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Sample records for neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone

  1. Transient neonatal hyperthyrotrophinaemia: a serum abnormality due to transplacentally acquired antibody to thyroid stimulating hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, J H; John, R; Ginsberg, J; Hughes, I A; Shewring, G; Smith, B R; Woodhead, J S; Hall, R

    1983-01-01

    In a screening programme for neonatal hypothyroidism an otherwise healthy female infant was found to have a high concentration of thyroid stimulating hormone in a filter paper blood spot and in serum. A high concentration was also found in the maternal serum. Mother and baby were both biochemically euthyroid with normal serum thyroxine concentrations. The apparently high concentration of thyroid stimulating hormone in the mother was due to the presence of an IgG antibody that bound to human but not bovine thyroid stimulating hormone. Maternal serum inhibited the action of human thyroid stimulating hormone in an in vitro bioassay for the hormone. It is suggested that the baby acquired the antibody transplacentally, especially as the concentration of thyroid stimulating hormone subsequently fell. It is concluded that maternal serum should be assayed for thyroid stimulating hormone when a neonate is found to have a high concentration of the hormone and a normal concentration of thyroxine to establish the incidence of this finding and to avoid inappropriate replacement treatment. PMID:6402161

  2. Neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone level is influenced by neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy factors.

    PubMed

    Trumpff, Caroline; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Moreno-Reyes, Rodrigo; Vanderpas, Jean; Tafforeau, Jean; Van Oyen, Herman; De Schepper, Jean

    2015-11-01

    The percentage of newborns with a neonatal whole blood thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) greater than 5 mIU/L has been used as an indicator of iodine deficiency at the population level. However, TSH levels in newborns may be influenced by many factors other than iodine status. The objective of this study was to identify neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy-related determinants of neonatal TSH levels in a retrospective cohort study. The study sample included 313 Belgian mothers and their 4- to 5-year-old children. The children had a neonatal TSH concentration between 0 and 15 mIU/L at neonatal screening, and blood samples were collected 3 to 5 days after birth. Children with suspected congenital hypothyroidism (neonatal TSH level >15 mIU/L), prematurely born (i.e., <37 weeks), or with a low birth weight (i.e., <2500 g) were excluded. Information about maternal and birth-related determinants was collected from the neonatal screening center via a self-administered questionnaire filled in by the mother together with the child's health booklet. Higher TSH levels were found in spring and winter compared to summer and autumn (P = .011). Higher TSH levels were associated with lifetime smoking behavior (up to child birth) in the mother (P = .005), lower weight gain during pregnancy (P = .014), and longer pregnancies (P = .003). This study showed that several neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy-related determinants are influencing neonatal TSH level. PMID:26428622

  3. Prenatal and Neonatal Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Levels and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yau, Vincent M.; Lutsky, Marta; Yoshida, Cathleen K.; Lasley, Bill; Kharrazi, Martin; Windham, Gayle; Gee, Nancy; Croen, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are critical for normal brain development. This study examined autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels measured in mid-pregnancy maternal serum and infant blood after birth. Three groups of children born in Orange County, CA in 2000-2001 were identified: ASD (n = 78), developmental delay…

  4. Effect of maternal and neonatal factors on cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayana, Sheetal G.; Sadanandan, Nidhish P.; Mehaboob, A. K.; Gopaliah, Lakshminarayana R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is most common preventable cause of mental retardation in children. Cord blood Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (CBTSH) level is an accepted screening tool for CH. Objectives: To study CBTSH profile in neonates born at tertiary care referral center and to analyze the influence of maternal and neonatal factors on their levels. Design: Cross retrospective sectional study. Methods: Study population included 979 neonates (males = 506 to females = 473). The CBTSH levels were estimated using electrochemiluminescence immunoassay on Cobas analyzer. Kit based cut-offs of TSH level were used for analysis. All neonates with abnormal CBSTH levels, were started on levothyroxine supplementation 10 μg/Kg/day and TSH levels were reassessed as per departmental protocol. Results: The mean CBTSH was 7.82 μIU/mL (Range 0.112 to 81.4, SD = 5.48). The mean CBTSH level was significantly higher in first order neonates, neonates delivered by assisted vaginal delivery and normal delivery, delivered at term or preterm, neonates with APGAR score <5 and those needing advanced resuscitation after birth. The CBTSH level >16.10 and <1.0 μIU/mL was found in 4.39 % and 1.02 % neonates respectively. The prevalence rate of CBTSH level >16.1 μIU/mL was significantly higher in neonates delivered by assisted vaginal delivery and normal delivery, term and preterm neonates, APAGR score of <5, presence of fetal distress, need for resuscitation beyond initial steps and in those with birth weight of <1.5 Kg. Three neonates were confirmed to have CH after retesting of TSH level. Conclusions: The CBTSH estimation is an easy, non-invasive method for screening for CH. The cutoff level of CB TSH (μIU/mL) >16.10 and <1.0 led to a recall of 5.41% of neonates which is practicable given the scenario in our Country. The mode of delivery and perinatal stress factors have a significant impact on CBTSH levels and any rise to be seen in the light of these factors. The prevalence

  5. Associations between brominated flame retardants in human milk and Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Eggesbø, Merete; Thomsen, Cathrine; Jørgensen, Jens V.; Becher, Georg; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Longnecker, Matthew P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been in widespread use in a vast array of consumer products since the 1970s. The metabolites of some BFRs show a structural similarity to thyroid hormones and experimental animal studies have confirmed that they may interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. A major concern has been whether intrauterine exposure to BFRs may disturb thyroid homeostasis since the fetal brain is particularly susceptible to alterations in thyroid hormones. However, few reports on newborns have been published to date. Objectives To evaluate the association between BFRs and neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Methods We studied six polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) measured in milk samples from 239 women who were part of the “Norwegian Human Milk Study” (HUMIS), 2003–2006. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and BDE-209 were measured in a subset of the women (193 and 46 milk samples, respectively). The milk was sampled at a median of 33 days after delivery. TSH was measured in babies three days after delivery as part of the routine national screening program for early detection of congenital hypothyroidism. Additional information was obtained through the Medical Birth Registry and questionnaires to the mothers. Results The PBDE concentrations in human milk in Norway were comparable to concentrations reported from other European countries and Asia, but not the US and Canada where levels are approximately one order of magnitude higher. We observed no statistically significant associations between BDE-47, 99, 153, 154, 209 and HBCD in human milk and TSH in models adjusted for possible confounders and other environmental toxicants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Conclusions We did not observe an association between TSH and exposure to HBCD and PBDEs within the exposure levels observed. PMID:21601188

  6. A neomutation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor in a severe neonatal hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    de Roux, N; Polak, M; Couet, J; Leger, J; Czernichow, P; Milgrom, E; Misrahi, M

    1996-06-01

    Until recently, neonatal hyperthyroidism has been considered to be related to the transplacental passage of thyroid-stimulating Ig present in the serum of the mother. We report here the case of a newborn who presented with severe hyperthyroidism, diffuse goiter, and important ocular signs (eyelid retraction and possibly proptosis). However, the absence of thyroid pathology in the parents and the lack of antithyroid antibodies in the mother and in the patient led us to suspect a nonimmune aetiology. Direct genomic sequencing of the last exon of the TSH receptor in the patient revealed a T-->C transversion yielding to a Met453-->Thr heterozygous substitution in the second transmembrane domain of the receptor. The mutation was absent in both parents. Eukaryotic expression analysis in COS-7 cells yielded a mutated receptor that produced constitutive activation of adenylate cyclase without enhancement of phospholipase C activity. PMID:8964822

  7. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Concentration at Birth in Belgian Neonates and Cognitive Development at Preschool Age

    PubMed Central

    Trumpff, Caroline; De Schepper, Jean; Vanderfaeillie, Johan; Vercruysse, Nathalie; Van Oyen, Herman; Moreno-Reyes, Rodrigo; Tafforeau, Jean; Vanderpas, Jean; Vandevijvere, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to investigate the effect of MID during late pregnancy, assessed by the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration at neonatal screening, on cognitive development of preschool children. A retrospective cohort study including 311 Belgian preschool children of 4–6 years old was conducted. Children were selected at random from the total list of neonates screened in 2008, 2009, and 2010 by the Brussels new-born screening center. Infants with congenital hypothyroidism, low birth weight, and/or prematurity were excluded from the selection. The selected children were stratified by gender and TSH-range (0.45–15 mIU/L). Cognitive abilities were assessed using Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence—third edition. In addition, several socioeconomic, parental, and child confounding factors were assessed. Neonatal TSH concentration—a surrogate marker for MID—was not associated with Full Scale and Performance IQ scores in children. Lower Verbal IQ scores were found in children with neonatal TSH values comprised between 10–15 mIU/L compared to lower TSH levels in univariate analysis but these results did not hold when adjusting for confounding factors. Current levels of iodine deficiency among pregnant Belgian women may not be severe enough to affect the neurodevelopment of preschool children. PMID:26540070

  8. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  13. Protocol of the PSYCHOTSH study: association between neonatal thyroid stimulating hormone concentration and intellectual, psychomotor and psychosocial development at 4–5 year of age: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several European countries, including Belgium, still suffer from mild iodine deficiency. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration in whole blood measured at birth has been proposed as an indicator of maternal iodine status during the last trimester of pregnancy. It has been shown that mild iodine deficiency during pregnancy may affect the neurodevelopment of the offspring. In several studies, elevated TSH levels at birth were associated with suboptimal cognitive and psychomotor outcomes among young children. This paper describes the protocol of the PSYCHOTSH study aiming to assess the association between neonatal TSH levels and intellectual, psychomotor and psychosocial development of 4–5 year old children. The results could lead to a reassessment of the recommended cut-off levels of 5 > mU/L used for monitoring iodine status of the population. Methods In total, 380 Belgian 4–5 year old preschool children from Brussels and Wallonia with a neonatal blood spot TSH concentration between 0 and 15 mU/L are included in the study. For each sex and TSH-interval (0–1, 1–2, 2–3, 3–4, 4–5, 5–6, 6–7, 7–8, 8–9 and 9–15 mU/L), 19 newborns were randomly selected from all newborns screened by the neonatal screening centre in Brussels in 2008–2009. Infants with congenital hypothyroidism, low birth weight and prematurity were excluded from the study. Neonatal TSH concentration was measured by the Autodelphia method in dried blood spots, collected by heel stick on filter paper 3 to 5 days after birth. Cognitive abilities and psychomotor development are assessed using the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence - third edition - and the Charlop-Atwell Scale of Motor coordination. Psychosocial development is measured using the Child Behaviour Check List for age 1½ to 5 years old. In addition, several socioeconomic, parental and child confounding factors are assessed. Conclusions This study aims to clarify the effect of

  14. Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Xenopus Metamorphosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serum thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in anuran larvae rise rapidly during metamorphosis. Such a rise in an adult anuran would inevitably trigger a negative feedback response resulting in decreased synthesis and secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by the pituitary....

  15. Effect of thyroid stimulating hormone on adaptive behaviour in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhaumik, S; Collacott, R A; Garrick, P; Mitchell, C

    1991-12-01

    Patients with Down's syndrome are particularly vulnerable to the development of both hypothyroidism and Alzheimer's disease. Both hypothyroidism and Alzheimer's disease may be associated with elevated serum concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone. In a group of institutionalized Down's syndrome patients with normal thyroid function, global scores of ability were higher than in a group of patients with elevated thyroid stimulating hormone levels in the presence of normal T3 and T4. The actual concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone were shown to be significantly and inversely correlated with scores of global abilities. If these findings are reproducible, the authors believe that thyroid stimulating hormone estimation may provide confirmatory evidence of clinical dementia in this group of mentally handicapped individuals. PMID:1839315

  16. Thyroid stimulating hormone microadenoma as a rare cause of thyrotoxicosis amenable to surgical cure.

    PubMed

    Turel, Mazda K; Asha, Hesarghatta S; Rajaratnam, Simon; Chacko, Geeta; Chacko, Ari G

    2012-06-01

    Hyperthyroidism due to a thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) pituitary adenoma is rare. We report a 29-year-old woman with thyrotoxicosis and elevated serum 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodothyronine and TSH levels that resolved after a transsphenoidal excision of the detected TSH pituitary adenoma. The diagnosis and management options in such patients are reviewed. PMID:22153796

  17. Thyroid-stimulating Hormone (TSH): Measurement of Intracellular, Secreted, and Circulating Hormone in Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is a hormone produced in the pituitary that stimulates the thyroid gland to grow and produce thyroid hormone (TH). The concentration of TH controls developmental changes that take place in a wide variety of organisms. Many use the metaphoric ch...

  18. Use of recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone for thyrotropin stimulation test in euthyroid dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Sauvé, F; Paradis, M

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) on serum total thyroxine (TT4) concentration in euthyroid dogs. Six healthy beagle dogs were used in each of the 3 phases of this study. Phase I: thyroid-stimulating hormone response tests were performed by using a total dose of 25 micrograms, 50 micrograms, and 100 micrograms of rhTSH, administered intravenously. Phases II and III: thyroid-stimulating hormone response tests were performed by using 50 micrograms of rhTSH administered by intramuscular and subcutaneous routes, respectively. In each phase and following all the administered doses of rhTSH, an increase in the serum TT4 concentration was noted, although it was not always significant. For phase I, there was a significant increase in serum TT4 concentrations. Based on this study, 50 micrograms was judged to be the optimal intravenous dose of rhTSH. For phases II and III, there was no significant increase in serum TT4 after the administration of rhTSH. Results of this study suggest that rhTSH could be a good substitute for bovine TSH, when used by the intravenous route, for the TSH stimulation test in dogs. Further studies are required to confirm its clinical usefulness. PMID:10738600

  19. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in malnutrition: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Osman, A; Khalid, B A; Tan, T T; Wan Nazaimoon, W M; Wu, L L; Ng, M L

    1993-06-01

    This is a report of a cross sectional study involving 3 groups of children, moderately malnourished (BMI < 15), mildly malnourished (BMI 15-18) and well nourished (BMI > 18) to determine the differences in hormonal and biochemical parameters between the groups. The children were of age range from 7-17 years old. The children were from the same area with exposure to the same food, drinking water and environment. There were significant differences in the nutritional indices between the three groups. No differences were observed in levels of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and T3:T4 ratio. Significant difference however was found in the TSH levels using highly sensitive IRMA TSH assays. Moderately malnourished children had higher TSH levels (p < 0.05) compared to mildly malnourished and well-nourished children. No difference was found between the mildly malnourished and well-nourished groups. There were no significant differences in serum cortisols done at similar times, fasting growth hormone and calcium. Serum alanine transminase (ALT) however was higher in moderately malnourished than in well-nourished children. Thus using highly sensitive IRMA TSH assays, we were able to detect differences in TSH levels even though T3, T4 and T3:T4 ratio, cortisol, growth hormone and calcium were normal, implying in moderately malnourished children, a higher TSH drive to maintain euthyroid state. PMID:8266178

  20. The Relationships between Thyroid Hormones and Thyroid-stimulating Hormone with Lipid Profile in Euthyroid Men

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Kok-Yong; Ima-Nirwana, Soelaiman; Mohamed, Isa Naina; Aminuddin, Amilia; Johari, Mohamad Hanapi; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Alteration in lipid profile is a common observation in patients with thyroid dysfunction, but the current knowledge on the relationship between lipids and thyroid hormone levels in euthyroid state is insufficient. The current study aimed to determine the association between thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) with lipid profile in a euthyroid male population. Methods: A total of 708 Chinese and Malay men aged 20 years and above were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Their blood was collected for the determination of total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglyceride (TG), free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3) and TSH levels. The association was analyzed using multiple regression and logistic regression models with adjustment for age, ethnicity, body mass index and FT4/FT3/TSH levels. Results: In multiple regression models, TSH was positively and significantly associated with TG (p<0.05). Free T4 was positively and significantly associated with TC, LDL-C and HDL-C (p<0.05). Free T3 was negatively and significantly associated with HDL-C (p<0.05). In binary logistic models, an increase in TSH was significantly associated with higher prevalence of elevated TG in the subjects (p<0.05), while an increase in FT4 was significantly associated with higher prevalence of elevated TC but a lower prevalence of subnormal HDL in the subjects (p<0.05). Free T3 was not associated with any lipid variables in the logistic regression (p>0.05). Conclusions: In euthyroid Malaysian men, there are positive and significant relationships between TSH level and TG level, and between FT4 level and cholesterol levels. PMID:24578612

  1. Targeting the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor with small molecule ligands and antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Terry F; Latif, Rauf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is the essential molecule for thyroid growth and thyroid hormone production. Since it is also a key autoantigen in Graves’ disease and is involved in thyroid cancer pathophysiology, the targeting of the TSHR offers a logical model for disease control. Areas covered We review the structure and function of the TSHR and the progress in both small molecule ligands and TSHR antibodies for their therapeutic potential. Expert opinion Stabilization of a preferential conformation for the TSHR by allosteric ligands and TSHR antibodies with selective modulation of the signaling pathways is now possible. These tools may be the next generation of therapeutics for controlling the pathophysiological consequences mediated by the effects of the TSHR in the thyroid and other extrathyroidal tissues. PMID:25768836

  2. Human longevity is characterised by high thyroid stimulating hormone secretion without altered energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, S. W.; Akintola, A. A.; Roelfsema, F.; van der Spoel, E.; Cobbaert, C. M.; Ballieux, B. E.; Egri, P.; Kvarta-Papp, Z.; Gereben, B.; Fekete, C.; Slagboom, P. E.; van der Grond, J.; Demeneix, B. A.; Pijl, H.; Westendorp, R. G. J.; van Heemst, D.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have included subjects with the propensity to reach old age in good health, with the aim to disentangle mechanisms contributing to staying healthier for longer. The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis maintains circulating levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid hormone (TH) in an inverse relationship. Greater longevity has been associated with higher TSH and lower TH levels, but mechanisms underlying TSH/TH differences and longevity remain unknown. The HPT axis plays a pivotal role in growth, development and energy metabolism. We report that offspring of nonagenarians with at least one nonagenarian sibling have increased TSH secretion but similar bioactivity of TSH and similar TH levels compared to controls. Healthy offspring and spousal controls had similar resting metabolic rate and core body temperature. We propose that pleiotropic effects of the HPT axis may favour longevity without altering energy metabolism. PMID:26089239

  3. Sensitive and specific immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for human thyroid stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Piaditis, G.P.; Hodgkinson, S.C.; McLean, C.; Lowry, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    A liquid phase ''two-site'' immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) specific for human thyroid stimulating hormone (hTSH) is described. The assay is based on the simultaneous addition of affinity purified sheep anti hTSH IgG- SVI and rabbit anti hTSH antiserum to standards and unknowns followed by 4h incubation at room temperature. The separation of free labelled sheep IgG- SVI from that bound to hTSH is achieved by the addition of sheep anti-rabbit IgG Fc fragment antiserum. The radiolabelled sheep anti-hTSH IgG- SVI was pretreated with solid phase urinary postmenopausal gonadotropins to remove cross reaction with FSH and LH. The assay is specific for hTSH and no cross reaction with the other anterior pituitary glycoproteins or protein hormones has been found. In addition it is characterized by a wide operating range, rapid equilibration of reactants and high sensitivity. The precision of dose estimates was less than 10% between 0.25-2.5 microU/ml and less than 2.5% over the range 2.5-60 microU/ml.

  4. Immunochemical characterization of two thyroid-stimulating hormone beta-subunit epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Fairlie, W D; Stanton, P G; Hearn, M T

    1995-01-01

    The epitopes of human thyroid-stimulating hormone (hTSH) recognized by two murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), designated MAb 279 and MAb 299, have been characterized. These MAbs are highly specific for the beta-subunit of TSH. The epitope recognized by MAb 279 appears to be completely conserved between bovine and human TSH and partially conserved in the porcine species. The TSH beta-subunit epitope recognized by MAb 299 is only partially conserved between the human, bovine and porcine species. Both MAbs are capable of inhibiting the binding of TSH to its receptor in a TSH radioreceptor assay, indicating that the epitopes either coincide or are located close to the TSH beta-subunit receptor-binding sites. The carbohydrate moieties of the TSH beta-subunit appear to play little or no role in the epitope recognition by MAb 279 or MAb 299 while the integrity of the disulphide bonds are essential. The epitopic recognition may also involve lysine residues, as determined by the immunoreactivity with both MAbs following citraconylation of TSH. In addition, the amino acid sequence region between residues bTSH beta 34-44 could be excised by trypsin digestion of bovine TSH beta (bTSH beta) without eliminating epitopic recognition by either MAb. These results provide further insight into the relationship between the structure of the TSH beta-subunit epitopes and location of the receptor-binding sites. Images Figure 2 PMID:7538754

  5. Monte Carlo loop refinement and virtual screening of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor transmembrane domain

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M. Rejwan; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F.; Mezei, Mihaly

    2015-01-01

    Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) loop refinement has been performed on the three extracellular loops (ECLs) of rhodopsin and opsin-based homology models of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor transmembrane domain, a class A type G protein-coupled receptor. The Monte Carlo sampling technique, employing torsion angles of amino acid side chains and local moves for the six consecutive backbone torsion angles, has previously reproduced the conformation of several loops with known crystal structures with accuracy consistently less than 2 Å. A grid-based potential map, which includes van der Waals, electrostatics, hydrophobic as well as hydrogen-bond potentials for bulk protein environment and the solvation effect, has been used to significantly reduce the computational cost of energy evaluation. A modified sigmoidal distance-dependent dielectric function has been implemented in conjunction with the desolvation and hydrogen-bonding terms. A long high-temperature simulation with 2 kcal/mol repulsion potential resulted in extensive sampling of the conformational space. The slow annealing leading to the low-energy structures predicted secondary structure by the MMC technique. Molecular docking with the reported agonist reproduced the binding site within 1.5 Å. Virtual screening performed on the three lowest structures showed that the ligand-binding mode in the inter-helical region is dependent on the ECL conformations. PMID:25012978

  6. Monte Carlo loop refinement and virtual screening of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Ali, M Rejwan; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F; Mezei, Mihaly

    2015-01-01

    Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) loop refinement has been performed on the three extracellular loops (ECLs) of rhodopsin and opsin-based homology models of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor transmembrane domain, a class A type G protein-coupled receptor. The Monte Carlo sampling technique, employing torsion angles of amino acid side chains and local moves for the six consecutive backbone torsion angles, has previously reproduced the conformation of several loops with known crystal structures with accuracy consistently less than 2 Å. A grid-based potential map, which includes van der Waals, electrostatics, hydrophobic as well as hydrogen-bond potentials for bulk protein environment and the solvation effect, has been used to significantly reduce the computational cost of energy evaluation. A modified sigmoidal distance-dependent dielectric function has been implemented in conjunction with the desolvation and hydrogen-bonding terms. A long high-temperature simulation with 2 kcal/mol repulsion potential resulted in extensive sampling of the conformational space. The slow annealing leading to the low-energy structures predicted secondary structure by the MMC technique. Molecular docking with the reported agonist reproduced the binding site within 1.5 Å. Virtual screening performed on the three lowest structures showed that the ligand-binding mode in the inter-helical region is dependent on the ECL conformations. PMID:25012978

  7. The application of NIR Raman spectroscopy in the assessment of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Gutiérrez, C.; Quintanar, J. Luis; Frausto-Reyes, C.; Sato-Berrú, R.

    2005-01-01

    Serum blood samples of euthyroid and thyroidectomized rats treated with thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were analyzed on aluminum substrates using the near-infrared Raman spectroscopy (830 nm). Spectra of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), TRH and prolactin standards were obtained. Differences between Raman spectra profiles of control and Tx+TRH samples groups were found. These differences were confirmed by the linear discriminant analysis (LDA), which presents a good classification between groups. It is supposed that these differences are produced by the increment of TSH in the thyroidectomized rats.

  8. 2012 European Thyroid Association Guidelines for the Management of Familial and Persistent Sporadic Non-Autoimmune Hyperthyroidism Caused by Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Receptor Germline Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Paschke, R.; Niedziela, M.; Vaidya, B.; Persani, L.; Rapoport, B.; Leclere, J.

    2012-01-01

    All cases of familial thyrotoxicosis with absence of evidence of autoimmunity and all children with persistent isolated neonatal hyperthyroidism should be evaluated for familial non-autoimmune autosomal dominant hyperthyroidism (FNAH) or persistent sporadic non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism (PSNAH). First, all index patients should be analysed for the presence/absence of a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TSHR) germline mutation, and if they display a TSHR germline mutation, all other family members including asymptomatic and euthyroid family members should also be analysed. A functional characterization of all new TSHR mutations is necessary. Appropriate ablative therapy is recommended to avoid relapses of hyperthyroidism and its consequences, especially in children. Therefore, in children the diagnosis of FNAH or PSNAH needs to be established as early as possible in the presence of the clinical hallmarks of the disease. PMID:24783013

  9. 2012 European thyroid association guidelines for the management of familial and persistent sporadic non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism caused by thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor germline mutations.

    PubMed

    Paschke, R; Niedziela, M; Vaidya, B; Persani, L; Rapoport, B; Leclere, J

    2012-10-01

    All cases of familial thyrotoxicosis with absence of evidence of autoimmunity and all children with persistent isolated neonatal hyperthyroidism should be evaluated for familial non-autoimmune autosomal dominant hyperthyroidism (FNAH) or persistent sporadic non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism (PSNAH). First, all index patients should be analysed for the presence/absence of a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TSHR) germline mutation, and if they display a TSHR germline mutation, all other family members including asymptomatic and euthyroid family members should also be analysed. A functional characterization of all new TSHR mutations is necessary. Appropriate ablative therapy is recommended to avoid relapses of hyperthyroidism and its consequences, especially in children. Therefore, in children the diagnosis of FNAH or PSNAH needs to be established as early as possible in the presence of the clinical hallmarks of the disease. PMID:24783013

  10. Increase in thyroid stimulating hormone levels in patients with gout treated with inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Chinchilla, Sandra Pamela; Atxotegi, Joana; Urionagüena, Irati; Herrero-Beites, Ana Maria; Aniel-Quiroga, Maria Angeles

    2015-11-01

    Increase in thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels over the upper normal limit has been reported in a small percentage of patients treated with febuxostat in clinical trials, but a mechanistic explanation is not yet available. In an observational parallel longitudinal cohort study, we evaluated changes in TSH levels in patients with gout at baseline and during urate-lowering treatment with febuxostat. Patients to be started on allopurinol who had a measurement of TSH in the 6-month period prior to baseline evaluation were used for comparison. TSH levels and change in TSH levels at 12-month follow-up were compared between groups. Patients with abnormal TSH levels or previous thyroid disease or on amiodarone were not included for analysis. Eighty-eight patients treated with febuxostat and 87 with allopurinol were available for comparisons. Patients to be treated with febuxostat had higher urate levels and TSH levels, more severe gout, and poorer renal function, but were similar regarding other characteristics. A similar rise in TSH levels was observed in both groups (0.4 and 0.5 µUI/mL for febuxostat and allopurinol, respectively); at 12-mo, 7/88 (7.9 %) of patients on febuxostat and 4/87 (3.4 %) of patients on allopurinol showed TSH levels over 0.5 µUI/mL. Doses prescribed (corrected for estimated glomerular filtration rate in the case if patients on allopurinol) and baseline TSH levels were determinants of TSH levels at 12-month follow-up. No impact on free T4 (fT4) levels was observed. Febuxostat, but also allopurinol, increased TSH levels in a dose-dependent way, thus suggesting rather a class effect than a drug effect, but with no apparent impact on either clinical or fT4 levels. PMID:26342297

  11. Gastroparesis - a novel cause of persistent thyroid stimulating hormone elevation in hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    O S, Khraisha; M M, Al-Madani; A N, Peiris; T K, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is easily treated by levothyroxine therapy which has an 80 percent absorption rate, mostly in the jejunum. The replacement dose of daily levothyroxine is usually calculated at 1.6 mcg/kg body weight per day. We report a 77-year-old man who required supraphysiologic thyroxine replacement (>2.7 mcg/ kg/day) to treat his hypothyroidism. The patient was referred for persistent thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) elevation (40 mcIU/ml) while on 175 mcg of levothyroxine. Patient was compliant with medication. Medical history included diabetes mellitus type 2, cerebrovascular accident, depression, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, vitamin B12 deficiency, Addison’s disease, as well as a colostomy secondary to diverticulitis. He was taking aspirin, carvedilol, cholecalciferol, finasteride, fluoxetine, furosemide, ketoconazole, levothyroxine, prednisone, and albuterol/ipratropium inhaler. His height was 180.3 cm; weight, 107 kg. Thyroid was impalpable, and he was clinically euthyroid. Despite discontinuation of iron and statin which are known to interfere with thyroxine absorption and crushing of thyroxine tablets to enhance absorption, his TSH remained elevated. Celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection were ruled out with serological testing. There was no proteinuria and anti-parietal cell antibody was positive. Gastroparesis was confirmed by gastric emptying study. He continued to require increasing doses of thyroxine with increment to 300 mcg daily. To our knowledge, this is the first documented association between gastroparesis and thyroxine malabsorption. We recommend that gastroparesis be considered in any patient with persistent TSH elevation despite usual thyroxine doses. PMID:25978052

  12. Gender and Age Impact on the Association Between Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone and Serum Lipids.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaowei; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Li; Song, Kun; Tan, Jian; Jia, Qiang; Zhang, Guizhi; Wang, Renfei; He, Yajing; Ren, Xiaojun; Zhu, Mei; He, Qing; Wang, Shen; Li, Xue; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Tianpeng; Liu, Na; Upadhyaya, Arun; Zhou, Pingping; Zhang, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and hyperlipidemia is still a topic of debate. We aimed to explore the impact of gender and age on the association between serum TSH and lipid profile in a large cohort of Chinese.This cross-sectional study enrolled 13,915 participants (8565 male, 5350 female), who self-reported as healthy without any known previous diseases. Clinical data including anthropometric measurements, thyroid function, and other serum parameters were collected. The associations between TSH and hyperlipidemia of males and females were analyzed separately after dividing TSH and age into subgroups. Odds ratio for hyperlipidemia was calculated by binary logistic regression models.Young males had significantly higher prevalence of hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and high serum low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol than females, yet after menopause, females had higher prevalence than males. TSH was positively associated with hyperlipidemia independent of thyroid hormones. Males showed more reduced risks of hyperlipidemia in low TSH concentrations, while females demonstrated more enhanced risks of hyperlipidemia in high TSH concentrations. For instance, if TSH was lower than 0.3 μIU/mL, the risks of developing hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia in males were only 0.198 (P < 0.01) and 0.425 (P < 0.05) of the reference TSH risks (between 2.0 and 3.0 μIU/mL), while in females the risks were 0.553 (P < 0.05) and 0.642 (P > 0.05), respectively. If TSH was higher than 4.0 μIU/mL, women displayed significantly higher risks of developing hypertriglyceridemia than the reference TSH risks (P < 0.05), yet, men did not demonstrate such significances.Our results showed thyroid hormone independent positive associations between serum TSH and lipids, which were substantially influenced by gender and age. Males demonstrated more protective effects of low TSH against hyperlipidemia, while females showed

  13. The Effect of Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone on Tumor Size in Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ozemir, I A; Gurbuz, B; Bayraktar, B; Aslan, S; Başkent, A; Yalman, H; Yigitbasi, R; Alimoglu, O

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the correlation between serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels and tumor size and other invasiveness parameters of tumor in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Several clinical studies have reported that TSH may also have a role as a regulator of the development and function of the thyroid gland. It is currently not clear whether TSH is involved in the existence of thyroid cancer or progression of thyroid cancer or both. Patients with DTC who underwent thyroid surgery between 2003 and 2008 were included this study. Preoperative serum T3, T4, and TSH levels were compared with the size and invasiveness of cancer, retrospectively. DTC was observed in 110 patients over the 5-year period. Seventy-seven (70 %) of them were euthyroid and classified as the "normal-TSH group" (NTG), and 33 (30 %) have an overt or subclinical hyperthyroidism, classified as the "low-TSH group" (LTG). The mean tumor diameter in the LTG was found to be 8.91 ± 8.03 mm; however, it was found to be 18.19 ± 16.24 mm in the NTG. There were significantly differences among the groups related to the diameter of tumor (p = 0.001). Microcarcinoma was determined in 36 patients (46.8 %) in the NTG and 23 patients (69.7 %) in the LTG (p = 0.027). Although there were no significant differences, tumor capsule invasion (33.8 vs. 18.2 %, p = 0.099) and lymphovascular invasion (16.9 vs. 6.1 %, p = 0.130) rates were higher in the NTG. These findings suggest that TSH has effects on growing and proliferation of not only normal thyroid cells but also cancer cells in DTC. This study revealed that serum TSH level can be explored as an important factor that affects the size and invasiveness of tumor in DTC. PMID:27011492

  14. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH): measurement of intracellular, secreted, and circulating hormone in Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Korte, Joseph J; Sternberg, Robin M; Serrano, Jose A; Thoemke, Kara R; Moen, Scott M; Lillegard, Kathryn E; Hornung, Michael W; Tietge, Joseph E; Degitz, Sigmund J

    2011-05-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is an important regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in Xenopus laevis. To evaluate the role of this hormone on developing tadpoles, immunologically-based Western blots and sandwich ELISAs were developed for measuring intracellular (within pituitaries), secreted (ex vivo pituitary culture), and circulating (serum) amounts. Despite the small size of the tadpoles, these methods were able to easily measure intracellular and secreted TSH, and circulating TSH was measurable in situations where high levels were induced. The method was validated after obtaining a highly purified and enriched TSH sample using anti-TSH-β antibodies conjugated to magnetic beads. Subsequent mass-spectrometric analysis of the bands from SDS-PAGE and Western procedures identified the presence of amino acid sequences corresponding to TSH subunits. The purified sample was also used to prepare standard curves for quantitative analysis. The Western and ELISA methods had limits of detection in the low nanogram range. While the majority of the developmental work for these methods was done with X. laevis, the methods also detected TSH in Xenopus tropicalis. To our knowledge this is the first report of a specific detection method for TSH in these species, and the first to measure circulating TSH in amphibians. Examples of the utility of the methods include measuring a gradual increase in pituitary TSH at key stages of development, peaking at stages 58-62; the suppression of TSH secretion from cultured pituitaries in the presence of thyroid hormone (T4); and increases in serum TSH following thyroidectomy. PMID:21354158

  15. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Suppression for Protection Against Hypothyroidism Due to Craniospinal Irradiation for Childhood Medulloblastoma/Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura Gandola, Lorenza; Collini, Paola; Seregni, Ettore; Marchiano, Alfonso; Serra, Annalisa; Pignoli, Emanuele Ph.D.; Spreafico, Filippo; Pallotti, Federica; Terenziani, Monica; Biassoni, Veronica; Bombardieri, Emilio; Fossati-Bellani, Franca

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Hypothyroidism is one of the earliest endocrine effects of craniospinal irradiation (CSI). The effects of radiation also depend on circulating thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which acts as an indicator of thyrocyte function and is the most sensitive marker of thyroid damage. Hence, our study was launched in 1998 to evaluate the protective effect of TSH suppression during CSI for medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Patients and Methods: From Jan 1998 to Feb 2001, a total of 37 euthyroid children scheduled for CSI for medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor underwent thyroid ultrasound and free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), and TSH evaluation at the beginning and end of CSI. From 14 days before and up to the end of CSI, patients were administered L-thyroxine at suppressive doses; every 3 days, TSH suppression was checked to ensure a value <0.3 {mu}M/ml. During follow-up, blood tests and ultrasound were repeated after 1 year; primary hypothyroidism was considered an increased TSH level greater than normal range. CSI was done using a hyperfractionated accelerated technique with total doses ranging from 20.8-39 Gy; models were used to evaluate doses received by the thyroid bed. Results: Of 37 patients, 25 were alive a median 7 years after CSI. They were well matched for all clinical features, except that eight children underwent adequate TSH suppression during CSI, whereas 17 did not. Hypothyroidism-free survival rates were 70% for the 'adequately TSH-suppressed' group and 20% for the 'inadequately TSH-suppressed' group (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression with L-thyroxine had a protective effect on thyroid function at long-term follow-up. This is the first demonstration that transient endocrine suppression of thyroid activity may protect against radiation-induced functional damage.

  16. Diagnosis and discrimination of autoimmune Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease using thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor-containing recombinant proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hidetaka; Matsuo, Hideaki; Imamura, Koji; Morino, Kazuhiko; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Yoshimura, Tetsuro

    2009-12-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland caused by autoantibodies against thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR). Currently, the diagnostic test for TSHR autoantibodies is based on an indirect competitive binding assay that measures the ability of TSHR autoantibodies to inhibit the binding of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) to TSHR. Here, we have developed a specific and direct diagnostic method for autoantibodies in GD that incorporates immobilized TSHR-containing recombinant proteoliposomes into an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To reduce non-specific binding of autoantibodies to recombinant proteoliposomes, we investigated the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipid on the binding of commercially available anti-TSHR antibodies (aTSHRAb). The incorporation of PEG-lipids into liposomes decreased non-specific binding, as compared to liposomes that did not contain PEG-lipids, and the addition of blocking reagents further decreased non-specific reactivity. aTSHRAb exhibited higher reactivity towards PEG-modified TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes than PEG-modified liposomes without TSHR (bare liposomes). Importantly, serum autoantibodies from patients with GD, which is associated with hyperthyroidism, exhibited remarkably specific binding to TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes. Serum autoantibodies from patients with Hashimoto's disease (HD), which is associated with hypothyroidism, also reacted specifically with proteoliposomal TSHR. These results suggest that immobilized TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes can serve as a direct diagnostic test for GD and HD. Furthermore, given that there is no competition test currently available for detecting autoantibodies in HD, the combination of TSHR recombinant proteoliposome ELISA and indirect competitive TSHR binding assay might be an effective way to discriminate between GD and HD. PMID:19914592

  17. Rapid detection of a point mutation in thyroid-stimulating hormone beta-subunit gene causing congenital isolated thyroid-stimulating hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mori, R; Sawai, T; Kinoshita, E; Baba, T; Matsumoto, T; Yoshimoto, M; Tsuji, Y; Satake, Y; Sawada, K

    1991-12-01

    Previous study showed that congenital isolated TSH deficiency in Japan is resulted exclusively from a G-A transition at nucleotide 145 in exon 2 of the TSH beta-subunit gene. All reported cases were from the inbred in Shikoku Island. We describe here a 10-year-old boy with hereditary TSH deficiency in the same area. The patient was born with a weight of 3,225 g to non-consanguineous parents. Evaluation at age 2 months revealed typical manifestations of cretinism without goiter. Serum T4, T3, and TSH values were 2.53 micrograms/dl, 107 ng/dl, and 0.5 microU/ml, respectively. A TRH stimulation test showed no increment of serum TSH value. Other anterior pituitary hormone levels were all within the normal range. Two oligonucleotide primers T1a and T1b were synthesized according to the sequence data. Amplified 169 bp nucleotides in exon 2 of the TSH beta gene with this primer set were digested with MaeI. Both the phenotypically normal brother and normal controls showed only the 169 bp fragment, whereas the proband showed 140 and 29 bp fragments and both parents showed three fragments; 169, 140, and 29 bp. These results were consistent with the point mutation of TSH beta gene in Japanese patients with congenital isolated TSH deficiency. Our PCR method with MaeI digestion contributes to the rapid detection of the homozygous patient and the heterozygous carrier. PMID:1811097

  18. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Increases HNF-4α Phosphorylation via cAMP/PKA Pathway in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yongfeng; Zheng, Dongmei; Zhao, Meng; Qin, Yejun; Wang, Tingting; Xing, Wanjia; Gao, Ling; Zhao, Jiajun

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 alpha (HNF-4α) is an orphan nuclear receptor with important roles in hepatic metabolism. Protein phosphorylation plays a functional role in its nuclear localization, DNA binding, and transactivation. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is a hormone produced by the anterior pituitary gland, whose direct effect on the metabolic pathway has been observed. Our previous study demonstrated that TSH significantly decreases hepatic nuclear HNF-4α expression. However, whether TSH can influence HNF-4α phosphorylation is unclear. Here, we discovered that TSH can increase HNF-4α phosphorylation and modulate its subcellularlocalization. When HepG2 cells were treated with TSH, the phosphorylation of HNF-4α increased and its nuclear localization was interrupted. Cytoplasmic HNF-4α increased, while nuclear HNF-4α decreased. When the cAMP/PKA pathway was inhibited by the PKA inhibitor H89 and the adenylate cyclase (AC) inhibitor SQ22536, the TSH-mediated phosphorylation of HNF-4α was disrupted. When Tshr was silenced in mice, the phosphorylation of HNF-4α decreased, and cytoplasmic HNF-4α decreased while nuclear HNF-4α increased. In conclusion, our study revealed a novel mechanism by which TSH regulated the hepatic HNF-4α subcellular localization, suggesting the possibility that one of the effects of TSH is to reduce the expression of HNF-4α target genes. PMID:26302721

  19. Thyroid-stimulating hormone decreases HMG-CoA reductase phosphorylation via AMP-activated protein kinase in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiujuan; Song, Yongfeng; Feng, Mei; Zhou, Xinli; Lu, Yingli; Gao, Ling; Yu, Chunxiao; Jiang, Xiuyun; Zhao, Jiajun

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis is strictly regulated through the modulation of HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR), the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Phosphorylation of HMGCR inactivates it and dephosphorylation activates it. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is the major kinase phosphorylating the enzyme. Our previous study found that thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) increased the hepatocytic HMGCR expression, but it was still unclear whether TSH affected hepatic HMGCR phosphorylation associated with AMPK. We used bovine TSH (bTSH) to treat the primary mouse hepatocytes and HepG2 cells with or without constitutively active (CA)-AMPK plasmid or protein kinase A inhibitor (H89), and set up the TSH receptor (Tshr)-KO mouse models. The p-HMGCR, p-AMPK, and related molecular expression were tested. The ratios of p-HMGCR/HMGCR and p-AMPK/AMPK decreased in the hepatocytes in a dose-dependent manner following bTSH stimulation. The changes above were inversed when the cells were treated with CA-AMPK plasmid or H89. In Tshr-KO mice, the ratios of liver p-HMGCR/HMGCR and p-AMPK/AMPK were increased relative to the littermate wild-type mice. Consistently, the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a downstream target molecule of AMPK, increased. All results suggested that TSH could regulate the phosphorylation of HMGCR via AMPK, which established a potential mechanism for hypercholesterolemia involved in a direct action of the TSH in the liver. PMID:25713102

  20. Electron Capture Dissociation of Divalent Metal-adducted Sulfated N-Glycans Released from Bovine Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Håkansson, Kristina

    2013-11-01

    Sulfated N-glycans released from bovine thyroid stimulating hormone (bTSH) were ionized with the divalent metal cations Ca2+, Mg2+, and Co by electrospray ionization (ESI). These metal-adducted species were subjected to infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) and the corresponding fragmentation patterns were compared. IRMPD generated extensive glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages, but most product ions suffered from sulfonate loss. Internal fragments were also observed, which complicated the spectra. ECD provided complementary structural information compared with IRMPD, and all observed product ions retained the sulfonate group, allowing sulfonate localization. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of ECD towards metal-adducted sulfated N-glycans released from a glycoprotein. Due to the ability of IRMPD and ECD to provide complementary structural information, the combination of the two strategies is a promising and valuable tool for glycan structural characterization. The influence of different metal ions was also examined. Calcium adducts appeared to be the most promising species because of high sensitivity and ability to provide extensive structural information.

  1. Wide-range quantification of human thyroid-stimulating hormone using gold-nanopatterned single-molecule sandwich immunoassay chip.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungah; Kang, Seong Ho

    2012-09-15

    We performed wide-range quantification of human thyroid-stimulating hormone (hTSH) using a gold nano-patterned sandwich immunoassay chip. Objective-type total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) was used to detect hTSH at the single-molecule level. A gold spot with a diameter of 100 nm on a 10-mm square glass substrate was fabricated by electron beam nanolithography. When hTSH bound to antibodies conjugated to each 100-nm gold spot, there was an increase in the relative fluorescent intensity (RFI). The detection limit of this "TSH-nanoarray chip" was 360 zM (equivalent to five molecules), which demonstrated that a TSH-nanoarray chip could be used for detection at the single-molecule level. A linear response was observed over a wide dynamic range (from 360 zM to 36 pM, R=0.9812) without a fluorescence quenching effect. A significant enhancement in the sensitivity (~12,000-fold) was achieved with the 100-nm gold nano-patterned chip compared with results obtained using a traditional chemiluminescence immunoassay for the evaluation of TSH in human serum. PMID:22967658

  2. Electron Capture Dissociation of Divalent Metal-adducted Sulfated N-Glycans Released from Bovine Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen; Håkansson, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Sulfated N-glycans released from bovine thyroid stimulating hormone (bTSH) were ionized with the divalent metal cations Ca2+, Mg2+, and Co by electrospray ionization (ESI). These metal-adducted species were subjected to infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) and the corresponding fragmentation patterns were compared. IRMPD generated extensive glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages, but most product ions suffered from sulfonate loss. Internal fragments were also observed, which complicated the spectra. ECD provided complementary structural information compared with IRMPD, and all observed product ions retained the sulfonate group, allowing sulfonate localization. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of ECD towards metal-adducted sulfated N-glycans released from a glycoprotein. Due to the ability of IRMPD and ECD to provide complementary structural information, the combination of the two strategies is a promising and valuable tool for glycan structural characterization. The influence of different metal ions was also examined. Calcium adducts appeared to be the most promising species because of high sensitivity and ability to provide extensive structural information. PMID:23982932

  3. Effect of thyroid peroxidase antibodies on thyroid-stimulating hormone reference limits in a primarily Latina population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Richard H; Spencer, Carole A; Montoro, Martin N; Aghajanian, Paola; Goodwin, T Murphy; Miller, Erin A; Petrovic, Ivana; Braverman, Lewis E; Mestman, Jorge H

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to determine the prevalence of thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) and assess its effect on the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) reference range during pregnancy in a primarily Latina population. Serum samples were collected from healthy pregnant women and non-pregnant controls. TSH reference ranges were calculated when TPOAb-positive patients were either included or excluded. A total of 134 pregnant women and 107 non-pregnant controls were recruited. Positive TPOAb titres were found in 23 (17.2%) of the 134 pregnant women, and in 14 (13.1%) of the 107 non-pregnant controls. When the TPOAb-positive women were included in the TSH analysis, the upper reference limit using two different methods was consistently higher: 0–2.2 fold in the non-pregnant women, 2.01–2.78 fold in the first trimester, 3.18–4.7 fold in the second and 1.05–1.42 fold in the third. The lower TSH reference limit was not affected by the inclusion of TPOAb-positive subjects. In conclusion, inclusion of TPOAb-positive patients results in higher upper reference limits during pregnancy.

  4. The epidemiology of iodine-deficiency disorders in relation to goitrogenic factors and thyroid-stimulating-hormone regulation.

    PubMed

    Thilly, C H; Swennen, B; Bourdoux, P; Ntambue, K; Moreno-Reyes, R; Gillies, J; Vanderpas, J B

    1993-02-01

    In children aged 5-7 y from goiter-endemic areas in Ubangi, Zaire, and Ntcheu, Malawi, mean serum thyroxin (T4) concentrations were 53 +/- 49 vs 81 +/- 33 nmol/L (P < 0.05), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) values were 24.3 +/- 9.6 vs 4.5 +/- 3.3 mU/L respectively (P < 0.01); mean urinary iodine concentrations were 0.14 +/- 0.02 vs 0.09 +/- 0.02 mumol/L, and mean thiocyanate concentrations were 0.33 +/- 0.05 vs 0.17 +/- 0.05 nmol/L, respectively (P < 0.05). Mean serum selenium concentrations were 0.343 +/- 0.176 mumol/L in Ubangi and 0.437 +/- 0.178 mumol/L in Ntcheu (P < 0.05). In two groups of 11 adolescent girls from Ubangi, the mean values for excretion of urinary iodine were 1.31 +/- 0.14 and 0.58 +/- 0.17 mumol/L (P < 0.05) after a meal of cassava or a control meal of rice, respectively. In euthyroid subjects from Ubangi, mean serum TSH for a given serum T4 was approximately twice as high for children aged < 15 y than for those aged 16-25 y. The high frequency of myxedematous cretins observed in Ubangi very probably result from both severe iodine and selenium deficiency together with thiocyanate overload. PMID:8427202

  5. Inherent Suppression of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone in Newly Diagnosed Dyslipidemic Patients – Indication for Use of Thyromimetics?

    PubMed Central

    Udupa, Sridevi V.; D’Souza, Vivian; Udupa, Vinit A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dyslipidemia triggers a sequel of metabolic derangements such as insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and oxidative stress via vicious cycle. Dyslipidemia is characterised by elevation of plasma cholesterol, triglycerides (TGs), or both, or a low level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) which in turn can progress to atherosclerosis a forerunner for ischemic heart disease (IHD). Dyslipidemia is seen even in subclinical hypothyroid patients. Objectives: The aim of the study was to look for thyroid & glycemic abnormalities in dyslipidemic patients and compare it with euthyroid, normolipidemic group. Materials and Methods: Thirty primarily dyslipidemic patients and 30 euthyroid normolipidemic subjects aged 25-55 years were tested for fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fructosamine, lipid profile, thyroid hormones - T3, T4 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The values were compared with those of age matched euthyroid normolipidemic control group. Results: The dyslipidemic pool showed small but significant decrease in the TSH levels with comparable T3, T4 levels as compared to euthyroid group. The group also had significantly higher FPG, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels and lower high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels as compared to the euthyroid normolipidemic group. The plasma fructosamine levels were similar in both the groups. The observed results reflected a picture of subclinical hyperthyroidism in dyslipidemic patients. Conclusion: The observations of the present study preclude a need to assess the thyroid status in patients of primary dyslipidemia as both conditions per se have an increased risk of cardio vascular diseases. A subclinical hyperthyroid state may essentially be helpful in maintaining the lipid metabolism. The prevailing mild hyperthyroid status also makes it important to reconsider the accuracy of long term glycemic indicators like fructosamine and possibly glycated haemoglobin in these patients

  6. Genetic associations of the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene with Graves diseases and Graves ophthalmopathy: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Haibo; Wu, Mingxing; Yi, Hong; Wang, Xiuqing; Wang, Qian; Nadirshina, Sophia; Zhou, Xiyuan; Liu, Xueqin

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease (GD) is a common thyroid disease, and Graves ophthalmopathy(GO) is the most common extra-thyroidal manifestation of GD. Genetic associations of the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene with GD and GO have been studied in different population groups for a long time. We aimed to obtain a more precise estimation of the effects of TSHR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on GD/GO using a meta-analysis. Publications were searched on Pub Med and EMBASE up to December 30, 2015. Eight studies involving three SNPs (rs179247, rs12101255, and rs2268458), which included 4790 cases and 5350 controls, met the selection criteria. The pooled odds ratios (OR) and the 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. SNPs rs179247 (dominant model [GG + GA vs. AA]: OR = 0.66, 95%CI: 0.61–0.73, P = 0.000, I2 = 0%) and rs12101255 (dominant model [TT + TC vs. CC]: OR = 1.67, 95%CI: 1.53–1.83, P = 0.000, I2 = 0%) were significantly associated with GD in all of the genetic models. TSHR rs12101255 and rs2268458 polymorphisms had no association between GO and GD (GD without GO). The results indicate that rs179247 and rs12101255 are likely to be genetic biomarkers for GD. Further studies with different population groups and larger sample sizes are needed to confirm the genetic associations of the TSHR gene with GD/GO. PMID:27456991

  7. A domestication related mutation in the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene (TSHR) modulates photoperiodic response and reproduction in chickens.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Anna-Carin; Fallahshahroudi, Amir; Johnsen, Hanna; Hagenblad, Jenny; Wright, Dominic; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per

    2016-03-01

    The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene (TSHR) has been suggested to be a "domestication locus" in the chicken. A strong selective sweep over TSHR in domestic breeds together with significant effects of a mutation in the gene on several domestication related traits, indicate that the gene has been important for chicken domestication. TSHR plays a key role in the signal transduction of seasonal reproduction, which is characteristically less strict in domestic animals. We used birds from an advanced intercross line between ancestral Red Junglefowl (RJF) and domesticated White Leghorn (WL) to investigate effects of the mutation on reproductive traits as well as on TSHB, TSHR, DIO2 and DIO3 gene expression during altered day length (photoperiod). We bred chickens homozygous for either the mutation (d/d) or wild type allele (w/w), allowing assessment of the effect of genotype at this locus while also controlling for background variation in the rest of the genome. TSHR gene expression in brain was significantly lower in both d/d females and males and d/d females showed a faster onset of egg laying at sexual maturity than w/w. Furthermore, d/d males showed a reduced testicular size response to decreased day length, and lower levels of TSHB and DIO3 expression. Additionally, purebred White Leghorn females kept under natural short day length in Sweden during December had active ovaries and lower levels of TSHR and DIO3 expression compared to Red Junglefowl females kept under similar conditions. Our study indicates that the TSHR mutation affects photoperiodic response in chicken by reducing dependence of seasonal reproduction, a typical domestication feature, and may therefore have been important for chicken domestication. PMID:26873630

  8. How well does the capillary thyroid-stimulating hormone test for newborn thyroid screening predict the venous free thyroxine level?

    PubMed Central

    Pokrovska, Tzveta; Jones, Jeremy; Shaikh, M Guftar; Smith, Sarah; Donaldson, Malcolm D C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine, in newborn infants referred with elevated capillary thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), a threshold below which a frankly subnormal venous free thyroxine (fT4) level of <10 pmol/L is unlikely, so that treatment with levo-thyroxine (L-T4) might be deferred until venous thyroid function tests (TFTs) become available. Subjects and methods All infants referred in Scotland since 1979 with capillary TSH elevation were studied, with particular focus on infants screened using the AutoDELFIA assay between 2002 and 2013. Results Of the 321 infants referred with capillary TSH elevation using AutoDELFIA, 35 were excluded (fT4/TSH unavailable (12), venous sample either preceding or >10 days after capillary sampling (13, 10)), leaving 286 eligible for analysis (208 definite/probable hypothyroidism, 61 transient TSH elevation, 17 of uncertain thyroid status). Capillary TSH and venous T4 were strongly correlated (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient −0.707355). The optimal capillary TSH threshold for predicting a venous fT4 of <10 pmol/L was found to be >40 mU/L (90.3% sensitivity and 65.9% specificity compared with 90.25% and 59.1% for >35 mU/L and 88.3% and 68.2% for >45 mU/L). 93 infants (32.5%) had capillary TSH ≤40 mU/L at referral of whom 15 (9.7%) had venous fT4 <10 pmol/L, comprising seven with true congenital hypothyroidism, five with transient TSH elevation and three with uncertain status, two of whom died. Conclusion For infants in whom capillary TSH is ≤40 mU/L, it is reasonable to defer L-T4 treatment until venous TFT results are known provided that the latter become available quickly. PMID:26966265

  9. Genetic associations of the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene with Graves diseases and Graves ophthalmopathy: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Haibo; Wu, Mingxing; Yi, Hong; Wang, Xiuqing; Wang, Qian; Nadirshina, Sophia; Zhou, Xiyuan; Liu, Xueqin

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is a common thyroid disease, and Graves ophthalmopathy(GO) is the most common extra-thyroidal manifestation of GD. Genetic associations of the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene with GD and GO have been studied in different population groups for a long time. We aimed to obtain a more precise estimation of the effects of TSHR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on GD/GO using a meta-analysis. Publications were searched on Pub Med and EMBASE up to December 30, 2015. Eight studies involving three SNPs (rs179247, rs12101255, and rs2268458), which included 4790 cases and 5350 controls, met the selection criteria. The pooled odds ratios (OR) and the 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. SNPs rs179247 (dominant model [GG + GA vs. AA]: OR = 0.66, 95%CI: 0.61-0.73, P = 0.000, I(2) = 0%) and rs12101255 (dominant model [TT + TC vs. CC]: OR = 1.67, 95%CI: 1.53-1.83, P = 0.000, I(2) = 0%) were significantly associated with GD in all of the genetic models. TSHR rs12101255 and rs2268458 polymorphisms had no association between GO and GD (GD without GO). The results indicate that rs179247 and rs12101255 are likely to be genetic biomarkers for GD. Further studies with different population groups and larger sample sizes are needed to confirm the genetic associations of the TSHR gene with GD/GO. PMID:27456991

  10. Somatic mutations of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor gene in feline hyperthyroidism: parallels with human hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Watson, S G; Radford, A D; Kipar, A; Ibarrola, P; Blackwood, L

    2005-09-01

    Hyperthyroidism is the most common endocrinopathy in cats, and is both clinically and histopathologically very similar to human toxic nodular goitre (TNG). Molecular studies on human TNG have revealed the presence of mis-sense mutations in the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene, most frequently in exon 10. Our hypothesis was that similar mutations exist in hyperthyroid cats. Genomic DNA was extracted from 134 hyperplastic/adenomatous nodules (from 50 hyperthyroid cats), and analysed for the presence of mutations in exon 10 of the TSHR gene. 11 different mutations were detected, one silent and 10 mis-sense, of which nine were somatic mutations. 28 of the 50 cats (67/134 nodules) had at least one mis-sense mutation. The mis-sense mutations were Met-452-->Thr in 17 cats (35 nodules), Ser-504-->Arg (two different mutational forms) in two cats (two nodules), Val-508-->Arg in one cat (three nodules), Arg-530-->Gln in one cat (two nodules), Val-557-->Leu in 13 cats (36 nodules), Thr-631-->Ala or Thr-631-->Phe (each mutation seen in one nodule of one cat), Asp-632-->Tyr in six cats (10 nodules) and Asp-632-->His in one cat (one nodule). Five of these mutations have been associated previously with human hyperthyroidism. Of the 41 cats for which more than one nodule was available, 14 had nodules with different mutations. The identification of a potential genetic basis for feline hyperthyroidism is novel, increases our understanding of the pathogenesis of this significant feline disease, and confirms its similarity to TNG. PMID:16135672

  11. Purification of bovine thyroid-stimulating hormone by a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, A.J.; van Denderen, J.; Aarden, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody directed against bovine TSH was obtained by hybridoma technology. This antibody was specific for TSH and did not react with bovine LH and FSH. Affinity chromatography of crude TSH was performed on anti-TSH Sepharose. Bovine TSH was purified in a single step to near homogeneity by this technique, as shown by cation exchange chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified TSH. The biological activity of the hormone was not affected during the purification, as determined by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation of the TSH-dependent FRTL5 cell line. The results indicate that affinity purification of TSH by means of a monoclonal antibody is a simple one-step procedure for the production of biologically active, highly purified TSH.

  12. Association Between Autoantibodies Against Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor and Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Latifi-Pupovci, Hatixhe

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between TRAb and different diseases. The highest percentage of increased TRAb levels can be found at patients with Graves’ diseases. Material and methods: Study was performed in 70 patients, grouped in three groups, and 14 persons who based on the clinical status and the levels of thyroid hormones do not have any thyroid disease. The TRAb levels has been determined in patients with Graves’ disease (N=40), Hashimoto’s disease (N=15), Plummer’s disease (N=15) and the control group (N=14). Results: The highest mean TRAb levels exist in patients with Graves’ disease. There exists a positive correlation between TRAb levels and T3, and T4, while there is no correlation between TSH and TRAb levels in patients with Graves’ disease,. On the other hand, the correlation between TRAb and T3 and T4 in patients with Hashimoto’s diseases and Plummers disease was shown to be positive, but of a low levels.

  13. The association between serum thyroid-stimulating hormone in its reference range and bone status in postmenopausal American women.

    PubMed

    Morris, Martha Savaria

    2007-04-01

    Evidence suggests that hyperthyroidism adversely affects bone, but the condition is rare and probably contributes little to postmenopausal osteoporosis. Subclinical hyperthyroidism, which can result from treatment with L-thyroxine, is more common, but its relationship to osteoporosis and fracture is uncertain. A recent study of healthy, postmenopausal Koreans with no history of thyroid disease reported associations between both below-normal and low-normal circulating thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels and osteoporosis. These findings raise the hypothesis that variation in thyroid function, or TSH itself, affects bone in normal women. In the present research, we used data collected in the third U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to examine associations between TSH, as it varies over its reference range, and bone status in healthy, postmenopausal American women. In some analyses, we used osteoporosis and osteopenia defined according to World Health Organization guidelines as the outcome variable. In others, we used bone mineral density (BMD) as a continuum. After adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, serum T(4), estrogen replacement therapy, smoking, and physical activity level, the odds ratios (95% CI) relating TSH between 0.39 and 1.8 mIU/L (the median of the reference range) versus TSH between 1.8 and 4.5 to osteoporosis and osteopenia were 3.4 (95% CI, 1.3-9.2) and 2.2 (1.2-3.8), respectively. Furthermore, BMD increased significantly as TSH increased over its reference range in both black and white women. After multivariate adjustment, least-square mean BMD for non-Hispanic white women in the bottom serum TSH quintile category was 0.79 g/cm(2) (95% CI, 0.76-0.82), as compared to 0.83 g/cm(2) (95% CI, 0.8-0.85) for those in the top quintile category. Least-square mean BMD (95% CI) for non-Hispanic black women in the bottom serum TSH quintile category was 0.85 g/cm(2) (95% CI, 0.81-0.89). For non-Hispanic black women in the

  14. Recombinant Human Thyroid Stimulating Hormone versus Thyroid Hormone Withdrawal for Radioactive Iodine Treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer with Nodal Metastatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, Robert M.; Rachinsky, Irina; Morrison, Deric; Driedger, Al; Spaic, Tamara; Van Uum, Stan H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH) is approved for preparation of thyroid remnant ablation with radioactive iodine (RAI) in low risk patients with well differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). We studied the safety and efficacy of rhTSH preparation for RAI treatment of thyroid cancer patients with nodal metastatic disease. Methods. A retrospective analysis was performed on 108 patients with histopathologically confirmed nodal metastatic DTC, treated with initial RAI between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2007. Within this selected group, 31 and 42 patients were prepared for initial and all subsequent RAI treatments by either thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) or rhTSH protocols and were followed up for at least 3 years. Results. The response to initial treatment, classified as excellent, acceptable, or incomplete, was not different between the rhTSH group (57%, 21%, and 21%, resp.) and the THW group (39%, 13%, and 48%, resp.; P = 0.052). There was no significant difference in the final clinical outcome between the groups. The rhTSH group received significantly fewer additional doses of RAI than the THW group (P = 0.03). Conclusion. In patients with nodal-positive DTC, preparation for RAI with rhTSH is a safe and efficacious alternative to THW protocol. PMID:26977148

  15. The Effect of a Mutation in the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) on Development, Behaviour and TH Levels in Domesticated Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Anna-Carin; Svemer, Frida; Eriksson, Jonas; Darras, Veerle M.; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) has been suggested to be a “domestication locus” in the chicken, due to a strong selective sweep over the gene found in domesticated chickens, differentiating them from their wild ancestor the Red Junglefowl (RJF). We investigated the effect of the mutation on development (incubation time), behaviour and thyroid hormone levels in intercross chickens homozygous for the mutation (d/d), wild type homozygotes (w/w) or heterozygotes (d/w). This allowed an assessment of the effect of genotype at this locus against a random mix of RJF and WL genotypes throughout the rest of the genome, controlling for family effects. The d/d genotype showed a longer incubation time, less fearful behaviours, lower number of aggressive behaviours and decreased levels of the thyroid hormone T4, in comparison to the w/w genotype. The difference between TSHR genotypes (d/d vs. w/w) in these respects mirrors the differences in development and behaviour between pure domesticated White Leghorns and pure RJF chickens. Higher individual T3 and T4 levels were associated with more aggression. Our study indicates that the TSHR mutation affects typical domestication traits, possibly through modifying plasma levels of thyroid hormones, and may therefore have been important during the evolution of the domestic chicken. PMID:26053744

  16. The Effect of a Mutation in the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) on Development, Behaviour and TH Levels in Domesticated Chickens.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Anna-Carin; Svemer, Frida; Eriksson, Jonas; Darras, Veerle M; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) has been suggested to be a "domestication locus" in the chicken, due to a strong selective sweep over the gene found in domesticated chickens, differentiating them from their wild ancestor the Red Junglefowl (RJF). We investigated the effect of the mutation on development (incubation time), behaviour and thyroid hormone levels in intercross chickens homozygous for the mutation (d/d), wild type homozygotes (w/w) or heterozygotes (d/w). This allowed an assessment of the effect of genotype at this locus against a random mix of RJF and WL genotypes throughout the rest of the genome, controlling for family effects. The d/d genotype showed a longer incubation time, less fearful behaviours, lower number of aggressive behaviours and decreased levels of the thyroid hormone T4, in comparison to the w/w genotype. The difference between TSHR genotypes (d/d vs. w/w) in these respects mirrors the differences in development and behaviour between pure domesticated White Leghorns and pure RJF chickens. Higher individual T3 and T4 levels were associated with more aggression. Our study indicates that the TSHR mutation affects typical domestication traits, possibly through modifying plasma levels of thyroid hormones, and may therefore have been important during the evolution of the domestic chicken. PMID:26053744

  17. Assignment of the gene for the. beta. subunit of thyroid-stimulating hormone to the short arm of human chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dracopoli, N.C.; Rettig, W.J.; Whitfield, G.K.; Darlington, G.J.; Spengler, B.A.; Biedler, J.L.; Old, L.J.; Kourides, I.A.

