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Sample records for neonatal hypoglycemia prevalence

  1. Update on Neonatal Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Rozance, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Neonatal hypoglycemia is one of the most common biochemical abnormalities encountered in the newborn. However, controversy remains surrounding its definition and management especially in asymptomatic patients. Recent Findings New information has been published that describes the incidence and timing of low glucose concentrations in the groups most at risk for asymptomatic neonatal hypoglycemia. Furthermore, one large prospective study failed to find an association between repetitive low glucose concentrations and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants. But hypoglycemia due to hyperinsulinism, especially genetic causes, continued to be associated with brain injury. New advances were made in the diagnosis and management of hyperinsulinism, including acquired hyperinsulinism in small for gestational age infants and others. Continuous glucose monitoring remains an attractive strategy for future research in this area. Summary The fundamental question of how best to manage asymptomatic newborns with low glucose concentrations remains unanswered. Balancing the risks of over treating newborns with low glucose concentrations who are undergoing a normal transition following birth against the risks of under treating those in whom low glucose concentrations are pathological, dangerous, and/or a harbinger of serious metabolic disease remains a challenge. PMID:24275620

  2. Neonate with hypoglycemia for pancreatectomy: Anesthetic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Alka; Kohli, Jasvinder Kaur; Senapati, Nihar Nalini; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) is rare and an important cause of hypoglycemia in neonates. It can lead to brain damage or death secondary to severe hypoglycemia. We present the anesthetic management in a diagnosed case of PHHI in an 8-day-old male neonate for total pancreatectomy. PMID:26957713

  3. Implementing a Protocol Using Glucose Gel to Treat Neonatal Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Catherine; Fagan, Elyse; Chaharbakhshi, Edwin; Zamfirova, Ina; Flicker, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal hypoglycemia is a leading cause of admission of neonates to the NICU. Typical treatment for neonatal hypoglycemia includes supplementation with formula or, in some cases, intravenous glucose administration. These treatments, though effective at treating hypoglycemia, interrupt exclusive breastfeeding and interfere with mother-infant bonding. Our institution developed a treatment algorithm for newborns at risk for neonatal hypoglycemia. The new algorithm called for the oral administration of 40% glucose gel. This intervention resulted in a 73% decreasein admission rates to the NICU for hypoglycemia, and it supported exclusive breastfeeding, skin-to-skin contact, and mother-infant bonding. PMID:26902441

  4. New approaches to management of neonatal hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Rozance, Paul J; Hay, William W

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a very common problem after birth, consensus on how to manage low glucose concentrations in the first 48 h of life has been difficult to establish and remains a debated issue. One of the reasons for this is that few studies have provided the type of data needed to establish a definitive approach agreed upon by all. However, some recent publications have provided much needed primary data to inform this debate. These publications have focused on aspects of managing low blood glucose concentrations in the patients most at-risk for asymptomatic hypoglycemia-those born late-preterm, large for gestational age, small for gestational age, or growth restricted, and those born following a pregnancy complicated by diabetes mellitus. The goal of this review is to discuss specific aspects of this new research. First, we focus on promising new data testing the role of buccal dextrose gel in the management of asymptomatic neonatal hypoglycemia. Second, we highlight some of the clinical implications of a large, prospective study documenting the association of specific glycemic patterns with neurodevelopmental outcomes at two years of age. PMID:27168942

  5. Hypoglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose, or blood sugar. Your body needs glucose to have enough energy. After ... blood sugar. If it doesn't, you have hypoglycemia, and your blood sugar can be dangerously low. ...

  6. Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Morales, Javier; Schneider, Doron

    2014-10-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common, potentially avoidable consequence of diabetes treatment and is a major barrier to initiating or intensifying antihyperglycemic therapy in efforts to achieve better glycemic control. Therapy regimen and a history of hypoglycemia are the most important predictors of future events. Other risk factors include renal insufficiency, older age, and history of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure. Reported rates of hypoglycemia vary considerably among studies because of differences in study design, definitions used, and population included, among other factors. Although occurring more frequently in type 1 diabetes, hypoglycemia also is clinically important in type 2 diabetes. Symptoms experienced by patients vary among individuals, and many events remain undiagnosed. The incidence of severe events is unevenly distributed, with only a small proportion (∼ 5%) of individuals accounting for >50% of events. Consequently, clinicians must be conscientious in obtaining thorough patient histories, because an accurate picture of the frequency and severity of hypoglycemic events is essential for optimal diabetes management. Severe hypoglycemia in particular is associated with an increased risk of mortality, impairments in cognitive function, and adverse effects on patients' quality of life. Economically, hypoglycemia burdens the healthcare system and adversely affects workplace productivity, particularly after a nocturnal event. Ongoing healthcare reform efforts will result in even more emphasis on reducing this side effect of diabetes treatment. Therefore, improving patients' self-management skills and selecting or modifying therapy to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia will increase in importance for clinicians and patients alike. PMID:25282009

  7. Hypoglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... kinds of tumors, and certain conditions occurring in infancy and childhood. Medications. Medications, including some used to ... measures to remove the tumor. Conditions occurring in infancy and childhood. Children rarely develop hypoglycemia. If they ...

  8. Re-evaluating "transitional neonatal hypoglycemia": mechanism and implications for management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Committee of the Pediatric Endocrine Society was recently formed to develop guidelines for evaluation and management of hypoglycemia in neonates, infants, and children. To aid in formulating recommendations for neonates, in this review, we analyzed available data on the brief period of hypoglycemi...

  9. EARS2 mutations cause fatal neonatal lactic acidosis, recurrent hypoglycemia and agenesis of corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Danhauser, Katharina; Haack, Tobias B; Alhaddad, Bader; Melcher, Marlen; Seibt, Annette; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Klee, Dirk; Mayatepek, Ertan; Prokisch, Holger; Distelmaier, Felix

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNA synthetases are essential for organelle protein synthesis. Genetic defects affecting the function of these enzymes may cause pediatric mitochondrial disease. Here, we report on a child with fatal neonatal lactic acidosis and recurrent hypoglycemia caused by mutations in EARS2, encoding mitochondrial glutamyl-tRNA synthetase 2. Brain ultrasound revealed agenesis of corpus callosum. Studies on patient-derived skin fibroblasts showed severely decreased EARS2 protein levels, elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and altered mitochondrial morphology. Our report further illustrates the clinical spectrum of the severe neonatal-onset form of EARS2 mutations. Moreover, in this case the live-cell parameters appeared to be more sensitive to mitochondrial dysfunction compared to standard diagnostics, which indicates the potential relevance of fibroblast studies in children with mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26780086

  10. Culture of islets of Langerhans from an infant with intractable neonatal hypoglycemia: cytochemical and radioimmunological studies.

    PubMed

    Ratovo, G; Gespach, C; Hollande, E; Creach, Y; Palevody, C; Rochiccioli, P

    1989-01-01

    Extralobular islet of Langerhans cells were isolated from the pancreas of an infant with intractable neonatal hypoglycemia (nesidioblastosis) by digestion with a mixture of trypsin and collagenase, and subsequent purification on a gradient of fetal calf serum. These islet cells cultured in Eagle's medium containing 20% fetal calf serum formed confluent endocrine cell monolayers within 15 days. These endocrine cells were studied immunocytochemically, and their secretion products were assayed by radioimmunological methods. The large numbers of beta, alpha and delta cells present in the islets before explanation remained functional in the cultures for 30 days. The beta cells secreted large amounts of insulin throughout this period, and secretion was stimulated by raising the glucose concentration in the medium from 5.6 to 16.8 mM. Initially there was little secretion of glucagon, but this increased during the subsequent 10 days in culture. It was not inhibited when the glucose concentration was raised from 5.6 to 16.8 mM. Somastostatin secretion remained stable throughout the period of culture, but tended to rise when the glucose concentration was increased. These results show that the culture of pancreatic cells from infants with nesidioblastosis provides an interesting in vitro system for studying the biological and biochemical characteristics of endocrine cells in the human pancreas. PMID:2698367

  11. Prevalence of porcine neonatal isosporosis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sayd, S M; Kawazoe, U

    1996-12-31

    The prevalence of Isospora suis and clinical signs of isosporosis were observed in 33 swine farms from 20 sites in the southeastern state of São Paulo, Brazil. The study was performed by collecting 177 faecal samples from nursing and weaned piglets. A history of clinical neonatal isosporosis, as well as the type of farrowing and nursery houses and the pig management in the farms were correlated to the prevalence of I. suis oocysts. Six faecal samples were collected in each of the farms (two from groups of 10- to 19-day-old piglets, two from groups of 20- to 29-day-old and another two from groups of 30- to 50-day-old pigs). Faecal consistency was also registered at the time of their collection. Chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis. Oocysts were more prevalent in farms with a history of neonatal isosporosis than in those without previous cases. Faecal consistency was not related to oocyst elimination. In farms with a history of clinical isosporosis, faecal samples from groups of 10- to 19-day-old piglets showed a higher prevalence of oocysts than the groups of other ages studied. There was no difference in the prevalence of oocysts between nursing and weaned piglets. Oocysts were more prevalent in faecal samples collected from dirty-cemented floors than from self-cleaning floors in the farrowing houses. Types of floor and pig management in nursery houses were not associated with the presence of oocysts in weaned pigs. PMID:9017865

  12. Real-Time Continuous Glucose Monitoring Reduces the Duration of Hypoglycemia Episodes: A Randomized Trial in Very Low Birth Weight Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Uettwiller, Florence; Chemin, Aude; Bonnemaison, Elisabeth; Favrais, Géraldine; Saliba, Elie; Labarthe, François

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Hypoglycemia is frequent in very low birth weight (VLBW) neonates and compromises their neurological outcome. The aim of this study was to compare real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (RT-CGMS) to standard methods by intermittent capillary blood glucose testing in detecting and managing hypoglycemia. Study design Forty-eight VLBW neonates were enrolled in this prospective study. During their 3 first days of life, their glucose level was monitored either by RT-CGMS (CGM-group), or by intermittent capillary glucose testing (IGM-group) associated with a blind-CGMS to detect retrospectively missed hypoglycemia. Outcomes were the number and duration of hypoglycemic (≤50mg/dl) episodes per patient detected by CGMS. Results Forty-three monitorings were analyzed (IGM n = 21, CGM n = 22), with a median recording time of 72 hours. In the IGM group, blind-CGMS revealed a significantly higher number of hypoglycemia episodes than capillary blood glucose testing (1.2±0.4 vs 0.4±0.2 episode/patient, p<0.01). In the CGM-group, the use of RT-CGMS made it possible (i) to detect the same number of hypoglycemia episodes as blind-CGMS (1.2±0.4 episode/patient), (ii) to adapt the glucose supply in neonates with hypoglycemia (increased supply during days 1 and 2), and (iii) to significantly reduce the duration of hypoglycemia episodes per patient (CGM 44[10–140] min versus IGM 95[15–520] min, p<0.05). Furthermore, it reduced the number of blood samples (CGM 16.9±1.0 vs IGM 21.9±1.0 blood sample/patient, p<0.001). Conclusion RT-CGMS played a beneficial role in managing hypoglycemia in VLBW neonates by adjusting the carbohydrate supply to the individual needs and by reducing the duration of hypoglycemia episodes. The clinical significance of the biological differences observed in our study need to be explored. PMID:25590334

  13. Prevalence of neonatal hypothyroidism in Kangra Valley, Himachal Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Kapil, U; Jain, V; Kabra, M; Pandey, R M; Sareen, N; Khenduja, P

    2014-06-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) is an endemic health problem in Kangra District, Himachal Pradesh (HP). ID in pregnant mothers leads to neonatal hypothyroidism (NH), mental retardation, deaf mutism, squint, dwarfism, spastic dysplasia, neurological defects and congenital anomalies. NH can be assessed by estimating the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in cord blood samples. The present study was conducted with an objective to assess the prevalence of NH in district Kangra, HP. In district Kangra, all the hospitals providing obstetric services were enlisted. Three hospitals conducting more than 100 deliveries per year were selected randomly. A total of 613 umbilical cord blood samples of neonates were collected on filter papers and analyzed for TSH. TSH was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Neonates with TSH levels ⩾20 mIU/l were recalled for reassessment of TSH for confirmation of NH. Prevalence of NH was found to be 4.4%. This finding suggests the need for the implementation of a neonatal screening program for early detection of children with ID. PMID:24755928

  14. Recommendations from the Pediatric Endocrine Society for evaluation and management of persistent hypoglycemia in neonates, infants, and children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the first 24-48 hours of life, as normal neonates transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life, their plasma glucose (PG) concentrations are typically lower than later in life. Published guidelines for screening at-risk newborns and managing low PG concentrations in neonates focus on the...

  15. Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low ... actions can also help prevent hypoglycemia: Check blood glucose levels Knowing your blood glucose level can help ...

  16. Hypoglycemia, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Wadwa, R Paul

    2012-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in people with diabetes, and the risk of CVD for adults with diabetes is at least two to four times the risk in adults without diabetes. Complications of diabetes, including not only CVD but also microvascular diseases such as retinopathy and nephropathy, are a major health and financial burden. Diabetes is a disease of glucose intolerance, and so much of the research on complications has focused on the role of hyperglycemia. Clinical trials have clearly demonstrated the role of hyperglycemia in microvascular complications of diabetes, but there appears to be less evidence for as strong of a relationship between hyperglycemia and CVD in people with diabetes. Hypoglycemia has become a more pressing health concern as intensive glycemic control has become the standard of care in diabetes. Clinical trials of intensive glucose lowering in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes populations has resulted in significantly increased hypoglycemia, with no decrease in CVD during the trial period, although several studies have shown a reduction in CVD with extended follow-up. There is evidence that hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetes, and this is one potential explanation for the lack of CVD prevention in trials of intensive glycemic control. Hypoglycemia causes a cascade of physiologic effects and may induce oxidative stress and cardiac arrhythmias, contribute to sudden cardiac death, and cause ischemic cerebral damage, presenting several potential mechanisms through which acute and chronic episodes of hypoglycemia may increase CVD risk. In this review, we examine the risk factors and prevalence of hypoglycemia in diabetes, review the evidence for an association of both acute and chronic hypoglycemia with CVD in adults with diabetes, and discuss potential mechanisms through which hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk. PMID:22650225

  17. Hypoglycemia, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wadwa, R. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in people with diabetes, and the risk of CVD for adults with diabetes is at least two to four times the risk in adults without diabetes. Complications of diabetes, including not only CVD but also microvascular diseases such as retinopathy and nephropathy, are a major health and financial burden. Diabetes is a disease of glucose intolerance, and so much of the research on complications has focused on the role of hyperglycemia. Clinical trials have clearly demonstrated the role of hyperglycemia in microvascular complications of diabetes, but there appears to be less evidence for as strong of a relationship between hyperglycemia and CVD in people with diabetes. Hypoglycemia has become a more pressing health concern as intensive glycemic control has become the standard of care in diabetes. Clinical trials of intensive glucose lowering in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes populations has resulted in significantly increased hypoglycemia, with no decrease in CVD during the trial period, although several studies have shown a reduction in CVD with extended follow-up. There is evidence that hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetes, and this is one potential explanation for the lack of CVD prevention in trials of intensive glycemic control. Hypoglycemia causes a cascade of physiologic effects and may induce oxidative stress and cardiac arrhythmias, contribute to sudden cardiac death, and cause ischemic cerebral damage, presenting several potential mechanisms through which acute and chronic episodes of hypoglycemia may increase CVD risk. In this review, we examine the risk factors and prevalence of hypoglycemia in diabetes, review the evidence for an association of both acute and chronic hypoglycemia with CVD in adults with diabetes, and discuss potential mechanisms through which hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk. PMID:22650225

  18. Prevalence and management of natal/neonatal teeth in cleft lip and palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, R. Burcu Nur; Cakan, Derya Germec; Mesgarzadeh, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and distribution of natal/neonatal teeth in infants with cleft lip and palate (CLP) according to gender, involving jaw and side and to show the management of some cases. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out on medical history and photographic records of 69 infants with CLP, who were treated at the CLP clinic of Yeditepe University between years 2014–2015. The presence of neonatal teeth was determined, and if present the gender, type of cleft, and position were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed. Results: Neonatal teeth were observed in 7% of the study group. No significant differences were found between cleft types and gender (P > 0.05). The prevalence of neonatal teeth in bilateral, unilateral and isolated cleft type was 16.5%, 6.5%, and none, respectively. All neonatal teeth were located in the maxilla and on the cleft-side (100%). Conclusion: The presence of natal/neonatal teeth in infants with CLP was not rare. In all of these cases the teeth were located adjacent to the cleft region. In isolated palatal cleft, where the alveolar region including the teeth buds are away from the cleft, no neonatal teeth were observed. It may be concluded that neonatal teeth in infants with CLP are frequently present and located inside the borders of the presurgical orthopedic treatment (POT) plate. Therefore, if possible, immediate extraction of the neonatal teeth is advised or if not possible because of systemic health reasons, modifications of the plate are required. PMID:27011740

  19. Update on strategies limiting iatrogenic hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventura, Aldo; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Dallegri, Franco

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing all over the world. Targeting good glycemic control is fundamental to avoid the complications of diabetes linked to hyperglycemia. This narrative review is based on material searched for and obtained via PubMed up to April 2015. The search terms we used were: ‘hypoglycemia, diabetes, complications’ in combination with ‘iatrogenic, treatment, symptoms.’ Serious complications might occur from an inappropriate treatment of hyperglycemia. The most frequent complication is iatrogenic hypoglycemia that is often associated with autonomic and neuroglycopenic symptoms. Furthermore, hypoglycemia causes acute cardiovascular effects, which may explain some of the typical symptoms: ischemia, QT prolongation, and arrhythmia. With regards to the latter, the night represents a dangerous period because of the major increase in arrhythmias and the prolonged period of hypoglycemia; indeed, sleep has been shown to blunt the sympatho-adrenal response to hypoglycemia. Two main strategies have been implemented to reduce these effects: monitoring blood glucose values and individualized HbA1c goals. Several drugs for the treatment of T2DM are currently available and different combinations have been recommended to achieve individualized glycemic targets, considering age, comorbidities, disease duration, and life expectancy. In conclusion, according to international guidelines, hypoglycemia-avoiding therapy must reach an individualized glycemic goal, which is the lowest HbA1c not causing severe hypoglycemia and preserving awareness of hypoglycemia. PMID:26099256

  20. Drug-induced hypoglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000310.htm Drug-induced hypoglycemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Drug-induced hypoglycemia is low blood sugar that results from medication. ...

  1. Prevalence of microcytosis in neonates: a cross-sectional study in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Khalesi, Nasrin; Khosravi, Nastaran; Rezaee, Mohammad Reza; Amini, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Background: Identification of α thalassemia (α thal) a common cause of microcytosis during neonatal periods is an important step prevent unnecessary interventions. Thus, low the mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) may consider as α-thalassemia key detection points. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of microcytosis among neonates who born in Tehran, Iran. Methods: Cord blood samples were collected from 1001 newborns after birth in labor room and their red blood cell parameters were investigated. Results: MCV was 114.2 fl (95% CI: 113.5-114.9) and twenty three neonates (2.3%) had MCV less than 94 fL that classified as microcytosis and 4 (0.40%) had both low MCH and MCV. Conclusion: Low MCV especially in normal Hb newborns may hints for α thal detection. PMID:25679000

  2. Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

  3. Trends in Prevalence and Characteristics of Post-Neonatal Cerebral Palsy Cases: A European Registry-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germany, Laurence; Ehlinger, Virginie; Klapouszczak, Dana; Delobel, Malika; Hollody, Katalin; Sellier, Elodie; De La Cruz, Javier; Alberge, Corine; Genolini, Christophe; Arnaud, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The present paper aims to analyze trends over time in prevalence of cerebral palsy of post-neonatal origin, to investigate whether changes are similar according to severity and to describe the disability profile by etiology. Post-neonatal cases, birth years 1976 to 1998, were identified from the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe…

  4. Neuroendocrine Responses to Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Tesfaye, Nolawit; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    The counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia is a complex and well-coordinated process. As blood glucose concentration declines, peripheral and central glucose sensors relay this information to central integrative centers to coordinate neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses and avert the progression of hypoglycemia. Diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, can perturb these counterregulatory responses. Moreover, defective counterregulation in the setting of diabetes can progress to hypoglycemia unawareness. While the mechanisms that underlie the development of hypoglycemia unawareness are not completely known, possible causes include altered sensing of hypoglycemia by the brain and/or impaired coordination of responses to hypoglycemia. Further study is needed to better understand the intricacies of the counterregulatory response and the mechanisms contributing to the development of hypoglycemia unawareness. PMID:21039590

  5. [Prevalence of hemoglobin S in the State of Paraná, Brazil, based on neonatal screening].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Alexandra M; Pianovski, Mara Albonei D; Zanis Neto, José; Lichtvan, Leniza C L; Chautard-Freire-Maia, Eleidi A; Domingos, Mouseline T; Wittig, Ehrenfried O

    2008-05-01

    The Brazilian Ministry of Health created the National Neonatal Screening Program under ruling no. 822/2001, including neonatal screening for hemoglobinopathies. In the State of Paraná, neonatal screening is conducted by the Ecumenical Foundation for the Protection of the Handicapped. The prevalence rates were determined for homozygous and heterozygous hemoglobin S and Sbeta-thalassemia. Blood samples drawn on filter paper were examined by isoelectric focusing (IEF) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). From January 2002 to December 2004, 548,810 newborns were screened, with the detection of 21 with FS, two FSA/FS, and four FSA. After confirmatory tests at six months of age, 12 were defined as sickle-cell anemia, or a prevalence of 2.2:100,000 newborns; Sbeta-thalassemia was confirmed in 15 (2.7:100,000 newborns); and 8,321 newborns were diagnosed as heterozygous HbS (1,500:100,000 newborns). HbS prevalence in Paraná (in southern Brazil) is lower than in the Central-West, North, and Northeast of the country. Ethnic origin of the population, fetal deaths, and non-random procreation may contribute to the relatively low number of homozygous individuals in the State. Sbeta-thalassemia interaction suggests the presence of Euro-Mediterranean peoples in this population's miscegenation. PMID:18461228

  6. HYPOGLYCEMIA INDUCED BY ANTIDIABETIC SULFONYLUREAS.

    PubMed

    Confederat, Luminiţa; Constantin, Sandra; Lupaşcu, Florentina; Pânzariu, Andreea; Hăncianu, Monica; Profire, Lenuţa

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major health problem due to its increasing prevalence and life-threatening complications. Antidiabetic sulfonylureas represent the first-line drugs in type 2 diabetes even though the most common associated risk is pharmacologically-induced hypoglycemia. In the development of this side effect are involved several factors including the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of the drug, patient age and behavior, hepatic or renal dysfunctions, or other drugs associated with a high risk of interactions. If all these are controlled, the risk-benefit balance can be equal to other oral antidiabetic drugs. PMID:26204670

  7. Diabetes, Dementia and Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Meneilly, Graydon S; Tessier, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    We are experiencing an epidemic of both diabetes and dementia among older adults in this country. The risk for dementia appears to be increased in patients with diabetes, and patients with dementia and diabetes appear to be at greater risk for severe hypoglycemia. In addition, there may be an increased risk for developing dementia by older patients with diabetes who have had episodes of severe hypoglycemia, although this issue is controversial. In this article, we review the factors that contribute to the increased risk for dementia in older adults with diabetes and outline the complex relationships between hypoglycemia and dementia. PMID:26778684

  8. High prevalence of early language delay exists among toddlers with neonatal brachial plexus palsy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kate Wan-Chu; Yang, Lynda J-S.; Driver, Lynn; Nelson, Virginia S.

    2016-01-01

    AIM Association of language impairment with neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) has not been reported in the literature. The current treatment paradigm for NBPP focuses on upper extremity motor recovery with little formal assessment of other aspects of development, such as language. We performed a cross-sectional pilot study to investigate early language delay prevalence in toddlers with NBPP and potential NBPP-related factors involved. METHOD Twenty toddlers with NBPP were consecutively recruited (12 males, 8 females; mean age 30 mos). Preschool Language Scale Score (4th edition), demographics, and socioeconomic status were collected. NBPP-related factors such as palsy side, treatment type, Narakas grade, muscle MRC score, and Raimondi hand score were reported. Student t test, chi-square, or Fisher exact test were applied. Statistical significance level was established at p<0.05. RESULTS Of study participants, 30% were diagnosed with language delay, while the prevalence of language delay in the population with normal development in this age range was approximately 5-15%. INTERPRETATION We observed high language delay prevalence among toddlers with NBPP. Although our subject sample is small, our findings warrant further study of this phenomenon. Early identification and timely intervention based on type of language impairment may be critical for improving communication outcome in this population. PMID:25160543

  9. The Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus between the Neonates and Their Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Skoczyński, Mariusz; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna; Kwaśniewska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection on pregnancy is a major problem of medicine. The transmission of the virus from mother to fetus is a process yet unresolved. The immune response and changed hormonal status of pregnant women might facilitate infection. A research on the prevalence of HPV infection was conducted at the Clinic of Obstetrics, Medical University of Lublin (Poland). The studied group included 152 randomly selected women. The material was tested for the presence of HPV DNA by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The aim of the research was to assess the relation between HPV infections detected in the buccal smears of the neonates and the incidence of such infections in the cervical/buccal smears of their mothers. In the group of 152 infants HPV was found in 16 (10.53%). Among the cervical/buccal smears, HPV was isolated, respectively, in 24 (15.79%) and in 19 (12.5%) pregnant women. Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of HPV swabs from the newborns and the cervical/buccal smears of their mothers were found (p < 0.001). The identification of mothers in whose buccal smears HPV was detected can help develop a group of children who run a relatively significant risk of being infected. PMID:26713313

  10. Symptoms of hypoglycemia, thresholds for their occurrence, and hypoglycemia unawareness.

    PubMed

    Cryer, P E

    1999-09-01

    Ultimately traceable to neural glucose deprivation, symptoms of hypoglycemia include neurogenic (autonomic) and neuroglycopenic symptoms. Neurogenic symptoms (tremulousness, palpitations, anxiety, sweating, hunger, paresthesias) are the results of the perception of physiologic changes caused by the autonomic nervous system's response to hypoglycemia. Neuroglycopenic symptoms (confusion, sensation of warmth, weakness or fatigue, severe cognitive failure, seizure, coma) are the results of brain glucose deprivation itself. Glycemic thresholds for symptoms of hypoglycemia shift to lower plasma glucose concentrations following recent episodes of hypoglycemia, leading to the syndrome of hypoglycemia unawareness--loss of the warning symptoms of developing hypoglycemia. Thus, patients with recurrent hypoglycemia (e.g., those with tightly controlled diabetes or with an insulinoma) often tolerate abnormally low plasma glucose concentrations without symptoms. PMID:10500927

  11. Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia – The Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nessa, Azizun; Rahman, Sofia A.; Hussain, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Under normal physiological conditions, pancreatic β-cells secrete insulin to maintain fasting blood glucose levels in the range 3.5–5.5 mmol/L. In hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (HH), this precise regulation of insulin secretion is perturbed so that insulin continues to be secreted in the presence of hypoglycemia. HH may be due to genetic causes (congenital) or secondary to certain risk factors. The molecular mechanisms leading to HH involve defects in the key genes regulating insulin secretion from the β-cells. At this moment, in time genetic abnormalities in nine genes (ABCC8, KCNJ11, GCK, SCHAD, GLUD1, SLC16A1, HNF1A, HNF4A, and UCP2) have been described that lead to the congenital forms of HH. Perinatal stress, intrauterine growth retardation, maternal diabetes mellitus, and a large number of developmental syndromes are also associated with HH in the neonatal period. In older children and adult’s insulinoma, non-insulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia syndrome and post bariatric surgery are recognized causes of HH. This review article will focus mainly on describing the molecular mechanisms that lead to unregulated insulin secretion. PMID:27065949

  12. [Influence of neonatal and maternal factors on the prevalence of vernix caseosa].

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, B; Labandeira, J; León-Muiños, E; Romarís, R; Ramírez-Santos, A; González-Vilas, D; Fernández-Prieto, R; Toribio, J

    2011-11-01

    At birth, vernix caseosa can cover the whole body surface or accumulate only on the back and in the skin folds. Interest in its composition and function and its possible applications in adults has increased in recent years. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of vernix caseosa in newborn infants in the health care area of Ferrol, Spain, and to assess its relationship with neonatal and maternal factors. We performed a prospective study of 1000 newborns seen within the first 3 days of life in our hospital. Vernix caseosa was observed in 42.9% of cases. The clinical profile associated with the presence of vernix caseosa was the following: healthy newborn girl with a high birth weight, born at term by normal vaginal delivery to a multiparous mother who had received medication and dietary supplements during pregnancy. The absence of vernix caseosa was associated with the presence of physiological scaling of the newborn and erythema toxicum neonatorum. PMID:21481821

  13. Noninvasive biosensor for hypoglycemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Sarukesi, Karunakaran

    2003-01-01

    Hypoglycemia-abnormal decrease in blood sugar- is a major obstacle in the management of diabetes and prevention of long-term complications, and it may impose serious effects on the brain, including impairment of memory and other cognitive functions. This is especially a concern in early childhood years when the nervous system is still developing. Hypoglycemic unawareness (in which the body"s normal ability to signal low blood sugar doesn"t work and an oncoming low blood sugar episode proceeds undetected) is a particularly frightening problem for many people with diabetes. Researchers have now uncovered evidence that repeated bouts of insulin-induced hypoglycemia can harm the brain over time, causing confusion, abnormal behavior, loss of consciousness, and seizures. Extreme cases have resulted in coma and death. In this paper, a non-invasive biosensor in a wrist watch along with a wireless data downloading system is proposed.

  14. The prevalence and risk factors of retinopathy of prematurity among preterm babies admitted to Soba Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Omer, Ilham M; Hassan, Hafsa A

    2014-01-01

    This is a prospective hospital based study conducted in Soba University Hospital (SUH), Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) between January 2012 and January 2013, to determine the prevalence and risk factors of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) among preterm babies admitted to Soba NICU and to assess the outcome of those babies. Ninety-two neonates with gestational age less than 34 weeks at birth were included in the study. Thirty-three of them were males and 59 were females. All of them were admitted to the NICU due to prematurity. Data was collected in a structured questionnaire. Thirty-four infants (37%) developed ROP in one or both eyes; 12 (35.3%) of them developed stage 3 and underwent laser therapy, 2 of them had aggressive posterior form, which was treated with Evastin injection. Seven (20.3%) neonates diagnosed as stage 2, and 13 (37.7%) had stage 1. Statistically, there were significant relationships between ROP and gestational age, birth weight (BW), oxygen therapy, sepsis, and blood transfusion (p=0.000). No significant relationship was found between the occurrence of ROP and sex of the baby, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), hyperbilirubineamia, intraventricular haemorrage (IVH) and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), p >0.000 in all of them. The prevalence of ROP in this study was 37%. Low BW, low gestational age, oxygen therapy, and blood transfusion were all significant risk factors for ROP. ROP should be highlighted in Sudan, and screening program should be recommended for all premature babies.

  15. Prevalence of rotavirus (GARV) and coronavirus (BCoV) associated with neonatal diarrhea in calves in western Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, Selles Sidi Mohammed; Mokhtaria, Kouidri; Tahar, Belhamiti Belkacem; Amar, Ait Amrane; Redha, Benia Ahmed; Yuva, Bellik; Mohamed, Hammoudi Si; Abdellatif, Niar; Laid, Boukrâa

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the prevalence of bovine group A rotavirus (GARV) and bovine coronavirus (BCoV) in diarrheic feces from calves and the sensitive's parameters such as age group and sex. Methods Feces samples from 82 diarrheic dairy calves from farms around Tiaret (Western Algeria) were collected. These samples were tested by ELISA assay. Results The results showed that the prevalence of rotavirus and coronavirus infection are 14.63% (12.2% alone and 2.43% associated with bovine coronavirus) and 20.73% (18.3% alone and 2.43% associated with GARV), respectively. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that the both BCoV and GARV are involved in the neonatal calves' diarrhea, where the frequency of BCoV is clearly higher than that of GARV. PMID:25183104

  16. Nationwide Surveillance Study of Clostridium difficile in Australian Neonatal Pigs Shows High Prevalence and Heterogeneity of PCR Ribotypes

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Daniel R.; Squire, Michele M.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important enteric pathogen of humans and the cause of diarrhea and enteritis in neonatal pigs. Outside Australia, prevalence in piglets can be up to 73%, with a single PCR ribotype (RT), 078, predominating. We investigated the prevalence and genotype of C. difficile in Australian pig herds. Rectal swabs (n = 229) were collected from piglets aged <7 days from 21 farms across Australia. Selective culture for C. difficile was performed and isolates characterized by PCR for toxin genes and PCR ribotyping. C. difficile was isolated from 52% of samples by direct culture on chromogenic agar and 67% by enrichment culture (P = 0.001). No association between C. difficile recovery or genotype and diarrheic status of either farm or piglets was found. The majority (87%; 130/154) of isolates were toxigenic. Typing revealed 23 different RTs, several of which are known to cause disease in humans, including RT014, which was isolated most commonly (23%; 36/154). RT078 was not detected. This study shows that colonization of Australian neonatal piglets with C. difficile is widespread in the herds sampled. PMID:25326297

  17. Review of Hypoglycemia in the Older Adult: Clinical Implications and Management.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Mousumi; Bhatia, Ashmeet; Munshi, Medha

    2016-02-01

    The aging of the population is a worldwide phenomenon. The prevalence of diabetes rises with increasing age, so the personal and financial costs of diabetes in the aging population have become significant burdens. In 2012, 104 billion (59%) of the estimated $176 billion in United States healthcare expenditures attributable to diabetes were utilized by patients older than 65 years of age [American Diabetes Association (1)]. With improvement in diabetes management and better glycemic control in the general population, there is an increase in the prevalence of hypoglycemia, which is the complication of the treatment of diabetes. Older adults with diabetes have a higher risk for hypoglycemia due to altered adaptive physiologic responses to low glucose levels. These patients also have comorbidities, such as cognitive and functional loss, that interfere with prompt identification and/or appropriate treatment of hypoglycemia. Older adults who suffer from hypoglycemia also have increased risk for falls, fall-related fractures, seizures and comas and exacerbation of chronic conditions, such as cognitive dysfunction and cardiac events. Thus, hypoglycemia in the older adult must be proactively avoided to decrease significant morbidity and mortality. Education of the patients and caregivers is important in prevention and treatment of hypoglycemia. In this article, we discuss the important aspects and unique challenges pertaining to hypoglycemia in older population. We also highlight the risks, consequences and prevention and management strategies for hypoglycemia that can be used by healthcare providers caring for older populations. PMID:26752195

  18. Paternal uniparental disomy 11p15.5 in the pancreatic nodule of an infant with Costello syndrome: Shared mechanism for hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in neonates with Costello and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and somatic loss of heterozygosity in Costello syndrome driving clonal expansion.

    PubMed

    Gripp, Karen W; Robbins, Katherine M; Sheffield, Brandon S; Lee, Anna F; Patel, Millan S; Yip, Stephen; Doyle, Daniel; Stabley, Deborah; Sol-Church, Katia

    2016-03-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) entails a cancer predisposition and is caused by activating HRAS mutations, typically arising de novo in the paternal germline. Hypoglycemia is common in CS neonates. A previously reported individual with the rare HRAS p.Gln22Lys had hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Autopsy showed a discrete pancreatic nodule. The morphologic and immunohistochemistry findings, including loss of p57(Kip2) protein, were identical to a focal lesion of congenital hyperinsulinism, however, no KCNJ11 or ABCC8 mutation was identified and germline derived DNA showed no alternation of the maternal or paternal 11p15 alleles. Here we report paternal uniparental disomy (pUPD) within the lesion, similar to the pUPD11p15.5 in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). The similar extent of the pUPD suggests a similar mechanism driving hyperinsulinemia in both conditions. After coincidental somatic LOH and pUPD, the growth promoting effects of the paternally derived HRAS mutation, in combination with the increased function of the adjacent paternally expressed IGF2, may together result in clonal expansion. Although this somatic LOH within pancreatic tissue resulted in hyperinsulinism, similar LOH in mesenchymal cells may drive embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). Interestingly, biallelic IGF2 expression has been linked to rhabdomyosarcoma tumorigenesis and pUPD11 occurred in all 8 ERMS samples from CS individuals. Somatic KRAS and HRAS mutations occur with comparable frequency in isolated malignancies. Yet, the malignancy risk in CS is notably higher than in Noonan syndrome with a KRAS mutation. It is conceivable that HRAS co-localization with IGF2 and the combined effect of pUPD 11p15.5 on both genes contributes to the oncogenic potential. PMID:26572961

  19. Paternal Uniparental Disomy 11p15.5 in the Pancreatic Nodule of an Infant With Costello Syndrome: Shared Mechanism for Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia in Neonates With Costello and Beckwith–Wiedemann Syndrome and Somatic Loss of Heterozygosity in Costello Syndrome Driving Clonal Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Gripp, Karen W.; Robbins, Katherine M.; Sheffield, Brandon S.; Lee, Anna F.; Patel, Millan S.; Yip, Stephen; Doyle, Daniel; Stabley, Deborah; Sol-Church, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) entails a cancer predisposition and is caused by activating HRAS mutations, typically arising de novo in the paternal germline. Hypoglycemia is common in CS neonates. A previously reported individual with the rare HRAS p.Gln22Lys had hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Autopsy showed a discrete pancreatic nodule. The morphologic and immunohistochemistry findings, including loss of p57Kip2 protein, were identical to a focal lesion of congenital hyperinsulinism, however, no KCNJ11 or ABCC8 mutation was identified and germline derived DNA showed no alternation of the maternal or paternal 11p15 alleles. Here we report paternal uniparental disomy (pUPD) within the lesion, similar to the pUPD11p15.5 in Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). The similar extent of the pUPD suggests a similar mechanism driving hyperinsulinemia in both conditions. After coincidental somatic LOH and pUPD, the growth promoting effects of the paternally derived HRAS mutation, in combination with the increased function of the adjacent paternally expressed IGF2, may together result in clonal expansion. Although this somatic LOH within pancreatic tissue resulted in hyperinsulinism, similar LOH in mesenchymal cells may drive embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). Interestingly, biallelic IGF2 expression has been linked to rhabdomyosarcoma tumorigenesis and pUPD11 occurred in all 8 ERMS samples from CS individuals. Somatic KRAS and HRAS mutations occur with comparable frequency in isolated malignancies. Yet, the malignancy risk in CS is notably higher than in Noonan syndrome with a KRAS mutation. It is conceivable that HRAS co-localization with IGF2 and the combined effect of pUPD 11p15.5 on both genes contributes to the oncogenic potential. PMID:26572961

  20. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Omi, Tsubasa; Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Takada, Hiromune; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  1. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  2. Hypoglycemia in patients treated with linezolid.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Prabha; Iarikov, Dmitri; Wassel, Ronald; Davidson, Alma; Nambiar, Sumathi

    2014-10-15

    Hypoglycemia was not previously known to be a linezolid-associated adverse reaction. A case report describing symptomatic hypoglycemia in a linezolid recipient prompted a review of the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System, which demonstrated a relationship between linezolid and hypoglycemia. A warning with this information was added to the linezolid package insert. PMID:24965346

  3. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia due to adult nesidioblastosis in insulin-dependent diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Raffel, A; Anlauf, M; Hosch, SB; Krausch, M; Henopp, T; Bauersfeld, J; Klofat, R; Bach, D; Eisenberger, CF; Klöppel, G; Knoefel, WT

    2006-01-01

    In neonates, persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (PHH) is associated with nesidioblastosis. In adults, PHH is usually caused by solitary benign insulinomas. We report on an adult patient who suffered from insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and subsequently developed PHH caused by diffuse nesidioblastosis. Mutations of the MEN1 and Mody 2/3 genes were ruled out. Preoperative diagnostic procedures, the histopathological criteria and the surgical treatment options of adult nesidioblastosis are discussed. So far only one similar case of adult nesidioblastosis subsequent to diabetes mellitus II has been reported in the literature. In case of conversion of diabetes into hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia syndrome, nesidioblastosis in addition to insulinoma should be considered. PMID:17131493

  4. Spontaneous hypoglycemia: diagnostic evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Kandaswamy, Leelavathy; Raghavan, Rajeev; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous hypoglycemia is a puzzling clinical problem and an important reason for referral to endocrinologists. Several clinical conditions such as insulinomas, non-insulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia syndrome, insulin autoimmune syndrome, postprandial hypoglycemia (reactive hypoglycemia), non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia, primary adrenal insufficiency, hypopituitarism, and critical illness can be associated with spontaneous hypoglycemia. Rarely, in patients with mental health issues, factious hypoglycemia from extrinsic insulin use or ingestion of oral hypoglycemic agents can obfuscate the clinical picture for clinicians trying to identify an organic cause. In those presenting with Whipple's triad (symptoms ± signs of hypoglycemia, low plasma glucose, and resolution symptoms ± signs after hypoglycemia correction), a 72-h supervised fast test with measurement of plasma insulin, c-peptide, pro-insulin, and beta-hydroxybutyrate levels, coupled with plasma/urine sulphonylurea screen, forms the first step in diagnostic evaluation. A mixed meal test is preferable for those with predominantly postprandial symptoms. Additional non-invasive and/or invasive diagnostic evaluation is necessary if an organic hypoglycemic disorder is suspected. With the aid of a few brief clinical case scenarios, we discuss the diagnostic evaluation and management of spontaneous hypoglycemia through this comprehensive article. PMID:26951054

  5. Hypoglycemia and aggression: a review.

    PubMed

    Benton, D

    1988-08-01

    The popular notion that a tendency to develop low levels of blood glucose is the cause of a range of behavioral problems is reviewed. It is concluded that it is inappropriate to use the glucose tolerance test as a test of the tendency to develop reactive hypoglycemia. Instead, a meal tolerance test, in which glucose is administered in the presence of fat and protein, should be the method of choice. The use of a meal tolerance test strongly suggests that reactive hypoglycemia rarely results, except in a few exceptional individuals. Three situations are described in which a correlation between a tendency to develop moderately low levels of blood glucose during a glucose tolerance test (not hypoglycemic values) and the tendency to act aggressively have been reported. The significance of these data is unclear but several possible mechanisms by which glucose may influence behavior are discussed. PMID:3053477

  6. High prevalence of rotavirus infection among neonates born at hospitals in Delhi, India: predisposition of newborns for infection with unusual rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Cicirello, H G; Das, B K; Gupta, A; Bhan, M K; Gentsch, J R; Kumar, R; Glass, R I

    1994-08-01

    Although rotavirus is the most common cause of diarrhea in children older than 3 months of age, neonatal infections, which are asymptomatic, have rarely been surveyed and have been identified in only a few discrete nosocomial outbreaks. After such a nosocomial outbreak of rotavirus infection among newborns at a hospital in Delhi, we screened infants born at five other nurseries in the immediate area to assess the prevalence of neonatal infections and to determine whether the unique neonatal rotavirus strain, 116E, previously identified in Delhi, was present in other settings. Infection was documented in 43 to 78% of hospitalized infants between 4 and 6 days of life born at five of the six hospitals. Infection with strains related to 116E were the most common, but other unusual strains and no strains common in the community were detected. In addition a shift in genotype was observed among specimens collected from two of these hospitals during a 2-year period. Our observation that neonatal rotavirus infections are more common than recognized previously would encourage the administration of rotavirus vaccines during the newborn period and suggests that the low efficacy of vaccines observed during trials in developing countries may be caused by early natural exposure of infants before immunization. The extraordinary predisposition of neonates for unusual rotavirus strains not commonly found in the community should encourage others to screen neonates for this infection, characterize the strains more fully and attempt to understand at a molecular level the unique relationship between the infecting strain type and the age of the host. PMID:7970972

  7. Hypoglycemia and Risk Factors for Death in 13 Years of Pediatric Admissions in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Lola; Acacio, Sozinho; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Lanaspa, Miguel; Sitoe, Antonio; Maculuve, Sónia Amós; Mucavele, Helio; Quintó, Llorenç; Sigaúque, Betuel; Bassat, Quique

    2016-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a life-threatening complication of several diseases in childhood. We describe the prevalence and incidence of hypoglycemia among admitted Mozambican children, establishing its associated risk factors. We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of 13 years collected through an ongoing systematic morbidity surveillance in Manhiça District Hospital in rural Mozambique. Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for hypoglycemia and death. Minimum community-based incidence rates (MCBIRs) for hypoglycemia were calculated using data from the demographic surveillance system. Of 49,089 children < 15 years hospitalized in Manhiça District Hospital, 45,573 (92.8%) had a glycemia assessment on admission. A total of 1,478 children (3.2%) presented hypoglycemia (< 3 mmol/L), of which about two-thirds (972) were with levels < 2.5 mmol/L. Independent risk factors for hypoglycemia on admission and death among hypoglycemic children included prostration, unconsciousness, edema, malnutrition, and bacteremia. Hypoglycemic children were significantly more likely to die (odds ratio [OR] = 7.11; P < 0.001), with an associated case fatality rate (CFR) of 19.3% (245/1,267). Overall MCBIR of hypoglycemia was 1.57 episodes/1,000 child years at risk (CYAR), significantly decreasing throughout the study period. Newborns showed the highest incidences (9.47 episodes/1,000 CYAR, P < 0.001). Hypoglycemia remains a hazardous condition for African children. Symptoms and signs associated to hypoglycemia should trigger the verification of glycemia and the implementation of life-saving corrective measures. PMID:26503282

  8. Persistent Hypoglycemia in Patient with Hodgkin's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Harold Cinco; Munshi, Lubna Bashir; Sharon, David

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a rare complication of Hodgkin's disease. Several explanations have been postulated but the exact pathophysiology is not well understood. We are presenting a case of newly diagnosed Stage IV Hodgkin's disease that developed persistent and recurrent hypoglycemia despite giving glucagon, repeated 50% dextrose, and D5 and D10 continuous infusion. Hypoglycemia workup showed the C-peptide level to be low. Patient was suspected of having hypoglycemia related to lymphoma and was given a trial of prednisone which resolved the hypoglycemic episodes and made the patient euglycemic for the rest of his hospital stay. The presence of a substance that mimicked the effects of insulin was highly suspected. Several case reports strengthen the hypothesis of an insulin-like growth factor or antibodies secreted by the cancer cells causing hypoglycemia in Hodgkin's disease but none of them have been confirmed. Further investigation is warranted to more clearly define the pathophysiology of persistent hypoglycemia in patients with Hodgkin's disease. PMID:26839722

  9. Hypoglycemia Revisited in the Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shih-Hung; Lin, Yen-Yue; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Cheng, Chien-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common finding in both daily clinical practice and acute care settings. The causes of severe hypoglycemia (SH) are multi-factorial and the major etiologies are iatrogenic, infectious diseases with sepsis and tumor or autoimmune diseases. With the advent of aggressive lowering of HbA1c values to achieve optimal glycemic control, patients are at increased risk of hypoglycemic episodes. Iatrogenic hypoglycemia can cause recurrent morbidity, sometime irreversible neurologic complications and even death, and further preclude maintenance of euglycemia over a lifetime of diabetes. Recent studies have shown that hypoglycemia is associated with adverse outcomes in many acute illnesses. In addition, hypoglycemia is associated with increased mortality among elderly and non-diabetic hospitalized patients. Clinicians should have high clinical suspicion of subtle symptoms of hypoglycemia and provide prompt treatment. Clinicians should know that hypoglycemia is associated with considerable adverse outcomes in many acute critical illnesses. In order to reduce hypoglycemia-associated morbidity and mortality, timely health education programs and close monitoring should be applied to those diabetic patients presenting to the Emergency Department with SH. ED disposition strategies should be further validated and justified to achieve balance between the benefits of euglycemia and the risks of SH. We discuss relevant issues regarding hypoglycemia in emergency and critical care settings. PMID:22028152

  10. Neonatal Mortality and Prevalence of Practices for Newborn Care in a Squatter Settlement of Karachi, Pakistan: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Afsheen; Saleem, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Background During the past two decades there has been a sustained decline in child and infant mortality, however neonatal mortality has remained relatively unchanged. Almost all neonatal deaths (99%) occur in developing countries, where the majority are delivered at homes. Evidence suggests that these deaths could be prevented by simple, inexpensive practices and interventions during the pregnancy, delivery and postnatal period. In Pakistan over the last decade extensive efforts have been made by the international donors and government to implement these practices. However, limited attempts have been made to explore if these efforts have made a difference at the grass root level. This study assessed the burden of neonatal mortality and prevalence of practices for newborn care in a squatter settlement of Karachi, Pakistan. Methodology/Principal Findings A community based cross-sectional study was performed. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was administered to 565 women who had recently delivered. Information was collected on neonatal morbidity, mortality and practices of women regarding care during pregnancy, child birth and for newborn, till 28th day of birth. Although 70% of women mentioned receiving antenatal care by a skilled provider, only 54.5% had four or more visits. Tetanus toxoid was received by 79% of women while only 56% delivered at a health care facility by a skilled attendant. Newborn care practices like bathing the baby immediately after birth (56%), giving pre-lacteals (79.5%), late initiation of breast feeding (80.3%), application of substances on umbilical cord (58%) and body massage (89%) were common. Most neonates (81.1%) received BCG injection and polio drops after birth. Neonatal mortality rate was 27/1000 live births with the majority of deaths occurring during the first three days of life. Conclusion Even after years of efforts by government and nongovernmental sector to reduce newborn morbidity and mortality, inadequate antenatal care

  11. Nocturnal Hypoglycemia: Answering the Challenge With Long-acting Insulin Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Nocturnal hypoglycemia may be the most common type of hypoglycemia in individuals with diabetes using insulin and is particularly worrisome because it often goes undetected and may lead to unconsciousness and even death in severe cases. Objectives The prevalence, causes, and consequences of nocturnal hypoglycemia as well as detection and prevention strategies are reviewed, including the use of long-acting insulin analogs, which offer more physiologic and predictable time-action profiles than traditional human basal insulin. Data Sources A total of 307 publications (151 PubMed; 104 Adis; 52 BIOSIS) were reviewed. Review Methods Relevant trials were found by searching for “(detemir OR glargine) AND nocturnal AND (hypoglycemia OR hypoglycaemia) AND diabetes.” To capture trials that may not have specified “nocturnal” in the title or abstract text but still reported nocturnal hypoglycemia data, a supplemental search of PubMed using “(detemir OR glargine) AND (nocturnal OR hypoglycemia OR hypoglycaemia) AND diabetes” was undertaken. Results A review of these trials found that patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus have a lower risk for nocturnal hypoglycemia when receiving long-acting insulin analogs (insulin detemir or insulin glargine), provided that glycemic control is comparable to that provided by traditional human basal insulin. Long-acting insulin analogs may be the best option to provide basal insulin coverage in patients who do not choose or require continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Conclusions Randomized clinical trials suggest that the long-acting insulin analogs are associated with a lower risk for nocturnal hypoglycemia than neutral protamine Hagedorn without sacrificing glycemic control. PMID:17955093

  12. Exercise-related hypoglycemia in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Younk, Lisa M; Mikeladze, Maia; Tate, Donna; Davis, Stephen N

    2011-01-01

    Current recommendations are that people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus exercise regularly. However, in cases in which insulin or insulin secretagogues are used to manage diabetes, patients have an increased risk of developing hypoglycemia, which is amplified during and after exercise. Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia blunt autonomic nervous system, neuroendocrine and metabolic defenses (counter-regulatory responses) against subsequent episodes of falling blood glucose levels during exercise. Likewise, antecedent exercise blunts counter-regulatory responses to subsequent hypoglycemia. This can lead to a vicious cycle, by which each episode of either exercise or hypoglycemia further blunts counter-regulatory responses. Although contemporary insulin therapies cannot fully mimic physiologic changes in insulin secretion, people with diabetes have several management options to avoid hypoglycemia during and after exercise, including regularly monitoring blood glucose, reducing basal and/or bolus insulin, and consuming supplemental carbohydrates. PMID:21339838

  13. Hypoglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes treatment plan. Causes of Low Blood Sugar Levels Low blood sugar levels are fairly common in ... headache. previous continue Checking for Low Blood Sugar Levels When blood sugar levels fall too low, the ...

  14. Hypoglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... without having diabetes. Causes include certain medicines or diseases, hormone or enzyme deficiencies, and tumors. Laboratory tests can help find the cause. The kind of treatment depends on why you have low blood sugar. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  15. Hypoglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... of energy for the body, comes from food. Carbohydrates are the main dietary source of glucose. Rice, ... tortillas, cereal, milk, fruit, and sweets are all carbohydrate-rich foods. After a meal, glucose is absorbed ...

  16. Effects of Intensive Therapy and Antecedent Hypoglycemia on Counterregulatory Responses to Hypoglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Stephen N.; Mann, Stephanie; Briscoe, Vanessa J.; Ertl, Andrew C.; Tate, Donna B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The physiology of counterregulatory responses during hypoglycemia in intensively treated type 2 diabetic subjects is largely unknown. Therefore, the specific aims of the study tested the hypothesis that 1) 6 months of intensive therapy to lower A1C <7.0% would blunt autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses to hypoglycemia, and 2) antecedent hypoglycemia will result in counterregulatory failure during subsequent hypoglycemia in patients with suboptimal and good glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Fifteen type 2 diabetic patients (8 men/7 women) underwent 6-month combination therapy of metformin, glipizide XL, and acarbose to lower A1C to 6.7% and 2-day repeated hypoglycemic clamp studies before and after intensive therapy. A control group of eight nondiabetic subjects participated in a single 2-day repeated hypoglycemic clamp study. RESULTS—Six-month therapy reduced A1C from 10.2 ± 0.5 to 6.7 ± 0.3%. Rates of hypoglycemia increased to 3.2 episodes per patient/month by study end. Hypoglycemia (3.3 ± 0.1 mmol/l) and insulinemia (1,722 ± 198 pmol/l) were similar during all clamp studies. Intensive therapy reduced (P < 0.05) ANS and metabolic counterregulatory responses during hypoglycemia. Antecedent hypoglycemia produced widespread blunting (P < 0.05) of neuroendocrine, ANS, and metabolic counterregulatory responses during subsequent hypoglycemia before and after intensive therapy in type 2 diabetic patients and in nondiabetic control subjects. CONCLUSIONS—Intensive oral combination therapy and antecedent hypoglycemia both blunt physiological defenses against subsequent hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes. Prior hypoglycemia of only 3.3 ± 0.1 mmol/l can result in counterregulatory failure in type 2 diabetic patients with suboptimal control and can further impair physiological defenses against hypoglycemia in intensively treated type 2 diabetes. PMID:19073776

  17. Prevalence of Bloodstream Pathogens Is Higher in Neonatal Encephalopathy Cases vs. Controls Using a Novel Panel of Real-Time PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Tann, Cally J.; Nkurunziza, Peter; Nakakeeto, Margaret; Oweka, James; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J.; Were, Jackson; Nyombi, Natasha; Hughes, Peter; Willey, Barbara A.; Elliott, Alison M.; Robertson, Nicola J.; Klein, Nigel; Harris, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background In neonatal encephalopathy (NE), infectious co-morbidity is difficult to diagnose accurately, but may increase the vulnerability of the developing brain to hypoxia-ischemia. We developed a novel panel of species-specific real-time PCR assays to identify bloodstream pathogens amongst newborns with and without NE in Uganda. Methodology Multiplex real-time PCR assays for important neonatal bloodstream pathogens (gram positive and gram negative bacteria, cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus(HSV) and P. falciparum) were performed on whole blood taken from 202 encephalopathic and 101 control infants. Automated blood culture (BACTEC) was performed for all cases and unwell controls. Principal Findings Prevalence of pathogenic bacterial species amongst infants with NE was 3.6%, 6.9% and 8.9%, with culture, PCR and both tests in combination, respectively. More encephalopathic infants than controls had pathogenic bacterial species detected (8.9%vs2.0%, p = 0.028) using culture and PCR in combination. PCR detected bacteremia in 11 culture negative encephalopathic infants (3 Group B Streptococcus, 1 Group A Streptococcus, 1 Staphylococcus aureus and 6 Enterobacteriacae). Coagulase negative staphylococcus, frequently detected by PCR amongst case and control infants, was considered a contaminant. Prevalence of CMV, HSV and malaria amongst cases was low (1.5%, 0.5% and 0.5%, respectively). Conclusion/Significance This real-time PCR panel detected more bacteremia than culture alone and provides a novel tool for detection of neonatal bloodstream pathogens that may be applied across a range of clinical situations and settings. Significantly more encephalopathic infants than controls had pathogenic bacterial species detected suggesting that infection may be an important risk factor for NE in this setting. PMID:24836781

  18. Post-Gastric Bypass Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Rariy, Chevon M; Rometo, David; Korytkowski, Mary

    2016-02-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem worldwide. Obesity-related illnesses, such as coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, stroke, sleep apnea, and several forms of cancer (endometrial, breast, and colon), contribute to a significant number of deaths in the USA. Bariatric surgery, including the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) procedure, has demonstrated significant improvements in obesity and obesity-related co-morbidities and is becoming more popular as the number of obese individuals rises. Despite the reported benefits of bariatric surgery, there are potential complications that physicians need to be aware of as the number of patients undergoing these procedures continues to increase. One challenging and potentially life-threatening complication that to date is not well understood is post-RYGB surgery hypoglycemia (PGBH). In this review, we will present the definition, historical perspective, diagnostic approach, currently available treatment options, and anecdotal assessment and treatment algorithm for this disorder. PMID:26868861

  19. Hypoglycemia unawareness prevention: Targeting glucagon production.

    PubMed

    Samson, Willis K; Stein, Lauren M; Elrick, Mollisa; Salvatori, Alison; Kolar, Grant; Corbett, John A; Yosten, Gina L C

    2016-08-01

    Insulin-dependent individuals with diabetes are at risk for a severe hypoglycemic event that may predispose them to several repeat episodes during which the normal counter regulatory mechanisms that protect against hypoglycemia fail to be activated. This state of hypoglycemia unawareness is characterized by a failure of glucagon release, preventing mobilization of endogenous glucose stores from the liver. We describe the discovery of a novel hormone, produced in pancreatic delta cells, which stimulates glucagon production and release, particularly under low glucose conditions. We hypothesize that this hormone, called neuronostatin, may be effective as a co-therapy with insulin to prevent repeated, potentially fatal episodes of recurrent hypoglycemia. PMID:27080082

  20. Recurrent Moderate Hypoglycemia Ameliorates Brain Damage and Cognitive Dysfunction Induced by Severe Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Erwin C.; Silverstein, Julie; Bree, Adam J.; Musikantow, Daniel R.; Wozniak, David F.; Maloney, Susan; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Fisher, Simon J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although intensive glycemic control achieved with insulin therapy increases the incidence of both moderate and severe hypoglycemia, clinical reports of cognitive impairment due to severe hypoglycemia have been highly variable. It was hypothesized that recurrent moderate hypoglycemia preconditions the brain and protects against damage caused by severe hypoglycemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Nine-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either 3 consecutive days of recurrent moderate (25–40 mg/dl) hypoglycemia (RH) or saline injections. On the fourth day, rats were subjected to a hyperinsulinemic (0.2 units · kg−1 · min−1) severe hypoglycemic (∼11 mg/dl) clamp for 60 or 90 min. Neuronal damage was subsequently assessed by hematoxylin-eosin and Fluoro-Jade B staining. The functional significance of severe hypoglycemia–induced brain damage was evaluated by motor and cognitive testing. RESULTS Severe hypoglycemia induced brain damage and striking deficits in spatial learning and memory. Rats subjected to recurrent moderate hypoglycemia had 62–74% less brain cell death and were protected from most of these cognitive disturbances. CONCLUSIONS Antecedent recurrent moderate hypoglycemia preconditioned the brain and markedly limited both the extent of severe hypoglycemia–induced neuronal damage and associated cognitive impairment. In conclusion, changes brought about by recurrent moderate hypoglycemia can be viewed, paradoxically, as providing a beneficial adaptive response in that there is mitigation against severe hypoglycemia–induced brain damage and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:20086229

  1. Hypoglycemia in a healthy toddler.

    PubMed

    Glatstein, Miguel; Garcia-Bournissen, Facundo; Scolnik, Dennis; Koren, Gideon; Finkelstein, Yaron

    2009-04-01

    Sulphonylurea ingestion is life-threatening in toddlers due to its strong and prolonged hypoglycemic effect, and is on the toddlers' "one pill can kill" list. Its administration to children may not be accidental. We discuss a case of non-accidental sulphonylurea ingestion by an 18-month-old girl, and the clinical reasoning process leading to identification of the causative agent for the patient's symptoms. A previously healthy 18 month-old girl presented to the Emergency Department with altered mental status and severe hypoglycaemia, which required intravenous hypertonic dextrose solutions to maintain euglycemia. A family history of type II diabetes prompted a search for sulphonylureas in the child's serum, which was positive. Further investigation led to the conclusion that the child's poisoning was the result of the mother's Munchausen-by-proxy syndrome. Sulphonylurea intoxication should be considered in previously healthy children presenting with hypoglycaemia. More than 20% of sulphonylurea poisonings reported in the literature correspond to Munchausen-by-proxy syndrome or homicide attempts. Initial management consists of rapid glucose infusion, but boluses should be avoided whenever possible to prevent rebound hyperinsulinism and worsening hypoglycemia. We stress the need to consider potential child abuse or neglect in a hypoglycaemic patient with sulphonylurea-using caregivers. PMID:19142176

  2. Hypoglycemia during moderate intensity exercise reduces counterregulatory responses to subsequent hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Cade, W Todd; Khoury, Nadia; Nelson, Suzanne; Shackleford, Angela; Semenkovich, Katherine; Krauss, Melissa J; Arbeláez, Ana María

    2016-09-01

    Hypoglycemia, which occurs commonly during and following exercise in people with diabetes, is thought to be due to attenuated counterregulation in the setting of therapeutic insulin excess. To better understand the pathophysiology of counterregulation, we aimed to determine if dextrose administration to maintain euglycemia during moderate intensity exercise alters the attenuation of counterregulatory responses to subsequent hypoglycemia in healthy adults : Counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia were assessed in 18 healthy adults after bed rest and following exercise with (n = 9) and without (n = 9) dextrose infusion. Responses were measured during a stepped euglycemic-hypoglycemic clamp 24 h after either bed rest or two 90-min bouts of exercise at 70% peak oxygen uptake : Hypoglycemia occurred during the second bout of exercise without dextrose infusion. Plasma glucagon and epinephrine responses to stepped hypoglycemia after antecedent exercise without dextrose infusion were significantly lower at the 45 mg/dL glycemic level compared to after bed rest. However, no attenuation of the counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia was evident after antecedent exercise when dextrose was infused. This study suggests that the attenuation of the counterregulatory responses during hypoglycemia after exercise is likely due to the hypoglycemia that occurs during moderate prolonged exercise and not solely due to exercise or its intensity. PMID:27597762

  3. Maternal and neonatal outcomes of macrosomic pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann-Brenner, Alina; Simchen, Michal J.; Zilberberg, Eran; Kalter, Anat; Weisz, Boaz; Achiron, Reuven; Dulitzky, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To compare maternal and neonatal outcomes of term macrosomic and adequate for gestational age (AGA) pregnancies. Material/Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on all term singleton macrosomic (birth weight ≥4000 g) and AGA (birth weight >10th percentile and <4000 g) pregnancies delivered at our hospital between 2004 and 2008. Data collected included maternal age, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, birth weight, fetal gender, maternal and neonatal complications. Comparisons were made between macrosomic and AGA pregnancies and between different severities of macrosomia (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g). Results The study population comprised of 34,685 pregnancies. 2077 neonates had birth weight ≥4000 g. Maternal age and gestational age at delivery were significantly higher for macrosomic neonates. Significantly more macrosomic neonates were born by cesarean section, and were complicated with shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and had longer hospitalization period (both in vaginal and cesarean deliveries). Specifically, the odds ratio (OR) relative to AGA pregnancies for each macrosomic category (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g) of shoulder dystocia was 2.37, 2.24, 7.61, respectively, and for neonatal hypoglycemia 4.24, 4.41, 4.15, respectively. The risk of post partum hemorrhage was statistically increased when birth weight was >4500 g (OR=5.23) but not for birth weight between 4000–4500 g. No differences were found in the rates of extensive perineal lacerations between AGA and the different macrosomic groups. Conclusions Macrosomia is associated with increased rate of cesarean section, shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and longer hospitalization, but not associated with excessive perineal tears. Increased risk of PPH was found in the >4500g group. PMID:22936200

  4. Development of a New Fear of Hypoglycemia Scale: FH-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anarte Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Caballero, Francisco Felix; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Rondan, Rosa Maria; Carreira, Monica; Dominguez-Lopez, Marta; Machado, Alberto; Gonzalo-Marin, Montserrat; Tapia, Maria Jose; Valdes, Sergio; Gonzalez-Romero, Stella; Soriguer, Federico C.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse event associated with insulin treatment in diabetes. The consequences of hypoglycemia can be quite aversive and potentially life threatening. The physical sequelae provide ample reason for patients to fear hypoglycemia and avoid episodes. For these reasons, our purpose in this study was to develop a new…

  5. Hypoglycemia-associated changes in the electroencephalogram in patients with type 1 diabetes and normal hypoglycemia awareness or unawareness.

