with caffeine suggested caffeine-induced anxiolysis, whereas increased grooming in the open field, decreased rearing in the plus maze and increased risk assessment in the light-dark box were consistent with anxiogenesis. Caffeine also reduced open-field rearing only for PVG/c rats, and entries into and occupation of the light side of the light-dark box only for Long-Evans rats, and increased total defecation in the three types of apparatus for all three strains combined. Overall, caffeine appeared to be mainly anxiogenic. The drug also increased open-field ambulation for PVG/c rats and walking for all rats, but decreased open-field ambulation and entries into the plus maze closed arms for Wistar rats alone. In general, Wistar rats appeared to be the least and Long-Evans the most anxious of the three strains investigated. Caffeine also decreased within-session habituation of open-field ambulation for PVG/c rats alone, thereby suggesting strain-dependent interference with non-associative learning and short-term memory. Several overall sex differences were also observed that supported female rats being more active and less anxious than males. PMID:26577750

  1. Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  2. Interplay of Tunneling, Two-State Reactivity, and Bell-Evans-Polanyi Effects in C-H Activation by Nonheme Fe(IV)O Oxidants.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Debasish; Shaik, Sason

    2016-02-24

    The study of C-H bond activation reactions by nonheme Fe(IV)O species with nine hydrocarbons shows that the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) involves strong tunneling and is a signature of the reactive spin states. Theory reproduces the observed spike-like appearance of plots of KIE(exp) against the C-H bond dissociation energy, and its origins are discussed. The experimentally observed Bell-Evans-Polanyi correlations, in the presence of strong tunneling, are reproduced, and the pattern is rationalized. PMID:26824716

  3. Are physicians performing neonatal circumcisions well-trained?

    PubMed Central

    DeMaria, Jorge; Abdulla, Alym; Pemberton, Julia; Raees, Ayman; Braga, Luis H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Notwithstanding the recommendations from the Canadian Pediatric Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics on the indications for neonatal circumcision, this procedure is still common in North America and throughout the world. Our purpose is not to argue whether this procedure should be done, but rather to examine who is doing it, their training, how it is performed and how can we prevent unsatisfactory results and complications. The objective is to identify what fields of knowledge require improvement and then design a teaching module to improve the outcomes of neonatal circumcision. Methods: A 19-question cross-sectional survey, including a visual identification item, was submitted to 87 physicians who perform neonatal circumcisions in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. To improve our response rate, study subjects were contacted in a variety of ways, including mail and fax and telephone. Once the survey was completed, we produced a surgical technique training video on using the Gomco clamp and the Plastibell techiques. A knowledge dissemination workshop was held with survey participants to discuss contraindications and the use of anesthesia and management of complications of neonatal circumcision and to evaluate the surgical technique training video. A 6-month follow-up questionnaire was completed to determine the impact of the teaching course on participants’ daily practice. Results: In total, we received 54 responses (62% response rate). From these, 46 (85%) were family doctors and pediatricians, while the remaining 8 (15%) were pediatric general surgeons and urologists. The circumcisions were carried out with the Gomco clamp 35 (63%) and the Plastibell 21 (37%). No respondent admitted to learning the procedure through a structured training course. Of the non-surgeons, 19 (43%) learned to perform a circumcision from a non-surgeon colleague. A little over a third of the participants (17, 31%) were happy to perform a circumcision in a child

  4. Neonatal mortality: an invisible and marginalised trauma

    PubMed Central

    Målqvist, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal mortality is a major health problem in low and middle income countries and the rate of improvement of newborn survival is slow. This article is a review of the PhD thesis by Mats Målqvist, titled ‘Who can save the unseen – Studies on neonatal mortality in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam,’ from Uppsala University. The thesis aims to investigate structural barriers to newborn health improvements and determinants of neonatal death. The findings reveal a severe under-reporting of neonatal deaths in the official health statistics in Quang Ninh province in northern Vietnam. The neonatal mortality rate (NMR) found was four times higher than what was reported to the Ministry of Health. This underestimation of the problem inhibits adequate interventions and efforts to improve the survival of newborns and highlights the invisibility of this vulnerable group. The findings of the thesis also point at an inequity in survival chances based on ethnicity of the mother. Newborns of ethnic minority mothers were at a twofold risk of dying within the first 4 weeks of life compared to their peers belonging to the hegemonic group of Kinh (OR 2.08, 95% CI: 1.39–3.10). This increased risk was independent of maternal education and household economic status. Neonatal mortality was also associated with home deliveries, non-attendance to antenatal care and distance to the health care facilities. However, ethnic minority mothers still had an increased risk of experiencing a neonatal death even if they attended antenatal care, delivered at, or lived close to a health facility. This example of ethnic inequity highlights the importance to target those most in need. PMID:21423597

  5. Umbilical cord leptin predicts neonatal bone mass.

    PubMed

    Javaid, M K; Godfrey, K M; Taylor, P; Robinson, S M; Crozier, S R; Dennison, E M; Robinson, J S; Breier, B R; Arden, N K; Cooper, C

    2005-05-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the risk of osteoporosis in later life may be determined in part by environmental influences on bone development during intrauterine and early postnatal life. A potential role for fetal leptin in mediating these effects is suggested by animal studies showing that leptin influences prenatal osteoblast growth and development, and that fetal leptin concentrations are altered by changes in maternal nutrition. In a group of term human infants we reported previously that maternal birthweight, smoking, fat mass, and exercise during late pregnancy independently predict neonatal bone mass. To investigate the potential role of leptin in mediating these effects, we now relate leptin concentrations in umbilical venous serum to neonatal bone mass and body composition in 117 infants. There were strong positive associations between umbilical venous leptin concentration and each of whole body bone mineral contents (BMC) (r = 0.42, P < or = 0.001) and estimated volumetric bone density (r = 0.21, P = 0.02); whole body lean mass (r = 0.21, P < or = 0.024); and whole body fat mass (r = 0.60, P < 0.001). The associations with neonatal BMC and fat mass, but not with lean mass, were independent of associations that we have reported previously between cord serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentrations and neonatal body composition. Among the maternal determinants of neonatal bone mass, cord leptin explained the relationship with maternal fat stores, but not those with the mother's own birthweight, smoking, or physical activity. We conclude that umbilical venous leptin predicts both the size of the neonatal skeleton and its estimated volumetric mineral density. In addition, among previously documented maternal determinants of neonatal bone mass in healthy pregnancies, maternal fat stores may mediate their effect on fetal bone accrual through variation in fetal leptin concentrations. PMID:15864467

  6. Advances in Neonatal Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Steinhorn, Robin H

    2016-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a surprisingly common event in the neonatal intensive care unit, and affects both term and preterm infants. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the maternal, fetal and genetic risk factors that trigger PPHN. There have been numerous therapeutic advances over the last decade. It is now appreciated that oxygen supplementation, particularly for the goal of pulmonary vasodilation, needs to be approached as a therapy that has risks and benefits. Administration of surfactant or inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy at a lower acuity of illness can decrease the risk of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation/death, progression of disease and duration of hospital stay. Milrinone may have specific benefits as an 'inodilator', as prolonged exposure to iNO plus oxygen may activate phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A. Additionally, sildenafil and hydrocortisone may benefit infants exposed to hyperoxia and oxidative stress. Continued investigation is likely to reveal new therapies such as citrulline and cinaciguat that will enhance NO synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase function. Continued laboratory and clinical investigation will be needed to optimize treatment and improve outcomes. PMID:27251312

  7. Nesidioblastosis and persistent neonatal hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Sempoux, C; Poggi, F; Brunelle, F; Saudubray, J M; Fekete, C; Rahier, J

    1995-12-01

    Neonatal hyperinsulinism is characterized by severe hypoglycaemia which can cause serious neurologic effects. Pancreatic morphological abnormalities involve either focal or diffuse lesions. The former can be cured by resection, whereas the latter, of uncertain pathogenesis, often require subtotal pancreatectomy. We investigated various hypotheses in an effort to explain the origin of this latter form of hyperinsulinism. We determined that nesidioblastosis, long considered to be the basic structural lesion of the diffuse form of hyperinsulinism, is not specific and does not correspond to a continuous proliferation of endocrine cells. We found that an increase in beta-cell mass can be excluded since the volume density of beta cells is not systematically higher in hyperinsulinemic infants than in controls. The hypothesis of a decrease in D cells is attractive but should be considered with due caution since the decrease of the D-cell volume density observed in hypoglycaemic infants is inconstant. Finally, the notion of beta-cell functional abnormality seems the most likely explanation since a higher quantity of proinsulin was detected within the Golgi area by a specific antibody and abnormal nuclei with abundant cytoplasm were observed in some cells. These histological abnormalities can be observed during intraoperative morphological examination. Functional activity might also be evaluated by studying the messenger RNA of proinsulin. PMID:8593920

  8. Olfactory Classical Conditioning in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Regina M.; Taborsky-Barba, Suzanne; Mendoza, Raffael; Itano, Alison; Leon, Michael; Cotman, Carl W.; Payne, Terrence F.; Lott, Ira

    2007-01-01

    One-day-old, awake infants underwent an olfactory classical conditioning procedure to assess associative learning within the olfactory system of newborns. Experimental infants received ten 30-second pairings of a novel olfactory conditioned stimulus (a citrus odor of neutral value) and tactile stimulation provided by stroking as the reinforcing unconditioned stimulus (a stimulus with positive properties). Control babies received only the odor, only the stroking, or the stroking followed by the odor presentation. The next day, all infants, in either the awake or sleep state, were given five 30-second presentations of the odor. Results were analyzed from video tapes scored by an observer unaware of the infants’ training condition. The results indicate that only those infants who received the forward pairings of the odor and stroking exhibited conditioned responding (head turning toward the odor) to the citrus odor. The performance of the conditioned response was not affected by the state of the baby during testing, because both awake and sleeping infants exhibited conditioned responses. Furthermore, the expression of the conditioned response was odor specific; a novel floral odor presented during testing did not elicit conditioned responses in the experimental babies. These results suggest that complex associative olfactory learning is seen in newborns within the first 48 hours of life. These baseline findings may serve as normative data against which observation from neonates at risk for neurological sequelae may be compared. PMID:2011429

  9. Neonatal hair nicotine levels and fetal exposure to paternal smoking at home.

    PubMed

    Seong, Moon-Woo; Hwang, Jong Hee; Moon, Jin Soo; Ryu, Hye-Jung; Kong, Sun-Young; Um, Tae Hyun; Park, Jae-Gahb; Lee, Do-Hoon

    2008-11-15

    Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is a major risk to human health, and the home is the greatest single source of ETS for children. The authors investigated fetal exposure to paternal smoking at home during pregnancy. Korean families were included as trios of fathers, mothers, and neonates identified in 2005-2007. Sixty-three trios were finally enrolled in this study after exclusion of those in which the mother was a smoker or was regularly exposed to ETS at places other than the home. Nicotine and cotinine concentrations in hair were measured by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to determine long-term exposure to ETS. The difference between neonatal nicotine concentrations in the smoker and nonsmoker groups was not statistically significant. However, in the indoor-smoker group, neonatal nicotine concentrations were significantly higher than in the outdoor and nonsmoker groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, neonatal nicotine concentrations in the outdoor-smoker group were not different from those in the nonsmoker group. These findings indicate that paternal smoking inside the home leads to significant fetal and maternal exposure to ETS and may subsequently affect fetal health. Conversely, findings show that paternal smoking outside the home prevents the mother and her fetus from being exposed to ETS. PMID:18801888

  10. Amp C beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in neonatal meningitis: diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Fakioglu, E; Queenan, A M; Bush, K; Jenkins, S G; Herold, B C

    2006-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global health priority. Major defenses for Gram-negative bacteria are beta-lactamase enzymes, which have co-evolved with the development and increasing utilization of new antibiotics. Bacteria harboring the plasmid-mediated AmpC enzymes are increasingly prevalent among adult patients, but have not previously been reported in neonates. Early-onset neonatal meningitis caused by an AmpC beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli is described for the first time; the plasmid was identified as a transferable CMY-2 family beta-lactamase. Limited experience with newer antibiotics and pharmacokinetics in neonates presents a therapeutic challenge. Currently, there are no Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) recommendations for detecting AmpC nor is the optimal treatment for AmpC-producing organisms known. Thus, it is imperative that clinicians have a high index of suspicion when antimicrobial susceptibility patterns are inconsistent. Development of better microbiology screening tests to rapidly detect resistance is essential. Additionally, pharmacokinetic studies with newer antibiotics in neonates are warranted. PMID:16871223

  11. Patterns and causes of neonatal and postneonatal mortality in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, S

    1989-01-01

    Community-level research data from a Maternal-Child Health and Family Planning (MCH/FP) program and comparison areas in rural Bangladesh indicate that 60 percent of infant deaths occurred in the neonatal period in both areas. Since the inception of the MCH/FP program, mortality rates declined relative to those in the comparison area. This decline, however, was confined to the neonatal period death rates only, with mortality rates in the postneonatal period remaining similar in the two areas. Prematurity accounted for approximately 40 percent of deaths in the neonatal period. Cause-of-death data indicated that the differences in the neonatal mortality rates between the two areas was mainly due to a marked decline in tetanus neonatorum deaths in the MCH/FP program area, because of the tetanus toxoid immunization of pregnant women there. The interventions in the MCH/FP area, however, did not significantly influence mortality due to any other cause. This study provides an explanation for the limited impact on infant mortality of health interventions that focus on diarrheal diseases and immunizations of children. PMID:2734810

  12. Neonatal nurses' attitudes, beliefs, and feelings toward the care and management of fetal-infants.

    PubMed

    Richey, D A

    1988-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care nurses must handle on a regular basis the complex dilemmas that accompany the rapid advances in knowledge and technology that have enabled the survival of fetal-infants. Little literature addresses the attitudes and feelings of neonatal nurses regarding the moral, ethical, legal, economic, and social issues surrounding fetal-infants. The purpose of this investigation, therefore, was to examine the attitudes, beliefs, and feelings held by neonatal nurses towards these issues as they relate to the care and management of fetal-infants. The research design of this study was a nonexperimental approach. The sample was drawn from a roster of subscribers to a neonatal nursing journal. The tool that was used in this study is an attitudinal assessment questionnaire developed by the investigator. Data obtained were described and synthesized by use of measures of central tendency, variability, frequency, and the chi square statistic. Comments to the questionnaire almost overwhelmingly referred to the participants' difficulty in responding as the issues were felt to be dependent on the particular fetal-infant, family, and circumstances involved. Respondents strongly supported the need for situational ethics in cases involving fetal-infants. PMID:3193266

  13. Prevention and Management of Neonatal Hypothermia in Rural Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Lunze, Karsten; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Marsh, David R.; Kafwanda, Sarah Ngolofwana; Musso, Austen; Semrau, Katherine; Waltensperger, Karen Z.; Hamer, Davidson H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal hypothermia is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for newborn survival. The World Health Organization recommends maintaining a warm chain and skin-to-skin care for thermoprotection of newborn children. Since little is known about practices related to newborn hypothermia in rural Africa, this study's goal was to characterize relevant practices, attitudes, and beliefs in rural Zambia. Methods and Findings We conducted 14 focus group discussions with mothers and grandmothers and 31 in-depth interviews with community leaders and health officers in Lufwanyama District, a rural area in the Copperbelt Province, Zambia, enrolling a total of 171 participants. We analyzed data using domain analysis. In rural Lufwanyama, community members were aware of the danger of neonatal hypothermia. Caregivers' and health workers' knowledge of thermoprotective practices included birthplace warming, drying and wrapping of the newborn, delayed bathing, and immediate and exclusive breastfeeding. However, this warm chain was not consistently maintained in the first hours postpartum, when newborns are at greatest risk. Skin-to-skin care was not practiced in the study area. Having to assume household and agricultural labor responsibilities in the immediate postnatal period was a challenge for mothers to provide continuous thermal care to their newborns. Conclusions Understanding and addressing community-based practices on hypothermia prevention and management might help improve newborn survival in resource-limited settings. Possible interventions include the implementation of skin-to-skin care in rural areas and the use of appropriate, low-cost newborn warmers to prevent hypothermia and support families in their provision of newborn thermal protection. Training family members to support mothers in the provision of thermoprotection for their newborns could facilitate these practices. PMID:24714630

  14. Cancer, Families, and Family Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Maureen; Gillig, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Examines the role of the family counselor in working with cancer patients and their families. Suggests ways in which the family counselor can work proactively with families in the area of cancer prevention and helping them cope more effectively with its impact on their lives. Uses a clinical case example to illustrate intervention with cancer…

  15. Family therapy by family doctors

    PubMed Central

    Neighbour, R.