    1986-03-01

    The chromosomal locations of the genes for the ..beta.. subunit of human thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and the glycoprotein hormone ..cap alpha.. subunit have been determined by restriction enzyme analysis of DNA extracted from rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. Human chorionic gonadotropin (CG) ..cap alpha..-subunit cDNA and a cloned 0.9-kilobase (kb) fragment of the human TSH ..beta..-subunit gene were used as hybridization probes in the analysis of Southern blots of DNA extracted from rodent-human hybrid clones. Analysis of the segregation of 5- and 10-kb EcoRI fragments hybridizing to CG ..cap alpha..-subunit cDNA confirmed the previous assignment of this gene to chromosome 6. Analysis of the patterns of segregation of a 2.3-kb EcoRI fragment containing human TSH ..beta..-subunit sequences permitted the assignment of the TSH ..beta..-subunit gene to human chromosome 1. The subregional assignment of TSH ..beta.. subunit to chromosome 1p22 was made possible by the additional analysis of a set of hybrids containing partially overlapping segments of this chromosome. Human TSH ..beta.. subunit is not syntenic with genes encoding the ..beta.. subunits of CG, luteinizing hormone, or follicle-stimulating hormone and is assigned to a conserved linkage group that also contains the structural genes for the ..beta.. subunit of nerve growth factor (NGFB) and the proto-oncogene N-ras (NRAS).

  18. Effect of subcutaneous injection of a long-acting analogue of somatostatin (SMS 201-995) on plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, S.; Tanaka, K.; Kumagae, M.; Takeda, F.; Morio, K.; Kogure, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Horiuchi, T.; Watabe, T.; Miyabe, S.

    1988-01-01

    SMS 201-995 (SMS), a synthetic analogue of somatostatin (SRIF) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the hypersecretion of hormones such as in acromegaly. However, little is known about the effects of SMS on the secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in normal subjects. In this study, plasma TSH was determined with a highly sensitive immunoradiometric assay, in addition to the concentration of SMS in plasma and urine with a radioimmunoassay, following subcutaneous injection of 25, 50, 100 ..mu..g of SMS or a placebo to normal male subjects, at 0900 h after an overnight fast. The plasma concentrations of SMS were dose-responsive and the peak levels were 1.61 +/- 0.09, 4.91 +/- 0.30 and 8.52 +/- 1.18 ng/ml, which were observed at 30, 15 and 45 min after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, respectively. Mean plasma disappearance half-time of SMS was estimated to be 110 +/- 3 min. Plasma TSH was suppressed in a dose dependent manner and the suppression lasted for at least 8 hours. At 8 hours after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, the plasma TSH levels were 43.8 +/- 19.4, 33.9 +/- 9.4 and 24.9 +/- 3.2%, respectively, of the basal values.

  19. Neuromedin U partly mimics thyroid-stimulating hormone and triggers Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the photoperiodic response of F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Helfer, G; Ross, A W; Morgan, P J

    2013-12-01

    In seasonal animals, photoperiod exerts profound effects on physiology, such as growth, energy balance and reproduction, via changes in the neuroendocrine axes. A key element of the photoperiodic response is the thyroid hormone level in the hypothalamus, which is controlled via retrograde transport of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the pars tuberalis of the pituitary. TSH regulates type II deiodinase (Dio2) expression, which transforms inactive thyroid hormone to its active form, via TSH receptors expressed in the ependymal cells of the hypothalamus. In the present study, we hypothesised that a second peptide hormone, neuromedin U (NMU), may play a role in the photoperiodic response alongside TSH because the gene for NMU is also expressed in a strongly photoperiod-dependent manner in the pars tuberalis and its receptor NMU2 is expressed in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle in photoperiod-sensitive F344 rats. Consistent with other studies conducted in nonseasonal mammals, we found that acute i.c.v. injections of NMU into the hypothalamus negatively regulated food intake and body weight and increased core body temperature in F344 rats. At the same time, NMU increased Dio2 mRNA expression in the ependymal region of the hypothalamus similar to the effects of TSH. These data suggest that NMU may affect acute and photoperiodically controlled energy balance through distinct pathways. We also showed that TSH inhibits the expression of type III deiodinase (Dio3) in F344 rats, a response not mimicked by NMU. Furthermore, NMU also increased the expression of genes from the Wnt/β-catenin pathway within the ependymal layer of the third ventricle. This effect was not influenced by TSH. These data indicate that, although NMU acts with some similarities to TSH, it also has completely distinct signalling functions that do not overlap. In summary, the present study of NMU signalling reveals the potential for a new player in the control of seasonal biology. PMID

  20. Neuromedin U Partly Mimics Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone and Triggers Wnt/β-Catenin Signalling in the Photoperiodic Response of F344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Helfer, G; Ross, A W; Morgan, P J

    2013-01-01

    In seasonal animals, photoperiod exerts profound effects on physiology, such as growth, energy balance and reproduction, via changes in the neuroendocrine axes. A key element of the photoperiodic response is the thyroid hormone level in the hypothalamus, which is controlled via retrograde transport of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the pars tuberalis of the pituitary. TSH regulates type II deiodinase (Dio2) expression, which transforms inactive thyroid hormone to its active form, via TSH receptors expressed in the ependymal cells of the hypothalamus. In the present study, we hypothesised that a second peptide hormone, neuromedin U (NMU), may play a role in the photoperiodic response alongside TSH because the gene for NMU is also expressed in a strongly photoperiod-dependent manner in the pars tuberalis and its receptor NMU2 is expressed in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle in photoperiod-sensitive F344 rats. Consistent with other studies conducted in nonseasonal mammals, we found that acute i.c.v. injections of NMU into the hypothalamus negatively regulated food intake and body weight and increased core body temperature in F344 rats. At the same time, NMU increased Dio2 mRNA expression in the ependymal region of the hypothalamus similar to the effects of TSH. These data suggest that NMU may affect acute and photoperiodically controlled energy balance through distinct pathways. We also showed that TSH inhibits the expression of type III deiodinase (Dio3) in F344 rats, a response not mimicked by NMU. Furthermore, NMU also increased the expression of genes from the Wnt/β-catenin pathway within the ependymal layer of the third ventricle. This effect was not influenced by TSH. These data indicate that, although NMU acts with some similarities to TSH, it also has completely distinct signalling functions that do not overlap. In summary, the present study of NMU signalling reveals the potential for a new player in the control of seasonal biology. PMID

  1. The direct cooling of the preoptic-hypothalamic area elicits the release of thyroid stimulating hormone during wakefulness but not during REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Davide; Luppi, Marco; Cerri, Matteo; Tupone, Domenico; Mastrotto, Marco; Perez, Emanuele; Zamboni, Giovanni; Amici, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Thermoregulatory responses to temperature changes are not operant during REM sleep (REMS), but fully operant in non-REM sleep and wakefulness. The specificity of the relationship between REMS and the impairment of thermoregulation was tested by eliciting the reflex release of Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone (TRH), which is integrated at hypothalamic level. By inducing the sequential secretion of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) and Thyroid Hormone, TRH intervenes in the regulation of obligatory and non-shivering thermogenesis. Experiments were performed on male albino rats implanted with epidural electrodes for EEG recording and 2 silver-copper wire thermodes, bilaterally placed in the preoptic-hypothalamic area (POA) and connected to small thermoelectric heat pumps driven by a low-voltage high current DC power supply. In preliminary experiments, a thermistor was added in order to measure hypothalamic temperature. The activation of TRH hypophysiotropic neurons by the thermode cooling of POA was indirectly assessed, in conditions in which thermoregulation was either fully operant (wakefulness) or not operant (REMS), by a radioimmunoassay determination of plasmatic levels of TSH. Different POA cooling were performed for 120 s or 40 s at current intensities of 80 mA and 125 mA, respectively. At both current intensities, POA cooling elicited, with respect to control values (no cooling current), a significant increase in plasmatic TSH levels in wakefulness, but not during REMS. These results confirm the inactivation of POA thermal sensitivity during REMS and show, for the first time, that this inactivation concerns also the fundamental endocrine control of non-shivering thermogenesis. PMID:24498374

  2. Preoperative ultrasonography and serum thyroid-stimulating hormone on predicting central lymph node metastasis in thyroid nodules as or suspicious for papillary thyroid microcarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Qu, Ning; Zhang, Ling; Chen, Jia-Ying; Ji, Qing-Hai

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the ultrasonography (US) image features and preoperative thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level in patients with thyroid nodules read as or suspicious for papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) on US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNAB) and to identify the risk factors for central lymph node metastasis (CLNM) that can guide surgical strategies for patients diagnosed with PTMC on pathology. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, a total of 163 patients diagnosed cytologically and histopathologically were included. Cytological diagnosis for each patient preoperatively was based on the Bethesda classification for the nodule: 44 (27.0 %) were suspicious for papillary carcinoma (Bethesda V) and 119 (73.0 %) were positive for papillary carcinoma (Bethesda VI). PTMC was confirmed in 162 patients on pathology. In the multivariate analysis, the US suspicious images including nodal metastases, microcalcification, and irregular margins, tumor size larger than 7 mm on US, and serum TSH level equal to or greater than 2.5 mIU/L were independent predictors for CLNM in 162 patients diagnosed with PTMC. Prophylactic central lymph node dissection (CLND) may be considered in PTMC patients presenting with risk factors. PMID:26678888

  3. An electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for thyroid stimulating hormone based on polyamidoamine-norfloxacin functionalized Pd-Au core-shell hexoctahedrons as signal enhancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuting; Zhang, Qiqi; Wang, Haijun; Yuan, Yali; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2015-09-15

    In this work, a novel polyamidoamine-norfloxacin (PAMAM-NFLX) complex and core-shell Pd-Au hexoctahedrons (Pd@Au HOHs) as enhancers are employed for development of a sensitive sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor to detect thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Here, norfloxacin (NFLX) is decorated abundantly on the surface of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer via amide linkage to form PAMAM-NFLX complex. Thus, the resultant PAMAM-NFLX can serve as a novel co-reactant to efficiently amplify the ECL signal of peroxydisulfate-oxygen (S2O8(2-)-O2) system. Pd@Au HOHs were used as nano-carriers to assemble detection antibody (Ab2) and the PAMAM-NFLX complex. Besides, it can further enhance the ECL signal by promoting the generation of intermediate free radical HO(•) during the ECL reaction of S2O8(2-)-O2 system. The proposed immunosensor shows high sensitivity and specificity, and responds linearly to the concentration of TSH from 0.05 to 20 μIU mL(-1) with a low detection limit of 0.02 μIU mL(-1) (S/N=3). Moreover, the immunosensor successfully achieves the detection of TSH in practical human blood serum with desirable results. PMID:25897886

  4. Strong Neck Accumulation of 131I Is a Predictor of Incomplete Low-Dose Radioiodine Remnant Ablation Using Recombinant Human Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Keisuke; Sakata, Yoshiharu; Izumi, Kazuyuki; Takenaka, Yukinori; Nagai, Miki; Takeda, Kazuya; Enomoto, Yukie; Uno, Atsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to identify the factors that predict incomplete low-dose radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) with recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) and to report the adverse events associated with this treatment. Between 2012 and 2014, 43 consecutive patients with thyroid cancer received low-dose RRA with rhTSH after total thyroidectomy. We retrospectively investigated the adverse events during low-dose RRA and during diagnostic whole body scan (DxWBS) using rhTSH, and analyzed the rate of RRA completion and the associations between RRA completion and various clinical/pathological factors. Complete RRA was seen in 33 (76.7%) patients, and incomplete RRA was observed in 10 (23.3%). Patients with incomplete RRA had stronger neck accumulation of 131I than those with complete RRA (P < 0.001). Adverse events at RRA and DxWBS were seen in 12 and 9 patients, respectively. All events at RRA were grade 1, with one exception (grade 2 vertigo after rhTSH administration). The rate of adverse events at DxWBS was significantly higher in patients with adverse events seen at RRA (risk ratio, 3.778, P = 0.008). Strong neck accumulation of 131I is significant independent predictor of incomplete low-dose RRA. The risk of adverse events at DxWBS was higher in patients who experienced adverse events at RRA than in those who did not. PMID:26426611

  5. Weight Changes in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma during Postoperative Long-Term Follow-up under Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Seo Young; Joung, Ji Young; Cho, Yoon Young; Park, Sun Mi; Jin, Sang Man; Chung, Jae Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited data about whether patients who receive initial treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) gain or lose weight during long-term follow-up under thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) suppression. This study was aimed to evaluate whether DTC patients under TSH suppression experience long-term weight gain after initial treatment. We also examined the impact of the radioactive iodine ablation therapy (RAIT) preparation method on changes of weight, comparing thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) and recombinant human TSH (rhTSH). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 700 DTC patients who underwent a total thyroidectomy followed by either RAIT and levothyroxine (T4) replacement or T4 replacement alone. The control group included 350 age-matched patients with benign thyroid nodules followed during same period. Anthropometric data were measured at baseline, 1 to 2 years, and 3 to 4 years after thyroidectomy. Comparisons were made between weight and body mass index (BMI) at baseline and follow-up. Results Significant gains in weight and BMI were observed 3 to 4 years after initial treatment for female DTC but not in male patients. These gains among female DTC patients were also significant compared to age-matched control. Women in the THW group gained a significant amount of weight and BMI compared to baseline, while there was no increase in weight or BMI in the rhTSH group. There were no changes in weight and BMI in men according to RAIT preparation methods. Conclusion Female DTC patients showed significant gains in weight and BMI during long-term follow-up after initial treatment. These changes were seen only in patients who underwent THW for RAIT. PMID:26248858

  6. Higher Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, Triiodothyronine and Thyroxine Values Are Associated with Better Outcome in Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Jan-Peter; Manka, Paul; Katsounas, Antonios; Syn, Wing-Kin; Führer, Dagmar; Gieseler, Robert K.; Bechmann, Lars P.; Gerken, Guido; Moeller, Lars C.; Canbay, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Changes in thyroid hormone levels, mostly as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS), have been described in many diseases. However, the relationship between acute liver failure (ALF) and thyroid hormone levels has not yet been clarified. The present study evaluates potential correlations of select thyroid functional parameters with ALF. Methods 84 consecutively recruited ALF patients were grouped according to the outcome of ALF (spontaneous recovery: SR; transplantation or death: NSR). TSH, free thyroxine (fT4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), T4, and T3 were determined. Results More than 50% of patients with ALF presented with abnormal thyroid parameters. These patients had greater risk for an adverse outcome than euthyroid patients. SR patients had significantly higher TSH, T4, and T3 concentrations than NSR patients. Albumin concentrations were significantly higher in SR than in NSR. In vitro T3 treatment was not able to rescue primary human hepatocytes from acetaminophen induced changes in mRNA expression. Conclusions In patients with ALF, TSH and total thyroid hormone levels differed significantly between SR patients and NSR patients. This might be related to diminished liver-derived transport proteins, such as albumin, in more severe forms of ALF. Thyroid parameters may serve as additional indicators of ALF severity. PMID:26147961

  7. Effect of metformin on thyroid stimulating hormone and thyroid volume in patients with prediabetes: A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Karimifar, Mozhgan; Aminorroaya, Ashraf; Amini, Masoud; Mirfendereski, Taghi; Iraj, Bijan; Feizi, Awat; Norozi, Atsa

    2014-01-01

    Background: The people with prediabetes have insulin resistance (IR). IR may affect thyroid function, size and nodules. We investigated the effects of metformin on the thyroid gland in prediabetic people. Materials and Methods: In a randomized, double-blind placebo-control clinical trial, 89 people with prediabetes, aged 18-65 years were studied for 3 months. They were divided into two, metformin (n = 43) and placebo (n = 46) treated groups. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was measured and thyroid nodules and volume was studied by ultrasonography. The data were compared between and within groups, before and after the study. Results: Mean of the baseline characteristics in metformin and placebo-treated groups had no statistically significant difference. At the end of the study, serum TSH was not significantly different between the two groups. However, if the TSH range was divided into two low normal (0.3-2.5 μU/ml) and high-normal (2.6-5.5 μU/ml) ranges, significant decrease was observed in metformin-treated group with a high-normal basal serum TSH (P = 0.01). Thyroid volume did not change in metformin-treated group. However, in placebo-treated group, the thyroid was enlarged (P = 0.03). In 53.9% of participants, thyroid nodule was observed. There was just a decrease in the volume of small solid (not mixed) nodules from median of 0.07 ml to 0.04 ml in metformin-treated group (P = 0.01). Conclusion: In prediabetic people, metformin decreases serum TSH, only, in those people with TSH >2.5 μU/ml and reduces the size of small solid thyroid nodules. It also prevents an increase in the thyroid volume. PMID:25657744

  8. A supersensitive in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for measurement of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and its clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Goh, K H; Ng, M L; Thean, E T; Khalid, B A; Goh, M L

    1992-12-01

    A supersensitive ELISA was developed for measurement of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in serum using in-house rabbit polyclonal antisera and a commercial monoclonal antibody. The assay was optimised and validated by recovery, linearity and cross-reactivity experiments and further compared to other available assays and EQAS samples. Good precision was obtained with a working assay range of 0.2 to 100 mIU/L with < 10% coefficient of variation (CV) for both intra and interassay. The assay is highly sensitive and specific with a minimum detectable limit of 0.07 mIU/L and negligible cross-reactivities against LH, FSH, HCG and other pituitary peptides. Good correlations were obtained when compared to Abbott hTSH EIA (r = 0.993; p < 0.001; n = 85) and NETRIA IRMA (r + 0.995; p < 0.001; n = 76). The normal reference range established was 0.4 to 4.0 mIU/L (n = 76). TSH levels in serum of thyrotoxic patients (n = 83) were significantly lower (0.07 to 0.20 mIU/L, p < 0.0001) and completely distinct from normal values thereby obviating the requirement of a TRH-stimulation test. Stability studies showed that coated wells can be stored at 4 degrees C for at least 2 months. This highly sensitive in-house hTSH ELISA which is cheap, stable and readily available is useful for diagnosis and management of patients with various thyroid disorders. PMID:1303476

  9. Propylthiouracil, Perchlorate, and Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Modulate High Concentrations of Iodide Instigated Mitochondrial Superoxide Production in the Thyroids of Metallothionein I/II Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Qi; Wang, Tingting; Zhang, Na; Perera, Vern; Liang, Xue; Abeysekera, Iruni Roshanie

    2016-01-01

    Background Increased oxidative stress has been suggested as one of the underlying mechanisms in iodide excess-induced thyroid disease. Metallothioneins (MTs) are regarded as scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in oxidative stress. Our aim is to investigate the effects of propylthiouracil (PTU), a thyroid peroxidase inhibitor, perchlorate (KClO4), a competitive inhibitor of iodide transport, and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on mitochondrial superoxide production instigated by high concentrations of iodide in the thyroids of MT-I/II knockout (MT-I/II KO) mice. Methods Eight-week-old 129S7/SvEvBrd-Mt1tm1Bri Mt2tm1Bri/J (MT-I/II KO) mice and background-matched wild type (WT) mice were used. Results By using a mitochondrial superoxide indicator (MitoSOX Red), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, we demonstrated that the decreased relative viability and increased LDH release and mitochondrial superoxide production induced by potassium iodide (100 µM) can be relieved by 300 µM PTU, 30 µM KClO4, or 10 U/L TSH in the thyroid cell suspensions of both MT-I/II KO and WT mice (P<0.05). Compared to the WT mice, a significant decrease in the relative viability along with a significant increase in LDH release and mitochondrial superoxide production were detected in MT-I/II KO mice(P<0.05). Conclusion We concluded that PTU, KClO4, or TSH relieved the mitochondrial oxidative stress induced by high concentrations of iodide in the thyroids of both MT-I/II KO and WT mice. MT-I/II showed antioxidant effects against high concentrations of iodide-induced mitochondrial superoxide production in the thyroid. PMID:26754589

  10. Genetic Variants Associated with Serum Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Levels in European Americans and African Americans from the eMERGE Network

    PubMed Central

    Malinowski, Jennifer R.; Denny, Joshua C.; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Basford, Melissa A.; Bradford, Yuki; Peissig, Peggy L.; Carrell, David; Crosslin, David R.; Pathak, Jyotishman; Rasmussen, Luke; Pacheco, Jennifer; Kho, Abel; Newton, Katherine M.; Li, Rongling; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Chute, Christopher G.; Chisholm, Rex L.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Larson, Eric B.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Masys, Daniel R.; Roden, Dan M.; de Andrade, Mariza; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Crawford, Dana C.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) hormone levels are normally tightly regulated within an individual; thus, relatively small variations may indicate thyroid disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified variants in PDE8B and FOXE1 that are associated with TSH levels. However, prior studies lacked racial/ethnic diversity, limiting the generalization of these findings to individuals of non-European ethnicities. The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network is a collaboration across institutions with biobanks linked to electronic medical records (EMRs). The eMERGE Network uses EMR-derived phenotypes to perform GWAS in diverse populations for a variety of phenotypes. In this report, we identified serum TSH levels from 4,501 European American and 351 African American euthyroid individuals in the eMERGE Network with existing GWAS data. Tests of association were performed using linear regression and adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and principal components, assuming an additive genetic model. Our results replicate the known association of PDE8B with serum TSH levels in European Americans (rs2046045 p = 1.85×10−17, β = 0.09). FOXE1 variants, associated with hypothyroidism, were not genome-wide significant (rs10759944: p = 1.08×10−6, β = −0.05). No SNPs reached genome-wide significance in African Americans. However, multiple known associations with TSH levels in European ancestry were nominally significant in African Americans, including PDE8B (rs2046045 p = 0.03, β = −0.09), VEGFA (rs11755845 p = 0.01, β = −0.13), and NFIA (rs334699 p = 1.50×10−3, β = −0.17). We found little evidence that SNPs previously associated with other thyroid-related disorders were associated with serum TSH levels in this study. These results support the previously reported association between PDE8B and serum TSH levels in European Americans and emphasize the need for additional genetic

  11. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone and Free Thyroxine Levels in Persons with HFE C282Y Homozygosity, a Common Hemochromatosis Genotype: The HEIRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Leiendecker-Foster, Catherine; Reboussin, David M.; Adams, Paul C.; Acton, Ronald T.; Eckfeldt, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Background Relationships of thyroid and iron measures in large cohorts are unreported. We evaluated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (T4) in white participants of the primary care–based Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study. Methods We measured serum TSH and free T4 in 176 HFE C282Y homozygotes without previous hemochromatosis diagnoses and in 312 controls without HFE C282Y or H63D who had normal serum iron measures and were matched to C282Y homozygotes for Field Center, age group, and initial screening date. We defined hypothyroidism as having TSH >5.00 mIU/L and free T4 <0.70 ng/dL, and hyperthyroidism as having TSH <0.400 mIU/L and free T4 >1.85 ng/dL. Multivariate analyses were performed using age, sex, Field Center, log10 serum ferritin (SF), HFE genotype, log10 TSH, and log10 free T4. Results Prevalences of hypothyroidism in C282Y homozygotes and controls were 1.7% and 1.3%, respectively, and of hyperthyroidism 0% and 1.0%, respectively. Corresponding prevalences did not differ significantly. Correlations of log10 SF with log10 free T4 were positive (p = 0.2368, C282Y homozygotes; p = 0.0492, controls). Independent predictors of log10 free T4 were log10 TSH (negative association) and age (positive association); positive predictors of log10 SF were age, male sex, and C282Y homozygosity. Proportions of C282Y homozygotes and controls who took medications to supplement or suppress thyroid function did not differ significantly. Conclusions Prevalences of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are similar in C282Y homozygotes without previous hemochromatosis diagnoses and controls. In controls, there is a significant positive association of SF with free T4. We conclude that there is no rationale for routine measurement of TSH or free T4 levels in hemochromatosis or iron overload screening programs. PMID:18651828

  12. Association of polymorphisms of rs179247 and rs12101255 in thyroid stimulating hormone receptor intron 1 with an increased risk of Graves' disease: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jing; Jiang, Shu-Jun; Wang, Ding-Kun; Dong, Hui; Chen, Guang; Fang, Ke; Cui, Jin-Rui; Lu, Fu-Er

    2016-08-01

    The polymorphisms of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) intron 1 rs179247 and rs12101255 have been found to be associated with Graves' disease (GD) in genetic studies. In the present study, we conducted a meta-analysis to examine this association. Two reviewers systematically searched eligible studies in PubMed, Web of Science, Embase and China Biomedical Literature Database (CBM). A meta-analysis on the association between GD and TSHR intron 1 rs179247 or rs12101255 was performed. The odd ratios (OR) were estimated with 95% confidence interval (CI). Meta package in R was used for the analyses. Seven articles (13 studies) published between 2009 and 2014, involving 5754 GD patients and 5768 controls, were analyzed. The polymorphism of rs179247 was found to be associated with an increased GD risk in the allele analysis (A vs. G: OR=1.40, 95% CI=1.33-1.48) and all genetic models (AA vs. GG: OR=1.94, 95% CI=1.73-2.19; AA+AG vs. GG: OR=1.57, 95% CI=1.41-1.74; AA vs. AG+GG: OR=1.54, 95% CI=1.43-1.66). The site rs12101255 also conferred a risk of GD in the allele analysis (T vs. C: OR=1.50, 95% CI=1.40-1.60) and all genetic models (TT vs. CC: OR=2.22, 95% CI=1.92-2.57; TT+TC vs. CC: OR=1.66, 95% CI=1.50-1.83; TT vs. TC+CC: OR=1.74, 95% CI=1.53-1.98). Analysis of the relationship between rs179247 and Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) showed no statistically significant correlation (A vs. G: OR=1.02, 95% CI=0.97-1.07). Publication bias was not significant. In conclusion, GD is associated with polymorphisms of TSHR intron 1 rs179247 and rs12101255. There is no association between rs179247 SNPs and GO. PMID:27465319

  13. Ovine thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) heterologously stimulates production of thyroid hormones from Chinese soft-shell turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) and bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana and Rana rugulosa) thyroids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Tung; Chien, Jung-Tsun; Weng, Ching-Feng; Jeng, Yung-Yue; Lu, Li-Chia; Yu, John Yuh-Lin

    2009-06-01

    Thyroid hormones are important for regulating a variety of developmental processes in vertebrates, including growth, differentiation, metamorphosis, and oxidative metabolism. In particular, this study focused on the in vitro production of thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)) from thyroids in American bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana), Chinese bullfrogs (Rana rugulosa Wiegmann), and Chinese soft-shell turtles (Pelodiscus sinensis) treated with ovine thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) at different culture intervals (2, 4, 8, and 12 h) and dosages (1, 10, 50 or 100 ng). The levels of T(4) and T(3) in the tested animals were elevated upon stimulation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, indicating de novo synthesis of T(4) and T(3). Significantly higher hormone levels were observed in the Chinese bullfrog compared to the other two species, for both the time-course and dose-response experiments. Although the bullfrog secreted significantly higher levels of T(4) and T(3), a higher T(4)-conversion capacity was found in the Chinese soft-shell turtle. The highest ratios of T(3) to T(4) were observed in the American bullfrog and Chinese soft-shell turtle for the time-course and dose-response experiments, respectively. These findings suggest that the Chinese soft-shell turtle and bullfrog thyroids can accept ovine TSH for T(4)- and T(3)-formation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, supporting the hypothesis that the binding interactions between TSHs and thyroidal receptors are conserved in vertebrates. PMID:19535032

  14. The effectiveness of recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone versus thyroid hormone withdrawal prior to radioiodine remnant ablation in thyroid cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Pak, Kyoungjune; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, In-Joo; Kim, E Edmund; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) versus thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) prior to radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) in thyroid cancer. A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and SCOPUS was performed. Randomized controlled trials that compared ablation success between rhTSH and THW at 6 to 12 months following RRA were included in this study. Six trials with a total of 1,660 patients were included. When ablation success was defined as a thyroglobulin (Tg) cutoff of 1 ng/mL (risk ratio, 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.96-1.03) or a Tg cutoff of 1 ng/mL plus imaging modality (RR 0.97; 0.90-1.05), the results of rhTSH and THW were similar. There were no significant differences when ablation success was defined as a Tg cutoff of 2 ng/mL (RR 1.03; 0.95-1.11) or a Tg cutoff of 2 ng/mL plus imaging modality (RR 1.02; 0.95-1.09). When a negative (131)I-whole body scan was used solely as the definition of ablation success, the effects of rhTSH and THW were not significantly different (RR 0.97; 0.93-1.02). Therefore, ablation success rates are comparable when RRA is prepared by either rhTSH or THW. PMID:24932083

  15. A novel hypothesis for the etiology of Graves' disease: TSAb may be thyroid stimulating animal IgG-like hormone and TBAb may be the precursor of TSAb.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Yukio; Kajita, Yoshihiro; Hachiya, Takashi; Hamaoki, Masaru

    2012-06-01

    spite of no antibody function). There are many reports for co-existence of TSAb and TBAb-IgG in sera of GD. We reported conversion from TBAb (non-thyroid stimulating type IgG) to TSAb by co-incubation of anti-hIgG Ab (containing anti-animal IgG Ab as a cross-reaction) with TBAb-bound porcine thyroid cells. Thus, we suggest that TBAb may be the precursor form of TSAb. PMID:22472575

  16. Low-dose immunization with adenovirus expressing the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor A-subunit deviates the antibody response toward that of autoantibodies in human Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Rong; Pichurin, Pavel; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D; Aliesky, Holly; Nagayama, Yuji; McLachlan, Sandra M; Rapoport, Basil

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with adenovirus expressing the TSH receptor (TSHR) induces hyperthyroidism in 25-50% of mice. Even more effective is immunization with a TSHR A-subunit adenovirus (65-84% hyperthyroidism). Nevertheless, TSHR antibody characteristics in these mice do not mimic accurately those of autoantibodies in typical Graves' patients, with a marked TSH-blocking antibody response. We hypothesized that this suboptimal antibody response was consequent to the standard dose of TSHR-adenovirus providing too great an immune stimulus. To test this hypothesis, we compared BALB/c mice immunized with the usual number (10(11)) and with far fewer viral particles (10(9) and 10(7)). Regardless of viral dose, hyperthyroidism developed in a similar proportion (68-80%) of mice. We then examined the qualitative nature of TSHR antibodies in each group. Sera from all mice had TSH binding-inhibitory (TBI) activity after the second immunization, with TBI values in proportion to the viral dose. After the third injection, all groups had near-maximal TBI values. Remarkably, in confirmation of our hypothesis, immunization with progressively lower viral doses generated TSHR antibodies approaching the characteristics of autoantibodies in human Graves' disease as follows: 1) lower TSHR antibody titers on ELISA and 2) lower TSH-blocking antibody activity without decrease in thyroid-stimulating antibody activity. In summary, low-dose immunization with adenovirus expressing the free TSHR A-subunit provides an induced animal model with a high prevalence of hyperthyroidism as well as TSHR antibodies more closely resembling autoantibodies in Graves' disease. PMID:14576177

  17. Effects of thyroid hormone deficiency on electrocardiogram findings of congenitally hypothyroid neonates.

    PubMed

    Asami, T; Suzuki, H; Yazaki, S; Sato, S; Uchiyama, M

    2001-08-01

    Hypothyroid status is believed to cause various metabolic changes in infants. However, it is interesting that even severely hypothyroid neonates, detected during mass neonatal screening, rarely show bradycardia, hypothermia, or inactivity. To study cardiac functions of screen-detected neonates with congenital hypothyroidism (CH), we recorded the electrocardiograms (ECG) of 53 screen-detected CH neonates before levothyroxine (LT4) replacement therapy, and 15 age-matched normal neonates for controls. The 53 CH neonates were divided into two groups according to initial serum thyroid hormone levels: a mildly hypothyroid group (n = 37), serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) less than 100 microIU/mL and free thyroxine (FT4) 0.6 ng/dl or more; and a severely hypothyroid group (n = 16), TSH 100 microIU/mL or more and FT4 less than 0.6 ng/dL. TSH, FT4, and other blood chemicals were measured on an autoanalyzer (Hitachi 7170). After blood sampling, the ECG was recorded during induced sleep by oral administration of triclofos sodium syrup. ECG parameters, including HR, PR, QRS, QT time and corrected QT time (QTc) were automatically obtained, using an auto-ECG analyzing system. The following results were obtained. No CH patients showed abnormal ECG findings. There was no significant difference of the mean heart rates (HRs) between the mildly hypothyroid (147.5 +/- 16.3 beats per minute) and the control group (148.3 +/- 12.1 beats per minute). The mean HR in the severely hypothyroid group (134.0 +/- 17.9 beats per minute, p = 0.007) was significantly low compared with the normal control group. However, all values were within normal ranges. QTc in the severely hypothyroid group (0.414 +/- 0.015, p = 0.033) was significantly shorter than in the control group (0.440 +/- 0.052). No statistical differences of PR, QRS, and QT time were noted among the three groups. All ECG parameters were within normal ranges. HR positively correlated with FT4 and log (FT4), and negatively with TSH

  18. SIRT1 Regulates Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Release by Enhancing PIP5Kγ Activity through Deacetylation of Specific Lysine Residues in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Akieda-Asai, Sayaka; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Ikegami, Koji; Kahyo, Tomoaki; Yao, Ikuko; Hatanaka, Takahiro; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Sugiyama, Rika; Yokozeki, Takeaki; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Koike, Morio; Ikeda, Kyoji; Chiba, Takuya; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Song, Si-Young; Matsuno, Akira; Mizutani, Akiko; Sawabe, Motoji; Chao, Moses V.; Tanaka, Masashi; Kanaho, Yasunori; Natsume, Tohru; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Date, Yukari; McBurney, Michael W.; Guarente, Leonard; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2010-01-01

    Background SIRT1, a NAD-dependent deacetylase, has diverse roles in a variety of organs such as regulation of endocrine function and metabolism. However, it remains to be addressed how it regulates hormone release there. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report that SIRT1 is abundantly expressed in pituitary thyrotropes and regulates thyroid hormone secretion. Manipulation of SIRT1 level revealed that SIRT1 positively regulated the exocytosis of TSH-containing granules. Using LC/MS-based interactomics, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K)γ was identified as a SIRT1 binding partner and deacetylation substrate. SIRT1 deacetylated two specific lysine residues (K265/K268) in PIP5Kγ and enhanced PIP5Kγ enzyme activity. SIRT1-mediated TSH secretion was abolished by PIP5Kγ knockdown. SIRT1 knockdown decreased the levels of deacetylated PIP5Kγ, PI(4,5)P2, and reduced the secretion of TSH from pituitary cells. These results were also observed in SIRT1-knockout mice. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicated that the control of TSH release by the SIRT1-PIP5Kγ pathway is important for regulating the metabolism of the whole body. PMID:20668706

  19. Immeasurably low and non-TRH-stimulatable TSH associated with normal I-123 uptake in two goitrous euthyroid patients: possible existence of other thyroid-hormone regulated thyroid stimulators other than TSH.

    PubMed

    Ikekubo, Katsuji; Hino, Megumu; Saiki, Yasuhiko; Son, Cheol; Iwakura, Toshio; Kobayashi, Hiromasa; Ishihara, Takashi

    2005-02-01

    We described two euthyroid patients with normally functioning goiters, but with persistently undetectable and non-stimulatable TSH levels. Subject 1 was a 64-year-old woman with a large diffuse goiter who has been clinically and biochemically euthyroid without any medication for at least 19 years. Subject 2 was a 31-year-old woman with a small diffuse goiter who has been euthyroid for 4 years. Both patients had persistently undetectable levels of serum TSH, TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb) and thyroid stimulating antibodies (TSAb). Their basal TSH levels were very low and their T3 responses to TRH were very diminished or absent. In contrast, the basal levels of the other pituitary hormones and their responses to LHRH, GRH and CRH stimulation were all within normal limits in both patients. MRI images of pituitary glands, 123I thyroid uptake, and thyroid scans were normal. Ectopic thyroids were not detected on (99m)TcO4- and 123I total body scans. Factors interfering with the measurement of TSH were excluded by recovery studies. In subject 1 a T3-suppression test was positive and a perchlorate discharge test was negative. In subject 2 a T3-suppression test was negative. Euthyroid Graves' disease, subclinical hyperthyroidism, destructive thyroiditis, thyrotoxicosis of extrathyroid origin, central hypothyroidism, and nonthyroidal illness were all ruled out by these observations. These results suggest that an unknown factor, such as thyrostimulin, but not TSH or TSAb, stimulates the thyroid and maintains euthyroidism, and may have a role in the regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. PMID:15758559

  20. Reference interval of thyroid stimulating hormone and free thyroxine in a reference population over 60 years old and in very old subjects (over 80 years): comparison to young subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies based on laboratory data about thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) reference interval (RI) show conflicting results regarding the importance of using specific values by age groups with advancing age. Retrospective laboratory data or non-specific criteria in the selection of subjects to be studied may be factors leading to no clear conclusions. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that TSH and FT4 have specific RI for subjects over 60 to 80 years. Methods We evaluated prospectively 1200 subjects of both sexes stratified by age groups, initially submitted to a questionnaire to do the first selection to exclude those with factors that could interfere in TSH or FT4 levels. Then, we excluded those subjects with goiter or other abnormalities on physical examination, positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb), thyroglobulin antibodies (TGAb), and other laboratory abnormalities. Results TSH increased with age in the whole group. There was no statistical difference in the analysis of these independent subgroups: 20–49 versus 50–59 years old (p > 0.05), and 60–69 versus 70–79 years old (p > 0.05). Consequently, we achieved different TSH RI for the three major age groups, 20 to 59 years old: 0.4 - 4.3 mU/L, 60 to 79 years old: 0.4 - 5.8 mU/L and 80 years or more: 0.4 - 6.7 mU/L. Conversely, FT4 progressively decreases = significantly with age, but the independent comparison test between the sub-groups showed that after age 60 the same RI was obtained (0.7 - 1.7 ng/dL) although the minimum value was smaller than that defined by manufacturer. In the comparison between TSH data obtained by this study and those defined by the manufacturer (without segmentation by age) 6.5% of subjects between 60 and 79 years and 12.5% with 80 years or more would have a misdiagnosis of elevated TSH. Conclusions TSH normal reference range increases with age, justifying the use of different RI in subjects 60

  1. TSH (Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of a thyroid disorder , including hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism . TSH is produced by the pituitary gland , a ... thyroid Monitor thyroid replacement therapy in people with hypothyroidism Monitor anti-thyroid treatment in people with hyperthyroidism ...

  2. Assays of thyroid-stimulating antibody

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, J.M.; Zakarija, M.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison is presented of the two major assay methods of thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) of Graves' disease. The basic procedures involve: (1) some index of thyroid stimulation, usually in vitro, using TSAb to indicate its activity; and (2) indirect recognition by assessment of the inhibition of binding of radioiodinated thyrotropin (TSH) to a preparation of its receptor, i.e., TSH-binding inhibition or TBI. There is potential for misinterpretation of data acquired by testing patients' sera by one or the other basic procedure.

  3. [Neonatal monitoring of congenital hypothyroidism in a mild iodine-deficiency region].

    PubMed

    Radzivil, T T; Krat, I V

    2006-07-01

    The paper analyzes the 2001-2004 data on congenital thyroid deficiency in a mild iodine-deficiency region. There is an increase in the number of neonatal infants with abnormally high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) values. There is evidence that there is a need for neonatal TSH screening. The latter makes it possible to diagnose congenital thyroid deficiency from the first days of a baby's life and to prevent serious consequences in future. PMID:16925057

  4. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis caused by maternal autoimmune hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Correia, Miguel Fragata; Maria, Ana Teresa; Prado, Sara; Limbert, Catarina

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal immune hyperthyroidism is a rare but potentially fatal condition. It occurs in 1-5% of infants born to women with Graves' disease (GD). In most of the cases it is due to maternal antibodies transferred from the mother into the fetal compartment, stimulating the fetal thyroid by binding thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) receptor. We present a case of neonatal thyrotoxicosis due to maternal GD detected at 25 days of age and discuss the potential pitfalls in the diagnosis. PMID:25750228

  5. The Presence of Thyroid-Stimulation Blocking Antibody Prevents High Bone Turnover in Untreated Premenopausal Patients with Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun Wook; Bae, Jae Hyun; Noh, Gyeong Woon; Kim, Ye An; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Do Joon; Chung, June-Key; Cho, Bo Youn; Park, Young Joo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis-related fractures are one of the complications of Graves’ disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves’ disease patients might oppositely impact bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves’ disease patients were enrolled (n = 93) and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity (stimulating activity group, n = 83) and patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity combined with blocking activity (blocking activity group, n = 10). From the stimulating activity group, patients who had matched values for free T4 and TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) to the blocking activity group were further classified as stimulating activity-matched control (n = 11). Bone turnover markers BS-ALP, Osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide were significantly lower in the blocking activity group than in the stimulating activity or stimulating activity-matched control groups. The TBII level showed positive correlations with BS-ALP and osteocalcin levels in the stimulating activity group, while it had a negative correlation with the osteocalcin level in the blocking activity group. In conclusion, the activation of TSHR antibody-activated TSH signaling contributes to high bone turnover, independent of the actions of thyroid hormone, and thyroid-stimulation blocking antibody has protective effects against bone metabolism in Graves’ disease. PMID:26650844

  6. The Presence of Thyroid-Stimulation Blocking Antibody Prevents High Bone Turnover in Untreated Premenopausal Patients with Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sun Wook; Bae, Jae Hyun; Noh, Gyeong Woon; Kim, Ye An; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Do Joon; Chung, June-Key; Cho, Bo Youn; Park, Young Joo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis-related fractures are one of the complications of Graves' disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves' disease patients might oppositely impact bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves' disease patients were enrolled (n = 93) and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity (stimulating activity group, n = 83) and patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity combined with blocking activity (blocking activity group, n = 10). From the stimulating activity group, patients who had matched values for free T4 and TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) to the blocking activity group were further classified as stimulating activity-matched control (n = 11). Bone turnover markers BS-ALP, Osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide were significantly lower in the blocking activity group than in the stimulating activity or stimulating activity-matched control groups. The TBII level showed positive correlations with BS-ALP and osteocalcin levels in the stimulating activity group, while it had a negative correlation with the osteocalcin level in the blocking activity group. In conclusion, the activation of TSHR antibody-activated TSH signaling contributes to high bone turnover, independent of the actions of thyroid hormone, and thyroid-stimulation blocking antibody has protective effects against bone metabolism in Graves' disease. PMID:26650844

  7. Neonatal detection of generalized resistance to thyroid hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.E.; Balzano, S.; Scherberg, N.H.; Refetoff, S. )

    1990-11-07

    Generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH) is an inherited disease that is usually suspected when elevated serum thyroid hormone levels are associated with nonsuppressed thyrotropin. Often these test results are obtained because of short stature, decreased intelligence, and/or hyperactivity with learning disability noted in childhood and adolescence, or because of goiter in adulthood. The authors detected GRTH at birth by analysis of blood obtained during routine neonatal screening. The proposita, born to a mother with GRTH, had a thyrotropin level of 26 mU/L and a corresponding thyroxine concentration of 656 nmol/L. Administration of thyroid hormone in doses eightfold to 10-fold above replacement levels were required to reduce serum thyrotropin to normal levels without induction of hypermetabolism. This case, and the retrospective finding of high thyroxine levels in five newborns subsequently diagnosed as having GRTH, suggest that measurement of thyroxine at birth, in conjunction with thyrotropin, could allow the early detection of GRTH.

  8. Molecular impact of juvenile hormone agonists on neonatal Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Daphnia magna has been used extensively to evaluate organism- and population-level responses to pollutants in acute toxicity and reproductive toxicity tests. We have previously reported that exposure to juvenile hormone (JH) agonists results in a reduction of reproductive function and production of male offspring in a cyclic parthenogenesis, D. magna. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided tools to understand better the responses to pollutants in aquatic organisms, including D. magna. DNA microarray was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of neonatal daphnids exposed to JH agonists: methoprene (125, 250 and 500 ppb), fenoxycarb (0.5, 1 and 2 ppb) and epofenonane (50, 100 and 200 ppb). Exposure to these JH analogs resulted in chemical-specific patterns of gene expression. The heat map analyses based on hierarchical clustering revealed a similar pattern between treatments with a high dose of methoprene and with epofenonane. In contrast, treatment with low to middle doses of methoprene resulted in similar profiles to fenoxycarb treatments. Hemoglobin and JH epoxide hydrolase genes were clustered as JH-responsive genes. These data suggest that fenoxycarb has high activity as a JH agonist, methoprene shows high toxicity and epofenonane works through a different mechanism compared with other JH analogs, agreeing with data of previously reported toxicity tests. In conclusion, D. magna DNA microarray is useful for the classification of JH analogs and identification of JH-responsive genes. PMID:24038158

  9. Need for neonatal screening program in India: A national priority.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Pradhan, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    In India, out of 342 districts surveyed, 286 have been identified as endemic to iodine deficiency (ID). Research studies conducted in school age children (SAC), Adolescent girls, Pregnant Mothers (PMs) and Neonates have documented poor iodine nutritional status. As observed by total goiter rate of more than 5% and median urinary iodine concentration level of <100 μg/l in SAC and <150 μg/l in PMs as prescribed cutoff of World Health Organization. And higher thyroid stimulating hormone levels among neonates. ID leads to compromised mental development and hence which remain hidden and not visible to family, program managers and administrator. The present review describes the current status of ID in different parts of the country. With a view to strongly recommend the implementation of Neonatal screening program for ID so that the optimal mental development of children can be achieved. PMID:25729682

  10. EFFECTS OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) ON THYROID HORMONE STATUS IN ADULT AND NEONATAL RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) ON THYROID HORMONE STATUS IN ADULT AND NEONATAL RATS. M.N. Logan1, J.R. Thibodeaux2, R.G. Hanson2, C. Lau2. 1North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC, 2Reprod. Tox. Div. NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Perfluor...

  11. Hormone levels in neonatal hair reflect prior maternal stress exposure during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Amita; Lubach, Gabriele R; Ziegler, Toni E; Coe, Christopher L

    2016-04-01

    Hormones present in hair provide summative information about endocrine activity while the hair was growing. Therefore, it can be collected from an infant after birth and still provide retrospective information about hormone exposure during prenatal development. We employed this approach to determine whether a delimited period of maternal stress during pregnancy affected the concentrations of glucocorticoids and gonadal hormones in the hair of neonatal rhesus monkeys. Hair from 22 infant monkeys exposed to 5 weeks of gestational disturbance was compared to specimens from 13 infants from undisturbed control pregnancies. Using an LC/MS/MS based technique, which permitted seven steroid hormones to be quantified simultaneously, we found 2 hormones were significantly different in infants from disturbed pregnancies. Cortisol and testosterone levels were lower in the hair of both male and female neonates. Maternal hair hormone levels collected on the same day after delivery no longer showed effects of the disturbance earlier during pregnancy. This study documents that a period of acute stress, lasting for 20% of gestation, has sustained effects on the hormones to which a developing fetus is exposed. PMID:26802598

  12. Roles of thyroid hormones in follicular development in the ovary of neonatal and immature rats.

    PubMed

    Fedail, Jaafar Sulieman; Zheng, Kaizhi; Wei, Quanwei; Kong, Lingfa; Shi, Fangxiong

    2014-08-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) play a critical role in ovarian follicular development, maturation and the maintenance of various endocrine functions. However, whether TH can affect ovarian follicular development in neonatal and immature rats remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the effect of TH on ovarian follicular development in neonatal and immature rats. Thirty female post-lactation mothers of Sprague-Dawley rat pups were randomly divided into three groups: control, hyperthyroid (hyper), and hypothyroid (hypo). On postnatal days (PND) 10 and 21, body weights, serum hormones, ovarian histologic changes, and immunohistochemistry of thyroid hormone receptor alpha 1 (TRα1) and nitric oxide synthase types (NOS), and NOS activities, were determined. The data showed that body weights significantly decreased in both hyper and hypo groups compared with the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, the hyper group had increased serum concentrations of T3, T4, and E2; whereas the hypo group manifested reduced serum concentrations of T3, T4, and E2 on PND 10 and 21. The hyper and hypo groups showed significantly reduced total number of primordial, primary and secondary follicles on PND 10 and 21 compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Similarly, antral follicle numbers in the hyper and hypo groups were significantly decreased on PND 21 compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Immunostaining indicated that TRα1 and NOS were expressed in ovarian surface epithelium and oocytes of growing and antral follicles, with strong staining of the granulosa and theca cells of follicles. NOS activities were significantly augmented in the hyper, but diminished in the hypo groups on PND 10 and 21. In summary, our findings suggest that TH play important roles in ovarian functions and in the regulation of NOS activity. Our results also indicate that a relationship exists between the TH and NO signaling pathways during the process of ovarian follicular

  13. Differences in neonatal exposure to estradiol or testosterone on ovarian function and hormonal levels.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, Rodrigo R; Carvalho, Kátia C; Duarte, Daniele C; Garcia, Natália; Amaral, Vinícius C; Simões, Manuel J; Lo Turco, Edson G; Soares, José M; Baracat, Edmund C; Maciel, Gustavo A R

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to an excess of androgen or estrogen can induce changes in reproductive function in adult animals that resemble polycystic ovary syndrome in humans. However, considerable differences exist among several types of animal models. Little is known about the molecular features of steroidogenesis and folliculogenesis in the ovaries of rats exposed to different sex steroids as neonates. Here, we evaluated the impact of androgen and estrogen exposure on the ovaries of adult female rats during their neonatal period in the gene expression of Lhr and Cyp17a1, two key players of steroidogenesis. We also assessed hormone levels, folliculogenesis and the theca-interstitial cell population. The study was performed on the second postnatal day in thirty female Wistar rats that were sorted into the following three intervention groups: testosterone, estradiol and vehicle (control group). The animals were euthanized 90 days after birth. The main outcomes were hormone serum levels, ovary histomorphometry and gene expression of Lhr and Cyp17a1 as analyzed via quantitative real-time PCR. We found that exposure to excess testosterone in early life increased the LH and testosterone serum levels, the LH/FSH ratio, ovarian theca-interstitial area and gene expression of Lhr and Cyp17a1 in adult rats. Estrogen induced an increase in the ovarian theca-interstitial area, the secondary follicle population and gene expression of Lhr and Cyp17a1. All animals exposed to the sex steroids presented with closed vaginas. Our data suggest that testosterone resulted in more pronounced reproductive changes than did estrogen exposure. Our results might provide some insight into the role of different hormones on reproductive development and on the heterogeneity of clinical manifestations of conditions such as polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:25623143

  14. Prevalence of neonatal hypothyroidism in Kangra Valley, Himachal Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Kapil, U; Jain, V; Kabra, M; Pandey, R M; Sareen, N; Khenduja, P

    2014-06-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) is an endemic health problem in Kangra District, Himachal Pradesh (HP). ID in pregnant mothers leads to neonatal hypothyroidism (NH), mental retardation, deaf mutism, squint, dwarfism, spastic dysplasia, neurological defects and congenital anomalies. NH can be assessed by estimating the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in cord blood samples. The present study was conducted with an objective to assess the prevalence of NH in district Kangra, HP. In district Kangra, all the hospitals providing obstetric services were enlisted. Three hospitals conducting more than 100 deliveries per year were selected randomly. A total of 613 umbilical cord blood samples of neonates were collected on filter papers and analyzed for TSH. TSH was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Neonates with TSH levels ⩾20 mIU/l were recalled for reassessment of TSH for confirmation of NH. Prevalence of NH was found to be 4.4%. This finding suggests the need for the implementation of a neonatal screening program for early detection of children with ID. PMID:24755928

  15. Iodine nutrition status amongst neonates in Kangra district, Himachal Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Umesh; Kabra, Madhulika; Sareen, Neha; Khenduja, Preetika; Pande, Shubhra

    2014-07-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) is an endemic health problem in Kangra district, Himachal Pradesh (HP) state. ID leads to mental retardation, deaf mutism, squint, dwarfism, spastic diplegia, neurological defects and congenital anomalies. Iodine nutrition status amongst neonates can be assessed by estimating thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The present study was conducted with an objective to assess the iodine nutrition status amongst Neonates in Kangra district, HP. All of the hospitals in the district which provide obstetric services were enlisted, of which three were selected for this survey. A total of 613 umbilical cord blood samples of neonates were collected on filter paper and analyzed for TSH. WHO (2007) reported that that a <3% frequency of TSH concentrations above 5 mIU/L in samples collected 3-4 days after birth indicates iodine sufficiency in a population. In our study we found that 73.4% of the neonates had TSH levels of more than 5 mlU/l, thus indicating ID in the population studied. Iodine deficiency continues to be a public health problem in Kangra district, Himachal Pradesh. PMID:24797042

  16. Netherton Syndrome in a Neonate with Possible Growth Hormone Deficiency and Transient Hyperaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Ilias, Chatziioannidis; Evgenia, Babatseva; Aikaterini, Patsatsi; Asimina, Galli-Tsinopoulou; Constantina, Sarri; Maria, Lithoxopoulou; George, Mitsiakos; Paraskevi, Karagianni; Christos, Tsakalidis; Zissis, Mamuris; Nikolaos, Nikolaidis

    2015-01-01

    Netherton syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder, is classified as an ichthyosiform syndrome. In this report we present the case of a neonate with erythroderma shortly after birth, accompanied by severe hypernatremia, recurrent infections, transient hyperaldosteronism, and signs of growth hormone (GH) deficiency. DNA molecular analysis in the SPINK5 gene revealed heterozygosity in our index patient for 238insG and 2468delA frameshift mutations in exons 4 and 26, respectively, in the maternal allele and 1431-12G>A splice-site mutation in intron 15 in the paternal allele as well as the missense variation E420K in homozygous state. Combination of the identified mutations along with transient hyperaldosteronism and possible GH deficiency have not been described before. Accordingly, the importance of early multidisciplinary approach is highlighted, in order to reach accurate diagnosis, initiate prompt treatment, and ensure survival with fewer disease complications. PMID:26229701

  17. Netherton Syndrome in a Neonate with Possible Growth Hormone Deficiency and Transient Hyperaldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Ilias, Chatziioannidis; Evgenia, Babatseva; Aikaterini, Patsatsi; Asimina, Galli-Tsinopoulou; Constantina, Sarri; Maria, Lithoxopoulou; George, Mitsiakos; Paraskevi, Karagianni; Christos, Tsakalidis; Zissis, Mamuris; Nikolaos, Nikolaidis

    2015-01-01

    Netherton syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder, is classified as an ichthyosiform syndrome. In this report we present the case of a neonate with erythroderma shortly after birth, accompanied by severe hypernatremia, recurrent infections, transient hyperaldosteronism, and signs of growth hormone (GH) deficiency. DNA molecular analysis in the SPINK5 gene revealed heterozygosity in our index patient for 238insG and 2468delA frameshift mutations in exons 4 and 26, respectively, in the maternal allele and 1431-12G>A splice-site mutation in intron 15 in the paternal allele as well as the missense variation E420K in homozygous state. Combination of the identified mutations along with transient hyperaldosteronism and possible GH deficiency have not been described before. Accordingly, the importance of early multidisciplinary approach is highlighted, in order to reach accurate diagnosis, initiate prompt treatment, and ensure survival with fewer disease complications. PMID:26229701

  18. Impaired growth hormone secretion in neonatal hypothyroid rats: hypothalamic versus pituitary component.

    PubMed

    De Gennaro, V; Cella, S G; Bassetti, M; Rizzi, R; Cocchi, D; Muller, E E

    1988-01-01

    In 10-day-old rats made hypothyroid by giving dams propylthiouracil (PTU) in the drinking water since the day of parturition, simultaneous radioimmunoassay (RIA) determinations of basal and stimulated growth hormone (GH) secretion, hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH)-like immunoreactivity (LI) content, immunocytochemical localization of somatotrophs, and hypothalamic GHRH-LI-positive structures were performed. The frequency of somatotrophs was also determined. One-day-old hypothyroid rats, whose mothers had been given PTU since the 14th day of pregnancy, were also used for comparison. In 10-day-old hypothyroid rats, pituitary and plasma GH levels and the number of somatotrophs were considerably lower and plasma TSH levels were significantly higher than those in age-matched control rats; however, GHRH-LI titers in the mediobasal hypothalamus and the morphology of GHRH-LI-positive structures were unaltered. In 1-day-old rats the only alteration present, in addition to elevated plasma TSH levels, was a clear-cut decrease in plasma GH levels. An acute challenge with GHRH (20 ng/100 g body wt, sc) or clonidine (15 micrograms/100 g body wt, sc) induced a clear-cut rise in plasma GH levels 15 min postinjection in 10-day-old control rats but failed to do so in age-matched hypothyroid rats. Both compounds failed to rise plasma GH in both hypothyroid and control 1-day-old rats. Taken together these data indicate that in neonatal and infant rats deprivation of thyroid hormones acts primarily to depress pituitary somatotroph function and that possible changes in GHRH-secreting structures represent a later postnatal event. PMID:3124121

  19. Frequency of congenital hypothyroidism in neonates in the Konya region, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ataş, Bülent; Altunhan, Hüseyin; Ata, Erkan; Müsevitoğlu, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) resulting from deficient production of thyroid hormone is one of the most commonly encountered diseases in pediatric endocrinology. Thyroid hormones play a crucial role in normal cerebral and growth maturation. These harmful effects on the cerebral and growth maturation can be prevented by early diagnosis and sufficient treatment in the first weeks of life. Diagnosis must be determined immediately within days after birth and effective treatment must begin. Unfortunately, despite the presence of national neonatal screening programs, CH cases are still rarely seen. In our study, it was aimed to assess the outcome of having determined an early diagnosis of CH and initiating treatment with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) screening test on live born babies over a period of 7 years in our hospital. With this aim, 93,897 live births were evaluated in the Doctor Faruk Sükan Obstetrics and Pediatrics Hospital between the years of 1999 and 2007. All neonates were screened with the TSH test. CH was determined in 43 (1/2183) of all cases and treatment was begun. The importance of this test was emphasized in that the test should be performed routinely on all neonates to obtain an early diagnosis and so that treatment for CH can begin. PMID:21648280

  20. Iodine nutritional status among neonates in the Solan district, Himachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Umesh; Kabra, Madhulika; Prakash, Shyam; Sareen, Neha; Khenduja, Preetika

    2014-10-01

    Iodine nutrition status amongst neonates can be assessed by estimating thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). According to WHO, if more than 3 % of the neonates have TSH levels of 5 mlU/l and more in a population, it indicates presence of iodine deficiency (ID). Iodine deficiency is an endemic health problem in Solan district, Himachal Pradesh (HP) state. ID leads to mental retardation, deaf mutism, squint, dwarfism, spastic diplegia, neurological defects and congenital anomalies. The aim is to determine iodine nutrition status of neonates of Solan district. In Solan district, six hospitals/community health centers providing obstetric services and conducting more than 100 deliveries per annum were identified and enlisted. Two hospitals were selected keeping in view of operational feasibility. A total of 683 umbilical cord blood samples of neonates were collected on filter paper and analyzed for TSH. It was found that 63.2 % of the neonates had TSH levels of more than 5 mlU/l indicating iodine deficiency in the Solan district. Iodine deficiency was a public health problem in Solan district, HP. PMID:24563104

  1. Maternal Urinary Bisphenol A during Pregnancy and Maternal and Neonatal Thyroid Function in the CHAMACOS Study

    PubMed Central

    Gunier, Robert B.; Bradman, Asa; Holland, Nina T.; Calafat, Antonia M.; Eskenazi, Brenda; Harley, Kim G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic bottles, food and beverage can linings, thermal receipts, and dental sealants. Animal and human studies suggest that BPA may disrupt thyroid function. Although thyroid hormones play a determinant role in human growth and brain development, no studies have investigated relations between BPA exposure and thyroid function in pregnant women or neonates. Objective: Our goal was to evaluate whether exposure to BPA during pregnancy is related to thyroid hormone levels in pregnant women and neonates. Methods: We measured BPA concentration in urine samples collected during the first and second half of pregnancy in 476 women participating in the CHAMACOS (Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas) study. We also measured free thyroxine (T4), total T4, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in women during pregnancy, and TSH in neonates. Results: Associations between the average of the two BPA measurements and maternal thyroid hormone levels were not statistically significant. Of the two BPA measurements, only the one taken closest in time to the TH measurement was significantly associated with a reduction in total T4 (β = –0.13 µg/dL per log2 unit; 95% CI: –0.25, 0.00). The average of the maternal BPA concentrations was associated with reduced TSH in boys (–9.9% per log2 unit; 95% CI: –15.9%, –3.5%) but not in girls. Among boys, the relation was stronger when BPA was measured in the third trimester of pregnancy and decreased with time between BPA and TH measurements. Conclusion: Results suggest that exposure to BPA during pregnancy is related to reduced total T4 in pregnant women and decreased TSH in male neonates. Findings may have implications for fetal and neonatal development. PMID:23052180

  2. Effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing central nervous system: possible involvement of thyroid hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Li, G. H.; Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Sulkowski, G. M.; Koibuchi, N.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing brain and specifically explored the possibility that these effects are mediated by altered thyroid status. Thirty-four timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to continuous centrifugation at 1.5 G (HG) from gestational Day 11 until one of three key developmental points: postnatal Day (P) 6, P15, or P21 (10 pups/dam: 5 males/5 females). During the 32-day centrifugation, stationary controls (SC, n = 25 dams) were housed in the same room as HG animals. Neonatal body, forebrain, and cerebellum mass and neonatal and maternal thyroid status were assessed at each time point. The body mass of centrifuged neonates was comparatively lower at each time point. The mass of the forebrain and the mass of the cerebellum were maximally reduced in hypergravity-exposed neonates at P6 by 15.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Analysis of neonatal plasma suggested a transient hypothyroid status, as indicated by increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level (38.6%) at P6, while maternal plasma TSH levels were maximally elevated at P15 (38.9%). Neither neonatal nor maternal plasma TH levels were altered, suggesting a moderate hypothyroid condition. Thus, continuous exposure of the developing rats to hypergravity during the embryonic and neonatal periods has a highly significant effect on the developing forebrain and cerebellum and neonatal thyroid status (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). These data are consistent with the hypothesized role of the thyroid hormone in mediating the effect of hypergravity in the developing central nervous system and begin to define the role of TH in the overall response of the developing organism to altered gravity.

  3. Harmonization protocols for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) immunoassays: different approaches based on the consensus mean value.