    PubMed

    Sejling, Anne-Sophie; Kjær, Troels W; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Diemar, Sarah S; Frandsen, Christian S S; Hilsted, Linda; Faber, Jens; Holst, Jens J; Tarnow, Lise; Nielsen, Martin N; Remvig, Line S; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Juhl, Claus B

    2015-05-01

    Hypoglycemia is associated with increased activity in the low-frequency bands in the electroencephalogram (EEG). We investigated whether hypoglycemia awareness and unawareness are associated with different hypoglycemia-associated EEG changes in patients with type 1 diabetes. Twenty-four patients participated in the study: 10 with normal hypoglycemia awareness and 14 with hypoglycemia unawareness. The patients were studied at normoglycemia (5-6 mmol/L) and hypoglycemia (2.0-2.5 mmol/L), and during recovery (5-6 mmol/L) by hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp. During each 1-h period, EEG, cognitive function, and hypoglycemia symptom scores were recorded, and the counterregulatory hormonal response was measured. Quantitative EEG analysis showed that the absolute amplitude of the θ band and α-θ band up to doubled during hypoglycemia with no difference between the two groups. In the recovery period, the θ amplitude remained increased. Cognitive function declined equally during hypoglycemia in both groups and during recovery reaction time was still prolonged in a subset of tests. The aware group reported higher hypoglycemia symptom scores and had higher epinephrine and cortisol responses compared with the unaware group. In patients with type 1 diabetes, EEG changes and cognitive performance during hypoglycemia are not affected by awareness status during a single insulin-induced episode with hypoglycemia. PMID:25488900

  6. Prevalence of anti-rubella, anti-measles and anti-mumps IgG antibodies in neonates and pregnant women in Catalonia (Spain) in 2013: susceptibility to measles increased from 2003 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Plans, P; de Ory, F; Campins, M; Álvarez, E; Payà, T; Guisasola, E; Compte, C; Vellbé, K; Sánchez, C; Lozano, M J; Aran, I; Bonmatí, A; Carreras, R; Jané, M; Cabero, L

    2015-06-01

    Non-immune neonates and non-immune pregnant women are at risk of developing rubella, measles and mumps infections, including congenital rubella syndrome. We describe the seroepidemiology of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) in neonates and pregnant women in Catalonia (Spain). Anti-rubella, anti-measles and anti-mumps serum IgG titres were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests in 353 cord blood samples from neonates of a representative sample of pregnant women obtained in 2013. The prevalence of protective antibody titres in neonates was 96 % for rubella IgG (≥8 IU/ml), 90 % for measles IgG (>300 IU/ml) and 84 % for mumps IgG (>460 EU/ml). Slightly lower prevalences of protective IgG titres, as estimated from the cord blood titres, were found in pregnant women: 95 % for rubella IgG, 89 % for measles IgG and 81 % for mumps IgG. The anti-measles and anti-mumps IgG titres and the prevalences of protective IgG titres against measles and mumps increased significantly (p < 0.001) with maternal age. The prevalence of protective anti-measles IgG titres decreased by 7 % [odds ratio (OR) = 0.15, p < 0.001), the prevalence of protective anti-rubella IgG titres increased by 3 % (OR = 1.80, p < 0.05) and the MMR vaccination coverage (during childhood) in pregnant women increased by 54 % (OR = 2.09, p < 0.001) from 2003 to 2013. We recommend to develop an MMR prevention programme in women of childbearing age based on mass MMR vaccination or MMR screening and vaccination of susceptible women to increase immunity levels against MMR. PMID:25666082

  7. Determination of Insulin for the Diagnosis of Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    De León, Diva D.; Stanley, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is the most common cause of persistent hypoglycemia in children and adults. The diagnosis of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia relies on the evaluation of the biochemical profile at the time of hypoglycemia, however, contrary to common perception, plasma insulin is not always elevated. Thus, the diagnosis must often be based on the examination of other physiologic manifestations of excessive insulin secretion, such as suppression of glycogenolysis, lipolysis and ketogenesis, which can be inferred by the finding of a glycemic response to glucagon, and the suppression of plasma free fatty acids and beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations during hypoglycemia. PMID:24275188

  8. Hospitalization for Hypoglycemia in Japanese Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Akahito; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Goto, Atsushi; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to elucidate the epidemiology, patient demographics, and clinical outcomes of hospitalization for hypoglycemia in diabetic patients using a Japanese large-scale database. We conducted a retrospective study using a national inpatient database of acute care hospitals in Japan. Diabetic patients ages ≥15 years with hypoglycemia as a main diagnosis for hospitalization were eligible. We estimated the annual number of hospitalizations in Japan and compared the annual admission rate by age and treatment groups. We also analyzed the association between patient characteristics and in-hospital mortality. Among 22.7 million discharge records from July 2008 and March 2013, a total of 25,071 patients were eligible. The mean age was 73.4 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 22.3 kg/m2. The estimated annual hospitalization for hypoglycemia in Japan was ∼20,000. Annual admission rates for hypoglycemia per 1000 diabetic patients and 1000 diabetic patients receiving insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents were 2.1 and 4.1, respectively. Patients <40 years and >70 years old were at a higher risk of hospitalization. In-hospital mortality was 3.8%, and risk factors associated with poor survival were male sex, older age, lower bed capacity, community hospital, low BMI, coma at admission, and higher Charlson Comorbidity Index. To prevent severe hypoglycemia that leads to death and complications, individualized and careful glycemic control are important, especially in very old or young patients and in those with comorbid conditions or low BMI. PMID:26107672

  9. Prevention of hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death by minocycline.

    PubMed

    Won, Seok Joon; Kim, Jin Hee; Yoo, Byung Hoon; Sohn, Min; Kauppinen, Tiina M; Park, Man-Seong; Kwon, Hyung-Joo; Liu, Jialing; Suh, Sang Won

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic patients who attempt strict management of blood glucose levels frequently experience hypoglycemia. Severe and prolonged hypoglycemia causes neuronal death and cognitive impairment. There is no effective tool for prevention of these unwanted clinical sequelae. Minocycline, a second-generation tetracycline derivative, has been recognized as an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agent in several animal models such as stroke and traumatic brain injury. In the present study, we tested whether minocycline also has protective effects on hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death and cognitive impairment. To test our hypothesis we used an animal model of insulin-induced acute hypoglycemia. Minocycline was injected intraperitoneally at 6 hours after hypoglycemia/glucose reperfusion and injected once per day for the following 1 week. Histological evaluation for neuronal death and microglial activation was performed from 1 day to 1 week after hypoglycemia. Cognitive evaluation was conducted 6 weeks after hypoglycemia. Microglial activation began to be evident in the hippocampal area at 1 day after hypoglycemia and persisted for 1 week. Minocycline injection significantly reduced hypoglycemia-induced microglial activation and myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunoreactivity. Neuronal death was significantly reduced by minocycline treatment when evaluated at 1 week after hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia-induced cognitive impairment is also significantly prevented by the same minocycline regimen when subjects were evaluated at 6 weeks after hypoglycemia. Therefore, these results suggest that delayed treatment (6 hours post-insult) with minocycline protects against microglial activation, neuronal death and cognitive impairment caused by severe hypoglycemia. The present study suggests that minocycline has therapeutic potential to prevent hypoglycemia-induced brain injury in diabetic patients. PMID:22998689

  10. Neonatal Glycemia and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes at 2 Years

    PubMed Central

    McKinlay, Christopher J.D.; Alsweiler, Jane M.; Ansell, Judith M.; Anstice, Nicola S.; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Gamble, Gregory D.; Harris, Deborah L.; Jacobs, Robert J.; Jiang, Yannan; Paudel, Nabin; Signal, Matthew; Thompson, Benjamin; Wouldes, Trecia A.; Yu, Tzu-Ying; Harding, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonatal hypoglycemia is common and can cause neurologic impairment, but evidence supporting thresholds for intervention is limited. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study involving 528 neonates with a gestational age of at least 35 weeks who were considered to be at risk for hypoglycemia; all were treated to maintain a blood glucose concentration of at least 47 mg per deciliter (2.6 mmol per liter). We intermittently measured blood glucose for up to 7 days. We continuously monitored interstitial glucose concentrations, which were masked to clinical staff. Assessment at 2 years included Bayley Scales of Infant Development III and tests of executive and visual function. Results Of 614 children, 528 were eligible, and 404 (77% of eligible children) were assessed; 216 children (53%) had neonatal hypoglycemia (blood glucose concentration, <47 mg per deciliter). Hypoglycemia, when treated to maintain a blood glucose concentration of at least 47 mg per deciliter, was not associated with an increased risk of the primary outcomes of neurosensory impairment (risk ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75 to 1.20; P = 0.67) and processing difficulty, defined as an executive-function score or motion coherence threshold that was more than 1.5 SD from the mean (risk ratio, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.51; P = 0.74). Risks were not increased among children with unrecognized hypoglycemia (a low interstitial glucose concentration only). The lowest blood glucose concentration, number of hypoglycemic episodes and events, and negative interstitial increment (area above the interstitial glucose concentration curve and below 47 mg per deciliter) also did not predict the outcome. Conclusions In this cohort, neonatal hypoglycemia was not associated with an adverse neurologic outcome when treatment was provided to maintain a blood glucose concentration of at least 47 mg per deciliter. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human

  11. [Recurrent hypoglycemia due to an occult insulinoma].

    PubMed

    Breuer, T G K; Breuer, H L; Menge, B A; Giese, A; Uhl, W; Schmidt, W E; Tannapfel, A; Wild, D; Nauck, M A; Meier, J J

    2016-04-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with a history of recurrent hypoglycemia. A prolonged fasting test revealed an increased "amended" insulin-glucose ratio. Transabdominal ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) scan, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not show abnormal results. An insulinoma was suspected based on a contrast-enhanced endoscopic US examination as well as a (68)gallium-DOTA-exendin-4 positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT. The diagnosis of an insulinoma was confirmed histologically after surgical removal of the tumor. Hypoglycemia did not occur during the postoperative period. The prolonged fasting test is the gold standard for the diagnosis of an insulinoma. Novel imaging procedures, such as contrast-enhanced endoscopic US or (68)gallium-DOTA-exendin-4 PET/CT are valuable additions to the diagnostic workup. PMID:26873007

  12. Neonatal hypoglycemic brain injury is a cause of infantile spasms

    PubMed Central

    YANG, GUANG; ZOU, LI-PING; WANG, JING; SHI, XIUYU; TIAN, SHUPING; YANG, XIAOFAN; JU, JUN; YAO, HONGXIANG; LIU, YUJIE

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal hypoglycemic brain injury is one of the causes of infantile spasms. In the present study, the clinical history and auxiliary examination results of 18 patients who developed infantile spasms several months after neonatal hypoglycemia were retrospectively analyzed. Among the 666 patients with infantile spasms admitted to two pediatric centers between January 2008 and October 2012, 18 patients developed infantile spasms after being diagnosed with neonatal hypoglycemia, defined as a whole blood glucose concentration of <2.6 mmol/l. These patients developed infantile spasms from between 2 and 10 months (mean, 4.9 months) following the diagnosis of neonatal hypoglycemia. All 18 patients had abnormal electroencephalographic findings with either classical or modified hypsarrhythmia. Upon examination using brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 10 patients (55.6%) exhibited abnormalities. The MRI results principally showed a disproportional involvement of parietal and occipital cortices and sub-cortical white matter lesions. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that neonatal hypoglycemic brain injury is associated with the subsequent development of infantile spasms. PMID:27168852

  13. Hypoglycemia-Associated Autonomic Failure in Healthy Humans: Comparison of Two vs Three Periods of Hypoglycemia on Hypoglycemia-Induced Counterregulatory and Symptom Response 5 Days Later

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A.; Eberly, L. E.; Kim, J.; Roberts, R.; Seaquist, E. R.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) limits the ability of patients with diabetes to achieve target glycemia. Animal models have provided insights into the pathogenesis of HAAF, but a robust human model of HAAF in which recurrent hypoglycemia impacts the counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia days later is lacking. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the impact of two or three episodes of moderate hypoglycemia on counterregulatory responses to subsequent hypoglycemia induced 5 days later. Design and Subjects: Six healthy subjects participated in each of the two study protocols. In both protocol 1 and 2, subjects underwent two 2-hour hypoglycemic clamp studies during the morning and afternoon of day 1. In protocol 2, subjects underwent an additional third hypoglycemic clamp during the morning of day 2. All subjects in both protocols underwent a final hypoglycemic clamp on the morning of day 5. Results: In protocol 1, there were no significant differences in the hypoglycemia-induced hormone response or in symptoms scores between the mornings of days 1 and 5. In protocol 2, hypoglycemia-induced epinephrine (P = .02) and cortisol (P = .04) secretions were significantly lower on day 5 compared with day 1, whereas glucagon (P = .08) and norepinephrine (P = .59) were not different. Also in protocol 2, neurogenic (P = .02) and neuroglycopenic (P = .04) symptoms during hypoglycemia were decreased on day 5 compared with day 1. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that exposure of healthy humans to three 2-hour hypoglycemic episodes over 30 hours leads to significant blunting in counterregulatory and symptom response to subsequent hypoglycemia on day 5. PMID:24423306

  14. Hypoglycemia Early Alarm Systems Based On Multivariable Models

    PubMed Central

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Bayrak, Elif S; Quinn, Lauretta; Littlejohn, Elizabeth; Rollins, Derrick; Cinar, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a major challenge of artificial pancreas systems and a source of concern for potential users and parents of young children with Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Early alarms to warn the potential of hypoglycemia are essential and should provide enough time to take action to avoid hypoglycemia. Many alarm systems proposed in the literature are based on interpretation of recent trends in glucose values. In the present study, subject-specific recursive linear time series models are introduced as a better alternative to capture glucose variations and predict future blood glucose concentrations. These models are then used in hypoglycemia early alarm systems that notify patients to take action to prevent hypoglycemia before it happens. The models developed and the hypoglycemia alarm system are tested retrospectively using T1D subject data. A Savitzky-Golay filter and a Kalman filter are used to reduce noise in patient data. The hypoglycemia alarm algorithm is developed by using predictions of future glucose concentrations from recursive models. The modeling algorithm enables the dynamic adaptation of models to inter-/intra-subject variation and glycemic disturbances and provides satisfactory glucose concentration prediction with relatively small error. The alarm systems demonstrate good performance in prediction of hypoglycemia and ultimately in prevention of its occurrence. PMID:24187436

  15. An Overview of Hypoglycemia in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Lacherade, Jean-Claude; Jacqueminet, Sophie; Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2009-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common and serious problem among patients with diabetes mellitus. It is also perceived as the most important obstacle to tight glucose control using intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients. Because glucose is an obligatory metabolic fuel for the brain, hypoglycemia always represents an emergency that signals the inability of the brain to meet its energy needs. When left untreated, hypoglycemia can result in permanent brain damage and ultimately, death. In the context of critical illness that limits endogenous glucose production and increases glucose utilization, inadequate nutrition, or insufficient provision of glucose, intensive insulin therapy is the most frequent cause of hypoglycemia. Neurogenic and neuroglycopenic symptoms of hypoglycemia can remain unknown because of the underlying critical illness and sedation. Thus, close and reliable monitoring of the glycemic level is crucial in detecting hypoglycemia. In prospective randomized controlled studies comparing the effects of two glucose regimens, intensive insulin therapy aimed to reach strict glucose control (<110 mg/dl) but increased the incidence of severe hypoglycemia (<40 mg/dl) by four- to sixfold. Severe hypoglycemia is statistically associated with adverse outcomes in intensive care unit patients, although a direct causal relationship has not been demonstrated. PMID:20144377

  16. Hypoglycemia in diabetes: pathophysiological mechanisms and diurnal variation.

    PubMed

    Cryer, Philip E

    2006-01-01

    Iatrogenic hypoglycemia, the limiting factor in the glycemic management of diabetes, causes recurrent morbidity (and sometimes death), precludes maintenance of euglycemia over a lifetime of diabetes and causes a vicious cycle of recurrent hypoglycemia. In insulin deficient - T1DM and advanced T2DM - diabetes hypoglycemia is the result of the interplay of therapeutic insulin excess and compromised physiological (defective glucose counterregulation) and behavioral (hypoglycemia unawareness) defenses against falling plasma glucose concentrations. The concept of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) in diabetes posits that recent antecedent hypoglycemia causes both defective glucose counterregulation (by reducing epinephrine responses in the setting of absent insulin and glucagon responses) and hypoglycemia unawareness (by reducing sympathoadrenal and the resulting neurogenic symptom responses) and thus a vicious cycle of recurrent hypoglycemia. The clinical impact of HAAF-including its reversal by avoidance of hypoglycemia-is well established, but its mechanisms are largely unknown. Loss of the glucagon response, a key feature of defective glucose counterregulation, is plausibly attributed to insulin deficiency, specifically loss of the decrement in intraislet insulin that normally signals glucagon secretion as glucose levels fall. Reduced neurogenic symptoms, a key feature of hypoglycemia unawareness, are largely the result of reduced sympathetic neural responses to falling glucose levels. The mechanism(s) by which hypoglycemia shifts the glycemic thresholds for sympathoadrenal activation to lower plasma glucose concentrations, the key feature of both components of HAAF, is not known. It does not appear to be the result of the release of a systemic mediator such as cortisol or epinephrine during antecedent hypoglycemia or of increased blood-to-brain glucose transport. It is likely the result of an as yet to be identified alteration of brain metabolism

  17. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BE. Perinatal viral infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ... K. Postnatal bacterial infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ...

  18. Case of alcoholic ketoacidosis accompanied with severe hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Tadanobu; Shiraishi, Wataru; Iwanaga, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Akifumi

    2015-03-01

    We report a 55 year old Japanese man with a history of alcohol abuse, who was in a near fasting state for the previous few days.He was admitted to our hospital with abrupt disturbance of consciousness. He presented disturbance of consciousness with extreme hypoglycemia and ketoacidosis with high β-hydroxybutyric acid concentration. Taking into account his living history, we diagnosed with alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA). Symptoms ameliorated with glucose injection and fluid loading. AKA patients show abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, but they are usually alert and lucid despite the severe acidosis. This case, however, presented comatose status caused by hypoglycemia. Poor oral intake of this patient was assumed to be the cause of hypoglycemia. Alcoholism may cause hypoglycemia accompanying with AKA, due to a low carbohydrate intake, the inhibition of gluconeogenesis, and reduced hepaticglycogen storage as seen in this case. Here, we report a case of AKA that demonstrated hypoglycemia with the literature review. PMID:25787101

  19. Brain Lactate Concentration Falls in Response to Hypoglycemia in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes and Impaired Awareness of Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Wiegers, Evita C; Rooijackers, Hanne M; Tack, Cees J; Heerschap, Arend; de Galan, Bastiaan E; van der Graaf, Marinette

    2016-06-01

    Brain lactate may be involved in the development of impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH), a condition that affects approximately 25% of patients with type 1 diabetes and increases the risk of severe hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute hypoglycemia on brain lactate concentration in patients with IAH as compared with those with normal awareness of hypoglycemia (NAH) and healthy control subjects (n = 7 per group). After an overnight fast, all subjects underwent a two-step hyperinsulinemic euglycemic (5.0 mmol/L)-hypoglycemic (2.8 mmol/L) glucose clamp. Brain lactate concentrations were measured continuously with (1)H-MRS using a specific lactate detection method. Hypoglycemia generated symptoms in patients with NAH and healthy control subjects but not in patients with IAH. Brain lactate fell significantly by ∼20% in response to hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes with IAH but remained stable in both healthy control subjects and in patients with NAH. The fall in brain lactate is compatible with increased brain lactate oxidation providing an alternative fuel source during hypoglycemia, which may contribute to the impaired detection of hypoglycemia. PMID:26993070

  20. Obstetric and Neonatal Outcome in PCOS with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Foroozanfard, Fatemeh; Moosavi, Seyed Gholam Abbas; Mansouri, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Objective There are some metabolic similarities between women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); it is still uncertain, however, to what extent coexistence GDM and PCOS affects pregnancy outcome. The present study was designed to determine the obstetric and neonatal outcome in PCOS with GDM. Materials and methods A case-control study was conducted involving 261 GDM women. Thirty hundred-one cases had PCOS based on Rotterdam criteria and the other thirty hundred cases (control group) were women without PCOS. The subjects in each group were evaluated regarding obstetric and those women whose documentation's were complete entered the study. Results In present study, women with PCOS and GDM had more than twofold increased odds of preeclampsia (p = 0.003, CI = 1.56–5.01, and OR = 2.8) and PIH (p= 0.04, CI = 1.28–4.5, and OR= 2.4). Maternal PCOS and GDM were also associated with threefold increased odds of neonatal hypoglycemia (p= 0.004, CI= 1.49–6.58, and OR= 3.13). Conclusion Our finding emphasized that pregnant PCOS patients should be followed carefully for the occurrence of various pregnancy and neonatal complications including hypertension and hypoglycemia. We suggested that these neonates should be given more care regarding hypoglycemia symptoms. PMID:24971127

  1. Anemia Causes Hypoglycemia in ICU Patients Due to Error in Single-Channel Glucometers: Methods of Reducing Patient Risk

    PubMed Central

    Pidcoke, Heather F.; Wade, Charles E.; Mann, Elizabeth A.; Salinas, Jose; Cohee, Brian M.; Holcomb, John B.; Wolf, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Intensive insulin therapy (IIT) in the critically ill reduces mortality but carries the risk of increased hypoglycemia. Point-of-care (POC) blood glucose analysis is standard; however anemia causes falsely high values and potentially masks hypoglycemia. Permissive anemia is routinely practiced in most intensive care units (ICUs). We hypothesized that POC glucometer error due to anemia is prevalent, can be mathematically corrected, and correction uncovers occult hypoglycemia during IIT. DESIGN The study has both retrospective and prospective phases. We reviewed data to verify the presence of systematic error, determine the source of error, and establish the prevalence of anemia. We confirmed our findings by reproducing the error in an in-vitro model. Prospective data was used to develop a correction formula validated by the Monte Carlo method. Correction was implemented in a burn ICU and results evaluated after nine months. SETTING Burn and trauma ICUs at a single research institution. PATIENTS/SUBJECTS Samples for in-vitro studies were taken from healthy volunteers. Samples for formula development were from critically ill patients on IIT. INTERVENTIONS Insulin doses were calculated based on predicted serum glucose values from corrected POC glucometer measurements. MEASUREMENTS Time-matched POC glucose, laboratory glucose, and hematocrit values. MAIN RESULTS We previously found that anemia (HCT<34%) produces systematic error in glucometer measurements. The error was correctible with a mathematical formula developed and validated using prospectively collected data. Error of uncorrected POC glucose ranged from 19% to 29% (p<0.001), improving to ≤5% after mathematical correction of prospective data. Comparison of data pairs before and after correction formula implementation demonstrated a 78% decrease in the incidence of hypoglycemia in critically ill and anemic patients treated with insulin and tight glucose control (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS A mathematical

  2. The unexpected truth about dates and hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Yasawy, Mohammed I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dates are a concentrated source of essential nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and carbohydrates (CHOs), which are necessary for the maintenance of optimum health. Most of the CHOs in dates come from sugars including glucose and fructose. Dates are commonly consumed in Saudi Arabia, particularly at the time of breaking the fast to provide instant energy and maintain blood sugar level. However, dates may cause hypoglycemia in a rare condition named as heredity fructose intolerance (HFI), and a few families have been to see us with a history of that nature. This is to report the preliminary results of an on-going study of a group of patients who get symptoms of hypoglycemia following the ingestion of dates and have suffered for years without an accurate diagnosis. Methodology: This report is based on three patients, from the same family, living in a date growing region of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The patients had been to several medical centers without getting any definite answers or diagnosis until they were referred to the Gastroenterology Clinic of King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, KSA. The data were obtained by careful history and laboratory investigations, and a final diagnosis of HFI made on fructose intolerance test (FIT). Results: The patients reported that they had avoided eating dates because of various symptoms, such as bloating, nausea, and even hypoglycemia when larger amounts were consumed. Their other symptoms included sleepiness, sweating, and shivering. After full examinations and necessary laboratory tests based on the above symptoms, FIT was performed and the patients were diagnosed with HFI. They were referred to a dietitian who advised a fructose-free diet. They felt well and were free of symptoms. Conclusion: HFI may remain undiagnosed until adulthood and may lead to disastrous complications and even death. The diagnosis can only be suspected after a careful dietary history is taken supported by FIT. This can

  3. The Role of Hypoglycemia in Cardiovascular Outcomes in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Paty, Breay W

    2015-12-01

    Intensive glucose management, targeting lower glycated hemoglobin (A1C) levels, has been shown to reduce the microvascular complications of diabetes, but the effect on cardiovascular (CV) outcomes is less clear. Observational follow-up of intensive glucose management studies suggest possible long-term CV benefits, but no clear reduction in CV events has been seen over 3 to 5 years. Intensive glucose management also increases the risk for hypoglycemia, particularly in patients with longstanding diabetes, cognitive impairment and hypoglycemia unawareness. Severe hypoglycemia has been linked to adverse consequences, including cardiac dysrhythmias, CV events and death, but the precise role of hypoglycemia in CV outcomes is uncertain. The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial was terminated early because of a higher rate of CV events in the intensive arm. Post hoc analyses of ACCORD and other trials suggest that cardiac autonomic neuropathy may be a predisposing factor to CV events. The Analyses of the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease (ADVANCE) trial and the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial (VADT) showed that subjects with severe hypoglycemia had more frequent adverse outcomes. However, rather than causing adverse events, it appears that severe hypoglycemia may be a marker of vulnerability for such events. This review focuses on the current understanding of the association between hypoglycemia and CV risk. PMID:26654859

  4. Defective counterregulation and hypoglycemia unawareness in diabetes: Mechanisms and emerging treatments

    PubMed Central

    Reno, Candace M.; Litvin, Marina; Clark, Amy L.; Fisher, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis For people with diabetes, hypoglycemia remains the limiting factor in achieving glycemic control. This article reviews recent advances in how the brain senses and responds to hypoglycemia. Novel mechanisms by which people with insulin treated diabetes develop hypoglycemia unawareness and impaired counterregulatory responses are outlined. Prevention strategies for reducing the incidence of hypoglycemia are discussed PMID:23391237

  5. Hypoglycemia After Antimicrobial Drug Prescription for Older Patients Using Sulfonylureas

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Trisha M.; Raji, Mukaila; Lin, Yu-Li; Tan, Alai; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Certain antimicrobial drugs interact with sulfonylureas to increase the risk of hypoglycemia. OBJECTIVE To determine the risk of hypoglycemia and associated costs in older patients prescribed glipizide or glyburide who fill a prescription for an antimicrobial drug. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This was a retrospective cohort study of Texas Medicare claims from 2006 to 2009 for patients 66 years or older who were prescribed glipizide or glyburide and who also filled a prescription for 1 of the 16 antimicrobials most commonly prescribed for this population. METHODS We assessed hypoglycemia events and associated Medicare costs in patients prescribed 1 of 7 antimicrobial agents thought to interact with sulfonylureas, using noninteracting antimicrobials as a comparison. We used a repeated measure logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, ethnicity, Medicaid eligibility, comorbidity, prior emergency department visits for hypoglycemia, prior hospitalizations for any cause, nursing home residence, and indication for the antimicrobial. We estimated odds of hypoglycemia, number needed to harm, deaths during hospitalization for hypoglycemia, and Medicare costs for hypoglycemia treatment. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Any hospitalization or emergency department visit owing to hypoglycemia within 14 days of antimicrobial exposure. RESULTS In multivariable analyses controlling for patient characteristics and indication for antimicrobial drug use, clarithromycin (odds ratio [OR], 3.96 [95% CI, 2.42–6.49]), levofloxacin (OR, 2.60 [95% CI, 2.18–3.10]), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (OR, 2.56 [95% CI, 2.12–3.10]), metronidazole (OR, 2.11 [95% CI, 1.28–3.47]), and ciprofloxacin (OR, 1.62 [95% CI, 1.33–1.97]) were associated with higher rates of hypoglycemia compared with a panel of noninteracting antimicrobials. The number needed to harm ranged from 71 for clarithromycin to 334 for ciprofloxacin. Patient factors associated with hypoglycemia included older

  6. Hypoglycemia in Patients with Diabetes and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E.

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic limitations in this situation. PMID:26239457

  7. Hypoglycemia-Induced Hemiparesis in a Diabetic Woman after Childbirth

    PubMed Central

    Kukaj, Vera; Jashari, Fisnik; Boshnjaku, Dren; Istrefi, Enis; Ibrahimi, Pranvera

    2015-01-01

    A 24-year-old female with type 1 diabetes mellitus presented with hemiparesis induced by hypoglycemia. She was hospitalized because she has noticed a weakness of her right hand and leg three days after childbirth. On physical examination she had an expressive dysphasia and right side hemiparesis with facial drop. Hypoglycemia is rarely associated with hemiparesis and it is often overlooked, especially when it happens in patients at higher risk of other diseases frequently associated with hemiparesis. Although sporadical cases of hypoglycemia-induced hemiparesis were reported, the clear pathophysiology behind this is not well determined. However, any individual case is important in order to increase the awareness of hypoglycemia as an important etiology of this condition. PMID:25984373

  8. Theophylline improves hypoglycemia unawareness in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    de Galan, Bastiaan E; Tack, Cees J; Lenders, Jacques W; Pasman, Jaco W; Elving, Lammy D; Russel, Frans G; Lutterman, Jos A; Smits, Paul

    2002-03-01

    Iatrogenic hypoglycemias and the subsequent occurrence of hypoglycemia unawareness are well-known complications of intensive insulin therapy in type 1 diabetic patients that limit glycemic management. From a pharmacological point of view, the adenosine-receptor antagonist theophylline might be beneficial in the management of hypoglycemia unawareness. Theophylline stimulates the release of catecholamines and reduces cerebral blood flow, thereby facilitating stronger metabolic responses to and a prompter perception of decreasing glucose levels. To test the effect of theophylline on responses to hypoglycemia, we performed paired hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp studies in 15 diabetic patients with hypoglycemia unawareness and 15 matched healthy control subjects. In random order, we concurrently infused either theophylline or placebo. Measurements included counterregulatory hormones, symptoms, hemodynamic parameters, and sweat detection using a dew-point electrode. Additionally, middle cerebral artery velocities (V(MCA)) using transcranial Doppler were monitored as an estimate of cerebral blood flow. When compared with placebo, theophylline significantly enhanced responses of plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol levels in both diabetic patients and control subjects. Because of the theophylline, sweat production started at approximately 0.3 mmol/l higher glucose levels in both groups (P < 0.01), and symptom scores in diabetic patients approached those in control subjects. Theophylline decreased V(MCA) in both groups (P < 0.001), but significantly greater in diabetic patients (P < 0.01), and prevented the hypoglycemia-induced increase of V(MCA) that occurred during the placebo studies. We conclude that theophylline improves counterregulatory responses to and perception of hypoglycemia in diabetic patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. PMID:11872681

  9. Transient hepatomegaly and hypoglycemia. A consequence of malicious insulin administration.

    PubMed

    Dershewitz, R; Vestal, B; Maclaren, N K; Cornblath, M

    1976-09-01

    On two occasions, a 3 1/2-year-old black girl had severe hypoglycemia associated with transient hepatomegaly. The plasma insulin level during the second hypoglycemic episode was excessive and led to a diagnosis of malicious insulin administration. We suggest that plasma be obtained for insulin determination in children with hypoglycemia, and that transient hepatomegaly may be a helpful sign in cases of insulin overdose. PMID:961662

  10. Low ambient temperature and neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia in men.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Kvetnanský, R; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H; Nazar, K; Vigas, M

    1995-12-01

    Nutritional factors, such as an excess or a deficiency of glucose, play an important role in neuroendocrine regulations. Hormonal and metabolic responses to hypoglycemia were examined in healthy non-obese volunteers under conditions of low ambient temperature. Hypoglycemia was induced by intravenous injection of insulin in two randomized trials performed at room temperature and at 4 degrees C. At room temperature, the typical neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia was established. The increases of ACTH, beta-endorphin, growth hormone and cortisol in response to insulin hypoglycemia failed to be modified by low ambient temperature. Acute cold exposure significantly reduced epinephrine and totally inhibited prolactin response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In spite of significant changes in epinephrine response to hypoglycemia at low ambient temperature, no striking differences in plasma glucose levels compared to those measured at room temperature were observed. However, under conditions of low temperature the reestablishment of normoglycemia was delayed. No changes in free fatty acids were found under our experimental conditions. The presented data show that low ambient temperature exerts selective effects on some neuroendocrine and metabolic parameters. PMID:8653553

  11. Hypoglycemia and Cardiovascular Risk: Is There a Major Link?

    PubMed

    Hanefeld, Markolf; Frier, Brian M; Pistrosch, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Severe hypoglycemia is recognized to be one of the strongest predictors of macrovascular events, adverse clinical outcomes, and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, it is uncertain whether a direct pathophysiological link exists or whether hypoglycemia is primarily a marker of vulnerability to these events. Large clinical trials have reported an increased hazard ratio for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes and severe hypoglycemia, but such an association has not been demonstrated in prospective trials of people with type 1 diabetes. Several cardiovascular effects occur during hypoglycemia either as a result of low blood glucose levels per se or through activation of the sympathoadrenal response: hemodynamic changes with an increase in cardiac work load and potential attenuation of myocardial perfusion, electrophysiological changes that may be arrhythmogenic, induction of a prothrombotic state, and release of inflammatory markers. Although the potential for a causal relationship has been demonstrated in mechanistic studies, the evidence from large prospective studies that hypoglycemia is a major causal contributor to cardiovascular events is limited to date. Other preexisting cardiovascular risk factors in addition to hypoglycemia may be the major link to the final cardiovascular event, but a low blood glucose level can trigger these events in patients with a high cardiovascular risk. PMID:27440834

  12. Update on the management of neonatal sepsis in horses.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jon

    2014-08-01

    Despite advances in neonatal intensive care sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock remain the biggest killers of neonatal foals. Management of this severe syndrome remains difficult, requiring intensive intervention. Key aspects of management include infection control, hemodynamic support, immunomodulatory interventions, and metabolic/endocrine support. Infection control largely consists of early antimicrobial therapy, plasma transfusions, and local therapy for the infected focus. In cases with severe sepsis or septic shock, hemodynamic support with fluids, vasoactive agents, and respiratory support insuring oxygen delivery to vital organs is important. Nutritional support is important, but close monitoring is needed to avoid hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. PMID:25016494

  13. How to prevent and treat pharmacological hypoglycemias.

    PubMed

    Reyes García, R; Mezquita Raya, P

    2014-05-01

    A 58 year-old woman with type 2 diabetes diagnosed 3 years before came to our clinic. Her treatment was metformin 850 mg every 12 hours and glimepiride 4 mg every 24 hours. After the initiation of glimepiride 9 months before her weight has increased 5 kg, and she suffers frequent hypoglycemias which have affected her while driving. Her BMI is 35.5 kg/m². She has a normal eye fund exam. She has hypertension treated with telmisartán and hidroclorotiazide with adequate control, and also hypercholesterolemia treated with atorvastatine 40 mg every 24 hours. Her blood test shows an HbA1c of 7.0%, normal values of microalbuminuria, total cholesterol 149 mg/dl, HDL cholesterol 52 mg/dl, LDL cholesterol 98 mg/dl and triglycerides 123 mg/dl. Her blood pressure is 129/81 mmHg, there was no orthostatic hypotension, and her peripheral neurological examination shows normal results. In summary, our case is a young woman with type 2 diabetes and obesity, without chronic complications and which has frequent hypoglycaemia. How must this woman be evaluated and treated? PMID:24468002

  14. Neonatal Hyperglycemia due to Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Fargas-Berríos, N.; García-Fragoso, L.; García-García, I.; Valcárcel, M.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hyperglycemia is a metabolic disorder found in the neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a very uncommon cause of hyperglycemia in the newborn, occurring in 1 in every 400,000 births. There are two subtypes of neonatal diabetes mellitus: permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) and transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM). We describe a term, small for gestational age, female neonate with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus who presented with poor feeding tolerance and vomiting associated with hyperglycemia (385 mg/dL), glycosuria, and metabolic acidosis within the first 12 hours of life. The neonate was treated with intravenous insulin, obtaining a slight control of hyperglycemia. An adequate glycemia was achieved at 5 weeks of life. The molecular studies showed complete loss of maternal methylation at the TND differentially methylated region on chromosome 6q24. The etiology of this neonate's hyperglycemia was a hypomethylation of the maternal TND locus. A rare cause of neonatal diabetes mellitus must be considered if a neonate presents refractory hyperglycemia. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in Puerto Rico of transient neonatal mellitus due to the uncommon mechanism of maternal hypomethylation of the TND locus. Its prevalence in Puerto Rico is unknown. PMID:26576310

  15. Neonatal Hyperglycemia due to Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Fargas-Berríos, N; García-Fragoso, L; García-García, I; Valcárcel, M

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hyperglycemia is a metabolic disorder found in the neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a very uncommon cause of hyperglycemia in the newborn, occurring in 1 in every 400,000 births. There are two subtypes of neonatal diabetes mellitus: permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) and transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM). We describe a term, small for gestational age, female neonate with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus who presented with poor feeding tolerance and vomiting associated with hyperglycemia (385 mg/dL), glycosuria, and metabolic acidosis within the first 12 hours of life. The neonate was treated with intravenous insulin, obtaining a slight control of hyperglycemia. An adequate glycemia was achieved at 5 weeks of life. The molecular studies showed complete loss of maternal methylation at the TND differentially methylated region on chromosome 6q24. The etiology of this neonate's hyperglycemia was a hypomethylation of the maternal TND locus. A rare cause of neonatal diabetes mellitus must be considered if a neonate presents refractory hyperglycemia. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in Puerto Rico of transient neonatal mellitus due to the uncommon mechanism of maternal hypomethylation of the TND locus. Its prevalence in Puerto Rico is unknown. PMID:26576310

  16. Neonatal hypotonia.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Susan E

    2015-06-01

    Neonatal hypotonia is a common problem in the neonatal intensive care unit. The genetic differential diagnosis is broad, encompassing primary muscular dystrophies, chromosome abnormalities, neuropathies, and inborn errors of metabolism. Recognition of hypotonia is relatively straightforward, but determining the cause can be challenging. It is important for the neonatologist to have an organized approach to the assessment of neonatal hypotonia. Physical examination and history alongside basic laboratory testing and imaging aid in the differential diagnosis. Identification of the cause is essential for determining prognosis, associated morbidities, and recurrence risk. The prevailing therapeutic modality is physical, occupational, speech/feeding, and respiratory therapy. PMID:26042909

  17. Severe hypoglycemia in users of sulfonylurea antidiabetic agents and antihyperlipidemics.

    PubMed

    Leonard, C E; Bilker, W B; Brensinger, C M; Han, X; Flory, J H; Flockhart, D A; Gagne, J J; Cardillo, S; Hennessy, S

    2016-05-01

    Drug-drug interactions causing severe hypoglycemia due to antidiabetic drugs is a major clinical and public health problem. We assessed whether sulfonylurea use with a statin or fibrate was associated with severe hypoglycemia. We conducted cohort studies of users of glyburide, glipizide, and glimepiride plus a statin or fibrate within a Medicaid population. The outcome was a validated, diagnosis-based algorithm for severe hypoglycemia. Among 592,872 persons newly exposed to a sulfonylurea+antihyperlipidemic, the incidence of severe hypoglycemia was 5.8/100 person-years. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for sulfonylurea+statins were consistent with no association. Most overall HRs for sulfonylurea+fibrate were elevated, with sulfonylurea-specific adjusted HRs as large as 1.50 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.24-1.81) for glyburide+gemfibrozil, 1.37 (95% CI: 1.11-1.69) for glipizide+gemfibrozil, and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.29-2.06) for glimepiride+fenofibrate. Concomitant therapy with a sulfonylurea and fibrate is associated with an often delayed increased rate of severe hypoglycemia. PMID:26566262

  18. Gastric Bypass Reduces Symptoms and Hormonal Responses in Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Niclas; Börjesson, Joey Lau; Sundbom, Magnus; Wiklund, Urban; Karlsson, F Anders; Eriksson, Jan W

    2016-09-01

    Gastric bypass (GBP) surgery, one of the most common bariatric procedures, induces weight loss and metabolic effects. The mechanisms are not fully understood, but reduced food intake and effects on gastrointestinal hormones are thought to contribute. We recently observed that GBP patients have lowered glucose levels and frequent asymptomatic hypoglycemic episodes. Here, we subjected patients before and after undergoing GBP surgery to hypoglycemia and examined symptoms and hormonal and autonomic nerve responses. Twelve obese patients without diabetes (8 women, mean age 43.1 years [SD 10.8] and BMI 40.6 kg/m(2) [SD 3.1]) were examined before and 23 weeks (range 19-25) after GBP surgery with hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp (stepwise to plasma glucose 2.7 mmol/L). The mean change in Edinburgh Hypoglycemia Score during clamp was attenuated from 10.7 (6.4) before surgery to 5.2 (4.9) after surgery. There were also marked postsurgery reductions in levels of glucagon, cortisol, and catecholamine and the sympathetic nerve responses to hypoglycemia. In addition, growth hormone displayed a delayed response but to a higher peak level. Levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide rose during hypoglycemia but rose less postsurgery compared with presurgery. Thus, GBP surgery causes a resetting of glucose homeostasis, which reduces symptoms and neurohormonal responses to hypoglycemia. Further studies should address the underlying mechanisms as well as their impact on the overall metabolic effects of GBP surgery. PMID:27313315

  19. A novel extreme learning machine for hypoglycemia detection.

    PubMed

    San, Phyo Phyo; Ling, Sai Ho; Soe, Ni Ni; Nguyen, Hung T

    2014-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common side-effect of insulin therapy for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and is the major limiting factor to maintain tight glycemic control. The deficiency in glucose counter-regulation may even lead to severe hypoglycaemia. It is always threatening to the well-being of patients with T1DM since more severe hypoglycemia leads to seizures or loss of consciousness and the possible development of permanent brain dysfunction under certain circumstances. Thus, an accurate early detection on hypoglycemia is an important research topic. With the use of new emerging technology, an extreme learning machine (ELM) based hypoglycemia detection system is developed to recognize the presence of hypoglycemic episodes. From a clinical study of 16 children with T1DM, natural occurrence of nocturnal hypoglycemic episodes are associated with increased heart rates (p <; 0.06) and increased corrected QT intervals (p <; 0.001). The overall data were organized into a training set with 8 patients (320 data points) and a testing set with 8 patients (269 data points). By using the ELM trained feed-forward neural network (ELM-FFNN), the testing sensitivity (true positive) and specificity (true negative) for detection of hypoglycemia is 78 and 60% respectability. PMID:25569957

  20. Neonatal conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn conjunctivitis; Conjunctivitis of the newborn; Ophthalmia neonatorum; Eye infection - neonatal conjunctivitis ... diseases spread through sexual contact to prevent newborn conjunctivitis caused by these infections. Putting eye drops into ...

  1. Neonatal Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Neonatal death ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Complications & Loss ...

  2. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and some strains of streptococcus. Group B streptococcus (GBS) has been a major cause of neonatal sepsis. ... an infant's risk of early-onset bacterial sepsis: GBS colonization during pregnancy Preterm delivery Water breaking (rupture ...

  3. Management of Hypoglycemia in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    McGill, Dayna E; Levitsky, Lynne L

    2016-09-01

    Hypoglycemia and fear of hypoglycemia limit appropriate glycemic control in many children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Traditional approaches to the prevention of hypoglycemia including patient education about modifiable risk factors for hypoglycemia (changes in insulin, diet, and exercise) and frequency of self glucose monitoring remain important for hypoglycemia prevention. Continuous glucose monitoring systems with or without a partial closed-loop control of insulin infusion have been very useful in the prevention of hypoglycemia. Oral carbohydrate and parenteral glucagon continue to be the mainstays of hypoglycemia treatment. In the future, we can look forward to regulatory approval of closed-loop insulin delivery and glucose monitoring systems to facilitate euglycemia, as well as glucagon administered by the intranasal route to treat hypoglycemia. PMID:27515311

  4. Intranasal glucagon: a promising approach for treatment of severe hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Pontiroli, Antonio E

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of diabetic complications is mainly obtained through optimal control of blood glucose levels. With hypoglycemic drugs like beta-cell stimulating drugs and especially insulin, the limit to treatment is represented by hypoglycemia, a life-threatening occurrence that is dangerous itself and can induce fear of other episodes. Glucagon, injected subcutaneously (SC) or intramuscularly (IM), is the treatment of choice for severe hypoglycemia outside of the hospital setting. However, due to practical aspects such as preparation of solutions for administration and injection by untrained persons, there are obstacles to its routine use. This review focuses on the current status of alternative routes of administration of peptide hormones, and in particular the intranasal (IN) route of glucagon, as a promising approach for the treatment of severe hypoglycemia. PMID:25385946

  5. A meta-analysis and systematic review of the prevalence of mitochondrially encoded 12S RNA in the general population: Is there a role for screening neonates requiring aminoglycosides?

    PubMed Central

    Ibekwe, Titus S.; Bhimrao, Sanjiv K.; Westerberg, Brian D.; Kozak, Frederick K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This was a meta-analysis and systematic review to determine the global prevalence of the mitochondrially encoded 12S RNA (MT-RNR1) genetic mutation in order to assess the need for neonatal screening prior to aminoglycoside therapy. Materials and Methods: A comprehensive search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effect, Cochrane Library, Clinical Evidence and Cochrane Central Register of Trials was performed including cross-referencing independently by 2 assessors. Selections were restricted to human studies in English. Meta-analysis was done with MetaXL 2013. Results: Forty-five papers out of 295 met the criteria. Pooled prevalence in the general population for MT-RNR1 gene mutations (A1555G, C1494T, A7445G) was 2% (1–4%) at 99%. Conclusion: Routine screening for MT-RNR1 mutations in the general population prior to treatment with aminoglycosides appear desirable but poorly supported by the weak level of evidence available in the literature. Routine screening in high-risk (Chinese and Spanish) populations appear justified. PMID:26168747

  6. Human Brain Glycogen Metabolism During and After Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Öz, Gülin; Kumar, Anjali; Rao, Jyothi P.; Kodl, Christopher T.; Chow, Lisa; Eberly, Lynn E.; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested the hypotheses that human brain glycogen is mobilized during hypoglycemia and its content increases above normal levels (“supercompensates”) after hypoglycemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We utilized in vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with intravenous infusions of [13C]glucose in healthy volunteers to measure brain glycogen metabolism during and after euglycemic and hypoglycemic clamps. RESULTS After an overnight intravenous infusion of 99% enriched [1-13C]glucose to prelabel glycogen, the rate of label wash-out from [1-13C]glycogen was higher (0.12 ± 0.05 vs. 0.03 ± 0.06 μmol · g−1 · h−1, means ± SD, P < 0.02, n = 5) during a 2-h hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp (glucose concentration 57.2 ± 9.7 mg/dl) than during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (95.3 ± 3.3 mg/dl), indicating mobilization of glucose units from glycogen during moderate hypoglycemia. Five additional healthy volunteers received intravenous 25–50% enriched [1-13C]glucose over 22–54 h after undergoing hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic (glucose concentration 92.4 ± 2.3 mg/dl) and hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic (52.9 ± 4.8 mg/dl) clamps separated by at least 1 month. Levels of newly synthesized glycogen measured from 4 to 80 h were higher after hypoglycemia than after euglycemia (P ≤ 0.01 for each subject), indicating increased brain glycogen synthesis after moderate hypoglycemia. CONCLUSIONS These data indicate that brain glycogen supports energy metabolism when glucose supply from the blood is inadequate and that its levels rebound to levels higher than normal after a single episode of moderate hypoglycemia in humans. PMID:19502412

  7. Hypoglycemia as a complication of removal of a pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, C. T.; Imrie, D.

    1977-01-01

    In a patient with a solitary pheochromocytoma severe hypoglycemia developed following excision of the tumour. The possible causative mechanism was thought to be a reactive relative increase in insulin production secondary to increased endogenous production of glucose, induced by the large amounts of epinephrine produced by the tumour. Alternatively, epinephrine withdrawal following removal of the tumour under phentolamine infusion may have induced increased insulin production and hence potentiated the development of hypoglycemia. Careful monitoring of the blood glucose concentration during and after the operation is recommended to obviate this potentially fatal complication. PMID:844018

  8. Prevalence and risk factors of early fecal carriage of Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus spp and their antimicrobial resistant patterns among healthy neonates born in a hospital setting in central Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    El-Kersh, Talat A.; Marie, Mohammed A.; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed A.; Al-Agamy, Mohamed H.; Al-Bloushy, Ahmad A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the prevalence, antibiotic resistant profiles, and risk factors of early fecal carriage of Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) and staphylococci among 150 healthy Saudi neonates born in a hospital setting in central Saudi Arabia. Methods: This prospective study was conducted in Al-Bukayriyah General Hospital, Qassim, Saudi Arabia, between June 2012 and January 2013. The E. faecalis and Staphylococcus spp. isolates were identified manually, and Vitek2 system was used for identity confirmation at the species level and minimum inhibitory concentration-susceptibility testing. Results: Enterococcus faecalis (n=73) and Staphylococcus spp. (n=18) were recovered. Unlike staphylococci, E. faecalis colonization did not significantly vary from day one up to 7 days of life, regardless of the type of feeding, but it was relatively higher among vaginally versus cesarean delivery. Both Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) and Staphylococcus aureus carriage increase as the body weight increases, and this difference was significant (p=0.025) for S. epidermidis. High-level resistance in Gentamycin among E. faecalis isolates was 25% and 11% to Streptomycin. Thirty percent of S. epidermidis were resistant to oxacillin and exhibited multidrug-resistant (MDR) patterns of 5 resistant markers, which were also observed among 2/5 (40%) of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Conclusion: Enterococcus faecalis did not significantly vary in relation to type of delivery, age up to 7 days, and type of feeding. The neonatal fecal carriage of MDR isolates should be considered as a crucial reservoir to the further spread of antimicrobial resistance genes among hospitals, cross infections, and the community. PMID:26905350

  9. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  10. Orexin signaling is necessary for hypoglycemia-induced prevention of conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Otlivanchik, Oleg; Sanders, Nicole M; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose; Levin, Barry E

    2016-01-01

    While the neural control of glucoregulatory responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia is beginning to be elucidated, brain sites responsible for behavioral responses to hypoglycemia are relatively poorly understood. To help elucidate central control mechanisms associated with hypoglycemia unawareness, we first evaluated the effect of recurrent hypoglycemia on a simple behavioral measure, the robust feeding response to hypoglycemia, in rats. First, food intake was significantly, and similarly, increased above baseline saline-induced intake (1.1 ± 0.2 g; n = 8) in rats experiencing a first (4.4 ± 0.3; n = 8) or third daily episode of recurrent insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH, 3.7 ± 0.3 g; n = 9; P < 0.05). Because food intake was not impaired as a result of prior IIH, we next developed an alternative animal model of hypoglycemia-induced behavioral arousal using a conditioned place preference (CPP) model. We found that hypoglycemia severely blunted previously acquired CPP in rats and that recurrent hypoglycemia prevented this blunting. Pretreatment with a brain penetrant, selective orexin receptor-1 antagonist, SB-334867A, blocked hypoglycemia-induced blunting of CPP. Recurrently hypoglycemic rats also showed decreased preproorexin expression in the perifornical hypothalamus (50%) but not in the adjacent lateral hypothalamus. Pretreatment with sertraline, previously shown to prevent hypoglycemia-associated glucoregulatory failure, did not prevent blunting of hypoglycemia-induced CPP prevention by recurrent hypoglycemia. This work describes the first behavioral model of hypoglycemia unawareness and suggests a role for orexin neurons in mediating behavioral responses to hypoglycemia. PMID:26511522

  11. Hypoglycemia associated with oleander toxicity in a dog.

    PubMed

    Page, C; Murtaugh, R J

    2015-03-01

    Oleander poisoning typically results in cardiac arrhythmias, hyperkalemia, and gastrointestinal irritation, and can be fatal. Oleander extracts have also been studied experimentally as hypoglycemic agents. Here, we describe a dog with confirmed oleander toxicosis presenting with classical symptoms and also hypoglycemia. After excluding other likely causes of hypoglycemia, the finding was attributed to oleander toxicosis, which has not been previously reported in dogs. A 7-year-old female spayed Maltese was presented to the emergency service after ingesting oleander leaves. Toxicosis was confirmed by measurement of digoxin using a competitive binding immunoassay, patient level 0.7 ng/mL (0.9 nmol/L) 24-h post-ingestion. Clinical symptoms included vomiting, cardiac arrhythmia, mild hyperkalemia, and hypoglycemia. Treatment was successful with aggressive supportive care, and the dog was discharged from the hospital after 48 h and made a full recovery. This case reviews the presentation and treatment of oleander toxicity but also highlights possible effects of oleander on blood sugar in dogs. Hypoglycemia in this dog, attributed to oleander poisoning, is interesting as it supports experimental research into hypoglycemic properties of oleander extracts. PMID:25252802

  12. Lactate preserves neuronal metabolism and function following antecedent recurrent hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Raimund I.; Jiang, Lihong; Herman, Peter; Zhao, Chen; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Mason, Graeme F.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Rothman, Douglas L.; Sherwin, Robert S.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia occurs frequently during intensive insulin therapy in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and remains the single most important obstacle in achieving tight glycemic control. Using a rodent model of hypoglycemia, we demonstrated that exposure to antecedent recurrent hypoglycemia leads to adaptations of brain metabolism so that modest increments in circulating lactate allow the brain to function normally under acute hypoglycemic conditions. We characterized 3 major factors underlying this effect. First, we measured enhanced transport of lactate both into as well as out of the brain that resulted in only a small increase of its contribution to total brain oxidative capacity, suggesting that it was not the major fuel. Second, we observed a doubling of the glucose contribution to brain metabolism under hypoglycemic conditions that restored metabolic activity to levels otherwise only observed at euglycemia. Third, we determined that elevated lactate is critical for maintaining glucose metabolism under hypoglycemia, which preserves neuronal function. These unexpected findings suggest that while lactate uptake was enhanced, it is insufficient to support metabolism as an alternate substrate to replace glucose. Lactate is, however, able to modulate metabolic and neuronal activity, serving as a “metabolic regulator” instead. PMID:23543056

  13. BAD Modulates Counterregulatory Responses to Hypoglycemia and Protective Glucoprivic Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Osundiji, Mayowa A.; Godes, Marina L.; Evans, Mark L.; Danial, Nika N.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia or glucoprivation triggers protective hormonal counterregulatory and feeding responses to aid the restoration of normoglycemia. Increasing evidence suggests pertinent roles for the brain in sensing glucoprivation and mediating counterregulation, however, the precise nature of the metabolic signals and molecular mediators linking central glucose sensing to effector functions are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that protective hormonal and feeding responses to hypoglycemia are regulated by BAD, a BCL-2 family protein with dual functions in apoptosis and metabolism. BAD-deficient mice display impaired glycemic and hormonal counterregulatory responses to systemic glucoprivation induced by 2-deoxy-D-glucose. BAD is also required for proper counterregulatory responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia as evident from significantly higher glucose infusion rates and lower plasma epinephrine levels during hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamps. Importantly, RNA interference-mediated acute knockdown of Bad in the brain provided independent genetic evidence for its relevance in central glucose sensing and proper neurohumoral responses to glucoprivation. Moreover, BAD deficiency is associated with impaired glucoprivic feeding, suggesting that its role in adaptive responses to hypoglycemia extends beyond hormonal responses to regulation of feeding behavior. Together, these data indicate a previously unappreciated role for BAD in the control of central glucose sensing. PMID:22162752

  14. Neonatal transfusion.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Anne M; Williamson, Lorna M

    2013-11-01

    Neonates and particularly preterm neonates are frequent recipients of large volumes of blood products relative to their size. Good quality evidence for transfusion practice in this patient group has been lacking but is now increasing. Triggers for red cell transfusion are now better defined, with on-going trials of platelet transfusions likely to yield similar evidence. Transfusion is now extremely safe, but complications such as transfusion associated acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) are likely to be under recognised, particularly in the sick extremely preterm neonate with respiratory symptoms. This review summarises the rationale and current practice with regard to blood component therapy. Background data on component specifications and hazards of transfusion are provided. Indications for transfusion of specific products including red cells, platelets, and plasma are discussed, and their use is illustrated by case examples. PMID:24095206

  15. Neonatal Stridor

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Matija; Cheng, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal stridor is an important condition, in many cases implying an impending disaster with a very compromised airway. It is a sign that has to be considered with the rest of the history and examination findings, and appropriate investigations should then be undertaken to confirm the source of the noise. Neonates with stridor should be managed in a multidisciplinary setting, by clinicians familiar with the intricate physiology of these children, and with access to the multitude of medical and surgical investigative and therapeutic options required to provide first-rate care. PMID:22235209

  16. Brain glucose metabolism during hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes: insights from functional and metabolic neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Rooijackers, Hanne M M; Wiegers, Evita C; Tack, Cees J; van der Graaf, Marinette; de Galan, Bastiaan E

    2016-02-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most frequent complication of insulin therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes. Since the brain is reliant on circulating glucose as its main source of energy, hypoglycemia poses a threat for normal brain function. Paradoxically, although hypoglycemia commonly induces immediate decline in cognitive function, long-lasting changes in brain structure and cognitive function are uncommon in patients with type 1 diabetes. In fact, recurrent hypoglycemia initiates a process of habituation that suppresses hormonal responses to and impairs awareness of subsequent hypoglycemia, which has been attributed to adaptations in the brain. These observations sparked great scientific interest into the brain's handling of glucose during (recurrent) hypoglycemia. Various neuroimaging techniques have been employed to study brain (glucose) metabolism, including PET, fMRI, MRS and ASL. This review discusses what is currently known about cerebral metabolism during hypoglycemia, and how findings obtained by functional and metabolic neuroimaging techniques contributed to this knowledge. PMID:26521082

  17. Evidence-informed clinical practice recommendations for treatment of type 1 diabetes complicated by problematic hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Pratik; Rickels, Michael R; Senior, Peter A; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Maffi, Paola; Kay, Thomas W; Keymeulen, Bart; Inagaki, Nobuya; Saudek, Frantisek; Lehmann, Roger; Hering, Bernhard J

    2015-06-01

    Problematic hypoglycemia, defined as two or more episodes per year of severe hypoglycemia or as one episode associated with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia, extreme glycemic lability, or major fear and maladaptive behavior, is a challenge, especially for patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes. Individualized therapy for such patients should include a composite target: optimal glucose control without problematic hypoglycemia. Therefore, we propose a tiered, four-stage algorithm based on evidence of efficacy given the limitations of educational, technological, and transplant interventions. All patients with problematic hypoglycemia should undergo structured or hypoglycemia-specific education programs (stage 1). Glycemic and hypoglycemia treatment targets should be individualized and reassessed every 3-6 months. If targets are not met, one diabetes technology-continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion or continuous glucose monitoring-should be added (stage 2). For patients with continued problematic hypoglycemia despite education (stage 1) and one diabetes technology (stage 2), sensor-augmented insulin pumps preferably with an automated low-glucose suspend feature and/or very frequent contact with a specialized hypoglycemia service can reduce hypoglycemia (stage 3). For patients whose problematic hypoglycemia persists, islet or pancreas transplant should be considered (stage 4). This algorithm provides an evidence-informed approach to resolving problematic hypoglycemia; it should be used as a guide, with individual patient circumstances directing suitability and acceptability to ensure the prudent use of technology and scarce transplant resources. Standardized reporting of hypoglycemia outcomes and inclusion of patients with problematic hypoglycemia in studies of new interventions may help to guide future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25998294

  18. Evidence-Informed Clinical Practice Recommendations for Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes Complicated by Problematic Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Pratik; Rickels, Michael R.; Senior, Peter A.; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Maffi, Paola; Kay, Thomas W.; Keymeulen, Bart; Inagaki, Nobuya; Saudek, Frantisek; Lehmann, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Problematic hypoglycemia, defined as two or more episodes per year of severe hypoglycemia or as one episode associated with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia, extreme glycemic lability, or major fear and maladaptive behavior, is a challenge, especially for patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes. Individualized therapy for such patients should include a composite target: optimal glucose control without problematic hypoglycemia. Therefore, we propose a tiered, four-stage algorithm based on evidence of efficacy given the limitations of educational, technological, and transplant interventions. All patients with problematic hypoglycemia should undergo structured or hypoglycemia-specific education programs (stage 1). Glycemic and hypoglycemia treatment targets should be individualized and reassessed every 3–6 months. If targets are not met, one diabetes technology—continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion or continuous glucose monitoring—should be added (stage 2). For patients with continued problematic hypoglycemia despite education (stage 1) and one diabetes technology (stage 2), sensor-augmented insulin pumps preferably with an automated low-glucose suspend feature and/or very frequent contact with a specialized hypoglycemia service can reduce hypoglycemia (stage 3). For patients whose problematic hypoglycemia persists, islet or pancreas transplant should be considered (stage 4). This algorithm provides an evidence-informed approach to resolving problematic hypoglycemia; it should be used as a guide, with individual patient circumstances directing suitability and acceptability to ensure the prudent use of technology and scarce transplant resources. Standardized reporting of hypoglycemia outcomes and inclusion of patients with problematic hypoglycemia in studies of new interventions may help to guide future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25998294

  19. Neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Heath, P T; Nik Yusoff, N K; Baker, C J

    2003-05-01

    Twelve years ago an annotation was published in Archives of Disease in Childhood regarding the antibiotic treatment of suspected neonatal meningitis. The authors recommended the use of cephalosporins rather than chloramphenicol and advocated intraventricular aminoglycoside treatment in selected cases. They noted the absence of clinical trials with third generation cephalosporins that showed an improvement in mortality or neurological outcome. PMID:12719388

  20. Neonatal Infectious Diseases: Evaluation of Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul W.; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. The following chapter reviews recent trends in epidemiology, and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods and management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:23481106

  1. [Will the new SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin help us reduce the risk of hypoglycemia?].

    PubMed

    Pelikánová, Terezie

    2014-12-01

    The treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes is typically accompanied by hypoglycemia, if insulin or derivatives of sulfonylurea are used within the treatment. Apart from the fact that hypoglycemias are the major obstacle to achieving the desirable compensation of diabetes, hypoglycemia also has a number of serious clinical consequences. A long term serious hypoglycemia may lead to a sudden death, heart attack or irreversible brain damage. Clinically significant are also the light or asymptomatic hypoglycemias which in a considerably negative way affect the patient's quality of life. The use of modern technologies in continuous monitoring of glycemias has shown that the occurrence of asymptomatic hypoglycemias is much higher than we anticipated and that they largely involve nocturnal hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is associated with an increased level of depression, anxiety, dissatisfaction with the treatment and with a greater number of physician office visits. Nocturnal hypoglycemia has a negative impact on the quality of sleep, it may impair cognitive functions and performance efficiency next day. The prevention of hypoglycemia is therefore one of the basic goals of diabetes treatment and the low risk of hypoglycemia is among the main requirements that we place on the newly developed antidiabetic drugs. The negligible risk of hypoglycemia, which is comparable to placebo both in monotherapy and in most combinations with the antidiabetic drugs available today, is evidenced by the data from the studies undertaken with empagliflozin. It shows that the low risk of hypoglycemia is one of the benefits of gliflozins, the new group of medications with a unique mechanism of effect which has quite recently appeared on our market. PMID:25692841

  2. Fading kitten syndrome and neonatal isoerythrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bücheler, J

    1999-07-01

    Fading kitten syndrome includes noninfectious and infectious causes for neonatal death (birth to weaning age). Noninfectious causes are mostly responsible for mortality in the first week of life and include congenital disorders, low birth weights, trauma, malnutrition, environmental causes, and neonatal isoerythroylsis. Infectious causes are more prevalent at 3-4 weeks of age. This article discusses the causes, clinical signs, and management of fading kitten syndrome. PMID:10390788

  3. Healthcare resource implications of hypoglycemia-related hospital admissions and inpatient hypoglycemia: retrospective record-linked cohort studies in England

    PubMed Central

    McEwan, Philip; Larsen Thorsted, Brian; Wolden, Michael; Jacobsen, Judith; Evans, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Objective Using a retrospective cohort study, the mean length of hospital stay (LoS) and total per-patient expenditure for hypoglycemia requiring admission to hospital were estimated. In a separate matched retrospective cohort study, the effect of inpatient hypoglycemia on LoS, expenditure, and risk of all-cause mortality while admitted was investigated. Methods The cohorts consisted of patients aged ≥18 years with a diagnosis of type 1 or 2 diabetes between January 1, 2002 and October 30, 2012 in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink database, who had initiated insulin treatment and had a recording of hypoglycemia in the same period. In the matched retrospective cohort study, exposed patients (who experienced hypoglycemia in hospital) were case-matched with patients who did not experience hypoglycemia during admission (unexposed). Generalized linear regression was used to estimate LoS. Risk of all-cause mortality was evaluated via logistic regression. Results In the retrospective cohort study (1131 patients), mean LoS was 5.46 (95% CI 4.62 to 6.45) days for type 1 diabetes, and 5.04 (95% CI 4.46 to 5.71) days for type 2 diabetes. Mean cost per admission was £1034 (95% CI £855 to £1253). In the matched retrospective cohort study (1079 pairs of patients), exposed patients had a mean LoS of 11.91 days (95% CI 10.96 to 12.94 days) versus 4.80 (95% CI 4.41 to 5.23) for unexposed patients, p<0.0001. Exposed patients had a higher mortality risk compared with unexposed patients (OR 1.439 (95% CI 1.060to 1.952), p=0.0195). Total average per-patient cost for exposed patients was GBP (£)2235, 40% (p<0.0001) higher than total average admission cost in unexposed patients. Conclusions Hypoglycemia has a significant negative impact on patient outcomes, healthcare resource use, and expenditure. PMID:25815204

  4. Recognition and management of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sarah; Mitchell, James E; Steffen, Kristine; Engel, Scott; Wiisanen, Ron; Garcia, Luis; Malik, Shahbaz Ali

    2016-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with neuroglycopenia is an increasingly recognized complication of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) due to the changes in gut hormonal milieu. Physicians should be aware of this complication to ensure timely and effective treatment of post-RYGB patients, who present to them with hypoglycemic symptoms. Possible causes of hypoglycemia in these patients include late dumping syndrome, nesidioblastosis and rarely insulinoma. Systematic evaluation including history, biochemical analysis, and diagnostic testing might help in distinguishing among these diagnoses. Continuous glucose monitoring is also a valuable tool, revealing the episodes in the natural environment and can also be used to monitor treatment success. Treatment should begin with strict low carbohydrate diet, followed by medication therapy. Therapy with diazoxide, acarbose, calcium channel blockers and octreotide have been proven to be beneficial, but the response apparently is highly variable. When other treatment options fail, surgical options can be considered. PMID:26522879

  5. Diffuse nesidioblastosis with hypoglycemia mimicking an insulinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We describe a case of diffuse nesidioblastosis in an adult patient who presented with exclusively fasting symptoms and a focal pancreatic 111In-pentetreotide uptake mimicking an insulinoma. Case presentation A 23-year-old Caucasian man had severe daily fasting hypoglycemia with glucose levels below 2mmol/L. Besides rare neuroglycopenic symptoms (confusion, sleepiness), he was largely asymptomatic. His investigations revealed low venous plasma glucose levels, high insulin and C-peptide levels and a 72-hour fast test that were all highly suggestive for an insulinoma. Abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal any lesions. The sole imagery that was compatible with an insulinoma was a 111In-somatostatin receptor scintigraphy that showed a faint but definite focal tracer between the head and the body of the pancreas. However, this lesion could not be confirmed by endoscopic ultrasonography of the pancreas. Following duodenopancreatectomy, the histological findings were consistent with diffuse nesidioblastosis. Postoperatively, the patient continued to present with fasting hypoglycemia and was successfully treated with diazoxide. Conclusion In the absence of gastrointestinal surgery, nesidioblastosis is very rare in adults. In addition, nesidioblastosis is usually characterized by post-prandial hypoglycemia, whereas this patient presented with fasting hypoglycemia. This case also illustrates the risk for a false positive result of 111In-pentetreotide scintigraphy in the case of nesidioblastosis. Selective arterial calcium stimulation and venous sampling is the most reliable procedure for the positive diagnosis of insulinoma or nesidioblastosis and should be used to confirm any suspicion based on imaging modalities. PMID:23031644

  6. Reducing the Risk of Hypoglycemia Associated With Intravenous Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Victoria; Misiasz, Meaghan R.; Jones, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Computerized insulin infusion protocols have facilitated more effective blood glucose (BG) control in intensive care units (ICUs). This is particularly important in light of the risks associated with hypoglycemia. End stage renal disease (ESRD) increases the risk of insulin-induced hypoglycemia. We evaluated BG control in 210 patients in 2 medical ICUs and in 2 surgical ICUs who were treated with a computerized insulin infusion program (CIIP). Our CIIP was programmed for a BG target of 140-180 mg/dL for medical ICU patients or 120-160 mg/dL for surgical ICU patients. In addition, we focused on BG control in the 11% of our patients with ESRD. Mean BG was 147 ± 20 mg/dL for surgical ICU patients and 171 ± 26 mg/dL for medical ICU patients. Of both surgical and medical ICU patients, 17% had 1 or more BG 60-79 mg/dL, while 3% of surgical ICU and 8% of medical ICU patients had 1 or more BG < 60 mg/dL. Mean BG in ESRD patients was 147 ± 16 mg/dL similar to 152 ± 23 mg/dL in patients without ESRD. Of ESRD patients, 41% had 1 or more BG < 79 mg/dL as compared with 17.8% of non-ESRD patients (P < .01). A higher BG target for medical ICU patients as compared with surgical ICU patients yielded comparably low rates of moderate or severe hypoglycemia. However, hypoglycemia among ESRD patients was more common compared to non-ESRD patients, suggesting a need for a higher BG target specific to ESRD patients. PMID:25172875

  7. Neonatal circumcision.

    PubMed

    Lerman, S E; Liao, J C

    2001-12-01

    The merits of neonatal circumcision continue to be debated hotly. Some argue that circumcision is a "uniquely American medical enigma." Most of the world's male population remains uncircumcised; however, most boys born in the United States continue to undergo neonatal circumcision. Review of existing literature supports that most children who are uncircumcised do well from a medical standpoint and, thus, the question of whether US health care practitioners are subjecting neonates to an unnecessary surgical procedure remains. The medical benefits of circumcision are multiple, but most are small. The clearest medical benefit of circumcision is the relative reduction in the risk for a UTI, especially in early infancy. Although this risk [figure: see text] is real, the absolute numbers are small (risk ranges from 1 in 100 to 1 in 1000), and one investigator has estimated that it may take approximately 80 neonatal circumcisions to prevent one UTI. In the case of a patient with known urologic abnormalities that predispose to UTI, neonatal circumcision has a clearer role in terms of medical benefit to the patient. Most of the other medical benefits of circumcision probably can be realized without circumcision as long as access to clean water and proper penile hygiene are achieved. Proper penile hygiene should all but eliminate the risk for foreskin-related medical problems that will require circumcision. Moreover, proper hygiene and access to clean water has been shown to reduce the rate of development of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis in the uncircumcised population. Proper techniques on the care of the foreskin are illustrated in the American Academy of Pediatrics pamphlet titled "How to care for the uncircumcised penis." Regarding the relationship between STDs and circumcision, patient education and the practice of low-risk sexual behavior make a far greater impact than does routine circumcision in hopes of reducing the spread of HIV and other STDs. Nevertheless

  8. Neonatal short-term outcomes in infants with intrauterine growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hasmasanu, Monica G.; Bolboaca, Sorana D.; Baizat, Melinda I.; Drugan, Tudor C.; Zaharie, Gabriela C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the neonatal outcomes in newborns with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) in a Romanian population in a 3 level maternity unit. Methods: A matched case-control design, with one control for each patient was used. The case group comprised neonates with birth weight and birth length below the 10th percentile for the gestational age. Individual matching by gender and age of gestation was used to identify the control group. Both cases and controls were selected from the infants admitted to and discharged from the Neonatal Ward, at the First Gynecology Clinic, of the County Emergency Hospital Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, between January 2012 and June 2014. Results: One hundred and forty-two subjects were included in each group. The cesarean delivery was significantly more frequent in the IUGR group (66.9%) compared with controls (46.5%; p=0.0006). The Apgar score at one minute was ≥7 for most infants in both groups (77.9% IUGR group versus 77.5% control group), with no significant differences between the groups. A significantly higher percentage of infants in the IUGR group had hypoglycemia or intraventricular hemorrhage compared with the controls (p<0.05). Hypoglycemia proved a significant factor for IUGR (odds ratio = 4.763, 95% confidence interval: 1.711-13.255). Conclusion: Hypoglycemia and intraventricular hemorrhage characterized the IUGR newborns. PMID:26219445

  9. TTP presenting as refractory hypoglycemia in a patient with thromboangiitis obliterans.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Ashley; Gingold, Daniel B; Calvello, Emilie J B

    2014-12-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a challenging diagnosis to make in the emergency department. We present a case of TTP initially presenting with refractory hypoglycemia in a woman with thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease). To our knowledge, this is the first description of the association of hypoglycemia and thromboangiitis obliterans with TTP. We briefly review key aspects of the acute diagnosis and management of hypoglycemia and TTP pertinent to the emergency physician. PMID:24929773

  10. Prolactin and growth hormone responses to hypoglycemia in patients with systemic sclerosis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rovensky, Jozef; Raffayova, Helena; Imrich, Richard; Radikova, Zofia; Penesova, Adela; Macho, Ladislav; Lukac, Jozef; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Vigas, Milan

    2006-06-01

    This study compared prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH) responses to hypoglycemia in premenopausal females with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) with those in matched healthy controls. No differences were found in glucose and GH responses to hypoglycemia in both groups of patients compared to controls. SSc patients had lower PRL response (P < 0.05) to hypoglycemia compared to controls. PRL response tended to be lower also in PsA patients, however the difference did not reach level of statistical significance (P = 0.11). The present study showed decreased PRL response to hypoglycemia in premenopausal females with SSc. PMID:16855141

  11. Protective effect of lithium chloride against hypoglycemia-induced apoptosis in neuronal PC12 cell.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuzhen; Wang, Qian; Li, Dongsheng; Wu, Zhenghua; Li, Dawei; Lu, Kaili; Zhao, Yuwu; Sun, Yongning

    2016-08-25

    Hypoglycemia is defined by an arbitrary plasma glucose level lower than 3.9mmol/L and is a most common and feared adverse effect of treatment of diabetes mellitus. Emerging evidences demonstrated that hypoglycemia could induce enhanced apoptosis. Lithium chloride (LiCl), a FDA approved drug clinically used for treatment of bipolar disorders, is recently proven having neuroprotection against various stresses in the cellular and animal models of neural disorders. Here, we have established a hypoglycemia model in vitro and assessed the neuroprotective efficacy of LiCl against hypoglycemia-induced apoptosis and the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. Our studies showed that LiCl protects against hypoglycemia-induced neurotoxicity in vitro. Exposure to hypoglycemia results in enhanced apoptosis and the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms involved inhibition of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by decreasing wnt3a levels, β-catenin levels and increasing GSK-3β levels, which was confirmed by the use of Wnt-specific activator LiCl. Hypoglycemia-induced apoptosis were significantly reversed by LiCl, leading to increased cell survival. LiCl also alters the expression/levels of the Wnt pathway genes/proteins, which were reduced due to exposed to hypoglycemia. Overall, our results conclude that LiCl provides neuroprotection against hypoglycemia-induced apoptosis via activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:27241942

  12. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia syndrome associated with mutations in the human insulin receptor gene: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yohei; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Mineo, Ikuo; Fukui, Kenji; Fukuhara, Atsunori; Iwamoto, Ryuya; Imagawa, Akihisa; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-01-01

    Insulinoma and insulin or insulin receptor (IR) autoantibodies are the main causes of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in adults, but the exact cause in other cases remains obscure. This study is to determine the genetic basis of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in two cases without the above abnormalities. Sequence analysis of IR gene in two patients with adult-onset hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia and their relatives were performed, and the mutant gene observed in one case was analyzed. Both cases had normal levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting hyperinsulinemia, low insulin sensitivity, and hypoglycemia with excessive insulin secretion during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Both reported adult-onset postprandial hypoglycemic symptoms. In one patient, a missense mutation (Arg256Cys) was detected in both alleles of the IR gene, and his parents had the same mutation in only one allele but no hypoglycemia. The other had a novel nonsense mutation (Trp1273X) followed by a mutation (Gln1274Lys) in one allele, and his 9-year old son had the same mutation in one allele, together with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia during OGTT. Overexpression experiments of the mutant gene found in Case 1 in mammalian cells showed abnormal processing of the IR protein and demonstrated reduced function of Akt/Erk phosphorylation by insulin in the cells. In two cases of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in adults, we found novel mutations in IR gene considered to be linked to hypoglycemia. We propose a disease entity of adult-onset hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia syndrome associated with mutations in IR gene. PMID:25753915

  13. [A neonate with pustules].

