Science.gov

Sample records for neoplasia polmonare con

  1. Neoplasia: The Second Decade

    PubMed Central

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2008-01-01

    This issue marks the end of the 10-year anniversary of Neoplasia where we have seen exciting growth in both number of submitted and published articles in Neoplasia. Neoplasia was first published in 1999. During the past 10 years, Neoplasia has dynamically adapted to the needs of the cancer research community as technologies have advanced. Neoplasia is currently providing access to articles through PubMed Central to continue to facilitate rapid broad-based dissemination of published findings to the scientific community through an Open Access model. This has in part helped Neoplasia to achieve an improved impact factor this past year, demonstrating that the manuscripts published by Neoplasia are of great interest to the overall cancer research community. This past year, Neoplasia received a record number of articles for review and has had a 21% increase in the number of published articles. PMID:19048110

  2. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-01-24

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  3. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) is a term used to describe a group of hereditary carcinoma syndromes. Patients carrying a characteristic autosomal dominant gene aberration exhibit various endocrine carcinomas, as well as other anatomical abnormalities. Unfortunately, familial endocrine carcinoma patients are too often unrecognized by primary care providers, resulting in delayed diagnosis and treatment, with profound consequences related to morbidity and mortality. This article will introduce the various MEN syndromes and the infusion nurse's role in the care of these individuals and their families. PMID:26536410

  4. CNP. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, T.

    1995-05-17

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  5. Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Preti, Mario; Scurry, James; Marchitelli, Claudia E; Micheletti, Leonardo

    2014-10-01

    Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) is a high-grade intraepithelial squamous lesion and precursor of invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The 2004 International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Disease (ISSVD) classification distinguished two types of VIN: usual type (human papillomavirus (HPV)-related) and differentiated type (not HPV-related). The incidence of usual-type VIN is higher in younger women, while differentiated-type VIN is more common in older patients with chronic dermatologic conditions. Differentiated-type VIN has a greater invasive potential and shorter time between diagnosis and SCC than usual-type VIN. The diagnosis of VIN is carried out by identifying a lesion by visual inspection and confirming by performing a biopsy. Screening tests are not available. Patients with usual-type VIN are at a higher risk of developing another HPV-related malignancy of the anogenital tract; therefore, examination from the cervix to the perianal area is mandatory. The therapeutic approach to VIN balances the invasive potential with the need to be as conservative as possible. Current prophylactic HPV vaccines offer protection against usual-type VIN and related invasive carcinoma. PMID:25106700

  6. [Laryngeal intraepithelial neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Eckel, H E; Raunik, W; Rogatsch, H

    2008-06-01

    Precancer (carcinoma in situ) or laryngeal intraepithelial neoplasia (LIN) is a non-invasive lesion that has genetic abnormalities, loss of cellular control functions, and some phenotypic characteristics of invasive cancer and that predicts for a substantial likelihood of developing invasive cancer. Several classifications have been proposed but none has received a total agreement. With regard to diagnosis, treatment and prognosis, these lesions differ substantially from infiltrating carcinoma. Known risk factors include cigarette smoking, viral infection with subtypes of the human papilloma virus, exposure to asbestos, and probably the gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. The diagnostic work-up usually includes indirect laryngoscopy with rigid telescopes, microlaryngoscopy and biopsies for histological evaluation. Therapeutic options include wait-and-see-strategies, radiotherapy, transoral laser surgery, vocal cord stripping with cold instruments, and open partial laryngectomy. Data from the literature suggest highest local control rate with radiotherapy as initial treatment compared to other standard methods of management of dysplasia. However, transoral laser surgery can be applied repeatedly and yields excellent final results. Therefore it is now considered the treatment of choice for these lesions in the majority of patients. Local recurrences are observed more frequently than with small infiltrative carcinoma, and second primaries may arise within the upper aero-digestive tract following initial treatment. Therefore systematic follow-up is recommended for these patients. PMID:18506655

  7. Neoplasia: An Anniversary of Progress

    PubMed Central

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2007-01-01

    This issue marks the 10th year anniversary of Neoplasia where we have seen exciting growth on the impact that Neoplasia has had on cancer research worldwide. Neoplasia was founded in 1999 at which time manuscripts were accepted through e-mail. In 2000, Neoplasia became the first journal to offer web-based online manuscript submission and peer-review using a custom-designed application JournalSoft. Now, the use of web-based manuscript processing has become an industry standard as it provides authors with a rapid and useful dialog exchange for improving the quality of the science and the overall speed of the review process. Moreover, during the past 10 years, the Internet has experienced a massive growth of a complex global grid of now over an estimated 1.2 billion Internet users which have resulted in a major shift in the medium of scientific communication for scholarly publishing. Neoplasia continues to evolve with the technology and has implemented a rapid time-to-publication schedule to continue dissemination of published cancer research findings quickly to the scientific community.

  8. Animal models of pituitary neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lines, K.E.; Stevenson, M.; Thakker, R.V.

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary neoplasias can occur as part of a complex inherited disorder, or more commonly as sporadic (non-familial) disease. Studies of the molecular and genetic mechanisms causing such pituitary tumours have identified dysregulation of >35 genes, with many revealed by studies in mice, rats and zebrafish. Strategies used to generate these animal models have included gene knockout, gene knockin and transgenic over-expression, as well as chemical mutagenesis and drug induction. These animal models provide an important resource for investigation of tissue-specific tumourigenic mechanisms, and evaluations of novel therapies, illustrated by studies into multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), a hereditary syndrome in which ∼30% of patients develop pituitary adenomas. This review describes animal models of pituitary neoplasia that have been generated, together with some recent advances in gene editing technologies, and an illustration of the use of the Men1 mouse as a pre clinical model for evaluating novel therapies. PMID:26320859

  9. Animal models of pituitary neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Lines, K E; Stevenson, M; Thakker, R V

    2016-02-01

    Pituitary neoplasias can occur as part of a complex inherited disorder, or more commonly as sporadic (non-familial) disease. Studies of the molecular and genetic mechanisms causing such pituitary tumours have identified dysregulation of >35 genes, with many revealed by studies in mice, rats and zebrafish. Strategies used to generate these animal models have included gene knockout, gene knockin and transgenic over-expression, as well as chemical mutagenesis and drug induction. These animal models provide an important resource for investigation of tissue-specific tumourigenic mechanisms, and evaluations of novel therapies, illustrated by studies into multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), a hereditary syndrome in which ∼30% of patients develop pituitary adenomas. This review describes animal models of pituitary neoplasia that have been generated, together with some recent advances in gene editing technologies, and an illustration of the use of the Men1 mouse as a pre clinical model for evaluating novel therapies. PMID:26320859

  10. Intrathoracic neoplasia: Epidemiology and etiology

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1992-05-01

    Neoplasms of the thorax encompass those derived from the thoracic wall, trachea, mediastinum, lungs and pleura. They represent a wide variety of lesions including benign and malignant tumors arising from many tissues. The large surface area, 60 to 90 m{sup 2} in man, represented by the respiratory epithelium and associated thoracic structures are ideal targets for carcinogens carried by inspired air. The topic of discussion in this report is the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in animals and man. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms.

  11. Surgery for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Hirsch, Pierre PL; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O; Keep, Sarah L

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is the most common pre-malignant lesion. Atypical squamous changes occur in the transformation zone of the cervix with mild, moderate or severe changes described by their depth (CIN 1, 2 or 3). Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia is treated by local ablation or lower morbidity excision techniques. Choice of treatment depends on the grade and extent of the disease. Objectives To assess the effectiveness and safety of alternative surgical treatments for CIN. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE and EMBASE (up to April 2009). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings and reference lists of included studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of alternative surgical treatments in women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risks of bias. Risk ratios that compared residual disease after the follow-up examination and adverse events in women who received one of either laser ablation, laser conisation, large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ), knife conisation or cryotherapy were pooled in random-effects model meta-analyses. Main results Twenty-nine trials were included. Seven surgical techniques were tested in various comparisons. No significant differences in treatment failures were demonstrated in terms of persistent disease after treatment. Large loop excision of the transformation zone appeared to provide the most reliable specimens for histology with the least morbidity. Morbidity was lower than with laser conisation, although the trials did not provide data for every outcome measure. There were not enough data to assess the effect on morbidity when compared with laser ablation. Authors’ conclusions The evidence suggests that there is no obvious superior surgical technique for treating cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in terms of treatment failures or operative morbidity. PMID:20556751

  12. Canine histiocytic neoplasia: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Fulmer, Amanda K.; Mauldin, Glenna E.

    2007-01-01

    Canine histiocytic neoplasms include cutaneous histiocytoma, as well as localized and disseminated histiocytic sarcoma. These tumors have variable biologic behavior, although the malignant disorders often have a poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry plays an essential role in differentiating histiocytic tumors from other neoplasias that may have similar histological appearances. This allows a definitive diagnosis to be established and provides a more accurate prediction of prognosis. This article reviews the biologic behavior, diagnosis, and treatment of histiocytic tumors in the dog. PMID:17987966

  13. Marine mammal neoplasia: a review.

    PubMed

    Newman, S J; Smith, S A

    2006-11-01

    A review of the published literature indicates that marine mammal neoplasia includes the types and distributions of tumors seen in domestic species. A routine collection of samples from marine mammal species is hampered, and, hence, the literature is principally composed of reports from early whaling expeditions, captive zoo mammals, and epizootics that affect larger numbers of animals from a specific geographic location. The latter instances are most important, because many of these long-lived, free-ranging marine mammals may act as environmental sentinels for the health of the oceans. Examination of large numbers of mortalities reveals incidental proliferative and neoplastic conditions and, less commonly, identifies specific malignant cancers that can alter population dynamics. The best example of these is the presumptive herpesvirus-associated metastatic genital carcinomas found in California sea lions. Studies of tissues from St. Lawrence estuary beluga whales have demonstrated a high incidence of neoplasia and produced evidence that environmental contamination with high levels of polychlorinated biphenols and dichlorophenyl trichloroethane might be the cause. In addition, viruses are suspected to be the cause of gastric papillomas in belugas and cutaneous papillomas in Florida manatees and harbor porpoises. While experimental laboratory procedures can further elucidate mechanisms of neoplasia, continued pathologic examination of marine mammals will also be necessary to follow trends in wild populations. PMID:17099143

  14. New concepts in neoplasia as applied to diagnostic pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Fenoglio-Preiser, C.M.; Weinstein, R.S.; Kaufman, N.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections. Some of the titles are: Cellular Aspects of Neoplasia; Oncogenes and Cancer; Chromosome and Oncogene Rearrangements in Leukemia and Lymphoma; Ionizing Radiation and Neoplasia; and Papillomaviruses and Neoplasia in Man.

  15. Emerging Entities in Renal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Rohit; Smith, Steven C; Divatia, Mukul; Amin, Mahul B

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews emerging entities in renal epithelial neoplasia, including tubulocystic carcinoma, clear-cell-papillary renal cell carcinoma (RCC), thyroid-like follicular RCC, ALK-related RCC, translocation RCC, acquired cystic disease-related RCC, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, and hereditary leiomyomatosis-RCC syndrome-associated RCC. Many of these rarer subtypes of RCC were recently studied in more depth and are included in the upcoming version of the World Health Organization classification of tumors. Emphasis is placed on common gross and morphologic features, differential diagnoses, use of ancillary studies for making accurate diagnoses, molecular alterations, and predicted biologic behavior based on previous studies. PMID:26612218

  16. Colorectal Neoplasia and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Jamie

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal neoplasia. Ulcerative colitis increases the risk of colorectal cancer, and patients with this condition should undergo routine colonoscopic surveillance to detect neoplasia. Crohn's disease increases the risk of malignancy in inflamed segments of bowel, which may include small bowel, colon, rectum, and anus. PMID:26596926

  17. Dietary fibre and colonic neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, H J

    1979-01-01

    Dietary plant fibre, or plantix, is thought to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of colon cancer in humans. It is a complex polymeric substance that has several distinct components resistant to hydrolysis by the digestive enzymes of humans. These components include cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, lignin, gums, mucilages and, in certain instances, algal polysaccharides. These polymers have different physicochemical properties, and recent evidence from experimental studies in animals treated with carcinogens suggests that some may exert protective effects in the intestine and others may enhance colon carcinogenesis. This review synthesizes information on the chemical composition, methods of analysis and physicochemical properties of dietary plant fibre and reviews available studies examining the role of fibre in colonic neoplasia in animals and humans. PMID:466603

  18. Oral contraceptives and cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Brinton, L A

    1991-06-01

    Although initial studies examining the relationship of oral contraceptives to risk of cervical neoplasia were reassuring, more recent studies provide some evidence of a positive relationship, particularly for long-term usage. Results, however, are difficult to interpret, because of a variety of methodologic complexities, including potential sources of confounding and bias. Sexual behavior and Pap smear screening have been identified as important confounders, but in several well-controlled studies residual excess risks of nearly 2-fold persist for users of 5 or more years. A possible promotional effect of oral contraceptives is suggested by higher risks associated with recent usage. There also is some suggestion of a stronger effect for adenocarcinomas than for squamous cell tumors. A relationship is biologically possible, given findings of hormone receptors in cervical tissue and the fact that oral contraceptives have been found to induce cervical hyperplasia. In addition, oral contraceptives may induce proliferation of the human papillomaviruses, the leading suspect agent for cervical cancer. Although a number of lines of evidence support a relationship of oral contraceptives to cervical cancer risk, firm conclusions await the results of additional studies that specifically address some of the methodologic shortcomings of previous investigations. In particular, additional follow-up studies are needed to define the effect of oral contraceptives on the natural history of cervical lesions. PMID:1868734

  19. [Multiple endocrine neoplasia: genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Calender, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and type 2 (MEN2) are major genetic disorders carrying a high risk of endocrine tumor development. The mutated genes were identified in 1993 (MEN2-RET) and 1997 (MEN1), enabling genetic testing and functional studies. Genetic analysis has led to new clinical and therapeutic strategies for MEN1/2 patients, and has improved our understanding of the pathways underlying the development of such tumors, which occur in an autosomal dominant manner and with high penetrance. The MEN1 gene encodes menin, a protein involved in many cell functions, such as transcription, genome stability, cell cycling and apoptosis. The MEN1 gene has 10 exons, and its exhaustive analysis in MEN1 patients helps guide their management. MEN2 is related to activating missense mutations in the RET protooncogene, which encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR). RET activation occurs upon autodimerization induced by the binding of specific ligands belonging to glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor-like family (GFL) proteins, regulated by coreceptors. The position of missense mutations--in the extracellular or intracellular TK domains--influences the aggressiveness of the most frequent malignancy, medullary thyroid carcinoma, establishing a genotype-phenotype correlation. We also briefly describe the genetic basis of three other inherited states predisposing individuals to endocrine tumors, namely Carney's syndrome, hyperparathyroidism type 2 (HRPT2) and familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA), which are related to inactivating mutations in the PRKAR1-alpha, HRPT2 and AIP genes, respectively. PMID:20669561

  20. Fluorescence detection of esophageal neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    White-light endoscopy is well-established and wide used modality. However, despite the many technological advances that have been occurred, conventional endoscopy is suboptimal and usually detects advanced stage lesions. The limitations of standard endoscopy initiate development of spectroscopic techniques, additional to standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most sensitive approaches is fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal mucosa for neoplasia detection. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20 mg/kg weight. Excitation source has max of emission at 405 nm and light is delivered by the standard light guide of the endoscopic equipment. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to reabsorption of blood. The lack of fluorescence peaks in the red spectral area for normal mucosa is an indication for selective accumulation of 5-ALA/PpIX only in abnormal sites Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  1. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1.

    PubMed

    Marini, Francesca; Falchetti, Alberto; Del Monte, Francesca; Carbonell Sala, Silvia; Gozzini, Alessia; Luzi, Ettore; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2006-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndrome presented mostly by tumours of the parathyroids, endocrine pancreas and anterior pituitary, and characterised by a very high penetrance and an equal sex distribution. It occurs in approximately one in 30,000 individuals. Two different forms, sporadic and familial, have been described. The sporadic form presents with two of the three principal MEN1-related endocrine tumours (parathyroid adenomas, entero-pancreatic tumours and pituitary tumours) within a single patient, while the familial form consists of a MEN1 case with at least one first degree relative showing one of the endocrine characterising tumours. Other endocrine and non-endocrine lesions, such as adrenal cortical tumours, carcinoids of the bronchi, gastrointestinal tract and thymus, lipomas, angiofibromas, collagenomas have been described. The responsible gene, MEN1, maps on chromosome 11q13 and encodes a 610 aminoacid nuclear protein, menin, with no sequence homology to other known human proteins. MEN1 syndrome is caused by inactivating mutations of the MEN1 tumour suppressor gene. This gene is probably involved in the regulation of several cell functions such as DNA replication and repair and transcriptional machinery. The combination of clinical and genetic investigations, together with the improving of molecular genetics knowledge of the syndrome, helps in the clinical management of patients. Treatment consists of surgery and/or drug therapy, often in association with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Currently, DNA testing allows the early identification of germline mutations in asymptomatic gene carriers, to whom routine surveillance (regular biochemical and/or radiological screenings to detect the development of MEN1-associated tumours and lesions) is recommended. PMID:17014705

  2. Trophoblastic Neoplasia in an African Urban Population

    PubMed Central

    Agboola, Akin

    1979-01-01

    A clinical study of trophoblastic neoplasia in a Nigerian population in Lagos over a four-year period is reported. A high incidence of one in 379 deliveries for benign trophoblastic tumor and one in 846 deliveries for malignant tumor was found. Seventeen percent of benign trophoblastic tumors in this series progressed to the malignant type, but malignant trophoblastic tumor was preceded by the benign type (hydatidiform mole) in 46 percent of cases. The anterior vaginal wall is a common site for metastases of malignant trophoblastic neoplasia and, in one patient, the lesion progressed further to form a vesicovaginal fistula. While the management of benign disease was conservative, all cases of malignant trophoblastic neoplasia received chemotherapy. PMID:231687

  3. Vulvar Intraepithelial Neoplasia (VIN) and Condylomata.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erin L; Bogliatto, Fabrizio; Stockdale, Colleen K

    2015-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of the lower genital tract is common and its effects are variable. The majority of infections are transient and the related pathology is self-resolving. Condyloma accuminatum is caused predominantly by HPV 6, 11 and can be managed with medical or surgical therapy. Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia is a treatable precursor to vulvar cancer with 2 main forms: one related to HPV and the other to chronic vulvar inflammatory conditions. It may be treated medically, surgically, or potentially via the use of therapeutic HPV vaccines. Preventive utilization of a quadrivalent HPV vaccine has the potential to decrease HPV-related lower genital disease burden substantially. PMID:26133495

  4. Aetiology, pathogenesis, and pathology of cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Arends, M J; Buckley, C H; Wells, M

    1998-01-01

    Early epidemiological studies of cervical neoplasia suggested a causal relation with sexual activity and human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have emerged as prime suspects as venerally transmitted carcinogens. HPVs fall into two broad camps: low risk types, associated with cervical condylomas and CIN 1; and high risk types (mostly 16 and 18), found in 50-80% of CIN 2 and CIN 3 lesions, and 90% of cancers. This association with cancer is very strong, with odds ratios of > 15 (often much higher) in case-control studies that are methodologically sound. An infrequently detected third group of intermediate risk type HPVs is associated with all grades of CIN and occasionally with cancers. HPVs have also been detected in a wide range of asymptomatic controls, indicating that other events are required for development of neoplasia such as viral persistence and/or altered expression of viral genes, often following integration of the viral genome. This leaves the two major viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, directly coupled to viral enhancers and promoters, allowing their continued expression after integration. High risk HPV E7 proteins bind and inactivate the Rb protein, whereas E6 proteins bind p53 and direct its rapid degradation. A range of putative cofactors has been implicated in progression: HLA type, immunosuppression, sex steroid hormones, and smoking; most of these cofactors appear to influence progression to CIN 3. The natural history includes progression to CIN 3 in 10% of CIN 1 and 20% of CIN 2 cases, whereas at least 12% of CIN 3 cases progress to invasive carcinoma. Cervical glandular intraepithelial neoplasia (CGIN) often coexists with squamous CIN, and the premalignant potential of high grade CGIN is not in doubt, but the natural history of low grade CGIN remains uncertain. A high proportion of CGIN lesions and adenocarcinomas are HPV positive, and HPV18 has been implicated more in glandular than in squamous lesions. A strong clinical case for the application of HPV typing of cells recovered from cervical scrapes can be made; however, a rigorous cost-benefit analysis of introducing HPV typing into the cervical screening programme is required. Prophylactic and therapeutic HPV vaccines are under development. This article reviews the aetiology, pathogenesis, and pathology of cervical neoplasia, emphasising the role of HPVs. PMID:9602680

  5. Neurofibromatosis type I: spinal neoplasia without symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Sheffali; Leekha, Surbhi; Gupta, Arun K; Kalra, Veena

    2004-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis1 (NF-1) or von Recklinghausen disease is the most common of the neurocutaneous syndromes. It is characterized by presence of hamartomas in multiple organs. Inheritance is autosomal dominant but spontaneous mutations are seen in half the cases. The authors are reporting a classical case of this syndrome with spinal neoplasia which was interestingly asymptomatic. Authorities seem to agree that because the risk of developing intradural disease is significant in patients with NF-1, a routine MRI of the entire spine should be obtained. PMID:15448395

  6. Cyclin D1 and human neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Donnellan, R; Chetty, R

    1998-01-01

    Neoplasia is characterised by abnormal regulation of the cell cycle. Cyclin D1 is a protein derived from the PRAD1, CCND1 or bcl-1 gene on chromosome 11q13, which is involved in both normal regulation of the cell cycle and neoplasia. In the G1 (resting) phase of the cell cycle, cyclin D1 together with its cyclin dependent kinase (cdk) partner, is responsible for transition to the S (DNA synthesis) phase by phosphorylating the product of the retinoblastoma gene (pRB), which then releases transcription factors important in the initiation of DNA replication. Amplification of the CCND1 gene or overexpression of the cyclin D1 protein releases a cell from its normal controls and causes transformation to a malignant phenotype. Analysis of these changes provides important diagnostic information in mantle cell (and related) lymphomas, and is of prognostic value in many cancers. Knowledge of cyclin D1's role in malignancy at the various sites, provides a basis on which future treatment directed against this molecule can proceed. PMID:9624412

  7. Spontaneous neoplasia in four captive greater hedgehog tenrecs (Setifer setosus).

    PubMed

    Khoii, Mina K; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Burns, Roy B; Carmichael, K Paige; Gyimesi, Zoltan S

    2008-09-01

    Little information is available about diseases and pathology of species within the family Tenrecidae, including the greater hedgehog tenrec (Setifer setosus), a Madagascan insectivore. This report summarizes necropsy and histopathologic findings of neoplasia in four captive greater hedgehog tenrecs. Although only four animals are included in this report, neoplasia seems to be a common and significant source of morbidity and mortality in greater hedgehog tenrecs. Types of neoplasia identified include a thyroid follicular-solid carcinoma, two urinary bladder transitional cell carcinomas, uterine endometrial polyps, and multicentric B-cell lymphoma. Due to small sample size, no etiology could be determined, but genetics, viral infection, pesticide treatment, nutrition, or other environmental factors might contribute to the development of neoplasia in this species. This is the first report of neoplasia in greater hedgehog tenrecs. PMID:18817002

  8. The evolving classification of renal cell neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R

    2015-03-01

    The classification of renal cell neoplasia is morphologically based; however, this has evolved over the last 35 years with the incorporation of genetic characteristics into the diagnostic features of some tumors. The 2013 Vancouver classification recognized 17 morphotypes of renal parenchymal malignancy and two benign tumors. This classification included the newly established entities tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC)), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo) papillary RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor family translocation RCC and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition to these newly described forms of RCC there are a number of novel tumors that are currently recognized as emerging entities. These are likely to be incorporated into subsequent classifications and include thyroid-like follicular RCC, succinate dehydrogenase B mutation-associated RCC, ALK translocation RCC, tuberous sclerosis complex-associated RCC, and RCC with (angio) leiomyomatous stroma. PMID:25753529

  9. Anal Warts and Anal Intradermal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Echenique, Ignacio; Phillips, Benjamin R.

    2011-01-01

    For the last five millennia we have been dealing with the annoyance of verrucas. Anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States and is increasing in incidence. As in other gastrointestinal conditions, HPV infection can lead to a stepwise transition from normal cells to dysplastic cells and then to invasive anal cancer. Knowledge of the natural history of HPV infection, risk factors, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic methods gives us the tools to adequately prevent, evaluate, treat, and counsel our patients. In this review, the authors detail the diagnosis, management, and treatment of anal condyloma and anal intraepithelial neoplasia with a focus on prevention, early detection, and treatment using current data and technology. PMID:22379403

  10. [Iodothyronine deiodinases expression in thyroid neoplasias].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Erika L Souza; Wagner, Márcia S; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2007-07-01

    The iodothyronine deiodinases constitute a family of selenoenzymes that catalyze the removal of iodine from the outer ring or inner ring of the thyroid hormones. The activating enzymes, deiodinases type I (D1) and type II (D2), are highly expressed in normal thyroid gland. Benign or malignant neoplastic transformation of the thyroid cells is associated with changes on the expression of these enzymes, suggesting that D1 or D2 can be markers of cellular differentiation. Abnormalities on the expression of both enzymes and also of the deiodinase type III (D3), that inactivates thyroid hormones, have been found in other human neoplasias. So far, the mechanism or implications of these findings on tumor pathogenesis are not well understood. Nevertheless, its noteworthy that abnormal expression of D2 can cause thyrotoxicosis in patients with metastasis of follicular thyroid carcinoma and that increased D3 expression in large hemangiomas causes severe hypothyroidism. PMID:17891232

  11. Photodynamic therapy of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Natalia M.; Lombardi, Welington; Leite, Marieli F. M.; Trujillo, Jose R.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique that has been used for the treatment of tumors, especially in Gynecology. The photodynamic reaction is based on the production of reactive oxygen species after the activation of a photosensitizer. Advantages of the PDT in comparison to the surgical resection are: ambulatory treatment and tissue recovery highly satisfactory, through a non-invasive procedure. The cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grades I and II presents potential indications for PDT. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the PDT for the diagnostics and treatment of CIN I and II. The equipment and the photosensitizer are produced in Brazil with a representative low cost. It is possible to visualize the fluorescence of the cervix and to treat the lesions, without side effects. The proposed clinical protocol shows great potential to become a public health technique.

  12. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Alexander; Brockmeyer, Norbert H; Altmeyer, Peter; Wieland, Ulrike

    2008-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections belong to the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. While the immune system eliminates most HPV infections over time in immunocompetent individuals, HPV infections tend to persist in immunodeficient individuals. In HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM), anal HPV prevalence is more than 90% and infections with multiple HPV types are common. Consequently, HPV-associated anogenital malignancies occur with high frequency in patients with HIV infection. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is a potential precursor lesion of squamous cell carcinoma of the anus. Like its cervical counterpart, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), AIN is causally linked to persistent infections with high-risk HPV types such as HPV16 or HPV18. As AIN and CIN share distinct biological similar-ities, AIN screenings analogous to Pap smear programs for CIN have been recommended in high-risk populations to reduce the incidence of anal carcinoma. These screenings include cytological analysis followed by high resolution anoscopy in case of anal dysplasia. Treatment guidelines for AIN are not yet available. Therapeutic strategies can be divided into topical (e.g. trichloroacetic acid, podophyllotoxin, imiquimod, photodynamic therapy) and ablative (e. g. surgical excision, laser ablation, infrared coagulation, electrocautery) measures. However, controlled studies on AIN treatment have not been performed. The impact of HPV vaccination on AIN development will also need to be assessed. Long-term follow-up of these patients is essential to gain more insight into the natural history of anogenital HPV infection in HIV-positive MSM. PMID:18410393

  13. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer in dermatological practice.

    PubMed

    Herat, Asoka; Whitfeld, Margot; Hillman, Richard

    2007-08-01

    Anal intraepithelial neoplasia is considered to be a precursor lesion of invasive anal cancer. It is now increasingly recognized in high-risk groups, such as men who have sex with men and HIV-infected patients. Human papillomaviruses are considered to be an important aetiological agent in both anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer. Dermatologists are likely to encounter these conditions among the differential diagnoses to be considered in high-risk patients presenting with perianal and anal lesions. Anal cancer rates are also increasing among the HIV-infected and HIV-non-infected population. The successful treatment of anal intraepithelial neoplasia may reduce the risk of subsequent development of anal cancer. However, current therapies for anal intraepithelial neoplasia may be associated with treatment-related morbidity and are not well validated. It is currently not proven that they reduce the likelihood of the development of anal cancer. Nevertheless, screening for anal intraepithelial neoplasia is being advocated for high-risk groups and may become standard dermatological care for these patients. In view of recent developments in the understanding of this condition, this article reviews the current understanding of anal intraepithelial neoplasia and its treatment from a dermatological perspective. PMID:17680964

  14. [Clinical characteristics of multiple endocrine neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Conte-Devolx, Bernard; Niccoli, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and type 2 (MEN2) are autosomal dominant inherited multiglandular diseases with familial and individual age-related penetrance and variable expression. The most frequent endocrine features of MEN1 are parathyroid involvement (> 95%), duodeno-pancreatic endocrine tissue involvement (80%), pituitary adenoma (30%), and adrenal cortex tumors (25%), with no clear syndromic variants. Identification of the germline MEN1 mutation confirms the diagnosis, but there is no phenotype-genotype correlation. All patients with MEN2 have medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The most distinctive MEN2 variants are MEN2A (MTC+pheochromocytoma+hyperparathyroidism), MEN2B (MTC+pheo), and isolated familial MTC (FMTC). The prognosis of MEN2 is linked to the progression of MTC, which depends mainly on the stage at diagnosis and the quality of initial surgical treatment. This emphasizes the need for early diagnosis and management. The specific RET codon mutation correlates with the MEN2 syndromic variant and with the age of onset and aggressiveness of MTC. Consequently, RET mutational status should guide major management decisions, such as whether and when to perform thyroidectomy. PMID:20669560

  15. Optical coherence tomography in vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, Ronni; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Boven, Hester H.; Vincent, Andrew D.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; van Beurden, Marc; Ruers, Theo J. M.

    2012-11-01

    Vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (VSCC) is a gynecological cancer with an incidence of two to three per 100,000 women. VSCC arises from vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), which is diagnosed through painful punch biopsy. In this study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used to differentiate between normal and VIN tissue. We hypothesize that (a) epidermal layer thickness measured in OCT images is different in normal tissue and VIN, and (b) quantitative analysis of the attenuation coefficient (μoct) extracted from OCT data differentiates VIN from normal vulvar tissue. Twenty lesions from 16 patients are imaged with OCT. Directly after data acquisition, a biopsy is performed. Epidermal thickness is measured and values of μoct are extracted from 200 OCT scans of normal and VIN tissue. For both methods, statistical analysis is performed using Paired Mann-Whitney-test. Correlation between the two methods is tested using a Spearman-correlation test. Both epidermal layer thickness as well as the μoct are different between normal vulvar tissue and VIN lesions (p<0.0001). Moreover, no correlation is found between the epidermal layer thickness and μoct. This study demonstrates that both the epidermal thickness and the attenuation coefficient of vulvar epithelial tissue containing VIN are different from that of normal vulvar tissue.

  16. Neoplasia of the male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Brinsko, S P

    1998-12-01

    Genital neoplasms in the male horse are relatively uncommon. Squamous cell carcinomas and squamous papillomas are the most commonly diagnosed neoplasms of the penis and prepuce. Geldings appear to be overrepresented for these types of neoplasms, and accumulation of smegma may be a contributing factor. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential for salvaging these organs before lesions become excessively large and invasive or are allowed to metastasize. Newer treatment modalities such as 5-fluorouracil appear to be promising alternatives to surgical excision. Although generally considered to be uncommon, testicular tumors may occur more frequently than previously thought and have the potential for devastating effects on stallion fertility. Cryptorchidism appears to play a role in the development of equine testicular tumors, especially teratomas. Seminoma is by far the most common testicular tumor of the mature stallion. Seminomas are rapidly growing tumors with a greater potential to metastasize in the horse than in other domestic species. Leydig cell and Sertoli cell tumors have been reported but are relatively rare in the stallion. Orchiectomy is the standard treatment for most testicular tumors. In certain circumstances, however, such as neoplasia occurring in the only functional testis, local cryotherapy of testicular tumors may prolong the breeding career of an affected stallion. PMID:9891722

  17. Development and progression of colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Upender; Shanmugam, Chandrakumar; Katkoori, Venkat R.; Bumpers, Harvey L.; Grizzle, William E.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of genetic and molecular alterations underlie the development and progression of colorectal neoplasia (CRN). Most of these cancers arise sporadically due to multiple somatic mutations and genetic instability. Genetic instability includes chromosomal instability (CIN) and microsatellite instability (MSI), which is observed in most hereditary non-polyposis colon cancers (HNPCCs) and accounts for a small proportion of sporadic CRN. Although many biomarkers have been used in the diagnosis and prediction of the clinical outcomes of CRNs, no single marker has established value. New markers and genes associated with the development and progression of CRNs are being discovered at an accelerated rate. CRN is a heterogeneous disease, especially with respect to the anatomic location of the tumor, race/ethnicity differences, and genetic and dietary interactions that influence its development and progression and act as confounders. Hence, efforts related to biomarker discovery should focus on identification of individual differences based on tumor stage, tumor anatomic location, and race/ethnicity; on the discovery of molecules (genes, mRNA transcripts, and proteins) relevant to these differences; and on development of therapeutic approaches to target these molecules in developing personalized medicine. Such strategies have the potential of reducing the personal and socio-economic burden of CRNs. Here, we systematically review molecular and other pathologic features as they relate to the development, early detection, diagnosis, prognosis, progression, and prevention of CRNs, especially colorectal cancers (CRCs). PMID:22112479

  18. Anal intraepitelial neoplasia: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Elorza, Garazi; Saralegui, Yolanda; Enríquez-Navascués, Jose María; Placer, Carlos; Velaz, Leyre

    2016-01-01

    Anal intraepitelial neoplasia (AIN) constitutes a major health problem in certain risk groups, such as patients with immunosuppression of varied origin, males who have sexual relations with other males, and females with a previous history of vaginal or cervical abnormalities in cytology. Its relationship with the human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been well documented; however, many of the factors involved in the progression and regression of the viral infection to dysplasia and anal carcinoma are unknown. AIN can be diagnosed through cytology of the anal canal or biopsy guided by high-resolution anoscopy. However, the need for these techniques in high-risk groups remains controversial. Treatment depends on the risk factors and given the high morbidity and high recurrence rates the utility of the different local treatments is still a subject of debate. Surgical biopsy is justified only in the case of progression suggesting lesions. The role of the vaccination in high-risk patients as primary prevention has been debated by different groups. However, there is no general consensus on its use or on the need for screening this population. PMID:26765233

  19. Histological Characterization of Biliary Intraepithelial Neoplasia with respect to Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Motoko; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2014-01-01

    Biliary intraepithelial neoplasia (BilIN) is a precursor lesion of hilar/perihilar and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. BilIN represents the process of multistep cholangiocarcinogenesis and is the biliary counterpart of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN). This study was performed to clarify the histological characteristics of BilIN in relation to PanIN. Using paraffin-embedded tissue sections of surgically resected specimens of cholangiocarcinoma associated with BilIN and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma associated with PanIN, immunohistochemical staining was performed using primary antibodies against MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, cyclin D1, p21, p53, and S100P. For mucin staining, Alcian blue pH 2.5 was used. Most of the molecules examined here showed similar expression patterns in BilIN and PanIN, in which their expression tended to increase along with the increase in atypia of the epithelial lesions. Significant differences were observed in the increase in mucin production and the expression of S100P in PanIN-1 and the expression of p53 in PanIN-3, when compared with those in BilIN of a corresponding grade. These results suggest that cholangiocarcinoma and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma share, at least in part, a common carcinogenic process and further confirm that BilIN can be regarded as the biliary counterpart of PanIN. PMID:24860672

  20. Histological Characterization of Biliary Intraepithelial Neoplasia with respect to Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasunori; Harada, Kenichi; Sasaki, Motoko; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2014-01-01

    Biliary intraepithelial neoplasia (BilIN) is a precursor lesion of hilar/perihilar and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. BilIN represents the process of multistep cholangiocarcinogenesis and is the biliary counterpart of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN). This study was performed to clarify the histological characteristics of BilIN in relation to PanIN. Using paraffin-embedded tissue sections of surgically resected specimens of cholangiocarcinoma associated with BilIN and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma associated with PanIN, immunohistochemical staining was performed using primary antibodies against MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, cyclin D1, p21, p53, and S100P. For mucin staining, Alcian blue pH 2.5 was used. Most of the molecules examined here showed similar expression patterns in BilIN and PanIN, in which their expression tended to increase along with the increase in atypia of the epithelial lesions. Significant differences were observed in the increase in mucin production and the expression of S100P in PanIN-1 and the expression of p53 in PanIN-3, when compared with those in BilIN of a corresponding grade. These results suggest that cholangiocarcinoma and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma share, at least in part, a common carcinogenic process and further confirm that BilIN can be regarded as the biliary counterpart of PanIN. PMID:24860672

  1. [Heredity in renal and prostatic neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Prayer Galetti, T; D'Arrigo, L; De Zorzi, L; Patarnello, T

    1997-09-01

    There is an ever growing report of data supporting the evidence that accumulated genetic changes underlie the development of neoplasia. The paradigma of this multistep process is colon cancer were cancer onset is associated, over decades, with at least seven genetic events. The number of genetic alterations increases moving from adenomatous lesions to colon cancer and, although the genetic alterations occur according to a preferred sequence, the total accumulation of changes rather than their sequential order is responsible of tumor biological behavior. It is noteworthy that, at least for this neoplasia, carcinogenesis appears to arise as a result of the mutational activation of oncogenes coupled with the mutational inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. In some cases mutant suppressor genes appear to exert a phenotypic effect even when present in the heterozygous state thus been non "recessive" at the cellular level. The general features of this model may apply also to renal cell cancer (RCC) and prostate cancer (CaP). Extensive literature exists on the cytogenetic and molecular findings in RCC. Only 2% of RCC are familiar, but molecular genetic studies of these cancers have provided important informations on RCC pathogenesis. As with other cancers, familiar RCC is characterized by an early age of onset and frequent multicentricity. A pathological classification useful in studying these patients subdivide renal cancers in papillary (pRCC) and non papillary (RCC) neoplasms. The most common cause of inherited RCC is the Von Hippel Lindau disease (VHL) a dominantly inherited multisystem disorder characterized by retinal and cerebellar hemangioblastomas, pheochromocytomas, pancreatic cysts and RCC. Over 70% of these patients will develop an RCC by their sixth decade. In 1993 the isolation of the tumor suppressor gene in VHL disease at the level of chromosome 3p25-p26 have lead to a better understanding of RCC. Most missense mutations are associated with high risk of RCC, but some are associated with high risk of pheochromocytoma and low risk of RCC. The VHL gene is evolutionary conserved and encodes for a specific protein (pVHL). VHL protein downregulates transcriptional elongation and so suppresses the expression of proto-oncogenes and growth factors. Recently reintroduction of wild-type, non mutant, VHL gene into VHL deficient RCC cell line 786-O had no demonstrable effect on their in vitro growth but inhibited their ability to form tumors in nude mice. So far, VHL mutations or hypermethylations have been found in 76% of sporadic RCC. On the contrary, up to now, no 3p allele loss or VHL mutations have been detected in pRCC. Preliminary studies in familiar pRCC are pointing on genetic changes on chromosomes 1, 7, 16 and 17. As far as prostate cancer is regarded, men with a family history of prostate cancer have an age dependent, significantly increased PCa risk. For familiar clustering, of PCa the two main factors are early age at onset of the disease and the number of multiple affected family members. Hereditary prostate cancer is a subset of familiar prostate cancer with a pattern of distribution consistent with Mendelian inheritance. Hereditary prostate cancer is clinically defined as a clustering of 3 or more relatives within any nuclear family; or the occurrence of prostate cancer in each of 3 generations in either the probands paternal or maternal lineage; or a cluster of 2 relatives affected within 55 years of age or less. Therefore, hereditary prostate cancer may be seen as a multistep carcinogenesis, and clustering may be explained by Mendelian inheritance of a rare (frequency in population 0.36%) dominant, highly penetrant, allele. The estimated cumulative risk of developing PCa, is 88% for carriers as compared with 5% for non carriers. There are conflicting reports of an associated increased incidence of breast cancer in female relatives of men with familiar prostate cancer. In conclusion, there is a clear associatio PMID:9417296

  2. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1991-05-31

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. During the end of the last grant year and the first half of the current grant year, we have completed analyses and summarized for publication: investigations on the relationship between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamicpituitary axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH- (thyrotropin-) responsive sub-population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and the results of the large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. We are testing new techniques for the culture, cytofluorescent analysis and characterization mammary epithelial cells and of clonogens in a parallel project, and plan to apply similar technology to the thyroid epithelial cells and clonogen population. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cells interactions during the neoplastic process.

  3. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1992-05-20

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. Previous results indicated that these clonogens are the precursor cells of radiogenic cancer, and that initiation, is common event at the clonegenic cell level. Detailed information on the physiologic control of clonogen proliferation, differentiation, and total numbers is thus essential to an understanding of the carcinogenic process. We report here studies on investigations on the relationships between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamus-pituitary feedback axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH-(thyrotropin-) responsive sub- population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and a large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cell interactions during the neoplastic process.

  4. Pathophysiology of ocular surface squamous neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Gichuhi, Stephen; Ohnuma, Shin-ichi; Sagoo, Mandeep S; Burton, Matthew J

    2014-12-01

    The incidence of ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) is strongly associated with solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, HIV and human papilloma virus (HPV). Africa has the highest incidence rates in the world. Most lesions occur at the limbus within the interpalpebral fissure particularly the nasal sector. The nasal limbus receives the highest intensity of sunlight. Limbal epithelial crypts are concentrated nasally and contain niches of limbal epithelial stem cells in the basal layer. It is possible that these are the progenitor cells in OSSN. OSSN arises in the basal epithelial cells spreading towards the surface which resembles the movement of corneo-limbal stem cell progeny before it later invades through the basement membrane below. UV radiation damages DNA producing pyrimidine dimers in the DNA chain. Specific CC → TT base pair dimer transformations of the p53 tumour-suppressor gene occur in OSSN allowing cells with damaged DNA past the G1-S cell cycle checkpoint. UV radiation also causes local and systemic photoimmunosuppression and reactivates latent viruses such as HPV. The E7 proteins of HPV promote proliferation of infected epithelial cells via the retinoblastoma gene while E6 proteins prevent the p53 tumour suppressor gene from effecting cell-cycle arrest of DNA-damaged and infected cells. Immunosuppression from UV radiation, HIV and vitamin A deficiency impairs tumour immune surveillance allowing survival of aberrant cells. Tumour growth and metastases are enhanced by; telomerase reactivation which increases the number of cell divisions a cell can undergo; vascular endothelial growth factor for angiogenesis and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that destroy the intercellular matrix between cells. Despite these potential triggers, the disease is usually unilateral. It is unclear how HPV reaches the conjunctiva. PMID:25447808

  5. Pathophysiology of ocular surface squamous neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gichuhi, Stephen; Ohnuma, Shin-ichi; Sagoo, Mandeep S.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) is strongly associated with solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, HIV and human papilloma virus (HPV). Africa has the highest incidence rates in the world. Most lesions occur at the limbus within the interpalpebral fissure particularly the nasal sector. The nasal limbus receives the highest intensity of sunlight. Limbal epithelial crypts are concentrated nasally and contain niches of limbal epithelial stem cells in the basal layer. It is possible that these are the progenitor cells in OSSN. OSSN arises in the basal epithelial cells spreading towards the surface which resembles the movement of corneo-limbal stem cell progeny before it later invades through the basement membrane below. UV radiation damages DNA producing pyrimidine dimers in the DNA chain. Specific CC → TT base pair dimer transformations of the p53 tumour-suppressor gene occur in OSSN allowing cells with damaged DNA past the G1-S cell cycle checkpoint. UV radiation also causes local and systemic photoimmunosuppression and reactivates latent viruses such as HPV. The E7 proteins of HPV promote proliferation of infected epithelial cells via the retinoblastoma gene while E6 proteins prevent the p53 tumour suppressor gene from effecting cell-cycle arrest of DNA-damaged and infected cells. Immunosuppression from UV radiation, HIV and vitamin A deficiency impairs tumour immune surveillance allowing survival of aberrant cells. Tumour growth and metastases are enhanced by; telomerase reactivation which increases the number of cell divisions a cell can undergo; vascular endothelial growth factor for angiogenesis and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that destroy the intercellular matrix between cells. Despite these potential triggers, the disease is usually unilateral. It is unclear how HPV reaches the conjunctiva. PMID:25447808

  6. Development of germ cell neoplasia in situ in chinchilla rabbits.

    PubMed

    Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Montelongo Solís, Paola; Chávez-Saldaña, Margarita; Gutiérrez-Pérez, Oscar; Cortés Trujillo, Lucero; Rojas-Castañeda, Julio César

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to describe the development of germ cell neoplasia in situ in Chinchilla rabbit by administration of estradiol. The study was performed in rabbits distributed into two groups: control and 17 β-estradiol. The determination of histological alterations and POU5F1 and c-kit proteins employed as biomarkers for the diagnosis of this neoplasia was carried out. Testicular descent and complete spermatogenesis were observed in the control group. The protein biomarkers were negative. However, in the rabbits treated with estradiol, the testes remained undescended with the gonocytes undifferentiated to spermatogonia. There were histological lesions owing to germ cell neoplasia in situ and positive to POU5F1 and c-kit proteins. These findings indicate that the chinchilla rabbit is an ideal model to study this neoplasia in which the histological characteristics and biomarkers of the disease could be clearly observed. Using this model we suggested that the persisting gonocytes could be responsible for the development of germ cell neoplasia in situ. PMID:26617392

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease associated neoplasia: A surgeon’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    Althumairi, Azah A; Lazarev, Mark G; Gearhart, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The risk is known to increase with longer duration of the disease, family history of CRC, and history of primary sclerosing cholangitis. The diagnosis of the neoplastic changes associated with IBD is difficult owing to the heterogeneous endoscopic appearance and inter-observer variability of the pathological diagnosis. Screening and surveillance guidelines have been established which aim for early detection of neoplasia. Several surgical options are available for the treatment of IBD-associated neoplasia. Patients’ morbidities, risk factors for CRC, degree and the extent of neoplasia must be considered in choosing the surgical treatment. A multidisciplinary team including the surgeon, gastroenterologist, pathologist, and the patient who has a clear understanding of the nature of their disease is needed to optimize outcomes. PMID:26811640

  8. Factors associated with conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia: A case control study

    SciTech Connect

    Napora, C.; Cohen, E.J.; Genvert, G.I.; Presson, A.C.; Arentsen, J.J.; Eagle, R.C.; Laibson, P.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Familial and environmental factors may play a role in the development of conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Nineteen patients with biopsy-proven CIN completed a questionnaire to evaluate possible predisposing factors. Nineteen age-matched and sex-matched controls completed questionnaires and received slit-lamp examinations. Factors associated with a relatively increased risk of developing CIN included exposure to petroleum products, heavy cigarette smoking, light hair and ocular pigmentation, and family origin in the British Isles, Austria or Switzerland. Non-office and nonprofessional workers were more likely to develop conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia (p = .05), as were those who were not college graduates (p = .07).

  9. Hematopoietic Neoplasias in Horses: Myeloproliferative and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    MUÑOZ, Ana; RIBER, Cristina; TRIGO, Pablo; CASTEJÓN, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia, i.e., the neoplasia of one or more cell lines of the bone marrow, although less common than in other species, it is also reported in horses. Leukemia can be classified according to the affected cells (myeloproliferative or lymphoproliferative disorders), evolution of clinical signs (acute or chronic) and the presence or lack of abnormal cells in peripheral blood (leukemic, subleukemic and aleukemic leukemia). The main myeloproliferative disorders in horses are malignant histiocytosis and myeloid leukemia, the latter being classified as monocytic and myelomonocytic, granulocytic, primary erythrocytosis or polycythemia vera and megakaryocytic leukemia. The most common lymphoproliferative disorders in horses are lymphoid leukemia, plasma cell or multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic neoplasia in horses and usually involves lymphoid organs, without leukemia, although bone marrow may be affected after metastasis. Lymphoma could be classified according to the organs involved and four main clinical categories have been established: generalized-multicentric, alimentary-gastrointestinal, mediastinal-thymic-thoracic and cutaneous. The clinical signs, hematological and clinical pathological findings, results of bone marrow aspirates, involvement of other organs, prognosis and treatment, if applicable, are presented for each type of neoplasia. This paper aims to provide a guide for equine practitioners when approaching to clinical cases with suspicion of hematopoietic neoplasia. PMID:24833969

  10. In vivo and in vitro hyperspectral imaging of cervical neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaojian; Zheng, Wenli; Bu, Yanggao; Chang, Shufang; Tong, Qingping; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald X.

    2014-02-01

    Cervical cancer is a prevalent disease in many developing countries. Colposcopy is the most common approach for screening cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). However, its clinical efficacy heavily relies on the examiner's experience. Spectroscopy is a potentially effective method for noninvasive diagnosis of cervical neoplasia. In this paper, we introduce a hyperspectral imaging technique for noninvasive detection and quantitative analysis of cervical neoplasia. A hyperspectral camera is used to collect the reflectance images of the entire cervix under xenon lamp illumination, followed by standard colposcopy examination and cervical tissue biopsy at both normal and abnormal sites in different quadrants. The collected reflectance data are calibrated and the hyperspectral signals are extracted. Further spectral analysis and image processing works are carried out to classify tissue into different types based on the spectral characteristics at different stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The hyperspectral camera is also coupled with a lab microscope to acquire the hyperspectral transmittance images of the pathological slides. The in vivo and the in vitro imaging results are compared with clinical findings to assess the accuracy and efficacy of the method.

  11. HISTOLOGICAL PROGRESSION OF HEPATIC NEOPLASIA IN RAINBOW TROUT ('SALMO GAIRDNERI')

    EPA Science Inventory

    The histological progression of hepatic neoplasia has not been as systematically studied in rainbow trout as it has been in rodents. Two putative preneoplastic lesions have been identified, the eosinophilic focus and the basophilic focus, but whether these correspond to similar l...

  12. Association between cysticercosis and neoplasia: a study based on autopsy findings.

    PubMed

    Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; da Silva, Aline Cristina Souza; Ribeiro, Grace Kelly Naves de Aquino; Oliveira, Lívia Ferreira; Ferraz, Mara Lúcia Fonseca; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes

    2013-01-01

    Chronic infections including the cysticercosis induce inflammatory cells to produce free radicals and synthesize carcinogenic toxins. The cells with genetic mutations proliferate in a disorganized manner, leading to the development of neoplasia. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the relation between cysticercosis and neoplasia. Patients autopsied were divided into 4 groups: patients with neoplasia and cysticercosis (NC), patients with neoplasia only (NN), patients with cysticercosis only (CC), and patients without neoplasia or cysticercosis (WW). Of 2012 autopsy reports analyzed, 0.4 showed NC. In groups CC and NC, the most common location of the parasite was the brain. There was a predominance of three or more cysticerci in groups NC and CC. In the NC group, all had malignant neoplasms, and was predominance of benign neoplasm in NN group. The digestive system was the most frequent neoplasia. By calculating odds ratio, rate of neoplasia in patients with cysticercosis was 0.74. In conclusion, the demographic profile of patients with cysticercosis and neoplasia is similar to that of patients with cysticercosis alone. The incidence of cysticercosis and neoplasia was greater in older patients suggesting that immunosenescence may contribute to development of neoplasia promoted by cysticercosis. PMID:24288510

  13. Association between Cysticercosis and Neoplasia: A Study Based on Autopsy Findings

    PubMed Central

    Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; da Silva, Aline Cristina Souza; Ribeiro, Grace Kelly Naves de Aquino; Oliveira, Lívia Ferreira; Ferraz, Mara Lúcia Fonseca; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes

    2013-01-01

    Chronic infections including the cysticercosis induce inflammatory cells to produce free radicals and synthesize carcinogenic toxins. The cells with genetic mutations proliferate in a disorganized manner, leading to the development of neoplasia. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the relation between cysticercosis and neoplasia. Patients autopsied were divided into 4 groups: patients with neoplasia and cysticercosis (NC), patients with neoplasia only (NN), patients with cysticercosis only (CC), and patients without neoplasia or cysticercosis (WW). Of 2012 autopsy reports analyzed, 0.4 showed NC. In groups CC and NC, the most common location of the parasite was the brain. There was a predominance of three or more cysticerci in groups NC and CC. In the NC group, all had malignant neoplasms, and was predominance of benign neoplasm in NN group. The digestive system was the most frequent neoplasia. By calculating odds ratio, rate of neoplasia in patients with cysticercosis was 0.74. In conclusion, the demographic profile of patients with cysticercosis and neoplasia is similar to that of patients with cysticercosis alone. The incidence of cysticercosis and neoplasia was greater in older patients suggesting that immunosenescence may contribute to development of neoplasia promoted by cysticercosis. PMID:24288510

  14. Hepatobiliary inflammation, neoplasia, and argyrophilic bacteria in a ferret colony.

    PubMed

    García, A; Erdman, S E; Xu, S; Feng, Y; Rogers, A B; Schrenzel, M D; Murphy, J C; Fox, J G

    2002-03-01

    Hepatobiliary disease was diagnosed in eight of 34 genetically unrelated cohabitating pet ferrets (Mustela putorios furo) during a 7-year period. The eight ferrets ranged in age from 5 to 8 years and exhibited chronic cholangiohepatitis coupled with cellular proliferation ranging from hyperplasia to frank neoplasia. Spiral-shaped argyrophilic bacteria were demonstrated in livers of three ferrets, including two with carcinoma. Sequence analysis of a 400-base pair polymerase chain reaction product amplified from DNA derived from fecal bacteria from one ferret demonstrated 98% and 97% similarity to Helicobacter cholecystus and Helicobacter sp. strain 266-1 , respectively. The clustering of severe hepatic disease in these cohabitating ferroes suggests a possible infectious etiology. The role of Helicobacter species and other bacteria in hepatitis and/or neoplasia in ferrets requires further study. PMID:12009055

  15. Homozygotes for the autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome (MEN1)

    SciTech Connect

    Brandi, M.L.; Falchetti, A.; Tonelli, F. ); Weber, G.; Svensson, A.; Larsson, C. ); Castello, R.; Furlani, L.; Scappaticci, S.; Fraccaro, M.