    PubMed

    Clerico, Aldo; Ripoli, Andrea; Zucchelli, Gian Carlo; Plebani, Mario

    2015-02-01

    The lack of interchangeable laboratory results and consensus in current practices has underpinned greater attention to standardization and harmonization projects. In the area of method standardization and harmonization, there is considerable debate about how best to achieve comparability of measurement for immunoassays, and in particular heterogeneous proteins. The term standardization should be used only when comparable results among measurement procedures are based on calibration traceability to the International System of Units (SI unit) using a reference measurement procedure (RMP). Recently, it has been promoted the harmonization of methods for many immunoassays, and in particular for thyreotropin (TSH), as accepted RMPs are not available. In a recent paper published in this journal, a group of well-recognized authors used a complex statistical approach in order to reduce variability between the results observed with the 14 TSH immunoassay methods tested in their study. Here we provide data demonstrating that data from an external quality assessment (EQA) study allow similar results to those obtained using the reported statistical approach. PMID:25241732

  4. Variability in Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Suppression by Human Chronic Gonadotropin during Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Haddow, James E.; McClain, Monica R.; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Palomaki, Glenn E.; Canick, Jacob A.; Cleary-Goldman, Jane; Malone, Fergal D.; Porter, T. Flint; Nyberg, David A.; Bernstein, Peter; D'Alton, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to further explore relationships between human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), TSH, and free T4 in pregnant women at 11 through 18 wk gestation. Study Design: The design of the study was to analyze hCG in comparison with TSH and free T4, in paired first- and second-trimester sera from 9562 women in the First and Second Trimester Evaluation of Risk for Fetal Aneuploidy trial study. Results: hCG is strongly correlated with body mass index, smoking, and gravidity. Correlations with selected maternal covariates also exist for TSH and free T4. As hCG deciles increase, body mass index and percent of women who smoke both decrease, whereas the percent of primigravid women increases (P < 0.0001). hCG/TSH correlations are weak in both trimesters (r2 = 0.03 and r2 = 0.02). TSH concentrations at the 25th and fifth centiles become sharply lower at higher hCG levels, whereas 50th centile and above TSH concentrations are only slightly lower. hCG/free T4 correlations are weak in both trimesters (r2 = 0.06 and r2 = 0.003). At 11–13 wk gestation, free T4 concentrations rise uniformly at all centiles, as hCG increases (test for trend, P < 0.0001), but not at 15–18 wk gestation. Multivariate analyses with TSH and free T4 as dependent variables and selected maternal covariates and hCG as independent variables do not alter these observations. Conclusions: In early pregnancy, a woman’s centile TSH level appears to determine susceptibility to the TSH being suppressed at any given hCG level, suggesting that hCG itself may be the primary analyte responsible for stimulating the thyroid gland. hCG affects lower centile TSH values disproportionately. PMID:18544616

  5. Influence of perinatal factors on thyroid stimulating hormone level in cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Armanian, Amir-Mohammad; Hashemipour, Mahin; Esnaashari, Azadeh; Kelishadi, Roya; Farajzadegan, Ziba

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of various perinatal factors on cord blood TSH among newborns in Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive–analytic cross sectional study which performed in Isfahan Iran. During a period of four months, since February to May 2012 a total number of 440 newborns delivered in Alzahra and Shahid beheshti hospitals were enrolled in the study. For all newborns one mL blood sample from umbilical vein was obtained by one of the project investigators and sent to laboratory for further examinations. Cord blood TSH and birth body weight (BBW), gestational age, history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), apgar at one minute, apgar at five minute, newborn gender and the mother's age were documented. Differences considered statistically significant if P < 0.01. Results: 440 newborns enrolled in the study, 221 (50.2%) were male and 219 (49.8%) were female. Among study parameters, method of delivery had statistically significant relation with cord blood TSH (P < 0.001), and other factors such as BBW, gestational age, GDM, apgar at one minute, apgar at five minute, newborn gender and the mother's age didn’t have statistically significant relationship with cord TSH level. Conclusion: In conclusion we deduce that the only factor that can affect cord blood TSH was method of delivery. Infant with vaginal delivery has higher TSH level in cord blood. Other factors that were evaluated in this study didn’t have any statistically significant relationship. PMID:24516848

  6. Usefulness of Measuring Thyroid Stimulating Antibody at the Time of Antithyroid Drug Withdrawal for Predicting Relapse of Graves Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyemi; Jang, Eun Kyung; Kim, Mijin; Park, Suyeon; Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Tae Yong; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperthyroidism relapse in Graves disease after antithyroid drug (ATD) withdrawal is common; however, measuring the thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) at ATD withdrawal in order to predict outcomes is controversial. This study compared measurement of thyroid stimulatory antibody (TSAb) and thyrotropin-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin (TBII) at ATD withdrawal to predict relapse. Methods This retrospective study enrolled patients with Graves disease who were treated with ATDs and whose serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were normal after receiving low-dose ATDs. ATD therapy was stopped irrespective of TRAb positivity after an additional 6 months of receiving the minimum dose of ATD therapy. Patients were followed using thyroid function tests and TSAb (TSAb group; n=35) or TBII (TBII group; n=39) every 3 to 6 months for 2 years after ATD withdrawal. Results Twenty-eight patients (38%) relapsed for a median follow-up of 21 months, and there were no differences in baseline clinical characteristics between groups. In the TSAb group, relapse was more common in patients with positive TSAb at ATD withdrawal (67%) than patients with negative TSAb (17%; P=0.007). Relapse-free survival was shorter in TSAb-positive patients. In the TBII group, there were no differences in the relapse rate and relapse-free survivals according to TBII positivity. For predicting Graves disease relapse, the sensitivity and specificity of TSAb were 63% and 83%, respectively, whereas those of TBII were 28% and 65%. Conclusion TSAb at ATD withdrawal can predict the relapse of Graves hyperthyroidism, but TBII cannot. Measuring TSAb at ATD withdrawal can assist with clinical decisions making for patients with Graves disease. PMID:27118279

  7. The Relationship between Perchlorate in Drinking Water and Cord Blood Thyroid Hormones: First Experience from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Javidi, Ashraf; Rafiei, Nasim; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Hovsepian, Silva; Hashemipour, Mahin; Kelishadi, Roya; Taghian, Zahra; Mofateh, Samaneh; Poursafa, Parinaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering the controversial information regarding the effects of perchlorate on thyroid function of high risk population as neonates, and given the high prevalence rate of thyroid disorders specially congenital hypothyroidism in our region, this study aims to investigate for the first time in Iran, the relationship between drinking groundwater perchlorate and cord blood thyroid hormones level in an industrial region. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, drinking groundwater perchlorate level of rural areas of Zarinshahr, Isfahan was measured. Simultaneously, cord blood level of thyroid hormones of neonates born in the studied region was measured. Thyroid function test of neonates in regions with low and high perchlorate level were compared. Results: In this study, 25 tap water samples were obtained for perchlorate measurement. Level of cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), T4 and T3 of 25 neonates were measured. Mean (standard deviation) of perchlorate, TSH, T4 and T3 was 3.59 (5.10) μg/l, 7.81 (4.14) mIU/m, 6.06 (0.85) mg/dl, and 63.46 (17.53) mg/dl, respectively. Mean levels of thyroid function tests were not different in low (<5 μg/l) and high level of drinking ground water perchlorate (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Perchlorate did not appear to be related to thyroid function of neonates in the studied industrial region. It seems that iodine status of the regions, as well as other environmental contaminants and genetic background, could impact on its relation with thyroid function of neonates. PMID:25789149

  8. Risk factors for neonatal encephalopathy in Kathmandu, Nepal, a developing country: unmatched case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Matthew; Manandhar, Nilu; Manandhar, Dharma S; Costello, Anthony M de L

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk factors for neonatal encephalopathy among term infants in a developing country. Design Unmatched case-control study. Setting Principal maternity hospital of Kathmandu, Nepal. Subjects All 131 infants with neonatal encephalopathy from a population of 21 609 infants born over an 18 month period, and 635 unmatched infants systematically recruited over 12 months. Main outcome measures Adjusted odds ratio estimates for antepartum and intrapartum risk factors. Results The prevalence of neonatal encephalopathy was 6.1 per 1000 live births of which 63% were infants with moderate or severe encephalopathy. The risk of death from neonatal encephalopathy was 31%. The risk of neonatal encephalopathy increased with increasing maternal age and decreasing maternal height. Antepartum risk factors included primiparity (odds ratio 2.0) and non-attendance for antenatal care (2.1). Multiple births were at greatly increased risk (22). Intrapartum risk factors included non-cephalic presentation (3.4), prolonged rupture of membranes (3.8), and various other complications. Particulate meconium was strongly associated with encephalopathy (18). Induction of labour with oxytocin was associated with encephalopathy in 12 of 41 deliveries (5.7). Overall, 78 affected infants (60%) compared with 36 controls (6%) either had evidence of intrapartum compromise or were born after an intrapartum difficulty likely to result in fetal compromise. A concentration of maternal haemoglobin of less than 8.0 g/dl in the puerperium was significantly associated with encephalopathy (2.5) as was a maternal thyroid stimulating hormone concentration greater than 5 mIU/l (2.1). Conclusions Intrapartum risk factors remain important for neonatal encephalopathy in developing countries. There is some evidence of a protective effect from antenatal care. The use of oxytocin in low income countries where intrapartum monitoring is suboptimal presents a major risk to the fetus. More work is

  9. Negative Feedback Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis

    EPA Science Inventory

    A basic understanding of the endocrinology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of anuran larvae is necessary for predicting the consequences of HPT perturbation by thyroid-disrupting chemicals (TDCs) on the whole organism. This project examined negative feedback con...

  10. Fetal and neonatal iron deficiency exacerbates mild thyroid hormone insufficiency effects on male thyroid hormone levels and brain thyroid hormone-responsive gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Thomas W; Prohaska, Joseph R; Georgieff, Michael K; Anderson, Grant W

    2014-03-01

    Fetal/neonatal iron (Fe) and iodine/TH deficiencies lead to similar brain developmental abnormalities and often coexist in developing countries. We recently demonstrated that fetal/neonatal Fe deficiency results in a mild neonatal thyroidal impairment, suggesting that TH insufficiency contributes to the neurodevelopmental abnormalities associated with Fe deficiency. We hypothesized that combining Fe deficiency with an additional mild thyroidal perturbation (6-propyl-2-thiouracil [PTU]) during development would more severely impair neonatal thyroidal status and brain TH-responsive gene expression than either deficiency alone. Early gestation pregnant rats were assigned to 7 different treatment groups: control, Fe deficient (FeD), mild TH deficient (1 ppm PTU), moderate TH deficient (3 ppm PTU), severe TH deficient (10 ppm PTU), FeD/1 ppm PTU, or FeD/3 ppm PTU. FeD or 1 ppm PTU treatment alone reduced postnatal day 15 serum total T4 concentrations by 64% and 74%, respectively, without significantly altering serum total T3 concentrations. Neither treatment alone significantly altered postnatal day 16 cortical or hippocampal T3 concentrations. FeD combined with 1 ppm PTU treatment produced a more severe effect, reducing serum total T4 by 95%, and lowering hippocampal and cortical T3 concentrations by 24% and 31%, respectively. Combined FeD/PTU had a more severe effect on brain TH-responsive gene expression than either treatment alone, significantly altering Pvalb, Dio2, Mbp, and Hairless hippocampal and/or cortical mRNA levels. FeD/PTU treatment more severely impacted cortical and hippocampal parvalbumin protein expression compared with either individual treatment. These data suggest that combining 2 mild thyroidal insults during development significantly disrupts thyroid function and impairs TH-regulated brain gene expression. PMID:24424046

  11. [Oxytocin and syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic neonatal hormone. Case report of early severe hyponatremia and literature review].

    PubMed

    Aldana-Valenzuela, Carlos; Prieto-Pantoja, José Alfredo; Hernández-Acevedo, Angélica

    2010-12-01

    This is a clinical case presentation of a full term newborn infant who suffered severe hyponatremia and early seizures, associated with maternal fluid overload with electrolyte free solutions and high doses of oxytocin for labor augmentation. Although this condition has been recognized since the 1960's with isolated reports, this particular case has features that needs further investigation, not only for the unsually severe hyponatremia, but most importantly we think, for the prominent signs of fluid retention, the infant had, that suggest excessive antidiuretic activity probably due to oxytocin. These findings are consistent with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. Although until now there is no proof that oxytocin by itself produces this syndrome. We think the association is possible in certain clinical circumstances, such as those found in this case. We also, briefly discussed the pathophysiology of perinatal hyponatremia, the neonatal treatment of this condition and the current guidelines for the women in labor. Hyponatremia should not be considered a benign condition, since in the neonate, it may affect brain function. PMID:21961376

  12. EFFECTS OF METAL CATIONS ON PITUITARY HORMONE SECRETION IN VITRO (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the study was to determine, in vitro, the effects of nickel, cadmium, and zinc (50 microM) on both baseline and potassium chloride (KCl)-stimulated pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (Prl), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) release. Baseline and stim...

  13. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  14. Thyroxine binding globulin excess detected by neonatal screening

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inherited thyroxine binding globulin (TBG) disorder can be identified incidentally or through neonatal screening test. TBG excess is characterized by high levels of thyroxine (T4) but normal level of free T4 (fT4), while TBG deficiency presents with low T4 levels and normal fT4 levels. A 27-day-old newborn was brought to the hospital because of hyperthyroxinemia detected by neonatal screening. His T4 level was 18.83 µg/dL (normal range, 5.9–16.0 µg/dL). His mother had no history of any thyroid disease. His fT4 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were 1.99 ng/dL (normal range, 0.8–2.1 ng/dL) and 4.54 mIU/L (normal range, 0.5–6.5 mIU/L), respectively. His serum total triiodothyronine (T3) level was 322.5 ng/dL (normal range, 105.0–245.0 ng/dL). His TBG level was 68.27 mg/L (normal range, 16.0–36.0 mg/L) at the age of 3 months. At 6 months and 12 months of age, his TBG levels were 48.77 mg/L (normal range, 16.0–36.0 mg/L) and 50.20 mg/L (normal range, 14.0–28.0 mg/L), respectively, which were 2 to 3 times higher than normal values. Hormonal studies showed consistently elevated T3 and T4 levels and upper normal levels of fT4 and free T3 with normal TSH levels. His growth and development were normal. TBG excess should be considered as a potential differential diagnosis for hyperthyroxinemia and especially high T3 levels with normal TSH concentration. PMID:27462589

  15. Thyroxine binding globulin excess detected by neonatal screening.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hye Young

    2016-06-01

    Inherited thyroxine binding globulin (TBG) disorder can be identified incidentally or through neonatal screening test. TBG excess is characterized by high levels of thyroxine (T4) but normal level of free T4 (fT4), while TBG deficiency presents with low T4 levels and normal fT4 levels. A 27-day-old newborn was brought to the hospital because of hyperthyroxinemia detected by neonatal screening. His T4 level was 18.83 µg/dL (normal range, 5.9-16.0 µg/dL). His mother had no history of any thyroid disease. His fT4 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were 1.99 ng/dL (normal range, 0.8-2.1 ng/dL) and 4.54 mIU/L (normal range, 0.5-6.5 mIU/L), respectively. His serum total triiodothyronine (T3) level was 322.5 ng/dL (normal range, 105.0-245.0 ng/dL). His TBG level was 68.27 mg/L (normal range, 16.0-36.0 mg/L) at the age of 3 months. At 6 months and 12 months of age, his TBG levels were 48.77 mg/L (normal range, 16.0-36.0 mg/L) and 50.20 mg/L (normal range, 14.0-28.0 mg/L), respectively, which were 2 to 3 times higher than normal values. Hormonal studies showed consistently elevated T3 and T4 levels and upper normal levels of fT4 and free T3 with normal TSH levels. His growth and development were normal. TBG excess should be considered as a potential differential diagnosis for hyperthyroxinemia and especially high T3 levels with normal TSH concentration. PMID:27462589

  16. Management of Neonates Born to Mothers With Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    van der Kaay, Daniëlle C M; Wasserman, Jonathan D; Palmert, Mark R

    2016-04-01

    Neonates born to mothers with Graves' disease are at risk for significant morbidity and mortality and need to be appropriately identified and managed. Because no consensus guidelines regarding the treatment of these newborns exist, we sought to generate a literature-based management algorithm. The suggestions include the following: (1) Base initial risk assessment on maternal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibodies. If levels are negative, no specific neonatal follow-up is necessary; if unavailable or positive, regard the newborn as "at risk" for the development of hyperthyroidism. (2) Determine levels of TSH-receptor antibodies in cord blood, or as soon as possible thereafter, so that newborns with negative antibodies can be discharged from follow-up. (3) Measurement of cord TSH and fT4 levels is not indicated. (4) Perform fT4 and TSH levels at day 3 to 5 of life, repeat at day 10 to 14 of life and follow clinically until 2 to 3 months of life. (5) Use the same testing schedule in neonates born to mothers with treated or untreated Graves' disease. (6) When warranted, use methimazole (MMI) as the treatment of choice; β-blockers can be added for sympathetic hyperactivity. In refractory cases, potassium iodide may be used in conjunction with MMI. The need for treatment of asymptomatic infants with biochemical hyperthyroidism is uncertain. (7) Assess the MMI-treated newborn on a weekly basis until stable, then every 1 to 2 weeks, with a decrease of MMI (and other medications) as tolerated. MMI treatment duration is most commonly 1 to 2 months. (8) Be cognizant that central or primary hypothyroidism can occur in these newborns. PMID:26980880

  17. NEONATAL SYMPATHECTOMY COMPROMISES DEVELOPMENT OF RESPONSES OF ORNITHINE DECARBOXYLASE TO HORMONAL STIMULATION IN PERIPHERAL TISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The onset of sympathetic innervation has been shown to play a role in the development of postsynaptic reactivity to stimulation. n the current study, we examined whether this relationship extends to responses evoked by hormonal stimuli. ats denervated at birth by 6-hydroxydopamin...

  18. Effects of prenatal phthalate exposure on thyroid hormone levels, mental and psychomotor development of infants: The Hokkaido Study on Environment and Children's Health.

    PubMed

    Minatoya, Machiko; Naka Jima, Sonomi; Sasaki, Seiko; Araki, Atsuko; Miyashita, Chihiro; Ikeno, Tamiko; Nakajima, Tamie; Goto, Yuko; Kishi, Reiko

    2016-09-15

    Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is commonly used phthalates and concerns of adverse effects of prenatal DEHP exposure on neonatal thyroid hormone (TH) and neurodevelopment are increasing. However, there is no report regarding association between prenatal DEHP exposure and infant neurodevelopment including TH levels in Japanese population. Thus the aim of present study was to evaluate the associations between prenatal DEHP exposure and mental and psychomotor development of infants 6 and 18months along with investigating influence on neonatal free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels in the prospective birth cohort study. Maternal blood samples collected between 23 and 41weeks of gestation was analyzed for mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), metabolite of DEHP levels. Neonatal FT4 and TSH were obtained from mass screening data. Infant neurodevelopment was assessed by Bayley Scale of Infant Development second edition at 6 and 18month of age. For the final analysis, 328 participants were included. The median levels of maternal MEHP was 10.6ng/ml, neonatal TSH and FT4 was 2.20 μU/ml and 2.03ng/ml, respectively. We did not find any associations between prenatal DEHP exposure and neonatal TH levels or infant mental and psychomotor development at 6 and 18month. In this study, prenatal DEHP exposure did not show adverse effects on infant TH levels or mental and psychomotor development in early life stage. However, our previous study revealed negative effects of prenatal DEHP exposure on sex hormone levels, continuous investigation on neurodevelopment in later life in association with prenatal DEHP exposure is necessary. PMID:27261429

  19. Peripheral T lymphocyte changes in neonatal piglets: Relationship with growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL) and cortisol changes.

    PubMed

    Borghetti, Paolo; De Angelis, Elena; Saleri, Roberta; Cavalli, Valeria; Cacchioli, Antonio; Corradi, Attilio; Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Martelli, Paolo

    2006-03-15

    Taking into account the role played by the neuroendocrine network in affecting the early development of the immune response, the present study aims to assess neonatal immunity in piglets by testing peripheral lymphocyte age-related changes in relationship to plasma levels of some relevant immunoregulatory hormones, such as growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL) and cortisol. For this purpose, we studied the peripheral lymphocyte age-related changes in relationship to plasma levels of GH, PRL and cortisol in conventional piglets from birth (day 0) to 41 days of age. A significant decrease was observed in the total number of lymphocytes at day 0, with a subsequent constant increment up to 41 days of age. Concomitantly, the number of T cell subsets (mainly CD8(+) cells and double positive CD4(+)CD8(+)) was low at birth, with strong increments between the 19th and 41st days of life. The CD4(+) T cell number subset was less diminished at birth than that of CD8(+), albeit with significant increments in the post-weaning period. Of interest, gammadelta T cells, which are more involved in innate immune efficiency, displayed the same trend as CD8(+) T cells from birth to the 41st day of life. From day 0 up to the 19th day, significant inverse correlations were found between T cell subsets and GH or PRL or cortisol, albeit with more significant inverse correlations with cortisol. The high levels of GH and PRL in the pre-weaning period may be due to the fact that they have to counteract the cortisol-mediated negative effect on lymphocyte production and development. These findings suggest that stress condition occurs at birth with decreases in the immune parameters, in the same way as in human newborns, with a subsequent gradual normalisation and immune development, as shown by decreased cortisol, GH and PRL normalisation and concomitant increments in T cell subsets. PMID:16213031

  20. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal ...

  1. Artificial feeding synchronizes behavioral, hormonal, metabolic and neural parameters in mother-deprived neonatal rabbit pups

    PubMed Central

    Morgado, Elvira; Juárez, Claudia; Melo, Angel I.; Domínguez, Belisario; Lehman, Michael N.; Escobar, Carolina; Meza, Enrique; Caba, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Nursing in the rabbit is under circadian control, and pups have a daily anticipatory behavioral arousal synchronized to this unique event, but it is not known which signal is the main entraining cue. In the present study we hypothesized that food is the main entraining signal. Using mother-deprived pups we tested the effects of artificial feeding on the synchronization of locomotor behavior, plasma glucose, corticosterone, FOS and PER1 protein rhythms in suprachiasmatic, supraoptic, paraventricular and tuberomammillary nuclei. At postnatal day 1 an intragastric tube was placed by gastrostomy. The next day and for the rest of the experiment pups were fed with a milk formula through the cannula at either 02:00 or 10:00 h (feeding time = zeitgeber time (ZT) 0). At postnatal days 5–7 pups exhibited behavioral arousal with a significant increase in locomotor behavior 60 min before feeding. Glucose levels increased after feeding, peaking at ZT4–ZT12 and then declining. Corticosterone was highest around the time of feeding then decreased to trough concentrations at ZT12–ZT16, increasing again in anticipation of next feeding bout. In the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus had a rhythm of FOS and PER1 that was not significantly affected by the feeding schedule. Conversely, the supraoptic, paraventricular and tuberomammillary nuclei had rhythms of both FOS and PER1 induced by the time of scheduled feeding. We conclude that the nursing rabbit pup is a natural model of food entrainment, since food, in this case milk formula, is a strong synchronizing signal for behavioral, hormonal, metabolic and neural parameters. PMID:22098455

  2. Bone development and mineral homeostasis in the fetus and neonate: roles of the calciotropic and phosphotropic hormones.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Christopher S

    2014-10-01

    Mineral and bone metabolism are regulated differently in utero compared with the adult. The fetal kidneys, intestines, and skeleton are not dominant sources of mineral supply for the fetus. Instead, the placenta meets the fetal need for mineral by actively transporting calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium from the maternal circulation. These minerals are maintained in the fetal circulation at higher concentrations than in the mother and normal adult, and such high levels appear necessary for the developing skeleton to accrete a normal amount of mineral by term. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcitriol circulate at low concentrations in the fetal circulation. Fetal bone development and the regulation of serum minerals are critically dependent on PTH and PTH-related protein, but not vitamin D/calcitriol, fibroblast growth factor-23, calcitonin, or the sex steroids. After birth, the serum calcium falls and phosphorus rises before gradually reaching adult values over the subsequent 24-48 h. The intestines are the main source of mineral for the neonate, while the kidneys reabsorb mineral, and bone turnover contributes mineral to the circulation. This switch in the regulation of mineral homeostasis is triggered by loss of the placenta and a postnatal fall in serum calcium, and is followed in sequence by a rise in PTH and then an increase in calcitriol. Intestinal calcium absorption is initially a passive process facilitated by lactose, but later becomes active and calcitriol-dependent. However, calcitriol's role can be bypassed by increasing the calcium content of the diet, or by parenteral administration of calcium. PMID:25287862

  3. Vasoactive intestinal peptide enhanced aromatase activity in the neonatal rat ovary before development of primary follicles or responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    George, F.W.; Ojeda, S.R.

    1987-08-01

    The authors have investigated the factors that regulate aromatase activity in fetal-neonatal rat ovaries. Ovarian aromatase activity (assessed by measuring the amount of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formed from (1..beta..-/sup 3/H)testosterone) is low prior to birth and increases to values greater than 30 pmol/hr per mg of protein between days 8 and 12 after birth. The appearance of ovarian aromatase coincides with the development of primordial follicles. Fetal-neonatal ovaries maintained in serum-free organ culture do not develop aromatase activity at the expected time. Ovine follicle-stimulating hormone, ovine luteinizing hormone, or their combination failed to induce the enzyme activity in cultured fetal ovaries, whereas follicle-stimulating hormone is effective in preventing the decline in aromatase activity when postnatal day 8 ovaries are placed in culture. In contrast to follicle-stimulating hormone, dibutyryl-cAMP markedly enhances ovarian aromatase in cultured fetal ovaries. Likewise, enhancement of endogenouse cAMP formation with forskolin or cholera toxin caused an increase in enzyme activity within 24 hr. Vasoactive intestinal peptide, a peptide known to occur in ovarian nerves, caused a dose-dependent increase in aromatase activity in fetal ovaries prior to folliculogenesis. Of related peptides tested, only the peptide having N-terminal histidine and C-terminal isoleucine amide was capable of inducing aromatase activity in fetal ovaries. The fact that VIP can induce aromatase activity in fetal rat ovaries prior to follicle formation and prior to responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone suggests that this neuropeptide may play a critical role in ovarian differentiation.

  4. The association between serum thyroid-stimulating hormone in its reference range and bone status in postmenopausal American women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence suggests that hyperthyroidism adversely affects bone, but the condition is rare and probably contributes little to postmenopausal osteoporosis. Subclinical hyperthyroidism, which can result from treatment with L-thyroxine, is more common, but its relationship to osteoporosis and fracture is...

  5. Long-term effects of thyroid stimulating hormone and insulin on intracellular pH in FRTL-5 cells.

    PubMed

    Wood, A M; Bidey, S P; Soden, J; Robertson, W R

    1992-05-01

    We have studied the chronic effects of TSH (100 microU/ml) and insulin (10 micrograms/ml) on intracellular pH (pH(i)) in FRTL-5 cells using the pH sensitive probe 2'7-bis (2-carboxyethyl-5'-6') carboxyfluorescein. FRTL-5 cells were cultured on Petri dishes either in the presence of 4H, ie. Coons F-12 containing cortisol (10 nM), transferrin (0.5 microgram/ml), glycyl-histidyl lysine acetate (10 ng/ml) and somatostatin (10 micrograms/ml), or with 4H + insulin (5H), 4H + TSH, or 4H + TSH + insulin (6H). pH(i) was measured in small groups of cells by microspectrofluorimetry both in the presence and absence of bicarbonate ions after cells had been deprived of serum for at least a day. In the absence of TSH, insulin and bicarbonate ions, pH(i) was 7.26 +/- 0.18 (mean +/- SD, n = 49) rising to 7.89 +/- 0.09 (n = 59) and 7.43 +/- 0.1 (n = 55) in the presence of TSH (4H + TSH) and insulin (5H) respectively. Addition of both insulin and TSH (6H) resulted in a pH(i) of 7.75 +/- 0.09 (n = 40). In the absence of TSH and insulin, but the presence of bicarbonate ions, pH(i) was 7.29 +/- 0.12 (mean +/- SD n = 47) rising to 7.72 +/- 0.07 (n = 59) in 4H + TSH and 7.48 +/- 0.08 (n = 60) in 5H. pH(i) in the presence of both TSH and insulin was 7.81 +/- 0.03 (n = 60). In conclusion, both insulin and TSH caused an intracellular alkalinization, TSH markedly so, even in the presence of bicarbonate ions. PMID:1613417

  6. Sialadenitis following low dose I-131 diagnostic thyroid scan with Thyrogen® (recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone - thyrotropin alfa)

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Marta E; Muttikkal, Thomas Jose Eluvathingal; Rehm, Patrice K

    2015-01-01

    Salivary dysfunction and sialadenitis are well known complications of radioiodine treatment for thyroid cancer. The parotid gland is more frequently affected and the salivary gland injury is dose related. The symptoms may develop shortly after therapeutic Iodine 131(I-131) administration or months later and progress with time. The development of unilateral parotiditis following a low dose, diagnostic I-131 scan performed following Thyrogen stimulation in a patient without prior history of sialadenitis is rare in our experience, and has not been reported in the medical literature. PMID:26622936

  7. Regulation of Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Release from the Pituitary by Thyroxine during Metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmentally-relevant chemicals such as perchlorate have the ability to disrupt the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of exposed individuals. Larval anurans are a particularly suitable model species for studying the effects of thyroid-disrupting chemicals (TDCs) becaus...

  8. Development of an immunoenzymometric assay (IEMA) for the estimation of human thyroid stimulating hormone (hTSH) in serum.

    PubMed

    Mirapurkar, Shubhangi; Samuel, G; Sivaprasad, N

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive immunoenzymometric assay (IEMA) of serum thyrotropin (hTSH) was developed using anti-hTSH rabbit polyclonal antibody and anti-hTSH in-house monoclonal antibody with a sensitivity of 0.12 mIU/L. Serum samples were incubated in ELISA wells precoated with polyclonal antibody. The hTSH bound to the wells was incubated with monoclonal antibody (detector antibody) and further with goat anti-mouse antibody-horse radish peroxidase (GAM-HRP), which obviates the need to label the detector antibody. The assay was validated by recovery, linearity, and cross-reactivity experiments with a working assay range of 0.15 to 100 mIU/L and <10% coefficient of variation (CV) for both intra- and interassay. Good correlations were obtained when compared with Immunotech hTSH IRMA (r = 0.971, n = 35). This in-house ELISA can be used as an initial screening test for thyroid dysfunction. PMID:21113842

  9. Changes of thyroid hormone levels and related gene expression in zebrafish on early life stage exposure to triadimefon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoying; Chang, Juhua; Zhao, Ying; Zhu, Guonian

    2011-11-01

    In this study, zebrafish was exposed to triadimefon. Thyroid hormones levels and the expression of related genes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, including thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH-beta), deiodinases (dio1 and dio2) and the thyroid hormone receptor (thraa and thrb) were evaluated. After triadimefon exposure, increased T4 can be explained by increased thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH-beta). The conversion of T4 to T3 (deiodinase type I-dio1) was decreased, which reduced the T3 level. Thyroid hormone receptor beta (thrb) mRNA levels were significantly down-regulated, possibly as a response to the decreased T3 levels. The overall results indicated that triadimefon exposure could alter gene expression in the HPT axis and that mechanisms of disruption of thyroid status by triadimefon could occur at several steps in the synthesis, regulation, and action of thyroid hormones. PMID:22004968

  10. Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Birrell, G; Lampe, A; Richmond, S; Bruce, S N; Gécz, J; Lower, K; Wright, M; Cheetham, T D

    2003-12-01

    We describe two brothers with Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome and the 22A-->T (Lys8X) PHF6 mutation, who presented with the symptoms and signs of multiple pituitary hormone deficiency. Biochemical investigations and radiology confirmed growth hormone (GH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) as well as gonadotrophin deficiency. They were also found to have optic nerve hypoplasia. This family suggests that the BFL gene product may play an important role in midline neuro-development including the hypothalamo-pituitary axis. PMID:14714754

  11. Effects of prenatal exposure to organochlorines on thyroid hormone status in newborns from two remote coastal regions in Quebec, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Dallaire, Renee; Dewailly, Eric Ayotte, Pierre; Muckle, Gina; Laliberte, Claire; Bruneau, Suzanne

    2008-11-15

    Background: Several prospective studies have revealed that prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other organochlorine compounds (OCs) affect neurodevelopment during infancy. One of the mechanisms by which PCBs might interfere with neurodevelopment is a deficit in thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations. Objectives: We investigated the potential impact of transplacental exposure to PCBs and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on TH concentrations in neonates from two remote coastal populations exposed to OCs through the consumption of seafood products. Methods: Blood samples were collected at birth from the umbilical cord of neonates from Nunavik (n=410) and the Lower North Shore of the St. Lawrence River (n=260) (Quebec, Canada) for thyroid parameters [thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free T{sub 4} (fT{sub 4}), total T{sub 3} (tT{sub 3}), and thyroxine-binding globuline (TBG)] and contaminants analyses. Results: In multivariate models, umbilical cord plasma concentrations of PCB 153, the predominant PCB congener, were not associated with TH and TSH levels in both populations. Prenatal exposure to HCB was positively associated with fT{sub 4} levels at birth in both populations (Nunavik, {beta}=0.12, p=0.04; St. Lawrence, {beta}=0.19, p<0.01), whereas TBG concentrations were negatively associated with PCB 153 concentrations ({beta}=-0.13, p=0.05) in the St. Lawrence cohort. Conclusion: OCs levels were not associated to a reduction in THs in neonates from our two populations. Essential nutrients derived from seafood such as iodine may have prevented the negative effects of OCs on the thyroid economy during fetal development.

  12. Thyroid hormone resistance and its management

    PubMed Central

    Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    The syndrome of impaired sensitivity to thyroid hormone, also known as syndrome of thyroid hormone resistance, is an inherited condition that occurs in 1 of 40,000 live births characterized by a reduced responsiveness of target tissues to thyroid hormone due to mutations on the thyroid hormone receptor. Patients can present with symptoms of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. They usually have elevated thyroid hormones and a normal or elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone level. Due to their nonspecific symptomatic presentation, these patients can be misdiagnosed if the primary care physician is not familiar with the condition. This can result in frustration for the patient and sometimes unnecessary invasive treatment such as radioactive iodine ablation, as in the case presented herein. PMID:27034574

  13. Thyroid hormone resistance: a novel mutation in thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene - case report.

    PubMed

    Işık, Emregül; Beck Peccoz, Paolo; Campi, Irene; Özön, Alev; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Gönç, Nazlı; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone resistance (THR) is a dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormones. It is usually caused by mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene. In the present report, we describe the clinical and laboratory characteristics and genetic analysis of patients with a novel THRB gene mutation. The index patient had been misdiagnosed as hyperthyroidism and treated with antithyroid drugs since eight days of age. Thyroid hormone results showed that thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) was never suppressed despite elevated thyroid hormone levels, and there was no symptom suggesting hyperthyroidism. A heterozygous mutation at codon 350 located in exon 9 of the THRB gene was detected in all the affected members of the family. It is important to consider thyroid hormone levels in association with TSH levels to prevent inappropriate treatment and the potential complications, such as clinical hypothyroidism or an increase in goiter size. PMID:24217081

  14. Thyroid Stimulating but Not Blocking Autoantibodies Are Highly Prevalent in Severe and Active Thyroid-Associated Orbitopathy: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Kampmann, E; Diana, T; Kanitz, M; Hoppe, D; Kahaly, G J

    2015-01-01

    The clinical utility of the functional TSH receptor autoantibodies was prospectively evaluated in patients with thyroid-associated orbitopathy (TAO). Ophthalmic, endocrine, and serological investigations were performed in 101 consecutive patients with severe and active TAO. Serum thyroid stimulating (TSAb) and blocking (TBAb) antibody levels were measured with two bioassays using cells that express a chimeric TSH receptor and CRE-dependent luciferase. TSAb results are expressed as percentage of specimen-to-reference ratio (SRR %). Blocking activity is defined as percent inhibition of luciferase expression relative to induction with bovine TSH alone. All 101 consecutively followed-up patients with severe and active TAO were TBAb negative. In contrast, 91 (90%) were TSAb positive of whom 90 had Graves' disease. Serum TSAb levels correlated with the diplopia score (P = 0.016), total severity eye score (P = 0.009), proptosis (P = 0.007), lid aperture (P = 0.003), upper lid retraction (P = 0.006), keratopathy (P = 0.04), and thyroid binding inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII, P < 0.001) and negatively with the duration of TAO (P = 0.002). Median serum values of TSAb were SRR% 418 (range 28% to 795%). TSAb, not TBAb, are highly prevalent in severe/active TAO and serum TSAb levels correlate with clinical disease severity. PMID:26221139

  15. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Reduces Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Adults But Not in Neonates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin critical for many developmental and physiological aspects of CNS function. Severe hypothyroidism in the early neonatal period results in developmental and cognitive impairments and reductions in mRNA and protein expressio...

  16. Programming of Dopaminergic Neurons by Neonatal Sex Hormone Exposure: Effects on Dopamine Content and Tyrosine Hydroxylase Expression in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Pedro; Silva, Roxana A.; Sanguinetti, Nicole K.; Venegas, Francisca C.; Riquelme, Raul; González, Luis F.; Cruz, Gonzalo; Renard, Georgina M.; Moya, Pablo R.; Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    We sought to determine the long-term changes produced by neonatal sex hormone administration on the functioning of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in adult male rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were injected subcutaneously at postnatal day 1 and were assigned to the following experimental groups: TP (testosterone propionate of 1.0 mg/50 μL); DHT (dihydrotestosterone of 1.0 mg/50 μL); EV (estradiol valerate of 0.1 mg/50 μL); and control (sesame oil of 50 μL). At postnatal day 60, neurochemical studies were performed to determine dopamine content in substantia nigra-ventral tegmental area and dopamine release in nucleus accumbens. Molecular (mRNA expression of tyrosine hydroxylase) and cellular (tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity) studies were also performed. We found increased dopamine content in substantia nigra-ventral tegmental area of TP and EV rats, in addition to increased dopamine release in nucleus accumbens. However, neonatal exposure to DHT, a nonaromatizable androgen, did not affect midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Correspondingly, compared to control rats, levels of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein were significantly increased in TP and EV rats but not in DHT rats, as determined by qPCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Our results suggest an estrogenic mechanism involving increased tyrosine hydroxylase expression, either by direct estrogenic action or by aromatization of testosterone to estradiol in substantia nigra-ventral tegmental area. PMID:26904299

  17. Thyroid hormone resistance.

    PubMed

    Olateju, Tolulope O; Vanderpump, Mark P J

    2006-11-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited syndrome of reduced end-organ responsiveness to thyroid hormone. Patients with RTH have elevated serum free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations and normal or slightly elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level. Despite a variable clinical presentation, the common characteristic clinical features are goitre but an absence of the usual symptoms and metabolic consequences of thyroid hormone excess. Patients with RTH can be classified on clinical grounds alone into either generalized resistance (GRTH), pituitary resistance (PRTH) or combined. Mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta gene are responsible for RTH and 122 different mutations have now been identified belonging to 300 families. With the exception of one family found to have complete deletion of the TRbeta gene, all others have been demonstrated to have minor alterations at the DNA level. The differential diagnosis includes a TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma and the presence of endogenous antibodies directed against thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Failure to differentiate RTH from primary thyrotoxicosis has resulted in the inappropriate treatment of nearly one-third of patients. Although occasionally desirable, no specific treatment is available for RTH; however, the diagnosis allows appropriate genetic counselling. PMID:17132274

  18. Use of 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 in prevention of bovine parturient paresis. 8. Maternal and neonatal plasma calcium, parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D metabolites concentrations.

    PubMed

    Bar, A; Striem, S; Perlman, R; Sachs, M

    1988-10-01

    Thirteen Israeli Friesian cows (3.71 average calvings) in the second or later lactation, fed a daily diet containing 90 g of Ca and 50 g of P, were injected once intramuscularly with 700 micrograms 1 alpha-hydroxy-vitamin D3 in order to investigate its placental transfer and its subsequent metabolism in the neonate. The injection of the vitamin 96 to 24 h before calving slightly increased plasma Ca at parturition, whereas uninjected controls displayed a prominent hypo-calcemia. On the 10th and 20th d after calving, difference in the plasma Ca concentration of the two groups was not significant. At parturition, plasma parathyroid hormone concentration was significantly higher and plasma 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D lower in the control than in the treated cows. At parturition the plasma concentrations of Ca, parathyroid hormone, hydroxyproline, and 24,25-hydroxyvitamin D were higher in the calves than in their dams. Plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were markedly higher and 1,25-hydroxyvitamin D was slightly higher in cows than in their offsprings. PMID:3204189

  19. Protein Hormones and Immunity‡

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Keith W.; Weigent, Douglas A.; Kooijman, Ron

    2007-01-01

    A number of observations and discoveries over the past 20 years support the concept of important physiological interactions between the endocrine and immune systems. The best known pathway for transmission of information from the immune system to the neuroendocrine system is humoral in the form of cytokines, although neural transmission via the afferent vagus is well documented also. In the other direction, efferent signals from the nervous system to the immune system are conveyed by both the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems. Communication is possible because the nervous and immune systems share a common biochemical language involving shared ligands and receptors, including neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, growth factors, neuroendocrine hormones and cytokines. This means that the brain functions as an immune-regulating organ participating in immune responses. A great deal of evidence has accumulated and confirmed that hormones secreted by the neuroendocrine system play an important role in communication and regulation of the cells of the immune system. Among protein hormones, this has been most clearly documented for prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), but significant influences on immunity by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been demonstrated. Here we review evidence obtained during the past 20 years to clearly demonstrate that neuroendocrine protein hormones influence immunity and that immune processes affect the neuroendocrine system. New findings highlight a previously undiscovered route of communication between the immune and endocrine systems that is now known to occur at the cellular level. This communication system is activated when inflammatory processes induced by proinflammatory cytokines antagonize the function of a variety of hormones, which then causes endocrine resistance in both the periphery and brain. Homeostasis during inflammation is achieved by a balance between cytokines and

  20. Effects of peroral insulin and glucose on circulating insulin-like growth factor-I, its binding proteins and thyroid hormones in neonatal calves

    PubMed Central

    Kirovski, Danijela; Lazareviæ, M.; Baričević-Jones, Ivona; Nediæ, Olgica; Masnikosa, Romana; Nikolić, Judith Anna

    2008-01-01

    There is disagreement in the literature about the ability of neonatal calves to absorb perorally administered insulin. This study evaluated the absorption of a bolus of insulin administered alone or with an energy souce and its effects on the circulating insulin-like growth factor system and thyroid hormones in newborn Holstein-Friesian calves. Within 1 h of dosing, mean serum insulin and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations had increased considerably, whether the insulin was applied alone (n = 4) or together with glucose (n = 4), accompanied by marked hypoglycemia. No significant changes were observed in control calves (n = 4) given the vehicle solution. Increased serum glucose and T3 concentrations with no change in insulinemia occurred in a 4th group of calves given glucose alone. At 32 h of age and after 3 meals of colostrum there were no differences in glycemia, insulinemia, or proteinemia among the 4 groups of calves examined. Mean serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) tended to decrease over this period in the control group. The decrease was more pronounced in the insulin-treated group but absent in both groups that received glucose. These differences were associated with equivalent differences in abundance of the 40–45K IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3); however, lower molecular mass IGFBPs were not affected. The results show that a pharmacological peroral dose of insulin can lead to rapid systemic alterations in the IGF/IGFBP system in neonatal calves that can be modified by simultaneous administration of a small energy supply in the form of glucose. PMID:18505189

  1. Maternal antioxidants prevent beta cell apoptosis and promote formation of dual hormone-expressing endocrine cells in male offspring following fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure

    PubMed Central

    BRUIN, Jennifer E; WOYNILLOWICZ, Amanda K; HETTINGA, Bart P; TARNOPOLSKY, Mark A; MORRISON, Katherine M; GERSTEIN, Hertzel C; HOLLOWAY, Alison C

    2013-01-01

    Aim Fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure causes beta cell oxidative stress and apoptosis in neonates, leading to adult-onset dysglycemia. The goal of this study was to determine whether an antioxidant intervention could prevent nicotine-induced beta cell loss. Methods Nulliparous female Wistar rats received daily subcutaneous injections of either saline or nicotine bitartrate (1.0 mg/kg/d) for 2 weeks prior to mating until weaning. Nicotine-exposed dams received either normal chow or diet containing antioxidants (1000 IU/kg vitamin E, 0.25% w/w coenzyme Q10 and 0.1% w/w alpha-lipoic acid) during mating, pregnancy and lactation; saline-exposed dams received normal chow. Pancreas tissue was collected from male offspring at 3 weeks of age to measure beta cell fraction, apoptosis, proliferation and the presence of cells co-expressing insulin and glucagon. Results The birth weight of the offspring born to nicotine-exposed dams receiving dietary antioxidants was significantly reduced. Most interestingly, the antioxidant intervention to nicotine-exposed dams prevented the beta cell loss and apoptosis observed in nicotine exposed male offspring whose mothers did not receive antioxidants. Male pups born to nicotine-treated mothers receiving antioxidants also had a trend towards increased beta cell proliferation and a significant increase in islets containing insulin/glucagon bi-hormonal cells relative to the other two treatment groups. Conclusion This study demonstrates that exposure to maternal antioxidants protects beta cells from the damaging effects of nicotine thus preserving beta cell mass. PMID:22385833

  2. Prolonged weightlessness effect on postflight plasma thyroid hormones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Johnson, P. C.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1977-01-01

    Blood drawn before and after spaceflight from the nine Skylab astronauts showed a statistically significant increase in mean plasma thyroxine (T-4) of 1.4 micro g/dl and in thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) of 4 microunits ml. Concurrent triiodothyronine (T-3) levels decreased 27 ng/dl indicating inhibited conversion of T-4 to T-3. The T-3 decrease is postulated to be a result of the increased cortisol levels noted during and following each mission. These results confirm the thyroidal changes noted after the shorter Apollo flights and show that thyroid hormone levels change during spaceflight.

  3. Neonatal oxytocin administration and supplemental milk ameliorate the weaning transition and alter hormonal expression in the gastrointestinal tract in pigs.

    PubMed

    Rault, J-L; Ferrari, J; Pluske, J R; Dunshea, F R

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influences of milk supplementation during lactation, over 1 wk after weaning, and oxytocin administration for the first 14 d of life on the pigs' response to weaning. Pigs from 20 litters were allocated to each of these 3 treatments in a randomized factorial design. Oxytocin was administered subcutaneously daily from 0 to 14 d of age at a rate of 10 I.U. per kg. The milk supplement consisted of a mixture of 25% skim milk powder offered either during lactation between 10 and 20 d of age or for the first week after weaning as a transitional diet along with dry pellets. Pigs were weaned at 21 d of age. Growth rate was measured from birth to slaughter at 140 d of age and feed intake of supplemental milk or feed from 10 to 56 d of age. Organ weights (heart, liver, stomach, and kidneys) and the gene expression of ghrelin, leptin, and glucagon-like peptides (glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucagon-like peptide-2) were measured in the stomach, ileum, and duodenum at 10, 21, and 28 d of age. Milk supplementation after weaning resulted in immediate feed intake and partially alleviated the depression in growth rate over the first 7 d postweaning (P < 0.001), but milk supplementation during lactation had no effects (P > 0.1). However, effects were only transient and disappeared once the milk liquid diet was removed. Neonatal oxytocin administration reduced weight loss over the first 2 d after weaning (P = 0.03), without affecting feed intake (P > 0.1), hence possibly reducing weaning stress. Seven days after weaning, oxytocin-treated pigs had greater stomach ghrelin and leptin expression (both P = 0.02), and pigs supplemented with milk after weaning had greater stomach leptin and glucagon-like peptide-2 expression (P = 0.02 and P = 0.05, respectively). Hence, neonatal oxytocin administration or postweaning milk supplementation are both effective means of enhancing gastric leptin expression and reducing weight loss at weaning, likely

  4. Endocrine and metabolic changes in neonatal calves in response to growth hormone and long-R3-insulin-like growth factor-I administration.

    PubMed

    Hammon, H; Blum, J W

    1998-01-01

    Postnatal growth is primarily controlled by growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). We have studied effects of recombinant bovine GH (rbGH) and Long-R3-insulin-like growth factor-I (Long-R3-IGF-I) on metabolic and endocrine characteristics of neonatal calves. Group GrC (control) was fed colostrum as first meal and then milk replacer up to day 7. Groups GrIGFf, GrIGFi and GrGH were fed as GrC. In group GrIGFf, Long-R3-IGF-I (50 micrograms/[kg x day], twice daily for 7 days) was fed together with colostrum or milk replacer and in group GrIGFi, Long-R3-IGF-I (50 micrograms/[kg x day], twice daily for 7 days) was injected subcutaneously at times of feeding. Calves of group GrGH were injected rbGH (1 mg/[kg x day, s.c.], twice daily for 7 days) at times of feeding. While orally administered Long-R3-IGF-I had no effects, subcutaneously administered Long-R3-IGF-I lowered plasma glucose and insulin concentrations (p < 0.05). In group GrGH, day-2 postprandial plasma insulin concentrations were increased more than in Long-R3-IGF-I-treated groups (p < 0.05) and day-2 postprandial prolactin responses were greater in group GrGH than in controls (p < 0.05). Other traits (lactic acid, nonesterified fatty acids, glucagon, cortisol, thyroxine and 3.5.3'-triiodothyronine) exhibited age-dependent changes, but were not significantly affected by rbGH or Long-R3-IGF-I. The study shows, that parenteral, but not oral, Long-R3-IGF-I affects plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, and that rbGH transiently influences plasma prolactin concentrations in neonatal calves. PMID:9483305

  5. Thyroid hormone-dependent formation of a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) in the neonatal brain is not exacerbated under conditions of low dietary iron (FeD).

    PubMed

    Spring, S R; Bastian, T W; Wang, Y; Kosian, P; Anderson, G W; Gilbert, M E

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical for brain development and insufficiencies can lead to structural abnormalities in specific brain regions. Administration of the goitrogen propylthiouracil (PTU) reduces TH production by inhibiting thyroperoxidase (TPO), an enzyme that oxidizes iodide for the synthesis of TH. TPO activity is iron (Fe)-dependent and dietary iron deficiency (FeD) also reduces circulating levels of TH. We have previously shown that modest degrees of TH insufficiency induced in pregnant rat dams alters the expression of TH-responsive genes in the cortex and hippocampus of the neonate, and results in the formation of a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) in the corpus callosum (Royland et al., 2008, Bastian et al., 2014, Gilbert et al., 2014). The present experiment investigated if FeD alone was sufficient to induce a SBH or if FeD would augment SBH formation at lower doses of PTU. One set of pregnant rats was administered 0, 1, 3, or 10ppm of PTU via drinking water starting on gestational day (GD) 6. FeD was induced in a 2nd set of dams beginning on GD2. A third set of dams received the FeD diet from GD2 paired with either 1ppm or 3ppm PTU beginning on GD6. All treatments continued until the time of sacrifice. On PN18, one female pup from each litter was sacrificed and the brain examined for SBH. We observed lower maternal, PN2 and PN18 pup serum T4 in response to PTU. FeD reduced serum T4 in pups on PN16, but did not affect serum T4 in dams or PN2 pups. Neither did FeD in combination with PTU alter T4 levels in dams on PN18 or pups on PN2 compared to PTU treatment alone. By PN16, however more severe T4 reductions were observed in pups when FeD was combined with PTU. SBH increased with increasing dosage of PTU, but counter to our hypothesis, no SBH was detected in the offspring of FeD dams. As such, T4 levels in dams and newborn pups rather than older neonates appear to be a better predictor SBH associated with TH insufficiency. These data indirectly

  6. The somatotropic axis in neonatal calves can be modulated by nutrition, growth hormone, and Long-R3-IGF-I.

    PubMed

    Hammon, H; Blum, J W

    1997-07-01

    Effects on the somatotropic axis [plasma levels of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) I and II, IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), and growth hormone (GH)] of feeding different amounts of colostrum or milk replacer, of Long-R3-IGF-I (administered subcutaneously or orally; 50 micrograms.kg body wt-1.day-1 for 7 days), and of subcutaneously injected recombinant bovine GH (rbGH; 1 mg.kg body wt-1.day-1 for 7 days) were evaluated in calves during the 1st wk of life. Plasma Long-R3-IGF-I increased after subcutaneous application but not with the oral dose. Endogenous IGF-I was higher in calves fed colostrum six times compared with those fed only milk replacer. Native IGF-I was highest in rbGH-injected calves but was lowered by the subcutaneous injection of Long-R3-IGF-I. IGF-II concentrations were not modified by any of the treatments. IGFBP-2 increased in calves fed only milk replacer and those receiving subcutaneous Long-R3-IGF-I. GH was not modulated by differences in nutrition but increased after rbGH administration and similarly in all groups after intravenous injection of GH-releasing factor analog GRF-(1-29). Parenteral administration of Long-R3-IGF-I decreased GH concentration but did not affect the secretory pattern. The data demonstrate that the somatotrophic axis is basically functioning in neonatal calves and is influenced by nutrition, GH, and Long-R3-IGF-I. PMID:9252489

  7. Neonatal screening for congenital hypothyroidism in Japan.

    PubMed

    Minamitani, Kanshi; Inomata, Hiroaki

    2012-10-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism may cause irreversible intellectual disability or failure to thrive if left untreated. Because this disorder can be prevented by early identification and early treatment, newborn mass screening started in 1979 in Japan. A guideline for mass screening for this disease was prepared in 1998. Currently, approximately 100% of newborns undergo this mass screening. The screening results show significant improvement of the intellectual outcome of patients with this disease, with almost no patients having irreversible intellectual disturbance or failure to thrive. However, there are issues of a delayed increase in thyroid stimulating hormone, management of latent hypothyroidism, and detection of central hypothyroidism. In recent years, as studies on this disease have advanced at the molecular level, many causative genes have been reported, clarification of the etiology, pathology, and clinical features has progressed, and new findings have been obtained. PMID:23330249

  8. Regulation of Seasonal Reproduction by Hypothalamic Activation of Thyroid Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Shinomiya, Ai; Shimmura, Tsuyoshi; Nishiwaki-Ohkawa, Taeko; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Organisms living outside the tropics measure the changes in the length of the day to adapt to seasonal changes in the environment. Animals that breed during spring and summer are called long-day breeders, while those that breed during fall are called short-day breeders. Although the influence of thyroid hormone in the regulation of seasonal reproduction has been known for several decades, its precise mechanism remained unknown. Recent studies revealed that the activation of thyroid hormone within the mediobasal hypothalamus plays a key role in this phenomenon. This localized activation of the thyroid hormone is controlled by thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone) secreted from the pars tuberalis of the pituitary gland. Although seasonal reproduction is a rate-limiting factor in animal production, genes involved in photoperiodic signal transduction pathway could emerge as potential targets to facilitate domestication. PMID:24600435

  9. Embryonic exposure to excess thyroid hormone causes thyrotrope cell death

    PubMed Central

    Tonyushkina, Ksenia N.; Shen, Meng-Chieh; Ortiz-Toro, Theresa; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2013-01-01

    Central congenital hypothyroidism (CCH) is more prevalent in children born to women with hyperthyroidism during pregnancy, suggesting a role for thyroid hormone (TH) in the development of central thyroid regulation. Using the zebrafish embryo as a model for thyroid axis development, we have characterized the ontogeny of negative feedback regulation of thyrotrope function and examined the effect of excess TH on thyrotrope development. We found that thyroid-stimulating hormone β subunit (tshb) and type 2 deiodinase (dio2) are coexpressed in zebrafish thyrotropes by 48 hours after fertilization and that TH-driven negative feedback regulation of tshb transcription appears in the thyroid axis by 96 hours after fertilization. Negative feedback regulation correlated with increased systemic TH levels from the developing thyroid follicles. We used a transgenic zebrafish that expresses GFP under the control of the tshb promoter to follow thyrotrope fates in vivo. Time-lapse imaging revealed that early exposure to elevated TH leads to thyrotrope cell death. Thyrotrope numbers slowly recovered following the removal of excess TH. These data demonstrate that transient TH exposure profoundly impacts the thyrotrope population during a critical period of pituitary development and may have long-term implications for the functional reserve of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) production and the TSH set point later in life. PMID:24316972

  10. Screening of Undiagnosed Hypothyroidism in Elderly Persons with Diabetes according to Age-Specific Reference Intervals for Serum Thyroid Stimulating Hormone and the Impact of Antidiabetes Drugs.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Rosita; Teixeira, Patricia de Fatima Dos Santos; Vaisman, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background. Studies have suggested that hypothyroidism is more frequent in the elderly with diabetes mellitus. However, an adaptation of TSH levels to age should be considered in this assessment. Some antidiabetes drugs reportedly interfere with TSH levels. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of undiagnosed hypothyroidism in patients with diabetes and the influence of antidiabetes drugs. Material and Methods. 1160 subjects, 60 years and older (751 with diabetes), were studied; results were compared according to diabetes treatment and with persons without diabetes. TSH, FT4, antithyroperoxidase, fasting glucose, and HbA1c were measured. Results and Discussion. 6.4% of patients with diabetes had hypothyroidism, a higher prevalence compared with persons without diabetes (5.1%), but lower than observed in many studies. The use of age-specific TSH reference interval (RI) could explain this difference. Patients taking metformin (MTF) had TSH (showed in medians) slightly lower (2.8 mU/L) than those not on MTF (3.3 mU/L), p < 0.05. MTF doses influenced TSH levels. Conclusions. The use of specific TSH RI could avoid the misdiagnosis of hypothyroidism in elderly with diabetes. Patients in use of MTF as single drug had lower TSH than those using other medications and persons without diabetes. PMID:27403442

  11. Screening of Undiagnosed Hypothyroidism in Elderly Persons with Diabetes according to Age-Specific Reference Intervals for Serum Thyroid Stimulating Hormone and the Impact of Antidiabetes Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Patricia de Fatima dos Santos; Vaisman, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background. Studies have suggested that hypothyroidism is more frequent in the elderly with diabetes mellitus. However, an adaptation of TSH levels to age should be considered in this assessment. Some antidiabetes drugs reportedly interfere with TSH levels. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of undiagnosed hypothyroidism in patients with diabetes and the influence of antidiabetes drugs. Material and Methods. 1160 subjects, 60 years and older (751 with diabetes), were studied; results were compared according to diabetes treatment and with persons without diabetes. TSH, FT4, antithyroperoxidase, fasting glucose, and HbA1c were measured. Results and Discussion. 6.4% of patients with diabetes had hypothyroidism, a higher prevalence compared with persons without diabetes (5.1%), but lower than observed in many studies. The use of age-specific TSH reference interval (RI) could explain this difference. Patients taking metformin (MTF) had TSH (showed in medians) slightly lower (2.8 mU/L) than those not on MTF (3.3 mU/L), p < 0.05. MTF doses influenced TSH levels. Conclusions. The use of specific TSH RI could avoid the misdiagnosis of hypothyroidism in elderly with diabetes. Patients in use of MTF as single drug had lower TSH than those using other medications and persons without diabetes. PMID:27403442

  12. Thyroid Hormone Replacement in Patients Following Thyroidectomy for Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hannoush, Zeina C.; Weiss, Roy E.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone replacement therapy in patients following thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer, although a potentially straightforward clinical problem, can present the clinician and patient with a variety of challenges. Most often the problems are related to the dose and preparation of thyroid hormone (TH) to use. Some patients feel less well following thyroidectomy and/or radioiodine ablation than they did before their diagnosis. We present evidence that levothyroxine (L-T4) is the preparation of choice, and keeping the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) between detectable and 0.1 mU/L should be the standard of care in most cases. In unusual circumstances, when the patient remains clinically hypothyroid despite a suppressed TSH, we acknowledge there may be as yet unidentified factors influencing the body’s response to TH, and individualized therapy may be necessary in such patients. PMID:26886951

  13. Predicting gestational age using neonatal metabolic markers

    PubMed Central

    Ryckman, Kelli K.; Berberich, Stanton L.; Dagle, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate gestational age estimation is extremely important for clinical care decisions of the newborn as well as for perinatal health research. Although prenatal ultrasound dating is one of the most accurate methods for estimating gestational age, it is not feasible in all settings. Identifying novel and accurate methods for gestational age estimation at birth is important, particularly for surveillance of preterm birth rates in areas without routine ultrasound dating. Objective We hypothesized that metabolic and endocrine markers captured by routine newborn screening could improve gestational age estimation in the absence of prenatal ultrasound technology. Study Design This is a retrospective analysis of 230,013 newborn metabolic screening records collected by the Iowa Newborn Screening Program between 2004 and 2009. The data were randomly split into a model-building dataset (n = 153,342) and a model-testing dataset (n = 76,671). We performed multiple linear regression modeling with gestational age, in weeks, as the outcome measure. We examined 44 metabolites, including biomarkers of amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and 17-hydroxyprogesterone. The coefficient of determination (R2) and the root-mean-square error were used to evaluate models in the model-building dataset that were then tested in the model-testing dataset. Results The newborn metabolic regression model consisted of 88 parameters, including the intercept, 37 metabolite measures, 29 squared metabolite measures, and 21 cubed metabolite measures. This model explained 52.8% of the variation in gestational age in the model-testing dataset. Gestational age was predicted within 1 week for 78% of the individuals and within 2 weeks of gestation for 95% of the individuals. This model yielded an area under the curve of 0.899 (95% confidence interval 0.895−0.903) in differentiating those born preterm (<37 weeks) from those born term (≥37 weeks). In the subset of

  14. Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins in Hashimoto's thyroiditis measured by radioreceptor assay and adenylate cyclase stimulation and their relationship to HLA-D alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Bliddal, H.; Bech, K.; Feldt-Rasmussen, U.; Thomsen, M.; Ryder, L.P.; Hansen, J.M.; Siersbaek-Nielsen, K.; Friis, T.

    1982-11-01

    The relationship between thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins, measured by both radioreceptor assay and adenylate cyclase stimulation, and the HLA alleles was studied in 41 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TSH binding-inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII) were detected in 9 (22%) patients, and human thyroid adenylate cyclase-stimulating immunoglobulins (HTACS) were found in 21 (51%) patients. Only 2 patients were positive in both assays, and an inverse relationship was observed between TBII and HTACS. In the 21 HTACS-positive patients, HLA-Dw5 was found in 1 subject, compared to 8 of the 20 HTACS-negative patients (P < 0.01), while 4 of the 9 TBII-positive patients had HLA-Dw5 compared to 5 of the 32 TBII-negative subjects (P = 0.09).No significant relations were observed between the presence of HTACS or TBII and HLA-Dw3 or HLA-B8. It is concluded that TBII and HTACS are produced independently in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and that the production of these autoantibodies seems to be related to the HLA-D region in this disease.

  15. Effects of simultaneous combined exposure to CDMA and WCDMA electromagnetic fields on serum hormone levels in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yeung Bae; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Byung Chan; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Kim, Nam; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2013-01-01

    Despite more than a decade of research on the endocrine system, there have been no published studies about the effects of concurrent exposure of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on this system. The present study investigated the several parameters of the endocrine system including melatonin, thyroid stimulating hormone, stress hormone and sex hormone after code division multiple access (CDMA, 849 MHz) and wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA, 1.95 GHz) signals for simultaneous exposure in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to RF-EMF signals for 45 min/day, 5 days/week for up to 8 weeks. The whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of CDMA or WCDMA was 2.0 W/kg (total 4.0 W/kg). At 4 and 8 weeks after the experiment began, each experimental group's 40 rats (male 20, female 20) were autopsied. Exposure for 8 weeks to simultaneous CDMA and WCDMA RF did not affect serum levels in rats of melatonin, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxin (T4), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and sex hormones (testosterone and estrogen) as assessed by the ELISA method. PMID:23239176

  16. Effects of simultaneous combined exposure to CDMA and WCDMA electromagnetic fields on serum hormone levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yeung Bae; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Byung Chan; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Kim, Nam; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2013-05-01

    Despite more than a decade of research on the endocrine system, there have been no published studies about the effects of concurrent exposure of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on this system. The present study investigated the several parameters of the endocrine system including melatonin, thyroid stimulating hormone, stress hormone and sex hormone after code division multiple access (CDMA, 849 MHz) and wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA, 1.95 GHz) signals for simultaneous exposure in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to RF-EMF signals for 45 min/day, 5 days/week for up to 8 weeks. The whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of CDMA or WCDMA was 2.0 W/kg (total 4.0 W/kg). At 4 and 8 weeks after the experiment began, each experimental group's 40 rats (male 20, female 20) were autopsied. Exposure for 8 weeks to simultaneous CDMA and WCDMA RF did not affect serum levels in rats of melatonin, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxin (T4), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and sex hormones (testosterone and estrogen) as assessed by the ELISA method. PMID:23239176

  17. DEHP reduces thyroid hormones via interacting with hormone synthesis-related proteins, deiodinases, transthyretin, receptors, and hepatic enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjiang; Zhao, Letian; Wei, Li; Li, Lianbing

    2015-08-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is used extensively in many personal care and consumer products, resulting in widespread nonoccupational human exposure through multiple routes and media. Limited studies suggest that exposure to DEHP may be associated with altered thyroid function, but detailed mechanisms are unclear. In order to elucidate potential mechanisms by which DEHP disturbs thyroid hormone homeostasis, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage at 0, 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg/day for 30 days and sacrificed within 24 h after the last dose. Gene expressions of thyroid hormone receptors, deiodinases, transthyretin, and hepatic enzymes were measured by RT-PCR; protein levels of transthyretin were also analyzed by Western blot. Results showed that DEHP caused histological changes in the thyroid and follicular epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia were observed. DEHP significantly reduced thyroid hormones (T3, T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) levels, whereas thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was not affected. After exposure to DEHP, biosynthesis of thyroid hormones was suppressed, and sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) levels were significantly reduced. Additionally, levels of deiodinases and transthyretin were also affected. TSH receptor (TSHr) level was downregulated, while TRH receptor (TRHr) level was upregulated. Metabolism of thyroid hormones was accelerated due to elevated gene expression of hepatic enzymes (UDPGTs and CYP2B1) by DEHP. Taken together, observed findings indicate that DEHP could reduce thyroid hormones through influencing biosynthesis, biotransformation, biotransport, receptor levels, and metabolism of thyroid hormones. PMID:25913319

  18. Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins as measured in a reporter bioassay are not detected in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and ophthalmopathy or isolated upper eyelid retraction.

    PubMed

    Wall, Jack R; Lahooti, Hooshang; El Kochairi, Ilhem; Lytton, Simon D; Champion, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Although ophthalmopathy is mainly associated with Graves' hyperthyroidism, milder eye changes are also found in about 25% of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). The recent finding of negative thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) antibodies, as measured in the Thyretain™ thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) reporter bioassay, in patients with euthyroid Graves' disease raises the possibility that TSHR antibodies are not the cause of ophthalmopathy in all situations. Here, we have tested serum from patients with HT with and without ophthalmopathy or isolated upper eyelid retraction (UER) for TSHR antibodies, using the TSI reporter bioassay and collagen XIII as a marker of autoimmunity against the orbital fibroblast. Study groups were 23 patients with HT with ophthalmopathy, isolated UER, or both eye features and 17 patients without eye signs. Thyretain™ TSI results were expressed as a percentage of the sample-to-reference ratio, with a positive test being taken as a sample-to-reference ratio of more than 140%. Serum collagen XIII antibodies were measured in standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TSI tests were positive in 22% of patients with HT with no eye signs but in no patient with eye signs. In contrast, TSI tests were positive in 94% of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. Tests were negative in all normal subjects tested. Collagen XIII antibodies were detected in 83% of patients with ophthalmopathy, UER, or both eye features, but in only 30% of patients with no eye signs. Our findings suggest that TSHR antibodies do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of ophthalmopathy or isolated UER in patients with HT. Moreover, the role of TSHR antibodies in the development of ophthalmopathy in patients with Graves' disease remains to be proven. In contrast, collagen XIII antibodies appear to be a good marker of eye disease in patients with HT. PMID:25336908

  19. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BE. Perinatal viral infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ... K. Postnatal bacterial infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ...