    PubMed

    Groot, Dominique T; van den Broek, Annique J M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a female neonate with non-grouped pustules directly postpartum without clinical signs of illness. There were no red maculae. At follow-up some pustules had turned to pigmented maculae, which confirmed the diagnosis of neonatal pustular melanosis. This benign transient condition occurs in 4-8% of dark-coloured neonates and in <1% of white neonates. PMID:26840934

  14. Neonatal resuscitation: Current issues

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Indu A

    2010-01-01

    The following guidelines are intended for practitioners responsible for resuscitating neonates. They apply primarily to neonates undergoing transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life. The updated guidelines on Neonatal Resuscitation have assimilated the latest evidence in neonatal resuscitation. Important changes with regard to the old guidelines and recommendations for daily practice are provided. Current controversial issues concerning neonatal resuscitation are reviewed and argued in the context of the ILCOR 2005 consensus. PMID:21189881

  15. [Neonatal cholestasis].

    PubMed

    Lacaille, F

    2016-03-01

    "Cholestasis" means abnormal synthesis or secretion of bile. The main symptom in a neonate or infant is jaundice. Urine is dark, staining diapers, and stools are variably pale or white. Vitamin K should be injected (to prevent coagulation disorders due to malabsorption). The two diagnoses requiring urgent treatment are urinary tract infection and biliary atresia. If stools are permanently white, biliary atresia is highly probable. A few genetic causes of intrahepatic cholestasis should be screened and corrective surgery organized. The diseases responsible for cholestasis in this age group are described as well as the investigations and treatments, including the management of non-specific complications of cholestasis. A delay in the diagnosis of biliary atresia can have such severe consequences that consultation with a hepatology unit or transfer should be easy and rapid. PMID:26850153

  16. Analyzing EEG signals under insulin-induced hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lien B; Nguyen, Anh V; Ling, Sai Ho; Nguyen, Hung T

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is dangerous and considered as a limiting factor of the glycemic control therapy for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Nocturnal hypoglycemia is especially feared because early warning symptoms are unclear during sleep so an episode of hypoglycemia may lead to a fatal effect on patients. The main objective of this paper is to explore the correlation between hypoglycemia and electroencephalography (EEG) signals. To do this, the EEG of five T1DM adolescents from an overnight insulin-induced study is analyzed by spectral analysis to extract four different parameters. We aim to explore the response of these parameters during the clamp study which includes three main phases of normal, hypoglycemia and recovery. We also look at data at the blood glucose level (BGL) of 3.3-3.9 mmol/l to find a threshold to distinguish between non-hypoglycemia and hypoglycemia states. The results show that extracted EEG parameters are highly correlated with patients' conditions during the study. It is also shown that at the BGL of 3.3 mmol/l, responses to hypoglycemia in EEG signals start to significantly occur. PMID:24110104

  17. BOLD Response to Semantic and Syntactic Processing during Hypoglycemia Is Load-Dependent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Robin J.; Page, Kathleen A.; Arora, Jagriti; Sherwin, Robert; Constable, R. Todd

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how syntactic and semantic load factors impact sentence comprehension and BOLD signal under moderate hypoglycemia. A dual session, whole brain fMRI study was conducted on 16 healthy participants using the glucose clamp technique. In one session, they experienced insulin-induced hypoglycemia (plasma glucose at [image…

  18. Body position and the neuroendocrine response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Radikova, Z; Penesova, A; Jezova, D; Kvetnansky, R; Vigas, M; Macho, L; Koska, J

    2003-10-01

    Changes in body fluid distribution are known to influence neuroendocrine function. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that changes in plasma volume affect the counterregulatory neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia. The tests were performed in 12 subjects in two situations: 'head-up' (+60 degrees head-up tilt standing for 30 min and hypoglycemia in sitting position afterwards) and 'leg-up' (leg-up position for 30 min and hypoglycemia in leg-up position afterwards) in a random order. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia was adjusted to 2.7 mmol/l for 15 min by glucose infusion. Plasma volume was greater by 2.2% (p < 0.001) in leg-up and lower by 9.6% (p < 0.001) in head-up position compared to the basal value in sitting position. Head-up position was associated with increases in ACTH, aldosterone, norepinephrine levels and plasma renin activity (p < 0.01). Leg-up position resulted in decreases in plasma growth hormone and epinephrine concentrations (p < 0.05). Except epinephrine, the neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia, if any, was mild. Hypoglycemia failed to activate ACTH release after head-up position. Body fluid redistribution did not modify hormonal changes during insulin hypoglycemia. In conclusion, we suggest that body position and accompanying plasma volume changes do not appear to affect neuroendocrine and counterregulatory responses to moderate, short duration hypoglycemia in healthy subjects. PMID:15764080

  19. Association between hypoglycemia and dementia in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Yi-Jing; Sheu, Wayne H H

    2016-06-01

    In addition to increased risks of macrovascular and microvascular complications, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) usually also are at increased risk for cognitive impairment and dementia. Hypoglycemia, a common consequence of diabetes treatment, is considered an independent risk factor for dementia in patients with T2DM. Hypoglycemia and dementia are clinically underestimated and are related to poor outcomes; thus, they may compromise the life expectancy of patients with T2DM. Epidemiological evidence of hypoglycemia-associated cognitive decline and dementia is highly varied. Acute, severe hypoglycemic episodes induce chronic subclinical brain damage, cognitive decline, and subsequent dementia. However, the effects of recurrent moderate hypoglycemia on cognitive decline and dementia remain largely uninvestigated. Poor glycemic control (including fluctuation of hemoglobin A1C [HbA1c] and glucose values) and the viscous circle of bidirectional associations between dementia and hypoglycemia may be clinically relevant. The possible pathophysiological hypotheses include post-hypoglycemic neuronal damage, inflammatory processes, coagulation defects, endothelial abnormalities, and synaptic dysfunction of hippocampal neurons during hypoglycemia episodes. This article reviews previous findings, provides insight into the detection of groups at high risk of hypoglycemia-associated dementia, and proposes specific strategies to minimize the potential burdens associated with hypoglycemia-related neurocognitive disorders in patients with T2DM. PMID:27321346

  20. Comparative risk of severe hypoglycemia among concomitant users of thiazolidinedione antidiabetic agents and antihyperlipidemics.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Charles E; Han, Xu; Bilker, Warren B; Flory, James H; Brensinger, Colleen M; Flockhart, David A; Gagne, Joshua J; Cardillo, Serena; Hennessy, Sean

    2016-05-01

    We conducted high-dimensional propensity score-adjusted cohort studies to examine whether thiazolidinedione use with a statin or fibrate was associated with an increased risk of severe hypoglycemia. We found that concomitant therapy with a thiazolidinedione+fibrate was associated with a generally delayed increased risk of severe hypoglycemia. PMID:27242124

  1. Seasonal variations of severe hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and non-diabetes mellitus: clinical analysis of 578 hypoglycemia cases.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Miyako; Noto, Hiroshi; Hachiya, Remi; Kimura, Akio; Kakei, Masafumi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2014-11-01

    Blood glucose control in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is reportedly influenced by the seasons, with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels decreasing in the summer or warm season and increasing in the winter or cold season. In addition, several studies have shown that sepsis is also associated with the seasons. Although both blood glucose control and sepsis can strongly affect the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia, few studies have examined the seasonal variation of severe hypoglycemia. The aim of the present study is to examine the association between severe hypoglycemia and the seasons in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and non-diabetes mellitus (non-DM). We retrospectively reviewed all the patients with severe hypoglycemia at a national center in Japan between April 1, 2006 and March 31, 2012. A total of 57,132 consecutive cases that had visited the emergency room by ambulance were screened, and 578 eligible cases of severe hypoglycemia were enrolled in this study. The primary outcome was to assess the seasonality of severe hypoglycemia. In the T1DM group (n  =  88), severe hypoglycemia occurred significantly more often in the summer than in the winter (35.2% in summer vs 18.2% in winter, P  =  0.01), and the HbA1c levels were highest in the winter and lowest in the summer (9.1% [7.6%-10.1%] in winter vs 7.7% [7.1%-8.3%] in summer, P  =  0.13). In the non-DM group (n  =  173), severe hypoglycemia occurred significantly more often in the winter than in the summer (30.6% in winter vs 19.6% in summer, P  =  0.01), and sepsis as a complication occurred significantly more often in winter than in summer (24.5% in winter vs 5.9% in summer, P  =  0.02). In the T2DM group (n  =  317), the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia and the HbA1c levels did not differ significantly among the seasons. The occurrence of severe hypoglycemia might be seasonal and might fluctuate with temperature changes

  2. Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Hypoglycemia Symptoms Improved with Diet Modification

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Sukriti

    2016-01-01

    Observational evidence suggests that a relationship may exist between high glycemic index diets and the development of anxiety and depression symptoms; however, as no interventional studies assessing this relationship in a psychiatric population have been completed, the possibility of a causal link is unclear. AB is a 15-year-old female who presented with concerns of generalized anxiety disorder and hypoglycemia symptoms. Her diet consisted primarily of refined carbohydrates. The addition of protein, fat, and fiber to her diet resulted in a substantial decrease in anxiety symptoms as well as a decrease in the frequency and severity of hypoglycemia symptoms. A brief return to her previous diet caused a return of her anxiety symptoms, followed by improvement when she restarted the prescribed diet. This case strengthens the hypothesis that dietary glycemic index may play a role in the pathogenesis or progression of mental illnesses such as generalized anxiety disorder and subsequently that dietary modification as a therapeutic intervention in the treatment of mental illness warrants further study. PMID:27493821

  3. Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Hypoglycemia Symptoms Improved with Diet Modification.

    PubMed

    Aucoin, Monique; Bhardwaj, Sukriti

    2016-01-01

    Observational evidence suggests that a relationship may exist between high glycemic index diets and the development of anxiety and depression symptoms; however, as no interventional studies assessing this relationship in a psychiatric population have been completed, the possibility of a causal link is unclear. AB is a 15-year-old female who presented with concerns of generalized anxiety disorder and hypoglycemia symptoms. Her diet consisted primarily of refined carbohydrates. The addition of protein, fat, and fiber to her diet resulted in a substantial decrease in anxiety symptoms as well as a decrease in the frequency and severity of hypoglycemia symptoms. A brief return to her previous diet caused a return of her anxiety symptoms, followed by improvement when she restarted the prescribed diet. This case strengthens the hypothesis that dietary glycemic index may play a role in the pathogenesis or progression of mental illnesses such as generalized anxiety disorder and subsequently that dietary modification as a therapeutic intervention in the treatment of mental illness warrants further study. PMID:27493821

  4. Changes in human brain glutamate concentration during hypoglycemia: insights into cerebral adaptations in hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, Melissa; Moheet, Amir; Kumar, Anjali; Eberly, Lynn E; Seaquist, Elizabeth; Öz, Gülin

    2014-01-01

    Hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) is a condition in which patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who experience frequent hypoglycemia develop defective glucose counter-regulation and become unable to sense hypoglycemia. Brain glutamate may be involved in the mechanism of HAAF. The goal of this study was to follow the human brain glutamate concentration during experimentally induced hypoglycemia in subjects with and without HAAF. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to track the occipital cortex glutamate concentration throughout a euglycemic clamp followed immediately by a hypoglycemic clamp. T1D patients with HAAF were studied in comparison to two control groups, i.e., T1D patients without HAAF and healthy controls (n=5 per group). Human brain glutamate concentration decreased (P⩽0.01) after the initiation of hypoglycemia in the two control groups, but a smaller trend toward a decrease in patients with HAAF did not reach significance (P>0.05). These findings are consistent with a metabolic adaptation in HAAF to provide higher glucose and/or alternative fuel to the brain, eliminating the need to oxidize glutamate. In an exploratory analysis, we detected additional metabolite changes in response to hypoglycemia in the T1D patient without HAAF control group, namely, increased aspartate and decreased lactate. PMID:24549182

  5. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline enhances counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Nicole M.; Wilkinson, Charles W.; Taborsky, Gerald J.; Al-Noori, Salwa; Daumen, Wendi; Zavosh, Aryana; Figlewicz, Dianne P.

    2008-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed for patients with comorbid diabetes and depression. Clinical case studies in diabetic patients, however, suggest that SSRI therapy may exacerbate hypoglycemia. We hypothesized that SSRIs might increase the risk of hypoglycemia by impairing hormonal counterregulatory responses (CRR). We evaluated the effect of the SSRI sertraline on hormonal CRR to single or recurrent hypoglycemia in nondiabetic rats. Since there are time-dependent effects of SSRIs on serotonin neurotransmission that correspond with therapeutic action, we evaluated the effect of 6- or 20-day sertraline treatment on hypoglycemia CRR. We found that 6-day sertraline (SERT) treatment specifically enhanced the epinephrine response to a single bout of hypoglycemia vs. vehicle (VEH)-treated rats (t = 120: VEH, 2,573 ± 448 vs. SERT, 4,202 ± 545 pg/ml, P < 0.05). In response to recurrent hypoglycemia, VEH-treated rats exhibited the expected impairment in epinephrine secretion (t = 60: 678 ± 73 pg/ml) vs. VEH-treated rats experiencing first-time hypoglycemia (t = 60: 2,081 ± 436 pg/ml, P < 0.01). SERT treatment prevented the impaired epinephrine response in recurrent hypoglycemic rats (t = 60: 1,794 ± 276 pgl/ml). In 20-day SERT-treated rats, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and glucagon CRR were all significantly elevated above VEH-treated controls in response to hypoglycemia. Similarly to 6-day SERT treatment, 20-day SERT treatment rescued the impaired epinephrine response in recurrent hypoglycemic rats. Our data demonstrate that neither 6- nor 20-day sertraline treatment impaired hormonal CRR to hypoglycemia in nondiabetic rats. Instead, sertraline treatment resulted in an enhancement of hypoglycemia CRR and prevented the impaired adrenomedullary response normally observed in recurrent hypoglycemic rats. PMID:18334609

  6. Neonatal euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Kon, Alexander A

    2009-12-01

    Despite advances in the care of infants, there remain many newborns whose medical conditions are incompatible with sustained life. At times, healthcare providers and parents may agree that prolonging life is not an appropriate goal of care, and they may redirect treatment to alleviate suffering. While pediatric palliative treatment protocols are gaining greater acceptance, there remain some children whose suffering is unrelenting despite maximal efforts. Due to the realization that some infants suffer unbearably (ie, the burdens of suffering outweigh the benefits of life), the Dutch have developed a protocol for euthanizing these newborns. In this review, I examine the ethical aspects of 6 forms of end of life care, explain the ethical arguments in support of euthanasia, review the history and verbiage of the United States regulations governing limiting and withdrawing life-prolonging interventions in infants, describe the 3 categories of neonates for whom the Dutch provide euthanasia, review the published analyses of the Dutch protocol, and finally present some practical considerations should some form of euthanasia ever be deemed appropriate. PMID:19914522

  7. Diazoxide improves hormonal counterregulatory responses to acute hypoglycemia in long-standing type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    George, Priya S; Tavendale, Roger; Palmer, Colin N A; McCrimmon, Rory J

    2015-06-01

    Individuals with long-standing type 1 diabetes (T1D) are at increased risk of severe hypoglycemia secondary to impairments in normal glucose counterregulatory responses (CRRs). Strategies to prevent hypoglycemia are often ineffective, highlighting the need for novel therapies. ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels within the hypothalamus are thought to be integral to hypoglycemia detection and initiation of CRRs; however, to date this has not been confirmed in human subjects. In this study, we examined whether the KATP channel-activator diazoxide was able to amplify the CRR to hypoglycemia in T1D subjects with long-duration diabetes. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial using a stepped hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia clamp was performed in 12 T1D subjects with prior ingestion of diazoxide (7 mg/kg) or placebo. Diazoxide resulted in a 37% increase in plasma levels of epinephrine and a 44% increase in plasma norepinephrine during hypoglycemia compared with placebo. In addition, a subgroup analysis revealed that the response to oral diazoxide was blunted in participants with E23K polymorphism in the KATP channel. This study has therefore shown for the first time the potential utility of KATP channel activators to improve CRRs to hypoglycemia in individuals with T1D and, moreover, that it may be possible to stratify therapeutic approaches by genotype. PMID:25591873

  8. Prevention of acute/severe hypoglycemia-induced neuron death by lactate administration.

    PubMed

    Won, Seok Joon; Jang, Bong Geom; Yoo, Byung Hoon; Sohn, Min; Lee, Min Woo; Choi, Bo Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Song, Hong Ki; Suh, Sang Won

    2012-06-01

    Hypoglycemia-induced cerebral neuropathy can occur in patients with diabetes who attempt tight control of blood glucose and may lead to cognitive dysfunction. Accumulating evidence from animal models suggests that hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death is not a simple result of glucose deprivation, but is instead the end result of a multifactorial process. In particular, the excessive activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) consumes cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), resulting in energy failure. In this study, we investigate whether lactate administration in the absence of cytosolic NAD(+) affords neuroprotection against hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death. Intraperitoneal injection of sodium L-lactate corrected arterial blood pH and blood lactate concentration after hypoglycemia. Lactate administered without glucose was not sufficient to promote electroencephalogram recovery from an isoelectric state during hypoglycemia. However, supplementation of glucose with lactate reduced neuronal death by ∼80% in the hippocampus. Hypoglycemia-induced superoxide production and microglia activation was also substantially reduced by administration of lactate. Taken together, these results suggest an intriguing possibility: that increasing brain lactate following hypoglycemia offsets the decrease in NAD(+) due to overactivation of PARP-1 by acting as an alternative energy substrate that can effectively bypass glycolysis and be fed directly to the citric acid cycle to maintain cellular ATP levels. PMID:22453629

  9. Evaluation and management of diabetic and non-diabetic hypoglycemia in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Gosmanov, Aidar R; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) regardless of diabetes status are at increased risk of hypoglycemia with a resultant array of adverse clinical outcomes. Therefore, hypoglycemia should be thoroughly evaluated in ESRD patients. In diabetic dialysis patients, hypoglycemic agents and nutritional alterations can trigger hypoglycemia in the background of diminished gluconeogenesis, reduced insulin clearance by the kidney and improved insulin sensitivity following initiation of renal replacement therapy. Detailed evaluation of antidiabetic regimen and nutritional patterns, patient education on self-monitoring of blood glucose and/or referral to a diabetes specialist may reduce risk of subsequent hypoglycemia. In certain situations, it is important to recognize the possibility of non-diabetic causes of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes and to avoid treating pseudo-hyperglycemia caused by glucose- non-specific glucometers in patients utilizing icodextrin-based solutions for peritoneal dialysis. Adrenal insufficiency, certain medications, malnutrition and/or infection are among the most common causes of hypoglycemia in non-diabetic ESRD patients, and they should be suspected after exclusion of inadvertent use of hypoglycemic agents. The goal of this review article is to summarize approaches and recommendations for the work up and treatment of hypoglycemia in ESRD. PMID:26152404

  10. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia activates the release of adrenocorticotropin predominantly via central and propranolol insensitive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Kvetnanský, R; Kovács, K; Oprsalová, Z; Vigas, M; Makara, G B

    1987-01-01

    The dynamic patterns of pituitary-adrenocortical and sympatho-adrenal hormone responses to insulin hypoglycemia as well as the relative importance of central vs. peripheral control of hypoglycemia-induced ACTH secretion were evaluated. In conscious rats bearing indwelling cannulae, the changes in hormone concentrations after insulin injection were dependent on the changes in blood glucose levels with respect to both time course and magnitude. ACTH, corticosterone, epinephrine, and norepinephrine levels were found to be maximal at 60 min after 2.5 IU kg-1 insulin injected ip, whereas earlier (20 min) but smaller increases were obtained in response to 0.5 IU kg-1 insulin injected iv. In rats 6-7 days after lesions of the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH), the rise of ACTH during insulin hypoglycemia was markedly inhibited and corticosterone levels were significantly reduced. Simultaneously, the hypoglycemia-induced increase in plasma epinephrine was unchanged and that in plasma norepinephrine was significantly enhanced in rats with the MBH destroyed. The beta-adrenoreceptor blocker propranolol did not inhibit ACTH and corticosterone responses to hypoglycemia in either sham-operated or MBH-lesioned animals. We conclude that the main factors triggering ACTH release during insulin-induced hypoglycemia are of central rather than peripheral origin. The high concentrations of circulating catecholamines occurring during insulin hypoglycemia are not responsible for pituitary-adrenocortical activation by direct, beta-adrenoreceptor mediated action at the pituitary level. PMID:3023036

  11. Brain glycogen supercompensation in the mouse after recovery from insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Canada, Sarah E; Weaver, Staci A; Sharpe, Shannon N; Pederson, Bartholomew A

    2011-04-01

    Brain glycogen is proposed to function under both physiological and pathological conditions. Pharmacological elevation of this glucose polymer in brain is hypothesized to protect neurons against hypoglycemia-induced cell death. Elevation of brain glycogen levels due to prior hypoglycemia is postulated to contribute to the development of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) in insulin-treated diabetic patients. This latter mode of elevating glycogen levels is termed "supercompensation." We tested whether brain glycogen supercompensation occurs in healthy, conscious mice after recovery from insulin-induced acute or recurrent hypoglycemia. Blood glucose levels were lowered to less than 2.2 mmol/liter for 90 min by administration of insulin. Brain glucose levels decreased at least 80% and brain glycogen levels decreased approximately 50% after episodes of either acute or recurrent hypoglycemia. After these hypoglycemic episodes, mice were allowed access to food for 6 or 27 hr. After 6 hr, blood and brain glucose levels were restored but brain glycogen levels were elevated by 25% in mice that had been subjected to either acute or recurrent hypoglycemia compared with saline-treated controls. After a 27-hr recovery period, the concentration of brain glycogen had returned to baseline levels in mice previously subjected to either acute or recurrent hypoglycemia. We conclude that brain glycogen supercompensation occurs in healthy mice, but its functional significance remains to be established. PMID:21259334

  12. BRAIN GLYCOGEN SUPERCOMPENSATION IN THE MOUSE AFTER RECOVERY FROM INSULIN-INDUCED HYPOGLYCEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Canada, Sarah E.; Weaver, Staci A.; Sharpe, Shannon N.; Pederson, Bartholomew A.

    2010-01-01

    Brain glycogen is proposed to function in both physiological and pathological conditions. Pharmacological elevation of this glucose polymer in brain is hypothesized to protect neurons against hypoglycemia-induced cell death. Elevation of brain glycogen levels due to prior hypoglycemia is postulated to contribute to the development of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) in insulin-treated diabetic patients. This latter mode of elevating glycogen levels is termed “supercompensation”. We tested whether brain glycogen supercompensation occurs in healthy, conscious mice after recovery from insulin-induced acute or recurrent hypoglycemia. Blood glucose levels were lowered to less than 2.2 mmol/L for 90 min by administration of insulin. Brain glucose levels decreased at least 80% and brain glycogen levels decreased approximately 50% after episodes of either acute or recurrent hypoglycemia. Following these hypoglycemic episodes, mice were allowed access to food for 6 or 27 hrs. After 6 hrs, blood and brain glucose levels were restored while brain glycogen levels were elevated 25% in mice that were previously subjected to either acute or recurrent hypoglycemia as compared with saline-treated controls. Following a 27 hr recovery period, the concentration of brain glycogen had returned to baseline levels in mice previously subjected to either acute or recurrent hypoglycemia. We conclude that brain glycogen supercompensation occurs in healthy mice but its functional significance remains to be established. PMID:21259334

  13. Using a Clinical Surveillance System to Detect Drug-Associated Hypoglycemia in Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Culley, Colleen M.; Perera, Subashan; Marcum, Zachary A.; Kane-Gill, Sandra L.; Handler, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Hypoglycemia is a common adverse drug event (ADE) frequently associated with temporary harm in the nursing home (NH) setting. Reports from the Office of the Inspector General and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommend the need for increased surveillance of drug-associated hypoglycemia events. The objective of this study was to test if a clinical surveillance system could be used to detect drug-associated hypoglycemia events and determine their incidence in NH residents Design Retrospective cohort Setting Four NHs in Western Pennsylvania Participants Computer-generated alerts detecting potential drug-associated hypoglycemia in residents with glucose ≤ 70 mg/dL and ordered a medication(s) associated with hypoglycemia over a 6-month period were included. Measurements Descriptive statistics were used to summarize all variables, including the frequency and distribution of alert type by glucose threshold. Analyses were conducted per numbers of alerts and per distinct residents. The frequency of medications associated with the alerts was determined. Additional calculations included the time to drug-associated hypoglycemic event alert from date of admission and frequency of events associated with post-acute/short-stay (≤ 35 days) admissions. Results Total of 772 alerts involving 141 unique residents were detected. Ninety (63.8%) residents had a glucose ≤ 55 mg/dL, and 42 (29.8%) had a glucose ≤ 40 mg/dL alert. Insulin orders were associated with 762 (98.7%) alerts. Overall incidence of drug-associated hypoglycemia events was 9.5 per 1000 resident-days. Conclusion Hypoglycemia can be detected using a clinical surveillance system. Our evaluation found a high incidence of drug-associated hypoglycemia in a general NH population. Future studies are needed to determine the potential benefits of use of a surveillance system in real-time detection and management of hypoglycemia in the NH. PMID:26456318

  14. NOCTURNAL HYPOGLYCEMIA--THE MAIN INDICATION FOR INSULIN PUMP THERAPY IN ADULTHOOD.

    PubMed

    Baretić, Maja; Kraljević, Ivana; Renar, Ivana Pavlić

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to determine which adult type 1 diabetic patient receiving multiple daily injection therapy is the most appropriate candidate for insulin pump therapy, while taking into consideration limited insulin pump affordability in Croatia. A total of 145 type 1 diabetic patients (52% diagnosed in adult age) were monitored at the Department of Endocrinology, Clinical Department of Internal Medicine, Zagreb University Hospital Center from 2009 to 2014. Twenty-one patients started insulin pump therapy in adulthood (seven men and 14 women, median age 27). Five patients had chronic complications (retinopathy in two, polyneuropathy in one, and both nephropathy and retinopathy in two patients). The median HbA1c at the initiation of pump therapy was 6.95% versus 6.5% after 1 year of pump therapy. Patients were stratified according to indications for insulin pump therapy (frequent and/or severe hypoglycemia, specific lifestyle, having not reached glycemic goals despite adherence/labile diabetes, and preconception). Patients could meet more than one criterion. Initially, the occurrence of hypoglycemia was analyzed by 6-day continuous glucose monitoring, while re-evaluation was done after collecting history data at 1 year ± 3 months. Initially, all patients had a median of 5 hypoglycemias/6 days (30% nocturnal) versus 1 hypoglycemia/6 days (without nocturnal) after 1 year. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test yielded a statistically significant difference in hypoglycemic events, nocturnal hypoglycemia and HbA1c. Patients commencing insulin pump therapy due to hypoglycemia initially had median HbA1c of 6.7% with 7 hypoglycemia/6 days (50% nocturnal). After one year, median HbA1c was 6% with 1 hypoglycemia/6 days (without nocturnal). In conclusion, the main indication for insulin pump therapy in adults is the frequency of hypoglycemia, especially nocturnal ones. PMID:27333724

  15. Routine neonatal circumcision?

    PubMed Central

    Tran, P. T.; Giacomantonio, M.

    1996-01-01

    Routine neonatal circumcision is still a controversial procedure. This article attempts to clarify some of the advantages and disadvantages of neonatal circumcision. The increased rate of penile cancer among uncircumcised men appears to justify the procedure, but that alone is not sufficient justification. The final decision on neonatal circumcision should be made by parents with balanced counsel from attending physicians. PMID:8939321

  16. Survey of Hypoglycemia in Elderly People With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Doi, Kunihiro; Sugawara, Masahiro; Naka, Yoshikazu; Mochizuki, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of elderly type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in Japan is increasing continuously. Hypoglycemia is a significant issue in their treatment. However, the actual situation and related details of their hypoglycemia remain unclear. In order to elucidate them, the Japan Physicians Association conducted a large-scale questionnaire survey for physicians and their outpatients all over Japan. Methods Targeted elderly T2DM outpatients were 65 years old or older in 2011. Specialized questionnaire survey forms were distributed to both of physicians and patients. The forms for physicians included questions whether patient had hypoglycemia in the last 1 month or 1 year; those for patients included whether they experienced it in the same durations and any of the 28 symptoms that are suggestive of hypoglycemia or pertaining to geriatric syndrome in the last 1 month, as well as questions about knowledge regarding hypoglycemia. We analyzed associations between hypoglycemia and the symptoms, and between hypoglycemia and medications. Results Of 15,892 T2DM patients (age, 74.2 ± 6.3 years; diabetes duration, 12.8 ± 8.9 years; HbA1c, 7.0±1.0%), dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (DPP-4i) was the most prescribed medication among all oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs). The frequencies of hypoglycemia in the last 1 month recognized by physicians and experienced by patients were 7.8% and 10.4% (P < 0.0001), and in the last 1 year were 15.5% and 21.1% respectively (P < 0.0001). The most common symptom was “weakness, fatigue/feeling languid” and the majority of all patients reported neuroglycopenic or autonomic symptoms. Regarding monotherapy, hypoglycemia was observed in 32.7% of the patients with insulin, 4% in sulfonylurea (SU), 3.8% in glinide, and 3.5% in pioglitazone. The questions asking knowledge about hypoglycemia revealed that SU or insulin users had significantly more knowledge of hypoglycemia than others (P < 0.001); however, 63% of patients using

  17. Hypoglycemia-induced spontaneous unilateral jerking movement in bilateral internal capsule posterior limb abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Nobuhito; Ueda, Masayuki; Nagayama, Hiroshi; Katayama, Yasuo

    2014-03-15

    We report an 89-year-old woman who developed consciousness disturbance associated with marked hypoglycemia, and showed involuntary movements manifested as spontaneous quick-jerking flexion followed by slow relaxation, in the right leg. Diffusion-weighted imaging revealed bilateral hyperintensities in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule (P-IC). She was treated with intravenous glucose supplementation, and her symptoms dramatically improved. The P-IC lesions are common abnormalities on MRI in hypoglycemia, and may cause paralysis. However involuntary movements associated with the lesions are rarely observed. The spontaneous jerking movements observed in this patient might result from transient impairment of the pyramidal tract associated with hypoglycemia. PMID:24411408

  18. Fear of Hypoglycemia in Children and Adolescents and Their Parents with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Kimberly A; Raymond, Jennifer; Naranjo, Diana; Patton, Susana R

    2016-08-01

    Hypoglycemia is a frequent occurrence in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. A variety of efforts have been made to standardize the definition of hypoglycemia and to define one of its most significant psychosocial consequences-fear of hypoglycemia (FOH). In addition to documenting the experience of FOH in children and adolescents type 1 diabetes and their parents, studies have investigated the relations between FOH and glycemic control and diabetes technology use. This review provides a summary of the recent FOH literature as it applies to pediatric type 1 diabetes. PMID:27370530

  19. Mechanisms of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure and its component syndromes in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cryer, Philip E

    2005-12-01

    Iatrogenic hypoglycemia is a problem for people with diabetes. It causes recurrent morbidity, and sometimes death, as well as a vicious cycle of recurrent hypoglycemia, precluding maintenance of euglycemia over a lifetime of diabetes. Improved therapeutic approaches that will minimize both hypo- and hyperglycemia will be based on insight into the pathophysiology of glucoregulation, specifically glucose counterregulation, in insulin-deficient (type 1 and advanced type 2) diabetes. In such patients, hypoglycemia is the result of the interplay of relative or absolute therapeutic insulin excess and compromised physiological (the syndrome of defective glucose counterregulation) and behavioral (the syndrome of hypoglycemia unawareness) defenses against falling plasma glucose concentrations. The concept of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) in diabetes posits that recent antecedent iatrogenic hypoglycemia causes both defective glucose counterregulation (by reducing epinephrine responses to a given level of subsequent hypoglycemia in the setting of absent decrements in insulin and absent increments in glucagon) and hypoglycemia unawareness (by reducing sympathoadrenal and the resulting neurogenic symptom responses to a given level of subsequent hypoglycemia) and thus a vicious cycle of recurrent hypoglycemia. The clinical impact of HAAF is well established in type 1 diabetes; it also affects those with advanced type 2 diabetes. It is now known to be largely reversible, by as little as 2-3 weeks of scrupulous avoidance of hypoglycemia, in most affected patients. However, the mechanisms of HAAF and its component syndromes are largely unknown. Loss of the glucagon secretory response, a key feature of defective glucose counterregulation, is plausibly explained by insulin deficiency, specifically loss of the decrement in intraislet insulin that normally signals glucagon secretion as glucose levels fall. Reduced neurogenic symptoms, a key feature of hypoglycemia

  20. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  1. Demystifying hypoglycemia. When is it real and how can you tell?

    PubMed

    McFarland, K F; Baker, C; Ferguson, S D

    1987-11-01

    Contrary to popular belief, hypoglycemia is an infrequently encountered condition and its presence is questionable until confirmed by appropriate tests. In ambulatory patients, blood glucose levels obtained during intake of a normal diet are more reliable than those obtained during a glucose tolerance test. If the blood glucose is actually abnormally low and the other two criteria of hypoglycemia are also satisfied, a search for the cause is in order. In hospitalized patients, excessive doses of insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents, the effect of drugs, or chronic renal failure are the most common causes of hypoglycemia. If these factors are absent, another chronic illness known to cause hypoglycemia may be the source. If the cause is still obscure, a thorough evaluation of the endocrine status is warranted. PMID:3313350

  2. Impact of hypoglycemia on daily life of type 2 diabetes patients in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Mandrik, Olena; Severens, Johan L; Doroshenko, Olena; Pan'kiv, Vladymir; Kravchun, Nonna; Vlasenko, Maryna; Hulchiy, Mykola; Baljuk, Maryna; Komisarenko, Yuliia; Martsynik, Eugene; Sokolova, Liubov; Zalis'ka, Olga; Mankovsky, Boris

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of hypoglycemia on the lives of Ukrainian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The secondary objective was to explore patient-physician relationships and the attitudes of patients towards various informational resources on diabetes management. Three focus groups with 26 patients were conducted. Qualitative information was evaluated using content analysis. The results show that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Ukraine are adapting to potential attacks of hypoglycemia; however, they still experience periodic manifestations of hypoglycemia that significantly affect their psychological well-being. This result is similar to observations made in other countries. Ukrainian patients >40 years old mainly receive information on disease management from endocrinologists, and rarely use internet resources on diabetes management. Information provision was especially important at the early stage of the disease, when patients lack information on hypoglycemia manifestations and could therefore fail to identify and manage it properly. PMID:23874102

  3. Recalcitrant hypoglycemia resolved with 2.5% dextrose containing replacement fluid during hemodiafiltration.

    PubMed

    Fülöp, Tibor; Iboaya, Benahili U; Avusula, Ramachandram; Csongrádi, Eva; Juncos, Luis A

    2013-08-01

    A 52-year-old African American male was admitted with acute kidney injury (AKI) four days after renal cryotherapy. He was started on continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) immediately but his subsequent course was complicated by recurrent hypoglycemia, poorly responding to conventional therapy. To address the recalcitrant hypoglycemia, we changed the replacement fluid to 5% dextrose in water with 150 mEq/L of sodium bicarbonate, Y-connected with 0.9% sodium chloride at a global rate of 2000 mL/hr, with resolution of refractory hypoglycemia. A modified CVVHDF employing hyperglycemic solution can be a valuable addition in treatment of AKI complicated by severe refractory hypoglycemia. PMID:23829694

  4. Neonatal Klebsiella Septicaemia in Ibadan: Implications for Neonatal Care in Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omokhodion, S. I.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The antecedent events, clinical features, prevalence, and complications of neonatal Klebsiella septicaemia in 73 infants admitted to a special care baby unit in Nigeria are retrospectively reviewed and compared with those of 72 infants who had no risk factors for sepsis admitted to the same unit during the same period. A nosocomial acquisition of…

  5. Pyruvate kinase deficiency as a cause of extreme hyperbilirubinemia in neonates from a polygamist community.

    PubMed

    Christensen, R D; Eggert, L D; Baer, V L; Smith, K N

    2010-03-01

    Neonatal hemolytic jaundice is a risk factor for kernicterus. Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is a rare cause of neonatal hemolytic jaundice, with a prevalence estimated at 1 case per 20,000 births in the United States, but with a higher prevalence among the Amish communities in Pennsylvania and Ohio. We discovered four neonates with PK deficiency born in a small community of polygamists. All four had early, severe, hemolytic jaundice. PK deficiency should be considered in neonates with early hemolytic, Coombs-negative, non-spherocytic jaundice, particularly in communities with considerable consanguinity. Such cases should be recognized early and managed aggressively to prevent kernicterus. PMID:20182430

  6. Does orthostatic stress influence the neuroendocrine response to subsequent hypoglycemia in humans?

    PubMed

    Radikova, Z; Penesova, A; Koska, J; Kvetnansky, R; Jezova, D; Huckova, M; Vigas, M; Macho, L

    2004-06-01

    Neuroendocrine response to stress stimuli is influenced by previous stimuli of different nature. The aim of the study was to test whether antecedent orthostatic stress may affect the neuroendocrine response to subsequent hypoglycemia. A group of 12 (6 men, 6 women) nonobese, healthy volunteers aged 19 to 27 y (mean 24 +/- 0.8) participated in the study in two sessions: controlled insulin-induced hypoglycemia to 2.7 mmol/L for 15 min either with or without antecedent orthostatic stress (30 min of 60 degrees head-up tilt before insulin administration). Orthostatic stress caused a significant decrease in plasma volume (-9.6%; P < 0.001) and a significant increase in plasma renin activity, aldosterone, norepinephrine (P < 0.01), and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) concentrations (P < 0.05) in all subjects. Growth hormone response to hypoglycemia was diminished in women (P < 0.01). The epinephrine response to hypoglycemia was diminished in women in comparison to men (P < 0.001), but was unaffected by antecedent orthostatic stress. Hypoglycemia failed to induce the ACTH release after its elevation during orthostatic stress. ACTH response to moderate hypoglycemia without previous orthostatic stress was evident only in men in comparison to women (P < 0.05). We conclude that the epinephrine, growth hormone, and ACTH responses to hypoglycemia were diminished in women. Except ACTH, the neuroendocrine response to mild hypoglycemia was not affected by previous orthostatic stress in healthy subjects. In the case of ACTH, the first stress stimulus is consequential for the subsequent response of this hormone, probably due to short-loop negative feedback effects. PMID:15240417

  7. Factors Associated with Nocturnal Hypoglycemia in At-Risk Adolescents and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Darrell M.; Calhoun, Peter M.; Maahs, David M.; Chase, H. Peter; Messer, Laurel; Buckingham, Bruce A.; Aye, Tandy; Clinton, Paula K.; Hramiak, Irene; Kollman, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hypoglycemia remains an impediment to good glycemic control, with nocturnal hypoglycemia being particularly dangerous. Information on major contributors to nocturnal hypoglycemia remains critical for understanding and mitigating risk. Materials and Methods: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data for 855 nights were studied, generated by 45 subjects 15–45 years of age with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels of ≤8.0% who participated in a larger randomized study. Factors assessed for potential association with nocturnal hypoglycemia (CGM measurement of <60 mg/dL for ≥30 min) included bedtime blood glucose (BG), exercise intensity, bedtime snack, insulin on board, day of the week, previous daytime hypoglycemia, age, gender, HbA1c level, diabetes duration, daily basal insulin, and daily insulin dose. Results: Hypoglycemia occurred during 221 of 885 (25%) nights and was more frequent with younger age (P<0.001), lower HbA1c levels (P=0.006), medium/high-intensity exercise during the preceding day (P=0.003), and the occurrence of antecedent daytime hypoglycemia (P=0.001). There was a trend for lower bedtime BG levels to be associated with more frequent nocturnal hypoglycemia (P=0.10). Bedtime snack, before bedtime insulin bolus, weekend versus weekday, gender, and daily basal and bolus insulin were not associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia. Conclusions: Awareness that HbA1c level, exercise, bedtime BG level, and daytime hypoglycemia are all modifiable factors associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia may help patients and providers decrease the risk of hypoglycemia at night. Risk for nocturnal hypoglycemia increased in a linear fashion across the range of variables, with no clear-cut thresholds to guide clinicians or patients for any particular night. PMID:25761202

  8. Glutaric aciduria type II: observations in seven patients with neonatal- and late-onset disease.

    PubMed

    al-Essa, M A; Rashed, M S; Bakheet, S M; Patay, Z J; Ozand, P T

    2000-03-01

    The clinical, biochemical, and neuroradiologic findings and clinical follow-up of seven patients with glutaric aciduria type II are reported. Three phenotypes of the disease are encountered: neonatal-onset form with congenital anomalies (two patients) or without congenital anomalies (three patients) and late-onset form (two patients). The neonatal-onset form presents as an overwhelming illness, with severe hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis leading to rapid death. Frequently it is associated with perinatal energy deprivation, a neonate with low birth weight and prematurity. The late-onset form presents with intermittent episodes of vomiting, hypoglycemia, and acidosis especially after meals rich in fat and/or proteins. All parents are consanguineous and have a first- or second-degree relationship. Initially, in the two phenotypes with neonatal onset and during crisis in the late-onset phenotype, routine laboratory evaluation showed severe metabolic acidosis, with an increased anion gap, hypoglycemia without ketonuria, and disturbed liver function tests. In the majority of patients with neonatal-onset forms, the kidneys, liver, and at times the spleen are enlarged with an increased echogenic pattern; however, no hepatic or renal cysts are detected. Cardiomegaly is observed in most patients. The diagnosis can be easily and rapidly reached through tandem mass spectrometry study of the blood and can further be confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of the urine organic acids. In this report, the magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography brain studies showed brain atrophy, white matter disease, and in one patient, fluid-filled cavities in the periventricular area and putamina. Fluorine-18-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomographic (FDG PET) brain studies in two patients with late-onset disease showed slightly decreased activity in the cerebral cortex in one and in the caudate nuclei in the other. Brain FDG PET scan and

  9. HYPOGLYCEMIA IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED POST-BURN MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G; Pinto, Ruxandra; Herndon, David N; Finnerty, Celeste C; Kraft, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of hypoglycemia after burn injury and whether hypoglycemia is associated with increased post-burn morbidity and mortality. Design Cohort analysis. Setting Academic pediatric burn hospital. Patients This analysis included 760 pediatric burn patients, who were stratified according the number of hypoglycemic episodes (<60 mg/dl glucose) they experienced while in the intensive care unit. Clinical outcomes as well as metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers were analyzed during the first 60 days post admission. Patients with one or more hypoglycemic events were matched with patients not experiencing any event using propensity score matching, and outcomes and biomarker expression were compared between groups. Measurements and main results Eighty-four patients had one episode of hypoglycemia, 108 patients had two or more episodes of hypoglycemia, and 568 patients never experienced hypoglycemia. Patients with one or more hypoglycemic episodes had longer hospitalization as well as more frequent infections, sepsis, multiple organ failure (MOF), and death (p<0.05). The 166 propensity score-matched patients with one or more hypoglycemic events had greater inflammatory and metabolic responses, incidence of sepsis, MOF, and mortality than burn patients without hypoglycemic (p<0.05). Conclusions Hypoglycemic episodes correlate with injury severity and inhalation injury. When adjusted for injury severity, hypoglycemia is associated with significantly higher post-burn morbidity and mortality. PMID:24368343

  10. Increased Brain Lactate Concentrations Without Increased Lactate Oxidation During Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    De Feyter, Henk M.; Mason, Graeme F.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Petersen, Kitt Falk

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that brain metabolism of acetate is increased more than twofold during hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetic (T1D) subjects with hypoglycemia unawareness. These data support the hypothesis that upregulation of blood-brain barrier monocarboxylic acid (MCA) transport may contribute to the maintenance of brain energetics during hypoglycemia in subjects with hypoglycemia unawareness. Plasma lactate concentrations are ∼10-fold higher than acetate concentrations, making lactate the most likely alternative MCA as brain fuel. We therefore examined transport of [3-13C]lactate across the blood-brain barrier and its metabolism in the brains of T1D patients and nondiabetic control subjects during a hypoglycemic clamp using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Brain lactate concentrations were more than fivefold higher (P < 0.05) during hypoglycemia in the T1D subjects compared with the control subjects. Surprisingly, we observed no increase in the oxidation of blood-borne lactate in the T1D subjects, as reflected by similar 13C fractional enrichments in brain glutamate and glutamine. Taken together, these data suggest that in addition to increased MCA transport at the blood-brain barrier, there may be additional metabolic adaptations that contribute to hypoglycemia unawareness in patients with T1D. PMID:23715622

  11. Neonatal Thrombocytopenia as a Consequence of Maternal Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Kalagiri, Ram R.; Choudhury, Saiara; Carder, Timothy; Govande, Vinayak; Beeram, Madhava R.; Uddin, M Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia (preE) is pregnancy-induced hypertension affecting a significant proportion of pregnant women worldwide and can cause detrimental effects in the mother and newborn. Some of the effects in the newborn include neonatal thrombocytopenia. Pertaining specifically to neonatal thrombocytopenia, several questions remain unanswered. Discussion According to the current literature, neonatal thrombocytopenia due to maternal preE is highly prevalent in the general population and the incidence is reported to be around 30% worldwide. This review gives an insight into the syndrome and summarizes the possible pathological mechanisms, the diagnostic approach, complications, and therapeutic interventions of neonatal thrombocytopenia. It also identifies the involvement of other cell lines, apart from platelets in the newborns. Furthermore, we suggest a future prospective study to investigate the pathogenesis of preE and plan a study involving animal models to come up with a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent preE and its various consequences in neonates. PMID:26929869

  12. Risk factors for 30-day readmission following hypoglycemia-related emergency room and inpatient admissions

    PubMed Central

    Emons, M F; Bae, J P; Hoogwerf, B J; Kindermann, S L; Taylor, R J; Nathanson, B H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hypoglycemia is a serious complication of diabetes treatment. This retrospective observational study characterized hypoglycemia-related hospital emergency room (ER) and inpatient (in-pt) admissions and identified risk factors for 30-day all-cause and hypoglycemia-related readmission. Research design and methods 4476 hypoglycemia-related ER and in-pt encounters with discharge dates from 1/1/2009 to 3/31/2014 were identified in a large, multicenter electronic health record database. Outcomes were 30-day all-cause ER/hospital readmission and hypoglycemia-related readmission. Multivariable logistic regression methods identified risk factors for both outcomes. Results 1095 (24.5%) encounters had ER/hospital all-cause readmission within 30 days and 158 (14.4%) of these were hypoglycemia-related. Predictors of all-cause 30-day readmission included recent exposure to a hospital/nursing home (NH)/skilled nursing facility (SNF; OR 1.985, p<0.001); age 25–34 and 35–44 (OR 2.334 and 1.996, respectively, compared with age 65–74, both p<0.001); and African-American (AA) race versus all other race categories (OR 1.427, p=0.011). Other factors positively associated with readmission include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, cardiac dysrhythmias, congestive heart disease, hypertension, and mood disorders. Predictors of readmissions attributable to hypoglycemia included recent exposure to a hospital/NH/SNF (OR 2.299, p<0.001), AA race (OR 1.722, p=0.002), age 35–44 (OR 3.484, compared with age 65–74, p<0.001), hypertension (OR 1.891, p=0.019), and delirium/dementia and other cognitive disorders (OR 1.794, p=0.038). Obesity was protective against 30-day hypoglycemia-related readmission (OR 0.505, p=0.017). Conclusions Factors associated with 30-day all-cause and hypoglycemia-related readmission among patients with diabetic hypoglycemia include recent exposure to hospital/SNF/NH, adults <45 years, AAs, and several cardiovascular and

  13. Risk of hypoglycemia following intensification of metformin treatment with insulin versus sulfonylurea

    PubMed Central

    Roumie, Christianne L.; Min, Jea Young; Greevy, Robert A.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Hung, Adriana M.; Liu, Xulei; Elasy, Tom; Griffin, Marie R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypoglycemia remains a common life-threatening event associated with diabetes treatment. We compared the risk of first or recurrent hypoglycemia event among metformin initiators who intensified treatment with insulin versus sulfonylurea. Methods: We assembled a retrospective cohort using databases of the Veterans Health Administration, Medicare and the National Death Index. Metformin initiators who intensified treatment with insulin or sulfonylurea were followed to either their first or recurrent hypoglycemia event using Cox proportional hazard models. Hypoglycemia was defined as hospital admission or an emergency department visit for hypoglycemia, or an outpatient blood glucose value of less than 3.3 mmol/L. We conducted additional analyses for risk of first hypoglycemia event, with death as the competing risk. Results: Among 178 341 metformin initiators, 2948 added insulin and 39 990 added sulfonylurea. Propensity score matching yielded 2436 patients taking metformin plus insulin and 12 180 taking metformin plus sulfonylurea. Patients took metformin for a median of 14 (interquartile range [IQR] 5–30) months, and the median glycated hemoglobin level was 8.1% (IQR 7.2%–9.9%) at intensification. In the group who added insulin, 121 first hypoglycemia events occurred, and 466 first events occurred in the group who added sulfonylurea (30.9 v. 24.6 events per 1000 person-years; adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06–1.59). For recurrent hypoglycemia, there were 159 events in the insulin group and 585 events in the sulfonylurea group (39.1 v. 30.0 per 1000 person-years; adjusted HR 1.39, 95% CI 1.12–1.72). In separate competing risk analyses, the adjusted HR for hypoglycemia was 1.28 (95% CI 1.04–1.56). Interpretation: Among patients using metformin who could use either insulin or sulfonylurea, the addition of insulin was associated with a higher risk of hypoglycemia than the addition of sulfonylurea. This finding should

  14. Diabetes Management and Hypoglycemia in Safety Sensitive Jobs

    PubMed Central

    Koh, David; Chui, Winnie KL; Sum, Chee-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The majority of people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus are in the working age group in developing countries. The interrelationship of diabetes and work, that is, diabetes affecting work and work affecting diabetes, becomes an important issue for these people. Therapeutic options for the diabetic worker have been developed, and currently include various insulins, insulin sensitizers and secretagogues, incretin mimetics and enhancers, and alpha glucosidase inhibitors. Hypoglycemia and hypoglycaemic unawareness are important and unwanted treatment side effects. The risk they pose with respect to cognitive impairment can have safety implications. The understanding of the therapeutic options in the management of diabetic workers, blood glucose awareness training, and self-monitoring blood glucose will help to mitigate this risk. Employment decisions must also take into account the extent to which the jobs performed by the worker are safety sensitive. A risk assessment matrix, based on the extent to which a job is considered safety sensitive and based on the severity of the hypoglycaemia, may assist in determining one's fitness to work. Support at the workplace, such as a provision of healthy food options and arrangements for affected workers will be helpful for such workers. Arrangements include permission to carry and consume emergency sugar, flexible meal times, self-monitoring blood glucose when required, storage/disposal facilities for medicine such as insulin and needles, time off for medical appointments, and structured self-help programs. PMID:22953182

  15. Non-invasive biosensor and wilreless interrogating system for hypoglycemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Saukesi, K.

    2002-11-01

    Hypoglycemia - abnormal decrease in blood sugar - is a major obstacle in the management of diabetes and prevention of long-term complications, and it may impose serious effects on the brain, including impairment of memory and other cognitive functions. This paper presents the development of a non-invasive sensor with miniaturized telemetry device in a wrist-watch for monitoring glucose concentration in blood. The sensor concept is based on optical chiralit of glucose level in the interstitial fluid. The wrist watch consists of a laser power source of the wavelength compatible with the glucose. A nanofilm with specific chirality is placed at the bottom of the watch. The light then passes through the film and illuminates a small area on the skin.It has been documented that there is certain concentration of sugar level is taken by the intertitial fluid from the blood stream and deposit a portion of it at the dead skin. The wrist-watch when in contact with the outer skin of the human will thus monitor the glucose concentration. A wireless monitoring system in the watch then downloads the data from the watch to a Palm or laptop computer.

  16. Mechanisms of hypoglycemia unawareness and implications in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Timón, Iciar; del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia unawareness (HU) is defined at the onset of neuroglycopenia before the appearance of autonomic warning symptoms. It is a major limitation to achieving tight diabetes and reduced quality of life. HU occurs in approximately 40% of people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and with less frequency in T2DM. Though the aetiology of HU is multifactorial, possible mechanisms include chronic exposure to low blood glucose, antecedent hypoglycaemia, recurrent severe hypoglycaemia and the failure of counter-regulatory hormones. Clinically it manifests as the inability to recognise impeding hypoglycaemia by symptoms, but the mechanisms and mediators remain largely unknown. Prevention and management of HU is complex, and can only be achieved by a multifactorial intervention of clinical care and structured patient education by the diabetes team. Less know regarding the impact of medications on the development or recognition of this condition in patients with diabetes. Several medications are thought to worsen or promote HU, whereas others may have an attenuating effect on the problem. This article reviews recent advances in how the brain senses and responds to hypoglycaemia, novel mechanisms by which people with insulin-treated diabetes develop HU and impaired counter-regulatory responses. The consequences that HU has on the person with diabetes and their family are also described. Finally, it examines the evidence for prevention and treatment of HU, and summarizes the effects of medications that may influence it. PMID:26185599

  17. Manganese Neurotoxicity: A Focus on the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Erikson, Keith M.; Thompson, Khristy; Aschner, Judy; Aschner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace metal found in all tissues, and it is required for normal amino acid, lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism. While Mn deficiency is extremely rare in humans, toxicity due to overexposure of Mn is more prevalent. The brain appears to be especially vulnerable. Mn neurotoxicity is most commonly associated with occupational exposure to aerosols or dusts that contain extremely high levels (> 1-5 mg Mn/m3) of Mn, consumption of contaminated well water, or parenteral nutrition therapy in patients with liver disease or immature hepatic functioning such as the neonate. This review will focus primarily on the neurotoxicity of Mn in the neonate. We will discuss putative transporters of the metal in the neonatal brain and then focus on the implications of high Mn exposure to the neonate focusing on typical exposure modes (e.g., dietary and parenteral). Although Mn exposure via parenteral nutrition is uncommon in adults, in premature infants, it is more prevalent, so this mode of exposure becomes salient in this population. We will briefly review some of the mechanisms of Mn neurotoxicity and conclude with a discussion of ripe areas for research in this underreported area of neurotoxicity. PMID:17084903

  18. 1,5-Anhydro-D-Glucitol Could Reflect Hypoglycemia Risk in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Receiving Insulin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kyeong; Kwak, Soo Heon; Cho, Young Min; Park, Kyong Soo; Kim, Seong Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of a marker for hypoglycemia could help patients achieve strict glucose control with a lower risk of hypoglycemia. 1,5-Anhydro-D-glucitol (1,5-AG) reflects postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with well-controlled diabetes, which contributes to glycemic variability. Because glycemic variability is related to hypoglycemia, we aimed to evaluate the value of 1,5-AG as a marker of hypoglycemia. Methods We enrolled 18 adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) receiving insulin therapy and assessed the occurrence of hypoglycemia within a 3-month period. We measured 1,5-AG level, performed a survey to score the severity of hypoglycemia, and applied a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). Results 1,5-AG was significantly lower in the high hypoglycemia-score group compared to the low-score group. Additionally, the duration of insulin treatment was significantly longer in the high-score group. Subsequent analyses were adjusted by the duration of insulin treatment and mean blood glucose, which was closely associated with both 1,5-AG level and hypoglycemia risk. In adjusted correlation analyses, 1,5-AG was negatively correlated with hypoglycemia score, area under the curve at 80 mg/dL, and low blood glucose index during CGMS (P=0.068, P=0.033, and P=0.060, respectively). Conclusion 1,5-AG level was negatively associated with hypoglycemia score determined by recall and with documented hypoglycemia after adjusting for mean glucose and duration of insulin treatment. As a result, this level could be a marker of the risk of hypoglycemia in patients with well-controlled T2DM receiving insulin therapy. PMID:27246285

  19. Maternal ethanol ingestion: effect on maternal and neonatal glucose balance

    SciTech Connect

    Witek-Janusek, L.

    1986-08-01

    Liver glycogen availability in the newborn is of major importance for the maintenance of postnatal blood glucose levels. This study examined the effect of maternal ethanol ingestion on maternal and neonatal glucose balance in the rate. Female rats were placed on 1) the Lieber-DeCarli liquid ethanol diet, 2) an isocaloric liquid pair-diet, or 3) an ad libitum rat chow diet at 3 wk before mating and throughout gestation. Blood and livers were obtained from dams and rat pups on gestational days 21 and 22. The pups were studied up to 6 h in the fasted state and up to 24 h in the fed state. Maternal ethanol ingestion significantly decreased litter size, birth weight, and growth. A significantly higher mortality during the early postnatal period was seen in the prenatal ethanol exposed pups. Ethanol significantly decreased fed maternal liver glycogen stores but not maternal plasma glucose levels. The newborn rats from ethanol ingesting dams also had significantly decreased liver glycogen stores. Despite mobilizing their available glycogen, these prenatal ethanol exposed pups became hypoglycemic by 6 h postnatal. This was more marked in the fasted pups. Ethanol did not affect maternal nor neonatal plasma insulin levels. Thus maternal ethanol ingestion reduces maternal and neonatal liver glycogen stores and leads to postnatal hypoglycemia in the newborn rat.

  20. Somatotropic, lactotropic and adrenocortical responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rovensky, Jozef; Bakosová, Jana; Koska, Juraj; Ksinantová, Lucia; Jezová, Daniela; Vigas, Milan

    2002-06-01

    Neuroendocrine mechanisms have been suggested to play an important role in the onset and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to evaluate hypothalamic-pituitary functions in RA patients by measurement of hormone responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Insulin-hypoglycemia (Actrapid HM 0.1 IU/kg, i.v. as a bolus) was induced in 17 male patients and in 11 age-, gender-, and weight-matched healthy subjects. Concentrations of growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL) and cortisol were analyzed in plasma. PRL release after thyreoliberin stimulation (TRH, 200 g, i.v.) was determined in 21 patients with active forms of RA and in 12 control subjects to evaluate pituitary lactotropic response. In RA patients, basal concentrations of glucose, GH, PRL, and cortisol were in the normal range and they were comparable to those in the control group. Stress of hypoglycemia induced significant elevation of GH, PRL, and cortisol concentrations in all groups. Cortisol responses to hypoglycemia were comparable in patients and in control subjects. GH release during hypoglycemia was increased (p < 0.05) and PRL response was attenuated (p < 0.05) in RA patients versus control subjects. After TRH administration, PRL response was the same in patients as in healthy subjects. In conclusion, the present study revealed an altered hypothalamic-pituitary function in patients with RA, namely, an enhanced somatotropic and reduced lactotropic activation in response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Basal hormone levels and cortisol release during hypoglycemia were similar to those in healthy subjects. PMID:12114282

  1. Primary Neonatal Diaphragmatic Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Zouari, Mohamed; Jallouli, Mohamed; Ben Thabet, Afef; Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Gargouri, Abdellatif; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal diaphragmatic abscesses are extremely rare and they usually develop by direct extension from a liver abscess. The first case of primary diaphragmatic abscess in a neonate is reported and the difficulties of diagnosing this rare entity are discussed. PMID:26023529

  2. The best defense against hypoglycemia is to recognize it: is caffeine useful?

    PubMed

    Watson, J; Kerr, D

    1999-01-01

    Caffeine, 1,3,7trimethylxanthine, is used by 80% of the adult population of the world in its various forms. Even the simple pleasure of consuming this socially acceptable drug has implications for the person with diabetes mellitus. Caffeine may increase an individual's sensitivity to hypoglycemia through the combined effects of reducing substrate delivery to the brain via constriction of the cerebral arteries, whilst simultaneously increasing brain glucose metabolism and augmenting catecholamine production. This article summarizes the evidence supporting the hypothesis that caffeine influences the perception of and physiological response to hypoglycemia. Under laboratory conditions, acute ingestion of caffeine markedly enhances the symptomatic and sympathoadrenal responses to hypoglycemia in both healthy volunteers and patients with type 1 diabetes. Recently a study of free-living people with type 1 diabetes showed that caffeine consumption increased the awareness of hypoglycemia. Caffeine has been associated with a number of negative effects and addiction. Most serious of these associations are ischemic heart disease and hypertension, the relationships have not been clearly established and the evidence to date is controversial. Thus we conclude that in modest doses, caffeine may be a useful adjuvant therapy for patients with hypoglycemia unawareness. For once here is a therapy which is inexpensive, safe, and remarkably popular with its consumers. PMID:11475292

  3. The impact of parents' sleep quality and hypoglycemia worry on diabetes self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Linda Jones; Monaghan, Maureen; Cogen, Fran; Streisand, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Parents of young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) may experience poor sleep quality, possibly impacting their confidence in T1D management. This study investigated sleep characteristics among parents of children with T1D and relationships among parents' sleep quality, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. As part of baseline assessment for a randomized clinical trial (RCT) to promote parental management of T1D, 134 parents of children ≤ age 6 reported on demographics, parent sleep characteristics, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. Parents reported they slept less time than recommended by the National Sleep Foundation and endorsed greater global sleep problems than standardized norms of healthy adults; one third of parents reported their overall sleep quality was "fairly bad" or "very bad." Hypoglycemia worry and parents' sleep quality were both significantly related to diabetes self-efficacy, but parents' sleep quality did not mediate the relationship of hypoglycemia worry and diabetes self-efficacy. Many parents experience disrupted sleep that impacts their perceived ability to perform T1D management. Interventions designed to improve parental T1D self-efficacy should consider sleep and concerns about children's hypoglycemia. PMID:24738994

  4. Economic Burden of Hypoglycemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus from Korea

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mi Hye; Lee, Eui-Kyung; Kim, Chong Hwa; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Jeong, In Kyung; Kang, Eun Seok; Kim, Dae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypoglycemia is a very serious complication in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and affects the economic burden of treatment. This study aims to create models of the cost of treating hypoglycemia in patients with T2DM based upon physician estimates of medical resource usage. Methods Using a literature review and personal advice from endocrinologists and emergency physicians, we developed several models for managing patients with hypoglycemia. The final model was approved by the consulting experts. We also developed 3 unique surveys to allow endocrinologists, emergency room (ER) physicians, and primary care physicians to evaluate the resource usage of patients with hypoglycemia. Medical costs were calculated by multiplying the estimated medical resource usage by the corresponding health insurance medical care costs reported in 2014. Results In total, 40 endocrinologists, 20 ER physicians, and 30 primary care physicians completed the survey. We identified 12 types of standard medical models for secondary or tertiary hospitals and 4 for primary care clinics based on the use of ER, general ward, or intensive care unit (ICU) and patients’ status of consciousness and self-respiration. Estimated medical costs per person per hypoglycemic event ranged from $17.28 to $1,857.09 for secondary and tertiary hospitals. These costs were higher for patients who were unconscious and for those requiring ICU admission. Conclusion Hypoglycemia has a substantial impact on the medical costs and its prevention will result in economic benefits for T2DM patients and society. PMID:26975054

  5. beta. -Receptor-mediated increase in cerebral blood flow during hypoglycemia

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, B.R.; Bryan, R.M. )

    1987-10-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that {beta}-adrenergic receptor stimulation is involved with the increase in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during hypoglycemia. Rats were surgically prepared with the use of halothane-nitrous oxide anesthesia. A plaster restraining cast was placed around the hindquarters, and anesthesia was discontinued. Hypoglycemia was produced by an intravenous injection of insulin; normoglycemic control rates were given saline. Propranolol was administered to some control and some hypoglycemic rats to block the {beta}-adrenergic receptors. Regional CBF was measured using 4-(N-methyl-{sup 14}C)iodoantipyrine. Regional CBF increased during hypoglycemia in rats that were not treated with propranolol. The increase varied from {approximately}60 to 200% depending on the brain region. During hypoglycemia, propranolol abolished the increase in rCBF in the hypothalamus, cerebellum, and pyramidal tract. In other regions the increase in rCBF was only 33-65% of the increase in hypoglycemic rats that were not treated with propranolol. They conclude that {beta}-receptor stimulation plays a major role in the increase in rCBF during hypoglycemia.