    1982-01-01

    The experiences of a group of general practitioners learning and attempting family therapy are described. Three principles for working with whole families — facilitation, formulation and focussing — are illustrated by case histories. Family therapy in general practice can be effective for patients and worthwhile for family doctors. PMID:7153974

  16. Lactoferrin for prevention of neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Turin, Christie G.; Zea-Vera, Alonso; Pezo, Alonso; Cruz, Karen; Zegarra, Jaime; Bellomo, Sicilia; Cam, Luis; Llanos, Raul; Castañeda, Anne; Tucto, Lourdes; Ochoa, Theresa J.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm neonates are at risk to acquire infections. In addition to the high mortality associated with sepsis, these patients are at risk for long-term disabilities, particularly neurodevelopment impairment. Several interventions have been evaluated to reduce rates of infections in neonates but have not proven efficacy. Lactoferrin (LF), a milk glycoprotein with anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti-microbial properties, has the potential to prevent infections in young children. We performed a review of current and ongoing clinical trials of LF for prevention of neonatal sepsis, and found eleven registered clinical trials that include more than 6000 subjects. Few of these trials have finished; despite their small sample size, the preliminary results show a trend towards a positive protective effect of LF on neonatal infections. Larger trials are underway to confirm the findings of these initial studies. This information will help to define LF´s role in clinical settings and, if proven effective, would profoundly affect the treatment of low birth weight neonates as a cost-effective intervention worldwide. PMID:24935001

  17. Antimicrobial therapy in neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Tzialla, Chryssoula; Borghesi, Alessandro; Serra, Gregorio; Stronati, Mauro; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and in industrialized countries about 1% of neonates are exposed to antibiotic therapy. Sepsis has often nonspecific signs and symptoms and empiric antimicrobial therapy is promptly initiated in high risk of sepsis or symptomatic infants. However continued use of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment in the setting of negative cultures especially in preterm infants may not be harmless.The benefits of antibiotic therapy when indicated are clearly enormous, but the continued use of antibiotics without any microbiological justification is dangerous and only leads to adverse events. The purpose of this review is to highlight the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the NICUs, to exam the impact of antibiotic treatment in preterm infants with negative cultures and to summarize existing knowledge regarding the appropriate choice of antimicrobial agents and optimal duration of therapy in neonates with suspected or culture-proven sepsis in order to prevent serious consequences. PMID:25887621

  18. Do ventilated neonates require pain management?

    PubMed

    Hall, R Whit; Boyle, Elaine; Young, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a stressful experience in neonates resulting in changes in neuroendocrine parameters, pain scores, and physiologic responses. Assisted ventilation in neonates is presumed to be associated with chronic repetitive pain, which in turn is associated with adverse long-term sequelae. Reasons to routinely sedate ventilated neonates include improved ventilator synchrony, improved pulmonary function, and decreased neuroendocrine responses, including cortisol, beta-endorphine, and catecholamines. Reasons not to treat include the well-known adverse side effects of pain medication, especially the opiates, including hypotension from morphine, chest wall rigidity from fentanyl, and tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal from both opiates and benzodiazepines. Additionally, adverse effects such as death and IVH are not improved with preemptive treatment. Chronic pain assessment is poorly validated and difficult to assess in this population, and most studies have evaluated only acute pain scores. If patients are treated, opiates are the most common class of drugs, with morphine the most well studied. Fentanyl may be advantageous in hypotensive, younger neonates because it has fewer cardiovascular effects. The benzodiazepines, midazolam and lorazepam, have been used in ventilated neonates, but midazolam has been associated with adverse effects in one small study so concern remains regarding its use. Significant gaps in our knowledge exist, especially in regard to long-term effects of treatment, or lack thereof, and in the assessment of the chronic pain associated with assisted ventilation. PMID:17905183

  19. Neonatal Tracheostomy – Issues and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    A, Saadia; GR, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To record and analyse the technical aspects of neonatal tracheostomy and to suggest some solutions. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective observational cohort of 37 cases of neonatal tracheostomies performed over 30 years (1985-2014). Results: Thirty-three of the 37 tracheostomies were done as an elective procedure and four done emergently. Eighteen neonatal tracheostomies were done with a low transverse cervical incision and 19 were done with low vertical cervical incision. Three patients had bleeding while exposing the trachea. Trachea could not easily be identified in 2 cases. Commercial tracheostomy tubes were used in only 20 cases. In 17 patients, the conventional endotracheal tubes 2.5 or 3fr size were used. There were 3 instances of wound infection out of which one has peri-tracheostomy necrotizing cellulitis and the neonate succumbed to sepsis. Two cases had surgical emphysema. No case had pneumothorax. Conclusion: We described tracheostomy in neonates in a resource constrained centre. Various makeshift arrangements can be used in absence of standard supplies. PMID:26034707

  20. Late-onset neonatal sepsis: recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ying; Speer, Christian P

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of neonatal late-onset sepsis (LOS) is inversely related to the degree of maturity and varies geographically from 0.61% to 14.2% among hospitalised newborns. Epidemiological data on very low birth weight infants shows that the predominant pathogens of neonatal LOS are coagulase-negative staphylococci, followed by Gram-negative bacilli and fungi. Due to the difficulties in a prompt diagnosis of LOS and LOS-associated high risk of mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, empirical antibiotic treatment is initiated on suspicion of LOS. However, empirical therapy is often inappropriately used with unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics and a prolonged duration of treatment. The increasing number of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative micro-organisms in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide is a serious concern, which requires thorough and efficient surveillance strategies and appropriate treatment regimens. Immunological strategies for preventing neonatal LOS are not supported by current evidence, and approaches, such as a strict hygiene protocol and the minimisation of invasive procedures in NICUs represent the cornerstone to reduce the burden of neonatal LOS. PMID:25425653

  1. Neonatal Temperament in Monozygotic and Dizygotic Twin Pairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reise, Marilyn L.

    1990-01-01

    Findings indicated that zygosity was not related to behavioral scores during the neonatal period, and that environment substantially influenced neonatal temperament. Specific perinatal indicators of risk were found to account for some of the intrapair differences in behavioral variables. (RH)

  2. Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression in Developing Neonatal Skeletal Muscle: Involvement of the Nerve, Gravity, and Thyroid State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Adams, G.; Haddad, F.; Zeng, M.; Qin, A.; Qin, L.; McCue, S.; Bodell, P.

    1999-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene family encodes at least six MHC proteins (herein designated as neonatal, embryonic, slow type I (beta), and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb) that are expressed in skeletal muscle in a muscle-specific and developmentally-regulated fashion. At birth, both antigravity (e.g. soleus) and locomotor (e.g., plantaris) skeletal muscles are undifferentiated relative to the adult MHC phenotype such that the neonatal and embryonic MHC isoforms account for 80 - 90% of the MHC pool in a fast locomotor muscle; whereas, the embryonic and slow, type I isoforms account for approx. 90% of the pool in a typical antigravity muscle. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of an intact nerve, gravity and thyroid hormone (T3), as well as certain interactions of these interventions, on MHC gene expression in developing neonatal skeletal muscles of rodents.

  3. FAMILIAL SUICIDE

    PubMed Central

    Unni, K.E. Sadanaandan

    1996-01-01

    Seven completed suicides in a family of lower socioeconomic status and suburban domicile in Pondicherry are reported. The presence of bipolar affective disorder in the family members and the absence of exogenous factors are illustrated by utilising both family history method and family study method. The details collected formed the basis for the terminology ‘familial suicide’. The management of the index case, one of the only three surviving male members of the family, who presented with suicidal ruminations and depressive features, is described. PMID:21584122

  4. Effects of acupuncture stimulation on blood glucose concentration in the Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat, an animal model for type-2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Hironori; Ishigami, Tatsuyo; Kawase, Yosihyuki; Yamada, Atsushi; Minagawa, Munenori; Fukuta, Hiroyasu; Kurono, Yasuzo; Suzuki, Hikaru

    2014-01-01

    Background Effects of acupuncture stimulation on blood glucose concentration and body weight were investigated in the Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat, a model for type-2 diabetes. Material/Methods Three groups of rats were used: OLETF, acupuncture-treated OLETF (AcOLETF), and Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats (as control for the OLETF rats). In AcOLETF rats, acupuncture stimulation was applied twice a week to 6 points (zhongwan, tianshu, qihai, ganshu, pishu, shenshu) and changes in blood glucose concentration and body weight were measured. Results Initially, at 6 weeks old, there was no significant difference in blood glucose levels between groups. Blood glucose levels increased with age in each group, reaching a maximum of about 430 mg/dl at 37 weeks in OLETF rats. In AcOLETF rats, blood glucose levels increased at a slower rate than in OLETF rats, reaching a maximum concentration of about 280 mg/dl at 37 weeks of age, significantly lower than that in OLETF rats. The concentration of blood glucose in LETO rats had stabilized at a maximum value of 120~140 mg/dl by 16 weeks, remaining at this level for up to 39 weeks. In each group, body weight increased with age and was not affected by acupuncture treatment. Conclusions In OLETF rats, acupuncture treatment significantly reduced blood glucose levels, but not their body weight, suggesting that acupuncture therapy was effective in preventing the development of type-2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24841896

  5. Development of an inhalation physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for 2,2, 4-trimethylpentane (TMP) in male Long-Evans rats using gas uptake experiments.

    PubMed

    El-Masri, Hisham A; Dowd, Sean; Pegram, Rex A; Harrison, Randy; Yavanhxay, Sisouphanh J; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Evans, Marina

    2009-12-01

    2,2,4-Trimethylpentane (TMP) is a volatile colorless liquid used primarily to increase the octane rating of combustible fuels. TMP is released in the environment through the manufacture, use, and disposal of products associated with the gasoline and petroleum industry. Short-term inhalation exposure to TMP (< 4 h; > 1000 ppm) caused sensory and motor irritations in rats and mice. Like many volatile hydrocarbons, acute exposure to TMP may also be expected to alter neurological functions. To estimate in vivo metabolic kinetics of TMP and to predict its target tissue dosimetry during inhalation exposures, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the chemical in Long-Evans male rats using closed-chamber gas-uptake experiments. Gas-uptake experiments were conducted in which rats (80-90 days old) were exposed to targeted initial TMP concentrations of 50, 100, 500, and 1000 ppm. The model consisted of compartments for the closed uptake chamber, lung, fat, kidney, liver, brain, and rapidly and slowly perfused tissues. Physiological parameters were obtained from literature. Partition coefficients for the model were experimentally determined for air/blood, fat, liver, kidney, muscle, and brain using vial equilibration methods. Common to other hydrocarbons, metabolism of TMP via oxidative reactions is assumed to mainly occur in the liver. The PBPK model simulations of the closed chamber data were used to estimate in vivo metabolic parameters for TMP in male Long-Evans rats. PMID:19922404

  6. Neonatal Transfusion Practice: When do Neonates Need Red Blood Cells or Platelets?

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Antonio; Franco, Caterina; Petrillo, Flavia; D'Amato, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Based on small studies and not on statistically valid clinical trials, guidelines for neonatal transfusions remain controversial and practices vary greatly. Premature infants and critically ill neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) often require blood transfusions and extremely preterm neonates receive at least one red blood cell transfusion during their hospital stay. Transfusions to neonates convey both benefits and risks and consequently it is imperative to establish specific guidelines to improve practice and avoid unnecessary transfusions. Appropriate and lifesaving platelet transfusion in thrombocytopenic bleeding neonates pertains to 2% of all neonates in NICUs. Inversely, 98% of platelet transfusions are given prophylactically, in the absence of bleeding, with the assumption that this reduces the risk of a serious hemorrhage. To date, no evidence base is available for assigning a platelet transfusion trigger to NICU patients. Each NICU should approve specific guidelines that best suit its local clinical practice. Therefore, whatever guidelines are chosen in deciding when to transfuse, what is most important is to adhere strictly to the guidelines adopted, thus limiting unnecessary transfusions that convey no benefits and carry both known and unknown risks. PMID:27603540

  7. Neonatal blood rheological parameters at delivery in healthy neonates and in those with morbidities.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Amr A; Csorba, Roland; Tsikouras, Pagnaioti; Wieg, Christian; Harnack, Harald; von Tempelhoff, Georg-Friedrich

    2013-03-26

    Rheological blood parameters of neonates are different form those of adults. Many authors have studied changes in blood rheology in neonates in different clinical disorders. To-date, no one set the normal values for blood rheological parameters in healthy neonates. The aim of this study is to set the norm for rheological blood parameters in healthy newborns and to describe the changes in those parameters in common clinical disorders that affect the newborns. We recruited all the neonates born to mothers experiencing un eventful pregnancies, blood was taken from the umbilical cord right after the delivery. In this time period we recruited 4985 neonate. From this huge database we were able to set the standards for blood rheology in neonates, namely plasma viscosity of 1.06 ± 0.072 mPa, erythrocyte aggregation at stasis of 2.41 ± 2.74 s-1 and erythrocyte aggregation under low shear forces of 8.51 ± 6.38 s-1. These values changed significantly in some diseased neonates. This is the largest study investigating normal rheological parameters and deviations from the norm in common clinical disorders occurring in this early stage of life. PMID:23532177

  8. Ethical issues in neonatal research involving human subjects.

    PubMed

    Fleischman, Alan R

    2016-06-01

    Research involving critically ill neonates creates many ethical challenges. Neonatal clinical research has always been hard to perform, is very expensive, and may generate some unique ethical concerns. This article describes some examples of historical and modern controversies in neonatal research, discusses the justification for research involving such vulnerable and fragile patients, clarifies current federal regulations that govern research involving neonates, and suggests ways that clinical investigators can develop and implement ethically grounded human subjects research. PMID:26804381

  9. Refractory Bacillus cereus infection in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, R; Patole, S K; Koh, T H; Norton, R; Whitehall, J S