  20. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5′-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets. PMID:24692351

  1. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of neonatal hypocalcemia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Im; Yu, Hyeoh Won; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won; Choi, Chang Won; Kim, Beyong Il

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical characteristics of full-term neonates with hypocalcemia and to suggest factors associated with neonatal hypocalcemia Methods The medical records of full-term neonates with hypocalcemia were reviewed. Hypocalcemia was defined as an ionized calcium (iCa) concentration of <4 mg/dL. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) insufficiency was defined as a serum PTH level of <60 pg/mL or a serum phosphorus level higher than the serum calcium level in the presence of hypocalcemia. Results Fifty-three neonates were enrolled. The median age at diagnosis of hypocalcemia was 3 days. In all the neonates, formula feeding predominance was observed. Thirty-eight neonates (69.8%) were compatible with PTH insufficiency. The number of formula-fed neonates was significantly higher than that of breast-fed patients among neonates with PTH insufficiency (P=0.017). Intact PTH was negatively correlated with serum phosphorus levels. Twelve out of 14 neonates (85.7%) had 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD) levels <20 ng/mL and 9 neonates (64.3%) had 25OHD levels <10 ng/mL. Twenty-one neonates had hypocalcemic tetany. The serum calcium and iCa concentrations of neonates with tetany were 4.2-8.3 mg/dL and 1.85-3.88 mg/dL, respectively. Three neonates showed symptomatic hypocalcemia with calcium levels over 7.5 mg/dL. Among the 16 neonates who underwent electroencephalography (EEG), 12 had abnormalities, which normalized after 1-2 months. Conclusion Formula milk feeding, PTH insufficiency and low serum vitamin D concentration are associated with the development of neonatal hypocalcemia. Symptoms such as tetany and QT interval prolongation can develop in relatively mild hypocalcemia. Moreover, transient neonatal hypocalcemia can cause transient EEG abnormalities. PMID:26191512

  2. Thyroid hormone level is associated with motor symptoms in de novo Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Umehara, Tadashi; Matsuno, Hiromasa; Toyoda, Chizuko; Oka, Hisayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Sympathetic denervation has been observed not only in the myocardium but also in the thyroid of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated whether sympathetic denervation as indicated by decreased cardiac (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine uptake is associated with the levels of thyroid hormones and whether the levels of thyroid hormones affect clinical manifestations in patients with PD. The subjects were 75 patients with de novo PD and 20 age-matched healthy controls. We examined the levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, and free thyroxine, and evaluated the associations of these levels with cardiac (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine uptake and motor symptoms. The results showed that the free triiodothyronine level was below the normal range in 29 patients (approximately 40 %) and was significantly lower in the patients with PD than in the controls. The decreased free triiodothyronine level was associated with akinetic-rigid motor subtype and washout ratio of cardiac (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy. The free triiodothyronine level negatively correlated with disease severity. Thyroid-stimulating hormone level was within normal range. However, its level was lower in patients with tremor-dominant type or mixed type than in those with akinetic-rigid type. All correlations of these variables with the levels of thyroid hormones remained statistically significant on multiple regression analysis. Our results suggest that the thyroid hormone level, especially the free triiodothyronine level, is closely related to motor symptoms in patients with de novo PD. Further studies are needed to clarify whether the decreased hormone levels have functional roles in motor and non-motor symptoms. PMID:25987207

  3. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  4. Undiagnosed congenital hypothyroidism in a newborn treated with dopamine infusion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xuanxing; Sun, Yueling; Qiang, Rong

    2015-06-01

    Medications administered during the neonatal period may mask the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism. Herein, we report a case of undiagnosed congenital hypothyroidism while the infant was on treatment with dopamine. Given the inhibitory effect of dopamine on thyroid-stimulating hormone, a high index of suspicion for potential congenital hypothyroidism is needed in such neonates. PMID:25724212

  5. Interleukin-6 does not mediate the stimulation by prostaglandin E2, parathyroid hormone, or 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 of osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in neonatal mouse parietal bones.

    PubMed

    Holt, I; Davie, M W; Braidman, I P; Marshall, M J

    1994-08-01

    The cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) was produced by neonatal mouse parietal bones during a 6- or 48-hour culture period in response to prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and bovine parathyroid hormone (PTH) 1-34 fragment but not 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3]. At the same time there was an increase in tartrate-resistant, acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts (TRAP+OC) with all three osteotropic effectors over 6 hours, and an increase in 45Ca release over 48 hours. TRAP+OC numbers on PGE2-stimulated bones were positively correlated with IL-6 concentration. Our aim was to determine if IL-6 mediated this response. Recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) was added to parietal bones in culture at concentrations within the range that PGE2 or PTH would produce during incubation. However, over 6 or 48 hours, rhIL-6 did not stimulate TRAP+OC to increase in number nor did it cause an increase in calcium release over 48 hours. Adding an antibody against mouse IL-6 to bone cultures stimulated with PTH or PGE2 neutralized the resulting IL-6 bioactivity by up to 92% but did not inhibit TRAP+OC formation. We conclude that although IL-6 is produced in response to two important stimulators of bone resorption, it does not mediate osteoclast differentiation or bone resorption in this model. PMID:7953976

  6. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Interferes with the Thyroid Hormone System by Regulating Thyroid Hormones and the Responsible Genes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongoh; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR). Based on its affinity for transthyretin, TBP could compete with endogenous thyroid hormone. In this study, the effects of TBP on the thyroid hormone system were assessed in mice. Briefly, animals were exposed to 40 and 250 mg/kg TBP. Thyroid hormones were also administered with or without TBP. When mice were treated with TBP, deiodinase 1 (Dio1) and thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 2 (Thrβ2) decreased in the pituitary gland. The levels of deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and growth hormone (Gh) mRNA increased in response to 250 mg/kg of TBP, and the relative mRNA level of thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ) increased in the pituitary gland. Dio1 and Thrβ1 expression in the liver were not altered, while Dio1 decreased in response to co-treatment with thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland activity decreased in response to TBP, as did the levels of free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine in serum. Taken together, these findings indicate that TBP can disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis and the presence of TBP influenced thyroid actions as regulators of gene expression. These data suggest that TBP interferes with thyroid hormone systems. PMID:27420076

  7. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Interferes with the Thyroid Hormone System by Regulating Thyroid Hormones and the Responsible Genes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongoh; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR). Based on its affinity for transthyretin, TBP could compete with endogenous thyroid hormone. In this study, the effects of TBP on the thyroid hormone system were assessed in mice. Briefly, animals were exposed to 40 and 250 mg/kg TBP. Thyroid hormones were also administered with or without TBP. When mice were treated with TBP, deiodinase 1 (Dio1) and thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 2 (Thrβ2) decreased in the pituitary gland. The levels of deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and growth hormone (Gh) mRNA increased in response to 250 mg/kg of TBP, and the relative mRNA level of thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ) increased in the pituitary gland. Dio1 and Thrβ1 expression in the liver were not altered, while Dio1 decreased in response to co-treatment with thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland activity decreased in response to TBP, as did the levels of free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine in serum. Taken together, these findings indicate that TBP can disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis and the presence of TBP influenced thyroid actions as regulators of gene expression. These data suggest that TBP interferes with thyroid hormone systems PMID:27420076

  8. The effects of thyroid hormone on insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP) expression in the neonatal rat: prolonged high expression of IGFBP-2 in methimazole-induced congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Näntö-Salonen, K; Glasscock, G F; Rosenfeld, R G

    1991-11-01

    In the rat a developmental switch in the serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP) profile takes place during the first 3 postnatal weeks. The fetal expression pattern of high IGF-II and IGFBP-2 is replaced by the adult pattern of low levels of IGF-II and IGFBP-2 and high levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3. The regulatory mechanisms mediating these changes are unknown, but may include perinatal changes in endocrine function. To study the effects of thyroid function and the perinatal thyroid secretory burst on IGF and IGFBP expression, we established a rat model of congenital hypothyroidism, leading to marked postnatal growth retardation during the perinatal period. The hypothyroid animals lacked the steep rise in serum IGF-I levels normally occurring during the third week of life, showing only a modest rise to approximately 50% of control levels. The pattern of serum IGF-II decline in hypothyroid animals was slightly different from that in controls, with lower IGF-II levels during the second week of life and a slower decline down to the very low final levels. The hypothyroid pups continued to express high levels of IGFBP-2 up to the age of 19 days, while the control animals, after a slow initial decline, showed an abrupt fall of IGFBP-2 serum levels during the third week of life. Liver IGFBP-2 mRNA levels reflected the serum changes, with elevated IGFBP-2 mRNA in hypothyroid animals. The expression of other IGFBPs did not differ from that in the control group. At the age of 18 days, serum GH levels in the hypothyroid animals were approximately one third of control GH levels, which suggests a role for GH as a possible mediator of thyroid hormone actions on the IGF system. The changes in growth parameters and in the IGF and IGFBP profile of hypothyroid pups could be abolished by thyroid hormone replacement from birth. We conclude that thyroid hormone is, directly or indirectly, essential for some of the neonatal changes in IGF and IGFBP profiles

  9. Mammary tumors and serum hormones in the bitch treated with medroxyprogesterone acetate or progesterone for four years.

    PubMed

    Frank, D W; Kirton, K T; Murchison, T E; Quinlan, W J; Coleman, M E; Gilbertson, T J; Feenstra, E S; Kimball, F A

    1979-03-01

    After 4 years of a long-term contraceptive steroid safety study, the incidence and the histologic types of mammary dysplasia produced are shown to be similar in beagles treated with medroxyprogesterone acetate (medroxyprogesterone) or progesterone. Serum insulin, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine, growth hormone, prolactin, 17 beta-estradiol, progesterone, and cortisol were determined by radioimmunoassay on samples collected after 45 months of treatment. Serum growth hormone and insulin concentrations were elevated in a dose-related manner in both treatment groups. Levels of triiodothyronine, cortisol, and 17 beta-estradiol (medroxyprogesterone only) were lowered. TSH and prolactin concentrations were not changed. Pituitary-gonadal hormone interaction in the pathogenesis of mammary neoplasia of the dog is discussed. Prolonged treatment of beagles with doses of progesterone or medroxyprogesterone 1 to 25 times the human contraceptive dose or luteal phase (dog) levels, respectively, results in a dose-related incidence of mammary nodules. PMID:437169

  10. Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone or Thyrotropin Deficiency Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Three Cases with Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Cho-Ok; Kim, Yu Ji; Kim, Ji Hye

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the clinical features and long-term outcomes of isolated pituitary hormone deficiencies after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Such deficiencies typically present at time intervals after TBI, especially after mild injuries such as concussions, which makes their diagnosis difficult without careful history taking. It is necessary to improve diagnosis and prevent life threatening or morbid conditions such as those that may occur in deficiencies of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or thyroid-stimulating hormone (as known as thyrotropin, TSH), the two most important pituitary hormones in hypopituitarism treatment. Here, we report two cases of isolated ACTH deficiency and one case of isolated TSH deficiency. These patients presented at different time points after concussion and underwent long-term follow-ups. PMID:27169080

  11. Correlation between serum leptin level and thyroid hormones in children with major beta-thalassemia 

    PubMed Central

    Shahramian, I; Noori, NM; Ramezani, AA; Sharafi, E; Akhlaghi, E

    2013-01-01

    Background Beta-thalassemia is the most common hematology disease in human and leptin is one of the hormone that produce by adiposities cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between serum leptin level and thyroid hormones in children with major beta-thalassemia. Materials and Methods This descriptive-cross sectional study was performed on 90 children aged 6-16 years old with beta-thalassemia. Body Mass Index (BMI ) were meuseurd in all patients and then, after collecting the samples, leptin and thyroid hormones levels of the serum were measured in the patients with thalassemia via ELISA method. Then, all data was analyzed by Pearson correlation test, and x2 statistical tests and P < 0.05 was considered as a significant difference. Results The mean of body mass index and serum leptin level in the patients group was 16.58±2.43 and 1.521 ±2. 49, respectively. The mean serum levels of thyroxin (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroid- stimulating hormone (TSH) in patient's groups were7.94 ±3.56, 1.28 ± 0.46, and 2.85 ±3. 44, respectively. There was significant correlation between serum leptin levels and T4 in patients with major thalassemia; also there was no significant correlation between serum leptin level and T3and TSH. There was a significant correlation was between the leptin serum level and BMI in patients (P value=0.008). Conclusion The results of this study demonstrated that in patients with major thalassemia, there was significant correlation between serum leptin level and thyroxin hormone. Leptin level has more relationship with thyroxin than thyroid- stimulating hormone. PMID:24575288

  12. Glucoregulatory function of thyroid hormones: role of pancreatic hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, M.J.B.; Burger, A.G.; Ferrannini, E.; Jequier, E.; Acheson, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glucose metabolism was investigated in humans before and 14 days after 300 micrograms L-thyroxine (T4)/day using a sequential clamp protocol during short-term somatostatin infusion (500 micrograms/h, 0-6 h) at euglycemia (0-2.5 h), at 165 mg/dl (2.5-6 h), and during insulin infusion (1.0 mU.kg-1.min-1, 4.5-6 h). T4 treatment increased plasma T4 (+96%) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3, +50%), energy expenditure (+8%), glucose turnover (+32%), and glucose oxidation (Glucox +87%) but decreased thyroid-stimulating hormone (-96%) and nonoxidative glucose metabolism (Glucnonox, -30%) at unchanged lipid oxidation (Lipox). During somatostatin and euglycemia glucose production (Ra, -67%) and disposal (Rd, -28%) both decreased in euthyroid subjects but remained at -22% and -5%, respectively, after T4 treatment. Glucox (control, -20%; +T4, -25%) fell and Lipox increased (control, +42%; +T4, +45%) in both groups, whereas Glucnonox decreased before (-36%) but increased after T4 (+57%). During somatostatin infusion and hyperglycemia Rd (control, +144%; +T4, +84%) and Glucnonox (control, +326%; +T4, +233%) increased, whereas Glucox and Lipox remained unchanged. Insulin further increased Rd (+76%), Glucox (+155%), and Glucnonox (+50%) but decreased Ra (-43%) and Lipox (-43%). All these effects were enhanced by T4 (Rd, +38%; Glucox, +45%; Glucnonox, +35%; Ra, +40%; Lipox, +11%). Our data provide evidence that, in humans, T3 stimulates Ra and Rd, which is in part independent of pancreatic hormones.

  13. Neonatal hypotonia.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Susan E

    2015-06-01

    Neonatal hypotonia is a common problem in the neonatal intensive care unit. The genetic differential diagnosis is broad, encompassing primary muscular dystrophies, chromosome abnormalities, neuropathies, and inborn errors of metabolism. Recognition of hypotonia is relatively straightforward, but determining the cause can be challenging. It is important for the neonatologist to have an organized approach to the assessment of neonatal hypotonia. Physical examination and history alongside basic laboratory testing and imaging aid in the differential diagnosis. Identification of the cause is essential for determining prognosis, associated morbidities, and recurrence risk. The prevailing therapeutic modality is physical, occupational, speech/feeding, and respiratory therapy. PMID:26042909

  14. Neonatal conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn conjunctivitis; Conjunctivitis of the newborn; Ophthalmia neonatorum; Eye infection - neonatal conjunctivitis ... diseases spread through sexual contact to prevent newborn conjunctivitis caused by these infections. Putting eye drops into ...

  15. Neonatal Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Neonatal death ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Complications & Loss ...

  16. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and some strains of streptococcus. Group B streptococcus (GBS) has been a major cause of neonatal sepsis. ... an infant's risk of early-onset bacterial sepsis: GBS colonization during pregnancy Preterm delivery Water breaking (rupture ...

  17. Further characterization of a high affinity thyrotropin binding site on the rat thyrotropin receptor which is an epitope for blocking antibodies from idiopathic myxedema patients but not thyroid stimulating antibodies from Graves' patients.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, S; Ban, T; Akamizu, T; Kohn, L D

    1991-10-31

    Cysteine 390 of the rat thyrotropin (TSH) receptor, when mutated to serine, results in a receptor with a reduced ability of TSH to bind and increase cAMP levels but a preserved ability of thyroid stimulating autoantibodies (TSAbs) from hyperthyroid Graves' patients to increase cAMP levels. The ability of receptor autoantibodies from hypothyroid patients with idiopathic myxedema to inhibit the TSAb activity which is preserved is, however, like TSH binding, significantly reduced. Cysteine 390, together with tyrosine 385, thus appears to be an important determinant in a high affinity TSH binding site which is an epitope for receptor autoantibodies which block TSH or TSAb action and cause hypothyroidism rather than TSAbs which increase cAMP levels and are associated with hyperthyroidism. Threonine 388 and aspartic acid 403 may contribute to this ligand interaction site. PMID:1719963

  18. Effects of chronic treatment with several halogenated bephenyl isomers on thyroid and adrenal hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to assess the consequences of chronic ingestion of several halogenated biphenyl mixtures with variable chlorine content and isomeric composition on rat thyroid and adrenal physiological parameters. Chronic ingestion of the PCB Aroclor 1016, 1242 and 1254 and the PBB hexabromobiphenyl and octabromobiphenyl induced reductions of circulating thyroid hormones. The PCB or PBB containing the highest halogenation and the highest concentration of highly halogenated isomers within the mixture proved to be most toxic. However, the chlorinated compounds were more toxic than the borminated compounds. A series of experiments were designed to address the question of whether the responsiveness of the thyroid gland to thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was altered following chronic exposure to Aroclor 1254 or hexabromobiphenyl. The effects of chronically ingested halogenated biphenyls, PCB, 1016, 1242 and 1254 and PBB hexabromobiphenyl and octabromobiphenyl on serum 17-keto steroids of adrenal origin were assessed.

  19. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  20. Neonatal transfusion.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Anne M; Williamson, Lorna M

    2013-11-01

    Neonates and particularly preterm neonates are frequent recipients of large volumes of blood products relative to their size. Good quality evidence for transfusion practice in this patient group has been lacking but is now increasing. Triggers for red cell transfusion are now better defined, with on-going trials of platelet transfusions likely to yield similar evidence. Transfusion is now extremely safe, but complications such as transfusion associated acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) are likely to be under recognised, particularly in the sick extremely preterm neonate with respiratory symptoms. This review summarises the rationale and current practice with regard to blood component therapy. Background data on component specifications and hazards of transfusion are provided. Indications for transfusion of specific products including red cells, platelets, and plasma are discussed, and their use is illustrated by case examples. PMID:24095206

  1. Chronic exposure to pentachlorophenol alters thyroid hormones and thyroid hormone pathway mRNAs in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Qin; Zhao, Gao-Feng; Feng, Min; Wen, Wu; Li, Kun; Zhang, Pan-Wei; Peng, Xi; Huo, Wei-Jie; Zhou, Huai-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is frequently detected in the aquatic environment and has been implicated as an endocrine disruptor in fish. In the present study, 4-month-old zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 1 of 4 concentrations of PCP (0.1, 1, 9, and 27 µg/L) for 70 d. The effects of PCP exposure on plasma thyroid hormone levels, and the expression levels of selected genes, were measured in the brain and liver. The PCP exposure at 27 µg/L resulted in elevated plasma thyroxine concentrations in male and female zebrafish and depressed 3, 5, 3'-triiodothyronine concentrations in males only. In both sexes, PCP exposure resulted in decreased messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone β-subunit (tshβ) and thyroid hormone receptor β (trβ) in the brain, as well as increased liver levels of uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferase (ugt1ab) and decreased deiodinase 1 (dio1). The authors also identified several sex-specific effects of PCP exposure, including changes in mRNA levels for deiodinase 2 (dio2), cytosolic sulfotransferase (sult1 st5), and transthyretin (ttr) genes in the liver. Environmental PCP exposure also caused an increased malformation rate in offspring that received maternal exposure to PCP. The present study demonstrates that chronic exposure to environmental levels of PCP alters plasma thyroid hormone levels, as well as the expression of genes associated with thyroid hormone signaling and metabolism in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis and liver, resulting in abnormal zebrafish development. PMID:24123209

  2. Neonatal Stridor

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Matija; Cheng, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal stridor is an important condition, in many cases implying an impending disaster with a very compromised airway. It is a sign that has to be considered with the rest of the history and examination findings, and appropriate investigations should then be undertaken to confirm the source of the noise. Neonates with stridor should be managed in a multidisciplinary setting, by clinicians familiar with the intricate physiology of these children, and with access to the multitude of medical and surgical investigative and therapeutic options required to provide first-rate care. PMID:22235209

  3. Neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Heath, P T; Nik Yusoff, N K; Baker, C J

    2003-05-01

    Twelve years ago an annotation was published in Archives of Disease in Childhood regarding the antibiotic treatment of suspected neonatal meningitis. The authors recommended the use of cephalosporins rather than chloramphenicol and advocated intraventricular aminoglycoside treatment in selected cases. They noted the absence of clinical trials with third generation cephalosporins that showed an improvement in mortality or neurological outcome. PMID:12719388

  4. Neonatal Infectious Diseases: Evaluation of Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul W.; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. The following chapter reviews recent trends in epidemiology, and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods and management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:23481106

  5. Disruption of thyroid hormone functions by low dose exposure of tributyltin: an in vitro and in vivo approach.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Shruti; Nikhil, Kumar; Roy, Partha

    2014-09-15

    Triorganotins, such as tributyltin chloride (TBTCl), are environmental contaminants that are commonly found in the antifouling paints used in ships and other vessels. The importance of TBTCl as an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) in different animal models is well known; however, its adverse effects on the thyroid gland are less understood. Hence, in the present study, we aimed to evaluate the thyroid-disrupting effects of this chemical using both in vitro and in vivo approaches. We used HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells for the in vitro studies, as they are a thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-positive and thyroid responsive cell line. For the in vivo studies, Swiss albino male mice were exposed to three doses of TBTCl (0.5, 5 and 50μg/kg/day) for 45days. TBTCl showed a hypo-thyroidal effect in vivo. Low-dose treatment of TBTCl exposure markedly decreased the serum thyroid hormone levels via the down-regulation of the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and thyroglobulin (Tg) genes by 40% and 25%, respectively, while augmenting the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. Thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) expression was up-regulated in the thyroid glands of treated mice by 6.6-fold relative to vehicle-treated mice (p<0.05). In the transient transactivation assays, TBTCl suppressed T3 mediated transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, TBTCl was found to decrease the expression of TR. The present study thus indicates that low concentrations of TBTCl suppress TR transcription by disrupting the physiological concentrations of T3/T4, followed by the recruitment of NCoR to TR, providing a novel insight into the thyroid hormone-disrupting effects of this chemical. PMID:25101840

  6. Discovery and Development of Small Molecule Allosteric Modulators of Glycoprotein Hormone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nataraja, Selvaraj G.; Yu, Henry N.; Palmer, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Glycoprotein hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) are heterodimeric proteins with a common α-subunit and hormone-specific β-subunit. These hormones are dominant regulators of reproduction and metabolic processes. Receptors for the glycoprotein hormones belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors. FSH receptor (FSHR) and LH receptor are primarily expressed in somatic cells in ovary and testis to promote egg and sperm production in women and men, respectively. TSH receptor is expressed in thyroid cells and regulates the secretion of T3 and T4. Glycoprotein hormones bind to the large extracellular domain of the receptor and cause a conformational change in the receptor that leads to activation of more than one intracellular signaling pathway. Several small molecules have been described to activate/inhibit glycoprotein hormone receptors through allosteric sites of the receptor. Small molecule allosteric modulators have the potential to be administered orally to patients, thus improving the convenience of treatment. It has been a challenge to develop a small molecule allosteric agonist for glycoprotein hormones that can mimic the agonistic effects of the large natural ligand to activate similar signaling pathways. However, in the past few years, there have been several promising reports describing distinct chemical series with improved potency in preclinical models. In parallel, proposal of new structural model for FSHR and in silico docking studies of small molecule ligands to glycoprotein hormone receptors provide a giant leap on the understanding of the mechanism of action of the natural ligands and new chemical entities on the receptors. This review will focus on the current status of small molecule allosteric modulators of glycoprotein hormone receptors, their effects on common signaling pathways in cells, their utility for clinical application as demonstrated in preclinical models

  7. Plane of nutrition affects plasma ghrelin concentrations in neonatal calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Investigating different planes of nutrition on appetite-related hormones could provide knowledge into the role of these hormones on growth performance in neonatal calves. The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of feeding rates on ghrelin in plasma from preruminant calves....

  8. [Neonatal hyperthyroidism and maternal Graves disease].

    PubMed

    Ben Ameur, K; Chioukh, F Z; Marmouch, H; Ben Hamida, H; Bizid, M; Monastiri, K

    2015-04-01

    The onset of Graves disease during pregnancy exposes the neonate to the risk of hyperthyroidism. The newborn must be monitored and treatment modalities known to ensure early treatment of the newborn. We report on the case of an infant born at term of a mother with Graves disease discovered during pregnancy. He was asymptomatic during the first days of life, before declaring the disease. Neonatal hyperthyroidism was confirmed by hormonal assays. Hyperthyroidism was treated with antithyroid drugs and propranolol with a satisfactory clinical and biological course. Neonatal hyperthyroidism should be systematically sought in infants born to a mother with Graves disease. The absence of clinical signs during the first days of life does not exclude the diagnosis. The duration of monitoring should be decided according to the results of the first hormonal balance tests. PMID:25727474

  9. Coupling between Nutrient Availability and Thyroid Hormone Activation.

    PubMed

    Lartey, Lattoya J; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro; O-Sullivan, InSug; Unterman, Terry G; Bianco, Antonio C

    2015-12-18

    The activity of the thyroid gland is stimulated by food availability via leptin-induced thyrotropin-releasing hormone/thyroid-stimulating hormone expression. Here we show that food availability also stimulates thyroid hormone activation by accelerating the conversion of thyroxine to triiodothyronine via type 2 deiodinase in mouse skeletal muscle and in a cell model transitioning from 0.1 to 10% FBS. The underlying mechanism is transcriptional derepression of DIO2 through the mTORC2 pathway as defined in rictor knockdown cells. In cells kept in 0.1% FBS, there is DIO2 inhibition via FOXO1 binding to the DIO2 promoter. Repression of DIO2 by FOXO1 was confirmed using its specific inhibitor AS1842856 or adenoviral infection of constitutively active FOXO1. ChIP studies indicate that 4 h after 10% FBS-containing medium, FOXO1 binding markedly decreases, and the DIO2 promoter is activated. Studies in the insulin receptor FOXO1 KO mouse indicate that insulin is a key signaling molecule in this process. We conclude that FOXO1 represses DIO2 during fasting and that derepression occurs via nutritional activation of the PI3K-mTORC2-Akt pathway. PMID:26499800

  10. Localization and synthesis of the hormone-binding regions of the human thyrotropin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Atassi, M.Z.; Manshouri, T. ); Sakata, Shigeki )

    1991-05-01

    Two regions of human thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) receptor (TSHR) were selected on the basis that they exhibit no sequence resemblance to luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor. Five synthetic overlapping peptides (12-30, 24-44, 308-328, 324-344, and 339-364) were studied for their ability to bind {sup 125}I-labeled human TSH (hTSH), its isolated {alpha} and {beta} subunits, bovine TSH, ovine TSH, human luteinizing hormone, and human follicle-stimulating hormone. The human TSHR peptides 12-30 and 324-344 exhibited remarkable binding activity to human, bovine, and ovine TSH and to the {beta} chain of hTSH. Lower binding activity resided in the adjacent overlapping peptides, probably due to the contribution of the shared overlap to the binding. The specificity of TSH binding to these peptides was confirmed by their inability to bind human luteinizing hormone, human follicle-stimulating hormone, and the {alpha} chain of hTSH. Thyrotropins did not bind to bovine serum albumin or to peptide controls unrelated to the TSHR system. It is concluded that the binding of TSH to its receptor involves extensive contacts and that the TSHR peptides 12-30 and 324-344 contain specific binding regions for TSH that might be either independent sites or two faces (subsites) within a large binding site.

  11. Adaptive Divergence in the Thyroid Hormone Signaling Pathway in the Stickleback Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Jun; Lema, Sean C.; Luckenbach, J. Adam; Mori, Seiichi; Kawagishi, Yui; Kusakabe, Makoto; Swanson, Penny; Peichel, Catherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary During adaptive radiations, animals colonize diverse environments, which requires adaptation in multiple phenotypic traits [1]. Because hormones mediate the dynamic regulation of suites of phenotypic traits [2–4], evolutionary changes in hormonal signaling pathways might contribute to adaptation to new environments. Here, we report changes in the thyroid hormone signaling pathway in stream-resident ecotypes of threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus), which have repeatedly evolved from ancestral marine ecotypes [5–8]. Stream-resident fish exhibit a lower plasma concentration of thyroid hormone and a lower metabolic rate, which is likely adaptive for permanent residency in small streams. The thyroid stimulating hormone-β2 (TSHβ2) gene exhibited significantly lower mRNA expression in pituitary glands of stream-resident sticklebacks relative to marine sticklebacks. Some of the difference in TSHβ2 transcript levels can be explained by cis-regulatory differences at the TSHβ2 gene locus. Consistent with these expression differences, a strong signature of divergent natural selection was found at the TSHβ2 genomic locus. By contrast, there were no differences between the marine and stream-resident ecotypes in mRNA levels or genomic sequence in the paralogous TSHβ1 gene. Our data indicate that evolutionary changes in hormonal signaling have played an important role in the postglacial adaptive radiation of sticklebacks. PMID:21093265

  12. Functional role of the heterodimeric glycoprotein hormone, GPA2/GPB5, and its receptor, LGR1: An invertebrate perspective.

    PubMed

    Rocco, David A; Paluzzi, Jean-Paul V

    2016-08-01

    In vertebrates, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), chorionic gonadotropin (CG) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) are glycoprotein hormones that play central roles in metabolism, reproduction and development. Recently, a novel heterodimeric glycoprotein hormone, called GPA2/GPB5, was discovered in humans; however, contrary to its vertebrate glycoprotein hormone relatives, the physiological role of GPA2/GPB5 has not yet been fully elucidated in any vertebrate or invertebrate. Moreover, it is unclear as to whether GPA2/GPB5 functions as a heterodimer or as individual GPA2 and GPB5 monomers in these organisms. GPA2- and GPB5-like subunits have been identified or predicted in a wide array of animal phyla including the nematodes, chordates, hemichordates, arthropods, molluscs, echinoderms and annelids. So far, molecular studies on transcript expression of the GPA2/GPB5 subunits and its putative receptor, the leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 1 (LGR1), suggests this glycoprotein hormone system plays a developmental role and may also function in hydromineral balance in invertebrates. This mini-review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the physiological actions and activity of this evolutionarily ancient heterodimeric glycoprotein hormone with a particular focus on its known functions in the invertebrates. PMID:26704853

  13. EVALUATION OF THYROID HORMONES AND AS INFLUENCED BY TREATMENT WITH DESLORELIN IN PALLAS' CATS (OTOCOLOBUS (FELIS) MANUL).

    PubMed

    Delaski, Kristina M; Gamble, Kathryn C

    2015-12-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate a variety of physiologic functions including metabolism, growth, and reproductive cycling, and these other hormones can impact the thyroid function via the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. For instance, the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, deslorelin, used in nondomestic carnivores for contraception and behavioral control, down-regulates reproductive hormones through this mechanism and so may impact thyroid function. Due to clinical concerns of hypothyroidism in a bachelor group of adult male Pallas' cats (Otocolobus (Felis) manul) which also had deslorelin implants, serum samples from treated captive (n = 8) individuals, untreated captive (n = 25), and free-ranging (n = 9) individuals were analyzed for thyroid hormone concentrations. Total and free thyroxine (TT4 and FT4), total and free tri-iodothyronine (TT3 and FT3), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were measured although, due to sample volume limitations, not every hormone could be analyzed for every sample. Of these hormones, only FT4 was found statistically different between the deslorelin-treated and untreated groups. As samples were unevenly distributed across season, true comparison between seasons could not be made. The values reported for the untreated captive and free-ranging group, while representing a small sample size, can serve as a baseline assessment when evaluating the thyroid status of captive Pallas' cats. PMID:26667522

  14. Recessive resistance to thyroid hormone in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptor beta: evidence for tissue-specific modulation of receptor function.

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, D; Hanebuth, E; Smeyne, R J; Everds, N; Stewart, C L; Wehner, J M; Curran, T

    1996-01-01

    The diverse functions of thyroid hormone (T3) are presumed to be mediated by two genes encoding the related receptors, TRalpha and TRbeta. However, the in vivo functions of TRalpha and TRbeta are undefined. Here, we report that targeted inactivation of the mouse TRbeta gene results in goitre and elevated levels of thyroid hormone. Also, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which is released by pituitary thyrotropes and which is normally suppressed by increased levels of thyroid hormone, was present at elevated levels in homozygous mutant (Thrb-/-) mice. These findings suggest a unique role for TRbeta that cannot be substituted by TRalpha in the T3-dependent feedback regulation of TSH transcription. Thrb-/- mice provide a recessive model for the human syndrome of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) that exhibits a similar endocrine disorder but which is typically caused by dominant TRbeta mutants that are transcriptional inhibitors. It is unknown whether TRalpha, TRbeta or other receptors are targets for inhibition in dominant RTH; however, the analysis of Thrb-/- mice suggests that antagonism of TRbeta-mediated pathways underlies the disorder of the pituitary-thyroid axis. Interestingly, in the brain, the absence of TRbeta may not mimic the defects often associated with dominant RTH, since no overt behavioural or neuroanatomical abnormalities were detected in Thrb-/- mice. These data define in vivo functions for TRbeta and indicate that specificity in T3 signalling is conferred by distinct receptor genes. Images PMID:8670802

  15. Toxic Effects of Tetrabromobisphenol A on Thyroid Hormones in SD Rats and the Derived-reference Dose.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Ni, Wei Wei; Yu, Lin; Cai, Ze; Yu, Yun Jiang

    2016-04-01

    The present study determined the thyroid hormone interference of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, and the derived-reference dose (RfD) of different endpoint effects on mammals based on experimental results and data collection. Based on repeated exposure toxicity tests on mammals and extensive research, the present study used BMDS240 Software to derive a benchmark dose, and analyzed the accuracy and uncertainty, and similarity with other studies. Test results on triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) demonstrated that all the indicators presented a non-monotonous dose-effect relationship clearly, except TSH in male rats exposed to 0-1000 mg/kg BW per day. Therefore, RfDs were derived from different critical effects. In summary, RfD for mammals in the present study was found to be 0.6 mg/kg per day. PMID:27241741

  16. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Wiersinga, W M

    2001-01-01

    Thyroid hormone replacement has been used for more than 100 years in the treatment of hypothyroidism, and there is no doubt about its overall efficacy. Desiccated thyroid contains both thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)); serum T(3) frequently rises to supranormal values in the absorption phase, associated with palpitations. Liothyronine (T(3)) has the same drawback and requires twice-daily administration in view of its short half-life. Synthetic levothyroxine (L-T(4)) has many advantages: in view of its long half-life, once-daily administration suffices, the occasional missing of a tablet causes no harm, and the extrathyroidal conversion of T(4) into T(3) (normally providing 80% of the daily T(3) production rate) remains fully operative, which may have some protective value during illness. Consequently, L-T(4) is nowadays preferred, and its long-term use is not associated with excess mortality. The mean T(4) dose required to normalize serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is 1.6 microg/kg per day, giving rise to serum free T(4) (fT(4)) concentrations that are slightly elevated or in the upper half of the normal reference range. The higher fT(4) values are probably due to the need to generate from T(4) the 20% of the daily T(3) production rate that otherwise is derived from the thyroid gland itself. The daily maintenance dose of T(4) varies widely between 75 and 250 microg. Assessment of the appropriate T(4) dose is by assay of TSH and fT(4), preferably in a blood sample taken before ingestion of the subsequent T(4) tablet. Dose adjustments can be necessary in pregnancy and when medications are used that are known to interfere with the absorption or metabolism of T(4). A new equilibrium is reached after approximately 6 weeks, implying that laboratory tests should not be done earlier. With a stable maintenance dose, an annual check-up usually suffices. Accumulated experience with L-T(4) replacement has identified some areas of concern. First, the

  17. Neonatal circumcision.

    PubMed

    Lerman, S E; Liao, J C

    2001-12-01

    The merits of neonatal circumcision continue to be debated hotly. Some argue that circumcision is a "uniquely American medical enigma." Most of the world's male population remains uncircumcised; however, most boys born in the United States continue to undergo neonatal circumcision. Review of existing literature supports that most children who are uncircumcised do well from a medical standpoint and, thus, the question of whether US health care practitioners are subjecting neonates to an unnecessary surgical procedure remains. The medical benefits of circumcision are multiple, but most are small. The clearest medical benefit of circumcision is the relative reduction in the risk for a UTI, especially in early infancy. Although this risk [figure: see text] is real, the absolute numbers are small (risk ranges from 1 in 100 to 1 in 1000), and one investigator has estimated that it may take approximately 80 neonatal circumcisions to prevent one UTI. In the case of a patient with known urologic abnormalities that predispose to UTI, neonatal circumcision has a clearer role in terms of medical benefit to the patient. Most of the other medical benefits of circumcision probably can be realized without circumcision as long as access to clean water and proper penile hygiene are achieved. Proper penile hygiene should all but eliminate the risk for foreskin-related medical problems that will require circumcision. Moreover, proper hygiene and access to clean water has been shown to reduce the rate of development of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis in the uncircumcised population. Proper techniques on the care of the foreskin are illustrated in the American Academy of Pediatrics pamphlet titled "How to care for the uncircumcised penis." Regarding the relationship between STDs and circumcision, patient education and the practice of low-risk sexual behavior make a far greater impact than does routine circumcision in hopes of reducing the spread of HIV and other STDs. Nevertheless

  18. Neonatal hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... called congenital hypothyroidism. Congenital means present from birth. Causes Hypothyroidism in the newborn may be caused by: A ... months after birth. Lack of thyroid hormones can cause damage that cannot be reversed. ... feel your infant shows signs or symptoms of hypothyroidism You are pregnant and have been exposed to ...

  19. Imbalance between thyroid hormones and the dopaminergic system might be central to the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jose Carlos; Pradella-Hallinan, Marcia; Lins Pessoa, Hugo de

    2010-05-01

    Data collected from medical literature indicate that dopaminergic agonists alleviate Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms while dopaminergic agonists antagonists aggravate them. Dopaminergic agonists is a physiological regulator of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Dopaminergic agonists infusion diminishes the levels of thyroid hormones, which have the ability to provoke restlessness, hyperkinetic states, tremors, and insomnia. Conditions associated with higher levels of thyroid hormones, such as pregnancy or hyperthyroidism, have a higher prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms. Low iron levels can cause secondary Restless Legs Syndrome or aggravate symptoms of primary disease as well as diminish enzymatic activities that are involved in dopaminergic agonists production and the degradation of thyroid hormones. Moreover, as a result of low iron levels, dopaminergic agonists diminishes and thyroid hormones increase. Iron therapy improves Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms in iron deprived patients. Medical hypothesis. To discuss the theory that thyroid hormones, when not counterbalanced by dopaminergic agonists, may precipitate the signs and symptoms underpinning Restless Legs Syndrome. The main cause of Restless Legs Syndrome might be an imbalance between the dopaminergic agonists system and thyroid hormones. PMID:20535374

  20. Correlation of Skin Changes with Hormonal Changes in Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome: A Cross-sectional Study Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Gowri, B Vijaya; Chandravathi, PL; Sindhu, PS; Naidu, K Shanthi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogenous collection of signs and symptoms that when gathered, form a spectrum of disorder with disturbance of reproductive, endocrine and metabolic functions. Aim: The aim of this study is to correlate the skin manifestations with hormonal changes and to know the incidence and prevalence of skin manifestations in patients with PCOS. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 patients with PCOS were examined during 1 year time period from May 2008 P to May 2009. Detailed clinical history was taken from each patient. PCOS was diagnosed on the basis of ultrasonography. Hormonal assays included fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, dehydroepiandrostenedione, prolactin, free testosterone, fasting lipid profile and sex hormone binding globulin. The results obtained were statistically correlated. Results: In our study, the prevalence of cutaneous manifestations was 90%. Of all the cutaneous manifestations acne was seen in highest percentage (67.5%), followed by hirsutism (62.5%), seborrhea (52.5%), androgenetic alopecia (AGA) (30%), acanthosis nigricans (22.5%) and acrochordons (10%). Fasting insulin levels was the most common hormonal abnormality seen in both acne and hirsutism, whereas AGA was associated with high testosterone levels. Conclusion: The prevalence of cutaneous manifestations in PCOS was 90%. Hirsutism, acne, seborrhea, acanthosis nigricans and acrochordons were associated with increased levels of fasting insulin, whereas AGA showed higher levels of serum testosterone. PMID:26288423

  1. Role of 3', 5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate and protein kinase C in the regulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein secretion by thyroid-stimulating hormone in isolated ovine thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J F; Hill, D J; Becks, G P

    1994-05-01

    Isolated sheep thyroid follicles release insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II together with IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). We previously showed that TSH suppresses the biosynthesis and release of IGFBPs in vitro which may increase the tissue availability of IGFs, allowing a synergy with TSH which potentiates both thyroid growth and function. Many of the actions of TSH on thyroid cell function are dependent upon activation of adenylate cyclase, although increased synthesis of inositol trisphosphate and activation of protein kinase C (PKC) have also been implicated. We have now examined whether probable changes in intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or PKC are involved in TSH-mediated suppression of IGFBP release. Confluent primary cultures of ovine thyroid cells were maintained in serum-free Ham's modified F-12M medium containing transferrin, somatostatin and glycyl-histidyl-lysine (designated 3H), and further supplemented with sodium iodide (10(-8)-10(-3) mol/l), dibutyryl cAMP (0.25-1 mmol/l), forskolin (5-20 mumol/l) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 10(-11)-10(-6) mol/l), with or without exposure to TSH (200 microU/ml). The uptake and organification of Na [125I] by cells was examined after test incubations of up to 48 h, and IGFBPs in conditioned media were analysed by ligand blot using 125I-labelled IGF-II. The PKC activity in the cytosol and plasma membrane fractions of cells was measured by phosphorylation of histone using [gamma-32P]ATP, and PKC immunoreactivity was visualized by Western immunoblot analysis. While dibutyryl cAMP or forskolin largely reproduced the stimulatory effect of TSH on iodine organification, they did not mimic the inhibitory effect of TSH on the secretion of IGFBPs of 43, 34, 28 and 19 kDa. Incubation with physiological or pharmacological concentrations of iodide (10(-6)-10(-3) mol/l) for up to 48 h significantly decreased TSH action on iodide uptake and organification but did not alter the inhibitory action of TSH on IGFBP release. Incubation of cells with 10(-11)-10(-6) mol TPA/l for 24 h inhibited the subsequent ability of TSH both to potentiate iodine organification and to suppress IGFBP release. In 3H medium, PKC activity was predominantly recovered from the membrane fraction but, following incubation for 48 h with TSH, the enzyme was no longer translocated to the membrane and was recovered predominantly from the cytosol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7519234

  2. Asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on lutropin, follitropin, and thyrotropin: structural elucidation of the sulfated and sialylated oligosaccharides on bovine, ovine, and human pituitary glycoprotein hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Green, E.D.; Baenziger, J.U.

    1988-01-05

    The authors have elucidated the structures of the anionic asparagine-linked oligosaccharides present on the glycoprotein hormones lutropin (luteinizing hormone), follitropin (follicle-stimulating hormone), and thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone). Purified hormones, isolated from bovine, ovine, and human pituitaries, were digested with N-glycanase, and the released oligosaccharides were reduced with NaB(/sup 3/H)/sub 4/. The /sup 3/H-labeled oligosaccharides from each hormone were then fractionated by anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) into populations differing in the number of sulfate and/or sialic acid moieties. The sulfated, sialylated, and sulfated/sialylated structures, which together comprised 67-90% of the asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on the pituitary glycoprotein hormones, were highly heterogeneous and displayed hormone- as well as animal species-specific features. A previously uncharacterized dibranched oligosaccharide, bearing one residue each of sulfate and sialic acid, was found on all of the hormones except bovine lutropin. In this study, they describe the purification and detailed structural characterizations of the sulfated, sialylated, and sulfated/sialylated oligosaccharides found on lutropin, follitropin, and thyrotropin from several animal species.

  3. Exhaustive exercise and vitamins C and E modulate thyroid hormone levels at low and high altitudes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashem, Fahaid; Alkhateeb, Mahmoud; Al-Ani, Bahjat; Sakr, Hussein; Khalil, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play an important role in cell growth and differentiation and regulation of oxygen consumption and thermogenesis. The effect of altitude and vitamin supplementation on thyroid hormone levels in animals or humans performing acute exhaustive exercise have not been investigated before. Therefore, we thought to test whether exhaustive exercise-induced stress with antioxidant supplementation was capable of modulating the level of thyroid hormones at different altitudes. Serum levels of T4 (Thyroxin), T3 (Triiodothyronine), and TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) were measured in rats (N=36) born and bred in low altitude (600 m above sea level) and high altitude (2200 m above sea level) following forced swimming with or without vitamins C and E (25 mg/kg) pre-treatments. Thyroid levels were significantly decreased in resting rats at high altitude compared to low altitude, and swimming exercise moderately increased T3 and TSH at both high and low altitudes, whereas T4 was markedly increased (62 %) at low altitude compared to a moderate high altitude increase (28 %). Co-administration of vitamins C and E augmented the observed forced swimming-induced thyroid release. However, the conversion of T4 to T3 was reduced in both altitude areas following swimming exercise and vitamin pre-treatment had no effect. We conclude that acute stress induced thyroidal hormones in rats, which was augmented by antioxidant drugs in both high and low altitude areas. These findings may play an important role in the human pathophysiology of thyroid gland at different altitudes.

  4. Correlation between ovarian morphology and biochemical and hormonal parameters in polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Inan, Cihan; Karadag, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the biochemical and hormonal differences in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients with and without polycystic ovary (PCO) morphology and to evaluate the outcomes resulting from those differences. Methods: The study included a total of 83 patients with PCOS; 43 of them had PCO morphology (Group-I) and 40 did not (Group-II). Serum LDL, HDL, total cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), total testosterone (T), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), 17b-estradiol (E2), prolactin (PRL), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), glucose and insulin levels were determined. Homoeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index was calculated. Results: The two groups were similar with respect to BMI. The systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements of Group-I were significantly lower (p<0.01). Serum mean level of LH (p=0.026) and the mean LH/FSH (p=0.001) level of Group-I were significantly higher than Group-II. The total cholesterol and triglyceride levels of Group-I were significantly lower (p<0.05, p<0.01). The mean HOMA-IR level of Group-I was significantly lower than Group-II (p=0.004). Conclusions: The group without PCO morphology had a higher risk than the other group in terms of increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular diseases due to effects of hyperandrogenism. PMID:27375725

  5. [A neonate with pustules].

    PubMed

    Groot, Dominique T; van den Broek, Annique J M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a female neonate with non-grouped pustules directly postpartum without clinical signs of illness. There were no red maculae. At follow-up some pustules had turned to pigmented maculae, which confirmed the diagnosis of neonatal pustular melanosis. This benign transient condition occurs in 4-8% of dark-coloured neonates and in <1% of white neonates. PMID:26840934

  6. Anti-mullerian hormon level and polycystic ovarian syndrome diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zadehmodarres, Shahrzad; Heidar, Zahra; Razzaghi, Zahra; Ebrahimi, Leili; Soltanzadeh, Kaveh; Abed, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy that accompanied with long term complications. The early diagnosis of this syndrome can prevent it. Objective: The aim was to determine the role of anti-mullerian hormon (AMH) in PCOS diagnosis and to find cut off level of it. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 117 women between 20-40 years old were participated in two groups: 60 PCOS women (based on Rotterdam criteria consensus) as the case group and 57 normal ovulatory women as the control group. In day 2-4 of cycle, transvaginal sonography was performed and serum hormonal level of AMH, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol (E2), testosterone, fasting blood sugar (FBS), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and prolactin (PRL) were measured in all of participants. For all of them score of hirsutism (base on Freeman-Galloway scoring) was determined. Results: There were statistically significant in irregular pattern of menstruation, AMH and FSH level, and presence of hirsutism between two groups. But regarding mean of age, body mass index, plasma level of PRL, TSH, LH, Testosterone, FBS, and E2 differences were not significant. Construction by ROC curve present 3.15 ng/ml as AMH cut off with 70.37% sensitivity and 77.36% specificity in order to PCOS diagnosis. Conclusion: AMH with cut off level of 3.15 ng/ml with sensitivity 70.37% and specificity 77.36% could use for early diagnosis of PCOS patients. PMID:26131012

  7. METABOLIC INTERACTIONS OF HORMONAL STEROIDS AND CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS: EFFECTS OF NEONATAL TREATMENT WITH O,P'-DDT ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE STEROIDOGENIC ENDOCRINE SYSTEM OF THE MALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study generated approaches to the measurements of the potential of xenobiotics to alter reproductive capacity and viability which may allow improvement of those currently in use. More specifically, it identified the effects of neonatal exposure to the model compound, o,p'-DDT...

  8. Prader-Willi Syndrome and Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Aycan, Zehra; Baş, Veysel Nijat

    2014-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare multisystem genetic disorder demonstrating great variability with changing clinical features during patient’s life. It is characterized by severe hypotonia with poor sucking and feeding difficulties in early infancy, followed by excessive eating and gradual development of morbid obesity in later infancy or early childhood. The phenotype is most probably due to hypothalamic dysfunction which is also responsible for growth hormone (GH) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) deficiencies, central adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadism. The multidimensional problems of patients with PWS can be managed with multidisciplinary approach. Reduced GH secretion, low peak GH response to stimulation, decreased spontaneous GH secretion and low serum IGF-1 levels in PWS patients have been documented in many studies. GH therapy has multiple beneficial effects on growth and body composition, motor and mental development in PWS patients. The recommended dosage for GH is 0.5-1 mg/m2/day. GH therapy should not be started in the presence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, adenotonsillar hypertrophy, severe obesity and diabetes mellitus. GH treatment should be considered for patients with genetically confirmed PWS in conjunction with dietary, environmental and life-style measures. PMID:24932597

  9. Effect of hypothyroidism on female reproductive hormones

    PubMed Central

    Saran, Sanjay; Gupta, Bharti Sona; Philip, Rajeev; Singh, Kumar Sanjeev; Bende, Sureshrao Anoop; Agroiya, Puspalata; Agrawal, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Objective was to evaluate reproductive hormones levels in hypothyroid women and impact of treatment on their levels. Materials and Methods: A total of 59 women with untreated primary hypothyroidism were included in this prospective study. Venous blood was taken at baseline and after euthyroidism was achieved for measuring serum free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine (FT3), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), prolactin (PRL), follicular stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E2), testosterone (T), and thyroid peroxidase antibody. Thirty-nine healthy women with regular menstrual cycles without any hormonal disturbances served as controls. The statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 20 ([SPSS] IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA). P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: On an average at diagnosis cases have more serum TSH (mean [M] = 77.85; standard error [SE] = 11.72), PRL (M = 39.65; SE = 4.13) and less serum E2 (M = 50.00; SE = 2.25) and T (M = 35.40; SE = 2.31) than after achieving euthyroidism (M = 1.74; SE = 0.73), (M = 16.04; SE = 0.84), (M = 76.25; SE = 2.60), and (M = 40.29; SE = 2.27), respectively. This difference was statistically significant t (58) = 6.48, P <0.05; t (58) = 6.49, P < 0.05; t (58) = 12.47; P < 0.05; and t (58) = 2.04, P < 0.05; respectively. Although average serum FSH (M = 12.14; SE = 0.40) and LH (M = 5.89; SE = 0.27) were lower in cases at diagnosis than after achieving euthyroidism (M = 12.70; SE = 0.40), (M = 6.22; SE = 0.25), respectively, but these differences were statistically insignificant t (58) = 1.61, P = 0.11; t (58) = 1.11, P = 0.27, respectively. Conclusion: The study has demonstrated low E2 and T levels in hypothyroid women which were increased after achieving euthyroidism. Although average serum FSH and LH were increased in hypothyroid women after achieving euthyroidism but this difference was statistically

  10. Effects of oral chlortetracycline and dietary protein level on plasma concentrations of growth hormone and thyroid hormones in beef steers before and after challenge with a combination of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Rumsey, T S; McLeod, K; Elsasser, T H; Kahl, S; Baldwin, R L

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a subtherapeutic level of chlortetracycline (CTC) fed to growing beef steers under conditions of limited and adequate dietary protein on plasma concentrations of GH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroid hormones before and after an injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) + GHRH. Young beef steers (n = 32; average BW = 285 kg) were assigned to a 2x2 factorial arrangement of treatments of either a 10 or 13% crude protein diet (70% concentrate, 15% wheat straw, and 15% cottonseed hulls) and either a corn meal carrier or carrier + 350 mg of CTC daily top dressed on the diet. Steers were fed ad libitum amounts of diet for 56 d, and a jugular catheter was then placed in each steer in four groups (two steers from each treatment combination per group) during four consecutive days (one group per day). Each steer was injected via the jugular catheter with 1.0 microg/kg BW TRH + .1 microg/kg BW GHRH in 10 mL of saline at 0800. Blood samples were collected at -30, -15, 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 120, 240, and 360 min after releasing hormone injection. Plasma samples were analyzed for GH, TSH, thyroxine (T4), and triiodothyronine (T3). After 84 d on trial, the steers were slaughtered and the pituitary and samples of liver were collected and analyzed for 5'-deiodinase activity. Feeding CTC attenuated the GH response to releasing hormone challenge by 26% for both area under the response curve (P<.03) and peak response (P<.10). Likewise, CTC attenuated the TSH response to releasing hormone challenge for area under the response curve by 16% (P<.10) and peak response by 33% (P<.02), and attenuated the T4 response for area under the curve by 12% (P<.08) and peak response by 14% (P<.04). Type II deiodinase activity in the pituitary was 36% less (P<.02) in CTC-fed steers than in steers not fed CTC. The results of this study are interpreted to suggest that feeding subtherapeutic levels of CTC to young

  11. An examination of the effects of different doses of recombinant human growth hormone on children with growth hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    XUE, YING; GAO, YIQING; WANG, SHUQIN; WANG, PEI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of different doses of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and on thyroid and glucose metabolism to identify more reasonable therapeutic doses of growth hormone (GH) for the treatment of this condition. In total, 60 prepubertal patients with GHD were randomly divided into the high-dose and low-dose groups (n=30 per group). The groups were treated with 0.1 or 0.05 U/kg for 6 months, respectively. The follow-up study focused on changes to the serum levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3, blood glucose, thyroid hormone [triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone, thyroxine (T4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)] and the analysis of variance of the repeated data. Changes in the height, body weight and bone age of the high-dose group were greater than those of the low-dose group. After 6 months of treatment, the difference in height between the two groups was statistically significant (P<0.05). Glucose metabolism in the two groups was consistent, but there was a statistically significant difference in the fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels of the two groups after 6 months of treatment (P<0.05). Prior to treatment, the T3, T4 and TSH values (the thyroid function tests) in the two groups, especially for the value of T3 in high-dose group were varied. However, 6 months after treatment, statistically significant differences between the two groups (P<0.05) were identified. In conclusion, 0.1 U/kg of GH is beneficial to children with GHD in attaining a satisfactory height, but it leads to insulin resistance. Thus, glucose metabolism and thyroid function should be monitored on a regular basis in a clinical setting. PMID:27168784

  12. Neonatal resuscitation: Current issues

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Indu A

    2010-01-01

    The following guidelines are intended for practitioners responsible for resuscitating neonates. They apply primarily to neonates undergoing transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life. The updated guidelines on Neonatal Resuscitation have assimilated the latest evidence in neonatal resuscitation. Important changes with regard to the old guidelines and recommendations for daily practice are provided. Current controversial issues concerning neonatal resuscitation are reviewed and argued in the context of the ILCOR 2005 consensus. PMID:21189881

  13. [Neonatal cholestasis].

    PubMed

    Lacaille, F

    2016-03-01

    "Cholestasis" means abnormal synthesis or secretion of bile. The main symptom in a neonate or infant is jaundice. Urine is dark, staining diapers, and stools are variably pale or white. Vitamin K should be injected (to prevent coagulation disorders due to malabsorption). The two diagnoses requiring urgent treatment are urinary tract infection and biliary atresia. If stools are permanently white, biliary atresia is highly probable. A few genetic causes of intrahepatic cholestasis should be screened and corrective surgery organized. The diseases responsible for cholestasis in this age group are described as well as the investigations and treatments, including the management of non-specific complications of cholestasis. A delay in the diagnosis of biliary atresia can have such severe consequences that consultation with a hepatology unit or transfer should be easy and rapid. PMID:26850153

  14. Effect of antiepileptic drug therapy on thyroid hormones among adult epileptic patients: An analytical cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Adhimoolam, Mangaiarkkarasi; Arulmozhi, Ranjitha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate and compare the effect of conventional and newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on thyroid hormone levels in adult epileptic patients. Methods: A hospital-based, analytical cross-sectional study was conducted among the adult epileptic patients receiving conventional AEDs (Group 2) or newer AEDs (Group 3) for more than 6 months. Serum thyroid hormone levels including free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were analyzed and the hormonal status was compared with healthy control subjects (Group 1). Findings: Sodium valproate and phenytoin were commonly used conventional AEDs; levetiracetam and topiramate were common among the newer drugs. There was a statistically significant decrease in serum fT4 and increase in serum TSH levels (P < 0.0001) in patients on long-term therapy with conventional antiepileptic agents than in the control group. No significant change in thyroid hormone levels (fT3, fT4, and TSH; P = 0.68, 0.37, and 0.90, respectively) was observed with newer antiepileptics-treated patients when compared to control group. One-way analysis of variance followed by post hoc Dunnett's test was performed using SPSS version 17.0 software package. Conclusion: The present study showed that conventional AEDs have significant alteration in the thyroid hormone levels than the newer antiepileptics in adult epileptic patients. PMID:27512707

  15. Liver X receptor β: new player in the regulatory network of thyroid hormone and 'browning' of white fat.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yifei; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Ke

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) has raised great research interest because of its significant potential in counteracting obesity and type II diabetes. However, the mechanisms underlying browning are still poorly understood. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are one class of nuclear receptors, which play a vital role in regulating cholesterol, triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Following our previous finding that LXRs serve as repressors of UCP1 in classic brown adipose tissue in female mice, we found that LXRs, especially LXRβ, also repress the browning process of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in male rodents fed a normal diet. Depletion of LXRs activated thyrotropin releasing hormone positive neurons in the paraventricular area of the hypothalamus, and thus stimulated secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone from the pituitary. Consequently production of thyroid hormones in the thyroid gland and circulating thyroid hormone level were increased. Moreover, the activity of thyroid signaling in SAT was markedly increased. One unexpected finding of our study is that LXRs are indispensable in the thyroid hormone negative feedback loop at the level of the hypothalamus. LXRs maintain expression of thyroid receptors in the brain and when they are inactivated there is no negative feedback of thyroid hormone in the hypothalamus. Together, our findings have uncovered the basis of increased energy expenditure in male LXR knock-out mice and provided support for targeting LXRs in treatment of obesity. PMID:27386163

  16. Placental Transfer of Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Associations with Thyroid Hormones: Beijing Prenatal Exposure Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin; Li, Jingguang; Lai, Jianqiang; Luan, Hemi; Cai, Zongwei; Wang, Yibaina; Zhao, Yunfeng; Wu, Yongning

    2016-02-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have been detected in wildlife and human samples worldwide. Toxicology research showed that PFASs could interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, eight PFASs, fifteen PFAS precursors and five thyroid hormones were analyzed in 157 paired maternal and cord serum samples collected in Beijing around delivery. Seven PFASs and two precursors were detected in both maternal and cord sera with significant maternal-fetal correlations (r = 0.336 to 0.806, all P < 0.001). The median ratios of major PFASs concentrations in fetal versus maternal serum were from 0.25:1 (perfluorodecanoic acid, PFDA) to 0.65:1 (perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA). Spearman partial correlation test showed that maternal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was negatively correlated with most maternal PFASs (r = -0.261 to -0.170, all P < 0.05). Maternal triiodothyronin (T3) and free T3 (FT3) showed negative correlations with most fetal PFASs (r = -0.229 to -0.165 for T3; r = -0.293 to -0.169 for FT3, all P < 0.05). Our results suggest prenatal exposure of fetus to PFASs and potential associations between PFASs and thyroid hormone homeostasis in humans.