  6. Pancreatic islet blood flow in conscious rats during hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Iwase, M; Tashiro, K; Uchizono, Y; Goto, D; Yoshinari, M

    2001-06-01

    Anesthesia affects general hemodynamics and regulation of organ perfusion. We used colored microspheres to measure pancreatic islet blood flow in conscious rats at two time points, during either hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. This method, using black and green microspheres, was validated by comparison with previous microsphere experiments and by lack of effect of a nonmetabolizable glucose analog, 3-O-methylglucose, on islet perfusion. Basal and glucose-stimulated islet blood flow levels were similar in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized and conscious rats. However, the basal distribution of pancreatic blood flow was altered by anesthesia (fractional islet blood flow 5.8 +/- 0.4% in conscious rats, 7.9 +/- 0.8% in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, P < 0.05). Insulin-induced hypoglycemia significantly increased whole pancreatic blood flow in conscious rats, whereas islet blood flow remained unchanged and fractional islet blood flow was decreased (5.8 +/- 0.5% in the basal state, 4.2 +/- 0.4% during hypoglycemia, P < 0.001). Methylatropine pretreatment significantly increased islet blood flow during hypoglycemia by 181%. This result suggests that prevention of hypoglycemia-induced increase in islet perfusion may be mediated, at least in part, by a cholinergic, vagal muscarinic mechanism. PMID:11353660

  7. Biological Characterization of Gene Response to Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Martine; Nanchen, Natacha; Preitner, Frédéric; Ibberson, Mark; Roduit, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the most important metabolic substrate of the retina and maintenance of normoglycemia is an essential challenge for diabetic patients. Chronic, exaggerated, glycemic excursions could lead to cardiovascular diseases, nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. We recently showed that hypoglycemia induced retinal cell death in mouse via caspase 3 activation and glutathione (GSH) decrease. Ex vivo experiments in 661W photoreceptor cells confirmed the low-glucose induction of death via superoxide production and activation of caspase 3, which was concomitant with a decrease of GSH content. We evaluate herein retinal gene expression 4 h and 48 h after insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Microarray analysis demonstrated clusters of genes whose expression was modified by hypoglycemia and we discuss the potential implication of those genes in retinal cell death. In addition, we identify by gene set enrichment analysis, three important pathways, including lysosomal function, GSH metabolism and apoptotic pathways. Then we tested the effect of recurrent hypoglycemia (three successive 4h periods of hypoglycemia spaced by 48 h recovery) on retinal cell death. Interestingly, exposure to multiple hypoglycemic events prevented GSH decrease and retinal cell death, or adapted the retina to external stress by restoring GSH level comparable to control situation. We hypothesize that scavenger GSH is a key compound in this apoptotic process, and maintaining “normal” GSH level, as well as a strict glycemic control, represents a therapeutic challenge in order to avoid side effects of diabetes, especially diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26918849

  8. The Impact of Parents’ Sleep Quality and Hypoglycemia Worry on Diabetes Self-Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Linda Jones; Monaghan, Maureen; Cogen, Fran; Streisand, Randi

    2014-01-01

    Parents of young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) may experience poor sleep quality possibly impacting their confidence in T1D management. This study investigated sleep characteristics among parents of children with T1D and relationships amongst parents’ sleep quality, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. As part of baseline assessment for a randomized clinical trial (RCT) to promote parental management of T1D, 134 parents of children ≤ age 6 reported on demographics, parent sleep characteristics, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. Parents reported they slept less time than recommended by the National Sleep Foundation and endorsed greater global sleep problems than standardized norms of healthy adults; 1/3 of parents reported their overall sleep quality was “fairly bad” or “very bad.” Hypoglycemia worry and parents’ sleep quality were both significantly related to diabetes self-efficacy, but parents’ sleep quality did not mediate the relationship of hypoglycemia worry and diabetes self-efficacy. Many parents experience disrupted sleep that impacts their perceived ability to perform T1D management. Interventions designed to improve parental T1D self-efficacy should consider sleep and concerns about children’s hypoglycemia. PMID:24738994

  9. Hypothalamic Nitric Oxide in Hypoglycemia Detection and Counterregulation: A Two-Edged Sword

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhentao; Vazirani, Reema P.; Beuve, Annie; Routh, Vanessa H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Hypoglycemia is the main complication for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus receiving intensive insulin therapy. In addition to the obvious deleterious effects of acute hypoglycemia on brain function, recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia (RH) have an even more insidious effect. RH impairs the ability of the brain to detect and initiate an appropriate counterregulatory response (CRR) to restore euglycemia in response to subsequent hypoglycemia. Knowledge of mechanisms involved in hypoglycemia detection and counterregulation has significantly improved over the past 20 years. Glucose sensitive neurons (GSNs) in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) may play a key role in the CRR. VMH nitric oxide (NO) production has recently been shown to be critical for both the CRR and glucose sensing by glucose-inhibited neurons. Interestingly, downstream effects of NO may also contribute to the impaired CRR after RH. In this review, we will discuss current literature regarding the molecular mechanisms by which VMH GSNs sense glucose. Putative roles of GSNs in the detection and initiation of the CRR will then be described. Finally, hypothetical mechanisms by which VMH NO production may both facilitate and subsequently impair the CRR will be discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 505–517. PMID:20518706

  10. Understanding the Construct of Fear of Hypoglycemia in Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Vajda, Karen; Nyer, Maren; Clarke, William

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fear of hypoglycemia (FoH) can be a significant barrier to glycemic control in pediatric type 1 diabetes (T1D). This study aimed to explore underlying constructs of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey (HFS) for parents (PHFS) and children (CHFS). Methods Data were aggregated from five studies of 259 youth with T1D and 250 parents. Exploratory Factor Analysis was used to determine the underlying factors of the CHFS and PHFS. Results Similar four-factor solutions were found for the CHFS and PHFS. Both subscales consisted of two factors: Behavior Subscale (1) behaviors used to keep blood glucose (BG) high to prevent hypoglycemia (Maintain High BG) and (2) other actions to avoid hypoglycemia (Avoidance); Worry Subscale (1) concerns about helplessness (Helplessness) and (2) negative social consequences associated with hypoglycemia (Social Consequences). Conclusions These constructs provide a more comprehensive understanding of pediatric FoH and have implications for interventions aimed at reducing FoH in this population. PMID:25214644

  11. Brain glycogen content and metabolism in subjects with type 1 diabetes and hypoglycemia unawareness.

    PubMed

    Öz, Gülin; Tesfaye, Nolawit; Kumar, Anjali; Deelchand, Dinesh K; Eberly, Lynn E; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2012-02-01

    Supercompensated brain glycogen may contribute to the development of hypoglycemia unawareness in patients with type 1 diabetes by providing energy for the brain during periods of hypoglycemia. Our goal was to determine if brain glycogen content is elevated in patients with type 1 diabetes and hypoglycemia unawareness. We used in vivo (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with [1-(13)C]glucose administration in five patients with type 1 diabetes and hypoglycemia unawareness and five age-, gender-, and body mass index-matched healthy volunteers to measure brain glycogen content and metabolism. Glucose and insulin were administered intravenously over ∼51 hours at a rate titrated to maintain a blood glucose concentration of 7 mmol/L. (13)C-glycogen levels in the occipital lobe were measured at ∼5, 8, 13, 23, 32, 37, and 50 hours, during label wash-in and wash-out. Newly synthesized glycogen levels were higher in controls than in patients (P<0.0001) for matched average blood glucose and insulin levels, which may be due to higher brain glycogen content or faster turnover in controls. Metabolic modeling indicated lower brain glycogen content in patients than in controls (P=0.07), implying that glycogen supercompensation does not contribute to the development of hypoglycemia unawareness in humans with type 1 diabetes. PMID:21971353

  12. Brain glycogen content and metabolism in subjects with type 1 diabetes and hypoglycemia unawareness

    PubMed Central

    Öz, Gülin; Tesfaye, Nolawit; Kumar, Anjali; Deelchand, Dinesh K; Eberly, Lynn E; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2012-01-01

    Supercompensated brain glycogen may contribute to the development of hypoglycemia unawareness in patients with type 1 diabetes by providing energy for the brain during periods of hypoglycemia. Our goal was to determine if brain glycogen content is elevated in patients with type 1 diabetes and hypoglycemia unawareness. We used in vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with [1-13C]glucose administration in five patients with type 1 diabetes and hypoglycemia unawareness and five age-, gender-, and body mass index-matched healthy volunteers to measure brain glycogen content and metabolism. Glucose and insulin were administered intravenously over ∼51 hours at a rate titrated to maintain a blood glucose concentration of 7 mmol/L. 13C-glycogen levels in the occipital lobe were measured at ∼5, 8, 13, 23, 32, 37, and 50 hours, during label wash-in and wash-out. Newly synthesized glycogen levels were higher in controls than in patients (P<0.0001) for matched average blood glucose and insulin levels, which may be due to higher brain glycogen content or faster turnover in controls. Metabolic modeling indicated lower brain glycogen content in patients than in controls (P=0.07), implying that glycogen supercompensation does not contribute to the development of hypoglycemia unawareness in humans with type 1 diabetes. PMID:21971353

  13. An adaptive strategy of classification for detecting hypoglycemia using only two EEG channels.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lien B; Nguyen, Anh V; Ling, Sai Ho; Nguyen, Hung T

    2012-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most common but highly feared side effect of the insulin therapy for patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM). Severe episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to unconsciousness, coma, and even death. The variety of hypoglycemic symptoms arises from the activation of the autonomous central nervous system and from reduced cerebral glucose consumption. In this study, electroencephalography (EEG) signals from five T1DM patients during an overnight clamp study were measured and analyzed. By applying a method of feature extraction using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and classification using neural networks, we establish that hypoglycemia can be detected non-invasively using EEG signals from only two channels. This paper demonstrates that a significant advantage can be achieved by implementing adaptive training. By adapting the classifier to a previously unseen person, the classification results can be improved from 60% sensitivity and 54% specificity to 75% sensitivity and 67% specificity. PMID:23366685

  14. What neonatal complications should the pediatrician be aware of in case of maternal gestational diabetes?

    PubMed

    Mitanchez, Delphine; Yzydorczyk, Catherine; Simeoni, Umberto

    2015-06-10

    In the epidemiologic context of maternal obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), the incidence of gestational diabetes has significantly increased in the last decades. Infants of diabetic mothers are prone to various neonatal adverse outcomes, including metabolic and hematologic disorders, respiratory distress, cardiac disorders and neurologic impairment due to perinatal asphyxia and birth traumas, among others. Macrosomia is the most constant consequence of diabetes and its severity is mainly influenced by maternal blood glucose level. Neonatal hypoglycemia is the main metabolic disorder that should be prevented as soon as possible after birth. The severity of macrosomia and the maternal health condition have a strong impact on the frequency and the severity of adverse neonatal outcomes. Pregestational T2D and maternal obesity significantly increase the risk of perinatal death and birth defects. The high incidence of maternal hyperglycemia in developing countries, associated with the scarcity of maternal and neonatal care, seriously increase the burden of neonatal complications in these countries. PMID:26069722

  15. The impact of accelerometer use in exercise-associated hypoglycemia prevention in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stenerson, Matthew; Cameron, Fraser; Payne, Shelby R; Payne, Sydney L; Ly, Trang T; Wilson, Darrell M; Buckingham, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    Exercise-associated hypoglycemia is a common adverse event in people with type 1 diabetes. Previous in silico testing by our group demonstrated superior exercise-associated hypoglycemia mitigation when a predictive low glucose suspend (PLGS) algorithm was augmented to incorporate activity data. The current study investigates the effectiveness of an accelerometer-augmented PLGS algorithm in an outpatient exercise protocol. Subjects with type 1 diabetes on insulin pump therapy participated in two structured soccer sessions, one utilizing the algorithm and the other using the subject's regular basal insulin rate. Each subject wore their own insulin pump and a Dexcom G4™ Platinum continuous glucose monitor (CGM); subjects on-algorithm also wore a Zephyr BioHarness™ 3 accelerometer. The algorithm utilized a Kalman filter with a 30-minute prediction horizon. Activity and CGM readings were manually entered into a spreadsheet and at five-minute intervals, the algorithm indicated whether the basal insulin infusion should be on or suspended; any changes were then implemented by study staff. The rate of hypoglycemia during and after exercise (until the following morning) was compared between groups. Eighteen subjects (mean age 13.4 ± 3.7 years) participated in two separate sessions 7-22 days apart. The difference in meter blood glucose levels between groups at each rest period did not achieve statistical significance at any time point. Hypoglycemia during the session was recorded in three on-algorithm subjects, compared to six off-algorithm subjects. In the postexercise monitoring period, hypoglycemia occurred in two subjects who were on-algorithm during the session and four subjects who were off-algorithm. The accelerometer-augmented algorithm failed to prevent exercise-associated hypoglycemia compared to subjects on their usual basal rates. A larger sample size may have achieved statistical significance. Further research involving an automated system, a larger sample

  16. Effect of acute and recurrent hypoglycemia on changes in brain glycogen concentration.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Raimund I; Chan, Owen; Yu, Sunkyung; Dziura, James; McNay, Ewan C; Sherwin, Robert S

    2008-04-01

    Our objective was to evaluate whether excessive brain glycogen deposition might follow episodes of acute hypoglycemia (AH) and thus play a role in the hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure seen in diabetic patients receiving intensive insulin treatment. We determined brain glucose and glycogen recovery kinetics after AH and recurrent hypoglycemia (RH), an established animal model of counterregulatory failure. A single bout of insulin-induced AH or RH for 3 consecutive days was used to deplete brain glucose and glycogen stores in rats. After microwave fixation and glycogen extraction, regional recovery kinetics in the brain was determined using a biochemical assay. Both AH and RH treatments reduced glycogen levels in the cerebellum, cortex, and hypothalamus from control levels of 7.78 +/- 0.55, 5.4 +/- 0.38, and 4.45 +/- 0.37 micromol/g, respectively, to approximately 50% corresponding to a net glycogen utilization rate between 0.6 and 1.2 micromol/g.h. After hypoglycemia, glycogen levels returned to baseline within 6 h in both the AH and the RH group. However, recovery of brain glycogen tended to be faster in rats exposed to RH. This effect followed more rapid recovery of brain glucose levels in the RH group, despite similar blood glucose levels in both groups. There was no statistically significant increase above baseline glycogen levels in either group. In particular, brain glycogen was not increased 24 h after the last of recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia, when a significant counterregulatory defect could be documented during a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp study. We conclude that glycogen supercompensation is not a major contributory factor to the pathogenesis of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure. PMID:18187548

  17. The Effect of IQ Level on the Degree of Cognitive Deterioration Experienced during Acute Hypoglycemia in Normal Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Ann E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Whether IQ level exerts a differential effect on the impairment of cognitive performance induced during acute hypoglycemia was studied for 24 nondiabetic adults. At various levels of hypoglycemia, no overall effect of IQ on deterioration was noted. Higher IQ did not apparently protect against adverse effects. (SLD)

  18. Malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast presenting with hypoglycemia: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pacioles, Toni; Seth, Rahul; Orellana, Cesar; John, Ivy; Panuganty, Veera; Dhaliwal, Ruban

    2014-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms that account for less than 1% of all breast tumors and are typically found in middle-aged women. Phyllodes tumors that present with hypoglycemia are even rarer. No one morphologic finding is reliable in predicting the clinical behavior of this tumor. Surgery has been the primary mode of treatment to date. However, the extent of resection and the role of adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy are still controversial. Here, we present a challenging case of malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast associated with hypoglycemia, and review the literature regarding clinical findings, pathologic risk factors for recurrence, and treatment recommendations. PMID:25525388

  19. Case report on an infant presenting with hypoglycemia, and milky serum

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Yogesh Kumar; Prasad, Anushre; Kini, Pushpa; Naik, Prashant; Choprra, Deepti; Prabhu, Krishnananda

    2012-01-01

    A 4-month-old male baby who presented in a moribund condition with seizures was found to have hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia and milky serum. Serum triglycerides were markedly elevated (3 168 mg/dL) with cholesterol being 257 mg/dL and high density lipoprotein levels were low (19 mg/dL). The possibility of glycogen storage disease type I was considered in the diagnosis. Infants with glycogen storage disease type I may present like sepsis. The association of hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia and abnormal lipid profile stated above should alert the physician to consider glycogen storage disease type I in the diagnosis. PMID:23569924

  20. Mini-review: Impact of recurrent hypoglycemia on cognitive and brain function

    PubMed Central

    McNay, Ewan C.; Cotero, Victoria E.

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent hypoglycemia (RH), the most common side-effect of intensive insulin therapy for diabetes, is well established to diminish counterregulatory responses to further hypoglycemia. However, despite significant patient concern, the impact of RH on cognitive and neural function remains controversial. Here we review both the data from human studies and recent animal studies regarding the impact of RH on cognitive, metabolic, and neural processes. Overall, RH appears to causes brain adaptations which may enhance cognitive performance and fuel supply when euglycemic but which pose significant threats during future hypoglycemic episodes. PMID:20096711

  1. Clinical Profile and Biochemical Abnormalities of Neonatal Seizure at NICU of a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Islam, M N; Hossain, M A; Yeasmin, L; Dutta, A; Ahmad, F; Khan, R H

    2016-07-01

    Seizures are most common neurological emergency in the neonatal period and present as a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to clinicians worldwide. This prospective observational study was conducted in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital from January 2015 to March 2015. Total 318 patients were enrolled in the study who presented with convulsion. Most of the patients were term (72.95%) and birth weight was normal (77.3%). Around 75% patients were delivered at home. Most common causes of convulsion were Perinatal Asphyxia (78%) followed by Septicemia, Hypoglycemia and Meningitis in order of frequency. Commonest type of seizure was subtle seizure (45.5%). Most of the patients recovered completely (73%) and 8.4% patients died due to complications. PMID:27612889

  2. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  3. Oral Lesions in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  4. The future of neonatal BCG.

    PubMed

    Odent, Michel R

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesise that neonatal BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) might be used to adapt to a new phase in the history of human births. Among most mammals, the placenta is not effective at transferring antibodies to the fetus: antibodies are transferred immediately after birth via the colostrum. Among humans (and other mammals with hemochorial placentas) the transplacental transfer of antibodies (namely IgG) is effective. In humans, foetal concentrations of IgG sub-classes approximate to maternal concentrations at 38weeks and continue to increase thereafter. These facts explain inter-species differences regarding the basic needs of neonates. Among most mammals, the early colostrum is, strictly speaking, vital. Among humans, the main questions are about the bacteriological environment in the birthing place and how familiar it is to the mother. Today, most human beings are born in unfamiliar bacteriological environments characterized by a low microbial diversity. The effects of clinical environments may be amplified by the use of antibiotics and birth by caesarean, i.e. by-passing the bacteriologically rich perineal zone. There is already an accumulation of data confirming that the maturation of a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response is affected by the mode of delivery. There is also an accumulation of epidemiological studies detecting risk factors in the perinatal period for health conditions such as type 1 diabetes (and other autoimmune diseases), atopy, autism and obesity. In such a context there are reasons to plan randomized controlled trials with long term follow-up of the effects of BCG given immediately after birth, as a modulator of Th-1/Th-2 responses. A follow-up period in the region of 6-10years would be long enough to evaluate the prevalence of several nosologically well defined diseases. These studies would be ethically acceptable, since BCG is the only infancy vaccine that has been evaluated through randomised controlled trials with long term follow

  5. Effects of Acute Hypoglycemia on Working Memory and Language Processing in Adults With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kate V.; Pickering, Martin J.; Zammitt, Nicola N.; Hartsuiker, Robert J.; Traxler, Matthew J.; Frier, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the effects of hypoglycemia on language processing in adults with and without type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Forty adults were studied (20 with type 1 diabetes and 20 healthy volunteers) using a hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp to lower blood glucose to 2.5 mmol/L (45 mg/dL) (hypoglycemia) for 60 min, or to maintain blood glucose at 4.5 mmol/L (81 mg/dL) (euglycemia), on separate occasions. Language tests were applied to assess the effects of hypoglycemia on the relationship between working memory and language (reading span), grammatical decoding (self-paced reading), and grammatical encoding (subject-verb agreement). RESULTS Hypoglycemia caused a significant deterioration in reading span (P < 0.001; η2 = 0.37; Cohen d = 0.65) and a fall in correct responses (P = 0.005; η2 = 0.19; Cohen d = 0.41). On the self-paced reading test, the reading time for the first sentence fragment increased during hypoglycemia (P = 0.039; η2 = 0.11; Cohen d = 0.25). For the reading of the next fragment, hypoglycemia affected the healthy volunteer group more than the adults with type 1 diabetes (P = 0.03; η2 = 0.12; Cohen d = 0.25). However, hypoglycemia did not significantly affect the number of errors in sentence comprehension or the time taken to answer questions. Hypoglycemia caused a deterioration of subject-verb agreement (correct responses: P = 0.011; η2 = 0.159; Cohen d = 0.31). CONCLUSIONS Hypoglycemia caused a significant deterioration in reading span and in the accuracy of subject-verb agreement, both of which are practical aspects of language involved in its everyday use. Language processing is therefore impaired during moderate hypoglycemia. PMID:25758768

  6. [Neonatal herpes simplex infection].

    PubMed

    van Ham-Borawitz, V E J; Stam, E D; Welborn, K M; Sas, T C J

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal encephalitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a familiar disease with a high mortality and morbidity rate. Isolated skin-eye-mouth infection is less familiar among professionals. In this article we present two neonates with an isolated skin lesion caused by an HSV infection. Of the neonates infected with HSV, 40-45% show isolated skin-eye-mouth disease. With correct treatment, the risk of spread to the central nervous system will decrease from 50-60% to 5-10%. Typical HSV skin lesions may present at a late stage of the disease or may be masked by a secondary bacterial infection. When a neonate presents with atypical skin lesions starting 7-12 days after the birth, immediate testing for HSV and immediate treatment are required, to decrease the risk of further progression of the disease. PMID:27122069

  7. Neonatal pain management

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Tarun; Shepherd, Ed; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    The past 2-3 decades have seen dramatic changes in the approach to pain management in the neonate. These practices started with refuting previously held misconceptions regarding nociception in preterm infants. Although neonates were initially thought to have limited response to painful stimuli, it was demonstrated that the developmental immaturity of the central nervous system makes the neonate more likely to feel pain. It was further demonstrated that untreated pain can have long-lasting physiologic and neurodevelopmental consequences. These concerns have resulted in a significant emphasis on improving and optimizing the techniques of analgesia for neonates and infants. The following article will review techniques for pain assessment, prevention, and treatment in this population with a specific focus on acute pain related to medical and surgical conditions. PMID:25538531

  8. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... Neonatal RDS occurs in infants whose lungs have not yet fully ... disease is mainly caused by a lack of a slippery substance in ...

  9. Neonatal abstinence syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    NAS; Neonatal abstinence symptoms ... may contribute to the severity of a baby's NAS symptoms. ... symptoms of withdrawal. Even after medical treatment for NAS is over and babies leave the hospital, they ...

  10. Maternal and neonatal tetanus.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, C Louise; Beeching, Nicholas J; Newton, Charles R

    2015-01-24

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surveillance, with specific approaches in high-risk areas, has meant that the incidence of the disease continues to fall. Despite this progress, an estimated 58,000 neonates and an unknown number of mothers die every year from tetanus. As of June, 2014, 24 countries are still to eliminate the disease. Maintenance of elimination needs ongoing vaccination programmes and improved public health infrastructure. PMID:25149223

  11. Neonatal bacteriemia isolates and their antibiotic resistance pattern in neonatal insensitive care unit (NICU) at Beasat Hospital, Sanandaj, Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Parvin; Kalantar, Enayatollah; Bahmani, Nasrin; Fatemi, Adel; Naseri, Nima; Ghotbi, Nahid; Naseri, Mohammad Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteremia continues to result in significant morbidity and mortality, particularly among neonates. There is scarce data on neonatal bacteremia in among Iranian neonates. In this study, we determined neonatal bacteremia isolates and their antibiotic resistance pattern in neonatal insensitive care unit at Beasat hospital, Sanandaj, Iran. During one year, all neonates admitted to the NICU were evaluated. Staphylococcal isolates were subjected to determine the prevalence of MRS and mecA gene. A total of 355 blood cultures from suspected cases of sepsis were processed, of which 27 (7.6%) were positive for bacterial growth. Of the 27 isolates, 20 (74%) were Staphylococcus spp as the leading cause of bacteremia. The incidence of Gram negative bacteria was 04 (14.8%). The isolated bacteria were resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Maximum resistance among Staphylococcus spp was against Penicillin, and Ampicillin. In our study, the isolated bacteria were 7.5 % Vancomycin and Ciprofloxacin sensitive. Oxacillin disk diffusion and PCR screened 35% and 30% mec a positive Staphylococcus spp. The spectrum of neonatal bacteremia as seen in NICU at Beasat hospital confirmed the importance of pathogens such as Staphylococcus spp. Penicillin, Ampicillin and Cotrimoxazol resistance was high in theses isolates with high mecA gene carriage, probably due to antibiotic selection. PMID:24902012

  12. Neonatal polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Priya; Miyashita, Yosuke

    2014-09-01

    This article provides an up-to-date comprehensive review and summary on neonatal polycystic kidney disease (PKD) with emphasis on the differential diagnosis, clinical manifestations, diagnostic techniques, and potential therapeutic approaches for the major causes of neonatal PKD, namely hereditary disease, including autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant PKD and nonhereditary PKD, with particular emphasis on multicystic dysplastic kidney. A brief overview of obstructive cystic dysplasia and simple and complex cysts is also included. PMID:25155726

  13. Disruption of Slc52a3 gene causes neonatal lethality with riboflavin deficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Hiroki; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Yamanishi, Kaori; Yao, Yoshiaki; Sugano, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Imai, Satoshi; Omura, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Yano, Ikuko; Masuda, Satohiro; Inui, Ken-Ichi; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of riboflavin should be maintained by transporters. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated basic information about riboflavin transporter RFVT3 encoded by SLC52A3 gene. However, the contribution of RFVT3 to the maintenance of riboflavin homeostasis and the significance in vivo remain unclear. Here, we investigated the physiological role of RFVT3 using Slc52a3 knockout (Slc52a3-/-) mice. Most Slc52a3-/- mice died with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia within 48 hr after birth. The plasma and tissue riboflavin concentrations in Slc52a3-/- mice at postnatal day 0 were dramatically lower than those in wild-type (WT) littermates. Slc52a3-/- fetuses showed a lower capacity of placental riboflavin transport compared with WT fetuses. Riboflavin supplement during pregnancy and after birth reduced neonatal death and metabolic disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first report to indicate that Rfvt3 contributes to placental riboflavin transport, and that disruption of Slc52a3 gene caused neonatal mortality with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia owing to riboflavin deficiency. PMID:27272163

  14. Disruption of Slc52a3 gene causes neonatal lethality with riboflavin deficiency in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimatsu, Hiroki; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Yamanishi, Kaori; Yao, Yoshiaki; Sugano, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Imai, Satoshi; Omura, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Yano, Ikuko; Masuda, Satohiro; Inui, Ken-ichi; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of riboflavin should be maintained by transporters. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated basic information about riboflavin transporter RFVT3 encoded by SLC52A3 gene. However, the contribution of RFVT3 to the maintenance of riboflavin homeostasis and the significance in vivo remain unclear. Here, we investigated the physiological role of RFVT3 using Slc52a3 knockout (Slc52a3−/−) mice. Most Slc52a3−/− mice died with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia within 48 hr after birth. The plasma and tissue riboflavin concentrations in Slc52a3−/− mice at postnatal day 0 were dramatically lower than those in wild-type (WT) littermates. Slc52a3−/− fetuses showed a lower capacity of placental riboflavin transport compared with WT fetuses. Riboflavin supplement during pregnancy and after birth reduced neonatal death and metabolic disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first report to indicate that Rfvt3 contributes to placental riboflavin transport, and that disruption of Slc52a3 gene caused neonatal mortality with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia owing to riboflavin deficiency. PMID:27272163

  15. Related Factors and Adverse Neonatal Outcomes in Women with Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes Complicated by Histologic Chorioamnionitis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ailan; Zhang, Wenwen; Chen, Miaomiao; Wang, Yuhuan; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Qingfeng; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify factors predicting histologic chorioamnionitis (HCA) in women with preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). Material/Methods We retrospectively enrolled 371 women diagnosed with PPROM at less than 34 weeks of gestation at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University between January 2008 and December 2012. HCA was diagnosed by placental histopathology in 70% of participants. Binary logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with HCA and neonatal outcomes. Results Patient age, rate of parity, tocolysis, cesarean section, serum C reactive protein (CRP) level at admission, white blood cell count, and latency duration did not significantly differ between the 2 groups. Binary logistic regression revealed that oligohydramnios at admission, gestational age at PPROM, and serum CRP >8 mg/L before delivery were significantly associated with HCA. Gestational age at delivery and birth weight were significantly lower in HCA patients than control patients. The rate of 1-min Apgar score <7, abnormal neonatal intracranial ultrasound findings, neonatal pneumonia, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, early-onset neonatal sepsis, and mortality were higher in HCA patients, but no significant difference was observed in the incidence of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, necrotizing enterocolitis, hyperbilirubinemia, or hypoglycemia. Conclusions Younger gestational age at time of PPROM, higher CRP level before delivery, and oligohydramnios at admission in women with PPROM are associated with HCA, and HCA is associated with some adverse neonatal outcomes. PMID:25644559

  16. Neonatal clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van de Velde, Marc; van den Anker, John

    2013-01-01

    Effective and safe drug administration in neonates should be based on integrated knowledge on the evolving physiological characteristics of the infant who will receive the drug, and the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a given drug. Consequently, clinical pharmacology in neonates is as dynamic and diverse as the neonates we admit to our units while covariates explaining the variability are at least as relevant as median estimates. The unique setting of neonatal clinical pharmacology will be highlighted based on the hazards of simple extrapolation of maturational drug clearance when only based on ‘adult’ metabolism (propofol, paracetamol). Secondly, maturational trends are not at the same pace for all maturational processes. This will be illustrated based on the differences between hepatic and renal maturation (tramadol, morphine, midazolam). Finally, pharmacogenetics should be tailored to neonates, not just mirror adult concepts. Because of this diversity, clinical research in the field of neonatal clinical pharmacology is urgently needed, and facilitated through PK/PD modeling. In addition, irrespective of already available data to guide pharmacotherapy, pharmacovigilance is needed to recognize specific side effects. Consequently, paediatric anesthesiologists should consider to contribute to improved pharmacotherapy through clinical trial design and collaboration, as well as reporting on adverse effects of specific drugs. PMID:23617305

  17. Neonatal surgery in Africa.

    PubMed

    Chirdan, Lohfa B; Ngiloi, Petronilla J; Elhalaby, Essam A

    2012-05-01

    The management of neonatal surgical problems continues to pose considerable challenges, particularly in low-resource settings. The burden of neonatal surgical diseases in Africa is not well documented. The characteristics of some neonatal surgical problems are highlighted. Late presentation coupled with poor understanding of the milieu interior of the neonates by incompetent health care providers and poorly equipped hospitals combine to give rise to the unacceptable high morbidity and mortality in most parts of Africa. Proper training of all staff involved in neonatal health care coupled with community awareness must be vigorously pursued by all stakeholders. Various governments throughout the continent of Africa, in conjunction with international donor agencies, must not only provide an adequate budget for health care services and improve infrastructures, but must also deliberately encourage and provide funding for neonatal surgical care and research across the continent. The well-established pediatric surgical training programs, particularly in North and South Africa, should hold the moral responsibility of training all possible numbers of young surgeons from other African countries that do not have any existing pediatric surgical training programs or those countries suffering from remarkable shortage of trained pediatric surgeons. PMID:22475121

  18. Minimizing morbidity of hypoglycemia in diabetes: A review of mini-dose glucagon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 1 diabetes is a common chronic disease of childhood and one of the most difficult conditions to manage. Advances in insulin formulations and insulin delivery devices have markedly improved the ability to achieve normal glucose homeostasis. However, hypoglycemia remains the primary limiting fact...

  19. Ectopic insulin secreting neuroendocrine tumor of kidney with recurrent hypoglycemia: a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypoglycemia secondary to ectopic insulin secretion of non-pancreatic tumors is rare. Case presentation We describe a middle aged woman with recurrent hypoglycemia. On evaluation, she was detected to have hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia and right sided renal mass lesion. 68Ga-Dotanoc and 99mTc-HYNICTOC scans confirmed the intrarenal mass to be of neuroendocrine origin. Right nephrectomy was done and it turned out to be an insulin secreting neuroendocrine tumour. Neuroendocrine nature of this tumour was further confirmed by ultra-structural examination. Her hypoglycemia did not recur after resection of this tumour. Conclusion Few cases of ectopic insulin secretion have been reported though some are not proven convincingly. This case addresses all the issues raised in previous case reports and proves by clinical, laboratory, functional imaging and immunohistochemical analysis that ectopic origin of insulin by non-pancreatic tumors does occur. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of ectopic insulinoma arising from the kidney. PMID:24741994

  20. Intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas for complex pancreatogenous hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiying; Tan, Haidong; Sun, Yongliang; Si, Shuang; Xu, Li; Liu, Xiaolei; Liu, Liguo; Zhou, Wenying; Huang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intraoperative localization and confirmation of complete resection of the hypersecreting tissue are the 2 main challenges in the management of pancreatogenous hypoglycemia. Here, we report our experience with intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas in the management of pancreatogenous hypoglycemia. Clinical courses of 2 patients with biochemical evidence of a pancreatogenous hypoglycemia were studied. The preoperative diagnosis was multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN-1) and nesidioblastosis, respectively. Rapid intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas was used to localize and confirm complete excision of the hypersecreting tissue. Hypoglycemia was successfully treated in both the patients. In the MEN-1 patient, 2 small tumors in the head of pancreas were not resected, as they were deemed noninsulin secreting by intraoperative portal vein insulin assay, thus avoiding a total pancreatectomy. In the patient with nesidioblastosis, using intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas, an appropriate amount of pancreatic tissue was resected thereby avoiding recurrence and diabetes. This technique may be of particular value in patients with complex conditions such as MEN-1 and nesidioblastosis, to localize and achieve complete resection of hypersecreting pancreatic tissue. PMID:27367988

  1. Hypoglycemia in the hospital: systems-based approach to recognition, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Varlamov, Elena V; Kulaga, Mark E; Khosla, Akhil; Prime, Danille L; Rennert, Nancy J

    2014-10-01

    Hypoglycemia causes immediate adverse reactions and is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes and increased health care costs. It is also one of the barriers to optimization of inpatient glycemic control. Prioritizing quality improvement efforts to address hypoglycemia in hospitalized patients with diabetes is of critical importance. Acute illness, hospital routine, and gaps in quality care predispose patients to hypoglycemia. Many of these factors can be minimized when approached from a systems-based perspective. This requires creation of a multidisciplinary team to develop strategies to prevent hypoglycemic events by targeting many factors, such as systemic analysis of blood glucometrics, policies and protocols, coordination of nutrition and insulin administration, transitions of care, staff and patient education, and communication. This article reviews recommendations of the American Diabetes Association, the Endocrine Society, and the Society of Hospital Medicine, and highlights our institution's approach in each of these areas. Despite a multitude of challenges, we believe that it is feasible to improve the safety and quality of inpatient diabetes care and avoid hypoglycemia without requiring significant additional hospital resources. Physician leaders play a major role in guiding this process and encouraging participation of interdisciplinary members of the hospital team. PMID:25502140

  2. Analysis of alternatives for insulinizing patients to achieve glycemic control and avoid accompanying risks of hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    GAO, JIALIN; XIONG, QIANYIN; MIAO, JUN; ZHANG, YAO; XIA, LIBING; LU, MEIQIN; ZHANG, BINHUA; CHEN, YUEPING; ZHANG, ANSU; YU, CUI; WANG, LI-ZHUO

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to explore the efficacy of glycemic control and the risks of hypoglycemia with different methods of insulin therapy, and to provide reference data for the clinical treatment of diabetes. In this retrospective study, hospitalized patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between March and December 2014, in the Department of Endocrinology in the First Affiliated Hospital of Wannan Medical College, were divided into three groups, including an intensive insulin analogue therapy group, a premixed insulin analogue treatment group and a premixed human insulin therapy group. The efficacy of glycemic control and the incidence of hypoglycemia were determined in each of the insulin treatment groups. Compared with the other treatment groups, the intensive insulin analogue therapy group was associated with superior blood glucose control, shorter time to reach standard insulin regimen, shorter hospitalization time, fewer fluctuations in blood glucose levels and lower insulin dosage on discharge from hospital. However, this treatment was also associated with a high risk of hypoglycemia. In conclusion, when combined with the effective prevention of hypoglycemia and appropriate nursing care (especially in hospital care), intensive insulin analogue therapy may provide the greatest benefit to patients. PMID:26137223

  3. Adrenomedullary response to hypoglycemia in first-degree relatives of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rovensky, J; Imrich, R; Penesova, A; Radikova, Z; Scipova, A; Vlcek, M; Vigas, M

    2008-12-01

    Our recent studies showed blunted adrenomedullary responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in premenopausal females with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic sclerosis, suggesting dysregulation of the adrenomedullary hormonal system (AMHS). Since no relationship has been found between degree of AMHS dysfunction and clinical or inflammatory parameters in those patients, we hypothesize the presence of an inherited perturbation of the AMHS. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated adrenomedullary responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia (0.1 IU/kg) in premenopausal female subjects: 17 glucocorticoid-naïve RA patients, 15 healthy first-degree family members (FDR), and 18 age- and body mass index-matched healthy controls. Our results demonstrate that when compared to controls, RA patients had lower baseline epinephrine levels (P= 0.01) and lower area under response curve (AUC) levels of norepinephrine (P < 0.001) and epinephrine (P < 0.003). In contrast, FDR had lower (P= 0.001) AUC levels of norepinephrine compared to controls and higher (P= 0.033) AUC levels of epinephrine compared to RA patients. There were no significant differences in epinephrine response between FDR and controls. Although we found lower norepinephrine responses to hypoglycemia in FDR of RA patients, adrenomedullary responses to hypoglycemia does not appear to be altered to the degree found in RA patients. PMID:19120156

  4. Weight-based insulin dosing for acute hyperkalemia results in less hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Dauria T; Schafers, Stephen J; Horwedel, Tim A; Deal, Eli N; Tobin, Garry S

    2016-05-01

    Hyperkalemia treatment with intravenous insulin has been associated with hypoglycemia. This single-center, retrospective study compared the effects on hypoglycemia between weight-based insulin dosing (0.1 U/kg of body weight up to a maximum of 10 U) compared to standard flat doses of 10 U among patients weighing less than 95 kg. Of the 132 charts randomly selected for review, hypoglycemic events (blood glucose <70 mg/dL) were reduced from 27.3% in the 10-U group to 12.1% in the weight-based group (P = 0.05). The number of affected patients was reduced with 19.7% in the 10-U group and 10.6% in the weight-based group (P = 0.22). The potassium-lowering effects of these 2 strategies were similar between groups. Female patients and those with baseline glucose values <140 mg/dL were at increased risk for hypoglycemia. Weight-based insulin dosing (0.1 U/kg) for acute hyperkalemia therapy resulted in less hypoglycemia without impacting potassium lowering. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:355-357. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26762588

  5. Effectiveness of a Nurse-Managed Protocol to Prevent Hypoglycemia in Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Giuseppe; Avanzini, Fausto; Iacuitti, Giuseppe; Planca, Enrico; Frigerio, Ilaria; Busi, Giovanna; Carlino, Liliana; Cortesi, Laura; Roncaglioni, Maria Carla; Riva, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hypoglycemia due to inadequate carbohydrate intake is a frequent complication of insulin treatment of diabetic in-patients. Objective. To assess the effectiveness of a nurse-managed protocol to prevent hypoglycemia during subcutaneous insulin treatment. Design. Prospective pre-post-intervention study. Methods. In 350 consecutive diabetic in-patients the incidence of hypoglycemia (blood glucose < 70 mg/dL) during subcutaneous insulin treatment was assessed before (phase A) and after (phase B) the protocol was adopted to permit (1) the patient to opt for substitutive food to integrate incomplete carbohydrate intake in the meal; (2) in case of lack of appetite or repeatedly partial intake of the planned food, prandial insulin administered at the end of the meal to be related to the actual amount of carbohydrates eaten; (3) intravenous infusion of glucose during prolonged fasting. Results. Eighty-four patients in phase A and 266 in phase B received subcutaneous insulin for median periods of, respectively, 7 (Q1–Q3 6–12) and 6 days (Q1–Q3 4–9). Hypoglycemic events declined significantly from 0.34 ± 0.33 per day in phase A to 0.19 ± 0.30 in phase B (P > 0.001). Conclusions. A nurse-managed protocol focusing on carbohydrate intake reduced the incidence of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes receiving subcutaneous insulin in hospital. PMID:25961051

  6. Candidate gene analysis: severe intraventricular hemorrhage in inborn preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Adén, Ulrika; Lin, Aiping; Carlo, Waldemar; Leviton, Alan; Murray, Jeffrey C; Hallman, Mikko; Lifton, Richard P; Zhang, Heping; Ment, Laura R

    2013-11-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a disorder of complex etiology. We analyzed genotypes for 7 genes from 224 inborn preterm neonates treated with antenatal steroids and grade 3-4 IVH and 389 matched controls. Only methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was more prevalent in cases of IVH, emphasizing the need for more comprehensive genetic strategies. PMID:23896193

  7. Hypoglycemia, With or Without Insulin Therapy, Is Associated With Increased Mortality Among Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rajesh; Hurwitz, Shelley; Turchin, Alexander; Trivedi, Apoorva

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hypoglycemia is associated with increased mortality in hospitalized patients. We investigated the relationship between spontaneous hypoglycemia versus insulin-associated hypoglycemia and mortality in hospitalized patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data for this retrospective cohort study were obtained from electronic databases of patients admitted between 1 April 2008 and 30 November 2010. Patients with one or more blood glucose values ≤50 mg/dL on point-of-care glucose testing were considered hypoglycemic. Patients treated with insulin were assumed to have insulin-associated hypoglycemia. Age-, sex-, and race-matched patients with all blood glucose values >70 mg/dL were selected as controls. The Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) was used to control for severity of illness. RESULTS There were four groups: 1) noninsulin-treated hypoglycemia (NTH) (n = 135), 2) insulin-treated hypoglycemia (ITH) (n = 961), 3) noninsulin-treated control (NTC) (n = 1,058), and 4) insulin-treated control (ITC) (n = 736). Mortality was higher in the ITH group compared with the ITC group (20.3 vs. 4.5%, P < 0.0001), with a relatively higher CCI (1.8 vs. 1.5%, P < 0.0001), but much higher in the NTH group compared with the NTC group (34.5 vs. 1.1%, P < 0.0001), with much higher CCI (2.4 vs. 1.1%, P < 0.0001). Mortality was higher in the NTH group compared with the ITH group (P < 0.0001) but lower in the NTC group compared with the ITC group (P < 0.0001). After controlling for age, sex, CCI, and admission to the intensive care unit, insulin treatment was associated with a lower mortality among the hypoglycemic patients; hazard ratio of death in the ITH group relative to the NTH group was 0.34 (95% CI 0.25–0.47, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Insulin-associated and spontaneous hypoglycemia are associated with increased mortality among hospitalized patients. PMID:23248192

  8. Suspected postprandial hypoglycemia is associated with beta-adrenergic hypersensitivity and emotional distress.

    PubMed

    Berlin, I; Grimaldi, A; Landault, C; Cesselin, F; Puech, A J

    1994-11-01

    Suspected postprandial (reactive or idiopathic) hypoglycemia is characterized by predominantly adrenergic symptoms appearing after meals rich in carbohydrates and by their rare association with low blood glucose level (< 2.77 mmol/L). We studied heart rate, blood pressure, plasma insulin, C-peptide, and catecholamine responses during a 5-h oral glucose tolerance test in eight patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia and eight age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls. We also evaluated beta-adrenergic sensitivity by using the isoproterenol sensitivity test. Psychological profile was assessed by the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90R) self-report symptom inventory. Patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia had higher beta-adrenergic sensitivity (defined as the dose of isoproterenol required to increase the resting heart rate by 25 beats/min) than controls (mean +/- SEM, 0.8 +/- 0.13 vs. 1.86 +/- 0.25 microgram isoproterenol; P = 0.002). After administration of glucose (75 g) blood glucose, plasma C-peptide, plasma epinephrine, and plasma norepinephrine responses were identical in the two groups, but plasma insulin was higher in the patients (group effect, P = 0.02; group by time interaction, P = 0.0001). Both heart rate and systolic blood pressure were significantly higher (but remained in the normal range) after glucose administration in patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia than in controls (group by time interactions, P = 0.004 and 0.0007, respectively). After glucose intake, seven patients had symptoms (palpitations, headache, tremor, generalized sweating, hunger, dizziness, sweating of the palms, flush, nausea, and fatigue), whereas in the control group, one subject reported flush and another palpitations, tremor, and hunger. Analysis of the SCL-90R questionnaire revealed that patients had emotional distress and significantly higher anxiety, somatization, depression, and obsessive-compulsive scores than controls. We may

  9. Insulin Delivery Into the Peripheral Circulation: A Key Contributor to Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Justin M; Kraft, Guillaume; Scott, Melanie F; Neal, Doss W; Farmer, Ben; Smith, Marta S; Hastings, Jon R; Allen, Eric J; Donahue, E Patrick; Rivera, Noelia; Winnick, Jason J; Edgerton, Dale S; Nishimura, Erica; Fledelius, Christian; Brand, Christian L; Cherrington, Alan D

    2015-10-01

    Hypoglycemia limits optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), making novel strategies to mitigate it desirable. We hypothesized that portal (Po) vein insulin delivery would lessen hypoglycemia. In the conscious dog, insulin was infused into the hepatic Po vein or a peripheral (Pe) vein at a rate four times of basal. In protocol 1, a full counterregulatory response was allowed, whereas in protocol 2, glucagon was fixed at basal, mimicking the diminished α-cell response to hypoglycemia seen in T1DM. In protocol 1, glucose fell faster with Pe insulin than with Po insulin, reaching 56 ± 3 vs. 70 ± 6 mg/dL (P = 0.04) at 60 min. The change in area under the curve (ΔAUC) for glucagon was similar between Pe and Po, but the peak occurred earlier in Pe. The ΔAUC for epinephrine was greater with Pe than with Po (67 ± 17 vs. 36 ± 14 ng/mL/180 min). In protocol 2, glucose also fell more rapidly than in protocol 1 and fell faster in Pe than in Po, reaching 41 ± 3 vs. 67 ± 2 mg/dL (P < 0.01) by 60 min. Without a rise in glucagon, the epinephrine responses were much larger (ΔAUC of 204 ± 22 for Pe vs. 96 ± 29 ng/mL/180 min for Po). In summary, Pe insulin delivery exacerbates hypoglycemia, particularly in the presence of a diminished glucagon response. Po vein insulin delivery, or strategies that mimic it (i.e., liver-preferential insulin analogs), should therefore lessen hypoglycemia. PMID:26085570

  10. Population-Based Study of Severe Hypoglycemia Requiring Emergency Medical Service Assistance Reveals Unique Findings

    PubMed Central

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Carter, Rickey E; Pattan, Vishwanath; Myers, Lucas A; Kumar, Hamit; Smith, Steven A; Russi, Christopher S; Levine, James A; Basu, Ananda; Kudva, Yogish C

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective is to report a contemporary population-based estimate of hypoglycemia requiring emergency medical services (EMS), its burden on medical resources, and its associated mortality in patients with or without diabetes mellitus (DM, non-DM), which will enable development of prospective strategies that will capture hypoglycemia promptly and provide an integrated approach for prevention of such episodes. Methods We retrieved all ambulance calls activated for hypoglycemia in Olmsted County, Minnesota, between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2009. Results A total of 1473 calls were made by 914 people (DM 8%, non-DM 16%, unknown DM status 3%). Mean age was 60 ± 16 years with 49% being female. A higher percentage of calls were made by DM patients (87%) with proportionally fewer calls coming from non-DM patients (11%) (chi-square test, p < .001), and the remaining 2% calls by people with unknown DM status. Emergency room transportation and hospitalization were significantly higher in non-DM patients compared to DM patients (p < .001) and type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to type 1 diabetes mellitus (p < .001). Sulphonylureas alone or in combination with insulin varied during the study period (p = .01). The change in incidence of EMS for hypoglycemia was tracked during this period. However, causality has not been established. Death occurred in 240 people, 1.2 (interquartile range 0.2–2.7) years after their first event. After adjusting for age, mortality was higher in non-DM patients compared with DM patients (p < .001) but was not different between the two types of DM. Conclusions The population burden of EMS requiring hypoglycemia is high in both DM and non-DM patients, and imposes significant burden on medical resources. It is associated with long-term mortality. PMID:22401324

  11. Priorities in neonatal care in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Ho, N K

    1996-08-01

    Lower perinatal and neonatal mortality have been achieved in the developed countries following advancement of neonatal care, introduction of high technologies, and better knowledge of pathophysiology of the newborn infants. Other contributing factors are organised delivery room care with skillful resuscitative techniques as well as risk identification and efficient transport of the sick infants including in utero transfer of the fetus, etc. It cannot be assumed that similar results can be attained in developing countries where financial and human resources are the problems. With limited resources, it is necessary to prioritize neonatal care in the developing countries. It is essential to collect minimum meaningful perinatal data to define the problems of each individual country. This is crucial for monitoring, auditing, evaluation, and planning of perinatal health care of the country. The definition and terminology in perinatology should also be uniform and standardised for comparative studies. Paediatricians should be well trained in resuscitation and stabilisation of the newborn infants. Resuscitation should begin in the delivery room and a resuscitation team should be formed. This is the best way to curtail complication and morbidity of asphyxiated births. Nosocomial infections have been the leading cause of neonatal deaths. It is of paramount importance to prevent infections in the nursery. Staff working in the nursery should pay attention to usage of sterilised equipment, isolation of infected babies and aseptic procedures. Paediatricians should avoid indiscriminate use of antibiotics. Most important of all, hand-washing before examination of the baby is mandatory and should be strictly adhered to. Other simpler measures include warming devices for maintenance of body temperature of the newborn babies, blood glucose monitoring, and antenatal steroid for mothers in premature labour. In countries where neonatal jaundice is prevalent, effective management to

  12. Hypoglycemia-Related Electroencephalogram Changes Are Independent of Gender, Age, Duration of Diabetes, and Awareness Status in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Remvig, Line Sofie; Elsborg, Rasmus; Sejling, Anne-Sophie; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Sønder Snogdal, Lena; Folkestad, Lars; Juhl, Claus B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Neuroglycopenia in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results in reduced cognition, unconsciousness, seizures, and possible death. Characteristic changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG) can be detected even in the initial stages. This may constitute a basis for a hypoglycemia alarm device. The aim of the present study was to explore the characteristics of the EEG differentiating normoglycemia and hypoglycemia and to elucidate potential group differences. Methods We pooled data from experiments in T1DM where EEG was available during both normoglycemia and hypo-glycemia for each subject. Temporal EEG was analyzed by quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) analysis with respect to absolute amplitude and centroid frequency of the delta, theta, alpha, and beta bands, and the peak frequency of the unified theta–alpha band. To elucidate possible group differences, data were subsequently stratified by age group (± 50 years), gender, duration of diabetes (± 20 years), and hypoglycemia awareness status (normal/impaired awareness of hypoglycemia). Results An increase in the log amplitude of the delta, theta, and alpha band and a decrease in the alpha band centroid frequency and the peak frequency of the unified theta–alpha band constituted the most significant hypoglycemia indicators (all p < .0001). The size of these qEEG changes remained stable across all strata. Conclusions Hypoglycemia-associated EEG changes remain stable across age group, gender, duration of diabetes, and hypoglycemia awareness status. This indicates that it may be possible to establish a general algorithm for hypoglycemia detection based on EEG measures. PMID:23294778

  13. NEONATAL DESTRUCTION OF DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rats treated as neonates with 6-hydroxydopamine are proposed to model the dopamine deficiency associated with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS). o understand the neurobiological basis of specific behaviors in LNS, investigations were undertaken in these neonatally lesioned rats. everal ...

  14. [Treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M D

    2001-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the recent medical literature on the treatment of neonatal jaundice, focusing on practical aspects that are relevant to pediatricians and neonatologists. SOURCES: An extensive review of the related literature was performed, also including the authors clinical experience in this field of investigation. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: Jaundice is very common among infants during the first days of life. Several factors such as maternal and neonatal history have to be considered before implementing treatment. Significant advances have been made in the past few years concerning the treatment of jaundiced newborn infants. This review focuses on three forms of treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia: phototherapy, exchange transfusion and the use of drugs to reduce serum bilirubin concentration. CONCLUSIONS: Nowadays, the in-depth knowledge about the mechanism of action of phototherapy, the development of intensified phototherapy units and the use of drugs to reduce bilirubin formation, have contributed to significantly decrease the need for exchange transfusion. PMID:14676895

  15. AB104. Glucose-6 phospate dehydrogenase deficiency among mongolian neonates

    PubMed Central

    Batjargal, Khishigjargal; Nansal, Gerelmaa; Zagd, Gerelmaa; Ganbaatar, Erdenetuya

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans, affecting 400 million people worldwide and a high prevalence in persons of African, Middle Asian countries. The most common clinical manifestations are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia, which is caused by the impairment of erythrocyte’s ability to remove harmful oxidative stress triggered by exogenous agents such as drugs, infection, or fava bean ingestion. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by G6PD is strongly associated with mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment. The study aims to determine a level of G6PD in healthy neonates. Methods We obtained blood spot samples from 268 infants around 24-72 hours in their age who has unsuspected intranatal and neonatal disorders. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase “Perkin Elmer, Finland” level is determined by Victor 2D Fluorometer assay, developing of neonatal jaundice is examined by recall. Results The76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PD, other 23.5% (n=63) was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. In the both sex, 51.5% of male 0.88±0.46 Ug/Hb (n=33) and 47.6% of female (n=30) 0.97±0.55 Ug/Hb was assessed with G6PD deficiency. Developing Jaundice period in number of 63 neonates with G6PD deficiency, 86% of neonates (n=54) was in 1-4 days, 4% of neonates (n=3) was in 5-7 days and there is no sign of jaundice in 9% (n=6). Therefore neonates with G6PD deficiency, 53.9% (n=34) continued jaundice more than two weeks. Conclusions G6PD deficiency was determined in male neonates (51.5%) more than female (47.6%). The 76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PDH other 23.5% (n=63) of all participants was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. It shows that G6PD might be one potential risk of neonatal jaundice and hyperbilirubinemia in neonates in Mongolia.

  16. Mode of Delivery in Premature Neonates: Does It Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Racusin, Diana A.; Antony, Kathleen M.; Haase, Jennifer; Bondy, Melissa; Aagaard, Kjersti M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective  Despite the current prevalence of preterm births, no clear guidelines exist on the optimal mode of delivery. Our objective was to investigate the effects of mode of delivery on neonatal outcomes among premature infants in a large cohort. Study Design  We applied a retrospective cohort study design to a database of 6,408 births. Neonates were stratified by birth weight and a composite score was calculated to assess neonatal outcomes. The results were then further stratified by fetal exposure to antenatal steroids, birth weight, and mode of delivery. Results  No improvement in neonatal outcome with cesarean delivery (CD) was noted when subjects were stratified by mode of delivery, both in the presence or absence of antenatal corticosteroid administration. In the 1,500 to 1,999 g subgroup, there appears to be an increased risk of respiratory distress syndromes in neonates born by CD. Conclusion  In our all-comers cohort, replicative of everyday obstetric practice, CD did not improve neonatal outcomes in preterm infants. PMID:27468363

  17. Obligate Role for Ketone Body Oxidation in Neonatal Metabolic Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, David G.; d'Avignon, D. André; Wentz, Anna E.; Weber, Mary L.; Crawford, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    To compensate for the energetic deficit elicited by reduced carbohydrate intake, mammals convert energy stored in ketone bodies to high energy phosphates. Ketone bodies provide fuel particularly to brain, heart, and skeletal muscle in states that include starvation, adherence to low carbohydrate diets, and the neonatal period. Here, we use novel Oxct1−/− mice, which lack the ketolytic enzyme succinyl-CoA:3-oxo-acid CoA-transferase (SCOT), to demonstrate that ketone body oxidation is required for postnatal survival in mice. Although Oxct1−/− mice exhibit normal prenatal development, all develop ketoacidosis, hypoglycemia, and reduced plasma lactate concentrations within the first 48 h of birth. In vivo oxidation of 13C-labeled β-hydroxybutyrate in neonatal Oxct1−/− mice, measured using NMR, reveals intact oxidation to acetoacetate but no contribution of ketone bodies to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Accumulation of acetoacetate yields a markedly reduced β-hydroxybutyrate:acetoacetate ratio of 1:3, compared with 3:1 in Oxct1+ littermates. Frequent exogenous glucose administration to actively suckling Oxct1−/− mice delayed, but could not prevent, lethality. Brains of newborn SCOT-deficient mice demonstrate evidence of adaptive energy acquisition, with increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase α, increased autophagy, and 2.4-fold increased in vivo oxidative metabolism of [13C]glucose. Furthermore, [13C]lactate oxidation is increased 1.7-fold in skeletal muscle of Oxct1−/− mice but not in brain. These results indicate the critical metabolic roles of ketone bodies in neonatal metabolism and suggest that distinct tissues exhibit specific metabolic responses to loss of ketone body oxidation. PMID:21209089

  18. Neonatal herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Alberto; Lugli, Licia; Rossi, Cecilia; Maria, Chiara Laguardia; Guidotti, Isotta; Gallo, Claudio; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2011-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus is an important cause of neonatal infection, which can lead to death or long-term disabilities. Rarely in utero, the transmission frequently occurs during delivery. The disease may be disseminated, localized to the central nervous system, or involving skin, eye and/or mouth. Mortality rates markedly decreased with high-dose antiviral treatment. Diagnosis of neonatal infection is based on viral isolation from ulcerated vesicles or by scarifying mucocutaneous lesions. Recently polymerase chain reaction plays a central role for both viral detection (skin, mucosal, cerebrospinal fluid samples) and response to therapy. Vertical transmission may be decreased by prophylactic antiviral treatment. PMID:21942600

  19. Resuscitation and Obstetrical Care to Reduce Intrapartum-Related Neonatal Deaths: A MANDATE Study.

    PubMed

    Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Griffin, Jennifer B; Moran, Katelin; Jones, Bonnie; Downs, Allan; McClure, Elizabeth M; Goldenberg, Robert L; Rouse, Doris; Jobe, Alan H

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of neonatal resuscitation and basic obstetric care on intrapartum-related neonatal mortality in low and middle-income countries, using the mathematical model, Maternal and Neonatal Directed Assessment of Technology (MANDATE). Using MANDATE, we evaluated the impact of interventions for intrapartum-related events causing birth asphyxia (basic neonatal resuscitation, advanced neonatal care, increasing facility birth, and emergency obstetric care) when implemented in home, clinic, and hospital settings of sub-Saharan African and India for 2008. Total intrapartum-related neonatal mortality (IRNM) was acute neonatal deaths from intrapartum-related events plus late neonatal deaths from ongoing intrapartum-related injury. Introducing basic neonatal resuscitation in all settings had a large impact on decreasing IRNM. Increasing facility births and scaling up emergency obstetric care in clinics and hospitals also had a large impact on decreasing IRNM. Increasing prevalence and utilization of advanced neonatal care in hospital settings had limited impact on IRNM. The greatest improvement in IRNM was seen with widespread advanced neonatal care and basic neonatal resuscitation, scaled-up emergency obstetric care in clinics and hospitals, and increased facility deliveries, resulting in an estimated decrease in IRNM to 2.0 per 1,000 live births in India and 2.5 per 1,000 live births in sub-Saharan Africa. With more deliveries occurring in clinics and hospitals, the scale-up of obstetric care can have a greater effect than if modeled individually. Use of MANDATE enables health leaders to direct resources towards interventions that could prevent intrapartum-related deaths. A lack of widespread implementation of basic neonatal resuscitation, increased facility births, and emergency obstetric care are missed opportunities to save newborn lives. PMID:25656720

  20. Combining genetic algorithm and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm in training neural network for hypoglycemia detection using EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lien B; Nguyen, Anh V; Ling, Sai Ho; Nguyen, Hung T

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most common but highly feared complication induced by the intensive insulin therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Nocturnal hypoglycemia is dangerous because sleep obscures early symptoms and potentially leads to severe episodes which can cause seizure, coma, or even death. It is shown that the hypoglycemia onset induces early changes in electroencephalography (EEG) signals which can be detected non-invasively. In our research, EEG signals from five T1DM patients during an overnight clamp study were measured and analyzed. By applying a method of feature extraction using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and classification using neural networks, we establish that hypoglycemia can be detected efficiently using EEG signals from only two channels. This paper demonstrates that by implementing a training process of combining genetic algorithm and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, the classification results are improved markedly up to 75% sensitivity and 60% specificity on a separate testing set. PMID:24110953

  1. Intimate partner violence, substance use, and adverse neonatal outcomes among urban women

    PubMed Central

    Alhusen, Jeanne L.; Lucea, Marguerite B.; Bullock, Linda; Sharps, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of intimate partner violence, substance use, and their co-occurrence during pregnancy and examines their associations with adverse neonatal outcomes. Study design Between February 2009 and February 2010, pregnant women receiving obstetrical care at three urban clinics were screened for intimate partner violence and substance use between 24-28 weeks gestation. A chart review was conducted upon delivery to assess for adverse neonatal outcomes of low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth, and small for gestational age (SGA). Results Maternal and neonatal data were collected on 166 mothers and their neonates. Overall, 19% of the sample reported intimate partner violence during their pregnancies. Of the study's neonates 41% had at least one adverse neonatal outcome. Nearly half of the mothers reported using at least one substance during pregnancy. Women experiencing intimate partner violence had a higher prevalence of marijuana use than their non-abused counterparts (p < 0.01). Experiencing intimate partner violence was associated with a fourfold increase in having a SGA neonate (aOR = 4.00; 95% CI 1.58 – 9.97). Women who reported marijuana use had five times the odds of having a neonate classified as SGA (aOR = 5.16, 95% CI 2.24 – 11.89) or LBW (aOR 5.00; 95% CI 1.98 – 12.65). Conclusions The prevalence of intimate partner violence during pregnancy and substance use is high in urban mothers, the risks of which extend to their neonates. Pediatric providers are urged to routinely screen for both issues and recognize the impact of co-occurrence of these risk factors on poor neonatal and childhood outcomes. PMID:23485028

  2. Impairments of hepatic gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis in PPARα-deficient neonatal mice

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, David G.; Ercal, Baris; André d'Avignon, D.; Dietzen, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα) is a master transcriptional regulator of hepatic metabolism and mediates the adaptive response to fasting. Here, we demonstrate the roles for PPARα in hepatic metabolic adaptations to birth. Like fasting, nutrient supply is abruptly altered at birth when a transplacental source of carbohydrates is replaced by a high-fat, low-carbohydrate milk diet. PPARα-knockout (KO) neonatal mice exhibit relative hypoglycemia due to impaired conversion of glycerol to glucose. Although hepatic expression of fatty acyl-CoA dehydrogenases is imparied in PPARα neonates, these animals exhibit normal blood acylcarnitine profiles. Furthermore, quantitative metabolic fate mapping of the medium-chain fatty acid [13C]octanoate in neonatal mouse livers revealed normal contribution of this fatty acid to the hepatic TCA cycle. Interestingly, octanoate-derived carbon labeled glucose uniquely in livers of PPARα-KO neonates. Relative hypoketonemia in newborn PPARα-KO animals could be mechanistically linked to a 50% decrease in de novo hepatic ketogenesis from labeled octanoate. Decreased ketogenesis was associated with diminished mRNA and protein abundance of the fate-committing ketogenic enzyme mitochondrial 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCS2) and decreased protein abundance of the ketogenic enzyme β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase 1 (BDH1). Finally, hepatic triglyceride and free fatty acid concentrations were increased 6.9- and 2.7-fold, respectively, in suckling PPARα-KO neonates. Together, these findings indicate a primary defect of gluconeogenesis from glycerol and an important role for PPARα-dependent ketogenesis in the disposal of hepatic fatty acids during the neonatal period. PMID:24865983

  3. Scrotal Swelling in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Amaya M.; Courtier, Jesse; Phelps, Andrew; Copp, Hillary L.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of scrotal swelling in a neonate can be a source of anxiety for parents, clinicians, and sonologists alike. This pictorial essay provides a focused review of commonly encountered scrotal masses and mimics specific to the neonatal setting. Although malignancy is a concern, it is very uncommon, as most neonatal scrotal masses are benign. Key discriminating features and management options are highlighted to improve the radiologist’s ability to diagnose neonatal scrotal conditions and guide treatment decisions. Neonatal scrotal processes ranging from common to uncommon will be discussed. PMID:25715370

  4. Neonatal Near Miss: the need for a standard definition and appropriate criteria and the rationale for a prospective surveillance system

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Juliana P; Cecatti, José G; Serruya, Suzanne J; Almeida, Paulo V; Duran, Pablo; de Mucio, Bremen; Pileggi-Castro,, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    In Latin American, there is currently a regional action with the main purposes of putting the concept of severe neonatal morbidity in practice and formulating proposals for interventions. A general overview of neonatal health conditions, including morbidity and mortality, is provided to update regional knowledge on the topic. An example of the development and implementation of the concept of maternal near miss is also provided, followed by results from a systematic review covering all previously published studies on Neonatal Near Miss. Finally, some proposals for building a common concept on the topic and for launching a prospective surveillance study are presented. A Neonatal Near Miss is a neonate who had a severe morbidity (organ dysfunction or failure) but who survived this condition within the first 27 days of life. The pragmatic criteria recommended to be used are as follows: birth weight below 1700 g, Apgar score below 7 at 5 minutes of life and gestational age below 33 weeks. As a proxy for organ dysfunction, the following management criteria are also confirmed: parenteral therapeutic antibiotics; nasal continuous positive airway pressure; any intubation during the first 27 days of life; phototherapy within the first 24 h of life; cardiopulmonary resuscitation; the use of vasoactive drugs, anticonvulsants, surfactants, blood products and steroids for refractory hypoglycemia and any surgical procedure. Although this study starts from a regional perspective, this topic is clearly globally relevant. All nations, especially low and middle-income countries, could benefit from the proposed standardization. PMID:26735223

  5. Effect of Naloxon on Counter Insulin Hormone Secretion in Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yeong Shil; Kim, Sung Woon; Yang, In Myung; Kim, Jin Woo; Kim, Young Seol; Choi, Young Kil

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the normal physiologic role of endogenous opiates in glucose homeostasis and as a preliminary study for clarifying the association of endogenous opites with pathophysilogy of NIDDM, we obseved the changes in the secretion of counter-insulin hormones in response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia with or without naloxone. The results were as follows: Blood glucose was decreased significantly more rapidly with naloxone infusion than after insulin alone, which seems to play a role in the early responses of ACTH and GH.Not only was the more rapid response of ACTH and GH, but also the prolonged secretion of ACTH and Cortisol were observed after administration of insulin and naloxone. We concluded that endogenous opiates may be involved in the feedback regulation of secretion of ACTH and GH during hypoglycemia either at hypophysis or hypothalamus, and involved in glucose homeostasis via a certain direct mechanism other than regulation of counter hormone secretion. PMID:2856480

  6. Identification of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetic patients using ECG parameters.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Linh Lan; Su, Steven; Nguyen, Hung T

    2012-01-01

    Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia are both serious diseases related to diabetes mellitus. Among Type 1 Diabetic patients, there are who experience both hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic events. The aim of this study was to identify of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia based on ECG changes in this population. An ECG Acquisition and Analysis System based on LabVIEW software has been developed for collecting ECG signals and extracting features with abnormal changes. ECG parameters included Heart rate (HR), corrected QT interval (QTeC), PR interval, corrected RT interval (RTC) and corrected TpTe interval (TpTe(C)). Blood glucose levels were used to classify glycemic states in subjects as hypoglycemic state (≤ 60 mml/l, Hypo), as normoglycemic state (80 to 110 mmol/l, Normo), and as hyperglycemic state 150 mml/l, Hyper). The results indicated that hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic states produce significant inverse changes on those ECG parameters. PMID:23366486

  7. Profound hypoglycemia-ınduced by vaccinium corymbosum juice and laurocerasus fruit

    PubMed Central

    Aktan, Ahmet Hamdi; Ozcelik, Abdullah; Cure, Erkan; Cure, Medine Cumhur; Yuce, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    An emergency intervention was performed in a 75-year-old male patient with hypoglycemic attack and blackout. Although he was diagnosed with prediabetes before 2 years, he did not take any anti-diabetic drug or follow dietary advice. He drank Vaccinium corymbosum L (VC) juice daily with a belief that it increases sexual potency. Before the development of hypoglycemia, the patient had consumed about 500 ml VC juice in addition to eating 200-300 gram of Laurocerasus officinalis (LO) fruit. The measured plasma glucose (PG) level during loss of consciousness was 30 mg/dl. The profound hypoglycemia may be an unexpected side effect of an interaction between the chemical compositions of the two plants, occurred as a result of LO fruit intake that may have a strong PG-lowering effect or related to excessive intake of VC juice. Both plants may be considered in the alternative treatment of diabetes. PMID:25097289

  8. Profound hypoglycemia-ınduced by vaccinium corymbosum juice and laurocerasus fruit.

    PubMed

    Aktan, Ahmet Hamdi; Ozcelik, Abdullah; Cure, Erkan; Cure, Medine Cumhur; Yuce, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    An emergency intervention was performed in a 75-year-old male patient with hypoglycemic attack and blackout. Although he was diagnosed with prediabetes before 2 years, he did not take any anti-diabetic drug or follow dietary advice. He drank Vaccinium corymbosum L (VC) juice daily with a belief that it increases sexual potency. Before the development of hypoglycemia, the patient had consumed about 500 ml VC juice in addition to eating 200-300 gram of Laurocerasus officinalis (LO) fruit. The measured plasma glucose (PG) level during loss of consciousness was 30 mg/dl. The profound hypoglycemia may be an unexpected side effect of an interaction between the chemical compositions of the two plants, occurred as a result of LO fruit intake that may have a strong PG-lowering effect or related to excessive intake of VC juice. Both plants may be considered in the alternative treatment of diabetes. PMID:25097289

  9. Intentional hypoglycemia to control bingeing in a patient with type 1 diabetes and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Mandana; Kreisman, Stuart; Hall, Lacresha

    2015-02-01

    Most cases of eating disorders associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus are categorized as diabulimia, a disorder of withholding insulin treatment to lose weight through sustained hyperglycemia. In this paper, we report a unique case of a patient with both type 1 diabetes and bulimia nervosa who has an atypical way of controlling her bingeing by keeping her blood sugars low. This pattern of intentionally sustained hypoglycemia has not been previously described in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Knowing various presentations of eating disorders in patients with type 1 diabetes can provide healthcare workers with enhanced ability in recognizing and educating at-risk patients, in the hope of preventing serious hypoglycemia or complications. Furthermore, a patient's awareness of complications associated with suboptimal control of diabetes, whether by overdosing or underdosing their insulin regimen, might lead to avoidance of disordered eating behaviours. PMID:25282003

  10. Secular Trends in the Clinical Characteristics of Type 2 Diabetic Patients With Severe Hypoglycemia Between 2008 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Tsugami, Emiko; Ando, Shigenori; Imai, Ayano; Matsumoto, Suzuko; Omoto, Takashi; Shinozaki, Masahiro; Nishio, Shinya; Abe, Mariko; Antoku, Shinichi; Mifune, Mizuo; Togane, Michiko

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated the trends in the clinical characteristics and prescriptions of type 2 diabetic patients with severe hypoglycemia because the prescription rate of antidiabetic agents has significantly changed recently. Methods A total of 193 patients with type 2 diabetes with severe hypoglycemia induced by antidiabetic agents between 2008 and 2013 were divided into three groups based on the period of visit: 2008 - 2009, 2010 - 2011 and 2012 - 2013. Results While the proportion of patients with severe hypoglycemia using insulin (from 55% to 74%), biguanides (from 6% to 20%), glinides, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors significantly increased, those using sulfonylureas (from 45% to 20%) significantly decreased. Errors of drug use significantly increased as a trigger of hypoglycemia in recent years. The number of antidiabetic agents (from 1.9 ± 0.6 to 2.3 ± 0.7), non-diabetic agents (from 2.3 ± 2.4 to 4.3 ± 3.3), and total drugs prescribed were significantly higher in recent years among patients receiving insulin therapy. Conclusions Polypharmacy especially in patients receiving insulin therapy and errors of drug use have increased in type 2 diabetic patients with severe hypoglycemia in recent years. Intensive education in the usage rule of drugs is considered to be important in order to prevent severe hypoglycemia.