    1993-12-01

    Families in which both parents are heterozygotes for the same autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome are extremely unusual. Recently, the authors had the unique opportunity to evaluate three symptomatic siblings from the union between two unrelated individuals affected by multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). When the three siblings and their parents and relatives were genotyped for 12 markers tightly linked to the MEN1 locus, at 11q13, two of the siblings were found to be homozygotes, and one a heterozygote, for MEN1. With regard to the MEN1 syndrome, no phenotypic differences were observed between the two homozygotes and the heterozygotes. However, the two homozygotes showed unexplained infertility, which was not the case for any of the heterozygotes. Thus, MEN1 appears to be a disease with complete dominance, and the presence of two MEN1 alleles with mutations of the type that occur constitutionally may be insufficient for tumor development. 28 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia: review and recommendations for screening and management.

    PubMed

    Smyczek, Petra; Singh, Ameeta E; Romanowski, Barbara

    2013-11-01

    Anal cancer is a rare malignancy of the distal gastrointestinal tract, often associated with human papillomavirus, the most common sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Currently available screening methods for anal intraepithelial neoplasia, a precursor for anal cancer, combine anal Papanicolaou cytology and high resolution anoscopy with biopsy of suspicious lesions. Significant barriers to establishing anal cancer screening programmes include the small number of healthcare professionals performing high resolution anoscopy and the lack of data showing that anal cancer screening can reduce morbidity and mortality related to anal carcinoma. Despite several controversies surrounding anal cancer screening, the rising incidence of this disease in some groups supports routine screening programmes in high-risk populations, especially in HIV-positive men who have sex with men. This review outlines the epidemiology of anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer and summarizes issues related to the introduction of anal cancer screening programmes. PMID:23970583

  17. Early Detection of and Screening for Colorectal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    There are approximately one million new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) per year worldwide, with substantial associated morbidity and mortality. The long natural history of colorectal neoplasia affords the opportunity to use preventive measures to improve survival in this disease. Currently screening for adenomatous polyps and early-stage cancers is the best methodology for improving survival. The increasing knowledge of CRC pathogenesis and its natural history is allowing the development of new tools to identify patients who will benefit most from colon cancer screening and the defining of appropriate surveillance intervals. The guidelines for screening for colorectal neoplasia have recently been substantially revised by several organizations based on developing technologies and a growing body of data on the efficacy of CRC screening. PMID:20431727

  18. [Thorium-induced neoplasia of the spleen? (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schumacher, K A; Bargon, G

    1978-08-01

    A patient is presented in whom multiple lienal circular foci are seen 25 years after application of a thorium-containing contrast medium for vascular visualization, over and above the well-known characteristic ThO2 deposits in the liver and spleen. The article discusses the problem whether these circular foci which meet the angiographic criteria of an angioblastic sarcoma, should be considered as a thiorium-induced neoplasia. PMID:567836

  19. [Treatment of vulvar intra-epithelial neoplasias with Imiquimod].

    PubMed

    Paternotte, J; Hebert, T; Ouldamer, L; Marret, H; Body, G

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of vulvar intra-epithelial neoplasia (VIN) is increasing in the developed countries especially in young women. There is little consensus regarding the optimal management. Surgery used to be the gold standard. Alternatives to surgery are now needed for the treatment of VIN. Many studies investigated the effectiveness of Imiquimod 5% cream in this pathology. We present a literature review of the results published on the subject. PMID:26047969

  20. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2: achievements and current challenges.

    PubMed

    Machens, Andreas; Dralle, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Incremental advances in medical technology, such as the development of sensitive hormonal assays for routine clinical care, are the drivers of medical progress. This principle is exemplified by the creation of the concept of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, encompassing medullary thyroid cancer, pheochromocytoma, and primary hyperparathyroidism, which did not emerge before the early 1960s. This review sets out to highlight key achievements, such as joint biochemical and DNA-based screening of individuals at risk of developing multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, before casting a spotlight on current challenges which include: (i) ill-defined upper limits of calcitonin assays for infants and young children, rendering it difficult to implement the biochemical part of the integrated DNA-based/biochemical concept; (ii) our increasingly mobile society in which different service providers are caring for one individual at various stages in the disease process. With familial relationships disintegrating as a result of geographic dispersion, information about the history of the origin family may become sketchy or just unavailable. This is when DNA-based gene tests come into play, confirming or excluding an individual's genetic predisposition to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 even before there is any biochemical or clinical evidence of the disease. However, the unrivaled molecular genetic progress in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 does not come without a price. Screening may uncover unknown gene sequence variants representing either harmless polymorphisms or pathogenic mutations. In this setting, functional characterization of mutant cells in vitro may generate helpful ancillary evidence with regard to the pathogenicity of gene variants in comparison with established mutations. PMID:22584715

  1. Piroxicam decreases postirradiation colonic neoplasia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Northway, M.G.; Scobey, M.W.; Cassidy, K.T.; Geisinger, K.R. )

    1990-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agent piroxicam on chronic radiation proctitis in the rat. Forty female Wistar rats received a 2250-cGy dose of irradiation to the distal 2 cm of the colon. Twenty received piroxicam 8.0 mg/kg orally 30 minutes before exposure and 24 hours after exposure; 20 rats served as irradiated controls. All animals were evaluated by colonoscopy 1 and 3 weeks postexposure and every third week until death or killing at 1 year. At killing, colons were removed for light microscopic examination. One year postirradiation results showed no differences in mortality, vascular changes, acute inflammation, colitis cystica profunda, or rectal stricture between the control and piroxicam-treated groups. However, at 1 year postirradiation the control group demonstrated neoplasia in 15 of 19 animals compared with eight of 20 animals in the piroxicam-treated group. The first endoscopic appearance of colonic neoplasm occurred at 15 weeks postirradiation in one control irradiated rat whereas the first evidence of endoscopic neoplasm in the piroxicam-treated group did not occur until 36 weeks postirradiation. Histologic examination documented a tendency toward a greater presence of adenocarcinomas in the control group compared with the piroxicam-treated group. The authors conclude that piroxicam treatment significantly decreased the incidence of colonic neoplasia in general as well as delayed the endoscopic appearance of colonic neoplasia in rats after pelvic irradiation. 41 references.

  2. Activation of ras oncogenes preceding the onset of neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barbacid, M. ); Sukumar, S. )

    1990-06-01

    The identification of ras oncogenes in human and animal cancers including precancerous lesions indicates that these genes participate in the early stages of neoplastic development. Yet, these observations do not define the timing of ras oncogene activation in the multistep process of carcinogenesis. To ascertain the timing of ras oncogene activation, an animal model system was devised that involves the induction of mammary carcinomas in rats exposed at birth to the carcinogen nitrosomethylurea. High-resolution restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified ras sequences revealed the presence of both H-ras and K-ras oncogenes in normal mammary glands 2 weeks after carcinogen treatment and at least 2 months before the onset of neoplasia. These ras oncogenes can remain latent within the mammary gland until exposure to estrogens, demonstrating that activation of ras oncogenes can precede the onset of neoplasia and suggesting that normal physiological proliferative processes such as estrogen-induced mammary gland development may lead to neoplasia if the targeted cells harbor latent ras oncogenes.

  3. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early Barrett’s neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Barret, Maximilien; Cao, Dalhia Thao; Beuvon, Frédéric; Leblanc, Sarah; Terris, Benoit; Camus, Marine; Coriat, Romain; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The possible benefit of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early neoplasia arising in Barrett’s esophagus remains controversial. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of ESD for the treatment of early Barrett’s neoplasia. Methods All consecutive patients undergoing ESD for the resection of a visible lesion in a Barrett’s esophagus, either suspicious of submucosal infiltration or exceeding 10 mm in size, between February 2012 and January 2015 were prospectively included. The primary endpoint was the rate of curative resection of carcinoma, defined as histologically complete resection of adenocarcinomas without poor histoprognostic factors. Results Thirty-five patients (36 lesions) with a mean age of 66.2 ± 12 years, a mean ASA score of 2.1 ± 0.7, and a mean C4M6 Barrett’s segment were included. The mean procedure time was 191 ± 79 mn, and the mean size of the resected specimen was 51.3 ± 23 mm. En bloc resection rate was 89%. Lesions were 12 ± 15 mm in size, and 81% (29/36) were invasive adenocarcinomas, six of which with submucosal invasion. Although R0 resection of carcinoma was 72.4%, the curative resection rate was 66% (19/29). After a mean follow-up of 12.9 ± 9 months, 16 (45.7%) patients had required additional treatment, among whom nine underwent surgical resection, and seven further endoscopic treatments. Metachronous lesions or recurrence of cancer developed during the follow-up period in 17.2% of the patients. The overall complication rate was 16.7%, including 8.3% perforations, all conservatively managed, and no bleeding. The 30-day mortality was 0%. Conclusion In this early experience, ESD yielded a moderate curative resection rate in Barrett’s neoplasia. At present, improvements are needed if ESD is to replace piecemeal endoscopic mucosal resection in the management of Barrett’s neoplasia. PMID:27087948

  4. Photodynamic therapy of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia using hexaminolevulinate and methylaminolevulinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soergel, Philipp; Staboulidou, Ismini; Hertel, Herrmann; Schippert, Cordula; Hillemanns, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is the precursor of invasive cervical cancer. Previous studies indicated that photodynamic therapy (PDT) represents an effective treatment modality in CIN. In 28 patients with CIN 1 - 3, 1 - 2 cycles of PDT were conducted using hexaminolevulinate (HAL) or methylaminolevulinate (MAL) and a special light delivery system. After 6 months, biopsies were obtained to assess response. The overall response rate for complete or partial response was 65%. Photodynamic therapy using new ALA esters is effective and may offer unique advantages in the therapy of CIN.

  5. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes: A Comprehensive Imaging Review.

    PubMed

    Grajo, Joseph R; Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Sahani, Dushyant V; Kambadakone, Avinash

    2016-05-01

    MEN1, MEN2, and MEN4 comprise a series of familial disorders involving the simultaneous occurrence of tumors in more than one endocrine organ, collectively known as multiple endocrine neoplasia. Patients with this family of disorders develop tumors of the parathyroid gland, pancreas, pituitary gland, adrenal gland, and thyroid gland, along with miscellaneous neuroendocrine tumors of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Although some patients undergo early prophylactic surgical management, particularly in the setting of familial medullary thyroid carcinoma, many develop tumors later in life. These tumors are often discovered at imaging for screening purposes. Recognition of the imaging features of the known tumors is important for appropriate patient management. PMID:27153782

  6. Nuclear medicine techniques in the evaluation of pulmonary neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, A.D.

    1987-10-01

    Many noninvasive imaging techniques are available for evaluating patients with pulmonary neoplastic processes. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and gallium scintigraphy, while having made major contributions to the noninvasive workup of patients with pulmonary neoplastic processes, are inadequate for purposes of accurate pathologic staging. A more complete understanding of the potential for existing techniques utilizing gallium 67 and thallium 201 along with the development of new radiopharmaceuticals coupled with recent advances in detection equipment will further expand the role of nuclear medicine in the noninvasive assessment of pulmonary neoplasias. 46 references.

  7. Investigations on the diagnosis and retroviral aetiology of renal neoplasia in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Simova-Curd, Stefka A; Huder, Jon B; Boeni, Jurg; Robert, Nadia; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2010-06-01

    The high susceptibility of budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) to neoplasia, and specifically renal neoplasia, has often been reported. Further investigations led to a suspicion of a retrovirus as the causative agent for renal neoplasia in budgerigars, but definitive proof has yet to be found. In the present study, 32 budgerigars suspected of having renal neoplasia (based on the clinical presentation) were examined. The objectives were to investigate the use of different diagnostic methods for the ante-mortem diagnosis of this condition and to find more supporting evidence of a retroviral aetiology. The predominant clinical signs observed in budgerigars with renal neoplasia were lameness and absence of deep pain sensation of one leg. Alterations in haematology, plasma chemistry, and urine analyses could not pinpoint the cases of renal neoplasia. Contrast radiography of the intestinal tract proved to be diagnostically more useful compared with plain radiographic studies. Histology confirmed the renal neoplasia as adenocarcinoma. Investigations for virus identification included product-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of avian leucosis virus group-specific antigen. Cell cultures and electron microscopy were performed on a limited number of patients. These investigations could find no presence of an exogenous, replicating retrovirus, neither could viral particles be detected by electron microscopy. Based on the current findings, it can be concluded that there is no evidence of retroviral involvement in the occurrence of renal neoplasia in budgerigars. PMID:20544420

  8. New perspectives on neoplasia and the RNA world.

    PubMed

    Hall, Peter A; Russell, Se Hilary

    2005-06-01

    Key tenets of modern biology are the central place of protein in cell regulation and the flow of genetic information from DNA to RNA to protein. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that genomes are much more complex than hitherto thought with remarkably complex regulatory systems. The notion that the fraction of the genome involved in coding protein is all that matters is increasingly being questioned as the roles of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) in cellular systems becomes recognised. The RNA world, including microRNA (miRNA), small inhibitory RNA (siRNA) and other RNA species, are now recognised as being crucial for the regulation of chromatin structure, gene expression, mRNA processing and splicing, mRNA stability and translational control. Furthermore such ncRNA systems may be perturbed in disease states and most notably in neoplasia, including in haematological malignancies. Here the burgeoning evidence for a role of miRNA in neoplasia is reviewed and the importance of understanding the RNA world emphasised. PMID:16216032

  9. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-can we detect early pancreatic cancer?

    PubMed

    Haugk, Beate

    2010-10-01

    Haugk B
(2010) Histopathology 57, 503-514
Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia - can we detect early pancreatic cancer? Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers, with an incidence equalling mortality. Pancreatic cancer is a heterogeneous group in which pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the most common. It is now established that PDAC develops through stepwise progression from precursor lesions. Detection and treatment of these precursor lesions would allow curative treatment. Three precursor lesions for PDAC have been identified. Two of these - mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) - are rare, radiologically detectable, cystic precursor lesions which can be cured if treated at the preinvasive stage. The third and most common precursor lesion has recently been defined as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN). PanINs are microscopic lesions with no clinical correlate. They display a spectrum of cyto-architectural changes (PanIN-1, PanIN-2 and PanIN-3) mirrored in an increasing accumulation of molecular genetic changes, with PanIN-3 sharing many of the alterations with PDAC. Great advances in the understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis have opened avenues for diagnosis and chemoprevention. However, access to the pancreas is limited, molecular tests are at the early stages and too little is known about the natural history of early PanINs to justify resection. Currently, screening focuses upon high-risk individuals only. PMID:20875068

  10. In situ increased chemokine expression in human cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Yenddy; Mosquera, Jesús; Callejas, Diana; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor

    2015-04-01

    Chemokines play a role in tumor-inflammation and angiogenesis that could be involved in tumor progression. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), Interleukin-8 (IL-8) and macrophage inflammatory proteins (MIP) have been identified in tumor tissues of patients with different neoplasms. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the expressions of MCP-1, IL-8 and MIP-1α, mononuclear leukocyte infiltration and leukocyte/chemokine expressions in cervical tissues from patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and controls. MCP-1, IL-8 and MIP-1α expressions and leukocyte infiltration were determined by indirect immunofluorescence in cervix biopsies from CIN patients (n=65) and 7 normal controls. Increased expressions of MCP-1 and IL-8 in CIN were observed. Increment of lymphocyte infiltration and coexpression of CD3/MCP-1 and CD3/IL-8 were found in CIN. CD3/MCP-1 cell percentage was found decreased and CD3/IL-8 percentage increased according to the CIN evolution. MIP-1α remained similar to control values. The increased expression of MCP-1 and IL-8 in cervical neoplasia may lead to tumor progression. PMID:25661067

  11. Surgery of intraepithelial neoplasia, CIN, VAIN, and VIN.

    PubMed

    McCartney, A J

    1987-06-01

    The various surgical treatments of CIN, VAIN, and VIN have been discussed. The necessity for careful pretreatment, histological diagnosis and colposcopic mapping of the various conditions has been stressed. The relative risks of malignant progression of the various conditions have been discussed along with the various modes and methods of surgical therapy. The facts emerging are that traditional surgical therapy is giving ground to more modern techniques of ablation, particularly that of carbon dioxide laser photoevaporation therapy. Particularly in treatment of CIN and VIN, laser therapy has begun to show many advantages. Traditional surgical techniques for treatment of intraepithelial neoplasia of the lower genital tract in the female have, in response, become more conservative in their application with an emphasis on preservation and reconstruction. However, in some cases confirmation of early results by long-term follow-up will be necessary. The general tendency of close surveillance and conservative treatment befits the management of non-invasive genital tract intraepithelial neoplasia. PMID:3319344

  12. Analysis of digitized cervical images to detect cervical neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Daron G.

    2004-05-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. If diagnosed in the premalignant stage, cure is invariably assured. Although the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear has significantly reduced the incidence of cervical cancer where implemented, the test is only moderately sensitive, highly subjective and skilled-labor intensive. Newer optical screening tests (cervicography, direct visual inspection and speculoscopy), including fluorescent and reflective spectroscopy, are fraught with certain weaknesses. Yet, the integration of optical probes for the detection and discrimination of cervical neoplasia with automated image analysis methods may provide an effective screening tool for early detection of cervical cancer, particularly in resource poor nations. Investigative studies are needed to validate the potential for automated classification and recognition algorithms. By applying image analysis techniques for registration, segmentation, pattern recognition, and classification, cervical neoplasia may be reliably discriminated from normal epithelium. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), in cooperation with the National Library of Medicine (NLM), has embarked on a program to begin this and other similar investigative studies.

  13. Aortic chondroid neoplasia in two Labrador Retriever dogs.

    PubMed

    Kohnken, R; Durham, J A; Premanandan, C; Scansen, B A

    2015-12-01

    In the same week, two Labrador Retriever dogs presented to The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center for cardiac evaluation. The presenting signs in both dogs included: weight loss, weakness, lethargy, and decreased femoral pulses. The first dog presented in cardiogenic shock and biventricular congestive heart failure, which initially responded to treatment; however, the dog was euthanized due to deteriorating clinical condition. In contrast, the second dog had a milder clinical course without signs of congestive heart failure, and remained stable over the 2-month period of clinical evaluation prior to euthanasia. Echocardiographic evaluation revealed a dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype in the first dog, while a space-occupying intraluminal mass originating at the aortic valve with preserved left ventricular systolic function was observed in the second dog. At autopsy, each dog had a large obstructive luminal mass affecting the ascending aorta and arch. Histopathology revealed that the mass in the first dog was consistent with a benign chondroma, while in the second dog the morphologic characteristics, mitotic activity, and infiltrative growth justified a diagnosis of chondrosarcoma. This report presents the contrasting clinical disease progression and findings in two dogs with aortic neoplasia, with a proposed pathogenesis of cardiac failure secondary to aortic neoplasia. PMID:26521222

  14. Diagnosis and therapies for gastric non-invasive neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Motohiko

    2015-01-01

    There has been a great discrepancy of pathological diagnosis for gastric non-invasive neoplasia/dysplasia between Japanese and western pathologists. In Japan, lesions that most western pathologists diagnose as dysplasia are often considered adenocarcinoma based on nuclear and structural atypia regardless of the presence of invasion. In the Vienna classification, gastric non-invasive intraepithelial neoplasia (NIN) were divided into low grade and high grade (including intra-mucosal cancer of Japanese criteria). The diagnosis by both endoscopy and pathology of biopsy specimen is difficult. Recent advances of diagnostic modality such as magnified endoscopy and imaged enhanced endoscopy is expected to improve the diagnostic yield for NIN. There are two treatment strategies for NIN, observation and diagnostic therapy by endoscopic resection (ER). ER is acceptable because of its less invasiveness and high local control rate, on the other hand, cancer-developing rate of low-grade NIN is reported to be low. Therefore there is controversy for the treatment of gastric NIN. Prospective study based on unified pathological definition is required in the future. PMID:26640329

  15. Microtopographic Inspection and Fractal Analysis of Skin Neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Manuel F. M.; Hipolito, Alberto Valencia; Gutierrez, Gustavo Fidel; Chanona, Jorge; Gallegos, Eva Ramn

    2008-04-01

    Early detection of skin cancer is fundamental to a successful treatment. Changes in the shape, including the relief, of skin lesions are an indicator of a possible malignity. Optical microtopographic inspection of skin lesions can be used to identify diagnostic patterns of benign and malign skin' lesions. Statistical parameters like the mean roughness (Ra) may allow the discrimination between different types of lesions and degree of malignity. Fractal analysis of bi-dimensional and 3D images of skin lesions can validate or complement that assessment by calculation of its fractal dimensions (FD). On the study herein reported the microtopographic inspection of the skin lesions were performed using the optical triangulation based microtopographer developed at the Physics Department of the University of Minho, MICROTOP.03.MFC. The patients that participated in this research work were men and women older than 15 years with the clinical and histopathology diagnoses of: melanoma, basocellular carcinoma, epidermoide carcinoma, actinic keratosis, keratoacantosis and benign nevus. Latex impressions of the lesions were taken and microtopographically analyzed. Characteristic information for each type of studied lesion was obtained. For melanoma it was observed that on the average these tumors present an increased roughness of around 67 percent compared to the roughness of the healthy skin. This feature allows the distinction from other tumors as basocellular carcinoma (were the roughness increase was in the average of 49 percent) and benign lesions as the epidermoide cyst (37 percent) or the seborrhea keratosis (4 percent). Tumor size and roughness are directly proportional to the grade of malignality. The characterization of the fractal geometry of 2D (histological slides) and 3D images of skin lesions was performed by obtaining its FD evaluated by means of the Box counting method. Results obtained showed that the average fractal dimension of histological slide images (FDh) corresponding to some neoplasia is higher (1.334+/-0.072) than those for healthy skin (1.091+/-0.082). A significant difference between the fractal dimensions of neoplasia and healhty skin (>0.001) was registered. The FD of microtopography maps (FDm) can also distinguish between healthy and malignant tissue in general (2.277+/-0.070 to 2.309+/-0.040), but not discriminate the different types of skin neoplasias. The combination of the rugometric evaluation and fractal geometry characterization provides valuable information about the malignity of skin lesions and type of lesion.

  16. Surgical interventions for high grade vulval intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Sonali; Pepas, Litha; Nordin, Andy; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background Vulval intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) is a pre-malignant condition of the vulval skin. This uncommon chronic skin condition of the vulva is associated with a high risk of recurrence and the potential to progress to vulval cancer. The condition is complicated by its’ multicentric and multifocal nature. The incidence of this condition appears to be rising particularly in the younger age group. There is a lack of consensus on the optimal surgical treatment method. However, the rationale for surgical treatment of VIN has been to treat symptoms and exclude underlying malignancy with the continued aim of preservation of vulval anatomy and function. Repeated treatments affect local cosmesis and cause psychosexual morbidity thus impacting on the patients’ quality of life. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of surgical interventions for high grade VIN. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 3, 2010, Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE and EMBASE up to September 2010. We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared surgical interventions, in adult women diagnosed with high grade vulval intraepithelial neoplasia. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Main results We found only one RCT which included 30 women that met our inclusion criteria and this trial reported data on carbon dioxide laser (CO2 laser) versus ultrasonic surgical aspiration (USA). There was no statistically significant difference in the risk of disease recurrence after one year follow-up, pain, presence of scarring, dysuria or burning, adhesions, infection, abnormal discharge and eschar between women who received CO2 laser and those who received USA. The trial lacked statistical power due to the small number of women in each group and the low number of observed events, but was at low risk of bias. Authors’ conclusions The included trial lacked statistical power due to the small number of women in each group and the low number of observed events. Therefore in the absence of reliable evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of the two surgical techniques for the management of vulval intraepithelial neoplasia precludes any definitive guidance or recommendations for clinical practice. PMID:21249698

  17. Myeloma cells in the cerebrospinal fluid in plasma cell neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    Myeloma cells were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of two patients with plasma cell neoplasia during the myelographic studies of 38 patients whose myeloma was associated with extensive neurological complications. The myeloma cells were looked for in Wright stained centrifuged deposit of 2–5 ml samples of the cerebrospinal fluid obtained during myelography. The possibility that occult traumatic lumbar puncture had allowed entry of circulating myeloma cells from the peripheral blood into the subarachnoid space was excluded by the absence of myeloma cells in smears of peripheral blood and its buffy coat. Up to the end stages of the disease the meningeal myeloma lesions remained microscopical and no signs of raised intracranial tension were manifested by either patient. Images PMID:4443811

  18. Myeloid Neoplasias: What Molecular Analyses Are Telling Us

    PubMed Central

    Gutiyama, Luciana M.; Coutinho, Diego F.; Lipkin, Marina V.; Zalcberg, Ilana R.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades, cytogenetic and molecular characterizations of hematological disorders at diagnosis and followup have been most valuable for guiding therapeutic decisions and prognosis. Genetic and epigenetic alterations detected by different procedures have been associated to different cancer types and are considered important indicators for disease classification, differential diagnosis, prognosis, response, and individualization of therapy. The search for new biomarkers has been revolutionized by high-throughput technologies. At this point, it seems that we have overcome technological barriers, but we are still far from sorting the biological puzzle. Evidence based on translational research is required for validating novel genetic and epigenetic markers for routine clinical practice. We herein discuss the importance of genetic abnormalities and their molecular pathways in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloproliferative neoplasms. We also discuss how novel genomic abnormalities may interact and reassess concepts and classifications of myeloid neoplasias. PMID:23056961

  19. Post-genomics of bone metabolic dysfunctions and neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Giulia; Braconi, Daniela; Spreafico, Adriano; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-02-01

    Post-genomic research on osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells, in contrast to that on many other cell types, has only been undertaken recently. Nevertheless, important information has been gained from these investigations on the mechanisms involved in osteoblast differentiation and on markers relevant for tissue regeneration and therapeutic validation of drugs, hormones and growth factors. These protein indicators may also have a diagnostic and prognostic value for bone dysfunctions and tumors. Some reviews have already focused on the application of transcriptomics and/or proteomics for exploring skeletal biology and related disorders. The main goal of the present review is to systematically summarize the most relevant post-genomic studies on various metabolic bone diseases (osteoporosis, Paget's disease and osteonecrosis), neoplasias (osteosarcoma) and metabolic conditions that indirectly affect bone tissue, such as alkaptonuria. PMID:22246652

  20. Cerebral oligodendroglioma mimicking intraventricular neoplasia in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R; Levine, Jonathan M; Eden, Kristin B; Watson, Victoria E; Griffin, John F; Edwards, John F; Porter, Brian F

    2015-05-01

    Oligodendroglioma is one of the most common primary central nervous system neoplasms of dogs. It is often diagnosed in older, brachycephalic breeds, and although its typical clinical features and neuroanatomic location have been well described, less common presentations may hinder its diagnosis. We describe 3 cases of canine cerebral oligodendroglioma that clinically and grossly present as intraventricular tumors. Histologic findings in all cases were typical of oligodendroglioma. Neoplastic cells were uniformly immunoreactive for Olig2 and negative for neuron-specific enolase, neurofilament, and glial fibrillary acidic protein. In addition to the immunopositivity for Olig2, a cluster of morphologically distinct neoplastic cells in one of the cases was immunoreactive for synaptophysin, and the case was diagnosed as an oligodendroglioma with neurocytic differentiation. Based on these findings, oligodendroglioma should be included as a differential diagnosis for intraventricular neoplasia in dogs. Furthermore, oligodendroglioma with ventricular involvement should be differentiated from central neurocytoma by immunohistochemistry. PMID:25943126

  1. A retrospective study of skull base neoplasia in 42 dogs.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R

    2015-11-01

    This study describes the prevalence and distribution of 42 cases of skull base neoplasia in dogs between 2000 and 2014. The average age of affected individuals was 9.5 years, and there was no sex or breed predisposition. The most common skull base neoplasms were meningioma (25 cases) and pituitary adenoma (9 cases). Less common tumors included craniopharyngioma (2 cases), nerve sheath tumor (2 cases), and 1 case each of pituitary carcinoma, meningeal oligodendrogliomatosis, presumed nasal or sinonasal carcinoma, and multilobular tumor of bone. All neoplasms caused some degree of compression of adjacent structures. The distribution of the tumors was greatest in the sellar region (n = 18), followed by the paranasal region (n = 12), caudal cranial fossa (n = 10), central cranial fossa (n = 1), and rostral cranial fossa (n = 1). PMID:26462763

  2. Thyroid neoplasia following radiation therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, C.; Jarosz, H.; Calandra, D.; McCall, A.; Lawrence, A.M.; Paloyan, E.

    1987-06-01

    The question of thyroid neoplasia following high-dose radiation treatment to the neck and mediastinum for malignant neoplasms such as Hodgkin's lymphoma in children and young adults has been raised recently. Five patients, 19 to 39 years old, were operated on for thyroid neoplasms that developed following cervical and mediastinal radiation therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Three patients had papillary carcinomas and two had follicular adenomas. The latency period between radiation exposure and the diagnosis of thyroid neoplasm ranged from eight to 16 years. This limited series provided strong support for the recommendation that children and young adults who are to receive high-dose radiation therapy to the head, neck, and mediastinum should receive suppressive doses of thyroxine prior to radiation therapy in order to suppress thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone) and then be maintained on a regimen of suppression permanently.

  3. The Risk of Colorectal Neoplasia in Patients with Gallbladder Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung Noh; Lee, Tae Yoon; Yun, Sung-Cheol

    2015-09-01

    Cholecystectomy is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, but little is known about the relationship between gallbladder disease and colorectal adenoma. Gallbladder polyps and colorectal neoplasia (CRN) share several risk factors such as obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, which might account for their association. In this study, we investigated whether asymptomatic patients with gallbladder disease are at increased risk of CRN and identified the factors to their association. The study population consisted of 4,626 consecutive, asymptomatic individuals drawn from a prospective health check-up cohort who underwent both ultrasonography and colonoscopy screening. The prevalence of CRNs in patients with gallbladder polyps or gallstones was significantly higher than that in the control group (32.1% vs. 26.8%; P = 0.032, 35.8% vs. 26.9%; P = 0.020). A multivariate regression analysis showed that gallbladder polyps were an independent risk factor for CRN [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.29; 95% confidence interval (CI); 1.03-1.62] whereas gallstones were not (adjusted OR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.79-1.63). The adjusted OR for the risk of CRN was 1.12 for gallbladder polyps < 5 mm (95% CI, 0.85-1.46) and 1.79 for gallbladder polyps ≥ 5 mm (95% CI, 1.15-2.77). The prevalence of CRN increased with increasing polyp size (P trend = 0.022). Our results suggest that colorectal neoplasia is significantly related to gallbladder polyps, especially those ≥ 5 mm. PMID:26339169

  4. Computed tomographic findings in 57 cats with primary pulmonary neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Aarsvold, Stacie; Reetz, Jennifer A; Reichle, Jean K; Jones, Ian D; Lamb, Christopher R; Evola, Maria G; Keyerleber, Michele A; Marolf, Angela J

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary neoplasia is relatively uncommon in cats and generally has a poor prognosis. In this multicenter, retrospective study of 57 cats with pulmonary neoplasia, the most frequent presenting signs were anorexia/inappetence (39%) and cough (37%). The pulmonary tumors were considered to be incidental findings in 9% cats. In computed tomographic (CT) images, primary pulmonary tumors appeared as a pulmonary mass in 55 (96%) cats and as a disseminated pulmonary lesion without a defined mass in two (4%) cats. Most pulmonary tumors were in the caudal lobes, with 28 (49%) in the right caudal lobe and 17 (30%) in the left caudal lobe. CT features associated with pulmonary tumors included mass in contact with visceral pleura (96%), irregular margins (83%), well-defined borders (79%), bronchial compression (74%), gas-containing cavities (63%), foci of mineral attenuation (56%), and bronchial invasion (19%). The mean (range) maximal dimension of the pulmonary masses was 3.5 cm (1.1-11.5 cm). Additional foci of pulmonary disease compatible with metastasis were observed in 53% cats. Pleural fluid was evident in 30% cats and pulmonary thrombosis in 12% cats. The histologic diagnoses were 47 (82%) adenocarcinomas, six (11%) tumors of bronchial origin, three (5%) adenosquamous cell carcinomas, and one (2%) squamous cell carcinoma. In this series, adenocarcinoma was the predominant tumor type, but shared many features with less common tumor types. No associations were identified between tumor type and CT features. Prevalence of suspected intrapulmonary metastasis was higher than in previous radiographic studies of cats with lung tumors. PMID:25605501

  5. Malignant Neoplasia of the Sex Skin in 2 Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Beck, Amanda P; Magden, Elizabeth R; Buchl, Stephanie J; Baze, Wallace B

    2016-01-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous malignant neoplasia within the sex skin of aged female chimpanzees. In both cases, the initial presentation resembled nonhealing traumatic wounds to the sex skin, with different degrees of infection, ulceration, and tissue necrosis. Histopathology of the lesions confirmed the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma in one case and of adenocarcinoma with metastasis in the other. Advanced age and previous trauma likely contributed to the development of the neoplasias in both cases; long-term sun exposure may also have contributed to the development of the squamous cell carcinoma. To our knowledge, these 2 cases represent the first reports of sex skin neoplasia in chimpanzees. PMID:27053571

  6. [Screening for anal intra-epithelial neoplasia among men, who have sex with men].

    PubMed

    Kiellberg Larsen, Helle

    2013-02-01

    Anal intra-epithelial neoplasia is of high incidence in the post-highly active antiretroviral treatment era especially among men, who have sex with men (MSM). This article focuses on the relation between infection with oncogenic HPV types and anal intra-epithelial neoplasia, and the potential progression to anal cancer. Vaccine studies with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in HIV-negative MSM shows promising results regarding preventing development of HGAIN. PMID:23402240

  7. A Drosophila Model of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Read, Renee D.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Novak, Nancy; Armstrong, Jon R.; Cagan, Ross L.

    2005-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the Ret receptor tyrosine kinase lead to the familial cancer syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2). Mammalian tissue culture studies suggest that RetMEN2 mutations significantly alter Ret-signaling properties, but the precise mechanisms by which RetMEN2 promotes tumorigenesis remain poorly understood. To determine the signal transduction pathways required for RetMEN2 activity, we analyzed analogous mutations in the Drosophila Ret ortholog dRet. Overexpressed dRetMEN2 isoforms targeted to the developing retina led to aberrant cell proliferation, inappropriate cell fate specification, and excessive Ras pathway activation. Genetic analysis indicated that dRetMEN2 acts through the Ras-ERK, Src, and Jun kinase pathways. A genetic screen for mutations that dominantly suppress or enhance dRetMEN2 phenotypes identified new genes that are required for the phenotypic outcomes of dRetMEN2 activity. Finally, we identified human orthologs for many of these genes and examined their status in human tumors. Two of these loci showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) within both sporadic and MEN2-associated pheochromocytomas, suggesting that they may contribute to Ret-dependent oncogenesis. PMID:15965261

  8. Challenges in automated detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Yeshwanth; Yang, Shuyu; Nutter, Brian; Mitra, Sunanda; Phillips, Benny; Long, Rodney

    2007-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) is a precursor to invasive cervical cancer, which annually accounts for about 3700 deaths in the United States and about 274,000 worldwide. Early detection of CIN is important to reduce the fatalities due to cervical cancer. While the Pap smear is the most common screening procedure for CIN, it has been proven to have a low sensitivity, requiring multiple tests to confirm an abnormality and making its implementation impractical in resource-poor regions. Colposcopy and cervicography are two diagnostic procedures available to trained physicians for non-invasive detection of CIN. However, many regions suffer from lack of skilled personnel who can precisely diagnose the bio-markers due to CIN. Automatic detection of CIN deals with the precise, objective and non-invasive identification and isolation of these bio-markers, such as the Acetowhite (AW) region, mosaicism and punctations, due to CIN. In this paper, we study and compare three different approaches, based on Mathematical Morphology (MM), Deterministic Annealing (DA) and Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM), respectively, to segment the AW region of the cervix. The techniques are compared with respect to their complexity and execution times. The paper also presents an adaptive approach to detect and remove Specular Reflections (SR). Finally, algorithms based on MM and matched filtering are presented for the precise segmentation of mosaicism and punctations from AW regions containing the respective abnormalities.

  9. Imiquimod in cervical, vaginal and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia: a review.

    PubMed

    de Witte, C J; van de Sande, A J M; van Beekhuizen, H J; Koeneman, M M; Kruse, A J; Gerestein, C G

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is in the vast majority of patients accountable for the development of vulvar, cervical and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN, CIN, VAIN); precursors of vulvar, cervical and vaginal cancers. The currently preferred treatment modality for high grade VIN, CIN and VAIN is surgical excision. Nevertheless surgical treatment is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and recurrence is not uncommon. The aim of this review is to present evidence on the efficacy, safety and tolerability of imiquimod (an immune response modifier) in HPV-related VIN, CIN and VAIN. A search for papers on the use of imiquimod in VIN, CIN and VAIN was performed in the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane library databases. Data was extracted and reviewed. Twenty-one articles met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed; 16 on VIN, 3 on CIN and 2 on VAIN. Complete response rates in VIN ranged from 5 to 88%. Although minor adverse effects were frequently reported, treatment with imiquimod was well tolerated in most patients. Studies on imiquimod treatment of CIN and VAIN are limited and lack uniformly defined endpoints. The available evidence however, shows encouraging effect. Complete response rates for CIN 2-3 and VAIN 1-3 ranged from 67 to 75% and 57 to 86% respectively. More randomized controlled trials on the use of imiquimod in CIN, VAIN and VIN with extended follow-up are necessary to determine the attributive therapeutic value in these patients. PMID:26335596

  10. Screening, Surveillance, and Treatment of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Long, Kevin C; Menon, Raman; Bastawrous, Amir; Billingham, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of anal intraepithelial neoplasia has been increasing, especially in high-risk patients, including men who have sex with men, human immunodeficiency virus positive patients, and those who are immunosuppressed. Several studies with long-term follow-up have suggested that rate of progression from high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions to invasive anal cancer is ∼ 5%. This number is considerably higher for those at high risk. Anal cytology has been used to attempt to screen high-risk patients for disease; however, it has been shown to have very little correlation to actual histology. Patients with lesions should undergo history and physical exam including digital rectal exam and standard anoscopy. High-resolution anoscopy can be considered as well, although it is of questionable time and cost-effectiveness. Nonoperative treatments include expectant surveillance and topical imiquimod or 5-fluorouracil. Operative therapies include wide local excision and targeted ablation with electrocautery, infrared coagulation, or cryotherapy. Recurrence rates remain high regardless of treatment delivered and surveillance is paramount, although optimal surveillance regimens have yet to be established. PMID:26929753

  11. Mutational spectrum of intraepithelial neoplasia in pancreatic heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changqing; Gocke, Christopher D; Hruban, Ralph H; Belchis, Deborah A

    2016-02-01

    Heterotopic pancreatic parenchyma recapitulates the normal pancreas in extrapancreatic locations and, on rare occasions, can even give rise to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The genetic signatures of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesions are well characterized. We explored the genetic alterations in precursor lesions (intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms [IPMN], pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia [PanIN]) in patients with pancreatic heterotopias but without concomitant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. This allowed us to determine whether the stereotypical dysplasia--infiltrating carcinoma sequence also occurs in these extrapancreatic foci. Seven cases of heterotopic pancreas with ductal precursor lesions were identified. These included 2 IPMNs with focal high-grade dysplasia and 5 PanINs with low- to moderate-grade dysplasia (PanIN grades 1-2). Neoplastic epithelium was microdissected and genomic DNA was extracted. Sequencing of commonly mutated hotspots (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, BRAF, and GNAS) in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesions was performed. Both IPMNs were found to have KRAS codon 12 mutations. The identification of KRAS mutations suggests a genetic pathway shared with IPMN of the pancreas. No mutations were identified in our heterotopic PanINs. One of the possible mechanisms for the development of dysplasia in these lesions is field effect. At the time of these resections, there was no clinical or pathologic evidence of a prior or concomitant pancreatic lesion. However, a clinically undetectable lesion is theoretically possible. Therefore, although a field effect cannot be excluded, there was no evidence for it in this study. PMID:26626780

  12. Coincidence of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsunenori; Miura, Daishu; Taguchi, Manabu; Takeshita, Akira; Miyakawa, Megumi; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2010-10-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) occurs as a part of multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2. Acromegaly, a pituitary adenoma, occurs as a part of MEN1. Rarely, MEN2 and MEN1 coexist in a single patient simultaneously. A 40-year-old man with a history of pituitary adenomectomy for acromegaly had a surgical resection of thyroid carcinoma clinically diagnosed as MTC. His mother, who had MTC and pheochromocytoma, had a germline mutation in the RET gene that could cause the subtype, MEN2A. Identification of gene mutations in RET and MEN1 were examined in the subject. The resected tumor was pathologically diagnosed as MTC. Genomic examinations revealed the RET mutation C634F, which was identical to the mutation of his mother, but no MEN1 gene mutation was found. Although the simultaneous occurrence of both MEN2A and sporadic acromegaly may be accidental, there is evidence to suggest a genetic interaction between MEN2 and acromegaly. PMID:20739875

  13. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia--is treatment better than observation?

    PubMed

    Orchard, M; Roman, A; Parvaiz, A C

    2013-01-01

    Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia (AIN) is an increasingly common condition for which the best treatment has not been well established. Traditional management was based on a 'watch and wait' strategy, but as the natural history of AIN and its progression to anal cancer is becoming better understood, more active treatment strategies are warranted. A best evidence topic in surgery was written according to a structured protocol to address the question whether treatment is indicated in patients with AIN. A total of 169 papers were identified using the defined search criteria. This included only one randomised controlled trial. Case series were therefore also included to help answer the question. The details of the papers were tabulated including relevant outcomes and study weaknesses. We conclude that treatment of high grade AIN, particularly in high risk groups is recommended to try to avoid progression to anal cancer. Treatment options that have shown some benefit include topical use of imiquimod cream or ablation directed by high resolution anoscopy. PMID:23643642

  14. Familial multiple endocrine neoplasia: the first 100 years.

    PubMed

    Carney, J Aidan

    2005-02-01

    In 1903, Erdheim described the case of an acromegalic patient with a pituitary adenoma and three enlarged parathyroid glands. Fifty years later, Underdahl et al reported 8 patients with a syndrome of pituitary, parathyroid, and pancreatic islet adenomas. In 1954, Wermer found that the syndrome was transmitted as a dominant trait. In 1959, Hazard et al described medullary (solid) thyroid carcinoma (MTC), a tumor that later was found to be a component of two endocrine syndromes. The first of these described by Sipple in 1961 comprised pheochromocytoma, MTC, and parathyroid adenoma. The second, described by Williams et al in 1966, was the combination of mucosal neuromas, pheochromocytoma, and MTC. In 1968, Steiner et al introduced the term "multiple endocrine neoplasia" (MEN) to describe disorders featuring combinations of endocrine tumors; they designated the Wermer syndrome as MEN 1 and the Sipple syndrome as MEN 2. In 1974, Sizemore et al concluded that the MEN 2 category included two groups of patients with MTC and pheochromocytoma: one with parathyroid disease and a normal appearance (MEN 2A) and the other without parathyroid disease but with mucosal neuromas and mesodermal abnormalities (MEN 2B). Later, additional nonendocrine conditions (von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis and von Hippel-Lindau disease) were found accompanying other more recently described familial MEN syndromes, indicating that these diseases are very complicated disorders. PMID:15644784

  15. Dynamic behavioural interpretation of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with molecular biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Baak, J P A; Kruse, A‐J; Robboy, S J; Janssen, E A M; van Diermen, B; Skaland, I

    2006-01-01

    The microscopic phenotype of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) reflects a fine balance between factors that promote or reduce CIN development. A shortcoming of the current grading system is its reliance on static morphology and microscopic haematoxylin–eosin features of the epithelium alone. In reality, CIN is a dynamic process, and the epithelium may exhibit differing results over time. Functional biomarkers p16, Ki‐67, p53, retinoblastoma protein cytokeratin (CK)14 and CK13, help in the assessment of an individual CIN's lesion's potential for progression and regression. The aggregate information provided by these biomarkers exceeds the value of the classic grading system. Consequently, many more CINs that will either regress or progress can be accurately identified. These findings agree with known molecular interactions between HPV and the host. For accurate interpretation of a CIN, it is essential that these biomarkers be determined quantitatively and separately in the superficial, middle and deep layers of the epithelium. Such geography‐specific epithelial evaluations of quantitative biomarkers emphasise the dynamic nature of a particular CIN lesion, thereby changing the art of static morphology grading into dynamic interpretation of the diseased tissue, with a strong prognostic effect. PMID:16679355

  16. Dynamic behavioural interpretation of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with molecular biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Baak, J P A; Kruse, A-J; Robboy, S J; Janssen, E A M; van Diermen, B; Skaland, I

    2006-10-01

    The microscopic phenotype of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) reflects a fine balance between factors that promote or reduce CIN development. A shortcoming of the current grading system is its reliance on static morphology and microscopic haematoxylin-eosin features of the epithelium alone. In reality, CIN is a dynamic process, and the epithelium may exhibit differing results over time. Functional biomarkers p16, Ki-67, p53, retinoblastoma protein cytokeratin (CK)14 and CK13, help in the assessment of an individual CIN's lesion's potential for progression and regression. The aggregate information provided by these biomarkers exceeds the value of the classic grading system. Consequently, many more CINs that will either regress or progress can be accurately identified. These findings agree with known molecular interactions between HPV and the host. For accurate interpretation of a CIN, it is essential that these biomarkers be determined quantitatively and separately in the superficial, middle and deep layers of the epithelium. Such geography-specific epithelial evaluations of quantitative biomarkers emphasise the dynamic nature of a particular CIN lesion, thereby changing the art of static morphology grading into dynamic interpretation of the diseased tissue, with a strong prognostic effect. PMID:16679355

  17. Pharmacological Intervention through Dietary Nutraceuticals in Gastrointestinal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mohammad F; Bhat, Showket H; Husain, Eram; Abu-Duhier, Faisel; Hadi, S M; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Ahmad, Aamir

    2014-11-01

    Abstract Neoplastic conditions associated with gastrointestinal (GI) tract are common worldwide with colorectal cancer alone accounting for the third leading rate of cancer incidence. Other GI malignancies such as esophageal carcinoma have shown an increasing trend in the last few years. The poor survival statistics of these fatal cancer diseases highlight the need for multiple alternative treatment options along with effective prophylactic strategies. Worldwide geographical variation in cancer incidence indicates a correlation between dietary habits and cancer risk. Epidemiological studies have suggested that populations with high intake of certain dietary agents in their regular meals have lower cancer rates. Thus an impressive embodiment of evidence supports the concept that dietary factors are key modulators of cancer including those of GI origin. Preclinical studies on animal models of carcinogenesis have reflected the pharmacological significance of certain dietary agents called as nutraceuticals in the chemoprevention of GI neoplasia. These include stilbenes (from red grapes and red wine), isoflavones (from soy), carotenoids (from tomatoes), curcuminoids (from spice turmeric), catechins (from green tea) and various other small plant metabolites (from fruits, vegetables and cereals). Pleiotropic action mechanisms have been reported for these diet-derived chemopreventive agents to retard, block or reverse carcinogenesis. This review presents a prophylactic approach to primary prevention of GI cancers by highlighting the translational potential of plant-derived nutraceuticals from epidemiological, laboratory and clinical studies, for the better management of these cancers through consumption of nutraceutical rich diets and their intervention in cancer therapeutics. PMID:25365584

  18. Anal cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia screening: A review.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Ira L; Fang, Sandy H

    2016-01-27

    This review focuses on the early diagnosis of anal cancer and its precursor lesions through routine screening. A number of risk-stratification strategies as well as screening techniques have been suggested, and currently little consensus exists among national societies. Much of the current clinical rationale for the prevention of anal cancer derives from the similar tumor biology of cervical cancer and the successful use of routine screening to identify cervical cancer and its precursors early in the disease process. It is thought that such a strategy of identifying early anal intraepithelial neoplasia will reduce the incidence of invasive anal cancer. The low prevalence of anal cancer in the general population prevents the use of routine screening. However, routine screening of selected populations has been shown to be a more promising strategy. Potential screening modalities include digital anorectal exam, anal Papanicolaou testing, human papilloma virus co-testing, and high-resolution anoscopy. Additional research associating high-grade dysplasia treatment with anal cancer prevention as well as direct comparisons of screening regimens is necessary to develop further anal cancer screening recommendations. PMID:26843912

  19. Helicobacter pylori and colorectal neoplasia: Is there a causal link?

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D

    2016-01-14

    Ever since Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was recognized as an infectious cause of gastric cancer, there has been increasing interest in examining its potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Data from case-control and cross-sectional studies, mostly relying on hospital-based samples, and several meta-analyses have shown a positive statistical relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasia. However, the possibility exists that the results have been influenced by bias, including the improper selection of patients and disparities with respect to potential confounders. While the evidence falls short of a definitive causal link, it appears that infection with H. pylori/H. pylori-related gastritis is associated with an increased, although modest, risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for this association remain uncertain. H. pylori has been detected in colorectal malignant tissues; however, the possibility that H. pylori is a direct activator of colonic carcinogenesis remains purely hypothetical. On the other hand, experimental data have indicated a series of potential oncogenic interactions between these bacteria and colorectal mucosa, including induction and perpetuation of inflammatory responses, alteration of gut microflora and release of toxins and/or hormonal mediators, such as gastrin, which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:26811614

  20. Thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to nuclear fallout.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, T E; van Belle, G; LoGerfo, J P

    1987-08-01

    We studied the risk of thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to radioiodines in nuclear fallout from the 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test. We screened 7266 Marshall Islanders for thyroid nodules; the islanders were from 14 atolls, including several southern atolls, which were the source of the best available unexposed comparison group. Using a retrospective cohort design, we determined the prevalence of thyroid nodularity in a subgroup of 2273 persons who were alive in 1954 and who therefore were potentially exposed to fallout from the BRAVO test. For those 12 atolls previously thought to be unexposed to fallout, the prevalence of thyroid nodules ranged from 0.9% to 10.6%. Using the distance of each atoll from the test site as a proxy for the radiation dose to the thyroid gland, a weighted linear regression showed an inverse linear relationship between distance and the age-adjusted prevalence of thyroid nodules. Distance was the strongest single predictor in logistic regression analysis. A new absolute risk estimate was calculated to be 1100 excess cases/Gy/y/1 X 10(6) persons (11.0 excess cases/rad/y/1 million persons), 33% higher than previous estimates. We conclude that an excess of thyroid nodules was not limited only to the two northern atolls but extended throughout the northern atolls; this suggests a linear dose-response relationship. PMID:3612986

  1. Helicobacter pylori and colorectal neoplasia: Is there a causal link?

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was recognized as an infectious cause of gastric cancer, there has been increasing interest in examining its potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Data from case-control and cross-sectional studies, mostly relying on hospital-based samples, and several meta-analyses have shown a positive statistical relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasia. However, the possibility exists that the results have been influenced by bias, including the improper selection of patients and disparities with respect to potential confounders. While the evidence falls short of a definitive causal link, it appears that infection with H. pylori/H. pylori-related gastritis is associated with an increased, although modest, risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for this association remain uncertain. H. pylori has been detected in colorectal malignant tissues; however, the possibility that H. pylori is a direct activator of colonic carcinogenesis remains purely hypothetical. On the other hand, experimental data have indicated a series of potential oncogenic interactions between these bacteria and colorectal mucosa, including induction and perpetuation of inflammatory responses, alteration of gut microflora and release of toxins and/or hormonal mediators, such as gastrin, which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:26811614

  2. Anal cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia screening: A review

    PubMed Central

    Leeds, Ira L; Fang, Sandy H

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the early diagnosis of anal cancer and its precursor lesions through routine screening. A number of risk-stratification strategies as well as screening techniques have been suggested, and currently little consensus exists among national societies. Much of the current clinical rationale for the prevention of anal cancer derives from the similar tumor biology of cervical cancer and the successful use of routine screening to identify cervical cancer and its precursors early in the disease process. It is thought that such a strategy of identifying early anal intraepithelial neoplasia will reduce the incidence of invasive anal cancer. The low prevalence of anal cancer in the general population prevents the use of routine screening. However, routine screening of selected populations has been shown to be a more promising strategy. Potential screening modalities include digital anorectal exam, anal Papanicolaou testing, human papilloma virus co-testing, and high-resolution anoscopy. Additional research associating high-grade dysplasia treatment with anal cancer prevention as well as direct comparisons of screening regimens is necessary to develop further anal cancer screening recommendations. PMID:26843912

  3. Thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to nuclear fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T.E.; van Belle, G.; LoGerfo, J.P.

    1987-08-07

    We studied the risk of thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to radioiodines in nuclear fallout from the 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test. We screened 7266 Marshall Islanders for thyroid nodules; the islanders were from 14 atolls, including several southern atolls, which were the source of the best available unexposed comparison group. Using a retrospective cohort design, we determined the prevalence of thyroid nodularity in a subgroup of 2273 persons who were alive in 1954 and who therefore were potentially exposed to fallout from the BRAVO test. For those 12 atolls previously thought to be unexposed to fallout, the prevalence of thyroid nodules ranged from 0.9% to 10.6%. Using the distance of each atoll from the test site as a proxy for the radiation dose to the thyroid gland, a weighted linear regression showed an inverse linear relationship between distance and the age-adjusted prevalence of thyroid nodules. Distance was the strongest single predictor in logistic regression analysis. A new absolute risk estimate was calculated to be 1100 excess cases/Gy/y/1 X 10(6) persons (11.0 excess cases/rad/y/1 million persons), 33% higher than previous estimates. We conclude that an excess of thyroid nodules was not limited only to the two northern atolls but extended throughout the northern atolls; this suggests a linear dose-response relationship.