    2000-06-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive aerobic or facultatively anaerobic spore-forming rod, which usually causes food poisoning. Its recognition as a pathogen in neonates has increased over the past two decades. The clinical course of a neonate (gestation 24 weeks) with B. cereus infection refractory to therapy is described. Death occurred after withdrawal of support following persistently positive blood and bone marrow cultures despite therapy with vancomycin, gentamicin, imipenum, clindamycin, ciprofloxacillin, immunoglobulin and granulocyte colony stimulating factor over a period of 49 days. No obvious focus of sepsis was identified. Contamination from the environment into the hospital and clinics occurs because of the ubiquitous presence of B. cereus. Combination therapy with vancomycin and gentamycin is appropriate for meningitis/severe systemic infections related to most bacillus species. The significance of repeated isolation of B. cereus in neonates with compromised host defences is emphasised. PMID:10954966

  10. Behavioral assessment of a hydranencephalic neonate.

    PubMed

    Francis, P L; Self, P A; McCaffree, M A

    1984-02-01

    This study attempted to clarify the role of the cerebral cortex in neonatal behavior by administering the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale-Kansas revision to a hydranencephalic infant; particularly of interest were behaviors that are implicated in infant social responsiveness. The examination revealed extremely deviant responses on portions of the exam, including items that measure response decrement and orientation. However, this infant was observed to approximate normal neonatal responding on items relating to motor maturity and reactivity. Other findings included that some response decrement occurred in response to auditory and visual, but not tactile, stimulation. The discussion focuses on similarities and differences between this study and early research on both normal infants and infants with imperfectly formed nervous systems. Particular emphasis is placed on the response decrement results, as well as the utility of the NBAS-K in measuring infant behaviors in atypical infant samples. PMID:6705627

  11. Cryopreservation of ovaries from neonatal marmoset monkeys.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Hideyuki H; Ishibashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-07-29

    The ovary of neonatal nonhuman primates contains the highest number of immature oocytes, but its cryopreservation has not yet been sufficiently investigated in all life stages. In the current study, we investigated cryodamage after vitrification/warming of neonatal ovaries from a nonhuman primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). A Cryotop was used for cryopreservation of whole ovaries. The morphology of the vitrified/warmed ovaries was found to be equivalent to that of fresh ovaries. No significant difference in the number of oocytes retaining normal morphology per unit area in histological sections was found between the two groups. In an analysis of dispersed cells from the ovaries, however, the cell viability of the vitrified/warmed group tended to be decreased. The results of a comet assay showed no significant differences in DNA damage. These results show that cryopreservation of neonatal marmoset ovaries using vitrification may be useful as a storage system for whole ovaries. PMID:26876597

  12. [Neonatal hyperthyroidism and maternal Graves disease].

    PubMed

    Ben Ameur, K; Chioukh, F Z; Marmouch, H; Ben Hamida, H; Bizid, M; Monastiri, K

    2015-04-01

    The onset of Graves disease during pregnancy exposes the neonate to the risk of hyperthyroidism. The newborn must be monitored and treatment modalities known to ensure early treatment of the newborn. We report on the case of an infant born at term of a mother with Graves disease discovered during pregnancy. He was asymptomatic during the first days of life, before declaring the disease. Neonatal hyperthyroidism was confirmed by hormonal assays. Hyperthyroidism was treated with antithyroid drugs and propranolol with a satisfactory clinical and biological course. Neonatal hyperthyroidism should be systematically sought in infants born to a mother with Graves disease. The absence of clinical signs during the first days of life does not exclude the diagnosis. The duration of monitoring should be decided according to the results of the first hormonal balance tests. PMID:25727474

  13. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations. PMID:12640270

  14. Cryopreservation of ovaries from neonatal marmoset monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Hideyuki H.; Ishibashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    The ovary of neonatal nonhuman primates contains the highest number of immature oocytes, but its cryopreservation has not yet been sufficiently investigated in all life stages. In the current study, we investigated cryodamage after vitrification/warming of neonatal ovaries from a nonhuman primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). A Cryotop was used for cryopreservation of whole ovaries. The morphology of the vitrified/warmed ovaries was found to be equivalent to that of fresh ovaries. No significant difference in the number of oocytes retaining normal morphology per unit area in histological sections was found between the two groups. In an analysis of dispersed cells from the ovaries, however, the cell viability of the vitrified/warmed group tended to be decreased. The results of a comet assay showed no significant differences in DNA damage. These results show that cryopreservation of neonatal marmoset ovaries using vitrification may be useful as a storage system for whole ovaries. PMID:26876597

  15. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: Presentation and Treatment Considerations.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hendrée E; Kaltenbach, Karol; Johnson, Elisabeth; Seashore, Carl; Freeman, Emily; Malloy, Erin

    2016-01-01

    This clinical case conference discusses the treatment of a pregnant woman with opioid use disorder in a comprehensive care program that includes buprenorphine pharmacotherapy. The presentation summarizes common experiences that pregnant women who receive buprenorphine pharmacotherapy face, and also what their prenatally opioid-exposed children confront in the immediate postpartum period. It describes the elements of a successful comprehensive care model and corollary neonatal abstinence syndrome treatment regimen. Expert commentary is included on issues that arise in the buprenorphine induction and maintenance throughout the prenatal and postpartum periods and in the treatment of co-occurring mental health problems during both the prenatal and postpartum periods, particularly the treatment of depression. There is also expert commentary on the care of opioid-exposed neonates, with attention to the treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome. PMID:27244045

  16. Neonatal management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Khan, Shareen; Baki, Md Abdul; Zabeen, Bedowra; Azad, Kiswhar

    2016-09-01

    Women with diabetes in pregnancy, either pre-gestational Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 & Type 2) or Gestational Diabetes, are at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm labour and increased foetal mortality rate. Adequate glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is crucial for improving foetal and perinatal outcomes in these babies. Perinatal and neonatal morbidities and mortality rates have declined since the development of specialized maternal, foetal, and neonatal care for women with diabetes and their offspring. However, infants of diabetic mothers are at risk for developing complications as macrosomia, hypoglycaemia, perinatal asphyxia, cardiac and respiratory problems, birth injuries and congenital malformations. In this review article we describe the neonatal management of the offspring of diabetic mothers. PMID:27582162

  17. Role of immunoglobulins in neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, L; Borrelli, AC; Cerullo, J; Pisanti, R; Figliuolo, C; Izzo, F; Paccone, M; Ferrara, T; Lama, S; Raimondi, F

    2015-01-01

    Neonates, especially VLBW, are at high risk for sepsis related morbidity and mortality for immaturity of their immune system and invasive NICU practices. The paucity of immunoglobulins in preterm neonates consequently to the immaturity of immune system contributes to their high risk for systemic infection. The use of intravenous IgM enriched immunoglobulins, with higher antimicrobial activity than standard IgG, has been demonstrated in a retrospective study to reduce short term mortality in VLBW infant with proven sepsis. Larger, randomized prospective trials given the enormous burden of morbidity and mortality imposed by neonatal sepsis should urgently be addressed not only to validate this results but also to tailor the optimal scheme of treatment. PMID:25674546

  18. The neonatal nurse: advocating for breastfeeding mothers.

    PubMed

    Darby, Colm; Nurse, Sharon

    2016-02-01

    Accurate information and support from healthcare professionals as well as respect for parental choice are all factors which contribute to effective breastfeeding in the neonatal unit; with this in mind, Colm Darby and Sharon Nurse discuss the potential problems in expressing breast milk and the interventions which might be effective in avoiding them. Advocacy is an inherent part of neonatal nurses' role whilst caring for sick, vulnerable babies. Colm Darby is a male neonatal nurse working in a predominantly female environment and passionately believes in supporting and advocating for mothers who want to provide breast milk for their babies. In this article, CoIm uses Borton's model of reflection to discuss how he acted as an effective advocate for such a mother. PMID:27008754

  19. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover and protect the eye of an infant during therapeutic procedures, such as phototherapy....

  20. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover and protect the eye of an infant during therapeutic procedures, such as phototherapy....

  1. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover and protect the eye of an infant during therapeutic procedures, such as phototherapy....

  2. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover and protect the eye of an infant during therapeutic procedures, such as phototherapy....

  3. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover and protect the eye of an infant during therapeutic procedures, such as phototherapy....

  4. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies. PMID:27108085

  5. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... kept in a controlled environment while being transported for medical care. The device may...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5700 - Neonatal phototherapy unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal phototherapy unit. 880.5700 Section 880.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.5700 Neonatal phototherapy unit. (a) Identification. A neonatal phototherapy unit is...

  7. Ruptured Liver Abscess in Neonates: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Niyaz Ahmed; Choudhury, SR; Jhanwar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal hepatic abscess is a rare disease seen mainly in preterm following umbilical catheterisation. Liver abscess in term neonates without any predisposing factor is still rarer and only few cases have been reported in the literature. Here we report two cases of liver abscess in term neonates presenting with abdominal mass due to rupture. PMID:27433449

  8. Why should we care about neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in 2011?

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Francesco; Maffucci, Rosalba; Milite, Paola; Ferrara, Teresa; Borrelli, Angela Carla; Sodano, Angela; Capasso, Letizia

    2011-10-01

    Recent research links serum bilirubin levels to a positive function in human health. Yet in the neonate hyperbilirubinemia is associated to damage to the CNS and beyond. This article summarizes the evidence for the double edged role of bilirubin with a focus on the neonatal period. Also we briefly describe some of the current shortcomings in the treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:21942598

  9. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880.5410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is...

  10. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880.5410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is...

  11. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880.5410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is...

  12. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880.5410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is...

  13. The Tuning of Human Neonates' Preference for Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vouloumanos, Athena; Hauser, Marc D.; Werker, Janet F.; Martin, Alia

    2010-01-01

    Human neonates prefer listening to speech compared to many nonspeech sounds, suggesting that humans are born with a bias for speech. However, neonates' preference may derive from properties of speech that are not unique but instead are shared with the vocalizations of other species. To test this, thirty neonates and sixteen 3-month-olds were…

  14. From Imitation to Conversation: The First Dialogues with Human Neonates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Emese

    2006-01-01

    The functional maturity of the newborn infant's brain, the resemblances between neonatal imitation and imitation in adults and the possibly lateralized neonatal imitation suggest that the mirror neuron system may contribute to neonatal imitation. Newborn infants not only imitate but also initiate previously imitated gestures, and are able to…

  15. Allocation of health care resources in the neonatal and perinatal area -CPS Symposium 1996.

    PubMed

    McMillan, D; Lee, S; Serediak, M; Finn, J; Saigal, S; Walker, C

    1999-01-01

    There have been publically expressed concerns about the costs and allocation of neonatal and perinatal health care resources in Canada and elsewhere for the past 15 years. This paper reports information from a symposium held during the 1996 Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS) annual meeting sponsored by the CPS Section on Perinatal Medicine. Experts in perinatal epidemiology, health care economics, public policy and finance, and consumer perspectives on the outcomes of neonatal and perinatal intensive care explored the following questions: How should the need for health care resources in the neonatal and perinatal area be objectively determined? When there are competing needs between the maternal-newborn area and other areas, how should these be rationalized? What evidence should be used (or should be available) to support the present use of resources? What evidence should be available (or is needed) to change or introduce new uses of resources? The conclusions indicated that there are no generally accepted methods to determine the allocation of health care resources but that considerations need to include population characteristics, desired outcomes, achievable results, values, ethics, legalities, cost-benefit analyses and political objectives. Information from families and adolescents who required the use of high technology and/or high cost programs will contribute individual, family and societal values that complement cost-efficacy analyses. PMID:20212990

  16. [Neonatal diarrhea due to congenital glucose-galactose malabsorption: report of seven cases].

    PubMed

    Chedane-Girault, C; Dabadie, A; Maurage, C; Piloquet, H; Chailloux, E; Colin, E; Pelatan, C; Giniès, J-L

    2012-12-01

    Congenital glucose-galactose malabsorption (CGGM) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, which presents as a protracted diarrhea in early neonatal life. We describe the clinical history, diagnostic evaluation, and management of 7 children with CGGM in western France. There were 4 girls and 3 boys from 5 families, born between 1984 and 2010. The principal complaint was a neonatal onset of watery and acidic severe diarrhea complicated by hypertonic dehydration. The diarrhea stopped with fasting. In 2 cases, the family history supported the diagnosis. In the other cases, elimination of glucose and galactose (lactose) from the diet resulted in the complete resolution of diarrhea symptoms. In 2 cases, the H2 breath tests were positive. In 2 cases, the HGPO or oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) demonstrated an abnormal curve with glucose and a normal curve with fructose. DNA sequencing was not used. When glucose and galactose were eliminated from the diet, the infants had normal growth and development. In conclusion, CGGM is a rare etiology of neonatal diarrhea; however, the diagnosis is easy to make and the prognosis is excellent. PMID:23107089

  17. [Parental roles and needs in neonatal intensive care: a review of Portuguese guidelines].

    PubMed

    Amorim, Mariana; Alves, Elisabete; Barros, Henrique; Silva, Susana

    2016-08-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze the parental roles and needs included in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit guidelines. Thematic content analysis was conducted of 33 guidelines (28 consensuses and 5 documents directed to parents) freely available on the Portuguese Pediatrics Society website in August 2014. These documents deal mainly with information needs, child care activities performed by the parents and the respective responsibilities in decision making with respect to the health of children. Furthermore, parental and family characteristics were mentioned as risk factors for prematurity and perinatal diseases. The psychosocial consequences of parenthood experienced in Neonatal Intensive Care Units, as well as the adequacy of their environmental characteristics to parental needs, were less frequently touched upon. Issues related to the safety and comfort, confidence of parents in healthcare and social support were rarely touched upon. The results reflect sociocultural norms associated with intensive parenting, which is exclusively child centered, highly emotional and performed under the guidance of health professionals. The important aspect is to issue and disseminate guidelines that foster the integration of family-centered care in the dynamics of Neonatal Intensive Care Units. PMID:27557031

  18. The predictive value of early behavioural assessments in pet dogs--a longitudinal study from neonates to adults.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Stefanie; Müller, Corsin; Virányi, Zsófia; Huber, Ludwig; Range, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    Studies on behavioural development in domestic dogs are of relevance for matching puppies with the right families, identifying predispositions for behavioural problems at an early stage, and predicting suitability for service dog work, police or military service. The literature is, however, inconsistent regarding the predictive value of tests performed during the socialisation period. Additionally, some practitioners use tests with neonates to complement later assessments for selecting puppies as working dogs, but these have not been validated. We here present longitudinal data on a cohort of Border collies, followed up from neonate age until adulthood. A neonate test was conducted with 99 Border collie puppies aged 2-10 days to assess activity, vocalisations when isolated and sucking force. At the age of 40-50 days, 134 puppies (including 93 tested as neonates) were tested in a puppy test at their breeders' homes. All dogs were adopted as pet dogs and 50 of them participated in a behavioural test at the age of 1.5 to 2 years with their owners. Linear mixed models found little correspondence between individuals' behaviour in the neonate, puppy and adult test. Exploratory activity was the only behaviour that was significantly correlated between the puppy and the adult test. We conclude that the predictive validity of early tests for predicting specific behavioural traits in adult pet dogs is limited. PMID:25003341