  11. Phase Contrast Imaging in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Kai; Ernst, Thomas; Buchthal, Steve; Speck, Oliver; Anderson, Lynn; Chang, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance phase images can yield superior gray and white matter contrast compared to conventional magnitude images. However, the underlying contrast mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Previous studies have been limited to high field acquisitions in adult volunteers and patients. In this study, phase imaging in the neonatal brain is demonstrated for the first time. Compared to adults, phase differences between gray and white matter are significantly reduced but not inverted in neonates with little myelination and iron deposits in their brains. The remaining phase difference between the neonatal and adult brains may be due to different macromolecule concentration in the unmyelinated brain of the neonates and thus different frequency due to water macromolecule exchange. Additionally, the susceptibility contrast from brain myelination can be separately studied in neonates during brain development. Therefore, magnetic resonance phase imaging is suggested as a novel tool to study neonatal brain development and pathologies in neonates. PMID:21232619

  12. Trends in Antihyperglycemic Medication Prescriptions and Hypoglycemia in Older Adults: 2002-2013

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Kristin K.; Shariff, Salimah; Liu, Kuan; Hramiak, Irene; Mahon, Jeffrey L.; McArthur, Eric; Garg, Amit X.

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, several new antihyperglycemic medications have been introduced including those associated with a lower hypoglycemia risk. We aimed to investigate how these medications are being prescribed to older adults in our region. Methods We conducted population-based cross-sectional analyses of older adults (mean age 75 years) with treated diabetes in Ontario, Canada from 2002 until 2013, to examine the percentage prescribed insulin, sulphonylureas, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, metformin, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors. Over the study period, we also examined their hospital encounters for hypoglycemia (emergency room or inpatient encounter). Results The mean age of treated patients increased slightly over the study quarters and the proportion that were women declined. With the exception of chronic kidney disease, cancer, dementia, and neuropathy, the percentage with a comorbidity appeared to decline. The percentage of treated patients prescribed metformin, gliclazide and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors increased as did combination therapy. Glyburide and thiazolidinedione prescriptions declined, and insulin use remained stable. In those with newly treated diabetes, the majority were prescribed metformin, with smaller percentages prescribed insulin and other oral agents. Although the absolute number of treated patients with a hypoglycemia encounter increased until mid-2006 and then decreased, the overall percentage with an encounter declined over the study period (0.8% with an event in the first quarter, 0.4% with an event in the last quarter). Conclusions Antihyperglycemic medications with safer profiles are being increasingly prescribed to older adults. In this setting there has been a decrease in the percentage of treated patients with a hospital encounter for hypoglycemia. PMID:26335938

  13. Severe Hypoglycemia Caused by Recurrent Sarcomatoid Carcinoma in the Pelvic Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chao; Fan, Chuan Wen; Yu, Yong Yang; Wang, Cun; Yang, Lie; Li, Yuan; Mo, Xian Ming; Zhou, Zong Guang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nonislet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH) is a paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by persistent, severe hypoglycemia in different tumor types of mesochymal or epithelial origin; however, NICTH is infrequently induced by sarcomatoid carcinoma (SC). Despite some sarcomatoid and epithelioid characteristics in few cases of malignancies from epithelium, NICTH induced by recurrent SC in pelvic cavity in this report is extremely rare. We report a case in which NICTH caused by recurrence and pulmonary metastases from SC in the pelvic cavity, and the computed tomography scan revealed multiple pelvic masses and multiple large masses in the pulmonary fields. During the treatment of intestinal obstruction, the patient presented paroxysmal loss of consciousness and sweating. Her glucose even reached 1.22 mmol/L while the serum glycosylated hemoglobin was normal and previous history of diabetes or use of oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin denied. The laboratory examination showed that the low level of insulin, C-peptide, and growth hormone levels in the course of hypoglycemic episodes suggesting to the diagnosis of hypoglycemia induced by nonislet cell tumor, and the decreased levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGFBP3 and the high expression of big IGF-II in the serum further confirmed the diagnosis of NICTH. Because of the widely pelvic recurrence and pulmonary metastases were unresected, the patient was discharged from the hospital after 2 weeks treatment with dexamethasone and glucose and unfortunately died 1 week later. NICTH caused by SC in the pelvic cavity is extremely rare case in clinical. The aim of this report was to present the importance to examine big IGF-II expression in patient's serum in order to reach the diagnosis of NICTH in cases of intractable cancer-associated hypoglycemia. PMID:26496258

  14. Sensitivity of the Predictive Hypoglycemia Minimizer System to the Algorithm Aggressiveness Factor

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Daniel A.; Dassau, Eyal; Breton, Marc D.; Patek, Stephen D.; McCann, Thomas W.; Kovatchev, Boris P.; Doyle, Francis J.; Levy, Brian L.; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Predictive Hypoglycemia Minimizer System (“Hypo Minimizer”), consisting of a zone model predictive controller (the “controller”) and a safety supervision module (the “safety module”), aims to mitigate hypoglycemia by preemptively modulating insulin delivery based on continuous glucose monitor (CGM) measurements. The “aggressiveness factor,” a pivotal variable in the system, governs the speed and magnitude of the controller’s insulin dosing characteristics in response to changes in CGM levels. Methods: Twelve adults with type 1 diabetes were studied in closed-loop in a clinical research center for approximately 24 hours. This analysis focused primarily on the effect of the aggressiveness factor on the automated insulin-delivery characteristics of the controller, and secondarily on the glucose control results. Results: As aggressiveness increased from “conservative” to “medium” to “aggressive,” the controller recommended less insulin (–3.3% vs –14.4% vs –19.5% relative to basal) with a higher frequency (5.3% vs 14.4% vs 20.3%) during the critical times when the CGM was reading 90-120 mg/dl and decreasing. Blood glucose analyses indicated that the most aggressive setting resulted in the most desirable combination of the least time spent <70 mg/dl and the most time spent 70-180 mg/dl, particularly in the overnight period. Hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, or severe hypoglycemia did not occur with any of the aggressiveness values. Conclusion: The Hypo Minimizer’s controller took preemptive action to prevent hypoglycemia based on predicted changes in CGM glucose levels. The most aggressive setting was quickest to take action to reduce insulin delivery below basal and achieved the best glucose metrics. PMID:26134834

  15. Hypoglycemia Prevention and User Acceptance of an Insulin Pump System with Predictive Low Glucose Management

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Birthe S.; Conget, Ignacio; Welsh, John B.; Vorrink, Linda; Shin, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The MiniMed 640G sensor-augmented insulin pump system (Medtronic, Inc., Northridge, CA) can automatically suspend insulin delivery in advance of predicted hypoglycemia and restart it upon recovery. The aims of this analysis were to determine the rate at which predicted hypoglycemia was avoided with this strategy, as well as to assess user acceptance of the system and its insulin management features. Subjects and Methods: Forty subjects with type 1 diabetes used the system for 4 weeks. We retrospectively evaluated performance of the system, using downloaded pump and sensor data, and evaluated user acceptance via questionnaires. Results: There were 2,322 suspend before low events (2.1 per subject-day). The mean (± SD) duration of pump suspension events was 56.4 ± 9.6 min, and the mean subsequent sensor glucose (SG) nadir was 71.8 ± 5.2 mg/dL. SG values following 1,930 (83.1%) of the predictive suspensions did not reach the preset low limit. Nadir SG values of ≤50 and ≤60 mg/dL were seen in 207 (8.9%) and 356 (15.3%) of the predictive suspensions, respectively. Blood glucose (BG) and SG values before and during the study were comparable (P > 0.05). The mean absolute relative difference between paired SG and BG values was 10.9 ± 13.8%. Subjects felt confident using the system, agreed that it helped protect them from hypoglycemia, and wished to continue using it. Conclusions: Automatic insulin pump suspension as implemented in the MiniMed 640G system can help patients avoid hypoglycemia, without significantly increasing hyperglycemia. PMID:26907513

  16. A triad of linezolid toxicity: hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, and acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P. Connor; Phillips, Kristy M.; O'Donnell, Walter J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of suspected linezolid toxicity in a 34-year-old man with sickle cell disease and line-related vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia and tricuspid valve endocarditis. The patient developed sudden-onset hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, and acute pancreatitis 11 days after initiation of linezolid. All adverse effects quickly resolved with drug cessation. The pathophysiology underlying this triad of linezolid toxicity is unclear, but may be related to mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26424943

  17. Glucose Variability: Timing, Risk Analysis, and Relationship to Hypoglycemia in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kovatchev, Boris; Cobelli, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Glucose control, glucose variability (GV), and risk for hypoglycemia are intimately related, and it is now evident that GV is important in both the physiology and pathophysiology of diabetes. However, its quantitative assessment is complex because blood glucose (BG) fluctuations are characterized by both amplitude and timing. Additional numerical complications arise from the asymmetry of the BG scale. In this Perspective, we focus on the acute manifestations of GV, particularly on hypoglycemia, and review measures assessing the amplitude of GV from routine self-monitored BG data, as well as its timing from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data. With availability of CGM, the latter is not only possible but also a requirement-we can now assess rapid glucose fluctuations in real time and relate their speed and magnitude to clinically relevant outcomes. Our primary message is that diabetes control is all about optimization and balance between two key markers-frequency of hypoglycemia and HbA1c reflecting average BG and primarily driven by the extent of hyperglycemia. GV is a primary barrier to this optimization, including to automated technologies such as the "artificial pancreas." Thus, it is time to standardize GV measurement and thereby streamline the assessment of its two most important components-amplitude and timing. PMID:27208366

  18. [Intermittent branched--chain ketoacidurie in ketotic hypoglycemia: investigations to localize the biochemical defect (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Held, K R; Sternowsky, H J; Singh, S; Plettner, C; Grüttner, R

    1976-02-01

    We are reporting a girl aged eight years with ketotic hypoglycemia, mental deficiency and retarded motor and somatic development. Investigation of plasma amino acid concentrations during a spontaneous hypoglycemia revealed an increase in the branched-chain amino acids valine (4.1), leucine (7.8) and isoleucine (1.7 mg/100 ml), while alanine was decreased (1.2 mg/100 ml) and ketonuria was present. The determination of the branched-chain ketoacid decarboxylase in leukocytes showed a decrease of approximately 50% of normal for alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) as substrate, whereas values for alpha-ketoisovaleric acid (KIVA) and alpha-keto-beta-methylvaleric acid (MEVA) were normal. In fibroblasts activities for all three substrates were in the normal range. Intermittend maple-syrup-urine disease was excluded by oral loading tests with the branched-chain amino acids and with an isocaloric, high-protein diet. Impairment of oxydative decarboxylation of leucine, valine, and isoleucine secondary to increased ketogenesis may play an etiologic role in ketotic hypoglycemia, since we observed, by gaschromatographic analysis, an increase in the urinary excretion of KIVA (5.5 mumol/h), KIC (29.4), and MEVA (47.9) after a provocative test with an isocaloric ketogenic diet for 36 hrs. The significance of branched-chain hyperaminoacidemia and branched chain alpha-ketoaciduria is discussed in this context. PMID:1256452

  19. Histopathological nerve and skeletal muscle changes in rats subjected to persistent insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Vivi Flou Hjorth; Mølck, Anne-Marie; Heydenreich, Annette; Jensen, Karin Juul; Bertelsen, Line Olrik; Alifrangis, Lene; Andersen, Lene; Søeborg, Henrik; Chapman, Melissa; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Bøgh, Ingrid Brück

    2015-01-01

    New insulin analogues with a longer duration of action and a flatter pharmacodynamic profile are developed to improve convenience and safety for diabetic patients. During the nonclinical development of such analogues, safety studies must be conducted in nondiabetic rats, which consequently are rendered chronically hypoglycemic. A rat comparator model using human insulin would be valuable, as it would enable differentiation between effects related to either persistent insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) or a new analogue per se. Such a model could alleviate the need for an in-study-comparator and thereby reduce the number of animals used during development. Thus, the aims of the present study were i) to develop a preclinical animal model of persistent hypoglycemia in rats using human insulin infusion for four weeks and ii) to investigate histopathological changes in sciatic nerves and quadriceps femoris muscle tissue, as little is known about the response to persistent hypoglycemia in these tissues. Histopathologic changes in insulin-infused animals included axonal degeneration and myofibre degeneration. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that persistent IIH provokes peripheral nerve and skeletal myofiber degeneration within the same animals. This suggests that the model can serve as a nonclinical comparator model during development of long-acting insulin analogues. PMID:26989298

  20. Effect of acarbose on glucose and insulin response to sucrose load in reactive hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Richard, J L; Rodier, M; Monnier, L; Orsetti, A; Mirouze, J

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute effect of acarbose, an alpha-glycosidase inhibitor, on glycemic and insulin response to an oral sucrose load in sixteen patients suffering from idiopathic reactive hypoglycemia. In each subject, two oral sucrose tolerance tests (45 g/m2 body surface) were performed with either placebo or acarbose in a double-blind random order. Compared with placebo, acarbose dramatically flattened the blood glucose curve with values significantly lower from 30 to 90 min and higher from 150 to 240 min. Moreover the magnitude of both glucose peak and nadir, and rate of blood glucose rise and fall were significantly reduced by acarbose as was the hypoglycemic index. Plasma insulin levels from 30 to 120 min, insulin peak and area under the insulin curve were significantly lower after ingestion of acarbose. Thus, in reducing the early rise in blood glucose and insulin after sucrose ingestion, acarbose prevents the occurrence of reactive hypoglycemia; the present study confirms that this drug may be of value in the treatment of reactive hypoglycemia. PMID:3042485

  1. Endurance training increases brain lactate uptake during hypoglycemia by up regulation of brain lactate transporters.

    PubMed

    Aveseh, Malihe; Nikooie, Rohollah; Sheibani, Vahid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed

    2014-08-25

    The capacity of the brain to metabolize non-glucose substrates under hypoglycemic state maintains its energy requirements. We hypothesized that exercise-induced increase in capacity for brain utilization of lactate by up regulation of the monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) may contribute metabolic substrates during hypoglycemia in diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin. The induced diabetes increased MCT1 and MCT2 expression in the cortex and the hippocampus in the sedentary diabetic animals. There were exercise-induced increases in MCT1 in the cortex and the hippocampus and MCT2 expression in the cortex in trained diabetic animals; whereas, no changes were found in the healthy trained animals. Both diabetic and healthy trained animals showed higher values for brain lactate uptake during insulin-induced hypoglycemia when animals were intraperitoneally injected by L(+)-lactic acid. However, the response of counterregulatory hormones during hypoglycemia were blunted in the diabetic trained animals which indicates to carefully monitoring of glycemic targets both during and following prolonged exercise. PMID:25004253

  2. Mild hypoglycemia associated with deterioration of mental efficiency in children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ryan, C M; Atchison, J; Puczynski, S; Puczynski, M; Arslanian, S; Becker, D

    1990-07-01

    To assess the effects of mild hypoglycemia on cognitive functioning in diabetic children, we used an insulin glucose clamp technique to induce and maintain a hypoglycemic state. Eleven patients, 11 to 18 years of age, completed a series of cognitive tests during a baseline euglycemic state (100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L] and repeated those measures at the beginning and end of a hypoglycemic plateau (55 to 65 mg/dl (3.1 to 3.6 mmol/L], and again at restoration of euglycemia. At plasma glucose levels of 60 to 65 mg/dl (3.3 to 3.6 mmol/L), a significant decline in mental efficiency was found. This was most apparent on measures of mental "flexibility" (Trial Making Test) and on measures that required planning and decision making, attention to detail, and rapid responding. Moreover, complete recovery of cognitive function was not contemporaneous with restoration of euglycemia, particularly on those tests requiring rapid responding and decision making (choice reaction time). Not all subjects showed evidence of cognitive impairment during hypoglycemia. The very high degree of intersubject variability suggests that, in addition to plasma glucose values, unknown physiologic variables are responsible for triggering cognitive impairments in school-aged youngsters with diabetes during an episode of mild hypoglycemia. PMID:2196358

  3. Synchronous Nesidioblastosis, Endocrine Microadenoma, and Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasia in a Man Presenting With Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Sunita M C; Haghighi, Koroush S; Qiu, Min Ru; Greenfield, Jerry R; Chen, Daniel L T

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report the first case of concomitant nesidioblastosis, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia. The combination is significant as each of these pathological entities is independently very rare. The patient was a 33-year-old man who presented with symptomatic hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia and no risk factors for pancreatic disease. Abdominal imaging showed an isolated 12 mm pancreatic lesion, whilst selective arterial calcium stimulation testing demonstrated multiple territories of insulin excess. He proceeded to subtotal pancreatectomy. Histopathology revealed an endocrine microadenoma, α and β cell nesidioblastosis, and multifocal intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia. The endocrine microadenoma and nesidioblastosis stained for insulin, suggesting both likely contributed to hypoglycemia. Glucagon immunohistochemistry was also positive, though there were no clinical features of glucagon excess. Hypoglycemia resolved postoperatively. This case and other evidence from the literature suggest that hyperplasia and neoplasia may occur sequentially in the pancreas, and that endocrine and exocrine tumorigenesis may be linked in some individuals. Further study is required to identify a unifying mechanism, and to elucidate potential ramifications in the management of patients with pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:26658039

  4. Effect of simulated microgravity on endocrine response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in physically fit men.

    PubMed

    Ksinantova, L; Koska, J; Kvetnansky, R; Marko, M; Hamar, D; Vigas, M

    2002-03-01

    Adaptation to microgravity is associated with alteration in some endocrine functions. In the present longitudinal study, the counterregulatory hormonal response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia (ITT, 0.1 IU/kg short acting insulin i. v.) was evaluated under simulated microgravity conditions in 15 physically fit subjects. ITT was performed at the beginning of the investigation, and again after completion of 6 weeks of endurance training and after a subsequent period of 4 days of head-down bed rest at a backward tilt of 6 degrees from the horizontal. Endurance training showed a significant increase in maximal aerobic capacity in previously well-trained subjects (increase by 12 %), as well as on attenuation of counterregulatory response of epinephrine to hypoglycemia. After 4 days of bed rest, basal concentrations of plasma norepinephrine was diminished (p < 0.002) and plasma renin activity was enhanced (p < 0.02). After bed rest, decreased responses of the two catecholamines (norepinephrine, p < 0.001; epinephrine, p < 0.001), growth hormone (p < 0.001), and cortisol (p < 0.05) were observed. Response of plasma renin activity after bed rest was increased (p < 0.01). This longitudinal study indicated that 4 days of bed rest in endurance-trained subjects induced increased response of PRA to hypoglycemia and attenuation of other counterregulatory neuroendocrine responses. PMID:11972306

  5. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    PubMed

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital. PMID:23434016

  6. Maternal, neonatal and community factors influencing neonatal mortality in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado, Carla Jorge; Hill, Kenneth

    2005-03-01

    Child mortality (the mortality of children less than five years old) declined considerably in the developing world in the 1990s, but infant mortality declined less. The reductions in neonatal mortality were not impressive and, as a consequence, there is an increasing percentage of infant deaths in the neonatal period. Any further reduction in child mortality, therefore, requires an understanding of the determinants of neonatal mortality. 209,628 birth and 2581 neonatal death records for the 1998 birth cohort from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, were probabilistically matched. Data were from SINASC and SIM, Information Systems on Live Births and Deaths of Brazil. Logistic regression was used to find the association between neonatal mortality and the following risk factors: birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes, delivery mode, plurality, sex, maternal education, maternal age, number of prior losses, prenatal care, race, parity and community development. Infants of older mothers were less likely to die in the neonatal period. Caesarean delivery was not found to be associated with neonatal mortality. Low birth weight, pre-term birth and low Apgar scores were associated with neonatal death. Having a mother who lives in the highest developed community decreased the odds of neonatal death, suggesting that factors not measured in this study are behind such association. This result may also indicate that other factors over and above biological and more proximate factors could affect neonatal death. PMID:15768774

  7. Fatal Neonatal Herpes Simplex Infection Likely from Unrecognized Breast Lesions.

    PubMed

    Field, Scott S

    2016-02-01

    Type 1 herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is very prevalent yet in rare circumstances can lead to fatal neonatal disease. Genital acquisition of type 2 HSV is the usual mode for neonatal herpes, but HSV-1 transmission by genital or extragenital means may result in greater mortality rates. A very rare scenario is presented in which the mode of transmission was likely through breast lesions. The lesions were seen by nurses as well as the lactation consultant and obstetrician in the hospital after delivery of the affected baby but not recognized as possibly being caused by herpes. The baby died 9 days after birth with hepatic failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Peripartum health care workers need to be aware of potential nongenital (including from the breast[s]) neonatal herpes acquisition, which can be lethal. PMID:26185119

  8. Restoration of Self-Awareness of Hypoglycemia in Adults With Long-Standing Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leelarathna, Lalantha; Little, Stuart A.; Walkinshaw, Emma; Tan, Horng Kai; Lubina-Solomon, Alexandra; Kumareswaran, Kavita; Lane, Annette P.; Chadwick, Thomas; Marshall, Sally M.; Speight, Jane; Flanagan, Daniel; Heller, Simon R.; Shaw, James A.M.; Evans, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) and defective counterregulation significantly increase severe hypoglycemia risk in type 1 diabetes (T1D). We evaluated restoration of IAH/defective counterregulation by a treatment strategy targeted at hypoglycemia avoidance in adults with T1D with IAH (Gold score ≥4) participating in the U.K.-based multicenter HypoCOMPaSS randomized controlled trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eighteen subjects with T1D and IAH (mean ± SD age 50 ± 9 years, T1D duration 35 ± 10 years, HbA1c 8.1 ± 1.0% [65 ± 10.9 mmol/mol]) underwent stepped hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp studies before and after a 6-month intervention. The intervention comprised the HypoCOMPaSS education tool in all and randomized allocation, in a 2 × 2 factorial study design, to multiple daily insulin analog injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy and conventional glucose monitoring or real-time continuous glucose monitoring. Symptoms, cognitive function, and counterregulatory hormones were measured at each glucose plateau (5.0, 3.8, 3.4, 2.8, and 2.4 mmol/L), with each step lasting 40 min with subjects kept blinded to their actual glucose value throughout clamp studies. RESULTS After intervention, glucose concentrations at which subjects first felt hypoglycemic increased (mean ± SE from 2.6 ± 0.1 to 3.1 ± 0.2 mmol/L, P = 0.02), and symptom and plasma metanephrine responses to hypoglycemia were higher (median area under curve for symptoms, 580 [interquartile range {IQR} 420–780] vs. 710 [460–1,260], P = 0.02; metanephrine, 2,412 [−3,026 to 7,279] vs. 5,180 [−771 to 11,513], P = 0.01). Glycemic threshold for deterioration of cognitive function measured by four-choice reaction time was unchanged, while the color-word Stroop test showed a degree of adaptation. CONCLUSIONS Even in long-standing T1D, IAH and defective counterregulation may be improved by a clinical strategy aimed at hypoglycemia avoidance. PMID:24130355

  9. Minimization of Hypoglycemia as an Adverse Event During Insulin Infusion: Further Refinement of the Yale Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Besterman, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The management of hyperglycemia in the intensive care unit has been a controversial topic for more than a decade, with target ranges varying from 80–110 mg/dL to <200 mg/dL. Multiple insulin infusion protocols exist, including several computerized protocols, which have attempted to achieve these targets. Importantly, compliance with these protocols has not been a focus of clinical studies. Methods: GlucoCare™, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared insulin-dosing calculator, was originally designed based on the Yale Insulin Infusion Protocol to target 100–140 mg/dL and has undergone several modifications to reduce hypoglycemia. The original Yale protocol was modified from 100–140 mg/dL to a range of 120–140 mg/dL (GlucoCare 120–140) and then to 140 mg/dL (GlucoCare 140, not a range but a single blood glucose [BG] level target) in an iterative and evidence-based manner to eliminate hypoglycemia <70 mg/dL. The final modification [GlucoCare 140(B)] includes the addition of bolus insulin “midprotocol” during an insulin infusion to reduce peak insulin rates for insulin-resistant patients. This study examined the results of these protocol modifications and evaluated the role of compliance with the protocol in the incidence of hypoglycemia <70 mg/dL. Results: Protocol modifications resulted in mean BG levels of 133.4, 136.4, 143.8, and 146.4 mg/dL and hypoglycemic BG readings <70 mg/dL of 0.998%, 0.367%, 0.256%, and 0.04% for the 100–140, 120–140, 140, and 140(B) protocols, respectively (P < 0.001). Adherence to the glucose check interval significantly reduced the incidence of hypoglycemia (P < 0.001). Protocol modifications led to a reduction in peak insulin infusion rates (P < 0.001) and the need for dextrose-containing boluses (P < 0.001). Conclusion: This study demonstrates that refinements in protocol design can improve glucose control in critically ill patients and that the use of

  10. Prevalence of Low Birth Weight and Obesity in Central Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafiei, M.; Ayatollahi, S. M. T.

    2008-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of low birth weight (LBW) and to document distribution of body mass index (BMI) at birth in Arak (central Iran) neonates of the 10,241 live neonates (5241 boys, 5000 girls, sex ratio 105) born in 2004 in Arak. A birth weight of less than 2500 g was classified as LBW. BMI based on the original supine length and weight…

  11. Philip E. Cryer, MD: Seminal Contributions to the Understanding of Hypoglycemia and Glucose Counterregulation and the Discovery of HAAF (Cryer Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Dagogo-Jack, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Optimized glycemic control prevents and slows the progression of long-term complications in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In healthy individuals, a decrease in plasma glucose below the physiological range triggers defensive counterregulatory responses that restore euglycemia. Many individuals with diabetes harbor defects in their defenses against hypoglycemia, making iatrogenic hypoglycemia the Achilles heel of glycemic control. This Profile in Progress focuses on the seminal contributions of Philip E. Cryer, MD, to our understanding of hypoglycemia and glucose counterregulation, particularly his discovery of the syndrome of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF). PMID:26604275

  12. Evidence that hyperglycemia after recovery from hypoglycemia worsens endothelial function and increases oxidative stress and inflammation in healthy control subjects and subjects with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, Antonio; Novials, Anna; Ortega, Emilio; La Sala, Lucia; Pujadas, Gemma; Testa, Roberto; Bonfigli, Anna Rita; Esposito, Katherine; Giugliano, Dario

    2012-11-01

    Currently there is debate on whether hypoglycemia is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis, but little attention has been paid to the effects of recovery from hypoglycemia. In normal control individuals and in people with type 1 diabetes, recovery from a 2-h induced hypoglycemia was obtained by reaching normoglycemia or hyperglycemia for another 2 h and then maintaining normal glycemia for the following 6 h. Hyperglycemia after hypoglycemia was also repeated with the concomitant infusion of vitamin C. Recovery with normoglycemia is accompanied by a significant improvement in endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammation, which are affected by hypoglycemia; however, a period of hyperglycemia after hypoglycemia worsens all of these parameters, an effect that persists even after the additional 6 h of normoglycemia. This effect is partially counterbalanced when hyperglycemia after hypoglycemia is accompanied by the simultaneous infusion of vitamin C, suggesting that when hyperglycemia follows hypoglycemia, an ischemia-reperfusion-like effect is produced. This study shows that the way in which recovery from hypoglycemia takes place in people with type 1 diabetes could play an important role in favoring the appearance of endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammation, widely recognized cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:22891214

  13. Neonatal iliopsoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Atsushi; Kameoka, Kazuhiro; Kuwabara, Jun; Watanabe, Yuji; Kawakami, Sanae; Tauchi, Hisamichi; Ishii, Eiichi

    2012-10-01

    Iliopsoas abscess (IPA) is rare in children, particularly in neonates. A male neonate was born at 38 weeks of gestation with a weight of 2915 g. On day 22 after birth, his family noticed that his right thigh was swollen. Abdominal computed tomography showed a mass extending to the right iliopsoas from the right thigh with thick septa. Puncture to the right groin yielded purulent fluid, and so a diagnosis of abscess was made. The puncture was followed by surgical drainage through a small inguinal incision, and the abscess cavity was irrigated thoroughly using normal saline. Culture of abscess fluid was positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, so intravenous ABPC infusion was continued. The postoperative magnetic resonance imaging indicate that the IPA was derived from arthritis of the hip, and the patients received Riemenbügel for the incomplete hip dislocation. He is doing well at 2 years of age. PMID:23005905

  14. Remifentanil: applications in neonates.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Mineto; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-06-01

    Remifentanil is a synthetic opioid derivative that was introduced into clinical practice in the United States in 1996. The unique modification of its chemical structure to include a methyl-ester ring allows its hydrolysis by non-specific plasma and tissue esterases. This molecular configuration results in its rapid metabolism thereby providing a rapid onset, easy titration by continuous infusion, and a short context-sensitive half-life with rapid elimination. These principles are stable and consistent across all age groups regardless of the infusion characteristics. Owing to these pharmacokinetic characteristics, it is an effective agent in the neonatal population allowing the provision of intense analgesia and anesthesia with a rapid recovery profile in various clinical scenarios. Here, we review the pharmacokinetics of remifentanil in neonates, discuss its clinical applications including intraoperative administration for anesthetic care, unique applications for procedural sedation including endotracheal intubation, and its potential use for sedation in the Intensive Care Unit setting during mechanical ventilation. PMID:26758072

  15. Neonatal mortality in Meerut district.

    PubMed

    Garg, S K; Mishra, V N; Singh, J V; Bhatnagar, M; Chopra, H; Singh, R B

    1993-09-01

    A study of neonatal mortality in Meerut district revealed an infant mortality rate of 50.1 per 1000 live births. Neonatal mortality accounted for 37.8% of infant mortality with a neonatal mortality rate of 19.0 per 1000 live births. 90.5% of these neonates were delivered at home largely by untrained personnel (57.2%). Only 28.6% of these neonates were treated by qualified doctors and only 30.9% of their mothers were fully immunized against tetanus. At least 2/3rd of neonatal mortality was due to exogenous factors with tetanus neonatorum and septicaemia being the principal causes of mortality each accounting for a mortality rate of 4.7 per 1000 live births. PMID:8112786

  16. [Physiopathology of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia].

    PubMed

    Vert, P

    1998-09-01

    The most important steps of bilirubin metabolism involved in the pathophysiology of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia are: 1) hemoglobin degradation by heme oxygenase; 2) bilirubin binding to serum albumin; 3) bilirubin conjugation to acid glucoronic by glucoronyl transferase. Progress in the knowledge of these metabolic steps allows to understanding of why massive hemolysis, infections, hypoxia and prematurity increase the risk of kernicterus and therefore justify adapted preventive and therapeutic measures. PMID:9789638

  17. Comparison of Glibenclamide and Insulin on Neonatal Outcomes in Pregnant Women with Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Behrashi, Mitra; Samimi, Mansooreh; Ghasemi, Tayyebeh; Saberi, Farzaneh; Atoof, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Untreated or poorly controlled gestational diabetes can cause serious complications for mother and newborn. Glibenclamide is rarely used in treating mothers with this disease. This study aimed at comparing the effect of glibenclamide and insulin on neonatal outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 249 pregnant women aged 18–45 years within the 11th–33rd weeks of gestation with gestational diabetes, single fetus pregnancy, and in need of hyperglycemia treatment were entered and grouped randomly as either glibenclamide or insulin. In the insulin group (n = 129), insulin was administered with an initial dose of 0.2 IU/kg subcutaneously twice per day, whereas in the glibenclamide group (n = 120), 1.25 mg oral glibenclamide was administered once daily and increased if needed. Results: The results showed no significant difference in means age, gestational age, and body mass index between women in the two groups. In addition, there were no significant differences in the frequency of neonatal hypoglycemia, anomaly, hyperbilirubinemia, admission in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), and neonatal respiratory distress between two groups. Macrosomia was lower in the glibenclamide group than the insulin group (3.3% vs. 13.2%, respectively, P = 0.005). Regression logistics model results showed that the type of treatment (odds ratio [OR]: 4.62; confidence interval [CI]: 1.45–14.02; P = 0.01) and gestational age at delivery (OR: 1.41; CI: 1.04–1.74; P = 0.01) were as predictor factors of macrosomia. Conclusions: The results of this study revealed that glibenclamide is able to reduce the risk of fetal macrosomia without increasing neonatal anomalies, jaundice, hypocalcemia, infant respiratory distress, and NICU admission. PMID:27413519

  18. Reduced neonatal mortality in Meishan piglets: a role for hepatic fatty acids?

    PubMed

    Fainberg, Hernan P; Bodley, Katherine; Bacardit, Jaume; Li, Dongfang; Wessely, Frank; Mongan, Nigel P; Symonds, Michael E; Clarke, Lynne; Mostyn, Alison

    2012-01-01

    The Meishan pig breed exhibits increased prolificacy and reduced neonatal mortality compared to commercial breeds, such as the Large White, prompting breeders to introduce the Meishan genotype into commercial herds. Commercial piglets are highly susceptible to hypoglycemia, hypothermia, and death, potentially due to limited lipid stores and/or delayed hepatic metabolic ability. We therefore hypothesized that variation in hepatic development and lipid metabolism could contribute to the differences in neonatal mortality between breeds. Liver samples were obtained from piglets of each breed on days 0, 7, and 21 of postnatal age and subjected to molecular and biochemical analysis. At birth, both breeds exhibited similar hepatic glycogen contents, despite Meishan piglets having significantly lower body weight. The livers from newborn Meishan piglets exhibited increased C18∶1n9C and C20∶1n9 but lower C18∶0, C20∶4n6, and C22∶6n3 fatty acid content. Furthermore, by using an unsupervised machine learning approach, we detected an interaction between C18∶1n9C and glycogen content in newborn Meishan piglets. Bioinformatic analysis could identify unique age-based clusters from the lipid profiles in Meishan piglets that were not apparent in the commercial offspring. Examination of the fatty acid signature during the neonatal period provides novel insights into the body composition of Meishan piglets that may facilitate liver responses that prevent hypoglycaemia and reduce offspring mortality. PMID:23155453

  19. Management of Refractory Noninsulinoma Pancreatogenous Hypoglycemia Syndrome with Gastric Bypass Reversal: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Bhavana B.; Click, Benjamin; Eid, George; Codario, Ronald A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a commonly performed, effective bariatric procedure; however, rarely, complications such as postprandial hypoglycemia due to noninsulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia syndrome (NIPHS) may ensue. Management of refractory NIPHS is challenging. We report a case that was successfully treated with RYGB reversal. Case Report. A 58-year-old male with history of RYGB nine months earlier for morbid obesity presented for evaluation of postprandial, hypoglycemic seizures. Testing for insulin level, insulin antibodies, oral hypoglycemic agents, pituitary axis hormone levels, and cortisol stimulation was unrevealing. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen was unremarkable. A 72-hour fast was completed without hypoglycemia. Mixed meal testing demonstrated endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (EHH) and selective arterial calcium stimulation testing (SACST) was positive. Strict dietary modifications, maximal medical therapy, gastrostomy tube feeding, and stomal reduction failed to alleviate symptoms. Ultimately, he underwent laparoscopic reversal of RYGB. Now, 9 months after reversal, he has markedly reduced hypoglycemia burden. Discussion. Hyperfunctioning islets secondary to exaggerated incretin response and altered intestinal nutrient delivery are hypothesized to be causative in NIPHS. For refractory cases, there is increasing skepticism about the safety and efficacy of pancreatic resection. RYGB reversal may be successful. PMID:26523235

  20. Expression of Aquaporin 4 and Breakdown of the Blood-Brain Barrier after Hypoglycemia-Induced Brain Edema in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jiangshan; Zhao, Fei; Yu, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Yuwu; Li, Dawei; Shi, Hong; Sun, Yongning

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypoglycemia-induced brain edema is a severe clinical event that often results in death. The mechanisms by which hypoglycemia induces brain edema are unclear. Methods In a hypoglycemic injury model established in adult rats, brain edema was verified by measuring brain water content and visualizing water accumulation using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Temporal expression of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) were evaluated. We assessed the distribution and expression of AQP4 following glucose deprivation in astrocyte cultures. Results Brain edema was induced immediately after severe hypoglycemia but continued to progress even after recovery from hypoglycemia. Upregulation of AQP4 expression and moderate breakdown of the BBB were observed 24 h after recovery. In vitro, significant redistribution of AQP4 to the plasma membrane was induced following 6 h glucose deprivation. Conclusion Hypoglycemia-induced brain edema is caused by cytotoxic and vasogenic factors. Changes in AQP4 location and expression may play a protective role in edema resolution. PMID:25264602

  1. Evaluation of intravascular microdialysis for continuous blood glucose monitoring in hypoglycemia: an animal model.

    PubMed

    Schierenbeck, Fanny; Wallin, Mats; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Liska, Jan

    2014-07-01

    We have previously shown that intravascular microdialysis in a central vein is an accurate method for continuous glucose monitoring in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, no hypoglycemia occurred in our earlier studies, prompting further evaluation of the accuracy of intravascular microdialysis in the hypoglycemic range. Thus, this animal study was performed. A porcine model was developed; hypoglycemia was induced using insulin injections. The pigs were monitored with intravascular microdialysis integrated in a triple-lumen central venous catheter. As reference, venous blood gas samples were taken every 5 minutes and analyzed in a blood gas analyzer. Ethical permission for the animal experiments was obtained from the Stockholm Regional Ethical Committee, reference no N397/09. A total of 213 paired samples were obtained for analysis, and 126 (59.2%) of these were in the hypoglycemic range (<74 mg/dl). Using Clarke error grid analysis, 100% of the paired samples were in region AB and 99% in region A. The ISO standard (ISO15197) was met. Bland-Altman analysis showed bias (mean difference) ± limits of agreement was -0.18 ± 16.2 mg/dl. No influence from glucose infusions was seen. The microdialysis monitoring system was found to be very responsive in rapid changes in blood glucose concentration. This study shows that intravascular microdialysis in a central vein is an accurate method for continuous glucose monitoring in hypoglycemia in a porcine experimental model. Furthermore, the system was not influenced by glucose administration and was found to be responsive in rapid blood glucose fluctuations. PMID:24876424

  2. Risk of Post-Gastric Bypass Surgery Hypoglycemia in Nondiabetic Individuals: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Clare J.; Craig Wood, G.; Lazo, Mariana; Brown, Todd T.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Still, Christopher; Benotti, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective The epidemiology of post-gastric bypass surgery hypoglycemia (PGBH) is incompletely understood. This study aimed to evaluate the risk of PGBH among nondiabetic patients and associated factors. Methods A cohort study of nondiabetic patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) was conducted. PGBH was defined by any postoperative record of glucose < 60 mg/dL, diagnosis of hypoglycemia, or any medication use for treatment of PGBH. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to describe PGBH occurrence, log-rank tests, and Cox regression to examine associated factors. Results Of the 1,206 eligible patients, 86% were female with mean age of 43.7 years, mean preoperative BMI of 48.7 kg/m2, and a mean follow-up of 4.8 years. The cumulative incidence of hypoglycemia at 1 and 5 years post-RYGB was 2.7% and 13.3%, respectively. Incidence of PGBH was identified in 158 patients and was associated with lower preoperative BMI (P = 0.048), lower preoperative HbA1c (P = 0.012), and higher 6-month percent of excess body weight loss (%EWL) (P = 0.001). A lower preoperative HbA1c (HR = 1.73, P = 0.0034) and higher 6-month %EWL (HR = 1.96, P = 0.0074) remained independently correlated with increased risk for PGBH in multi-regression analysis. Conclusions The 5-year incidence of PGBH among nondiabetic individuals was 13.3% and was associated with a lower preoperative HbA1c and greater weight loss at 6 months following surgery. PMID:27225597

  3. Single incision laparoscopic 90 % pancreatectomy for the treatment of persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Shan; Li, Long; Cheng, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Single incision laparoscopic surgery as a surgical approach in treatment of pancreatic disease has recently been reported in adults. However, its application in persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) in children is limited. In this article, we report single incision laparoscopic 90 % pancreatectomy for the treatment of persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy. Between July 2011 and February 2015, the single incision laparoscopic 90 % pancreatectomy was performed in three children with PHHI. All patients underwent (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT before the surgeries. The scans showed diffuse physiologic (18)F-FDOPA activity in entire pancreas. All patients were followed up. The levels of blood sugar and insulin were recorded postoperatively. The time required for surgery was 120-230 min, and blood loss was minimal. The hospital stay was 6 days. The duration of postoperative abdominal drainage was 4-5 days. The levels of fasting blood glucose after surgery were higher than those before surgery (4.38-8.9 vs. 0.54-1.8 mmol/L). The levels of fasting insulin after surgery were lower than those before surgery (2.4-5.5 vs. 14-33.3 uU/ml). The duration of follow-up was 4-46 months. During follow-up, the levels of blood glucose and insulin were normal in three patients. There was no recurrence of hypoglycemia after operation in all patients. Single incision laparoscopic 90 % pancreatectomy for children with PHHI is feasible and safe in well-selected cases in the experienced centers. PMID:27473008

  4. Neonatal neurosonography: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Bhat, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Neurosonography is a simple, established non-invasive technique for the intracranial assessment of preterm neonate. Apart from established indication in the evaluation of periventricular haemorrhage, it provides clue to wide range of pathology. This presentation provides a quick roadmap to the technique, imaging anatomy and spectrum of pathological imaging appearances encountered in neonates. PMID:25489132

  5. Fetal and Neonatal Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Jaeggi, Edgar; Öhman, Annika

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an important aspect of fetal and neonatal medicine. Premature complexes of atrial or ventricular origin are the main cause of an irregular heart rhythm. The finding is typically unrelated to an identifiable cause and no treatment is required. Tachyarrhythmia most commonly relates to supraventricular reentrant tachycardia, atrial flutter, and sinus tachycardia. Several antiarrhythmic agents are available for the perinatal treatment of tachyarrhythmias. Enduring bradycardia may result from sinus node dysfunction, complete heart block and nonconducted atrial bigeminy as the main arrhythmia mechanisms. The management and outcome of bradycardia depend on the underlying mechanism. PMID:26876124

  6. Hyperbilirubinemia in Preterm Neonates.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Vinod K; Wong, Ronald J; Stevenson, David K

    2016-06-01

    Preterm neonates with increased bilirubin production loads are more likely to sustain adverse outcomes due to either neurotoxicity or overtreatment with phototherapy and/or exchange transfusion. Clinicians should rely on expert consensus opinions to guide timely and effective interventions until there is better evidence to refine bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction or benefits of bilirubin. In this article, we review the evolving evidence for bilirubin-induced brain injury in preterm infants and highlight the clinical approaches that minimize the risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity. PMID:27235203

  7. Hemolysis in Preterm Neonates.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Robert D; Yaish, Hassan M

    2016-06-01

    Hemolysis can be an important cause of hyperbilirubinemia in premature and term neonates. It can result from genetic abnormalities intrinsic to or factors exogenous to normal to red blood cells (RBCs). Hemolysis can lead to a relatively rapid increase in total serum/plasma bilirubin, hyperbilirubinemia that is somewhat slow to fall with phototherapy, or hyperbilirubinemia that is likely to rebound after phototherapy. Laboratory methods for diagnosing hemolysis are more difficult to apply, or less conclusive, in preterm infants. Transfusion of donor RBCs can present a bilirubin load that must be metabolized. Genetic causes can be identified by next-generation sequencing panels. PMID:27235204

  8. Non-islet cell tumor-induced hypoglycemia: a report of five cases and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Pinaki; Aggarwal, Anuradha; Gogate, Yashpal; Nahar, Uma; Shah, Viral N; Singla, Mandeep; Khandelwal, N; Bhansali, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Summary We describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic and management issues in five cases of non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH), diagnosed at a tertiary care institute over a period of 15 years. The clinical, laboratory, and histopathological findings of these patients along with diagnostic utility of IGF2:IGF1 ratio are discussed. The mean age of presentation was 52 years, with a male predominance (3:2). Three patients presented with recurrent episodes of fasting hypoglycemia and it was detected in other two patients during hospitalization. Two patients had acromegaloid features that regressed following treatment. One patient had hypokalemia. Low levels of insulin, C-peptide, GH, and IGF1 were invariably found in all. The IGF2 level was elevated in only one patient; however, IGF2:IGF1 ratio was more than 10 in four of the five patients. The mean tumor size was 16.4 cm and mean weight was 3.6 kg. Four patients had mesenchymal tumors and one had epithelial tumor. NICTH is a rare cause of hypoglycemia. Hypoinsulinemic hypoglycemia with low IGF1 and IGF2:IGF1 ratio more than 10 is suggestive of this entity. Learning points NICTH should be considered in patients presenting with tumor of mesenchymal origin and hypoglycemia.Hypoinsulinemic hypoglycemia with low IGF1 is a strong biochemical evidence of NICTH.IGF2:IGF1 ratio of more than 10 is a complementary investigation in the absence of an assay facility for IGF2. PMID:24616774

  9. Medication safety in neonatal care: a review of medication errors among neonates

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Natalia; Bajorek, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the medication errors in hospitalized patients, comparing those in neonates with medication errors across the age spectrum. Method: In tier 1, PubMed, Embase and Google Scholar were searched, using selected MeSH terms relating to hospitalized paediatric, adult and elderly populations. Tier 2 involved a search of the same electronic databases for literature relating to hospitalized neonatal patients. Results: A total of 58 articles were reviewed. Medication errors were well documented in each patient group. Overall, prescribing and administration errors were most commonly identified across each population, and mostly related to errors in dosing. Errors due to patient misidentification and overdosing were particularly prevalent in neonates, with 47% of administration errors involving at least tenfold overdoses. Unique errors were identified in elderly patients, comprising duplication of therapy and unnecessary prescribing of medicines. Overall, the medicines most frequently identified with error across each patient group included: heparin, antibiotics, insulin, morphine and parenteral nutrition. While neonatal patients experience the same types of medication errors as other hospitalized patients, the medication-use process within this group is more complex and has greater consequences resulting from error. Suggested strategies to help overcome medication error most commonly involved the integration of a clinical pharmacist into the treating team. Conclusion: This review highlights that each step of the medication-use process is prone to error across the age spectrum. Further research is required to develop targeted strategies relevant to specific patient groups that integrate key pharmacy services into wards. PMID:27298721

  10. Functional Connectivity of Insula, Basal Ganglia, and Prefrontal Executive Control Networks during Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, Donald C.; Nickerson, Lisa D.; Flores, Veronica L.; Siracusa, Tamar; Hager, Brandon; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Renshaw, Perry F.; Jacobson, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Human brain networks mediating interoceptive, behavioral, and cognitive aspects of glycemic control are not well studied. Using group independent component analysis with dual-regression approach of functional magnetic resonance imaging data, we examined the functional connectivity changes of large-scale resting state networks during sequential euglycemic–hypoglycemic clamp studies in patients with type 1 diabetes and nondiabetic controls and how these changes during hypoglycemia were related to symptoms of hypoglycemia awareness and to concurrent glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. During hypoglycemia, diabetic patients showed increased functional connectivity of the right anterior insula and the prefrontal cortex within the executive control network, which was associated with higher HbA1c. Controls showed decreased functional connectivity of the right anterior insula with the cerebellum/basal ganglia network and of temporal regions within the temporal pole network and increased functional connectivity in the default mode and sensorimotor networks. Functional connectivity reductions in the right basal ganglia were correlated with increases of self-reported hypoglycemic symptoms in controls but not in patients. Resting state networks that showed different group functional connectivity during hypoglycemia may be most sensitive to glycemic environment, and their connectivity patterns may have adapted to repeated glycemic excursions present in type 1 diabetes. Our results suggest that basal ganglia and insula mediation of interoceptive awareness during hypoglycemia is altered in type 1 diabetes. These changes could be neuroplastic adaptations to frequent hypoglycemic experiences. Functional connectivity changes in the insula and prefrontal cognitive networks could also reflect an adaptation to changes in brain metabolic pathways associated with chronic hyperglycemia. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The major factor limiting improved glucose control in type 1 diabetes is

  11. Homozygosity mapping, to chromosome 11p, of the gene for familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.M.; Cote, G.J.; Hallman, D.M.; Mathew, P.M.

    1995-02-01

    Familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease of unregulated insulin secretion, defined by elevations in serum insulin despite severe hypoglycemia. We used the homozygosity gene-mapping strategy to localize this disorder to the region of chromosome 11p between markers D11S1334 and D11S899 (maximum LOD score 5.02 [{theta} = 0] at marker D11S926) in five consanguineous families of Saudi Arabian origin. These results extend those of a recent report that also placed PHHI on chromosome 11p, between markers D11S926 and D11S928. Comparison of the boundaries of these two overlapping regions allows the PHHI locus to be assigned to the 4-cM region between the markers D11S926 and D11S899. Identification of this gene may allow a better understanding of other disorders of glucose homeostasis, by providing insight into the regulation of insulin release. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Response to deep hypoglycemia does not involve glucoreceptors in carotid perfused tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Cane, P.; Haun, C.K.; Evered, J.; Youn, J.H.; Bergman, R.N. )

    1988-11-01

    In the present study the authors examined whether the magnified hormonal counter-regulatory response seen during deep hypoglycemia (40 mg/dl) could be attenuated by supplying the forebrain with glucose furnished through carotid infusion. Two protocols were performed in conscious dogs. In the first protocol they infused glucose bilaterally into the carotid circulation to produce a forebrain glycemia of 55 {plus minus} 1 mg/dl whereas systemic glycemia declined to 39 {plus minus} 2 mg/dl. In the second protocol as a control they infused glucose into the systemic circulation at a rate matched to protocol 1 so that both systemic and jugular plasma glucose concentrations were equivalent to the systemic glucose concentrations in protocol 1. In spite of a substantial difference in forebrain glycemia there were no differences in the counter-regulatory responses of catecholamines or glucagon. In addition, through the use of radiolabeled microspheres, they defined the precise regions of the forebrain irrigated during bilateral intracarotid glucose infusions. The concentration of microspheres was high in the forebrain but very low in the hindbrain. The results indicate that glucoreceptor cells in tissues perfused by carotid arteries may play a tautological role in the sympathetic response to hypoglycemia and imply that glucose-sensitive receptors must also be located elsewhere in the central nervous system or in the periphery.

  13. Insulin absorption and subcutaneous blood flow in normal subjects during insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    SciTech Connect

    Fernqvist-Forbes, E.; Linde, B.; Gunnarsson, R.

    1988-09-01

    We studied the effects of insulin-induced hypoglycemia on the absorption of 10 U /sup 125/I-labeled soluble human insulin injected sc in the thigh in 10 normal subjects. The disappearance of /sup 125/I from the injection site was followed by external gamma-counting. Subcutaneous blood flow (ATBF) was measured concomitantly with the 133Xe washout technique. The plasma glucose nadir (mean, 2.0 +/- 0.1 (+/- SE) mmol/L) occurred at 33 +/- 3 min and resulted in maximal arterial plasma epinephrine concentrations of approximately 6 nmol/L. From 30 min before to 60 min after the glucose nadir the (/sup 125/I)insulin absorption rate was depressed compared to that during normoglycemia. The first order disappearance rate constants were reduced by approximately 50% (P less than 0.01) during the first 30-min interval after the glucose nadir. During the same period ATBF increased by 100% (P less than 0.05). The results suggest that in normal subjects the absorption of soluble insulin from a sc depot is depressed in connection with hypoglycemia, despite considerably elevated ATBF.

  14. Glucose and amino acid metabolism in rat brain during sustained hypoglycemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.L.; Tyce, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    The metabolism of glucose in brains during sustained hypoglycemia was studied. (U-/sup 14/C)Glucose (20 microCi) was injected into control rats, and into rats at 2.5 hr after a bolus injection of 2 units of insulin followed by a continuous infusion of 0.2 units/100 g rat/hr. This regimen of insulin injection was found to result in steady-state plasma glucose levels between 2.5 and 3.5 mumol per ml. In the brains of control rats carbon was transferred rapidly from glucose to glutamate, glutamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid and aspartate and this carbon was retained in the amino acids for at least 60 min. In the brains of hypoglycemic rats, the conversion of carbon from glucose to amino acids was increased in the first 15 min after injection. After 15 min, the specific activity of the amino acids decreased in insulin-treated rats but not in the controls. The concentrations of alanine, glutamate, and gamma-amino-butyric acid decreased, and the concentration of aspartate increased, in the brains of the hypoglycemic rats. The concentration of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, a cofactor in many of the reactions whereby these amino acids are formed from tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, was less in the insulin-treated rats than in the controls. These data provide evidence that glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, and GABA can serve as energy sources in brain during insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

  15. Fasting induces a form of autonomic synaptic plasticity that prevents hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Manqi; Wang, Qian; Whim, Matthew D

    2016-05-24

    During fasting, activation of the counter-regulatory response (CRR) prevents hypoglycemia. A major effector arm is the autonomic nervous system that controls epinephrine release from adrenal chromaffin cells and, consequently, hepatic glucose production. However, whether modulation of autonomic function determines the relative strength of the CRR, and thus the ability to withstand food deprivation and maintain euglycemia, is not known. Here we show that fasting leads to altered transmission at the preganglionic → chromaffin cell synapse. The dominant effect is a presynaptic, long-lasting increase in synaptic strength. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches we show this plasticity requires neuropeptide Y, an adrenal cotransmitter and the activation of adrenal Y5 receptors. Loss of neuropeptide Y prevents a fasting-induced increase in epinephrine release and results in hypoglycemia in vivo. These findings connect plasticity within the sympathetic nervous system to a physiological output and indicate the strength of the final synapse in this descending pathway plays a decisive role in maintaining euglycemia. PMID:27092009

  16. A comparison of different statistical methods analyzing hypoglycemia data using bootstrap simulations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Honghua; Ni, Xiao; Huster, William; Heilmann, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia has long been recognized as a major barrier to achieving normoglycemia with intensive diabetic therapies. It is a common safety concern for the diabetes patients. Therefore, it is important to apply appropriate statistical methods when analyzing hypoglycemia data. Here, we carried out bootstrap simulations to investigate the performance of the four commonly used statistical models (Poisson, negative binomial, analysis of covariance [ANCOVA], and rank ANCOVA) based on the data from a diabetes clinical trial. Zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) model and zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB) model were also evaluated. Simulation results showed that Poisson model inflated type I error, while negative binomial model was overly conservative. However, after adjusting for dispersion, both Poisson and negative binomial models yielded slightly inflated type I errors, which were close to the nominal level and reasonable power. Reasonable control of type I error was associated with ANCOVA model. Rank ANCOVA model was associated with the greatest power and with reasonable control of type I error. Inflated type I error was observed with ZIP and ZINB models. PMID:24905704

  17. A reexamination of the hypoglycemia-aggression hypothesis in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Andrade, M L; Benton, D; Brain, P F; Ramirez, J M; Walmsley, S V

    1988-08-01

    The suggestion of a clinical link between hypoglycemia and aggression has been recently encouraged by the work of Virkkunen and others. Modern techniques have impressively established a correlation between reactive hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels engendered by stimulation of endogenous insulin secretion) and hostility as expressed in a variety of situations. It is not surprising that blood sugar levels influence behavior, as the brain is entirely dependent on glucose reaching it via the vascular system. In spite of this impressive link, there are remarkably few successful studies involving the effects of manipulating glucose levels on fighting in infrahuman animals. As there have been several methodological developments in this area it was thought appropriate to reinvestigate such phenomena in mice. The effects of injected bovine insulin and glucose were assessed using an ethopharmacological methodology applied to social encounters by isolated male Swiss mice with docile anosmic opponents. Although manipulation of blood glucose levels did not consistently change attack or defensive behavior, these treatments did modify aspects of the interactions. PMID:3053478

  18. Patients with type 1 diabetes exhibit altered cerebral metabolism during hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Kim C.C.; Tack, Cees J.; Heerschap, Arend; van der Graaf, Marinette; de Galan, Bastiaan E.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) experience, on average, 2 to 3 hypoglycemic episodes per week. This study investigated the effect of hypoglycemia on cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with uncomplicated T1DM. For this purpose, hyperinsulinemic euglycemic and hypoglycemic glucose clamps were performed on separate days, using [1-13C]glucose infusion to increase plasma 13C enrichment. In vivo brain 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to measure the time course of 13C label incorporation into different metabolites and to calculate the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux (VTCA) by a one-compartment metabolic model. We found that cerebral glucose metabolism, as reflected by the VTCA, was not significantly different comparing euglycemic and hypoglycemic conditions in patients with T1DM. However, the VTCA was inversely related to the HbA1C and was, under hypoglycemic conditions, approximately 45% higher than that in a previously investigated group of healthy subjects. These data suggest that the brains of patients with T1DM are better able to endure moderate hypoglycemia than those of subjects without diabetes. PMID:23298837

  19. Neonatal Subventricular Zone Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, David M.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Bordey, Angélique

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) line the postnatal lateral ventricles and give rise to multiple cell types which include neurons, astrocytes, and ependymal cells1. Understanding the molecular pathways responsible for NSC self-renewal, commitment, and differentiation is critical for harnessing their unique potential to repair the brain and better understand central nervous system disorders. Previous methods for the manipulation of mammalian systems required the time consuming and expensive endeavor of genetic engineering at the whole animal level2. Thus, the vast majority of studies have explored the functions of NSC molecules in vitro or in invertebrates. Here, we demonstrate the simple and rapid technique to manipulate neonatal NPCs that is referred to as neonatal subventricular zone (SVZ) electroporation. Similar techniques were developed a decade ago to study embryonic NSCs and have aided studies on cortical development3,4 . More recently this was applied to study the postnatal rodent forebrain5-7. This technique results in robust labeling of SVZ NSCs and their progeny. Thus, postnatal SVZ electroporation provides a cost and time effective alternative for mammalian NSC genetic engineering. PMID:23426329

  20. Mycoplasmas and Ureaplasmas as Neonatal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Waites, Ken B.; Katz, Brenda; Schelonka, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    The genital mycoplasmas represent a complex and unique group of microorganisms that have been associated with a wide array of infectious diseases in adults and infants. The lack of conclusive knowledge regarding the pathogenic potential of Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma spp. in many conditions is due to a general unfamiliarity of physicians and microbiology laboratories with their fastidious growth requirements, leading to difficulty in their detection; their high prevalence in healthy persons; the poor design of research studies attempting to base association with disease on the mere presence of the organisms in the lower urogenital tract; the failure to consider multifactorial aspects of diseases; and considering these genital mycoplasmas only as a last resort. The situation is now changing because of a greater appreciation of the genital mycoplasmas as perinatal pathogens and improvements in laboratory detection, particularly with regard to the development of powerful molecular nucleic acid amplification tests. This review summarizes the epidemiology of genital mycoplasmas as causes of neonatal infections and premature birth; evidence linking ureaplasmas with bronchopulmonary dysplasia; recent changes in the taxonomy of the genus Ureaplasma; the neonatal host response to mycoplasma and ureaplasma infections; advances in laboratory detection, including molecular methods; and therapeutic considerations for treatment of systemic diseases. PMID:16223956

  1. Euthanasia of neonatal mice with carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pritchett, K.; Corrow, D.; Stockwell, J.; Smith, A.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most prevalent method used to euthanize rodents in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine the time of CO2 exposure required to euthanize neonatal mice (0 to 10 days old). Multiple groups of mice were exposed to 100% CO 2 for time periods between 5 and 60 min. Mice were placed in room air for 10 or 20 min after CO2 exposure, to allow for the chance of recovery. If mice recovered at one time point, a longer exposure was examined. Inbred and outbred mice were compared. Results of the study indicated that time to death varied with the age of the animals and could be as long as 50 min on the day of birth and differed between inbred and outbred mice. Institutions euthanizing neonatal mice with CO2 may wish to adjust their CO 2 exposure time periods according the age of the mice and their genetic background. Copyright 2005 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.

  2. Neonates need tailored drug formulations

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Drugs are very strong tools used to improve outcome in neonates. Despite this fact and in contrast to tailored perfusion equipment, incubators or ventilators for neonates, we still commonly use drug formulations initially developed for adults. We would like to make the point that drug formulations given to neonates need to be tailored for this age group. Besides the obvious need to search for active compounds that take the pathophysiology of the newborn into account, this includes the dosage and formulation. The dosage or concentration should facilitate the administration of low amounts and be flexible since clearance is lower in neonates with additional extensive between-individual variability. Formulations need to be tailored for dosage variability in the low ranges and also to the clinical characteristics of neonates. A specific focus of interest during neonatal drug development therefore is a need to quantify and limit excipient exposure based on the available knowledge of their safety or toxicity. Until such tailored vials and formulations become available, compounding practices for drug formulations in neonates should be evaluated to guarantee the correct dosing, product stability and safety. PMID:25254168

  3. Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... less) when you’re having symptoms is an important part of diagnosis. Your doctor will check your blood glucose level and may order other tests. A personal blood glucose meter is not accurate enough for ...

  4. Congenital and neonatal malaria in a rural Kenyan district hospital: An eight-year analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Malaria remains a significant burden in sub-Saharan Africa. However, data on burden of congenital and neonatal malaria is scarce and contradictory, with some recent studies reporting a high burden. Using prospectively collected data on neonatal admissions to a rural district hospital in a region of stable malaria endemicity in Kenya, the prevalence of congenital and neonatal malaria was described. Methods From 1st January 2002 to 31st December 2009, admission and discharge information on all neonates admitted to Kilifi District Hospital was collected. At admission, blood was also drawn for routine investigations, which included a full blood count, blood culture and blood slide for malaria parasites. Results Of the 5,114 neonates admitted during the eight-year surveillance period, blood slide for malaria parasites was performed in 4,790 (93.7%). 18 (0.35%) neonates with Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasitaemia, of whom 11 were admitted within the first week of life and thus classified as congenital parasitaemia, were identified. 7/18 (39%) had fever. Parasite densities were low, ≤50 per μl in 14 cases. The presence of parasitaemia was associated with low haemoglobin (Hb) of <10 g/dl (χ2 10.9 P = 0.001). The case fatality rate of those with and without parasitaemia was similar. Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia was identified as the cause of symptoms in four neonates. Conclusion Congenital and neonatal malaria are rare in this malaria endemic region. Performing a blood slide for malaria parasites among sick neonates in malaria endemic regions is advisable. This study does not support routine treatment with anti-malarial drugs among admitted neonates with or without fever even in a malaria endemic region. PMID:21054891

  5. Urban and rural comparison of vitamin D status in Pakistani pregnant women and neonates.

    PubMed

    Anwar, S; Iqbal, M P; Azam, I; Habib, A; Bhutta, S; Soofi, S B; Bhutta, Z A

    2016-04-01

    We undertook a cross-sectional study in rural Jehlum and urban Karachi to evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in Pakistani pregnant women and neonates and to assess any association of serum 25(OH) vitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration with vitamin D binding protein (Gc) genotypes. Altogether, 390 women and 266 neonates were recruited from urban and rural sites, respectively. Serum 25(OH)D was measured by an immunoassay, while Gc genotypes were identified using polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-RFLP. One-way analysis of variance or ANOVA and linear regression were used for statistical analysis. In urban Karachi, 99.5% of women and 97.3% of neonates were vitamin D deficient (< 50 nmol/L), while 89% of women and 82% of neonates were deficient in rural Jehlum. Gc genotypes were not associated with serum 25(OH)D concentrations in both women and their neonates. We conclude that vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in Pakistani women and their neonates, and Gc genotypes are not associated with serum 25(OH)D concentrations. PMID:26466513

  6. Bacillus species infections in neonates.

    PubMed

    Patrick, C C; Langston, C; Baker, C J

    1989-01-01

    A case of neonatal meningitis due to Bacillus cereus is presented. Postmortem histopathologic examination revealed an invasive disease involving the brain parenchyma, with a cellular composition consistent with an indolent process indicative of possible perinatally acquired infection. One other neonate from our institution with systemic disease due to a nonanthrax bacillus is described, and a review of the English-language literature since 1900 reveals four additional neonates infected with these unusual pathogens. Such Bacillus species infections are rare but should be suspected when gram-positive bacilli are noted on gram stain, especially in an immunocompromised host. PMID:2505353

  7. Neonatal carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency associated with Dandy-Walker syndrome and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Yahyaoui, Raquel; Espinosa, María Gracia; Gómez, Celia; Dayaldasani, Anita; Rueda, Inmaculada; Roldán, Ana; Ugarte, Magdalena; Lastra, Gonzalo; Pérez, Vidal

    2011-11-01

    Neonatal onset of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an autosomal recessive, often lethal disorder of the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids. It is a rare multiorgan disease which includes hypoketotic hypoglycemia, severe hepatomuscular symptoms, cardiac abnormalities, seizures and lethargy, as well as dysmorphic features. Until now, only 22 affected families have been described in the literature. An increasing number of mutations are being identified in the CPT2 gene, with a distinct genotype-phenotype correlation in most cases. Herein we report a new case of neonatal CPT II deficiency associated with Dandy-Walker syndrome and sudden death at 13 days of life. CPT II deficiency was suggested by acylcarnitine analysis of dried-blood on filter paper in the expanded newborn screening. Genetic analysis of the CPT2 gene identified the presence of a previously described mutation in homozygosity (c.534_558del25bpinsT). All lethal neonatal CPT II deficiency patients previously described presented severe symptoms during the first week of life, although this was not the case in our patient, who remained stable and without apparent vital risk during the first 11 days of life. The introduction of tandem mass spectrometry to newborn screening has substantially improved our ability to detect metabolic diseases in the newborn period. This case illustrates the value of expanded newborn screening in a neonate with an unusual clinical presentation, combining hydrocephalus and sudden death, that might not commonly lead to the suspicion of an inborn error of metabolism. PMID:21641254

  8. Acute liver failure in a term neonate after repeated paracetamol administration

    PubMed Central

    Bucaretchi, Fábio; Fernandes, Carla Borrasca; Branco, Maíra Migliari; Capitani, Eduardo Mello De; Hyslop, Stephen; Caldas, Jamil Pedro S.; Moreno, Carolina Araújo; Porta, Gilda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Severe hepatotoxicity caused by paracetamol is rare in neonates. We report a case of paracetamol-induced acute liver failure in a term neonate. Case description: A 26-day-old boy was admitted with intestinal bleeding, shock signs, slight liver enlargement, coagulopathy, metabolic acidosis (pH=7.21; bicarbonate: 7.1mEq/L), hypoglycemia (18mg/dL), increased serum aminotransferase activity (AST=4,039IU/L; ALT=1,087IU/L) and hyperbilirubinemia (total: 9.57mg/dL; direct: 6.18mg/dL) after receiving oral paracetamol (10mg/kg/dose every 4 hours) for three consecutive days (total dose around 180mg/kg; serum concentration 36-48 hours after the last dose of 77µg/ mL). Apart from supportive measures, the patient was successfully treated with intravenous N-acetylcysteine infusion during 11 consecutive days, and was discharged on day 34. The follow-up revealed full recovery of clinical and of laboratory findings of hepatic function. Comments: The paracetamol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in neonates and infants differ substantially from those in older children and adults. Despite the reduced rates of metabolism by the P-450 CYP2E1 enzyme system and the increased ability to synthesize glutathione - which provides greater resistance after overdoses -, it is possible to produce hepatotoxic metabolites (N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone) that cause hepatocellular damage, if glutathione sources are depleted. Paracetamol clearance is reduced and the half-life of elimination is prolonged. Therefore, a particular dosing regimen should be followed due to the toxicity risk of cumulative doses. This report highlights the risk for severe hepatotoxicity in neonates after paracetamol multiple doses for more than two to three days. PMID:24676202

  9. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia in a Premature Neonate Mimicking Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Luen; Yen, Hsiu-Ju; Chen, Shu-Jen; Hung, Giun-Yi; Tsao, Pei-Chen; Soong, Wen-Jue

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare hematologic malignancy in children. Its presentations include anemia, thrombocytopenia, monocytosis, skin rash, marked hepatomegaly, and/or splenomegaly. Fever and respiratory involvement are common. Here, we report a case of a premature neonate with initial symptoms of respiratory distress. She gradually developed clinical manifestations of JMML that mimicked neonatal sepsis. Three weeks after birth, JMML was diagnosed. This is the first reported case of JMML presenting in a premature infant in Taiwan. PMID:24269860

  10. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  11. Neonatal sensitization to latex.