  17. Thyroid Hormone Indices in Computer Workers with Emphasis on the Role of Zinc Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Ahmed Ibrahim; Hegazy, Noha Mohamed; Ibrahim, Khadiga Salah; Mahdy-Abdallah, Heba; Hammouda, Hamdy A. A.; Shaban, Eman Essam

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to investigate the effects of computer monitor-emitted radiation on thyroid hormones and the possible protective role of zinc supplementation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included three groups. The first group (group B) consisted of 42 computer workers. This group was given Zinc supplementation in the form of one tablet daily for eight weeks. The second group (group A) comprised the same 42 computer workers after zinc supplementation. A group of 63 subjects whose job does not entail computer use was recruited as a control Group (Group C). All participants filled a questionnaire including detailed medical and occupational histories. They were subjected to full clinical examination. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and zinc levels were measured in all participants. RESULTS: TSH, FT3, FT4 and zinc concentrations were decreased significantly in group B relative to group C. In group A, all tested parameters were improved when compared with group B. The obtained results revealed that radiation emitted from computers led to changes in TSH and thyroid hormones (FT3 and FT4) in the workers. CONCLUSION: Improvement after supplementation suggests that zinc can ameliorate hazards of such radiation on thyroid hormone indices. PMID:27335605

  18. Placental Transfer of Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Associations with Thyroid Hormones: Beijing Prenatal Exposure Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Li, Jingguang; Lai, Jianqiang; Luan, Hemi; Cai, Zongwei; Wang, Yibaina; Zhao, Yunfeng; Wu, Yongning

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have been detected in wildlife and human samples worldwide. Toxicology research showed that PFASs could interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, eight PFASs, fifteen PFAS precursors and five thyroid hormones were analyzed in 157 paired maternal and cord serum samples collected in Beijing around delivery. Seven PFASs and two precursors were detected in both maternal and cord sera with significant maternal-fetal correlations (r = 0.336 to 0.806, all P < 0.001). The median ratios of major PFASs concentrations in fetal versus maternal serum were from 0.25:1 (perfluorodecanoic acid, PFDA) to 0.65:1 (perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA). Spearman partial correlation test showed that maternal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was negatively correlated with most maternal PFASs (r = −0.261 to −0.170, all P < 0.05). Maternal triiodothyronin (T3) and free T3 (FT3) showed negative correlations with most fetal PFASs (r = −0.229 to −0.165 for T3; r = −0.293 to −0.169 for FT3, all P < 0.05). Our results suggest prenatal exposure of fetus to PFASs and potential associations between PFASs and thyroid hormone homeostasis in humans. PMID:26898235

  19. Frequency of mutations in PROP-1 gene in Turkish children with combined pituitary hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kandemir, Nurgün; Vurallı, Doğuş; Taşkıran, Ekim; Gönç, Nazlı; Özön, Alev; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Yılmaz, Engin

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the prophet of Pit-1 (PROP-1) gene are responsible for most of the cases of combined pituitary hormone deficiencies (CPHD). We performed this study to determine the prevalence of PROP-1 mutations in a group of Turkish children with CPHD. Fifty-three children with the diagnosis of CPHD were included in this study. Clinical data were obtained from medical files, and hormonal evaluation and genetic screening for PROP-1 mutations were performed. A homozygous S109X mutation was found in the second exon in two brothers, and they had growth hormone (GH) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) deficiencies and normal prolactin levels. In the third exon of the PROP-1 gene, a heterozygous A142T polymorphism was found in 14 patients and a homozygous A142T polymorphism was found in 3 patients. In the first exon, a homozygous A9A polymorphism was found in 7 patients and a heterozygous A9A polymorphism was found in 31 patients. We assumed that mutations in the PROP-1 gene in cases with CPHD were expected to be more prevalent in our population due to consanguinity, but it was found that these mutations were far less than expected and that it was rare in non-familial cases. PMID:23692781

  20. Do thyroid hormones mediate the effects of starvation on mood in adolescent girls with eating disorders?

    PubMed

    Swenne, Ingemar; Rosling, Agneta

    2010-11-01

    In the eating disorders (ED) comorbid depression is common and clinical experience suggests that it is partly related to starvation. Starvation affects thyroid hormone status and thyroid hypofunction is in turn associated with depressed mood. We have therefore investigated the possibility that thyroid hormones and starvation are associated with mood in ED. Two-hundred and thirty-nine adolescent girls were examined at presentation of an ED. Analyses of thyroid hormones, documentation of weight and weight changes, self-reports of depressive symptomatology and clinical diagnoses of ED and depression were used in the analyses. Of the 239 girls 100 were diagnosed with depression. The girls with and without depression did not differ in age, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), weight loss or duration of disease. Plasma free thyroxine concentrations were lower in depressed girls (11.9±1.7 versus 12.8±1.9 pmol/L; p<0.01). Plasma triodothyronine and thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations did not differ between groups. In a logistic regression analysis the odds ratio for depression was 41.1 (95% confidence interval 4.18-405; p=0.001) for a 10 pmol/L change of plasma free thyroxine after correction for BMI, weight loss, duration of disease, rate of weight loss, plasma triodothyronine and an interaction between BMI and plasma free thyroxine. BMI did not predict depression. Low circulating thyroxine concentrations may provide a link between starvation and depression in adolescent girls with ED. PMID:20576362

  1. Placental Transfer of Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Associations with Thyroid Hormones: Beijing Prenatal Exposure Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Li, Jingguang; Lai, Jianqiang; Luan, Hemi; Cai, Zongwei; Wang, Yibaina; Zhao, Yunfeng; Wu, Yongning

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have been detected in wildlife and human samples worldwide. Toxicology research showed that PFASs could interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, eight PFASs, fifteen PFAS precursors and five thyroid hormones were analyzed in 157 paired maternal and cord serum samples collected in Beijing around delivery. Seven PFASs and two precursors were detected in both maternal and cord sera with significant maternal-fetal correlations (r = 0.336 to 0.806, all P < 0.001). The median ratios of major PFASs concentrations in fetal versus maternal serum were from 0.25:1 (perfluorodecanoic acid, PFDA) to 0.65:1 (perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA). Spearman partial correlation test showed that maternal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was negatively correlated with most maternal PFASs (r = -0.261 to -0.170, all P < 0.05). Maternal triiodothyronin (T3) and free T3 (FT3) showed negative correlations with most fetal PFASs (r = -0.229 to -0.165 for T3; r = -0.293 to -0.169 for FT3, all P < 0.05). Our results suggest prenatal exposure of fetus to PFASs and potential associations between PFASs and thyroid hormone homeostasis in humans. PMID:26898235

  2. The immune system as a regulator of thyroid hormone activity.

    PubMed

    Klein, John R

    2006-03-01

    It has been known for decades that the neuroendocrine system can both directly and indirectly influence the developmental and functional activity of the immune system. In contrast, far less is known about the extent to which the immune system collaborates in the regulation of endocrine activity. This is particularly true for immune-endocrine interactions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. Although thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) can be produced by many types of extra-pituitary cells--including T cells, B cells, splenic dendritic cells, bone marrow hematopoietic cells, intestinal epithelial cells, and lymphocytes--the functional significance of those TSH pathways remains elusive and historically has been largely ignored from a research perspective. There is now, however, evidence linking cells of the immune system to the regulation of thyroid hormone activity in normal physiological conditions as well as during times of immunological stress. Although the mechanisms behind this are poorly understood, they appear to reflect a process of local intrathyroidal synthesis of TSH mediated by a population of bone marrow cells that traffic to the thyroid. This hitherto undescribed cell population has the potential to microregulate thyroid hormone secretion leading to critical alterations in metabolic activity independent of pituitary TSH output, and it has expansive implications for understanding mechanisms by which the immune system may act to modulate neuroendocrine function during times of host stress. In this article, the basic underpinnings of the hematopoietic-thyroid connection are described, and a model is presented in which the immune system participates in the regulation of thyroid hormone activity during acute infection. PMID:16514168

  3. Hormone Disruption by PBDEs in Adult Male Sport Fish Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Turyk, Mary E.; Persky, Victoria W.; Imm, Pamela; Knobeloch, Lynda; Chatterton, Robert; Anderson, Henry A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Persistent pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), affect endocrine function. Human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which are similar in structure to PCBs, has increased recently, but health effects have not been well studied. Objectives Our goal in this study was to determine whether PBDE body burdens are related to thyroid and steroid hormone levels, thyroid antibodies, and thyroid disease in a cohort of frequent and infrequent adult male sport fish consumers. Methods We tested serum from 405 adult males for PBDE congeners, PCB congeners, testosterone, sex-hormone–binding globulin (SHBG), SHBG-bound testosterone, thyroglobulin antibodies, and the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and T4-binding globulin (TBG). We collected data on demographics, fish consumption, medical diseases, and medication use. Results The median sum of PBDEs was 38 ng/g lipid. In 308 men without thyroid disease or diabetes, PBDEs were positively related to measures of T4 and reverse T3 and inversely related to total T3 and TSH. PBDEs were positively related to the percentage of T4 bound to albumin, and inversely related to the percentage of T4 bound to TBG. Associations of BDE congeners with hormones varied. BDE-47 was positively associated with testosterone levels. Participants with PBDEs over the 95th percentile were more likely to have thyroglobulin antibodies, although high PBDE exposure was not associated with thyroid disease. PBDE effects were independent of PCB exposure and sport fish consumption. Conclusions PBDE exposure, at levels comparable with those of the general U.S. population, was associated with increased thyroglobulin antibodies and increased T4 in adult males. PMID:19079713

  4. Profile of thyroid hormones in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, P P; Figueiredo, N B; Padovani, C R; Brentani, M M; Nogueira, C R

    2005-05-01

    Estrogen involvement in breast cancer has been established; however, the association between breast cancer and thyroid diseases is controversial. Estrogen-like effects of thyroid hormone on breast cancer cell growth in culture have been reported. The objective of the present study was to determine the profile of thyroid hormones in breast cancer patients. Serum aliquots from 26 patients with breast cancer ranging in age from 30 to 85 years and age-matched normal controls (N = 22) were analyzed for free triiodothyronine (T3F), free thyroxine (T4F), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), antiperoxidase antibody (TPO), and estradiol (E2). Estrogen receptor ss (ERss) was determined in tumor tissues by immunohistochemistry. Thyroid disease incidence was higher in patients than in controls (58 vs 18%, P < 0.05). Subclinical hyperthyroidism was the most frequent disorder in patients (31%); hypothyroidism (8%) and positive anti-TPO antibodies (19%) were also found. Subclinical hypothyroidism was the only dysfunction (18%) found in controls. Hyperthyroidism was associated with postmenopausal patients, as shown by significantly higher mean T3 and T4 values and lower TSH levels in this group of breast cancer patients than in controls. The majority of positive ERss tumors were clustered in the postmenopausal patients and all cases presenting subclinical hyperthyroidism in this subgroup concomitantly exhibited Erss-positive tumors. Subclinical hyperthyroidism was present in only one of 6 premenopausal patients. We show here that postmenopausal breast cancer patients have a significantly increased thyroid hormone/E2 ratio (P < 0.05), suggesting a possible tumor growth-promoting effect caused by this misbalance. PMID:15917958

  5. Prenatal exposure to perfluorinated compounds affects thyroid hormone levels in newborn girls.

    PubMed

    Shah-Kulkarni, Surabhi; Kim, Byung-Mi; Hong, Yun-Chul; Kim, Hae Soon; Kwon, Eun Jin; Park, Hyesook; Kim, Young Ju; Ha, Eun-Hee

    2016-09-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are ubiquitous in the environment and have been detected in humans and wildlife. Exposure to PFCs has decreased in the United States recently, while exposure to PFCs continues in Asian countries, which represents a public health concern. Various mechanisms by which PFCs affect fetal growth have been proposed, such as activation of peroxisome proliferators, disruption of thyroid hormones and changes in lipid metabolism. However, the overall evidence for an association with thyroid hormones is not strong. Therefore, we examined the effect of various prenatal PFCs on cord blood thyroid hormones: triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels, and explored the endocrine disrupting effect of these PFCs on thyroid hormone levels in children according to gender. Two hundred and seventy-nine study participants were selected from among the enrolled participants in the Ewha Birth & Growth Retrospective Cohort, a retrospective birth cohort study conducted at Ewha Womans University Hospital, Seoul, Korea between 2006 and 2010. A generalized linear model was constructed to explore the association of PFCs and thyroid hormones. Further, an analysis stratified by gender was conducted. Our study shows that cord blood perfluoro n-pentanoic acid (PFPeA) was positively associated with cord blood T4 (p=0.01) level. Gender-specific analysis showed that prenatal PFCs: PFPeA and Perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS) exposure significantly increased T4 (p<0.01) and T3 (p=0.03), respectively, while perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) decreased TSH (p=0.04) concentration in newborn girls. Thus, prenatal PFC exposure may disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis. Thyroid hormones play a crucial role in fetal development and may have gender specific action. Hence, these results are of utmost importance in high-risk groups, such as pregnant women and children. PMID:27395336

  6. Antiepileptic potential and behavioral profile of L-pGlu-(2-propyl)-L-His-L-ProNH2, a newer thyrotropin-releasing hormone analog.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Satyendra Kumar; Krishnamoorthy, Srinivasan; Pawar, Chandrasekhar; Kaur, Navneet; Monga, Vikramdeep; Meena, Chhuttan Lal; Jain, Rahul; Sharma, Shyam S

    2009-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and its analogs have a number of neurobiological functions and therapeutic uses in disorders of the central nervous system. In this study, the newly synthesized TRH analogs were evaluated for central nervous system activity in pentobarbital-induced sleeping in mice. The most potent TRH analog (L-pGlu-(2-propyl)-L-His-L-ProNH(2) coded as NP-647) was evaluated for its antiepileptic potential in various seizure models in mice in comparison with TRH. Intravenous pretreatment with NP-647 (10 and 20 micromol/kg body wt) significantly delayed the onset and reduced the frequency of convulsions in the pentylenetetrazole model, but not in the maximum electroshock seizure model. Also, it was found to be protective against picrotoxin- and kainic acid-induced seizures. However, NP-647 did not significantly affect theophylline-induced seizures. Further study of the effect of NP-647 on locomotor activity and a functional observational battery revealed that it did not significantly exhibit any undesirable effects as compared with vehicle and TRH. NP-647 did not significantly affect cerebral blood flow, whereas the native peptide TRH markedly increased cerebral blood flow. Furthermore, NP-647 exerted antiepileptic activity without significantly altering plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone levels and mean arterial blood pressure. This suggests that NP-647 is more selective for central nervous system activity and devoid of hormonal and cerebrovascular system effects. In contrast, TRH exhibited cardiac and endocrine effects as marked by significant elevation in mean arterial blood pressure and plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. This study demonstrates that NP-647 has potential antiepileptic activity devoid of undesirable effects and, thus, can be exploited for the prevention and treatment of epilepsy. PMID:18952198

  7. Neonatal euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Kon, Alexander A

    2009-12-01

    Despite advances in the care of infants, there remain many newborns whose medical conditions are incompatible with sustained life. At times, healthcare providers and parents may agree that prolonging life is not an appropriate goal of care, and they may redirect treatment to alleviate suffering. While pediatric palliative treatment protocols are gaining greater acceptance, there remain some children whose suffering is unrelenting despite maximal efforts. Due to the realization that some infants suffer unbearably (ie, the burdens of suffering outweigh the benefits of life), the Dutch have developed a protocol for euthanizing these newborns. In this review, I examine the ethical aspects of 6 forms of end of life care, explain the ethical arguments in support of euthanasia, review the history and verbiage of the United States regulations governing limiting and withdrawing life-prolonging interventions in infants, describe the 3 categories of neonates for whom the Dutch provide euthanasia, review the published analyses of the Dutch protocol, and finally present some practical considerations should some form of euthanasia ever be deemed appropriate. PMID:19914522

  8. Gestational urinary bisphenol A and maternal and newborn thyroid hormone concentrations: The HOME Study

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Megan E.; Webster, Glenys M.; Vuong, Ann M.; Thomas Zoeller, R.; Chen, Aimin; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Calafat, Antonia M.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Yolton, Kimberly; Lanphear, Bruce P.; Braun, Joseph M.

    2015-04-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor used in consumer products, may perturb thyroid function. Prenatal BPA exposure may have sex-specific effects on thyroid hormones (THs). Our objectives were to investigate whether maternal urinary BPA concentrations during pregnancy were associated with THs in maternal or cord serum, and whether these associations differed by newborn sex or maternal iodine status. We measured urinary BPA concentrations at 16 and 26 weeks gestation among pregnant women in the HOME Study (2003–2006, Cincinnati, Ohio). Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free and total thyroxine (T{sub 4}) and triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) were measured in maternal serum at 16 weeks (n=181) and cord serum at delivery (n=249). Associations between BPA concentrations and maternal or cord serum TH levels were estimated by multivariable linear regression. Mean maternal urinary BPA was not associated with cord THs in all newborns, but a 10-fold increase in mean BPA was associated with lower cord TSH in girls (percent change=−36.0%; 95% confidence interval (CI): −58.4, −1.7%), but not boys (7.8%; 95% CI: −28.5, 62.7%; p-for-effect modification=0.09). We observed no significant associations between 16-week BPA and THs in maternal or cord serum, but 26-week maternal BPA was inversely associated with TSH in girls (−42.9%; 95% CI: −59.9, −18.5%), but not boys (7.6%; 95% CI: −17.3, 40.2%; p-for-effect modification=0.005) at birth. The inverse BPA–TSH relation among girls was stronger, but less precise, among iodine deficient versus sufficient mothers. Prenatal BPA exposure may reduce TSH among newborn girls, particularly when exposure occurs later in gestation. - Highlights: • Examined associations of BPA with thyroid hormones in pregnant women and newborns. • Assessed effect modification of BPA–thyroid hormone associations by newborn sex. • Greater BPA related to decreased thyroid stimulating hormone in girls' cord serum. • Results may

  9. [Neonatal mucolipidosis type II].

    PubMed

    Hmami, F; Oulmaati, A; Bouharrou, A

    2016-01-01

    Mucolipidosis type II (ML II, OMIM 252,500) is an autosomal recessive disorder clinically characterized by facial dysmorphia similar to Hurler syndrome and pronounced gingival hypertrophy. The disorder is caused by a defect in targeting acid hydrolases on the surface of lysosomes, which impede their entry and lead to accumulation of undigested substrates in lysosomes. The onset of the symptoms is usually in infancy, beginning in the 6th month of life. Early onset, at birth or even in utero, is a sign of severity and involves the specific dysmorphia as well as skeletal dysplasia related to hyperparathyroidism. We report on a severe neonatal form of this disorder revealed by respiratory distress with severe chest deformity. The dysmorphic syndrome, combining coarse features, pronounced gingival hypertrophy, with diffuse bone demineralization and secondary hyperparathyroidism associating significant elevation of parathyroid hormone and alkaline phosphatase with normal levels of vitamin D and calcium were characteristics of mucolipidosis type II. Recognizing this specific association of anomalies helps eliminate the differential diagnosis and establish appropriate diagnosis and care. PMID:26552632

  10. Polychlorinated biphenyl exposure, diabetes and endogenous hormones: a cross-sectional study in men previously employed at a capacitor manufacturing plant

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies have shown associations of diabetes and endogenous hormones with exposure to a wide variety of organochlorines. We have previously reported positive associations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and inverse associations of selected steroid hormones with diabetes in postmenopausal women previously employed in a capacitor manufacturing plant. Methods This paper examines associations of PCBs with diabetes and endogenous hormones in 63 men previously employed at the same plant who in 1996 underwent surveys of their exposure and medical history and collection of bloods and urine for measurements of PCBs, lipids, liver function, hematologic markers and endogenous hormones. Results PCB exposure was positively associated with diabetes and age and inversely associated with thyroid stimulating hormone and triiodothyronine-uptake. History of diabetes was significantly related to total PCBs and all PCB functional groupings, but not to quarters worked and job score, after control for potential confounders. None of the exposures were related to insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in non-diabetic men. Conclusions Associations of PCBs with specific endogenous hormones differ in some respects from previous findings in postmenopausal women employed at the capacitor plant. Results from this study, however, do confirm previous reports relating PCB exposure to diabetes and suggest that these associations are not mediated by measured endogenous hormones. PMID:22931295

  11. 42 CFR 493.933 - Endocrinology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... categorized as waived tests) T3 Uptake Triiodothyronine Thyroid-stimulating hormone Thyroxine (c) Evaluation.... Triiodothyronine Target value ±3 SD. Thyroid-stimulating hormone Target value ±3 SD. Thyroxine Target value ±20%...

  12. 42 CFR 493.933 - Endocrinology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... categorized as waived tests) T3 Uptake Triiodothyronine Thyroid-stimulating hormone Thyroxine (c) Evaluation.... Triiodothyronine Target value ±3 SD. Thyroid-stimulating hormone Target value ±3 SD. Thyroxine Target value ±20%...

  13. 42 CFR 493.933 - Endocrinology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... categorized as waived tests) T3 Uptake Triiodothyronine Thyroid-stimulating hormone Thyroxine (c) Evaluation.... Triiodothyronine Target value ±3 SD. Thyroid-stimulating hormone Target value ±3 SD. Thyroxine Target value ±20%...

  14. 42 CFR 493.933 - Endocrinology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... categorized as waived tests) T3 Uptake Triiodothyronine Thyroid-stimulating hormone Thyroxine (c) Evaluation.... Triiodothyronine Target value ±3 SD. Thyroid-stimulating hormone Target value ±3 SD. Thyroxine Target value ±20%...

  15. 42 CFR 493.933 - Endocrinology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... categorized as waived tests) T3 Uptake Triiodothyronine Thyroid-stimulating hormone Thyroxine (c) Evaluation.... Triiodothyronine Target value ±3 SD. Thyroid-stimulating hormone Target value ±3 SD. Thyroxine Target value ±20%...

  16. Routine neonatal circumcision?

    PubMed Central

    Tran, P. T.; Giacomantonio, M.

    1996-01-01

    Routine neonatal circumcision is still a controversial procedure. This article attempts to clarify some of the advantages and disadvantages of neonatal circumcision. The increased rate of penile cancer among uncircumcised men appears to justify the procedure, but that alone is not sufficient justification. The final decision on neonatal circumcision should be made by parents with balanced counsel from attending physicians. PMID:8939321

  17. Urinary Bisphenol A Concentrations in Relation to Serum Thyroid and Reproductive Hormone Levels in Men from an Infertility Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, John D.; Calafat, Antonia M.; Hauser, Russ

    2010-01-01

    Human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) is widespread. Animal studies have demonstrated that BPA can alter endocrine function, but human studies are limited. For the present study, we measured urinary BPA concentrations and serum thyroid and reproductive hormone levels in 167 men recruited through an infertility clinic. BPA was detected in 89% of urine samples with a median (range) of 1.3 (<0.4 – 36.4) ng/mL. In multivariable regression models adjusted for potential confounders, BPA concentrations in urine collected on the same day as a blood sample were inversely associated with serum levels of inhibin B and estradiol:testosterone ratio (E2:T) and positively associated with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and FSH:inhibin B ratio. Because BPA is metabolized quickly and multiple urine measures may better reflect exposure than a single measure, we also considered among a subset of the men the BPA concentrations in repeated urine samples collected weeks or months following serum sample collection. In these analyses, the effect estimates remained consistent for FSH and E2:T but were somewhat weakened for inhibin B; in addition, we observed inverse relationships between urinary BPA and free androgen index (ratio of testosterone to sex hormone binding globulin), estradiol, and thyroid stimulating hormone. Our results suggest that BPA exposure may be associated with altered hormone levels in men, but these findings need to be substantiated through further research. PMID:20030380

  18. PCB153 and p,p'-DDE disorder thyroid hormones via thyroglobulin, deiodinase 2, transthyretin, hepatic enzymes and receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjiang; Ha, Mei; Li, Lianbing; Yang, Kedi

    2014-10-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and DDT are widespread environmental persistent organic pollutants that have various adverse effects on reproduction, development and endocrine function. In order to elucidate effects of PCBs and DDT on thyroid hormone homeostasis, Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with PCB153 and p,p'-DDE intraperitoneally (ip) for five consecutive days and sacrificed within 24 h after the last dose. Results indicated that after combined exposure to PCB153 and p,p'-DDE, total thyroxine , free thyroxine, total triiodothyronine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone in serum were decreased, whereas free triiodothyronine and thyrotropin-releasing hormone were not affected. Thyroglobulin and transthyretin levels in serum were significantly reduced. mRNA expression of deiodinases 2 (D2) was also suppressed, while D1 and D3 levels were not significantly influenced after combined exposure. PCB153 and p,p'-DDE induced hepatic enzymes, UDPGTs, CYP1A1, CYP2B1, and CYP3A1 mRNA expressions being significantly elevated. Moreover, TRα1, TRβ1, and TRHr expressions in the hypothalamus displayed increasing trends after combined exposure to PCB153 and p,p'-DDE. Taken together, observed results indicate that PCB153 and p,p'-DDE could disorder thyroid hormone homeostasis via thyroglobulin, deiodinase 2, transthyretin, hepatic enzymes, and hormone receptors. PMID:24878560

  19. Liver X receptor β controls thyroid hormone feedback in the brain and regulates browning of subcutaneous white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yifei; Wu, Wanfu; Dai, Yubing; Maneix, Laure; Huang, Bo; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2015-11-10

    The recent discovery of browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) has raised great research interest because of its significant potential in counteracting obesity and type 2 diabetes. Browning is the result of the induction in WAT of a newly discovered type of adipocyte, the beige cell. When mice are exposed to cold or several kinds of hormones or treatments with chemicals, specific depots of WAT undergo a browning process, characterized by highly activated mitochondria and increased heat production and energy expenditure. However, the mechanisms underlying browning are still poorly understood. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are one class of nuclear receptors, which play a vital role in regulating cholesterol, triglyceride, and glucose metabolism. Following our previous finding that LXRs serve as repressors of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) in classic brown adipose tissue in female mice, we found that LXRs, especially LXRβ, also repress the browning process of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in male rodents fed a normal diet. Depletion of LXRs activated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH)-positive neurons in the paraventricular nucleus area of the hypothalamus and thus stimulated secretion of TSH from the pituitary. Consequently, production of thyroid hormones in the thyroid gland and circulating thyroid hormone level were increased. Moreover, the activity of thyroid signaling in SAT was markedly increased. Together, our findings have uncovered the basis of increased energy expenditure in male LXR knockout mice and provided support for targeting LXRs in treatment of obesity. PMID:26504234

  20. Liver X receptor β controls thyroid hormone feedback in the brain and regulates browning of subcutaneous white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yifei; Wu, Wanfu; Dai, Yubing; Maneix, Laure; Huang, Bo; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) has raised great research interest because of its significant potential in counteracting obesity and type 2 diabetes. Browning is the result of the induction in WAT of a newly discovered type of adipocyte, the beige cell. When mice are exposed to cold or several kinds of hormones or treatments with chemicals, specific depots of WAT undergo a browning process, characterized by highly activated mitochondria and increased heat production and energy expenditure. However, the mechanisms underlying browning are still poorly understood. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are one class of nuclear receptors, which play a vital role in regulating cholesterol, triglyceride, and glucose metabolism. Following our previous finding that LXRs serve as repressors of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) in classic brown adipose tissue in female mice, we found that LXRs, especially LXRβ, also repress the browning process of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in male rodents fed a normal diet. Depletion of LXRs activated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH)-positive neurons in the paraventricular nucleus area of the hypothalamus and thus stimulated secretion of TSH from the pituitary. Consequently, production of thyroid hormones in the thyroid gland and circulating thyroid hormone level were increased. Moreover, the activity of thyroid signaling in SAT was markedly increased. Together, our findings have uncovered the basis of increased energy expenditure in male LXR knockout mice and provided support for targeting LXRs in treatment of obesity. PMID:26504234

  1. Role of the Extracellular and Intracellular Loops of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Its Function

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Antara A.; Mahale, Smita D.

    2015-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) is a leucine-rich repeat containing class A G-protein coupled receptor belonging to the subfamily of glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHRs), which includes luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LH/CGR) and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. Its cognate ligand, follicle-stimulating hormone binds to, and activates FSHR expressed on the surface of granulosa cells of the ovary, in females, and Sertoli cells of the testis, in males, to bring about folliculogenesis and spermatogenesis, respectively. FSHR contains a large extracellular domain (ECD) consisting of leucine-rich repeats at the N-terminal end and a hinge region at the C-terminus that connects the ECD to the membrane spanning transmembrane domain (TMD). The TMD consists of seven α-helices that are connected to each other by means of three extracellular loops (ELs) and three intracellular loops (ILs) and ends in a short-cytoplasmic tail. It is well established that the ECD is the primary hormone binding domain, whereas the TMD is the signal transducing domain. However, several studies on the ELs and ILs employing site directed mutagenesis, generation of chimeric receptors and in vitro characterization of naturally occurring mutations have proven their indispensable role in FSHR function. Their role in every phase of the life cycle of the receptor like post translational modifications, cell surface trafficking, hormone binding, activation of downstream signaling, receptor phosphorylation, hormone–receptor internalization, and recycling of hormone–receptor complex have been documented. Mutations in the loops causing dysregulation of these processes lead to pathophysiological conditions. In other GPHRs as well, the loops have been convincingly shown to contribute to various aspects of receptor function. This review article attempts to summarize the extensive contributions of FSHR loops and C-terminal tail to its function. PMID:26236283

  2. Comparison of effect of sex hormone manipulation during neonatal period, on mRNA expression of Slc9a4, Nr3c2, Htr5b and Mas1 in hippocampus and frontal cortex of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Karimi, B; Hafidzi, M N; Panandam, J M; Fuzina, N H

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that spatial memory and the ability to navigate through space are sexually dimorphic traits among mammals, and numerous studies have shown that these traits can be altered by means of sex hormone manipulation. Hippocampus, the main organ involved in this kind of memory, has specific signature genes with high expression level compared to other regions of the brain. Based on their expression levels and the role that products of these genes can play in processes like signal transduction, mediation of hormone effects and long term potentiation, these genes can be considered as genes necessary for routine tasks of hippocampus. Male and female rat pups were injected with estradiol and testosterone respectively. at early stage of their lives to examine the effect of sex hormone manipulation on mRNA expression of Slc9a4, Nr3c2, Htr5b and Mas1 using comparative quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that expressions of these genes are strongly influenced by sex hormones in both the frontal cortex and hippocampus, especially in male hippocampus, in which expression of all genes were up-regulated. Htr5b was the only gene that was affected only in the males. Expression of Mas1 was contrary to expectations, showed stronger changes in its expression in cortex than in hippocampus. Nr3c2 was down regulated in all samples but up regulated in male hippocampus, and Slc9a4 also showed a huge up-regulation in male hippocampus compared to other samples. PMID:24152851

  3. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  4. Isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    PU, JIUJUN; WANG, ZHIMING; ZHOU, HUI; ZHONG, AILING; JIN, KAI; RUAN, LUNLIANG; YANG, GANG

    2016-01-01

    Only a few cases of double or multiple pituitary adenomas have previously been reported in the literature; however, isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas are even more rare. The present study reports a rare case of a 50-year-old female patient who presented with typical clinical features of Cushing's disease and was diagnosed with isolated double ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. Endocrinological examination revealed an ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma, and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a microadenoma with a lower intensity on the right side of the pituitary gland. The patient underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery, which revealed another pituitary tumor in the left side of the pituitary gland. The two, clearly separated, pituitary adenomas identified in the same gland were completely resected. Immunohistochemistry and pathology revealed that the clearly separated double pituitary adenomas were positive for ACTH, thyroid-stimulating, growth and prolactin hormones. Postoperatively, the levels of ACTH and cortisol hormone decreased rapidly. The case reported in the present study is considerably rare, due to the presence of a second pituitary adenoma in the same gland, which was not detected by preoperative MRI scan, but was noticed during surgery. Intraoperative evaluation may be important in the identification of double or multiple pituitary adenomas. PMID:27347184

  5. Subacute Microcystin-LR Exposure Alters the Metabolism of Thyroid Hormones in Juvenile Zebrafish (Danio Rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zidong; Tang, Rong; Li, Dapeng; Hu, Qing; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) has been detected extensively in the aquatic environment and has the potential to disturb the thyroid endocrine system. However, limited information is available on the effects of subacute MC-LR exposure on fish thyroid hormone (TH) metabolism. In the present study, juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to MC-LR at environmentally relevant concentrations (0, 1, 5, and 25 μg/L) for 28 days. Whole-body TH content and thyroid follicle histology were used as direct endpoints to assess thyroid disruption. The activities of iodothyronine deiodinases (IDs) and the transcription of selected genes associated with TH synthesis were also investigated to study the underlying mechanisms of endocrine disruption. Exposure of zebrafish to MC-LR significantly increased whole-body thyroxine (T4) content but decreased whole-body triiodothyronine (T3) content. We also observed hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the thyroid follicle epithelial cells, as well as up-regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and transthyretin (TTR) genes. The decreases in ID1 and ID2 activities coupled with an increase in ID3 activity were observed in MC-LR treatment groups. These results demonstrate that exposure to MC-LR at environmental concentrations results in the disturbance of TH homeostasis by disrupting the synthesis and conversion of THs. PMID:25647779

  6. Serum Dioxin Concentrations and Thyroid Hormone Levels in the Seveso Women's Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Chevrier, Jonathan; Warner, Marcella; Gunier, Robert B.; Brambilla, Paolo; Eskenazi, Brenda; Mocarelli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a persistent environmental contaminant. Although experimental evidence suggests that TCDD alters thyroid hormone levels in rodents, human data are inconsistent. In 1976, a trichlorophenol plant exploded in Seveso, Italy. Women living in highly exposed areas were followed through the Seveso Women's Health Study. TCDD concentrations were measured in 1976 (n = 981) and 1996 (n = 260), and levels of total thyroxine, free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone were measured in 1996 (n = 909) and 2008 (n = 724). We used conditional multiple linear regression and marginal structural models with inverse-probability-of-treatment weights to evaluate associations and causal effects. TCDD concentration in 1976 was inversely associated with total thyroxine level in 1996 but not in 2008. Associations were stronger among women who had been exposed before menarche. Among these women, associations between total thyroxine and concurrent 1996 TCDD were slightly weaker than those with 1976 TCDD. A model including both 1976 and 1996 measurements strengthened the relationship between 1976 TCDD and total thyroxine but drove the association with 1996 TCDD to the null. TCDD exposure was not associated with levels of other thyroid hormones. TCDD exposure, particularly exposure before menarche, may have enduring impacts on women's total thyroxine levels. Initial exposure appears to be more influential than remaining body burden. PMID:25096280

  7. Subacute microcystin-LR exposure alters the metabolism of thyroid hormones in juvenile zebrafish (Danio Rerio).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zidong; Tang, Rong; Li, Dapeng; Hu, Qing; Wang, Ying

    2015-02-01

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) has been detected extensively in the aquatic environment and has the potential to disturb the thyroid endocrine system. However, limited information is available on the effects of subacute MC-LR exposure on fish thyroid hormone (TH) metabolism. In the present study, juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to MC-LR at environmentally relevant concentrations (0, 1, 5, and 25 μg/L) for 28 days. Whole-body TH content and thyroid follicle histology were used as direct endpoints to assess thyroid disruption. The activities of iodothyronine deiodinases (IDs) and the transcription of selected genes associated with TH synthesis were also investigated to study the underlying mechanisms of endocrine disruption. Exposure of zebrafish to MC-LR significantly increased whole-body thyroxine (T4) content but decreased whole-body triiodothyronine (T3) content. We also observed hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the thyroid follicle epithelial cells, as well as up-regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and transthyretin (TTR) genes. The decreases in ID1 and ID2 activities coupled with an increase in ID3 activity were observed in MC-LR treatment groups. These results demonstrate that exposure to MC-LR at environmental concentrations results in the disturbance of TH homeostasis by disrupting the synthesis and conversion of THs. PMID:25647779

  8. Evaluation of oxidative stress and thyroid hormone status in hemodialysis patients in Gorgan

    PubMed Central

    Velayeti, Javad; Mansourian, Azad Reza; Mojerloo, Mohammad; Marjani, Abdoljalal

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study focused on serum malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in hemodialysis patients and compared with control groups. Materials and Methods: Forty-five hemodialyzed patients and 45 control groups recruited in this study. Serum creatinine and urea, thyroid hormones (THs) levels and erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities were determined. Results: Hemodialysis (HD) patients showed higher levels of MDA than control groups (P < 0.01), but the levels of thyroxin (T3), free triiodothyronine (fT3), and free thyroxin (fT4), SOD and CAT were low in HD patients (P < 0.01). Serum T3, fT3, and fT4 levels were significantly negative correlated with MDA (P < 0.01). Conclusion: It is concluded that serum lipid peroxidation is markedly increased in HD patients. This means that elevated reactive oxygen species may interact with the lipid molecules in HD patients. HD may cause significant changes in TH levels. Thyroid-stimulating hormone level in HD patients is slightly similar to that of control groups. This suggests that thyroid is able to resynthesize for hormonal urinary losses. PMID:27186552

  9. Growth Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... the dose of glucose. Growth hormone stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) . ... regular intervals for years afterward to monitor GH production and to detect tumor recurrence. Other blood tests ...

  10. Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... based lubricants include petroleum jelly, baby oil, or mineral oil. Oil-based types should not be used ... caused by low levels of these hormones. Hysterectomy: Removal of the uterus. Menopause: The time in a ...

  11. Ethanol blocks the cold-induced increase in thyrotropin-releasing hormone mRNA in paraventricular nuclei but not the cold-induced increase in thyrotropin.

    PubMed

    Zoeller, R T; Rudeen, P K

    1992-05-01

    The effects of a single intraperitoneal injection of ethanol (3 g/kg b.wt.) on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid system was explored as a possible explanation of the hypothermic effect of ethanol. Serum thyroid hormones were significantly reduced by ethanol injection, but ethanol did not affect the cold-induced increase in serum thyroid hormones or thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Since cold-exposure stimulates serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones by stimulating thyroid-releasing hormone (TRH) release from neurons of the PVN, these findings demonstrate that ethanol did not block pituitary response to TRH or thyroid response to TSH. Paradoxically, ethanol increased cellular levels of TRH mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and blocked the cold-induced increase in TRH mRNA, suggesting that ethanol uncouples the regulation of TRH gene expression from the regulation of TRH release specifically in neurons of the PVN. Measurements of the effects of ethanol on TRH mRNA in thalamus, and beta-actin, vasopressin, somatostatin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNAs in the PVN in addition to TRH mRNA revealed very specific effects of ethanol on the TRH neuronal system. PMID:1352612

  12. THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY DURING BRAIN DEVELOPMENT REDUCES PARVALBUMIN IMMUNOREACTIVITY AND INHIBITORY FUNCTION IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA must evaluate the risk of exposure of the developing brain to chemicals with the potential to disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis. The existing literature identifies morphological and neurochemical indices of severe neonatal hypothyroidism in the early postnatal period i...

  13. Evaluation of Oogenesis Aspects in Neonatal and Adult Mice after Toloaldoxime Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fazeltabar Malekshah, Mohammad; Sedighi, Mahsa; Parivar, Kazem; Mohseni Kouchesfahani, Homa; Bigdeli, Mohamadali

    2015-01-01

    Objective Oximes are important materials in organic chemistry. Synparamethyl benzal- dehyde oxime (toloaldoxime) is structurally similar to other oximes, hence we have studied its effects on the neonatal and adult female Balb/c mice reproductive systems in order to provide a platform for future studies on the production of female contraceptive drugs. Materials and Methods In experimental study, we studied the effects of toloaldoxime on ovary growth and gonadal hormones of neonatal and adult Balb/c mice. A regression model for prediction was presented. Results The effects of toloaldoxime on neonatal mice were more than adult mice. The greatest effect was on the number of Graafian follicles (59.6% in adult mice and 31.83% in neonatal mice). The least effect was on ovary weight, and blood serum lev- els of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). Conclusion According to the data obtained, toloaldoxime can be considered an anti- pregnancy substance. PMID:26464830

  14. Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and levels of thyroid hormones in children.

    PubMed Central

    Osius, N; Karmaus, W; Kruse, H; Witten, J

    1999-01-01

    As part of an epidemiologic study on exposure to a toxic waste incineration plant we investigated whether blood concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), lead, and cadmium, as well as concentration of mercury in 24-hr urine samples were associated with thyroid hormone status. As an indication of status, we determined levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT(4)), and free triiodothyronine (FT(3)) in children living in households where [less than/equal to] 10 cigarettes were smoked per day. Eight PCB congeners (PCBs 101, 118, 138, 153, 170, 180, 183, and 187) were measured in whole blood samples. Of these, seven congeners (PCB 101 was not detected in any sample) and the sum of all PCB congeners were analyzed as predictors for thyroid hormone status in separate linear regression models adjusted for potential confounders. In addition, the possible effects of cadmium, lead, and mercury on levels of thyroid hormones were examined. Blood concentrations and information on questionnaire data were available for 320 children 7-10 years of age. We found a statistically significant positive association between the mono-ortho congener PCB 118 and TSH as well as statistically significant negative relationships of PCBs 138, 153, 180, 183, and 187 to FT(3). There was no association for the PCB congeners and FT(4). Blood cadmium concentration was associated with increasing TSH and diminishing FT(4). Blood lead and urine concentration of mercury were of no importance to thyroid hormone levels. The results stress the need for future studies on the possible influences of PCB and cadmium exposure on thyroid hormones, particularly in children. These studies should also take neurologic development into account. PMID:10504153

  15. Associations between brominated flame retardants in house dust and hormone levels in men.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paula I; Stapleton, Heather M; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Hauser, Russ; Meeker, John D

    2013-02-15

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are used in the manufacture of a variety of materials and consumer products in order to meet fire safety standards. BFRs may persist in the environment and have been detected in wildlife, humans and indoor dust and air. Some BFRs have demonstrated endocrine and reproductive effects in animals, but human studies are limited. In this exploratory study, we measured serum hormone levels and flame retardant concentrations [31 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners and 6 alternate flame retardants] in house dust from men recruited through a US infertility clinic. PBDE congeners in dust were grouped by commercial mixtures (i.e. penta-, octa- and deca-BDE). In multivariable linear regression models adjusted by age and body mass index (BMI), significant positive associations were found between house dust concentrations of pentaBDEs and serum levels of free T4, total T3, estradiol, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), along with an inverse association with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). There were also positive associations of octaBDE concentrations with serum free T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone and an inverse association of decaBDE concentrations with testosterone. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was associated with decreased SHBG and increased free androgen index. Dust concentrations of bis-tribromophenoxyethane (BTBPE) and tetrabromo-diethylhexylphthalate (TBPH) were positively associated with total T3. These findings are consistent with our previous report of associations between PBDEs (BDE 47, 99 and 100) in house dust and hormone levels in men, and further suggest that exposure to contaminants in indoor dust may be leading to endocrine disruption in men. PMID:23333513

  16. The Activation Mechanism of Glycoprotein Hormone Receptors with Implications in the Cause and Therapy of Endocrine Diseases.

    PubMed

    Brüser, Antje; Schulz, Angela; Rothemund, Sven; Ricken, Albert; Calebiro, Davide; Kleinau, Gunnar; Schöneberg, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Glycoprotein hormones (GPHs) are the main regulators of the pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-gonadal axes. Selective interaction between GPHs and their cognate G protein-coupled receptors ensure specificity in GPH signaling. The mechanisms of how these hormones activate glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHRs) or how mutations and autoantibodies can alter receptor function were unclear. Based on the hypothesis that GPHRs contain an internal agonist, we systematically screened peptide libraries derived from the ectodomain for agonistic activity on the receptors. We show that a peptide (p10) derived from a conserved sequence in the C-terminal part of the extracellular N terminus can activate all GPHRs in vitro and in GPHR-expressing tissues. Inactivating mutations in this conserved region or in p10 can inhibit activation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor by autoantibodies. Our data suggest an activation mechanism where, upon extracellular ligand binding, this intramolecular agonist isomerizes and induces structural changes in the 7-transmembrane helix domain, triggering G protein activation. This mechanism can explain the pathophysiology of activating autoantibodies and several mutations causing endocrine dysfunctions such as Graves disease and hypo- and hyperthyroidism. Our findings highlight an evolutionarily conserved activation mechanism of GPHRs and will further promote the development of specific ligands useful to treat Graves disease and other dysfunctions of GPHRs. PMID:26582202

  17. Hormone impostors

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, T.; Dumanoski, D.; Myers, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the accumulating evidence that some synthetic chemicals disrupt hormones in one way or another. Some mimic estrogen and others interfere with other parts of the body`s control or endocrine system such as testosterone and thyroid metabolism. Included are PCBs, dioxins, furans, atrazine, DDT. Several short sidebars highlight areas where there are or have been particular problems.

  18. Primary Neonatal Diaphragmatic Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Zouari, Mohamed; Jallouli, Mohamed; Ben Thabet, Afef; Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Gargouri, Abdellatif; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal diaphragmatic abscesses are extremely rare and they usually develop by direct extension from a liver abscess. The first case of primary diaphragmatic abscess in a neonate is reported and the difficulties of diagnosing this rare entity are discussed. PMID:26023529

  19. Hormone Health Network

    MedlinePlus

    International Resource Center Online Store Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Healthy Living ...

  20. Menstrual disturbances and hormonal changes in women workers exposed to a mixture of organic solvents in a pharmaceutical company

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Somayeh; Namvar, Mohamad; Ghoreishvandi, Maryam; Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Golabadi, Majid; Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Khodarahmian, Mahshad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chemicals are among risk factors that can affect women's reproductive system. This study is aimed to investigate the association of occupational exposure to a mixture of organic solvents with menstruation disturbances and hormonal changes among female workers. Methods: Female workers of a pharmaceutical company were divided into three groups of non-exposed, lowexposed and highly-exposed to a mixture of organic solvents (formaldehyde, phenol, N-hexane, and chloroform) based on workplace measurements. Menstrual disturbances (in terms of short cycles, long cycles, irregular cycles, and bleeding or spotting between periods) and mean of hormone levels (including follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, prolactin, estrogen and progesterone levels) were compared between these three groups. For investigating associations, logistic regression was performed. Results: Our study showed that mean length of cycles, duration of bleeding, and amount of flow and also prevalence of long cycles, irregular cycles, and bleeding or spotting between periods were higher in exposed groups (p≤0.05). Odds ratio for prevalence of menstrual disturbances in the low exposure group and high exposure group were 9.69 (p=0.001) and 3.40 (p=0.002) respectively compared to the reference group. Estrogen and progesterone levels were not affected (p> 0.05), but other hormones levels were significantly disturbed in the exposed groups compared with the non-exposed group (p=0.001). Conclusion: Occupational exposure to the mixture of organic solvents may be associated with the increase of menstrual disorders and hormonal changes in female workers. Based on our findings, periodic evaluation of reproductive system of female workers in pharmaceutical companies is recommended. PMID:25695014

  1. Thyroxine modifies the effects of growth hormone in Ames dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Do, Andrew; Menon, Vinal; Zhi, Xu; Gesing, Adam; Wiesenborn, Denise S; Spong, Adam; Sun, Liou; Bartke, Andrzej; Masternak, Michal M

    2015-04-01

    Ames dwarf (df/df) mice lack growth hormone (GH), thyroid stimulating hormone and prolactin. Treatment of juvenile df/df mice with GH alone stimulates somatic growth, reduces insulin sensitivity and shortens lifespan. Early-life treatment with thyroxine (T4) alone produces modest growth stimulation but does not affect longevity. In this study, we examined the effects of treatment of juvenile Ames dwarf mice with a combination of GH + T4 and compared them to the effects of GH alone. Treatment of female and male dwarfs with GH + T4 between the ages of 2 and 8 weeks rescued somatic growth yet did not reduce lifespan to match normal controls, thus contrasting with the previously reported effects of GH alone. While the male dwarf GH + T4 treatment group had no significant effect on lifespan, the female dwarfs undergoing treatment showed a decrease in maximal longevity. Expression of genes related to GH and insulin signaling in the skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue (WAT) of female dwarfs was differentially affected by treatment with GH + T4 vs. GH alone. Differences in the effects of GH + T4 vs. GH alone on insulin target tissues may contribute to the differential effects of these treatments on longevity. PMID:25935838

  2. [Transthyretin-binding activity of hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and its thyroid hormone disrupting effects after developmental exposure].

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiu-Ling; Liu, Yang; Liu, Fang; Lu, Yue; Zhong, Gao-Ren

    2010-09-01

    In vivo and in vitro research approaches were carried out to survey the potential health risk of environmental exposure by hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs). Transthyretin-binding assay was designed to test for the potency of HBCDs to compete with thyroxine (T4) for binding to the transport protein. The results showed that the binding of 25I-T4 and T4 was only slightly inhabited even at the highest competitive concentration of HBCDs (75.08%, 80 micromol x L(-1)), indicating the marginally interfere potency of HBCDs in the transportation of T4. Sprague-Dawley rats of 3-days old were exposed to 0.2 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg HBCDs for 21 d to examine the thyroid hormones (THs) disrupting effects of HBCDs after developmental exposure. Compared with the controls, levels of total 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (TT3), free 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (FT3), increased significantly (p < 0.05, p < 0.05) in low- and high-dose exposures, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) also increased slightly while the total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4) had a decline about two-fold inversely. Combined both the in vivo and in vitro results, the possible mode of action of HBCDs on THs disruption may through the synergy or substitution effect of T3. The findings support further investigation of the potential THs disrupting effects of HBCDs on public health, especially on children during brain development. PMID:21072945

  3. Thyroid hormones and thyroid disease in relation to perchlorate dose and residence near a superfund site.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ellen B; Blount, Benjamin C; O'Neill Rasor, Marianne; Lee, Jennifer S; Alwis, Udeni; Srivastav, Anup; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2013-07-01

    Perchlorate is a widely occurring contaminant, which can competitively inhibit iodide uptake and thus thyroid hormone production. The health effects of chronic low dose perchlorate exposure are largely unknown. In a community-based study, we compared thyroid function and disease in women with differing likelihoods of prior and current perchlorate exposure. Residential blocks were randomly selected from areas: (1) with potential perchlorate exposure via drinking water; (2) with potential exposure to environmental contaminants; and (3) neighboring but without such exposures. Eligibility included having lived in the area for ≥6 months and aged 20-50 years during 1988-1996 (during documented drinking water well contamination). We interviewed 814 women and collected blood samples (assayed for thyroid stimulating hormone and free thyroxine) from 431 interviewed women. Daily urine samples were assayed for perchlorate and iodide for 178 premenopausal women with blood samples. We performed multivariable regression analyses comparing thyroid function and disease by residential area and by urinary perchlorate dose adjusted for urinary iodide levels. Residential location and current perchlorate dose were not associated with thyroid function or disease. No persistent effect of perchlorate on thyroid function or disease was found several years after contaminated wells were capped. PMID:22968349

  4. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity.

    PubMed

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9-5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r(2) = 0.484, p < 0.001) and the TSH incremental area under the curve during the TRH stimulation test (r(2) = 0.307, p < 0.001). These results suggest that pituitary TSH release in response to TRH stimulation might be an important factor contributing to high normal serum TSH concentrations, which is a regular finding in children with overweight and obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27485208

  5. Combined effects of cadmium and decabrominated diphenyl ether on thyroid hormones in rats.

    PubMed

    Curčić, Marijana; Janković, Saša; Jaćević, Vesna; Stanković, Sanja; Vučinić, Slavica; Durgo, Ksenija; Bulat, Zorica; Antonijević, Biljana

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to see how a mixture of cadmium (Cd) and decabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE209) affect thyroid function, namely thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroxin (T4), free thyroxin (FT4), triiodothyronin (T3), and free triiodothyronin (FT3) in Wistar rats (eight per group) receiving either a single substance or their combination by gavage for 28 days. Three groups were receiving Cd alone in the doses of 2.5 mg kg-1, 7.5 mg kg-1, or 15 mg kg-1 b. w. a day, three groups were receiving BDE209 in the doses of 1000 mg kg-1, 2000 mg kg-1, or 4000 mg kg-1 b. w. a day, while nine groups were receiving different mixtures of Cd and BDE209 in these doses (3x3 design). The results have indicated that the Cd+BDE209 mixtures more potently disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis than would be expected from these chemicals alone. PMID:23152375

  6. Thyroid Hormones and Thyroid Disease in Relation to Perchlorate Dose and Residence Near a Superfund Site

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ellen B.; Blount, Benjamin C.; Rasor, Marianne O’Neill; Lee, Jennifer S.; Alwis, Udeni; Srivastav, Anup; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2013-01-01

    Background Perchlorate is a widely occurring contaminant, which can competitively inhibit iodide uptake and thus thyroid hormone production. The health effects of chronic low dose perchlorate exposure are largely unknown. Objectives In a community-based study, we compared thyroid function and disease in women with differing likelihoods of prior and current perchlorate exposure. Methods Residential blocks were randomly selected from areas: 1) with potential perchlorate exposure via drinking water; 2) with potential exposure to environmental contaminants; and 3) neighboring but without such exposures. Eligibility included having lived in the area for ≥6 months and aged 20–50 years during 1988–1996 (during documented drinking water well contamination). We interviewed 814 women and collected blood samples (assayed for thyroid stimulating hormone [TSH] and free thyroxine [fT4]) from 431 interviewed women. Daily urine samples were assayed for perchlorate and iodide for 178 premenopausal women with blood samples. We performed multivariable regression analyses comparing thyroid function and disease by residential area and by urinary perchlorate dose adjusted for urinary iodide levels. Results Residential location and current perchlorate dose were not associated with thyroid function or disease. Conclusions No persistent effect of perchlorate on thyroid function or disease was found several years after contaminated wells were capped. PMID:22968349

  7. Thyroid hormones and adult interpersonal violence among women with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Sinai, Cave; Hirvikoski, Tatja; Nordström, Anna-Lena; Nordström, Peter; Nilsonne, Åsa; Wilczek, Alexander; Åsberg, Marie; Jokinen, Jussi

    2015-06-30

    Elevated T3 levels have been reported in men with antisocial behavior. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between thyroid hormones and expressed adult interpersonal violence in female patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Furthermore, expressed adult interpersonal violence in female BPD patients was compared to healthy female controls. A total of 92 clinically euthyroid women with BPD and 57 healthy women were assessed with the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scales (KIVS). Baseline thyroid function was evaluated by measuring plasma free and bound triiodothyronine (FT3 and T3), thyroxine (FT4 and T4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) with immunoassays in patients. Plasma cortisol was also measured. Among females with BPD, expressed interpersonal violence as an adult showed a significant positive correlation with the T3 levels. The mean expression of interpersonal violence as an adult was significantly higher in BPD patients as compared to healthy controls. The multiple regression model indicated that two independent predictors of KIVS expressed interpersonal violence as an adult: T3 and comorbid diagnosis of alcohol abuse. Association between T3 levels and violent/aggressive behavior earlier reported exclusively in male samples may be valid also in females with BPD. PMID:25858801

  8. Thyroid hormone balance in beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas: dynamics after capture and influence of thyrotropin.

    PubMed Central

    St Aubin, D J; Geraci, J R

    1992-01-01

    Ten beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas, were captured in the Churchill River, Manitoba, held for up to five days, and then released. Blood samples were obtained immediately after capture and at 6-7 h intervals thereafter to monitor changes in circulating levels of thyroid hormones (TH). In six of the whales, total and free thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) declined steadily, whereas reverse-T3 (rT3) showed a transient increase during the first 24-36 h, followed by a decrease to below initial values. The changes in TH may have been due to glucocorticoid-mediated reduction in endogenous thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and inhibition of 5'-monodeiodinase in peripheral tissue. Two whales were given 10 IU of bovine TSH immediately after capture, and again one and two days later, resulting in successive increases in all TH, which remained elevated for at least 24 h after the last injection. Thereafter, circulating levels declined as in the untreated whales. Two whales receiving a single TSH injection on the fourth day responded with an increase in plasma TH comparable to that observed following the first TSH injection in the other two animals. Average (+/- SD) circulating level of rT3 at capture was 6.3 +/- 3.1 nmol/L, which is higher than reported for any other mammal and was significantly correlated with the naturally elevated levels of T4 that occur in belugas occupying estuaries during the summer. PMID:1586888

  9. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9–5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r2 = 0.484, p < 0.001) and the TSH incremental area under the curve during the TRH stimulation test (r2 = 0.307, p < 0.001). These results suggest that pituitary TSH release in response to TRH stimulation might be an important factor contributing to high normal serum TSH concentrations, which is a regular finding in children with overweight and obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27485208

  10. Low selenium status in the elderly influences thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, O; Girelli, D; Azzini, M; Stanzial, A M; Russo, C; Ferroni, M; Corrocher, R

    1995-12-01

    1. Iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase, which is mainly responsible for peripheral triiodothyronine (T3) production, has recently been demonstrated to be a selenium-containing enzyme. In the elderly, reduced peripheral conversion of thyroxine (T4) to T3 and overt hypothyroidism are frequently observed. 2. We measured serum selenium and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (as indices of selenium status), thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone in 109 healthy euthyroid subjects (52 women, 57 men), carefully selected to exclude abnormally low thyroid hormone levels induced by acute or chronic diseases or calorie restriction. The subjects were subdivided into three age groups. To avoid conditions of under-nutrition or malnutrition, dietary records were obtained for a sample of 24 subjects, randomly selected and representative of the whole population for age and sex. 3. In order to properly assess the influence of selenium status on iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase type I activity, a double-blind placebo-controlled trial was also carried out on 36 elderly subjects, resident at a privately owned nursing home. 4. In the free-living population, a progressive reduction of the T3/T4 ratio (due to increased T4 levels) and of selenium and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity was observed with advancing age. A highly significant linear correlation between T4, T3/T4 and selenium was observed in the population as a whole (for T4, R = -0.312, P < 0.002; for T3/T4 ratio, R = 0.32, P < 0.01) and in older subjects (for T4, R = -0.40, P < 0.05; for T3/T4 ratio, R = 0.54, P < 0.002). 5. The main result of the double-blind placebo-controlled trial was a significant improvement of selenium indices and a decrease in the T4 level in selenium-treated subjects; serum selenium, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity and thyroid hormones did not change in placebo-treated subjects. 6. We concluded that selenium status influences thyroid hormones in the elderly, mainly modulating T4

  11. The number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts on neonatal mouse parietal bones is decreased when prostaglandin synthesis is inhibited and increased in response to prostaglandin E2, parathyroid hormone, and 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Marshall, M J; Holt, I; Davie, M W

    1995-03-01

    The culture of parietal bones from 4-day old mice in indomethacin (Ind) for 1 day caused a large reduction in the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive osteoclasts (TRAP + OC) relative to both control bones and to freshly isolated bones. This reduction did not occur if prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was present. When 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BDU) was injected into 4-day old mice, newly formed TRAP + OC nuclei became labeled 1 day later; these bones were then cultured with Ind for 1 day. TRAP + OC and newly labeled TRAP+OC nuclei were commensurately decreased in number. This suggests an active down-regulation rather than merely the inhibition of new TRAP+OC formation. Incubation of bones with Ind and either PGE2, parathyroid hormone, or 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 for 6 hours following a 1-day preincubation in Ind, resulted in an increase in TRAP + OC compared with Ind alone. Using BDU labeling in vitro and in vivo, we show that this increase in number of TRAP+OC is not the result of cell proliferation, but rather differentiation of postmitotic precursors. PMID:7538445

  12. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  13. Oral Lesions in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  14. Maternal phthalate exposure during the first trimester and serum thyroid hormones in pregnant women and their newborns.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hui-Yuan; Han, Yan; Gao, Hui; Huang, Kun; Ge, Xing; Xu, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Ye-Qing; Jin, Zhong-Xiu; Sheng, Jie; Yan, Shuang-Qin; Zhu, Peng; Hao, Jia-Hu; Tao, Fang-Biao

    2016-08-01

    Animal and human studies have suggested that phthalate alters thyroid hormone concentrations. This study investigated the associations between phthalate exposure during the first trimester and thyroid hormones in pregnant women and their newborns. Pregnant women were enrolled from the prospective Ma'anshan Birth Cohort study in China. A standard questionnaire was completed by the women at the first antenatal visit. Seven phthalate metabolites were measured in one-spot urine at enrolment (10.0 ± 2.1 gestational weeks), as were thyroid hormone levels in maternal and cord sera. Multivariable linear regression showed that 1-standard deviation (SD) increase in natural log (ln)-transformed mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) and mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP) was associated with 0.163 μg/dL (p = 0.001) and 0.173 μg/dL (p = 0.001) decreases in maternal total thyroxine (TT4). Both MEHP and MEHHP were negatively associated with maternal free thyroxine (FT4; β: -0.013, p < 0.001 and β: -0.011, p = 0.001, respectively) and positively associated with maternal thyroid-stimulating hormone (β: 0.101, p < 0.001; β: 0.132, p < 0.001, respectively). An inverse association was observed between monobenzyl phthalate and maternal TT4 and FT4. A 1-SD increase in ln-transformed monoethyl phthalate was inversely associated with maternal TT4 (β: -0.151, p = 0.002). By contrast, the concentrations of phthalate metabolites in urine were not associated with those of thyroid hormone in cord serum. Our analysis suggested that phthalate exposure during the first trimester disrupts maternal thyroid hormone levels. PMID:27208644

  15. Growth hormone deficiency due to traumatic brain injury in a patient with X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Engiz, Ozlem; Ozön, Alev; Riepe, Felix; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Gönç, Nazli; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2010-01-01

    X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) is characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency and is frequently associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). The production of other pituitary hormones (adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH], growth hormone [GH], thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], and prolactin [PRL]) is usually normal. Mutations of the DAX-1 gene have been reported in patients with AHC and HH. We present a 13-year-old male patient with AHC caused by a nonsense mutation in the DAX-1 gene who developed GH deficiency following head trauma. He showed signs of adrenal insufficiency at the age of 23 months, and glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid treatment was started. His parents reported head trauma due to a traffic accident at the age of 21 months. Adrenal computed tomography revealed hypoplasia of the left and agenesis of the right adrenal gland. Decreased growth rate was noted at the age of 12.5 years while receiving hydrocortisone 15 mg/m2/day. His height was 139.9 cm (-1.46 SD), body weight was 54.9 kg, pubic hair was Tanner stage 1, and testis size was 3 ml. His bone age was 7 years. His gonadotropin (follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH], luteinizing hormone [LH]) and testosterone levels were prepubertal. The evaluation of GH/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion at the age of 13 years revealed GH deficiency. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a hypoplastic hypophysis (< 2.5 mm) and a normal infundibulum. GH treatment (0.73 IU/kg/week) was started. This paper reports a patient with genetically confirmed AHC demonstrating GH deficiency possibly due to a previous head trauma. Complete pituitary evaluation should be performed in any child who has survived severe traumatic brain injury. PMID:20718192

  16. Presence of a putative steroidal allosteric site on glycoprotein hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mario; Dimida, Antonio; Ferrarini, Eleonora; Silvano, Elena; De Marco, Giuseppina; Agretti, Patrizia; Aloisi, Gabriella; Simoncini, Tommaso; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Tonacchera, Massimo; Giorgi, Franco; Maggio, Roberto

    2009-11-25

    In a previous work we found that the insecticide 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT), inhibits the accumulation of cAMP as induced by the bovine thyroid stimulating hormone (bTSH) in cells transfected with the TSH receptor. In this work, we demonstrate that the DDT molecular analogues, diethylstilbestrol and quercetine, are more potent inhibitors of the TSH receptor activity than DDT itself. The notion that all these compounds interfere with nuclear estrogen receptors, as either agonists (DDT and diethylstilbestrol) or antagonists (quercetin), prompted us to test the ability of the steroid hormone 17-beta-estradiol to inhibit the TSH receptor activity. We found that estrogen exposure causes a modest but significant inhibition of the bTSH induced cAMP accumulation both in transfected CHO-TSH receptor and Fischer Rat Thyroid Low Serum 5% (FRTL-5) cells. When applied to CHO cells transfected with the luteinizing hormone receptor, 17-beta-estradiol proved capable of inhibiting the hCG induced cAMP accumulation at a concentration as low as 10nM, though the effect was not greater than 35%. The effect of 17-beta-estradiol was not estrogen receptors mediated, as co-transfection of the estrogen receptor alpha and beta subunits with LH receptor caused cAMP to increase above the level attained by the sole hCG stimulation, and not to decrease it as expected. These data suggest the presence of a steroidal-like allosteric binding site on glycoprotein hormone receptors. PMID:19766106

  17. Preservation of renal function by thyroid hormone replacement in elderly persons with subclinical hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hong; Liu, Dongmei; Zhao, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism in elderly persons is controversial. Previous studies have shown that there are interactions between kidney and thyroid function, but data regarding interventions that target thyroid function in elderly patients are scarce. We aimed to investigate the impact of thyroid hormone therapy on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in elderly patients. Material and methods Ninety elderly patients aged ≥ 65 years with subclinical hypothyroidism were followed for 36 months in our case-control study. The changes in the eGFR in patients with and without thyroid hormone replacement therapy were compared. The adverse effects during the treatment period were noted. Results The eGFR of both groups was similar at the beginning of the study (43.4 ±6.1 vs. 42.8 ±5.9 ml/min/1.73 m2; p = 0.62). With the decline in thyroid stimulating hormone levels after treatment, the eGFR of the treatment group significantly improved compared with the control group (45.8 ±4.8 vs. 35.8 ±5.3 ml/min/1.73 m2; p < 0.001); the eGFR increased rapidly over the first 6 months and then plateaued. No patients withdrew from the study, but the therapeutic dose was decreased in two patients due to angina pectoris. Conclusions Thyroid hormone therapy preserved renal function in elderly patients. Appropriate individual treatment should be considered in elderly patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. PMID:27478458

  18. Thyroid Hormone Signaling In Vivo Requires a Balance between Coactivators and Corepressors

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Kristen R.; Ramadoss, Preeti; Costa-e-Sousa, Ricardo H.; Astapova, Inna; Ye, Felix D.; Holtz, Kaila A.; Harris, Jamie C.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH), a human syndrome, is characterized by high thyroid hormone (TH) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. Mice with mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ) gene that cannot bind steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) and Src-1−/− mice both have phenotypes similar to that of RTH. Conversely, mice expressing a mutant nuclear corepressor 1 (Ncor1) allele that cannot interact with TRβ, termed NCoRΔID, have low TH levels and normal TSH. We hypothesized that Src-1−/− mice have RTH due to unopposed corepressor action. To test this, we crossed NCoRΔID and Src-1−/− mice to create mice deficient for coregulator action in all cell types. Remarkably, NCoRΔID/ΔID Src-1−/− mice have normal TH and TSH levels and are triiodothryonine (T3) sensitive at the level of the pituitary. Although absence of SRC-1 prevented T3 activation of key hepatic gene targets, NCoRΔID/ΔID Src-1−/− mice reacquired hepatic T3 sensitivity. Using in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP) for the related coactivator SRC-2, we found enhanced SRC-2 recruitment to TR-binding regions of genes in NCoRΔID/ΔID Src-1−/− mice, suggesting that SRC-2 is responsible for T3 sensitivity in the absence of NCoR1 and SRC-1. Thus, T3 targets require a critical balance between NCoR1 and SRC-1. Furthermore, replacement of NCoR1 with NCoRΔID corrects RTH in Src-1−/− mice through increased SRC-2 recruitment to T3 target genes. PMID:24550004

  19. [Neonatal herpes simplex infection].

    PubMed

    van Ham-Borawitz, V E J; Stam, E D; Welborn, K M; Sas, T C J

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal encephalitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a familiar disease with a high mortality and morbidity rate. Isolated skin-eye-mouth infection is less familiar among professionals. In this article we present two neonates with an isolated skin lesion caused by an HSV infection. Of the neonates infected with HSV, 40-45% show isolated skin-eye-mouth disease. With correct treatment, the risk of spread to the central nervous system will decrease from 50-60% to 5-10%. Typical HSV skin lesions may present at a late stage of the disease or may be masked by a secondary bacterial infection. When a neonate presents with atypical skin lesions starting 7-12 days after the birth, immediate testing for HSV and immediate treatment are required, to decrease the risk of further progression of the disease. PMID:27122069

  20. Neonatal pain management

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Tarun; Shepherd, Ed; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    The past 2-3 decades have seen dramatic changes in the approach to pain management in the neonate. These practices started with refuting previously held misconceptions regarding nociception in preterm infants. Although neonates were initially thought to have limited response to painful stimuli, it was demonstrated that the developmental immaturity of the central nervous system makes the neonate more likely to feel pain. It was further demonstrated that untreated pain can have long-lasting physiologic and neurodevelopmental consequences. These concerns have resulted in a significant emphasis on improving and optimizing the techniques of analgesia for neonates and infants. The following article will review techniques for pain assessment, prevention, and treatment in this population with a specific focus on acute pain related to medical and surgical conditions. PMID:25538531

  1. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... Neonatal RDS occurs in infants whose lungs have not yet fully ... disease is mainly caused by a lack of a slippery substance in ...

  2. Neonatal abstinence syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    NAS; Neonatal abstinence symptoms ... may contribute to the severity of a baby's NAS symptoms. ... symptoms of withdrawal. Even after medical treatment for NAS is over and babies leave the hospital, they ...