  19. The Predictive Value of Early Behavioural Assessments in Pet Dogs – A Longitudinal Study from Neonates to Adults

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, Stefanie; Müller, Corsin; Virányi, Zsófia; Huber, Ludwig; Range, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    Studies on behavioural development in domestic dogs are of relevance for matching puppies with the right families, identifying predispositions for behavioural problems at an early stage, and predicting suitability for service dog work, police or military service. The literature is, however, inconsistent regarding the predictive value of tests performed during the socialisation period. Additionally, some practitioners use tests with neonates to complement later assessments for selecting puppies as working dogs, but these have not been validated. We here present longitudinal data on a cohort of Border collies, followed up from neonate age until adulthood. A neonate test was conducted with 99 Border collie puppies aged 2–10 days to assess activity, vocalisations when isolated and sucking force. At the age of 40–50 days, 134 puppies (including 93 tested as neonates) were tested in a puppy test at their breeders' homes. All dogs were adopted as pet dogs and 50 of them participated in a behavioural test at the age of 1.5 to 2 years with their owners. Linear mixed models found little correspondence between individuals' behaviour in the neonate, puppy and adult test. Exploratory activity was the only behaviour that was significantly correlated between the puppy and the adult test. We conclude that the predictive validity of early tests for predicting specific behavioural traits in adult pet dogs is limited. PMID:25003341

  20. Neonatal death dwarfism. (A further report).

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, K; Masel, J; Morris, L; Kunze, D

    1978-11-01

    Seven cases of rare "Neonatal Death Dwarfism" observed recently in three major Children's Hospitals in Australia are reported. These include Diastrophic Dwarfism, Achondrogenesis II, Lethal Form of Hypophosphatasia, Homozygous Achondroplasia, Minor Form of Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy, Achondrogenesis II (?) and Unclassified Lethal Bone Dysplasia. In all the patients the clinical diagnosis was uncertain or incorrect, whereas a conclusive radiographic diagnosis could be made after X-ray examination in all but one of the cases. Skeletal survey should be performed in each case of neonatal death dwarfism. PMID:152275

  1. Neonatal Resuscitation in Low-Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Berkelhamer, Sara K; Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Niermeyer, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Almost one quarter of newborn deaths are attributed to birth asphyxia. Systematic implementation of newborn resuscitation programs has the potential to avert many of these deaths as basic resuscitative measures alone can reduce neonatal mortality. Simplified resuscitation training provided through Helping Babies Breathe decreases early neonatal mortality and stillbirth. However, challenges remain in providing every newborn the needed care at birth. Barriers include ineffective educational systems and programming; inadequate equipment, personnel and data monitoring; and limited political and social support to improve care. Further progress calls for renewed commitments to closing gaps in the quality of newborn resuscitative care. PMID:27524455

  2. Staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Shalini Dewan; Bharara, Tanisha; Jena, Pragnya Paramita; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Abha; Gur, Renu; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2016-07-16

    An otherwise healthy, full-term neonate presented at day 15 of life to the pediatric emergency with generalized papulo-pustular rash for 2 d. This was finally diagnosed as bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The skin lesions decreased significantly after starting antibiotic therapy and drainage of blister fluid. There was no recurrence of the lesions on follow-up. This case of generalized pustular eruption due to S. aureus in a neonate is reported, as it poses a diagnostic dilemma and can have serious consequences if left untreated. PMID:27458596

  3. Next generation neonatal health informatics with Artemis.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Carolyn; Catley, Christina; James, Andrew; Padbury, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the deployment of a platform to enable processing of currently uncharted high frequency, high fidelity, synchronous data from medical devices. Such a platform would support the next generation of informatics solutions for neonatal intensive care. We present Artemis, a platform for real-time enactment of clinical knowledge as it relates to multidimensional data analysis and clinical research. Through specific deployment examples at two different neonatal intensive care units, we demonstrate that Artemis supports: 1) instantiation of clinical rules; 2) multidimensional analysis; 3) distribution of services for critical care via cloud computing; and 4) accomplishing 1 through 3 using current technology without a negative impact on patient care. PMID:21893725

  4. Neonatal cranial ultrasound screening for intraventricular haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tudehope, D I; Lamont, A C

    1998-04-01

    The cost effectiveness of performing routine neonatal cranial ultrasound scans to diagnose intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) on cohorts of high risk infants is in question. In the early 1980s cranial ultrasound scans were performed on preterm infants to expand knowledge of the incidence, aetiology, pathogenesis and evolution of IVH. In many neonatal units high risk infants are scanned on days 5-7 and 10-14 and prior to discharge for extremely low birthweight (ELBW) infants. Cranial ultrasound scanning is often used as a surrogate for assessment of neurodevelopmental outcome with information from meta analyses used to counsel parents about the likelihood of subsequent neurosensory disability. PMID:9588629

  5. Staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Shalini Dewan; Bharara, Tanisha; Jena, Pragnya Paramita; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Abha; Gur, Renu; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy, full-term neonate presented at day 15 of life to the pediatric emergency with generalized papulo-pustular rash for 2 d. This was finally diagnosed as bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The skin lesions decreased significantly after starting antibiotic therapy and drainage of blister fluid. There was no recurrence of the lesions on follow-up. This case of generalized pustular eruption due to S. aureus in a neonate is reported, as it poses a diagnostic dilemma and can have serious consequences if left untreated. PMID:27458596

  6. Genes and environment in neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ment, Laura R; Ådén, Ulrika; Bauer, Charles R; Bada, Henrietta S; Carlo, Waldemar A; Kaiser, Jeffrey R; Lin, Aiping; Cotten, Charles Michael; Murray, Jeffrey; Page, Grier; Hallman, Mikko; Lifton, Richard P; Zhang, Heping

    2015-12-01

    Emerging data suggest intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of the preterm neonate is a complex disorder with contributions from both the environment and the genome. Environmental analyses suggest factors mediating both cerebral blood flow and angiogenesis contribute to IVH, while candidate gene studies report variants in angiogenesis, inflammation, and vascular pathways. Gene-by-environment interactions demonstrate the interaction between the environment and the genome, and a non-replicated genome-wide association study suggests that both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the risk for severe IVH in very low-birth weight preterm neonates. PMID:26516117

  7. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis caused by maternal autoimmune hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Correia, Miguel Fragata; Maria, Ana Teresa; Prado, Sara; Limbert, Catarina

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal immune hyperthyroidism is a rare but potentially fatal condition. It occurs in 1-5% of infants born to women with Graves' disease (GD). In most of the cases it is due to maternal antibodies transferred from the mother into the fetal compartment, stimulating the fetal thyroid by binding thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) receptor. We present a case of neonatal thyrotoxicosis due to maternal GD detected at 25 days of age and discuss the potential pitfalls in the diagnosis. PMID:25750228

  8. Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen, Ed.; McBride, Marijo, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "Feature Issue" of the quarterly journal "Impact" presents 19 brief articles on family support systems in the United States for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on provisions of Public Law 99-457. Articles include: "Family Support in the United States: Setting a Course for the 1990s" (James Knoll);…

  9. Family Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainor, Peggy

    2001-01-01

    Describes a Kellogg Family Collaborative project that involves the University of Montana and four tribal colleges in a family-strengths approach to improving student retention and achievement. States that the project is grounded in social work theory and research that recognize and reinforce family and student resilience through promotion of…

  10. Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This "special focus" journal issue consists of 13 individual articles on the theme of rural family programs relating to school, health services, church, and other institutions. It includes: (1) "Towards a Rural Family Policy" (Judith K. Chynoweth and Michael D. Campbell); (2) "Montana: Council for Families Collaborates for Prevention (Jean…

  11. Diversity of Disorders Causing Neonatal Cholestasis – The Experience of a Tertiary Pediatric Center in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Hoerning, André; Raub, Simon; Dechêne, Alexander; Brosch, Michelle N.; Kathemann, Simone; Hoyer, Peter F.; Gerner, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Rapidly establishing the cause of neonatal cholestasis is an urgent matter. The aim of this study was to report on the prevalence and mortality of the diverse disorders causing neonatal cholestasis in an academic center in Germany. Methods: Clinical chemistry and cause of disease were retrospectively analyzed in 82 infants (male n = 42, 51%) that had presented with neonatal cholestasis to a tertiary medical center from January 2009 to April 2013. Results: Altogether, 19 disorders causing neonatal cholestasis were identified. Biliary atresia was the most common diagnosis (41%), followed by idiopathic cases (13%), progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC, 10%), cholestasis in preterm infants (10%), α1AT deficiency, Alagille syndrome, portocaval shunts, mitochondriopathy, biliary sludge (all 2%), and others. Infants with biliary atresia were diagnosed with a mean age of 62 days, they underwent Kasai portoenterostomy ~66 days after birth. The majority of these children (~70%) received surgery within 10 weeks of age and 27% before 60 days. The 2-year survival with their native liver after Kasai procedure was 12%. The time span between Kasai surgery and liver transplantation was 176 ± 73 days. Six children (7%), of whom three patients had a syndromic and one a non-syndromic biliary atresia, died prior to liver transplantation. The pre- and post-transplant mortality rate for children with biliary atresia was ~12 and ~17%, respectively. Conclusion: Neonatal cholestasis is a severe threat associated with a high risk of complications in infancy and it therefore requires urgent investigation in order to initiate life saving therapy. Although in the last 20 years new causes such as the PFICs have been identified and newer diagnostic tools have been introduced into the clinical routine biliary atresia still represents the major cause. PMID:25003101

  12. Human neonatal hepatocyte transplantation induces long-term rescue of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Laia; López, Silvia; Pareja, Eugenia; Donato, María Teresa; Myara, Anne; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Castell, José Vicente; Gómez-Lechón, María José

    2015-06-01

    Crigler-Najjar type 1 disease is a rare inherited metabolic disease characterized by high levels of unconjugated bilirubin due to the complete absence of hepatic uridine diphosphoglucuronate-glucuronosyltransferase activity. Hepatocyte transplantation (HT) has been proposed as an alternative treatment for Crigler-Najjar syndrome, but it is still limited by the quality and the low engraftment and repopulation ability of the cells used. Because of their attachment capability and expression of adhesion molecules as well as the higher proportion of hepatic progenitor cells, neonatal hepatocytes may have an advantage over adult cells. Adult or neonatal hepatocytes were transplanted into Gunn rats, a model for Crigler-Najjar disease. Engraftment and repopulation were studied and compared by immunofluorescence (IF). Additionally, the serum bilirubin levels, the presence of bilirubin conjugates in rat serum, and the expression of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1 family polypeptide A1 (UGT1A1) in rat liver samples were also analyzed. Here we show that neonatal HT results in long-term correction in Gunn rats. In comparison with adult cells, neonatal cells showed better engraftment and repopulation capability 3 days and 6 months after transplantation, respectively. Bilirubinemia decreased in the transplanted animals during the whole experimental follow-up (6 months). Bilirubin conjugates were also present in the serum of the transplanted animals. Western blots and IF confirmed the presence and expression of UGT1A1 in the liver. This work is the first to demonstrate the advantage of using neonatal hepatocytes for the treatment of Crigler-Najjar in vivo. PMID:25821167

  13. Splenic rupture and intracranial haemorrhage in a haemophilic neonate: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Adamu, Ibrahim; Asarian, Armand; Xiao, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Splenic rupture and intracranial haemorrhage are life-threatening conditions infrequently encountered in neonates without history of birth trauma. External manifestations of birth trauma; namely, capput succadeneum and cephalhematoma, when present raise suspicions for more serious intracranial or visceral damage. Rupture of normal spleen without an obvious source of trauma in haemophilic neonate is a rare event. The concurrence of both conditions and the unusual presentation make this case a rare one that is seldom encountered in the literature. Additionally, when splenic rupture occurs, the consensus is to employ all non-operative techniques aimed at salvaging the spleen, thus avoiding the immune-compromised state associated with splenectomy. However, in this case, we present a 3-day-old male with family history of haemophilia A, who was diagnosed with splenic rupture and bilateral subdural haematomas and underwent splenectomy, albeit with post-operative complications, in light of haemodynamic instability and high ongoing transfusion requirements. PMID:22878771

  14. The Child and Family Hospital Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Deron; Fryda, Sarah; Rubin, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Patient and family experiences are important indicators of quality of care and little is known about how family accommodation affects hospital experience. We added questions about accommodation to standardized inpatient pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit family experience surveys at 10 U.S. hospitals to determine the accommodation types used by families, compare characteristics across accommodation types and explore accommodation-type influences on overall hospital experience outcomes. Parents of inpatient children (n = 5,105; 93.4%) most often stayed in the child’s room (76.8%). Parents of neonatal intensive care unit infants (n = 362; 6.6%) most often stayed overnight in their own home or with relatives/friends (47.2%). Accommodation varied based on hospital, parent, and child factors. Accommodation type was a significant predictor for most hospital experience outcomes, with families who stayed at a Ronald McDonald House reporting more positive overall hospital experiences (odds ratios: ranging from 1.83 to 4.86 for contrasted accommodation types and three experience outcomes). PMID:25854957

  15. Neonatal Bartter Syndrome in association with congenital adrenal hyperplasia in a neonate - a rare combination.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shabbir

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal Bartter syndrome (NBS) is an autosomal recessive renal tubulopathy characterized by hypokalaemic, hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis associated with increased urinary loss of sodium, potassium, calcium and chloride. There is hyperreninaemia and hyperaldosteronaemia but normotension. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), another autosomal recessive condition, may present in the neonatal period with vomiting, hypovolaemia, failure to gain weight or ambiguous genitalia. We report a case of NBS and CAH combination in a neonate. A male neonate born at term was admitted with history of recurrent vomiting and dehydration episodes. Investigations revealed electrolytes imbalance, metabolic alkalosis, raised aldosterone and renin levels suggestive of NBS. He was treated successfully and discharged. He was re-admitted with the same symptoms. Further evaluation confirmed the presence of CAH as well. We report this case because of the rarity of this combination (NBS plus CAH) and to the best of our knowledge this is the first such case report from Pakistan. PMID:27183948

  16. Early Onset Neonatal Septicaemia Caused by Pantoea agglomerans

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Mallika; Das, Niloy Kumar; Guchhait, Partha; Misra, Saheli

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans is an opportunistic pathogen causing infection in the immunocompromised patients. It is a plant pathogen and a rare human pathogen causing neonatal sepsis, joint infection, urinary tract infection and bloodstream infections. Neonatal Gram negative septicaemia may have an unusual presentation of subtle generalised neonatal seizures without any other cardinal features of sepsis. An appropriate diagnosis is therefore the key to proper management. P. agglomerans being an unusual cause of neonatal sepsis should be diagnosed early with proper antibiogram for clinical cure. Here, we report a case of neonatal sepsis caused by P. agglomerans in a tertiary care hospital in Eastern India. PMID:27437219

  17. Intracranial complications of Serratia marcescens infection in neonates.

    PubMed

    Madide, Ayanda; Smith, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Even though Serratia marcescens is not one of the most common causes of infection in neonates, it is associated with grave morbidity andmortality. We describe the evolution of brain parenchymal affectation observed in association with S. marcescens infection in neonates. Thisretrospective case series details brain ultrasound findings of five neonates with hospital-acquired S. marcescens infection. Neonatal S. marcescensinfection with or without associated meningitis can be complicated by brain parenchymal affectation, leading to cerebral abscess formation. Itis recommended that all neonates with this infection should undergo neuro-imaging more than once before discharge from hospital; this canbe achieved using bedside ultrasonography. PMID:27032843