    PubMed

    Worth, J

    2000-05-01

    Babies born in delivery rooms of hospitals are exposed to latex through skin and mucous membrane contact with prepowdered latex gloves worn by midwives and doctors, and through the inhalation of latex-bound starch powder in the air of the delivery room. This paper examines the hypothesis that they are at risk for latex sensitization, and that part of the sharp increase of childhood asthma, eczema and anaphylaxis in the past 30-40 years may be linked. These possibilities seem hitherto unsuspected. In over 700 papers on latex allergy no mention of neonatal exposure to latex has been found. Even obstetric papers discussing the risks for an atopic mother (atopy - a tendency to develop allergies) do not seem to anticipate any risk for the baby, who might also be atopic. Latex allergy is primarily regarded as an occupational hazard. This paper suggests that it is a hazard for every baby handled by latex gloves at birth. PMID:10859678

  12. Neonatal pulmonary hemosiderosis.

    PubMed

    Limme, Boris; Nicolescu, Ramona; Misson, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare complex entity characterized clinically by acute or recurrent episodes of hemoptysis secondary to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. The radiographic features are variable, including diffuse alveolar-type infiltrates, and interstitial reticular and micronodular patterns. We describe a 3-week-old infant presenting with hemoptysis and moderate respiratory distress. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis was the first working diagnosis at the Emergency Department and was confirmed, 2 weeks later, by histological studies (bronchoalveolar lavage). The immunosuppressive therapy by 1 mg/kg/d prednisone was immediately started, the baby returned home on steroid therapy at a dose of 0,5 mg/kg/d. The diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis should be evocated at any age, even in the neonate, when the clinical presentation (hemoptysis and abnormal radiological chest images) is strongly suggestive. PMID:25389504

  13. Severe hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis among youth with type 1 diabetes in the T1D Exchange clinic registry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe hypoglycemia (SH) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) are common serious acute complications of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of SH and DKA and identify factors related to their occurrence in the T1D Exchange pediatric and young adult cohort. The anal...

  14. Anesthetic agents modulate ECoG potentiation after spreading depression, and insulin-induced hypoglycemia does not modify this effect.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Thays Kallyne Marinho; E Silva-Gondim, Mariana Barros; Rodrigues, Marcelo Cairrão Araújo; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2015-04-10

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is characterized by reversible reduction of spontaneous and evoked electrical activity of the cerebral cortex. Experimental evidence suggests that CSD may modulate neural excitability and synaptic activity, with possible implications for long-term potentiation. Systemic factors like anesthetics and insulin-induced hypoglycemia can influence CSD propagation. In this study, we examined whether the post-CSD ECoG potentiation can be modulated by anesthetics and insulin-induced hypoglycemia. We found that awake adult rats displayed increased ECoG potentiation after CSD, as compared with rats under urethane+chloralose anesthesia or tribromoethanol anesthesia. In anesthetized rats, insulin-induced hypoglycemia did not modulate ECoG potentiation. Comparison of two cortical recording regions in awake rats revealed a similarly significant (p<0.05) potentiation effect in both regions, whereas in the anesthetized groups the potentiation was significant only in the recording region nearer to the stimulating point. Our data suggest that urethane+chloralose and tribromoethanol anesthesia modulate the post-CSD potentiation of spontaneous electrical activity in the adult rat cortex, and insulin-induced hypoglycemia does not modify this effect. Data may help to gain a better understanding of excitability-dependent mechanisms underlying CSD-related neurological diseases. PMID:25681772

  15. Rapid-onset hypoglycemia suppresses Fos expression in discrete parts of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Foster, Nicholas N; Azam, Sana; Watts, Alan G

    2016-06-01

    The consensus view of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) is that it is a key node in the rodent brain network controlling sympathoadrenal counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia. To identify the location of hypoglycemia-responsive neurons in the VMH, we performed a high spatial resolution Fos analysis in the VMH of rats made hypoglycemic with intraperitoneal injections of insulin. We examined Fos expression in the four constituent parts of VMH throughout its rostrocaudal extent and determined their relationship to blood glucose concentrations. Hypoglycemia significantly decreased Fos expression only in the dorsomedial and central parts of the VMH, but not its anterior or ventrolateral parts. Moreover, the number of Fos-expressing neurons was significantly and positively correlated in the two responsive regions with terminal blood glucose concentrations. We also measured Fos responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) and in several levels of the periaqueductal gray (PAG), which receives strong projections from the VMH. We found the expected and highly significant increase in Fos in the neuroendocrine PVH, which was negatively correlated to terminal blood glucose concentrations, but no significant differences were seen in any part of the PAG. Our results show that there are distinct populations of VMH neurons whose Fos expression is suppressed by hypoglycemia, and their numbers correlate with blood glucose. These findings support a clear division of glycemic control functions within the different parts of the VMH. PMID:27030665

  16. Clinical characteristics of neonates with inborn errors of metabolism detected by Tandem MS analysis in Oman.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Surendra Nath; Venugopalan, Poothirikovil

    2007-10-01

    We reviewed the clinical profile of our neonates diagnosed to have inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) by Tandem Mass Spectrometry (TMS) over a seven years period, and compared the results with published reports. We also attempted to evaluate various clinical situations wherein the screening test would yield a high pick up rate. Among the 166 neonates studied (10 aged 1 day, 79 aged 2-7 days and 77 aged 8-28 days), significant abnormalities on TMS suggestive of IEM were detected in 38 babies (23%), most common diseases diagnosed were maple syrup urine disease (10 neonates), propionic acidemia (8 neonates), urea cycle diseases (6 neonates) and isovaleric acidemia (4 neonates). The detection incidence was calculated to be one positive case out of every 4 to 5 babies tested. A high prevalence of parental consanguinity and high level of positive family history of affected siblings were the highlights of this study. The major clinical situations where testing was helpful were (a) unexplained acute neonatal encephalopathy, (b) positive family history of known or suspected IEM and (c) new born presenting with abnormal serum biochemistry suggestive of IEM. PMID:17314022

  17. Neonatal outcomes and birth weight in pregnancies complicated by maternal thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Männistö, Tuija; Mendola, Pauline; Reddy, Uma; Laughon, S Katherine

    2013-09-01

    Maternal hypothyroidism has previously been shown to increase risk for neonatal intensive care treatment, but otherwise the association between thyroid diseases and neonatal morbidity is understudied. The Consortium on Safe Labor, a retrospective cohort (2002-2008), included 223,512 singleton deliveries of which 0.2% had hyperthyroidism, 1.4% primary and 0.1% iatrogenic hypothyroidism, and 1.3% other/unspecified thyroid disease. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations estimated adjusted odds ratios of adverse outcomes. Intensive care treatment was more common for neonates of women with thyroid disease. Hyperthyroidism and primary hypothyroidism were associated with sepsis, respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea, and apnea. Iatrogenic hypothyroidism was associated with sepsis and neonatal anemia. Hyperthyroidism was also associated with rare outcomes (prevalence, <1%) including cardiomyopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, and neonatal thyroid diseases. Hyperthyroid non-Hispanic black women had higher odds of term infants that weighed <2,500 g, and hypothyroid non-Hispanic white women had higher odds of large-for-gestational-age infants. These analyses were stratified by race/ethnicity due to interaction. Associations were similar in analyses restricted to term infants. In conclusion, thyroid diseases were associated with increased neonatal morbidity. Although we lacked data on treatment during pregnancy, these nationwide data suggest a need for better thyroid disease management to reduce neonatal morbidity. PMID:23666815

  18. Use of high-flow nasal cannula in neonates: Nationwide survey in Japan.

    PubMed

    Motojima, Yukiko; Ito, Masato; Oka, Shuntaro; Uchiyama, Atsushi; Tamura, Masanori; Namba, Fumihiko

    2016-04-01

    High-flow nasal cannula is a new modality of respiratory support and is increasing in popularity despite the lack of supporting evidence. We investigated the prevalence of its use in tertiary neonatal units in Japan. A paper-based survey was conducted. The response rate was 83%. High-flow nasal cannula was used in 46/80 units (58%), of which 96% used the high-flow nasal cannula without guidelines. It was used for several indications, including weaning off nasal continuous positive airway pressure and post-extubation respiratory support. The main perceived benefits of the cannula included better access to the neonate and reduced risk of nasal trauma. This survey found that high-flow nasal cannula is used without clear criteria and that clinical practice varies across neonatal units in Japan. Its use in neonates needs to be urgently evaluated. PMID:27095676

  19. Effect of maternal and neonatal factors on cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayana, Sheetal G.; Sadanandan, Nidhish P.; Mehaboob, A. K.; Gopaliah, Lakshminarayana R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is most common preventable cause of mental retardation in children. Cord blood Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (CBTSH) level is an accepted screening tool for CH. Objectives: To study CBTSH profile in neonates born at tertiary care referral center and to analyze the influence of maternal and neonatal factors on their levels. Design: Cross retrospective sectional study. Methods: Study population included 979 neonates (males = 506 to females = 473). The CBTSH levels were estimated using electrochemiluminescence immunoassay on Cobas analyzer. Kit based cut-offs of TSH level were used for analysis. All neonates with abnormal CBSTH levels, were started on levothyroxine supplementation 10 μg/Kg/day and TSH levels were reassessed as per departmental protocol. Results: The mean CBTSH was 7.82 μIU/mL (Range 0.112 to 81.4, SD = 5.48). The mean CBTSH level was significantly higher in first order neonates, neonates delivered by assisted vaginal delivery and normal delivery, delivered at term or preterm, neonates with APGAR score <5 and those needing advanced resuscitation after birth. The CBTSH level >16.10 and <1.0 μIU/mL was found in 4.39 % and 1.02 % neonates respectively. The prevalence rate of CBTSH level >16.1 μIU/mL was significantly higher in neonates delivered by assisted vaginal delivery and normal delivery, term and preterm neonates, APAGR score of <5, presence of fetal distress, need for resuscitation beyond initial steps and in those with birth weight of <1.5 Kg. Three neonates were confirmed to have CH after retesting of TSH level. Conclusions: The CBTSH estimation is an easy, non-invasive method for screening for CH. The cutoff level of CB TSH (μIU/mL) >16.10 and <1.0 led to a recall of 5.41% of neonates which is practicable given the scenario in our Country. The mode of delivery and perinatal stress factors have a significant impact on CBTSH levels and any rise to be seen in the light of these factors. The prevalence

  20. Primacy of liver glucosensors in the sympathetic response to progressive hypoglycemia.

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, C M; Hamilton-Wessler, M; Halter, J B; Bergman, R N

    1994-01-01

    The impact of hepatic glucose concentration on the sympathetic response to progressive hypoglycemia was examined in chronically cannulated conscious male dogs (n = 6). Graded hypoglycemia was induced via peripheral insulin infusion (30 pmol.kg-1.min-1) with either peripheral (PER) or portal (POR) glucose infusion. Over the 260-min experimental period, arterial glycemia was adjusted from 5.2 +/- 0.1 to 2.5 +/- 0.1 mM in decrements of approximately 0.5 mM every 40 min. Arterial glycemias were not significantly different between PER and POR at any measured level. However, hepatic glycemia was significantly elevated at all times during POR (8.4 +/- 0.8 to 3.4 +/- 0.2 mM) when compared to PER (5.2 +/- 0.2 to 2.5 +/- 0.1 mM). Plasma epinephrine values were significantly greater during PER vs. POR at all arterial glycemias below 4.0 mM. At the lowest level of arterial glycemia studied (2.5 +/- 0.2 mM) the epinephrine response above basal was 3-fold greater for PER (8.7 +/- 1.7 nM) when compared to POR (2.6 +/- 0.6 nM) (P < 0.01). Plasma norepinephrine results were similar for the two protocols, with PER demonstrating a 3-fold greater response above basal when compared to POR at 2.5 mM arterial glycemia (P < 0.05). While the sympathetic response was markedly different between protocols when expressed as a function of arterial glycemia, when expressed as a function of hepatic glycemia this discrepancy was largely eliminated. This latter observation supports the liver as the primary locus for glycemic detection relevant to the sympathoadrenal response when hypoglycemia develops slowly--i.e., over a period of 2-3 h. A comparison of the current findings with our previous observations suggests that the hepatic glucosensors may play a greater role in hypoglycemic counterregulation as the rate of fall in glycemia is less. PMID:8146201

  1. Neonatal `Brain Damage'—An Analysis of 250 Claims

    PubMed Central

    Cornblath, Marvin; Clark, Russell L.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in perinatal care have resulted in decreased neonatal mortality. Increasingly, damage in survivors has been attributed to alleged negligence. We analyzed the 250 claims (1957 to 1982) from one major insurance company for factors to characterize high-risk pregnancies and then to distinguish preventable from nonpreventable causes within the group. Using predetermined criteria, 77 (31%) were classified preventable, 105 (42%) nonpreventable and 68 (27%) indeterminate. Preventable actions could be attributed to family members as well as health care providers. Twenty risk factors were significantly increased in the study group compared with those in a general population and included maternal, gestational, delivery and postdelivery risks. Furthermore, 13 of 25 factors differed significantly between preventable and nonpreventable cases. Those with significantly higher prevalence in preventable cases included prolonged gestation, the use of mid or high forceps, cesarean sections, meconium staining, low one- and five-minute Apgar scores, birth weight exceeding 4.5 kg (10 lb), poor tone, seizures and transfers to neonatal intensive care units. Increased in prevalence in the nonpreventable cases were congenital infections and malformations and the late onset of neurologic abnormalities. These findings suggest preventive measures to reduce unwarranted litigation and certain cases of neonatal brain damage. PMID:6730485

  2. Therapeutic drug monitoring in neonates.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Steven; Allegaert, Karel

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) aims to integrate drug measurement results into clinical decision making. The basic rules apply when using TDM in neonates (aminoglycosides, vancomycin, phenobarbital, digoxin), but additional factors should also be taken into account. First, due to both pharmacokinetic variability and non-pharmacokinetic factors, the correlation between dosage and concentration is poor in neonates, but can be overcome with the use of more complex, validated dosing regimens. Second, the time to reach steady state is prolonged, especially when no loading dose is used. Consequently, the timing of TDM sampling is important in this population. Third, the target concentration may be uncertain (vancomycin) or depend on specific factors (phenobarbital during whole body cooling). Finally, because of differences in matrix composition (eg, protein, bilirubin), assay-related inaccuracies may be different in neonates. We anticipate that complex validated dosing regimens, with subsequent TDM sampling and Bayesian forecasting, are the next step in tailoring pharmacotherapy to individual neonates. PMID:26803050

  3. Mastitis in a neonatal filly

    PubMed Central

    Gilday, Rebecca; Lewis, Danyse; Lohmann, Katharina L.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal mastitis is a rare occurrence in the horse. This report documents a case of mastitis caused by an organism within the Streptococcus dysgalactiae group in a 1-week-old Paint filly. PMID:25565717

  4. Neonatal and pediatric respiratory care

    SciTech Connect

    Koff, P.B. ); Eitzman, D.V.; Nev, J. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 23 chapters. Some of the titles are: Radiographic evaluations; Neonatal parenchymal diseases: physiologic development; Oxygen therapy; Pediatric parenchymal diseases; and Care of the neurologically injured child.

  5. Neonatal euthanasia: The Groningen Protocol*

    PubMed Central

    Vizcarrondo, Felipe E.

    2014-01-01

    For the past thirty years, voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide of adult patients have been common practice in the Netherlands. Neonatal euthanasia was recently legalized in the Netherlands and the Groningen Protocol (GP) was developed to regulate the practice. Supporters claim compliance with the GP criteria makes neonatal euthanasia ethically permissible. An examination of the criteria used by the Protocol to justify the euthanasia of seriously ill neonates reveals the criteria are not based on firm moral principles. The taking of the life of a seriously ill person is not the solution to the pain and suffering of the dying process. It is the role of the medical professional to care for the ailing patient with love and compassion, always preserving the person's dignity. Neonatal euthanasia is not ethically permissible. PMID:25473136

  6. Therapeutic hypothermia in neonatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Cornette, L.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a serious condition affecting newborn infants which can result in death and disability. There is now strong clinical evidence that moderate post-asphyxial total body cooling or hypothermia in full term neonates results in long-term neuroprotection, allowing us to proclaim this innovative therapy as “standard of care.” The treatment is a time-critical emergency and should be started within 6 hours after the insult. Such requires optimal collaboration among local hospitals, transport teams and the closest neonatal intensive care unit. The technique is only safe when applied according to published clinical trial protocols, and with admission of these patients to a neonatal intensive care unit. Future studies should be aimed at optimizing the onset, duration, and depth of hypothermia. Combination of hypothermia and drugs may further improve neuroprotection in asphyxiated full term neonates. PMID:24753900

  7. Neonatal euthanasia: The Groningen Protocol.

    PubMed

    Vizcarrondo, Felipe E

    2014-11-01

    For the past thirty years, voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide of adult patients have been common practice in the Netherlands. Neonatal euthanasia was recently legalized in the Netherlands and the Groningen Protocol (GP) was developed to regulate the practice. Supporters claim compliance with the GP criteria makes neonatal euthanasia ethically permissible. An examination of the criteria used by the Protocol to justify the euthanasia of seriously ill neonates reveals the criteria are not based on firm moral principles. The taking of the life of a seriously ill person is not the solution to the pain and suffering of the dying process. It is the role of the medical professional to care for the ailing patient with love and compassion, always preserving the person's dignity. Neonatal euthanasia is not ethically permissible. PMID:25473136

  8. Determining Prevalence of Acute Bilirubin Encephalopathy in Developing Countries

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-11

    Demonstrate BIND II Score of >=5, is Valid for Detecting Moderate to Severe ABE in Neonates <14 Days Old.; Demonstrate Community-BIND Instrument, a Modified BIND II, is a Valid and Reliable Tool for Detecting ABE.; Demonstrate That Community-BIND Can be Used for Acquiring Population-based Prevalence of ABE in the Community.

  9. Association Between History of Severe Hypoglycemia and Risk of Falls in Younger and Older Patients With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chin-Li; Hsu, Pei-Chun; Shen, Hsiu-Nien; Chang, Ya-Hui; Chen, Hua-Fen; Li, Chung-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To compare the incidence and relative risk of falls between adults with and without diabetes, and to prospectively assess the role of history of severe hypoglycemia in the putative relationship between diabetes and falls in younger and older people, respectively. The National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan was used in this cohort study. Diabetic cases (with and without history of severe hypoglycemia) and nondiabetic people were followed from 2000 to 2009. There were 31,049 people enrolled in each of the 3 groups. Subdistribution hazard ratio (sHR) of falls was estimated with considering death as a competing risk by using Fine and Gray method. Demographic characteristics, diabetes-related complications, and comorbidities associated with falls were adjusted in multivariable Cox regression model. As compared to nondiabetic people, adjusted sHR was 1.13 for diabetes without history of severe hypoglycemia (DwoH) and 1.63 for diabetes with history of severe hypoglycemia (DwH), respectively. DwH group was associated with a higher risk than DwoH (adjusted sHR = 1.57). All of the excessive risks were more pronounced in people younger than 65 years old than in older people. Patients with diabetes had increased risk of falls. Severe hypoglycemia was further associated with a higher risk in diabetes, the increased hazards were particularly pronounced in people younger than 65 years old. Because falls in younger people may result in a greater economic and social loss, our study call for proper attentions to prevention of falls in younger patients (<65 years old) with diabetes. PMID:26287419

  10. Hypoglycemia and Medical Expenses in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Analysis Based on the Korea National Diabetes Program Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Suk; Ahn, Kyu Jeung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Baik, Sei Hyun; Park, Yong Soo; Nam, Moon Suk; Lee, Kwan Woo; Woo, Jeong-Taek; Kim, Young Seol

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Hypoglycemia is one of the most important adverse events in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, hypoglycemia-related events are usually overlooked and have been documented less in clinical practice. Materials and Methods We evaluated the incidence, clinical characteristics, and medical expenses of hypoglycemia related events in T2DM patients based on the Korea National Diabetes Program (KNDP), which is the largest multi-center, prospective cohort in Korea (n = 4,350). For accurate outcomes, the KNDP data were merged with claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) of Korea. Results During a median follow-up period of 3.23 years (95% CI: 3.14, 3.19), 88 subjects (2.02%) were newly diagnosed with hypoglycemia, and the incidence of hypoglycemia was 6.44 cases per 1,000 person-years (PY). Individuals with hypoglycemia were significantly older (59.7±10.7 vs. 53.3±10.4 years, p < 0.001), had more hospital visits (121.94±126.88 days/PY, p < 0.001), had a longer hospital stays (16.13±29.21 days/PY, p < 0.001), and incurred greater medical costs ($2,447.56±4,056.38 vs. $1,336.37±3,403.39 /PY, p < 0.001) than subjects without hypoglycemia. Conclusion Hypoglycemia-related events were infrequently identified among the medical records of T2DM subjects. However, they were associated significantly with poor clinical outcomes, and thus, hypoglycemia could have a substantial burden on the Korean national healthcare system. PMID:26890789

  11. A 36-year-old man with vomiting, pain abdomen, significant weight loss, hyponatremia, and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Mutreja, Deepti; Sivasami, Kartik; Tewari, Vanmalini; Nandi, Bhaskar; Nair, G Lakhsmi; Patil, Sunita D

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection can be a challenge. The key to a timely diagnosis is to have a high index of suspicion. We present a rare case of a 36-year-old human immunodeficiency virus negative male patient, who was on multidrug therapy for lepromatous leprosy and was treated for type 2 lepra reactions with steroids in the past. The patient presented with vomiting and pain abdomen, persistent hyponatremia, and terminal hypoglycemia. He had features of malnutrition and had a rapid downhill course following admission. A diagnosis of S. stercoralis hyperinfection with sepsis and multiorgan failure, adrenal hemorrhage, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion was established on a postmortem examination. PMID:26549076

  12. Continuous subcutaneous infusion of glucagon by portable pump in non beta cell tumor hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Houlbert, D; Altman, J J; Lageron, A; Capeau, J; Dahan, R; Friedberg, G; Wassef, M; Poffenbarger, P L; Segrestaa, J M

    1985-04-01

    Subcutaneous infusion of glucagon by portable pump appears to give very effective symptomatic relief from non beta cell tumor hypoglycemia when surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are impossible or ineffective. This mode of glucagon administration was proposed in a patient who had severe nocturnal hypoglycemic attacks. The aim of the study was to specify the modes of utilization and to test the efficiency and the tolerance of this treatment. Glucagon was infused at 400 micrograms/h during every 12 hour night. Because of the hepatic action of glucagon it is very important to use this treatment with an adequate diet and to stop the infusion during the day to reconstitute the glycogen overload. This mode of glucagon administration was very effective in over 6 months of use and well tolerated. PMID:4007224

  13. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies in children: hypocalcemia, hypoglycemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Young

    2015-12-01

    It is important to fast diagnosis and management of the pediatric patients of the endocrine metabolic emergencies because the signs and symptoms of these disorders are nonspecific. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to serious consequences of the pediatric patients, for example, cerebral dysfunction leading to coma or death of the patients with hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, or diabetic ketoacidosis. The index of suspicion of the endocrine metabolic emergencies should be preceded prior to the starting nonspecific treatment. Importantly, proper diagnosis depends on the collection of blood and urine specimen before nonspecific therapy (intravenous hydration, electrolytes, glucose or calcium injection). At the same time, the taking of precise history and searching for pathognomonic physical findings should be performed. This review was described for fast diagnosis and proper management of hypoglycemic emergencies, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:26817004

  14. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies in children: hypocalcemia, hypoglycemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is important to fast diagnosis and management of the pediatric patients of the endocrine metabolic emergencies because the signs and symptoms of these disorders are nonspecific. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to serious consequences of the pediatric patients, for example, cerebral dysfunction leading to coma or death of the patients with hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, or diabetic ketoacidosis. The index of suspicion of the endocrine metabolic emergencies should be preceded prior to the starting nonspecific treatment. Importantly, proper diagnosis depends on the collection of blood and urine specimen before nonspecific therapy (intravenous hydration, electrolytes, glucose or calcium injection). At the same time, the taking of precise history and searching for pathognomonic physical findings should be performed. This review was described for fast diagnosis and proper management of hypoglycemic emergencies, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:26817004

  15. Economic resources consumption structure in severe hypoglycemia episodes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Michał; Rdzanek, Elżbieta; Niewada, Maciej; Czech, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with severe hypoglycemia events (SHEs) that vary in severity and resource consumption. Here we perform a systematic review in Medline of studies evaluating SHE-related health resource use. Eligible studies investigated patients with DM and included ≥10 SHEs. We also assessed studies identified in another systematic review, and through references from the included studies. We identified 14 relevant studies and used data from 11 (encompassing 6075 patients). Study results were interpreted to fit our definitions, which sometimes required assumptions. SHE type structure was synthesized using Bayesian modeling. Estimating Type 1 & 2 DM separately revealed only small differences; therefore, we used joint results. Of the analyzed SHEs, 9.97% were hospital-treated, 22.3% medical professional-treated, and 67.73% family-treated. These meta-analysis results help in understanding the structure of resource consumption following SHE and can be used in economic studies. PMID:26289736

  16. Novel molecular type of Clostridium difficile in neonatal pigs, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Squire, Michele M; Carter, Glen P; Mackin, Kate E; Chakravorty, Anjana; Norén, Torbjörn; Elliott, Briony; Lyras, Dena; Riley, Thomas V

    2013-05-01

    Clostridium difficile causes neonatal enteritis in piglets; strains of PCR ribotype 078 are most commonly identified. We investigated C. difficile prevalence in piglets in Australia and isolated a novel strain with a unique pathogenicity locus. In a mouse infection model, this strain produced more weight loss than did a ribotype 078 strain. PMID:23697508

  17. Novel Molecular Type of Clostridium difficile in Neonatal Pigs, Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Squire, Michele M.; Carter, Glen P.; Mackin, Kate E.; Chakravorty, Anjana; Norén, Torbjörn; Elliott, Briony; Lyras, Dena

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile causes neonatal enteritis in piglets; strains of PCR ribotype 078 are most commonly identified. We investigated C. difficile prevalence in piglets in Australia and isolated a novel strain with a unique pathogenicity locus. In a mouse infection model, this strain produced more weight loss than did a ribotype 078 strain. PMID:23697508

  18. Effect of Algorithm Aggressiveness on the Performance of the Hypoglycemia-Hyperglycemia Minimizer (HHM) System

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Thomas W.; Rhein, Kathleen; Dassau, Eyal; Breton, Marc D.; Patek, Stephen D.; Anhalt, Henry; Kovatchev, Boris P.; Doyle, Francis J.; Anderson, Stacey M.; Zisser, Howard; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Hypoglycemia-Hyperglycemia Minimizer (HHM) System aims to mitigate glucose excursions by preemptively modulating insulin delivery based on continuous glucose monitor (CGM) measurements. The “aggressiveness factor” is a key parameter in the HHM System algorithm, affecting how readily the system adjusts insulin infusion in response to changing CGM levels. Methods: Twenty adults with type 1 diabetes were studied in closed-loop in a clinical research center for approximately 26 hours. This analysis focused on the effect of the aggressiveness factor on the insulin dosing characteristics of the algorithm and, to a lesser extent, on the glucose control results observed. Results: As the aggressiveness factor increased from conservative to medium to aggressive: the maximum observed insulin dose delivered by the algorithm—which is designed to give doses that are corrective in nature every 5 minutes—increased (1.00 vs 1.15 vs 2.20 U, respectively); tendency to adhere to the subject’s nominal basal dose decreased (61.9% vs 56.6% vs 53.4%); and readiness to decrease insulin below basal also increased (18.4% vs 19.4% vs 25.2%). Glucose analyses by both CGM and Yellow Springs Instruments (YSI) indicated that the aggressive setting of the algorithm resulted in the least time spent at levels >180 mg/dL, and the most time spent between 70-180 mg/dL. There was no severe hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, or severe hypoglycemia for any of the aggressiveness values investigated. Conclusions: These analyses underscore the importance of investigating the sensitivity of the HHM System to its key parameters, such as the aggressiveness factor, to guide future development decisions. PMID:24876443

  19. Effect of algorithm aggressiveness on the performance of the Hypoglycemia-Hyperglycemia Minimizer (HHM) System.

    PubMed

    Finan, Daniel A; McCann, Thomas W; Rhein, Kathleen; Dassau, Eyal; Breton, Marc D; Patek, Stephen D; Anhalt, Henry; Kovatchev, Boris P; Doyle, Francis J; Anderson, Stacey M; Zisser, Howard; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    2014-07-01

    The Hypoglycemia-Hyperglycemia Minimizer (HHM) System aims to mitigate glucose excursions by preemptively modulating insulin delivery based on continuous glucose monitor (CGM) measurements. The "aggressiveness factor" is a key parameter in the HHM System algorithm, affecting how readily the system adjusts insulin infusion in response to changing CGM levels. Twenty adults with type 1 diabetes were studied in closed-loop in a clinical research center for approximately 26 hours. This analysis focused on the effect of the aggressiveness factor on the insulin dosing characteristics of the algorithm and, to a lesser extent, on the glucose control results observed. As the aggressiveness factor increased from conservative to medium to aggressive: the maximum observed insulin dose delivered by the algorithm—which is designed to give doses that are corrective in nature every 5 minutes—increased (1.00 vs 1.15 vs 2.20 U, respectively); tendency to adhere to the subject's nominal basal dose decreased (61.9% vs 56.6% vs 53.4%); and readiness to decrease insulin below basal also increased (18.4% vs 19.4% vs 25.2%). Glucose analyses by both CGM and Yellow Springs Instruments (YSI) indicated that the aggressive setting of the algorithm resulted in the least time spent at levels >180 mg/dL, and the most time spent between 70-180 mg/dL. There was no severe hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, or severe hypoglycemia for any of the aggressiveness values investigated. These analyses underscore the importance of investigating the sensitivity of the HHM System to its key parameters, such as the aggressiveness factor, to guide future development decisions. PMID:24876443

  20. Sodium salicylate augments the plasma adrenocorticotropin and cortisol responses to insulin hypoglycemia in man.

    PubMed

    Halter, J B; Metz, S A

    1982-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that prostaglandins attenuate neuroendocrine responses to changes in circulating glucose levels in man, we studied the effects of sodium salicylate (SS), a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor, on the plasma ACTH and cortisol responses to insulin hypoglycemia. Six normal men were given insulin (0.05 U/kg, iv) on 2 different days during the infusion of either SS (40 mg/min) or saline. Compared to the saline control, SS had no significant effect on either the rate of fall of plasma glucose after insulin or the glucose nadir (mean +/- SEM, 33 +/- 3 vs. 36 +/- 3 mg/dl; P = NS). Peak ACTH levels after insulin were higher during SS compared to those during saline in all six subjects (316 +/- 95 vs. 102 +/- 26 pg/ml; P less than 0.05), and SS had a clear effect to increase both the overall ACTH response (F = 21.3; P less than 0.01, by analysis of variance) and the plasma cortisol response (F = 6.72; P less than 0.05, by analysis of variance). The most striking example of this effect of SS occurred in one subject whose peak plasma ACTH was only 44 pg/ml during saline but reached 750 pg/ml during SS despite an identical fall of plasma glucose to 42 mg/dl. Augmentation of the ACTH and cortisol responses to insulin hypoglycemia may be the result of an alteration by SS of recognition of glucose levels by glucose-sensitive cells of the brain, and effect which could be due to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:6274894

  1. Aetiology of community-acquired neonatal sepsis in low and middle income countries

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Donald; Jawad, Issrah; Ahmad, Aziez; Lukšić, Ivana; Nair, Harish; Zgaga, Lina; Theodoratou, Evropi; Rudan, Igor; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Campbell, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Background 99% of the approximate 1 million annual neonatal deaths from life-threatening invasive bacterial infections occur in developing countries, at least 50% of which are from home births or community settings. Data concerning aetiology of sepsis in these settings are necessary to inform targeted therapy and devise management guidelines. This review describes and analyses the bacterial aetiology of community-acquired neonatal sepsis in developing countries. Methods A search of Medline, Embase, Global Health and Web of Knowledge, limited to post-1980, found 27 relevant studies. Data on aetiology were extracted, tabulated and analysed along with data on incidence, risk factors, case fatality rates and antimicrobial sensitivity. Results The most prevalent pathogens overall were Staphylococcus aureus (14.9%), Escherichia coli (12.2%), and Klebsiella species (11.6%). However, variations were observed both between global regions and age-of-onset categories. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae were most prevalent in Africa, while Klebsiella was highly prevalent in South-East Asia. A notably higher prevalence of Group B Streptococcus was present in neonates aged 7 days or less. The highest case fatality rates were recorded in South-East Asia. Klebsiella species showed highest antimicrobial resistance. Conclusion Data on community-acquired neonatal sepsis in developing countries are limited. Future research should focus on areas of high disease burden with relative paucity of data. Research into maternal and neonatal vaccination strategies and improved diagnostics is also needed. All of this could contribute to the formulation of community-based care packages, the implementation of which has significant potential to lower overall neonatal mortality and hence advance progress towards the attainment of Millennium Development Goal 4. PMID:23198116

  2. Hypoglycemia Associated with a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Producing High-molecular-weight Insulin Growth Factor II: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Ogata, Emi; Ohki, Shinji; Fukuda, Izumi; Tanaka, Mizuko; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman with multiple metastatic and unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was referred for investigation of refractory hypoglycemia that developed four months before this hospitalization. On admission, her fasting plasma glucose was 38 mg/dL despite 10% glucose infusion. Investigations revealed that her serum C-peptide, insulin and growth hormone levels were suppressed, and big insulin-like growth factor II was observed. She was diagnosed with non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia, which resolved after glucocorticoid treatment. Clinicians should thus be vigilant to identify hypoglycemia in patients with large metastatic GISTs because glucocorticoid therapy is useful even if the GIST is inoperable. PMID:27181538

  3. Adverse neonatal outcomes in women with pre-eclampsia in Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Kiondo, Paul; Tumwesigye, Nazarius Mbona; Wandabwa, Julius; Wamuyu-Maina, Gakenia; Bimenya, Gabriel S; Okong, Pius

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pre-eclampsia, which is more prevalent in resource-limited settings, contributes significantly to maternal, fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. However, the factors associated with these adverse outcomes are poorly understood in low resource settings. In this paper we examine the risk factors for adverse neonatal outcomes among women with pre-eclampsia at Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda. Methods Pre-eclampsia, which is more prevalent in resource-limited settings, contributes significantly to maternal, fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. However, the factors associated with these adverse outcomes are poorly understood in low resource settings. In this paper we examine the risk factors for adverse neonatal outcomes among women with pre-eclampsia at Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda. Resuls Predictors of adverse neonatal outcomes were: preterm delivery (OR 5.97, 95% CI: 2.97-12.7) and severe pre-eclampsia (OR 5.17, 95% CI: 2.36-11.3). Conclusion Predictors of adverse neonatal outcomes among women with pre-eclampsia were preterm delivery and severe pre-eclampsia. Health workers need to identify women at risk, offer them counseling and, refer them if necessary to a hospital where they can be managed successfully. This may in turn reduce the neonatal morbidity and mortality associated with pre-eclampsia. PMID:24643210

  4. Role of Mitochondria in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujiao; Tucker, Donovan; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Ningjun; Zhuo, Xiaoying; Zhang, Quanguang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) causes severe brain injury in neonates. It’s one of the leading causes to neonatal death and pediatric disability, resulting in devastating consequences, emotionally and economically, to their families. A series of events happens in this process, e.g. excitatory transmitter release, extracelluar Ca2+ influxing, mitochondrial dysfunction, energy failure, and neuron death. There are two forms of neuron death after HI insult: necrosis and apoptosis, apoptosis being the more prevalent form. Mitochondria handle a series of oxidative reactions, and yield energy for various cellular activities including the maintainance of membrane potential and preservation of intracellular ionic homeostasis. Therefore mitochondria play a critical role in neonatal neurodegeneration following HI, and mitochondrial dysfunction is the key point in neurodegenerative evolution. Because of this, exploring effective mitochondria-based clinical strategies is crucial. Today the only efficacious clinic treatment is hypothermia. However, due to its complex management, clinical complication and autoimmune decrease, its clinical application is limited. So far, many mitochondria-based strategies have been reported neuroprotective in animal models, which offers promise on neonatal therapy. However, since their clinical effectiveness are still unclear, plenty of studies need to be continued in the future. According to recent reports, two novel strategies have been proposed: methylene blue (MB) and melatonin. Although they are still in primary stage, the underlying mechanisms indicate promising clinical applications. Every neurological therapeutic strategy has its intrinsic deficit and limited efficacy, therefore in the long run, the perfect clinical therapy for hypoxic-ischemic neonatal brain injury will be based on the combination of multiple strategies. PMID:27441209

  5. Functional Neonatal Echocardiography: Indian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Suryawanshi, Pradeep B.; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Patnaik, Suprabha; Malshe, Nandini; Kalrao, Vijay; Lalwani, Sanjay; Surwade, Jitendra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Functional echocardiography, as opposed to echocardiography as performed by the cardiologist, is the bedside utilization of cardiac ultrasound to take after functional and haemodynamic changes longitudinally. Information reflecting cardiovascular capacity and systemic and pulmonary blood flow in sick preterm and term neonates can be observed utilizing this strategy. Information is lacking on its use in neonatal units in India. Aim To characterize the impact of Functional neonatal echocardiography (FnECHO) programme on decision making in a tertiary care centre in India by evaluating its frequency of use, patient characteristics, and indications. Materials and Methods Prospective observational study of neonates in a tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in Pune (India) from February 2014 to January 2015. All the neonates undergoing FnECHO during this 12 month period based on clinical findings were included in the study. Data extracted from the review of the clinical notes included gestational age, birth-weight, mode of delivery, Apgar scores, details of respiratory and cardiovascular support, timing of FnECHO and any other clinical diagnosis. The findings of echocardiography were recorded and correlated with the clinical and other laboratory or X-ray findings. If these findings indicated a change in management, it was instituted. Results A total of 348 echocardiographic studies were performed in 187 neonates (mean 1.86; SD 2.02). The most frequent indication was Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) assessment (n= 174, 50%), followed by haemodynamic instability (n=43, 12.36%). The results of FnECHO modified treatment in 148 cases (42.50%) in the form of addition and/or change in the treatment or avoidance of unnecessary intervention. Conclusion FnECHO is frequently used in the NICU setting and may be a useful tool to guide treatment. PDA assessment and haemodynamic instability are the most frequent indications. To validate its usefulness, well co

  6. Overview of neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benay

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal lupus (NL) is defined by the presentation of the fetus and the newborn who possess autoantibodies received from the mother. It is the dysfunction of the maternal immune system that leads to the production of autoantibodies to anti-Sjögren syndrome-A, anti-Sjögren syndrome-B, and anti-ribonuclear protein antigens. These antibodies are shared through the placenta and produce bodily changes in the fetal skin and heart, as well as potential changes in other body systems. Congenital complete heart block is the most dangerous manifestation of NL that can occur in utero or after birth. This article will provide an overview the presentation of NL and current therapies. Prenatal steroids have been the mainstay of therapy to try to reverse first- and second-degree congenital heart block and to prevent progression to a more advanced stage. New therapies are combining steroids with intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. This article will provide guidelines for practitioners so they can consider NL as a differential diagnosis when presented with cutaneous lesions, congenital heart block, or abnormal findings in the hematologic, hepatobiliary, neurologic, and musculoskeletal systems. PMID:24100008

  7. [Neonatal mucolipidosis type II].

    PubMed

    Hmami, F; Oulmaati, A; Bouharrou, A

    2016-01-01

    Mucolipidosis type II (ML II, OMIM 252,500) is an autosomal recessive disorder clinically characterized by facial dysmorphia similar to Hurler syndrome and pronounced gingival hypertrophy. The disorder is caused by a defect in targeting acid hydrolases on the surface of lysosomes, which impede their entry and lead to accumulation of undigested substrates in lysosomes. The onset of the symptoms is usually in infancy, beginning in the 6th month of life. Early onset, at birth or even in utero, is a sign of severity and involves the specific dysmorphia as well as skeletal dysplasia related to hyperparathyroidism. We report on a severe neonatal form of this disorder revealed by respiratory distress with severe chest deformity. The dysmorphic syndrome, combining coarse features, pronounced gingival hypertrophy, with diffuse bone demineralization and secondary hyperparathyroidism associating significant elevation of parathyroid hormone and alkaline phosphatase with normal levels of vitamin D and calcium were characteristics of mucolipidosis type II. Recognizing this specific association of anomalies helps eliminate the differential diagnosis and establish appropriate diagnosis and care. PMID:26552632

  8. Severe hypoglycemia in a juvenile diabetic rat model: presence and severity of seizures are associated with mortality.

    PubMed

    Maheandiran, Margaret; Mylvaganam, Shanthini; Wu, Chiping; El-Hayek, Youssef; Sugumar, Sonia; Hazrati, Lili; del Campo, Martin; Giacca, Adria; Zhang, Liang; Carlen, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    It is well accepted that insulin-induced hypoglycemia can result in seizures. However, the effects of the seizures, as well as possible treatment strategies, have yet to be elucidated, particularly in juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Here we establish a model of diabetes in young rats, to examine the consequences of severe hypoglycemia in this age group; particularly seizures and mortality. Diabetes was induced in post-weaned 22-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats by streptozotocin (STZ) administered intraperitoneally (IP). Insulin IP (15 U/kg), in rats fasted (14-16 hours), induced hypoglycemia, defined as <3.5 mM blood glucose (BG), in 68% of diabetic (STZ) and 86% of control rats (CON). Seizures occurred in 86% of STZ and all CON rats that reached hypoglycemic levels with mortality only occurring post-seizure. The fasting BG levels were significantly higher in STZ (12.4 ± 1.3 mM) than in CON rodents (6.3 ± 0.3 mM), resulting in earlier onset of hypoglycemia and seizures in the CON group. However, the BG at seizure onset was statistically similar between STZ (1.8 ± 0.2 mM) and CON animals (1.6 ± 0.1 mM) as well as between those that survived (S+S) and those that died (S+M) post-seizure. Despite this, the S+M group underwent a significantly greater number of seizure events than the S+S group. 25% glucose administered at seizure onset and repeated with recurrent seizures was not sufficient to mitigate these continued convulsions. Combining glucose with diazepam and phenytoin significantly decreased post-treatment seizures, but not mortality. Intracranial electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded in 10 CON and 9 STZ animals. Predictive EEG changes were not observed in these animals that underwent seizures. Fluorojade staining revealed damaged cells in non-seizing STZ animals and in STZ and CON animals post-seizure. In summary, this model of hypoglycemia and seizures in juvenile diabetic rats provides a paradigm for further study of underlying

  9. Severe Hypoglycemia in a Juvenile Diabetic Rat Model: Presence and Severity of Seizures Are Associated with Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Maheandiran, Margaret; Mylvaganam, Shanthini; Wu, Chiping; El-Hayek, Youssef; Sugumar, Sonia; Hazrati, Lili; del Campo, Martin; Giacca, Adria; Zhang, Liang; Carlen, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    It is well accepted that insulin-induced hypoglycemia can result in seizures. However, the effects of the seizures, as well as possible treatment strategies, have yet to be elucidated, particularly in juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Here we establish a model of diabetes in young rats, to examine the consequences of severe hypoglycemia in this age group; particularly seizures and mortality. Diabetes was induced in post-weaned 22-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats by streptozotocin (STZ) administered intraperitoneally (IP). Insulin IP (15 U/kg), in rats fasted (14–16 hours), induced hypoglycemia, defined as <3.5 mM blood glucose (BG), in 68% of diabetic (STZ) and 86% of control rats (CON). Seizures occurred in 86% of STZ and all CON rats that reached hypoglycemic levels with mortality only occurring post-seizure. The fasting BG levels were significantly higher in STZ (12.4±1.3 mM) than in CON rodents (6.3±0.3 mM), resulting in earlier onset of hypoglycemia and seizures in the CON group. However, the BG at seizure onset was statistically similar between STZ (1.8±0.2 mM) and CON animals (1.6±0.1 mM) as well as between those that survived (S+S) and those that died (S+M) post-seizure. Despite this, the S+M group underwent a significantly greater number of seizure events than the S+S group. 25% glucose administered at seizure onset and repeated with recurrent seizures was not sufficient to mitigate these continued convulsions. Combining glucose with diazepam and phenytoin significantly decreased post-treatment seizures, but not mortality. Intracranial electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded in 10 CON and 9 STZ animals. Predictive EEG changes were not observed in these animals that underwent seizures. Fluorojade staining revealed damaged cells in non-seizing STZ animals and in STZ and CON animals post-seizure. In summary, this model of hypoglycemia and seizures in juvenile diabetic rats provides a paradigm for further study of underlying

  10. Neonatal Screening Part 2: Neonatal Screening in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Brian A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Neonatal screening is a widely accepted, cost-effective method for early detection of various inborn errors of metabolism. This series of three articles examines different aspects of neonatal screening. In the first article, the author discussed general principles of screening and its function in the spectrum of diagnostic techniques for genetic disease. In this, the second article, the author reviews the history and current practices of neonatal screening in Canada. The individual diseases for which screening is used and particular points of interest for each of these diseases are briefly described. The author also outlines the benefits of screening and treatment. In the final article of this series, the author will examine controversial topics that represent the possible future of screening. PMID:21234041

  11. The Effects of Increased Maternal Visual Regard of Neonate Upon the Neonate-Mother Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcastro, Christina M.; And Others

    This study attempts to investigate the effects of increased maternal visual regard on neonatal social visual behavior and upon patterns of mother-neonate interaction within the context of a learning theory paradigm. Subjects were 3-day-old neonates and their mothers; with 10 of the 15 mother-neonate pairs as the experimental group, and 5 as the…

  12. Neonatal hemochromatosis in monochorionic twins.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, L; Baştuğ, O; Daar, G; Doğanay, S; Deniz, K; Kurtoğlu, S

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is a form of neonatal liver failure caused by maternal-fetal alloimmune injury to hepatocytes. The etiology of neonatal hemochromatosis is not exactly understood. However, according to one theory neonatal hemochromatosis is believed to be an alloimmune disorder causing liver injury in the fetus. In order to diagnose neonatal hemochromatosis there are some criteria that should be taken into account, such as positive family history, high serum ferritin levels, high serum alpha-fetoprotein levels and siderosis demonstrated by histology or with magnetic resonance.We present a case of a monochorionic newborn twin who applied to our hospital with sepsis clinical symptoms like clinics, was diagnosed with NH and immediately treated with antioxidant therapy while the other twin with same clinical symptoms did not respond to therapy and passed away. NH should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cases with sepsis-like clinical symptoms that do not respond to antibiotics; early antioxidant therapy in these cases is lifesaving. PMID:26836824

  13. Neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Nisha; Knorr, Aimee; Muldrew, Kenneth L

    2008-09-01

    The classic organisms associated with central nervous system infection in the neonate are herpes simplex, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus agalactiae; we describe an unusual case of neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by Bacillus cereus. PMID:18679155

  14. The use of non-insulin anti-diabetic agents to improve glycemia without hypoglycemia in the hospital setting: focus on incretins.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stanley; DeFronzo, Ralph A

    2014-03-01

    Patients with hyperglycemia in hospital have increased adverse outcomes compared with patients with normoglycemia, and the pathophysiological causes seem relatively well understood. Thus, a rationale for excellent glycemic control exists. Benefits of control with intensive insulin regimes are highly likely based on multiple published studies. However, hypoglycemia frequency increases and adverse outcomes of hypoglycemia accrue. This has resulted in a 'push' for therapeutic nihilism, accepting higher glycemic levels to avoid hypoglycemia. One would ideally prefer to optimize glycemia, treating hyperglycemia while minimizing or avoiding hypoglycemia. Thus, one would welcome therapies and processes of care to optimize this benefit/ risk ratio. We review the logic and early studies that suggest that incretin therapy use in-hospital can achieve this ideal. We strongly urge randomized prospective controlled studies to test our proposal and we offer a process of care to facilitate this research and their use in our hospitalized patients. PMID:24515252

  15. Posttraumatic Stress Related to Hyperglycemia: Prevalence in Adults with Type I Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Renna, Chelsea P; Boyer, Bret A; Prout, Maurice F; Scheiner, Gary

    2016-09-01

    Prevalence of hyperglycemia-related posttraumatic stress (PTS) was assessed in 239 adults with type 1 diabetes using the posttraumatic stress diagnostic scale (PDS; Foa, Posttraumatic stress diagnostic scale manual, National Computer Systems, Inc., Minneapolis, 1995) by an anonymous online survey. Additionally, this study aimed to identify variables related to hyperglycemia-related PTS. Over 30 % of participants reported symptoms consistent with PTSD related to hyperglycemia with standard PDS scoring, and 10 % with more conservative scoring. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that diabetes self-management behavior and perceived helplessness about hyperglycemia predicted PTSD with standard scoring. Perceived death threat, self-management behavior, helplessness about hyperglycemia, and severity of hypoglycemia in past month predicted PTSD using more conservative scoring. Perceived helplessness, hypoglycemia severity, perceived death-threat, HbA1c, and self-management behavior predicted PTS severity. When fear, helplessness, and perceived death-threat were combined to represent an overall cognitive appraisal factor, this variable was the strongest predictor of PTSD and PTS severity. Scores for PTSD symptom clusters appeared similar to data on hypoglycemia-related PTS. PMID:27469991

  16. Seasonal Variations of Severe Hypoglycemia in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, and Non-diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Miyako; Noto, Hiroshi; Hachiya, Remi; Kimura, Akio; Kakei, Masafumi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Blood glucose control in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is reportedly influenced by the seasons, with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels decreasing in the summer or warm season and increasing in the winter or cold season. In addition, several studies have shown that sepsis is also associated with the seasons. Although both blood glucose control and sepsis can strongly affect the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia, few studies have examined the seasonal variation of severe hypoglycemia. The aim of the present study is to examine the association between severe hypoglycemia and the seasons in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and non-diabetes mellitus (non-DM). We retrospectively reviewed all the patients with severe hypoglycemia at a national center in Japan between April 1, 2006 and March 31, 2012. A total of 57,132 consecutive cases that had visited the emergency room by ambulance were screened, and 578 eligible cases of severe hypoglycemia were enrolled in this study. The primary outcome was to assess the seasonality of severe hypoglycemia. In the T1DM group (n = 88), severe hypoglycemia occurred significantly more often in the summer than in the winter (35.2% in summer vs 18.2% in winter, P = 0.01), and the HbA1c levels were highest in the winter and lowest in the summer (9.1% [7.6%–10.1%] in winter vs 7.7% [7.1%–8.3%] in summer, P = 0.13). In the non-DM group (n = 173), severe hypoglycemia occurred significantly more often in the winter than in the summer (30.6% in winter vs 19.6% in summer, P = 0.01), and sepsis as a complication occurred significantly more often in winter than in summer (24.5% in winter vs 5.9% in summer, P = 0.02). In the T2DM group (n = 317), the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia and the HbA1c levels did not differ significantly among the seasons. The occurrence of severe hypoglycemia might be seasonal and might fluctuate with temperature changes. Patients

  17. Predisposing Factors for Hypoglycemia and Its Relation With Mortality in Critically Ill Patients Undergoing Insulin Therapy in an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Beigmohammadi, Mahammadtaghi; Sanaie, Sarvin; Shadvar, Kamran; Soleimanpour, Hassan; Rahimi, Ahsan; Safari, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypoglycemia is a common and the most important complication of intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients. Because of hypoglycemia’s impact on the cardinal organs as a fuel, if untreated it could results in permanent brain damage and increased mortality. Objectives: In this study, we aim to evaluate the incidence of hypoglycemia, its risk factors, and its relationship with mortality in critically ill patients. Patients and Methods: Five hundred adult patients who admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) were enrolled in this study. A program of glycemic control with a target of 100 - 140 mg/dL was instituted. We used the threshold of 150 mg/dL for septic patients, which were monitored by point of care devices for capillary blood measurement. We detected hypoglycemia with a blood sugar of less than 50 mg/dL and with the detection of each episode of hypoglycemia, blood glucose measurement was performed every 30 minutes. Results: Five hundred patients experienced at least one episode of hypoglycemia, almost always on the third day. Of 15 expired patients who had one hypoglycemia episode, the most common causes were multiple trauma and sepsis. Increases in the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) number augmented the hypoglycemia risk to 52% (P < 0.001). Moreover, in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI), the risk of hypoglycemia is 10 times greater than in those without AKI (RR: 10.3, CI: 3.16 - 33.6, P < 0.001). ICU admission blood sugar has a significant relationship with mortality (RR: 1.01, CI: 1.004 - 1.02, P < 0.006). Hypoglycemia increased the mortality rate twofold, but it was not significant (RR: 1.2, CI: 0.927 - 1.58, P = 0.221). Conclusions: Our results showed that the SOFA score, AKI, and hemoglobin A1c are the independent risk factors for the development of hypoglycemia and demonstrated that ICU admission blood glucose, Hba1c, and hypoglycemia increased the risk of death, but only ICU admission blood glucose is

  18. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of neonatal hypocalcemia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Im; Yu, Hyeoh Won; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won; Choi, Chang Won; Kim, Beyong Il

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical characteristics of full-term neonates with hypocalcemia and to suggest factors associated with neonatal hypocalcemia Methods The medical records of full-term neonates with hypocalcemia were reviewed. Hypocalcemia was defined as an ionized calcium (iCa) concentration of <4 mg/dL. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) insufficiency was defined as a serum PTH level of <60 pg/mL or a serum phosphorus level higher than the serum calcium level in the presence of hypocalcemia. Results Fifty-three neonates were enrolled. The median age at diagnosis of hypocalcemia was 3 days. In all the neonates, formula feeding predominance was observed. Thirty-eight neonates (69.8%) were compatible with PTH insufficiency. The number of formula-fed neonates was significantly higher than that of breast-fed patients among neonates with PTH insufficiency (P=0.017). Intact PTH was negatively correlated with serum phosphorus levels. Twelve out of 14 neonates (85.7%) had 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD) levels <20 ng/mL and 9 neonates (64.3%) had 25OHD levels <10 ng/mL. Twenty-one neonates had hypocalcemic tetany. The serum calcium and iCa concentrations of neonates with tetany were 4.2-8.3 mg/dL and 1.85-3.88 mg/dL, respectively. Three neonates showed symptomatic hypocalcemia with calcium levels over 7.5 mg/dL. Among the 16 neonates who underwent electroencephalography (EEG), 12 had abnormalities, which normalized after 1-2 months. Conclusion Formula milk feeding, PTH insufficiency and low serum vitamin D concentration are associated with the development of neonatal hypocalcemia. Symptoms such as tetany and QT interval prolongation can develop in relatively mild hypocalcemia. Moreover, transient neonatal hypocalcemia can cause transient EEG abnormalities. PMID:26191512

  19. Biliary atresia and neonatal hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wynchank, S.; Guillet, J.; Leccia, F.; Soubiran, G.; Blanquet, P.

    1984-03-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m diethyl IDA was performed on 14 jaundiced neonates. It aided greatly the differential diagnosis between neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia. Limitations in the interpretation of the results are described, as neonatal hepatitis may be accompanied by biliary excretion ranging from zero to normal. Also both biliary atresia (intra- and extrahepatic) and neonatal hepatitis may show no biliary excretion within 24 hours.

  20. Changes of cognition and regional cerebral activity during acute hypoglycemia in normal subjects: A H2 15O positron emission tomographic study.

    PubMed

    Bie-Olsen, Lise G; Kjaer, Troels W; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Lonsdale, Markus N; Holst, Jens Juul; Law, Ian; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2009-06-01

    Blurred vision and cognitive difficulties are prominent symptoms during acute insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Our hypothesis was that changes in cerebral activity reflect these symptoms. Positron emission tomography (PET) with oxygen-15-labelled water was used to measure relative changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) as a marker of cerebral activity. Hypoglycemia was induced by intravenous insulin infusion in 19 healthy men performing two different cognitive tasks of varying complexity. The hypoglycemic stimulus [plasma glucose 2.2 mmol/liter (0.4)] produced a significant hormonal counterregulatory response. During the low cognitive load, rCBF decreased in response to hypoglycemia in a large bilateral area in the posterior part of the temporal lobe, and rCBF increased bilaterally in the anterior cingulate gyrus, the right frontal gyrus, the fusiform gyrus, thalamus, and the left inferior part of the frontal gyrus. During the high cognitive load, rCBF decreased bilaterally in a large region in the posterior part of the temporal gyrus and increased in the left and right anterior cingulate gyrus, left and right frontal gyrus, right parahippocampal and lingual gyrus, and left superior temporal gyrus. Visual impairment during hypoglycemia was associated with deactivation in the ventral visual stream. The anterior cingulate gyrus was activated during hypoglycemia in a load-dependent manner. Areas on the frontal convexity were differentially activated in response to the cognitive load during hypoglycemia. Our findings suggest that hypoglycemia induces changes in sensory processing in a cognition-independent manner, whereas activation of areas of higher order functions is influenced by cognitive load as well as hypoglycemia. PMID:19170163

  1. Neonatal Jaundice Detection System.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Mustafa; Hardalaç, Fırat; Ural, Berkan; Karap, Serhat

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a common condition that occurs in newborn infants in the first week of life. Today, techniques used for detection are required blood samples and other clinical testing with special equipment. The aim of this study is creating a non-invasive system to control and to detect the jaundice periodically and helping doctors for early diagnosis. In this work, first, a patient group which is consisted from jaundiced babies and a control group which is consisted from healthy babies are prepared, then between 24 and 48 h after birth, 40 jaundiced and 40 healthy newborns are chosen. Second, advanced image processing techniques are used on the images which are taken with a standard smartphone and the color calibration card. Segmentation, pixel similarity and white balancing methods are used as image processing techniques and RGB values and pixels' important information are obtained exactly. Third, during feature extraction stage, with using colormap transformations and feature calculation, comparisons are done in RGB plane between color change values and the 8-color calibration card which is specially designed. Finally, in the bilirubin level estimation stage, kNN and SVR machine learning regressions are used on the dataset which are obtained from feature extraction. At the end of the process, when the control group is based on for comparisons, jaundice is succesfully detected for 40 jaundiced infants and the success rate is 85 %. Obtained bilirubin estimation results are consisted with bilirubin results which are obtained from the standard blood test and the compliance rate is 85 %. PMID:27229489

  2. Cardiogenic shock in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Viveiros, Eulália; Aveiro, Ana Cristina; Costa, Edite; Nunes, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of a healthy male full-term neonate, 21 days old, admitted to the emergency room, presenting a severe cardiovascular collapse with an initial sinus rhythm. The first diagnostic hypothesis was of septic shock, having antibiotics, fluid resuscitation, inotropic drugs and ventilatory support started immediately. After achieving haemodynamic stability, a new cardiovascular collapse occurred with supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). The latter was successfully treated and the neonate did not suffer any organ damage. Cardiogenic shock should be considered despite being a much rarer cause of shock in neonates. SVT is promptly diagnosed when a cardiorespiratory monitor is available; however, the intermittent occurrence of the tachycardia episodes makes this diagnosis more difficult to recognise and manage. PMID:23737567

  3. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  7. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  8. Regulation of muscle growth in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review reports recent findings on the multiple factors that regulate skeletal muscle growth in neonates. Skeletal muscle is the fastest growing protein mass in neonates. The high rate of neonatal muscle growth is due to accelerated rates of protein synthesis accompanied by the rapid accumulatio...

  9. Amino acids and insulin in neonatal growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rate of growth during the neonatal period is greater than at any other stage of postnatal life, and a majority of the mass increase is skeletal muscle. The rapid growth of skeletal muscle in the neonate is driven by an elevated rate of protein synthesis. Neonates are very efficient at utilizin...

  10. Diminution of Campylobacter colonization in neonatal pigs reared off-sow.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R B; Young, C R; Anderson, R C; Droleskey, R E; Genovese, K J; Egan, L F; Nisbet, D J

    2000-10-01

    Pigs may be a natural reservoir of Campylobacter and can be colonized as early as 24 h after birth. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate what effect early removal of piglets from Campylobacter-positive sows has on Campylobacter prevalence in neonates. In two trials, piglets were removed from sows within 24 h of birth and were reared in nurseries isolated from sows for 21 days. From the neonates rectal swabs were cultured for Campylobacter, and Campylobacter status of the isolated piglets was compared to that of littermates reared on sows. The nurseries consisted of wire-floored farrowing crates that were equipped with heaters and self-feeders. In trial I, the Campylobacter prevalence in nursery-reared piglets was 13 of 14 on day 2 and 0 of 14 on day 20. Campylobacter prevalence in the sow-reared piglets was 8 of 9 from days 2 to 20. In trial II, 12 of 29 on day 2, and 5 of 26 on day 20, of the nursery-reared piglets were culture positive for Campylobacter. For the sow-reared piglets, Campylobacter prevalence was 7 of 15 on day 1 and 15 of 15 (100%) on day 20. These data suggest that successful permanent colonization of the gut by Campylobacter is probably related to constant exposure of piglets to Campylobacter-positive feces. Campylobacter prevalence may be diminished in neonates that are reared off-sow in isolated nurseries. PMID:11041146

  11. [Hypoglycemia in nondiabetic patients: When is the 72-hour-fast test required and how can it be interpreted?].

    PubMed

    Vezzosi, Delphine; Bennet, Antoine; Grunenwald, Solange; Caron, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Whereas hypoglycaemia is uncommon in nondiabetic patients, it is a frequent reason for consultation. Hypoglycaemia is confirmed when criteria of Whipple's triad are fulfilled. If a venous sample cannot be collected when hypoglycemia occurs spontaneously, a 72-hour-fast test should be performed firstly to affirm the reality of hypoglycaemia and secondly to make the etiological diagnosis. Before carrying out this long and expensive test, the obvious causes of hypoglycaemia must be ruled out: iatrogenic, severe prolonged undernutrition, liver or renal deficiency, adrenal insufficiency, IGFII or pro-IGFII secreting tumours…At the time of hypoglycemia, plasma insulin≥3mUI/L, C-peptide≥0.6ng/mL, proinsulin≥5pmol/L associated with plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate≤2700μmol/L provide evidence for inappropriate insulin secretion. The lack of hypoglycaemia after a 72-hour-fast test rules out, in the majority of cases, organic hypoglycaemia. PMID:27208915

  12. Recurrent Moderate Hypoglycemia Suppresses Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in the Prefrontal Cortex and Impairs Sensorimotor Gating in the Posthypoglycemic Period in Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Rao, Raghavendra; Ennis, Kathleen; Mitchell, Eugena P; Tran, Phu V; Gewirtz, Jonathan C

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent hypoglycemia is common in infants and children. In developing rat models, recurrent moderate hypoglycemia leads to neuronal injury in the medial prefrontal cortex. To understand the effects beyond neuronal injury, 3-week-old male rats were subjected to 5 episodes of moderate hypoglycemia (blood glucose concentration, approx. 30 mg/dl for 90 min) once daily from postnatal day 24 to 28. Neuronal injury was determined using Fluoro-Jade B histochemistry on postnatal day 29. The effects on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its cognate receptor, tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) expression, which is critical for prefrontal cortex development, were determined on postnatal day 29 and at adulthood. The effects on prefrontal cortex-mediated function were determined by assessing the prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex on postnatal day 29 and 2 weeks later, and by testing for fear-potentiated startle at adulthood. Recurrent hypoglycemia led to neuronal injury confined primarily to the medial prefrontal cortex. BDNF/TrkB expression in the prefrontal cortex was suppressed on postnatal day 29 and was accompanied by lower prepulse inhibition, suggesting impaired sensorimotor gating. Following the cessation of recurrent hypoglycemia, the prepulse inhibition had recovered at 2 weeks. BDNF/TrkB expression in the prefrontal cortex had normalized and fear-potentiated startle was intact at adulthood. Recurrent moderate hypoglycemia during development has significant adverse effects on the prefrontal cortex in the posthypoglycemic period. PMID:26820887

  13. Neonatal records and the computer.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, C H

    1977-01-01

    To use a combined single document clinical case sheet/computer record which can form the basic document for a life medical record is a practical proposition. With adequate briefing doctors and nurses soon become familiar with the record and appreciate its value. Secretarial and clerical requirements are reduced to a minimum as transcription of medical data is eliminated, so greatly speeding up processing and feed back to the medical services. A few illustrations of trends in neonatal statistics and of computer linked maternal/neonatal data are presented. PMID:879830

  14. Interprofessional Education in Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education is not a new concept. Yet, the operationalization of interprofessional education with related competencies for collaborative team-based practice in neonatal units is often difficult. Changes in healthcare with an emphasis on patient-focused care and the concern for patient safety and quality care are accelerating the need for more interprofessional education. This article briefly outlines the evolution of interprofessional education to support collaborative team-based practice and how that facilitates safety and quality care in neonatal units. PMID:27465448

  15. Association of severe hypoglycemia with depressive symptoms in patients with type 2 diabetes: the Fukuoka Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Yohei; Iwase, Masanori; Fujii, Hiroki; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Kaizu, Shinako; Ide, Hitoshi; Jodai, Tamaki; Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Udai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although many studies have investigated the clinical characteristics of patients with diabetes with depression in Western populations, there is a lack of information regarding other ethnicities. We studied the association between clinical characteristics and depressive symptoms in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods A total of 4218 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes who were not taking antidepressants were divided into four groups according to the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score. The relationship between the severity of depressive symptoms and clinical parameters was examined cross-sectionally. Results After multivariate adjustments, the severity of depressive symptoms was significantly associated with body mass index, leisure-time physical activity, current smoking, sleep duration, sucrose intake, skipping breakfast, insulin use, severe hypoglycemia, dysesthesia of both feet, history of foot ulcer, photocoagulation, ischemic heart disease, and stroke. ORs for severe hypoglycemia increased significantly with the CES-D score in 2756 sulfonylurea and/or insulin-treated patients after multivariate adjustment including age, sex, duration of diabetes, glycated hemoglobin, insulin use, self-monitoring of blood glucose, leisure-time physical activity, skipping breakfast, dysesthesia of both feet, ischemic heart disease, and stroke (CES-D score ≤9, referent; 10–15, OR 1.64; 16–23, OR 2.09; ≥24, OR 3.66; p for trend <0.01). Conclusions Severe hypoglycemia was positively associated with the severity of depressive symptoms in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes independent of glycemic control, insulin therapy, lifestyle factors, and diabetic complications. As both severe hypoglycemia and depression are known risk factors for morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes, clinicians should be aware of this association. UMIN Clinical Trial Registry 000002627. PMID:26019877

  16. Chiari type I malformation, syncope, headache, hypoglycemia and hepatic steatosis in an 8-year old girl: a causal association?