  3. Maternal and neonatal tetanus.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, C Louise; Beeching, Nicholas J; Newton, Charles R

    2015-01-24

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surveillance, with specific approaches in high-risk areas, has meant that the incidence of the disease continues to fall. Despite this progress, an estimated 58,000 neonates and an unknown number of mothers die every year from tetanus. As of June, 2014, 24 countries are still to eliminate the disease. Maintenance of elimination needs ongoing vaccination programmes and improved public health infrastructure. PMID:25149223

  4. Neonatal polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Priya; Miyashita, Yosuke

    2014-09-01

    This article provides an up-to-date comprehensive review and summary on neonatal polycystic kidney disease (PKD) with emphasis on the differential diagnosis, clinical manifestations, diagnostic techniques, and potential therapeutic approaches for the major causes of neonatal PKD, namely hereditary disease, including autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant PKD and nonhereditary PKD, with particular emphasis on multicystic dysplastic kidney. A brief overview of obstructive cystic dysplasia and simple and complex cysts is also included. PMID:25155726

  5. Neonatal clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van de Velde, Marc; van den Anker, John

    2013-01-01

    Effective and safe drug administration in neonates should be based on integrated knowledge on the evolving physiological characteristics of the infant who will receive the drug, and the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a given drug. Consequently, clinical pharmacology in neonates is as dynamic and diverse as the neonates we admit to our units while covariates explaining the variability are at least as relevant as median estimates. The unique setting of neonatal clinical pharmacology will be highlighted based on the hazards of simple extrapolation of maturational drug clearance when only based on ‘adult’ metabolism (propofol, paracetamol). Secondly, maturational trends are not at the same pace for all maturational processes. This will be illustrated based on the differences between hepatic and renal maturation (tramadol, morphine, midazolam). Finally, pharmacogenetics should be tailored to neonates, not just mirror adult concepts. Because of this diversity, clinical research in the field of neonatal clinical pharmacology is urgently needed, and facilitated through PK/PD modeling. In addition, irrespective of already available data to guide pharmacotherapy, pharmacovigilance is needed to recognize specific side effects. Consequently, paediatric anesthesiologists should consider to contribute to improved pharmacotherapy through clinical trial design and collaboration, as well as reporting on adverse effects of specific drugs. PMID:23617305

  6. Neonatal surgery in Africa.

    PubMed

    Chirdan, Lohfa B; Ngiloi, Petronilla J; Elhalaby, Essam A

    2012-05-01

    The management of neonatal surgical problems continues to pose considerable challenges, particularly in low-resource settings. The burden of neonatal surgical diseases in Africa is not well documented. The characteristics of some neonatal surgical problems are highlighted. Late presentation coupled with poor understanding of the milieu interior of the neonates by incompetent health care providers and poorly equipped hospitals combine to give rise to the unacceptable high morbidity and mortality in most parts of Africa. Proper training of all staff involved in neonatal health care coupled with community awareness must be vigorously pursued by all stakeholders. Various governments throughout the continent of Africa, in conjunction with international donor agencies, must not only provide an adequate budget for health care services and improve infrastructures, but must also deliberately encourage and provide funding for neonatal surgical care and research across the continent. The well-established pediatric surgical training programs, particularly in North and South Africa, should hold the moral responsibility of training all possible numbers of young surgeons from other African countries that do not have any existing pediatric surgical training programs or those countries suffering from remarkable shortage of trained pediatric surgeons. PMID:22475121

  7. Fibroblast growth factor 21 in breast milk controls neonatal intestine function

    PubMed Central

    Gavaldà-Navarro, Aleix; Hondares, Elayne; Giralt, Marta; Mampel, Teresa; Iglesias, Roser; Villarroya, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    FGF21 is a hormonal factor with important functions in the control of metabolism. FGF21 is found in rodent and human milk. Radiolabeled FGF21 administered to lactating dams accumulates in milk and is transferred to neonatal gut. The small intestine of neonatal (but not adult) mice highly expresses β-Klotho in the luminal area. FGF21-KO pups fed by FGF21-KO dams showed decreased expression and circulating levels of incretins (GIP and GLP-1), reduced gene expression of intestinal lactase and maltase-glucoamylase, and low levels of galactose in plasma, all associated with a mild decrease in body weight. When FGF21-KO pups were nursed by wild-type dams (expressing FGF21 in milk), intestinal peptides and digestive enzymes were up-regulated, lactase enzymatic activity was induced, and galactose levels and body weight were normalized. Neonatal intestine explants were sensitive to FGF21, as evidenced by enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Oral infusion of FGF21 into neonatal pups induced expression of intestinal hormone factors and digestive enzymes, lactase activity and lactose absorption. These findings reveal a novel role of FGF21 as a hormonal factor contributing to neonatal intestinal function via its presence in maternal milk. Appropriate signaling of FGF21 to neonate is necessary to ensure optimal digestive and endocrine function in developing intestine. PMID:26329882

  8. Fibroblast growth factor 21 in breast milk controls neonatal intestine function.

    PubMed

    Gavaldà-Navarro, Aleix; Hondares, Elayne; Giralt, Marta; Mampel, Teresa; Iglesias, Roser; Villarroya, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    FGF21 is a hormonal factor with important functions in the control of metabolism. FGF21 is found in rodent and human milk. Radiolabeled FGF21 administered to lactating dams accumulates in milk and is transferred to neonatal gut. The small intestine of neonatal (but not adult) mice highly expresses β-Klotho in the luminal area. FGF21-KO pups fed by FGF21-KO dams showed decreased expression and circulating levels of incretins (GIP and GLP-1), reduced gene expression of intestinal lactase and maltase-glucoamylase, and low levels of galactose in plasma, all associated with a mild decrease in body weight. When FGF21-KO pups were nursed by wild-type dams (expressing FGF21 in milk), intestinal peptides and digestive enzymes were up-regulated, lactase enzymatic activity was induced, and galactose levels and body weight were normalized. Neonatal intestine explants were sensitive to FGF21, as evidenced by enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Oral infusion of FGF21 into neonatal pups induced expression of intestinal hormone factors and digestive enzymes, lactase activity and lactose absorption. These findings reveal a novel role of FGF21 as a hormonal factor contributing to neonatal intestinal function via its presence in maternal milk. Appropriate signaling of FGF21 to neonate is necessary to ensure optimal digestive and endocrine function in developing intestine. PMID:26329882

  9. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is being suppressed by high blood sugar. ... away. The lab measures the glucose and growth hormone (GH) levels in each sample.

  10. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  11. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003706.htm Growth hormone test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone test measures the amount of growth hormone in ...

  12. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  13. Thyroid Hormones and Moderate Exposure to Perchlorate during Pregnancy in Women in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Steinmaus, Craig; Pearl, Michelle; Kharrazi, Martin; Blount, Benjamin C.; Miller, Mark D.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; DeLorenze, Gerald; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Liaw, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background: Findings from national surveys suggest that everyone in the United States is exposed to perchlorate. At high doses, perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate inhibit iodide uptake into the thyroid and decrease thyroid hormone production. Small changes in thyroid hormones during pregnancy, including changes within normal reference ranges, have been linked to cognitive function declines in the offspring. Objectives: We evaluated the potential effects of low environmental exposures to perchlorate on thyroid function. Methods: Serum thyroid hormones and anti-thyroid antibodies and urinary perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide concentrations were measured in 1,880 pregnant women from San Diego County, California, during 2000–2003, a period when much of the area’s water supply was contaminated from an industrial plant with perchlorate at levels near the 2007 California regulatory standard of 6 μg/L. Linear regression was used to evaluate associations between urinary perchlorate and serum thyroid hormone concentrations in models adjusted for urinary creatinine and thiocyanate, maternal age and education, ethnicity, and gestational age at serum collection. Results: The median urinary perchlorate concentration was 6.5 μg/L, about two times higher than in the general U.S. population. Adjusted associations were identified between increasing log10 perchlorate and decreasing total thyroxine (T4) [regression coefficient (β) = –0.70; 95% CI: –1.06, –0.34], decreasing free thyroxine (fT4) (β = –0.053; 95% CI: –0.092, –0.013), and increasing log10 thyroid-stimulating hormone (β = 0.071; 95% CI: 0.008, 0.133). Conclusions: These results suggest that environmental perchlorate exposures may affect thyroid hormone production during pregnancy. This could have implications for public health given widespread perchlorate exposure and the importance of thyroid hormone in fetal neurodevelopment. Citation: Steinmaus C, Pearl M, Kharrazi M, Blount BC

  14. Lipid profile and thyroid hormone status in the last trimester of pregnancy in single-humped camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Omidi, Arash; Sajedi, Zhila; Montazer Torbati, Mohammad Bagher; Ansari Nik, Hossein

    2014-04-01

    Changes in lipid metabolism have been shown to occur during pregnancy. The thyroid hormones affect lipid metabolism. The present study was carried out to find out whether the last trimester of pregnancy affects thyroid hormones, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), lipid, and lipoprotein profile in healthy dromedary camels. Twenty clinical healthy dromedary camels aged between 4-5 years were divided into two equal groups: (1) pregnant camels in their last trimester of pregnancy and (2) non-pregnant age-matched controls. Thyroid function tests were carried out by measuring serum levels of TSH, free thyroxin (fT4), total thyroxin (T4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), and total triiodothyronine (T3) by commercially available radio immunoassay kits. Total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were analyzed using enzymatic/spectrophotometric methods while low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and total lipid (TL) were calculated using Friedewald's and Raylander's formula, respectively. Serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones except fT4 did not show any significant difference between pregnant and non-pregnant camels. fT4 level was lower in the pregnant camels (P < 0.05). Serum levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, total lipid, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and VLDL did not show significant difference between pregnant and non-pregnant camels. All of these variables in pregnant camels were higher than non-pregnant. Based on the results of this study, the fetus load may not alter the thyroid status of the camel and the concentrations of thyroid hormones were not correlated with TSH and lipid profile levels in the healthy pregnant camels. PMID:24429808

  15. Thyroid hormones are associated with exposure to persistent organic pollutants in aging residents of upper Hudson River communities.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Michael S; Jansing, Robert L; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Rej, Robert; Fitzgerald, Edward F

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and thyroid hormones in an aging population. Forty-eight women and 66 men, aged 55-74 years and living in upper Hudson River communities completed a questionnaire and provided blood specimens. Serum was analyzed for thyrotropin (thyroid stimulating hormone, TSH), free (fT4) and total thyroxine (T4), total triiodothyronine (T3), and for POPs. POPs included 39 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) determined by gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-ECD), and nine polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) determined by high-resolution gas chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry detection (HRGC-HRMS). Multivariable linear regression analysis was used to evaluate associations between thyroid hormones and sums of POPs, adjusted for covariates and stratified by sex. Effects were expressed as differences in thyroid hormone levels associated with a doubling in the level of exposure. Among women, DDT+DDE increased T4 by 0.34μg/dL (P=0.04) and T3 by 2.78ng/dL (P=0.05). Also in women, sums of PCBs in conjunction with PBDEs elicited increases of 24.39-80.85ng/dL T3 (P<0.05), and sums of PCBs in conjunction with DDT+DDE elicited increases of 0.18-0.31μg/dL T4 (P<0.05). For men estrogenic PCBs were associated with a 19.82ng/dL T3 decrease (P=0.003), and the sum of estrogenic PCBs in conjunction with DDT+DDE elicited an 18.02ng/dL T3 decrease (P=0.04). Given age-related declines in physiologic reserve, the influence of POPs on thyroid hormones in aging populations may have clinical implications and merits further investigation. PMID:24138783

  16. NEONATAL DESTRUCTION OF DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rats treated as neonates with 6-hydroxydopamine are proposed to model the dopamine deficiency associated with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS). o understand the neurobiological basis of specific behaviors in LNS, investigations were undertaken in these neonatally lesioned rats. everal ...

  17. Thyroid hormones according to gestational age in pregnant Spanish women

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Thyroid function changes during pregnancy and maternal thyroid dysfunction have been associated with adverse outcomes. Our aim was to evaluate thyroid hormones levels in pregnant women resident in Aragon, Spain. Findings Samples for 1198 pregnant women with no apparent thyroid disorders were analyzed, using paramagnetic microparticle and chemiluminescent detection technologies, in order to determine levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-Ab), and thyroglobulin antibodies (Tg-Ab). Of the women in our sample, 85.22% had normal values for TPO-Ab and Tg-Ab and 14.77% had results revealing the presence of autoimmune diseases of the thyroid. The thyroid hormone reference values obtained according to gestational age (in brackets) were as follows: for free T3, values were 3.38 ± 0.52 pg/mL (<11 weeks), 3.45 ± 0.54 pg/mL (11-20 weeks), 3.32 ± 0.43 pg/mL (21-30 weeks), 3.21 ± 0.53 pg/mL (31-36 weeks), and 3.23 ± 0.41 pg/mL (>36 weeks); for free T4, values were 1.10 ± 0.14 ng/dL (<10 weeks), 1.04 ± 0.14 ng/dL (11-20 weeks), 0.93 ± 0.12 ng/dL (21-30 weeks), 0.90 ± 0.13 ng/dL (31-36 weeks), and 0.80 ± 0.21 ng/dL (>36 weeks); and for TSH, values were (μIU/mL): 1.12 ± 0.69 (<10 weeks), 1.05 ± 0.67 (11-20 weeks), 1.19 ± 0.60 (21-30 weeks), 1.38 ± 0.76 (31-36 weeks), and 1.46 ± 0.72 (>36 weeks). Conclusion Pregnant women with normal antibody values according to gestational age had values for FT4 and TSH, but not for FT3, that differed to a statistically significant degree. The values we describe can be used as reference values for the Aragon region of Spain. PMID:19939287

  18. Hormonal change and cytokine mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells during the development of canine autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Choi, E-W; Shin, I-S; Bhang, D-H; Lee, D-H; Bae, B-K; Kang, M-S; Kim, D-Y; Hwang, C-Y; Lee, C-W; Youn, H-Y

    2006-10-01

    To elucidate the hormonal change and alteration in cytokine expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) during the early stage of autoimmune thyroiditis, we have developed a canine model of this disease, in which normal dogs were immunized with bovine thyroglobulin (Tg) and/or canine thyroid extract. Serum samples were collected weekly, anti-canine Tg antibody was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and total T4 levels by radioimmunoassay. We also assayed T lymphocyte proliferation in response to Tg, as well as measuring cytokine mRNA by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). All six dogs immunized with bovine Tg had both canine Tg autoantibody and anti-T4 antibody. When the sample from the highest TgAA titre time-point was compared with baseline the expression of mRNA encoding the Th1-type cytokine such as interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-18 and IL-15 was increased during the development of autoimmune thyroiditis. Expression of the Th2-type cytokine, IL-6 showed minimal change and IL-4 expression was not detected in any of the samples. Expression of the T suppressive cytokine, IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta was increased in the presence of antigen stimulation. These findings suggest that, although autoimmune thyroiditis is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, systemic cytokine mRNA expression is also changed. PMID:16968404

  19. Alteration of Thyroid-Related Hormones within Normal Ranges and Early Functional Outcomes in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-yan; Li, Wen-yu; Hu, Xing-yue

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the prognostic value of thyroid-related hormones within normal ranges after acute ischemic stroke. This was a retrospective study and we reviewed 1072 ischemic stroke patients consecutively admitted within 72 h after symptom onset. Total triiodothyronine (T3), total thyroxine (T4), free T3, free T4, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were assessed to determine their values for predicting functional outcome at the first follow-up clinic visits, which usually occurred 2 to 4 weeks after discharge from the hospital. 722 patients were finally included. On univariate analysis, poor functional outcome was associated with presence of atrial fibrillation as the index event. Furthermore, score of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), total T4, free T4, and C-reactive protein at admission were significantly higher in patients with poor functional outcome, whereas free T3 and total T3 were significantly lower. On multiple logistic regression analysis, lower total T3 concentrations remained independently associated with poor functional outcome [odds ratio (OR), 0.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.01–0.84; P = 0.035]. The only other variables independently associated with poor functional outcome were NIHSS scores. In sum, lower total T3 concentrations that were within the normal ranges were independently associated with poor short-term outcomes. PMID:27375741

  20. Alteration of Thyroid-Related Hormones within Normal Ranges and Early Functional Outcomes in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Yan; Li, Wen-Yu; Hu, Xing-Yue

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the prognostic value of thyroid-related hormones within normal ranges after acute ischemic stroke. This was a retrospective study and we reviewed 1072 ischemic stroke patients consecutively admitted within 72 h after symptom onset. Total triiodothyronine (T3), total thyroxine (T4), free T3, free T4, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were assessed to determine their values for predicting functional outcome at the first follow-up clinic visits, which usually occurred 2 to 4 weeks after discharge from the hospital. 722 patients were finally included. On univariate analysis, poor functional outcome was associated with presence of atrial fibrillation as the index event. Furthermore, score of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), total T4, free T4, and C-reactive protein at admission were significantly higher in patients with poor functional outcome, whereas free T3 and total T3 were significantly lower. On multiple logistic regression analysis, lower total T3 concentrations remained independently associated with poor functional outcome [odds ratio (OR), 0.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.01-0.84; P = 0.035]. The only other variables independently associated with poor functional outcome were NIHSS scores. In sum, lower total T3 concentrations that were within the normal ranges were independently associated with poor short-term outcomes. PMID:27375741

  1. Effects of aging on thermoregulatory responses and hormonal changes in humans during the four seasons in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Maki; Kanikowska, Dominika; Sugenoya, Junichi; Inukai, Yoko; Shimizu, Yuuki; Nishimura, Naoki; Iwase, Satoshi

    2011-03-01

    Physiological functions are impaired in various organs in aged people, as manifest by, e.g., renal and cardiac dysfunction and muscle atrophy. The elderly are also at increased risk of both hypothermia and hyperthermia in extreme temperatures. The majority of those over 65 years old have elevated serum osmolality. Our hypothesis is that the elderly have suppressed osmolality control in different seasons compared to the young. Eight healthy young men and six healthy older men participated in this study. The experiments were performed during spring, summer, autumn and winter in Japan, with average atmospheric temperatures of 15-20°C in spring, 25-30°C in summer, 15-23°C in autumn and 5-10°C in winter. Each subject immersed his lower legs in warm water at 40°C for 30 min. Core (tympanic) temperature and sweat rate at chest were recorded continuously. Blood was taken pre-immersion to measure the concentrations of antidiuretic hormone, serum osmolality, plasma renin activity, angiotensin II, aldosterone, leptin, thyroid stimulating hormone, fT3 and fT4. The results suggested that the elderly have suppressed osmolality control compared to the young; osmolality was especially elevated in winter compared to the summer in elderly subjects. Therefore, particularly in the elderly, balancing fluid by drinking water should be encouraged to maintain euhydration status in winter.

  2. [Treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M D

    2001-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the recent medical literature on the treatment of neonatal jaundice, focusing on practical aspects that are relevant to pediatricians and neonatologists. SOURCES: An extensive review of the related literature was performed, also including the authors clinical experience in this field of investigation. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: Jaundice is very common among infants during the first days of life. Several factors such as maternal and neonatal history have to be considered before implementing treatment. Significant advances have been made in the past few years concerning the treatment of jaundiced newborn infants. This review focuses on three forms of treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia: phototherapy, exchange transfusion and the use of drugs to reduce serum bilirubin concentration. CONCLUSIONS: Nowadays, the in-depth knowledge about the mechanism of action of phototherapy, the development of intensified phototherapy units and the use of drugs to reduce bilirubin formation, have contributed to significantly decrease the need for exchange transfusion. PMID:14676895

  3. Synergism between exposure to mercury and use of iodine supplements on thyroid hormones in pregnant women

    SciTech Connect

    Llop, Sabrina; Lopez-Espinosa, Maria-Jose; Murcia, Mario; Alvarez-Pedrerol, Mar; Vioque, Jesús; Aguinagalde, Xabier; Julvez, Jordi; and others

    2015-04-15

    Objective: To evaluate the association between mercury exposure and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), total triiodothyronine (TT3) and free thyroxine (FT4) levels during pregnancy as well as to explore if there is any synergic action between mercury and intake of iodine from different sources. Methods: The study population was 1407 pregnant women participating in the Spanish INMA birth cohort study. Total mercury concentrations were analyzed in cord blood. Thyroid hormones (THs) were measured in serum samples collected at 13.2±1.5 weeks of gestation. The association between mercury and TH levels was evaluated with multivariate linear regression models. Effect modification caused by iodine intake from supplements and diet was also evaluated. Results: The geometric means of TSH, TT3, FT4 and mercury were 1.1 μU/L, 2.4 nmol/L, 10.5 pmol/L and 7.7 μg/L, respectively. Mercury levels were marginally significantly associated with TT3 (β: −0.05; 95%CI: −0.10, 0.01), but were neither associated with TSH nor FT4. The inverse association between mercury and TT3 levels was stronger among the iodine supplement consumers (−0.08; 95%CI: −0.15, −0.02, interaction p-value=0.07). The association with FT4 followed the same pattern, albeit not significant. Conclusion: Prenatal mercury exposure was inversely associated with TT3 levels among women who took iodine supplements during pregnancy. These results could be of public health concern, although further research is needed. - Highlights: • We studied the relationship between mercury and thyroid hormones among pregnant. • Mercury was marginally significantly associated with TT3, but not with TSH or FT4. • This association was stronger among the iodine supplement. • These results could be of public health concern, but further research is needed.

  4. Photoperiod-dependent negative feedback effects of thyroid hormones in Fundulus heteroclitus

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.L.; Stetson, M.H.

    1985-05-01

    In Fundulus heteroclitus, an annual cycle in the response of the thyroid to ovine thyroid-stimulating hormone (oTSH) is characterized by maximal thyroxin (T4) secretion in mid-winter and minimal T4 secretion in summer. Four daily injections of oTSH, given in winter caused serum T4 to plateau at elevated levels for several days, while in summer fish similar treatment resulted in far more fluctuating titers of serum T4; maximum levels were similar in both groups. The difference in sustenance rather than magnitude of Peak T4 led to an examination of the negative feedback effects of thyroid hormones as they might relate to these seasonal changes. Radioiodine uptake by thyroid follicles served as a simple, but effective bioassay for endogenous TSH. Fish collected in summer were more sensitive to negative feedback of T3 than those collected in winter; feedback effects of T4 in the two groups were not significantly different. The effects of specific photoperiods on negative feedback sensitivity to T3 and T4 were also tested. Exposure of winter fish for one month to long days (LD 14:10) enhanced the degree of reduction of iodine uptake caused by T4 in the aquarium water (10 micrograms/100 ml). Negative feedback in short-day (LD 8:16) winter fish was not demonstrated. It is concluded that long days increase and short days diminish the negative feedback sensitivity of the hypothalamus-pituitary axis to thyroid hormones in F. heteroclitus. Such photoperiodically induced changes may act to aid in the year-round maintenance of T4 levels necessary for seasonal adaptation and survival.

  5. Thyroid Hormones, Autoantibodies, Ultrasonography, and Clinical Parameters for Predicting Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Lin-zheng; Zeng, Tian-shu; Pu, Lin; Pan, Shi-xiu; Xia, Wen-fang; Chen, Lu-lu

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate thyroid nodule malignancy prediction using thyroid function tests, autoantibodies, ultrasonographic imaging, and clinical data. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in 1400 patients with nodular thyroid disease (NTD). The thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration was significantly higher in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) versus benign thyroid nodular disease (BTND) (p = 0.004). The receiver operating characteristic curve of TSH showed an AUC of 0.58 (95% CI 0.53–0.62, p = 0.001), sensitivity of 74%, and specificity of 57% at a cut-off of 1.59 mIU/L. There was an incremental increase in TSH concentration along with the increasing tumor size (p < 0.001). Thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) concentration was associated with an increased risk of malignancy (p = 0.029), but this association was lost when the effect of TSH was taken into account (p = 0.11). Thyroid ultrasonographic characteristics, including fewer than three nodules, hypoechoic appearance, solid component, poorly defined margin, intranodular or peripheral-intranodular flow, and punctate calcification, can be used to predict the risk of thyroid cancer. In conclusion, our study suggests that preoperative serum TSH concentration, age, and ultrasonographic features can be used to predict the risk of malignancy in patients with NTD. PMID:27313612

  6. Neonatal herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Alberto; Lugli, Licia; Rossi, Cecilia; Maria, Chiara Laguardia; Guidotti, Isotta; Gallo, Claudio; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2011-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus is an important cause of neonatal infection, which can lead to death or long-term disabilities. Rarely in utero, the transmission frequently occurs during delivery. The disease may be disseminated, localized to the central nervous system, or involving skin, eye and/or mouth. Mortality rates markedly decreased with high-dose antiviral treatment. Diagnosis of neonatal infection is based on viral isolation from ulcerated vesicles or by scarifying mucocutaneous lesions. Recently polymerase chain reaction plays a central role for both viral detection (skin, mucosal, cerebrospinal fluid samples) and response to therapy. Vertical transmission may be decreased by prophylactic antiviral treatment. PMID:21942600

  7. Hypothalamic control of the male neonatal testosterone surge.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Jenny; Herbison, Allan E

    2016-02-19

    Sex differences in brain neuroanatomy and neurophysiology underpin considerable physiological and behavioural differences between females and males. Sexual differentiation of the brain is regulated by testosterone secreted by the testes predominantly during embryogenesis in humans and the neonatal period in rodents. Despite huge advances in understanding how testosterone, and its metabolite oestradiol, sexually differentiate the brain, little is known about the mechanism that actually generates the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge. This review examines the evidence for the role of the hypothalamus, and particularly the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, in generating the neonatal testosterone surge in rodents and primates. Kisspeptin-GPR54 signalling is well established as a potent and critical regulator of GnRH neuron activity during puberty and adulthood, and we argue here for an equally important role at birth in driving the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge in rodents. The presence of a male-specific population of preoptic area kisspeptin neurons that appear transiently in the perinatal period provide one possible source of kisspeptin drive to neonatal GnRH neurons in the mouse. PMID:26833836

  8. [Hormonal dysnatremia].

    PubMed

    Karaca, P; Desailloud, R

    2013-10-01

    Because of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) disorder on production or function we can observe dysnatremia. In the absence of production by posterior pituitary, central diabetes insipidus (DI) occurs with hypernatremia. There are hereditary autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X- linked forms. When ADH is secreted but there is an alteration on his receptor AVPR2, it is a nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in acquired or hereditary form. We can make difference on AVP levels and/or on desmopressine response which is negative in nephrogenic forms. Hyponatremia occurs when there is an excess of ADH production: it is a euvolemic hypoosmolar hyponatremia. The most frequent etiology is SIADH (syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH), a diagnostic of exclusion which is made after eliminating corticotropin deficiency and hypothyroidism. In case of brain injury the differential diagnosis of cerebral salt wasting (CSW) syndrome has to be discussed, because its treatment is perfusion of isotonic saline whereas in SIADH, the treatment consists in administration of hypertonic saline if hyponatremia is acute and/or severe. If not, fluid restriction demeclocycline or vaptans (antagonists of V2 receptors) can be used in some European countries. Four types of SIADH exist; 10 % of cases represent not SIADH but SIAD (syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis) due to a constitutive activation of vasopressin receptor that produces water excess. c 2013 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. PMID:24356291

  9. In vivo evaluation of 1-benzyl-4-aminoindole-based thyroid hormone receptor β agonists: importance of liver selectivity in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoki; Asano, Yukiyasu; Maeda, Koji; Watanabe, Nobuhide

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that the novel thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ) selective agonists SKL-12846 and SKL-13784 reduce blood cholesterol levels without affecting thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in cholesterol-fed rats. Our aim in this study was to elucidate what sets apart these SKL-compounds as TRβ agonists with no effect on TSH. To this end, we determined SKL-compounds pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution in normal rats and compared them to those of GC-1, a liver-selective TRβ agonist with concomitant effect on TSH. The present study explains why SKL-12846 and SKL-13784 have beneficial effects on lowering lipids without affecting heart rate and TSH production at the therapeutic dose in cholesterol-fed rats. In addition, we found that SKL-13784 shows no sign of escape phenomenon in fructose-fed rats. These results demonstrate the advantages of extremely high liver specificity to TRβ agonists. However, SKL-13784 has been found significantly to reduce endogenous T4 levels at doses lower than its lipid-lowering dose, which may raise concerns over this compound's ability to alter thyroid hormone metabolism in the liver. While the mechanism by which SKL-13784 reduces endogenous T4 levels is still unclear, our results would help design better liver-selective TRβ modulators. PMID:24989002

  10. Sex hormones and brain dopamine functions.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor-Zarate, Ramon; Cruz, Gonzalo; Renard, Georgina M; Espinosa, Pedro; Ramirez, Victor D

    2014-01-01

    Sex hormones exert differential effects on a variety of sensitive tissues like the reproductive tract, gonads, liver, bone and adipose tissue, among others. In the brain, sex hormones act as neuroactive steroids regulating the function of neuroendocrine diencephalic structures like the hypothalamus. In addition, steroids can exert physiological effects upon cortical, limbic and midbrain structures, influencing different behaviors such as memory, learning, mood and reward. In the last three decades, the role of sex hormones on monoamine neurotransmitters in extra-hypothalamic areas related to motivated behaviors, learning and locomotion has been the focus of much research. The purpose of this thematic issue is to present the state of art concerning the effects of sex hormones on the neurochemical regulation of dopaminergic midbrain areas involved in neurobiological and pathological processes, such as addiction to drugs of abuse. We also discuss evidence of how neonatal exposure to sex hormones or endocrine disrupting chemicals can produce long-term changes on the neurochemical regulation of dopaminergic neurons in the limbic and midbrain areas. PMID:25540983

  11. Scrotal Swelling in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Amaya M.; Courtier, Jesse; Phelps, Andrew; Copp, Hillary L.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of scrotal swelling in a neonate can be a source of anxiety for parents, clinicians, and sonologists alike. This pictorial essay provides a focused review of commonly encountered scrotal masses and mimics specific to the neonatal setting. Although malignancy is a concern, it is very uncommon, as most neonatal scrotal masses are benign. Key discriminating features and management options are highlighted to improve the radiologist’s ability to diagnose neonatal scrotal conditions and guide treatment decisions. Neonatal scrotal processes ranging from common to uncommon will be discussed. PMID:25715370

  12. Phase Contrast Imaging in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Kai; Ernst, Thomas; Buchthal, Steve; Speck, Oliver; Anderson, Lynn; Chang, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance phase images can yield superior gray and white matter contrast compared to conventional magnitude images. However, the underlying contrast mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Previous studies have been limited to high field acquisitions in adult volunteers and patients. In this study, phase imaging in the neonatal brain is demonstrated for the first time. Compared to adults, phase differences between gray and white matter are significantly reduced but not inverted in neonates with little myelination and iron deposits in their brains. The remaining phase difference between the neonatal and adult brains may be due to different macromolecule concentration in the unmyelinated brain of the neonates and thus different frequency due to water macromolecule exchange. Additionally, the susceptibility contrast from brain myelination can be separately studied in neonates during brain development. Therefore, magnetic resonance phase imaging is suggested as a novel tool to study neonatal brain development and pathologies in neonates. PMID:21232619

  13. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    PubMed

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital. PMID:23434016

  14. Maternal, neonatal and community factors influencing neonatal mortality in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado, Carla Jorge; Hill, Kenneth

    2005-03-01

    Child mortality (the mortality of children less than five years old) declined considerably in the developing world in the 1990s, but infant mortality declined less. The reductions in neonatal mortality were not impressive and, as a consequence, there is an increasing percentage of infant deaths in the neonatal period. Any further reduction in child mortality, therefore, requires an understanding of the determinants of neonatal mortality. 209,628 birth and 2581 neonatal death records for the 1998 birth cohort from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, were probabilistically matched. Data were from SINASC and SIM, Information Systems on Live Births and Deaths of Brazil. Logistic regression was used to find the association between neonatal mortality and the following risk factors: birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes, delivery mode, plurality, sex, maternal education, maternal age, number of prior losses, prenatal care, race, parity and community development. Infants of older mothers were less likely to die in the neonatal period. Caesarean delivery was not found to be associated with neonatal mortality. Low birth weight, pre-term birth and low Apgar scores were associated with neonatal death. Having a mother who lives in the highest developed community decreased the odds of neonatal death, suggesting that factors not measured in this study are behind such association. This result may also indicate that other factors over and above biological and more proximate factors could affect neonatal death. PMID:15768774

  15. DOSE-DEPENDENT REDUCTIONS IN SPATIAL LEARING AND SYNAPTIC FUNCTION IN THE DENTATE GYRUS OF ADULT RATS FOLLOWING DEVELOPMENTAL THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA must evaluate the risk of exposure of the developing brain to chemicals with the potential to disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis. The existing literature identifies morphological and neurochemical indices of severe neonatal hypothyroidism in the early postnatal period i...

  16. Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE)-induced alterations in vitamin A and thyroid hormone concentrations in the rat during lactation and early postnatal development

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis-Hutchings, Robert G.; Cherr, Gary N.; Hanna, Lynn A.; Keen, Carl L. . E-mail: clkeen@ucdavis.edu

    2006-09-01

    In experimental animals fed standard laboratory diets, penta-BDE mixtures can decrease circulating thyroid hormone and liver vitamin A concentrations. A substantial number of pregnant women and their children have marginal vitamin A status, potentially increasing their risk of adverse effects to penta-BDE exposure. The current study investigated the effects of maternal gestational and lactational penta-BDE exposure on thyroid hormone and vitamin A homeostasis in rats of sufficient vitamin A (VAS) or marginal vitamin A (VAM) status and their offspring. Dams were administered daily oral doses of 18 mg/kg DE-71 (a penta-BDE mixture) or a corn oil vehicle from gestation day 6 through lactation day (LD) 18. Thyroid hormone and vitamin A homeostasis were assessed in plasma and tissues of LD 19 dams and postnatal day (PND) 12, 18, and 31 pups. DE-71 exposure induced hepatomegaly in VAS and VAM pups at all timepoints and increased testes weights at PND 31. While liver vitamin A concentrations were low in DE-71 treated dams and pups, plasma retinol concentrations and plasma retinol binding protein levels were only low in VAM animals exposed to DE-71. DE-71 exposure lowered plasma thyroxine concentrations in VAS and VAM dams and pups. Plasma thyroid stimulating hormone concentrations were high in VAM dams exposed to DE-71, suggesting that marginal vitamin A status enhances the susceptibility to thyroid hormone axis disruption by DE-71. These results support the concept that marginal vitamin A status in pregnant women may increase the risk for PBDE-induced disruptions in vitamin A and thyroid hormone homeostasis.

  17. Effects of commercial formulations of deltamethrin and/or thiacloprid on thyroid hormone levels in rat serum.

    PubMed

    Sekeroglu, V; Sekeroglu, Z Atli; Demirhan, Es

    2014-02-01

    Deltamethrin (DEL) and thiacloprid (THIA) are the two commonly used synthetic insecticides applied either separately or as a mixture. The aim of this study was to assess thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and the serum levels of thyroid hormones exposure to these compounds in rats. The animals were orally gavaged with a single dose of DEL (15 mg/kg), THIA (112.5 mg/kg) or DEL + THIA (15 + 112.5 mg/kg) for 24 h (acute treatments) or DEL (3 mg/kg per day), THIA (22.5 mg/kg per day) or DEL + THIA (3 + 22.5 mg/kg per day) for 30 days (subacute treatments). Although all independent and combined treatments with DEL and THIA changed the levels of TSH, these alterations were not significant. Statistically significant increases in free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxine (FT4) serum hormone levels were observed in the independent treatment with THIA and the combined treatment with DEL and THIA for 30 days. The results of this study suggest that in vivo exposure to subacute treatments of commercial formulations of THI and mixture of DEL + THIA increased serum FT3 and FT4 levels in rats. Further studies are required to determine the effects of endocrine disruptors and potential health risks of these insecticides in human, especially in children because of the importance of these hormones during growth and development. PMID:22677783

  18. Neonatal iliopsoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Atsushi; Kameoka, Kazuhiro; Kuwabara, Jun; Watanabe, Yuji; Kawakami, Sanae; Tauchi, Hisamichi; Ishii, Eiichi

    2012-10-01

    Iliopsoas abscess (IPA) is rare in children, particularly in neonates. A male neonate was born at 38 weeks of gestation with a weight of 2915 g. On day 22 after birth, his family noticed that his right thigh was swollen. Abdominal computed tomography showed a mass extending to the right iliopsoas from the right thigh with thick septa. Puncture to the right groin yielded purulent fluid, and so a diagnosis of abscess was made. The puncture was followed by surgical drainage through a small inguinal incision, and the abscess cavity was irrigated thoroughly using normal saline. Culture of abscess fluid was positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, so intravenous ABPC infusion was continued. The postoperative magnetic resonance imaging indicate that the IPA was derived from arthritis of the hip, and the patients received Riemenbügel for the incomplete hip dislocation. He is doing well at 2 years of age. PMID:23005905

  19. Remifentanil: applications in neonates.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Mineto; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-06-01

    Remifentanil is a synthetic opioid derivative that was introduced into clinical practice in the United States in 1996. The unique modification of its chemical structure to include a methyl-ester ring allows its hydrolysis by non-specific plasma and tissue esterases. This molecular configuration results in its rapid metabolism thereby providing a rapid onset, easy titration by continuous infusion, and a short context-sensitive half-life with rapid elimination. These principles are stable and consistent across all age groups regardless of the infusion characteristics. Owing to these pharmacokinetic characteristics, it is an effective agent in the neonatal population allowing the provision of intense analgesia and anesthesia with a rapid recovery profile in various clinical scenarios. Here, we review the pharmacokinetics of remifentanil in neonates, discuss its clinical applications including intraoperative administration for anesthetic care, unique applications for procedural sedation including endotracheal intubation, and its potential use for sedation in the Intensive Care Unit setting during mechanical ventilation. PMID:26758072

  20. Neonatal mortality in Meerut district.

    PubMed

    Garg, S K; Mishra, V N; Singh, J V; Bhatnagar, M; Chopra, H; Singh, R B

    1993-09-01

    A study of neonatal mortality in Meerut district revealed an infant mortality rate of 50.1 per 1000 live births. Neonatal mortality accounted for 37.8% of infant mortality with a neonatal mortality rate of 19.0 per 1000 live births. 90.5% of these neonates were delivered at home largely by untrained personnel (57.2%). Only 28.6% of these neonates were treated by qualified doctors and only 30.9% of their mothers were fully immunized against tetanus. At least 2/3rd of neonatal mortality was due to exogenous factors with tetanus neonatorum and septicaemia being the principal causes of mortality each accounting for a mortality rate of 4.7 per 1000 live births. PMID:8112786

  1. [Physiopathology of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia].

    PubMed

    Vert, P

    1998-09-01

    The most important steps of bilirubin metabolism involved in the pathophysiology of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia are: 1) hemoglobin degradation by heme oxygenase; 2) bilirubin binding to serum albumin; 3) bilirubin conjugation to acid glucoronic by glucoronyl transferase. Progress in the knowledge of these metabolic steps allows to understanding of why massive hemolysis, infections, hypoxia and prematurity increase the risk of kernicterus and therefore justify adapted preventive and therapeutic measures. PMID:9789638

  2. Epiphyseal chondrocyte secondary ossification centers require thyroid hormone activation of Indian hedgehog and osterix signaling.

    PubMed

    Xing, Weirong; Cheng, Shaohong; Wergedal, Jon; Mohan, Subburaman

    2014-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are known to regulate endochondral ossification during skeletal development via acting directly in chondrocytes and osteoblasts. In this study, we focused on TH effects on the secondary ossification center (SOC) because the time of appearance of SOCs in several species coincides with the time when peak levels of TH are attained. Accordingly, micro-computed tomography (µCT) evaluation of femurs and tibias at day 21 in TH-deficient and control mice revealed that endochondral ossification of SOCs is severely compromised owing to TH deficiency and that TH treatment for 10 days completely rescued this phenotype. Staining of cartilage and bone in the epiphysis revealed that whereas all of the cartilage is converted into bone in the prepubertal control mice, this conversion failed to occur in the TH-deficient mice. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed that TH treatment of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor mutant (Tshr(-/-) ) mice induced expression of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) and Osx in type 2 collagen (Col2)-expressing chondrocytes in the SOC at day 7, which subsequently differentiate into type 10 collagen (Col10)/osteocalcin-expressing chondro/osteoblasts at day 10. Consistent with these data, treatment of tibia cultures from 3-day-old mice with 10 ng/mL TH increased expression of Osx, Col10, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin in the epiphysis by sixfold to 60-fold. Furthermore, knockdown of the TH-induced increase in Osx expression using lentiviral small hairpin RNA (shRNA) significantly blocked TH-induced ALP and osteocalcin expression in chondrocytes. Treatment of chondrogenic cells with an Ihh inhibitor abolished chondro/osteoblast differentiation and SOC formation. Our findings indicate that TH regulates the SOC initiation and progression via differentiating chondrocytes into bone matrix-producing osteoblasts by stimulating Ihh and Osx expression in chondrocytes. PMID:24753031

  3. Thyroid Hormone Levels and TSH Activity in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bielicki, P; Przybyłowski, T; Kumor, M; Barnaś, M; Wiercioch, M; Chazan, R

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by complete cessation of inspiratory flow (apnea) or upper airway airflow limitation (hypopnea) with increased respiratory muscle activity, which is repeatedly observed during sleep. Hypothyroidism has been described as a rare cause of OSAS, but it is considered to be the main cause of breathing disorders during sleep in patients in whom an improvement of OSAS is observed after thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Nevertheless, euthyreosis due to thyroxine replacement in patients with OSAS often does not improve the breathing disorder and treatment with continuous positive airway pressure is usually applied. The aim of this study was to assess thyroid function in patients with OSAS. We studied 813 patients in whom severe OSAS was diagnosed; the mean apnea-hypopnea index was 44.0. Most of the patients were obese (mean BMI 33.1 ± 6.6 kg/m2) and had excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS 12.8 ± 6.6). With the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration as the major criterion, hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 38 (4.7%) and hyperthyroidism was diagnosed in 31 (3.8%) patients. Analysis of basic anthropometric data, selected polysomnography results, and TSH, fT3, and fT4 values did not reveal any significant correlations. In conclusion, the incidence of thyroid function disorders seems to be no different in OSAS than that in the general population. We did not find correlations between TSH activity and the severity of breathing disorders during sleep. PMID:26542600

  4. Biological Functions of Thyroid Hormone in Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Chie-Pein; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormone, 3,3,5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3), modulates several physiological processes, including cellular growth, differentiation, metabolism, inflammation and proliferation, via interactions with thyroid hormone response elements (TREs) in the regulatory regions of target genes. Infection and inflammation are critical processes in placental development and pregnancy-related diseases. In particular, infection is the leading cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. However, to date, no successful approach has been developed for the effective diagnosis of infection in preterm infants. Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a serious disorder that adversely affects ~5% of human pregnancies. Recent studies identified a multiprotein complex, the inflammasome, including the Nod-like receptor (NLR) family of cytosolic pattern recognition receptors, the adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC) and caspase-1, which plays a vital role in the placenta. The thyroid hormone modulates inflammation processes and is additionally implicated in placental development and disease. Therefore, elucidation of thyroid hormone receptor-regulated inflammation-related molecules, and their underlying mechanisms in placenta, should facilitate the identification of novel predictive and therapeutic targets for placental disorders. This review provides a detailed summary of current knowledge with respect to identification of useful biomarkers and their physiological significance in placenta. PMID:25690032

  5. Hormones and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ... Women's Health Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ...

  6. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same age. The child will have normal intelligence in most cases. In older children, puberty may ... hormones cause the body to make. Tests can measure these growth factors. Accurate growth hormone deficiency testing ...

  7. Hormones and Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Fact Sheet Hormones and Hypertension What is hypertension? Hypertension, or chronic (long-term) high blood pressure, is a main cause of ... tobacco, alcohol, and certain medications play a part. Hormones made in the kidneys and in blood vessels ...

  8. ADH (Antidiuretic Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also known as: Vasopressin; AVP Formal name: Antidiuretic Hormone; Arginine Vasopressin Related tests: Osmolality , BUN , Creatinine , Sodium , ... should know? How is it used? The antidiuretic hormone (ADH) test is used to help detect, diagnose, ...

  9. Menopause and Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Menopause and Hormones: Common Questions Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... reproduction and distribution. Learn More about Menopause and Hormones Menopause--Medicines to Help You Links to other ...

  10. Hormonal effects in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001911.htm Hormonal effects in newborns To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hormonal effects in newborns occur because in the womb babies ...

  11. Novel hormone "receptors".

    PubMed

    Nemere, Ilka; Hintze, Korry

    2008-02-01

    Our concepts of hormone receptors have, until recently, been narrowly defined. In the last few years, an increasing number of reports identify novel proteins, such as enzymes, acting as receptors. In this review we cover the novel receptors for the hormones atrial naturetic hormone, enterostatin, hepcidin, thyroid hormones, estradiol, progesterone, and the vitamin D metabolites 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and 24,25(OH)(2)D(3). PMID:17546587

  12. Hormonal and non-hormonal bases of maternal behavior: The role of experience and epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg, Danielle S; Champagne, Frances A

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care". Though hormonal changes occurring throughout pregnancy and at the time of parturition have been demonstrated to prime the maternal brain and trigger the onset of mother-infant interactions, extended experience with neonates can induce similar behavioral interactions. Sensitization, a phenomenon in which rodents engage in parental responses to young following constant cohabitation with donor pups, was elegantly demonstrated by Rosenblatt (1967) to occur in females and males, independent of hormonal status. Study of the non-hormonal basis of maternal behavior has contributed significantly to our understanding of hormonal influences on the maternal brain and the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate maternal behavior. Here, we highlight our current understanding regarding both hormone-induced and experience-induced maternal responsivity and the mechanisms that may serve as a common pathway through which increases in maternal behavior are achieved. In particular, we describe the epigenetic changes that contribute to chromatin remodeling and how these molecular mechanisms may influence the neural substrates of the maternal brain. We also consider how individual differences in these systems emerge during development in response to maternal care. This research has broad implications for our understanding of the parental brain and the role of experience in the induction of neurobiological and behavior changes. PMID:26172856

  13. Aging changes in hormone production

    MedlinePlus

    The endocrine system is made up of organs and tissues that produce hormones. Hormones are natural chemicals produced in one ... hormones that control the other structures in the endocrine system. The amount of these regulating hormones stays about ...

  14. Neonatal hypothyroxinemia: effects of iodine intake and premature birth.

    PubMed

    Ares, S; Escobar-Morreale, H F; Quero, J; Durán, S; Presas, M J; Herruzo, R; Morreale de Escobar, G

    1997-06-01

    We have investigated the effects of iodine (I) intake on urinary I excretion in preterm (PT) babies up to 2 months after birth and its effect on serum T4, free T4 (FT4), T3, TSH, and thyroglobulin (Tg) levels compared to those in term (T) newborns. Very premature and very sick infants were in negative I balance for the first weeks after birth. Later, these same infants, as well as the other PT and T newborns, were in positive balance; 75- 80% of the ingested I was not accounted for in the urine. The urinary I levels of PT and T neonates cannot be equated to their I intakes. T4, FT4, and T3 levels in PT and T neonates increased with postmenstrual age, whereas Tg decreased and TSH did not change. Serum FT4, T3, Tg, and TSH levels in PT neonates were affected negatively, independently from age, by a low I intake. PT birth also affected T4, FT4, and Tg negatively, independently from I intake and postmenstrual age, for at least 6-8 weeks after birth. Care should be taken to avoid I deficiency in PT neonates. However, even when I intake is adequate, PT newborns are hypothyroxinemic compared to T babies during an important period of brain development. This suggests the possible convenience of interventions that might mimic the intrauterine hormone environment and accelerate maturation. PMID:9177368

  15. Residue profiles of organohalogen compounds in human serum from e-waste recycling sites in North Vietnam: Association with thyroid hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Akifumi; Nomiyama, Kei; Minh Tue, Nguyen; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Hung Viet, Pham; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2015-02-01

    This study demonstrated the contamination levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs), hydroxylated PBDEs (OH-PBDEs), and bromophenols (BPhs), and their relationships with thyroid hormones (THs), in the serum of human donors from an e-waste recycling site and a rural site in Hung Yen province, Vietnam. Occupationally related exposure was indicated by significantly higher residue levels of PCBs, OH-PCBs, PBDEs, and BPhs in the serum of donors from the e-waste recycling site (median: 420, 160, 290, and 300pgg(-1) wet wt, respectively) than those in the serum of donors from the rural site (median: 290, 82, 230, and 200pgg(-)(1) wet wt, respectively). On the other hand, levels of OH-/MeO-PBDEs were significantly higher in serum of donors from the reference site (median: 160 and 20pgg(-1) wet wt, respectively) than in those from the e-waste recycling site (median: 43 and 0.52pgg(-1) wet wt, respectively). In addition, we implemented stepwise generalized linear models to assess the association between the levels of TH and PCBs, PBDEs, and their related compounds. In females, we found positive associations of PCBs and OH-PCB concentrations with total thyroxine, free thyroxine, total triiodothyronine, and free triiodothyronine, and a negative association with thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations. PMID:25659948

  16. Ameliorative Effect of Vitamin C on Alterations in Thyroid Hormones Concentrations Induced by Subchronic Coadministration of Chlorpyrifos and Lead in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ambali, Suleiman F.; Orieji, Chinedu; Abubakar, Woziri O.; Shittu, Muftau; Kawu, Mohammed U.

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated the ameliorative effect of vitamin C on alteration in thyroid hormones induced by low-dose subchronic coadministration of chlorpyrifos (CPF) and lead (Pb). Forty Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups of 10 animals each. Groups I and II were administered soya oil (2 mL/kg) and vitamin C (100 mg/kg), respectively. Group III was coadministered CPF (4.25 mg/kg ~1/20th LD50) and Pb (250 mg/kg ~1/20th LD50), respectively. Group IV was pretreated with vitamin C (100 mg/kg) and then coadministered with CPF (4.25 mg/kg) and Pb (250 mg/kg), 30 min later. The regimens were administered by gavage for a period of 9 weeks. The marginal decrease in serum triiodothyronine and thyroxine and the significant increase in the concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone and malonaldehyde in the group coadministered with CPF and Pb were ameliorated by vitamin C partly due to its antioxidant properties. PMID:21687644

  17. Involvement of heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfation in the regulation of energy metabolism and the alteration of thyroid hormone levels in male mice.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Naoko; Habuchi, Hiroko; Sugaya, Noriko; Nakamura, Masao; Imamura, Toru; Watanabe, Hideto; Kimata, Koji

    2013-08-01

    Here, we report that male heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase-2 (Hs6st2) knockout mice showed increased body weight in an age-dependent manner even when fed with a normal diet and showed a phenotype of impaired glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that the expression of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins Ucp1 and Ucp3 was reduced in the interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) of male Hs6st2 knockout mice, suggesting reduced energy metabolism. The serum level of thyroid-stimulating hormone was significantly higher and that of thyroxine was lower in the knockout mice. When cultures of brown adipocytes from wild-type and Hs6st2 knockout mice isolated and differentiated in vitro were treated with FGF19 (fibroblast growth factor 19) or FGF21 in the presence or the absence of heparitinase I, phosphorylation of p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase was reduced. Heparan sulfate (HS) 6-O-sulfation was reduced not only in BAT but also in the thyroid tissue of the knockout mice. Thus, 6-O-sulfation in HS seems to play an important role in mediating energy metabolism by controlling thyroid hormone levels and signals from the FGF19 subfamily proteins, and the alteration of the HS composition may result in metabolic syndrome phenotypes such as altered glucose and insulin tolerance. PMID:23690091

  18. Msx1 homeodomain transcription factor and TATA-binding protein interact to repress the expression of the glycoprotein hormone α subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Sun; Kim, Kee K; Kim, Kyoon Eon

    Studying the regulatory mechanism of the glycoprotein hormone α subunit (αGSU) gene in thyrotropes is essential for understanding the synthesis of functional thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Here, we investigated the influence of a homeodomain transcription factor Msx1 (Msh homeobox 1) on αGSU expression in thyrotropes. The transient expression of Msx1 inhibited the activity of an αGSU reporter gene, as well as its endogenous mRNA level in thyrotrope-derived αTSH cells. Luciferase reporter assays with serial deletion constructs and a close examination of the sequences revealed that the putative Msx1 binding site (PMS) in the αGSU promoter is not responsible for Msx1-mediated transcriptional repression. We also identified the TATA-box binding protein (TBP) as an interacting protein in thyrotropes. Interaction of TBP with Msx1 attenuates the inhibitory effect of Msx1 on αGSU gene expression in a DNA binding-independent manner. Furthermore, transient transfection studies with mutant Msx1 revealed that the interaction of TBP and Msx1 is critical for Msx1-mediated transcriptional repression of the αGSU. These results suggest that Msx1 functions as a transcriptional repressor of αGSU and that its interaction with TBP is an integral part of the mechanism by which Msx1 regulates the inhibition of αGSU gene expression. PMID:26505791

  19. Elevated Serum Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers and Alteration of Thyroid Hormones in Children from Guiyu, China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xijin; Liu, Junxiao; Zeng, Xiang; Lu, Fangfang; Chen, Aimin; Huo, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Informal electronic waste (e-waste) recycling results in serious environmental pollution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and heavy metals. This study explored whether there is an association between PBDEs, heavy metal and key growth- and development-related hormones in children from Guiyu, an e-waste area in southern China. We quantified eight PBDE congeners using gas chromatographic mass spectrometry, lead and cadmium utilizing graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, three thyroids with radioimmunoassay and two types of growth hormones by an enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) in 162 children, 4 to 6 years old, from Guiyu. In blood, median total PBDE was 189.99 ng/g lipid. Lead and cadmium concentrations in blood averaged 14.53±4.85 µg dL−1 and 0.77±0.35 µg L−1, respectively. Spearman partial correlation analysis illustrated that lead was positively correlated with BDE153 and BDE183. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was positively correlated with almost all PBDE congeners and negatively correlated with insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), whereas free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxine (FT4) were negatively correlated with BDE154. However, no correlation between the hormones and blood lead or cadmium levels was found in this study. Adjusted multiple linear regression analysis showed that total PBDEs was negatively associated with FT3 and positively associated with TSH. Notably, FT4 was positively correlated with FT3, house functions as a workshop, and father's work involved in e-waste recycling and negatively correlated with vitamin consumptions. TSH was negatively related with FT4, paternal residence time in Guiyu, working hours of mother, and child bean products intake. IGFBP-3 was positively correlated with IGF-1 and house close to an e-waste dump. These results suggest that elevated PBDEs and heavy metals related to e-waste in Guiyu may be important risk factors for hormone alterations in children

  20. Was sind hormone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlson, P.

    1982-01-01

    Historically, the meaning of the term hormone has changed during the last decades. Morphological studies of secreting cells lead Feyrter to the concept of paracrine action of some hormones. While endocrine regulators are blood-borne, paracrine messengers reach their target cells through the diffusion in the intracellular space. Though it is rather difficult to draw a line between true hormones and hormone-like substances, valid definitions for endocrine and paracrine regulatory systems can be given. The term ‘hormonal control’ should be restricted to endocrine systems. For effectors acting by paracrine mechanisms, the term paramone is proposed in this article.

  1. A Prospective Investigation of Graves' Disease and Selenium: Thyroid Hormones, Auto-Antibodies and Self-Rated Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Calissendorff, Jan; Mikulski, Emil; Larsen, Erik H.; Möller, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Background In Graves' thyrotoxicosis tachycardia, weight loss and mental symptoms are common. Recovery takes time and varies between patients. Treatment with methimazole reduces thyroid hormone levels. According to previous research, this reduction has been faster if selenium (Se) is added. Objective The objective was to investigate whether supplementing the pharmacologic treatment with Se could change the immune mechanisms, hormone levels and/or depression and anxiety. Methods We prospectively investigated 38 patients with initially untreated thyrotoxicosis by measuring the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), thyroid receptor antibodies and thyroid peroxidase auto-antibodies before medication and at 6, 18 and 36 weeks after commencing treatment with methimazole and levo-thyroxine, with a randomized blinded oral administration of 200 µg Se/day or placebo. The selenoprotein P concentration was determined in plasma at inclusion and after 36 weeks. The patients were also assessed with questionnaires about depression, anxiety and self-rated symptoms before medication was started and after 36 weeks. Results FT4 decreased more in the Se group at 18 weeks (14 vs. 17 pmol/l compared to the placebo group, p = 0.01) and also at 36 weeks (15 vs. 18 pmol/l, p = 0.01). The TSH increased more in the Se group at 18 weeks (0.05 vs. 0.02 mIU/l, p = 0.04). The depression and anxiety scores were similar in both groups. In the Se group, the depression rates correlated negatively with FT3 and positively with TSH. This was not seen in the placebo group. Conclusions Se supplementation can enhance biochemical restoration of hyperthyroidism, but whether this could shorten clinical symptoms of thyrotoxicosis and reduce mental symptoms must be investigated further. PMID:26279994

  2. Lactation Biology Symposium: role of colostrum and colostrum components on glucose metabolism in neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Hammon, H M; Steinhoff-Wagner, J; Flor, J; Schönhusen, U; Metges, C C

    2013-02-01

    In neonatal calves, nutrient intake shifts from continuous glucose supply via the placenta to discontinuous colostrum and milk intake with lactose and fat as main energy sources. Calves are often born hypoglycemic and have to establish endogenous glucose production (eGP) and gluconeogenesis, because lactose intake by colostrum and milk does not meet glucose demands. Besides establishing a passive immunity, colostrum intake stimulates maturation and function of the neonatal gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Nutrients and nonnutritive factors, such as hormones and growth factors, which are present in high amounts in colostrum of first milking after parturition, affect intestinal growth and function and enhance the absorptive capacity of the GIT. Likely as a consequence of that, colostrum feeding improves the glucose status in neonatal calves by increasing glucose absorption, which results in elevated postprandial plasma glucose concentrations. Hepatic glycogen concentrations rise much greater when colostrum instead of a milk-based colostrum replacer (formula with same nutrient composition as colostrum but almost no biologically active substances, such as hormones and growth factors) is fed. In contrast, first-pass glucose uptake in the splanchnic tissue tended to be greater in calves fed formula. The greater plasma glucose rise and improved energy status in neonatal calves after colostrum intake lead to greater insulin secretion and accelerated stimulation of anabolic processes indicated by enhanced maturation of the postnatal somatotropic axis in neonatal calves. Hormones involved in stimulation of eGP, such as glucagon and cortisol, depend on neonatal diet, but their effects on eGP stimulation seem to be impaired. Although colostrum feeding affects systemic insulin, IGF-I, and leptin concentrations, evidence for systemic action of colostral insulin, IGF-I, and leptin in neonatal calves is weak. Studies so far indicate no absorption of insulin, IGF-I, and leptin from

  3. Neonatal neurosonography: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Bhat, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Neurosonography is a simple, established non-invasive technique for the intracranial assessment of preterm neonate. Apart from established indication in the evaluation of periventricular haemorrhage, it provides clue to wide range of pathology. This presentation provides a quick roadmap to the technique, imaging anatomy and spectrum of pathological imaging appearances encountered in neonates. PMID:25489132

  4. Hormonal therapies in acne.

    PubMed

    Shaw, James C

    2002-07-01

    Hormones, in particular androgen hormones, are the main cause of acne in men, women, children and adults, in both normal states and endocrine disorders. Therefore, the use of hormonal therapies in acne is rational in concept and gratifying in practice. Although non-hormonal therapies enjoy wide usage and continue to be developed, there is a solid place for hormonal approaches in women with acne, especially adult women with persistent acne. This review covers the physiological basis for hormonal influence in acne, the treatments that are in use today and those that show promise for the future. The main treatments to be discussed are oral contraceptives androgen receptor blockers like spironolactone and flutamide, inhibitors of the enzyme 5 alpha-reductase and topical hormonal treatments. PMID:12083987

  5. Fetal and Neonatal Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Jaeggi, Edgar; Öhman, Annika

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an important aspect of fetal and neonatal medicine. Premature complexes of atrial or ventricular origin are the main cause of an irregular heart rhythm. The finding is typically unrelated to an identifiable cause and no treatment is required. Tachyarrhythmia most commonly relates to supraventricular reentrant tachycardia, atrial flutter, and sinus tachycardia. Several antiarrhythmic agents are available for the perinatal treatment of tachyarrhythmias. Enduring bradycardia may result from sinus node dysfunction, complete heart block and nonconducted atrial bigeminy as the main arrhythmia mechanisms. The management and outcome of bradycardia depend on the underlying mechanism. PMID:26876124

  6. Hyperbilirubinemia in Preterm Neonates.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Vinod K; Wong, Ronald J; Stevenson, David K

    2016-06-01

    Preterm neonates with increased bilirubin production loads are more likely to sustain adverse outcomes due to either neurotoxicity or overtreatment with phototherapy and/or exchange transfusion. Clinicians should rely on expert consensus opinions to guide timely and effective interventions until there is better evidence to refine bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction or benefits of bilirubin. In this article, we review the evolving evidence for bilirubin-induced brain injury in preterm infants and highlight the clinical approaches that minimize the risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity. PMID:27235203

  7. Hemolysis in Preterm Neonates.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Robert D; Yaish, Hassan M

    2016-06-01

    Hemolysis can be an important cause of hyperbilirubinemia in premature and term neonates. It can result from genetic abnormalities intrinsic to or factors exogenous to normal to red blood cells (RBCs). Hemolysis can lead to a relatively rapid increase in total serum/plasma bilirubin, hyperbilirubinemia that is somewhat slow to fall with phototherapy, or hyperbilirubinemia that is likely to rebound after phototherapy. Laboratory methods for diagnosing hemolysis are more difficult to apply, or less conclusive, in preterm infants. Transfusion of donor RBCs can present a bilirubin load that must be metabolized. Genetic causes can be identified by next-generation sequencing panels. PMID:27235204

  8. Update on Neonatal Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Rozance, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Neonatal hypoglycemia is one of the most common biochemical abnormalities encountered in the newborn. However, controversy remains surrounding its definition and management especially in asymptomatic patients. Recent Findings New information has been published that describes the incidence and timing of low glucose concentrations in the groups most at risk for asymptomatic neonatal hypoglycemia. Furthermore, one large prospective study failed to find an association between repetitive low glucose concentrations and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants. But hypoglycemia due to hyperinsulinism, especially genetic causes, continued to be associated with brain injury. New advances were made in the diagnosis and management of hyperinsulinism, including acquired hyperinsulinism in small for gestational age infants and others. Continuous glucose monitoring remains an attractive strategy for future research in this area. Summary The fundamental question of how best to manage asymptomatic newborns with low glucose concentrations remains unanswered. Balancing the risks of over treating newborns with low glucose concentrations who are undergoing a normal transition following birth against the risks of under treating those in whom low glucose concentrations are pathological, dangerous, and/or a harbinger of serious metabolic disease remains a challenge. PMID:24275620

  9. Neonatal Subventricular Zone Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, David M.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Bordey, Angélique

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) line the postnatal lateral ventricles and give rise to multiple cell types which include neurons, astrocytes, and ependymal cells1. Understanding the molecular pathways responsible for NSC self-renewal, commitment, and differentiation is critical for harnessing their unique potential to repair the brain and better understand central nervous system disorders. Previous methods for the manipulation of mammalian systems required the time consuming and expensive endeavor of genetic engineering at the whole animal level2. Thus, the vast majority of studies have explored the functions of NSC molecules in vitro or in invertebrates. Here, we demonstrate the simple and rapid technique to manipulate neonatal NPCs that is referred to as neonatal subventricular zone (SVZ) electroporation. Similar techniques were developed a decade ago to study embryonic NSCs and have aided studies on cortical development3,4 . More recently this was applied to study the postnatal rodent forebrain5-7. This technique results in robust labeling of SVZ NSCs and their progeny. Thus, postnatal SVZ electroporation provides a cost and time effective alternative for mammalian NSC genetic engineering. PMID:23426329

  10. Human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Strobl, J S; Thomas, M J

    1994-03-01

    The study of human growth hormone is a little more than 100 years old. Growth hormone, first identified for its dramatic effect on longitudinal growth, is now known to exert generalized effects on protein, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. Additional roles for growth hormone in human physiology are likely to be discovered in the areas of sleep research and reproduction. Furthermore, there is some indication that growth hormone also may be involved in the regulation of immune function, mental well-being, and the aging process. Recombinant DNA technology has provided an abundant and safe, albeit expensive, supply of human growth hormone for human use, but the pharmacological properties of growth hormone are poor. Most growth hormone-deficient individuals exhibit a secretory defect rather than a primary defect in growth hormone production, however, and advances in our understanding of the neuroendocrine regulation of growth hormone secretion have established the basis for the use of drugs to stimulate release of endogenously synthesized growth hormone. This promises to be an important area for future drug development. PMID:8190748

  11. TSH test

    MedlinePlus

    Thyrotropin; Thyroid stimulating hormone; Hypothyroidism - TSH; Hyperthyroidism - TSH; Goiter - TSH ... most often due to an underactive thyroid gland ( hypothyroidism ). There are many causes of this problem. A ...

  12. Induction of chronic growth hormone deficiency by anti-GH serum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R. E.; Smith, A. T.; Ellis, S.; Evans, E. S.