  4. A Possible New Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Mutation in a Patient with a Prototypic Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Buzzola, Rino; Kurukulasuriya, Lilamani Romayne; Touza, Mariana; Litofsky, Norman S.; Brietzke, Stephen; Sowers, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 1 syndrome is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by the occurrence of tumors involving two or more endocrine glands. These tumors include pheochromocytoma, adrenal cortical and neuroendocrine tumors including (bronchopulmonary, thymic, gastric), lipomas, angiofibromas, collagenomas, and meningiomas. MEN-4 is very rare and has been characterized by the occurrence of parathyroid and anterior pituitary tumors in association with tumors of the adrenals, kidneys, and reproductive organs. Summary We report the case of a 40-year-old male without significant family history of endocrine disease who was found to have primary hyperparathyroidism, a pituitary tumor causing acromegaly, thyroid cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and pancreatic cysts. We posit that this represents a new version of MEN-4. While renal tumors (angiomyolipoma) have been reported as part of the MEN-4 phenotype, to our knowledge, this is the first case reported of the association of MEN-1 and/or MEN-4 phenotype with this unique constellation of tumors, including renal cell carcinoma. Interestingly, this patient tested negative (DNA sequencing/deletion) for MEN-1 (menin), MEN-4 (CDKN1B) and VHL genes. Key Message Thus, while this case has clinical characteristics consistent with either MEN-1 or MEN-4, it may represent a unique genetic variant. PMID:26989398

  5. A shared transcriptional program in early breast neoplasias despite genetic and clinical distinctions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The earliest recognizable stages of breast neoplasia are lesions that represent a heterogeneous collection of epithelial proliferations currently classified based on morphology. Their role in the development of breast cancer is not well understood but insight into the critical events at this early stage will improve efforts in breast cancer detection and prevention. These microscopic lesions are technically difficult to study so very little is known about their molecular alterations. Results To characterize the transcriptional changes of early breast neoplasia, we sequenced 3′- end enriched RNAseq libraries from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue of early neoplasia samples and matched normal breast and carcinoma samples from 25 patients. We find that gene expression patterns within early neoplasias are distinct from both normal and breast cancer patterns and identify a pattern of pro-oncogenic changes, including elevated transcription of ERBB2, FOXA1, and GATA3 at this early stage. We validate these findings on a second independent gene expression profile data set generated by whole transcriptome sequencing. Measurements of protein expression by immunohistochemistry on an independent set of early neoplasias confirms that ER pathway regulators FOXA1 and GATA3, as well as ER itself, are consistently upregulated at this early stage. The early neoplasia samples also demonstrate coordinated changes in long non-coding RNA expression and microenvironment stromal gene expression patterns. Conclusions This study is the first examination of global gene expression in early breast neoplasia, and the genes identified here represent candidate participants in the earliest molecular events in the development of breast cancer. PMID:24887547

  6. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic inflammatory response. Successful treatment requires adherence to a regime that is uncomfortable at best and at worst painful. Topical treatments can be successful in motivated adherent patients willing to accept these side effects. PMID:23788834

  7. High Resolution Microendoscopy for Quantitative Diagnosis of Esophageal Neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongsuk

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the world. Cancers of the esophagus account for 3.8% of all cases of cancers, with approximately 482,300 new cases reported in 2008 worldwide. In the United States alone, it is estimated that approximately 18,000 new cases will be diagnosed in 2013, and 15,210 deaths are expected. Despite advances in surgery and chemoradiation therapy, these advances have not led to a significant increase in survival rates, primarily because diagnosis often at an advanced and incurable stage when treatment is more difficult and less successful. Accurate, objective methods for early detection of esophageal neoplasia are needed. Here, quantitative classification algorithms for high resolution miscroendoscopic images were developed to distinguish between esophageal neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissue. A clinical study in 177 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was performed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the classification algorithm in collaboration with the Mount Sinai Medical Center in the United States, the First Hospital of Jilin University in China, and the Cancer Institute and Hospital, the Chinese Academy of Medical Science in China. The study reported a sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 92%, respectively, in the training set, 87% and 97%, respectively, in the test set, and 84% and 95%, respectively, in an independent validation set. Another clinical study in 31 patients with Barrett's esophagus resulted in a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 85%. Finally, a compact, portable version of the high resolution microendoscopy (HRME) device using a consumer-grade camera was developed and a series of biomedical experimental studies were carried out to assess the capability of the device.

  8. CpG island methylation profile of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Norihiro; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Infiltrating adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is thought to develop through well-defined precursor lesions called pancreatic intraductal neoplasia (PanIN). Despite the exponential growth in our understanding of genetic events that characterize the progression of PanINs to invasive carcinoma, little is known about the role of epigenetic alterations in these precursor lesions. To define the timing and prevalence of methylation abnormalities during early pancreatic carcinogenesis, we investigated the CpG island methylation profile in the various grades of PanINs. Using methylation-specific PCR, we analyzed DNA samples from 65 PanIN lesions for methylation status of eight genes recently identified by microarray approach as aberrantly hypermethylated in invasive pancreatic cancer. Aberrant methylation at any of the eight genes was identified in 68% of all the PanIN lesions examined, and, notably, aberrant methylation was identified in more than 70% of the earliest lesions (PanIN-1A). The average number of methylated loci was 1.1 in PanIN-1A, 0.8 in PanIN-1B, 1.1 in PanIN-2, and 2.9 in PanIN-3 lesions (P = 0.01 for PanIN -3 vs earlier PanINs). Among the genes analyzed, NPTX2 demonstrated an increase in methylation prevalence from PanIN-1 to PanIN-2 (P = 0.0008), and from PanIN-2 to PanIN-3 for SARP2 (P = 0.001), Reprimo (P = 0.01), and LHX1 (P = 0.03). These results suggest that aberrant CpG island hypermethylation begins in early stages of PanINs, and its prevalence progressively increases during neoplastic progression. PMID:18157091

  9. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Griffin, Heather; Doorbar, John

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted. PMID:26193301

  10. CXC chemokine receptor 7 expression in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    TANG, TIAN; XIA, QINGJIE; XI, MINGRONG

    2016-01-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), also known as transformation and dysplasia of cervical intraepithelial cells, is the precancerous lesion of squamous cell carcinoma. CXC chemokine receptor 7 (CXCR7) has been indicated in tumor development and metastasis of multiple malignancies or precancerous lesion. However, the protein expression and function of CXCR7 in different stages of human CIN remains unclear. The present study examined CXCR7 protein expression in cervical tissue samples from 34 patients, including 7 patients with normal cervical tissues (negative control), 10 patients with stage I of CIN (CIN I), 8 patients with CIN II and 9 patients with CIN III. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) were established to evaluate the prognostic value of CXCR7 in differentiating various stages of CIN. Immunohistochemical staining showed that protein expression of CXCR7 was higher in CIN tissues compared with the normal cervical epithelium (P<0.05). High-grade CIN tissues expressed a higher level of CXCR7 compared to low-grade samples. The ROC curve of integral optical density analysis showed that CXCR7 could discriminate CIN I–III from normal cervical epithelium with 88.9% sensitivity and 71.4% specificity, and CIN II–III from the negative control and CIN I with 92.7% sensitivity and 50.0% specificity. ROC curve of area analysis also showed that CXCR7 could discriminate CIN I–III from normal cervical epithelium with 70.4% sensitivity and 100.0% specificity, and CIN II–III from the negative control and CIN I with 50.0% sensitivity and 90.0% specificity. An increase in CXCR7 expression may represent a novel predictor of CIN. The wide expression of CXCR7 in CIN also supports the assumption that CXCR7 plays a role in precancerous lesion progression, as well as proliferation, migration and angiogenesis. PMID:26870336

  11. Multiple endocrine neoplasias: advances and challenges for the future

    PubMed Central

    Alevizaki, M.; Stratakis, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Several important advances have been made over the last 2 years, since the last international workshop on multiple endocrine neoplasias (MENs) that was held in Marseilles, France (MEN2006). The series of articles that are included in this issue summarize the most important of these advances as they were presented in Delphi, Greece, during the 11th International Workshop on MENs, September 2527, 2008 (MEN2008). This editorial summarizes some of these advances: the identification of the AIP, and the PDE11A and PDE8B genes by genome-wide association (GWA) studies as predisposing genes for pituitary and adrenal tumours, respectively, the discovery of p27 mutations in a new form of MEN similar to MEN type 1 (MEN 1) that is now known as MEN 4, the molecular investigations of Carney triad (CT), a disorder that associates paragangliomas (PGLs), gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GISTs), and pulmonary chondromas (PCH) with pheochromocytomas and adrenocortical adenomas and other lesions, and the molecular elucidation of the association of GISTs with paragangliomas (CarneyStratakis syndrome) that is now known to be because of SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD mutations. Molecular investigations in Carney complex (another MEN also described by Dr. Carney, who during the meeting, along with Dr. Charles E. (Gene) Jackson was honoured for his life-long and many contributions to the field) have also revealed the role of cyclic AMP signalling in tumorigenesis. As our knowledge of the molecular causes of MENs increases, the challenge is to translate these discoveries in better treatments for our patients. Indeed, new advances in the preventive diagnosis and molecular treatment of MEN 1 and MEN 2, respectively, continued unabated, and an update on this front was also presented at MEN2008 and is included in this issue. PMID:19522821

  12. Atrial Fibrillation and Colonic Neoplasia in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Nouraie, Mehdi; Kansal, Vandana; Belfonte, Cassius; Ghazvini, Mohammad; Haidari, Tahmineh; Shahnazi, Anahita; Brim, Hassan; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Ashktorab, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) and atrial fibrillation/flutter (AF) share several risk factors including increasing age and obesity. However, the association between CRC and AF has not been thoroughly examined, especially in African Americans. In this study we aimed to assess the prevalence of AF and its risk factors in colorectal neoplasia in an African American. Methods We reviewed records of 527 African American patients diagnosed with CRC and 1008 patients diagnosed with benign colonic lesions at Howard University Hospital from January 2000 to December 2012. A control group of 731 hospitalized patients without any cancer or colonic lesion were randomly selected from the same time and age range, excluding patients who had diagnosis of both CRC and/or adenoma. The presence or absence of AF was based upon ICD-9 code documentation. The prevalence of AF in these three groups was compared by multivariate logistic regression. Results The prevalence of AF was highest among CRC patients (10%) followed by adenoma patients (7.2%) then the control group (5.4%, P for trend = 0.002). In the three groups of participants, older age (P<0.008) and heart failure (P<0.001) were significantly associated with higher risk of AF. After adjusting for these risk factors, CRC (OR: 1.4(95%CI):0.92.2, P = 0.2) and adenoma (OR: 1.1(95%CI):0.71.6, P = 0.7) were not significantly associated AF compared to control group. Conclusions AF is highly prevalent among CRC patients; 1 in 10 patients had AF in our study. The predictors of AF in CRC was similar to that in adenoma and other patients after adjustment for potential confounders suggesting that the increased AF risk in CRC is explained by higher prevalence of AF risk factors. PMID:26317627

  13. Diagnosis of gastric epithelial neoplasia: Dilemma for Korean pathologists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Mee; Cho, Mee-Yon; Sohn, Jin Hee; Kang, Dae Young; Park, Cheol Keun; Kim, Woo Ho; Jin, So-Young; Kim, Kyoung Mee; Chang, Hee Kyung; Yu, Eunsil; Jung, Eun Sun; Chang, Mee Soo; Joo, Jong Eun; Joo, Mee; Kim, Youn Wha; Park, Do Youn; Kang, Yun Kyung; Park, Sun Hoo; Han, Hye Seung; Kim, Young Bae; Park, Ho Sung; Chae, Yang Seok; Kwon, Kye Won; Chang, Hee Jin

    2011-06-01

    The histopathological diagnosis of gastric mucosal biopsy and endoscopic mucosal resection/endoscopic submucosal dissection specimens is important, but the diagnostic criteria, terminology, and grading system are not the same in the East and West. A structurally invasive focus is necessary to diagnose carcinoma for most Western pathologists, but Japanese pathologists make a diagnosis of cancer based on severe dysplastic cytologic atypia irrespective of the presence of invasion. Although the Vienna classification was introduced to reduce diagnostic discrepancies, it has been difficult to adopt due to different concepts for gastric epithelial neoplastic lesions. Korean pathologists experience much difficulty making a diagnosis because we are influenced by Japanese pathologists as well as Western medicine. Japan is geographically close to Korea, and academic exchanges are active. Additionally, Korean doctors are familiar with Western style medical terminology. As a result, the terminology, definitions, and diagnostic criteria for gastric intraepithelial neoplasia are very heterogeneous in Korea. To solve this problem, the Gastrointestinal Pathology Study Group of the Korean Society of Pathologists has made an effort and has suggested guidelines for differential diagnosis: (1) a diagnosis of carcinoma is based on invasion; (2) the most important characteristic of low grade dysplasia is the architectural pattern such as regular distribution of crypts without severe branching, budding, or marked glandular crowding; (3) if nuclear pseudostratification occupies more than the basal half of the cryptal cells in three or more adjacent crypts, the lesion is considered high grade dysplasia; (4) if severe cytologic atypia is present, careful inspection for invasive foci is necessary, because the risk for invasion is very high; and (5) other structural or nuclear atypia should be evaluated to make a final decision such as cribriform pattern, papillae, ridges, vesicular nuclei, high nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio, loss of nuclear polarity, thick and irregular nuclear membrane, and nucleoli. PMID:21677827

  14. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Griffin, Heather; Doorbar, John

    2015-07-01

    Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted. PMID:26193301

  15. Goitrogens and thyroid follicular cell neoplasia: evidence for a threshold process.

    PubMed

    Paynter, O E; Burin, G J; Jaeger, R B; Gregorio, C A

    1988-03-01

    Thyroid neoplasia can result from many different causes. These include low iodine diets, subtotal thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine, natural goitrogens such as rape seed and cabbage, chemotherapeutic agents such as sulfathiazole, and pesticides such as amitrole. All of these appear to act through either direct or indirect interference with thyroid hormone synthesis. Decreased circulating levels of thyroid hormones in the blood result in increased release of thyroid-stimulating hormone by the anterior pituitary gland. This, in turn, results in hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the thyroid without a corresponding increase in blood thyroid hormone levels. Hyperplasia of the pituitary is also observed due to increased functional demand for continued production of thyroid-stimulating hormone. After prolonged stimulation of the pituitary/thyroid axis, hyperplasia may progress to neoplasia. Cessation of exposure prior to the induction of neoplasia results in a return to the normal state. It is clear that some degree of thyroid inhibition can be accommodated within the bounds of the normal feedback mechanism without the induction of either hyperplasia or neoplasia. A threshold for thyroid follicular neoplasia is therefore indicated. PMID:3285378

  16. Serum and tissue antioxidant capacity in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia investigated using an enhanced chemiluminescent reaction.

    PubMed

    Cope, G; Thorpe, G; Holder, R; Luesley, D; Jordan, J

    1999-01-01

    Depleted antioxidant defence has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cervical neoplasia. We determined the systemic and local antioxidant status of women with this condition. Thirty-four women with varying grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, 25 patients who had been treated successfully with diathermy loop excision, and 56 women who had no evidence of cervical abnormality acted as controls. Total antioxidant capacity of serum and protein-free serum, and of neat and protein-free homogenized cervical punch biopsies were determined using enhanced chemiluminescence. Mean serum antioxidant capacity of patients with current neoplasia and treated patients was not significantly different from that of controls. However, mean antioxidant capacity of homogenized cervical tissue from women with neoplasia was significantly lower than control means (P < 0.005), while results for treated patients were intermediate between those from diseased and normal samples (P < 0.05). The enhanced chemiluminescence technique has potential as a suitable method for measuring total antioxidant capacity of cervical tissue, and warrants further investigations using other tissue types. Significant antioxidant depletion in cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia appears to be confined to the local cervical mucosa. PMID:10370766

  17. RETROSPECTIVE EVALUATION OF CASES OF NEOPLASIA IN A CAPTIVE POPULATION OF EGYPTIAN FRUIT BATS (ROUSETTUS AEGYPTIACUS).

    PubMed

    Olds, June E; Burrough, Eric R; Fales-Williams, Amanda J; Lehmkuhl, Aaron; Madson, Darin; Patterson, Abby J; Yaeger, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Reports of neoplasia in Chiroptera species are rare. (6, 10) This retrospective study describes five types of neoplasia identified within a captive population of male Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) housed in a zoo from 2004 through November of 2014. Tumor types identified include fibrosarcoma, cutaneous lymphoma, benign focal bronchioloalveolar neoplasm, anaplastic sarcoma, and sebaceous epithelioma. To the author's knowledge, aside from a recent report of focal brochioloalveolar adenoma, (8) these tumor types have not previously been described in the Rousettus species, nor in chiropterans in general. Based upon these findings and other recent publications regarding R. aegyptiacus, neoplasia does appear to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in captive members of this megachiropterid species. PMID:26056887

  18. Association of Genital Infections Other Than Human Papillomavirus with Pre-Invasive and Invasive Cervical Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ishita; Mandal, Ranajit; Kundu, Pratip; Biswas, Jaydip

    2016-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established causative agent of malignancy of the female genital tract and a common Sexually Transmitted Infection. The probable co-factors that prevent spontaneous clearance of HPV and progression to neoplasia are genital tract infections from organisms like Chlamydia, Trichomonas vaginalis etc, smoking, nutritional deficiencies and multiparity. Inflammatory conditions can lead to pre-neoplastic manifestations in the cervical epithelium; however their specific role in cervical carcinogenesis is not yet established. Therefore it is imperative to study the likely association between HPV and co-infection with various common pathogens in the genital tract of women having cervical precancer or cancer. A "Pubmed" search was made for articles in Literature on this topic using the words: Cervical neoplasia, HPV, co-infections, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN), Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida, Chlamydia and the relevant information obtained was used to draft the review. PMID:27042571

  19. Relationship between types of human papillomavirus and Langerhans' cells in cervical condyloma and intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Morelli, A E; Sananes, C; Di Paola, G; Paredes, A; Fainboim, L

    1993-02-01

    Planimetric and immunohistologic studies of Langerhans' cells were performed on epithelial sheets dissected from paired biopsy specimens removed from histopathologically normal and abnormal areas of cervices infected by the human papillomavirus. The results showed that epithelial lesions associated with human papillomavirus types classically not related to malignancy (such as types 6 and 11) showed a similar decrease in the Langerhans' cell number to that induced by types 16 and 18. This phenomenon was analyzed in condylomas and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of low degree, in which human papillomavirus DNA was detected by Southern blot. On the other hand, a significant decrease was observed in Langerhans' cell number in areas of condyloma and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia compared to normal (control) areas from the same patients. It was also confirmed that Langerhans' cell density increases along with the grade of intraepithelial neoplasia. PMID:7679874

  20. Pathological diagnosis of flat epithelial lesions of the biliary tract with emphasis on biliary intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasunori; Sasaki, Motoko; Harada, Kenichi; Aishima, Shinichi; Fukusato, Toshio; Ojima, Hidenori; Kanai, Yae; Kage, Masayoshi; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Tsubouchi, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    Flat epithelial lesions of the biliary tract cannot be detected by the image analysis, and the diagnosis entirely depends on pathological examination. The biliary tract is often affected by inflammatory conditions, and the resultant changes of the biliary epithelium make it difficult to differentiate them from neoplasia. Thus, the pathological diagnosis of biliary flat epithelial lesions can be challenging. In the biliary tract, there are several forms of intraepithelial neoplasia of the flat type, and biliary intraepithelial neoplasia (BilIN) is known as one of such lesions that represent the multistep cholangiocarcinogenesis. In this article, the diagnostic criteria and the differential diagnosis of biliary flat epithelial lesions, particularly focusing on BilIN, were presented and discussed to provide help to advance clinical and research applications of the BilIN system. PMID:23616173

  1. Association of Genital Infections Other Than Human Papillomavirus with Pre-Invasive and Invasive Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Ranajit; Kundu, Pratip; Biswas, Jaydip

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established causative agent of malignancy of the female genital tract and a common Sexually Transmitted Infection. The probable co-factors that prevent spontaneous clearance of HPV and progression to neoplasia are genital tract infections from organisms like Chlamydia, Trichomonas vaginalis etc, smoking, nutritional deficiencies and multiparity. Inflammatory conditions can lead to pre-neoplastic manifestations in the cervical epithelium; however their specific role in cervical carcinogenesis is not yet established. Therefore it is imperative to study the likely association between HPV and co-infection with various common pathogens in the genital tract of women having cervical precancer or cancer. A “Pubmed” search was made for articles in Literature on this topic using the words: Cervical neoplasia, HPV, co-infections, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN), Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida, Chlamydia and the relevant information obtained was used to draft the review. PMID:27042571

  2. Histologic differentiation and mucin phenotype in white opaque substance-positive gastric neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Ueo, Tetsuya; Yonemasu, Hirotoshi; Yao, Kenshi; Ishida, Tetsuya; Togo, Kazumi; Yanai, Yuka; Fukuda, Masahide; Motomura, Mitsuteru; Narita, Ryoich; Murakami, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: The authors previously reported that the white opaque substance (WOS) in gastric epithelial neoplasia was caused by accumulation of lipid droplets by immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic studies of adipophilin, which was recently identified and validated as a marker of lipid droplets. The aim of the current study was to investigate the characteristics of the histologic differentiation and mucin phenotype in WOS-positive gastric epithelial neoplasias. Patients and methods: A total of 130 gastric epithelial neoplasias (45 adenomas and 85 early adenocarcinomas) from 120 patients were retrospectively evaluated. The presence or absence of WOS was evaluated by M-NBI. Lipids were examined by immunohistochemical staining for adipophilin. Tissue phenotypes were immunohistochemically classified as intestinal (I), gastrointestinal (GI), and gastric (G) using antibodies against CD10, MUC2, MUC5AC and MUC6. The histologic differentiation and mucin phenotype of WOS-positive neoplasias were characterized and examined according to adipophilin expression. Results: The presence of WOS by M-NBI was correlated with histologic differences between adenoma or differentiated type adenocarcinoma and mixed type or undifferentiated type adenocarcinoma (P = 0.0153). Adipophilin was only expressed in primary adenoma and well to moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma components but not in undifferentiated components. WOS and adipophilin expression were only observed in neoplasias with I or GI phenotypes, but not in those with the G phenotype (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: WOS in gastric epithelial neoplasias might indicate differentiation into a mature histological subtype with GI or I mucin phenotype. PMID:26716119

  3. Infliximab and newly diagnosed neoplasia in Crohn's disease: a multicentre matched pair study

    PubMed Central

    Biancone, L; Orlando, A; Kohn, A; Colombo, E; Sostegni, R; Angelucci, E; Rizzello, F; Castiglione, F; Benazzato, L; Papi, C; Meucci, G; Riegler, G; Petruzziello, C; Mocciaro, F; Geremia, A; Calabrese, E; Cottone, M; Pallone, F

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims The widespread use of anti‐tumour necrosis factor α antibody (Infliximab) in Crohn's disease (CD) raises concerns about a possible cancer risk in the long term. In a matched pair study, we assessed whether Infliximab is associated with an increased risk of neoplasia. Methods In a multicentre matched pair study, 404 CD patients treated with Infliximab (CD‐IFX) were matched with 404 CD patients who had never received Infliximab (CD‐C). Cases and controls were matched for sex, age (±5 years), site of CD, age at diagnosis (±5 years), immunosuppressant use, and follow up. New diagnoses of neoplasia from April 1999 to October 2004 were recorded. Results Among the 404 CD‐IFX, neoplasia was diagnosed in nine patients (2.22%) while among the 404 CD‐C, seven patients developed neoplasia (1.73%) (odds ratio 1.33 (95% confidence interval 0.46–3.84); p = 0.40). The survival curve adjusted for patient year of follow up showed no differences between CD‐IFX and CD‐C (p = 0.90; log rank test). In the CD‐IFX group, there was one cholangiocarcinoma, three breast cancers, one skin cancer, one leukaemia, one laryngeal cancer, and two anal carcinomas. Among the 7/404 (1.73%) CD‐C, there were three intestinal adenocarcinomas (two caecum, one rectum), one basalioma, one spinalioma, one non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma, and one breast cancer. Age at diagnosis of neoplasia did not differ between groups (CD‐IFX v CD‐C: median 50 (range 40–70 years) v 45 (27–72); p = 0.50). Conclusion In our multicentre matched pair study, the frequency of a new diagnosis of neoplasia in CD patients treated with Infliximab was comparable with CD patients who had never received Infliximab. PMID:16120759

  4. Diagnosing Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Nguena, Marie B.; van den Tweel, Jan G.; Makupa, William; Hu, Victor H.; Weiss, Helen A.; Gichuhi, Stephen; Burton, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the reliability of clinical examination and invivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) in distinguishing ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) from benign conjunctival lesions. Design Case-control study. Participants Sixty individuals with conjunctival lesions (OSSN and benign) and 60 age-matched controls with normal conjunctiva presenting to Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre, Moshi, Tanzania. Methods Participants were examined and photographed, and IVCM was performed. Patients with conjunctival lesions were offered excisional biopsy with histopathology and a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test. The IVCM images were read masked to the clinical appearance and pathology results. Images were graded for several specific features and given an overall categorization (normal, benign, or malignant). A group of 8 ophthalmologists were shown photographs of conjunctival lesions and asked to independently classify as OSSN or benign. Main Outcome Measures Comparison of the histopathology diagnosis with the clinical and IVCM diagnosis. Results Fifty-two cases underwent excisional biopsy with histopathology; 34 were on the OSSN spectrum, 17 were benign, and 1 was lymphoma. The cases and controls had comparable demographic profiles. Human immunodeficiency syndrome infection was more common in OSSN compared with benign cases (58.8% vs. 5.6%; odds ratio, 24.3, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8204; P= 0.003). Clinically, OSSN lesions more frequently exhibited feeder vessels and tended to have more leukoplakia and a gelatinous appearance. Overall, the ophthalmologists showed moderate agreement with the histology result (average kappa= 0.51; 95% CI, 0.360.64). The masked grading of IVCM images reliably distinguished normal conjunctiva. However, IVCM was unable to reliably distinguish between benign lesions and OSSN because of an overlap in their appearance (kappa= 0.44; 95% CI, 0.320.57). No single feature was significantly more frequent in OSSN compared with benign lesions. The sensitivity and specificity of IVCM for distinguishing OSSN from benign conjunctival lesions were 38.5% and 66.7%, respectively. Conclusions In East Africa, conjunctival pathology is relatively common and can present significant diagnostic challenges for the clinician. In this study, neither clinical examination nor IVCM was found to reliably distinguish OSSN from benign conjunctival pathology because of an overlap in the features of these groups. Therefore, IVCM cannot currently replace histopathology, and management decisions should continue to rely on careful clinical assessment supported by histopathology as indicated. PMID:24321141

  5. Epidemiology of ocular surface squamous neoplasia in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gichuhi, Stephen; Sagoo, Mandeep S; Weiss, Helen A; Burton, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the epidemiology and an aetiological model of ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) in Africa. Methods Systematic and non-systematic review methods were used. Incidence was obtained from the International Agency for Research on Cancer. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and the reference lists of articles retrieved. Meta-analyses were conducted using a fixed-effects model for HIV and cigarette smoking and random effects for human papilloma virus (HPV). Results The incidence of OSSN is highest in the Southern Hemisphere (16° South), with the highest age-standardised rate (ASR) reported from Zimbabwe (3.4 and 3.0 cases/year/100 000 population for males and females, respectively). The mean ASR worldwide is 0.18 and 0.08 cases/year/100 000 among males and females, respectively. The risk increases with exposure to direct daylight (2–4 h, OR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.2–2.4 and ≥5 h OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1–3.1) and outdoor occupations (OR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1–2.6). Meta-analysis also shows a strong association with HIV (6 studies: OR = 6.17, 95% CI: 4.83–7.89) and HPV (7 studies: OR = 2.64, 95% CI: 1.27–5.49) but not cigarette smoking (2 studies: OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 0.94–2.09). The effect of atopy, xeroderma pigmentosa and vitamin A deficiency is unclear. Conclusions Africa has the highest incidence of OSSN in the world, where males and females are equally affected, unlike other continents where male disease predominates. African women probably have increased risk due to their higher prevalence of HIV and HPV infections. As the survival of HIV-infected people increases, and given no evidence that anti-retroviral therapy (ART) reduces the risk of OSSN, the incidence of OSSN may increase in coming years. PMID:24237784

  6. Two cases of pancreatic neoplasia in British ferrets (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Lloyd, C G; Lewis, W G V

    2004-11-01

    Two six-year-old male neutered polecat ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) were presented for the investigation of acute collapse or periodic weakness and weight loss. While blood biochemistry revealed hypoglycaemia in both cases, diagnosis of an insulin-secreting neoplasia was confirmed by exploratory surgery in one case and supported by the use of an insulin assay in the other. Subsequent histopathological examination showed the former to be a pancreatic islet cell carcinoma and the latter to be a pancreatic islet cell adenoma. While neoplasia of the pancreas commonly affects ferrets in the USA, there appears to be only one previous report from the UK. PMID:15553194

  7. A Clinical and Pathological Overview of Vulvar Condyloma Acuminatum, Intraepithelial Neoplasia, and Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lonard, Boris; Kridelka, Frederic; Delbecque, Katty; Goffin, Frederic; Demoulin, Stphanie; Doyen, Jean; Delvenne, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Condyloma acuminatum, intraepithelial neoplasia, and squamous cell carcinoma are three relatively frequent vulvar lesions. Condyloma acuminatum is induced by low risk genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV). Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) and squamous cell carcinoma have different etiopathogenic pathways and are related or not with high risk HPV types. The goal of this paper is to review the main pathological and clinical features of these lesions. A special attention has been paid also to epidemiological data, pathological classification, and clinical implications of these diseases. PMID:24719870

  8. Etiology, pathogenesis and epizootiology of hematopoietic neoplasia in the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    Studies on the etiology of hematopoietic neoplasia (HN) in soft-shell clams, Mya arenaria, have been inconclusive. Petroleum-derived hydrocarbons, polychlorinated-biphenyls and a virus have all been implicated as causative agents. The isolation of 100 nm virus-like particles from neoplastic clams proved conclusively that the causative agent is a retrovirus. The virus can induce a neoplasia in non-neoplastic clams and similar virus particles can be re-isolated and induce neoplasia. The activities of the RT are temperature dependent, found at 6[degrees]C, but not at 25[degrees]C and 37[degrees]C. The incidence rate for neoplasia in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island was 7.7% and for combined other locations, 3.7% (26/699). HN was present in clams throughout the year at varying levels. The highest incidence occurred in October (11.5%); the lowest incidence in April (1.2%) and June (2.5%). The outcome of the disease depends on the water temperature and degree of severity of neoplasia in the clams. Death rate was greatest when water temperature was at 15[degrees]C (100%). High severity clams had the highest death rate (100%). Chronicity of persistent neoplasia occurred more at 10[degrees]C (19%) than at 6[degrees]C (15%) or 15[degrees]C (0%). Remission occurred only in low severity juvenile clams at either 6[degrees]C or 10[degrees]C. Neoplasia causes metabolic alteration in clams. Remission occurred only in low severity juvenile clams at either 6[degrees]C or 10[degrees]C. The time to remission was longer at 6[degrees]C than 10[degrees]C. Neoplasia causes metabolic alteration in clams. This shown by a significant increase in uric acid, asparatate transminase and triglycerides and a decrease in urea in the hemolymph. The cell membrane of neoplastic hemocytes also shows differences in their binding pattern to lectin than the normal hemocytes, indicating a change in cell surface glycoprotein probably induced by the retrovirus.

  9. Total vaginectomy for refractory vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia III of the vaginal vault

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Ju Hyun; Lee, Min Ah; Ju, Woong; Kim, Seoung Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia III, is a relatively rare disease. Consequently standard treatments for this disease were not established until recently. Although several convenient methods, such as laser ablation, 5-fluorouracil topical injection, and radiation therapy, have been applied for treating these lesions, surgical treatments, including vaginectomy, have not yet been attempted, as they would likely be accompanied by technical difficulties and various complications. Herein, we report a case of refractory vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia III in the vaginal vault that was successfully treated with a total vaginectomy. PMID:26866041

  10. Folate-genetics and colorectal neoplasia: What we know and need to know next

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The metabolism of folate involves a complex network of polymorphic enzymes that may explain a proportion of the risk associated with colorectal neoplasia. Over 60 observational studies primarily in non-Hispanic White populations have been conducted on selected genetic variants in specific genes, MTH...

  11. Local recurrence of pheochromocytoma in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Tramunt, Blandine; Buffet, Alexandre; Grunenwald, Solange; Vezzosi, Delphine; Bennet, Antoine; Huyghe, Eric; Zerdoud, Slimane; Caron, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    In a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), an inverted physiological ratio between urinary normetanephrines and metanephrines is an early marker of recurrence in epinephrine-secreting pheochromocytoma, and 131I MIBG treatment appears to be a useful therapeutic option in order to avoid multiple invasive surgical procedures in pheochromocytomatosis. PMID:27014456

  12. Neoplasias mielodisplásicas o mieloproliferativas (PDQ®)—Versión para pacientes

    Cancer.gov

    Resumen de información revisada por expertos acerca del tratamiento de las neoplasias mielodisplásicas o mieloproliferativas, incluso las leucemias mielomonocíticas crónicas o juveniles, y la LMC atípica.

  13. Genetics of Endocrine and Neuroendocrine Neoplasias (PDQ)Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of endocrine and neuroendocrine neoplasias. This summary contains information about the MEN1 gene, the RET gene, genetic testing, and clinical interventions. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have a hereditary medullary thyroid cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  14. Brain metastasis from pheochromocytoma in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A.

    PubMed

    Gentile, S; Rainero, I; Savi, L; Rivoiro, C; Pinessi, L

    2001-12-01

    Neurological involvement in multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndrome is uncommon. Notalgia paresthetica (pruritus localized in an area between D2 and D6 dermatomes) is the neurological symptom more frequently described in patients with MEN 2A. The authors report the unusual case of a MEN 2A patient with a brain metastasis from a pheochromocytoma. PMID:11677427

  15. THE INDUCTION OF COLON NEOPLASIA IN MALE RATS EXPOSED TO TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS) IN THE DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INDUCTION OF COLON NEOPLASIA IN MALE RATS EXPOSED TO TRIHALO METHANES (THMs) IN THE DRINKING WATER
    Christopher Sistrunk and Tony DeAngelo, North Carolina Central University and US Environmental Protection Agency
    The THMs are the most widely distributed and the most co...

  16. A rare presentation of multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weledji, Elroy Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease may be a manifestation of symptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism. A case of an intractable complicated peptic ulcer disease secondary to hypercalcaemia from multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A is presented. Hypercalcaemia should always be excluded as a cause of recurrent, or complicated peptic ulcer disease. PMID:26858832

  17. A rare presentation of multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A syndrome.

    PubMed

    Weledji, Elroy Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Peptic ulcer disease may be a manifestation of symptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism. A case of an intractable complicated peptic ulcer disease secondary to hypercalcaemia from multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A is presented. Hypercalcaemia should always be excluded as a cause of recurrent, or complicated peptic ulcer disease. PMID:26858832

  18. Proceedings From the First Asia-Oceania Research Organisation on Genital Infections and Neoplasia (AOGIN) Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Faro, Edited by Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    The First Asia-Oceania Research Organisation on Genital Infections and Neoplasia (AOGIN) Meeting was held in Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia, in July 2005. The conference covered regional issues relating to infection with the human papillomavirus—epidemiology, virology, and immunology, testing, screening, and prevention strategies—as well as cervical cancer screening and its management.

  19. Genetics of Endocrine and Neuroendocrine Neoplasias (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of endocrine and neuroendocrine neoplasias. This summary contains information about the MEN1 gene, the RET gene, genetic testing, and clinical interventions. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have a hereditary medullary thyroid cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  20. Multiple head and neck neoplasia following radiation for benign disease during childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Sirota, D.K.; Eden, A.R.; Biller, H.F.

    1988-06-01

    A woman received radiation therapy to the adenoids for benign disease at the age of 10 years and subsequently developed an adenocarcinoma of the middle ear, a parathyroid adenoma, and a papillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland in adulthood. This appears to be the first such case on record. The literature of neoplasia after head and neck irradiation is briefly reviewed.

  1. Image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy in 4 dogs with intracranial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Alaina Burkard; Heller, Heidi Barnes; Forrest, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the use, and side effects, of a novel stereotactic radiotherapy protocol using TomoTherapy(®) in 4 dogs with confirmed or suspected primary extra-axial intracranial neoplasia. Three fractions of 8 Gy were prescribed. Acute side effects were noted in 1 dog; no late effects were noted. PMID:27152041

  2. Measuring the size of neoplasia in colonoscopy using Depth-From-Defocus.

    PubMed

    Chadebecq, Françcois; Tilmant, Christophe; Bartoli, Adrien

    2012-01-01

    Colonoscopy is the reference medical examination for the diagnosis and treatment of neoplasia in gastroenterology. During the examination, the expert explores the colon cavity with a gastroscope in order to detect neoplasias - abnormal growths of tissue - and to diagnose which ones could be malignant. The Paris classification of superficial neoplastic lesions is the gold standard set of criteria for this type of diagnosis. One of the major criteria is the size. However, this is tremendously difficult to accurately estimate from images. This is because the absolute scale of the observed tissues is not directly conveyed in the 2D endoscopic image. We propose an image-based method to estimate the size of neoplasias. The core idea is to combine Depth-From-Focus (DFF) and Depth-From-Defocus (DFD). This allows us to recover the absolute scale by automatically detecting the blur/unblur breakpoint while the expert pulls the gastroscope away from a neoplasia. Our method is passive: it uses the image data only and thus does not require hardware modification of the gastroscope. We report promising experimental results on phantom and patient datasets. PMID:23366181

  3. Prostaglandin E2-induced colonic secretion in patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis for colorectal cancer remains unresolved. A growing body of evidence suggests a direct correlation between cyclooxygenase enzyme expression, prostaglandin E2 metabolism and neoplastic development. Thus further understanding of the regulation of epithelial functions by prostaglandin E2 is needed. We hypothesized that patients with colonic neoplasia have altered colonic epithelial ion transport and express functionally different prostanoid receptor levels in this respect. Methods Patients referred for colonoscopy were included and grouped into patients with and without colorectal neoplasia. Patients without endoscopic findings of neoplasia served as controls. Biopsy specimens were obtained from normally appearing mucosa in the sigmoid part of colon. Biopsies were mounted in miniaturized modified Ussing air-suction chambers. Indomethacin (10 μM), various stimulators and inhibitors of prostanoid receptors and ion transport were subsequently added to the chamber solutions. Electrogenic ion transport parameters (short circuit current and slope conductance) were recorded. Tissue pathology and tissue damage before and after experiments was assessed by histology. Results Baseline short circuit current and slope conductance did not differ between the two groups. Patients with neoplasia were significantly more sensitive to indomethacin with a decrease in short circuit current of 15.1 ± 2.6 μA·cm-2 compared to controls, who showed a decrease of 10.5 ± 2.1 μA·cm-2 (p = 0.027). Stimulation or inhibition with theophylline, ouabain, bumetanide, forskolin or the EP receptor agonists prostaglandin E2, butaprost, sulprostone and prostaglandin E1 (OH) did not differ significantly between the two groups. Histology was with normal findings in both groups. Conclusions Epithelial electrogenic transport is more sensitive to indomethacin in normal colonic mucosa from patients with previous or present colorectal neoplasia compared to colonic mucosa from control patients. Stimulated epithelial electrogenic transport through individual prostanoid subtype receptors EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4 is not significantly different between neoplasia diseased patients and controls. This indicates that increased indomethacin-sensitive mechanisms in colonic mucosa from neoplasia diseased patients are not related to differences in functional expression of EP receptor subtypes. PMID:20100359

  4. Spectrum and Risk of Neoplasia in Werner Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lauper, Julia M.; Krause, Alison; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Monnat, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive genetic instability and progeroid (‘premature aging’) syndrome which is associated with an elevated risk of cancer. Objectives Our study objectives were to characterize the spectrum of neoplasia in WS using a well-documented study population, and to estimate the type-specific risk of neoplasia in WS relative to the general population. Methods We obtained case reports of neoplasms in WS patients through examining previous case series and reviews of WS, as well as through database searching in PubMed, Google Scholar, and J-EAST, a search engine for articles from Japan. We defined the spectrum (types and sites) of neoplasia in WS using all case reports, and were able to determine neoplasm type-specific risk in Japan WS patients by calculating standardized incidence and proportionate incidence ratios (SIR and SPIR, respectively) relative to Osaka Japan prefecture incidence rates. Results We used a newly assembled study population of 189 WS patients with 248 neoplasms to define the spectrum of neoplasia in WS. The most frequent neoplasms in WS patients, representing 2/3 of all reports, were thyroid neoplasms, malignant melanoma, meningioma, soft tissue sarcomas, leukemia and pre-leukemic conditions of the bone marrow, and primary bone neoplasms. Cancer risk defined by SIRs was significantly elevated in Japan-resident WS patients for the six most frequent neoplasms except leukemia, ranging from 53.5-fold for melanoma of the skin (95% CI: 24.5, 101.6) to 8.9 (95% CI: 4.9, 15.0) for thyroid neoplasms. Cancer risk as defined by SPIR was also significantly elevated for the most common malignancies except leukemia. Conclusions WS confers a strong predisposition to several specific types of neoplasia. These results serve as a guide for WS clinical care, and for additional analyses to define the mechanistic basis for cancer in WS and the general population. PMID:23573208

  5. Pathogenesis of germ cell neoplasia in testicular dysgenesis and disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Jrgensen, Anne; Lindhardt Johansen, Marie; Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Main, Katharina M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Development of human gonads is a sex-dimorphic process which evolved to produce sex-specific types of germ cells. The process of gonadal sex differentiation is directed by the action of the somatic cells and ultimately results in germ cells differentiating to become functional gametes through spermatogenesis or oogenesis. This tightly controlled process depends on the proper sequential expression of many genes and signalling pathways. Disturbances of this process can be manifested as a large spectrum of disorders, ranging from severe disorders of sex development (DSD) to - in the genetic male - mild reproductive problems within the testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS), with large overlap between the syndromes. These disorders carry an increased but variable risk of germ cell neoplasia. In this review, we discuss the pathogenesis of germ cell neoplasia associated with gonadal dysgenesis, especially in individuals with 46,XY DSD. We summarise knowledge concerning development and sex differentiation of human gonads, with focus on sex-dimorphic steps of germ cell maturation, including meiosis. We also briefly outline the histopathology of germ cell neoplasia in situ (GCNIS) and gonadoblastoma (GDB), which are essentially the same precursor lesion but with different morphological structure dependent upon the masculinisation of the somatic niche. To assess the risk of germ cell neoplasia in different types of DSD, we have performed a PubMed search and provide here a synthesis of the evidence from studies published since 2006. We present a model for pathogenesis of GCNIS/GDB in TDS/DSD, with the risk of malignancy determined by the presence of the testis-inducing Y chromosome and the degree of masculinisation. The associations between phenotype and the risk of neoplasia are likely further modulated in each individual by the constellation of the gene polymorphisms and environmental factors. PMID:26410164

  6. Optimal fluorescence excitation wavelengths for detection of squamous intra-epithelial neoplasia: results from an animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coghlan, Lezlee; Utzinger, Urs; Drezek, Rebekah A.; Heintzelmann, Doug; Zuluaga, Andres F.; Brookner, Carrie; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R.; Gimenez-Conti, Irma; Follen, Michele

    2000-12-01

    Using the hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model, we explore which fluorescence excitation wavelengths are useful for the detection of neoplasia. 42 hamsters were treated with DMBA to induce carcinogenesis, and 20 control animals were treated only with mineral oil. Fluorescence excitation emission matrices were measured from the cheek pouches of the hamsters weekly. Results showed increased fluorescence near 350-370 nm and 410 nm excitation and decreased fluorescence near 450-470 nm excitation with neoplasia. The optimal diagnostic excitation wavelengths identified using this model - 350-370 nm excitation and 400-450 nm excitation - are similar to those identified for detection of human oral cavity neoplasia.

  7. The Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer: What Will it Take to Diagnose and Treat Curable Pancreatic Neoplasia?

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, Anne Marie; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Canto, Marcia Irene; Klein, Alison P.; Herman, Joseph M.; Goggins, Michael; Fishman, Elliot K.; Kamel, Ihab; Weiss, Matthew J.; Diaz, Luis A.; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the deadliest of all solid malignancies. Early detection offers the best hope for a cure, but characteristics of this disease such as the lack of early clinical symptoms, make the early detection difficult. Recent genetic mapping of the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer suggests that a large window of opportunity exists for the early detection of pancreatic neoplasia, and developments in cancer genetics offer new, potentially highly specific, approaches for screening for curable pancreatic neoplasia. We review the challenges of screening for early pancreatic neoplasia, as well as opportunities presented by incorporating molecular genetics into these efforts. PMID:24924775

  8. Neoplasias mieloproliferativas y síndromes mielodisplásicos—Versión para profesionales de salud

    Cancer.gov

    Información del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer para profesionales de salud sobre el tratamiento de las neoplasias mieloproliferativas, así como referencias a estudios clínicos y otros temas relacionados.

  9. A new association – multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    PubMed Central

    Preda, Veronica; Sywak, Mark; Learoyd, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We report a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1) and an aggressive malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) arising from a ganglioneuroma of the adrenal gland. Patients with MEN-1 require careful consideration of other tumor associations, including MPNST, as it can portend a poor prognosis. MEN-1 and MPNST have not been reported. We report a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1) and an aggressive malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) arising from a ganglioneuroma of the adrenal gland. Patients with MEN-1 require careful consideration of other tumor associations, including MPNST, as it can portend a poor prognosis. MEN-1 and MPNST have not been reported. PMID:25678969

  10. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced neoplasia in the urinary bladder: a missing link?

    PubMed

    Alexander, Riley E; Wang, Lisha; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Emerson, Robert E; Montironi, Rodolfo; Pedrosa, Jose A; Kaimakliotis, Hristos Z; Koch, Michael O; Cheng, Liang

    2016-06-01

    The discovery that the role human papillomavirus (HPV) plays in the induction of human cancer represents an important achievement in oncologic research. It has taken on even greater importance since the development of vaccines, which promise the hope of preventing these cancers from ever occurring. Because of these important implications, many have attempted to determine a possible role for the virus in cancers of the urinary bladder-an organ in close anatomic proximity to the primary sites of HPV-induced neoplasia and one which already has an established oncogenic infectious agent in Schistosoma haematobium. Here we review the current literature exploring this possible role in the most common subtype of cancer of the urinary bladder, urothelial carcinoma, and two much more rare histologic subtypes that have well established roles for HPV-induced neoplasia in other anatomic sites-squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. PMID:26687533

  11. Association of CDKN2A polymorphisms with the severity of cervical neoplasia in a Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Torres, Sandra Liliana; Portari, Elyzabeth Avvad; Klumb, Evandro Mendes; Guillobel, Heloisa Carneiro da Rocha; de Camargo, Maria José; Russomano, Fábio Bastos; Macedo, Jacyara Maria Brito

    2014-03-01

    Variants of p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF), encoded by the CDKN2A locus, may respond differently to the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV). We investigated the potential association of two CDKN2A polymorphisms, 500C > G (rs11515) and 540C > T (rs3088440), with cervical neoplasia in patients with cervical lesions and healthy controls (n = 492). Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and/or DNA sequencing techniques were employed for genotyping. The 500G allele was found higher, whereas the 540T/T genotype was less frequent in patients with more severe lesions. The CDKN2A variants may have the potential to be markers for the management of patients with cervical neoplasia. PMID:24491138

  12. Abraham Lincoln's marfanoid mother: the earliest known case of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B?

    PubMed

    Sotos, John G

    2012-07-01

    The nature and cause of President Abraham Lincoln's unusual physical features have long been debated, with the greatest attention directed at two monogenic disorders of the transforming growth factor β system: Marfan syndrome and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B. The present report examines newly discovered phenotypic information about Lincoln's biological mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln, and concludes that (a) Lincoln's mother was skeletally marfanoid, (b) the President and his mother were highly concordant for the presence of numerous facial features found in various transforming growth factor β disorders, and (c) Lincoln's mother, like her son, had hypotonic skeletal muscles, resulting in myopathic facies and 'pseudodepression'. These conclusions establish that mother and son had the same monogenic autosomal dominant marfanoid disorder. A description of Nancy Hanks Lincoln as coarse-featured, and a little-known statement that a wasting disease contributed to her death at age 34, lends support to the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B hypothesis. PMID:22504423

  13. Condylomata of the uterine cervix and koilocytosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Pilotti, S; Rilke, F; De Palo, G; Della Torre, G; Alasio, L

    1981-01-01

    In 202 women with koilocytotic atypia in cervical smears, 136 had predominantly small condylomata of the uterine cervix, and 66 had cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) of varying degree either with koilocytosis of the neoplasia or associated with condylomata. Koilocytosis correlated well with the histological diagnosis of condylomata, but occasionally it obscured the cytological evidence of CIN. Human papilloma virus particles were found in the cells of condylomata in 10 cases and in those of CIN II with koilocytosis in two cases of 21 examined ultrastructurally. There was evidence that the condyloma of the uterine cervix is a well-defined morphological entity and also that cytopathie changes similar to those seen in condylomata are present in some cases of CIN. Images PMID:6265503

  14. Comparative analysis of the expression patterns of metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in breast neoplasia, sporadic colorectal neoplasia, pulmonary carcinomas and malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Kossakowska, A. E.; Huchcroft, S. A.; Urbanski, S. J.; Edwards, D. R.

    1996-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, TIMPs) play essential roles in the remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Results of in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that the balance between MMPs and TIMPs is altered in neoplasia, contributing to the invasive and metastatic properties of malignant tumours. In this study we have analysed the expression of five MMP genes and TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 in 37 benign and malignant lesions of human breast using Northern blot analysis. MMP-9 (92 kDa gelatinase) and MMP-11 (stromelysin 3) were most consistently expressed by carcinomas. Based on detection of either MMP-9 or MMP-11 mRNAs, we were able to distinguish between malignant and benign disease with a predictive accuracy of 90% with 94% sensitivity and 85% specificity. Subsequently, these results were compared with results for carcinomas of colon and lung and malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Elevated MMP-9 and TIMP-1 expression was observed in all four systems. MMP-11 characterised all carcinomas as well as carcinomas in situ but was not detectable in NHL. Our data therefore argue that there are remarkably similar patterns of specific functions involved in ECM remodelling that correlate with malignancy in different human tumours of different histogenesis. However, MMP-11 expression is a characteristic of tumours of epithelial origin that is not found in lymphoid neoplasia. Thus it suggests that MMP-11 may play a regulatory role in the invasion and metastasis of carcinomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:8645587

  15. 2006 Bethesda International Consensus recommendations on the immunophenotypic analysis of hematolymphoid neoplasia by flow cytometry: optimal reagents and reporting for the flow cytometric diagnosis of hematopoietic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Wood, Brent L; Arroz, Maria; Barnett, David; DiGiuseppe, Joseph; Greig, Bruce; Kussick, Steven J; Oldaker, Teri; Shenkin, Mark; Stone, Elizabeth; Wallace, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Immunophenotyping by flow cytometry has become standard practice in the evaluation and monitoring of patients with hematopoietic neoplasia. However, despite its widespread use, considerable variability continues to exist in the reagents used for evaluation and the format in which results are reported. As part of the 2006 Bethesda Consensus conference, a committee was formed to attempt to define a consensus set of reagents suitable for general use in the diagnosis and monitoring of hematopoietic neoplasms. The committee included laboratory professionals from private, public, and university hospitals as well as large reference laboratories that routinely operate clinical flow cytometry laboratories with an emphasis on lymphoma and leukemia immunophenotyping. A survey of participants successfully identified the cell lineage(s) to be evaluated for each of a variety of specific medical indications and defined a set of consensus reagents suitable for the initial evaluation of each cell lineage. Elements to be included in the reporting of clinical flow cytometric results for leukemia and lymphoma evaluation were also refined and are comprehensively listed. The 2006 Bethesda Consensus conference represents the first successful attempt to define a set of consensus reagents suitable for the initial evaluation of hematopoietic neoplasia. PMID:17803189

  16. Biomarkers of Risk for Colorectal Neoplasia (Team Project #2) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The goal of this project is to evaluate biomarkers in normal colonic mucosa to determine their relationship to the occurrence of short- and long-term colorectal neoplasia. Candidate markers have been proposed by participating investigators based on promising preliminary data. The purpose of this team project is to evaluate these markers in a common, tissue-based reference set, under a uniform, structured protocol.