    PubMed Central

    Tarani, Luigi; Del Balzo, Francesca; Costantino, Francesco; Properzi, Enrico; D’Eufemia, Patrizia; Liberati, Natascia; Spalice, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Chiari type I malformation (CMI) is a congenital hindbrain anomaly characterized by downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. Chiari type I malformation often presents with a complex clinical picture and can be sporadic or linked to a variety of genetic conditions. We report on a girl in whom Chiari type I malformation was associated with hypoglycemia, headache, vertigo, syncope and hepatic steatosis. We hypothesize that these symptoms are primarily a consequence of Chiari type I malformation. PMID:21589844

  17. Complex III deficiency due to an in-frame MT-CYB deletion presenting as ketotic hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis☆

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Mari; Goldstein, Jennifer; Young, Sarah P.; Bossen, Edward H.; Shoffner, John; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2015-01-01

    Complex III deficiency due to a MT-CYB mutation has been reported in patients with myopathy. Here, we describe a 15-year-old boy who presented with metabolic acidosis, ketotic hypoglycemia and carnitine deficiency. Electron transport chain analysis and mitochondrial DNA sequencing on muscle tissue lead to the eventual diagnosis of complex III deficiency. This case demonstrates the critical role of muscle biopsies in a myopathy work-up, and the clinical efficacy of supplement therapy. PMID:26937408

  18. Complex III deficiency due to an in-frame MT-CYB deletion presenting as ketotic hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Mari; Goldstein, Jennifer; Young, Sarah P; Bossen, Edward H; Shoffner, John; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2015-09-01

    Complex III deficiency due to a MT-CYB mutation has been reported in patients with myopathy. Here, we describe a 15-year-old boy who presented with metabolic acidosis, ketotic hypoglycemia and carnitine deficiency. Electron transport chain analysis and mitochondrial DNA sequencing on muscle tissue lead to the eventual diagnosis of complex III deficiency. This case demonstrates the critical role of muscle biopsies in a myopathy work-up, and the clinical efficacy of supplement therapy. PMID:26937408

  19. Depression in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes: associations with hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and poor treatment adherence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuying; Ting, Rose ZW; Yang, Wenying; Jia, Weiping; Li, Wenhui; Ji, Linong; Guo, Xiaohui; Kong, Alice PS; Wing, Yun‐Kwok; Luk, Andrea OY; Sartorius, Norman; Morisky, Donald E; Oldenburg, Brian; Weng, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background We hypothesize that depression in type 2 diabetes might be associated with poor glycemic control, in part due to suboptimal self‐care. We tested this hypothesis by examining the associations of depression with clinical and laboratory findings in a multicenter survey of Chinese type 2 diabetic patients. Method 2538 patients aged 18–75 years attending hospital‐based clinics in four cities in China underwent detailed clinical‐psychological‐behavioral assessment during a 12‐month period between 2011 and 2012. Depression was diagnosed if Patient Health Questionnaire‐9 (PHQ‐9) score ≥10. Diabetes self‐care and medication adherence were assessed using the Summary of Diabetes Self‐care Activities and the 4‐item Morisky medication adherence scale respectively. Results In this cross‐sectional study (mean age: 56.4 ± 10.5[SD] years, 53% men), 6.1% (n = 155) had depression. After controlling for study sites, patients with depression had higher HbA 1c (7.9 ± 2.0 vs. 7.7 ± 2.0%, P = 0.008) and were less likely to achieve HbA 1c goal of <7.0% (36.2% vs 45.6%, P = 0.004) than those without depression. They were more likely to report hypoglycemia and to have fewer days of being adherent to their recommended diet, exercise, foot care and medication. In logistic regression, apart from young age, poor education, long disease duration, tobacco use, high body mass index, use of insulin, depression was independently associated with failure to attain HbA 1c target (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.56, 95%CI:1.05–2.32, P = 0.028). The association between depression and glycemic control became non‐significant after inclusion of adherence to diet, exercise and medication (OR = 1.48, 95% CI 0.99–2.21, P = 0.058). Conclusion Depression in type 2 diabetes was closely associated with hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, which might be partly mediated through poor treatment adherence. PMID:25349949

  20. Hypoglycemia Secondary to Sulfonylurea Ingestion in a Patient with End Stage Renal Disease: Results from a 72-Hour Fast.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Alice; Rubin, Mishaela; Accili, Domenico; Bilezikian, John P; Pajvani, Utpal B

    2015-01-01

    Insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide levels increase with sulfonylurea exposure but the acuity of increase has not been described in dialysis patients. We present a case of a dialysis patient who presented with hypoglycemia and was found to have accidental sulfonylurea ingestion. This is a 73-year-old man with ESRD on peritoneal dialysis, without history of diabetes, who presented with hypoglycemia. Past medical history includes multiple myeloma, congestive heart failure, and hypertension. At initial presentation, his blood glucose was 47 mg/dL, with concomitant elevations in the following: C-peptide 30.5 (nl: 0.8-3.5 ng/mL), insulin 76 (nl: 3-19 μIU/mL), and proinsulin 83.3 (nl: ≤8.0 pmol/L). During the 72-hour fast, which he completed without hypoglycemia, insulin declined to be within normal limits (to 12 μIU/mL); proinsulin (to 12.1 pmol/L) and C-peptide (to 7.2 ng/mL) levels decreased but remained elevated. The sulfonylurea screen ultimately returned positive for glipizide, clinching the diagnosis. This is the first reported case which characterizes the chronic elevation of proinsulin in a patient with ESRD, as well as its dramatic increase after a presumed solitary exposure to sulfonylurea. The 72-hour fast conducted gives insight into the clearance of insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide after sulfonylurea ingestion in ESRD. PMID:26664768

  1. Inactivation of the first nucleotide-binding fold of the sulfonylurea receptor, and familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.M.; Wohllk, N.; Huang, E.

    1996-09-01

    Familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy is a disorder of glucose homeostasis and is characterized by unregulated insulin secretion and profound hypoglycemia. Loss-of-function mutations in the second nucleotide-binding fold of the sulfonylurea receptor, a subunit of the pancreatic-islet {beta}-cell ATP-dependent potassium channel, has been demonstrated to be causative for persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy. We now describe three additional mutations in the first nucleotide-binding fold of the sulfonylurea-receptor gene. One point mutation disrupts the highly conserved Walker A motif of the first nucleotide-binding-fold region. The other two mutations occur in noncoding sequences required for RNA processing and are predicted to disrupt the normal splicing pathway of the sulfonylurea-receptor mRNA precursor. These data suggest that both nucleotide-binding-fold regions of the sulfortylurea receptor are required for normal regulation of {beta}-cell ATP-dependent potassium channel activity and insulin secretion. 32 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Glucoreceptors located in different areas mediate the hypoglycemia-induced release of growth hormone, prolactin, and adrenocorticotropin in man.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Tatár, P; Jurcovicová, J; Jezová, D

    1990-03-01

    In young male volunteers, the changes in growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release in response to insulin injection combined with the infusion of saline, glucose, and fructose were evaluated. Glucose infusion in a dose which prevented insulin hypoglycemia completely abolished endocrine responses. Infusion of fructose, which is known not to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), did not influence the GH release during hypoglycemia; however, it inhibited PRL secretion. The ACTH response was slightly attenuated and delayed, while the hypoglycemia-induced rise in cortisol levels was not modified by fructose infusion. These data indicate that the glucoreceptors mediating the signals for a complete counterregulatory neuroendocrine response are not located in a single brain structure. Stimuli for GH release are produced in areas of the central nervous system protected by the BBB, while those for PRL release are presumably present in structures not protected by the BBB. Glucoreceptors triggering ACTH release are located both inside and outside the BBB. PMID:2157998

  3. A glucagon analog chemically stabilized for immediate treatment of life-threatening hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Chabenne, Joseph; Chabenne, Maria Dimarchi; Zhao, Yan; Levy, Jay; Smiley, David; Gelfanov, Vasily; Dimarchi, Richard

    2014-06-01

    For more than half a century glucagon has been used as a critical care medicine in the treatment of life-threatening hypoglycemia. It is commercially supplied as a lyophilized powder intended to be solubilized in dilute aqueous hydrochloric acid immediately prior to administration. We have envisioned a "ready-to-use" glucagon as a drug of more immediate and likely use. Through a series of iterative changes in the native sequence we have identified glucagon analogs of appreciably enhanced aqueous solubility at physiological pH, and of chemical stability suitable for routine medicinal use. The superior biophysical properties were achieved in part through adjustment of the isoelectric point by use of a C-terminal Asp-Glu dipeptide. The native glutamines at positions 3, 20 and 24 as well as the methionine at 27 were substituted with amino acids of enhanced chemical stability, as directed by a full alanine scan of the native hormone. Of utmost additional importance was the dramatically enhanced stability of the peptide when Ser16 was substituted with alpha,aminoisobutyric acid (Aib), a substitution that stabilizes peptide secondary structure. The collective set of changes yield glucagon analogs of comparable in vitro and in vivo biological character to native hormone but with biophysical properties much more suitable for clinical use. PMID:24749059

  4. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Presenting as Hypoglycemia due to Insulinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hwal Rim; Shim, Young Seok; Lee, Hae Sang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) mutation is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of parathyroid, pancreatic islet, and anterior pituitary tumors. The incidence of insulinoma in MEN is relatively uncommon, and there have been a few cases of MEN manifested with insulinoma as the first symptom in children. We experienced a 9-year-old girl having a familial MEN1 mutation. She complained of dizziness, occasional palpitation, weakness, hunger, sweating, and generalized tonic-clonic seizure that lasted for 5 minutes early in the morning. At first, she was only diagnosed with insulinoma by abdominal magnetic resonance images of a 1.3 x 1.5 cm mass in the pancreas and high insulin levels in blood of the hepatic vein, but after her father was diagnosed with MEN1. We found she had familial MEN1 mutation, and she recovered hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia after enucleation of the mass. Therefore, the early genetic identification of MEN1 mutation is considerable for children with at least one manifestation. PMID:27247513

  5. Abnormal Nocturnal Behavior due to Hypoglycemia in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kwang Ik; Kim, Hyung Ki; Baek, Jeehun; Kim, Doh-Eui; Park, Hyung Kook

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal nocturnal behavior can have many causes, including primary sleep disorder, nocturnal seizures, and underlying medical or neurological disorders. A 79-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes was admitted for evaluation of abnormal nocturnal behavior. Every night at around 04:30 she was observed displaying abnormal behavior including leg shaking, fumbling with bedclothes, crawling around the room with her eyes closed, and non-responsiveness to verbal communication. Polysomnography with 20-channel electroencephalography (EEG) was performed. EEG showed that the posterior dominant rhythm was slower than that observed in the initial EEG, with diffuse theta and delta activities intermixed, and no epileptiform activity. The serum glucose level was 35 mg/dL at that time, and both the EEG findings and clinical symptoms were resolved after an intravenous injection of 50 mL of 50% glucose. These results indicate that nocturnal hypoglycemia should be considered as one of the possible etiologies in patients presenting with abnormal nocturnal behavior. PMID:26943712

  6. Fear of hypoglycemia in the parents of children and adolescents with diabetes: maladaptive or healthy response?

    PubMed

    Marrero, D G; Guare, J C; Vandagriff, J L; Fineberg, N S

    1997-01-01

    Sixty-one parents of children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus completed modified versions of the Hypoglycemic Fear Survey (HFS) and the Diabetes Quality of Life (DQOL) scale. They also indicated their child's history of hypoglycemic-related seizures or loss of consciousness (SLC) events. Parental HFS scores were significantly greater if their child had ever experienced a SLC event or experienced a SLC event within the past year. Parental HFS scores were positively correlated with general parental worry about their child having diabetes. Adolescent children who experienced a SLC event during the past year reported greater HFS scores, greater general worry about diabetes, and a greater negative impact of having diabetes compared with adolescents with no such history. Despite the greater fear of hypoglycemia in parents and adolescents, there was no significant difference in HbA1 values between children with or without any history of SLC events or children with or without a SLC event within the past year. PMID:9257618

  7. Evolvable rough-block-based neural network and its biomedical application to hypoglycemia detection system.

    PubMed

    San, Phyo Phyo; Ling, Sai Ho; Nuryani; Nguyen, Hung

    2014-08-01

    This paper focuses on the hybridization technology using rough sets concepts and neural computing for decision and classification purposes. Based on the rough set properties, the lower region and boundary region are defined to partition the input signal to a consistent (predictable) part and an inconsistent (random) part. In this way, the neural network is designed to deal only with the boundary region, which mainly consists of an inconsistent part of applied input signal causing inaccurate modeling of the data set. Owing to different characteristics of neural network (NN) applications, the same structure of conventional NN might not give the optimal solution. Based on the knowledge of application in this paper, a block-based neural network (BBNN) is selected as a suitable classifier due to its ability to evolve internal structures and adaptability in dynamic environments. This architecture will systematically incorporate the characteristics of application to the structure of hybrid rough-block-based neural network (R-BBNN). A global training algorithm, hybrid particle swarm optimization with wavelet mutation is introduced for parameter optimization of proposed R-BBNN. The performance of the proposed R-BBNN algorithm was evaluated by an application to the field of medical diagnosis using real hypoglycemia episodes in patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. The performance of the proposed hybrid system has been compared with some of the existing neural networks. The comparison results indicated that the proposed method has improved classification performance and results in early convergence of the network. PMID:24122616

  8. Eucaloric Ketogenic Diet Reduces Hypoglycemia and Inflammation in Mice with Endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Nandivada, Prathima; Fell, Gillian L; Pan, Amy H; Nose, Vania; Ling, Pei-Ra; Bistrian, Bruce R; Puder, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Dietary strategies to alter the immune response to acute inflammation have the potential to improve outcomes in critically ill patients. A eucaloric ketogenic diet (EKD), composed predominantly of fat with very small amounts of carbohydrate, can provide adequate caloric support while minimizing spikes in blood glucose and reducing oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of an EKD on glycemic control and the inflammatory response after acute endotoxemia in mice. Mice received either an EKD or a carbohydrate-based control diet (CD) for 4 weeks. Animals subsequently underwent either a 2-h fast (postprandial) or an overnight fast (postabsorptive), and half of the animals in each diet group were randomized to receive either intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (1 mg/kg) or an equivalent volume of saline. Glycemic response, insulin resistance, inflammatory cytokine levels, and the expression of key inflammatory and metabolic genes were measured. After endotoxin challenge, hypoglycemia was more frequent in mice fed a CD than an EKD in the postprandial period. This was due in part to the preservation of hepatic glycogen stores despite endotoxin exposure and prolonged fasting in mice fed an EKD. Furthermore, mice fed the CD had higher levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in the postabsorptive period, with a fivefold higher expression of hepatic NFκB compared to mice fed the EKD in both fasting periods. These results suggest that the unique metabolic state induced by an EKD can alter the response to acute inflammation in mice. PMID:27117864

  9. Hypoglycemia, hypopotassemia and hyperleukocytosis associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Imamura, T; Kimura, N; Niho, Y; Okeda, T; Yanase, T

    1982-01-01

    We studied a patient with lung cancer, who exhibited severe systemic derangements of metabolism causing cachexia preceding the appearance of a large bulky tumor. The data described herein left no doubt that lung cancer growing in the patient acted as a powerful hypoglycemic factor, setting in motion widespread metabolic disorders. Inappropriate secretion of insulin may be involved in the manifestation of hypoglycemia. However, no ectopic secretion of insulin, glucagon, ACTH and aldosterone appeared to be associated with the carcinoma in the patient. From the present and previous observations, it is stressed that progressive energy loss from the patient occurs by virtue of a combination of severe anorexia and the establishment of a systemic energy-losing cycle dependent on an interplay of glycolysis in the cancer cells and stimulated gluconeogenesis in the host tissues, which in turn results in derangements of protein, lipid and electrolyte metabolism. Attempts to ameliorate the patient's distress and counterbalance the effect of the tumor by parenteral hyperalimentation were not satisfactory and resulted in only a temporary improvement. This study also demonstrated that marked granulocytosis was the result of production of an excess granulopoietic colony stimulating activity by the cancer cells. PMID:6978422

  10. Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    CONSTANTINESCU, Simona; ZAMFIRESCU, Vlad; VLADAREANU, Prof. Radu

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is the commonest cause of severe neonatal thrombocytopenia. FNAIT is usually suspected in neonates with bleeding or severe, unexplained, and/or isolated postnatal thrombocytopenia. Affected fetuses should be managed in referral centers with experience in the ante-natal management of FNAIT. Close collaboration is required between specialists in fetal medicine, obstetrics, hematology/transfusion medicine, and pediatrics. The mother and her partner should be provided with detailed information about FNAIT and its potential clinical consequences, and the benefits and risks of different approaches to ante-natal management. There has been huge progress in the ante-natal management of FNAIT over the last 20 years. However, the ideal effective treatment without significant side effects to the mother or fetus has yet to be determined. Key issues: Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is a condition that is underdiagnosed. Immunization seldom occurs in the first pregnancy. Immunization takes place in association with delivery in most cases. Anti-HPA-1a level is a predictor for the severity of thrombocytopenia. PMID:23482913

  11. Microbiome Development in Neonatal Calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The initial colonization of eukaryotic hosts by microbial populations is poorly understood, yet this remains a critical time for growth and development. The goals of this study were to characterize the microbiome of neonatal calves. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis...

  12. Eruption cysts in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Hérica Adad; Parisotto, Thaís Manzano; Giro, Elisa Maria Aparecida; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances of the dental development may result in anomalies, which may be apparent as soon as the child is born. Eruption cysts are rarely observed in neonates considering that at this stage of the child's life teeth eruption is uncommon. Thus, the aim of this report is to describe a case of eruption cysts in a neonate. A male neonate was brought to the emergency service with the chief complaint of an elevated area on the anterior region of the inferior alveolar ridge. The lesion was clinically characterized as a compressive and floating swelling. Through a radiographic exam two mandibular primary incisors could be seen superficially located. Due to the patient's age and the initial diagnosis of eruption cysts the conduct adopted was clinical surveillance. Forty-five days after the first visit the lesions had significantly decreased in size, and completely disappeared after 4 months. At that age, both mandibular central incisors were already in the oral cavity exhibiting small hypoplastic areas in the incisal edges. The clinical and radiographic follow-up of eruption cysts in neonates appears to be an adequate conduct without differing from that recommended for older children. PMID:18524277

  13. [Top five neonatal articles 2015].

    PubMed

    Flamant, C; Fischer Fumeaux, C J

    2016-09-01

    This review includes five randomized controlled trials, published in the Medline database in 2015, which were selected by the Scientific commission of the French society of neonatology, taking into account their influence in perinatology. This selection was presented during the specific "Top five" session in the French congress of neonatal research. PMID:27431853

  14. Arginine production in the neonate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous arginine synthesis in adults is a complex multiorgan process, in which citrulline is synthesized in the gut, enters the general circulation, and is converted into arginine in the kidney, by what is known as the intestinal-renal axis. In neonates, the enzymes required to convert citrulline...

  15. Photodegradation of riboflavin in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Sisson, T.R.

    1987-04-01

    The biologically most important flavins are riboflavin and its related nucleotides, all highly sensitive to light. It is because of its photoreactivity and its presence in almost all body fluids and tissues that riboflavin assumes importance in phototherapy of neonatal jaundice. The absorption maxima of both bilirubin and riboflavin in the body are nearly identical: 445-450 (447) nm. In consequence, blue visible light will cause photoisomerization of bilirubin accompanied by photodegradation of riboflavin. This results in diminished erythrocyte glutathione reductase, which indicates generalized tissue riboflavin deficiency and red cell lysis. Single- and double-strand breaks in intracellular DNA have occurred with phototherapy. This light exposure of neonates may result also in alterations of bilirubin-albumin binding in the presence of both riboflavin and theophylline (the latter frequently given to prevent neonatal apnea). Many newborns, especially if premature, have low stores of riboflavin at birth. The absorptive capacity of premature infants for enteral riboflavin is likewise reduced. Consequently, inherently low stores and low intake of riboflavin plus phototherapy for neonatal jaundice will cause a deficiency of riboflavin at a critical period for the newborn. Supplementation to those infants most likely to develop riboflavin deficiency is useful, but dosage, time, and mode of administration to infants undergoing phototherapy must be carefully adjusted to avoid unwanted side effects.

  16. Postpartum depression on the neonatal intensive care unit: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tahirkheli, Noor N; Cherry, Amanda S; Tackett, Alayna P; McCaffree, Mary Anne; Gillaspy, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    As the most common complication of childbirth affecting 10%–15% of women, postpartum depression (PPD) goes vastly undetected and untreated, inflicting long-term consequences on both mother and child. Studies consistently show that mothers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) experience PPD at higher rates with more elevated symptomatology than mothers of healthy infants. Although there has been increased awareness regarding the overall prevalence of PPD and recognition of the need for health care providers to address this health issue, there has not been adequate attention to PPD in the context of the NICU. This review will focus on an overview of PPD and psychological morbidities, the prevalence of PPD in mothers of infants admitted to NICU, associated risk factors, potential PPD screening measures, promising intervention programs, the role of NICU health care providers in addressing PPD in the NICU, and suggested future research directions. PMID:25473317

  17. [Amelioration of glucose tolerance and correction of reactive hypoglycemias induced by intravenous calcium infusion cannot be explained by modifications in blood glucagon levels].

    PubMed

    Vexiau, P; Cathelineau, G; Luyckx, A; Lefebvre, P

    1986-08-01

    Glucagon is not involved in intravenous calcium-induced improvement in glucose tolerance nor in correction of reactive hypoglycemia. Recent investigations have shown that intravenous (IV) calcium infusion improved blood glucose values in patients with moderately impaired glucose tolerance, and suppressed hypoglycemia in patients with isolated reactive hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility that these changes were secondary to calcium induced alterations in glucagon (IRG) secretion. Four groups of subjects were studied: group 1: normal controls (n = 7); group 2: patients with isolated hypoglycemia (n = 9); group 3: patients with impaired glucose tolerance without reactive hypoglycemia (n = 9) and group 4: patients with impaired glucose tolerance and reactive hypoglycemia (n = 10). All patients were submitted in randomized order to two 5 hour oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT, 75 g glucose), during a simultaneous infusion, either of saline or of calcium (calcium gluconate 36.3 mEq/5 h.), starting 30 minutes before the OGTT. In none of the groups did calcium infusion influence basal plasma IRG. In group 1 and 3, oral glucose significantly suppressed IRG, and during IV calcium infusion this suppression disappeared. In group 2, glucose ingestion resulted in a paradoxical increase in IRG both during saline and during calcium infusion. In group 4, oral glucose induced a significant drop in plasma IRG and a rebound rise during hypoglycemia, results which were unaffected by IV calcium infusion. These data suggest that glucagon is not involved in the alterations of blood glucose profiles during OGTT observed during intravenous calcium infusion. PMID:3770273

  18. Intimate Partner Violence During Pregnancy: Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Ellen; Sharps, Phyllis; Bullock, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on maternal and neonatal outcomes are multifaceted and largely preventable. During pregnancy, there are many opportunities within the current health care system for screening and early intervention during routine prenatal care or during episodic care in a hospital setting. This article describes the effects of IPV on maternal health (e.g., insufficient or inconsistent prenatal care, poor nutrition, inadequate weight gain, substance use, increased prevalence of depression), as well as adverse neonatal outcomes (e.g., low birth weight [LBW]), preterm birth [PTB], and small for gestational age [SGA]) and maternal and neonatal death. Discussion of the mechanisms of action are explored and include: maternal engagement in health behaviors that are considered “risky,” including smoking and alcohol and substance use, and new evidence regarding the alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and resulting changes in hormones that may affect LBW and SGA infants and PTB. Clinical recommendations include a commitment for routine screening of IPV in all pregnant women who present for care using validated screening instruments. In addition, the provision of readily accessible prenatal care and the development of a trusting patient–provider relationship are first steps in addressing the problem of IPV in pregnancy. Early trials of targeted interventions such as a nurse-led home visitation program and the Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program show promising results. Brief psychobehavioral interventions are also being explored. The approach of universal screening, patient engagement in prenatal care, and targeted individualized interventions has the ability to reduce the adverse effects of IPV and highlight the importance of this complex social disorder as a top priority in maternal and neonatal health. PMID:25265285

  19. Intimate partner violence during pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Alhusen, Jeanne L; Ray, Ellen; Sharps, Phyllis; Bullock, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on maternal and neonatal outcomes are multifaceted and largely preventable. During pregnancy, there are many opportunities within the current health care system for screening and early intervention during routine prenatal care or during episodic care in a hospital setting. This article describes the effects of IPV on maternal health (e.g., insufficient or inconsistent prenatal care, poor nutrition, inadequate weight gain, substance use, increased prevalence of depression), as well as adverse neonatal outcomes (e.g., low birth weight [LBW]), preterm birth [PTB], and small for gestational age [SGA]) and maternal and neonatal death. Discussion of the mechanisms of action are explored and include: maternal engagement in health behaviors that are considered "risky," including smoking and alcohol and substance use, and new evidence regarding the alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and resulting changes in hormones that may affect LBW and SGA infants and PTB. Clinical recommendations include a commitment for routine screening of IPV in all pregnant women who present for care using validated screening instruments. In addition, the provision of readily accessible prenatal care and the development of a trusting patient-provider relationship are first steps in addressing the problem of IPV in pregnancy. Early trials of targeted interventions such as a nurse-led home visitation program and the Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program show promising results. Brief psychobehavioral interventions are also being explored. The approach of universal screening, patient engagement in prenatal care, and targeted individualized interventions has the ability to reduce the adverse effects of IPV and highlight the importance of this complex social disorder as a top priority in maternal and neonatal health. PMID:25265285

  20. [Microflora formation in the newborn in maternity hospitals and neonatal abnormality units].

    PubMed

    Shilova, V P; Rozanova, S M; Kyrf, M V; Beĭkin, Ia B; Kuznetsova, L S; Turintseva, E G; Usova, O P; Chernykh, N G; Iagafarova, I S

    2007-10-01

    The basic sources of pyoseptic infection pathogens are infected and colonized neonatal infants in maternity hospitals. Microbiological monitoring revealed the specific features of biocenosis formation in the newborn in the "Mother and Baby" units, resuscitative departments (RD), intensive care units, and neonatal abnormality departments (NAD). Irrespective of the conditions of hospital stay, methicillin-resistant S. epidermis (MRSE) and Enterococcus faecium were prevalent in the neonatal microbial landscape. Colonization with the normal flora in the newborn actively treated with antibiotics is difficult in RD, at the same time there is a significant infection with the mycotic flora. Broad-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Klebsiela pneumonia strains have received wide acceptance in NAD. PMID:18154133

  1. Cytomegalovirus Seroprevalence in Pregnant Women and Association with Adverse Pregnancy/Neonatal Outcomes in Jiangsu Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Xu, Biyun; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Hu, Yali

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, we aimed to determine the provincial population-based seroprevalence in pregnant women and to further explore the association of maternal CMV infection status and adverse pregnancy/neonatal/growth outcomes in Jiangsu, China. Methods In this case-control study, the sera from 527 pregnant women with adverse pregnancy/neonatal outcomes and 496 mothers of healthy infants in Jiangsu Province, collected at gestation age of 15–20 weeks, were tested for anti-CMV IgG, IgM and IgG avidity. Adverse pregnancy/neonatal outcomes were identified based on pregnancy/neonatal outcomes. Results The overall seroprevalence of anti-CMV IgG was 98.7%, with 99.4% and 98.0% in the case and control groups, respectively (P = 0.039). The prevalence of anti-CMV IgG+/IgM+, was higher in the case group than that in the control group (3.8% vs. 1.6%, P = 0.033). Anti-CMV IgG avidity assay showed that none in the control group were primarily infected, but five (0.9%) in the case group underwent primary infection (P = 0.084); all five infants of these women presented severe adverse neonatal/growth outcomes. Exact logistic regression analysis showed that anti-CMV IgG+/IgM+ was associated with adverse pregnancy/neonatal/growth outcomes (aOR = 2.44, 95% CI 1.01–6.48, P = 0.047). Maternal low education level and prior abnormal pregnancies also were risk factors for adverse pregnancy/neonatal outcomes. Conclusions In populations with very high prevalence of latent CMV infection, active maternal CMV infection during pregnancy might be a risk factor for adverse pregnancy/neonatal outcomes. PMID:25211647

  2. A Novel Allosteric Insulin Receptor-Activating Antibody Reduces Hyperglycemia without Hypoglycemia in Diabetic Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bezwada, Padma; Zhao, Jingsong; Der, Ken; Shimizu, Bob; Cao, Liching; Ahene, Ago; Rubin, Paul; Johnson, Kirk

    2016-02-01

    XMetA is a fully human, allosteric monoclonal antibody that binds the insulin receptor with high affinity and mimics the glucoregulatory, but not the mitogenic, actions of insulin. Here we evaluated the efficacy of both single and repeat s.c. administrations of XMetA in reducing hyperglycemia in obese cynomolgus monkeys with naturally developed type 2 diabetes, a model that shares many features of human diabetes. The data show that a single s.c. administration of XMetA at dose levels ranging from 1.5 to 10 mg/kg markedly reduced fasting hyperglycemia, with a peak effect occurring 1 to 2 days after administration, and sustained for up to 1 week. XMetA's effect on hyperglycemia was observed without elevations in serum insulin and was concomitant with reduced serum C-peptide levels, even at the lowest dose. Subchronic effects were evaluated via once weekly s.c. administration of XMetA, 10 mg/kg, for 6 weeks. XMetA treatment resulted in robust weekly decreases in fasting glucose levels averaging approximately 30% throughout the study, along with a significant absolute reduction from the vehicle control baseline of 1.2% in hemoglobin A1c, a marker of long-term glycemic status. XMetA treatment was well tolerated with no injection-site reactions, no body weight gain, and no episodes of clinical hypoglycemia. Thus, XMetA shows acute and subchronic improvements in glycemic control in spontaneously diabetic cynomolgus monkeys with a broad safety margin. This profile supports the development of XMetA as a novel glucose-lowering therapeutic agent for the management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26578267

  3. AAV vector-mediated reversal of hypoglycemia in canine and murine glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Pinto, Carlos; Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Kozink, Daniel M; Benjamin, Daniel K; Demaster, Amanda K; Kruse, Meghan A; Vaughn, Valerie; Hillman, Steven; Bird, Andrew; Jackson, Mark; Brown, Talmage; Kishnani, Priya S; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2008-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) profoundly impairs glucose release by the liver due to glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) deficiency. An adeno-associated virus (AAV) containing a small human G6Pase transgene was pseudotyped with AAV8 (AAV2/8) to optimize liver tropism. Survival was prolonged in 2-week-old G6Pase (-/-) mice by 600-fold fewer AAV2/8 vector particles (vp), in comparison to previous experiments involving this model (2 x 10(9) vp; 3 x 10(11) vp/kg). When the vector was pseudotyped with AAV1, survival was prolonged only at a higher dose (3 x 10(13) vp/kg). The AAV2/8 vector uniquely prevented hypoglycemia during fasting and fully corrected liver G6Pase deficiency in GSD-Ia mice and dogs. The AAV2/8 vector has prolonged survival in three GSD-Ia dogs to >11 months, which validated this strategy in the large animal model for GSD-Ia. Urinary biomarkers, including lactate and 3-hydroxybutyrate, were corrected by G6Pase expression solely in the liver. Glycogen accumulation in the liver was reduced almost to the normal level in vector-treated GSD-Ia mice and dogs, as was the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in GSD-Ia mice. These preclinical data demonstrated the efficacy of correcting hepatic G6Pase deficiency, and support the further preclinical development of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy for GSD-Ia. PMID:18362924

  4. Repetitive hypoglycemia increases circulating adrenaline level with resultant worsening of intimal thickening after vascular injury in male Goto-Kakizaki rat carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, Eisuke; Mita, Tomoya; Osonoi, Yusuke; Azuma, Kosuke; Goto, Hiromasa; Ohmura, Chie; Kanazawa, Akio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Fujitani, Yoshio; Watada, Hirotaka

    2014-06-01

    Hypoglycemia associated with diabetes management is a potential risk for cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of hypoglycemic episodes including a surge of sympathetic activity on the progression of neointima formation after vascular injury remains largely unknown. In this study, insulin was injected intraperitoneally into nonobese diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, once every 3 days for 4 weeks after balloon injury of carotid artery to induce hypoglycemia. Then, we evaluated balloon injury-induced neointima formation. Insulin treatment enhanced neointima formation and increased the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells in the carotid artery. Injection of glucose with insulin prevented hypoglycemia and abrogated intimal thickening. Also, bunazosin, an α1 adrenergic receptor antagonist, prevented intimal thickening and accumulation of PCNA-positive cells induced by insulin treatment despite the presence of concomitant hypoglycemia and high adrenaline levels. Incubation of cultured smooth muscle cells with adrenaline resulted in a significant increase in their proliferation and G0/G1 to S phase progression, which was associated with activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, enhanced expression of cell cycle regulatory molecules such as cyclin D1, and cyclin E, and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. These adrenaline-induced effects were abrogated by bunazosin. Our data indicated that increased adrenaline induced by repetitive hypoglycemia promotes intimal thickening and smooth muscle cell proliferation after endothelial denudation in GK rats. PMID:24684300

  5. Neonatal Pustular Dermatosis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal pustular eruption is a group of disorders characterized by various forms of pustulosis seen in first 4 weeks of life. Its presentation is often similar with some subtle differences, which can be further established by few simple laboratory aids, to arrive at a definite diagnosis. Given their ubiquitous presentation, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate among self-limiting, noninfectious, pustular dermatosis such as erythema toxicum neonatorum, transient neonatal pustular melanosis, miliaria pustulosa, etc., and potentially life threatening infections such as herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus infections. This review article tries to address the chronological, clinical, morphological, and histological differences among the various pustular eruptions in a newborn, in order to make it easier for a practicing dermatologist to diagnose and treat these similar looking but different entities of pustulation with a clear demarcation between the physiological benign pustular rashes and the infectious pustular lesions. PMID:25814724

  6. Pain Perception in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Midmer, Deana K.

    1989-01-01

    Pain expression in both pre-term and term infants is a little understood phenomenon. Recent research has generated data documenting that the newborn can feel pain, can act to avoid the pain, and may form memory traces of the experience. ”Nociceptive activity” or ”noxious stimuli” are better terms to use when addressing aversive stimulation of the neonate because they encourage scrutiny of the behavioural and physiologic responses of the newborn without placing emphasis on the emotional and subjective associations of the word ”pain”. Many invasive procedures are performed on infants with little or no provision for adequate pain management. The general and specific responses of the neonate to pain must be recognized. Analgesia and anesthesia should be made available to all infants, pre-term or term, sick or well, on the same basis on which they are made available to older children and adults. PMID:21248938

  7. Neonatal haemochromatosis associated with gastroschisis.

    PubMed

    Thornton, M P; Marven, S S; Tanner, M S; Gürtl-Lackner, B

    2008-05-01

    We describe, to our knowledge, the first case of progressive neonatal liver failure due to neonatal haemochromatosis (NH) occurring in an infant with a gastroschisis and review the literature regarding these two conditions. A 1,665 g male infant with antenatally diagnosed gastroschisis was born with a severe coagulopathy, anaemia, thrombocytopenia, hypoglycaemia and jaundice. He developed progressive liver failure, complicated by necrotising enterocolitis. Serum ferritin was elevated at 1,459 microg/L. He died on day 40 and a limited post-mortem examination confirmed significant hepatic siderosis with fibrosis and cholestasis, and siderosis of the pancreas. Although no genetic aetiology for gastroschisis has been identified, an occasional inherited tendency has been observed. There is also evidence to support an autosomal recessive inheritance in NH. PMID:18338135

  8. Neuroimaging in Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Pradeep; Shroff, Manohar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is emerging as one of the most important tools in identifying the etiology of neonatal encephalopathy as well as in predicting long-term outcomes. This makes it imperative to have a broader understanding of normal myelination of the neonatal brain on MR imaging and to be familiar with the spectrum of imaging features in ischemic and non-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. Hypoxic ischemic injury (HIE) is one of the most common causes of neonatal encephalopathy and imaging appearances are influenced by factors such as the stage of maturation of the neonatal brain and severity as well as duration of ischemic insult. Other common causes of neonatal encephalopathy include infectious diseases, congenital disorders and inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:26909496

  9. Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, J P; Caradeux, J; Norwitz, Errol R; Illanes, S E

    2013-01-01

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FMAIT) is a relatively uncommon disease, but is the leading cause of severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn. It can cause severe complications and long-term disabilities. The main objective of screening is to reduce both the morbidity and mortality associated with FMAIT, primarily by preventing intracranial hemorrhage. However, controversy surrounds both pre- and antenatal management. This article discusses pathogenesis, screening, diagnosis, and both pre- and neonatal management of FMAIT. PMID:23687553

  10. [A neonate with ambiguous genitalia].

    PubMed

    Jansen, Burgo J; van Rijn, Rick R; van Trotsenburg, A S P Paul

    2015-01-01

    In a neonate with ambiguous genitalia, physical examination revealed a phallus. Ultrasonography showed a vagina and uterus, but no gonads. Because of severe undervirilisation in the presence of a uterus, probably due to 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis, parents were advised female sex assignment. When after a few weeks the phallus had increased in size, abdominal laparoscopy showed an underdeveloped uterus. Gonadal biopsy confirmed gonadal dysgenesis. Sex assignment was reconsidered and changed into the male gender. PMID:26200425

  11. Neonatal resuscitation: improving the outcome.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Autumn P

    2014-03-01

    Prudent veterinary intervention in the prenatal, parturient, and postpartum periods can increase neonatal survival by controlling or eliminating factors contributing to puppy morbidity and mortality. Postresuscitation or within the first 24 hours of a natural delivery, a complete physical examination should be performed by a veterinarian, technician, or knowledgeable breeder. Adequate ingestion of colostrum must occur promptly (within 24 hours) postpartum for puppies and kittens to acquire passive immunity. PMID:24580986

  12. Risk factors for neonatal encephalopathy in Kathmandu, Nepal, a developing country: unmatched case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Matthew; Manandhar, Nilu; Manandhar, Dharma S; Costello, Anthony M de L

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk factors for neonatal encephalopathy among term infants in a developing country. Design Unmatched case-control study. Setting Principal maternity hospital of Kathmandu, Nepal. Subjects All 131 infants with neonatal encephalopathy from a population of 21 609 infants born over an 18 month period, and 635 unmatched infants systematically recruited over 12 months. Main outcome measures Adjusted odds ratio estimates for antepartum and intrapartum risk factors. Results The prevalence of neonatal encephalopathy was 6.1 per 1000 live births of which 63% were infants with moderate or severe encephalopathy. The risk of death from neonatal encephalopathy was 31%. The risk of neonatal encephalopathy increased with increasing maternal age and decreasing maternal height. Antepartum risk factors included primiparity (odds ratio 2.0) and non-attendance for antenatal care (2.1). Multiple births were at greatly increased risk (22). Intrapartum risk factors included non-cephalic presentation (3.4), prolonged rupture of membranes (3.8), and various other complications. Particulate meconium was strongly associated with encephalopathy (18). Induction of labour with oxytocin was associated with encephalopathy in 12 of 41 deliveries (5.7). Overall, 78 affected infants (60%) compared with 36 controls (6%) either had evidence of intrapartum compromise or were born after an intrapartum difficulty likely to result in fetal compromise. A concentration of maternal haemoglobin of less than 8.0 g/dl in the puerperium was significantly associated with encephalopathy (2.5) as was a maternal thyroid stimulating hormone concentration greater than 5 mIU/l (2.1). Conclusions Intrapartum risk factors remain important for neonatal encephalopathy in developing countries. There is some evidence of a protective effect from antenatal care. The use of oxytocin in low income countries where intrapartum monitoring is suboptimal presents a major risk to the fetus. More work is

  13. [Fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Díaz, E; Ginovart Galiana, G

    2003-06-01

    Fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is the commonest cause of severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn. This disorder is due to the destruction of fetal platelets by a maternal platelet-specific antibody caused by fetal-maternal incompatibility. The most serious complication is intracranial hemorrhage (10-30 % of newborns), which may cause death (10 % of the reported cases) or irreversible neurological sequelae (20 %). The diagnosis is usually made after birth when most affected neonates have petechiae, purpura or overt bleeding. The degree of severity varies according to platelet count. Current methods allow detection of maternal platelet alloantibodies (usually HPA-1a). Clinical grounds and the exclusion of other causes of neonatal thrombocytopenia are required to establish an accurate diagnosis. Recurrence of this disease is very high and has prompted clinicians to develop antenatal prophylactic programs in subsequent pregnancies. However, the optimal treatment of at-risk pregnancies remains controversial. The early diagnosis of this process allows effective therapy based on the infusion of compatible platelets and IgG immunoglobulins when hemorrhage is not obvious. Antenatal management of subsequent pregnancies can prevent recurrence of thrombocytopenia and intracranial hemorrhage. The aim of this review is to draw pediatricians' attention to the importance of this probably under-diagnosed disease in which early diagnosis can prevent potentially severe complications. PMID:12781112

  14. Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Kari A.; Anderson-Berry, Ann L.; Delair, Shirley F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS. PMID:24396135

  15. Strategies to reduce neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Singh, M

    1990-01-01

    In India, 60% of deaths in infants under 1 year of age occur in the 1st 4 weeks after birth. The neonatal mortality rate is currently 76/1000 live births in rural areas and 39/1000 in urban areas. The Government if India has launched a plan of action of address the cycle of poorly spaced pregnancies, inadequate maternal health care and nutrition, and high incidence of low birthweight babies that contributes to this high neonatal mortality phenomenon. Crucial to such a plan is the expansion, strengthening, and improved organization of maternal-child health services. At the level of maternal health services, efforts will be made to identify pregnant women early, arrange a minimum of 4 prenatal visits, provide dietary supplementation and immunization against tetanus toxoid, create more sterile conditions for home deliveries, identify and refer high-risk pregnancies and deliveries, and provide postnatal follow-up care. Child health service staff are motivating mothers to breastfeed and screening newborns for jaundice and bacterial infection. A risk approach, in which there is a minimum necessary level of care for all pregnant women but more intensive management and follow-up of those at high risk, is most cost-efficient given the lack of human and financial resources. Attention must also be given to the determinants of low birthweight (maternal undernutrition, closely spaced pregnancies, severe anemia, adolescent childbearing, prenatal infections, strenuous work responsibilities, and maternal hypertension), which is a co-factor in neonatal mortality. PMID:12316586

  16. Neonatal asphyxia and forensic medicine.

    PubMed

    d'Aloja, E; Müller, M; Paribello, F; Demontis, R; Faa, A

    2009-01-01

    In the last decades, the scientific literature addressing neonatal encephalopathy has grown in a logarithmic way and malpractice claims in obstetrics and neonatology have become a major threat to the health service. At the moment, scientific evidence are insufficient to clearly identify in each single case whether the hypoxic insult has developed in the course of labor or in the first few hours after the birth or, otherwise, whether the damage has to recognize a remote and long-lasting cause acting during pregnancy. Several authors feel that this scientific uncertainty leads to a higher percentage of civil suit decisions prone to recognizing a guilty medical behavior, and they wish a more in-depth analysis of all these cases to clearly identify all the data either in favor or in contrary to the assumption of the existence of a causal correlation between neonatal encephalopathy and medical misbehavior. This article will focus on the medico-legal approach to a hypoxic-ischemic event in the perinatal period, addressing the relevant data to be collected in order to establish the medical and juridical cause of the neonatal damage. PMID:19757333

  17. A case of neonatal tetanus presented within 24 hours of life.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayan; Hemram, Sunil; Bhattacharya, Subhasish; Khuntdar, Bidyut Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal tetanus is still prevalent in developing countries such as India. Generally, neonatal tetanus is seen in babies of unimmunized mothers beyond the second day of life. A neonate presented to us on the 4th hour of birth with a periumbilical ulcer. The baby's antenatal and birth history was uneventful. The mother had been immunized against tetanus. At presentation, the baby was active, alert and sucking normally. A very small ulcer was noted below the umbilicus. Subsequently, the baby developed rigidity and a tonic spasm of its body with recurrent seizures from the 18th hour of its birth and by 21st hour. It also had a full blown clinical picture of neonatal tetanus including: masseter spasm; generalized rigidity; a high pitched cry: and intermittent opisthotonos posturing. An ulcer gradually enlarged to 5 × 4 cm and a swab from ulcer showed Clostridium tetani (both on Gram staining and culture). A review of the published literature did not reveal any case that had presented so early. Therefore, this is probably the first case of neonatal tetanus being reported within the 21st hour of birth. PMID:23443624

  18. Bacteriological Profile of Neonatal Septicemia in a Tertiary Care Hospital from Western India.

    PubMed

    Muley, Vrishali Avinash; Ghadage, Dnyaneshwari Purushottam; Bhore, Arvind Vamanrao

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal septicemia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The present study was undertaken to determine the bacteriological profile and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of prevalent pathogens isolated from the blood of septicemic neonates from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). A total of 180 blood samples of septicemic neonates were studied bacteriologically. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by the Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method in accordance to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institutes (CLSI) guidelines. 26.6% (48 out of 180) cases of septicemia could be confirmed by blood culture. Of these, 66.7% cases were of early onset septicemia (EOS) and 33.3% were of late onset septicemia (LOS). Klebsiella pneumoniae was the predominant pathogen (35.4%) among the Gram-negative pathogens and Staphylococcus aureus (22.9%) was the predominant Gram-positive pathogen. 28% of K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolates were extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers. 18.1% of the Staphylococcus isolates were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Multi-drug-resistance pattern was observed with all the isolates. Ciprofloxacin and aminoglycosides were the most effective drugs against Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates. This study highlights the predominance of Gram-negative organisms in causing neonatal sepsis and emergence of multi-drug-resistant strains in our set up. PMID:26069427

  19. Birth and Neonatal Outcomes Following Opioid Use in Pregnancy: A Danish Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Nørgaard, Mette; Nielsson, Malene Schou; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Few population-based data exist on birth outcomes in women who received opioid maintenance treatment during pregnancy. We therefore examined adverse birth outcomes in women exposed to methadone or buprenorphine during pregnancy and the risk of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) among neonates exposed to buprenorphine, methadone, and/or heroin in utero. PATIENTS AND METHODS This study included all female Danish residents with a live birth or a stillbirth from 1997 to 2011. We identified the study population, use of opioids and opioid substitution treatment, birth outcomes, and NAS through medical registers. Birth outcomes included preterm birth (born before 38th gestational week), low-birth weight (LBW) (<2,500 g, restricted to term births), small for gestational age (SGA) (weight <2 standard deviations from the sex- and gestational-week-specific mean), congenital malformations, and stillbirths. We used log-binomial regression to estimate the prevalence ratio (PR) for birth outcomes. RESULTS Among 950,172 pregnancies in a total of 571,823 women, we identified 557 pregnancies exposed to buprenorphine, methadone, and/or heroin (167 to buprenorphine, 197 to methadone, 28 to self-reported heroin, and 165 to combinations). Compared with nonexposed pregnancies, prenatal opioid use was associated with greater prevalence of preterm birth (PR of 2.8 (95% confidence interval (CI), 2.3–3.4)), LBW among infants born at term (PR of 4.3 (95% CI, 3.0–6.1)), and being SGA (PR of 2.7 (95% CI, 1.9–4.3)). Restricting the analyses to women who smoked slightly lowered these estimates. The prevalence of congenital malformations was 8.3% in opioid-exposed women compared with 4.2% in nonexposed women (PR of 2.0 (95% CI, 1.5–2.6)). The risk of NAS ranged from 7% in neonates exposed to buprenorphine only to 55% in neonates exposed to methadone only or to opioid combinations. CONCLUSION The maternal use of buprenorphine and methadone during pregnancy was associated with

  20. Hypoglycemia Secondary to Sulfonylurea Ingestion in a Patient with End Stage Renal Disease: Results from a 72-Hour Fast

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alice; Rubin, Mishaela; Accili, Domenico; Pajvani, Utpal B.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide levels increase with sulfonylurea exposure but the acuity of increase has not been described in dialysis patients. We present a case of a dialysis patient who presented with hypoglycemia and was found to have accidental sulfonylurea ingestion. This is a 73-year-old man with ESRD on peritoneal dialysis, without history of diabetes, who presented with hypoglycemia. Past medical history includes multiple myeloma, congestive heart failure, and hypertension. At initial presentation, his blood glucose was 47 mg/dL, with concomitant elevations in the following: C-peptide 30.5 (nl: 0.8–3.5 ng/mL), insulin 76 (nl: 3–19 μIU/mL), and proinsulin 83.3 (nl: ≤8.0 pmol/L). During the 72-hour fast, which he completed without hypoglycemia, insulin declined to be within normal limits (to 12 μIU/mL); proinsulin (to 12.1 pmol/L) and C-peptide (to 7.2 ng/mL) levels decreased but remained elevated. The sulfonylurea screen ultimately returned positive for glipizide, clinching the diagnosis. This is the first reported case which characterizes the chronic elevation of proinsulin in a patient with ESRD, as well as its dramatic increase after a presumed solitary exposure to sulfonylurea. The 72-hour fast conducted gives insight into the clearance of insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide after sulfonylurea ingestion in ESRD. PMID:26664768

  1. Insulin and glucagon levels of umbilical cord blood in appropriate for gestational age - preterm infants with or without postnatal hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hyun; Bae, Jin Gon; Kim, Shin; Kim, Chun Soo; Lee, Sang Lak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether serum insulin and glucagon levels of umbilical cord blood correlate with subsequent postnatal hypoglycemia in appropriate for gestational age (AGA) – preterm infants at different gestational ages (GAs). Methods The serum insulin and glucagon levels of umbilical cord blood were measured using magnetic bead based multiplex immunoassay in 69 AGA - premature infants, stratified according to GA: GA 23–30 weeks, early preterm (EP, n=31); GA 31–34 weeks, late preterm (LP, n=38). Postnatal hypoglycemia was defined as a capillary glucose level <40 mg/dL within the first 60 minutes of life, regardless of GA. Results The capillary glucose concentration in EP infants (65.5±21.2 mg/dL) was significantly higher than that of LP infants (55.9±17.3 mg/dL) (P=0.043). The serum glucagon level in EP infants (44.3±28.7 pg/mL) was significantly higher than that in LP infants (28.1±13.6 pg/mL) (P=0.006). There was not a significant difference in serum insulin level between EP and LP infants (372.7±254.2 pg/mL vs. 372.4±209.1 pg/mL, P=0.996). There was a significant difference in the serum glucagon level between infants with and without hypoglycemia (27.7±8.9 mg/dL vs. 36.8±24.6 mg/dL, P=0.036), but not in the serum insulin level (451.9±256.9 pg/mL vs. 357.4±222.2 pg/mL, P=0.211). Postnatal glucose concentration within the first 60 minutes of life had a significant positive correlation with serum glucagon levels (r=0.256, P=0.034), but not with serum insulin levels (r=–0.020, P=0.867). Conclusion Lower glucagon levels of cord blood were seen in premature infants with higher GA, which might contribute to the occurrence of postnatal hypoglycemia. PMID:27462585

  2. Potentiation of Hormonal Responses to Hemorrhage and Fasting, but not Hypoglycemia in Conscious Adrenalectomized Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1989-01-01

    Bilateral adrenalectomy (ADRX) in rats removes the source of two major stress-responsive hormones, corticosterone and epinephrine. To test how ADRX rats with-stand stress, we performed the following experiments in adult male rats provided with indwelling femoral arterial and venous cannulae and either ADRX or sham-adrenalectomized (Sham) 3 days later and given 0.5% NaCl to drink. Five to 6 days after adrenal surgery the rats were studied after either a 15 ml/kg.5 min hemorrhage or after an overnight fast followed by insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In fed unstressed ADRX rats, basal mean arterial blood pressure was slightly decreased; heart rate was increased; blood volume, vasopressin, and oxytocin concentrations were not different from sham values; and renin and norepinephrine were significantly elevated. The recovery of arterial pressure after hemorrhage in the ADRX rats was similar to that in the sham group over a 5-h period; however, the responses of vasopressin and oxytocin were significantly greater, and those of renin and norepinephrine were markedly potentiated in the ADRX group. Heart rate recovered faster in the ADRX group and was elevated, compared to the sham value, for most of the 5-h period. Restitution of blood volume was attenuated in the ADRX group, although the restitution of plasma protein was not different between the groups. A significant difference in the change in plasma osmolality between groups after hemorrhage may account for the attenuated restitution of blood volume. After an overnight fast, which reduced blood volume in both groups of rats, the plasma renin concentration rose still further in ADRX rats; the differences in other measured variables observed between fed ADRX and sham groups remained the same. The insulin-induced 50% decrease in glucose caused minor effects on arterial blood pressure and heart rate and occasioned responses in renin and norepinephrine of similar magnitudes in the two groups. We conclude that in the absence of

  3. Maternal and Neonatal Care. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains the materials required to teach a course in maternal and neonatal care that will prepare students for employment as practical nurses. The course's five instructional units cover procedures for caring for the following: prenatal patients, patients in labor and delivery, postpartum patients, healthy neonates, and…

  4. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  5. Rural Hospital Preparedness for Neonatal Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukkala, Angela; Henly, Susan J.; Lindeke, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Context: Neonatal resuscitation is a critical component of perinatal services in all settings. Purpose: To systematically describe preparedness of rural hospitals for neonatal resuscitation, and to determine whether delivery volume and level of perinatal care were associated with overall preparedness or its indicators. Methods: We developed the…

  6. Mechanisms of Neonatal Mucosal Antibody Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following an abrupt transition at birth from the sterile uterus to an environment with abundant commensal and pathogenic microbes, neonatal mammals are protected by maternal antibodies at mucosal surfaces. We show in mice that different antibody isotypes work in distinct ways to protect the neonatal...

  7. Brazelton Neonatal Assessment for School Psychologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoudt, Calvin L.

    This speech addresses the "What,""Why," and "How" of Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Training for school psychologists. "What" concerns the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale, its administration, and what it assesses. Based on the best performance, the infant's score on this scale is scored in the context of six states of consciousness…

  8. Neonatal Seizures: Impact on Neurodevelopmental Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok Kyu; Kadam, Shilpa D.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal period is the most vulnerable time for the occurrence of seizures, and neonatal seizures often pose a clinical challenge both for their acute management and frequency of associated long-term co-morbidities. Etiologies of neonatal seizures are known to play a primary role in the anti-epileptic drug responsiveness and the long-term sequelae. Recent studies have suggested that burden of acute recurrent seizures in neonates may also impact chronic outcomes independent of the etiology. However, not many studies, either clinical or pre-clinical, have addressed the long-term outcomes of neonatal seizures in an etiology-specific manner. In this review, we briefly review the available clinical and pre-clinical research for long-term outcomes following neonatal seizures. As the most frequent cause of acquired neonatal seizures, we focus on the studies evaluating long-term effects of HIE-seizures with the goal to evaluate (1) what parameters evaluated during acute stages of neonatal seizures can reliably be used to predict long-term outcomes? and (2) what available clinical and pre-clinical data are available help determine importance of etiology vs. seizure burdens in long-term sequelae. PMID:26636052

  9. Acute neonatal appendicitis in a preterm.

    PubMed

    Mammou, Sihem; Ayadi, Imen; Ben Hamida, Emira; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Acute neonatal appendicitis is very rare in the neonatal period. It is usually associated with comorbidity including prematurity. Symptoms are non-specific. The prognosis is marked by high risk of mortality and morbidity. Here, we report a case of preterm new born who presented with sepsis, apnoea, and digestive signs. The laparotomy revealed perforated appendicitis complicated with peritonitis. PMID:26712299

  10. Murine neonatal intravascular injections: Modeling newborn disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to perform murine neonatal intravascular injections likely will prove useful in studying many newborn-specific disease states that are modeled in mice. Unfortunately, effective intravascular injection in the neonatal mouse has been limited by developmental immaturity and small size. To e...

  11. Acute neonatal appendicitis in a preterm

    PubMed Central

    Mammou, Sihem; Ayadi, Imen; Hamida, Emira Ben; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Acute neonatal appendicitis is very rare in the neonatal period. It is usually associated with comorbidity including prematurity. Symptoms are non-specific. The prognosis is marked by high risk of mortality and morbidity. Here, we report a case of preterm new born who presented with sepsis, apnoea, and digestive signs. The laparotomy revealed perforated appendicitis complicated with peritonitis. PMID:26712299

  12. Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Cecile

    2006-01-01

    Foetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia (NAIT) results from maternal alloimmunisation against foetal platelet antigens inherited from the father and different from those present in the mother, and usually presents as a severe isolated thrombocytopaenia in otherwise healthy newborns. The incidence has been estimated at 1/800 to 1/1 000 live births. NAIT has been considered to be the platelet counterpart of Rh Haemolytic Disease of the Newborn (RHD). Unlike RHD, NAIT can occur during a first pregnancy. The spectrum of the disease may range from sub-clinical moderate thrombocytopaenia to life-threatening bleeding in the neonatal period. Mildly affected infants may be asymptomatic. In those with severe thrombocytopaenia, the most common presentations are petechiae, purpura or cephalohaematoma at birth, associated with major risk of intracranial haemorrhage (up to 20% of reported cases), which leads to death or neurological sequelae. Alloimmune thrombocytopaenia is more often unexpected and is usually diagnosed after birth. Once suspected, the diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of maternal antiplatelet alloantibodies directed against a paternal antigen inherited by the foetus/neonate. Post-natal management involves transfusion of platelets devoid of this antigen, and should not be delayed by biological confirmation of the diagnosis (once the diagnosis is suspected), especially in case of severe thrombocytopaenia. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to reduce the chances of death and disability due to haemorrhage. Due to the high rate of recurrence and increased severity of the foetal thrombocytopaenia in successive pregnancies, antenatal therapy should be offered. However, management of high-risk pregnancies is still a matter of discussion. PMID:17032445

  13. [Neonatal intermittent hypoxia and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Sukhova, G K; Nozdrachev, A D; Gozal, D

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive apnea during sleep is accompanied by intermittent hypoxia (IH) leading to hypertension and other cardiovascular disturbances. A comparative evaluation of long-term effects of the neonatal IH on the cardiovascular function was performed in normotensive Sprague-Dawley and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The newborn rats were placed for 30 days to conditions of IH (8 and 21% O2, alternating every 90 s for 12 h/day). Control groups of rats were constantly kept in normoxia. By 6 months, in the spontaneously hypertensive rats submitted to IH at the period of wakefulness there was a statistically significant increase (as compared with control) of the systolic (correspondingly 185.8 +/- 1.7 and 169.9 +/- 1.4 mm Hg, p < 0.01) and diastolic pressure (correspondingly 96.2 +/- 4.9 and 86.0 +/- 2.6 mm Hg, p < 0.01). During sleep, the systolic and diastolic pressure in these rats was higher than in control animals by 10 mm Hg (p < 0.01) and 12 mm Hg (p < 0.01), its decrease during sleep being absent. SHR submitted to IH had an increase in low- to the high-frequency power ratio of the heart rate variability from 0.9 +/- 0.15 to 1.5 +/- 0.17, which indicates a shift of the sympatho-parasympathetic balance in this group towards predominance of the sympathetic component. In the Sprague-Dawley rats submitted to neonatal hypoxia, the above changes were not pronounced. These peculiarities of the hypertensive rats allow establishing connection of the genetic factor with the sympathetic mechanism providing long-term consequences of the neonatal IH for the cardiovascular control in these rats. PMID:19435263

  14. Early and late neonatal septicaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Placzek, M M; Whitelaw, A

    1983-01-01

    Between 1979 and 1982 we reviewed 1000 consecutive admissions to the neonatal intensive care unit of this hospital. Sixty five infants had positive blood cultures. Mortality was 70% among 17 infants who had septicaemia in the first 48 hours of life and for whom appropriate treatment may have been too late because of difficulties of early diagnosis. In the remaining 48 infants mortality was 12%, septicaemia occurred later, and was associated with Staphylococcus epidermidis (56%) and with the presence of an intravascular catheter (50%). PMID:6625634

  15. Neonatal tetanus associated with skin infection.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, M; Dungwa, N

    2016-09-01

    A 1-week-old infant was brought to a regional hospital with a history of recurrent seizures following lower abdominal septic skin infection. She was found to have neonatal tetanus, and a spatula test was positive. The tetanus infection was associated with a superficial skin infection, common in neonates. Treatment included sedatives (diazepam, chlorpromazine, phenobarbitone and morphine), muscle relaxants, antibiotics and ventilation in the neonatal intensive care unit. Intrathecal and intramuscular immunoglobulin were given, and the wound was treated. The infant recovered, with no seizures by the 16th day from admission, and was off the ventilator by the 18th day. This was shorter than the usual 3 - 4 weeks for neonates with tetanus at the hospital. The question arises whether tetanus immunisation should be considered in infants with skin infections, which frequently occur in the neonatal period. PMID:27601113

  16. Stem Cells for Neonatal Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ahn, So Yoon; Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Won Soon

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in neonatal intensive care medicine, neonatal brain injury resulting from intraventricular hemorrhage or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy remains a major cause of neonatal mortality and neurologic morbidities in survivors. Several studies have indicated that stem cell therapy is a promising novel therapy for neonatal brain injury resulting from these disorders. This review summarizes recent advances in stem cell research for treating neonatal brain injury due to intraventricular hemorrhage or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with a particular focus on preclinical data, covering important issues for clinical translation such as optimal cell type, route, dose and timing of stem cell therapy, and translation of these preclinical results into a clinical trial. PMID:27251746

  17. The epidemiology of neonatal tumours. Report of an international working group.

    PubMed

    Moore, S W; Satgé, D; Sasco, A J; Zimmermann, A; Plaschkes, J

    2003-09-01

    Neonatal tumours occur every 12,500-27,500 live births and comprise 2% of childhood malignancies, but there is little clarity as to their real prevalence, sites of origin and pathological nature as reported series vary. As an entity, neonatal tumours provide a unique window of opportunity to study tumours in which minimal environmental interference has occurred. The majority of tumours present with a mass at birth (e.g., teratomas, neuroblastomas, mesoblastic nephroma, fibromatosis), which are not infrequently identified on antenatal ultrasound. Histologically, teratoma and neuroblastoma remain the two main tumour types encountered with soft tissue sarcoma, renal tumours, CNS tumours and leukaemia being the next most common tumour types identified. Malignant tumours are uncommon in the neonatal period per se and benign tumours may have malignant potential. A particular problem exists in clinical classification, as histological features of malignancy do not always correlate with clinical behaviour. Benign tumours may also be life threatening because of their size and location. Other tumours may demonstrate local invasiveness, but no metastatic potential, and tumours that are clearly malignant may demonstrate unpredictable or uncertain behaviour. Screening programmes have brought more tumours to light, but do not appear to affect the overall prognosis. They may provide clues to the stage at which tumours develop in foetu. The aetiology of cancer in children is multifactorial and includes both genetic and environmental factors. The association between congenital abnormalities and tumours is well established (15% of neonatal tumours). Genetic defects are highly likely in neonatal tumours and include those with a high risk of malignancy (e.g., retinoblastoma), but also genetically determined syndromes with an increased risk of malignancy and complex genetic rearrangements. Tumours are mostly genetically related at a cellular level and factors influencing cellular

  18. Impact of Kidney Disease on Survival in Neonatal Extracorporeal Life Support

    PubMed Central

    Wightman, Aaron; Bradford, Miranda C.; Symons, Jordan; Brogan, Thomas V.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and survival to discharge of neonates with kidney disease who received extracorporeal life support. Design We analyzed the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization international registry of neonates (< 30 d old) who received extracorporeal life support from 1989 to 2012. We used International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification, codes to identify neonates with kidney disease at time of cannulation for extracorporeal life support. Setting Participating Extracorporeal Life Support Organization centers. Patients All neonates who received extracorporeal life support at an Extracorporeal Life Support Organization center from 1989 to 2012. Interventions We performed bivariate logistic regression to estimate associations between survival and covariates. We used unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression to compare survival to discharge between neonates with and without kidney disease. Odds ratios were estimated separately for three groups based on extracorporeal life support indication: pulmonary indication without congenital diaphragmatic hernia, pulmonary indication with congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and cardiac indication. Adjusted models included covariates identified as significant in bivariate models for each group. Measurements and Main Results The primary outcome measure was survival to discharge from hospitalization. Of the 28,755 neonates who received extracorporeal life support, 405 had kidney disease (extracorporeal life support indication: 210 pulmonary indication without congenital diaphragmatic hernia, 65 pulmonary indication with congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and 130 cardiac indication). Survival was lower in neonates with kidney disease than those without (49% vs 82% pulmonary indication without congenital diaphragmatic hernia, 25% vs 51% pulmonary indication with congenital diaphragmatic hernia, 21% vs 41% cardiac indication). Kidney disease was

  19. Nutritional Factors Influencing Intestinal Health of the Neonate12

    PubMed Central

    Jacobi, Sheila K.; Odle, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Dietary nutrients are essential for gastrointestinal (GI) growth and function, and nutritional support of GI growth and development is a significant component of infant care. For healthy full-term neonates, nutritional provisions of the mother’s milk and/or formula will support normal maturation of structure and function of the GI tract in most infants. The composition of breast milk affects GI barrier function and development of a competent mucosal immune system. The functional nutrients and other bioactive components of milk support a microenvironment for gut protection and maturation. However, premature infants struggle with feeding tolerance impairing normal GI function, leading to intestinal dysfunction and even death. The high prevalence worldwide of enteric diseases and dysfunction in neonates has led to much interest in understanding the role of nutrients and food components in the establishment and maintenance of a functioning GI tract. Neonates who do not receive enteral feeding as either mother’s milk or formula are supported by total parental nutrition (TPN). The lack of enteral nutrition can compound intestinal dysfunction, leading to high morbidity and mortality in intestinally compromised infants. Reciprocally, enteral stimulation of an immature GI tract can also compound intestinal dysfunction. Therefore, further understanding of nutrient interactions with the mucosa is necessary to define nutritional requirements of the developing GI tract to minimize intestinal complications and infant morbidity. Piglet models of intestinal development and function are similar to humans, and this review summarizes recent findings regarding nutrient requirements for growth and maintenance of intestinal health. In particular, this article reviews the role of specific amino acids (arginine, glutamine, glutamate, and threonine), fatty acids (long chain polyunsaturated, medium chain, and short chain), various prebiotic carbohydrates (short-chain fructo

  20. Nutritional factors influencing intestinal health of the neonate.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Sheila K; Odle, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Dietary nutrients are essential for gastrointestinal (GI) growth and function, and nutritional support of GI growth and development is a significant component of infant care. For healthy full-term neonates, nutritional provisions of the mother's milk and/or formula will support normal maturation of structure and function of the GI tract in most infants. The composition of breast milk affects GI barrier function and development of a competent mucosal immune system. The functional nutrients and other bioactive components of milk support a microenvironment for gut protection and maturation. However, premature infants struggle with feeding tolerance impairing normal GI function, leading to intestinal dysfunction and even death. The high prevalence worldwide of enteric diseases and dysfunction in neonates has led to much interest in understanding the role of nutrients and food components in the establishment and maintenance of a functioning GI tract. Neonates who do not receive enteral feeding as either mother's milk or formula are supported by total parental nutrition (TPN). The lack of enteral nutrition can compound intestinal dysfunction, leading to high morbidity and mortality in intestinally compromised infants. Reciprocally, enteral stimulation of an immature GI tract can also compound intestinal dysfunction. Therefore, further understanding of nutrient interactions with the mucosa is necessary to define nutritional requirements of the developing GI tract to minimize intestinal complications and infant morbidity. Piglet models of intestinal development and function are similar to humans, and this review summarizes recent findings regarding nutrient requirements for growth and maintenance of intestinal health. In particular, this article reviews the role of specific amino acids (arginine, glutamine, glutamate, and threonine), fatty acids (long chain polyunsaturated, medium chain, and short chain), various prebiotic carbohydrates (short-chain fructo

  1. Candidiasis caused by Candida kefyr in a neonate: Case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Systemic Candidia infections are of major concern in neonates, especially in those with risk factors such as longer use of broad spectrum antibiotics. Recent studies showed that also term babies with underlying gastrointestinal or urinary tract abnormalities are much more prone to systemic Candida infection. We report a very rare case of candidiasis caused by Candida kefyr in a term neonate. Case Presentation Renal agenesis on the left side was diagnosed antenatally and anal atresia postnatally. Moreover, a vesico-ureteral-reflux (VUR) grade V was detected by cystography. The first surgical procedure, creating a protective colostoma, was uneventful. Afterwards our patient developed urosepsis caused by Enterococcus faecalis and was treated with piperacillin. The child improved initially, but deteriorated again. A further urine analysis revealed Candida kefyr in a significant number. As antibiotic resistance data about this non-albicans Candida species are limited, we started liposomal amphotericin B (AMB), but later changed to fluconazole after receiving the antibiogram. Candiduria persisted and abdominal imaging showed a Candida pyelonephritis. Since high grade reflux was prevalent we instilled AMB into the child's bladder as a therapeutic approach. While undergoing surgery (creating a neo-rectum) a recto-vesical fistula could be shown and subsequently was resected. The child recovered completely under systemic fluconazole therapy over 3 months. Conclusions Candidiasis is still of major concern in neonates with accompanying risk factors. As clinicians are confronted with an increasing number of non-albicans Candida species, knowledge about these pathogens and their sensitivities is of major importance. PMID:22424058

  2. Arrhythmias presenting in neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Brucato, A; Previtali, E; Ramoni, V; Ghidoni, S

    2010-09-01

    Perfusion of human foetal heart with anti-Ro/SSA antibodies induces transient heart block. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies may cross-react with T- and L-type calcium channels, and anti-p200 antibodies may cause calcium to accumulate in rat heart cells. These actions may explain a direct electrophysiological effect of these antibodies. Congenital complete heart block is the more severe manifestation of so-called "Neonatal Lupus". In clinical practice, it is important to distinguish in utero complete versus incomplete atrioventricular (AV) block, as complete AV block to date is irreversible, while incomplete AV block has been shown to be potentially reversible after fluorinated steroid therapy. Another issue is the definition of congenital AV block, as cardiologists have considered congenital blocks detected months or years after birth. We propose as congenital blocks detected in utero or within the neonatal period (0-27 days after birth). The possible detection of first degree AV block in utero, with different techniques, might be a promising tool to assess the effects of these antibodies. Other arrhythmias have been described in NL or have been linked to anti-Ro/SSA antibodies: first degree AV block, in utero and after birth, second degree (i.e. incomplete block), sinus bradycardia and QT prolongation, both in infants and in adults, ventricular arrhythmias (in adults). Overall, these arrhythmias have not a clinical relevance, but are important for research purposes. PMID:20696016

  3. Neonatal Incidence of Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Eli; Eidelman, Mark; Katzman, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The advantages of sonographic examination are well known, but its main disadvantage is that it might lead to overdiagnosis, which might cause overtreatment. Variations in the incidence of developmental dysplasia of the hip are well known. We ascertained the incidence of neonatal sonographic developmental dysplasia of the hip without considering the development of those joints during followup. All 45,497 neonates (90,994 hips) born in our institute between January 1992 and December 2001 were examined clinically and sonographically during the first 48 hours of life. Sonography was performed according to Graf’s method, which considers mild hip sonographic abnormalities as Type IIa. We evaluated the different severity type incidence pattern and its influence on the total incidence during and between the investigated years. According to our study, sonographic Type IIa has major effects on the incidence of overall developmental dysplasia of the hip with a correlation coefficient of 0.95, whereas more severe sonographic abnormalities show relatively stable incidence patterns. Level of Evidence: Level I, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18288551

  4. Predicting gestational age using neonatal metabolic markers

    PubMed Central

    Ryckman, Kelli K.; Berberich, Stanton L.; Dagle, John M.