    1974-01-01

    The observations reported indicate that the growth rate of neonatal rats can be specifically inhibited for at least 78 days following the administration of antisera against growth hormone (GH) for only four days after birth. The inhibition can be correlated with a marked deficit of tibial growth promoting activity in the pituitary but not with the plasma concentrations of immuno-reactive GH.

  13. Neonatal hypoglycaemia in Nepal 2. Availability of alternative fuels

    PubMed Central

    Costello, A.; Pal, D.; Manandhar, D.; Rajbhandari, S.; Land, J.; Patel, N.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To study early neonatal metabolic adaptation in a hospital population of neonates in Nepal.
METHODS—A cross sectional study was made of 578 neonates, 0 to 48 hours after birth, in the main maternity hospital in Kathmandu. The following clinical and nutritional variables were assessed: concentrations and age profiles of blood glucose, hydroxybutyrate, lactate, pyruvate, free fatty acids (FFA) and glycerol; associations between alternative fuel levels and hypoglycaemia; and regression of possible risk factors for ketone availability.
RESULTS—Risk factors for impaired metabolic adaptation were common, especially low birthweight (32%), feeding delays, and cold stress. Blood glucose and ketones rose with age, but important age effects were also found for risk factors like hypothermia, thyroid hormone activities, and feeding practices. Alternative fuel concentrations, except FFA, were significantly reduced in infants with moderate hypoglycaemia during the first 48 hours after birth. Unlike earlier studies, small for gestational age (SGA) infants had significantly higher hydroxybutyrate:glucose ratios which suggested counter regulatory ketogenesis. Hypoglycaemic infants were not hyperinsulinaemic. Regression analysis showed risk factors for impaired counter regulation which included male and large infants, hypothermia, and poorer infant thyroid function. SGA infants and those whose mothers had received no antenatal care had increased counter regulation.
CONCLUSIONS—Alternative fuels are important in the metabolic assessment of neonates, and they might provide effective cerebral metabolism even during moderate hypoglycaemia. Hypoglycaemic infants generally had lower concentrations of alternative fuels through either reduced availability or increased consumption. SGA and post term infants increased counter regulatory ketogenesis with early neonatal hypoglycaemia, but hypothermia, male gender, and low infant T4 were associated with impaired counter

  14. Neonates need tailored drug formulations

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Drugs are very strong tools used to improve outcome in neonates. Despite this fact and in contrast to tailored perfusion equipment, incubators or ventilators for neonates, we still commonly use drug formulations initially developed for adults. We would like to make the point that drug formulations given to neonates need to be tailored for this age group. Besides the obvious need to search for active compounds that take the pathophysiology of the newborn into account, this includes the dosage and formulation. The dosage or concentration should facilitate the administration of low amounts and be flexible since clearance is lower in neonates with additional extensive between-individual variability. Formulations need to be tailored for dosage variability in the low ranges and also to the clinical characteristics of neonates. A specific focus of interest during neonatal drug development therefore is a need to quantify and limit excipient exposure based on the available knowledge of their safety or toxicity. Until such tailored vials and formulations become available, compounding practices for drug formulations in neonates should be evaluated to guarantee the correct dosing, product stability and safety. PMID:25254168

  15. Hormonal therapy for acne.

    PubMed

    George, Rosalyn; Clarke, Shari; Thiboutot, Diane

    2008-09-01

    Acne affects more than 40 million people, of which more than half are women older than 25 years of age. These women frequently fail traditional therapy and have high relapse rates even after isotretinoin. Recent advances in research have helped to delineate the important role hormones play in the pathogenesis of acne. Androgens such as dihydrotestosterone and testosterone, the adrenal precursor dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, estrogens, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factors may all contribute to the development of acne. Hormonal therapy remains an important part of the arsenal of acne treatments available to the clinician. Women dealing with acne, even those without increased serum androgens, may benefit from hormonal treatments. The mainstays of hormonal therapy include oral contraceptives and antiandrogens such as spironolactone, cyproterone acetate, or flutamide. In this article, we discuss the effects of hormones on the pathogenesis of acne, evaluation of women with suspected endocrine abnormalities, and the myriad of treatment options available. PMID:18786497

  16. Hormones and endometrial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Areege; Tempest, Nicola; Parkes, Christina; Alnafakh, Rafah; Makrydima, Sofia; Adishesh, Meera; Hapangama, Dharani K

    2016-02-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the commonest gynaecological cancer in the Western World with an alarmingly increasing incidence related to longevity and obesity. Ovarian hormones regulate normal human endometrial cell proliferation, regeneration and function therefore are implicated in endometrial carcinogenesis directly or via influencing other hormones and metabolic pathways. Although the role of unopposed oestrogen in the pathogenesis of EC has received considerable attention, the emerging role of other hormones in this process, such as androgens and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) is less well recognised. This review aims to consolidate the current knowledge of the involvement of the three main endogenous ovarian hormones (oestrogens, progesterone and androgens) as well as the other hormones in endometrial carcinogenesis, to identify important avenues for future research. PMID:26966933

  17. Toxicological effects of clofibric acid and diclofenac on plasma thyroid hormones of an Indian major carp, Cirrhinus mrigala during short and long-term exposures.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Manoharan; Hur, Jang-Hyun; Arul, Narayanasamy; Ramesh, Mathan

    2014-11-01

    In the present investigation, the toxicity of most commonly detected pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment namely clofibric acid (CA) and diclofenac (DCF) was investigated in an Indian major carp Cirrhinus mrigala. Fingerlings of C. mrigala were exposed to different concentrations (1, 10 and 100μgL(-1)) of CA and DCF for a period of 96h (short term) and 35 days (long term). The toxic effects of CA and DCF on thyroid hormones (THs) such as thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels were evaluated. During the short and long-term exposure period TSH level was found to be decreased at all concentrations of CA (except at the end of 14(th) day in 1 and 10μgL(-l) and 21(st) day in 1μgL(-l)) whereas in DCF exposed fish TSH level was found to be increased when compared to control groups. T4 level was found to be decreased at 1 and 100μgL(-l) of CA exposure at the end of 96h. However, T4 level was decreased at all concentrations of CA and DCF during long-term (35 days) exposure period. Fish exposed to all concentrations of CA and DCF had lower level of T3 in both the treatments. These results suggest that both CA and DCF drugs induced significant changes (P<0.01 and P<0.05) on thyroid hormonal levels of C. mrigala. The alterations of these hormonal levels can be used as potential biomarkers in monitoring of pharmaceutical drugs in aquatic organisms. PMID:25461555

  18. Antioxidant status and hormonal profile reflected by experimental feeding of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, Magdy A; Moselhy, Said S

    2016-04-01

    Excessive production of free radicals can result in tissue damage, which mainly involves generation of hydroxyl radical and other oxidants. Such free radical-induced cell damage appears to play a major role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Probiotics have been used therapeutically to modulate immunity, improve digestive processes, lower cholesterol, treat rheumatoid arthritis, and prevent cancer. The proposed research was designed to evaluate the changes in oxidative and antioxidative profile in addition to metabolic-related hormones of living animal model, which may generally affect the health status. Two groups of rabbits (10 animals each) were allocated in hygienic cages of controlled animal house. Control group received standard diet, and the other group received the same diet containing one probiotic for 30 days. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in leukocytes, blood glucose, reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were estimated in different tissues. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and total proteins were also determined in different tissues. Certain hormones related to metabolism and growth were also evaluated. Leukocytic LDH activity was significantly increased along with nonsignificant increase of blood glucose in probiotics-fed animals. Results showed significant decreases in the levels of triiodothyronine and thyroid-stimulating hormone but showed significant elevations in thyroxine, insulin, growth hormone, and testosterone levels in animals fed with probiotics. Total proteins content was highly significantly elevated in liver, kidneys, and muscles of probiotic-administered animals. Microsomal GSH level was significantly decreased only in skeletal muscles of probiotic-treated animals. MDA was significantly lowered in animal tissues fed with probiotics. GSH-Px activity was elevated in hepatic and muscular microsomes of probiotic-supplemented animals while it was nonsignificantly increased in renal

  19. Bacillus species infections in neonates.

    PubMed

    Patrick, C C; Langston, C; Baker, C J

    1989-01-01

    A case of neonatal meningitis due to Bacillus cereus is presented. Postmortem histopathologic examination revealed an invasive disease involving the brain parenchyma, with a cellular composition consistent with an indolent process indicative of possible perinatally acquired infection. One other neonate from our institution with systemic disease due to a nonanthrax bacillus is described, and a review of the English-language literature since 1900 reveals four additional neonates infected with these unusual pathogens. Such Bacillus species infections are rare but should be suspected when gram-positive bacilli are noted on gram stain, especially in an immunocompromised host. PMID:2505353

  20. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia in a Premature Neonate Mimicking Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Luen; Yen, Hsiu-Ju; Chen, Shu-Jen; Hung, Giun-Yi; Tsao, Pei-Chen; Soong, Wen-Jue

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare hematologic malignancy in children. Its presentations include anemia, thrombocytopenia, monocytosis, skin rash, marked hepatomegaly, and/or splenomegaly. Fever and respiratory involvement are common. Here, we report a case of a premature neonate with initial symptoms of respiratory distress. She gradually developed clinical manifestations of JMML that mimicked neonatal sepsis. Three weeks after birth, JMML was diagnosed. This is the first reported case of JMML presenting in a premature infant in Taiwan. PMID:24269860

  1. Menopause Analytical Hormonal Correlate Outcome Study (MAHCOS) and the Association to Brain Electrophysiology (P300) in a Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Braverman, Eric R.; Han, David; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Karikh, Tatiana; Truesdell, Courtney; Dushaj, Kristina; Kreuk, Florian; Li, Mona; Stratton, Danielle; Blum, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have demonstrated that increased leptin levels and obesity are inversely related to cognitive decline in menopausal women. It is hypothesized that adiposity is inversely correlated with cognitive decline, as women with increased weight are less vulnerable to diminishing cognition. However, it is increasingly observed that menopausal women, even with increased adiposity, experience significant cognitive decline. Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to analyze cognitive function and processing in menopausal women. Evoked potentials (P300) and neurophysiologic tests have validated brain metabolism in cognitively impaired patients. Post-hoc analyses of 796 female patients entering PATH Medical Clinic, between January 4, 2009 and February 24, 2013, were performed as part of the “Menopause Analytical Hormonal Correlate Outcome Study” (MAHCOS). Patient age range was 39–76 years (46.7±0.2). P300 latency and amplitude correlated with a number of hormones: follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol, estrone, estriol, DHEA, pregnenolone, progesterone, free and total testosterone, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), Vitamins D 1.25 and D 25OH, leptin, and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGF-BP3). Corrected statistics did not reveal significant associations with P300 latency or amplitude for these hormones except for leptin plasma levels. However, factor analysis showed that FSH and LH clustered together with Vitamin D1.25 and Vitamin D25OH, P300 latency (not amplitude), and log leptin were found to be associated in the same cluster. Utilizing regression analysis, once age adjusted, leptin was the only significant predictor for latency or speed (p = 0.03) with an effect size of 0.23. Higher plasma leptin levels were associated with abnormal P300 speed (OR = 0.98). Our findings show a significant relationship of higher plasma leptin levels, potentially due to leptin resistance, and prolonged P

  2. Menopause Analytical Hormonal Correlate Outcome Study (MAHCOS) and the association to brain electrophysiology (P300) in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Eric R; Han, David; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Karikh, Tatiana; Truesdell, Courtney; Dushaj, Kristina; Kreuk, Florian; Li, Mona; Stratton, Danielle; Blum, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have demonstrated that increased leptin levels and obesity are inversely related to cognitive decline in menopausal women. It is hypothesized that adiposity is inversely correlated with cognitive decline, as women with increased weight are less vulnerable to diminishing cognition. However, it is increasingly observed that menopausal women, even with increased adiposity, experience significant cognitive decline. Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to analyze cognitive function and processing in menopausal women. Evoked potentials (P300) and neurophysiologic tests have validated brain metabolism in cognitively impaired patients. Post-hoc analyses of 796 female patients entering PATH Medical Clinic, between January 4, 2009 and February 24, 2013, were performed as part of the "Menopause Analytical Hormonal Correlate Outcome Study" (MAHCOS). Patient age range was 39-76 years (46.7 ± 0.2). P300 latency and amplitude correlated with a number of hormones: follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol, estrone, estriol, DHEA, pregnenolone, progesterone, free and total testosterone, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), Vitamins D 1.25 and D 25OH, leptin, and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGF-BP3). Corrected statistics did not reveal significant associations with P300 latency or amplitude for these hormones except for leptin plasma levels. However, factor analysis showed that FSH and LH clustered together with Vitamin D1.25 and Vitamin D25OH, P300 latency (not amplitude), and log leptin were found to be associated in the same cluster. Utilizing regression analysis, once age adjusted, leptin was the only significant predictor for latency or speed (p = 0.03) with an effect size of 0.23. Higher plasma leptin levels were associated with abnormal P300 speed (OR = 0.98). Our findings show a significant relationship of higher plasma leptin levels, potentially due to leptin resistance, and prolonged P300 latency

  3. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  4. Neonatal sensitization to latex.

    PubMed

    Worth, J

    2000-05-01

    Babies born in delivery rooms of hospitals are exposed to latex through skin and mucous membrane contact with prepowdered latex gloves worn by midwives and doctors, and through the inhalation of latex-bound starch powder in the air of the delivery room. This paper examines the hypothesis that they are at risk for latex sensitization, and that part of the sharp increase of childhood asthma, eczema and anaphylaxis in the past 30-40 years may be linked. These possibilities seem hitherto unsuspected. In over 700 papers on latex allergy no mention of neonatal exposure to latex has been found. Even obstetric papers discussing the risks for an atopic mother (atopy - a tendency to develop allergies) do not seem to anticipate any risk for the baby, who might also be atopic. Latex allergy is primarily regarded as an occupational hazard. This paper suggests that it is a hazard for every baby handled by latex gloves at birth. PMID:10859678

  5. Neonatal pulmonary hemosiderosis.

    PubMed

    Limme, Boris; Nicolescu, Ramona; Misson, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare complex entity characterized clinically by acute or recurrent episodes of hemoptysis secondary to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. The radiographic features are variable, including diffuse alveolar-type infiltrates, and interstitial reticular and micronodular patterns. We describe a 3-week-old infant presenting with hemoptysis and moderate respiratory distress. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis was the first working diagnosis at the Emergency Department and was confirmed, 2 weeks later, by histological studies (bronchoalveolar lavage). The immunosuppressive therapy by 1 mg/kg/d prednisone was immediately started, the baby returned home on steroid therapy at a dose of 0,5 mg/kg/d. The diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis should be evocated at any age, even in the neonate, when the clinical presentation (hemoptysis and abnormal radiological chest images) is strongly suggestive. PMID:25389504

  6. Therapeutic drug monitoring in neonates.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Steven; Allegaert, Karel

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) aims to integrate drug measurement results into clinical decision making. The basic rules apply when using TDM in neonates (aminoglycosides, vancomycin, phenobarbital, digoxin), but additional factors should also be taken into account. First, due to both pharmacokinetic variability and non-pharmacokinetic factors, the correlation between dosage and concentration is poor in neonates, but can be overcome with the use of more complex, validated dosing regimens. Second, the time to reach steady state is prolonged, especially when no loading dose is used. Consequently, the timing of TDM sampling is important in this population. Third, the target concentration may be uncertain (vancomycin) or depend on specific factors (phenobarbital during whole body cooling). Finally, because of differences in matrix composition (eg, protein, bilirubin), assay-related inaccuracies may be different in neonates. We anticipate that complex validated dosing regimens, with subsequent TDM sampling and Bayesian forecasting, are the next step in tailoring pharmacotherapy to individual neonates. PMID:26803050

  7. Mastitis in a neonatal filly

    PubMed Central

    Gilday, Rebecca; Lewis, Danyse; Lohmann, Katharina L.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal mastitis is a rare occurrence in the horse. This report documents a case of mastitis caused by an organism within the Streptococcus dysgalactiae group in a 1-week-old Paint filly. PMID:25565717

  8. Neonatal and pediatric respiratory care

    SciTech Connect

    Koff, P.B. ); Eitzman, D.V.; Nev, J. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 23 chapters. Some of the titles are: Radiographic evaluations; Neonatal parenchymal diseases: physiologic development; Oxygen therapy; Pediatric parenchymal diseases; and Care of the neurologically injured child.

  9. Neonatal euthanasia: The Groningen Protocol*

    PubMed Central

    Vizcarrondo, Felipe E.

    2014-01-01

    For the past thirty years, voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide of adult patients have been common practice in the Netherlands. Neonatal euthanasia was recently legalized in the Netherlands and the Groningen Protocol (GP) was developed to regulate the practice. Supporters claim compliance with the GP criteria makes neonatal euthanasia ethically permissible. An examination of the criteria used by the Protocol to justify the euthanasia of seriously ill neonates reveals the criteria are not based on firm moral principles. The taking of the life of a seriously ill person is not the solution to the pain and suffering of the dying process. It is the role of the medical professional to care for the ailing patient with love and compassion, always preserving the person's dignity. Neonatal euthanasia is not ethically permissible. PMID:25473136

  10. Therapeutic hypothermia in neonatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Cornette, L.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a serious condition affecting newborn infants which can result in death and disability. There is now strong clinical evidence that moderate post-asphyxial total body cooling or hypothermia in full term neonates results in long-term neuroprotection, allowing us to proclaim this innovative therapy as “standard of care.” The treatment is a time-critical emergency and should be started within 6 hours after the insult. Such requires optimal collaboration among local hospitals, transport teams and the closest neonatal intensive care unit. The technique is only safe when applied according to published clinical trial protocols, and with admission of these patients to a neonatal intensive care unit. Future studies should be aimed at optimizing the onset, duration, and depth of hypothermia. Combination of hypothermia and drugs may further improve neuroprotection in asphyxiated full term neonates. PMID:24753900

  11. Neonatal euthanasia: The Groningen Protocol.

    PubMed

    Vizcarrondo, Felipe E

    2014-11-01

    For the past thirty years, voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide of adult patients have been common practice in the Netherlands. Neonatal euthanasia was recently legalized in the Netherlands and the Groningen Protocol (GP) was developed to regulate the practice. Supporters claim compliance with the GP criteria makes neonatal euthanasia ethically permissible. An examination of the criteria used by the Protocol to justify the euthanasia of seriously ill neonates reveals the criteria are not based on firm moral principles. The taking of the life of a seriously ill person is not the solution to the pain and suffering of the dying process. It is the role of the medical professional to care for the ailing patient with love and compassion, always preserving the person's dignity. Neonatal euthanasia is not ethically permissible. PMID:25473136

  12. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... medicines you take. These include: Birth control pills Hormone therapy Testosterone DHEA (a supplement) If you are ...

  13. Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 30 • Have used combination hormone therapy (estrogen plus progestin) for more than five years • Have a mother, ... know that estrogen (the major female hormone) and progestin (a synthetic form of progesterone, another female hormone) ...

  14. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000908.htm Hormone therapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing ... helps slow the growth of prostate cancer. Male Hormones and Prostate Cancer Androgens are male sex hormones. ...

  15. Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome from Infancy to Adulthood: Clinical, Hormonal, and Radiological Assessment According to the Initial Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Céline; Zadro, Charline; Diene, Gwenaelle; Oliver, Isabelle; Pienkowski, Catherine; Jouret, Béatrice; Cartault, Audrey; Ajaltouni, Zeina; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Sevely, Annick; Tauber, Maithé; Edouard, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS) are initially referred for hypoglycemia during the neonatal period or growth retardation during childhood. PSIS is either isolated (nonsyndromic) or associated with extra-pituitary malformations (syndromic). Objective To compare baseline characteristics and long-term evolution in patients with PSIS according to the initial presentation. Study Design Sixty-seven patients with PSIS were included. Data from subgroups were compared: neonates (n = 10) versus growth retardation patients (n = 47), and syndromic (n = 32) versus nonsyndromic patients (n = 35). Results Neonates displayed a more severe hormonal and radiological phenotype than children referred for growth retardation, with a higher incidence of multiple hormonal deficiencies (100% versus 34%; P = 0.0005) and a nonvisible anterior pituitary lobe (33% versus 2%; P = 0.0017). Regular follow-up of growth might have allowed earlier diagnosis in the children with growth retardation, as decreased growth velocity and growth retardation were present respectively 3 and 2 years before referral. We documented a progressive worsening of endocrine impairment throughout childhood in these patients. Presence of extra-pituitary malformations (found in 48%) was not associated with more severe hormonal and radiological characteristics. Growth under GH treatment was similar in the patient groups and did not vary according to the pituitary MRI findings. Conclusions PSIS diagnosed in the neonatal period has a particularly severe hormonal and radiological phenotype. The progressive worsening of endocrine impairment throughout childhood justifies periodic follow-up to check for additional hormonal deficiencies. PMID:26562670

  16. Protective effects of GM-CSF in experimental neonatal hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, R G; Abdel-Latif, M; Ahmed, F

    2015-12-01

    Hypothyroidism induced by methimazole (MMI), has a negative impact on the postnatal development. Neonatal Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor [GM-CSF; 50μg/kg, intramuscular injection at postnatal day (PND) 17] had been tested to ameliorate the effects of MMI [0.05%, (weight per volume; w/v), intraperitoneal injection at PND 15]-induced hypothyroidism in Wistar rats. The hypothyroid conditions due to the administration of MMI produced inhibitory effects on neonatal serum thyroxine (T4), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), neutrophil count in bone marrow and blood, cerebellar glutathione (GSH) and acetylcholinesterase (AchE), although it induced stimulatory actions on serum thyrotropin (TSH), growth hormone (GH), insulin growth factor-II (IGF-II), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cerebellar malondialdehyde (MDA) at PND 19. The treatment with GM-CSF could reverse the depressing and stimulating effects of MMI on these markers except for cerebellar AchE where its enhancement was non-significant (P>0.05) at tested PND. Thus, neonatal GM-CSF may be responsible for suppressing autoimmune responses and preventing hypothyroidism. PMID:26453507

  17. Growth Hormone Promotes Lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Banziger-Tobler, Nadja Erika; Halin, Cornelia; Kajiya, Kentaro; Detmar, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in inflammation and cancer progression, although the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. As determined using comparative transcriptional profiling studies of cultured lymphatic endothelial cells versus blood vascular endothelial cells, growth hormone receptor was expressed at much higher levels in lymphatic endothelial cells than in blood vascular endothelial cells. These findings were confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses. Growth hormone induced in vitro proliferation, sprouting, tube formation, and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells, and the mitogenic effect was independent of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 or -3 activation. Growth hormone also inhibited serum starvation-induced lymphatic endothelial cell apoptosis. No major alterations of lymphatic vessels were detected in the normal skin of bovine growth hormone-transgenic mice. However, transgenic delivery of growth hormone accelerated lymphatic vessel ingrowth into the granulation tissue of full-thickness skin wounds, and intradermal delivery of growth hormone resulted in enlargement and enhanced proliferation of cutaneous lymphatic vessels in wild-type mice. These results identify growth hormone as a novel lymphangiogenic factor. PMID:18583315

  18. Functional Neonatal Echocardiography: Indian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Suryawanshi, Pradeep B.; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Patnaik, Suprabha; Malshe, Nandini; Kalrao, Vijay; Lalwani, Sanjay; Surwade, Jitendra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Functional echocardiography, as opposed to echocardiography as performed by the cardiologist, is the bedside utilization of cardiac ultrasound to take after functional and haemodynamic changes longitudinally. Information reflecting cardiovascular capacity and systemic and pulmonary blood flow in sick preterm and term neonates can be observed utilizing this strategy. Information is lacking on its use in neonatal units in India. Aim To characterize the impact of Functional neonatal echocardiography (FnECHO) programme on decision making in a tertiary care centre in India by evaluating its frequency of use, patient characteristics, and indications. Materials and Methods Prospective observational study of neonates in a tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in Pune (India) from February 2014 to January 2015. All the neonates undergoing FnECHO during this 12 month period based on clinical findings were included in the study. Data extracted from the review of the clinical notes included gestational age, birth-weight, mode of delivery, Apgar scores, details of respiratory and cardiovascular support, timing of FnECHO and any other clinical diagnosis. The findings of echocardiography were recorded and correlated with the clinical and other laboratory or X-ray findings. If these findings indicated a change in management, it was instituted. Results A total of 348 echocardiographic studies were performed in 187 neonates (mean 1.86; SD 2.02). The most frequent indication was Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) assessment (n= 174, 50%), followed by haemodynamic instability (n=43, 12.36%). The results of FnECHO modified treatment in 148 cases (42.50%) in the form of addition and/or change in the treatment or avoidance of unnecessary intervention. Conclusion FnECHO is frequently used in the NICU setting and may be a useful tool to guide treatment. PDA assessment and haemodynamic instability are the most frequent indications. To validate its usefulness, well co

  19. Overview of neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benay

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal lupus (NL) is defined by the presentation of the fetus and the newborn who possess autoantibodies received from the mother. It is the dysfunction of the maternal immune system that leads to the production of autoantibodies to anti-Sjögren syndrome-A, anti-Sjögren syndrome-B, and anti-ribonuclear protein antigens. These antibodies are shared through the placenta and produce bodily changes in the fetal skin and heart, as well as potential changes in other body systems. Congenital complete heart block is the most dangerous manifestation of NL that can occur in utero or after birth. This article will provide an overview the presentation of NL and current therapies. Prenatal steroids have been the mainstay of therapy to try to reverse first- and second-degree congenital heart block and to prevent progression to a more advanced stage. New therapies are combining steroids with intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. This article will provide guidelines for practitioners so they can consider NL as a differential diagnosis when presented with cutaneous lesions, congenital heart block, or abnormal findings in the hematologic, hepatobiliary, neurologic, and musculoskeletal systems. PMID:24100008

  20. Thyroid Hormone and Cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Anthony Martin; Ojamaa, Kaie

    2016-01-01

    The heart is a major target of thyroid hormones, with maintenance of euthyroid hormone balance critical for proper function. In particular, chronic low thyroid function can eventually lead to dilated heart failure with impaired coronary blood flow. New evidence also suggests that heart diseases trigger a reduction in cardiac tissue thyroid hormone levels, a condition that may not be detectible using serum hormone assays. Many animal and clinical studies have demonstrated a high prevalence of low thyroid function in heart diseases with worse outcomes from this condition. Animal and human studies have also demonstrated many benefits from thyroid hormone treatment of heart diseases, particularly heart failure. Nonetheless, this potential treatment has not yet translated to patients due to a number of important concerns. The most serious concern involves the potential of accidental overdose leading to increased arrhythmias and sudden death. Several important clinical studies, which actually used excessive doses of thyroid hormone analogs, have played a major role in convincing the medical community that thyroid hormones are simply too dangerous to be considered for treatment in cardiac patients. Nonetheless, this issue has not gone away due primarily to overwhelmingly positive evidence for treatment benefits and a new understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying those benefits. This review will first discuss the clinical evidence for the use of thyroid hormones as a cardioprotective agent and then provide an overview of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying beneficial changes from thyroid hormone treatment of heart diseases. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1199-1219, 2016. PMID:27347890

  1. Impact of Smoking and Thiocyanate on Perchlorate and Thyroid Hormone Associations in the 2001–2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Steinmaus, Craig; Miller, Mark D.; Howd, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Background Findings from a recent large study suggest that perchlorate at commonly occurring exposure concentrations may decrease thyroid hormone levels in some women. Decreases in thyroid hormone seen with perchlorate exposure could be even greater in people with concomitant exposure to agents such as thiocyanate that may affect the thyroid by mechanisms similar to those of perchlorate. Objectives and methods We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to assess the impact of smoking and thiocyanate on the relationship between urinary per-chlorate and serum thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Results In women with urinary iodine levels < 100 μg/L, the association between the logarithm of perchlorate and decreased T4 was greater in smokers [regression coefficient (β) = −1.66, p = 0.0005] than in nonsmokers (β = −0.54, p = 0.04). In subjects with high, medium, and low cotinine levels, these regression coefficients were −1.47 (p = 0.0002), −0.57 (p = 0.03), and −0.16 (p = 0.59). For high, medium, and low thiocyanate tertiles they were −1.67 (p = 0.0009), −0.68 (p = 0.09), and −0.49 (p = 0.11). Clear interactions between perchlorate and smoking were not seen with TSH or with T4 in women with urinary iodine levels ≥ 100 μg/L or in men. Conclusions These results suggest that thiocyanate in tobacco smoke and perchlorate interact in affecting thyroid function, and this effect can take place at commonly occurring perchlorate exposures. Agents other than tobacco smoke might cause similar interactions, and further research on these agents could help identify people who are particularly susceptible to perchlorate. PMID:17805424

  2. Dietary contaminant exposure affects plasma testosterone, but not thyroid hormones, vitamin A, and vitamin E, in male juvenile arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus).

    PubMed

    Hallanger, Ingeborg G; Jørgensen, Even H; Fuglei, Eva; Ahlstrøm, Øystein; Muir, Derek C G; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro

    2012-01-01

    Levels of persistent organic pollutants (POP), such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), are high in many Arctic top predators, including the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus). The aim of this study was to examine possible endocrine-disruptive effects of dietary POP exposure in male juvenile Arctic foxes in a controlled exposure experiment. The study was conducted using domesticated farmed blue foxes (Vulpes lagopus) as a model species. Two groups of newly weaned male foxes received a diet supplemented with either minke whale (Baleneoptera acutorostrata) blubber that was naturally contaminated with POP (exposed group, n = 5 or 21), or pork (Sus scrofa) fat (control group, n = 5 or 21). When the foxes were 6 mo old and had received the 2 diets for approximately 4 mo (147 d), effects of the dietary exposure to POP on plasma concentrations of testosterone (T), thyroid hormones (TH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), retinol (vitamin A), and tocopherol (viramin E) were examined. At sampling, the total body concentrations of 104 PCB congeners were 0.1 ± 0.03 μg/g lipid weight (l.w.; n = 5 [mean ± standard deviation]) and 1.5 ± 0.17 μg/g l.w. (n = 5) in the control and exposed groups, respectively. Plasma testosterone concentrations in the exposed male foxes were significantly lower than in the control males, being approximately 25% of that in the exposed foxes. There were no between-treatment differences for TH, TSH, retinol, or tocopherol. The results suggest that the high POP levels experienced by costal populations of Arctic foxes, such as in Svalbard and Iceland, may result in delayed masculine maturation during adolescence. Sex hormone disruption during puberty may thus have lifetime consequences on all aspects of reproductive function in adult male foxes. PMID:23030655

  3. Relationship of Urinary Phthalate Metabolites with Serum Thyroid Hormones in Pregnant Women and Their Newborns: A Prospective Birth Cohort in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Fu-Chen; Su, Sheng-Wen; Wu, Chia-Fang; Huang, Meng-Chuan; Shiea, Jentaie; Chen, Bai-Hsiu; Chen, Yi-Ling; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of phthalates exposure with thyroid function in pregnant women and their newborns. Methods One hundred and forty-eight Taiwanese maternal and infant pairs were recruited from E-Da hospital in southern Taiwan between 2009 and 2010 for analysis. One-spot urine samples and blood samples in the third trimester of pregnant women and their cord blood samples at delivery were collected. Nine phthalate metabolites in urine were determined by triple quadrupole liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, whereas serum from pregnant women and their cord blood were used to measure thyroid profiles (thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], thyroxine, free thyroxine, and triiodothyronine) by radioimmunoassay. Results Median levels of urinary mono-n-butyl phthalate, mono-ethyl phthalate, and mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (μg/g creatinine) were the three highest phthalate metabolites, which were 37.81, 34.51, and 21.73, respectively. Using Bonferroni correction at a significance of < 0.006, we found that urinary mono-benzyl phthalate (MBzP) levels were significantly and negatively associated with serum TSH in cord blood (β = -2.644, p = 0.003). Conclusions Maternal urinary MBzP, of which the parental compound is butylbenzyl phthalate, may affect TSH activity in newborns. The alteration of thyroid homeostasis by certain phthalates in the early life, a critical period for neurodevelopment, is an urgent concern. PMID:26042594

  4. Neonatal Screening Part 2: Neonatal Screening in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Brian A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Neonatal screening is a widely accepted, cost-effective method for early detection of various inborn errors of metabolism. This series of three articles examines different aspects of neonatal screening. In the first article, the author discussed general principles of screening and its function in the spectrum of diagnostic techniques for genetic disease. In this, the second article, the author reviews the history and current practices of neonatal screening in Canada. The individual diseases for which screening is used and particular points of interest for each of these diseases are briefly described. The author also outlines the benefits of screening and treatment. In the final article of this series, the author will examine controversial topics that represent the possible future of screening. PMID:21234041

  5. The Effects of Increased Maternal Visual Regard of Neonate Upon the Neonate-Mother Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcastro, Christina M.; And Others

    This study attempts to investigate the effects of increased maternal visual regard on neonatal social visual behavior and upon patterns of mother-neonate interaction within the context of a learning theory paradigm. Subjects were 3-day-old neonates and their mothers; with 10 of the 15 mother-neonate pairs as the experimental group, and 5 as the…

  6. Intimate Partner Violence During Pregnancy: Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Ellen; Sharps, Phyllis; Bullock, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on maternal and neonatal outcomes are multifaceted and largely preventable. During pregnancy, there are many opportunities within the current health care system for screening and early intervention during routine prenatal care or during episodic care in a hospital setting. This article describes the effects of IPV on maternal health (e.g., insufficient or inconsistent prenatal care, poor nutrition, inadequate weight gain, substance use, increased prevalence of depression), as well as adverse neonatal outcomes (e.g., low birth weight [LBW]), preterm birth [PTB], and small for gestational age [SGA]) and maternal and neonatal death. Discussion of the mechanisms of action are explored and include: maternal engagement in health behaviors that are considered “risky,” including smoking and alcohol and substance use, and new evidence regarding the alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and resulting changes in hormones that may affect LBW and SGA infants and PTB. Clinical recommendations include a commitment for routine screening of IPV in all pregnant women who present for care using validated screening instruments. In addition, the provision of readily accessible prenatal care and the development of a trusting patient–provider relationship are first steps in addressing the problem of IPV in pregnancy. Early trials of targeted interventions such as a nurse-led home visitation program and the Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program show promising results. Brief psychobehavioral interventions are also being explored. The approach of universal screening, patient engagement in prenatal care, and targeted individualized interventions has the ability to reduce the adverse effects of IPV and highlight the importance of this complex social disorder as a top priority in maternal and neonatal health. PMID:25265285

  7. Intimate partner violence during pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Alhusen, Jeanne L; Ray, Ellen; Sharps, Phyllis; Bullock, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on maternal and neonatal outcomes are multifaceted and largely preventable. During pregnancy, there are many opportunities within the current health care system for screening and early intervention during routine prenatal care or during episodic care in a hospital setting. This article describes the effects of IPV on maternal health (e.g., insufficient or inconsistent prenatal care, poor nutrition, inadequate weight gain, substance use, increased prevalence of depression), as well as adverse neonatal outcomes (e.g., low birth weight [LBW]), preterm birth [PTB], and small for gestational age [SGA]) and maternal and neonatal death. Discussion of the mechanisms of action are explored and include: maternal engagement in health behaviors that are considered "risky," including smoking and alcohol and substance use, and new evidence regarding the alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and resulting changes in hormones that may affect LBW and SGA infants and PTB. Clinical recommendations include a commitment for routine screening of IPV in all pregnant women who present for care using validated screening instruments. In addition, the provision of readily accessible prenatal care and the development of a trusting patient-provider relationship are first steps in addressing the problem of IPV in pregnancy. Early trials of targeted interventions such as a nurse-led home visitation program and the Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program show promising results. Brief psychobehavioral interventions are also being explored. The approach of universal screening, patient engagement in prenatal care, and targeted individualized interventions has the ability to reduce the adverse effects of IPV and highlight the importance of this complex social disorder as a top priority in maternal and neonatal health. PMID:25265285

  8. Neonatal hemochromatosis in monochorionic twins.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, L; Baştuğ, O; Daar, G; Doğanay, S; Deniz, K; Kurtoğlu, S

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is a form of neonatal liver failure caused by maternal-fetal alloimmune injury to hepatocytes. The etiology of neonatal hemochromatosis is not exactly understood. However, according to one theory neonatal hemochromatosis is believed to be an alloimmune disorder causing liver injury in the fetus. In order to diagnose neonatal hemochromatosis there are some criteria that should be taken into account, such as positive family history, high serum ferritin levels, high serum alpha-fetoprotein levels and siderosis demonstrated by histology or with magnetic resonance.We present a case of a monochorionic newborn twin who applied to our hospital with sepsis clinical symptoms like clinics, was diagnosed with NH and immediately treated with antioxidant therapy while the other twin with same clinical symptoms did not respond to therapy and passed away. NH should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cases with sepsis-like clinical symptoms that do not respond to antibiotics; early antioxidant therapy in these cases is lifesaving. PMID:26836824

  9. Neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Nisha; Knorr, Aimee; Muldrew, Kenneth L

    2008-09-01

    The classic organisms associated with central nervous system infection in the neonate are herpes simplex, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus agalactiae; we describe an unusual case of neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by Bacillus cereus. PMID:18679155

  10. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two types of bioidentical hormone products: • Pharmaceutical products. These products have been approved by the ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy (a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a ...

  11. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two types of bioidentical hormone products: Pharmaceutical products . These products have been approved by the ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy(a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a ...

  12. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... is to closely replicate normal thyroid functioning. Pure, synthetic thyroxine (T4) works in the same way as ... needing thyroid hormone replacement (see Hypothyroidism brochure ). Pure synthetic thyroxine (T4), taken once daily by mouth, successfully ...

  13. Growth hormone stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone (GH) stimulation test measures the ability of the body to produce GH. ... killing medicine (antiseptic). The first sample is drawn early in the morning. Medicine is given through the ...

  14. Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Endocrine System » Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  15. Autoimmunity against thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Sakata, S

    1994-01-01

    The presence of thyroid hormone autoantibodies (THAA) is a common phenomenon. More than 270 cases have been reported by the end of 1993 involving not only thyroidal but also nonthyroidal disorders. Clinically, THAA in a patient's serum produces variation in thyroid hormone metabolism and, in particular, may interfere with the radioimmunoassay (RIA) results of total or free thyroid hormone measurements, which can cause unusually high or low values of the hormones depending on the B/F separation method used. This in vitro interference can give clinicians confusing information about the patient's thyroid state. As a result, the patient may receive inappropriate treatment from physicians who are unaware of this disorder. The presence of THAA has been reported not only in humans but also in dogs, chickens, and rats. In this review article, clinical features of THAA and the mechanism of autoantibody production are discussed. PMID:7535535

  16. Vaginal bleeding - hormonal

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken just before the period starts Women over age 40 and older may have the option to receive cyclic progestin or cyclic hormone therapy. A health care provider may recommend iron supplements for women with anemia. If you want ...

  17. Biliary atresia and neonatal hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wynchank, S.; Guillet, J.; Leccia, F.; Soubiran, G.; Blanquet, P.

    1984-03-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m diethyl IDA was performed on 14 jaundiced neonates. It aided greatly the differential diagnosis between neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia. Limitations in the interpretation of the results are described, as neonatal hepatitis may be accompanied by biliary excretion ranging from zero to normal. Also both biliary atresia (intra- and extrahepatic) and neonatal hepatitis may show no biliary excretion within 24 hours.

  18. Neonatal Jaundice Detection System.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Mustafa; Hardalaç, Fırat; Ural, Berkan; Karap, Serhat

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a common condition that occurs in newborn infants in the first week of life. Today, techniques used for detection are required blood samples and other clinical testing with special equipment. The aim of this study is creating a non-invasive system to control and to detect the jaundice periodically and helping doctors for early diagnosis. In this work, first, a patient group which is consisted from jaundiced babies and a control group which is consisted from healthy babies are prepared, then between 24 and 48 h after birth, 40 jaundiced and 40 healthy newborns are chosen. Second, advanced image processing techniques are used on the images which are taken with a standard smartphone and the color calibration card. Segmentation, pixel similarity and white balancing methods are used as image processing techniques and RGB values and pixels' important information are obtained exactly. Third, during feature extraction stage, with using colormap transformations and feature calculation, comparisons are done in RGB plane between color change values and the 8-color calibration card which is specially designed. Finally, in the bilirubin level estimation stage, kNN and SVR machine learning regressions are used on the dataset which are obtained from feature extraction. At the end of the process, when the control group is based on for comparisons, jaundice is succesfully detected for 40 jaundiced infants and the success rate is 85 %. Obtained bilirubin estimation results are consisted with bilirubin results which are obtained from the standard blood test and the compliance rate is 85 %. PMID:27229489

  19. Cardiogenic shock in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Viveiros, Eulália; Aveiro, Ana Cristina; Costa, Edite; Nunes, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of a healthy male full-term neonate, 21 days old, admitted to the emergency room, presenting a severe cardiovascular collapse with an initial sinus rhythm. The first diagnostic hypothesis was of septic shock, having antibiotics, fluid resuscitation, inotropic drugs and ventilatory support started immediately. After achieving haemodynamic stability, a new cardiovascular collapse occurred with supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). The latter was successfully treated and the neonate did not suffer any organ damage. Cardiogenic shock should be considered despite being a much rarer cause of shock in neonates. SVT is promptly diagnosed when a cardiorespiratory monitor is available; however, the intermittent occurrence of the tachycardia episodes makes this diagnosis more difficult to recognise and manage. PMID:23737567

  20. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  1. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  2. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  3. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  5. Regulation of muscle growth in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review reports recent findings on the multiple factors that regulate skeletal muscle growth in neonates. Skeletal muscle is the fastest growing protein mass in neonates. The high rate of neonatal muscle growth is due to accelerated rates of protein synthesis accompanied by the rapid accumulatio...

  6. Amino acids and insulin in neonatal growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rate of growth during the neonatal period is greater than at any other stage of postnatal life, and a majority of the mass increase is skeletal muscle. The rapid growth of skeletal muscle in the neonate is driven by an elevated rate of protein synthesis. Neonates are very efficient at utilizin...

  7. Hormonally-mediated Epigenetic Changes to Steroid Receptors in the Developing Brain: Implications for Sexual Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, Bridget M.; Schwarz, Jaclyn M.; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2010-01-01

    The establishment of sex-specific neural morphology, which underlies sex-specific behaviors, occurs during a perinatal sensitive window in which brief exposure to gonadal steroid hormones produces permanent masculinization of the brain. In the rodent, estradiol derived from testicular androgens is a principle organizational hormone. The mechanism by which transient estradiol exposure induces permanent differences in neuronal anatomy has been widely investigated, but remains elusive. Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, allow environmental influences to alter long-term gene expression patterns and therefore may be a potential mediator of estradiol-induced organization of the neonatal brain. Here we review data that demonstrate sex and estradiol-induced differences in DNA methylation on the estrogen receptor α (ERα), estrogen receptor β (ERβ), and progesterone receptor (PR) promoters in sexually dimorphic brain regions across development. Contrary to the overarching view of DNA methylation as a permanent modification directly tied to gene expression, these data demonstrate that methylation patterns on steroid hormone receptors change across the life span and do not necessarily predict expression. Although further exploration into the mechanism and significance of estradiol-induced alterations in DNA methylation patterns in the neonatal brain is necessary, these results provide preliminary evidence that epigenetic alterations can occur in response to early hormone exposure and may mediate estradiol-induced organization of sex differences in the neonatal brain. PMID:20800064

  8. Neonatal records and the computer.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, C H

    1977-01-01

    To use a combined single document clinical case sheet/computer record which can form the basic document for a life medical record is a practical proposition. With adequate briefing doctors and nurses soon become familiar with the record and appreciate its value. Secretarial and clerical requirements are reduced to a minimum as transcription of medical data is eliminated, so greatly speeding up processing and feed back to the medical services. A few illustrations of trends in neonatal statistics and of computer linked maternal/neonatal data are presented. PMID:879830

  9. Interprofessional Education in Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education is not a new concept. Yet, the operationalization of interprofessional education with related competencies for collaborative team-based practice in neonatal units is often difficult. Changes in healthcare with an emphasis on patient-focused care and the concern for patient safety and quality care are accelerating the need for more interprofessional education. This article briefly outlines the evolution of interprofessional education to support collaborative team-based practice and how that facilitates safety and quality care in neonatal units. PMID:27465448

  10. Assessment of the hormonal milieu.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, Susan E; Tworoger, Shelley S

    2011-01-01

    The hormonal milieu has been hypothesized to play a role in a range of human diseases, and therefore has been a topic of much epidemiologic investigation. Hormones of particular interest include: sex steroids; growth hormones; insulin-like growth factors; stress hormones, such as cortisol; and hormones produced by the adipose tissue, termed adipokines. Depending on the hormone, levels may be measured in plasma or serum, urine, saliva, tissue, or by assessing genetic variation in the hormone or hormone metabolizing genes. Sample collection, processing, and storage requirements vary according to the type of sample collected (e.g. blood or urine) and the hormone of interest. Laboratory analysis of hormones is frequently complex, and the technology used to conduct the assays is constantly evolving. For example, direct or indirect radioimmunoassay, bioassay or mass spectrometry can be used to measure sex steroids, each having advantages and disadvantages. Careful attention to laboratory issues, including close collaboration with laboratory colleagues and ongoing quality control assessments, is critical. Whether a single hormone measurement, as is frequently collected in epidemiologic studies, is sufficient to characterize the hormonal environment of interest (e.g. long-term adult hormone exposure) is also an important issue. While the assessment of hormones in epidemiologic studies is complex, these efforts have, and will continue to, add importantly to our knowledge of the role of hormones in human health. PMID:22997864

  11. A comprehensive assessment of urinary iodine concentration and thyroid hormones in New Zealand schoolchildren: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Insufficient iodine in children’s diets is of concern because thyroid hormones are needed for normal growth and development, particularly of the brain. This study aimed to carry out a comprehensive assessment of the iodine status of New Zealand schoolchildren using a range of biochemical indices suitable for populations (i.e. urinary iodine concentration) and individuals (i.e. thyroid hormones). Methods The New Zealand National Children’s Nutrition Survey was a cross­‒sectional survey of a representative sample of schoolchildren aged 5­‒14 years. Children were asked to provide a casual urine sample for the determination of urinary iodine concentration (UIC) and a blood sample for the determination of thyroglobulin (Tg), Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (fT4) and free triiodothyronine (fT3). Results The median UIC was 68 μg/L (n = 1153), which falls between 50­‒99 μg/L indicative of mild iodine deficiency. Furthermore, 29% of children had an UIC <50 μg/L and 82% had an UIC <100 μg/L. The median Tg concentration was 12.9 μg/L, which also falls between 10.0­‒19.9 μg/L indicative of mild iodine deficiency. The Tg concentration of children with an UIC <100 μg/L was 13.9 μg/L, higher than the 10.3 μg/L in children with an UIC >100 μg/L (P = 0.001). The mean TSH (1.7 mU/L), fT4 (14.9 pmol/L), and fT3 (6.0 pmol/L) concentrations for these mildly iodine deficient New Zealand children fell within normal reference ranges. Conclusions The UIC and Tg concentration indicate that New Zealand schoolchildren were mildly iodine deficient according to WHO/UNICEF/ICCIDD, and both are suitable indices to assess iodine status in populations or groups. The normal concentrations of TSH, fT4 and fT3 of these children suggest that these thyroid hormones are not useful indices of mild iodine deficiency. PMID:22569210

  12. Reduction in the level of antibodies against heat shock proteins 60 during different hormonal protocols in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Kacalska-Janssen, Olga; Zmaczyński, Andrzej; Wyroba, Jakub; Tomczyk, Rita; Wiatr, Joanna; Gałuszka-Bednarczyk, Anna; Bereza, Tomasz; Milewicz, Tomasz; Krzysiek, Józef

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In current literature, the immune-inflammatory theory of atherosclerosis is widely discussed. The role of how heat shock proteins 60 (HSP60) lead to the development of the atheromatous plaque is especially underlined. The aim of the study is to estimate the influence of three hormonal protocols on behavior of antibodies against HSP60. It determines the state of endothelium in postmenopausal women. Material and methods The study was carried out on 90 women between 2007 and 2012. All the women were in their menopausal age (51 ± 3 years), from the south region of Poland, with a follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) level above 25 mIU/ml, and with menopausal symptoms disturbing their normal daily activity. The study was done for a period of 6 months. Three groups of 30 randomized patients were formed. In the first group we used transdermal estrogen therapy in a 37.5 µg/24 h dose combined with a 10 mg dose of dydrogesterone. In the second group we applied transdermal estrogen therapy in a 50 µg/24 h dose with 2.5 mg of oral medroxyprogesterone. In both these groups, gestagens were administered continuously. In the third group, we prescribed continuous, oral, low-dose combined estrogen-gestagen therapy with 1 mg of ethinyl estradiol and 0.5 mg of norethisterone acetate. The control group consisted of 30 volunteers who were also from the south region of Poland, in good health, with menopausal symptoms, no menstrual period for the last 12 months, selected considering their age and weight, with an FSH level above 25 mIU/ml and with normal levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and prolactin. All patients treated and in the control group were seronegative to Chlamydia pneumonia for the entire duration of the study. In the analysis conducted, nonparametric tests were used (Mann-Whitney U test, Wilcoxon test, Kruskal-Wallis test – ANOVA). Results After 6 months of hormonal therapy, we found that all schemes of treatment promote a significant reduction in

  13. [Causative hormonal prevention of premature labour].

    PubMed

    Klimek, Rudolf

    2003-01-01

    Labour is the most important caesura in the life of every human being, as it is the ultimate test of the child's fetal maturity to self dependent life, whose onset is connected with a violent change in the circulatory system and the commencement of breathing. Maturity assessment scale comprises such features as, among others: posture, angle forearm, pulling an elbow to the middle line of the body, distribution of lanugo, plantar creases, breast development. They can be objectified through their technical quantification the same way as we give the appropriate number of grams and centimeters when assessing the weight and length of the newborn. However, two equally mature fetuses call differ in mass by 800g, body length by 6 cm, and gestational age by 6 weeks. Relativity of pregnancy duration clearly demonstrates that only the quantitativization of maturity enabled its prenatal assessment on the basis of the rate of increase of the spatial parameters of the baby developing in the mother's womb. The date of the end of pregnancy is determined depending equally on the child's fetal maturity and the mother's readiness to birth, where the placenta plays an important role, as its existence coincides with the individual duration of every pregnancy. The use of industrially synthesized hormones means that those pharmaceuticals contain the whole mixture of side-products of the synthesis of the hormones. The biologically alien corticoid analogues like dexamethasone and betamethasone must, when exerting prolonged action, cause unwanted side effects. In contrast the ACTH-depot administration leads to desired production and secretion of corticoids through the control of the whole body function of the adrenals. Such naturally stimulated endogenous steroid hormones are free from unwanted side effects of drugs from the group of their synthetic analogues. An enormous body of evidence supports the link between the administration of corticotrophin and fetal body mass, maturity and age of

  14. Gastrointestinal hormones regulating appetite.

    PubMed

    Chaudhri, Owais; Small, Caroline; Bloom, Steve

    2006-07-29

    The role of gastrointestinal hormones in the regulation of appetite is reviewed. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest endocrine organ in the body. Gut hormones function to optimize the process of digestion and absorption of nutrients by the gut. In this capacity, their local effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion have been well characterized. By altering the rate at which nutrients are delivered to compartments of the alimentary canal, the control of food intake arguably constitutes another point at which intervention may promote efficient digestion and nutrient uptake. In recent decades, gut hormones have come to occupy a central place in the complex neuroendocrine interactions that underlie the regulation of energy balance. Many gut peptides have been shown to influence energy intake. The most well studied in this regard are cholecystokinin (CCK), pancreatic polypeptide, peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin and ghrelin. With the exception of ghrelin, these hormones act to increase satiety and decrease food intake. The mechanisms by which gut hormones modify feeding are the subject of ongoing investigation. Local effects such as the inhibition of gastric emptying might contribute to the decrease in energy intake. Activation of mechanoreceptors as a result of gastric distension may inhibit further food intake via neural reflex arcs. Circulating gut hormones have also been shown to act directly on neurons in hypothalamic and brainstem centres of appetite control. The median eminence and area postrema are characterized by a deficiency of the blood-brain barrier. Some investigators argue that this renders neighbouring structures, such as the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the nucleus of the tractus solitarius in the brainstem, susceptible to influence by circulating factors. Extensive reciprocal connections exist between these areas and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and other energy-regulating centres of the

  15. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. PMID:26374891

  16. [Hormones and hair growth].

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2010-06-01

    With respect to the relationship between hormones and hair growth, the role of androgens for androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and hirsutism is best acknowledged. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that intervene in androgen metabolism have been successfully developed for treatment of these conditions. Clinical observations of hair conditions involving hormones beyond the androgen horizon have determined their role in regulation of hair growth: estrogens, prolactin, thyroid hormone, cortisone, growth hormone (GH), and melatonin. Primary GH resistance is characterized by thin hair, while acromegaly may cause hypertrichosis. Hyperprolactinemia may cause hair loss and hirsutism. Partial synchronization of the hair cycle in anagen during late pregnancy points to an estrogen effect, while aromatase inhibitors cause hair loss. Hair loss in a causal relationship to thyroid disorders is well documented. In contrast to AGA, senescent alopecia affects the hair in a diffuse manner. The question arises, whether the hypothesis that a causal relationship exists between the age-related reduction of circulating hormones and organ function also applies to hair and the aging of hair. PMID:20502852

  17. Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    CONSTANTINESCU, Simona; ZAMFIRESCU, Vlad; VLADAREANU, Prof. Radu

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is the commonest cause of severe neonatal thrombocytopenia. FNAIT is usually suspected in neonates with bleeding or severe, unexplained, and/or isolated postnatal thrombocytopenia. Affected fetuses should be managed in referral centers with experience in the ante-natal management of FNAIT. Close collaboration is required between specialists in fetal medicine, obstetrics, hematology/transfusion medicine, and pediatrics. The mother and her partner should be provided with detailed information about FNAIT and its potential clinical consequences, and the benefits and risks of different approaches to ante-natal management. There has been huge progress in the ante-natal management of FNAIT over the last 20 years. However, the ideal effective treatment without significant side effects to the mother or fetus has yet to be determined. Key issues: Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is a condition that is underdiagnosed. Immunization seldom occurs in the first pregnancy. Immunization takes place in association with delivery in most cases. Anti-HPA-1a level is a predictor for the severity of thrombocytopenia. PMID:23482913

  18. Microbiome Development in Neonatal Calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The initial colonization of eukaryotic hosts by microbial populations is poorly understood, yet this remains a critical time for growth and development. The goals of this study were to characterize the microbiome of neonatal calves. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis...

  19. Eruption cysts in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Hérica Adad; Parisotto, Thaís Manzano; Giro, Elisa Maria Aparecida; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances of the dental development may result in anomalies, which may be apparent as soon as the child is born. Eruption cysts are rarely observed in neonates considering that at this stage of the child's life teeth eruption is uncommon. Thus, the aim of this report is to describe a case of eruption cysts in a neonate. A male neonate was brought to the emergency service with the chief complaint of an elevated area on the anterior region of the inferior alveolar ridge. The lesion was clinically characterized as a compressive and floating swelling. Through a radiographic exam two mandibular primary incisors could be seen superficially located. Due to the patient's age and the initial diagnosis of eruption cysts the conduct adopted was clinical surveillance. Forty-five days after the first visit the lesions had significantly decreased in size, and completely disappeared after 4 months. At that age, both mandibular central incisors were already in the oral cavity exhibiting small hypoplastic areas in the incisal edges. The clinical and radiographic follow-up of eruption cysts in neonates appears to be an adequate conduct without differing from that recommended for older children. PMID:18524277

  20. [Top five neonatal articles 2015].

    PubMed

    Flamant, C; Fischer Fumeaux, C J

    2016-09-01

    This review includes five randomized controlled trials, published in the Medline database in 2015, which were selected by the Scientific commission of the French society of neonatology, taking into account their influence in perinatology. This selection was presented during the specific "Top five" session in the French congress of neonatal research. PMID:27431853

  1. Arginine production in the neonate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous arginine synthesis in adults is a complex multiorgan process, in which citrulline is synthesized in the gut, enters the general circulation, and is converted into arginine in the kidney, by what is known as the intestinal-renal axis. In neonates, the enzymes required to convert citrulline...

  2. Photodegradation of riboflavin in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Sisson, T.R.

    1987-04-01

    The biologically most important flavins are riboflavin and its related nucleotides, all highly sensitive to light. It is because of its photoreactivity and its presence in almost all body fluids and tissues that riboflavin assumes importance in phototherapy of neonatal jaundice. The absorption maxima of both bilirubin and riboflavin in the body are nearly identical: 445-450 (447) nm. In consequence, blue visible light will cause photoisomerization of bilirubin accompanied by photodegradation of riboflavin. This results in diminished erythrocyte glutathione reductase, which indicates generalized tissue riboflavin deficiency and red cell lysis. Single- and double-strand breaks in intracellular DNA have occurred with phototherapy. This light exposure of neonates may result also in alterations of bilirubin-albumin binding in the presence of both riboflavin and theophylline (the latter frequently given to prevent neonatal apnea). Many newborns, especially if premature, have low stores of riboflavin at birth. The absorptive capacity of premature infants for enteral riboflavin is likewise reduced. Consequently, inherently low stores and low intake of riboflavin plus phototherapy for neonatal jaundice will cause a deficiency of riboflavin at a critical period for the newborn. Supplementation to those infants most likely to develop riboflavin deficiency is useful, but dosage, time, and mode of administration to infants undergoing phototherapy must be carefully adjusted to avoid unwanted side effects.

  3. 75 FR 63841 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... agonists of the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor that may be readily synthesized, and are likely... thyroid- stimulating hormone receptor. Endocrinology. 2010 Jul;151(7):3454-3459. 2. S Moore, H Jaeschke, G..., MC Gershengorn. Evaluation of small-molecule modulators of the luteinizing...

  4. Sex differences in aging, life span and spontaneous tumorigenesis in 129/Sv mice neonatally exposed to metformin.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, Vladimir N; Popovich, Irina G; Zabezhinski, Mark A; Egormin, Peter A; Yurova, Maria N; Semenchenko, Anna V; Tyndyk, Margarita L; Panchenko, Andrey V; Trashkov, Alexandr P; Vasiliev, Andrey G; Khaitsev, Nikolai V

    2015-01-01

    The perinatal (prenatal and early neonatal) period is a critical stage for hypothalamic programming of sexual differentiation as well as for the development of energy and metabolic homeostasis. We hypothesized that neonatal treatment with antidiabetic drug biguanide metformin would positively modify regulation of growth hormone--IGF-1--insulin signaling pathway slowing down aging and improving cancer preventive patterns in rodents. To test this hypothesis male and female 129/Sv mice were s.c. injected with metformin (100 mg/kg) at the 3rd, 5th and 7th days after birth. Metformin-treated males consumed less food and water and their body weight was decreased as compared with control mice practically over their entire lifespan. There were no significant differences in age-related dynamics of food and water consumption in females and they were heavier than controls. The fraction of mice with regular estrous cycles decreased with age and demonstrated a tendency to decrease in the females neonatally treated with metformin. Neonatal exposure to metformin practically failed to change the extent of hormonal and metabolic parameters in blood serum of male and female mice. In males, neonatal metformin treatment significantly increased the mean life span (+20%, P < 0.05) and slightly increased the maximum life span (+3.5%). In females, the mean life span and median in metformin-treated groups were slightly decreased (-9.1% and -13.8% respectively, P > 0.05) in comparison to controls, whereas mean life span of last 10% survivors and maximum life span were the same as in controls. Almost half (45%) of control male mice and 71.8% male mice neonatally exposed to metformin survived up to 800 d of age, the same age was achieved by 54.3% of mice in control female group and 30% of metformin-treated females (P < 0.03). Thus, neonatal metformin exposure slows down aging and prolongs lifespan in male but not in female mice. PMID:25483062

  5. Congenital Hypothyroidism with Neurological and Respiratory Alterations: A Case Detected Using a Variable Diagnostic Threshold for TSH

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Jesús; Castro-Feijoo, Lidia; Colón, Cristóbal; Cabanas, Paloma; Heredia, Claudia; Castaño, Luis Antonio; Gómez-Lado, Carmen; Couce, M.Luz; Pombo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) with neurological and respiratory alterations due to a heterozygotic c.374-1G > A mutation of TITF1/NKX2-1. The hypothyroidism was detected using a neonatal screening protocol in which the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) threshold is re-set each day on the basis of within-day variability and between-day variation. In this case, the threshold on the day of the initial analysis was 8.2 mIU/L, and the measured TSH level in heel-prick blood was 8.3 mIU/L. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22155464

  6. Congenital hypothyroidism with neurological and respiratory alterations: a case detected using a variable diagnostic threshold for TSH.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Jesús; Alonso-Fernández, Jóse Ramón; Castro-Feijoo, Lidia; Colón, Cristóbal; Cabanas, Paloma; Heredia, Claudia; Castaño, Luis Antonio; Gómez-Lado, Carmen; Couce, M Luz; Pombo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) with neurological and respiratory alterations due to a heterozygotic c.374-1G > A mutation of TITF1/NKX2-1. The hypothyroidism was detected using a neonatal screening protocol in which the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) threshold is re-set each day on the basis of within-day variability and between-day variation. In this case, the threshold on the day of the initial analysis was 8.2 mIU/L, and the measured TSH level in heel-prick blood was 8.3 mIU/L. PMID:22155464

  7. Hormones in Infant Hair at Birth Provide a Window into the Fetal Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Amita; Lubach, Gabriele; Hedman, Curtis; Ziegler, Toni E.; Coe, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is established that maternal parity can affect infant growth and risk for several disorders, but the prenatal endocrine milieu that contributes to these outcomes is still largely unknown. Recently, it has been shown that hormones deposited in hair can provide a retrospective reflection of hormone levels while the hair was growing. Taking advantage of this finding, our study utilized hair at birth to investigate if maternal parity affected fetal hormone exposure during late gestation. Methods Hair was collected from primiparous and multiparous mother and infant monkeys at birth and used to determine steroid hormones embedded in hair while the infant was in utero. An LC/MS/MS technique was refined, which enabled the simultaneous measurement of 8 hormones. Results Hormone concentrations were dramatically higher in neonatal compared to maternal hair, reflecting extended fetal exposure as the first hair was growing. Further, hair cortisone was higher in primiparous mothers and infants when compared to the multiparous dyads. Conclusion This research demonstrates that infant hair can be used to track fetal hormone exposure and a panel of steroid hormones can be quantified from hair specimens. Given the utility in nonhuman primates, this approach can be translated to a clinical setting with human infants. PMID:24418932

  8. Effect of age and season on the thyroid hormone activity of Mizoram strain female mithun (Bos frontalis)

    PubMed Central

    Lalsangpuii; Ali, M. Ayub; Devi, L. Inaotombi; Behera, Parthasarathi; Ralte, Lalsanglura

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to generate baseline data on the normal values of the thyroidhormone (TH) activity as well as their correlation with age and season. Materials and Methods: Blood samples (10 ml) were collected from jugular vein of 30 female mithun’s of three different age groups viz. Calves (6 months to 1 year), heifer (1-3 years) and adult (above 3 years) during the three season’s viz. Monsoon, winter and spring of a year. The serum was analyzed for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) activity. Result: The result showed a significantly (p<0.05) a higher T3 level in heifers followed by adults and calves and higher T4 level in adults followed by heifers and calves in all the seasons. The TSH level was higher in heifers in all the seasons. The winter season recorded higher level of T3, T4, and TSH as compared to the other seasons of a year. Conclusion: The TSH and T3 level were the highest for aheifer, whereas T4 level was the highest for adults inall the season. Furthermore, the higher level of TH was observed in winter season. The increased level of the TH during the winter season signifies their calorigenic effect. Similarly in heifers, the increased T3 concentrations show its importance in reproductive physiology and its association with ovarian activity. This indicates that age and season have aprofound effect on TH activity of Mizoram strain female mithun. PMID:27047046

  9. Urinary Perchlorate and Thyroid Hormone Levels in Adolescent and Adult Men and Women Living in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Blount, Benjamin C.; Pirkle, James L.; Osterloh, John D.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Caldwell, Kathleen L.