  17. Economic burden of vulvar and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia: retrospective cost study at a German dysplasia centre

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus is responsible for a variety of diseases including grade 2 and 3 vulvar and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia. The aim of this study was to assess parts of the burden of the last diseases including treatment costs. The direct medical resource use and cost of surgery associated with neoplasia and related diagnostic procedures (statutory health insurance perspective) were estimated, as were the indirect costs (productivity losses) associated with surgical treatment and related gynaecology visits for diagnostic purposes. Methods Data from 1991-2008 were retrospectively collected from patient records of the outpatient unit of the Gynaecological Dysplasia Clinic, Heinrich Heine University, Dusseldorf, Germany. Two subgroups of patients were analysed descriptively: women undergoing one surgical procedure related to a diagnosis of vulvar and/or vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia, and women undergoing two or more surgical procedures. Target measures were per-capita medical resource consumption, direct medical cost and indirect cost. Results Of the 94 women analysed, 52 underwent one surgical intervention and 42 two or more interventions (mean of 3.0 interventions during the total period of analysis). Patients undergoing one surgical intervention accrued €881 in direct costs and €682 in indirect costs; patients undergoing more than one intervention accrued €2,605 in direct costs and €2,432 in indirect costs. Conclusions The economic burden on German statutory health insurance funds and society induced by surgical interventions and related diagnostic procedures for grade 2/3 vulvar and vaginal neoplasia should not be underrated. The cost burden is one part of the overall burden attributable to human papillomavirus infections. PMID:21426562

  18. The new Vienna classification of epithelial neoplasia of the gastrointestinal tract: advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Stolte, Manfred

    2003-02-01

    A number of seminars have shown considerable differences between Japanese and Western pathologists in the diagnostic differentiation of reactive changes, dysplasia and well-differentiated adenocarcinoma in gastroenterological biopsy material. Lesions that most Western pathologists identify as "dysplasia" are often considered adenocarcinomas in Japan. A comparison of the biopsy-based diagnoses with those established in resected mucosa, however, reveals appreciable diagnostic inexperience on the part of Western pathologists, with significant discrepancies between their diagnoses based on biopsies and those based on resected material. Against this background, a new classification of epithelial neoplasia of the gastrointestinal tract was drafted on the occasion of the World Congress of Gastroenterology in Vienna in 1998. By collapsing the diagnoses "high-grade adenoma/dysplasia, noninvasive carcinoma (carcinoma in situ), and suspected invasive carcinoma" into a single category ("noninvasive high-grade neoplasia", category 4), this scheme should largely eliminate the diagnostic discrepancies between Western and Japanese pathologists. As with every classification, the Vienna classification has its advantages and disadvantages; these are discussed here. The most important advantage of the Vienna classification is that the various categories are associated with different recommendations for further diagnostic and therapeutic measures. This applies in particular to category 4, with the recommendation for only local treatment initially (endoscopic mucosal resection or surgical excision). Since the introduction of the Vienna classification, the new World Health Organization classification of neoplasia of the gastrointestinal tract has recently been published, in which the term dysplasia has been replaced by "intraepithelial neoplasia". This means that the Vienna classification needs to be modified accordingly. PMID:12596058

  19. Inflammation and Atrophy Precede Prostate Neoplasia in PhIP Induced Rat Model

    SciTech Connect

    Borowsky, A D; Dingley, K; Ubick, E; Turteltaub, K; Cardiff, R D; DeVere-White, R

    2006-06-01

    2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine (PhIP) has been implicated as a major mutagenic heterocyclic amine in the human diet and is carcinogenic in the rat prostate. In order to validate PhIP induced rat prostate neoplasia as a model of human prostate cancer progression, we sought to study the earliest histologic and morphologic changes in the prostate and to follow the progressive changes over time. We fed 67 male Fischer F344 5 week old rats with PhIP (400 PPM) or control diets for 20 weeks, and then sacrificed animals for histomorphologic examination at age 25 weeks, 45 weeks, and 65 weeks. Animals treated with PhIP showed significantly more inflammation (P=.002 (25wk), >.001(45wk), .016(65wk)) and atrophy (P=.003(25wk), >.001(45wk), .006 (65wk)) in their prostate glands relative to controls. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) occurred only in PhIP treated rats. PIN lesions arose in areas of glandular atrophy, most often in the ventral prostate. Atypical cells in areas of atrophy show loss of glutathione S-transferase pi immunostaining preceding development of PIN. None of the animals in this study developed invasive carcinomas differing from previous reports. Overall, these findings suggest that the pathogenesis of prostatic neoplasia in the PhIP treated rat prostate proceeds from inflammation to post-inflammatory proliferative atrophy to PIN.

  20. Targeted imaging of esophageal neoplasia with a fluorescently labeled peptide: First in-human results

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Matthew B.; Joshi, Bishnu P.; Lu, Shaoying; Piraka, Cyrus; Khondee, Supang; Elmunzer, B. Joseph; Kwon, Richard S.; Beer, David G.; Appelman, Henry; Turgeon, D. Kim; Wang, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is rising rapidly in incidence, and usually develops from Barrett’s esophagus, a precursor condition commonly found in patients with chronic acid reflux. Pre-malignant lesions are challenging to detect on conventional screening endoscopy because of their flat appearance. Molecular changes can be used to improve detection of early neoplasia. We have developed a peptide that binds specifically to high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. We first applied the peptide ex vivo to esophageal specimens from 17 patients to validate specific binding. Next, we performed confocal endomicroscopy in vivo in 25 human subjects after topical peptide administration and found 3.8-fold greater fluorescence intensity for esophageal neoplasia compared with Barrett’s esophagus and squamous epithelium with 75% sensitivity and 97% specificity. No toxicity was attributed to the peptide in either animal or patient studies. Therefore, our first-in-humans results show that this targeted imaging agent is safe, and may be useful for guiding tissue biopsy and for early detection of esophageal neoplasia and potentially other cancers of epithelial origin, such as bladder, colon, lung, pancreas, and stomach. PMID:23658246

  1. Flat ductal intraepithelial neoplasia of the breast: evolution of Azzopardi's "clinging" concept.

    PubMed

    Moinfar, Farid

    2010-02-01

    Thirty years ago, John G. Azzopardi described a mainly cytologically defined atypical intraepithelial lesion of the breast, which he called "clinging carcinoma in situ," a variant of "ductal carcinoma in situ." The lesion was characterized by replacement of native epithelial cells by very few cell layers of mildly to severely atypical epithelial cells. Based on the degree of cytologic atypia, Azzopardi distinguished type 1 with highly atypical nuclei and type 2 with merely subtle cytologic (nuclear) atypia. Although this distinctive lesion remained widely unrecognized and/or ignored by many pathologists for a long period, several recent studies strongly suggest its neoplastic nature. The aim of this review is to focus on the "clinging" concept and its evolution after the first description. The diagnostic criteria, main diagnostic pitfalls, immunohistochemistry, molecular-genetic findings, and the relevance of this type of lesion for clinicians and histopathologists are discussed. Rational for adopting a more appropriate terminology and classification, namely flat ductal intraepithelial neoplasia are also discussed. It is concluded that the "clinging" or flat lesion represents one of the earliest morphologically recognizable neoplastic breast lesions. This lesion is important, if one tries to better understand the tumorigenesis of early precursor lesions of the breast. This type of breast lesion is an indicator for coexisting neoplastic lesions, such as low-grade ductal intraepithelial neoplasia (atypical ductal hyperplasia/low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ) and lobular intraepithelial neoplasia. PMID:20306829

  2. Synchronous Nesidioblastosis, Endocrine Microadenoma, and Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasia in a Man Presenting With Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Sunita M C; Haghighi, Koroush S; Qiu, Min Ru; Greenfield, Jerry R; Chen, Daniel L T

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report the first case of concomitant nesidioblastosis, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia. The combination is significant as each of these pathological entities is independently very rare. The patient was a 33-year-old man who presented with symptomatic hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia and no risk factors for pancreatic disease. Abdominal imaging showed an isolated 12 mm pancreatic lesion, whilst selective arterial calcium stimulation testing demonstrated multiple territories of insulin excess. He proceeded to subtotal pancreatectomy. Histopathology revealed an endocrine microadenoma, α and β cell nesidioblastosis, and multifocal intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia. The endocrine microadenoma and nesidioblastosis stained for insulin, suggesting both likely contributed to hypoglycemia. Glucagon immunohistochemistry was also positive, though there were no clinical features of glucagon excess. Hypoglycemia resolved postoperatively. This case and other evidence from the literature suggest that hyperplasia and neoplasia may occur sequentially in the pancreas, and that endocrine and exocrine tumorigenesis may be linked in some individuals. Further study is required to identify a unifying mechanism, and to elucidate potential ramifications in the management of patients with pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:26658039

  3. Presence of human papilloma virus types 16 and 18 in genital warts and cervical neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Battista, C; Hillova, J; Hill, M; Reynès, M; Mathé, G

    1988-01-01

    Certain types of human papilloma viruses (HPV) are associated with human genital proliferative diseases, and among them HPV16 and HPV18 seem to play an important role in the occurrence of cervical cancer. We used restriction enzyme analysis and molecular hybridization, in order to investigate the type of viral infection and the physical state of viral DNA in gynecological benign, pre-malignant and malignant lesions. HPV6/11 specific sequences could only be detected as episomes and this in benign lesions classified as condylomata acuminata. On the other hand, HPV16 and HPV18 sequences were detected in non-malignant lesions such as flat condylomata (7 out of 14 cases), pre-malignant lesions including cervical intra-epithelial neoplasias (10 out of 20 cases), and most frequently in cervical invasive cancers (21 out of 27 cases). In a large number of virus-positive cases, HPV16 and HPV18 could only be discerned in forms consistent with the existence of episomes and/or randomly integrated head-to-tail oligomers. However, some invasive carcinomas and cervical intra-epithelial neoplasias contained, in addition, clonal outgrowths with detectable virus-cellular junction fragments of the integrated viral genomes. In the light of these data, monitoring the type of viral infection proves to be an important adjunct to histological analysis when assessing those patients affected by condyloma or cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia who are at risk for developing invasive carcinoma. PMID:2835559

  4. Effects of oncological treatments on semen quality in patients with testicular neoplasia or lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Di Bisceglie, Cataldo; Bertagna, Angela; Composto, Emanuela R; Lanfranco, Fabio; Baldi, Matteo; Motta, Giovanna; Barberis, Anna M; Napolitano, Emanuela; Castellano, Elena; Manieri, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Pretherapy sperm cryopreservation in young men is currently included in good clinical practice guidelines for cancer patients. The aim of this paper is to outline the effects of different oncological treatments on semen quality in patients with testicular neoplasia or lymphoproliferative disorders, based on an 8-year experience of the Cryopreservation Centre of a large public hospital. Two hundred and sixty-one patients with testicular neoplasia and 219 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders who underwent chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and pretherapy semen cryopreservation were evaluated. Sperm and hormonal parameters (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, inhibin B levels) were assessed prior to and 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months after the end of cancer treatment. At the time of sperm collection, baseline FSH level and sperm concentration were impaired to a greater extent in patients with malignant testicular neoplasias than in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. Toxic effects on spermatogenesis were still evident at 6 and 12 months after the end of cancer therapies, while an improvement of seminal parameters was observed after 18 months. In conclusion, an overall increase in sperm concentration was recorded about 18 months after the end of cancer treatments in the majority of patients, even if it was not possible to predict the evolution of each single case ‘a priori'. For this reason, pretherapy semen cryopreservation should be considered in all young cancer patients. PMID:23542137

  5. Effects of oncological treatments on semen quality in patients with testicular neoplasia or lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Di Bisceglie, Cataldo; Bertagna, Angela; Composto, Emanuela R; Lanfranco, Fabio; Baldi, Matteo; Motta, Giovanna; Barberis, Anna M; Napolitano, Emanuela; Castellano, Elena; Manieri, Chiara

    2013-05-01

    Pretherapy sperm cryopreservation in young men is currently included in good clinical practice guidelines for cancer patients. The aim of this paper is to outline the effects of different oncological treatments on semen quality in patients with testicular neoplasia or lymphoproliferative disorders, based on an 8-year experience of the Cryopreservation Centre of a large public hospital. Two hundred and sixty-one patients with testicular neoplasia and 219 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders who underwent chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and pretherapy semen cryopreservation were evaluated. Sperm and hormonal parameters (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, inhibin B levels) were assessed prior to and 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months after the end of cancer treatment. At the time of sperm collection, baseline FSH level and sperm concentration were impaired to a greater extent in patients with malignant testicular neoplasias than in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. Toxic effects on spermatogenesis were still evident at 6 and 12 months after the end of cancer therapies, while an improvement of seminal parameters was observed after 18 months. In conclusion, an overall increase in sperm concentration was recorded about 18 months after the end of cancer treatments in the majority of patients, even if it was not possible to predict the evolution of each single case 'a priori'. For this reason, pretherapy semen cryopreservation should be considered in all young cancer patients. PMID:23542137

  6. Combination of Paris and Vienna Classifications may Optimize Follow-Up of Gastric Epithelial Neoplasia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen; Ai, Xin-Bo; Zhu, Yi-Miao; Han, Tie-Mei; Shen, Bo; Pan, Wen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the combination of Paris and Vienna classifications in a follow-up study of gastric epithelial neoplasia (GEN) patients. Material/Methods This study was conducted between January 2003 and September 2010, during which 170 biopsy-proven GEN patients were followed up by gastroenterologists and pathologists according to our follow-up regimen (modified Vienna classification). Results In total, 161 patients with low-grade neoplasia (LGN) and 9 patients with high-grade neoplasia (HGN) were randomly enrolled in our study. Eighteen patients with depressed appearance were observed, of which 9 patients had HGN and 9 patients had low-grade dysplasia (LGD). Three patients with type 0-IIa were observed with low-grade adenoma (LGA), and type 0I was observed in 2 patients with LGN. Endoscopic or surgical treatments were performed to avoid potential malignancy or bleeding. Two patients with ulcer lesions, 2 patients with non-depressed type 0 appearance, and 3 patients without visible lesions were shown to have higher-grade lesions during follow-up. The misdiagnosis rate of forceps biopsy 62.07% was determined by comparing pre- and post-resection diagnoses of 29 patients. Conclusions The combination of the Paris and Vienna classifications for GEN may optimize the follow-up routines for patients with suspicious precancerous lesions and may significantly improve the detection of early gastric cancer (EGC) while helping gastroenterologists select the best therapy option. PMID:25841675

  7. Correlation between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Ying; Wang, Min; Lin, Ying-Min; Wu, Dong; Zhu, Jing-Yu; Gao, Lang; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yin, Teng-Fei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia. METHODS: Patients included in this study underwent a colonoscopy and esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) along with histopathological measurement between March 2012 and March 2015 at Qi-Lu Hospital of Shandong University, who also had results of H. pylori detection. A total of 233 cases were selected. Demographic data, H. pylori infection status (including results of rapid urease tests and gastric mucosa pathological examinations) and histopathological examination results of gastric and colorectal mucosa were gathered and analyzed. The statistical analysis focused on the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms among patients with various histopathological categories of the stomach. ORs and their 95%CI were calculated to describe the strengths of the associations. RESULTS: The incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIEN) (OR = 2.400, 95%CI: 0.969-5.941), adenoma with HGIEN (5.333, 1.025-27.758) and adenocarcinoma (1.455, 0.382-5.543) were all higher for patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis than for those in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma with HGIEN (3.218, 0.767-13.509) was higher in patients with intestinal metaplasia than in the control group, while the incidence rates of adenoma without HGIEN (0.874, 0.414-1.845) and adenocarcinoma (0.376, 0.096-1.470) were lower in the intestinal metaplasia group than in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (3.111, 1.248-7.753) was significantly higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group than in the control group, while the rates of adenoma with HGIEN (1.481, 0.138-15.941) and adenocarcinoma (2.020, 0.561-7.272) were higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group. Incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (1.067, 0.264-4.314), adenoma with HGIEN (2.667, 0.231-30.800) and adenocarcinoma (2.182, 0.450-10.585) were all higher in the gastric adenocarcinoma group than in the control group. CONCLUSION: H. pylori infection as well as H. pylori-associated gastric diseases are risk factors for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:27182167

  8. Immunophenotypic and antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis in T cell neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    The author reviews the immunophenotypic profiles displayed by the major clinicopathologic categories of T cell neoplasia, the immunophenotypic criteria useful in the immunodiagnosis of T cell neoplasia, and the contributions made by antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis to the understanding of T cell neoplasia. Neoplasms belonging to distinct clinicopathologic categories of T cell neoplasia often exhibit characteristic immunophenotypic profiles. Approximately 80% of lymphoblastic lymphomas and 20% of acute lymphoblastic leukemias express phenotypes consistent with prethymic and intrathymic stages of T cell differentiation, including intranuclear terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas of mycosis fungoides type usually express pan-T cell antigens CD2, CD5, and CD3, often lack the pan-T cell antigen CD7, and usually express the mature, peripheral helper subset phenotype, CD4+ CD8-. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas of nonmycosis fungoides type and peripheral T cell lymphomas often lack one or more pan-T cell antigens and, in addition, occasionally express the anomalous CD4+ CD8+ or CD4- CD8- phenotypes. T gamma-lymphoproliferative disease is divisable into two broad categories: those cases that are CD3 antigen positive and exhibit clonal T cell receptor beta chain (TCR-beta) gene rearrangements and those cases that are CD3 antigen negative and exhibit the TCR-beta gene germline configuration. Human T cell lymphotropic virus-I (HTLV-I) associated Japanese, Carribean, and sporadic adult T cell leukemia/lymphomas usually express pan-T cell antigens, the CD4+ CD8- phenotype, and various T cell-associated activation antigens, including the interleukin-2 receptor (CD25). Immunophenotypic criteria useful in the immunodiagnosis of T cell neoplasia include, in increasing order of utility, T cell predominance, T cell subset antigen restriction, anomalous T cell subset antigen expression, and deletion of one or more pan-T cell antigens. Only in exceptional circumstances do normal, non-neoplastic T cell populations express the CD4- CD8- or the CD4+ CD8+ phenotype and/or lack one or more pan-T cell antigens. T cell receptor beta chain gene rearrangement analysis represents an accurate, objective, and sensitive molecular genetic marker of T cell lineage and clonality that allows discrimination among non-T cell, polyclonal T cell and monoclonal T cell populations. Non-T cells exhibit the TCR-beta gene germline configuration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2495724

  9. p16, Ki-67, and BD ProExC immunostaining: a practical approach for diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Walts, Ann E; Bose, Shikha

    2009-07-01

    p16, Ki-67, and BD ProExC (TriPath Imaging, Inc., Burlington, NC) have each been shown to be helpful adjuncts in the diagnosis and grading of human papillomavirus-associated cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. However, no clear guidelines are available regarding their use in routine practice. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of the 3 stains alone and in combinations to determine the most useful strategy in the diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and provide guidance in instances with discordant staining patterns. Serial sections of 136 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cervical samples with consensus diagnoses of 39 benign-reactive, 46 low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN I/human papillomavirus), and 51 high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CINII/III) were immunostained using p16, Ki-67, and BD ProExC antibodies. Results of high-risk human papillomavirus testing were available in 70 cases. Immunostaining patterns were designated as negative, intermediate, and strongly positive based on the patterns observed most commonly in benign-reactive, low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia lesions, respectively. A concordant staining pattern with all 3 stains correctly identified benign-reactive, low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia cases. p16 was the most sensitive and specific individual stain (sensitivity, 33%; specificity, 93%; positive predictive value [PPV], 81%; negative predictive value [NPV], 58%). Performing all 3 immunostains and using concordant results of any 2 improved diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity, 35%; specificity, 98%; PPV, 93%; NPV, 67%). However, a significant proportion of low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia cases showed aberrant staining patterns with 52% staining negative and 9% staining strongly positive. Low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia cases with the negative staining pattern were more likely to be negative for high-risk human papillomavirus, whereas those showing the strongly positive staining pattern were high-risk human papillomavirus positive. Performing p16 and BD ProExC initially followed by Ki-67 only when p16 and BD ProExC yielded discordant results provided similar diagnostic accuracy at reduced cost because only one third of the cases required the additional stain. PMID:19269017

  10. Quantitative evaluation of in vivo vital-dye fluorescence endoscopic imaging for the detection of Barrett's-associated neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thekkek, Nadhi; Lee, Michelle H.; Polydorides, Alexandros D.; Rosen, Daniel G.; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-05-01

    Current imaging tools are associated with inconsistent sensitivity and specificity for detection of Barrett's-associated neoplasia. Optical imaging has shown promise in improving the classification of neoplasia in vivo. The goal of this pilot study was to evaluate whether in vivo vital dye fluorescence imaging (VFI) has the potential to improve the accuracy of early-detection of Barrett's-associated neoplasia. In vivo endoscopic VFI images were collected from 65 sites in 14 patients with confirmed Barrett's esophagus (BE), dysplasia, or esophageal adenocarcinoma using a modular video endoscope and a high-resolution microendoscope (HRME). Qualitative image features were compared to histology; VFI and HRME images show changes in glandular structure associated with neoplastic progression. Quantitative image features in VFI images were identified for objective image classification of metaplasia and neoplasia, and a diagnostic algorithm was developed using leave-one-out cross validation. Three image features extracted from VFI images were used to classify tissue as neoplastic or not with a sensitivity of 87.8% and a specificity of 77.6% (AUC=0.878). A multimodal approach incorporating VFI and HRME imaging can delineate epithelial changes present in Barrett's-associated neoplasia. Quantitative analysis of VFI images may provide a means for objective interpretation of BE during surveillance.

  11. Comparison of computed tomographic and pathologic findings in 17 dogs with primary adrenal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Gregori, Tommaso; Mantis, Panagiotis; Benigni, Livia; Priestnall, Simon L; Lamb, Christopher R

    2015-01-01

    The CT appearance of canine adrenal masses has been reported, but associations between imaging features and pathologic features of these lesions have not been investigated in detail. The purpose of this study was to test associations between different types of adrenal neoplasia and their CT and pathologic features. A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed and inclusion criteria were histologic diagnosis of primary adrenal neoplasia, contrast-enhanced CT examination of the abdomen and surgical resection of the mass or necropsy examination. For all included dogs, CT images and histopathologic specimens were reviewed independently by two veterinary radiologists and a veterinary pathologist, respectively. Seventeen dogs met inclusion criteria. Diagnoses were adenocarcinoma in nine (53%) dogs, pheochromocytoma in five (29%) dogs, and adenoma in three (18%) dogs. Pheochromocytoma was associated with CT signs of vascular invasion (likelihood ratio = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.3-18.3, P = 0.03) and macroscopic vascular invasion (likelihood ratio = 9.6, 95% CI = 1.4-65.9, P = 0.02). There was excellent agreement between signs of vascular invasion in CT images and vascular invasion at surgery or necropsy (kappa = 0.86, P = 0.001). A peripheral contrast-enhancing rim in delayed postcontrast CT images was associated with fibrous encapsulation of the tumor (kappa = 0.53, P = 0.05), and a heterogeneous pattern of contrast distribution in delayed postcontrast CT images was associated with adrenal hemorrhage or infarction on histological examination (kappa = 0.45, P = 0.05). Findings indicated that CT enabled assessment of adrenal neoplasia features that reflected their biological behavior and pathological findings, however overlapping characteristics between tumor types limited the potential for reliably distinguishing them based on CT alone. PMID:25139015

  12. Applications and Advancements in the use of High-Resolution Microendoscopy for Detection of Gastrointestinal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Justin S.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila

    2014-01-01

    The high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) is a novel imaging modality that allows real-time epithelial imaging at subcellular resolution. Used in concert with any standard endoscope, this portable, low cost, ‘optical biopsy’ technology has the ability to provide images of cellular morphology during a procedure. This technology has been the subject of a number of studies investigating its use in screening and surveillance of a range of gastrointestinal neoplasia, including esophageal adenocarcinoma(EAC), esophageal squamous cell cancer(ESCC), colorectal neoplasia(CRC) and anal neoplasia. These studies have shown that HRME is a modality that consistently provides high specificity, negative predictive value, and accuracy across different diseases. In addition, they have illustrated that HRME users can be relatively easily trained in a short period of time and that users have demonstrated solid inter-rater reliability. These features make HRME a potential complement to high definition white light imaging, narrow band imaging and other ‘red flag technologies’ in facilitating real-time clinical diagnosis, endoscopic therapy and margin determination. Further clinical validation is needed to determine whether this translates to reduced procedure times, pathology costs, and follow up procedures. Finally, the HRME has a relatively simple design compared to other similar technologies, making it portable, simple to maintain, and low cost. This may allow the HRME device to function in both advanced care settings as well as in places with less resources and specialized support systems. As a whole, the HRME device has shown good performance along with low-cost and portable construction, and its application in different conditions and settings has been promising. PMID:25108219

  13. Early identification of cervical neoplasia with Raman spectroscopy and advanced methods for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, Phillip R. T.; Smith, Daniel D. W.; Mazilu, Michael; Cormack, Iain; Riches, Andrew C.; Herrington, C. Simon; Dholakia, Kishan

    2008-02-01

    Early detection of malignant tumours, or their precursor lesions, can dramatically improve patient outcome. High risk human Papillomavirus (HPV), particularly HPV16, infection can lead to the initiation and development of uterine cervical neoplasia. Bearing this in mind the identification of the effects of HPV infection may have clinical value. In this manuscript we investigate the application of Raman microspectroscopy to detect the presence of HPV in cultured cells when compared with normal cells. We also investigate the effect of sample fixation, which is a common clinical practice, on the ability of Raman spectroscopy to detect the presence of HPV. Raman spectra were acquired from Primary Human Keratinocytes (PHK), PHK expressing the E7 gene of HPV 16 (PHK E7) and CaSki cells, an HPV16 containing cervical carcinoma derived cell line. The average Raman spectra display variations, mostly in peaks relating to DNA and proteins, consistent with HPV gene expression and the onset of neoplasia in both live and fixed samples. Principle component analysis was used to objectively discriminate between the cells types giving sensitivities up to 100% for the comparison between PHK and CaSki. These results show that Raman spectroscopy can discriminate between cell lines representing different stages of cervical neoplasia. Furthermore Raman spectroscopy was able to identify cells expressing the HPV 16 E7 gene suggesting the approach may be of value in clinical practice. Finally this technique was also able to detect the effects of the virus in fixed samples demonstrating the compatibility of this technique with current cervical screening methods. However if Raman spectroscopy is to make a significant impact in clinical practice the long acquisition times must be addressed. In this report we examine the potential for beam shaping and advanced to improve the signal to noise ration hence subsequently facilitating a reduction in acquisition time.

  14. Genetic Variation in the Lipoxygenase Pathway and Risk of Colorectal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstein, Sarah E.; Heath, Laura; Makar, Karen W.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Seufert, Brenna L.; Slattery, Martha L.; Xiao, Liren; Duggan, David J.; Hsu, Li; Curtin, Karen; Koepl, Lisel; Muehling, Jill; Taverna, Darin; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Potter, John D.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.

    2013-01-01

    Arachidonate lipoxygenase (ALOX) enzymes metabolize arachidonic acid to generate potent inflammatory mediators and play an important role in inflammation-associated diseases. We investigated associations between colorectal cancer risk and polymorphisms in ALOX5, FLAP, ALOX12, and ALOX15, and their interactions with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use. We genotyped fifty tagSNPs, one candidate SNP, and two functional promoter variable nucleotide tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphisms in three US population-based case-control studies of colon cancer (1424 cases/1780 controls), rectal cancer (583 cases/775 controls), and colorectal adenomas (485 cases/578 controls). Individuals with variant genotypes of the ALOX5 VNTR had decreased risk of rectal cancer, with the strongest association seen for individuals with one or more alleles of >5 repeats (wildtype=5, OR>5/≥5=0.42, 95% CI 0.20-0.92; p=0.01). Four SNPs in FLAP (rs17239025), ALOX 12 (rs2073438), and ALOX15 (rs4796535 and rs2619112) were associated with rectal cancer risk at p≤0.05. One SNP in FLAP (rs12429692) was associated with adenoma risk. A false discovery rate (FDR) was applied to account for false positives due to multiple testing; the ALOX15 associations were noteworthy at 25% FDR. Colorectal neoplasia risk appeared to be modified by NSAID use in individuals with variant alleles in FLAP and ALOX15. One noteworthy interaction (25% FDR) was observed for rectal cancer. Genetic variability in arachidonate lipoxygenases may affect risk of colorectal neoplasia, particularly for rectal cancer. Additionally, genetic variability in FLAP and ALOX15 may modify the protective effect of NSAID use against colorectal neoplasia. PMID:23404351

  15. DNA Methylation Profiling across the Spectrum of HPV-Associated Anal Squamous Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Riggs, Bridget; Eschrich, Steven; Elahi, Abul; Qu, Xiaotao; Ajidahun, Abidemi; Berglund, Anders; Coppola, Domenico; Grady, William M.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Shibata, David

    2012-01-01

    Background Changes in host tumor genome DNA methylation patterns are among the molecular alterations associated with HPV-related carcinogenesis. However, there is little known about the epigenetic changes associated specifically with the development of anal squamous cell cancer (SCC). We sought to characterize broad methylation profiles across the spectrum of anal squamous neoplasia. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty-nine formalin-fixed paraffin embedded samples from 24 patients were evaluated and included adjacent histologically normal anal mucosa (NM; n = 3), SCC-in situ (SCC-IS; n = 11) and invasive SCC (n = 15). Thirteen women and 11 men with a median age of 44 years (range 26–81) were included in the study. Using the SFP10 LiPA HPV-typing system, HPV was detected in at least one tissue from all patients with 93% (27/29) being positive for high-risk HPV types and 14 (93%) of 15 invasive SCC tissues testing positive for HPV 16. Bisulfite-modified DNA was interrogated for methylation at 1,505 CpG loci representing 807 genes using the Illumina GoldenGate Methylation Array. When comparing the progression from normal anal mucosa and SCC-IS to invasive SCC, 22 CpG loci representing 20 genes demonstrated significant differential methylation (p<0.01). The majority of differentially methylated gene targets occurred at or close to specific chromosomal locations such as previously described HPV methylation “hotspots” and viral integration sites. Conclusions We have identified a panel of differentially methlylated CpG loci across the spectrum of HPV-associated squamous neoplasia of the anus. To our knowledge, this is the first reported application of large-scale high throughput methylation analysis for the study of anal neoplasia. Our findings support further investigations into the role of host-genome methylation in HPV-associated anal carcinogenesis with implications towards enhanced diagnosis and screening strategies. PMID:23226306

  16. Anal cytology as a predictor of anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-positive men and women.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Eve M; Wahbah, Mary M; Been, Laura C; Chiao, Elizabeth Y; Citron, Deborah R; Laucirica, Rodolfo

    2013-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals have increased risk of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Cytologic screening is invaluable in the detection of cervical neoplasia, therefore many clinicians have adopted anal cytology as part of anal cancer screening in patients at high-risk for anal neoplasia. The purpose of this study is to determine whether anal cytology is a valuable screening test for identifying AIN in HIV+ patients. The cohort included 228 HIV+ patients who underwent anal cancer screening with collection of 318 anal cytology specimens between January 2006 and December 2009. Of this group, 74 (32.5%) patients had associated anal biopsies within a 6-month period, with a total of 89 comparison cases. The anal cytology samples were classified using the 2001 Bethesda System terminology. The sensitivity of anal cytology in detecting ASC-US, AIN 1-3 or SCC was 93%. Cytology was 88% sensitive for detecting low-grade AIN (AIN 1), but only 20% sensitive for detecting high-grade AIN (AIN 2-3) or SCC. Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance cases were distributed evenly between low- and high-grade AIN, with two cases having normal histology. Only six cases had negative cytology, all of which were associated with AIN on biopsy, for a false negative rate of 7%. Anal cytology is a good predictor of AIN, as confirmed by the high degree of sensitivity. However, there is poor correlation between the cytological and histological grade of AIN. Cytology underestimates the grade of dysplasia compared to the corresponding biopsy. PMID:23288861

  17. Adherence to therapy for Barrett’s esophagus-associated neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cassani, Lisa; Slaughter, James C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Multiple endoscopic sessions may be necessary for treatment and surveillance of Barrett’s esophagus (BE)-associated neoplasia. Adherence to an endoscopic therapeutic regimen is important for longitudinal management of BE. The objective of this study was to identify the factors associated with adherence to therapy for BE-associated neoplasia. Methods We retrospectively identified patients with BE whom were referred to a tertiary center for endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA) between 2009 and 2012. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from the medical record. Results We had 69 subjects meet our inclusion criteria. Referral diagnosis was low-grade dysplasia in 9 (13%) subjects, high-grade dysplasia in 33 (48%) subjects and adenocarcinoma in 26 (38%) subjects. The majority (55%) lived more than 100 miles from the treatment center. The primary third-party payer was US Medicare for 54% of the subjects and private insurance for 36% of them; 45% of the subjects were seen in the clinic by the treating endoscopist, prior to endoscopic therapy and 71% underwent EMR as the initial treatment, while 29% underwent RFA without prior EMR. We found that 72% of subjects were adherent to therapy, including: 23 (33%) completing endoscopic therapy with documented post-treatment surveillance, 18 (26%) with ongoing endoscopic therapy, and 9 (13%) whom underwent esophagectomy. Subjects seen in gastroenterology clinical consultation were significantly more likely to demonstrate adherence than those referred for open access endoscopy (Lasso OR 2.31). Conclusions Patients seen in a clinical consultation prior to endoscopic therapy for BE-associated neoplasia were more likely to demonstrate treatment adherence, compared to patients referred for open-access endoscopy. A clinic visit prior to therapy may define expectations regarding treatment course and increase the likelihood of patient adherence.

  18. Characterisation of the signalment, clinical and survival characteristics of 41 cats with mast cell neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Litster, Annette L; Sorenmo, Karin U

    2006-06-01

    Mast cell tumours (MCTs) are relatively common tumours of cats, and are the second most common cutaneous tumours in cats in the USA. While the primary splenic form of the disease is far less common, it is usually associated with more severe clinical signs. Signalment, clinical and survival characteristics of mast cell neoplasia were characterised in 41 cats. The most common tumour location was cutaneous/subcutaneous head and trunk. Stage 1a was the most common tumour stage at first diagnosis (n=20), followed by stage 4 (both stage 4a and stage 4b; n=10). Of 22 cats that underwent excisional biopsy, mast cell neoplasia recurred in four cats during the study period. Three of the 41 cats presented with simultaneous cutaneous and either splenic or lymph node tumours. A comparison between cats with only cutaneous tumours (n=30) and those with tumours involving the spleen or lymph nodes (n=11) showed longer survival times for the cutaneous-only group (P=0.031). Twelve of the 41 cats died of mast cell neoplasia during the study period. When a subgroup of cats with only cutaneous tumours (no lymph node or visceral involvement) were divided according to whether there were multiple (five or more) tumours (n=6) or a single tumour (n=19), cats with single tumours survived longer than those with multiple tumours (P=0.001). Solitary cutaneous feline MCTs without spread to the lymph nodes usually manifest as benign disease with a relatively protracted course. However, multiple cutaneous tumours, recurrent tumours and primary splenic disease should receive a guarded prognosis due to the relatively short median survival times associated with these forms of the disease. PMID:16476559

  19. Diagnostic yield of non-guided flexible bronchoscopy for peripheral pulmonary neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, Catherine; Beaudoin, Stéphane; Martel, Simon; Delage, Antoine; Joubert, Philippe; Drapeau, Christine; Provencher, Steeve

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of conventional bronchoscopy for peripheral pulmonary neoplasia remains controversial. We aimed to assess the diagnostic yield and the added value of non-guided bronchial aspiration, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and brushing for the diagnosis of pulmonary neoplasia not visible endoscopically. Methods We retrospectively assessed 207 consecutive patients with a final diagnosis of peripheral lung malignancy who underwent bronchoscopy with non-guided aspiration, brushing, and BAL as their initial evaluation. The influence of clinical and radiological factors on diagnostic yield was assessed using univariate logistic regression analyses. Results The overall sensitivity of non-guided bronchoscopy was 25.6%, whereas sensitivities for bronchial aspiration, BAL, and brushing were 14.2%, 11.6%, and 16.5%, respectively. Younger age, larger lesion, central/intermediate distance from the hilum, presence of a bronchus sign, and higher standardized uptake value (SUV) on positron emission tomography scan were predictors of a higher diagnostic yield. Conversely, forced expiratory volume in one second, fellow implication in the procedure, and tumor histology did not influence sensitivity. The overall sensitivity of bronshoscopy was >40% for tumors >4 cm, located in the central/intermediate thirds of the lung, showing a bronchus sign, with an SUV >12 or occurring in patients <50 years of age. Conversely, the sensitivity was <10% for tumors <2 cm, located peripherally or with an SUV <4. Conclusion Neoplasia characteristics may help targeting situations in which conventional bronchoscopy could be used as the initial diagnostic procedure when advanced techniques are unavailable. However, advanced diagnostic tools should probably be proposed as the initial modality for the diagnosis of peripheral malignant lesions when available. PMID:26273409

  20. Low-Dose-Rate Definitive Brachytherapy for High-Grade Vaginal Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Monnier, Laurie; Dumas, Isabelle; Morice, Philippe; Pautier, Patricia; Duvillard, Pierre; Azoury, Fares; Mazeron, Renaud; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Background. Treatment of high-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) is controversial and could include surgical excision, topical medication, brachytherapy, or other treatments. We report the results of low-dose-rate (LDR) vaginal brachytherapy for grade 3 VAIN (VAIN-3) over a 25-year period at Gustave Roussy Institute. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the files of all patients treated at Gustave Roussy Institute for VAIN-3 since 1985. The treatment consisted of LDR brachytherapy using a personalized vaginal mold and delivered 60 Gy to 5 mm below the vaginal mucosa. All patients had at least an annual gynecological examination, including a vaginal smear. Results. Twenty-eight patients were eligible. The median follow-up was 41 months. Seven patients had a follow-up <2 years, and the median follow-up for the remaining 21 patients was 79 months. The median age at brachytherapy was 63 years (range, 38–80 years). Twenty-six patients had a history of VAIN recurring after cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and 24 had a previous hysterectomy. The median brachytherapy duration was 4.5 days. Median doses to the International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements rectum and bladder points were 68 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively. The median prescription volume (60 Gy) was 74 cm3. Only one “in field” recurrence occurred, corresponding to a 5- and 10-year local control rate of 93% (95% confidence interval, 70%–99%). The treatment was well tolerated, with no grade 3 or 4 late toxicity and only one grade 2 digestive toxicity. No second cancers were reported. Conclusion. LDR brachytherapy is an effective and safe treatment for vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia. PMID:21262875

  1. Mapping of multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) to proximal chromosome 18 of the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Luongo, C.; Gould, K.A.; Moser, A.R. ); Su, Likuo; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B. ); Dietrich, W.; Lander, E.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The Min (multiple intestinal neoplasia) mutation of the mouse has been mapped by analyzing the inheritance of restriction fragment length polymorphisms and simple sequence length polymorphisms in progeny from two intraspecific crosses segregating for the Min mutation. Min, a mutant allele of Apc, the mouse homo- log of the human APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) gene, maps to proximal chromosome 18. The synteny between Apc and Mcc, the mouse homolog of the human MCC (mutated in colorectal cancer) gene, is conserved between mouse and human, although the gene order in the Apc to Mcc interval is different from that in the APC to MCC interval. 29 refs., 3 figs.

  2. A new concept of melanocytic neoplasia pathogenesis based on the phenotype of common acquired nevi.

    PubMed

    Batistatou, Anna; Zioga, Aikaterini; Panelos, John; Massi, Daniela; Agnantis, Niki J; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos

    2007-01-01

    Common melanocytic nevi are ubiquitous lesions which in some cases constitute a risk factor for the development of melanoma. To date, despite long term research there are no known molecular hallmarks for nevus development. We have observed that common acquired nevi excised from the same individual share remarkable similarity in their microscopic appearance and in the immunohistochemical expression of E-cadherin. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that all melanocytes are genetically similar in the same individual and changes predisposing to neoplasia are a global melanocytic event characteristic for each person and propose a microgenomics/proteomics approach to test this hypothesis. PMID:17459602

  3. The question of a link between insulin-like growth factor physiology and neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Pollak, M

    2000-04-01

    The results of both population and laboratory studies suggest that the physiology of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) has important influences on cancer biology and cancer risk. This review highlights recent laboratory and epidemiological results in this rapidly evolving area of investigation. There is no direct evidence to suggest that growth hormone (GH) treatment of GH-deficient patients increases their risk of neoplasia, but recent research reinforces the need for careful surveillance. The monitoring of serum IGF-I levels may be advisable to help avoid inadvertent over-treatment, particularly in individuals undergoing long-term GH replacement therapy. PMID:10984249

  4. c-Myc Oncoprotein: A Dual Pathogenic Role in Neoplasia and Cardiovascular Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Claudio; Lerman, Lilach O; de Nigris, Filomena; Sica, Vincenzo

    2002-01-01

    Abstract A growing body of evidence indicates that c-Myc can play a pivotal role both in neoplasia and cardiovascular diseases. Indeed, alterations of the basal machinery of the cell and perturbations of c-Myc-dependent signaling network are involved in the pathogenesis of certain cardiovascular disorders. Down-regulation of c-Myc induced by intervention with antioxidants or by antisense technology may protect the integrity of the arterial wall as well as neoplastic tissues. Further intervention studies are necessary to investigate the effects of tissue-specific block of c-Myc overexpression in the development of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:11988837

  5. Implementation of a program to improve the quality of colonoscopy increases the neoplasia detection rate: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Luis Alberto; Cassella, Federico; Wonaga, Andrés; Arnao Dellamea, Gloria; Di Paola, Leandro; Ubeira Salim, Rodrigo; Fernández, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopists worldwide have been encouraged to report quality indicators in order to evaluate their performance. We aimed to determine whether a program to improve the quality of colonoscopy results in better rates of neoplasia detection. Patients and methods: This is a prospective study set in a private endoscopy center. From May 2009 to March 2010, we evaluated 1573 consecutive colonoscopies (group 1). After the implementation of a quality program, from February 2011 to January 2012, we prospectively evaluated 1583 colonoscopies (group 2). Our quality-enhancing intervention consisted of instructing both patients and endoscopists. We measured the cecal intubation rate and the neoplasia detection rate. Overall neoplasias, high-risk adenomas, carcinomas, right colon adenomas, and adenomas detected in screening studies were analyzed. Results: Cecal intubation was documented in 1384 cases from group 1 (88 %) and 1534 from group 2 (96.9 %) (P < 0.0001). The neoplasia detection rates in groups 1 and 2 were, respectively: neoplasias 288 (18.3 %) and 427 (27 %) (P < 0.0001), high-risk adenomas 76 (4.8 %) and 142 (9 %) (P < 0.0001), carcinomas 16 (1 %) and 21 (1.3 %) (P = 0.52), right colon adenomas 112 (7.1 %) and 154 (9.7 %) (P = 0.01), and adenomas 141 (16.5 %) and 233 (28 %) (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Implementation of a quality program improves the neoplasia detection rate. Because of the small number of cancerous lesions found in both groups, we were unable to identify differences in the carcinoma detection rate. PMID:26793787

  6. Molecular mechanisms of cholangiocarcinogenesis: are biliary intraepithelial neoplasia and intraductal papillary neoplasms of the bile duct precursors to cholangiocarcinoma?

    PubMed

    Bickenbach, Kai; Galka, Eva; Roggin, Kevin King

    2009-04-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is a rare, malignant neoplasm that can develop from any site within the intrahepatic or extrahepatic biliary tree. Although the key steps of cholangiocarcinogenesis remain unknown, it has been hypothesized that CC may develop through two key premalignant precursor lesions: biliary intraepithelial neoplasia (BilIN) and intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB). These lesions probably are analogous to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, respectively. This article outlines the molecular basis of cholangiocarcinogenesis through the BilIN and IPNB pathways. It highlights the genetic mutations that alter cellular proliferation, tumor suppression, and impairment of critical mucinous, cell-adhesion, and matrix proteins. PMID:19306808

  7. Diagnosis of Retrobulbar Round Cell Neoplasia in a Macaroni Penguin ( Eudyptes chrysolophus ) Through Use of Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Sarah J; Rose, Michelle; Desjardins, Danielle R; Agnew, Dalen W

    2015-03-01

    A 25-year-old female macaroni penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus) was diagnosed with exophthalmos secondary to retrobulbar neoplasia through use of computed tomography (CT). Histopathologic examination of the mass supported a diagnosis of malignant round cell neoplasia. Immunohistochemical (IHC) labeling was applied to determine cell origin; the neoplastic cells did not label with T-cell marker CD3 or B-cell marker BLA.36 and could not be further characterized. The scleral ossicles precluded evaluation of the retrobulbar space by ultrasonography; therefore, CT scanning is recommended for examination of intraorbital structures in penguin and other avian species. PMID:25867665

  8. Validity of colposcopy in the diagnosis of early cervical neoplasia--a review.

    PubMed

    Olaniyan, Olayinka Babafemi

    2002-12-01

    This study was conducted to quantify by meta-analysis the validity of colposcopy in the diagnosis of early cervical neoplasia in order to assess the justification of its integral role in this regard. Eight longitudinal studies were selected, which compared correlation of colposcopic impression with colposcopically directed biopsy results. The prevalence of disease in the studies ranged from 40 to 89%. Colposcopic accuracy was 89%, which agreed exactly with histology in 61% of cases. The sensitivity and specificity of colposcopy for the threshold normal versus all cervical abnormalities were 87-99% and 26-87% respectively. For the threshold normal and low grade SIL versus high grade SIL, the values were 30-90% and 67-97%. Likelihood ratios increased with disease severity. Colposcopy performed better in differentiation of high grade from low grade disease than in differentiation of low grade disease from normal cervix. Colposcopy is a valid tool for the diagnosis of early cervical neoplasia. Its integral role in the management of early cervical disease is justified. PMID:12685410

  9. C-C Chemokine Receptor 1 Expression in Human Hematolymphoid Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Matthew W.; Zhao, Shuchun; Ai, Weiyun Z.; Tibshirani, Robert; Levy, Ronald; Lossos, Izidore S.; Natkunam, Yasodha

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) is a G protein–coupled receptor that binds to members of the C-C chemokine family. Recently, CCL3 (MIP-1α), a high-affinity CCR1 ligand, was identified as part of a model that independently predicts survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, the role of chemokine signaling in the pathogenesis of human lymphomas is unclear. In normal human hematopoietic tissues, we found CCR1 expression in intraepithelial B cells of human tonsil and granulocytic/monocytic cells in the bone marrow. Immunohistochemical analysis of 944 cases of hematolymphoid neoplasia identified CCR1 expression in a subset of B- and T-cell lymphomas, plasma cell myeloma, acute myeloid leukemia, and classical Hodgkin lymphoma. CCR1 expression correlated with the non–germinal center subtype of DLBCL but did not predict overall survival in follicular lymphoma. These data suggest that CCR1 may be useful for lymphoma classification and support a role for chemokine signaling in the pathogenesis of hematolymphoid neoplasia. PMID:20154287

  10. C-C chemokine receptor 1 expression in human hematolymphoid neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew W; Zhao, Shuchun; Ai, Weiyun Z; Tibshirani, Robert; Levy, Ronald; Lossos, Izidore S; Natkunam, Yasodha

    2010-03-01

    Chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that binds to members of the C-C chemokine family. Recently, CCL3 (MIP-1alpha), a high-affinity CCR1 ligand, was identified as part of a model that independently predicts survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, the role of chemokine signaling in the pathogenesis of human lymphomas is unclear. In normal human hematopoietic tissues, we found CCR1 expression in intraepithelial B cells of human tonsil and granulocytic/monocytic cells in the bone marrow. Immunohistochemical analysis of 944 cases of hematolymphoid neoplasia identified CCR1 expression in a subset of B- and T-cell lymphomas, plasma cell myeloma, acute myeloid leukemia, and classical Hodgkin lymphoma. CCR1 expression correlated with the non-germinal center subtype of DLBCL but did not predict overall survival in follicular lymphoma. These data suggest that CCR1 may be useful for lymphoma classification and support a role for chemokine signaling in the pathogenesis of hematolymphoid neoplasia. PMID:20154287

  11. Hyperspectral wide gap second derivative analysis for in vivo detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenli; Wang, Chaojian; Chang, Shufang; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald X

    2015-12-01

    Hyperspectral reflectance imaging technique has been used for in vivo detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. However, the clinical outcome of this technique is suboptimal owing to multiple limitations such as nonuniform illumination, high-cost and bulky setup, and time-consuming data acquisition and processing. To overcome these limitations, we acquired the hyperspectral data cube in a wavelength ranging from 600 to 800 nm and processed it by a wide gap second derivative analysis method. This method effectively reduced the image artifacts caused by nonuniform illumination and background absorption. Furthermore, with second derivative analysis, only three specific wavelengths (620, 696, and 772 nm) are needed for tissue classification with optimal separability. Clinical feasibility of the proposed image analysis and classification method was tested in a clinical trial where cervical hyperspectral images from three patients were used for classification analysis. Our proposed method successfully classified the cervix tissue into three categories of normal, inflammation and high-grade lesion. These classification results were coincident with those by an experienced gynecology oncologist after applying acetic acid. Our preliminary clinical study has demonstrated the technical feasibility for in vivo and noninvasive detection of cervical neoplasia without acetic acid. Further clinical research is needed in order to establish a large-scale diagnostic database and optimize the tissue classification technique. PMID:26220210

  12. Complex APC germline mutation associated metaplasia and intraepithelial neoplasia (CAM-IEN) of the gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Böger, Christine; Haag, Jochen; Egberts, Jan-Hendrik; Röcken, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Preneoplasic and neoplastic changes of the gallbladder of patients with a familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) are rare, and very little is known about their incidence in patients with an attenuated FAP. We herein report on a unique case of a woman with an attenuated FAP who shows eight distinct, partially preneoplastic differentiation patterns within the gallbladder mucosa, which are: (1) regular gallbladder epithelium, (2) low grade biliary intraepithelial neoplasia, (3) papillary adenoma, (4) Paneth cell metaplasia, (5) goblet cell metaplasia, (6) pancreatic metaplasia, (7) pseudopyloric metaplasia, and (8) neuroendocrine differentiation. Moreover, this is the first case of a KRAS mutation in a gallbladder adenoma of a patient with an APC germline mutation, which is highly suggestive of an early event of malignant transformation. As a consequence of our findings, clinicians should draw special attention to the gallbladder of FAP patients, and a simultaneous protective cholecystectomy of FAP patients, which undergo colectomy and show conspicuous changes of the gallbladder mucosa, should be performed in these patients in order to eliminate the risk of a synchronous or metachronous gallbladder neoplasia. PMID:26643927

  13. Novel optical detection system for in vivo identification and localization of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Schomacker, Kevin T; Meese, Thomas M; Jiang, Chunsheng; Abele, Charles C; Dickson, Karen; Sum, Stephen T; Flewelling, Ross F

    2006-01-01

    A noncontact optical detection system is developed for the in vivo identification and localization of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2,3). Diagnostic scans of the entire human cervix are performed following acetic acid application employing three integrated optical measurements: laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, white light diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and video imaging. Full cervical scans comprising 499 interrogation locations at 1-mm spatial resolution are completed in 12 s. Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra with signal-to-noise ratios of better than 100-to-1 are collected between 360 and 720 nm in increments of 1 nm, with an inherent spectral resolution of 8 nm. Glare reduction and optical vignetting are handled with a novel illumination scheme and subsequent spectral arbitration algorithms. The system is designed and found to be well below acceptable safe optical exposure levels. Typical reproducibility across multiple systems is approximately 5%, providing reliable and accurate detection of in vivo cervical neoplasia in normal clinical use. PMID:16822059

  14. Conjunctival Intraepithelial Neoplasia with Mucoepidermoid Differentiation: A Case Report of a Subtle Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Joag, Madhura G.; Gupta, Anita; Galor, Anat; Dubovy, Sander R.; Bermudez-Magner, Jose Antonio; Wang, Jianhua; Karp, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic imaging, and treatment options of conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) with mucoepidermoid differentiation, an in situ stage of mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the conjunctiva (MCC). Results We report the case of an 86-year-old man presenting with a subtle limbal lesion that had only mild erythema and elevation. Based on a few atypical clinical features and an abnormal ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR OCT), an incisional biopsy was performed revealing CIN with mucoepidermoid differentiation. Treatment involved aggressive surgical excision. No evidence of recurrence was noted in the 5 years of follow-up. Conclusion MCC is an aggressive tumor that has a tendency to be invasive and recur after treatment. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment is critical. CIN with mucoepidermoid differentiation may represent the earliest stage of MCC. It can present subtly, with a clinical resemblance to benign and less aggressive ocular surface lesions. Imaging with UHR OCT may be helpful to detect early neoplasia. A high level of suspicion must be maintained when evaluating potential ocular surface tumors.

  15. [Practical problems in breast screening. Columnar cell lesions including flat epithelial atypia and lobular neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Nährig, J

    2008-11-01

    Columnar cell lesions (CCL) and lobular neoplasia (LN) are encountered with increasing frequency in breast screening biopsies. CCLs are frequently associated with microcalcifications, whereas LN is an incidental finding in most cases. Flat epithelia atypia (FEA) the atypical variant of CLL, LN and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) are frequently associated lesions. Molecular genetic studies of CCL, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and low grade invasive carcinomas revealed similar chromosomal alterations supporting the assumption that CCLs are neoplastic proliferations. The frequent association of FEA together with well differentiated invasive carcinomas provides further evidence of this concept. There is no internationally accepted classification of CCLs at present. CDH1-gene mutations are the cardinal feature of LN and invasive lobular carcinoma. In immunohistochemically CDH1-positive cases, alternative genetic alterations of the CDH1 pathway can lead to functional loss of CDH1. In our opinion morphologically and immunohistochemically hybrid lesions may represent this group of lobular lesions. Recent follow-up data suggest a higher rate of ipsilateral carcinomas in patients with previously diagnosed LN. It is currently an open question whether FEA and LN are members of a common family of intralobular proliferations, which are non-obligatory precursors of a low nuclear grade breast neoplasia family. PMID:18726595

  16. Low-grade mucinous neoplasia in a cecal diverticulum: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Kazuyoshi; Tokuhara, Katsuji; Sakaguchi, Tatsuma; Ryota, Hironori; Yoshioka, Kazuhiko; Kon, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low-grade mucinous neoplasia is an uncommon benign tumor that develops in the appendix. The development of mucocele disease has never been reported in a colonic diverticulum. We present a case developing low-grade mucinous neoplasia in a cecal diverticulum. Presentation of case A tumor in the ileocecal region was found during a medical examination of a 66-year-old woman. Three months later, the tumor was still present and the patient developed abdominal pain. Laparoscopic ileocecal resection with D2 lymph node dissection was performed. Histopathological examination revealed a low-grade mucinous neoplasm in a cecal diverticulum. Discussion Colonic mucoceles reportedly originate from the appendix. There are no previous reports of mucocele disease in a colonic diverticulum worldwide. This report reviews and discusses the management of the appendiceal mucoceles. Conclusion The incidence of colonic diverticula has recently begun to increase in Japan. The possibility of a mucocele within a colonic diverticulum should be considered in patients with submucosal colonic tumors. PMID:26318130

  17. Hyperspectral wide gap second derivative analysis for in vivo detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenli; Wang, Chaojian; Chang, Shufang; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-12-01

    Hyperspectral reflectance imaging technique has been used for in vivo detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. However, the clinical outcome of this technique is suboptimal owing to multiple limitations such as nonuniform illumination, high-cost and bulky setup, and time-consuming data acquisition and processing. To overcome these limitations, we acquired the hyperspectral data cube in a wavelength ranging from 600 to 800 nm and processed it by a wide gap second derivative analysis method. This method effectively reduced the image artifacts caused by nonuniform illumination and background absorption. Furthermore, with second derivative analysis, only three specific wavelengths (620, 696, and 772 nm) are needed for tissue classification with optimal separability. Clinical feasibility of the proposed image analysis and classification method was tested in a clinical trial where cervical hyperspectral images from three patients were used for classification analysis. Our proposed method successfully classified the cervix tissue into three categories of normal, inflammation and high-grade lesion. These classification results were coincident with those by an experienced gynecology oncologist after applying acetic acid. Our preliminary clinical study has demonstrated the technical feasibility for in vivo and noninvasive detection of cervical neoplasia without acetic acid. Further clinical research is needed in order to establish a large-scale diagnostic database and optimize the tissue classification technique.