  18. Neonatal enteral feeding tubes as loci for colonisation by members of the Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    , irrespective of feeding regime, act as loci for the bacterial attachment and multiplication of numerous opportunistic pathogens within the Enterobacteriaceae family. Subsequently, these organisms will enter the stomach as a bolus with each feed. Therefore, enteral feeding tubes are an important risk factor to consider with respect to neonatal infections. PMID:19723318

  19. Compilation of the neonatal palliative care clinical guideline in neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Zoafa, Aniyehsadat; Marofi, Maryam; Badiee, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clinical guidelines are important instruments for increasing the quality of clinical practice in the treatment team. Compilation of clinical guidelines is important due to special condition of the neonates and the nurses facing critical conditions in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). With 98% of neonatal deaths occurring in NICUs in the hospitals, it is important to pay attention to this issue. This study aimed at compilation of the neonatal palliative care clinical guidelines in NICU. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with multistage comparative strategies with localization in Isfahan in 2013. In the first step, the components of the neonatal palliative care clinical guidelines were determined by searching in different databases. In the second stage, the level of expert group's consensus with each component of neonatal palliative care in the nominal group and focus group was investigated, and the clinical guideline was written based on that. In the third stage, the quality and applicability were determined with the positive viewpoints of medical experts, nurses, and members of the science board of five cities in Iran. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics through SPSS. Results: In the first stage, the draft of neonatal palliative care was designed based on neonates’, their parents’, and the related staff's requirements. In the second stage, its rank and applicability were determined and after analyzing the responses, with agreement of the focus group, the clinical guideline was written. In the third stage, the means of indication scores obtained were 75%, 69%, 72%, 72%, and 68% by Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) instrument. Conclusions: The compilation of the guideline can play an effective role in provision of neonatal care in nursing. PMID:26120329

  20. Cotoneaster: A Safe and Easy Way to Reduce Neonatal Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Kheiri, Soleiman; Shemian, Rabin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Consumption of cotoneaster may reduce neonatal jaundice. Aim Hence this study was undertaken to determine the effect of mothers’ cotoneaster consumption on treatment of their neonates’ jaundice. Materials and Methods In this randomized clinical trial study, 120 neonates with jaundice referred to a hospital in southwest Iran were enrolled by nonprobability sampling and divided randomly into four groups. In the first group both mothers and neonates received cotoneaster; in the second group only mothers; in the third group only neonates; and in the fourth group the neonates received distilled water as placebo. Phototherapy was done under the same condition for all neonates. Results The reduction of bilirubin was significantly higher in treatment groups compared to control group (p<0.05). Bilirubin in the group of neonates whose mothers consumed cotoneaster was less compared to control group at 24 and 36 hours (p<0.05) and the highest reduction in bilirubin was observed in the first group. The mean duration of hospitalization was longer for the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion Consumption of cotoneaster by both mothers and neonates caused a decrease in neonatal jaundice more rapidly compared to other groups and decreased the duration of hospitalization. Cotoneaster consumption by mothers, neonates, or both may be useful in treatment of neonatal jaundice. PMID:27190910

  1. Maternal bile acid transporter deficiency promotes neonatal demise

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Fei; Wang, Yao; Pitre, Aaron; Fang, Zhong-ze; Frank, Matthew W.; Calabrese, Christopher; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Neale, Geoffrey; Frase, Sharon; Vogel, Peter; Rock, Charles O.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Schuetz, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is associated with adverse neonatal survival and is estimated to impact between 0.4 and 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Here we show that maternal cholestasis (due to Abcb11 deficiency) produces neonatal death among all offspring within 24 h of birth due to atelectasis-producing pulmonary hypoxia, which recapitulates the neonatal respiratory distress of human ICP. Neonates of Abcb11-deficient mothers have elevated pulmonary bile acids and altered pulmonary surfactant structure. Maternal absence of Nr1i2 superimposed on Abcb11 deficiency strongly reduces maternal serum bile acid concentrations and increases neonatal survival. We identify pulmonary bile acids as a key factor in the disruption of the structure of pulmonary surfactant in neonates of ICP. These findings have important implications for neonatal respiratory failure, especially when maternal bile acids are elevated during pregnancy, and highlight potential pathways and targets amenable to therapeutic intervention to ameliorate this condition. PMID:26416771

  2. Neonatal anthropometry: thin-fat phenotype in fourth to fifth generation South Asian neonates in Surinam.

    PubMed

    van Steijn, L; Karamali, N S; Kanhai, H H H; Ariëns, G A M; Fall, C H D; Yajnik, C S; Middelkoop, B J C; Tamsma, J T

    2009-11-01

    We assessed whether the earlier described 'thin-fat phenotype' is present in Surinam South Asian babies of the fourth to fifth generation after migration from India. In this observational study we collected data from 39 South Asian term neonates and their mothers in Paramaribo, Surinam. We compared the following data with data from an earlier study in Southampton, UK (338 neonates) and in Pune, India (631 neonates): maternal body mass index, neonatal weight, length, head, mid-upper arm and abdominal circumferences and subscapular skinfold thickness. The mothers in Paramaribo were older than the Southampton mothers; their body mass index was comparable. Mean birth weight was 3159 g (Southampton: 3494 g; Pune: 2666 g). Compared with Southampton babies, the Paramaribo babies were smaller in nearly all body measurements, the smallest being abdominal circumference at the umbilicus level (s.d. score: -1.62; 95% confidence interval (CI): -2.07 to -1.16) and mid-upper arm circumference (s.d. score: -1.08; 95% CI: -1.46 to -0.69). In contrast, subscapular skinfold thickness was similar (s.d. score: +0.08; 95% CI: -0.24 to +0.55). Except for subscapular skinfold thickness and length, all neonatal measurements were intermediate between those from Southampton and Pune. The thin-fat phenotype is preserved in Surinam South Asian neonates of the fourth to fifth generation after migration from India. PMID:19636321

  3. Neonatal Atlas Construction Using Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Li; Wu, Guorong; Li, Gang; Gilmore, John H.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Atlas construction generally includes first an image registration step to normalize all images into a common space and then an atlas building step to fuse the information from all the aligned images. Although numerous atlas construction studies have been performed to improve the accuracy of the image registration step, unweighted or simply weighted average is often used in the atlas building step. In this article, we propose a novel patch-based sparse representation method for atlas construction after all images have been registered into the common space. By taking advantage of local sparse representation, more anatomical details can be recovered in the built atlas. To make the anatomical structures spatially smooth in the atlas, the anatomical feature constraints on group structure of representations and also the overlapping of neighboring patches are imposed to ensure the anatomical consistency between neighboring patches. The proposed method has been applied to 73 neonatal MR images with poor spatial resolution and low tissue contrast, for constructing a neonatal brain atlas with sharp anatomical details. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can significantly enhance the quality of the constructed atlas by discovering more anatomical details especially in the highly convoluted cortical regions. The resulting atlas demonstrates superior performance of our atlas when applied to spatially normalizing three different neonatal datasets, compared with other start-of-the-art neonatal brain atlases. PMID:24638883

  4. Buprenorphine During Pregnancy Reduces Neonate Distress

    MedlinePlus

    ... individual comparison. Addiction 106(7):1355–1362, 2011. Full Text Jones, H.E., et al. Neonatal abstinence syndrome ... Journal of Medicine 363(24):2320–2331, 2010. Full Text MOTHER Collaborators Following is a list of collaborators ...

  5. Gender-Related Differences in Neonatal Imitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Emese; Kompagne, Hajnalka; Orvos, Hajnalka; Pal, Attila

    2007-01-01

    Socio-emotional behaviour is in part sex-related in humans, although the contribution of the biological and socio-cultural factors is not yet known. This study explores sex-related differences during the earliest communicative exchange, the neonatal imitation in 43 newborn infants (3-96 hours old) using an index finger extension imitative gesture.…

  6. EVALUATION OF RENAL FUNCTION IN NEONATAL RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ontogenetic profile of several parameters of neonatal renal development in the rat is presented. Nephrogenesis was observed to continue at a rapid pace between birth and 8 days of age and to be virtually complete by 11 days of age. The activity of alkaline phosphatase, a brus...

  7. A case of ectrodactyly in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Kalathia, Mitul B; Seta, Avani A; Parmar, Parin N

    2013-07-01

    Ectrodactyly also known as Split hand/foot malformation is a rare limb malformation with autosomal dominant in heritance with variable penetrance, commonly known as "lobster claw hand". Usually it involves midline clefts of the hands and feet with syndactyly. We report a neonate with ectrodactyly and brief review of literature of condition. PMID:24251264

  8. Auditory Evoked Responses in Neonates by MEG

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Pavon, J. C.; Sosa, M.; Lutter, W. J.; Maier, M.; Wakai, R. T.

    2008-08-11

    Magnetoencephalography is a biomagnetic technique with outstanding potential for neurodevelopmental studies. In this work, we have used MEG to determinate if newborns can discriminate between different stimuli during the first few months of life. Five neonates were stimulated during several minutes with auditory stimulation. The results suggest that the newborns are able to discriminate between different stimuli despite their early age.

  9. Hansenula anomala infection in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Wong, A R; Ibrahim, H; Van Rostenberghe, H; Ishak, Z; Radzi, M J

    2000-12-01

    We present an unusual neonatal fungal infection, Hansenula anomala in a very low birthweight infant who underwent abdominal surgery for an omphalocele. Despite treatment with adequate doses of amphotericin B, the yeast continued to grow from the blood culture, and was only eradicated with the use of oral ketoconazole. PMID:11115044

  10. Neonatal tetanus--report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ilic, Milena; Pejcic, Ljiljana; Tiodorovic, Branislav; Hasani, Bajram; Stankovic, Sandra; Milojevic, Dejan; Djordjevic, Daniela; Vucic, Jelena; Milosevic, Zaklina; Sahiti, Mitat; Ristic, Goran

    2010-01-01

    Neonatal tetanus is a severe, often fatal disease caused by the toxin Clostridium tetani. Neonatal tetanus is a generalized tetanus, which occurs in a neonate between 3-28 days of life. The findings indicated that tetanus in a newborn of an unvaccinated mother occurred after the application of non-sterile clay to the umbilical cord. This case was a seven-day-old male baby with progressive difficulty in feeding, trismus, hypertonicity, opisthotonos, and heart murmur. The patient was afebrile and eupneic, and had a history of non-sterile home delivery. In the past, the area of Bujanovac, Medvedja and Presevo had been exposed to mass immigration (especially due to the war in the territory of former Yugoslavia), which caused a serious problem for general practitioners, who had to be vigilant and ensure that all patients registered in their practice were fully immunized. This case has provided a clear indication of the necessity for strategies of both vaccination and ensuring hygienic conditions throughout pregnancy and delivery to prevent neonatal tetanus. PMID:21043387

  11. Manganese Neurotoxicity: A Focus on the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Erikson, Keith M.; Thompson, Khristy; Aschner, Judy; Aschner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace metal found in all tissues, and it is required for normal amino acid, lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism. While Mn deficiency is extremely rare in humans, toxicity due to overexposure of Mn is more prevalent. The brain appears to be especially vulnerable. Mn neurotoxicity is most commonly associated with occupational exposure to aerosols or dusts that contain extremely high levels (> 1-5 mg Mn/m3) of Mn, consumption of contaminated well water, or parenteral nutrition therapy in patients with liver disease or immature hepatic functioning such as the neonate. This review will focus primarily on the neurotoxicity of Mn in the neonate. We will discuss putative transporters of the metal in the neonatal brain and then focus on the implications of high Mn exposure to the neonate focusing on typical exposure modes (e.g., dietary and parenteral). Although Mn exposure via parenteral nutrition is uncommon in adults, in premature infants, it is more prevalent, so this mode of exposure becomes salient in this population. We will briefly review some of the mechanisms of Mn neurotoxicity and conclude with a discussion of ripe areas for research in this underreported area of neurotoxicity. PMID:17084903

  12. Neurodevelopmental outcome of transient neonatal intracerebral echodensities.

    PubMed

    Appleton, R E; Lee, R E; Hey, E N

    1990-01-01

    The later neurodevelopmental progress of 15 babies who had neonatal periventricular echodensities or flares in the absence of any intraventricular bleeding or subsequent cystic degeneration was studied. At follow up four infants had neurological abnormalities, including spastic diplegia (n = 2). These findings suggest that transient flares may represent mild periventricular leucomalacia with consequent mild neurological dysfunction. PMID:2407199

  13. An MR-compatible neonatal incubator

    PubMed Central

    Paley, M N J; Hart, A R; Lait, M; Griffiths, P D

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To develop a neonatal MR-compatible incubator for transporting babies between a neonatal intensive care unit and an MRI unit that is within the same hospital but geographically separate. Methods The system was strapped to a standard MR-compatible patient trolley, which provides space for resuscitation outside the incubator. A constant-temperature exothermic heat pad was used to maintain temperature together with a logging fluoro-optic temperature monitor and alarm system. The system has been designed to accommodate standard knee-sized coils from the major MR manufacturers. The original incubator was constructed from carbon fibre, but this required modification to prevent radiofrequency shading artefacts due to the conducting properties of the carbon fibre. A high-tensile polyester material was used, which combined light weight with high impact strength. The system could be moved onto the patient bed with the coils and infant in place by one technologist. Results Studies in eight neonatal patients produced high quality 1.5 T MR images with low motion artefacts. The incubator should also be compatible with imaging in 3 T MR systems, although further work is required to establish this. Images were acquired using both rapid and high-resolution sequences, including three-dimensional volumes, proton spectra and diffusion weighting. Conclusion The incubator provides a safe, quiet environment for neonates during transport and imaging, at low cost. PMID:22167517

  14. Parental and Perinatal Correlates of Neonatal Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standley, Kay

    This paper discusses the analyses of antecedent correlates of the behavior of 60 infants as measured by the Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Scale on the third day after birth. The data include two sets of antecedent variables: maternal adaptation to pregnancy as reported in prenatal interviews and measured describing the conditions of labor and…

  15. The Structuring of Neonatal Arm Movements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hofsten, Claes; Ronnqvist, Louise

    1993-01-01

    The organization and structuring of spontaneous arm movements of eight neonates were studied quantitatively, with each movement divided into an acceleration phase and a deceleration phase. Found that the movements of the two arms were coupled in all three dimensions of space and had a tendency to follow the body's longitudinal axis. (MDM)

  16. Reducing the risk in neonatal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal anesthesia is fraught with potential risk for the patient and stress for the anesthesiologist. Where possible, recognition of these risks, avoidance of, and being able to manage them appropriately, must impact positively on perioperative outcomes in this vulnerable group of patients. Good communication with the parents, as well as with other healthcare providers, is crucial to safe and successful anesthetic care. PMID:24299618

  17. Imitation in Neonatal Chimpanzees ("Pan Troglodytes")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako; Tomonaga, Masaki; Tanaka, Masayuki; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides evidence for imitative abilities in neonatal chimpanzees ("Pan troglodytes"), our closest relatives. Two chimpanzees were reared from birth by their biological mothers. At less than 7 days of age the chimpanzees could discriminate between, and imitate, human facial gestures (tongue protrusion and mouth opening). By the time…

  18. Heaf test results after neonatal BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Crawshaw, P A; Thomson, A H

    1988-01-01

    Heaf testing was carried out on 98 preschool Asian children who had received a BCG vaccination. A strongly positive Heaf reaction (grade 3) occurred in only two children. Heaf testing can still be used in tuberculosis screening after neonatal BCG. PMID:3232997

  19. Neonate Orientation Behaviour towards Human Voice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alegria, J.; Noirot, E.