    2016-01-01

    infants born small-for-gestational age, the average difference between gestational ages predicted by the newborn metabolic model and the recorded gestational age was 1.5 weeks. In contrast, the average difference between gestational ages predicted by the model including only newborn weight and the recorded gestational age was 1.9 weeks. The estimated prevalence of preterm birth <37 weeks’ gestation in the subset of infants that were small for gestational age was 18.79% when the model including only newborn weight was used, over twice that of the actual prevalence of 9.20%. The newborn metabolic model underestimated the preterm birth prevalence at 6.94% but was closer to the prevalence based on the recorded gestational age than the model including only newborn weight. Conclusions The newborn metabolic profile, as derived from routine newborn screening markers, is an accurate method for estimating gestational age. In small-for-gestational age neonates, the newborn metabolic model predicts gestational age to a better degree than newborn weight alone. Newborn metabolic screening is a potentially effective method for population surveillance of preterm birth in the absence of prenatal ultrasound measurements or newborn weight. PMID:26645954

  5. Factors Associated With Changes in Magnesium Levels in Asymptomatic Neonates: A Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Yogesh; Shitole, Charudatta; Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neonates and infants with hypomagnesemia present with seizures and psychomotor delay. Objectives: The present study evaluated the changes in magnesium (Mg) levels and factors associated with these in the first three days of life. Materials and Methods: We monitored 50 clinically asymptomatic neonates; they were not given any magnesium supplements even if they had hypomagnesemia at baseline. The variables analysed were: serum Mg; gestational age; birth weight; length; and the ponderal index. We used random effects (RE) models for longitudinal analysis of these data. Results: The mean standard deviation (SD) gestational age was 36.3 (3.6) weeks and the mean (SD) weight was 2604.2 (754.4) grams. About 31% of the neonates had hypomagnesemia (< 1.6 mg/dL) on day one; however, all had normal magnesium levels by day three of life (P < 0.001). At birth, after adjusting for intrauterine growth retardation status (IUGR), serum Mg levels were lower by 0.0097 mg/dL (95% CI: -0.019 to -0.0003) per 100 grams increase in weight of the neonate. After adjusting for IUGR status, the mean increase in the serum Mg levels was 0.14 mg/dL (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.10 to 0.18) per day. The per-day increase in magnesium levels was significantly higher in low birth weight babies (0.10, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.18) compared with normal birth weight babies. Conclusions: Asymptomatic neonates may have a high prevalence of hypomagnesemia; however, the levels become normal without any magnesium supplementation. Even though regular monitoring of magnesium levels is useful, no supplements are required - particularly in clinically asymptomatic neonates. PMID:26848372

  6. Maternal Anaemia and Neonatal Outcome: A Prospective Study on Urban Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Chauhan, Aarti; Manzar, Md Dilshad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maternal anaemia is a major contributor of adverse neonatal outcomes, particularly compromised birth weight and head circumference. Objective To assess the relationship between maternal anaemia and neonatal measures in a sample of low-middle income group urban mothers. Materials and Methods One hundred pregnant women with population representative prevalence of anaemia were enrolled. Socio-demographic, anthropometry, obstetric profile (parity, abortion history, food habits, gap period with last pregnancy etc), and systolic/diastolic blood pressure were documented. Neonatal outcomes (gestational age and type of delivery), and birth anthropometry (weight, length, and head circumference) were measured at delivery. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis for associating maternal haemoglobin levels and neonatal outcomes were performed. Results The anaemic and non-anaemic pregnant women differed significantly in interval between previous & index pregnancy (p=0.031), parity (p=0.009), systolic blood pressure (p=0.026), diastolic blood pressure (p=0.042), maternal Hb (p<0.01). The mean gestational age (p<0.01), weight (p<0.01), length (p<0.01) and head circumference (p<0.01) of the neonates differed significantly between the two groups. On using maternal haemoglobin as a continuous variable, these anthropometric birth outcomes were positively correlated with maternal haemoglobin (p<0.05). Further, univariate linear regression showed similar associations between maternal haemoglobin (g/dL) and birth weight (p=0.004), length (p=0.010) and head circumference (p=0.003). Conclusion Maternal haemoglobin has a positive relationship with the neonatal measures of weight, length and head circumference. PMID:26816949

  7. The burden and management of neonatal jaundice in Nigeria: A scoping review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Olusanya, B O; Osibanjo, F B; Mabogunje, C A; Slusher, T M; Olowe, S A

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a leading cause of hospitalization in the first week of life worldwide. If inappropriately managed, it may result in significant bilirubin-induced mortality and disability. We set out to describe the epidemiology of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia as well as the practices and challenges in the care of infants with significant neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (SNH) in Nigeria, as basis for policy intervention and research priorities. We systematically searched PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, WHO Library Database, African Index Medicus, African Journals Online, and local journals for studies published between January 1960 and December 2014. We included studies, without restriction on methodological design that provided evidence on the incidence/prevalence, etiological /risk factors and adverse outcomes of hyperbilirubinemia, care-seeking practices, diagnosis and treatment, as well as follow-up evaluation of infants with SNH in Nigeria. A total of 558 studies were identified from all sources out of which 198 (35.5%) were finally selected. SNH accounted for about one in five neonatal admissions and has been associated consistently with substantial case fatality and neuro-developmental sequelae such as cerebral palsy and auditory impairments, especially among out-born babies. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, prematurity/low birth weight, infection, and ABO incompatibility were most frequently, and Rhesus disease rarely, associated with SNH. Late presentation at appropriate health facilities was common and resulted in high rates of acute bilirubin encephalopathy (ABE), kernicterus and avoidable exchange transfusions. Uniform practice guidelines, including developmental assessment and surveillance of infants with SNH, were rare at all levels of healthcare delivery. In summary, since 1960, SHN persists as a major contributor to neonatal mortality and developmental disabilities in Nigeria. The

  8. Neonatal pain in very preterm infants: long-term effects on brain, neurodevelopment and pain reactivity.

    PubMed

    Grunau, Ruth Eckstein

    2013-01-01

    Effects of early life psychosocial adversity have received a great deal of attention, such as maternal separation in experimental animal models and abuse/neglect in young humans. More recently, long-term effects of the physical stress of repetitive procedural pain have begun to be addressed in infants hospitalized in neonatal intensive care. Preterm infants are more sensitive to pain and stress, which cannot be distinguished in neonates. The focus of this review is clinical studies of long-term effects of repeated procedural pain-related stress in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in relation to brain development, neurodevelopment, programming of stress systems, and later pain sensitivity in infants born very preterm (24-32 weeks' gestational age). Neonatal pain exposure has been quantified as the number of invasive and/or skin-breaking procedures during hospitalization in the NICU. Emerging studies provide convincing clinical evidence for an adverse impact of neonatal pain/stress in infants at a time of physiological immaturity, rapidly developing brain microstructure and networks, as well as programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Currently it appears that early pain/stress may influence the developing brain and thereby neurodevelopment and stress-sensitive behaviors, particularly in the most immature neonates. However, there is no evidence for greater prevalence of pain syndromes compared to children and adults born healthy at full term. In addressing associations between pain/stress and outcomes, careful consideration of confounding clinical factors related to prematurity is essential. The need for pain management for humanitarian care is widely advocated. Non-pharmacological interventions to help parents reduce their infant's stress may be brain-protective. PMID:24228168

  9. Global health and neonatal nursing: a personal journey.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole; Boykova, Marina

    2012-09-01

    The need for improvement of neonatal nursing care is a global issue. Neonatal nurses have an important role in optimizing these health outcomes for neonates and their families. This article describes the personal journey of one nurse and her mentee. It describes how a passion for neonates led to global policy work. PMID:22895204

  10. Use of extensively hydrolysed formula for refeeding neonates postnecrotising enterocolitis: a nationwide survey-based, cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Lapillonne, Alexandre; Matar, Maroun; Adleff, Ariane; Chbihi, Marwa; Kermorvant-Duchemin, Elsa; Campeotto, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of and reasons for using extensively hydrolysed formulas (EHFs) of cow's milk proteins in the French neonatal units as well as the modality of their prescription for refeeding infants recovering from necrotising enterocolitis (NEC). Methods A multicentre nationwide cross-sectional study using a questionnaire to address the prevalence of use and the reasons for prescribing EHF in hospitalised neonates and to examine the protocols and the actual reasons for their use for refeeding infants in recovery from NEC. The questionnaire was sent to only 1 senior neonatologist in each neonatal unit included in the study. Results More than half of the French neonatal units participated in the survey. 91% of the surveyed units used EHF. Of 1969 infants hospitalised on the day the survey was run, 12% were fed on an EHF. 11% of the EHF prescriptions were due to previous NEC. The main reasons for using an EHF to feed infants post-NEC were the absence of human milk (75%) and surgical management of NEC (17%). When given, EHF was mainly prescribed for a period varying between 15 days and 3 months. None of the involved units continued using the EHF after 6 months of age. More than half of the surveyed units acknowledged hospitalising infants for the initiation of weaning EHF but only 21% of them tested these infants for cow's milk allergy. Conclusions The prevalence of EHF use in the French neonatal units is high. Refeeding infants post-NEC is one of the main reasons for such a high prevalence. The main incentive for using an EHF is the absence of human breast milk, either maternal or donor. PMID:27388344

  11. [Neonatal cerebral thrombosis and deficit of factor V leiden].

    PubMed

    Moliner Calderón, E; López Bernal, E; Ginovart Galiana, G; Nadal Amat, J; Cubells Riero, J

    2000-01-01

    Background Cerebral venous thrombosis is an inusual disease in neonatal age. Increasing reports of this disorder had described since magnetic resonance angiography is used. Case report Newborn of apropriate seze for gestational age was delivered at 35 weeks of gestation. Refered a severe hipoxic-isquemic disease with multisistemic afectation. The second day of life presented disseminated intravascular coagulation with pulmonary bleeding. The third day, the infant developed seizures that required treatment with diazepam in continuous perfussion. MR angiography visualized superior sagital and transvers sinus thrombosis. Coagulation study detected factor V Leiden. Comments Frecuently venous cerebral thrombosis is presenting with lethargy and seizures. The most common vessels involved are sagital and transvers sinus. It is described in association with exogenous risk factors that increasing blood hyperviscosity and additional inhered coagulation dissorders such as defects on antihrombina III, protein C and S and activate protein C resistance. The last defect has a hight prevalence in subjects with trombosis events. PMID:11003860

  12. Timing of neonatal seizures and intrapartum obstetrical factors.

    PubMed

    Scher, Mark S; Steppe, Doris A; Beggarly, Marquita

    2008-06-01

    One hundred ninety-three neonates with seizures were available on a neonatal seizure database, which included intrapartum and neonatal factors such as labor duration, fetal heart rate abnormalities, cord blood gas values, Apgar scores and clinical signs of encephalopathy. Regression analyses (analysis of variance) were performed on the entire cohort as well as specific subsets of neonates (eg, neonatal encephalopathy vs no encephalopathy) to assess the relationship between seizure timing and intrapartum/neonatal factors. Seizures were noted earlier for the encephalopathic group than for the nonencephalopathic group. No significant differences were noted for any intrapartum or neonatal factors. Timing of neonatal seizures, with or without an encephalopathy occurs within the first 2 days after birth and is independent of selected intrapartum and neonatal factors, underscoring recent task force recommendations concerning neonatal encephalopathy. Factors other than intrapartum events more likely contribute to the encephalopathic repertoire of the newborn, including seizures. PMID:18281619

  13. Lack of Association Between Residual Insulin Production and Glucagon Response to Hypoglycemia in Youth With Short Duration of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sherr, Jennifer; Xing, Dongyuan; Ruedy, Katrina J.; Beck, Roy W.; Kollman, Craig; Buckingham, Bruce; White, Neil H.; Fox, Larry; Tsalikian, Eva; Weinzimer, Stuart; Arbelaez, Ana Maria; Tamborlane, William V.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the loss of glucagon response to hypoglycemia and its relationship with residual β-cell function early in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in youth. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty-one youth with T1D duration <1 year (ages 8–18 years, T1D duration 6–52 weeks) underwent mixed-meal tolerance tests (MMTTs) to assess residual β-cell function and hypoglycemic clamps to assess glucagon responses to hypoglycemia. Glucagon responses to hypoglycemia in T1D subjects were compared with those in 12 nondiabetic young adults (ages 19–25 years). RESULTS Peak MMTT-stimulated C-peptide levels (range 0.12–1.43) were ≥0.2 nmol/L in all but one T1D subject. As expected, the median of glucagon responses to hypoglycemia in the T1D subjects (18 pg/mL [interquartile range 7–32]) was significantly reduced compared with the responses in nondiabetic control subjects (38 pg/mL [19–66], P = 0.02). However, there was no correlation between the incremental increase in plasma glucagon during the hypoglycemic clamp and the incremental increase and peak plasma C-peptide level during the MMTT. Similarly, the seven T1D subjects who failed to achieve an increase in glucagon ≥12 pg/mL (i.e., 3 SD above baseline values) had C-peptide response ≥0.2 nmol/L (0.54–1.12), and the one T1D subject with peak stimulated <0.2 nmol/L had a 14 pg/mL increase in plasma glucagon in response to hypoglycemia. CONCLUSIONS Impaired plasma glucagon responses to hypoglycemia are evident in youth with T1D during the first year of the disease. Moreover, defective and absent glucagon responses to hypoglycemia were observed in patients who retained clinically important residual endogenous β-cell function. PMID:23288858

  14. Effect of different bile salts on the relative hypoglycemia of witepsol W35 suppositories containing insulin in diabetic Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Hosny, E A; Al-Shora, H I; Elmazar, M M

    2001-09-01

    Insulin suppositories were formulated using Witepsol W35 as a base to investigate the effect of various bile salts/acids on the plasma glucose concentration of diabetic beagle dogs. Comparison of the effect of these formulations was made with that produced by insulin subcutaneous injections. Of the bile salts/acids studied, incorporation of 100 mg of deoxycholic acid (DCA), sodium cholate (NaC), or sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) with insulin (10 U/Kg) showed that suppositories containing NaDC produced the highest area under the curve (AUC) and relative hypoglycemia (RH) of 290 +/- 83 mg%h and 28% +/- 8.1%, respectively. To study the optimum amount of NaDC in insulin suppositories to produce the highest RH, 50-200 mg/suppository were used, and we found that 150 mg NaDC produced 35% +/- 13% RH. We also studied the influence of different doses of insulin (5-20 U/kg) in the presence of NaDC (100 mg). It was found that increase of the insulin dose was accompanied by an increase in AUC and maximum reduction in plasma glucose level Cmax. A combination of NaDC (100 mg) and NaC (50 mg) produced an AUC of 252 +/- 13mg%h and an RH of 49% +/- 2.6%, which were higher than produced by either of its individual components (NaC 50 mg or NaDC 100 mg) when used alone or when compared with an equivalent amount of NaDC (150 mg). When the effect of sodium taurocholate (NaTC) and sodium taurodeoxycholate (NaTDC) was studied, it was found that an insulin suppository containing 100 mg of either NaTC or NaTDC produced an RH equivalent to that produced previouslY with a mixture of NaDC (100 mg) and NaC (50 mg). On the other hand, NaC (50 mg) did not improve the hypoglycemic effect of NaTC any further. In conclusion, a relative hYpoglycemia of about 50% can be reached using insulin suppositories containing Witepsol W35 as a base and NaDC plus NaC (100 mg plus 50 mg, respectively), NaTDC (100mg), or NaTC (100 mg) as rectal absorption enhancers of insulin. A desirable hypoglycemia, expressed as

  15. The Korean Neonatal Network: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Hyun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Currently, in the Republic of Korea, despite the very-low-birth rate, the birth rate and number of preterm infants are markedly increasing. Neonatal deaths and major complications mostly occur in premature infants, especially very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWIs). VLBWIs weigh less than 1,500 g at birth and require intensive treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The operation of the Korean Neonatal Network (KNN) officially started on April 15, 2013, by the Korean Society of Neonatology with support from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The KNN is a national multicenter neonatal network based on a prospective web-based registry for VLBWIs. About 2,000 VLBWIs from 60 participating hospital NICUs are registered annually in the KNN. The KNN has built unique systems such as a web-based real-time data display on the web site and a site-visit monitoring system for data quality surveillance. The KNN should be maintained and developed further in order to generate appropriate, population-based, data-driven, health-care policies; facilitate active multicenter neonatal research, including quality improvement of neonatal care; and ultimately lead to improvement in the prognosis of high-risk newborns and subsequent reduction in health-care costs through the development of evidence-based neonatal medicine in Korea. PMID:26566355

  16. Laser Photoradiation Therapy For Neonatal Jaundice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Mostafa; Hamza, Mohammad

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes our leading experience in the clinical application of laser in the treatment of neonatal jaundice. Currently, the irradiation of jaundiced infants during neonatal life to fluorescent light is the most common treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The authors have investigated the photodegradation of bilirubin by laser in vitro and in Gunn rats before embarking on its clinical application in the treatment of jaundice in the new born child. This work was done to study the theraputic effect of laser compared to the currently used phototherapy in the treatment of neonatal jaundice. We selected 16 full term neonates with jaundice to be the subject of this study. The neonates of the study were devided into two groups. The first group was treated with continuous phototherapy . The second group recieved photoradiation therapy with gas laser The laser used was a CW argon-ion laser tuned to oscillate at 488.0 nm wavelength. This wavelength selection was based on our previous studies on the effect of laser irradiation of Gunn rats at different wavelengths. Comparison of the results of both methods of treatment will be reported in detail. The advantages and limitations of laser photoradiation therapy for neonatal jaundice will be discussed.

  17. Methaemoglobinaemia among neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hjelt, K; Lund, J T; Scherling, B; Bendixen, S; Lundstrøm, K; Støvring, S; Voldsgaard, P; Linnet, K

    1995-04-01

    After detection of a few clinical cases of methaemoglobinaemia (methb) in our NICU, a prospective clinical study was undertaken to determine the extent of the problem and to identify the causes. Consequently, during the following 8 months all haemoglobin tests included simultaneous measurements of methb on an OSM 3 hemoximeter (Radiometer): 8% (n = 33) of 415 neonates were found to be methb positive (defined as > or = 6% methb). Mean methb was 19% (range 6.5-45.5%). Maximum methb concentrations were found on day 4-31 postpartum (mean 12 days) and the number of days with a positive methb sample ranged from 1 to 18 days (mean 6 days). About 40% of the neonates born at 25-30 weeks of gestation and 60% with a birth weight < 1000 g were methb positive. Also, there was a negative correlation between the size of the methb positive concentration and gestational age (r = -0.38, p = 0.02). Measurements of C-reactive protein and leucocytes, NADH reductase, pH, Cl, nitrate and nitrite were carried out in methb positive patients. The tests were repeated 1 week after cessation of methb. The only significant difference was an increase in NADH reductase at the second measurement. Likewise, a wide range of clinical parameters were registered and they occurred with a higher frequency among the methb positive patients when compared with a methb negative control group matched with regard to gestational age and the closest possible birth weight. The mean birth weight of methb positive patients was 1170 g and that of negative controls 1380 g (p < 0.006).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7795342

  18. A SYNDROME OF SEVERE HYPOGLYCEMIA AND ACIDOSIS IN YOUNG IMMUNOSUPPRESSED DIABETIC MONKEYS AND PIGS – ASSOCIATION WITH SEPSIS1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; van der Windt, Dirk J.; Dons, Eefje M.; Rigatti, Lora H.; Echeverri, Gabriel J.; Bottino, Rita; Wijkstrom, Martin; Wagner, Robert; Cooper, David K.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Large animals treated with immunosuppressive drugs for preclinical experiments of transplantation have increased risks of infection, which can be compounded by the induction of diabetes in these animals if islet transplantation is planned. Methods We report our experience with severe sepsis in two young cynomolgus monkeys and five pigs that were subjected to diabetes induction, immunosuppressive therapy +/− islet allotransplantation. Results In two monkeys and five pigs, infection was associated with a syndrome of profound hypoglycemia accompanied by severe acidosis, which was resistant to treatment. We do not believe this syndrome has been reported previously by others. Conclusions Despite treatment, this syndrome complicated the interpretation of blood glucose readings as a measure of islet graft function, and resulted in death or the need for euthanasia in all 7 animals. We tentatively suggest that the syndrome may be related to the presence of microorganisms that metabolize glucose and produce lactate. PMID:23128998

  19. Effect of acute cold exposure and insulin hypoglycemia on plasma thyrotropin levels by IRMA in healthy young males.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Martino, E; Bukovská, M; Langer, P

    1988-12-01

    Thyrotropin (TSH) levels in plasma were estimated with the aid of immunoradiometric assay in two groups of healthy male subjects aged 21-22 years in two experiments: 1. acute (30 min) exposure to 4 degrees C in a cold room; 2. insulin (0.01 U per kg i.v.) hypoglycemia at room temperature and at 55 degrees C. Immediately after cold exposure a decrease of TSH level was found (P less than 0.01), while no changes were observed during 30 min exposure. After insulin injection a significant decrease (P less than 0.05 to less than 0.001) of TSH level was found at 45 to 120 min irrespectively of the ambient temperature. In addition, increased levels of noradrenaline and decreased levels of growth hormone after cold exposure are presented. PMID:3243203

  20. Amp C beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in neonatal meningitis: diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Fakioglu, E; Queenan, A M; Bush, K; Jenkins, S G; Herold, B C

    2006-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global health priority. Major defenses for Gram-negative bacteria are beta-lactamase enzymes, which have co-evolved with the development and increasing utilization of new antibiotics. Bacteria harboring the plasmid-mediated AmpC enzymes are increasingly prevalent among adult patients, but have not previously been reported in neonates. Early-onset neonatal meningitis caused by an AmpC beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli is described for the first time; the plasmid was identified as a transferable CMY-2 family beta-lactamase. Limited experience with newer antibiotics and pharmacokinetics in neonates presents a therapeutic challenge. Currently, there are no Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) recommendations for detecting AmpC nor is the optimal treatment for AmpC-producing organisms known. Thus, it is imperative that clinicians have a high index of suspicion when antimicrobial susceptibility patterns are inconsistent. Development of better microbiology screening tests to rapidly detect resistance is essential. Additionally, pharmacokinetic studies with newer antibiotics in neonates are warranted. PMID:16871223

  1. Neonatal candidaemia in Kuwait: a 12-year study of risk factors, species spectrum and antifungal susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Al-Sweih, Noura; Khan, Ziauddin; Khan, Seema; Devarajan, L V

    2009-11-01

    A study of candidaemia in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) over a 12-year period (1995-2006) taking into consideration demographic variables, risk factors, aetiological Candida species and therapeutic outcomes is presented. The yeast isolates were identified by VITEK2 yeast identification system and antifungal susceptibility was determined by E-test. Of 4815 neonates admitted in NICU, 182 cases of candidaemia were detected with an overall prevalence of 4.0% and crude mortality of 27.7%. The annual rate of candidaemia per 1000 admissions was the highest in 1997 (84 cases) and the lowest in 2004 (10 cases). Of the 112 assessable candidaemia cases, 78 (70%) occurred in very low birth weight neonates (< or =1500 g), 65 (58%) were born with gestational age of < or =30 weeks. The main identifiable risk factors were use of > or =2 antibiotics (87%), total parenteral nutrition for >5 days (82%), placement of central venous catheter (78%) and prior colonisation with Candida species (54%). Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida species accounted for 43% and 57% of candidaemia cases, respectively, and C. parapsilosis emerged as a predominant species. No fluconazole resistance was observed in C. albicans and C. parapsilosis isolates. This is the first comprehensive study on the epidemiology of neonatal candidiasis in Kuwait. PMID:18983425

  2. Neonatal medicine in ancient art.

    PubMed

    Yurdakök, Murat

    2010-01-01

    There are a limited number of artistic objects from ancient times with particular importance in neonatal medicine. The best examples are figurines from ancient Egypt of Isis nursing Horus, showing the importance of breastfeeding. The earliest images of the human fetus were made by the Olmecs in Mexico around 1200- 400 BCE. One of the earliest representations of congenital anomalies is a figurine of diencephalic twins thought to be the goddess of Anatolia, dated to around 6500 BCE. In addition to these figurines, three sets of twins in the ancient world have medical importance, and Renaissance artists often used them as a subject for their paintings: "direct suckling animals" (Romulus and Remus), "heteropaternal superfecundation" (mother: Leda, fathers: Zeus, the king of the Olympian gods, and Leda's husband, Tyndareus), and "twin-to-twin transfusion" in monozygotic twins (Jacob and Esau). PMID:20560265

  3. Futile care and the neonate.

    PubMed

    Romesberg, Tricia L

    2003-10-01

    The concept of futile care is controversial and difficult to define. Efforts to prolong life, once considered an outcome of healing, may now be viewed by some as harmful acts of prolonging suffering. This article reviews a number of cases representing this challenging ethical dilemma, such as Baby K and MacDonald v. Milleville. The Baby Doe regulations, the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA), and the Born-Alive Protection Act of 2001, also are discussed to provide an improved understanding of the legal framework that impacts ethical decision making. Nurses at the bedside must be equipped with the ethical knowledge and communication skills necessary to care for patients and families facing the ethical dilemma of futile care. An increased focus on neonatal palliative care is suggested to provide infants, families, and staff with the necessary tools to work through this painful process. PMID:14648518

  4. Neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone level is influenced by neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy factors.

    PubMed

    Trumpff, Caroline; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Moreno-Reyes, Rodrigo; Vanderpas, Jean; Tafforeau, Jean; Van Oyen, Herman; De Schepper, Jean

    2015-11-01

    The percentage of newborns with a neonatal whole blood thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) greater than 5 mIU/L has been used as an indicator of iodine deficiency at the population level. However, TSH levels in newborns may be influenced by many factors other than iodine status. The objective of this study was to identify neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy-related determinants of neonatal TSH levels in a retrospective cohort study. The study sample included 313 Belgian mothers and their 4- to 5-year-old children. The children had a neonatal TSH concentration between 0 and 15 mIU/L at neonatal screening, and blood samples were collected 3 to 5 days after birth. Children with suspected congenital hypothyroidism (neonatal TSH level >15 mIU/L), prematurely born (i.e., <37 weeks), or with a low birth weight (i.e., <2500 g) were excluded. Information about maternal and birth-related determinants was collected from the neonatal screening center via a self-administered questionnaire filled in by the mother together with the child's health booklet. Higher TSH levels were found in spring and winter compared to summer and autumn (P = .011). Higher TSH levels were associated with lifetime smoking behavior (up to child birth) in the mother (P = .005), lower weight gain during pregnancy (P = .014), and longer pregnancies (P = .003). This study showed that several neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy-related determinants are influencing neonatal TSH level. PMID:26428622

  5. Model of extreme hypoglycemia in dogs made ketotic with (R,S)-1,3-butanediol acetoacetate esters.

    PubMed

    Ciraolo, S T; Previs, S F; Fernandez, C A; Agarwal, K C; David, F; Koshy, J; Lucas, D; Tammaro, A; Stevens, M P; Tserng, K Y

    1995-07-01

    The rationale behind this study is that controlled starvation of poorly differentiated (anaplastic) fast-growing tumor cells, but not host cells, might be possible in vivo. The energy metabolism of anaplastic tumor cells, but not host cells, is largely dependent on carbohydrate metabolism at all times. Therefore depleting plasma of carbohydrate fuels could place these tumor cells at a significant metabolic disadvantage. Hence an animal model was developed in which all cells would be required to oxidize fatty acids, ketoacids, and/or 1,3-butanediol to satisfy their energy needs. To achieve this aim, one would need ketosis, severe hypoglycemia, and low lactatemia. Anesthetized normal dogs were infused with somatostatin and a mixture of (R,S)-1,3-butanediol monoacetoacetate and (R,S)-1,3-butanediol diacetoacetate; these latter compounds are nonionized precursors of ketoacids. They were infused at 90% of the dog's caloric requirement. After establishment of a moderate ketosis (2-3 mM) over < 100 min, a severe degree of hypoglycemia (close to 0.5 mM) without rebound and without hyperlactatemia was induced by infusing insulin and dichloroacetate. Tracer kinetic measurements showed 1) a 20% decrease in the rate of appearance of glucose, 2) 50 and 62% increases in glycerol and nonesterified fatty acid rates of appearance, reflecting stimulation of lipolysis, and 3) no change in the rate of glutamine appearance. We suggest that this model may prove useful for selectively starving those cancer cells that are unable to utilize fat-derived fuels while preserving nutrient supply to vital organs. PMID:7631780

  6. Closed-Loop Control Performance of the Hypoglycemia-Hyperglycemia Minimizer (HHM) System in a Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Thomas W.; Mackowiak, Linda; Dassau, Eyal; Patek, Stephen D.; Kovatchev, Boris P.; Doyle, Francis J.; Zisser, Howard; Anhalt, Henry; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Background: This feasibility study investigated the insulin-delivery characteristics of the Hypoglycemia-Hyperglycemia Minimizer (HHM) System—an automated insulin delivery device—in participants with type 1 diabetes. Methods: Thirteen adults with type 1 diabetes were enrolled in this nonrandomized, uncontrolled, clinical-research-center-based feasibility study. The HHM System comprised a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump, a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), and a model predictive control algorithm with a safety module, run on a laptop platform. Closed-loop control lasted approximately 20 hours, including an overnight period and two meals. Results: When attempting to minimize glucose excursions outside of a prespecified target zone, the predictive HHM System decreased insulin infusion rates below the participants’ preset basal rates in advance of below-zone excursions (CGM < 90 mg/dl), and delivered 80.4% less insulin than basal during those excursions. Similarly, the HHM System increased infusion rates above basal during above-zone excursions (CGM > 140 mg/dl), delivering 39.9% more insulin than basal during those excursions. Based on YSI, participants spent a mean ± standard deviation (SD) of 0.2 ± 0.5% of the closed-loop control time at glucose levels < 70 mg/dl, including 0.3 ± 0.9% for the overnight period. The mean ± SD glucose based on YSI for all participants was 164.5 ± 23.5 mg/dl. There were nine instances of algorithm-recommended supplemental carbohydrate administrations, and there was no severe hypoglycemia or diabetic ketoacidosis. Conclusions: Results of this study indicate that the current HHM System is a feasible foundation for development of a closed-loop insulin delivery device. PMID:24876535

  7. Renal glucose release during hypoglycemia is partly controlled by sympathetic nerves - a study in pigs with unilateral surgically denervated kidneys.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Sabine J; Schmidt, Martin; Lehmann, Thomas; Schwab, Matthias; Matziolis, Georg; Saemann, Alexander; Schiffner, René

    2015-11-01

    Catecholamines are known to increase renal glucose release during hypoglycemia. The specific extent of the contribution of different sources of catecholamines, endocrine delivery via circulation or release from autonomous sympathetic renal nerves, though, is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that sympathetic renal innervation plays a major role in the regulation of renal gluconeogenesis. For this purpose, instrumented adolescent pigs had one kidney surgically denervated while the other kidney served as a control. A hypoglycemic clamp with arterial blood glucose below 2 mmol/L was maintained for 75 min. Arteriovenous blood glucose difference, inulin clearance, p-aminohippurate clearance, and sodium excretion were measured in intervals of 15 min separately for both kidneys. Blood glucose was lowered to 0.84 ± 0.33 mmol/L for 75 min. The side-dependent renal net glucose release (SGN) decreased significantly after the unilateral ablation of renal nerves. In the linear mixed model, renal denervation had a significant inhibitory effect on renal net glucose release (P = 0.036). The SGN of the ablated kidney decreased by 0.02 mmol/min and was equivalent to 43.3 ± 23.2% of the control (nonablated) kidney in the pigs. This allows the conclusion that renal glucose release is partly controlled by sympathetic nerves. This may be relevant in humans as well, and could explain the increased risk of severe hypoglycemia of patients with diabetes mellitus and autonomous neuropathy. The effects of denervation on renal glucose metabolism should be critically taken into account when considering renal denervation as a therapy in diabetic patients. PMID:26564063

  8. Concurrent Therapy with a Low-carbohydrate Diet and Miglitol Remarkably Improved the Postprandial Blood Glucose and Insulin Levels in a Patient with Reactive Hypoglycemia due to Late Dumping Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Sachie; Iwahashi, Yasuyuki; Seo, Akane; Sumiyoshi, Michitaka; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Tamori, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Reactive hypoglycemia induced by late dumping syndrome is often observed after gastrectomy. However, no effective therapy has yet been fully established. We herein describe a case in which concurrent therapy with a low-carbohydrate diet using low-glycemic-index food and an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, miglitol, very effectively ameliorated the postprandial fluctuations in the blood glucose and plasma insulin levels in a patient with reactive hypoglycemia due to late dumping syndrome following total gastrectomy. The administration of miglitol under a low-carbohydrate diet using low-glycemic-index food may therefore be an ideal treatment for reactive hypoglycemia due to late dumping syndrome. PMID:27150868

  9. Whole blood viscosity of preterm infants - differences to term neonates.

    PubMed

    Kuss, N; Bauknecht, E; Felbinger, C; Gehm, J; Gehm, L; Pöschl, J; Ruef, P

    2015-01-01

    Determination of shear stresses at given shear rates with the LS 300 allows approximation of flow curves by mathematical models and to calculate viscosities of non-Newtonian fluids across the entire physiological shear range. Particular in preterm neonates, which in comparison to term neonates and adults have a substantially lower mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), rheological blood properties play a decisive role to maintain the perfusion. Whole blood viscosity was measured in umbilical cord blood taken from 34 preterm neonates using the LS 300 viscometer. In addition aggregation index, plasma viscosity, hematocrit and red blood cell (RBC) deformability was determined. The highest quality of approximation of the flow curve of whole blood was achieved by the method of Ostwald. Shear stresses of whole blood of preterm neonates were significantly lower compared to term neonates at similar shear rates (velocity range 6.16 s-1-50 s-1). With hematocrit calculated to 0.40 the related exponent (n) of the viscosity of preterm neonates (by Ostwald) showed a significant lower exponent (n) (0.71 ± 0.07) than term neonates (0.76 ± 0.06). The highest quality of approximation of the flow curve of plasma was achieved with the model of Ostwald in preterm neonates as well as in term neonates. The viscosity of plasma determined by Newton was lower for preterm neonates (0.89 ± 0.19) than for term neonates (1.04 ± 0.16). Concurrent to term neonates the whole blood of preterm neonates showed a very low aggregation index (term neonates 2.97 ± 2.10; preterm neonates 2.37 ± 1.32) and preterm neonates showed higher RBC deformability than term neonates. Because of the physiologically lower MAP and the particular viscous properties of neonatal blood special attention should be given when treating neonates with conventional blood products derived from adult donors. PMID:26444619

  10. Sound production in neonate sperm whales (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, P. T.; Carder, D. A.; Au, W. W. L.; Nachtigall, P. E.; Møhl, B.; Ridgway, S. H.

    2003-06-01

    Acoustic data from two sperm whale neonates (Physeter macrocephalus) in rehabilitation are presented and implications for sound production and function are discussed. The clicks of neonate sperm whale are very different from usual clicks of adult specimens in that neonate clicks are of low directionality [SL anomaly (0°-90°) <8 dB], long duration (2-12 ms), and low frequency (centroid frequency between 300 and 1700 Hz) with estimated SLs between 140 and 162 dB//1 μPa (rms). Such neonate clicks are unsuited for biosonar, but can potentially convey homing information between calves and submerged conspecifics in open ocean waters at ranges of some 2 km. Moreover, it is demonstrated that sperm whale clicks are produced at the anterior placed monkey lips, thereby substantiating a key point in the modified Norris and Harvey theory and supporting the unifying theory of sound production in odontocetes.

  11. Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis in Neonates and Children.

    PubMed

    Chung, Melissa G

    2016-03-01

    Investigators from Erasmus University Hospital in Belgium and Gustave-Dron Hospital and Roger-Salengro Hospital in France studied the clinical and neuroradiologic characteristics of cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) in neonates and children. PMID:27396366

  12. The many etiologies of neonatal hypocalcemic seizures.

    PubMed

    Levy-Shraga, Yael; Dallalzadeh, Keren; Stern, Keren; Paret, Gideon; Pinhas-Hamiel, Orit

    2015-03-01

    Seizures during the neonatal period have a broad differential diagnosis. Unlike in developing countries where hypovitaminosis D and hypocalcemia constitutes a major cause of infantile seizures, the number of neonatal seizures attributed to hypocalcemia in developed countries has decreased dramatically due to the improvement of infant formulas and vitamin D supplementation. In these countries, most infants that present with hypocalcemic seizures have underlying endocrinological etiologies rather than dietary insufficiencies. Here, we describe 3 cases of neonatal seizures due to hypocalcemia. Although the symptoms and calcium concentrations at presentation were similar in all 3 cases, the course of the disease and the final diagnosis for each were distinct. The cases are presented along with a brief review of the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment of neonatal hypocalcemia. PMID:25738238

  13. Neonatal euthanasia: moral considerations and criminal liability.

    PubMed

    Sklansky, M

    2001-02-01

    Despite tremendous advances in medical care for critically ill newborn infants, caregivers in neonatal intensive care units still struggle with how to approach those patients whose prognoses appear to be the most grim, and whose treatments appear to be the most futile. Although the practice of passive neonatal euthanasia, from a moral perspective, has been widely (albeit quietly) condoned, those clinicians and families involved in such cases may still be found legally guilty of child abuse or even manslaughter. Passive neonatal euthanasia remains both a moral dilemma and a legal ambiguity. Even the definition of passive euthanasia remains unclear. This manuscript reviews the basic moral and legal considerations raised by the current practice of neonatal euthanasia, and examines the formal position statements of the American Medical Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The paper concludes by emphasising the need, at least in the United States, to clarify the legal status of this relatively common medical practice. PMID:11233379

  14. Effect of vitamin K on neonatal erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shahal, Y; Zmora, E; Katz, M; Mazor, D; Meyerstein, N

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated the possible oxidative effect of vitamin K3 (menadione) and Vitamin K1 (Konakion) on neonatal erythrocytes by controlled in vitro exposure. Menadione caused only mild morphological changes and did not decrease ATP levels. However, it oxidized intracellular hemoglobin to methemoglobin in neonatal cells more than in adult cells. Reduced glutathione contents were higher in neonatal cells, but less available for antioxidant protection. Konakion did not increase methemoglobin levels in newborn infants after a prophylactic injection. In vitro exposure to Konakion did not affect reduced glutathione and ATP levels, nor did it oxidize hemoglobin. However, extensive morphological changes were observed, attributed to the effect of its solvent. Therefore, it seems that menadione, which is no longer administered to newborns, causes oxidative stress in neonatal cells whereas Konakion, the current vitamin K1, does not, either in in vitro studies or by therapeutic administration. PMID:1472579

  15. Prevalence of prelingual deafness in Italy.

    PubMed

    Bubbico, L; Rosano, A; Spagnolo, A

    2007-02-01

    Neonatal hearing loss is the most frequent sensorial congenital defect in newborns. No data are available on worldwide prevalence of congenital deafness. World Health Organization (WHO) data indicate 1-4 cases per 1000 individuals, with a considerable increase in developing countries. A prevalence exceeding 1 per 1000 however, indicates a serious public health problem calling for urgent attention. Aim of the study was the evaluate the prevalence of prelingual deafness in the Italian population and determine the socio-demographic characteristics of the condition. Data were provided by the National Institute of Social Insurance (INPS) and the Italian Central Statistics Institute (ISTAT) and were collected in 18 out of the 20 Italian regions (98.2% of total population). All subjects recognized as deaf-mute by a special medical committee were included. According to law No. 509/1988, they had to present a mean bilateral sensorineural-hearing impairment, detected in neonatal age, which caused the damage in speech development and equal to 60 dB or more for 500-, 1000- and 2000-Hz frequency tones in the better ear. Prevalence rates were calculated according to region and age bracket using updated population data from census 2001. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical software package. A total of 40,887 cases of prelingual profound sensorineural hearing loss > or =60 dB were detected in Italy in 2003, for a total prevalence rate of 0.72 per 1000. The hearing impairment prevalence differs according to sex. The overall prevalence is 0.78 per 1000 for males and 0.69 per 1000 for females (p < 0.001). The hearing impairment prevalence differs according to region of residence (p < 0.001). The geographic distribution of prelingual deafness was found to be: North 15,644 cases (0.63 per 1000), Central Italy 7111 cases (0.64 per 1000), South and Islands 18,132 (0.87 per 1000). The prelingual hearing loss is highly prevalent in South Italy (Basilicata

  16. Prevalence of prelingual deafness in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Bubbico, L; Rosano, A; Spagnolo, A

    2007-01-01

    Summary Neonatal hearing loss is the most frequent sensorial congenital defect in newborns. No data are available on worldwide prevalence of congenital deafness. World Health Organization (WHO) data indicate 1-4 cases per 1,000 individuals, with a considerable increase in developing countries. A prevalence exceeding 1 per 1,000 however, indicates a serious public health problem calling for urgent attention. Aim of the study was the evaluate the prevalence of prelingual deafness in the Italian population and determine the socio-demographic characteristics of the condition. Data were provided by the National Institute of Social Insurance (INPS) and the Italian Central Statistics Institute (ISTAT) and were collected in 18 out of the 20 Italian regions (98.2% of total population). All subjects recognized as deaf-mute by a special medical committee were included. According to law No. 509/1988, they had to present a mean bilateral sensorineural-hearing impairment, detected in neonatal age, which caused the damage in speech development and equal to 60 dB or more for 500-, 1,000- and 2,000-Hz frequency tones in the better ear. Prevalence rates were calculated according to region and age bracket using updated population data from census 2001. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical software package. A total of 40,887 cases of prelingual profound sensorineural hearing loss ≥ 60 dB were detected in Italy in 2003, for a total prevalence rate of 0.72 per 1,000. The hearing impairment prevalence differs according to sex. The overall prevalence is 0.78 per 1,000 for males and 0.69 per 1,000 for females (p < 0.001). The hearing impairment prevalence differs according to region of residence (p < 0.001). The geographic distribution of prelingual deafness was found to be: North 15,644 cases (0.63 per 1,000), Central Italy 7,111 cases (0.64 per 1,000), South and Islands 18,132 (0.87 per 1,000). The prelingual hearing loss is highly prevalent in South Italy

  17. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period. PMID:12199947

  18. Periventricular leukomalacia in a neonatal calf.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kenji; Fujita, Riku; Maezawa, Masaki; Fukumoto, Natsuko; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Inokuma, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2016-08-01

    A 10-day-old, Japanese Black, female calf had shown astasia since just after birth. Focal symmetrical periventricular malacic lesions of the cerebrum and suppurative arthritis of the left hip joint were observed in macroscopic examination. Histologically, the cerebral lesions were confirmed as periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The location and histological features of the lesions were similar to PVL in humans, caused by neonatal ischemia/hypovolemia. This is the first report of PVL in a neonatal calf. PMID:27010465

  19. Legal and ethical issues in neonatal nursing.

    PubMed

    2016-09-12

    Neonatal nurses regularly face complex legal and ethical dilemmas. This article discusses the hypothetical case of Jack, a two-day-old infant, born at 39 weeks' gestation, and diagnosed with trisomy 13 (syndrome), a life-limiting condition and being cared for in a neonatal intensive care unit. Jack's prognosis is poor and he is not expected to live past two weeks of age. PMID:27615591

  20. Neonatal osteomyelitis examined by bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bressler, E.L.; Conway, J.J.; Weiss, S.C.

    1984-09-01

    Thirty-three infants less than six weeks of age and suspected of having osteomyelitis were examined by bone scintigraphy. Each of the 25 sites of proved osteomyelitis in 15 individuals demonstrated abnormal radionuclide localization. Ten additional scintigraphically positive but radiographically normal sites were detected. Optimal quality scintigrams of the growth plate complex and osteomyelitis in neonates appeared similar to those in older children. All neonates suspected of having osteomyelitis should be studied with bone scintigraphy following initial radiographs.

  1. Conjugation Inhibitors and Early Neonatal Hyperbilirubinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Cole, A. P.; Hargreaves, T.

    1972-01-01

    Milk and serum were obtained from 50 mothers on the 6th day post partum and examined for inhibitory activity against bilirubin conjugation in rat liver slices. Neonatal serum bilirubin levels were also analysed at this time. There was no relation between the amount of inhibitory substance in breast milk or serum and the degree of neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia. It was observed that inhibitory activity increased in frozen breast milk but not in frozen autoclaved breast milk. PMID:5034671

  2. Periventricular leukomalacia in a neonatal calf

    PubMed Central

    KOYAMA, Kenji; FUJITA, Riku; MAEZAWA, Masaki; FUKUMOTO, Natsuko; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; INOKUMA, Hisashi; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu

    2016-01-01

    A 10-day-old, Japanese Black, female calf had shown astasia since just after birth. Focal symmetrical periventricular malacic lesions of the cerebrum and suppurative arthritis of the left hip joint were observed in macroscopic examination. Histologically, the cerebral lesions were confirmed as periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The location and histological features of the lesions were similar to PVL in humans, caused by neonatal ischemia/hypovolemia. This is the first report of PVL in a neonatal calf. PMID:27010465

  3. Milk allergy in the neonatal intensive care unit: comparison between premature and full-term neonates

    PubMed Central

    Iwakura, Hideo; Ohtsuka, Harumi; Kohno, Yoichi; Shimojo, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Background There have been several reports on neonates with milk allergy in a neonatal ward. This type of allergy is mostly categorized as a non-IgE-mediated food allergy. Although most cases of milk allergy occur in the first few months of life, the differences in clinical characteristics between premature and full-term neonates are still unclear. Objective This study aimed to clarify the differences in clinical characteristics of milk allergy between premature and full-term neonates. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 2,116 neonates admitted to the Department of Neonatology, Chiba Kaihin Municipal Hospital, between 2001 and 2007. Results We identified 24 neonates strongly suspected of having milk allergy because of symptoms, such as bloody stools, repeated vomiting, diminished sucking and abdominal distension, as well as objective laboratory findings of eosinophilia in stool cytology and/or positive results for a rectal milk challenge test. Twelve of these 24 neonates were premature (median gestational age, 31 ± 3 weeks; median birth weight, 1,656 ± 592 g) and the other 12 were full-term (median gestational age, 38 ± 1 weeks; median birth weight, 2,760 ± 560 g). There were no differences in symptoms and time to start of feeding between premature and full-term neonates, but there was a significant difference in the median postnatal age at onset (premature neonates: 23 days; vs. full-term neonates: 3.5 days; p < 0.01). Conclusion All premature neonates developed a milk allergy after 32 weeks of corrected gestational age, suggesting that the development of milk allergy requires a certain degree of immunological maturation. PMID:23403887

  4. Nutrition support after neonatal cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Owens, Joyce L; Musa, Ndidiamaka

    2009-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect in the United States, with an estimated frequency of approximately 12-14 of 1000 live births per year. Neonates with congenital heart disease often need palliative or corrective surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass during the first weeks of life. The neonate undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery experiences a more profound metabolic response to stress than that seen in older children and adults undergoing surgery. However, compared with older children and adults, the neonate has less metabolic reserves and is extremely vulnerable to the negative metabolic impact induced by stress, which can lead to suboptimal wound healing and growth failure. There are complications associated with the metabolic derangements of neonatal surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass, including but not limited to acute renal failure, chylothorax, and neurological dysfunction. This article discusses the importance of nutrition and metabolic support for the neonate undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass and the immediate postoperative nutrition needs of such a patient. Also, this article uses a case study to examine the feeding methodology used at one particular institution after neonatal cardiac surgery. The purpose of the case study is to provide an illustration of the many factors and obstacles that clinicians often face in the provision and timing of nutrition support. PMID:19321898

  5. Selenium status in neonates with connatal infection.

    PubMed

    Wiehe, Lennart; Cremer, Malte; Wisniewska, Monika; Becker, Niels-Peter; Rijntjes, Eddy; Martitz, Janine; Hybsier, Sandra; Renko, Kostja; Bührer, Christoph; Schomburg, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Infectious diseases impair Se metabolism, and low Se status is associated with mortality risk in adults with critical disease. The Se status of neonates is poorly characterised, and a potential impact of connatal infection is unknown. We hypothesised that an infection negatively affects the Se status of neonates. We conducted an observational case-control study at three intensive care units at the Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. Plasma samples were collected from forty-four neonates. On the basis of clinical signs for bacterial infection and concentrations of IL-6 or C-reactive protein, neonates were classified into control (n 23) and infected (n 21) groups. Plasma Se and selenoprotein P (SePP) concentrations were determined by X-ray fluorescence and ELISA, respectively, at day of birth (day 1) and 48 h later (day 3). Se and SePP showed a positive correlation in both groups of neonates. Se concentrations indicative of Se deficit in adults (500 ng/l). During antibiotic therapy, SePP increased significantly from day 1 (1·03 (sd 0·10) mg/l) to day 3 (1·34 (sd 0·10) mg/l), indicative of improved hepatic Se metabolism. We conclude that both Se and SePP are suitable biomarkers for assessing Se status in neonates and for identifying subjects at risk of deficiency. PMID:27267586

  6. Antiepileptic drug treatment strategies in neonatal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hernan, A E; Holmes, G L

    2016-01-01

    The highest risk of seizures across the lifespan is in the neonatal period. The enhanced excitability of the immature brain compared to the mature brain is related to the sequential development and expression of essential neurotransmitter signaling pathways. During the neonatal period there is an overabundance of excitatory receptors, and γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) is potentially depolarizing, as opposed to hyperpolarizing in the older brain. While this enhanced excitability is required for regulation of activity-dependent synapse formation and refining of synaptic connections that are necessary for normal brain development, enhanced excitability predisposes the immature brain to seizures. In addition to being common, neonatal seizures are very difficult to treat; antiepileptic drugs used in older children and adults are less efficacious, and possibly detrimental to brain development. In an effort to target the unique features of neurotransmission in the neonate, bumetanide, an NKCC1 inhibitor which reduces intraneuronal Cl(-) and induces a significant shift of EGABA toward more hyperpolarized values in vitro, has been used to treat neonatal seizures. As the understanding of the pathophysiology of genetic forms of neonatal epilepsy has evolved there have been a few successful attempts to pharmacologically target the mutated protein. This approach, while promising, is challenging due to the findings that the genetic syndromes presenting in infancy demonstrate genetic heterogeneity in regard to both the mutated gene and its function. PMID:27323943

  7. Development of a pressure ulcer trigger tool for the neonatal population.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Bette; Askew, Mary; Otten, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    A large Midwest level IIIb neonatal intensive care unit located in a 500-bed teaching hospital implemented quarterly skin prevalence surveys to monitor prevalence of altered skin integrity including pressure ulcers, diaper dermatitis (incontinence-associated dermatitis), and skin damage as a result of intravenous therapy, adhesive, or medical devices. Pressure ulcer prevalence varied from 0% to 1% per quarter, and no pressure ulcer risk assessment tool was regularly implemented. Therefore, a working group was formed to identify a risk assessment. The Iowa Model for Evidence-Based Practice was used to guide the project. A literature review was completed to identify validated instruments, but available tools were judged lengthy for routine clinical use. Therefore, we developed a short trigger tool comprising 3 questions to identify infants at risk for pressure ulcer development. PMID:22948496

  8. The Main Etiologies of Acute Kidney Injury in the Newborns Hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Momtaz, Hossein Emad; Sabzehei, Mohammad Kazem; Rasuli, Bahman; Torabian, Saadat

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most common diseases among the newborns hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), which is usually resulted from predisposing factors including sepsis, hypovolemia, asphyxia, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and heart failure. The goal of this study was to assess main etiologies, relevant risk factors, and early outcome of neonatal AKI. Materials and Methods: In a cross- sectional study, 49 consecutive neonates hospitalized in NICU of Besat hospital with diagnosis of AKI from October 2009 to October 2011 were investigated through census sampling method. AKI was diagnosed based on urine output and serum creatinine levels. Results: The prevalence of AKI was 1.54% (49 out of 3166 newborns hospitalized in NICU) with the female: male was 7:1. Thirty-nine patients (79.5%) were full-term neonates. Oliguria was observed in 38 (77.5%) patients. Sepsis was the most common predisposing factor for AKI in 77.5% of patients (n = 38) accompanied with the highest mortality rate among other factors (30.5%). Other leading causes of AKI included hypovolemia secondary to dehydration, followed by hypoxia secondary to RDS, patent ductus arteriosus, posterior urethral valve, asphyxia, and renal venous thrombosis. A positive relationship was observed between neonates' age, sex, urine output, and also between serum creatinine levels with initiation of dialysis. The mortality rate among the newborns hospitalized with AKI was 36.7%. Eighteen (36.7%) newborns were treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD) of whom 10 patients (55.6%) died, 31 patients were managed conservatively of whom five neonate died (25.9%). Discussion: Prognosis of AKI in the oliguric neonates requiring PD is very poor. It is thus recommended to prevent AKI by predicting and rapid diagnosis of AKI in patients with potential risk factors and also by early and effective treatment of such factors in individuals with AKI. PMID:25024976

  9. A study of the epidemiology of an endemic strain of staphylococcus haemolyticus (TOR-35) in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kazembe, P; Simor, A E; Swarney, A E; Yap, L G; Kreiswirth, B; Ng, J; Low, D E

    1993-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are among the most prevalent microorganisms that colonize and cause sepsis in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). We had previously identified a strain of CNS, Staphylococcus haemolyticus (TOR-35), in the NICU at Mount Sinai Hospital, that had been repeatedly isolated from blood cultures from neonates. We therefore carried out a prospective study to determine the frequency and time of colonization and the frequency of bacteremia in neonates over a 3.5 month period. This was accomplished by obtaining surface swabs within 1 h of birth and on days 3, 5, and 7 and by characterizing all blood culture isolates of CNS. We also determined what percentage of neonatal CNS bacteremias were due to this strain, between January 1, 1987 and December 31, 1990, by retrieving and typing all stock cultures of CNS from that period. All isolates were typed by species identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profile code. There were 76 (38%) neonates that became colonized with the TOR-35 strain at some time during their NICU stay. Lower birth weight was associated with colonization (p < 0.001), as was lower gestational age (p < 0.001). Only 1 neonate had a positive blood culture isolate for the TOR-35 strain during the prospective study. Of the 4 years of neonatal bacteremias that were studied retrospectively, there were 252 episodes of CNS bacteremia, of which 27 (11%) were due to the TOR-35 strain. The TOR-35 strain has become endemic in our NICU and appears to selectively colonize premature, low birth weight newborn infants, but only infrequently causes bacteremia. PMID:8248752

  10. Systemic antifungal prescribing in neonates and children: outcomes from the Antibiotic Resistance and Prescribing in European Children (ARPEC) Study.

    PubMed

    Lestner, J M; Versporten, A; Doerholt, K; Warris, A; Roilides, E; Sharland, M; Bielicki, J; Goossens, H

    2015-02-01

    The appropriate use of systemic antifungals is vital in the prevention and treatment of invasive fungal infection (IFI) in immunosuppressed children and neonates. This multicenter observational study describes the inpatient prescribing practice of antifungal drugs for children and neonates and identifies factors associated with prescribing variability. A single-day point prevalence study of antimicrobial use in hospitalized neonates and children was performed between October and December 2012. The data were entered through a study-specific Web-based portal using a standardized data entry protocol. Data were recorded from 17,693 patients from 226 centers. A total of 136 centers recorded data from 1,092 children and 380 neonates receiving at least one antifungal agent. The most frequently prescribed systemic antifungals were fluconazole (n=355) and amphotericin B deoxycholate (n=195). The most common indications for antifungal administration in children were medical prophylaxis (n=325), empirical treatment of febrile neutropenia (n=122), and treatment of confirmed or suspected IFI (n=100 [14%]). The treatment of suspected IFI in low-birthweight neonates accounted for the majority of prescriptions in the neonatal units (n=103). An analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated no significant effect of clinical indication (prophylaxis or treatment of systemic or localized infection) on the total daily dose (TDD). Fewer than one-half of the patients (n=371) received a TDD within the dosing range recommended in the current guidelines. Subtherapeutic doses were prescribed in 416 cases (47%). The predominance of fluconazole and high incidence of subtherapeutic doses in participating hospitals may contribute to suboptimal clinical outcomes and an increased predominance of resistant pathogenic fungi. A global consensus on antifungal dosing and coordinated stewardship programs are needed to promote the consistent and appropriate use of antifungal drugs in neonates and children

  11. Increased Viral Dissemination in the Brain and Lethality in MCMV-Infected, Dicer-Deficient Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Macquin, Cécile; Krezel, Wojciech; Bahram, Seiamak; Georgel, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Among Herpesviruses, Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV or HHV-5) represents a major threat during congenital or neonatal infections, which may lead to encephalitis with serious neurological consequences. However, as opposed to other less prevalent pathogens, the mechanisms and genetic susceptibility factors for CMV encephalitis are poorly understood. This lack of information considerably reduces the prognostic and/or therapeutic possibilities. To easily monitor the effects of genetic defects on brain dissemination following CMV infection we used a recently developed in vivo mouse model based on the neonatal inoculation of a MCMV genetically engineered to express Luciferase. Here, we further validate this protocol for live imaging, and demonstrate increased lethality associated with viral infection and encephalitis in mutant mice lacking Dicer activity. Our data indicate that miRNAs are important players in the control of MCMV pathogenesis and suggest that miRNA-based endothelial functions and integrity are crucial for CMV encephalitis. PMID:25955106

  12. Cause-specific neonatal mortality: analysis of 3772 neonatal deaths in Nepal, Bangladesh, Malawi and India

    PubMed Central

    Fottrell, Edward; Osrin, David; Alcock, Glyn; Azad, Kishwar; Bapat, Ujwala; Beard, James; Bondo, Austin; Colbourn, Tim; Das, Sushmita; King, Carina; Manandhar, Dharma; Manandhar, Sunil; Morrison, Joanna; Mwansambo, Charles; Nair, Nirmala; Nambiar, Bejoy; Neuman, Melissa; Phiri, Tambosi; Saville, Naomi; Sen, Aman; Seward, Nadine; Shah Moore, Neena; Shrestha, Bhim Prasad; Singini, Bright; Tumbahangphe, Kirti Man; Costello, Anthony; Prost, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Objective Understanding the causes of death is key to tackling the burden of three million annual neonatal deaths. Resource-poor settings lack effective vital registration systems for births, deaths and causes of death. We set out to describe cause-specific neonatal mortality in rural areas of Malawi, Bangladesh, Nepal and rural and urban India using verbal autopsy (VA) data. Design We prospectively recorded births, neonatal deaths and stillbirths in seven population surveillance sites. VAs were carried out to ascertain cause of death. We applied descriptive epidemiological techniques and the InterVA method to characterise the burden, timing and causes of neonatal mortality at each site. Results Analysis included 3772 neonatal deaths and 3256 stillbirths. Between 63% and 82% of neonatal deaths occurred in the first week of life, and males were more likely to die than females. Prematurity, birth asphyxia and infections accounted for most neonatal deaths, but important subnational and regional differences were observed. More than one-third of deaths in urban India were attributed to asphyxia, making it the leading cause of death in this setting. Conclusions Population-based VA methods can fill information gaps on the burden and causes of neonatal mortality in resource-poor and data-poor settings. Local data should be used to inform and monitor the implementation of interventions to improve newborn health. High rates of home births demand a particular focus on community interventions to improve hygienic delivery and essential newborn care. PMID:25972443

  13. Diversity of Disorders Causing Neonatal Cholestasis – The Experience of a Tertiary Pediatric Center in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Hoerning, André; Raub, Simon; Dechêne, Alexander; Brosch, Michelle N.; Kathemann, Simone; Hoyer, Peter F.; Gerner, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Rapidly establishing the cause of neonatal cholestasis is an urgent matter. The aim of this study was to report on the prevalence and mortality of the diverse disorders causing neonatal cholestasis in an academic center in Germany. Methods: Clinical chemistry and cause of disease were retrospectively analyzed in 82 infants (male n = 42, 51%) that had presented with neonatal cholestasis to a tertiary medical center from January 2009 to April 2013. Results: Altogether, 19 disorders causing neonatal cholestasis were identified. Biliary atresia was the most common diagnosis (41%), followed by idiopathic cases (13%), progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC, 10%), cholestasis in preterm infants (10%), α1AT deficiency, Alagille syndrome, portocaval shunts, mitochondriopathy, biliary sludge (all 2%), and others. Infants with biliary atresia were diagnosed with a mean age of 62 days, they underwent Kasai portoenterostomy ~66 days after birth. The majority of these children (~70%) received surgery within 10 weeks of age and 27% before 60 days. The 2-year survival with their native liver after Kasai procedure was 12%. The time span between Kasai surgery and liver transplantation was 176 ± 73 days. Six children (7%), of whom three patients had a syndromic and one a non-syndromic biliary atresia, died prior to liver transplantation. The pre- and post-transplant mortality rate for children with biliary atresia was ~12 and ~17%, respectively. Conclusion: Neonatal cholestasis is a severe threat associated with a high risk of complications in infancy and it therefore requires urgent investigation in order to initiate life saving therapy. Although in the last 20 years new causes such as the PFICs have been identified and newer diagnostic tools have been introduced into the clinical routine biliary atresia still represents the major cause. PMID:25003101

  14. Neonatal mortality: an invisible and marginalised trauma

    PubMed Central

    Målqvist, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal mortality is a major health problem in low and middle income countries and the rate of improvement of newborn survival is slow. This article is a review of the PhD thesis by Mats Målqvist, titled ‘Who can save the unseen – Studies on neonatal mortality in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam,’ from Uppsala University. The thesis aims to investigate structural barriers to newborn health improvements and determinants of neonatal death. The findings reveal a severe under-reporting of neonatal deaths in the official health statistics in Quang Ninh province in northern Vietnam. The neonatal mortality rate (NMR) found was four times higher than what was reported to the Ministry of Health. This underestimation of the problem inhibits adequate interventions and efforts to improve the survival of newborns and highlights the invisibility of this vulnerable group. The findings of the thesis also point at an inequity in survival chances based on ethnicity of the mother. Newborns of ethnic minority mothers were at a twofold risk of dying within the first 4 weeks of life compared to their peers belonging to the hegemonic group of Kinh (OR 2.08, 95% CI: 1.39–3.10). This increased risk was independent of maternal education and household economic status. Neonatal mortality was also associated with home deliveries, non-attendance to antenatal care and distance to the health care facilities. However, ethnic minority mothers still had an increased risk of experiencing a neonatal death even if they attended antenatal care, delivered at, or lived close to a health facility. This example of ethnic inequity highlights the importance to target those most in need. PMID:21423597

  15. Umbilical cord leptin predicts neonatal bone mass.

    PubMed

    Javaid, M K; Godfrey, K M; Taylor, P; Robinson, S M; Crozier, S R; Dennison, E M; Robinson, J S; Breier, B R; Arden, N K; Cooper, C

    2005-05-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the risk of osteoporosis in later life may be determined in part by environmental influences on bone development during intrauterine and early postnatal life. A potential role for fetal leptin in mediating these effects is suggested by animal studies showing that leptin influences prenatal osteoblast growth and development, and that fetal leptin concentrations are altered by changes in maternal nutrition. In a group of term human infants we reported previously that maternal birthweight, smoking, fat mass, and exercise during late pregnancy independently predict neonatal bone mass. To investigate the potential role of leptin in mediating these effects, we now relate leptin concentrations in umbilical venous serum to neonatal bone mass and body composition in 117 infants. There were strong positive associations between umbilical venous leptin concentration and each of whole body bone mineral contents (BMC) (r = 0.42, P < or = 0.001) and estimated volumetric bone density (r = 0.21, P = 0.02); whole body lean mass (r = 0.21, P < or = 0.024); and whole body fat mass (r = 0.60, P < 0.001). The associations with neonatal BMC and fat mass, but not with lean mass, were independent of associations that we have reported previously between cord serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentrations and neonatal body composition. Among the maternal determinants of neonatal bone mass, cord leptin explained the relationship with maternal fat stores, but not those with the mother's own birthweight, smoking, or physical activity. We conclude that umbilical venous leptin predicts both the size of the neonatal skeleton and its estimated volumetric mineral density. In addition, among previously documented maternal determinants of neonatal bone mass in healthy pregnancies, maternal fat stores may mediate their effect on fetal bone accrual through variation in fetal leptin concentrations. PMID:15864467

  16. How to manage neonatal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Di Comite, A; Esposito, S; Villani, A; Stronati, M

    2016-02-01

    This article reports the recommendations for managing neonatal tuberculosis (TB) drawn up by a group of Italian scientific societies. The Consensus Conference method was used, and relevant publications in English were identified through a systematic review of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from their inception until 31 December 2014. Group experts concluded that if suspicion is aroused, it is necessary to undertake promptly all of the investigations useful for identifying the disease not only in the newborn, but also in the mother and family contacts because a diagnosis of TB in the family nucleus can guide its diagnosis and treatment in the newborn. If the suspicion is confirmed, empirical treatment should be started. Breast-fed newborns being treated with isoniazid should be given pyridoxine supplementation at a dose of 1 mg kg(-1) day(-1). Mothers with active-phase TB can breast-feed once they have become smear negative after having received appropriate treatment. PMID:26270256

  17. Advances in Neonatal Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Steinhorn, Robin H

    2016-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a surprisingly common event in the neonatal intensive care unit, and affects both term and preterm infants. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the maternal, fetal and genetic risk factors that trigger PPHN. There have been numerous therapeutic advances over the last decade. It is now appreciated that oxygen supplementation, particularly for the goal of pulmonary vasodilation, needs to be approached as a therapy that has risks and benefits. Administration of surfactant or inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy at a lower acuity of illness can decrease the risk of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation/death, progression of disease and duration of hospital stay. Milrinone may have specific benefits as an 'inodilator', as prolonged exposure to iNO plus oxygen may activate phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A. Additionally, sildenafil and hydrocortisone may benefit infants exposed to hyperoxia and oxidative stress. Continued investigation is likely to reveal new therapies such as citrulline and cinaciguat that will enhance NO synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase function. Continued laboratory and clinical investigation will be needed to optimize treatment and improve outcomes. PMID:27251312

  18. Nesidioblastosis and persistent neonatal hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Sempoux, C; Poggi, F; Brunelle, F; Saudubray, J M; Fekete, C; Rahier, J

    1995-12-01

    Neonatal hyperinsulinism is characterized by severe hypoglycaemia which can cause serious neurologic effects. Pancreatic morphological abnormalities involve either focal or diffuse lesions. The former can be cured by resection, whereas the latter, of uncertain pathogenesis, often require subtotal pancreatectomy. We investigated various hypotheses in an effort to explain the origin of this latter form of hyperinsulinism. We determined that nesidioblastosis, long considered to be the basic structural lesion of the diffuse form of hyperinsulinism, is not specific and does not correspond to a continuous proliferation of endocrine cells. We found that an increase in beta-cell mass can be excluded since the volume density of beta cells is not systematically higher in hyperinsulinemic infants than in controls. The hypothesis of a decrease in D cells is attractive but should be considered with due caution since the decrease of the D-cell volume density observed in hypoglycaemic infants is inconstant. Finally, the notion of beta-cell functional abnormality seems the most likely explanation since a higher quantity of proinsulin was detected within the Golgi area by a specific antibody and abnormal nuclei with abundant cytoplasm were observed in some cells. These histological abnormalities can be observed during intraoperative morphological examination. Functional activity might also be evaluated by studying the messenger RNA of proinsulin. PMID:8593920

  19. Olfactory Classical Conditioning in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Regina M.; Taborsky-Barba, Suzanne; Mendoza, Raffael; Itano, Alison; Leon, Michael; Cotman, Carl W.; Payne, Terrence F.; Lott, Ira

    2007-01-01

    One-day-old, awake infants underwent an olfactory classical conditioning procedure to assess associative learning within the olfactory system of newborns. Experimental infants received ten 30-second pairings of a novel olfactory conditioned stimulus (a citrus odor of neutral value) and tactile stimulation provided by stroking as the reinforcing unconditioned stimulus (a stimulus with positive properties). Control babies received only the odor, only the stroking, or the stroking followed by the odor presentation. The next day, all infants, in either the awake or sleep state, were given five 30-second presentations of the odor. Results were analyzed from video tapes scored by an observer unaware of the infants’ training condition. The results indicate that only those infants who received the forward pairings of the odor and stroking exhibited conditioned responding (head turning toward the odor) to the citrus odor. The performance of the conditioned response was not affected by the state of the baby during testing, because both awake and sleeping infants exhibited conditioned responses. Furthermore, the expression of the conditioned response was odor specific; a novel floral odor presented during testing did not elicit conditioned responses in the experimental babies. These results suggest that complex associative olfactory learning is seen in newborns within the first 48 hours of life. These baseline findings may serve as normative data against which observation from neonates at risk for neurological sequelae may be compared. PMID:2011429

  20. No Islet Cell Hyperfunction, but Altered Gut-Islet Regulation and Postprandial Hypoglycemia in Glucose-Tolerant Patients 3 Years After Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    PubMed

    Dirksen, Carsten; Eiken, Aleksander; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Svane, Maria S; Martinussen, Christoffer; Jørgensen, Nils B; Holst, Jens J; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-09-01

    Postprandial hyperinsulinemia characterizes Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sometimes leads to reactive hypoglycemia. We prospectively evaluated changes in beta cell function in seven RYGB-operated patients with a median follow-up of 2.9 years with hyperglycemic clamps and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs). Three years after RYGB, weight loss was 26 % and insulin sensitivity had improved. Insulin secretion during clamp experiments was largely unchanged compared to before surgery. In contrast, insulin secretion in response to the OGTTs doubled when evaluated by the disposition index and 2-h plasma glucose declined to a mean of 3.3 ± 0.3 mmol/l postoperatively. Our findings indicate that intrinsic beta cell function remains unchanged in glucose-tolerant patients even years after RYGB, while altered gut-islet regulation drive risk of postprandial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. PMID:27138601