  18. Zeranol may increase the risk of leptin-induced neoplasia in human breast.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pingping; Ye, Weiping; Zhong, Saiyi; Jen, Robert; Li, Hong; Feng, Eric; Lin, Shu-Hong; Liu, Jie-Yu; Lin, Young C

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer and obesity are serious health problems and their relationship has been studied for many years. Leptin is mainly secreted by adipocytes and plays a key role in breast cancer development. Leptin expression is up-regulated in obese individuals and promotes breast cancer cell growth. On the other hand, exposure to environmental estrogens has been found to be directly related to breast cancer. Zeranol (Z) is a non-steroidal anabolic growth promoter used in the beef industry in the US. This study focused on the evaluation of Z and Z-containing sera (ZS) and its adverse health risk to human consumption of Z-containing meat produced from Z-implanted beef cattle. We hypothesized that Z increases the risk of breast neoplasia in women, particularly in obese women. A cell proliferation assay, ELISA analysis, RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were conducted. Our study demonstrated that Z and ZS collected from Z-implanted heifers stimulated the proliferation of primary cultured human normal breast epithelial cells (HNBECs) by up-regulating cyclin D1 expression. Leptin increased the sensitivity of HNBECs to Z, and Z increased the ability of HNBECs to secrete leptin. These results suggest an interaction between leptin and Z in HNBECs. Furthermore, Z may play a role in leptin-induced breast neoplasia. PMID:22870137

  19. Assessment of a custom-built Raman spectroscopic probe for diagnosis of early oesophageal neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almond, L. Max; Hutchings, Jo; Kendall, Catherine; Day, John C. C.; Stevens, Oliver A. C.; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Shepherd, Neil A.; Barr, Hugh; Stone, Nick

    2012-08-01

    We evaluate the potential of a custom-built fiber-optic Raman probe, suitable for in vivo use, to differentiate between benign, metaplastic (Barrett's oesophagus), and neoplastic (dysplastic and malignant) oesophageal tissue ex vivo on short timescales. We measured 337 Raman spectra (λex=830 nm Pex=60 mW t=1 s) using a confocal probe from fresh (298) and snap-frozen (39) oesophageal tissue collected during surgery or endoscopy from 28 patients. Spectra were correlated with histopathology and used to construct a multivariate classification model which was tested using leave one tissue site out cross-validation in order to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the probe system. The Raman probe system was able to differentiate, when tested with leave one site out cross-validation, between normal squamous oesophagus, Barrett's oesophagus and neoplasia with sensitivities of (838% to 6%) and specificities of (89% to 99%). Analysis of a two group model to differentiate Barrett's oesophagus and neoplasia demonstrated a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 87% for classification of neoplastic disease. This fiber-optic Raman system can provide rapid, objective, and accurate diagnosis of oesophageal pathology ex vivo. The confocal design of this probe enables superficial mucosal abnormalities (metaplasia and dysplasia) to be classified in clinically applicable timescales paving the way for an in vivo trial.

  20. Fundic gland polyps (Elster's cysts) of the gastric mucosa. A marker for colorectal epithelial neoplasia?

    PubMed

    Jung, A; Vieth, M; Maier, O; Stolte, M

    2002-01-01

    The results of several retrospective studies allow us to conclude that the detection of fundic gland polyps (Elster's cysts) is associated with an increased incidence of colorectal tumors. In this survey, we present the results of a prospective study investigating such a possible relationship. A total of 144 patients were investigated, of whom 80 had fundic gland polyps of the gastric corpus mucosa. Sixty-four of these patients underwent a colonoscopy, whereas the other 64 patients belonged to a sex- and age-matched control group with no fundic gland polyps. In the group with known fundic gland polyps, colorectal neoplasias were found in 29 (45.3%) patients. Eight of these patients had (12.5%) adenocarcinomas, 3 (4.7%) had high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and 18 (28.1%) had tubular adenomas. In one patient, a synchronous carcinoma of the rectum and the colon was detected. In comparison, 6 patients of the control group (9.3%) developed tubular adenomas and 9 (14.1%) had hyperplastic polyps of the colonic and rectal mucosa. Our results suggest that it is necessary to conduct a careful diagnostic work-up of the colon in patients with gastric fundic gland polyps. PMID:12530575

  1. HPV infection, anal intra-epithelial neoplasia (AIN) and anal cancer: current issues

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is well known as the major etiological agent for ano-genital cancer. In contrast to cervical cancer, anal cancer is uncommon, but is increasing steadily in the community over the last few decades. However, it has undergone an exponential rise in the men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV + groups. HIV + MSM in particular, have anal cancer incidences about three times that of the highest worldwide reported cervical cancer incidences. Discussion There has therefore traditionally been a lack of data from studies focused on heterosexual men and non-HIV + women. There is also less evidence reporting on the putative precursor lesion to anal cancer (AIN – anal intraepithelial neoplasia), when compared to cervical cancer and CIN (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia). This review summarises the available biological and epidemiological evidence for HPV in the anal site and the pathogenesis of AIN and anal cancer amongst traditionally non-high risk groups. Summary There is strong evidence to conclude that high-grade AIN is a precursor to anal cancer, and some data on the progression of AIN to invasive cancer. PMID:22958276

  2. Arf Suppresses Hepatic Vascular Neoplasia in a Carcinogen-Exposed Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Stephanie E; Gurley, Kay E; Moser, Russell D; Kemp, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic haemangiosarcoma is a deadly malignancy whose aetiology remains poorly understood. Inactivation of the CDKN2A locus, which houses the ARF and p16INK4a tumour suppressor genes, is a common event in haemangiosarcoma patients, but the precise role of ARF in vascular tumourigenesis is unknown. To determine the extent to which ARF suppresses vascular neoplasia, we examined the incidence of hepatic vascular lesions in Arf-deficient mice exposed to the carcinogen urethane (i.p. 1 mg/g). Loss of Arf resulted in elevated morbidity and increased the incidence of both haemangiomas and incipient haemangiosarcomas. Suppression of vascular lesion development by ARF was heavily dependent on both Arf gene-dosage and the genetic strain of the mouse. Trp53-deficient mice also developed hepatic vascular lesions after exposure to urethane, suggesting that ARF signals through a p53-dependent pathway to inhibit the development of hepatic haemangiosarcoma. Our findings provide strong evidence that inactivation of Arf is a causative event in vascular neoplasia and suggest that the ARF pathway may be a novel molecular target for therapeutic intervention in haemangiosarcoma patients. PMID:22430984

  3. A Multiscale Model Evaluates Screening for Neoplasia in Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Curtius, Kit; Hazelton, William D.; Jeon, Jihyoun; Luebeck, E. Georg

    2015-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) patients are routinely screened for high grade dysplasia (HGD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) through endoscopic screening, during which multiple esophageal tissue samples are removed for histological analysis. We propose a computational method called the multistage clonal expansion for EAC (MSCE-EAC) screening model that is used for screening BE patients in silico to evaluate the effects of biopsy sampling, diagnostic sensitivity, and treatment on disease burden. Our framework seamlessly integrates relevant cell-level processes during EAC development with a spatial screening process to provide a clinically relevant model for detecting dysplastic and malignant clones within the crypt-structured BE tissue. With this computational approach, we retain spatio-temporal information about small, unobserved tissue lesions in BE that may remain undetected during biopsy-based screening but could be detected with high-resolution imaging. This allows evaluation of the efficacy and sensitivity of current screening protocols to detect neoplasia (dysplasia and early preclinical EAC) in the esophageal lining. We demonstrate the clinical utility of this model by predicting three important clinical outcomes: (1) the probability that small cancers are missed during biopsy-based screening, (2) the potential gains in neoplasia detection probabilities if screening occurred via high-resolution tomographic imaging, and (3) the efficacy of ablative treatments that result in the curative depletion of metaplastic and neoplastic cell populations in BE in terms of the long-term impact on reducing EAC incidence. PMID:26001209

  4. Super-efficient starch absorption. A risk factor for colonic neoplasia?

    PubMed

    Thornton, J R; Dryden, A; Kelleher, J; Losowsky, M S

    1987-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that super-efficient starch absorption, by reducing the supply of carbohydrate to the colon, may be associated with and possibly promote colonic neoplasia. By means of breath hydrogen measurements following a potato meal and comparison with the hydrogen response to lactulose, the amount of starch escaping small bowel absorption was measured in 10 patients who had a colonic adenoma removed endoscopically and in 10 controls. The subjects' consumption of starch and fiber was assessed. Percentage unabsorbed starch was approximately half as much in the patients (5.3%) compared with the controls (10.9%, P less than 0.05). Consumption of starch and dietary fiber, and mouth-to-cecum transit times were not significantly different. Unabsorbed starch was calculated to contribute to 6.0 g/day colonic carbohydrate in the patients and 10.9 g/day in the controls (P less than 0.05). This study confirms that unabsorbed starch provides an important quantity of colonic carbohydrate and suggests that super-efficient starch absorption, by reducing this provision, may promote colonic neoplasia. PMID:2820674

  5. Surgical management of pancreatico-duodenal tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1

    PubMed Central

    Åkerström, Göran; Stålberg, Peter; Hellman, Per

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatico-duodenal tumors are the second most common endocrinopathy in multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1, and have a pronounced effect on life expectancy as the principal cause of disease-related death. Previous discussions about surgical management have focused mainly on syndromes of hormone excess and, in particular, the management of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1-related Zollinger–Ellison syndrome. Since hormonal syndromes tend to occur late and indicate the presence of metastases, screening with biochemical markers and endoscopic ultrasound is recommended for early detection of pancreatico-duodenal tumors, and with early surgery before metastases have developed. Surgery is recommended in patients with or without hormonal syndromes in the absence of disseminated liver metastases. The suggested operation includes distal 80% subtotal pancreatic resection together with enucleation of tumors in the head of the pancreas, and in cases with Zollinger–Ellison syndrome, excision of duodenal gastrinomas together with clearance of regional lymph node metastases. This strategy, with early and aggressive surgery before metastases have developed, is believed to reduce the risks for tumor recurrence and malignant progression. PMID:22584725

  6. Anal Neoplasia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Is Associated With HPV and Perianal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ruel, Joannie; Ko, Huaibin Mabel; Roda, Giulia; Patil, Ninad; Zhang, David; Jharap, Bindia; Harpaz, Noam; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Literature describing the risk factors predisposing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients to anal squamous neoplasia is very scarce. Case reports and small case series have implicated perianal Crohn's disease (CD), long-standing IBD, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and immunosuppressive treatment. In this study, we retrospectively examined the association between HPV infection and anal squamous neoplastic lesions among IBD patients from our center. METHODS: We reviewed the pathology records and slides of IBD patients diagnosed with anal squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs), and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs) who presented at our center between 1 March 1994 and 9 September 2014. The HPV status of the neoplasms was assessed histologically, by immunohistochemical staining for p16 overexpression, and by global and type-specific HPV PCR. RESULTS: SCCs, HSILs, LSILs, and small cell carcinoma were identified, respectively, in six, nine, two, and one IBD patients. All six patients with SCC had CD with perianal involvement. HPV-related neoplasia was identified in 3/6 cases of SCC (all HPV-16), 1/1 small cell carcinoma (HPV-18), and 9/9 HSIL (7 HPV-16, 2 not typed); 2/2 LSILs were negative for high-risk HPV. CONCLUSIONS: In our experience, anal squamous neoplastic lesions in IBD are associated with HPV infection and SCC seem to be associated with perianal CD. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:26938479

  7. Canine neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Prier, J. E.; Brodey, R. S.

    1963-01-01

    The authors review current knowledge of spontaneous neoplasms in the dog. The prevalence of certain types of canine tumour has been studied, and comparisons have been made with the occurrence of similar neoplasms in man. Where there are appropriate analogies between the two species, the dog with spontaneous tumours can be used for studies that are not practicable in man. Nutritional and morphological studies have been done on cells cultured from canine tumours. Some consistency has been demonstrated in the morphology of cultures of different tumours of the same type. Nutritional studies with the transmissible venereal sarcoma of the dog have shown the cells to be subject to a growth-repressing effect by SH-containing amino-acids. Attempts to transmit tumours to other dogs or other species have generally been unsuccessful. A transplantable tumour developed in a mouse injected with non-cellular material from a canine thyroid carcinoma, but it is not certain that the tumour was induced. Cell-culture studies have shown that some tumours yield a factor that is cytopathogenic for normal cells, but none has been shown capable of inducing neoplasms in vivo. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 6 PMID:14058226

  8. Prevalence and risk factors of sexually transmitted infections and cervical neoplasia in women from a rural area of southern Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Clara; Castellsagué, Xavier; Renom, Montse; Sacarlal, Jahit; Quintó, Llorenç; Lloveras, Belen; Klaustermeier, Joellen; Kornegay, Janet R; Sigauque, Betuel; Bosch, F Xavier; Alonso, Pedro L

    2010-01-01

    There is limited information on the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and the prevalence of cervical neoplasia in rural sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the prevalence and the etiology of STIs and the prevalence of cervical neoplasia among women in southern Mozambique. An age-stratified cross-sectional study was performed where 262 women aged 14 to 61 years were recruited at the antenatal clinic (59%), the family-planning clinic (7%), and from the community (34%). At least one active STI was diagnosed in 79% of women. Trichomonas vaginalis was present in 31% of all study participants. The prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhea and Chlamydia trachomatis were 14% and 8%, respectively, and Syphilis was diagnosed in 12% of women. HPV DNA was detected in 40% of women and cervical neoplasia was diagnosed in 12% of all women. Risk factors associated with the presence of some of the STIs were being divorced or widowed, having more than one sexual partner and having the partner living in another area. A higher prevalence was observed in the reproductive age group and some of the STIs were more frequently diagnosed in pregnant women. STI control programs are a priority to reduce the STIs burden, including HIV and cervical neoplasia. PMID:20706691

  9. [Method for the tube management of the dehiscence of the rectal stump after Hartmann's operation for neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Iarŭmov, N; Iankov, V; Kumanov, Ch; Karageorgiev, M

    2005-01-01

    It is described operative method for the suture of rectal stump by tube management of dehiscence on the rectal stump after Hartmann's operation for the low proximal resection of the rectum for neoplasia. Es-sence for the method it is applied on the transrectal and -anal tube drainage. PMID:18693521

  10. Neoplasias mielodisplásicas o mieloproliferativas (PDQ®)—Versión para profesionales de salud

    Cancer.gov

    Resumen de información revisada por expertos acerca del tratamiento de las neoplasias mielodisplásicas o mieloproliferativas, incluso las leucemias mielomonocítica crónica o juvenil y la LMC atípica.

  11. Comparing Benign and Malignant Neoplasia and DSB Induction for Low-and High-LET Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Fredric; (Eric) Tang, Moon-Shong; Wu, Feng

    One-and 2-stage models based on DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) have been developed to describe the dose and LET dependence of cancer induction in rat skin exposed to the Bragg plateau of several ion beams or electron radiation. Data are presented showing that carcinomas (malignant) and fibromas (benign) are induced differently by low and high LET radiation. DSBs are subject to complex repair processes, including homologous and non-homologous end joining, that slowly eliminate broken chromosome ends but at the expense of elevating genomic instability that increases the risk of neoplasia. In this formulation the initial molecular lesion in radiation carcinogenesis is assumed to be a DNA double strand break (DSB). The 2-event model assumes that pairs of DSBs join to create cellular genomic instability that eventually progresses to malignancy. The 1-event model assumes that joining is insignificant but that unrepaired DSBs remain and are sufficiently destabilizing to produce low-grade neoplasias. The respective expected relationships between neoplasia yield (Y), radiation dose (D) and LET (L) are: Y(D) = CLD + BD2 (A) for 2-events and Y(D) = CLD (B) for 1-event. Respective B and C values have been evaluated empirically for carcinomas, fibromas and DSBs, the latter via the -H2Ax technique in surrogate keratinocytes, for several types of radiations, including, 40Ar ions, 56Fe ions, 20Ne ions, protons, electrons and x-rays. Fibromas outnumber carcinomas by about 6:1 but are more sensitive than carcinomas to the cytolethal effect of the radiations. The 2-event model agrees well with carcinoma yields in rat skin but fails to model fibromas correctly. Instead the fibroma yields best fitted with the 1-event model for the high LET ion radiations, but at very low LET (electron radiation), an empirical D3 component becomes apparent which is not currently incorporated into the theoretical model. At higher LET values, the D3 component was not detected. The overall results are summarized as follows: 1) DSBs predict carcinoma yields in regard to dose and LET in conformity to Equation A, 2) fibroma yields for 40Ar and 20Ne ions conform to Equation B, i.e. yield proportionality to D and L and 3) the positive slope of the fibroma yield to electron radiation is a third order discrepancy suggesting a more complicated response that has yet to be incorporated into the model. The results provide encouragement that once calibrated for humans, a short-term test of DSB yield might be capable of predicting cancer risks for a variety of space radiation exposure scenarios.

  12. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett; Eble, John N; Egevad, Lars; Epstein, Jonathan I; Grignon, David; Hes, Ondrej; Moch, Holger; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tickoo, Satish K; Zhou, Ming; Argani, Pedram

    2013-10-01

    The classification working group of the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference on renal neoplasia was in charge of making recommendations regarding additions and changes to the current World Health Organization Classification of Renal Tumors (2004). Members of the group performed an exhaustive literature review, assessed the results of the preconference survey and participated in the consensus conference discussion and polling activities. On the basis of the above inputs, there was consensus that 5 entities should be recognized as new distinct epithelial tumors within the classification system: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo) papillary RCC, the MiT family translocation RCCs (in particular t(6;11) RCC), and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition, there are 3 rare carcinomas that were considered as emerging or provisional new entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC; succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC; and ALK translocation RCC. Further reports of these entities are required to better understand the nature and behavior of these highly unusual tumors. There were a number of new concepts and suggested modifications to the existing World Health Organization 2004 categories. Within the clear cell RCC group, it was agreed upon that multicystic clear cell RCC is best considered as a neoplasm of low malignant potential. There was agreement that subtyping of papillary RCC is of value and that the oncocytic variant of papillary RCC should not be considered as a distinct entity. The hybrid oncocytic chromophobe tumor, which is an indolent tumor that occurs in 3 settings, namely Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome, renal oncocytosis, and as a sporadic neoplasm, was placed, for the time being, within the chromophobe RCC category. Recent advances related to collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and mucinous spindle cell and tubular RCC were elucidated. Outside of the epithelial category, advances in our understanding of angiomyolipoma, including the epithelioid and epithelial cystic variants, were considered. In addition, the apparent relationship between cystic nephroma and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor was discussed, with the consensus that these tumors form a spectrum of neoplasia. Finally, it was thought that the synovial sarcoma should be removed from the mixed epithelial and mesenchymal category and placed within the sarcoma group. The new classification is to be referred to as the International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia. PMID:24025519

  13. Colonic Mucosal Fatty Acid Synthase as an Early Biomarker for Colorectal Neoplasia: Modulation by Obesity and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Mart Dela; Wali, Ramesh K.; Bianchi, Laura K.; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Crawford, Susan E.; Jepeal, Lisa; Goldberg, Michael J.; Weinstein, Jaclyn; Momi, Navneet; Roy, Priya; Calderwood, Audrey H.; Backman, Vadim; Roy, Hemant K.

    2015-01-01

    Background We have previously reported that colonic peri-cryptal microvascular blood flow is augmented in the premalignant colonic epithelium, highlighting the increased metabolic demand of the proliferative epithelium as a marker of field carcinogenesis. However, its molecular basis is unexplored. In this study, we assessed the expression of a regulator of the “lipogenic switch”, fatty acid synthase (FASN), in early colon carcinogenesis for its potential biomarker utility for concurrent neoplasia. Methods FASN expression (IHC) in the colonic epithelium from azoxymethane and Pirc rat models of CRC was studied. FASN mRNA expression from endoscopically normal rectal mucosa was evaluated and correlated with colonoscopic findings (pathological confirmation of neoplasia). Results FASN expression progressively increased from premalignant to malignant stage in the azoxymethane-model (1.9 to 2.5 fold; p<0.0001) and was also higher in the adenomas compared to adjacent uninvolved mucosa (1.8 to 3.4 fold; p<0.001) in the pirc-model. Furthermore, FASN was significantly overexpressed in rectal biopsies from patients harboring adenomas compared to those with no adenomas. These effects were accentuated in male (~2 fold) and obese patients (1.4 fold compared to those with BMI <30). Overall, the performance of rectal FASN was excellent (AUROC of 0.81). Conclusions FASN is altered in the premalignant colonic mucosa and may serve as a marker for colonic neoplasia present elsewhere. The enhanced effects in men and obesity may have implications for identifying patient subgroups at risk for early onset neoplasia. Impact These findings support the role of rectal FASN expression as a reliable biomarker of colonic neoplasia. PMID:25155760

  14. Bacterial vaginosis and inflammatory response showed association with severity of cervical neoplasia in HPV-positive women.

    PubMed

    de Castro-Sobrinho, Juçara Maria; Rabelo-Santos, Silvia Helena; Fugueiredo-Alves, Rosane Ribeiro; Derchain, Sophie; Sarian, Luis Otávio Z; Pitta, Denise R; Campos, Elisabete A; Zeferino, Luiz Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Vaginal infections may affect susceptibility to and clearance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and chronic inflammation has been linked to carcinogenesis. This study aimed to evaluate the association between bacterial vaginosis (BV) and inflammatory response (IR) with the severity of cervical neoplasia in HPV-infected women. HPV DNA was amplified using PGMY09/11 primers and genotyping was performed using a reverse line blot hybridization assay in 211 cervical samples from women submitted to excision of the transformation zone. The bacterial flora was assessed in Papanicolaou stained smears, and positivity for BV was defined as ≥20% of clue cells. Present inflammatory response was defined as ≥30 neutrophils per field at 1000× magnification. Age higher than 29 years (OR:1.91 95% CI 1.06-3.45), infections by the types 16 and/or 18 (OR:1.92 95% CI 1.06-3.47), single or multiple infections associated with types 16 and/or 18 (OR: 1.92 CI 95% 1.06-3.47), BV (OR: 3.54 95% CI 1.62-7.73) and IR (OR: 6.33 95% CI 3.06-13.07) were associated with severity of cervical neoplasia (CIN 2 or worse diagnoses), while not smoking showed a protective effect (OR: 0.51 95% CI 0.26-0.98). After controlling for confounding factors, BV(OR: 3.90 95% CI 1.64-9.29) and IR (OR: 6.43 95% CI 2.92-14.15) maintained their association with the severity of cervical neoplasia. Bacterial vaginosis and inflammatory response were independently associated with severity of cervical neoplasia in HPV-positive women, which seems to suggest that the microenvironment would relate to the natural history of cervical neoplasia. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:80-86. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26644228

  15. [Combined endoscopic diagnostics with catheter confocal endomicroscopy for gastric neoplasia detection].

    PubMed

    Shuleshova, A G; Zav'ialov, M O; Ul'ianov, D N; Kanareĭtseva, T D

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of combined endoscopic diagnostics with catheter confocal laser endomicroscopy (CCLE) for detection of gastric neoplasia in 103 patients is presented in the article. It was described the main principles of catheter confocal laser endomicroscopy by using of Cellvizio-system ("Mauna Kea Technologies", France). All patients underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy before catheter confocal laser endomicroscopy. Such modes as HRE-endoscopy, NBI-endoscopy and Zoom-endoscopy were used. It was revealed different neoplastic changes of stomach mucous coat and early cancer forms of stomach in 185 cases. It was noted expediency and high informational content of CCLE which leads to detect the foci of intestinal metaplasia by colonic type, foci of dysplasia and early cancer of stomach mucous coat. The role of conventional morphological study for verification of changes detected with CCLE was shown. PMID:25327669

  16. Parent-of-origin effects in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, K. M.; Bracamontes, J.; Jackson, C. E.; Clark, R.; Lacroix, A.; Wells, S. A.; Goodfellow, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN 2B) is characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytomas, mucosal neuromas, ganglioneuromas, and skeletal and ophthalmic abnormalities. It is observed as both inherited and sporadic disease, with an estimated 50% of cases arising de novo. A single point mutation in the catalytic core region of the receptor tyrosine kinase, RET, has been observed in germ-line DNA of MEN 2B patients. We have analyzed 25 cases of de novo disease in order to determine the parental origin of the mutated RET allele. In all cases the new mutation was of paternal origin. We observe a distortion of the sex ratio in both de novo MEN 2B patients and the affected offspring of MEN 2B transmitting males. These results suggests a differential susceptibility of RET to mutation in paternally and maternally derived DNA and a possible role for imprinting of RET during development. Images Figure 4b PMID:7977365

  17. Protein kinase D1 drives pancreatic acinar cell reprogramming and progression to intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Geou-Yarh; Döppler, Heike; Braun, Ursula B.; Panayiotou, Richard; Scotti Buzhardt, Michele; Radisky, Derek C.; Crawford, Howard C.; Fields, Alan P.; Murray, Nicole R.; Wang, Q. Jane; Leitges, Michael; Storz, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The transdifferentiation of pancreatic acinar cells to a ductal phenotype (acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, ADM) occurs after injury or inflammation of the pancreas and is a reversible process. However, in the presence of activating Kras mutations or persistent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) signalling, cells that underwent ADM can progress to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually pancreatic cancer. In transgenic animal models, ADM and PanINs are initiated by high-affinity ligands for EGF-R or activating Kras mutations, but the underlying signalling mechanisms are not well understood. Here, using a conditional knockout approach, we show that protein kinase D1 (PKD1) is sufficient to drive the reprogramming process to a ductal phenotype and progression to PanINs. Moreover, using 3D explant culture of primary pancreatic acinar cells, we show that PKD1 acts downstream of TGFα and Kras, to mediate formation of ductal structures through activation of the Notch pathway.

  18. Fine-scaling mapping of the gene responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN1)

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimori, Minoru; Nakamura, Yusuke ); Wells, S.A. )

    1992-02-01

    The authors have constructed a high-resolution genetic linkage map in the vicinity of the gene responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). The mutation causing this disease, inherited as an autosomal dominant, predisposes carriers to development of neoplastic tumors in the parathyroid, the endocrine pancreas, and the anterior lobe of the pituitary. The 12 markers on the genetic linkage map reported here span nearly 20 cM, and linkage analysis of MEN1 pedigrees has placed the MEN1 locus within the 8-cM region between D11S480 and D11S546. The markers on this map will be useful for prenatal or presymptomatic diagnosis of individuals in families that segregate a mutant allele of the MEN1 gene.

  19. Wnt signaling and senescence: a tug of war in early neoplasia?

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Peter D.; Enders, Greg H.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of early neoplasia have revealed fundamental molecular pathways that drive tumorigenesis. Despite this progress, synthesis of principles of tumorigenesis that span tissue types has lagged. Such forays into the ‘comparative anatomy’ of cancer can stimulate new models and refine key questions. We envision commonality of pathways important in formation of two early benign neoplasms that are found in different tissues and which are not generally thought to be similar: dysplastic nevi of the skin and intestinal aberrant crypt foci. We propose that these neoplasms result from an ongoing ‘tug of war’ between the tumor suppression barrier posed by cellular senescence and the tumor-promoting activity of Wnt signaling. Whether or not such neoplasms progress to malignancy or persist in a benign state for many years might be largely determined by the outcome of this tug of war and its modulation by other genetic and epigenetic alterations, such as inactivation of p16INK4a. PMID:18836285

  20. Pancreatic neoplasia induced by ras expression in acinar cells of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Quaife, C J; Pinkert, C A; Ornitz, D M; Palmiter, R D; Brinster, R L

    1987-03-27

    Expression of an activated human c-H-ras oncogene under control of rat elastase I regulating elements leads to neoplasia of the fetal exocrine pancreas. In most transgenic mice bearing this gene construct, massive tumors involving all the pancreatic acinar cells develop within a few days of pancreatic differentiation. Expression of the normal c-H-ras proto-oncogene in acinar cells leads to more subtle anomalies, but no tumors develop. Thus modest amounts of the mutant ras proteins are sufficient, in an otherwise normal genetic background, to lead to neoplastic transformation of differentiating pancreatic acinar cells. In contrast, a comparable elastase-myc construct produces no pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice. PMID:3470144

  1. [Early detection of anal intraepithelial neoplasia in high-risk patients].

    PubMed

    Sendagorta, E; Herranz, P; Guadalajara, H; Zamora, F X

    2011-12-01

    The incidence of anal squamous cell carcinoma has increased alarmingly, particularly in high-risk groups such as men who have sex with men and immunosuppressed patients. Infection with an oncogenic strain of the human papillomavirus in the anal canal or perianal skin leads to anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AIN), progressive dysplastic intraepithelial lesions that are the precursors of anal squamous cell carcinoma. AIN can be diagnosed through cytological screening and biopsy guided by high-resolution anoscopy and can be treated using a range of procedures in an effort to prevent progression to invasive anal carcinoma. Given the recent advances in the understanding of this disease, and the increasing calls from experts for the establishment of screening programs to identify AIN, we review current knowledge on the condition, its diagnosis, and treatment from the point of view of dermatology. PMID:21764027

  2. Parent-of-origin effects in multiple endocrine neoplasia Type 2B

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.M.; Bracamontes, J.; Wells, S.A. Jr.; Goodfellow, P.J.; Jackson, C.E.; Clark, R.; Lacroix, A.

    1994-12-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN 2B) is characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytomas, mucosal neuromas, ganglioneuromas, and skeletal and ophthalmic abnormalities. It is observed as both inherited and sporadic disease, with an estimated 50% of cases arising de novo. A single point mutation in the catalytic core region of the receptor tyrosine kinase, RET, has been observed in germ-line DNA of MEN 2B patients. The authors have analyzed 25 cases of de novo disease in order to determine the parental origin of the mutated RET allele. In all cases the new mutation was of paternal origin. We observe a distortion of the sex ratio in both de novo MEN 2B patients and the affected offspring of MEN 2B transmitting males. These results suggest a differential susceptibility of RET to mutation in paternally and maternally derived DNA and a possible role for imprinting of RET during development.

  3. A case of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome associated with high-grade intramucosal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ru-Ying; Sheng, Jian-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare, inherited autosomal dominant disease characterized by mucocutaneous pigmentation and polyps in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we report the rare case of a 64-year-old female patient with pigmentation on her lips and extremities for over 63 years and intermittent abdominal pain and, diarrhea for 3 years. The presence of intestinal and colorectal hamartomatous polyps was confirmed. The removal and characterization of her rectal polyp showed it to be a typical hamartomatous polyp with a portion of it being an adenoma with high-grade intramucosal neoplasia. A survey of the patient’s family identified 9 people in the family with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and three of them have already died from colorectal cancer. This case study serves as an example of how imperative it is to survey the patient about their family history in order to detect early cancerous lesions. PMID:26261661

  4. A case of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome associated with high-grade intramucosal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ru-Ying; Sheng, Jian-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare, inherited autosomal dominant disease characterized by mucocutaneous pigmentation and polyps in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we report the rare case of a 64-year-old female patient with pigmentation on her lips and extremities for over 63 years and intermittent abdominal pain and, diarrhea for 3 years. The presence of intestinal and colorectal hamartomatous polyps was confirmed. The removal and characterization of her rectal polyp showed it to be a typical hamartomatous polyp with a portion of it being an adenoma with high-grade intramucosal neoplasia. A survey of the patient's family identified 9 people in the family with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and three of them have already died from colorectal cancer. This case study serves as an example of how imperative it is to survey the patient about their family history in order to detect early cancerous lesions. PMID:26261661

  5. Frequent Somatic Mutation in Adult Intestinal Stem Cells Drives Neoplasia and Genetic Mosaicism during Aging.

    PubMed

    Siudeja, Katarzyna; Nassari, Sonya; Gervais, Louis; Skorski, Patricia; Lameiras, Sonia; Stolfa, Donato; Zande, Maria; Bernard, Virginie; Rio Frio, Thomas; Bardin, Allison J

    2015-12-01

    Adult stem cells may acquire mutations that modify cellular behavior, leading to functional declines in homeostasis or providing a competitive advantage resulting in premalignancy. However, the frequency, phenotypic impact, and mechanisms underlying spontaneous mutagenesis during aging are unclear. Here, we report two mechanisms of genome instability in adult Drosophila intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that cause phenotypic alterations in the aging intestine. First, we found frequent loss of heterozygosity arising from mitotic homologous recombination in ISCs that results in genetic mosaicism. Second, somatic deletion of DNA sequences and large structural rearrangements, resembling those described in cancers and congenital diseases, frequently result in gene inactivation. Such modifications induced somatic inactivation of the X-linked tumor suppressor Notch in ISCs, leading to spontaneous neoplasias in wild-type males. Together, our findings reveal frequent genomic modification in adult stem cells and show that somatic genetic mosaicism has important functional consequences on aging tissues. PMID:26607382

  6. Peoscopic diagnosis of flat condyloma and penile intraepithelial neoplasia. Clinical manifestation.

    PubMed

    Cardamakis, E; Kotoulas, I G; Relakis, K; Metalinos, K; Stathopoulos, E; Diamantis, A; Korantzis, A; Michopoulos, J; Mantouvalos, C; Tzingounis, V

    1997-01-01

    Peoscopy was performed in order to assess penile lesions in the male sexual partners of 326 women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or flat condyloma (FC). Each patient was submitted to a careful naked-eye inspection, peoscopy and biopsy of any suspicious lesion which was confirmed histologically and immunohistochemically. A brush cytologic examination of the distal portion of the urethra was also performed. The distribution of penile lesions was as follows: (1) 8 patients with herpes virus infection; (2) 37 patients with condyloma accuminata (CA); (3) 89 patients with FC; (4) 51 patients with FC and CA; (5) 18 patients with penile intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (PIN-I); (6) 2 patients with PIN-II; (7) 17 patients with PIN-III; (8) 92 patients with no penile lesions; (9) 7 patients with human papilloma virus infection of papillae coronae glandis, and (10) 5 patients with FC of the distal portion of the urethra. Naked-eye inspection revealed the presence of penile lesions in 39 of 233 patients (16.73%). Peoscopic examination revealed the presence of penile lesions in 233 of 326 patients (71.48%). In 135 of 155 patients the peoscopic findings were in accordance with the histologic diagnosis (87.09%). Immunohistochemical (by indirect peroxidase-antiperoxidase method) detection of virus antigens was positive in 16 of 34 patients (47.03%). It is concluded that peoscopy of the male sexual partners of women with CIN or FC should be performed to better assess the treatment used in the couple. PMID:9194625

  7. Penile intraepithelial neoplasia is frequent in HIV-positive men with anal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Alexander; Brockmeyer, Norbert H; Weissenborn, Soenke J; Gambichler, Thilo; Stücker, Markus; Altmeyer, Peter; Pfister, Herbert; Wieland, Ulrike

    2008-09-01

    Anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV)-infection is common in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (HIV+MSM). These patients have a strongly increased risk of HPV-induced anal cancer and its precursor lesion, anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN), and a moderately increased risk for penile cancer. Only limited data exist on penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in HIV+MSM. We determined the prevalence and evaluated the virologic characteristics of PIN and AIN in 263 HIV+MSM. In case of histologically confirmed PIN (and AIN), HPV-typing, HPV-DNA load determination, and immunohistochemical staining for p16(INK4a) were performed. PIN was detected in 11 (4.2%) and AIN in 156 (59.3%) patients. Ten PIN patients also had AIN within the observation period. Four clinical types of PINs could be distinguished. High-risk-alpha-HPV-DNA was found in 10 PIN lesions, with HPV16 being the most frequent type. Infections with multiple HPV-types were common. All high-grade lesions had high-risk-HPV-DNA-loads > or = 1 HPV-copy/beta-globin-gene-copy. Cutaneous beta-HPVs were found in PIN and AIN, but beta-HPV-DNA loads were very low, irrespective of the histological grade. p16(INK4a) Expression was detectable in all PIN lesions and correlated both with the histological grade and with high-risk HPV-DNA loads. In view of the PIN prevalence found in our study, all HIV+MSM should be screened for PIN in addition to AIN screening. PMID:18385760

  8. Whole body computed tomographic characteristics of skeletal and cardiac muscular metastatic neoplasia in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Vignoli, Massimo; Terragni, Rossella; Rossi, Federica; Frühauf, Lukas; Bacci, Barbara; Ressel, Lorenzo; Capitani, Ombretta; Marconato, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Muscular metastatic neoplasia has been reported to be rare in domestic animals, however previous studies were based primarily on necropsy findings. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe whole body computed tomography (CT) characteristics of confirmed muscular metastases in a cohort of dogs and cats presented for oncology evaluation. Medical records of 1201 oncology patients were reviewed. Included animals underwent pre and postcontrast whole body CT, and CT-guided tru-cut biopsy or fine needle aspiration of one or more metastatic lesions. Twenty-one dogs and six cats met inclusion criteria, representing 2.08% of all canine oncology patients and 3.1% of all feline oncology patients. Mean age was 9.6 years. Postcontrast CT characteristics included well-demarcated, oval-to-round lesions with varying enhancement patterns: ring enhancing (n = 16), heterogeneously enhancing (n = 8), or homogeneously enhancing (n = 5). Five animals showed concurrent and varying nodular patterns. In seven cases (five dogs and two cats), one single muscular nodule was observed. In 20 cases, two or more lesions were observed. In two cases, cardiac hypodense nodules were observed in the postcontrast CT, while appearing isodense in the precontrast study. Necropsy confirmed neoplasia in both of them. Locations of muscular metastases included epaxial/paraspinal muscles of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine (n = 18), superficial muscles of the thoracic wall (n = 13), scapular/shoulder region (n = 3), hind limb (n = 3), and abdominal wall muscles (n = 1). Findings supported the use of pre and postcontrast whole body CT for oncologic staging in dogs and cats, especially for primary tumors characterized by a high metastatic rate. PMID:23441584

  9. NON-MAMMALIAN FAT-1 GENE PREVENTS NEOPLASIA WHEN INTRODUCED TO A MOUSE HEPATOCARCINOGENESIS MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Griffitts, J.; Saunders, D.; Tesiram, Y.A.; Reid, G.E.; Salih, A.; Liu, S.; Lydic, T.A.; Busik, J.V.; Kang, J.X.; Towner, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effect of a non-mammalian omega-3 desaturase in a mouse hepatocarcinogenesis model. Mice containing double mutations (DM) in c-myc and TGF-? (transforming growth factor-?), leading to liver neoplasia, were crossed with mice containing omega-3 desaturase. MRI analysis of triple mutant (TM) mice showed the absence of neoplasia at all time points for 92% of mice in the study. Pathological changes of TM (TGF?/c-myc/fat-1) mouse liver tissue was similar to control mouse liver tissue. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measurements of unsaturated fatty acids found a significant difference (p<0.005) between DM and TM transgenic (Tg) mice at 34 and 40 weeks of age. HPLC analysis of mouse liver tissue revealed markedly decreased levels of omega-6 fatty acids in TM mice when compared to DM (TGF?/c-myc) and control (CD1) mice. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis indicated significantly decreased 16:0/20:4 and 18:1/20:4 and elevated 16:0/22:6 fatty acyl groups in both GPCho and GPEtn, and elevated 16:0/20:5, 18:0/18:2, 18:0/18:1 and 18:0/22:6 in GPCho, within TM mice compared to DM mice. Total fatty acid analysis indicated a significant decrease in 18:1n9 in TM mice compared to DM mice. Western blot analysis of liver tissue showed a significant (p<0.05) decrease in NF-?B (nuclear factor- ?B) levels at 40 weeks of age in TM mice compared to DM mice. Microarray analysis of TM versus DM mice livers at 40 weeks revealed alterations in genes involved in cell cycle regulation, cell-to-cell signaling, p53 signaling, and arachidonic acid (20:4) metabolism. Endogenous omega-3 fatty acids were found to prevent HCC development in mice. PMID:20620224

  10. The association of uterine cervical microbiota with an increased risk for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in Korea.

    PubMed

    Oh, H Y; Kim, B-S; Seo, S-S; Kong, J-S; Lee, J-K; Park, S-Y; Hong, K-M; Kim, H-K; Kim, M K

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have suggested potential roles of the microbiome in cervicovaginal diseases. However, there has been no report on the cervical microbiome in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). We aimed to identify the cervical microbiota of Korean women and assess the association between the cervical microbiota and CIN, and to determine the combined effect of the microbiota and human papillomavirus (HPV) on the risk of CIN. The cervical microbiota of 70 women with CIN and 50 control women was analysed using pyrosequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene. The associations between specific microbial patterns or abundance of specific microbiota and CIN risk were assessed using multivariate logistic regression, and the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) and the synergy index (S) were calculated. The phyla Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Tenericutes, Fusobacteria and TM7 were predominant in the microbiota and four distinct community types were observed in all women. A high score of the pattern characterized by predominance of Atopobium vaginae, Gardnerella vaginalis and Lactobacillus iners with a minority of Lactobacillus crispatus had a higher CIN risk (OR 5.80, 95% CI 1.73-19.4) and abundance of A. vaginae had a higher CIN risk (OR 6.63, 95% CI 1.61-27.2). The synergistic effect of a high score of this microbial pattern and oncogenic HPV was observed (OR 34.1, 95% CI 4.95-284.5; RERI/S, 15.9/1.93). A predominance of A. vaginae, G. vaginalis and L. iners with a concomitant paucity of L. crispatus in the cervical microbiota was associated with CIN risk, suggesting that bacterial dysbiosis and its combination with oncogenic HPV may be a risk factor for cervical neoplasia. PMID:25752224

  11. Endoscopic features suggesting gastric cancer in biopsy-proven gastric adenoma with high-grade neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Yoon Jae; An, Jungsuk; Lee, Jong Joon; Cho, Jae Hee; Kim, Kyoung Oh; Chung, Jun-Won; Kwon, Kwang An; Park, Dong Kyun; Kim, Ju Hyun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the endoscopic features that predict the cancer following endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in patients with high-grade neoplasia (HGN). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients who underwent ESD of gastric neoplasms from January 2007 to September 2010. ESD was performed in 555 cases involving 550 patients. A total of 112 lesions from 110 consecutive patients were initially diagnosed as HGN without cancer by forceps biopsy, and later underwent ESD. We classified lesions into two groups according to histologic discrepancies between the biopsy and ESD diagnosis. Gastric adenoma in the final diagnosis by ESD specimens were defined as adenoma group. Lesions with coexisting cancer after ESD were defined as cancer group. RESULTS: The mean age was 65.3 years, and 81 patients were male. There was no significant difference in the age or gender distribution between the adenoma (n = 52) and cancer (n = 60) groups. Thirty-six of these lesions (32.1%) showed histologic concordance between the forceps biopsy and ESD specimens, 16 (14.3%) showed a downgraded histology (low-grade neoplasia), and 60 (53.6%) showed an upgraded histology (cancer). A red color change of the mucosal surface on endoscopy was found in 27/52 (51.9%) of cases in the adenoma group and in 46/60 (76.7%) of cases in the cancer group (P = 0.006). Ulceration of the mucosal surface on endoscopy was found in 5 (9.6%) of 52 lesions in the adenoma group and in 17 (28.3%) of 60 lesions in the cancer group (P = 0.013). In the multivariate analysis, a reddish surface color change and mucosal ulceration were significant predictive factors correlated with cancer after ESD of the HGN by forceps biopsy. CONCLUSION: HGN with a red color change or mucosal ulceration correlated with the presence of gastric cancer. These finding may help to guide the diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25232257

  12. The Con Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the format of the Con Test, an Australian television game show which followed the same general rules and game play as the UK show PokerFace. At the end of each round a contestant needs to decide whether or not he or she should fold. A contestant needs to know how likely it is that he or she is in last place.…

  13. Evaluation of intracranial neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis in dogs by use of short echo time, single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Inés; Richter, Henning; Beckmann, Katrin; Meier, Dieter; Dennler, Matthias; Kircher, Patrick R

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate metabolite concentrations of the brains of dogs with intracranial neoplasia or noninfectious meningoencephalitis by use of short echo time, single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 3.0 T. ANIMALS 29 dogs with intracranial lesions (14 with neoplasia [3 oligodendromas, 3 glioblastomas multiformes, 3 astrocytomas, 2 lymphomas, and 3 meningiomas] and 15 is with noninfectious meningoencephalitis) and 10 healthy control dogs. PROCEDURES Short echo time, single voxel (1)H-MRS at 3.0 T was performed on neoplastic and noninfectious inflammatory intracranial lesions identified with conventional MRI. Metabolites of interest included N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), total choline, creatine, myoinositol, the glutamine-glutamate complex (Glx), glutathione, taurine, lactate, and lipids. Data were analyzed with postprocessing fitting algorithm software. Metabolite concentrations relative to brain water content were calculated and compared with results for the healthy control dogs, which had been previously evaluated with the same (1)H MRS technique. RESULTS NAA, creatine, and Glx concentrations were reduced in the brains of dogs with neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis, whereas choline concentration was increased. Concentrations of these metabolites differed significantly between dogs with neoplasia and dogs with noninfectious meningoencephalitis. Concentrations of NAA, creatine, and Glx were significantly lower in dogs with neoplasia, whereas the concentration of choline was significantly higher in dogs with neoplasia. Lipids were predominantly found in dogs with high-grade intra-axial neoplasia, meningioma, and necrotizing meningoencephalitis. A high concentration of taurine was found in 10 of 15 dogs with noninfectious meningoencephalitis. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE (1)H MRS provided additional metabolic information about intracranial neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis in dogs. PMID:27111012

  14. Using flow cytometry to detect haemic neoplasia in mussels (Mytilus trossulus) from the Pacific Coast of Southern British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Vassilenko, Ekaterina; Baldwin, Susan A

    2014-03-01

    Flow cytometry was investigated as an alternative to visual haemocytology for potentially higher-throughput and less subjective detection of neoplasia in Mytilus trossulus. In contrast to previous studies of ploidy in the Mytilus spp. complex, distinct tetra- and pentaploidal neoplastic cells were rare and a wide range of aneuploidy peaks from 1.4n to 5.5n were detected for late-stage leukemic animals. There was no correlation between aneuploidy and the number of diseased cells for early and intermediate disease stages. Formation of aneuploidy and neoplasia progression might not be simultaneous, and DNA content analysis using flow cytometry was only useful for detecting late stages of the disease. PMID:24576571

  15. Biochemically curative surgery for gastrinoma in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 patients

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Masayuki; Komoto, Izumi; Ota, Shuichi; Hiratsuka, Takuya; Kosugi, Shinji; Doi, Ryuichiro; Awane, Masaaki; Inoue, Naoya

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To search for the optimal surgery for gastrinoma and duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. METHODS: Sixteen patients with genetically confirmed multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) underwent resection of both gastrinomas and duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) between 1991 and 2009. For localization of gastrinoma, selective arterial secretagogue injection test (SASI test) with secretin or calcium solution was performed as well as somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) and other imaging methods such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The modus of surgery for gastrinoma has been changed over time, searching for the optimal surgery: pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) was first performed guided by localization with the SAST test, then local resection of duodenal gastrinomas with dissection of regional lymph nodes (LR), and recently pancreas-preserving total duodenectomy (PPTD) has been performed for multiple duodenal gastrinomas. RESULTS: Among various types of preoperative localizing methods for gastrinoma, the SASI test was the most useful method. Imaging methods such as SRS or CT made it essentially impossible to differentiate functioning gastrinoma among various kinds of NETs. However, recent imaging methods including SRS or CT were useful for detecting both distant metastases and ectopic NETs; therefore they are indispensable for staging of NETs. Biochemical cure of gastrinoma was achieved in 14 of 16 patients (87.5%); that is, 100% in 3 patients who underwent PD, 100% in 6 patients who underwent LR (although in 2 patients (33.3%) second LR was performed for recurrence of duodenal gastrinoma), and 71.4% in 7 patients who underwent PPTD. Pancreatic NETs more than 1 cm in diameter were resected either by distal pancreatectomy or enucleations, and no hepatic metastases have developed postoperatively. Pathological study of the resected specimens revealed co-existence of pancreatic gastrinoma with duodenal gastrinoma in 2 of 16 patients (13%), and G cell hyperplasia and/or microgastrinoma in the duodenal Brunner’s gland was revealed in all of 7 duodenal specimens after PPTD. CONCLUSION: Aggressive resection surgery based on accurate localization with the SASI test was useful for biochemical cure of gastrinoma in patients with MEN 1. PMID:21455335

  16. The incidence of human papillomavirus infection following treatment for cervical neoplasia: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rositch, Anne F.; Soeters, Heidi M.; Offutt-Powell, Tabatha N.; Wheeler, Bradford S.; Taylor, Sylvia M.; Smith, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the published literature in order to estimate the incidence and describe the variability of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in women following treatment for cervical neoplasia. Methods Several scientific literature databases (e.g. PubMed, ISI Web of Science) were searched through January 31, 2012. Eligible articles provided data on (i) baseline HPV infection status within 6 months prior to or at time of treatment (pre-treatment); and (ii) HPV test results for women's first visit after treatment occurring within 36 months (post-treatment). We abstracted and summarized the post-treatment incidence of newly detected HPV genotypes that were not present at pre-treatment, overall and stratified by study and other population characteristics. Results A total of 25 studies were included, reporting post-treatment HPV incidence in nearly 2000 women. Mean patient age ranged from 31 to 43 years (median 36). Most studies used cervical exfoliated cell specimens to test for HPV DNA (n = 20; 80%), using polymerase chain reaction (n = 21; 84%). Cervical neoplasia treatment included loop electrical excision procedure (n = 11; 44%); laser conization (n = 2; 8%); laser ablation, surgical conization, cryotherapy, alpha-interferon (n = 1; 4% each); or multiple treatment regimens (n = 8; 32%). Follow-up times post-treatment ranged from 1.5 to 36 months (median 6). More than half of studies (n = 17; 68%) estimated the incidence of any HPV type following treatment, while 7 (28%) focused specifically on high-risk (HR) HPV. HPV incidence after treatment varied widely, ranging from 0 to 47% (interquartile range: 0%-15%) in up to 3 years of follow-up after treatment. Lower HPV incidence was observed among studies that included relatively younger women, used laser conization, focused on HR-HPV rather than overall HPV infection, and had a lower proportion of recurrent cervical disease. Conclusions These modest summary incidence estimates from the published literature can guide clinicians, epidemiologists and health economists in developing best practices for post-treatment cervical cancer prevention. PMID:24412508

  17. A novel blueprint for 'top down' differentiation defines the cervical squamocolumnar junction during development, reproductive life, and neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Herfs, Michael; Vargas, Sara O; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Howitt, Brooke E; Nucci, Marisa R; Hornick, Jason L; McKeon, Frank D; Xian, Wa; Crum, Christopher P

    2013-02-01

    The cervical squamocolumnar (SC) junction is the site of a recently discovered 'embryonic' cell population that was proposed as the cell of origin for cervical cancer and its precursors. How this population participates in cervical remodelling and neoplasia is unclear. In the present study, we analysed the SC junction immunophenotype during pre- and post-natal human and mouse development and in the adult, processes of metaplastic evolution of the SC junction, microglandular change, and early cervical neoplasia. Early in life, embryonic cervical epithelial cells were seen throughout the cervix and subsequently diminished in number to become concentrated at the SC junction in the adult. In all settings, there was a repetitive scenario in which cuboidal embryonic/SC junction cells gave rise to subjacent metaplastic basal/reserve cells with a switch from the SC junction positive to negative immunophenotype. This downward or basal (rather than upward or apical) evolution from progenitor cell to metaplastic progeny was termed reverse or 'top down' differentiation. A similar pattern was noted in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs), suggesting that HPV infection of the cuboidal SC junction cells initiated outgrowth of basally-oriented neoplastic progeny. The progressive loss of the embryonic/SC junction markers occurred with 'top down' differentiation during development, remodelling, and early neoplasia. Interestingly, most low-grade SILs were SC junction-negative, implying infection of metaplastic progeny rather than the original SC junction cells. This proposed model of 'top down' differentiation resolves the mystery of how SC junction cells both remodel the cervix and participate in neoplasia and provides for a second population of metaplastic progeny (including basal and reserve cells), the infection of which is paradoxically less likely to produce a biologically aggressive precursor. It also provides new targets in animal models to determine why the SC junction is uniquely susceptible to carcinogenic HPV infection. PMID:23007879

  18. Volumetric laser endomicroscopy can target neoplasia not detected by conventional endoscopic measures in long segment Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Arvind J; George, Benley J; Berkowitz, Joshua; Sejpal, Divyesh V; McKinley, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Methods and study aims: The incidence of esophageal cancer is rising despite increased surveillance efforts. Volumetric laser endomicroscopy (VLE) is a new endoscopic imaging tool that can allow for targeted biopsy of neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus. We report a series of 6 patients with long-segment Barrett's esophagus ( > 3 cm), who underwent a session of endoscopy with volumetric laser endomicroscopy, after a separate prior session of standard high-definition endoscopy with narrow band imaging (NBI) and random biopsies that did not reveal neoplasia. In all six patients, the first endoscopy was the index endoscopy diagnosing the Barrett's esophagus. All VLE exams were performed within 6 months of the previous endoscopy. In five patients, VLE-targeted biopsy resulted in upstaged disease/diagnosed dysplasia that then qualified the patient for endoscopic ablation therapy. In one patient, VLE localized a focus of intramucosal cancer that allowed for curative endoscopic mucosal resection. This case series shows that endoscopy with VLE can target neoplasia that cannot be localized by high-definition endoscopy with NBI and random biopsies. PMID:27004250

  19. Volumetric laser endomicroscopy can target neoplasia not detected by conventional endoscopic measures in long segment Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Arvind J.; George, Benley J.; Berkowitz, Joshua; Sejpal, Divyesh V.; McKinley, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Methods and study aims: The incidence of esophageal cancer is rising despite increased surveillance efforts. Volumetric laser endomicroscopy (VLE) is a new endoscopic imaging tool that can allow for targeted biopsy of neoplasia in Barrett’s esophagus. We report a series of 6 patients with long-segment Barrett’s esophagus ( > 3 cm), who underwent a session of endoscopy with volumetric laser endomicroscopy, after a separate prior session of standard high-definition endoscopy with narrow band imaging (NBI) and random biopsies that did not reveal neoplasia. In all six patients, the first endoscopy was the index endoscopy diagnosing the Barrett’s esophagus. All VLE exams were performed within 6 months of the previous endoscopy. In five patients, VLE-targeted biopsy resulted in upstaged disease/diagnosed dysplasia that then qualified the patient for endoscopic ablation therapy. In one patient, VLE localized a focus of intramucosal cancer that allowed for curative endoscopic mucosal resection. This case series shows that endoscopy with VLE can target neoplasia that cannot be localized by high-definition endoscopy with NBI and random biopsies. PMID:27004250

  20. Spectrum of pheochromocytoma in multiple endocrine neoplasia. A scintigraphic portrayal using 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Valk, T.W.; Frager, M.S.; Gross, M.D.; Sisson, J.C.; Wieland, D.M.; Swanson, D.P.; Mangner, T.J.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1981-06-01

    Six patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) types 2a and 2b were investigated to determine the spectrum of pheochromocytoma by scintigraphy. Iodine-131-metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 131/I-MIBG), a new imaging agent which concentrates in adrenergic neurotransmitter vesicles, was administered at 0.5 mCi/1.7m2 and scintiscans were taken at 24 and 48 hours. Two normotensive patients with normal plasma and urinary catecholamines had no adrenal tracer uptake. One patient with a modest and intermittent increase only in urinary catecholamine metabolites showed faint adrenal images. Two other patients with increased plasma and urinary catecholamines showed bilateral adrenal imaging patterns. The sixth patient who had increased norepinephrine and epinephrine secretion showed bilateral asymmetrical adrenal images, findings that were corroborated at operation. Functional as well as anatomic evidence of adrenal medullary abnormalities in patients with MEN-2 syndromes are demonstrated by /sup 131/I-MIBG scintigraphy. Therefore, the procedure can be used to define the extent of abnormalities of the adrenal medulla in these patients.