    1978-01-01

    Investigates the effect of a recorded male human voice on neonate head, eye, mouth and crying behaviors. Vocal Stimulation enhanced head movement, eye opening, mouthing and crying and influenced hand sucking. Differences between breast fed and bottle fed babies were found for mouth orientation, hand sucking and crying. (RH)

  20. Neonatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hanako; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a known pathogen of infective endocarditis, but not of urinary tract infection. We report a previously healthy neonate without congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract who developed urinary tract infection due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis, illustrating that Staphylococcus lugdunensis can cause urinary tract infection even in those with no urinary tract complications. PMID:26177232

  1. Infants at Risk: Perinatal and Neonatal Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsitt, Lewis P.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of infant behavior and development. Delineates a behavioral hypothesis relating prenatal and neonatal risk factors in infancy to crib death. The mutual dependence of experience and neurostructural development suggests that infancy is a period of critical learning experiences. (Author/RH)

  2. [Real-time ultrasonography in neonatal diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Nogués, A; Morales, A; Munguía, C; Pagola, C; Arena, J

    1982-11-01

    Real time ultrasonography is a diagnostic technique very widely used in pediatrics and with specific applications in neonatology. Bedside its use in Neonatal I.C.U. it has many interesting aspects for intraabdominal and intracranial pathology. In some particular conditions this procedure can be the first diagnostic tool. Conventional X-rays can be performed after sonographic data have been analyzed. PMID:7168508

  3. Sexually dimorphic effects of prenatal exposure to propionic acid and lipopolysaccharide on social behavior in neonatal, adolescent, and adult rats: implications for autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Foley, Kelly A; MacFabe, Derrick F; Vaz, Alisha; Ossenkopp, Klaus-Peter; Kavaliers, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the gut microbiome plays an important role in immune functioning, behavioral regulation and neurodevelopment. Altered microbiome composition, including altered short chain fatty acids, and/or immune system dysfunction, may contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD), with some children with ASD exhibiting both abnormal gut bacterial metabolite composition and immune system dysfunction. This study describes the effects of prenatal propionic acid (PPA), a short chain fatty acid and metabolic product of many antibiotic resistant enteric bacteria, and of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial mimetic and microbiome component, on social behavior in male and female neonatal, adolescent and adult rats. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were injected once a day with either a low level of PPA (500 mg/kg SC) on gestation days G12-16, LPS (50 μg/kg SC) on G12, or vehicle control on G12 or G12-16. Sex- and age-specific, subtle effects on behavior were observed. Both male and female PPA treated pups were impaired in a test of their nest seeking response, suggesting impairment in olfactory-mediated neonatal social recognition. As well, adolescent males, born to PPA treated dams, approached a novel object more than control animals and showed increased levels of locomotor activity compared to prenatal PPA females. Prenatal LPS produced subtle impairments in social behavior in adult male and female rats. These findings raise the possibility that brief prenatal exposure to elevated levels of microbiome products, such as PPA or LPS, can subtly influence neonatal, adolescent and adult social behavior. PMID:24747144

  4. Neonatal and Prepubertal Gynecologic Concerns.

    PubMed

    Merens, Teri A

    2015-10-01

    The role of the pediatrician in today's health care environment is one of constant evolution, as specialty care becomes more difficult to access for a growing number of young patients and their families. The primary care doctor will now have to offer more reassurance and follow-up that was once thought to be solely the role of the subspecialist. This article helps to define commonly seen entities in pediatric gynecology and offers the necessary background enabling the practitioner to provide a simple course of treatment, reassurance, or appropriate referral for specialty care. PMID:26473420

  5. The Intestinal Eukaryotic Virome in Healthy and Diarrhoeic Neonatal Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Hayer, Juliette; Berg, Mikael; Jacobson, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal porcine diarrhoea of uncertain aetiology has been reported from a number of European countries. The aim of the present study was to use viral metagenomics to examine a potential viral involvement in this diarrhoea and to describe the intestinal virome with focus on eukaryotic viruses. Samples from the distal jejunum of 50 diarrhoeic and 19 healthy piglets from 10 affected herds were analysed. The viral fraction of the samples was isolated and nucleic acids (RNA and DNA fractions) were subjected to sequence independent amplification. Samples from diarrhoeic piglets from the same herds were pooled whereas samples from healthy piglets were analysed individually. In total, 29 clinical samples, plus two negative controls and one positive control consisting of a mock metagenome were sequenced using the Ion Torrent platform. The resulting sequence data was subjected to taxonomic classification using Kraken, Diamond and HMMER. In the healthy specimens, eight different mammalian virus families were detected (Adenoviridae, Anelloviridae, Astroviridae, Caliciviridae, Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, Picornaviridae, and Reoviridae) compared to four in the pooled diarrhoeic samples (Anelloviridae, Circoviridae, Picornaviridae, and Reoviridae). It was not possible to associate a particular virus family with the investigated diarrhoea. In conclusion, this study does not support the hypothesis that the investigated diarrhoea was caused by known mammalian viruses. The results do, however, indicate that known mammalian viruses were present in the intestine as early as 24–48 hours after birth, indicating immediate infection post-partum or possibly transplacental infection. PMID:26982708

  6. Neonatal tetanus elimination in Pakistan: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lambo, Jonathan A; Nagulesapillai, Tharsiya

    2012-12-01

    Pakistan is one of the 34 countries that have not achieved the neonatal tetanus (NT) global elimination target set by the World Health Organization (WHO). NT, caused by Clostridium tetani, is a highly fatal infection of the neonatal period. It is one of the most underreported diseases and remains a major but preventable cause of neonatal and infant mortality in many developing countries. In 1989, the World Health Assembly called for the elimination of NT by 1995, and since then considerable progress has been made using the following strategies: clean delivery practices, routine tetanus toxoid (TT) immunization of pregnant women, and immunization of all women of childbearing age with three doses of TT vaccine in high-risk areas during supplementary immunization campaigns. This review presents the activities, progress, and challenges in achieving NT elimination in Pakistan. A review of the literature found TT vaccination coverage in Pakistan ranged from 60% to 74% over the last decade. Low vaccination coverage, the main driver for NT in Pakistan, is due to many factors, including demand failure for TT vaccine resulting from inadequate knowledge of TT vaccine among reproductive age females and inadequate information about the benefits of TT provided by health care workers and the media. Other factors linked to low vaccination coverage include residing in rural areas, lack of formal education, poor knowledge about place and time to get vaccinated, and lack of awareness about the importance of vaccination. A disparity exists in TT vaccination coverage and antenatal care between urban and rural areas due to access and utilization of health care services. NT reporting is incomplete, as cases from the private sector and rural areas are underreported. To successfully eliminate NT, women of reproductive age must be made aware of the benefits of TT vaccine, not only to themselves, but also to their families. Effective communication strategies for TT vaccine delivery and

  7. Reduced nephron endowment in the neonates of Indigenous Australian peoples.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Y; Smith, R; Wright, I M R; Lumbers, E R

    2014-02-01

    Rates of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among Indigenous groups in Australia exceed non-Indigenous rates eight-fold. Using kidney volume as a surrogate for nephron number, we carried out a study to determine if Indigenous neonates have a smaller kidney volume (and thus a reduced nephron number) from birth compared with non-Indigenous neonates. We recruited term and preterm neonates (<32 weeks) at a tertiary care neonatal unit over a 12 months period. Preterm neonates were assessed (renal sonography and renal function measurement) at 32 weeks corrected age (CA) and again at 38 weeks CA when blood pressure was also measured. All term neonates were assessed in the first post-natal week, including renal sonography, renal function and blood pressure measurement. The primary outcome measured was total kidney volume (TKV) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was a secondary outcome. Data was available for 44 preterm (11 Indigenous) and 39 term (13 Indigenous) neonates. TKV of Indigenous neonates was significantly lower at 32 weeks [12.0 (2.0) v. 15.4 (5.1) ml; P=0.03] and 38 weeks CA [18.6 (4.0) v. 22.6 (5.9) ml; P=0.04] respectively. Term Indigenous neonates also had smaller kidney volumes compared with non-Indigenous neonates. Despite a smaller kidney volume (and reduced nephron number), Indigenous neonates did not have a significantly lower eGFR. Indigenous neonates achieve similar eGFRs to Non-Indigenous neonates, presumably through a higher single nephron filtration rate. This places Indigenous neonates at a greater risk of long-term kidney damage later in life. PMID:24847688

  8. Neonatal incontinentia pigmenti: Six cases and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Guo, Yan; Ping, Ying; Zhou, Xiao-Guang; Li, Yong

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the cases of six infants with incontinentia pigmenti (IP) in the Department of Neonates and compare their data with 60 cases of IP reported in the available Chinese literature, in order to determine the clinical characteristics and outcomes of neonatal IP in China. The majority of the cases were located near the eastern and southern coasts of China, and ~98.5% of IP cases occurred within 1 week of birth. The majority of the babies with IP were term infants. Twelve cases had a positive family history of IP. The mothers of 10 patients had a history of recurrent spontaneous abortions, and the mothers of five patients had infectious or autoimmune diseases during pregnancy. Cutaneous manifestations were shown at stage I in 59 cases, at stage II in 28 cases and at stage III in three cases (multiple stages were recorded in certain cases). Neurological changes occurred in 18 cases and ocular changes were observed in 12 cases. The toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex (TORCH) test showed positive results in three cases; autoantibody positivity was found in three cases and high blood eosinophil levels were observed in 20 cases. Brain scans revealed positive results in 16 cases and complications were observed in 21 cases. Thirty-four cases were followed for 1-6 months, six cases for 7-12 months and 17 cases for 13-84 months. Among these cases, 34 exhibited no evidence of recurrence. Five patients, including one male, succumbed in the long course of the follow-up. Two IP cases persisted after five years of follow-up. The data from the present study may reflect the characteristics of IP in the Chinese population and provide useful information for the diagnosis and treatment of IP by dermatologists and neonatologists. PMID:25371735

  9. Strategies to reduce perinatal and neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Paul, V K

    1988-06-01

    The perinatal mortality rate in India averages 66.3/1000 live births. 60% of all infant deaths occur during the 1st month, making the neonatal mortality rate 76/1000 in rural areas and 39/1000 in urban areas. These rates have remained static since 1974. Over 90% of all deliveries occur at home and are conducted by untrained birth attendants. The major causes of perinatal deaths are immaturity/low birth weight, birth asphyxia/trauma, neonatal infections, and congenital malformations. Neonatal tetanus alone is responsible for 230,000-280,000 deaths a year. Hypoxia, low birth weight, and tetanus are preventable, if primary perinatal care is provided and high-risk pregnancies are recognized and referred to facilities where fetal monitoring and neonatal care are available. It is proposed to train all of the country's 5 million traditional birth attendants by 1990 to deliver primary perinatal care. By 1990 also there will be 1 village health guide for every 1000 people. All traditional birth attendants must know how to give mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, and the infrastructure for an adequate referral system must be established. In order to reduce the incidence of low birth weight, the Integrated Child Development Service Scheme proposes that all pregnant women receive a dietary supplement of 500 calories and 25 gm protein, and that pregnant women be given a 2-hour midday rest period. The control of malaria and intestinal infections with chloroquine and antibiotics would do much to reduce low birth weight. Simple technologies for measuring birth weight indicators, such as chest circumference or mid-arm circumference, require only a tape measure. Finally, technics of mass communication must be utilized to spread knowledge of perinatal and neonatal care. PMID:3069742

  10. Priorities in neonatal care in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Ho, N K

    1996-08-01

    Lower perinatal and neonatal mortality have been achieved in the developed countries following advancement of neonatal care, introduction of high technologies, and better knowledge of pathophysiology of the newborn infants. Other contributing factors are organised delivery room care with skillful resuscitative techniques as well as risk identification and efficient transport of the sick infants including in utero transfer of the fetus, etc. It cannot be assumed that similar results can be attained in developing countries where financial and human resources are the problems. With limited resources, it is necessary to prioritize neonatal care in the developing countries. It is essential to collect minimum meaningful perinatal data to define the problems of each individual country. This is crucial for monitoring, auditing, evaluation, and planning of perinatal health care of the country. The definition and terminology in perinatology should also be uniform and standardised for comparative studies. Paediatricians should be well trained in resuscitation and stabilisation of the newborn infants. Resuscitation should begin in the delivery room and a resuscitation team should be formed. This is the best way to curtail complication and morbidity of asphyxiated births. Nosocomial infections have been the leading cause of neonatal deaths. It is of paramount importance to prevent infections in the nursery. Staff working in the nursery should pay attention to usage of sterilised equipment, isolation of infected babies and aseptic procedures. Paediatricians should avoid indiscriminate use of antibiotics. Most important of all, hand-washing before examination of the baby is mandatory and should be strictly adhered to. Other simpler measures include warming devices for maintenance of body temperature of the newborn babies, blood glucose monitoring, and antenatal steroid for mothers in premature labour. In countries where neonatal jaundice is prevalent, effective management to

  11. Neonatal nursing: an unmet challenge in India.

    PubMed

    Kalyan, Geetanjli; Vatsa, Manju

    2014-11-01

    Nurses comprise a key component to maternal and newborn health care delivery, including the care of 'at-risk' or sick newborns. However, the efficiency and effectiveness of services rely heavily on adequate numbers of highly skilled neonatal nurses. Currently, in India, a significant shortage of trained nurses in the field of newborn care is contributing to poor neonatal outcomes. Specifically, nurses caring for newborns lack the competency and experience needed to ensure optimal care. This deficiency has been linked to a lack of expert faculty, standardized training and minimal or no exposures to newborn clinical care areas during pre service education. Moreover, in addition to a lack of operational research in the area, nurses who provide care for newborns are often faced with numerous system related issues that impede their ability to provide optimal care. Most notably, frequent changes of work place, poor wages, and lack of continuing education, skill maintenance, recognition, and collaborative team culture further compromise the nursing care. All these lead to poor motivation and competency. To meet this challenge, it is essential that emphasis be placed on the identification and support of nursing faculty with expertise in newborn and neonatal care who are able to ensure that nurses receive standardized education for pre-service, in-service and ongoing care. In addition, importance should be placed on encouraging newborn nursing research as well as on governmental increases in salary compensation. Lastly, given the shortage of physicians to take care of sick neonates in remote areas, the creation of a cadre of Neonatal nurse practitioner/ advanced practice nurses would be an invaluable solution in developing countries. Furthermore, centralized oversight of newborn education and training would be best served, if responsibility was placed with Reproductive maternal newborn child health (RMNCH) workers and district level officers. PMID:25278279

  12. [Initial antibiotic therapy of neonatal sepsis].