    2006-01-01

    Background Perchlorate is commonly found in the environment and known to inhibit thyroid function at high doses. Assessing the potential effect of low-level exposure to perchlorate on thyroid function is an area of ongoing research. Objectives We evaluated the potential relationship between urinary levels of perchlorate and serum levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and total thyroxine (T4) in 2,299 men and women, ≥ 12 years of age, participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) during 2001–2002. Methods We used multiple regression models of T4 and TSH that included perchlorate and covariates known to be or likely to be associated with T4 or TSH levels: age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, estrogen use, menopausal status, pregnancy status, premenarche status, serum C-reactive protein, serum albumin, serum cotinine, hours of fasting, urinary thiocyanate, urinary nitrate, and selected medication groups. Results Perchlorate was not a significant predictor of T4 or TSH levels in men. For women overall, perchlorate was a significant predictor of both T4 and TSH. For women with urinary iodine < 100 μg/L, perchlorate was a significant negative predictor of T4 (p < 0.0001) and a positive predictor of TSH (p = 0.001). For women with urinary iodine ≥ 100 μg/L, perchlorate was a significant positive predictor of TSH (p = 0.025) but not T4 (p = 0.550). Conclusions These associations of perchlorate with T4 and TSH are coherent in direction and independent of other variables known to affect thyroid function, but are present at perchlorate exposure levels that were unanticipated based on previous studies. PMID:17185277

  10. Effect of Dietary Selenium Deficiency on the Cell Apoptosis and the Level of Thyroid Hormones in Chicken.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yunmao; Li, Wanyan; Xu, Danning; Li, Bingxin; Tian, Yunbo; Zan, Linsen

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed the effect of dietary selenium (Se) deficiency on male reproductive function in chicken. A total of 180 Hy-line laying cocks (1 day old; Weiwei) were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 90) of Se-deficient chickens and control chickens. The control group was fed a basic diet (containing 0.15 mg of Se/kg). The Se-deficient group was fed a Se-deficient corn-soy basal diet (containing 0.033 mg of Se/kg). Fifteen chickens were killed in each group on days 30, 60, and 90, respectively. Then, serum and testes were collected and used in the detection of experimental index. Results indicated that GSH-Px activity and Bcl-2 mRNA level in the testes and thyroidal triiodothyronine (T3) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) levels in serum by dietary Se deficiency were significantly decreased compared to the corresponding control groups. Se deficiency-treated group showed a significant increase in MDA concent, TUNEL-positive cells, and mRNA level of Bax, Caspase3, and p53 in the testes and thyroidal thyroxine (T4), free thyroxine (FT4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels in serum. Histopathologically, Se deficiency caused impairments in the testes. These results suggested that dietary Se deficiency exerts significant harmful effects on male reproductive organ and that the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways and the upstream regulators such as p53, Bax, and Bcl-2 were all involved in Se deficiency-induced testicular apoptosis. PMID:26507440

  11. Neonatal Hyperglycemia due to Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Fargas-Berríos, N.; García-Fragoso, L.; García-García, I.; Valcárcel, M.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hyperglycemia is a metabolic disorder found in the neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a very uncommon cause of hyperglycemia in the newborn, occurring in 1 in every 400,000 births. There are two subtypes of neonatal diabetes mellitus: permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) and transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM). We describe a term, small for gestational age, female neonate with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus who presented with poor feeding tolerance and vomiting associated with hyperglycemia (385 mg/dL), glycosuria, and metabolic acidosis within the first 12 hours of life. The neonate was treated with intravenous insulin, obtaining a slight control of hyperglycemia. An adequate glycemia was achieved at 5 weeks of life. The molecular studies showed complete loss of maternal methylation at the TND differentially methylated region on chromosome 6q24. The etiology of this neonate's hyperglycemia was a hypomethylation of the maternal TND locus. A rare cause of neonatal diabetes mellitus must be considered if a neonate presents refractory hyperglycemia. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in Puerto Rico of transient neonatal mellitus due to the uncommon mechanism of maternal hypomethylation of the TND locus. Its prevalence in Puerto Rico is unknown. PMID:26576310

  12. Neonatal Hyperglycemia due to Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Fargas-Berríos, N; García-Fragoso, L; García-García, I; Valcárcel, M

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hyperglycemia is a metabolic disorder found in the neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a very uncommon cause of hyperglycemia in the newborn, occurring in 1 in every 400,000 births. There are two subtypes of neonatal diabetes mellitus: permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) and transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM). We describe a term, small for gestational age, female neonate with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus who presented with poor feeding tolerance and vomiting associated with hyperglycemia (385 mg/dL), glycosuria, and metabolic acidosis within the first 12 hours of life. The neonate was treated with intravenous insulin, obtaining a slight control of hyperglycemia. An adequate glycemia was achieved at 5 weeks of life. The molecular studies showed complete loss of maternal methylation at the TND differentially methylated region on chromosome 6q24. The etiology of this neonate's hyperglycemia was a hypomethylation of the maternal TND locus. A rare cause of neonatal diabetes mellitus must be considered if a neonate presents refractory hyperglycemia. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in Puerto Rico of transient neonatal mellitus due to the uncommon mechanism of maternal hypomethylation of the TND locus. Its prevalence in Puerto Rico is unknown. PMID:26576310

  13. Thyroid hormone autoantibodies: are they a better marker to detect early thyroid damage in patients with hematologic cancers receiving tyrosine kinase inhibitor or immunoregulatory drug treatments?

    PubMed Central

    Mondello, P.; Mian, M.; Pitini, V.; Cuzzocrea, S.; Sindoni, A.; Galletti, M.; Mandolfino, M.; Santoro, D.; Mondello, S.; Aloisi, C.; Altavilla, G.; Benvenga, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Unlike cytotoxic agents, novel antineoplastic drugs can variably affect thyroid function and so impair patient outcomes. However, the widely used standard thyroid tests have demonstrated low sensitivity for detecting early thyroid damage that leads to dysfunction of the gland. To find a more reliable thyroid marker, we assessed the presence of antibodies binding thyroid hormones (thAbs) in a cancer population undergoing potentially thyrotoxic treatment. Methods From April 2010 to September 2013, 82 patients with hematologic malignancies treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or immunoregulatory drugs were recruited. Healthy volunteers (n = 104) served as control subjects. Thyroid function, autoimmunity tests, thAbs, and thyroid sonography were assessed once during treatment. Results Overall, thAb positivity was recorded in 13% of the entire cohort. In most cases, the thAbs were of a single type, with a predominance of T3 immunoglobulin G. More specifically, thAbs were detected in 11 cancer patients; and abnormal levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroglobulin antibody, and thyroperoxidase antibody were detected in 6 (p = 0.05), 0 (p = 0.0006), and 2 cancer patients (p = 0.001) respectively. Ultrasonographic alterations of the thyroid were observed in 12 cancer patients. In contrast, of the 104 healthy control subjects, only 1 was positive for thAbs (1%). Conclusions We have demonstrated for the first time that thAbs are a reliable marker of early thyroid dysfunction when compared with the widely used standard thyroid tests. A confirmatory prospective trial aiming at evaluating thAbs at various time points during treatment could clarify the incidence and timing of antibody appearance. PMID:27330353

  14. Prolonged food deprivation increases mRNA expression of deiodinase 1 and 2, and thyroid hormone receptor β-1 in a fasting-adapted mammal.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A; MacKenzie, Duncan S; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-12-15

    Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations and deiodinase content and activity to suppress metabolism. However, in prolonged-fasted, metabolically active elephant seal pups, TH levels are maintained, if not elevated. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox is unknown and demonstrates variability in the regulation of TH levels, metabolism and function in food-deprived mammals. To address our hypothesis that cellular TH-mediated activity is upregulated with fasting duration, we quantified the mRNA expression and protein content of adipose and muscle deiodinase type I (DI1) and type II (DI2), and TH receptor beta-1 (THrβ-1) after 1, 3 and 7 weeks of fasting in northern elephant seal pups (N=5-7 per week). Fasting did not decrease the concentrations of plasma thyroid stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine (tT3), free T3, total thyroxine (tT4) or free T4, suggesting that the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is not suppressed, but rather maintained during fasting. Mean mRNA expression of adipose DI1 and DI2 increased threefold and fourfold, respectively, and 20- and 30-fold, respectively, in muscle. With the exception of adipose DI1, protein expression of adipose DI2 and muscle DI1 and DI2 increased twofold to fourfold. Fasting also increased adipose (fivefold) and muscle (fourfold) THrβ-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms mediating cellular TH activity are upregulated with prolonged fasting. The data demonstrate a unique, atypical mechanism of TH activity and regulation in mammals adapted to prolonged food deprivation in which the potential responsiveness of peripheral tissues and cellular TH activity are increased, which may contribute to their lipid-based metabolism. PMID:24307712

  15. Essential Role of GATA2 in the Negative Regulation of Type 2 Deiodinase Gene by Liganded Thyroid Hormone Receptor β2 in Thyrotroph

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Suzuki, Shingo; Matsushita, Akio; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Nakamura, Hiroko Misawa; Hirahara, Naoko; Kuroda, Go; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Ohba, Kenji; Morita, Hiroshi; Oki, Yutaka; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of thyrotropin (thyroid stimulating hormone; TSH) by thyroid hormone (T3) and its receptor (TR) is the central mechanism of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. Two transcription factors, GATA2 and Pit-1, determine thyrotroph differentiation and maintain the expression of the β subunit of TSH (TSHβ). We previously reported that T3-dependent repression of the TSHβ gene is mediated by GATA2 but not by the reported negative T3-responsive element (nTRE). In thyrotrophs, T3 also represses mRNA of the type-2 deiodinase (D2) gene, where no nTRE has been identified. Here, the human D2 promoter fused to the CAT or modified Renilla luciferase gene was co-transfected with Pit-1 and/or GATA2 expression plasmids into cell lines including CV1 and thyrotroph-derived TαT1. GATA2 but not Pit-1 activated the D2 promoter. Two GATA responsive elements (GATA-REs) were identified close to cAMP responsive element. The protein kinase A activator, forskolin, synergistically enhanced GATA2-dependent activity. Gel-shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with TαT1 cells indicated that GATA2 binds to these GATA-REs. T3 repressed the GATA2-induced activity of the D2 promoter in the presence of the pituitary-specific TR, TRβ2. The inhibition by T3-bound TRβ2 was dominant over the synergism between GATA2 and forskolin. The D2 promoter is also stimulated by GATA4, the major GATA in cardiomyocytes, and this activity was repressed by T3 in the presence of TRα1. These data indicate that the GATA-induced activity of the D2 promoter is suppressed by T3-bound TRs via a tethering mechanism, as in the case of the TSHβ gene. PMID:26571013

  16. Prolonged food deprivation increases mRNA expression of deiodinase 1 and 2, and thyroid hormone receptor β-1 in a fasting-adapted mammal

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G.; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A.; MacKenzie, Duncan S.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Ortiz, Rudy M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations and deiodinase content and activity to suppress metabolism. However, in prolonged-fasted, metabolically active elephant seal pups, TH levels are maintained, if not elevated. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox is unknown and demonstrates variability in the regulation of TH levels, metabolism and function in food-deprived mammals. To address our hypothesis that cellular TH-mediated activity is upregulated with fasting duration, we quantified the mRNA expression and protein content of adipose and muscle deiodinase type I (DI1) and type II (DI2), and TH receptor beta-1 (THrβ-1) after 1, 3 and 7 weeks of fasting in northern elephant seal pups (N=5–7 per week). Fasting did not decrease the concentrations of plasma thyroid stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine (tT3), free T3, total thyroxine (tT4) or free T4, suggesting that the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid axis is not suppressed, but rather maintained during fasting. Mean mRNA expression of adipose DI1 and DI2 increased threefold and fourfold, respectively, and 20- and 30-fold, respectively, in muscle. With the exception of adipose DI1, protein expression of adipose DI2 and muscle DI1 and DI2 increased twofold to fourfold. Fasting also increased adipose (fivefold) and muscle (fourfold) THrβ-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms mediating cellular TH activity are upregulated with prolonged fasting. The data demonstrate a unique, atypical mechanism of TH activity and regulation in mammals adapted to prolonged food deprivation in which the potential responsiveness of peripheral tissues and cellular TH activity are increased, which may contribute to their lipid-based metabolism. PMID:24307712

  17. Iodine and thyroid hormones during pregnancy and postpartum.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Faustino R

    2007-07-01

    Iodine is a trace element essential for synthesis of the thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine and thyroxine. These hormones play a vital role in the early growth and development stages of most organs, especially the brain. The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared that, after famine, iodine deficiency is the most avoidable cause of cerebral lesions including different degrees of mental retardation and cerebral paralysis. The main function of iodine in vertebrates is to interact with the thyroid hormones. During pregnancy sufficient quantities of iodine are required to prevent the appearance of hypothyroidism, trophoblastic and embryonic or fetal disorders, neonatal and maternal hypothyroidism, and permanent sequelae in infants. Thyroid hormone receptors and iodothyronine deiodinases are present in placenta and central nervous tissue of the fetus. A number of environmental factors influence the epidemiology of thyroid disorders, and even relatively small abnormalities and differences in the level of iodine intake in a population have profound effects on the occurrence of thyroid abnormalities. The prevalence of disorders related to iodine deficit during pregnancy and postpartum has increased. Iodine supplementation is an effective measure in the case of pregnant and lactating women. However, it is not implemented and the problem is still present even in societies with theoretically advanced health systems. During pregnancy and postpartum, the WHO recommends iodine intake be increased to at least 200 microg/day. Side-effects provoked by iodine supplementation are rare during pregnancy at the recommended doses. PMID:17701774

  18. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer On This Page What are hormones? How do ... sensitive breast cancer: Adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer : Research has shown that women treated for early- ...

  19. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... to temporarily stop medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about ...

  20. Side Effects of Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Living with Prostate Cancer Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction Loss of Fertility Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects of Chemotherapy Side Effects: When ...

  1. Aging changes in hormone production

    MedlinePlus

    ... that produce hormones are controlled by other hormones. Aging also changes this process. For example, an endocrine ... produce the same amount at a slower rate. AGING CHANGES The hypothalamus is located in the brain. ...

  2. Neonatal testosterone suppresses a neuroendocrine pulse generator required for reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, Jean-Marc; Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Le Masson, Gwendal; Oliet, Stéphane H.; Ciofi, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    The pituitary gland releases hormones in a pulsatile fashion guaranteeing signalling efficiency. The determinants of pulsatility are poorly circumscribed. Here we show in magnocellular hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal oxytocin (OT) neurons that the bursting activity underlying the neurohormonal pulses necessary for parturition and the milk-ejection reflex is entirely driven by a female-specific central pattern generator (CPG). Surprisingly, this CPG is active in both male and female neonates, but is inactivated in males after the first week of life. CPG activity can be restored in males by orchidectomy or silenced in females by exogenous testosterone. This steroid effect is aromatase and caspase dependent, and is mediated via oestrogen receptor-α. This indicates the apoptosis of the CPG network during hypothalamic sexual differentiation, explaining why OT neurons do not burst in adult males. This supports the view that stereotypic neuroendocrine pulsatility is governed by CPGs, some of which are subjected to gender-specific perinatal programming.

  3. Sex hormone receptors in the hypothalamus and their role in sexual differentiation of the male rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Shishkina, I.V.; Babichev, V.N.; Ozol', L.Yu.

    1986-09-01

    In this investigation, changes in the level of receptors for sex hormones in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex of male rats were studied on the first through fifth days of postnatal life, and the results obtained were compared with the levels of luteinizing hormone and sex hormones in the peripheral blood in order to discover any correlation between these parameters. 2,4,6,7,-/sup 3/H-estradiol-17..beta.. and 1,2,6,7-/sup 3/H-testosterone were used as labeled hormones. The values of the association constant and concentration of specific binding sites for estradiol and testosterone in hypothalamus and cerebral cortex of male rats during neonatal development is shown. It is found that in male rats on the first day after birth, receptors for estradiol and testosterone are present and they enable the action both of the testicular hormone and that of estradiol to be realized.

  4. [Infusion therapy for neonates, infants and children].

    PubMed

    Steurer, M A; Berger, T M

    2011-01-01

    Intravenous administration of fluids, electrolytes and glucose are the most common interventions in hospitalized pediatric patients. Parenteral fluid administration can be life-saving, however, if used incorrectly it also carries substantial risks. Perioperatively, adequate hydration, prevention of electrolyte imbalances and maintenance of normoglycemia are the main goals of parenteral fluid therapy. Conceptionally, the distinction between maintenance requirements, deficits and ongoing loss is helpful. Although the pathophysiological basis for parenteral fluid therapy was clarified in the first half of the 20th century, some aspects still remain controversial. In newborn infants, rational parenteral fluid therapy must take into account large insensible fluid losses, adaptive changes of renal function in the first days of life and the fact that neonates do not tolerate prolonged periods of fasting. In older infants the occurrence of iatrogenic hyponatremia with the use of hypotonic solutions has led to a critical reappraisal of the validity of the Holliday-Segar method for calculating maintenance fluid requirements in the postoperative period. Pragmatically, only isotonic solutions should be used in clinical situations which are known to be associated with increases in antidiuretic hormone (ADH) secretion. In this context, it is important to realize that in contrast to lactated Ringer's solution, the use of normal saline can lead to hyperchloremic acidosis in a dose-dependent fashion. Although there is no convincing evidence that colloids are better than crystalloids, there are clinical situations where the use of the more expensive colloids seems justified. It may be reasonable to choose a solution for fluid replacement which has a composition comparable to the composition of the fluid which must be replaced. Although hypertonic saline can reduce an elevated intracranial pressure, this therapy cannot be recommended as a routine procedure because there is currently

  5. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  6. [Hormonal contraception in autoimmpne diseases].

    PubMed

    Matyszkiewicz, Anna; Jach, Robert; Rajtar-Ciosek, Agnieszka; Basta, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The onset and the course of autoimmune diseases is influenced among other factors by the sex hormones. Hormonal contraception might affect the course of the autoimmune disease. The paper summarises the manner of save application of hormonal contraception in patients with autoimmune disease. PMID:27526427

  7. Reproductive hormones in the environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low detections of reproductive hormones, at the part per trillion concentrations, are frequently measured in surface and subsurface waters. These exogenous hormones are a concern because they can bind strongly to hormone receptors in animals and induce an endocrine response or disruption. Human heal...

  8. Bioidentical Hormones for Menopausal Hormone Therapy: Variation on a Theme

    PubMed Central

    Bythrow, Jenna

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Progesterone creams and natural or bioidentical compounded estrogen preparations are being promoted to consumers as safe alternatives to conventional menopausal hormone therapy and as health-promoting tonics. No reliable data support these claims. SAFETY Natural hormones, including estradiol, estriol, estrone, and progesterone, can be expected to have the same adverse event profile as conventional menopausal hormone regimens. SALIVARY HORMONE TESTS Salivary tests may be used to persuade asymptomatic consumers to use hormones (or symptomatic patients to use higher doses than those needed to mitigate symptoms), a practice that can be expected to result in adverse events. PMID:17549577

  9. Neonatal Pustular Dermatosis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal pustular eruption is a group of disorders characterized by various forms of pustulosis seen in first 4 weeks of life. Its presentation is often similar with some subtle differences, which can be further established by few simple laboratory aids, to arrive at a definite diagnosis. Given their ubiquitous presentation, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate among self-limiting, noninfectious, pustular dermatosis such as erythema toxicum neonatorum, transient neonatal pustular melanosis, miliaria pustulosa, etc., and potentially life threatening infections such as herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus infections. This review article tries to address the chronological, clinical, morphological, and histological differences among the various pustular eruptions in a newborn, in order to make it easier for a practicing dermatologist to diagnose and treat these similar looking but different entities of pustulation with a clear demarcation between the physiological benign pustular rashes and the infectious pustular lesions. PMID:25814724

  10. Pain Perception in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Midmer, Deana K.

    1989-01-01

    Pain expression in both pre-term and term infants is a little understood phenomenon. Recent research has generated data documenting that the newborn can feel pain, can act to avoid the pain, and may form memory traces of the experience. ”Nociceptive activity” or ”noxious stimuli” are better terms to use when addressing aversive stimulation of the neonate because they encourage scrutiny of the behavioural and physiologic responses of the newborn without placing emphasis on the emotional and subjective associations of the word ”pain”. Many invasive procedures are performed on infants with little or no provision for adequate pain management. The general and specific responses of the neonate to pain must be recognized. Analgesia and anesthesia should be made available to all infants, pre-term or term, sick or well, on the same basis on which they are made available to older children and adults. PMID:21248938

  11. Neonatal haemochromatosis associated with gastroschisis.

    PubMed

    Thornton, M P; Marven, S S; Tanner, M S; Gürtl-Lackner, B

    2008-05-01

    We describe, to our knowledge, the first case of progressive neonatal liver failure due to neonatal haemochromatosis (NH) occurring in an infant with a gastroschisis and review the literature regarding these two conditions. A 1,665 g male infant with antenatally diagnosed gastroschisis was born with a severe coagulopathy, anaemia, thrombocytopenia, hypoglycaemia and jaundice. He developed progressive liver failure, complicated by necrotising enterocolitis. Serum ferritin was elevated at 1,459 microg/L. He died on day 40 and a limited post-mortem examination confirmed significant hepatic siderosis with fibrosis and cholestasis, and siderosis of the pancreas. Although no genetic aetiology for gastroschisis has been identified, an occasional inherited tendency has been observed. There is also evidence to support an autosomal recessive inheritance in NH. PMID:18338135

  12. Ovarian follicular dynamics after aromatizable or non aromatizable neonatal androgenization.

    PubMed

    Anesetti, Gabriel; Chávez-Genaro, Rebeca

    2016-10-01

    The effects of neonatal testosterone or dihydrotestosterone exposure on ovarian follicular dynamics were analysed at prepubertal, pubertal or adult age in Wistar rats. Both androgens induced a transitory increase on follicular endowment that was partially corrected at puberty. At adult age testosterone prevented ovulation, without significant modifications on follicular dynamics. An increased number of cystic structures were observed from puberty to adult age. However, ovaries of rats treated with dihydrotestosterone showed follicles with evident morphological alterations in granulosa and thecal layers although several corpora lutea were observed. A significant increase in preantral follicles and few cystic structures were detected at advanced adulthood. The size of cyst increased with age. No immunohistochemical changes on growth factors or enzymes related to steroidogenesis in growing follicles were obvious in any group. In both androgenized groups, cysts shared immunohistochemical characteristics exhibited by preovulatory follicles but they were unable to ovulate spontaneously. Our results provide an insight into the role of different androgens in female reproductive system development, indicating a direct effect of dihydrotestosterone on ovarian tissues whereas a central effect would be the main feature of neonatal testosterone exposure. Heterogeneous clinical manifestations seen in pathologies such as polycystic ovary syndrome among women could be associated with subtle hormonal changes during follicular population development. PMID:27541036

  13. Neuroprotection by Melatonin after Germinal Matrix Hemorrhage in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lekic, Tim; Manaenko, Anatol; Rolland, William; Virbel, Kelly; Hartman, Richard; Tang, Jiping

    2013-01-01

    Background Germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) is a devastating neurological disorder of very low birth weight premature infants that leads to post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus, cerebral palsy, and mental retardation. Melatonin is a potent antioxidant known to reverse free-radical mediated injury in the brain. This study investigated the effect of melatonin treatment after GMH injury. Methods Clostridial collagenase was infused into the right germinal matrix region of neonatal rats with stereotaxic technique. Cognitive function, sensorimotor ability, cerebral, cardiac and splenic growths were measured in juvenile animals. Results Systemic melatonin treatment ameliorated cognitive and sensorimotor dysfunction at the juvenile developmental stage. This hormone also normalized brain atrophy, splenomegaly, and cardiac hypertrophy consequences at 1 month after injury. Conclusion This study supports the role of free radicals in acute neonatal hemorrhagic brain injury. Melatonin is an effective antioxidant that can protect the infant’s brain from the post-hemorrhagic consequences of mental retardation and cerebral palsy. Further mechanistic studies are warranted to determine the mechanisms behind these neuroprotective effects. PMID:21725756

  14. Neuroimaging in Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Pradeep; Shroff, Manohar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is emerging as one of the most important tools in identifying the etiology of neonatal encephalopathy as well as in predicting long-term outcomes. This makes it imperative to have a broader understanding of normal myelination of the neonatal brain on MR imaging and to be familiar with the spectrum of imaging features in ischemic and non-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. Hypoxic ischemic injury (HIE) is one of the most common causes of neonatal encephalopathy and imaging appearances are influenced by factors such as the stage of maturation of the neonatal brain and severity as well as duration of ischemic insult. Other common causes of neonatal encephalopathy include infectious diseases, congenital disorders and inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:26909496

  15. Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, J P; Caradeux, J; Norwitz, Errol R; Illanes, S E

    2013-01-01

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FMAIT) is a relatively uncommon disease, but is the leading cause of severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn. It can cause severe complications and long-term disabilities. The main objective of screening is to reduce both the morbidity and mortality associated with FMAIT, primarily by preventing intracranial hemorrhage. However, controversy surrounds both pre- and antenatal management. This article discusses pathogenesis, screening, diagnosis, and both pre- and neonatal management of FMAIT. PMID:23687553

  16. [A neonate with ambiguous genitalia].

    PubMed

    Jansen, Burgo J; van Rijn, Rick R; van Trotsenburg, A S P Paul

    2015-01-01

    In a neonate with ambiguous genitalia, physical examination revealed a phallus. Ultrasonography showed a vagina and uterus, but no gonads. Because of severe undervirilisation in the presence of a uterus, probably due to 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis, parents were advised female sex assignment. When after a few weeks the phallus had increased in size, abdominal laparoscopy showed an underdeveloped uterus. Gonadal biopsy confirmed gonadal dysgenesis. Sex assignment was reconsidered and changed into the male gender. PMID:26200425

  17. Neonatal resuscitation: improving the outcome.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Autumn P

    2014-03-01

    Prudent veterinary intervention in the prenatal, parturient, and postpartum periods can increase neonatal survival by controlling or eliminating factors contributing to puppy morbidity and mortality. Postresuscitation or within the first 24 hours of a natural delivery, a complete physical examination should be performed by a veterinarian, technician, or knowledgeable breeder. Adequate ingestion of colostrum must occur promptly (within 24 hours) postpartum for puppies and kittens to acquire passive immunity. PMID:24580986

  18. [Fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Díaz, E; Ginovart Galiana, G

    2003-06-01

    Fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is the commonest cause of severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn. This disorder is due to the destruction of fetal platelets by a maternal platelet-specific antibody caused by fetal-maternal incompatibility. The most serious complication is intracranial hemorrhage (10-30 % of newborns), which may cause death (10 % of the reported cases) or irreversible neurological sequelae (20 %). The diagnosis is usually made after birth when most affected neonates have petechiae, purpura or overt bleeding. The degree of severity varies according to platelet count. Current methods allow detection of maternal platelet alloantibodies (usually HPA-1a). Clinical grounds and the exclusion of other causes of neonatal thrombocytopenia are required to establish an accurate diagnosis. Recurrence of this disease is very high and has prompted clinicians to develop antenatal prophylactic programs in subsequent pregnancies. However, the optimal treatment of at-risk pregnancies remains controversial. The early diagnosis of this process allows effective therapy based on the infusion of compatible platelets and IgG immunoglobulins when hemorrhage is not obvious. Antenatal management of subsequent pregnancies can prevent recurrence of thrombocytopenia and intracranial hemorrhage. The aim of this review is to draw pediatricians' attention to the importance of this probably under-diagnosed disease in which early diagnosis can prevent potentially severe complications. PMID:12781112

  19. Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Kari A.; Anderson-Berry, Ann L.; Delair, Shirley F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS. PMID:24396135

  20. Strategies to reduce neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Singh, M

    1990-01-01

    In India, 60% of deaths in infants under 1 year of age occur in the 1st 4 weeks after birth. The neonatal mortality rate is currently 76/1000 live births in rural areas and 39/1000 in urban areas. The Government if India has launched a plan of action of address the cycle of poorly spaced pregnancies, inadequate maternal health care and nutrition, and high incidence of low birthweight babies that contributes to this high neonatal mortality phenomenon. Crucial to such a plan is the expansion, strengthening, and improved organization of maternal-child health services. At the level of maternal health services, efforts will be made to identify pregnant women early, arrange a minimum of 4 prenatal visits, provide dietary supplementation and immunization against tetanus toxoid, create more sterile conditions for home deliveries, identify and refer high-risk pregnancies and deliveries, and provide postnatal follow-up care. Child health service staff are motivating mothers to breastfeed and screening newborns for jaundice and bacterial infection. A risk approach, in which there is a minimum necessary level of care for all pregnant women but more intensive management and follow-up of those at high risk, is most cost-efficient given the lack of human and financial resources. Attention must also be given to the determinants of low birthweight (maternal undernutrition, closely spaced pregnancies, severe anemia, adolescent childbearing, prenatal infections, strenuous work responsibilities, and maternal hypertension), which is a co-factor in neonatal mortality. PMID:12316586

  1. Neonatal asphyxia and forensic medicine.

    PubMed

    d'Aloja, E; Müller, M; Paribello, F; Demontis, R; Faa, A

    2009-01-01

    In the last decades, the scientific literature addressing neonatal encephalopathy has grown in a logarithmic way and malpractice claims in obstetrics and neonatology have become a major threat to the health service. At the moment, scientific evidence are insufficient to clearly identify in each single case whether the hypoxic insult has developed in the course of labor or in the first few hours after the birth or, otherwise, whether the damage has to recognize a remote and long-lasting cause acting during pregnancy. Several authors feel that this scientific uncertainty leads to a higher percentage of civil suit decisions prone to recognizing a guilty medical behavior, and they wish a more in-depth analysis of all these cases to clearly identify all the data either in favor or in contrary to the assumption of the existence of a causal correlation between neonatal encephalopathy and medical misbehavior. This article will focus on the medico-legal approach to a hypoxic-ischemic event in the perinatal period, addressing the relevant data to be collected in order to establish the medical and juridical cause of the neonatal damage. PMID:19757333

  2. Neonatal endotoxin exposure changes neuroendocrine, cardiovascular function and mortality during polymicrobial sepsis in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Saia, Rafael Simone; Oliveira-Pelegrin, Gabriela Ravanelli; da Silva, Maria Emília Nadaletto Bonifácio; Aguila, Fábio Alves; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Rocha, Maria José Alves; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether neonatal LPS challenge may improve hormonal, cardiovascular response and mortality, this being a beneficial adaptation when adult rats are submitted to polymicrobial sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Fourteen days after birth, pups received an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100μg/kg) or saline. After 8-12 weeks, they were submitted to CLP, decapitated 4, 6 or 24h after surgery and blood was collected for vasopressin (AVP), corticosterone and nitrate measurement, while AVP contents were measured in neurohypophysis, supra-optic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei. Moreover, rats had their mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) evaluated, and mortality and bacteremia were determined at 24h. Septic animals with neonatal LPS exposure had higher plasma AVP and corticosterone levels, and higher c-Fos expression in SON and PVN at 24h after surgery when compared to saline treated rats. The LPS pretreated group showed increased AVP content in SON and PVN at 6h, while we did not observe any change in neurohypophyseal AVP content. The nitrate levels were significantly reduced in plasma at 6 and 24h after surgery, and in both hypothalamic nuclei only at 6h. Septic animals with neonatal LPS exposure showed increase in MAP during the initial phase of sepsis, but HR was not different from the neonatal saline group. Furthermore, neonatally LPS exposed rats showed a significant decrease in mortality rate as well as in bacteremia. These data suggest that neonatal LPS challenge is able to promote beneficial effects on neuroendocrine and cardiovascular responses to polymicrobial sepsis in adulthood. PMID:21549159

  3. Neonatal Leptin Deficiency Reduces Frontal Cortex Volumes and Programs Adult Hyperactivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dexter, Benjamin C; Rahmouni, Kamal; Cushman, Taylor; Hermann, Gregory M; Ni, Charles; Nopoulos, Peg C; Thedens, Daniel L; Roghair, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction and premature delivery decrease circulating levels of the neurotrophic hormone leptin and increase the risk of adult psychiatric disease. In mouse models, neonatal leptin replacement normalizes brain growth and improves the neurodevelopmental outcomes of growth restricted mice, but leptin supplementation of well-grown mice decreases adult locomotor activity. We hypothesized isolated neonatal leptin deficiency is sufficient to reduce adult brain volumes and program behavioral outcomes, including hyperactivity. C57Bl/6 pups were randomized to daily injections of saline or PEG-leptin antagonist (LX, 12.5 mg/kg) from postnatal day 4 to 14. After 4 months, fear conditioning and open field testing were performed followed by carotid radiotelemetry for the measurement of baseline activity and blood pressure. Neonatal LX did not significantly increase cue-based fear or blood pressure, but increased adult locomotor activity during assessment in both the open field (beam breaks: control 930±40, LX 1099±42, P<0.01) and the home cage (radiotelemetry counts: control 4.5±0.3, LX 5.6±0.3, P=0.02). Follow-up MRI revealed significant reductions in adult frontal cortex volumes following neonatal LX administration (control 45.1±0.4 mm3, LX 43.8±0.4 mm3, P=0.04). This was associated with a significant increase in cerebral cortex leptin receptor mRNA expression. In conclusion, isolated neonatal leptin deficiency increases cerebral cortex leptin receptor expression and reduces frontal cortex volumes in association with increased adult locomotor activity. We speculate neonatal leptin deficiency may contribute to the adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes associated with perinatal growth restriction, and postnatal leptin therapy may be protective. PMID:24472638

  4. Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression in Developing Neonatal Skeletal Muscle: Involvement of the Nerve, Gravity, and Thyroid State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Adams, G.; Haddad, F.; Zeng, M.; Qin, A.; Qin, L.; McCue, S.; Bodell, P.

    1999-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene family encodes at least six MHC proteins (herein designated as neonatal, embryonic, slow type I (beta), and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb) that are expressed in skeletal muscle in a muscle-specific and developmentally-regulated fashion. At birth, both antigravity (e.g. soleus) and locomotor (e.g., plantaris) skeletal muscles are undifferentiated relative to the adult MHC phenotype such that the neonatal and embryonic MHC isoforms account for 80 - 90% of the MHC pool in a fast locomotor muscle; whereas, the embryonic and slow, type I isoforms account for approx. 90% of the pool in a typical antigravity muscle. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of an intact nerve, gravity and thyroid hormone (T3), as well as certain interactions of these interventions, on MHC gene expression in developing neonatal skeletal muscles of rodents.

  5. Thyroid Hormone and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Safer, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    Although thyroid hormone is one of the most potent stimulators of growth and metabolic rate, the potential to use thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology has never been subject to rigorous investigation. A number of investigators have demonstrated intriguing therapeutic potential for topical thyroid hormone. Topical T3 has accelerated wound healing and hair growth in rodents. Topical T4 has been used to treat xerosis in humans. It is clear that the use of thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology may be of large consequence and merits further study. This is a review of the literature regarding thyroid hormone action on skin along with skin manifestations of thyroid disease. The paper is intended to provide a context for recent findings of direct thyroid hormone action on cutaneous cells in vitro and in vivo which may portend the use of thyroid hormone to promote wound healing. PMID:23577275

  6. Hormonal control of implantation.

    PubMed

    Sandra, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    In mammals, implantation represents a key step of pregnancy and its progression conditions not only the success of pregnancy but health of the offspring. Implantation requires a complex and specific uterine tissue, the endometrium, whose biological functions are tightly regulated by numerous signals, including steroids and polypeptide hormones. Endometrial tissue is endowed with dynamic properties that associate its ability to control the developmental trajectory of the embryo (driver property) and its ability to react to embryos displaying distinct capacities to develop to term (sensor property). Since dynamical properties of the endometrium can be affected by pre- and post-conceptional environment, determining how maternal hormonal signals and their biological actions are affected by environmental factors (e.g. nutrition, stress, infections) is mandatory to reduce or even to prevent their detrimental effects on endometrial physiology in order to preserve the optimal functionality of this tissue. PMID:27172870

  7. Hormones in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pratap; Magon, Navneet

    2012-01-01

    The endocrinology of human pregnancy involves endocrine and metabolic changes that result from physiological alterations at the boundary between mother and fetus. Progesterone and oestrogen have a great role along with other hormones. The controversies of use of progestogen and others are discussed in this chapter. Progesterone has been shown to stimulate the secretion of Th2 and reduces the secretion of Th1 cytokines which maintains pregnancy. Supportive care in early pregnancy is associated with a significant beneficial effect on pregnancy outcome. Prophylactic hormonal supplementation can be recommended for all assisted reproduction techniques cycles. Preterm labor can be prevented by the use of progestogen. The route of administration plays an important role in the drug's safety and efficacy profile in different trimesters of pregnancy. Thyroid disorders have a great impact on pregnancy outcome and needs to be monitored and treated accordingly. Method of locating review: Pubmed, scopus PMID:23661874

  8. The wound hormone jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J.K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant tissues are highly vulnerable to injury by herbivores, pathogens, mechanical stress, and other environmental insults. Optimal plant fitness in the face of these threats relies on complex signal transduction networks that link damage-associated signals to appropriate changes in metabolism, growth, and development. Many of these wound-induced adaptive responses are triggered by de novo synthesis of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Recent studies provide evidence that JA mediates systemic wound responses through distinct cell autonomous and nonautonomous pathways. In both pathways, bioactive JAs are recognized by an F-box protein-based receptor system that couples hormone binding to ubiquitin-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins. These results provide a new framework for understanding how plants recognize and respond to tissue injury. PMID:19695649

  9. Effects of early enteral micro-feeding on neonatal serum Vitamin D levels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liang; Yin, Xiangdang; Chu, Haifeng; Zheng, Guangli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of early enteral micro-feeding on neonatal serum vitamin D levels, and to analyze the application value of glutamine. Methods: One hundred ninty neonates enrolled in intensive care unit were randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group (n=95) that were both given enteral and parenteral nutrition support. Meanwhile, the treatment group was fed formula milk containing 0.3 g/(kg·d) glutamine as enteral nutrition support for 14 days. Results: The weight of the treatment group increased significantly faster than that of the control group did (P<0.05). The treatment group had significantly higher milk amount and calorie intake than those of the control group (P<0.05), and neonates in the treatment group who reached calorie intake of 50/80/100 kcal/kg/d were significantly younger (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the treatment group was significantly less prone to feeding intolerance than the control group (P<0.05). After 14 days of feeding, the serum motilin, gastrin and vitamin D levels of both groups all increased, with significant intra-group and inter-group differences. Such levels of the treatment group significantly exceeded those of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Supplementing early enteral micro-feeding with glutamine promoted the absorption of neonatal routine nutrients and vitamin D, obviously regulated gastrointestinal hormones, and elevated weight as a result. PMID:26870119

  10. Effects of Maternally-Transferred Methylmercury on Stress Physiology in Northern Water Snake (Nerodia sipedon) Neonates.

    PubMed

    Cusaac, J Patrick W; Kremer, Victoria; Wright, Raymond; Henry, Cassandra; Otter, Ryan R; Bailey, Frank C

    2016-06-01

    Biomagnification of methylmercury in aquatic systems can cause elevated tissue mercury (Hg) and physiological stress in top predators. Mercury is known to affect stress hormone levels in mammals, birds and fish. In this study, the effects of maternally-transferred methylmercury on the stress physiology of Northern Water Snake (Nerodia sipedon) neonates were tested. Gravid females were dosed via force-fed capsules during late gestation with 0, 0.01, or 10 µg methylmercury per gram of body mass. Plasma corticosterone levels and leukocyte differentials were analyzed in baseline and confinement-stressed neonates from all dose levels. Neither Hg nor confinement stress had a significant effect on leukocyte differentials nor was Hg related to corticosterone levels. However, stress group neonates showed lower heterophil/lymphocyte ratios and this study was the first to show that neonate N. sipedon can upregulate CORT in response to stress. These results indicate that N. sipedon may be somewhat tolerant to Hg contamination. PMID:26886428

  11. Hyperplasia in glands with hormone excess.

    PubMed

    Marx, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Five syndromes share predominantly hyperplastic glands with a primary excess of hormones: neonatal severe primary hyperparathyroidism, from homozygous mutated CASR, begins severely in utero; congenital non-autoimmune thyrotoxicosis, from mutated TSHR, varies from severe with fetal onset to mild with adult onset; familial male-limited precocious puberty, from mutated LHR, expresses testosterone oversecretion in young boys; hereditary ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, from mutated FSHR, expresses symptomatic systemic vascular permeabilities during pregnancy; and familial hyperaldosteronism type IIIA, from mutated KCNJ5, presents in young children with hypertension and hypokalemia. The grouping of these five syndromes highlights predominant hyperplasia as a stable tissue endpoint and as their tissue stage for all of the hormone excess. Comparisons were made among this and two other groups of syndromes, forming a continuum of gland staging: predominant oversecretions express little or no hyperplasia; predominant hyperplasias express little or no neoplasia; and predominant neoplasias express nodules, adenomas, or cancers. Hyperplasias may progress (5 of 5) to neoplastic stages while predominant oversecretions rarely do (1 of 6; frequencies differ P<0.02). Hyperplasias do not show tumor multiplicity (0 of 5) unlike neoplasias that do (13 of 19; P<0.02). Hyperplasias express mutation of a plasma membrane-bound sensor (5 of 5), while neoplasias rarely do (3 of 14; P<0.002). In conclusion, the multiple distinguishing themes within the hyperplasias establish a robust pathophysiology. It has the shared and novel feature of mutant sensors in the plasma membrane, suggesting that these are major contributors to hyperplasia. PMID:26407873

  12. Sensory deprivation stress and supplemental stimulation in the rat pup and preterm human neonate.

    PubMed

    Schanberg, S M; Field, T M

    1987-12-01

    This article reviews the literature and presents data from our laboratories on sensory deprivation stress and supplemental stimulation of the rat pup and the preterm neonate. The data suggest that the effects of maternal deprivation in the rat pup (suppression of growth hormone release and protein synthesis) are regulated by a specific form of tactile stimulation: only brush stroking of maternally deprived rat pups returned growth parameters to normal; other forms of stimulation, including kinesthetic and vestibular stimulation, were ineffective in restoring normal functions. Other data are presented demonstrating that very small preterm neonates given tactile-kinesthetic stimulation gain more weight per day, spend more time awake and active, and show more mature habituation, orientation, motor, and range of state behaviors on the Brazelton assessment. PMID:3691193

  13. Maternal and Neonatal Care. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains the materials required to teach a course in maternal and neonatal care that will prepare students for employment as practical nurses. The course's five instructional units cover procedures for caring for the following: prenatal patients, patients in labor and delivery, postpartum patients, healthy neonates, and…

  14. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  15. Rural Hospital Preparedness for Neonatal Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukkala, Angela; Henly, Susan J.; Lindeke, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Context: Neonatal resuscitation is a critical component of perinatal services in all settings. Purpose: To systematically describe preparedness of rural hospitals for neonatal resuscitation, and to determine whether delivery volume and level of perinatal care were associated with overall preparedness or its indicators. Methods: We developed the…

  16. Neonate with hypoglycemia for pancreatectomy: Anesthetic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Alka; Kohli, Jasvinder Kaur; Senapati, Nihar Nalini; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) is rare and an important cause of hypoglycemia in neonates. It can lead to brain damage or death secondary to severe hypoglycemia. We present the anesthetic management in a diagnosed case of PHHI in an 8-day-old male neonate for total pancreatectomy. PMID:26957713

  17. Mechanisms of Neonatal Mucosal Antibody Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following an abrupt transition at birth from the sterile uterus to an environment with abundant commensal and pathogenic microbes, neonatal mammals are protected by maternal antibodies at mucosal surfaces. We show in mice that different antibody isotypes work in distinct ways to protect the neonatal...

  18. Brazelton Neonatal Assessment for School Psychologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoudt, Calvin L.

    This speech addresses the "What,""Why," and "How" of Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Training for school psychologists. "What" concerns the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale, its administration, and what it assesses. Based on the best performance, the infant's score on this scale is scored in the context of six states of consciousness…

  19. Neonatal Seizures: Impact on Neurodevelopmental Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok Kyu; Kadam, Shilpa D.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal period is the most vulnerable time for the occurrence of seizures, and neonatal seizures often pose a clinical challenge both for their acute management and frequency of associated long-term co-morbidities. Etiologies of neonatal seizures are known to play a primary role in the anti-epileptic drug responsiveness and the long-term sequelae. Recent studies have suggested that burden of acute recurrent seizures in neonates may also impact chronic outcomes independent of the etiology. However, not many studies, either clinical or pre-clinical, have addressed the long-term outcomes of neonatal seizures in an etiology-specific manner. In this review, we briefly review the available clinical and pre-clinical research for long-term outcomes following neonatal seizures. As the most frequent cause of acquired neonatal seizures, we focus on the studies evaluating long-term effects of HIE-seizures with the goal to evaluate (1) what parameters evaluated during acute stages of neonatal seizures can reliably be used to predict long-term outcomes? and (2) what available clinical and pre-clinical data are available help determine importance of etiology vs. seizure burdens in long-term sequelae. PMID:26636052

  20. Acute neonatal appendicitis in a preterm.

    PubMed

    Mammou, Sihem; Ayadi, Imen; Ben Hamida, Emira; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Acute neonatal appendicitis is very rare in the neonatal period. It is usually associated with comorbidity including prematurity. Symptoms are non-specific. The prognosis is marked by high risk of mortality and morbidity. Here, we report a case of preterm new born who presented with sepsis, apnoea, and digestive signs. The laparotomy revealed perforated appendicitis complicated with peritonitis. PMID:26712299

  1. Murine neonatal intravascular injections: Modeling newborn disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to perform murine neonatal intravascular injections likely will prove useful in studying many newborn-specific disease states that are modeled in mice. Unfortunately, effective intravascular injection in the neonatal mouse has been limited by developmental immaturity and small size. To e...

  2. Acute neonatal appendicitis in a preterm

    PubMed Central

    Mammou, Sihem; Ayadi, Imen; Hamida, Emira Ben; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Acute neonatal appendicitis is very rare in the neonatal period. It is usually associated with comorbidity including prematurity. Symptoms are non-specific. The prognosis is marked by high risk of mortality and morbidity. Here, we report a case of preterm new born who presented with sepsis, apnoea, and digestive signs. The laparotomy revealed perforated appendicitis complicated with peritonitis. PMID:26712299

  3. Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Cecile

    2006-01-01

    Foetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia (NAIT) results from maternal alloimmunisation against foetal platelet antigens inherited from the father and different from those present in the mother, and usually presents as a severe isolated thrombocytopaenia in otherwise healthy newborns. The incidence has been estimated at 1/800 to 1/1 000 live births. NAIT has been considered to be the platelet counterpart of Rh Haemolytic Disease of the Newborn (RHD). Unlike RHD, NAIT can occur during a first pregnancy. The spectrum of the disease may range from sub-clinical moderate thrombocytopaenia to life-threatening bleeding in the neonatal period. Mildly affected infants may be asymptomatic. In those with severe thrombocytopaenia, the most common presentations are petechiae, purpura or cephalohaematoma at birth, associated with major risk of intracranial haemorrhage (up to 20% of reported cases), which leads to death or neurological sequelae. Alloimmune thrombocytopaenia is more often unexpected and is usually diagnosed after birth. Once suspected, the diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of maternal antiplatelet alloantibodies directed against a paternal antigen inherited by the foetus/neonate. Post-natal management involves transfusion of platelets devoid of this antigen, and should not be delayed by biological confirmation of the diagnosis (once the diagnosis is suspected), especially in case of severe thrombocytopaenia. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to reduce the chances of death and disability due to haemorrhage. Due to the high rate of recurrence and increased severity of the foetal thrombocytopaenia in successive pregnancies, antenatal therapy should be offered. However, management of high-risk pregnancies is still a matter of discussion. PMID:17032445

  4. [Neonatal intermittent hypoxia and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Sukhova, G K; Nozdrachev, A D; Gozal, D

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive apnea during sleep is accompanied by intermittent hypoxia (IH) leading to hypertension and other cardiovascular disturbances. A comparative evaluation of long-term effects of the neonatal IH on the cardiovascular function was performed in normotensive Sprague-Dawley and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The newborn rats were placed for 30 days to conditions of IH (8 and 21% O2, alternating every 90 s for 12 h/day). Control groups of rats were constantly kept in normoxia. By 6 months, in the spontaneously hypertensive rats submitted to IH at the period of wakefulness there was a statistically significant increase (as compared with control) of the systolic (correspondingly 185.8 +/- 1.7 and 169.9 +/- 1.4 mm Hg, p < 0.01) and diastolic pressure (correspondingly 96.2 +/- 4.9 and 86.0 +/- 2.6 mm Hg, p < 0.01). During sleep, the systolic and diastolic pressure in these rats was higher than in control animals by 10 mm Hg (p < 0.01) and 12 mm Hg (p < 0.01), its decrease during sleep being absent. SHR submitted to IH had an increase in low- to the high-frequency power ratio of the heart rate variability from 0.9 +/- 0.15 to 1.5 +/- 0.17, which indicates a shift of the sympatho-parasympathetic balance in this group towards predominance of the sympathetic component. In the Sprague-Dawley rats submitted to neonatal hypoxia, the above changes were not pronounced. These peculiarities of the hypertensive rats allow establishing connection of the genetic factor with the sympathetic mechanism providing long-term consequences of the neonatal IH for the cardiovascular control in these rats. PMID:19435263

  5. Pituitary Tumors: Condition Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... stress. Growth hormone helps control body growth and metabolism. Thyroid-stimulating hormone is involved in growth, body temperature, and heart rate. Nonfunctioning pituitary tumors (also called nonsecretory tumors) do ...

  6. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding: Questions to Discuss with Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... lifestyle might help prevent cancer » What is a synthetic human genome? » See All In Case You Missed ... thyroid stimulating hormone, cortisol, prolactin, follicle stimulating hormone, testosterone) Pelvic ultrasound Pap smear Endometrial biopsy. Originally published: ...

  7. Free T4 (Thyroxine) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... function and diagnose thyroid diseases , including hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism , usually after discovering that the thyroid stimulating hormone ( ... much or too little thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism) and diagnose the cause Distinguish between different thyroid ...

  8. Early and late neonatal septicaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Placzek, M M; Whitelaw, A

    1983-01-01

    Between 1979 and 1982 we reviewed 1000 consecutive admissions to the neonatal intensive care unit of this hospital. Sixty five infants had positive blood cultures. Mortality was 70% among 17 infants who had septicaemia in the first 48 hours of life and for whom appropriate treatment may have been too late because of difficulties of early diagnosis. In the remaining 48 infants mortality was 12%, septicaemia occurred later, and was associated with Staphylococcus epidermidis (56%) and with the presence of an intravascular catheter (50%). PMID:6625634

  9. The future of neonatal BCG.

    PubMed

    Odent, Michel R

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesise that neonatal BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) might be used to adapt to a new phase in the history of human births. Among most mammals, the placenta is not effective at transferring antibodies to the fetus: antibodies are transferred immediately after birth via the colostrum. Among humans (and other mammals with hemochorial placentas) the transplacental transfer of antibodies (namely IgG) is effective. In humans, foetal concentrations of IgG sub-classes approximate to maternal concentrations at 38weeks and continue to increase thereafter. These facts explain inter-species differences regarding the basic needs of neonates. Among most mammals, the early colostrum is, strictly speaking, vital. Among humans, the main questions are about the bacteriological environment in the birthing place and how familiar it is to the mother. Today, most human beings are born in unfamiliar bacteriological environments characterized by a low microbial diversity. The effects of clinical environments may be amplified by the use of antibiotics and birth by caesarean, i.e. by-passing the bacteriologically rich perineal zone. There is already an accumulation of data confirming that the maturation of a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response is affected by the mode of delivery. There is also an accumulation of epidemiological studies detecting risk factors in the perinatal period for health conditions such as type 1 diabetes (and other autoimmune diseases), atopy, autism and obesity. In such a context there are reasons to plan randomized controlled trials with long term follow-up of the effects of BCG given immediately after birth, as a modulator of Th-1/Th-2 responses. A follow-up period in the region of 6-10years would be long enough to evaluate the prevalence of several nosologically well defined diseases. These studies would be ethically acceptable, since BCG is the only infancy vaccine that has been evaluated through randomised controlled trials with long term follow

  10. Neonatal tetanus associated with skin infection.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, M; Dungwa, N

    2016-09-01

    A 1-week-old infant was brought to a regional hospital with a history of recurrent seizures following lower abdominal septic skin infection. She was found to have neonatal tetanus, and a spatula test was positive. The tetanus infection was associated with a superficial skin infection, common in neonates. Treatment included sedatives (diazepam, chlorpromazine, phenobarbitone and morphine), muscle relaxants, antibiotics and ventilation in the neonatal intensive care unit. Intrathecal and intramuscular immunoglobulin were given, and the wound was treated. The infant recovered, with no seizures by the 16th day from admission, and was off the ventilator by the 18th day. This was shorter than the usual 3 - 4 weeks for neonates with tetanus at the hospital. The question arises whether tetanus immunisation should be considered in infants with skin infections, which frequently occur in the neonatal period. PMID:27601113

  11. Stem Cells for Neonatal Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ahn, So Yoon; Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Won Soon

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in neonatal intensive care medicine, neonatal brain injury resulting from intraventricular hemorrhage or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy remains a major cause of neonatal mortality and neurologic morbidities in survivors. Several studies have indicated that stem cell therapy is a promising novel therapy for neonatal brain injury resulting from these disorders. This review summarizes recent advances in stem cell research for treating neonatal brain injury due to intraventricular hemorrhage or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with a particular focus on preclinical data, covering important issues for clinical translation such as optimal cell type, route, dose and timing of stem cell therapy, and translation of these preclinical results into a clinical trial. PMID:27251746

  12. Neonatal stress affects the aging trajectory of female rats on the endocrine, temperature, and ventilatory responses to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Sébastien; Gulemetova, Roumiana; Baldy, Cécile; Joseph, Vincent; Kinkead, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Human and animal studies on sleep-disordered breathing and respiratory regulation show that the effects of sex hormones are heterogeneous. Because neonatal stress results in sex-specific disruption of the respiratory control in adult rats, we postulate that it might affect respiratory control modulation induced by ovarian steroids in female rats. The hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) of adult female rats exposed to neonatal maternal separation (NMS) is ∼30% smaller than controls (24), but consequences of NMS on respiratory control in aging female rats are unknown. To address this issue, whole body plethysmography was used to evaluate the impact of NMS on the HVR (12% O2, 20 min) of middle-aged (MA; ∼57 wk old) female rats. Pups subjected to NMS were placed in an incubator 3 h/day for 10 consecutive days (P3 to P12). Controls were undisturbed. To determine whether the effects were related to sexual hormone decline or aging per se, experiments were repeated on bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX) young (∼12 wk old) adult female rats. OVX and MA both reduced the HVR significantly in control rats but had little effect on the HVR of NMS females. OVX (but not aging) reduced the anapyrexic response in both control and NMS animals. These results show that hormonal decline decreases the HVR of control animals, while leaving that of NMS female animals unaffected. This suggests that neonatal stress alters the interaction between sex hormone regulation and the development of body temperature, hormonal, and ventilatory responses to hypoxia. PMID:25652536

  13. Evidence of associations between feto-maternal vitamin D status, cord parathyroid hormone and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, and newborn whole body bone mineral content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of a high prevalence of vitamin D inadequacy in pregnant women and neonates, relationships among vitamin D status [25(OH)D], parathyroid hormone (PTH), bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP), and whole body bone mineral content (WBBMC) in the newborn are poorly characterized. The purpose...

  14. Parathyroid Hormone Signaling via Gαs Is Selectively Inhibited by an NH2-Terminally Truncated Gαs: Implications for Pseudohypoparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Puzhko, Svetlana; Goodyer, Cynthia Gates; Kerachian, Mohammad Amin; Canaff, Lucie; Misra, Madhusmita; Jüppner, Harald; Bastepe, Murat; Hendy, Geoffrey N

    2013-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroid patients have resistance predominantly to parathyroid hormone (PTH), and here we have examined the ability of an alternative Gαs-related protein to inhibit Gαs activity in a hormone-selective manner. We tested whether the G/VAS exon A/B-derived NH2-terminally truncated (Tr) αs protein alters stimulation of adenylate cyclase by the PTH receptor (PTHR1), the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TSHR), the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), or the AVP receptor (V2R). HEK293 cells cotransfected with receptor and full-length (FL) Gαs±Tr ±s protein expression vectors were stimulated with agonists (PTH [10−7 to 10−9 M], TSH [1 to 100 mU], isoproterenol [10−6 to 10−8M], or AVP [10−6 to 10−8M]). Following PTH stimulation, HEK293 cells cotransfected with PTHR1 + FL Gαs + Tr αs had a significantly lower cAMP response than those transfected with only PTHR1 + FL Gαs. Tr αs also exerted an inhibitory effect on the cAMP levels stimulated by TSH via the TSHR but had little or no effect on isoproterenol or AVP acting via β2AR or V2R, respectively. These differences mimic the spectrum of hormone resistance in pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP-1a) and type 1b (PHP-1b) patients. In opossum kidney (OK) cells, endogenously expressing the PTHR1 and β2AR, the exogenous expression of Tr αs at a level similar to endogenous FL Gαs resulted in blunting of the cAMP response to PTH, whereas that to isoproterenol was unaltered. A pseudopseudohypoparathyroid patient with Albright hereditary osteodystrophy harbored a de novo paternally inherited M1l Gαs mutation. Similar maternally inherited mutations at the initiation codon have been identified previously in PHP-1a patients. The M1l αs mutant (lacking the first 59 amino acids of Gαs) blunted the increase in cAMP levels stimulated via the PTHR1 in both HEK293 and OK cells similar to the Tr αs protein. Thus NH2-terminally truncated forms of Gαs may contribute to the pathogenesis of

  15. Twenty-four hour hormone profiles of TSH, Free T3 and free T4 in hypothyroid patients on combined T3/T4 therapy.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, P; Siddique, H; Simmons, D J; Greenwood, R; Dayan, C M

    2007-04-01

    The benefits of using thyroxine (T4) plus triiodothyronine (T3) in combination in thyroid hormone replacement are unproven but many individuals continue to be treated with this regime. When T3 is used alone for hypothyroidism, it results in wide fluctuations of thyroid hormone levels. However, only limited data exists on combined T3/T4 therapy. In this study, we have compared 24-hour profiles of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free T4 (fT4) and free T3 (fT3) and cardiovascular parameters in 10 hypothyroid patients who had been on once daily combined T3/T4 therapy for more than 3 months with 10 patients on T4 alone. Twenty patients, who were part of a larger study, investigating the long-term benefits of combined T3/T4 therapy, were recruited into this sub-study. Over 24-hours, 12 samples were taken for thyroid hormones. Their 24-hour pulse and BP is also monitored on a separate occasion. On T4 alone, a modest 16% rise in fT4 with no change in fT3 was seen in the first 4-hours post-dose. In contrast, on combined treatment, fT3 levels showed a marked rise of 42% within the first 4-hours post-dose (T3/T4:T4=6.24: 4.63 mU/L, p<0.001). Mean exposure to fT3 calculated by area under the curve (AUC) was higher (T3/T4:T4=1148:1062, p<0.0001) on T3. Circadian rhythm of TSH was maintained on both treatments. No difference in pulse or blood pressure over the 24-hours was seen between the groups. Our data suggests that despite chronic combined T3/T4 therapy, wide peak-to-trough variation in fT3 levels persists. Although no immediate cardiovascular effects were seen, the long-term consequences for patients on combined therapy are unknown. PMID:17479444

  16. Naloxone does not Affect the Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone-Induced Inhibition of Luteinizing Hormone Secretion in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Naylor, A M; Porter, D W; Lincoln, D W

    1989-06-01

    Abstract Injection of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (21 pmol) into the third cerebral ventricle of long-term ovariectomized ewes caused a marked inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion. Mean luteinizing hormone levels and luteinizing hormone pulse frequency were reduced significantly when compared with the control responses to saline (50 mul). A notable characteristic of the response was the delayed and sustained nature of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-induced inhibition. In the presence of the opioid antagonist naloxone (4 +/- 25 mg iv), the central administration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone still produced a marked inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion. Again, mean luteinizing hormone levels and luteinizing hormone pulse frequency were reduced significantly. When naloxone was injected iv, there was a significant rise in mean luteinizing hormone levels as a consequence of an increase in pulse frequency (in four out of five ewes) and a significant increase in luteinizing hormone pulse amplitude. In conclusion, these data suggest that central opioid pathways sensitive to blockade by naloxone are not involved in the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-induced inhibition of luteinizing hormone release. Furthermore, in the long-term ovariectomized ewe, endogenous opioid peptides exert a tonic inhibitory influence on luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone/luteinizing hormone secretion. PMID:19210459

  17. Hormonal contraception and lactation.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, J J

    1996-12-01

    Hormonal contraceptive measures can be used immediately postpartum if the patient so desires. Progestin-only contraceptives are preferable to estrogen-containing methods if initiated during the first six months after delivery. Progestin only contraceptives do not appear to affect milk volume, composition, or to cause deleterious effects in the infant. Ideally for women who desire a form of contraception in addition to lactation-induced amenorrhea, progestin-only methods should be started at six weeks postpartum if the woman is fully breastfeeding. Since contraception protection is provided by lactation amenorrhea, the six week delay will decrease infant exposure to exogenous hormones and decrease the incidence of irregular postpartum bleeding. Milk volume may decrease with the use of estrogen; however, no detrimental effects have been shown on infant growth or development. For women who are planning to gradually wean their infant, use of COCs may provide an easier transition to bottle-feeding. COCs should be used with caution by women who are not able to obtain supplemental milk. A decrease in milk volume can lead to earlier discontinuation of the hormonal contraceptive in an attempt to increase milk quantity. Supplementation is often needed, and then the woman ovulates again, possibly resulting in an unintended pregnancy. Many women are motivated immediately postpartum to accept contraception. For other women, lack of access to health care may provide barriers in obtaining adequate contraception later. In either case, there are adequate data to show no detriments of starting progestin-only contraceptives within days of delivery. Therefore, the best method for the patient should be employed to ensure adequate contraception while preserving optimal lactation. PMID:9025449

  18. The growth hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Waters, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Once thought to be present only in liver, muscle and adipose tissue, the GH receptor is now known to be ubiquitously distributed, in accord with the many pleiotropic actions of GH. These include the regulation of metabolism, postnatal growth, cognition, immune, cardiac and renal systems and gut function. GH exerts these actions primarily through alterations in gene expression, initiated by activation of its membrane receptor and the resultant activation of the associated JAK2 (Janus kinase 2) and Src family kinases. Receptor activation involves hormone initiated movements within a receptor homodimer, rather than simple receptor dimerization. We have shown that binding of the hormone realigns the orientation of the two receptors both by relative rotation and by closer apposition just above the cell membrane. This is a consequence of the asymmetric placement of the binding sites on the hormone. Binding results in a conversion of parallel receptor transmembrane domains into a rotated crossover orientation, which produces separation of the lower part of the transmembrane helices. Because the JAK2 is bound to the Box1 motif proximal to the inner membrane, receptor activation results in separation of the two associated JAK2s, and in particular the removal of the inhibitory pseudokinase domain from the kinase domain of the other JAK2 (and vice versa). This brings the two kinase domains into position for trans-activation and initiates tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor cytoplasmic domain and other substrates such as STAT5, the key transcription factor mediating most genomic actions of GH. There are a limited number of genomic actions initiated by the Src kinase family member which also associates with the upper cytoplasmic domain of the receptor, including important immune regulatory actions to dampen exuberant innate immune activation of cells involved in transplant rejection. These findings offer insights for developing specific receptor antagonists which may be

  19. Clinical and hormonal status of infants with nonmosaic XXY karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Lahlou, Najiba; Fennoy, Ilene; Ross, Judith L; Bouvattier, Claire; Roger, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Aim To compare our recent findings in a cohort of 77 nonmosaic XXY infants <2 years of age with clinical and biological features already reported. Results The majority of reported XXY neonates had normal external genitalia. Only undescended testes and/or micropenis were identified reasons for referral. Delayed ambulation and speech skills were also indications for postnatally karyotyping. All subjects from our cohort (73 prenatally detected subjects, five postnatal diagnoses) had height and weight within the normal range, and were not dysmorphic. Insulin-like-peptide-3 and testosterone secretion by Leydig cells appeared normally sensitive to luteinizing hormone. In reported studies, inhibin B levels were within normal range, anti-Mullerian hormone levels were normal or high and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were significantly higher than control values, data consistent with a relative resistance to FSH. Conclusion Early detection of Klinefelter syndrome is desirable for prospectively monitoring the apparition of developmental problems and the progressive decline in the tubular function of the testis, with the hope of designing future conservative interventions before germ cell degeneration is completed. PMID:21429009

  20. Arrhythmias presenting in neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Brucato, A; Previtali, E; Ramoni, V; Ghidoni, S

    2010-09-01

    Perfusion of human foetal heart with anti-Ro/SSA antibodies induces transient heart block. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies may cross-react with T- and L-type calcium channels, and anti-p200 antibodies may cause calcium to accumulate in rat heart cells. These actions may explain a direct electrophysiological effect of these antibodies. Congenital complete heart block is the more severe manifestation of so-called "Neonatal Lupus". In clinical practice, it is important to distinguish in utero complete versus incomplete atrioventricular (AV) block, as complete AV block to date is irreversible, while incomplete AV block has been shown to be potentially reversible after fluorinated steroid therapy. Another issue is the definition of congenital AV block, as cardiologists have considered congenital blocks detected months or years after birth. We propose as congenital blocks detected in utero or within the neonatal period (0-27 days after birth). The possible detection of first degree AV block in utero, with different techniques, might be a promising tool to assess the effects of these antibodies. Other arrhythmias have been described in NL or have been linked to anti-Ro/SSA antibodies: first degree AV block, in utero and after birth, second degree (i.e. incomplete block), sinus bradycardia and QT prolongation, both in infants and in adults, ventricular arrhythmias (in adults). Overall, these arrhythmias have not a clinical relevance, but are important for research purposes. PMID:20696016