  1. Genetic analysis of 24 French families with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.A.; Morgan, K. ); Lavoue, M.F.; Lenoir, G.M.; Sobol, H. ); Calmettes, C. ); Goodfellow, P.J. )

    1992-09-01

    The gene for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A) has been mapped to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10 by linkage analysis. Thirty-four families with multiple cases of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC), including 24 families with origins in France, have been typed with nine polymorphic markers spanning the centromere of chromosome 10. No recombination was observed between the MEN2A locus and either of the four loci D10Z1 (lod score 12.79), D10S102 (lod score 6.38), D10S94 (lod score 7.76), and D10S34 (lod score 5.94). There was no evidence for genetic linkage heterogeneity in the panel of 34 families. Haplotypes were constructed for a total of 11 polymorphisms in the MEN2A region, for mutation bearing chromosomes in 24 French families and for 100 spouse controls. One haplotype was present in four MEN2A families but was not observed in any control (P<0.1). Two additional families share a core segment of this haplotype near the MEN2A gene. It is likely that these six families have a common affected ancestor. Because the incidence of pheochromocytoma among carriers varies from 0% to 74% within these six families, it is probable that additional factors modify the expression of the MEN2A gene. 39 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Natural history of body weight gain, survival, and neoplasia in the F344 rat.

    PubMed

    Solleveld, H A; Haseman, J K; McConnell, E E

    1984-04-01

    This study involved the fact that knowledge of the natural incidence of neoplastic lesions is essential for interpretation of experiments designed to reveal the effects of potential carcinogens. Although the F344 rat is widely used in chronic (2-yr) testing programs, the natural history of neoplasia after 24 months is not known; thus this study, with 529 male and 529 female inbred F344 rats, was designed to deal with this aspect. This report also included information on growth and longevity. In addition, the tumor rates found in this study were compared with 2-year historic control tumor rates; results revealed the following. 1) Maximum mean body weights were 468 and 330 g for males and females, respectively. Peak weight in males was reached at 77 weeks of age and in females, at 107 weeks of age. 2) There was no clear sex difference in longevity; a median life-span (50% survival age) or 28 months was recorded in both sexes. 3) Variety of neoplastic lesions in animals that were allowed to live out their life-span was not greater than that in animals that were killed between 110 and 116 weeks of age; thus older age was not characterized by unique neoplasms. 4) The incidence of certain neoplasms increased markedly after 110-116 weeks. The data indicated that life-span studies in F344 rats had no advantages over 2-year studies. However, availability of life-span data is essential for interpretation of the 2-year studies. PMID:6584668

  3. The risk of residual neoplasia in women with microinvasive squamous cervical carcinoma and positive cone margins.

    PubMed

    Phongnarisorn, C; Srisomboon, J; Khunamornpong, S; Siriaungkul, S; Suprasert, P; Charoenkwan, K; Cheewakriangkrai, C; Siriaree, S; Pantasri, T

    2006-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the prevalence and factors affecting residual disease in women with cervical microinvasive carcinoma (MIC) with positive cone margins for high-grade lesions and invasive carcinoma. We reviewed histopathology slides of 129 women with MIC who had high-grade lesions or invasive carcinoma at cone margins. These patients underwent hysterectomy following cone biopsy between January 1994 and June 2004. Of the 129 patients, 77 (59.7%) had residual disease in the hysterectomy specimens, in which 57 (44.2%) had residual high-grade lesions. Twenty patients (15.5%) had residual invasive carcinoma: 18 were microinvasive and 2 were invasive. Factors significantly affecting the risk of residual disease included positive postconization endocervical curettage (P= 0.001), positive cone margins for invasive carcinoma (P= 0.003), and depth of stromal invasion >1 mm (P= 0.014). Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed positive cone margins for invasive carcinoma as significant predictor of residual invasive disease (hazard ratio, 3.22; 95% CI 1.21-8.60, P= 0.019) In summary, patients with MIC and positive cone margins for high-grade lesions or invasive carcinoma are at high risk of residual neoplasia. Repeat cone biopsy should be performed to determine exactly the severity of lesion before planning treatment. PMID:16681742

  4. Morphological and morphometric measurements in colorectal mucosa of subjects at increased risk for colonic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Richter, A; Yang, K; Richter, F; Lynch, H T; Lipkin, M

    1993-10-15

    Measurements of intermediate biomarkers have recently increased, attempting to provide useful information about cancer risk. We report morphological findings in rectal mucosal biopsies from patients at low risk and at high risk for colorectal cancer. Rectal biopsies were analyzed from fourteen Seventh-Day Adventist (SDA) subjects at low risk and from twenty-seven members of families with hereditary nonpolyposis colonic cancer (HNPCC) at higher risk. The following measurements were made on rectal crypts: length of crypts, numbers of cells, diameter of the surface, middle and base of the crypts and infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lamina propria. Findings indicated morphological differences in normal-appearing rectal mucosa of individuals in the HNPCC group compared with SDA subjects (P < 0.05). They included shorter crypts with fewer epithelial cells and increased cellular infiltration in the mucosa of HNPCC subjects compared with SDA subjects, suggesting minimal inflammation, and an early stage of crypt atrophy in the rectal mucosa of subjects at higher risk for colonic neoplasia. PMID:8287373

  5. [International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia 2012].

    PubMed

    Hes, Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    Kidney tumours form a broad spectrum of distinguished histopathological and molecular genetic entities. The last WHO classification is dated to 2004. Current classification has been published in October 2013 by ISUP (International Society of Urological Pathology). There were 5 new epithelials tumours: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo-)papillary RCC, the MiT family translocation RCCs (in particular t(6;11) RCC), and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. Another 3 subtypes of RCC were added as "provisional" entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC; succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC; and ALK translocation RCC. Modifications were performed in already existing entities: multicystic clear cell RCC (formerly multilocular cystic RCC) is newly included as a subcategory of clear cell RCC with low malignant potential. Oncocytic papillary RCC (PRCC) has not been recognized as a distinctive subcategory of PRCC yet. Hybrid oncocytic-chromophobe tumour was placed within the chromophobe RCC category. Recent advances related to collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and mucinous spindle cell and tubular RCC were elucidated. Outside of the epithelial category, current approach to our understanding of angiomyolipoma, including the epithelioid variant and angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts was clarified. Cystic nephroma and mixed epithelial and stromal tumour were considered as a spectrum of one entity. Synovial sarcoma was placed within the sarcoma group. The new classification is to be referred to as the International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia. PMID:25418900

  6. Immunohistochemical Characterization of Intestinal Neoplasia in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Indicates Epithelial Origin

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Colleen E.; Kent, Michael L.; Peterson, Tracy S.; Wang, Rong; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Löhr, Christiane V.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous neoplasia of the intestinal tract in sentinel and moribund zebrafish (Danio rerio) is common in some zebrafish facilities. We previously classified these tumors as adenocarcinoma, small-cell carcinoma, or carcinoma otherwise unspecified based on histomorphologic characteristics. Based on histological presentation, the primary differential diagnosis for the intestinal carcinomas was tumor of neuroendocrine cells (e.g., carcinoids). To further characterize the phenotype of the neoplastic cells, select tissue sections were stained with a panel of antibodies directed toward human epithelial (Cytokeratin Wide Spectrum Screening [WSS], AE1/AE3) or neuroendocrine (S100, chromogranin A) markers. We also investigated antibody specificity by Western blot analysis, using a human cell line and zebrafish tissues. Nine of the intestinal neoplasms (64%) stained for AE1/AE3, seven (50%) also stained for WSS. None of the intestinal neoplastic cells were stained for chromogranin A or S100. Endocrine cells of the pituitary gland and neurons and axons of peripheral nerves and ganglia stained for Chromogranin A, whereas perineural and periaxonal cells of peripheral intestinal ganglia, and glial and ependymal cells of the brain stained for S100. Immunohistochemistry for cytokeratins confirmed the majority of intestinal neoplasms in this cohort of zebrafish as carcinomas. PMID:26503773

  7. Electron beam radiotherapy for the management of recurrent extensive ocular surface squamous neoplasia with orbital extension

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Ramesh; Gupta, Himika; Krishnatry, Rahul; Laskar, Siddhartha

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent extensive ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) with orbital invasion can be successfully managed with external radiotherapy using electrons resulting in eye and vision salvage. We report a case of right eye recurrent OSSN in an immunocompetent adult Indian male, with extensive orbital involvement. The patient had two previous surgical excisions with recurrent disease. At this stage, conventionally exenteration is considered the treatment modality. However, he was treated with 5040 cGy radiotherapy (15eV electrons) resulting in complete disease regression. At the end of 3 years follow-up, the patient was disease free, maintained a vision of 20/25, with mild dry eye, well-managed with topical lubricants. Extensive OSSN with orbital invasion does not always need exenteration. External beam electron radiotherapy provides a noninvasive cure with organ and vision salvage and should be considered in extensive OSSN not amenable to simple excision biopsies. Long-term studies to evaluate the effect of radiation on such eyes are suggested. PMID:26576526

  8. Scintigraphic portrayal of the syndrome of multiple endocrine neoplasia type-2B

    SciTech Connect

    Yobbagy, J.J.; Levatter, R.; Sisson, J.C.; Shulkin, B.L.; Polley, T.

    1988-06-01

    The scintigraphic appearance of the neoplasms in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN-2B) and the interpretations of the image patterns are described. An 18-year-old male patient with the MEN-2B syndrome underwent TI-201 imaging that showed concentrations of TI-201 in the primary medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) tumor and in cervical lymph node metastases. After total thyroidectomy and lymph node dissection, the TI-201 image was normal. Catecholamine levels in the blood and urine were only borderline elevated. Yet, greater than normal concentrations of I-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-131 MIBG) were present in both adrenal glands. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed normal adrenal glands. These results were consistent with the diagnosis of adrenal medullary hyperplasia, a precursor of pheochromocytoma. No operation was indicated to remove the adrenal glands. Imaging with TI-201 appears to be useful in identifying sites of MTC in patients with the MEN-2B syndrome. I-131 MIBG imaging, in conjunction with computed tomography of the adrenal glands and appropriate catecholamine measurements, should be performed in patients with the MEN-2B syndrome to determine the status of the adrenal medullae, which then may be classified as normal, hyperplastic, or tumorous with pheochromocytoma.

  9. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Gastric Neoplasia Occurring in the Remnant Stomach after Distal Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jung Gyu; Noh, Donghyo; Lee, Jun Haeng; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for tumors occurring in the remnant stomach is technically difficult to perform because of limited working space and severe fibrosis and staples present around the suture line. We aimed to elucidate the feasibility and clinical outcomes of performing ESD for tumors in the remnant stomach. Methods: Between December 2007 and January 2013, 18 patients underwent ESD for tumors (six adenomas and 12 differentiated-type early gastric cancers [EGCs]) occurring in the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy. Clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes after ESD were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Two-thirds of the lesions were located on the body, and half were located on the suture line. En bloc resection, R0 resection, and en bloc with R0 resection rates were 88.9%, 100%, and 88.9%, respectively. Curative resection rate for EGC was 91.7%. Perforation occurred in one patient (5.6%) and was successfully managed by endoscopic closure with metallic clips and conservative management. There was no significant bleeding after ESD. During a median follow-up of 47.5 months, no local, metachronous, or extragastric recurrence was seen for either EGC or adenoma lesions. Conclusions: ESD is a feasible and effective treatment modality and can be considered a primary intervention for early gastric neoplasia occurring in the remnant stomach. PMID:26879552

  10. Novel markers of gonadectomy-induced adrenocortical neoplasia in the mouse and ferret

    PubMed Central

    Schillebeeckx, Maximiliaan; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Gretzinger, Elisabeth; Yang, Wei; Thol, Franziska; Hiller, Theresa; Lbs, Ann-Kathrin; Rhrig, Theresa; Schrade, Anja; Cochran, Rebecca; Jay, Patrick Y.; Heikinheimo, Markku; Mitra, Robi D.; Wilson, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Gonadectomy (GDX) induces sex steroid-producing adrenocortical tumors in certain mouse strains and in the domestic ferret. Transcriptome analysis and DNA methylation mapping were used to identify novel genetic and epigenetic markers of GDX-induced adrenocortical neoplasia in female DBA/2J mice. Markers were validated using a combination of laser capture microdissection, quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. Microarray expression profiling of whole adrenal mRNA from ovariectomized vs. intact mice demonstrated selective upregulation of gonadal-like genes including Spinlw1 and Insl3 in GDX-induced adrenocortical tumors of the mouse. A complementary candidate gene approach identified Foxl2 as another gonadal-like marker expressed in GDX-induced neoplasms of the mouse and ferret. That both male-specific (Spinlw1) and female-specific (Foxl2) markers were identified is noteworthy and implies that the neoplasms exhibit mixed characteristics of male and female gonadal somatic cells. Genome-wide methylation analysis showed that two genes with hypomethylated promoters, Igfbp6 and Foxs1, are upregulated in GDX-induced adrenocortical neoplasms. These new genetic and epigenetic markers may prove useful for studies of steroidogenic cell development and for diagnostic testing. PMID:25289806

  11. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens. Progress report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1993-07-30

    The induction of cancer by ionizing radiation is a matter of great practical importance to the nuclear industry, to national defense, to radiological medicine and to the general public. It is increasingly apparent that carcinogenesis is one of the leading dose-limiting effects of radiation exposure (Co90). Quantitative information at the cellular level is essential to an understanding of the mechanisms of radiogenic neoplastic initiation and the stages of promotion and progression to overt neoplasia. We have developed two experimental models, the rat thyroid and rat mammary clonogen transplant systems, for the quantitative study of radiation carcinogenesis at the cellular level in vivo (C185). The most important steps taken or completed during the current grant year include: (a) demonstration of the high age-dependent radiosensitivity of prepubertal rat mammary clonogens to radiogenic damage which may influence their susceptibility to neoplastic initiation, and (b) demonstration of the feasibility of using a molecular test for clonogenicity in which Simple Sequence Repeats in the DNA serve as identifying signals of the genotypic origin of the cells. We have also (c) set up a large carcinogenesis experiment to test the effect of close intercellular contact in thyroid glands in situ on promotion-progression of radiogenically initiated clonogens, (d) achieved considerable further concentration of thyroid clonogens, and (e) begun to explore whether thyroid cells can be induced to give rise to three dimensional multicellular structures in culture in reconstituted basement membrane. These are discussed in this report.

  12. Neoplasia of captive yellow sea horses (Hippocampus kuda) and weedy sea dragons (Phyllopteryx taeniolatus).

    PubMed

    LePage, Véronique; Dutton, Christopher J; Kummrow, Maya; McLelland, David J; Young, Karrie; Lumsden, John S

    2012-03-01

    Syngnathidae is the family of fish that includes sea horses, pipefish, and sea dragons. To date, only a single publication has described neoplasia in syngnathids, a fibrosarcoma of the brood pouch in an aquarium-reared lined sea horse (Hippocampus erectus). From 1998 until 2010, the Toronto Zoo submitted 172 syngnathids for postmortem; species included the spotted or yellow sea horse (Hippocampus kuda), the pot-bellied sea horse (Hippocampus abdominalis) and the weedy sea dragon (Phyllopteryx taeniolatus). Seven neoplasms and two neoplastic-like lesions were identified from these cases. Under light microscopy, the neoplasms had morphological characteristics of a cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma, renal adenocarcinoma, renal adenoma, renal round cell tumors, which were likely lymphomas, exocrine pancreatic carcinoma, and intestinal carcinoma. Of these neoplasms, four had clear evidence of metastasis: the pancreatic and intestinal carcinomas and both round cell tumors. As syngnathids are highly fastidious animals, they can be difficult to maintain in captivity. In order to improve their husbandry, preventative and palliative care, as well as treatment, it is important to investigate and document the types of diseases affecting syngnathids. PMID:22448509

  13. Cutaneous lesion associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A: lichen amyloidosis or notalgia paresthetica?

    PubMed

    Chabre, O; Labat, F; Pinel, N; Berthod, F; Tarel, V; Bachelot, I

    1992-01-01

    Three patients of a French family demonstrated an association of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A) with a pruritic scapular skin lesion. The lesions are similar to those described as familial cutaneous lichen amyloidosis in unrelated MEN 2A and medullary thyroid carcinoma families, but histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural analysis of skin biopsies from each patient in the French family did not show amyloid deposition. The topography of the lesion follows dermatomes C8-D3. The patients report not only pruritus but also paresthesia and hyperalgesia, and one showed touch hypoesthesia and pain hyperesthesia in the area of the lesion. Such an association of cutaneous and neurological features suggests notalgia paresthetica (NP), a neuropathy of the posterior dorsal rami nerves. We thus suggest that the cutaneous lesions associated with MEN 2A might be secondary to pathology in the neural crest-derived dorsal sensory nerves. The amyloid, when present, would be secondary to scratching. We propose that patients presenting with familial NP be suspect for MEN 2A. PMID:1362414

  14. Human papillomavirus and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in women who subsequently had invasive cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Caussy, D; Marrett, L D; Worth, A J; McBride, M; Rawls, W E

    1990-01-01

    In a retrospective case-control study biopsy specimens of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) lesions from 47 women in whom invasive cancer subsequently developed (cases) and from 94 control subjects in whom CIN was diagnosed within 6 months of the diagnosis for the matched case subject but invasive disease did not develop were tested for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA with tissue in-situ hybridization. There were no significant differences in the frequency of detection of HPV DNA between the two groups. In a cross-sectional survey the prevalence of HPV DNA was found to be 11% in specimens without CIN, 27% in those with CIN I, 49% in those with CIN II and 56% in those with CIN III. The positivity rates for HPV 16/33 DNA increased with the severity of CIN, but this was not observed for HPV 6/11 and 18 DNA. A comparison of the results of the case-control and cross-sectional studies suggested that the younger cohort of women had higher prevalence rates of HPV DNA than the older cohort. PMID:2154306

  15. Identification of interstitial deletions in human neoplasia by FISH-technique

    SciTech Connect

    Gogineni, S.K.; Sanchez, M.A.; Elizalde, S.A. |

    1994-09-01

    Undoubtedly, the discovery of the minute chromosome in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), termed the Philadelphia chromosome, has revolutionized cancer cytogenetics. Rowely`s seminal findings of a balanced translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 opened new avenues where a simple deletion was clearly refuted. Even today, thousands of cases are being identified as simple terminal deletions by routine banding techniques in various human neoplasias. If these deletions are terminal, then how is the instability of the chromosome retained? Apparently, the precise characterization of telomeric ends has gone undetected in the past by conventional methods. It is evident that telomeres of chromosomes consist of short tandemly repeated DNA sequences (TTAGGG){sub n} which are conserved on both ends. The recent availability of chromosome-specific telomeric probes has become a cytogenetic icon for many perplexing questions. For example, we were referred a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia evolving from agnogenic myloid metaplasia. Routine cytogenetic techniques revealed a terminal deletion of one of the chromosomes 7 [del(7)(q21)]. When we hybridized the metaphases with chromosome 7q-specific telomeric probe [Oncor, Gaithersburg, MD], signal was detected at the distal q arms of the deleted chromosomes, apparently suggesting an interstial deletion. The cytogenetic diagnosis was changed to 46,SY,del(7)(q21.lq36.2). All deletions must be identified by FISH.

  16. Critical review of preclinical approaches to evaluate the potential of immunosuppressive drugs to influence human neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Bugelski, Peter J; Volk, Amy; Walker, Mindi R; Krayer, John H; Martin, Pauline; Descotes, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Many immunosuppressive drugs are associated with an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and Kaposi sarcoma. Thirteen immunosuppressive drugs have been tested in 2-year carcinogenicity studies (abatacept; azathioprine; busulfan; cyclophosphamide; cyclosporine; dexamethasone; everolimus; leflunomide; methotrexate; mycophenolate mofetil; prednisone; sirolimus; and tacrolimus) and in additional models including neonatal and genetically modified mice; chemical, viral, ultraviolet, and ionizing radiation co-carcinogenesis, and in models with transplanted tumor cells. The purpose of this review is to outline the mechanisms by which immunosuppressive drugs can influence neoplasia, to summarize the available preclinical data on the 13 drugs, and to critically review the performance of the models. A combination of primary tumor and metastasis assays conducted with transplanted cells may provide the highest value for hazard identification and can be applied on a case-by-case basis. However, for both small molecules and therapeutic proteins, determining the relative risk to patients from preclinical data remains problematic. Classifying immunosuppressive drugs based on their mechanism of action and hazard identification from preclinical studies and a prospective pharmacovigilance program to monitor carcinogenic risk may be a feasible way to manage patient safety during the clinical development program and postmarketing. PMID:20884856

  17. HIRA orchestrates a dynamic chromatin landscape in senescence and is required for suppression of neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cole, John J.; Nelson, David M.; Dikovskaya, Dina; Faller, William J.; Vizioli, Maria Grazia; Hewitt, Rachael N.; Anannya, Orchi; McBryan, Tony; Manoharan, Indrani; van Tuyn, John; Morrice, Nicholas; Pchelintsev, Nikolay A.; Ivanov, Andre; Brock, Claire; Drotar, Mark E.; Nixon, Colin; Clark, William; Sansom, Owen J.; Anderson, Kurt I.; King, Ayala; Blyth, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stable proliferation arrest that suppresses tumorigenesis. Cellular senescence and associated tumor suppression depend on control of chromatin. Histone chaperone HIRA deposits variant histone H3.3 and histone H4 into chromatin in a DNA replication-independent manner. Appropriately for a DNA replication-independent chaperone, HIRA is involved in control of chromatin in nonproliferating senescent cells, although its role is poorly defined. Here, we show that nonproliferating senescent cells express and incorporate histone H3.3 and other canonical core histones into a dynamic chromatin landscape. Expression of canonical histones is linked to alternative mRNA splicing to eliminate signals that confer mRNA instability in nonproliferating cells. Deposition of newly synthesized histones H3.3 and H4 into chromatin of senescent cells depends on HIRA. HIRA and newly deposited H3.3 colocalize at promoters of expressed genes, partially redistributing between proliferating and senescent cells to parallel changes in expression. In senescent cells, but not proliferating cells, promoters of active genes are exceptionally enriched in H4K16ac, and HIRA is required for retention of H4K16ac. HIRA is also required for retention of H4K16ac in vivo and suppression of oncogene-induced neoplasia. These results show that HIRA controls a specialized, dynamic H4K16ac-decorated chromatin landscape in senescent cells and enforces tumor suppression. PMID:25512559

  18. Association between vitamin C Intake and the risk of cervical neoplasia: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dan; Shen, Kaiying; Li, Zhunan; Xu, Ying; Wu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    To assess the association between vitamin C intake and cervical neoplasia (CN) risk. Databases including PubMed, Embase, and Springer link were retrieved up to June 10, 2014 with predefined strategy. The combined odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for overall and subgroup analyses. The publication bias was assessed using Begg's test and Egger's test. Sensitivity analysis was also conducted. Twelve studies consisting of 1 prospective cohort study and 11 case-control studies were included. In overall analysis, vitamin C intake was significantly associated with the reduced risk of CN (OR = 0.58; 95% CI: 0.44 to 0.75; P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis stratified by vitamin C dose indicated all dose categories achieved a reduced CN risk. Furthermore, increased vitamin C intake by 50 mg/day was related to the reduced risk of CN (OR = 0.92; 95% CI: 0.89 to 0.94; P < 0.05). No publication bias was detected by Begg's test (P = 0.169) and no apparent fluctuation was observed in summary OR by sensitivity analysis. Vitamin C intake was inversely associated with the risk of CN and this association was dose-dependent. However, more randomized controlled trials are required for further validation. PMID:26731169

  19. Tailoring treatment for ductal intraepithelial neoplasia of the breast according to Ki-67 and molecular phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeroni, M; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, A; Botteri, E; Leonardi, M C; Rotmensz, N; Serrano, D; Varricchio, C; Disalvatore, D; Castillo, A Del; Bassi, F; Pagani, G; DeCensi, A; Viale, G; Bonanni, B; Pruneri, G

    2013-01-01

    Background: The post-surgical management of ductal intraepithelial neoplasia (DIN) of the breast is still a dilemma. Ki-67 labelling index (LI) has been proposed as an independent predictive and prognostic factor in early breast cancer. Methods: The prognostic and predictive roles of Ki-67 LI were evaluated with a multivariable Cox regression model in a cohort of 1171 consecutive patients operated for DIN in a single institution from 1997 to 2007. Results: Radiotherapy (RT) was protective in subjects with DIN with Ki-67 LI ≥14%, whereas no evidence of benefit was seen for Ki-67 LI <14%, irrespective of nuclear grade and presence of necrosis. Notably, the higher the Ki-67 LI, the stronger the effect of RT (P-interaction <0.01). Hormonal therapy (HT) was effective in both Luminal A (adjusted hazard ratio (HR)=0.56 (95% CI, 0.33–0.97)) and Luminal B/Her2neg DIN (HR 0.51 (95% CI, 0.27–0.95)). Conclusion: Our data suggest that Ki-67 LI may be a useful prognostic and predictive adjunct in DIN patients. The Ki-67 LI of 14% could be a potential cutoff for better categorising this population of women at increased risk for breast cancer and in which adjuvant treatment (RT, HT) should be differently addressed, independent of histological grade and presence of necrosis. PMID:23579208

  20. Thyroid dysfunction and neoplasia in children receiving neck irradiation for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, I.D.; Black, T.L.; Thompson, E.I.; Pratt, C.; Rao, B.; Hustu, O.

    1985-03-15

    The reported relationship of radiation exposure and thyroid carcinoma stimulated this retrospective study of 298 patients treated at St. Jude Children's Hospital with radiation therapy to the neck for childhood cancer to identify patients who developed subsequent thyroid abnormalities. This series includes 153 patients with Hodgkin's disease, 95 with acute lymphocytic leukemia, 28 with lymphoepithelioma, and 22 with miscellaneous tumors. Inclusion in the study required 5 years of disease-free survival following therapy for their original tumor, which included thyroid irradiation. Follow-up has been 100%. Most patients also received chemotherapy. Seventeen patients were found to have decreased thyroid reserve with normal levels of free triiodothyroxine (T3) or free thyroxin, (T4) and an elevated level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). In nine patients hypothyroidism developed, with decreased T3 or T4 levels and an elevated level of TSH. One hyperthyroid patient was identified. Two patients had thyroiditis, and seven had thyroid neoplasms: (carcinoma in two, adenoma in two, colloid nodule in one, and undiagnosed nodules in two). This survey has demonstrated an increased incidence of thyroid dysfunction and thyroid neoplasia when compared to the general population. The importance of long-term follow-up for thyroid disease is emphasized in patients who have received thyroid irradiation. The possible role of subclinical hypothyroidism with TSH elevation coupled with radiation damage to the thyroid gland as a model for the development of neoplastic disease is discussed.

  1. Serum peptidome profiling analysis for the identification of potential biomarkers in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Wei, Fangqiao; Wang, Feng; Li, Changdong; Meng, Ge; Duan, Hua; Ma, Qingwei; Zhang, Weiyuan

    2015-09-25

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is a precancerous disease of cervical squamous cell carcinoma. We Used Mass Spectrometry based peptidome profile study to predict the transformation of CIN1, which is the primary stage of this lesion. . Serum samples of 34 Cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients, 31 healthy controls, and 29 CIN1 samples were analyzed. Peptides were purified by WCX magnetic beads (Bioyong), and analyzed by MALDI TOF (Bruker). Raw data were analyzed by BioExplorer software (Bioyong). The results showed 14 mass peaks with significant differences. The diagnosis model is established by analyzing peptide profiles of 15 SCC patients and 20 healthy women serum, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 100.00%. In validation set, the SCC diagnosis model also had good performance with a sensitivity of 80%, a specificity of 100%. In addition, this model could predict 29 CIN1 patients with accuracy of 55.17%. These results would provide a new method to predict the trend of CIN1 and take effective measures for high risk group timely. PMID:26282206

  2. MicroRNAs Involved in Tumor Suppressor and Oncogene Pathways; Implications for Hepatobiliary Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Justin L.

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small regulatory RNAs that function to modulate protein expression. This control allows for fine-tuning of the cellular phenotype, including regulation of proliferation, cell signaling, and apoptosis; not surprisingly, microRNAs contribute to liver cancer biology. Recent investigations in human liver cancers and tumor-derived cell lines have demonstrated decreased or increased expression of particular microRNAs in hepatobiliary cancer cells. Based on predicted and validated protein targets as well as functional consequences of altered expression, microRNAs with decreased expression in liver tumor cells may normally aid in limiting neoplastic transformation. Conversely, selected microRNAs that are upregulated in liver tumor cells can promote malignant features, contributing to carcinogenesis. In addition, microRNAs themselves are subject to regulated expression, including regulation by tumor suppressor and oncogene pathways. This review will focus on the expression and function of cancer-related microRNAs, including their intimate involvement in tumor suppressor and oncogene signaling networks relevant to hepatobiliary neoplasia. PMID:19585622

  3. CYP2E1 PstI polymorphism increases cervical neoplasia risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; He, Y

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) is a key enzyme in the metabolic activation of many carcinogens, but the roles of CYP2E1 polymorphisms in cervical neoplasia (CN) are inconclusive. Published case-control cohort studies from the Pubmed, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were retrieved. Data were extracted and pooled odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Seven studies examining 1097 cases and 1117 controls were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled effect size showed no association between CYP2E1 RsaI and DraI polymorphisms and CN risk in a codominant model. However, using a recessive model, an association between the PstI polymorphism and CN risk was observed (odds ratio: 2.10, 95% confidence interval: 0.96-4.62, P = 0.06), indicating that individuals with the homozygous rare genotype have a higher risk of developing CN compared to those with homozygous wild-type and heterozygous genotypes. When stratified by ethnicity, the PstI polymorphism was significantly correlated with CN susceptibility in non-Asians (odds ratio: 3.74, 95% confidence interval: 1.13-12.43, P = 0.03). This meta-analysis suggests that the CYP2E1 PstI polymorphism increases the risk of CN in non-Asians. PMID:26125714

  4. Soft shell clams Mya arenaria with disseminated neoplasia demonstrate reverse transcriptase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    House, M.L.; Kim, C.H.; Reno, P.W.

    1998-01-01

    Disseminated neoplasia (DN), a proliferative cell disorder of the circulatory system of bivalves, was first reported in oysters in 1969. Since that time, the disease has been determined to be transmissible through water-borne exposure, but the etiological agent has not been unequivocally identified. In order to determine if a viral agent, possibly a retrovirus, could be the causative agent of DN, transmission experiments were performed, using both a cell-free filtrate and a sucrose gradient-purified preparation of a cell-free filtrate of DN positive materials. Additionally, a PCR-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay was used to determine if reverse transcriptase was present in tissues or hemolymph from DN positive soft shell clams Mya arenaria. DN was transmitted to healthy clams by injection with whole DN cells, but not with cell-free flitrates prepared from either tissues from DN positive clams, or DN cells. The cell-free preparations from DN-positive tissues and hemolymph having high levels of DN cells in circulation exhibited positive reactions in the PCR-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay. Cell-free preparations of hemolymph from clams having low levels of DN (<0.1% of cells abnormal), hemocytes from normal soft shell clams, and normal soft shell clam tissues did not produce a positive reaction in the PCR enhanced reverse transcriptase assay.

  5. The histologic features of intratubular germ cell neoplasia and its correlation with tumor behavior

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Abbas; Movahhed, Saeed; Parvin, Mahmood; Salimi, Maziar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the prevalence of intratubular germ cell neoplasia (ITGCN) in patients with concurrent testis tumor and its correlation with histologic features and serum tumor markers. Materials and Methods From 2003 to 2015, 179 patients underwent radical orchiectomy due to testicular mass. Tissue specimens were evaluated by an expert uro-pathologist using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining, in addition to light microscopy, to identify presence of ITGCN. Patients' demographic characteristics, histologic subtypes, pathologic stage of tumor and serum tumor markers were gathered and analyzed. Results Eighty-five out of 179 patients (47.5%) had concomitant ITGCN according to IHC staining. There was not statistically significant difference in histologic type, histologic components, cryptorchidism, and lymphovascular invasion between the 2 groups (p=0.151, p=0.11, p=0.233, p=0.413, and p=0.14, respectively). The prevalence of ITGCN was significantly higher in patients with stage T2 and T3 of tumor than those with stage T1. Elevated serum alpha feto protein level is much common in patients with ITGCN (p<0.001). Conclusions The prevalence of concurrent ITGCN in our region is lower than previous data from western countries. ITGCN is more common in higher tumor stages and is accompanied with elevated serum alpha feto protein levels before surgery. Presence of ITGCN in adjacent tissue may suggest a negative cancer behavior. PMID:27195317

  6. Glycodelin expression in pregnant patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ciavattini, Andrea; Sopracordevole, Francesco; Di Giuseppe, Jacopo; Lucarini, Guendalina; Zizzi, Antonio; Moriconi, Lorenzo; Goteri, Gaia

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate glycodelin immunostaining in pregnant women with a first diagnosis of cervical intraephitelial neoplasia (CIN) and to correlate the expression of CIN with Ki-67 and glycodelin immunostaining. A retrospective case-control study was performed including 20 patients with natural pregnancy and with first time onset of CIN occurring not later than 16 gestational weeks. The control group included 20 non-pregnant patients matched for age, parity, smoking status and number of previous sexual partners. Exclusion criteria included previous cervical treatment, immunocompromised status and chronic hepatitis B and/or C. Staining for Glycodelin and for Ki-67 was expressed using a classification based on the distribution of positivity on a semi-quantitative three-point scale. An inverse relationship was observed between glycodelin immunostaining and CIN grade in pregnant patients (p = 0.01), with a significantly higher expression in CIN1 than in CIN2 and CIN3, but not in non-pregnant patients (p = 0.81). Positivity for Ki-67 was less intense in pregnant than in non-pregnant patients. A significant inverse relationship was observed between glycodelin immunostaining and Ki-67 expression (p = 0.02). We suggest that the higher expression of glycodelin in pregnancy is related to a lower proliferative activity in CIN, which is probably associated to hormonal status of pregnancy. Further clinical studies are needed to support these findings. PMID:26631447

  7. Comparison between two portable devices for widefield PpIX fluorescence during cervical intraepithelial neoplasia treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Inada, Natalia Mayumi; Lombardi, Welington; Cossetin, Natália Fernandez; Varoto, Cinthia; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2015-06-01

    The use of portable electronic devices, in particular mobile phones such as smartphones is increasing not only for all known applications, but also for diagnosis of diseases and monitoring treatments like topical Photodynamic Therapy. The aim of the study is to evaluate the production of the photosensitizer Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) after topical application of a cream containing methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) in the cervix with diagnosis of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) through the fluorescence images captured after one and three hours and compare the images using two devices (a Sony Xperia® mobile and an Apple Ipod®. Was observed an increasing fluorescence intensity of the cervix three hours after cream application, in both portable electronic devices. However, because was used a specific program for the treatment of images using the Ipod® device, these images presented better resolution than observed by the Sony cell phone without a specific program. One hour after cream application presented a more selective fluorescence than the group of three hours. In conclusion, the use of portable devices to obtain images of PpIX fluorescence shown to be an effective tool and is necessary the improvement of programs for achievement of better results.

  8. HPV-Based Screening, Triage, Treatment, and Followup Strategies in the Management of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Deas, Jessica; Gómez-Cerón, Claudia; García-Suastegui, Wendy Argelia; Fierros-Zárate, Geny del Socorro; Jacobo-Herrera, Nadia Judith

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer in women worldwide, and the development of new diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment strategies merits special attention. Many efforts have been made to design new drugs and develop immunotherapy and gene therapy strategies to treat cervical cancer. HPV genotyping has potentially valuable applications in triage of low-grade abnormal cervical cytology, assessment of prognosis and followup of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and in treatment strategies for invasive cervical cancer. It is known that during the development of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection, a cascade of abnormal events is induced, including disruption of cellular cycle control, alteration of gene expression, and deregulation of microRNA expression. Thus, the identification and subsequent functional evaluation of host proteins associated with HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins may provide useful information in understanding cervical carcinogenesis, identifying cervical cancer molecular markers, and developing specific targeting strategies against tumor cells. Therefore, in this paper, we discuss the main diagnostic methods, management strategies, and followup of HPV-associated cervical lesions and review clinical trials applying gene therapy strategies against the development of cervical cancer. PMID:23690785

  9. Treatment and prevention of intraepithelial neoplasia: an important target for accelerated new agent development.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Kelloff, Gary J; Gordon, Gary B; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Hong, Waun Ki; Fabian, Carol J; Sigman, Caroline C; Bertagnolli, Monica M; Stratton, Steven P; Lam, Stephen; Nelson, William G; Meyskens, Frank L; Alberts, David S; Follen, Michele; Rustgi, Anil K; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vali; Scardino, Peter T; Gazdar, Adi F; Wattenberg, Lee W; Sporn, Michael B; Sakr, Wael A; Lippman, Scott M; Von Hoff, Daniel D

    2002-02-01

    Precancer or intraepithelial neoplasia (IEN) is a noninvasive lesion that has genetic abnormalities, loss of cellular control functions, and some phenotypic characteristics of invasive cancer and that predicts for a substantial likelihood of developing invasive cancer. The AACR Task Force on the Treatment and Prevention of IEN has delineated the relationship between IEN and cancer risk as well as the clinical benefit that can be derived from reducing IEN burden. Although several effective endoscopic and surgical treatments for IEN have become standard medical practice, these interventions can confer morbidity and do not treat the entire epithelial field at risk. The incidence of many epithelial cancers is continuing to rise, the number of individuals at risk is increasing with the aging population, and the rapid advancement of imaging and molecular diagnostics is bringing to light precancers that were heretofore clinically silent. There is therefore an urgent need to rapidly develop new treatment and prevention agents for IEN. The AACR IEN Task Force recommends focusing on established precancers as the target for new agent development because of the close association between dysplasia and invasive cancer and because a convincing reduction in IEN burden provides patient benefit by reducing cancer risk and/or by decreasing the need for invasive interventions. The IEN Task Force proposes several clinical trial designs that provide practical and feasible approaches to the rapid development of new agents to treat and prevent precancer. PMID:11839647

  10. Combined use of optical coherence tomography and fluorescence cystoscopy to detect bladder neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagaynova, Elena V.; Streltsova, Olga S.; Orlova, Anna G.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Unusova, Ekaterina E.; Iksanov, Rashid R.; Feldchtein, Felix I.

    2006-02-01

    Introduction: Early detection of bladder carcinoma is very important clinical problem. Diagnostic yield of white light cystoscopy with random biopsies remains poor. The use of exogenous fluorescence significantly increases the sensitivity, but specificity remains low. We analyzed diagnostic efficacy of OCT during white light cystoscopy and combined use of OCT and fluorescence cystoscopy. Materials and methods: An OCT device (1280 nm wavelength with 3 mW power, 8 Fr endoscopic probe, in-depth resolution 15 μm in tissue, lateral resolution 30 μm, acquisition time 1.5 sec for a 200x200 pixels image) was used in combination with a standard Karl Storz fluorescence cystoscope. A 3% solution of 5-ALA was instilled intravesically for 2 hours before the procedure. Initial examination was made under white light. OCT imaging and biopsy of all fluorescence zones were performed in blue light. 20 patients were studied. The study is ongoing. Results: 80 fluorescence zones (16 exophytic and 64 flat lesions) were analyzed with OCT. All exophytic zones were correctly detected by OCT and white light cystoscopy. Out of 64 flat fluorescent areas, 56 had benign histopathology readings, with 45 of them having the benign type of OCT images. Of 8 fluorescent zones with neoplastic histopathology, OCT correctly detected all 8. Based on this preliminary data, OCT could help to avoid 80% of unnecessary biopsies/resections. Conclusion: Combined use of OCT imaging and fluorescence cystoscopy can substantially improve diagnostic yield of bladder neoplasia detection.

  11. Screening for oesophageal neoplasia in patients with head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scherübl, H; Lampe, B von; Faiss, S; Däubler, P; Bohlmann, P; Plath, T; Foss, H-D; Scherer, H; Strunz, A; Hoffmeister, B; Stein, H; Zeitz, M; Riecken, E-O

    2002-01-01

    Due to advanced disease at the time of diagnosis the prognosis of oesophageal cancer is generally poor. As mass screening for oesophageal cancer is neither feasible nor reasonable, high-risk groups should be identified and surveilled. The aim of this study was to define the risk of oesophageal cancer in patients with (previous) head and neck cancer. A total of 148 patients with (previous) head and neck cancer were prospectively screened for oesophageal cancer by video-oesophagoscopy and random oesophageal biopsies. Even in a macroscopically normal looking oesophagus, four biopsy specimens were taken every 3 cm throughout the entire length of the squamous oesophagus. Low- or high-grade squamous cell dysplasia was detected histologically in 10 of the 148 patients (6.8%). All but one dysplasias were diagnosed synchronously with the head and neck cancers. In addition, oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma was diagnosed in 11 of the 148 patients (7.4%). Most invasive cancers (63.6%) occurred metachronously. The risk of squamous cell neoplasia of the oesophagus is high in patients with (previous) head and neck cancer. Surveillance is recommended in this high-risk group. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 239–243. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600018 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 The Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11870513

  12. Malignant neoplasia arising from ovarian remnants following bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (Review).

    PubMed

    Imai, Atsushi; Matsunami, Kazutoshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Ichigo, Satoshi

    2014-07-01

    Ovarian remnant syndrome (ORS) is a rare, but well-known gynecological complication, most often induced by difficult bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) procedures that leave residual ovarian tissue on the pelvic wall. The most common preexisting conditions for this complication include endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease and prior abdominal surgery. The residual ovarian tissue may eventually cause malignant development. A total of 12 cases of malignant and benign tumors (clear cell adenocarcinoma in 1 case, mucinous-type tumors in 2, endometrioid-type tumors in 5, adenocarcinoma in 3 and border serous neoplasia in 1) and 21 benign cysts developing from an ovarian remnant have been described in the literature to date. Endometriosis, known to increase the risk of ovarian cancer, predisposes patients to ORS, with an incidence rate of 30 to 50% in ORS patients with ovarian carcinoma. Although the true incidence of ORS remains unknown, when endometriotic adhesions are diagnosed during BSO, the possibility of ORS and subsequent ovarian malignant transformation may mandate complete surgical resection. PMID:24959210

  13. Fiber optic FTIR instrument for in vivo detection of colonic neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Nortwick, Matthew; Hargrove, John; Wolters, Rolf; Crawford, James M.; Arroyo, May; Mackanos, Mark; Contag, Christopher H.; Wang, Thomas D.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate the proof of concept for use of a fiber optic FTIR instrument to perform in vivo detection of colonic neoplasia as an adjunct to medical endoscopy. FTIR is sensitive to the molecular composition of tissue, and can be used as a guide for biopsy by identifying pre-malignant tissue (dysplasia). First, we demonstrate the use of a silver halide optical fiber to collect mid-infrared absorption spectra in the 950 to 1800 cm-1 regime with high signal-to-noise from biopsy specimens of colonic mucosa tissue ex vivo. We observed subtle differences in wavenumber and magnitude of the absorbance peaks over this regime. We then show that optimal sub-ranges can be defined within this spectral regime and that spectral pre-processing can be performed to classify the tissue as normal, hyperplasia, or dysplasia with high levels of performance. We used a partial least squares discriminant analysis and a leave-one-subject-out crossvalidation strategy to classify the spectra. The results were compared with histology, and the optimal thresholds resulted in an overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive predictive value of 96%, 92%, 93%, and 82%, respectively for this technique. We demonstrate that mid-infrared absorption spectra can be collected remotely with an optical fiber and used to identify colonic dysplasia with high accuracy. We are now developing an endoscope compatible optical fiber to use this technique clinically for the early detection of cancer.

  14. Grading of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia using spatial frequency for optical histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Jagtap, Jaidip; Pradhan, Asima; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    It is important to detect cervical dysplasia, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN). CIN is the potentially premalignant and abnormal squamous cells on surface of cervix. In this study, the spatial frequency spectra of pre-cancer cervical tissues are used to detect differences among different grades of human cervical tissues. Seven sets of thick tissue sections of human cervix of normal, CIN 1, CIN 2, and CIN 3 tissues are studied. The confocal microscope images of the stromal region of normal and CIN human tissues were analyzed using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to generate the spatial spectra. It is observed that higher frequency components exist in CIN tissues than those in normal tissue, as well as those in higher grade CIN tissue than those in lower grade CIN tissue. The width of the spatial frequency of different types of tissues is used to create a criterion for CIN grading by training a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The results show that the randomness of tissue structures from normal to different stages of precancer in cervical tissue can be recognized by fingerprints of the spatial frequency. The efficacy of spatial frequency analysis for CIN grading is evaluated as excellent since high AUC (area under the ROC curve), sensitivity and specificity are obtained by the statistics study. This works lays the foundation of using spatial frequency spectra for a histology evaluation.

  15. Lack of PTEN expression in endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia is correlated with cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Baak, Jan Pieter Albert; Van Diermen, Bianca; Steinbakk, Anita; Janssen, Emiel; Skaland, Ivar; Mutter, George L; Fiane, Bent; Løvslett, Kjell

    2005-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that PTEN inactivation may stratify cancer progression risk among putative endometrial hyperplasias, classified prognostically by means of the morphometric D score (DS). The DS, calculated from 3 morphometric variables measured in routine hematoxylin-eosin-stained endometrial biopsy slides, is the most sensitive and specific method of endometrial cancer risk prediction currently available. Clinical outcomes of 103 women with endometrial hyperplasia on biopsy were tallied according to the DS. Seven (7/103; 7%) patients with carcinoma during follow-up were all distributed within the high-risk prognostic group (ie, DS <1 = endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia [EIN]) (7/21; 33% progression). None of the 82 cases with a DS higher than 1 progressed. All cases that progressed were PTEN null, indicating that this genotype is capable of further stratifying cancer progression risk in hyperplasias irrespective of histological categorization. However, only 16% of the PTEN-null cases progressed. When PTEN expression pattern was combined with EIN, the prognostic power was greatly increased (specificity from 63% for PTEN and 85% for EIN to 93% when combined; positive predictive value from 16% and 33% to 50%). We conclude that loss of PTEN expression is the first biomarker in EIN that increases the accuracy of the prognostic DS to predict cancer progression risk. Unless endometrial hyperplasias are stratified by histological morphometric D-Score, PTEN has a low positive predictive value. PMID:15948123

  16. Reduced keratin expression in colorectal neoplasia and associated fields is reversible by diet and resection

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Caroline A; Rosser, Ria; Waby, Jennifer S; Noirel, Josselin; Lai, Daphne; Wright, Phillip C; Williams, Elizabeth A; Riley, Stuart A; Bury, Jonathan P; Corfe, Bernard M

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with adenomatous colonic polyps are at increased risk of developing further polyps suggesting field-wide alterations in cancer predisposition. The current study aimed to identify molecular alterations in the normal mucosa in the proximity of adenomatous polyps and to assess the modulating effect of butyrate, a chemopreventive compound produced by fermentation of dietary residues. Methods A cross-sectional study was undertaken in patients with adenomatous polyps: biopsy samples were taken from the adenoma, and from macroscopically normal mucosa on the contralateral wall to the adenoma and from the mid-sigmoid colon. In normal subjects biopsies were taken from the mid-sigmoid colon. Biopsies were frozen for proteomic analysis or formalin-fixed for immunohistochemistry. Proteomic analysis was undertaken using iTRAQ workflows followed by bioinformatics analyses. A second dietary fibre intervention study arm used the same endpoints and sampling strategy at the beginning and end of a high-fibre intervention. Results Key findings were that keratins 8, 18 and 19 were reduced in expression level with progressive proximity to the lesion. Lesional tissue exhibited multiple K8 immunoreactive bands and overall reduced levels of keratin. Biopsies from normal subjects with low faecal butyrate also showed depressed keratin expression. Resection of the lesion and elevation of dietary fibre intake both appeared to restore keratin expression level. Conclusion Changes in keratin expression associate with progression towards neoplasia, but remain modifiable risk factors. Dietary strategies may improve secondary chemoprevention. Trial registration number ISRCTN90852168. PMID:26462274

  17. Wide-field and high-resolution optical imaging for early detection of oral neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Mark C.; Schwarz, Richard A.; Rosbach, Kelsey; Roblyer, Darren; Muldoon, Tim; Williams, Michelle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2010-02-01

    Current procedures for oral cancer screening typically involve visual inspection of the entire tissue surface at risk under white light illumination. However, pre-cancerous lesions can be difficult to distinguish from many benign conditions when viewed under these conditions. We have developed wide-field (macroscopic) imaging system which additionally images in cross-polarized white light, narrowband reflectance, and fluorescence imaging modes to reduce specular glare, enhance vascular contrast, and detect disease-related alterations in tissue autofluorescence. We have also developed a portable system to enable high-resolution (microscopic) evaluation of cellular features within the oral mucosa in situ. This system is a wide-field epi-fluorescence microscope coupled to a 1 mm diameter, flexible fiber-optic imaging bundle. Proflavine solution was used to specifically label cell nuclei, enabling the characteristic differences in N/C ratio and nuclear distribution between normal, dysplastic, and cancerous oral mucosa to be quantified. This paper discusses the technical design and performance characteristics of these complementary imaging systems. We will also present data from ongoing clinical studies aimed at evaluating diagnostic performance of these systems for detection of oral neoplasia.

  18. Characterization of Notch Signalling Pathway Members in Normal Prostate, Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PIN) and Prostatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Soylu, Hakan; Acar, Nuray; Ozbey, Ozlem; Unal, Betul; Koksal, Ismail Turker; Bassorgun, Ibrahim; Ciftcioglu, Akif; Ustunel, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Prostate Cancer (PCa) holds the second place in terms of cancer-related mortality rate among men. The Notch signalling pathway regulates the proliferation and differentiation in embryonic and adult tissues and determines the cell fate. The body of knowledge in the present literature is currently controversial about the effect of the Notch pathway on prostatic cancer. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the immunolocalization and expression levels of Notch1-4, Jagged1-2, Delta, HES1 and HES5 from among the members of the Notch signalling pathway in tissues of normal, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and malignant prostate. The current study included a sample of 20 patients with localised prostatic adenocarcinoma, 18 patients with high grade PIN (H-PIN) and 18 normal prostatic tissue. Immunolocalisations of Notch1, 2, 3, 4, Jagged1, 2, Delta, HES1 and HES5 were identified through the immunohistochemical method. The findings of the present study showed that all in-scope members of the Notch signalling pathway were localised in PIN structures to a greater extent than in other tissues and from amongst these members, specifically Notch1, Notch4, Jagged1 and HES1 were at more significant levels. Consequently, the findings of the present study may indicate that the Notch signalling pathway can play a role especially in the formation of PIN structures. PMID:26341090

  19. Induction of Cervical Neoplasia in the Mouse by Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Donald D.; Budd Wentz, W.; Reagan, James W.; Heggie, Alfred D.

    1989-06-01

    Induction of cervical neoplasia in the mouse cervix by herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) has been reported. The present study was done to determine if transfection with DNA of HSV-2 can induce carcinogenesis in this animal model. Genomic HSV-2 DNA was isolated from infected HEp-2 cells and separated from host cell DNA by cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation. The DNA was applied to mouse cervix for periods of 80-100 weeks. Experimental controls were treated with uninfected genomic HEp-2 cell DNA or with calf thymus DNA. Vaginal cytological preparations from all animals were examined monthly to detect epithelial abnormalities. Animals were sacrificed and histopathology studies were done when cellular changes indicative of premalignant or malignant lesions were seen on vaginal smears. Cytologic and histologic materials were coded and evaluated without knowledge of whether they were from animals treated with virus or control DNA. Premalignant and malignant cervical lesions similar to those that occur in women were detected in 61% of the histologic specimens obtained from animals exposed to HSV-2 DNA. The yield of invasive cancers was 21% in animals treated with HSV-2 DNA. No cancers were detected in mice treated with either HEp-2 or calf thymus DNA. Dysplasia was detected in only one of these control animals.