    PubMed

    Jesić, Milos; Jesić, Maja; Maglajlić, Svjetlana; Lukac, Marija; Sindjić, Sanja; Vujović, Dragana; Grković, Slobodanka

    2004-10-01

    It is certain that in the past the types of bacterial agents responsible for neonatal sepsis and their sensitivity to antibiotics were not the same in all historical periods. However, the reports confirming the conclusion have been published only in the last three years. According to these facts, the bacterial causes of neonatal sepsis were analyzed in patients treated at the University children's hospital in Belgrade (S&M) as well as their sensitivity to antibiotics to determine the most effective initial therapy. Between January 2001 and June 2004, 35 neonates, aged from 1-30 days, with positive blood culture were treated. Gram-negative bacteria were the cause of sepsis in 57% of patients (Pseudomonas--20%, Klebsiella--20%, E. coli--8.5%, Acinetobacter--8.5%), gram-positive in 43% (coagulase-negative Staphylococci--14%, Staphylococcus epidermidis--14%, Staphylococcus aureus--9%, Streptococcus group B--3%, Listeria monocytogenes--3%). The bacteria were the most sensitive to carbapenems (85-89%), amikacin (68%), third-generation cephalosporins (47-50%), while the sensitivity to gentamicin was less than expected (48.5%). Sensitivity to ampicillin (8%) confirmed a high level of resistance to this antibiotic. All isolated Staphylococci were sensitive to vancomycin, and the overall methicillin resistance was 46%. Combined cefotaxime and amikacin therapy was the most effective of all suggested initial combinations of antibiotics (74%). The sensitivity to all other combinations of antibiotics was 51-71%. The most adequate initial combination of antibiotics for the treatment of neonatal sepsis is cefotaxime plus amikacin. The most adequate antibiotic for the treatment of nosocomial neonatal sepsis is carbapenem. PMID:15615466

  13. Screening for G6PD Deficiency Among Neonates with Neonatal Jaundice Admitted to Tertiary Care Center: A Need in Disguise.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kishwer; Sohaila, Arjumand; Tikmani, Shiyam Sunder; Khan, Iqtidar Ahmed; Zafar, Anila

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the association of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency among neonates admitted with jaundice at the neonatal intensive care unit, well baby nursery and neonatal step down nursery of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, from January to June 2010. A total of 205 neonates following the selection criteria were included. All selected neonates have their venous blood drawn, saved in EDTA bottle and sent to laboratory of The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH). The laboratory results of whether G-6-PD deficiency was present or not was recorded in the proforma. G-6-PD was deficient in 19 neonates (9.3%). All neonates were male. PMID:26305316

  14. Enantioselective Syntheses of Lignin Models: An Efficient Synthesis of β-O-4 Dimers and Trimers by Using the Evans Chiral Auxiliary.

    PubMed

    Njiojob, Costyl N; Bozell, Joseph J; Long, Brian K; Elder, Thomas; Key, Rebecca E; Hartwig, William T

    2016-08-22

    We describe an efficient five-step, enantioselective synthesis of (R,R)- and (S,S)-lignin dimer models possessing a β-O-4 linkage, by using the Evans chiral aldol reaction as a key step. Mitsunobu inversion of the (R,R)- or (S,S)-isomers generates the corresponding (R,S)- and (S,R)-diastereomers. We further extend this approach to the enantioselective synthesis of a lignin trimer model. These lignin models are synthesized with excellent ee (>99 %) and high overall yields. The lignin dimer models can be scaled up to provide multigram quantities that are not attainable by using previous methodologies. These lignin models will be useful in degradation studies probing the selectivity of enzymatic, microbial, and chemical processes that deconstruct lignin. PMID:27459234

  15. Transfer of label from /sup 3/H-glucose in Digitaria eriantha leaves to the rust fungus Puccinia digitariae Pole Evans

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, M.E.; Garnett, H.M.

    1985-08-01

    Digitaria eriantha pentzii was fed /sup 3/H-glucose prior to inoculation with uredospores of Puccinia digitariae Pole Evans. Twenty-one hours after inoculation, uptake of label from /sup 3/H-glucose by the primary infection structures of P. digitariae was demonstrated employing autoradiography. These results indicate that an exchange of nutrients between host and pathogen occurs very early on in the infection process, during the formation of the primary infection structures. Despite contrary reports that obligate parasites receive no nutrition before establishment of haustoria, this study supports the work of Andrews, who demonstrated uptake of /sup 3/H-glucose label from lettuce cotyledons into the primary and secondary infection vesicles, appressoria, and germ tubes of Bremia lactucae.

  16. Sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, attenuates diabetic nephropathy in non-insulin-dependent Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Yoshihiro; Iyoda, Masayuki; Shibata, Takanori; Hirai, Yuki; Akizawa, Tadao

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is well established that the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy is associated with abnormalities of renal nitric oxide (NO) generation. Many of the biological actions of NO are mediated by cGMP, which is rapidly degraded by phosphodiesterases. In this study, we evaluated the renoprotective effects of sildenafil (SIL), an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase-5, in type 2 diabetic rats. METHODS Male Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, a non-insulin-dependent diabetes model, and Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats, a non-diabetic control, were treated with either SIL (2.5 mg·kg−1 in drinking water) or undosed water for 28 weeks, starting at 30 weeks of age. RESULTS Sildenafil treatment significantly decreased albuminuria, attenuated glomerular hyperfiltration and resulted in a decrease in glomerular hypertrophy, in addition to a reduced glomerulosclerosis score and a dramatic decrease in the number of glomerular and tubulointerstitial proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells in OLETF rats. This was accompanied by a significant reduction in renal cortical mRNA levels of collagen types I and III. The increased mRNA levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2 in the OLETF rats were significantly or partially attenuated by SIL treatment. CONCLUSIONS This study suggests that SIL attenuated diabetic nephropathy due to its potent antiproliferative effects and its regulatory effects on extracellular matrix. This latter effect is thought to be a result of its ability to affect the balance between MMPs and their inhibitors. PMID:21133896

  17. The effect of early, comprehensive genomic testing on clinical care in neonatal diabetes: an international cohort study

    PubMed Central

    De Franco, Elisa; Flanagan, Sarah E; Houghton, Jayne AL; Allen, Hana Lango; Mackay, Deborah JG; Temple, I Karen; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Traditional genetic testing focusses on analysis of one or a few genes according to clinical features; this approach is changing as improved sequencing methods enable simultaneous analysis of several genes. Neonatal diabetes is the presenting feature of many discrete clinical phenotypes defined by different genetic causes. Genetic subtype defines treatment, with improved glycaemic control on sulfonylurea treatment for most patients with potassium channel mutations. We investigated the effect of early, comprehensive testing of all known genetic causes of neonatal diabetes. Methods In this large, international, cohort study, we studied patients with neonatal diabetes diagnosed with diabetes before 6 months of age who were referred from 79 countries. We identified mutations by comprehensive genetic testing including Sanger sequencing, 6q24 methylation analysis, and targeted next-generation sequencing of all known neonatal diabetes genes. Findings Between January, 2000, and August, 2013, genetic testing was done in 1020 patients (571 boys, 449 girls). Mutations in the potassium channel genes were the most common cause (n=390) of neonatal diabetes, but were identified less frequently in consanguineous families (12% in consanguineous families vs 46% in non-consanguineous families; p<0·0001). Median duration of diabetes at the time of genetic testing decreased from more than 4 years before 2005 to less than 3 months after 2012. Earlier referral for genetic testing affected the clinical phenotype. In patients with genetically diagnosed Wolcott-Rallison syndrome, 23 (88%) of 26 patients tested within 3 months from diagnosis had isolated diabetes, compared with three (17%) of 18 patients referred later (>4 years; p<0·0001), in whom skeletal and liver involvement was common. Similarly, for patients with genetically diagnosed transient neonatal diabetes, the diabetes had remitted in only ten (10%) of 101 patients tested early (<3 months) compared with 60

  18. Neonatal neuropsychology: emerging relations of neonatal sensory-motor responses to white matter integrity.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Maya; Marom, Ronella; Berger, Irit; Ben Bashat, Dafna; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Ben-Sira, Liat; Artzi, Moran; Uliel, Shimrit; Leitner, Yael; Geva, Ronny

    2014-09-01

    The neonatal period is considered to be essential for neurodevelopment and wellbeing throughout the life span, yet little is known about brain-behavior relationships in the neonatal period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between neonatal sensory-motor regulation and white-matter (WM) integrity of major fiber tracts in the neonatal period. We hypothesized that WM integrity of sensory-motor systems would predict neurobehavioral maturation during the first month of life. Forty-nine premature neonates underwent magnetic-resonance-imaging at term. Diffusion-tensor-imaging analysis was performed in major WM tracts along with repeated neonatal neurobehavioral evaluations assessing sensory reactivity and motor regulation. Difficulties in one or more behavioral sub-category, mostly in auditory and visual attention, hypotonicity and jitteriness, were documented in 78.3% infants at term. Sixty-six percent of infants experienced difficulties, mostly in auditory attention, head-neck control, hypotonicity and motor asymmetry, at 44 weeks. Attention difficulties were associated with reduced integrity of cerebral and superior cerebellar peduncles; while tonicity was associated with reduced integrity of the corpus-callosum and inferior-posterior tracts. Overall, results showed that early maturing tracts were related with the degree of typicality of sensory reactivity status while late maturing tracts were related with the degree of typicality of tonic regulation. WM integrity and maturation factors explained 40.2% of the variance in neurobehavior at 44 weeks. This study suggests that in preterm neonates, deviant sensory-motor reactivity can be detected very early in development in manners that are related to lower integrity/maturational level of early and late maturing fiber tracts. PMID:25090927

  19. Multi-Contrast Human Neonatal Brain Atlas: Application to Normal Neonate Development Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Kenichi; Mori, Susumu; Donohue, Pamela K.; Ernst, Thomas; Anderson, Lynn; Buchthal, Steven; Faria, Andreia; Jiang, Hangyi; Li, Xin; Miller, Michael I.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Chang, Linda

    2011-01-01

    MRI is a sensitive method for detecting subtle anatomic abnormalities in the neonatal brain. To optimize the usefulness for neonatal and pediatric care, systematic research, based on quantitative image analysis and functional correlation, is required. Normalization-based image analysis is one of the most effective methods for image quantification and statistical comparison. However, the application of this methodology to neonatal brain MRI scans is rare. Some of the difficulties are the rapid changes in T1 and T2 contrasts and the lack of contrast between brain structures, which prohibits accurate cross-subject image registration. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which provides rich and quantitative anatomical contrast in neonate brains, is an ideal technology for normalization–based neonatal brain analysis. In this paper, we report the development of neonatal brain atlases with detailed anatomic information derived from DTI and co-registered anatomical MRI. Combined with a diffeomorphic transformation, we were able to normalize neonatal brain images to the atlas space and three-dimensionally parcellate images into 122 regions. The accuracy of the normalization was comparable to the reliability of human raters. This method was then applied to babies of 37 to 53 post-conceptional weeks to characterize developmental changes of the white matter, which indicated a posterior-to-anterior and a central-to-peripheral direction of maturation. We expect that future applications of this atlas will include investigations of the effect of prenatal events and the effects of preterm birth or low birth weights, as well as clinical applications, such as determining imaging biomarkers for various neurological disorders. PMID:21276861

  20. Emerging Piglet Models of Neonatal Short Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lim, David W; Turner, Justine M; Wales, Paul W

    2015-08-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a growing problem in the human neonatal population. In infants, SBS is the leading cause of intestinal failure, the state of being unable to absorb sufficient nutrients for growth and development. Neonates with SBS are dependent on long-term parenteral nutrition therapy, but many succumb to the complications of sepsis and liver disease. Research in neonatal SBS is challenged by the ethical limits of studying sick human neonates and the heterogeneous nature of the disease process. Outcomes in SBS vary depending on residual intestinal anatomy, intestinal length, patient age, and exposure to nutrition therapies. The neonatal piglet serves as an appropriate translational model of the human neonate because of similarities in gastrointestinal ontogeny, physiological maturity, and adaptive processes. Re-creating the disease process in a piglet model presents a unique opportunity for researchers to discover novel insights and therapies in SBS. Emerging piglet models of neonatal SBS now represent the entire spectrum of disease seen in human infants. This review aims to contextualize these emerging piglet models within the context of SBS as a heterogeneous disease. We first explore the factors that account for SBS heterogeneity and then explore the suitability of the neonatal piglet as an appropriate translational animal model. We then examine differences between the emerging piglet models of neonatal SBS and how these differences affect their translational potential to human neonates with SBS. PMID:25293943

  1. Neonatal mortality of low-birth-weight infants in Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Yasmin, S.; Osrin, D.; Paul, E.; Costello, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the role of low birth weight (LBW) in neonatal mortality in a periurban setting in Bangladesh. METHODS: LBW neonates were recruited prospectively and followed up at one month of age. The cohort of neonates were recruited after delivery in a hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and 776 were successfully followed up either at home or, in the event of early death, in hospital. FINDINGS: The neonatal mortality rate (NMR) for these infants was 133 per 1000 live births (95% confidence interval: 110-159). The corresponding NMRs (and confidence intervals) for early and late neonates were 112 (91-136) and 21 (12-33) per thousand live births, respectively. The NMR for infants born after fewer than 32 weeks of gestation was 769 (563-910); and was 780 (640-885) for infants whose birth weights were under 1500 g. Eighty-four per cent of neonatal deaths occurred in the first seven days; half within 48 hours. Preterm delivery was implicated in three-quarters of neonatal deaths, but was associated with only one-third of LBW neonates. CONCLUSION: Policy-relevant findings were: that LBW approximately doubles the NMR in a periurban setting in Bangladesh; that neonatal mortality tends to occur early; and that preterm delivery is the most important contributor to the NMR. The group of infants most likely to benefit from improvements in low-cost essential care for the newborn accounted for almost 61% of neonatal mortalities in the cohort. PMID:11477963

  2. Use and safety of azithromycin in neonates: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Coral; Egunsola, Oluwaseun; Choonara, Imti; Kotecha, Sailesh; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Sammons, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the use and adverse drug reactions associated with azithromycin in neonates. Setting Databases MEDLINE (1948–August 2015), EMBASE (1980–August 2015) and Pubmed (August 2015) were searched for studies on azithromycin in neonates. Participants All studies involving neonates (<28 days old) who have received at least a single dose of azithromycin for which safety was evaluated. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was adverse event (AE) associated with use of azithromycin. Use of azithromycin in neonates was the secondary outcome. Results A total of 11 articles involving 473 neonates were identified. 371 AEs were reported. Adverse events were mainly respiratory (358/1000 neonate), neurological (273/1000 neonates) and gastrointestinal (196/1000 neonates) in origin. Azithromycin significantly reduced the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in extremely premature neonates (RR=0.83, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.98, p=0.02). There was no significant difference in the incidence of elevated liver enzymes between the azithromycin and placebo group (p=0.76). There were four cases of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS). Conclusions Azithromycin significantly reduces the risk of BPD in preterm neonates. The relationship between azithromycin and IHPS requires further investigation. PMID:26656010

  3. Effects of Kangaroo Care on Neonatal Pain in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Sun; Lee, Joohyun; Ahn, Hye Young