  20. Nam Con Son Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

  1. Risk of Advanced Neoplasia in First-Degree Relatives with Colorectal Cancer: A Large Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Enrique; Gargallo, Carla; Lanas, Angel; Bujanda, Luis; Gimeno-García, Antonio Z.; Hernández-Guerra, Manuel; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Alonso-Abreu, Inmaculada; Morillas, Juan Diego; Balaguer, Francesc; Muriel, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background First-degree relatives (FDR) of patients with colorectal cancer have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer than the general population. For this reason, screening guidelines recommend colonoscopy every 5 or 10 y, starting at the age of 40, depending on whether colorectal cancer in the index-case is diagnosed at <60 or ≥60 y, respectively. However, studies on the risk of neoplastic lesions are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of advanced neoplasia (three or more non-advanced adenomas, advanced adenoma, or invasive cancer) in FDR of patients with colorectal cancer compared to average-risk individuals (i.e., asymptomatic adults 50 to 69 y of age with no family history of colorectal cancer). Methods and Findings This cross-sectional analysis includes data from 8,498 individuals undergoing their first lifetime screening colonoscopy between 2006 and 2012 at six Spanish tertiary hospitals. Of these individuals, 3,015 were defined as asymptomatic FDR of patients with colorectal cancer (“familial-risk group”) and 3,038 as asymptomatic with average-risk for colorectal cancer (“average-risk group”). The familial-risk group was stratified as one FDR, with one family member diagnosed with colorectal cancer at ≥60 y (n = 1,884) or at <60 y (n = 831), and as two FDR, with two family members diagnosed with colorectal cancer at any age (n = 300). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used for between-group comparisons after adjusting for potential confounders (age, gender, and center). Compared with the average-risk group, advanced neoplasia was significantly more prevalent in individuals having two FDR with colorectal cancer (odds ratio [OR] 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36–2.66, p < 0.001), but not in those having one FDR with colorectal cancer diagnosed at ≥60 y (OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.83–1.27, p = 0.77) and <60 y (OR 1.19; 95% CI 0.90–1.58, p = 0.20). After the age of 50 y, men developed advanced neoplasia over two times more frequently than women and advanced neoplasia appeared at least ten y earlier. Fewer colonoscopies by 2-fold were required to detect one advanced neoplasia in men than in women. Major limitations of this study were first that although average-risk individuals were consecutively included in a randomized control trial, this was not the case for all individuals in the familial-risk cohort; and second, the difference in age between the average-risk and familial-risk cohorts. Conclusions Individuals having two FDR with colorectal cancer showed an increased risk of advanced neoplasia compared to those with average-risk for colorectal cancer. Men had over 2-fold higher risk of advanced neoplasia than women, independent of family history. These data suggest that screening colonoscopy guidelines should be revised in the familial-risk population. PMID:27138769

  2. Parenchymal Signal Intensity in 3-T Body MRI of Dogs with Hematopoietic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Daniel A; Sharkey, Leslie C; Steward, Susan M; Bahr, Katherine L; Henson, Michael S; Ito, Daisuke; O'Brien, Timothy D; Jessen, Carl R; Husbands, Brian D; Borgatti, Antonella; Modiano, Jaime F

    2013-01-01

    We performed a preliminary study involving 10 dogs to assess the applicability of body MRI for staging of canine diffuse hematopoietic neoplasia. T1-weighted (before and after intravenous gadolinium), T2-weighted, in-phase, out-of-phase, and short tau inversion recovery pulse sequences were used. By using digital region of interest (ROI) and visual comparison techniques, relative parenchymal organ (medial iliac lymph nodes, liver, spleen, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla) signal intensity was quantified as less than, equal to, or greater than that of skeletal muscle in 2 clinically normal young adult dogs and 10 dogs affected with either B-cell lymphoma (n = 7) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 3). Falciform fat and urinary bladder were evaluated to provide additional perspective regarding signal intensity from the pulse sequences. Dogs with nonfocal disease could be distinguished from normal dogs according to both the visual and ROI signal-intensity relationships. In normal dogs, liver signal intensity on the T2-weighted sequence was greater than that of skeletal muscle by using either the visual or ROI approach. However in affected dogs, T2-weighted liver signal intensity was less than that of skeletal muscle by using either the ROI approach (10 of 10 dogs) or the visual approach (9 of 10 dogs). These findings suggest that the comparison of relative signal intensity among organs may have merit as a research model for infiltrative parenchymal disease (ROI approach) or metabolic effects of disease; this comparison may have practical clinical applicability (visual comparison approach) as well. PMID:23582424

  3. Prediction of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in cytologically normal women by human papillomavirus testing.

    PubMed

    Carozzi, F; Ronco, G; Confortini, M; Noferini, D; Maddau, C; Ciatto, S; Segnan, N

    2000-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing has been suggested for primary screening of cervical cancer. Prediction of future high-grade cervical lesions is crucial for effectiveness and cost. We performed a case control study in a retrospective cohort of women with at least two cervical smears, all but the last one being negative, from the organized cervical screening programme in Florence, Italy. We searched for high-risk HPV in all previous, archival, smears from cases (new histologically confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade II or worse) and in one previous smear from each control (last smear cytologically normal, matched by age and interval (latency) from last smear). We applied polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the b-globin gene was used as a DNA preservation marker. High-risk HPV was identified in 71/92 (77.17%) previous smears from 79 cases and 17/332 controls (5.12%). The odds ratio (OR) was 63.76 (95% CI 30.57-132.96). Among cases the proportion of HPV-positive smears declined slightly with increasing latency. Among cases, HPV was found in 81.24% (95% CI 69.93-88.96%) of smears with latency < 4 years and in 67.80% (95% CI 47.72-82.93%) of those taken at longer intervals, up to 6 years. These findings suggest that testing for high-risk HPV allows predicting 80% of CINII/III 3 years before the cytological diagnosis and two thirds 6 years before. They also suggest that testing women negative for high-risk HPV at longer interval and strictly following-up women who are HPV positive could be an effective strategy for cervical cancer screening. PMID:11076654

  4. Up regulation in gene expression of chromatin remodelling factors in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Shadeo, Ashleen; Chari, Raj; Lonergan, Kim M; Pusic, Andrea; Miller, Dianne; Ehlen, Tom; Van Niekerk, Dirk; Matisic, Jasenka; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Follen, Michele; Guillaud, Martial; Lam, Wan L; MacAulay, Calum

    2008-01-01

    Background The highest rates of cervical cancer are found in developing countries. Frontline monitoring has reduced these rates in developed countries and present day screening programs primarily identify precancerous lesions termed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN). CIN lesions described as mild dysplasia (CIN I) are likely to spontaneously regress while CIN III lesions (severe dysplasia) are likely to progress if untreated. Thoughtful consideration of gene expression changes paralleling the progressive pre invasive neoplastic development will yield insight into the key casual events involved in cervical cancer development. Results In this study, we have identified gene expression changes across 16 cervical cases (CIN I, CIN II, CIN III and normal cervical epithelium) using the unbiased long serial analysis of gene expression (L-SAGE) method. The 16 L-SAGE libraries were sequenced to the level of 2,481,387 tags, creating the largest SAGE data collection for cervical tissue worldwide. We have identified 222 genes differentially expressed between normal cervical tissue and CIN III. Many of these genes influence biological functions characteristic of cancer, such as cell death, cell growth/proliferation and cellular movement. Evaluation of these genes through network interactions identified multiple candidates that influence regulation of cellular transcription through chromatin remodelling (SMARCC1, NCOR1, MRFAP1 and MORF4L2). Further, these expression events are focused at the critical junction in disease development of moderate dysplasia (CIN II) indicating a role for chromatin remodelling as part of cervical cancer development. Conclusion We have created a valuable publically available resource for the study of gene expression in precancerous cervical lesions. Our results indicate deregulation of the chromatin remodelling complex components and its influencing factors occur in the development of CIN lesions. The increase in SWI/SNF stabilizing molecule SMARCC1 and other novel genes has not been previously illustrated as events in the early stages of dysplasia development and thus not only provides novel candidate markers for screening but a biological function for targeting treatment. PMID:18248679

  5. Prediction of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in cytologically normal women by human papillomavirusesting

    PubMed Central

    Carozzi, F; Ronco, G; Confortini, M; Noferini, D; Maddau, C; Ciatto, S; Segnan, N

    2000-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing has been suggested for primary screening of cervical cancer. Prediction of future high-grade cervical lesions is crucial for effectiveness and cost. We performed a case control study in a retrospective cohort of women with at least two cervical smears, all but the last one being negative, from the organized cervical screening programme in Florence, Italy. We searched for high-risk HPV in all previous, archival, smears from cases (new histologically confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade II or worse) and in one previous smear from each control (last smear cytologically normal, matched by age and interval (latency) from last smear). We applied polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the b-globin gene was used as a DNA preservation marker. High-risk HPV was identified in 71/92 (77.17%) previous smears from 79 cases and 17/332 controls (5.12%). The odds ratio (OR) was 63.76 (95% CI 30.57132.96). Among cases the proportion of HPV-positive smears declined slightly with increasing latency. Among cases, HPV was found in 81.24% (95% CI 69.9388.96%) of smears with latency < 4 years and in 67.80% (95% CI 47.7282.93%) of those taken at longer intervals, up to 6 years. These findings suggest that testing for high-risk HPV allows predicting 80% of CINII/III 3 years before the cytological diagnosis and two thirds 6 years before. They also suggest that testing women negative for high-risk HPV at longer interval and strictly following-up women who are HPV positive could be an effective strategy for cervical cancer screening. 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11076654

  6. Human Papillomavirus Genotype-Specific Prevalence Across the Continuum of Cervical Neoplasia and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joste, Nancy E.; Ronnett, Brigitte M.; Hunt, William C.; Pearse, Amanda; Langsfeld, Erika; Leete, Thomas; Jaramillo, MaryAnn; Stoler, Mark H.; Castle, Philip E.; Wheeler, Cosette M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The New Mexico HPV Pap Registry was established to measure the impact of cervical cancer prevention strategies in the United States. Prior to widespread HPV vaccine implementation, we established the baseline prevalence for a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes across the continuum of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cancer. Methods A population-based sample of 6,272 tissue specimens were tested for 37 HPV genotypes. The number of specimens tested within each diagnostic category was: 541 negative, 1,411 CIN grade 1 (CIN1), 2,226 CIN grade 2 (CIN2), and 2,094 CIN grade 3 (CIN3) or greater. Age-specific HPV prevalence was estimated within categories for HPV genotypes targeted by HPV vaccines. Results The combined prevalence of HPV genotypes included in the quadrivalent and nonavalent vaccines increased from 15.3% and 29.3% in CIN1 to 58.4% and 83.7% in CIN3, respectively. The prevalence of HPV types included in both vaccines tended to decrease with increasing age for CIN1, CIN2, CIN3, and squamous cell carcinoma, most notably for CIN3 and SCC. The six most common HPV types in descending order of prevalence were HPV-16, −31, −52, −58, −33, and −39 for CIN3 and HPV-16, −18, −31, −45, −52, and −33 for invasive cancers. Conclusions Health economic modeling of HPV vaccine impact should consider age-specific differences in HPV prevalence. Impact Population-based HPV prevalence in CIN is not well described but is requisite for longitudinal assessment of vaccine impact and to understand the effectiveness and performance of various cervical screening strategies in vaccinated and unvaccinated women. PMID:25363635

  7. The normal structure and function of CD44 and its role in neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Sneath, R J; Mangham, D C

    1998-01-01

    CD44 is a transmembrane glycoprotein, the variant isoforms of which are coded for by alternative splicing, with the most prolific isoform being CD44 standard. CD44 is found in a wide variety of tissues including the central nervous system, lung, epidermis, liver, and pancreas, whereas variant isoforms of CD44 (CD44v) appear to have a much more restricted distribution. Variants of CD44 are expressed in tissues during development, including embryonic epithelia. Known functions of CD44 are cellular adhesion (aggregation and migration), hyaluronate degradation, lymphocyte activation, lymph node homing, myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis, angiogenesis, and release of cytokines. The functions of CD44 are principally dependant on cellular adhesion in one setting or another. The role of CD44 in neoplasia is less well defined, although metastatic potential can be conferred on non-metastasising cell lines by transfection with a variant of CD44 and high levels of CD44 are associated with several types of malignant tumours. The physiological functions of CD44 indicate that the molecule could be involved in the metastatic spread of tumours. Many studies have investigated the pattern of CD44 distribution in tumours and some observations suggest that certain cells do not use CD44 in tumorigenesis or in the production of metastases. However, the data are extremely conflicting, and further studies are needed to establish the prognostic value of CD44 and its variant isoforms. The precise function of CD44 in the metastatic process and the degree of involvement in human malignancies has yet to be established fully. PMID:9893744

  8. Pathologic spectrum of cysts in end-stage kidneys: possible precursors to renal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mojgan; Antic, Tatjana; Paner, Gladell P; Chang, Anthony

    2014-07-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD) is common in patients with end-stage renal disease. Given the significant increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in these patients, we characterized the pathologic spectrum of cysts in end-stage kidneys to determine the possible relationship with coincidental neoplasms. Twenty-one native end-stage kidneys contained multiple cysts (0.1-4 cm), which could be categorized into 3 groups based on the cytoplasm of the predominant cell type: clear, eosinophilic, or foamy. Clear cell cysts showed strong staining with carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9) in a cup-shaped manner. Of 7 kidneys with CA9-positive clear cell cysts, 3 had at least 2 foci of RCC (0.5-8 cm), which all demonstrated the morphologic features and immunoprofile of clear cell papillary RCC. Eight kidneys contained foamy cysts, and 4 of these contained ACD-associated RCC, but 1 papillary RCC was also encountered. Six kidneys had eosinophilic cysts, which were negative for CA9, and 3 of these were associated with papillary RCC. Clear cell cysts, although few in number, are common in end-stage nephrectomy specimens. These cysts were present in all kidneys with clear cell papillary RCC and a few kidneys without an obvious mass. In specimens with ACD-associated RCC or papillary RCC, cysts lined by epithelial cells with predominantly eosinophilic or foamy cytoplasm were identified. These data support the idea that the cysts in end-stage kidneys could represent the earliest precursor lesion of renal neoplasia. PMID:24775605

  9. The association between sexually transmitted pathogens and cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia in a developing community.

    PubMed Central

    Kharsany, A B; Hoosen, A A; Moodley, J; Bagaratee, J; Gouws, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the association of sexually transmitted pathogens in women with cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN). SETTING--An urban tertiary referral hospital serving a large indigent developing community. PARTICIPANTS--48 women attending a colposcopy clinic and 49 women attending a family planning clinic. METHODS--Vaginal, endocervical, rectal swab specimens and sera were collected for the detection of sexually transmitted pathogens. Cervical cytology was performed on all patients. Women attending the colposcopy clinic had confirmation of abnormal cervical cytology by colposcopic directed biopsy. RESULTS--The mean age of women with CIN (33 years) was significantly greater than that of the women without CIN (28 years) and that of the family planning group (26 years). There was a high prevalence of sexually transmitted pathogens in all women. A significantly higher prevalence of bacterial vaginosis was found in women with CIN compared to those without (50% vs 20%; p = 0.034). The human papilloma virus (HPV) was detected in 46% of women with CIN and 65% of those without CIN. Chlamydia trachomatis (21%) and Trichomonas vaginalis (39%) were detected frequently in women with CIN. C. trachomatis (14%-21%) was detected more frequently than Neisseria gonorrhoeae (3-5%) in all asymptomatic women studied. CONCLUSION--This study demonstrates a high prevalence of sexually transmitted pathogens in women with and without CIN as well as family planning clinic attenders. Bacterial vaginosis was a significant finding in women with CIN. C. trachomatis was detected in a high proportion of all women studied and found more commonly than N. gonorrhoeae. We therefore recommend that all women attending gynaecological services in a developing community be investigated and treated for sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:8244352

  10. Progression of epididymal maldevelopment into hamartoma-like neoplasia in VHL disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Gautam U; Shively, Sharon B; Duong, Heng; Tran, Maxine G B; Moncrief, Travis J; Smith, Jonathan H; Li, Jie; Edwards, Nancy A; Lonser, Russell R; Zhuang, Zhengping; Merrill, Marsha J; Raffeld, Mark; Maxwell, Patrick H; Oldfield, Edward H; Vortmeyer, Alexander O

    2008-10-01

    Inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene and activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) in susceptible cells precedes formation of tumorlets and frank tumor in the epididymis of male VHL patients. We performed detailed histologic and molecular pathologic analysis of tumor-free epididymal tissues from VHL patients to obtain further insight into early epididymal tumorigenesis. Four epididymides from two VHL patients were serially sectioned to allow for three-dimensional visualization of morphologic changes. Areas of interest were genetically analyzed by tissue microdissection, immunohistochemistry for HIF and markers for mesonephric differentiation, and in situ hybridization for HIF downstream target vascular endothelial growth factor. Structural analysis of the epididymides revealed marked deviations from the regular anatomic structure resulting from impaired organogenesis. Selected efferent ductules were represented by disorganized mesonephric cells, and the maldeveloped mesonephric material was VHL-deficient by allelic deletion analysis. Furthermore, we observed maldeveloped mesonephric material near cystic structures, which were also VHL-deficient and were apparent derivatives of maldeveloped material. Finally, a subset of VHL-deficient cells was structurally integrated in regular efferent ductules; proliferation of intraductular VHL-deficient cells manifests itself as papillary growth into the ductular lumen. Furthermore, we clarify that that there is a pathogenetic continuum between microscopic tumorlets and formation of tumor. In multiple locations, three-dimensional reconstruction revealed papillary growth to extend deeply into ductular lumina, indicative of progression into early hamartoma-like neoplasia. We conclude epididymal tumorigenesis in VHL disease to occur in two distinct sequential steps: maldevelopment of VHL-deficient mesonephric cells, followed by neoplastic papillary proliferation. PMID:18813354

  11. Basement membrane proteins promote progression of intraepithelial neoplasia in 3-dimensional models of human stratified epithelium.

    PubMed

    Andriani, Frank; Garfield, Jackie; Fusenig, Norbert E; Garlick, Jonathan A

    2004-01-20

    We have developed novel 3-dimensional in vitro and in vivo tissue models that mimic premalignant disease of human stratified epithelium in order to analyze the stromal contribution of extracellular matrix and basement membrane proteins to the progression of intraepithelial neoplasia. Three-dimensional, organotypic cultures were grown either on a de-epidermalized human dermis with pre-existing basement membrane components on its surface (AlloDerm), on a Type I collagen gel that lacked basement membrane proteins or on polycarbonate membranes coated with purified extracellular matrix proteins. When tumor cells (HaCaT-II4) were mixed with normal keratinocytes (4:1/normals:HaCaT-II4), tumor cells selectively attached, persisted and proliferated at the dermal-epidermal interface in vitro and generated dysplastic tissues when transplanted to nude mice only when grown in the presence of the AlloDerm substrate. This stromal interface was permissive for tumor cell attachment due to the rapid assembly of structured basement membrane. When tumor cells were mixed with normal keratinocytes and grown on polycarbonate membranes coated with individual extracellular matrix or basement membrane components, selective attachment and significant intraepithelial expansion occurred only on laminin 1 and Type IV collagen-coated membranes. This preferential adhesion of tumor cells restricted the synthesis of laminin 5 to basal cells where it was deposited in a polarized distribution. Western blot analysis revealed that tumor cell attachment was not due to differences in the synthesis or processing of laminin 5. Thus, intraepithelial progression towards premalignant disease is dependent on the selective adhesion of cells with malignant potential to basement membrane proteins that provide a permissive template for their persistence and expansion. PMID:14648700

  12. Address of early stage primary colonic neoplasia by N.O.T.E.S.

    PubMed

    Cahill, R A; Lindsey, I; Cunningham, C

    2009-06-01

    Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery (N.O.T.E.S.) has the capacity to impact greatly on the practice of colorectal surgery. As much as potentially providing an alternative means of operative approach, its consideration and evolution is already also providing a wealth of instrument innovation that seems likely to greatly enhance the endoscopists' armamentarium for advanced endoluminal intervention. Furthermore, its aspirational concept is greatly advancing the progress of single site incision laparoscopic approaches and is speeding appreciation of translumenal assistance and operation. However, if N.O.T.E.S. is to occupy a distinct role in the surgical management of colorectal disease, it needs a niche indication of its own that constitutes a therapeutic advance with considerable clinical benefit for suitable patients. Conversely, sound development of a specific stream-lined operative strategy for N.O.T.E.S-type operations may exert a reciprocal swash upon conventional specialist practice. Thus spurred by N.O.T.E.S, localized resection may become standard therapy for early stage colonic neoplasia regardless of operative access although considerable clinical study is as yet required. Therefore, as much as ensuring feasibility and accuracy in the replication of conventional surgical maneuvers, the dawn of N.O.T.E.S. should be recognized as an opportunity for the inquisition of prevailing surgical principles and prejudices in order that colorectal operations are further honed towards perfection (above all it should be realized that avoidance of abdominal scarring is not the last barrier before surgical nirvana). This may represent the main legacy of transluminal investigation whether or not pure N.O.T.E.S. operating ever becomes a clinical reality in its own right. PMID:19179068

  13. Risk Factors for Persistent Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grades 1 and 2 Managed by Watchful Waiting

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Gloria Y.F.; Einstein, Mark H.; Romney, Seymour L.; Kadish, Anna S.; Abadi, Maria; Mikhail, Magdy; Basu, Jayasri; Thysen, Benjamin; Reimers, Laura; Palan, Prabhudas R.; Trim, Shelly; Soroudi, Nafisseh; Burk, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examines risk factors for persistent cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and whether human papillomavirus (HPV) testing predicts persistent lesions. Materials and Methods Women with histologically diagnosed CIN 1 or CIN 2 (n = 206) were followed every 3 months without treatment. HPV genotyping, plasma levels of ascorbic acid, and red blood cell folate were obtained. Cervical biopsy at 12 months determined the presence of CIN. Relative risk (RR) was estimated by log-linked binomial regression models. Results At 12 months, 70% of CIN 1 versus 54% of CIN 2 lesions spontaneously regressed (p< 0.001). Levels of folate or ascorbic acid were not associated with persistent CIN at 12 months. Compared to HPV negative women, those with multiple HPV types (RRs ranged from 1.68 to 2.17 at each follow-up visit) or high-risk types (RRs range = 1.74 to 2.09) were at increased risk for persistent CIN; women with HPV 16/18 had the highest risk (RRs range = 1.91 to 2.21). Persistent infection with a high-risk type was also associated with persistent CIN (RRs range = 1.50 2.35). Typing for high-risk HPVs at 6 months only had a sensitivity of 46% in predicting persistence of any lesions at 12 months. Conclusion Spontaneous regression of CIN 1 and CIN 2 occurs frequently within 12 months. HPV infection is the major risk factor for persistent CIN. However, HPV testing cannot reliably predict persistence of any lesion. PMID:21811178

  14. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens. Progress report, January 1, 1990--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1992-05-20

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. Previous results indicated that these clonogens are the precursor cells of radiogenic cancer, and that initiation, is common event at the clonegenic cell level. Detailed information on the physiologic control of clonogen proliferation, differentiation, and total numbers is thus essential to an understanding of the carcinogenic process. We report here studies on investigations on the relationships between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamus-pituitary feedback axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH-(thyrotropin-) responsive sub- population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and a large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cell interactions during the neoplastic process.

  15. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens. Progress report, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1991-05-31

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. During the end of the last grant year and the first half of the current grant year, we have completed analyses and summarized for publication: investigations on the relationship between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamicpituitary axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH- (thyrotropin-) responsive sub-population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and the results of the large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. We are testing new techniques for the culture, cytofluorescent analysis and characterization mammary epithelial cells and of clonogens in a parallel project, and plan to apply similar technology to the thyroid epithelial cells and clonogen population. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cells interactions during the neoplastic process.

  16. The normal structure and function of CD44 and its role in neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Sneath, R J; Mangham, D C

    1998-08-01

    CD44 is a transmembrane glycoprotein, the variant isoforms of which are coded for by alternative splicing, with the most prolific isoform being CD44 standard. CD44 is found in a wide variety of tissues including the central nervous system, lung, epidermis, liver, and pancreas, whereas variant isoforms of CD44 (CD44v) appear to have a much more restricted distribution. Variants of CD44 are expressed in tissues during development, including embryonic epithelia. Known functions of CD44 are cellular adhesion (aggregation and migration), hyaluronate degradation, lymphocyte activation, lymph node homing, myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis, angiogenesis, and release of cytokines. The functions of CD44 are principally dependant on cellular adhesion in one setting or another. The role of CD44 in neoplasia is less well defined, although metastatic potential can be conferred on non-metastasising cell lines by transfection with a variant of CD44 and high levels of CD44 are associated with several types of malignant tumours. The physiological functions of CD44 indicate that the molecule could be involved in the metastatic spread of tumours. Many studies have investigated the pattern of CD44 distribution in tumours and some observations suggest that certain cells do not use CD44 in tumorigenesis or in the production of metastases. However, the data are extremely conflicting, and further studies are needed to establish the prognostic value of CD44 and its variant isoforms. The precise function of CD44 in the metastatic process and the degree of involvement in human malignancies has yet to be established fully. PMID:9893744

  17. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and their associations with squamous cell neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, K J

    1987-01-01

    Current data implicating an etiological role of Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in precancer lesions (intraepithelial neoplasia) and squamous cell carcinoma of both the genital tract and other sites (oral cavity, larynx, skin, esophagus, nasal cavity, bronchus) can be summarized as follows: a) HPV involvement in benign, precancer, and malignant genital squamous cell lesions has been demonstrated by morphological, immunohistochemical and DNA hybridization techniques; b) HPV infections in the genital tract are sexually transmitted (STD) and associated with the same risk factors as development of cervical carcinoma; c) natural history of cervical HPV lesions is equivalent to that of CIN, i.e. they are potentially progressive to carcinoma in situ; d) latent HPV infections exist in the genital tract of both sexes; e) animal models exist, where papillomaviruses induce malignant transformation; f) HPV 11 induces transformation of human squamous epithelium in vivo (nude mouse renal subcapsule assay); g) malignant transformation of HPV lesions seems to depend on virus type and the physical state of its DNA, i.e. whether or not integrated in the host cell DNA; h) malignant transformation most probably requires synergistic actions between HPV and chemical or physical carcinogens or other infectious agents; i) genetic disposition (at least in animals) significantly contributes to malignant transformation; j) immunological defence mechanisms of the host probably are capable of modifying the course of HPV infection (efficacy in man remains to be elucidated). Many details of the molecular mechanisms still remain to be clarified, however. No applicable model systems exist to elucidate these issues, or the mechanisms leading to the progression to invasive cancer. Improved tissue culture systems for in vitro differentiation of keratinocytes should help in elucidating the biology of papillomaviruses and their interaction with cell division and differentiation. PMID:2829787

  18. p53 immunoreactivity in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and non-neoplastic cervical squamous epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffers, M D; Richmond, J; Farquharson, M; McNicol, A M

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To determine the pattern of p53 immunoreactivity in cervical squamous epithelium and to investigate the relation between p53 immunostaining and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. METHODS--Immunocytochemistry for p53 was performed in 65 specimens of formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded cervical tissue using a polyclonal antibody against recombinant p53. Microwave oven heating was used for antigen retrieval. Eight normal biopsy specimens, eight cases with histological features of HPV infection, and 49 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) were examined. Thirty one cases of CIN were examined. Thirty one cases of CIN were examined for evidence of HPV infection using in situ hybridisation with probes directed against wide spectrum HPV, HPV 16 and HPV 18. RESULTS--p53 immunoreactivity was seen in seven of eight (87%) of specimens with histological features of HPV infection, five of eight (62%) normal specimens, 13 of 22 (59%) CIN III, three of 14 (21%) CIN II and five of 13 (38%) CIN I specimens. The numbers of positive nuclei were small in cases of CIN and the location of positive nuclei within the epithelium paralleled the degree of dysplasia. Eleven of 15 (73%) CIN specimens which were immunoreactive for p53 yielded a positive signal for HPV by in situ hybridisation. A positive signal for HPV was also seen in 10 of 16 (63%) of CIN specimens in which p53 staining was absent. CONCLUSIONS--p53 immunoreactivity can be demonstrated in a small proportion of cells in the cervical squamous epithelium in a significant proportion of cases of CIN. This immunoreactivity seems to be independent of the presence of HPV, as assessed by in situ hybridisation. p53 immunoreactivity also occurs in non-neoplastic cervical squamous epithelium with a pattern of distribution within the epithelium which differs from that seen in CIN. Antigen retrieval by microwave oven heating enhances p53 immunostaining and may result in visualisation of cellular p53 in the absence of mutation. Images PMID:7876377

  19. Autophagy may occur at an early stage of cholangiocarcinogenesis via biliary intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Motoko; Nitta, Takeo; Sato, Yasunori; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2015-02-01

    Similar to the pancreatic carcinoma sequence model, cholangiocarcinoma reportedly follows a stepwise carcinogenesis process via the precursor lesion biliary intraepithelial neoplasia (BilIN). Given that autophagy plays an important role in the occurrence and development of carcinomas, we examined the involvement of autophagy in multistep cholangiocarcinogenesis. Thirty-six patients with hepatolithiasis associated with BilIN and/or cholangiocarcinoma, 7 with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, 8 with intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB), and 6 with control livers were surveyed. Their lesions were categorized as follows: invasive carcinoma (n = 16), IPNB (n = 8), BIlN-3 (n = 16), BilIN-1/2 (n = 40), nonneoplastic large bile duct (n = 55), and peribiliary gland (n = 55). We examined the immunohistochemical expression of autophagy-related proteins, microtubule-associated proteins light chain 3β (LC3), beclin-1, and p62/sequestosome-1 (p62), as well as tumor suppressor gene product p53. The extent of expression was semiquantitatively assessed. The status of KRAS mutations at codons 12 and 13 was examined in selected cases of BilIN-1/2. The expression of LC3 (cytoplasmic), beclin-1 (cytoplasmic), and p62 (cytoplasmic and nuclear) was significantly higher in BilIN-1/2, BilIN-3, IPNB, and invasive carcinoma than in large bile duct and peribiliary gland (P < .01). KRAS mutation was detected in 6 (40%) of 15 BilIN-1/2 lesions, and there was no correlation between the status of KRAS mutation and the expression of autophagy-related proteins. In conclusion, this study is the first to disclose that the expression of autophagy-related proteins, LC3, beclin-1, and p62, was increased at an early stage of multistep cholangiocarcinogenesis in hepatolithiasis. Autophagy, probably deregulated autophagy, may be related to the occurrence and development of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:25466963

  20. Characterization of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and potential clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera, Juan-Miguel; Perner, Sven; Genega, Elizabeth M; Sanda, Martin; Hofer, Matthias D.; Mertz, Kirsten D.; Paris, Pamela L.; Simko, Jeff; Bismar, Tarek A.; Ayala, Gustavo; Shah, Rajal B.; Loda, Massimo; Rubin, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose More than 1,300,000 prostate needle biopsies are performed annually in the U.S. with up to 16% incidence of isolated high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). HGPIN has low predictive value for identifying prostate cancer (PCA) on subsequent needle biopsies in PSA screened populations. In contemporary series, PCA is detected in about 20% of repeat biopsies following a diagnosis of HGPIN. Further, discrete histological subtypes of HGPIN with clinical implication in management have not been characterized. The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion that has recently been described in PCA has also been demonstrated to occur in a subset of HGPIN. This may have significant clinical implications given that TMPRSS2-ERG fusion PCA is associated with a more aggressive clinical course. Experimental Design In this study we assessed a series of HGPIN lesions and paired PCA for the presence of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. Results Fusion positive HGPIN was observed in 16% of the 143 number of lesions, and in all instances the matching cancer shared the same fusion pattern. 60% of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion PCA had fusion negative HGPIN. Conclusions Given the more aggressive nature of TMPRSS2-ERG PCA, the findings of this study raise the possibility that gene fusion positive HGPIN lesions are harbingers of more aggressive disease. To date, pathological, molecular and clinical parameters do not help stratify which men with HGPIN are at increased risk for a cancer diagnosis. Our results suggest that the detection of isolated TMPRSS2-ERG fusion HGPIN would improve the positive predictive value of finding TMPRSS2-ERG fusion PCA in subsequent biopsies. PMID:18519767

  1. A comparative evaluation of Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy for optical diagnosis of oral neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, S. K.; Krishna, H.; Sidramesh, M.; Chaturvedi, P.; Gupta, P. K.

    2011-08-01

    We report the results of a comparative evaluation of in vivo fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy for diagnosis of oral neoplasia. The study carried out at Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, involved 26 healthy volunteers and 138 patients being screened for neoplasm of oral cavity. Spectral measurements were taken from multiple sites of abnormal as well as apparently uninvolved contra-lateral regions of the oral cavity in each patient. The different tissue sites investigated belonged to one of the four histopathology categories: 1) squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 2) oral sub-mucous fibrosis (OSMF), 3) leukoplakia (LP) and 4) normal squamous tissue. A probability based multivariate statistical algorithm utilizing nonlinear Maximum Representation and Discrimination Feature for feature extraction and Sparse Multinomial Logistic Regression for classification was developed for direct multi-class classification in a leave-one-patient-out cross validation mode. The results reveal that the performance of Raman spectroscopy is considerably superior to that of fluorescence in stratifying the oral tissues into respective histopathologic categories. The best classification accuracy was observed to be 90%, 93%, 94%, and 89% for SCC, SMF, leukoplakia, and normal oral tissues, respectively, on the basis of leave-one-patient-out cross-validation, with an overall accuracy of 91%. However, when a binary classification was employed to distinguish spectra from all the SCC, SMF and leukoplakik tissue sites together from normal, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy were seen to have almost comparable performances with Raman yielding marginally better classification accuracy of 98.5% as compared to 94% of fluorescence.

  2. A comparative evaluation of Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy for optical diagnosis of oral neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, S. K.; Krishna, H.; Sidramesh, M.; Chaturvedi, P.; Gupta, P. K.

    2010-12-01

    We report the results of a comparative evaluation of in vivo fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy for diagnosis of oral neoplasia. The study carried out at Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, involved 26 healthy volunteers and 138 patients being screened for neoplasm of oral cavity. Spectral measurements were taken from multiple sites of abnormal as well as apparently uninvolved contra-lateral regions of the oral cavity in each patient. The different tissue sites investigated belonged to one of the four histopathology categories: 1) squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 2) oral sub-mucous fibrosis (OSMF), 3) leukoplakia (LP) and 4) normal squamous tissue. A probability based multivariate statistical algorithm utilizing nonlinear Maximum Representation and Discrimination Feature for feature extraction and Sparse Multinomial Logistic Regression for classification was developed for direct multi-class classification in a leave-one-patient-out cross validation mode. The results reveal that the performance of Raman spectroscopy is considerably superior to that of fluorescence in stratifying the oral tissues into respective histopathologic categories. The best classification accuracy was observed to be 90%, 93%, 94%, and 89% for SCC, SMF, leukoplakia, and normal oral tissues, respectively, on the basis of leave-one-patient-out cross-validation, with an overall accuracy of 91%. However, when a binary classification was employed to distinguish spectra from all the SCC, SMF and leukoplakik tissue sites together from normal, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy were seen to have almost comparable performances with Raman yielding marginally better classification accuracy of 98.5% as compared to 94% of fluorescence.

  3. Inverted (hobnail) high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive inverted pattern

    PubMed Central

    ÖZNUR, MELTEM; KOCA, SEVIM BAYKAL; YILDIZ, PELIN; BAHADIR, BURAK; BEHZATOĞLU, KEMAL

    2015-01-01

    High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is considered to be an important precursor for prostatic adenocarcinoma. The present study aimed to investigate the histological features of the uncommon inverted (hobnail) pattern of HGPIN in transrectal ultrasonographic (TRUS) prostatic needle biopsies from 13 cases. These 13 diagnosed cases of inverted HGPIN were identified out of a total of 2,034 TRUS biopsies (0.63%), obtained from patients suspected to have prostate cancer. The hobnail pattern is comprised of secretory cell nuclei, which are histologically localized at the luminal surface of the prostate gland, rather than the periphery, and exhibit reverse polarity. Histological examinations were performed and the results demonstrated that 5 of the 13 cases exhibited pure inverted histology, while HGPIN was observed to be histologically associated with other patterns in the remaining 8 patients. In addition, an association with adenocarcinoma was identified in 7 of the 13 cases. All 7 carcinomas accompanied by inverted HGPIN were conventional acinar adenocarcinoma cases; of note, for these 7 cases, the Gleason score was 7 for each. One acinar adenocarcinoma case accompanying inverted HGPIN demonstrated hobnail characteristics in large areas of the invasive component. It was observed that nuclei were proliferated in the invasive cribriform glands, which was comparable to that of inverted HGPIN, and were located on the cytoplasmic luminal surface; a similar morphology was also observed in individual glands. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that the hobnail HGPIN pattern may be of diagnostic importance due to its high association with adenocarcinoma and the high Gleason scores in the accompanying carcinomas. PMID:26622858

  4. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia disease progression is associated with increased vaginal microbiome diversity

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, A.; MacIntyre, D. A.; Lee, Y. S.; Smith, A.; Marchesi, J. R.; Lehne, B.; Bhatia, R.; Lyons, D.; Paraskevaidis, E.; Li, J. V.; Holmes, E.; Nicholson, J. K.; Bennett, P. R.; Kyrgiou, M.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary for cervical carcinogenesis. Although evidence suggests that the vaginal microbiome plays a functional role in the persistence or regression of HPV infections, this has yet to be described in women with cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN). We hypothesised that increasing microbiome diversity is associated with increasing CIN severity. llumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was used to characterise the vaginal microbiota of women with low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions (LSIL; n = 52), high-grade (HSIL; n = 92), invasive cervical cancer (ICC; n = 5) and healthy controls (n = 20). Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed an increased prevalence of microbiomes characterised by high-diversity and low levels of Lactobacillus spp. (community state type-CST IV) with increasing disease severity, irrespective of HPV status (Normal = 2/20,10%; LSIL = 11/52,21%; HSIL = 25/92,27%; ICC = 2/5,40%). Increasing disease severity was associated with decreasing relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. The vaginal microbiome in HSIL was characterised by higher levels of Sneathia sanguinegens (P < 0.01), Anaerococcus tetradius (P < 0.05) and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (P < 0.05) and lower levels of Lactobacillus jensenii (P < 0.01) compared to LSIL. Our results suggest advancing CIN disease severity is associated with increasing vaginal microbiota diversity and may be involved in regulating viral persistence and disease progression. PMID:26574055

  5. Conization Using an Electrosurgical Knife for Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Microinvasive Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wentao; Xu, Xiaoli; Wu, Xiaohua; Wang, Huaying; Li, Ziting; Yang, Huijuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidences of margin involvement, disease relapse, and complications in patients who had undergone conization using an electrosurgical knife (EKC) for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or microinvasive carcinomas (micro-CAs). Materials and Methods A retrospective case series analysis was performed with a total of 1359 patients who underwent EKC in Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center between June 2004 and July 2010. Results The median age of the patients was 39 years old (range: 19-72). Conization revealed the presence of CIN in 1113 (81.9%) patients, micro-CA in 72 (5.3%) patients and invasive carcinomas in 44 (3.2%) patients. The remaining 130 (9.6%) patients were free of diseases in the cone specimens. Positive surgical margins, or endocervical curettages (ECCs) were found in 90 (7.6%) patients with CINs or micro-CAs. Three factors were associated with positive margins and ECCs and included age (>50 years; odds ratio (OR), 3.0, P<0.01), postmenopausal status (OR, 3.1, P<0.01) and microinvasive disease (OR, 2.7, P<0.01). One thousand and eighty-nine (92.0%) patients were followed-up regularly for a median follow-up duration of 46 months (range: 24-106 months). Disease relapse was documented in 50 (4.6%) patients. Eighty-two (6.0%) cases experienced surgical complications that needed to be addressed, including early or late hemorrhages, infections, cervical stenosis, etc. Conclusions Our patients demonstrated that EKC was an alternative technique for diagnosis and treatment of CIN or micro-CAs with relatively low rate of recurrence and acceptable rate of complications. A randomized clinical trial is warranted to compare EKC, CKC and LEEP in the management of CIN or micro-CA. PMID:26153692

  6. LINE-1 Methylation Patterns as a Predictor of Postmolar Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lertkhachonsuk, Ruangsak; Paiwattananupant, Krissada; Tantbirojn, Patou; Rattanatanyong, Prakasit; Mutirangura, Apiwat

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To study the potential of long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) methylation change in the prediction of postmolar gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN). Methods. The LINE-1 methylation pattern from first trimester placenta, hydatidiform mole, and malignant trophoblast specimens were compared. Then, hydatidiform mole patients from 11999 to 2010 were classified into the following 2 groups: a remission group and a group that developed postmolar GTN. Specimens were prepared for a methylation study. The methylation levels and percentages of LINE-1 loci were evaluated for their sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the prediction of postmolar GTN. Results. First, 12 placentas, 38 moles, and 19 malignant trophoblast specimens were compared. The hydatidiform mole group had the highest LINE-1 methylation level (p = 0.003) and the uCuC of LINE-1 increased in the malignant trophoblast group (p ≤ 0.001). One hundred forty-five hydatidiform mole patients were classified as 103 remission and 42 postmolar GTN patients. The %mCuC and %uCmC of LINE-1 showed the lowest p value for distinguishing between the two groups (p < 0.001). The combination of the pretreatment β-hCG level (≥100,000 mIU/mL) with the %mCuC and %uCmC, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy modified the levels to 60.0%, 92.2%, 77.4%, 83.8%, and 82.3%, respectively. Conclusions. A reduction in the partial methylation of LINE-1 occurs early before the clinical appearance of malignant transformation. The %mCuC and %uCmC of LINE-1s may be promising markers for monitoring hydatidiform moles before progression to GTN. PMID:26448937

  7. A Risk Prediction Index for Advanced Colorectal Neoplasia at Screening Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schroy, Paul C.; Wong, John B.; O’Brien, Michael J.; Chen, Clara A.; Griffith, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Eliciting patient preferences within the context of shared decision-making has been advocated for colorectal cancer screening. Risk stratification for advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) might facilitate more effective shared decision-making when selecting an appropriate screening option. Our objective was to develop and validate a clinical index for estimating the probability ACN at screening colonoscopy. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 3,543 asymptomatic, mostly average risk patients 50–79 years of age undergoing screening colonoscopy at two urban safety net hospitals. Predictors of ACN were identified using multiple logistic regression. Model performance was internally validated using bootstrapping methods. Results The final index consisted of 5 independent predictors of risk (age, smoking, alcohol intake, height and a combined sex/race/ethnicity variable). Smoking was the strongest predictor (net reclassification improvement [NRI], 8.4%) and height the weakest (NRI, 1.5%). Using a simplified weighted scoring system based on 0.5 increments of the adjusted odds ratio, the risk of ACN ranged from 3.2% (95% CI, 2.6 to 3.9) for the low-risk group (score ≤ 2) to 8.6% (95% CI, 7.4–9.7) for the intermediate/high-risk group (score 3–11). The model had moderate to good overall discrimination (C-statistic, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.66–0.72) and good calibration (P=0.73 to 0.93). Conclusions A simple 5-item risk index based on readily available clinical data accurately stratifies average-risk patients into low- and intermediate/high-risk categories for ACN at screening colonoscopy. Uptake into clinical practice could facilitate more effective shared decision-making for CRC screening, particularly in situations where patient and provider test preferences differ. PMID:26010311

  8. CAHM, a long non-coding RNA gene hypermethylated in colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Susanne K; Mitchell, Susan M; Graham, Lloyd D; McEvoy, Aidan; Thomas, Melissa L; Baker, Rohan T; Ross, Jason P; Xu, Zheng-Zhou; Ho, Thu; LaPointe, Lawrence C; Young, Graeme P; Molloy, Peter L

    2014-08-01

    The CAHM gene (Colorectal Adenocarcinoma HyperMethylated), previously LOC100526820, is located on chromosome 6, hg19 chr6:163 834 097-163 834 982. It lacks introns, encodes a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and is located adjacent to the gene QKI, which encodes an RNA binding protein. Deep bisulphite sequencing of ten colorectal cancer (CRC) and matched normal tissues demonstrated frequent hypermethylation within the CAHM gene in cancer. A quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP) was used to characterize additional tissue samples. With a threshold of 5% methylation, the CAHM assay was positive in 2/26 normal colorectal tissues (8%), 17/21 adenomas (81%), and 56/79 CRC samples (71%). A reverse transcriptase-qPCR assay showed that CAHM RNA levels correlated negatively with CAHM % methylation, and therefore CAHM gene expression is typically decreased in CRC. The CAHM qMSP assay was applied to DNA isolated from plasma specimens from 220 colonoscopy-examined patients. Using a threshold of 3 pg methylated genomic DNA per mL plasma, methylated CAHM sequences were detected in the plasma DNA of 40/73 (55%) of CRC patients compared with 3/73 (4%) from subjects with adenomas and 5/74 (7%) from subjects without neoplasia. Both the frequency of detection and the amount of methylated CAHM DNA released into plasma increased with increasing cancer stage. Methylated CAHM DNA shows promise as a plasma biomarker for use in screening for CRC. PMID:24799664

  9. The PapilloCheck Assay for Detection of High-Grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, Emma J; Bailey, Andrew; Sargent, Alex; Gilham, Clare; Peto, Julian; Kitchener, Henry C

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is used in primary cervical screening, as an adjunct to cervical cytology for the management of low grade abnormal cytology, and in a test of cure. PapilloCheck (Greiner Bio-One) is a PCR-based DNA microarray system that can individually identify 24 HPV types, including the 13 high-risk (HR) types identified by Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2). Here, we compare PapilloCheck with HC2 for the detection of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+) in a total of 8,610 cervical cytology samples from the ARTISTIC population-based cervical screening study. We performed a retrospective analysis of 3,518 cytology samples from round 1 ARTISTIC enriched for underlying CIN2+ (n = 723) and a prospective analysis of 5,092 samples from round 3 ARTISTIC. Discrepant results were tested using the Roche reverse line blot (RLB) or Linear Array (LA) assay. The relative sensitivity and specificity of HR PapilloCheck compared with that of HC2 for the detection of CIN2+ in women aged over 30 years were 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91, 0.97) and 1.05 (95% CI, 1.04, 1.05), respectively. HC2 missed 44/672 (7%) CIN2+ lesions, while HR PapilloCheck missed 74/672 (11%) CIN2+ lesions. Thirty-six percent of HC2-positive normal cytology samples were HR HPV negative by both PapilloCheck and RLB/LA, indicating that the use of HR PapilloCheck rather than HC2 in population-based primary screening would reduce the number of additional tests required (e.g., reflex cytology) in women where underlying CIN2+ is extremely unlikely. HR PapilloCheck could be a suitable HPV detection assay for use in the cervical screening setting. PMID:26338859

  10. Endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia terminology in practice: 4-year experience at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Kane, Sarah E; Hecht, Jonathan L

    2012-03-01

    An alternative WHO classification system for endometrial precancers and hyperplasia separates a lesion called endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (EIN) from diffuse hormonal effects and cancer, resulting in a 3-category system. EIN is a localized lesion with objective histologic criteria, characterized by monoclonal growth of mutated cells, and associated with a 45-fold elevated cancer risk. This study summarizes our department's experience with EIN diagnoses in the 4 years since conversion to the new terminology. We identified all reports from endometrial samples diagnosed as EIN or including the terms "gland crowding" or "atypia" since conversion and obtained follow-up information from subsequent pathology specimens or clinic notes (82%). The diagnoses were reported by a mixture of pathologists, the majority of whom are not subspecialized to gynecologic pathology and the slides were not reviewed. Overall, 17.1% of women with EIN had carcinoma and 34.9% had either carcinoma or persistent EIN. The proportion of women with EIN or cancer on follow-up did not trend with years since adoption of EIN terminology. The median age at the time of diagnosis was 55 years in an overall population of women who underwent sampling at a median age of 47 years. The median follow-up time was 4 months. All cancers were of endometrioid histology; all but 2 were International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade 1. In comparison with a previous reproducibility study among expert pathologists on a comparable population from our department, these results for general pathologists show a higher false positive rate for subsequent cancer. PMID:22317874

  11. Accuracy of Colposcopically Guided Diagnostic Methods for the Detection of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Müller, K.; Soergel, P.; Hillemanns, P.; Jentschke, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Many factors can affect the accuracy of colposcopically guided biopsy, endocervical curettage (ECC) and differential cytology, all of which are standard, minimally invasive procedures used to detect cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Method: All conizations carried out between 2007 and 2013 in the gynecological department of Hannover Medical School were retrospectively reviewed. The agreement between colposcopic diagnosis and histology was evaluated retrospectively. The analysis included 593 complete datasets out of a total of 717 cases treated. Results: The overall agreement was 85.5 %; the accuracy was significantly higher (p = 0.029) when three biopsy specimens were taken rather than just one. The agreement between diagnosis and histological findings from conization was highest for women < 30 years (90.7 %) and lowest for women > 50 years (72.1 %; p = 0.008). The agreement between preoperative differential cytology and histology results after conization was 86.7 % and improved as patient age increased (p = 0.035). The agreement between ECC findings and the results of conization was only 49.1 % irrespective of patient age, transformation zone or the patientʼs menopausal status. Conclusion: The accuracy of colposcopically guided biopsy appears to increase when three biopsy specimens are taken and is particularly high for younger patients. Differential cytology was also found to be highly accurate and is particularly useful for patients aged more than 50 years. The accuracy of ECC was significantly lower; however ECC can provide important additional information in selected cases. PMID:26941452

  12. Analysis of a new histological and molecular-based classification of canine mammary neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Im, K S; Kim, N H; Lim, H Y; Kim, H W; Shin, J I; Sur, J H

    2014-05-01

    Canine mammary tumors (CMTs) are morphologically and biologically heterogeneous, prompting several attempts to classify such tumors on the basis of their histopathological characteristics. Recently, molecular-based analysis methods borrowed from human breast cancer research have also been applied to the classification of CMTs. In this study, canine mammary neoplasms (n = 648) occurring in Korea from 2008 to 2011 were analyzed according to the histological classification and grading system proposed by Goldschmidt et al. Furthermore, randomly selected mammary carcinomas (n = 159) were classified according to the molecular subtype using immunohistochemical characteristics. Canine mammary neoplasia accounted for 52.6% (648/1250) of the tumors in female dogs, and 51.7% (340/648) of these were malignant. All of the carcinoma-anaplastic subtypes were grade III tumors (5/5, 100%), while most of the carcinoma-tubular subtypes (15/18, 83.3%) and carcinoma arising in a complex adenoma/mixed-tumor subtype (115/135, 85.2%) were grade I tumors. Tumor cell invasion into lymphatic vessels was most common in the comedocarcinoma, carcinoma-anaplastic, and inflammatory carcinoma subtypes. The most frequently occurring molecular subtype (70/159, 44%) was luminal A. However, the basal-like subtype was the most malignant and was frequently associated with grade III tumors and lymphatic invasion. The carcinoma-solid subtypes were also often of the basal-like subtype. Reclassification of CMTs using the newly proposed histopathological classification system and molecular subtyping could aid in determining the prognosis and the most suitable anticancer treatment for each case. PMID:24003019

  13. Head and Neck Paragangliomas in Von Hippel-Lindau Disease and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Boedeker, Carsten C.; Erlic, Zoran; Richard, Stéphane; Kontny, Udo; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Cascon, Alberto; Robledo, Mercedes; de Campos, José M.; van Nederveen, Francien H.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Burnichon, Nelly; Gaal, José; Walter, Martin A.; Reschke, Kirsten; Wiech, Thorsten; Weber, Johannes; Rückauer, Klaus; Plouin, Pierre Francois; Darrouzet, Vincent; Giraud, Sophie; Eng, Charis; Neumann, Hartmut P. H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Head and neck paragangliomas (HNPs) occur as sporadic or familial entities, the latter mostly in association with germline mutations of the SDHB, SDHC, or SDHD (SDHx) genes. Heritable non-SDHx HNP might occur in von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL, VHL gene), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2, RET gene), and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, NF1 gene). Reports of non-SDHx HNP presentations are scarce and guidance for genetic testing nonexistent. Patients and Methods: An international consortium registered patients with HNPs and performed mutation analyses of the SDHx, VHL, and RET genes. Those with SDHx germline mutations were excluded for purposes of this study. Personal and family histories were evaluated for paraganglial tumors, for the major tumor manifestations, and for family history of VHL, MEN2, or NF1. Results: Twelve patients were found to have hereditary non-SDHx HNPs of a total of 809 HNP and 2084 VHL registrants, 11 in the setting of germline VHL mutations and one of a RET mutation. The prevalence of hereditary HNP is five in 1000 VHL patients and nine in 1000 non-SDHx HNP patients. Comprehensive literature review revealed previous reports of HNPs in five VHL, two MEN2, and one NF1 patient. Overall, 11 here presented HNP cases, and four previously reported VHL-HNPs had lesions characteristic for VHL and/or a positive family history for VHL. Conclusions: Our observations provide evidence that molecular genetic testing for VHL or RET germline mutations in patients with HNP should be done only if personal and/or family history shows evidence for one of these syndromes. PMID:19336503

  14. Relationship between HPV typing and the status of G2 cell cycle regulators in cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Yasunori; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Sadako; Inoue, Takeshi; Kawamura, Naoki; Yamamoto, Kumio

    2004-09-01

    We examined human papillomavirus (HPV) typing and the status of ATM, chk2, CDC25C, cdc2 and cyclinB1 in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and invasive cancer (IC). A total of 93 samples [normal: 10; CIN: 34 (CINI:9, CINII:12, CINIII:13); IC: 49 (stage I:10, stage II:21, stage III:15, stage IV:3)] were included in this study. HPV status was evaluated by the PCR non-radioactive HPV detection system. We analyzed ATM, chk2, CDC25C, cdc2 and cyclinB1 protein expression by immunohistochemistry. HPV DNA was detected in 73.5% of 34 CINs and 89.8% of 49 ICs. Detection of HPV subtypes 16 and 18 was more frequent in ICs (46.9%) than in CINs (23.5%) (p=0.0387). Abnormal expression of ATM, chk2, CDC25C, cdc2 and cyclinB1 were 2.9%, 32.4%, 2.9% 20.6% and 0% in CINs and 8.2%, 30.6%, 10.2%, 46.9% and 12.2% in ICs. The alteration of cdc2 was higher in ICs than in CINs (p=0.0198). Altered expression of cdc2 was higher in HPV16 and 18 cases (69.6%) than in other cases (26.9%) (p=0.0042). However, the relationship between HPV typing and ATM, chk2, CDC25C and cyclinB1 expression was not significant. Cdc2 is implicated in cervical carcinogenesis and may be related to p53 inactivation by HPV. PMID:15289842

  15. Pheochromocytoma in rats with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MENX) shares gene expression patterns with human pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Molatore, Sara; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Irmler, Martin; Perren, Aurel; Mannelli, Massimo; Ercolino, Tonino; Beuschlein, Felix; Jarzab, Barbara; Wloch, Jan; Ziaja, Jacek; Zoubaa, Saida; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Höfler, Heinz; Atkinson, Michael J.; Pellegata, Natalia S.