    2016-06-01

    Blood sampling for a newborn screening test is necessary for all neonates in South Korea. During the heel stick, an appropriate intervention should be implemented to reduce neonatal pain. This study was conducted to identify the effectiveness of kangaroo care (KC), skin contact with the mother, on pain relief during the neonatal heel stick. Twenty-six neonates undergoing KC and 30 control neonates at a university hospital participated in this study. Physiological responses of neonates, including heart rate, oxygen saturation, duration of crying and Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) scores were measured and compared before, during and 1 min and 2 min after heel sticks. The heart rate of KC neonates was lower at both 1 and 2 min after sampling than those of the control group. Also, PIPP scores of KC neonates were significantly lower both during and after sampling. The duration of crying for KC neonates was around 10% of the duration of the control group. In conclusion, KC might be an effective intervention in a full-term nursery for neonatal pain management. PMID:26867561

  4. Strategies to sustain a quality improvement initiative in neonatal resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    van Heerden, Carlien; Janse van Rensburg, Elsie S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many neonatal deaths can be prevented globally through effective resuscitation. South Africa (SA) committed towards attaining the Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG4) set by the World Health Organization (WHO). However, SA’s district hospitals have the highest early neonatal mortality rates. Modifiable and avoidable causes associated with patient-related, administrative and health care provider factors contribute to neonatal mortality. A quality improvement initiative in neonatal resuscitation could contribute towards decreasing neonatal mortality, thereby contributing towards the attainment of the MDG4. Aim The aim of this study was, (1) to explore and describe the existing situation regarding neonatal resuscitation in a district hospital, (2) to develop strategies to sustain a neonatal resuscitation quality improvement initiative and (3) to decrease neonatal mortality. Changes that occurred and the sustainability of strategies were evaluated. Setting A maternity section of a district hospital in South Africa. Methods The National Health Service (NHS) Sustainability Model formed the theoretical framework for the study. The Problem Resolving Action Research model was applied and the study was conducted in three cycles. Purposive sampling was used for the quantitative and qualitative aspects of data collection. Data was analysed accordingly. Results The findings indicated that the strategies formulated and implemented to address factors related to neonatal resuscitation (training, equipment and stock, staff shortages, staff attitude, neonatal transport and protocols) had probable sustainability and contributed towards a reduction in neonatal mortality in the setting. Conclusion These strategies had the probability of sustainability and could potentially improve neonatal outcomes and reduce neonatal mortality to contribute toward South Africa’s’ drive to attain the MDG4. PMID:27380840

  5. Neonatal Duodenal Obstruction: A 15-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rattan, Kamal Nain; Singh, Jasbir; Dalal, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital duodenal obstruction is one of the commonest causes of neonatal intestinal obstruction. We are presenting our 15-year experience by analyzing clinical spectrum and outcome in neonates with duodenal obstruction admitted at our center. Material and Methods: The hospital records of all neonates admitted with duodenal obstruction from June 2000 to June 2015 were reviewed. The patient records were analyzed for antenatal diagnosis, age, sex, clinical presentation, diagnosis, associated anomalies, surgical procedures performed; postoperative morbidity and mortality. We excluded from our study malrotation of gut associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia and abdominal wall defects. Results: A total of 81 patients were admitted, out of which 56 were males and 25 were females. Polyhydramnios was detected in 24 (30%) pregnancies. Average birth weight was 2.1±1.0Kg and average gestational age was 38 (SD±1) weeks with 17 (21%) preterm neonates. Presenting features were vomiting in 81(100%) which was bilious in 81% and non-bilious in 19%, epigastric fullness in 56 (69%) and dehydration in 18 (22%) and failure to thrive in 16 (19%). Most common cause of obstruction was duodenal atresia in 38 (46.9%), followed by malrotation of gut in 33 (40.7%), and annular pancreas in 4 cases. Depending upon site of location, infra-ampullary obstruction was the most common in 64 (79%), supra-ampullary in 9 (7.4%) and ampullary 8 neonates. Both duodenal atresia and malrotation of gut was present in 4 cases. X-ray abdomen was most commonly used investigation to confirm the diagnosis. All cases were managed surgically by open laparotomy. Eleven (13.5%) patients died due to sepsis and associated congenital anomalies. Conclusion: Congenital duodenal obstruction most commonly presents in early neonatal period with features of upper GIT obstruction like vomiting and epigastrium fullness as in our series. Early antenatal diagnosis and surgical interventions hold the key in

  6. Novel α-spectrin mutation in trans with α-spectrin causing severe neonatal jaundice from hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nussenzveig, Roberto H; Christensen, Robert D; Prchal, Josef T; Yaish, Hassan M; Agarwal, Archana M

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a neonate with severe jaundice but a negative family history. Spherocytes were present and suspected hereditary spherocytosis was confirmed by osmotic fragility and eosin-5-maleimide erythrocyte staining. We found he was a compound heterozygote for two pathogenic mutations in the gene encoding α-spectrin: a previously reported α(LEPRA) inherited from his asymptomatic mother, and a novel α-spectrin mutation in intron 45 +1 disrupting the consensus splice site, from his asymptomatic father. PMID:25277063

  7. Infantile cortical hyperostosis – a report of Saudi family

    PubMed Central

    ALBagshi, Muneer H; ALZoayed, Heji I

    2015-01-01

    A 2-weeks-old Saudi neonate was apparently well till the 10th day of life when a swelling of the right groin was noted accompanied by irritability and fever, without history of trauma. On examination: the girl was irritable and febrile, the mass was firm, ill defined, fixed and tender. The state of the underlying skin was normal. There was family history of 3 siblings with similar swellings in the neonatal period and one of them had recurrence of the condition till the age of 7 year. The radiological findings indicated diaphysis hyperostosis, sparring of the epiphysis and the benign course of the disease. With exclusion of syphilis, osteomyelitis and trauma, the likely diagnosis would be infantile cortical hyperostosis. Such diagnosis should not be overlooked when faced by bony swellings in neonates. PMID:27493423

  8. Mutations in the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Potter, Carol J.; Xiao, Rui; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Kang Ho; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Picarsic, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, Theodora A.; Zhang, Jing; He, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Knisely, A. S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Plon, Sharon E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Washington, Gabriel C.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Berquist, William E.; Kambham, Neeraja; Singh, Ravinder J.; Xia, Fan; Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring prompt diagnosis. Mutations in several different genes can cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, but known genes cannot account for all familial cases. Here we report four individuals from two unrelated families with neonatal cholestasis and mutations in NR1H4, which encodes the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a bile acid-activated nuclear hormone receptor that regulates bile acid metabolism. Clinical features of severe, persistent NR1H4-related cholestasis include neonatal onset with rapid progression to end-stage liver disease, vitamin K-independent coagulopathy, low-to-normal serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein and undetectable liver bile salt export pump (ABCB11) expression. Our findings demonstrate a pivotal function for FXR in bile acid homeostasis and liver protection. PMID:26888176

  9. FAMILY LYGISTORRHINIDAE.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira; Amorim, Dalton De Souza

    2016-01-01

    The Lygistorrhinidae are a family belonging to the suborder Bibionomorpha, with no previous record from Colombia. This paper refers for the first time to the occurrence of the family in the country, an undetermined species of the genus Lygistorrhina (Probolaeus) Williston. PMID:27395260

  10. Family Potyviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses potyvirus study group has revised the description of the family Potyviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 9th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of viral sp...

  11. Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on various aspects of mammal family life ranging from ways different species are born to how different mammals are raised. Learning activities include making butter from cream, creating birth announcements for mammals, and playing a password game on family life. (ML)

  12. Family Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This feature issue of IMPACT focuses on the empowerment of families with a member who has a developmental disability. It presents strategies and models for a collaborative, respectful approach to service provision, and presents the experiences of families in seeking support and assistance. Feature articles include "Two Generations of Disability: A…

  13. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  14. Tuberous sclerosis complex: neonatal deaths in three of four children of consanguineous, non-expressing parents.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, M; Carbonara, C; Magro, G; Migone, N; Grasso, S; Tinè, A; Pavone, L; Gomez, M R

    1997-03-01

    We describe here four sibs, born to consanguineous, healthy, asymptomatic parents. Three of these infants had a rapidly fatal course in the neonatal period; death was attributed to congestive heart failure with radiographic evidence of cardiomegaly in all of them. Necropsy was done in only one of them and showed the typical findings of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in the central nervous system (CNS), kidneys, heart, and liver. The fourth sib, currently 2 years old, also has typical signs of TSC, namely hypomelanotic skin macules and calcified subependymal nodules. Both parents and a living maternal grandmother had appropriate examination, which included skin inspection under Wood's lamp, dental examination, fundoscopy, echocardiography, abdominal and renal ultrasound, and head CT and MRI scans, and no signs of TSC were found in either parent or in the only living grandmother. By history alone there is no other relative with signs or symptoms suggestive of TSC. Linkage analysis and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) investigations on a variety of lesions obtained from postmortem and tissue or blood specimens from all available family members studied failed to identify a microdeletion in the chromosomal regions where TSC genes are located. It is very unusual that in a single TSC family there were three consecutive neonatal deaths, and very likely that all had cardiac rhabdomyomas. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of TSC families with more than one affected sib, unusually severe manifestations of the disease, and completely normal, consanguineous parents. PMID:9132502

  15. The calibration of a prototype occluded ear simulator designed for neonatal hearing assessment applications.

    PubMed

    Barham, Richard; Olsen, Erling S; Rodrigues, Dominique; Barrera-Figueroa, Salvador; Sadikoğlu, Enver; Karaböce, Baki

    2016-08-01

    An innovative family of ear simulators has been conceived for the calibration and traceability of audiometric equipment. Each device within the family has been designed for a particular key age group, covering neonates through to adults. The age-specific ear simulators are intended to improve the quality of hearing assessment measurements for all test subject age groups, and will be proposed as the next generation of standardised ear simulators for audiometric applications. The family of ear simulators shares a common design and modeling approach, and the first prototype devices for neonatal applications have been manufactured. The objectives of this study were to develop calibration methods, verify conformance to the design goals, demonstrate that the device is capable of being calibrated reliably, and show that its performance is ultimately suitable for international standardisation and eventual adoption into clinical practices. Four national measurement institutes took part in a round-robin calibration comparison and an analysis of the results showed that these objectives were achieved. PMID:27586713

  16. Perception and Expectation of Iran Neonatal Transport Expert Regard to Developing Neonatal Transport System in Iran: A Qualitative Research

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mohammad-Bager; Jannati, Ali; Gholipour, Kamal; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Iezadi, Shabnam; Mojahed, Farokh; Vahidi, Reza Gholi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study was aimed to reach expert's expectations of neonatal transport system for developing neonatal transport system in Iran. Materials and Methods: This is a qualitative study conducted by using focus group discussion (FGD) to present expert's perspectives and expectancy about neonatal transport system. Participants was selected from all experts and specialist about neonatal transport in Iran countryside. Finally 48 experts, participate in this study. To data collection 4 FGD were conducted, data were analyzed by content analyses. All subthemes were categorized in main themes according to conceptual relationship as an expert panels opinions. In order to comply with the ethical issues involved in the study was voluntary, also permission for the recording session were taken and confidentiality was also ensured. Result: According to FGD results, 11 themes and 90 subthemes were founded related to neonatal transport system, the main identified themes included: Aims, necessity and models of neonatal transport system, organizing the transport system, management and quality of instruments in the transport system, Neonatal transport system staff, Human resource management and issue related to human resources, conditions and requirements of neonatal transport system, facilitating factors in neonatal transport system, information management and communication system and weakness of neonatal transport system. Conclusion: Neonatal transport systems in different countries must adapted according to situation and component of each country have different strength and weakness and in implementing a system must attend to geographical conditions, financial ability and access to professionals, health system structure, facilities related to neonatal health care, antenatal services in regain, health care related, health care program about neonates and pregnant women and epidemiological status and mortality and morbidity in deferent locals and regains in countryside

  17. Cholestasis beyond the Neonatal and Infancy Periods.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Racha; Phen, Claudia; Karjoo, Sara; Wilsey, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Cholestasis results from impairment in the excretion of bile, which may be due to mechanical obstruction of bile flow or impairment of excretion of bile components into the bile canaliculus. When present, cholestasis warrants prompt diagnosis and treatment. The differential diagnosis of cholestasis beyond the neonatal period is broad and includes congenital and acquired etiologies. It is imperative that the clinician differentiates between intrahepatic and extrahepatic origin of cholestasis. Treatment may be supportive or curative and depends on the etiology. Recent literature shows that optimal nutritional and medical support also plays an integral role in the management of pediatric patients with chronic cholestasis. This review will provide a broad overview of the pathophysiology, diagnostic approach, and management of cholestasis beyond the neonatal and infancy periods. PMID:27066444

  18. An Immunological Perspective on Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kan, Bernard; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Lavoie, Pascal M

    2016-04-01

    Despite concerted international efforts, mortality from neonatal infections remains unacceptably high in some areas of the world, particularly for premature infants. Recent developments in flow cytometry and next-generation sequencing technologies have led to major discoveries over the past few years, providing a more integrated understanding of the developing human immune system in the context of its microbial environment. We review these recent findings, focusing on how in human newborns incomplete maturation of the immune system before a full term of gestation impacts on their vulnerability to infection. We also discuss some of the clinical implications of this research in guiding the design of more-accurate age-adapted diagnostic and preventive strategies for neonatal sepsis. PMID:26993220

  19. An interdisciplinary fetal/neonatal neurology program.

    PubMed

    Scher, Mark S

    2012-04-01

    A fetal/neonatal neurology program should encompass interdisciplinary service, educational and research objectives, merging curricula concerning maternal, placental, fetal and neonatal contributions to brain health and disease. This approach is anchored by research in early life programming that demonstrates that prenatal and postnatal factors influence long-term neurologic health. This concept also supports the design of neuroprotective interventions during critical periods of brain development when brain circuitries more optimally adapt to maturational challenges. Preventive, rescue and repair protocols will transform pediatric medical practices, to promote improved childhood outcomes. Inclusion of life-course science and research will identify medical and socioeconomic factors that favorably or adversely affect quality of life into adulthood. Greater awareness of the convergence of developmental origins of brain health and disease and developmental aging theories will influence public health policies, to encourage financial support for programs that will improve the quality of life for the child and adult. PMID:22290854

  20. Intestinal malrotation presenting outside the neonatal period.

    PubMed Central

    Yanez, R; Spitz, L

    1986-01-01

    We report 37 patients ranging in age from 1 month to 14 years treated for intestinal malrotation during a five year period. The main presenting features consisted of intermittent attacks of vomiting (15 patients), failure to thrive (seven), and recurrent colicky abdominal pain (seven). The diagnosis was confirmed by gastrointestinal contrast studies in all but three patients. A standard Ladd's procedure comprised the definitive surgical treatment. We emphasise the poor nutritional state at the time of operation (49% of the cases were on or below the third centile). In contrast with neonatal presentation, volvulus of the midgut occurred in only five patients (14%) compared with 68% in neonates with malrotation. There were two deaths in the series. Ninety four per cent of the remaining patients responded favourably to the operative procedure. Malrotation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a wide variety of symptoms and should be treated promptly once the diagnosis has been confirmed. PMID:3740908