    2010-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas are rare neoplasias of neural crest origin arising from chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla and sympathetic ganglia (extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma). Pheochromocytoma that develop in rats homozygous for a loss-of-function mutation in p27Kip1 (MENX syndrome) show a clear progression from hyperplasia to tumor, offering the possibility to gain insight into tumor pathobiology. We compared the gene-expression signatures of both adrenomedullary hyperplasia and pheochromocytoma with normal rat adrenal medulla. Hyperplasia and tumor show very similar transcriptome profiles, indicating early determination of the tumorigenic signature. Overrepresentation of developmentally regulated neural genes was a feature of the rat lesions. Quantitative RT-PCR validated the up-regulation of 11 genes, including some involved in neural development: Cdkn2a, Cdkn2c, Neurod1, Gal, Bmp7, and Phox2a. Overexpression of these genes precedes histological changes in affected adrenal glands. Their presence at early stages of tumorigenesis indicates they are not acquired during progression and may be a result of the lack of functional p27Kip1. Adrenal and extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma development clearly follows diverged molecular pathways in MENX rats. To correlate these findings to human pheochromocytoma, we studied nine genes overexpressed in the rat lesions in 46 sporadic and familial human pheochromocytomas. The expression of GAL, DGKH, BMP7, PHOX2A, L1CAM, TCTE1, EBF3, SOX4, and HASH1 was up-regulated, although with different frequencies. Immunohistochemical staining detected high L1CAM expression selectively in 27 human pheochromocytomas but not in 140 nonchromaffin neuroendocrine tumors. These studies reveal clues to the molecular pathways involved in rat and human pheochromocytoma and identify previously unexplored biomarkers for clinical use. PMID:20937862

  16. Eliminating a need for esophagectomy: endoscopic treatment of Barrett esophagus with early esophageal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Lada, Michal J; Watson, Thomas J; Shakoor, Aqsa; Nieman, Dylan R; Han, Michelle; Tschoner, Andreas; Peyre, Christian G; Jones, Carolyn E; Peters, Jeffrey H

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years, endoscopic ablation and resection have become a new standard of care in the management of Barrett esophagus (BE) with high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or intramucosal adenocarcinoma (IMC). Risk factors for failure of endoscopic therapy and the need for subsequent esophagectomy have not been well elucidated. The aims of this study were to determine the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with or without endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) in the management of BE with HGD or IMC, to discern factors predictive of endoscopic treatment failure, and to assess the effect of endoscopic therapies on esophagectomy volume at our institution. Data were obtained retrospectively for all patients who underwent endoscopic therapies or esophagectomy for a diagnosis of BE with HGD or IMC in our department between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2012. Complete remission (CR) of BE or HGD or IMC was defined as 2 consecutive biopsy sessions without BE or HGD or IMC and no subsequent recurrence. Recurrence was defined by the return of BE or HGD or IMC after initial remission. Progression was defined as worsening of HGD to IMC or worsening of IMC to submucosal neoplasia or beyond. Overall, 57 patients underwent RFA with or without EMR for BE with HGD (n = 45) or IMC (n = 12) between 2007 and 2012, with a median follow-up duration of 35.4 months (range: 18.5-52.0 months). The 57 patients underwent 181 ablation sessions and more than half (61%) of patients underwent EMR as a component of treatment. There were no major procedural complications or deaths, with only 2 minor complications including 1 symptomatic stricture requiring dilation. Multifocal HGD or IMC was present in 43% (25/57) of patients. CR of IMC was achieved in 100% (12/12) at a median of 6.1 months, CR of dysplasia was achieved in 79% (45/57) at a median of 11.5 months, and CR of BE was achieved in 49% (28/57) at a median of 18.4 months. Following initial remission, 28% of patients (16/57) had recurrence of dysplasia (n = 12) or BE (n = 4). Progression to IMC occurred in 7% (4/57). All patients without CR continue endoscopic treatment. No patient required esophagectomy or developed metastatic disease. Overall, 6 patients died during the follow-up interval, none from esophageal cancer. Factors associated with failure to achieve CR of BE included increasing length of BE (6.0 ± 0.6 vs 4.0 ± 0.6cm, P = 0.03) and shorter duration of follow-up (28.5 ± 3.8 months vs 49.0 ± 5.8 months, P = 0.004). Shorter surveillance duration (17.8 ± 7.6 months vs 63.9 ± 14.4 months, P = 0.009) and shorter follow-up (21.1 ± 6.1 months vs 43.2 ± 4.1 months) were the only significant factors associated with failure to eradicate dysplasia. Our use of esophagectomy as primary therapy for BE with HGD or IMC has diminished since we began using endoscopic therapies in 2007. From a maximum of 16 esophagectomies per year for early Barrett neoplasia in 2006, we performed only 3 esophageal resections for such early disease in 2012, all for IMC, and we have not performed an esophagectomy for HGD since 2008. Although recurrence of BE or dysplasia/IMC was not uncommon, RFA with or without EMR ultimately resulted in CR of IMC in all patients, CR of HGD in the majority (79%), and CR of BE in nearly half (49%). No patient treated endoscopically for HGD or IMC subsequently required esophagectomy. In patients with BE with HGD or IMC, RFA and EMR are safe and highly effective. The use of endoscopic therapies appears justified as the new standard of care in most cases of BE with early esophageal neoplasia. PMID:25837538

  17. Assessment of the "fish tumors or other deformities" beneficial use impairment in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus): II. Liver neoplasia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blazer, V.S.; Rafferty, S.D.; Baumman, P.C.; Smith, S.B.; Obert, E.C.

    2009-01-01

    Liver pathology of fishes, including neoplastic and preneoplastic lesions, is widely used as an indicator of exposure to anthropogenic contaminants. By definition, the "fish tumor or other deformities" beneficial use impairment (BUI) at Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOC) includes neoplastic and preneoplastic liver lesions in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) or suckers. Unfortunately, adequate guidelines for defining neoplastic and preneoplastic liver lesions or determining rates at unimpacted control sites were not provided and different criteria have been used. In some cases, only neoplastic changes were used to calculate tumor prevalence, in some both neoplastic and preneoplastic changes and in some it is difficult to determine which changes were included. Using standardized criteria, the prevalence of liver neoplasia was compared at eight AOC during 1998-2000. The Cuyahoga River had the highest prevalence (25.0%), while the Maumee River had the lowest (3.9%). The Buffalo (4.8%), Detroit (5.9%), Ashtabula (6.8%), Niagara (7.5%) and Black (8.9%) rivers were intermediate, as was Presque Isle Bay (7.1%). From 2002 to 2007 the prevalence of liver neoplasia at Presque Isle Bay ranged from a low of 2.1% (2002) to a high of 12.0% (2007). Non-AOC sites, as potential reference sites, also were monitored during this time. By combining years and sites, the prevalence of liver neoplasia in bullhead (aged 2 to 12 years) at inland lakes was 0.7%, at bays/harbors was 1.6% and at tributary sites was 4.1%. This is the same trend (inland lakes < bays/harbors < tributaries < Presque Isle Bay) noted for orocutaneous neoplasms.

  18. Diet and serum micronutrients in relation to cervical neoplasia and cancer among low-income Brazilian women.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Luciana Yuki; Longatto Filho, Adhemar; Costa, Maria Cecília; Andreoli, Maria Antonieta Avilla; Villa, Luisa Lina; Franco, Eduardo Luiz; Cardoso, Marly Augusto

    2010-02-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cancer among women in developing countries. Infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types has been recognized as a necessary cause of this disease. Serum carotenoids and tocopherols have also been associated with risk for cervical neoplasia, but results from previous studies were not consistent. We evaluated the association of serum total carotene and tocopherols, and dietary intakes with the risk of newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grades 1, 2, 3 and invasive cancer in a hospital-based case-control study in São Paulo, Brazil. The investigation included 453 controls and 4 groups of cases (CIN1, n = 140; CIN2, n = 126; CIN3, n = 231; invasive cancer, n =108) recruited from two major public clinics between 2003 and 2005. Increasing concentrations of serum lycopene were negatively associated with CIN1, CIN3 and cancer, with odds ratios (OR) (95% CI) for the highest compared to the lowest tertile of 0.53 (0.27-1.00, p for trend = 0.05), 0.48 (0.22-1.04, p for trend = 0.05) and 0.18 (0.06-0.52, p for trend = 0.002), respectively, after adjusting for confounding variables and HPV status. Increasing concentrations of serum alpha- and gamma-tocopherols, and higher dietary intakes of dark green and deep yellow vegetables/fruit were associated with nearly 50% decreased risk of CIN3. These results support the evidence that a healthy and balanced diet leading to provide high serum levels of antioxidants may reduce cervical neoplasia risk in low-income women. PMID:19642096

  19. Combined use of vitamin D3and metformin exhibits synergistic chemopreventive effects on colorectal neoplasia in rats and mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wan; Wang, Qi-Long; Liu, Xia; Dong, Shu-Hong; Li, Hong-Xia; Li, Chun-Yang; Guo, Li-Shu; Gao, Jing-Miao; Berger, Nathan A.; Li, Li; Ma, Lan; Wu, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D3 and metformin are widely used in humans for regulating mineral metabolism and as an anti-diabetic drug respectively; and both of them have been shown to have chemopreventive effects against various tumors. This study was designed to investigate the potential synergistic chemopreventive effects of vitamin D3 and metformin against the development of early colon neoplasia in two models. The first model was a 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) induced colon cancer rat model and the second, a DMH-dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced colitis-associated colon neoplasia mouse model. Compared to either vitamin D3 or metformin alone, combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin showed more pronounced effect in reducing the numbers of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and tumor in the colon. The most prominent inhibitory effects were observed in the vitamin D3 medium dose (100 IU/kg/day) and metformin medium dose (120 mg/kg/day) combination group. Furthermore, our results showed that enhancement of metformin’s chemopreventive effects by vitamin D3 was associated with down-regulation of S6P expression, via the AMPK (IGF-1)/mTOR pathway. In addition, and enhancement of vitamin D3’s chemopreventive effects by metformin was associated with inhibition of the protein expressions of c-Myc and Cyclin D1, via the vitamin D receptor/β-catenin pathway. These findings show that combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin exhibits synergistic effects against the development of early colon neoplasia. They suggest that the combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin may represent a novel strategy for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer. PMID:25416412

  20. Dietary Supplementation with Fresh Pineapple Juice Decreases Inflammation and Colonic Neoplasia in IL-10-deficient Mice with Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Laura P.; Chichlowski, Maciej; Trinh, Chau T.; Greer, Paula K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Bromelain, a mixture of proteolytic enzymes typically derived from pineapple stem, decreases production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and leukocyte homing to sites of inflammation. We previously showed that short-term oral treatment with bromelain purified from pineapple stem decreased the severity of colonic inflammation in C57BL/6 Il10−/− mice with chronic colitis. Since fresh pineapple fruit contains similar bromelain enzymes but at different proportions, this study aimed to determine whether long-term dietary supplementation with pineapple (supplied as juice) could decrease colon inflammation and neoplasia in Il10−/− mice with chronic colitis as compared with bromelain derived from stem. Results Experimental mice readily consumed fresh pineapple juice at a level that generated mean stool proteolytic activities equivalent to 16 mg bromelain purified from stem, while control mice received boiled juice with inactive enzymes. Survival was increased in the group supplemented with fresh rather than boiled juice (p = 0.01). Mice that received fresh juice also had decreased histologic colon inflammation scores and a lower incidence of inflammation-associated colonic neoplasia (35% vs. 66%; p< 0.02), with fewer neoplastic lesions/colon (p = 0.05). Flow cytometric analysis of murine splenocytes exposed to fresh pineapple juice in vitro demonstrated proteolytic removal of cell surface molecules that can affect leukocyte trafficking and activation. Conclusions These results demonstrate that long-term dietary supplementation with fresh or unpasteurized frozen pineapple juice with proteolytically active bromelain enzymes is safe and decreases inflammation severity and the incidence and multiplicity of inflammation-associated colonic neoplasia in this commonly used murine model of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:20848493

  1. Acute coronary syndrome: a rare case of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maloberti, Alessadro; Meani, Paolo; Pirola, Roberto; Varrenti, Marisa; Boniardi, Marco; De Biase, Anna Maria; Vallerio, Paola; Bonacina, Edgardo; Mancia, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Giannattasio, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor arising from neuroectodermal chromaffin tissues in the adrenal gland or extra-adrenal paraganglia (paragangliomas). The prevalence of the tumor is 0.1%-0.6% in the hypertensive population, of which 10%-20% are malignant. Pheochromocytoma produces, stores, and secretes catecholamines, as well as leads to hypertensive crisis, arrhythmia, angina, and acute myocardial infarction without coronary artery diseases. We report a case of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a final diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). PMID:26487970

  2. Acute coronary syndrome: a rare case of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maloberti, Alessadro; Meani, Paolo; Pirola, Roberto; Varrenti, Marisa; Boniardi, Marco; De Biase, Anna Maria; Vallerio, Paola; Bonacina, Edgardo; Mancia, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Giannattasio, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor arising from neuroectodermal chromaffin tissues in the adrenal gland or extra-adrenal paraganglia (paragangliomas). The prevalence of the tumor is 0.1%-0.6% in the hypertensive population, of which 10%-20% are malignant. Pheochromocytoma produces, stores, and secretes catecholamines, as well as leads to hypertensive crisis, arrhythmia, angina, and acute myocardial infarction without coronary artery diseases. We report a case of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a final diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). PMID:26487970

  3. Fertility and early pregnancy outcomes after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Anita; Arbyn, Marc; Stasinou, Sofia Melina; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre; Bennett, Phillip; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of cervical excision for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia on fertility and early pregnancy outcomes. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies. Data sources Medline and Embase. Eligibility criteria Studies assessing fertility and early pregnancy outcomes in women with a history of treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia versus untreated women. We classified the included studies according to treatment type and fertility or early pregnancy endpoint. Analysis Pooled relative risks and 95% confidence intervals using a random effect model, and interstudy heterogeneity with I2 statistics. Results 15 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included. The meta-analysis did not provide any evidence that treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia adversely affected the chances of conception. The overall pregnancy rate was higher for treated women than for untreated women (four studies; 43% v 38%, pooled relative risk 1.29, 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.64), although the heterogeneity between studies was high (P<0.0001). Pregnancy rates did not differ between women with an intention to conceive (two studies; 88% v 95%, 0.93, 0.80 to 1.08) and the number requiring more than 12 months to conceive (three studies, 15% v 9%, 1.45, 0.89 to 2.37). Although the rates for total miscarriages (10 studies; 4.6% v 2.8%, 1.04, 0.90 to 1.21) and miscarriage in the first trimester (four studies; 9.8% v 8.4%, 1.16, 0.80 to 1.69) was similar for treated and untreated women, cervical treatment was associated with a significantly increased risk of miscarriage in the second trimester. The rate was higher for treated women than for untreated women (eight studies; 1.6% v 0.4%, 16 558 women; 2.60, 1.45 to 4.67). The number of ectopic pregnancies (1.6% v 0.8%; 1.89, 1.50 to 2.39) and terminations (12.2% v 7.4%; 1.71, 1.31 to 2.22) was also higher for treated women. Conclusion There is no evidence suggesting that treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia adversely affects fertility, although treatment was associated with a significantly increased risk of miscarriages in the second trimester. Research should explore mechanisms that may explain this increase in risk and stratify the impact that treatment may have on fertility and early pregnancy outcomes by the size of excision and treatment method used. PMID:25352501

  4. Use of Vandetanib in Metastatic Medullary Carcinoma of Thyroid in a Pediatric Patient With Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia 2B.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Vidya K; Ronghe, Milind; MacGregor, Fiona B; Bradshaw, Nicola; Davidson, Rosemarie; Welbury, Richard; Reed, Nicholas; Shaikh, Mohamad G

    2016-03-01

    We describe a child with advanced, metastatic, inoperable medullary carcinoma of thyroid associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia 2B and rearranged during transfection mutation with a positive response to vandetanib treatment. He responded well with a fall in calcitonin levels and a reduction in size of the thyroid malignancy, lymph nodes, and pulmonary metastases. He has been on vandetanib for 4 years with good clinical and biochemical response. Vandetanib has a role in the treatment of patients including children with inoperable locally advanced and metastatic medullary carcinoma of thyroid. More information is needed on its use in children and long-term outcome. PMID:26479990

  5. Corneal xanthogranuloma in association with multiple endocrine neoplasia 1: A clinicopathologic case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Alkatan, Hind M; Al-Rajhi, Ali A

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a benign inflammatory condition of uncertain pathogenesis. It is characterized by skin and ocular involvement - typically in the iris - in children. It has been reported in older age groups and has been also observed to involve other ocular structures such as the cornea and conjunctiva. In this case report, we are presenting an extensive right eye corneal lesion in a 43-year old male which showed the typical histopathological feature of JXG and in association with multiple endocrine neoplasia (type 1). Similar cases in the English-language literature have been also reviewed. PMID:26949359

  6. Pituitary Prolactinoma Imaged by 99mTc-Sestamibi SPECT/CT in a Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Patient.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu; Lv, Jing; Guo, Rui; Pan, Mengyi; Zhang, Yifan

    2016-06-01

    A 35-year-old woman who had undergone bilateral inferior parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism was referred to our hospital to evaluate the cause of irregular menses, galactorrhea, and paroxysmal headache. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 was then suspected for the high levels of plasma prolactin, parathyroid hormone, serum calcium, insulin, and related symptoms. A Tc-sestamibi SPECT/CT acquired to evaluate parathyroid glands unexpectedly revealed an increased accumulation in the pituitary gland, which was further confirmed by enhanced magnetic resonance imaging as a pituitary microadenoma. Bromocriptine treatment gradually reduced the prolactin level. PMID:26828146

  7. Corneal xanthogranuloma in association with multiple endocrine neoplasia 1: A clinicopathologic case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alkatan, Hind M.; Al-Rajhi, Ali A.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a benign inflammatory condition of uncertain pathogenesis. It is characterized by skin and ocular involvement – typically in the iris – in children. It has been reported in older age groups and has been also observed to involve other ocular structures such as the cornea and conjunctiva. In this case report, we are presenting an extensive right eye corneal lesion in a 43-year old male which showed the typical histopathological feature of JXG and in association with multiple endocrine neoplasia (type 1). Similar cases in the English-language literature have been also reviewed. PMID:26949359

  8. Synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential: A clinico-pathologic and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Raspollini, Maria Rosaria; Castiglione, Francesca; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    We report a rare case of synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential in the same kidney. The tumors were seen incidentally in a 45-year-old man. Pathologic study revealed that the former tumor was nucleolar grade 2, and the multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential was nucleolar grade 1. At immunohistochemistry, the clear cells in both tumors were positive for CD10 and CA IX. Interestingly, these uncommon synchronous tumors showed a different KRAS/NRAS mutation analysis that was characterized by KRAS mutation at codon p.G12C in the clear cell renal cell carcinoma, while this mutation was not present in the case of multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential. NRAS mutation was not seen in any of the tumors. PMID:26874573

  9. Distribution of haemic neoplasia of soft-shelled clams in Prince Edward Island: an examination of anthropogenic factors and effects of experimental fungicide exposure.

    PubMed

    Mateo, D R; MacCallum, G S; McGladdery, S E; Davidson, J

    2016-05-01

    Haemic neoplasia was first considered a disease of concern for soft-shell clams in Prince Edward Island (PEI) when it was diagnosed as the cause of mass mortalities in 1999. The aetiology of the disease remains elusive, but has been associated with environmental degradation. In this study, a 2-year (2001-2002) geographic and seasonal survey was conducted for haemic neoplasia, using histology, in soft-shell clams from PEI. In addition, using geographic information system, the association between anthropogenic factors in the watersheds at sites affected by haemic neoplasia and the prevalence of the disease was investigated. Finally, histopathological changes were assessed in soft-shell clams experimentally exposed to four concentrations of chlorothalonil for 27 days. Haemic neoplasia could not be induced at any concentration of chlorothalonil. Clams exposed to a concentration of 1000 μg L(-1) of the fungicide, however, exhibited an LC50 of 17 days. Although this information provides additional toxicity information (LC50) for soft-shell clams, further experiments are required to assess longer term exposure to the fungicide. The highest prevalences of haemic neoplasia in PEI were found in North River and Miscouche (28.3-50.9% and 33.0-77.8%, respectively). No clear seasonal patterns were found. There was a correlation between haemic neoplasia prevalence and watersheds with a high percentage of potato acreage and forest coverage (P = 0.026 and P = 0.045, respectively), suggesting a link between anthropogenic activity and the prevalence of the disease. PMID:26123078

  10. Depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy for noninvasive diagnosis of oral neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard Alan

    Oral cancer is the 11th most common cancer in the world. Cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx account for more than 7,500 deaths each year in the United States alone. Major advances have been made in the management of oral cancer through the combined use of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, improving the quality of life for many patients; however, these advances have not led to a significant increase in survival rates, primarily because diagnosis often occurs at a late stage when treatment is more difficult and less successful. Accurate, objective, noninvasive methods for early diagnosis of oral neoplasia are needed. Here a method is presented to noninvasively evaluate oral lesions using depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy (DSOS). A ball lens coupled fiber-optic probe was developed to enable preferential targeting of different depth regions in the oral mucosa. Clinical studies of the diagnostic performance of DSOS in 157 subjects were carried out in collaboration with the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. An overall sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 89% were obtained for nonkeratinized oral tissue relative to histopathology. Based on these results a compact, portable version of the clinical DSOS device with real-time automated diagnostic capability was developed. The portable device was tested in 47 subjects and a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 83% were obtained for nonkeratinized oral tissue. The diagnostic potential of multimodal platforms incorporating DSOS was explored through two pilot studies. A pilot study of DSOS in combination with widefield imaging was carried out in 29 oral cancer patients, resulting in a combined sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 69%. Widefield imaging and spectroscopy performed slightly better in combination than each method performed independently. A pilot study of DSOS in combination with the optical contrast agents 2-NBDG, EGF-Alexa 647, and proflavine was carried out in resected tissue specimens from 15 oral cancer patients. Improved contrast between neoplastic and healthy tissue was observed using 2-NBDG and EGF-Alexa 647.

  11. Feature-based analysis of mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in histological tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Valkonen, Mira; Nykter, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio; Latonen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes work presented at the Nordic Symposium on Digital Pathology 2015, in Linköping, Sweden. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) represents premalignant tissue involving epithelial growth confined in the lumen of prostatic acini. In the attempts to understand oncogenesis in the human prostate, early neoplastic changes can be modeled in the mouse with genetic manipulation of certain tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. As with many early pathological changes, the PIN lesions in the mouse prostate are macroscopically small, but microscopically spanning areas often larger than single high magnification focus fields in microscopy. This poses a challenge to utilize full potential of the data acquired in histological specimens. We use whole prostates fixed in molecular fixative PAXgene™, embedded in paraffin, sectioned through and stained with H&E. To visualize and analyze the microscopic information spanning whole mouse PIN (mPIN) lesions, we utilize automated whole slide scanning and stacked sections through the tissue. The region of interests is masked, and the masked areas are processed using a cascade of automated image analysis steps. The images are normalized in color space, after which exclusion of secretion areas and feature extraction is performed. Machine learning is utilized to build a model of early PIN lesions for determining the probability for histological changes based on the calculated features. We performed a feature-based analysis to mPIN lesions. First, a quantitative representation of over 100 features was built, including several features representing pathological changes in PIN, especially describing the spatial growth pattern of lesions in the prostate tissue. Furthermore, we built a classification model, which is able to align PIN lesions corresponding to grading by visual inspection to more advanced and mild lesions. The classifier allowed both determining the probability of early histological changes for uncategorized tissue samples and interpretation of the model parameters. Here, we develop quantitative image analysis pipeline to describe morphological changes in histological images. Even subtle changes in mPIN lesion characteristics can be described with feature analysis and machine learning. Constructing and using multidimensional feature data to represent histological changes enables richer analysis and interpretation of early pathological lesions. PMID:26955503

  12. Comparison of /sup 125/I-fibrinogen kinetics and fibrinopeptide A in patients with disseminated neoplasias

    SciTech Connect

    Mombelli, G.; Roux, A.; Haeberli, A.; Straub, P.W.

    1982-08-01

    To provide more information on the pathways of fibrinogen catabolism in generalized cancer, the effect of heparin on fibrinopeptide A (fpA) and on /sup 125/I-fibrinogen kinetics was studied in 15 patients with disseminated neoplasia. Three patients had evidence of venous thrombosis and in 2 additional patients a low fibrinogen level together with increased amounts of FDP/fdp and a positive ethanol test indicated disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The plasma levels of fpA were grossly elevated (4.6--20, mean 11.4 ng/ml, normal values 1.01 +/- 0.45 ng/ml) in patients with thrombosis or DIC, and normal to grossly elevated (0.4--10.4, mean 6.1 ng/ml) in the other patients. Intravenous heparin bolus lowered the fpA level in 11/11 patients, and continuous heparin treatment led to an impressive suppression or complete normalization of the plasma fpA in 5/6 patients. This finding is thought to reflect heparin suppression of thrombin activity on fibrinogen. In some cases, the fpA fall after heparin bolus was slow and/or incomplete, suggesting fpA generation at sites not easily accessible to heparin or insufficient heparin dosage. The /sup 125/I-fibrinogen kinetics were characterized by a significantly shorter half-life (t1/2: 2.5 days), increased catabolic rate constant (j: 0.44 days-1), and increased absolute turnover (68.9 mg fibrinogen/kg/day) as compared to 4 normal subjects (t1/2: 4.2 days; j: 0.26 days-1; turnover 21.7 mg fibrinogen/kg/day). As estimated from the fpA generation rates, intravascular thrombin action on fibrinogen contributed only in minor part to increase the turnover of /sup 125/I-fibrinogen. In particular, the turnover was greatly accelerated in heparin-treated patients despite impressive suppression or normalization of the fpA levels in 5/6 cases.

  13. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and type 4 (MEN4)

    PubMed Central

    Thakker, Rajesh V.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) is characterized by the occurrence of tumors involving two or more endocrine glands within a single patient. Four major forms of MEN, which are autosomal dominant disorders, are recognized and referred to as: MEN type 1 (MEN1), due to menin mutations; MEN2 (previously MEN2A) due to mutations of a tyrosine kinase receptor encoded by the rearranged during transfection (RET) protoncogene; MEN3 (previously MEN2B) due to RET mutations; and MEN4 due to cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDNK1B) mutations. Each MEN type is associated with the occurrence of specific tumors. Thus, MEN1 is characterized by the occurrence of parathyroid, pancreatic islet and anterior pituitary tumors; MEN2 is characterized by the occurrence of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in association with phaeochromocytoma and parathyroid tumors; MEN3 is characterized by the occurrence of MTC and phaeochromocytoma in association with a marfanoid habitus, mucosal neuromas, medullated corneal fibers and intestinal autonomic ganglion dysfunction, leading to megacolon; and MEN4, which is also referred to as MENX, is characterized by the occurrence of parathyroid and anterior pituitary tumors in possible association with tumors of the adrenals, kidneys, and reproductive organs. This review will focus on the clinical and molecular details of the MEN1 and MEN4 syndromes. The gene causing MEN1 is located on chromosome 11q13, and encodes a 610 amino-acid protein, menin, which has functions in cell division, genome stability, and transcription regulation. Menin, which acts as scaffold protein, may increase or decrease gene expression by epigenetic regulation of gene expression via histone methylation. Thus, menin by forming a subunit of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) complexes that trimethylate histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4), facilitates activation of transcriptional activity in target genes such as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors; and by interacting with the suppressor of variegation 3–9 homolog family protein (SUV39H1) to mediate H3K methylation, thereby silencing transcriptional activity of target genes. MEN1-associated tumors harbor germline and somatic mutations, consistent with Knudson’s two-hit hypothesis. Genetic diagnosis to identify individuals with germline MEN1 mutations has facilitated appropriate targeting of clinical, biochemical and radiological screening for this high risk group of patients for whom earlier implementation of treatments can then be considered. MEN4 is caused by heterozygous mutations of CDNK1B which encodes the 196 amino-acid CDK1 p27Kip1, which is activated by H3K4 methylation. PMID:23933118

  14. Feature-based analysis of mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in histological tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Valkonen, Mira; Nykter, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio; Latonen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes work presented at the Nordic Symposium on Digital Pathology 2015, in Linköping, Sweden. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) represents premalignant tissue involving epithelial growth confined in the lumen of prostatic acini. In the attempts to understand oncogenesis in the human prostate, early neoplastic changes can be modeled in the mouse with genetic manipulation of certain tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. As with many early pathological changes, the PIN lesions in the mouse prostate are macroscopically small, but microscopically spanning areas often larger than single high magnification focus fields in microscopy. This poses a challenge to utilize full potential of the data acquired in histological specimens. We use whole prostates fixed in molecular fixative PAXgene™, embedded in paraffin, sectioned through and stained with H&E. To visualize and analyze the microscopic information spanning whole mouse PIN (mPIN) lesions, we utilize automated whole slide scanning and stacked sections through the tissue. The region of interests is masked, and the masked areas are processed using a cascade of automated image analysis steps. The images are normalized in color space, after which exclusion of secretion areas and feature extraction is performed. Machine learning is utilized to build a model of early PIN lesions for determining the probability for histological changes based on the calculated features. We performed a feature-based analysis to mPIN lesions. First, a quantitative representation of over 100 features was built, including several features representing pathological changes in PIN, especially describing the spatial growth pattern of lesions in the prostate tissue. Furthermore, we built a classification model, which is able to align PIN lesions corresponding to grading by visual inspection to more advanced and mild lesions. The classifier allowed both determining the probability of early histological changes for uncategorized tissue samples and interpretation of the model parameters. Here, we develop quantitative image analysis pipeline to describe morphological changes in histological images. Even subtle changes in mPIN lesion characteristics can be described with feature analysis and machine learning. Constructing and using multidimensional feature data to represent histological changes enables richer analysis and interpretation of early pathological lesions. PMID:26955503

  15. Role of nucleotide excision repair deficiency in intestinal tumorigenesis in multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mice.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, Inger-Lise; Schut, Herman A J; Nesland, Jahn M; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Alexander, Jan

    2006-12-10

    Mice deficient in the Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (Xpa) gene are defective in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and highly susceptible to skin carcinogenesis after dermal exposure to UV light or chemicals. Min (multiple intestinal neoplasia) mice, heterozygous for a germline nonsense mutation in the tumor suppressor gene adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc), develop intestinal tumors spontaneously and show additional intestinal tumors after exposure to the food mutagen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). In this study, we investigated the impact of loss of XPA function on PhIP-induced intestinal tumorigenesis in F1 offspring of Min/+ (Apc(+/-)) mice crossed with Xpa gene-deficient mice. Apc(+/-) mice lacking both alleles of Xpa had higher susceptibility towards toxicity of PhIP, higher levels of PhIP-DNA adducts in the middle and distal small intestines, as well as in liver, and a higher number of small intestinal tumors at 11 weeks, compared with Apc(+/-) mice with one or two intact Xpa alleles. Localization of tumors was not affected, being highest in middle and distal small intestines in all genotypes. At 11 weeks of age, the number of spontaneous intestinal tumors was not significantly increased by homozygous loss of Xpa, but untreated Apc(+/-)/Xpa(-/-) mice had significantly shorter life-spans than their XPA-proficient littermates. Heterozygous loss of Xpa did not affect any of the measured end points. In conclusion, the Xpa gene and the NER pathway are involved in repair of bulky PhIP-DNA adducts in the intestines and the liver, and most probably of DNA lesions leading to spontaneous intestinal tumors. These results confirm a role of the NER pathway also in protection against cancer in internal organs, additional to its well-known importance in protection against skin cancer. An effect of Apc(+/-) on adduct levels, additional to that of Xpa(-/-), indicates that the truncated APC protein may affect a repair pathway other than NER. PMID:16962818

  16. Postoperative Complications After Prophylactic Thyroidectomy for Very Young Patients With Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Kluijfhout, Wouter P.; van Beek, Dirk-Jan; Verrijn Stuart, Annemarie A.; Lodewijk, Lutske; Valk, Gerlof D.; van der Zee, David C.; Vriens, Menno R.; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate whether younger age at surgery is associated with the increased incidence of postoperative complications after prophylactic thyroidectomy in pediatric patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2. The shift toward earlier thyroidectomy has resulted in significantly less medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC)-related morbidity and mortality. However, very young pediatric patients might have a higher morbidity rate compared with older patients. Hardly any literature exists on complications in the very young. A retrospective single-center analysis was performed on the outcomes of MEN2 patients undergoing a prophylactic total thyroidectomy at the age of 17 or younger. Forty-one MEN2A and 3 MEN2B patients with thyroidectomy after January 1993 and at least 6 months of follow-up were included, subdivided in 9 patients younger than 3 years, 15 patients 3 to 6 years, and 20 patients older than 6 years. Postoperative hypocalcemia and other complications were registered. Twelve (27%) patients developed transient hypocalcemia and 9 (20%) patients suffered from permanent hypocalcemia, with a nonsignificant trend toward higher incidence with decreasing age. Three (7%) patients had other complications, of whom 2 were younger than 3 years. For patients younger than 3 years, the average length of stay (LOS) was 6.7 days, versus 1.7 and 3.5 days, respectively, for the older patient groups (P < 0.05). Patients with complications had a longer LOS compared with patients without (5.0 vs 2.0, P < 0.01). None of the patients had clinical signs of recurrent MTC after a mean follow-up of 10.5 years. Prophylactic thyroidectomy in very young children is associated with a higher rate of complications, causing a significant increased LOS. Irrespective age of surgery, MTC did not recur in any patient. In planning optimal timing of surgery, clinicians should take the risk of complications into account. We advise not to perform total thyroidectomy before the age of 3 for patients defined high risk by the American Thyroid Association guideline. PMID:26200612

  17. Increased risk of colorectal neoplasia in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and inflammatory bowel disease: a meta-analysis of 16 observational studies.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Han-Han; Jiang, Xue-Liang

    2016-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with concomitant primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) carry an increased risk of colorectal neoplasia (dysplasia and cancer), whereas the association between PSC and the development of colorectal neoplasia in Crohn's disease (CD) is controversial. A meta-analysis was carried out to compare the risk of this neoplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with and without PSC. A systematic research of MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed to identify studies that compared the risk of colorectal neoplasia (dysplasia and cancer) in patients with IBD with and without PSC. Quality assessment was performed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Pooled odds ratio (OR) was calculated using the random-effects model by STATA 12.0. A total of 16 studies (four cohort studies, 12 case-control studies; nine prospective studies and seven retrospective studies) were selected for further study. These studies included 13 379 IBD patients, of whom 1022 also had PSC. Patients with IBD and PSC were at an increased risk of colorectal dysplasia and cancer compared with patients with IBD alone [OR 3.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.14-4.90]. This increased risk was present even when the risk of colorectal cancer alone was analysed (OR 3.41; 95% CI: 2.13-5.48). Data only from patients with UC showed that PSC was associated with an increased risk for the development of colorectal neoplasia and cancer in patients with UC (OR 2.98; 95% CI: 1.54-5.76) (OR 3.01; 95% CI: 1.44-6.29), but there were high heterogeneity among studies (I=76.9 and 62.8%, respectively). Heterogeneity of the studies was affected by the study design (prospective or retrospective). The OR of colorectal neoplasia was 2.32 (95% CI: 0.70-7.70, P=0.133) and that of cancer was 2.91 (95% CI: 0.84-10.16, P=0.388) for patients with CD and concurrent PSC. Patients with IBD and PSC have a markedly higher risk for the development of colorectal neoplasia than patients with IBD, but not PSC. Stratification by IBD type show that the presence of PSC is associated with an increased risk for the development of colorectal neoplasia in patients with UC; however, there is a nonsignificant association in CD patients. When the risk of colorectal cancer alone is analysed, the conclusion does not change. PMID:26938805

  18. Screening for colorectal cancer and advanced colorectal neoplasia in kidney transplant recipients: cross sectional prevalence and diagnostic accuracy study of faecal immunochemical testing for haemoglobin and colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether screening kidney transplant recipients aged over 50 years for colorectal cancer with a faecal immunochemical test for haemoglobin might be justified, by determining the prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasia and evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of faecal haemoglobin testing compared with colonoscopy in a population of kidney transplant recipients at otherwise average risk. Design Cross sectional prevalence and diagnostic accuracy study with index test of faecal haemoglobin and reference standard of colonoscopy. Setting Outpatient clinics in metropolitan and regional hospitals in South Australia. Participants 229 kidney transplant recipients aged 50 years and over, who were at least 6 months (mean 9.0 (SD 8.4) years) post-transplant and otherwise at average risk of colorectal cancer, completed the study between June 2008 and October 2011. Interventions Faecal immunochemical testing (Enterix Insure) for human haemoglobin, followed by colonoscopy with histological evaluation of retrieved samples. Main outcome measures Prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasia, defined as an adenoma at least 10 mm in diameter, villous features, high grade dysplasia, or colorectal cancer; sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of faecal haemoglobin testing for advanced neoplasia compared with colonoscopy. Results Advanced colorectal neoplasia was found in 29 (13%, 95% confidence interval 9% to 18%) participants, including 2% (n=4) with high grade dysplasia and 2% (n=5) with colorectal cancer. Faecal testing for haemoglobin was positive in 12% (n=28); sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for advanced neoplasia were 31.0% (15.3% to 50.8%), 90.5% (85.6% to 94.2%), 32.1% (15.9% to 52.4%), and 90.1% (85.1% to 93.8%). Colonoscopy was well tolerated, with no significant adverse outcomes. To identify one case of advanced neoplasia, 8 (6 to 12) colonoscopies were needed. Conclusions Kidney transplant recipients aged over 50 years have a high prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasia. Faecal haemoglobin screening for colorectal neoplasia has similar performance characteristics in transplant recipients to those reported in general population studies, with poor sensitivity but reasonable specificity. Surveillance colonoscopy might be a more appropriate approach in this population. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12608000154303. PMID:22833618

  19. Neoplasia and Neoplasm Associated Lesions in Laboratory Colonies of Zebrafish Emphasizing Key Influences of Diet and Aquaculture System Design

    PubMed Central

    Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Buhler, Donald R.; Peterson, Tracy S.

    2014-01-01

    During the past decade the zebrafish has emerged as a leading model for mechanistic cancer research due to its sophisticated genetic and genomic resources, its tractability for tissue targeting of transgene expression, its efficiency for forward genetic approaches to cancer model development, and its cost-effectiveness for enhancer and suppressor screens once a cancer model is established. However, in contrast to other laboratory animal species widely used as cancer models, much basic cancer biology information is lacking in zebrafish. As yet data are not published regarding dietary influences on neoplasm incidences in zebrafish. Little information is available regarding spontaneous tumor incidences or histologic types in wild-type (wt) lines of zebrafish. So far a comprehensive database documenting the full spectrum of neoplasia in various organ systems and tissues in not available for zebrafish as it is for other intensely studied laboratory animal species. This manuscript confirms that as in other species diet and husbandry can profoundly influence tumor incidences and histologic spectra in zebrafish. We show that in many laboratory colonies wt lines of zebrafish exhibit elevated neoplasm incidences and neoplasm associated lesions such as heptocyte megalocytosis. We present experimental evidence showing that certain diet and water management regimens can result in high incidences of neoplasia and neoplasm associated lesions. We document the wide array of benign and malignant neoplasms affecting nearly every organ, tissue and cell type in zebrafish, in some cases as a spontaneous aging change, and in other cases due to carcinogen treatment or genetic manipulation. PMID:23382343

  20. Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization in Ulcerative Colitis Neoplasia: Single Non-Dysplastic Biopsies Distinguish Progressors from Non-Progressors

    PubMed Central

    Bronner, Mary P.; Skacel, Marek; Crispin, David A.; Hoff, Peter D.; Emond, Mary J.; Lai, Lisa A.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 10% of ulcerative colitis patients develop colorectal neoplasia. At present, identification of this subset is markedly limited and necessitates lifelong colonoscopic surveillance for the entire ulcerative colitis population. Better risk markers are needed to focus surveillance onto the patients most likely to benefit. Using array-based comparative genomic hybridization, we analyzed single, non-dysplastic biopsies from three patient groups: ulcerative colitis progressors (n=9) with cancer or high-grade dysplasia at a mean distance of 18 cm from the analyzed site; ulcerative colitis nonprogressors (n=8) without dysplasia during long-term surveillance; and non-ulcerative colitis normal controls (n=2). Genomic DNA from fresh colonic epithelium purified from stroma was hybridized to 287 (low-density) and 4,342 (higher-density) feature bacterial artificial chromosome arrays. Sample-to-reference fluorescence ratios were calculated for individual chromosomal targets and globally across the genome. The low-density arrays yielded pronounced genomic gains and losses in 3 of 9 (33%) ulcerative colitis progressors but in none of the 10 control patients. Identical DNA samples analyzed on the higher density arrays, using a combination of global and individual high variance assessments, distinguished all 9 progressors from all 10 controls. These data confirm that genomic alterations in ulcerative colitis progressors are widespread, even involving single non-dysplastic biopsies far distant from neoplasia. They therefore show promise toward eliminating full colonoscopic surveillance with extensive biopsy sampling in the majority of ulcerative colitis patients. PMID:20802465

  1. Loss of Sirt1 promotes prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, reduces mitophagy, and delays PARK2 translocation to mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Di Sante, Gabriele; Pestell, Timothy G; Casimiro, Mathew C; Bisetto, Sara; Powell, Michael J; Lisanti, Michael P; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bonal, Dennis M; Debattisti, Valentina; Chen, Ke; Wang, Liping; He, Xiaohong; McBurney, Michael W; Pestell, Richard G

    2015-01-01

    Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia is a precursor to prostate cancer. Herein, deletion of the NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase Sirt1 induced histological features of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia at 7 months of age; these features were associated with increased cell proliferation and enhanced mitophagy. In human prostate cancer, lower Sirt1 expression in the luminal epithelium was associated with poor prognosis. Genetic deletion of Sirt1 increased mitochondrial superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2) acetylation of lysine residue 68, thereby enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reducing SOD2 activity. The PARK2 gene, which has several features of a tumor suppressor, encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase that participates in removal of damaged mitochondria via mitophagy. Increased ROS in Sirt1(-/-) cells enhanced the recruitment of Park2 to the mitochondria, inducing mitophagy. Sirt1 restoration inhibited PARK2 translocation and ROS production requiring the Sirt1 catalytic domain. Thus, the NAD(+)-dependent inhibition of SOD2 activity and ROS by SIRT1 provides a gatekeeper function to reduce PARK2-mediated mitophagy and aberrant cell survival. PMID:25529796

  2. Mortalities associated with sepsis, parasitism, and disseminated round cell neoplasia in yellow-lipped sea kraits (Laticauda colubrina).

    PubMed

    Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Brown, Danielle L; Van Wettere, Arnaud; Tuttle, Allison D; Fatzinger, Michael H; Linder, Keith E; Harms, Craig A

    2008-12-01

    This case series describes multiple mortalities associated with sepsis, neoplasia, and endoparasitism in yellow-lipped sea kraits (Laticauda colubrina) at an exhibit aquarium. Over a 2-yr period, the facility kept 42 L colubrina, of which 38 died and 19 were suitable for necropsy and histopathology. The common clinical syndrome seen in these animals consisted of partial to compete anorexia, increased time spent "hauled-out" on land, intermittent regurgitation, chronic lethargy, and weight loss. Few animals died without premonitory signs. Nutritional support and treatment for presumptive parasitism and sepsis were unsuccessful. The mortality seen in this collection of sea kraits could be placed into three groups; one group of animals (n=9) died of sepsis secondary to necrotizing enteritis or pneumonia; one group (n=6) remained apparently healthy for over 1 yr and then died with multifocal granulomas and sepsis; and the last group (n=3) died as a result of multicentric lymphoid neoplasia with secondary sepsis. The unifying factor in the majority of these cases is the presence of septicemia as the proximate cause of death. Based on the clinical picture, it is presumed that an immunosuppressive event, such as transport, captivity stress, or possible concurrent viral infection, resulted in a septic event and death. PMID:19110707

  3. Ocular surface squamous neoplasia – Review of etio-pathogenesis and an update on clinico-pathological diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ruchi; Rath, Suryasnata; Vemuganti, Geeta Kashyap

    2013-01-01

    Ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) has a varied clinical presentation, the diagnosis of which rests on the histopathological examination of the excised lesion. The term OSSN includes mild dysplasia on one end of the spectrum and invasive squamous cell carcinoma on the other end. This lesion has a multi factorial aetiology with interplay of several factors like exposure to ultraviolet radiation, various chemical carcinogens and viral infections, however role of individual agents is not well understood. With the upsurge of infection with human immunodeficiency virus, a changing trend is seen in the clinical presentation and prognosis of patients of OSSN even in developed countries. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal microscopy, hold promise in in-vivo differentiation of intraepithelial neoplasia from invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Variants of squamous cell carcinoma like Mucoepidermoid carcinoma, spindle cell carcinoma and OSSN associated with HIV infection should be suspected in a case of aggressive clinical presentation of OSSN or with massive and recurrent tumours. Surgery, chemotherapy and immunotherapy are the various treatment modalities which in combination show promising results in aggressive, recurrent and larger tumours. PMID:24227983

  4. Loss of Sirt1 Promotes Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia, Reduces Mitophagy, and Delays Park2 Translocation to Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Di Sante, Gabriele; Pestell, Timothy G.; Casimiro, Mathew C.; Bisetto, Sara; Powell, Michael J.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bonal, Dennis M.; Debattisti, Valentina; Chen, Ke; Wang, Liping; He, Xiaohong; McBurney, Michael W.; Pestell, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia is a precursor to prostate cancer. Herein, deletion of the NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase Sirt1 induced histological features of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia at 7 months of age; these features were associated with increased cell proliferation and enhanced mitophagy. In human prostate cancer, lower Sirt1 expression in the luminal epithelium was associated with poor prognosis. Genetic deletion of Sirt1 increased mitochondrial superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2) acetylation of lysine residue 68, thereby enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reducing SOD2 activity. The PARK2 gene, which has several features of a tumor suppressor, encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase that participates in removal of damaged mitochondria via mitophagy. Increased ROS in Sirt1−/− cells enhanced the recruitment of Park2 to the mitochondria, inducing mitophagy. Sirt1 restoration inhibited PARK2 translocation and ROS production requiring the Sirt1 catalytic domain. Thus, the NAD+-dependent inhibition of SOD2 activity and ROS by SIRT1 provides a gatekeeper function to reduce PARK2-mediated mitophagy and aberrant cell survival. PMID:25529796

  5. Anchoring Hepatic Gene Expression with Development of Fibrosis and Neoplasia in a Toxicant-Induced Fish Model of Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; Law, J. Mac; Hinton, David E.; Kullman, Seth W.

    2014-01-01

    Fish have been used as laboratory models to study hepatic development and carcinogenesis but not for pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. In this study, a dimethylnitrosamine-induced fish model of hepatic injury was developed in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and gene expression was anchored with the development of hepatic fibrosis and neoplasia. Exposed livers exhibited mild hepatocellular degenerative changes 2 weeks post-exposure. Within six weeks hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis was evident with development of neoplasia by 10 weeks. Stellate cell activation and development of fibrosis was associated with upregulation of tgfb1,tgfb receptor 2, smad3a, smad3b, ctnnb1, myc, mmp2, mmp14a, mmp14b, timp2a, timp2b, timp3, col1a1a, and col1a1b, and a less pronounced increase in mmp13 and col4a1expression. Tgfb receptor I expression was unchanged. Immunohistochemistry suggested that biliary epithelial cells and stellate cells were the main producers of TGF-β1. This study identified a group of candidate genes likely to be involved in the development of hepatic fibrosis, and demonstrated that the TGF-β pathway likely plays a major role in the pathogenesis. These results support the medaka as a viable fish model of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:23197195

  6. A review of dietary prevention of human papillomavirus-related infection of the cervix and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Chih, Hui Jun; Lee, Andy H; Colville, Linda; Binns, Colin W; Xu, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The natural history of cervical cancer suggests that prevention can be achieved by modification of the host's immune system through a nutrient-mediated program. This study reviews the preventive role of dietary intake on cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) induced by human papillomavirus (HPV). Electronic databases were searched using relevant keywords such as, but not limited to, human papillomavirus infection, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, lifestyle factors, nutrients intake, and diet. High consumption of fruit and vegetables appears to be protective against CIN. The findings also highlight the possibility of consuming high levels of specific nutrients, vitamins, and minerals, and retaining sufficient level of these elements in the body, especially those with high antioxidants and antiviral properties, to prevent progression of transient and persistent HPV infections to high-grade CIN 2 and 3 (including in situ cervical cancer). The protective effect is not significant for high-risk HPV persistent infections and invasive cervical cancer. Although it appears that intake of specific nutrients, vitamins, and minerals may be good in CIN prevention, there is lack of evidence from controlled trial to confirm this. Health professionals shall focus on implementation of a balanced-diet prevention strategy at an early stage for cervical cancer prevention. PMID:23530631

  7. Causes of Death and Prognostic Factors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Uehara, Hirotsugu; Berna, Marc J.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is classically characterized by the development of functional or nonfunctional hyperplasia or tumors in endocrine tissues (parathyroid, pancreas, pituitary, adrenal). Because effective treatments have been developed for the hormone excess state, which was a major cause of death in these patients in the past, coupled with the recognition that nonendocrine tumors increasingly develop late in the disease course, the natural history of the disease has changed. An understanding of the current causes of death is important to tailor treatment for these patients and to help identify prognostic factors; however, it is generally lacking. To add to our understanding, we conducted a detailed analysis of the causes of death and prognostic factors from a prospective long-term National Institutes of Health (NIH) study of 106 MEN1 patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1/ZES patients) and compared our results to those from the pooled literature data of 227 patients with MEN1 with pancreatic endocrine tumors (MEN1/PET patients) reported in case reports or small series, and to 1386 patients reported in large MEN1 literature series. In the NIH series over a mean follow-up of 24.5 years, 24 (23%) patients died (14 MEN1-related and 10 non-MEN1-related deaths). Comparing the causes of death with the results from the 227 patients in the pooled literature series, we found that no patients died of acute complications due to acid hypersecretion, and 8%–14% died of other hormone excess causes, which is similar to the results in 10 large MEN1 literature series published since 1995. In the 2 series (the NIH and pooled literature series), two-thirds of patients died from an MEN1-related cause and one-third from a non-MEN1-related cause, which agrees with the mean values reported in 10 large MEN1 series in the literature, although in the literature the causes of death varied widely. In the NIH and pooled literature series, the main causes of MEN1-related deaths were due to the malignant nature of the PETs, followed by the malignant nature of thymic carcinoid tumors. These results differ from the results of a number of the literature series, especially those reported before the 1990s. The causes of non-MEN1-related death for the 2 series, in decreasing frequency, were cardiovascular disease, other nonendocrine tumors > lung diseases, cerebrovascular diseases. The most frequent non-MEN1-related tumor deaths were colorectal, renal > lung > breast, oropharyngeal. Although both overall and disease-related survival are better than in the past (30-yr survival of NIH series: 82% overall, 88% disease-related), the mean age at death was 55 years, which is younger than expected for the general population. Detailed analysis of causes of death correlated with clinical, laboratory, and tumor characteristics of patients in the 2 series allowed identification of a number of prognostic factors. Poor prognostic factors included higher fasting gastrin levels, presence of other functional hormonal syndromes, need for >3 parathyroidectomies, presence of liver metastases or distant metastases, aggressive PET growth, large PETs, or the development of new lesions. The results of this study have helped define the causes of death of MEN1 patients at present, and have enabled us to identify a number of prognostic factors that should be helpful in tailoring treatment for these patients for both short- and long-term management, as well as in directing research efforts to better define the natural history of the disease and the most important factors determining long-term survival at present. PMID:23645327

  8. Neoplasias de células plasmáticas (incluso mieloma múltiple)—Versión para profesionales de salud

    Cancer.gov

    Información del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer para profesionales de salud sobre el tratamiento del mieloma múltiple y otras neoplasias de células plasmáticas, así como referencias a estudios clínicos, investigación, estadísticas y otros temas.

  9. Neoplasias de células plasmáticas (incluso mieloma múltiple)—Versión para pacientes

    Cancer.gov

    Información del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer sobre el tratamiento del mieloma múltiple y otras neoplasias de células plasmáticas, así como referencias a estudios clínicos, investigación, estadísticas y otros temas relacionados.

  10. THE FAILURE OF CHLOROFORM ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING WATER TO INDUCE RENAL TUBULAR CELL NEOPLASIA IN MALE F344/N RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The failure of chloroform administered in drinking water to induce renal tubular cell neoplasia in male F344/N rats

    Chloroform (TCM) has been demonstrated to be a renal carcinogen in the male Osborne-
    Mendel rat when administered either by corn oil gavage or in drin...

  11. THE INDUCTION OF COLORECTAL NEOPLASIA BY A MIXTURE HIGH IN BROMINATED TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS) ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING WATER TO MALE F344/N RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INDUCTION OF COLORECTAL NEOPLASIA BY A MIXTURE HIGH IN BROMINA TED TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS) ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING W A TER TO MALE F344/N RA TS.

    Abstract:

    The THMs are the most widely distributed and concentrated of the chlorine disinfection by-products (D...

  12. Both SEPT2 and MLL are down-regulated in MLL-SEPT2 therapy-related myeloid neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background A relevant role of septins in leukemogenesis has been uncovered by their involvement as fusion partners in MLL-related leukemia. Recently, we have established the MLL-SEPT2 gene fusion as the molecular abnormality subjacent to the translocation t(2;11)(q37;q23) in therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia. In this work we quantified MLL and SEPT2 gene expression in 58 acute myeloid leukemia patients selected to represent the major AML genetic subgroups, as well as in all three cases of MLL-SEPT2-associated myeloid neoplasms so far described in the literature. Methods Cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and molecular studies (RT-PCR, qRT-PCR and qMSP) were used to characterize 58 acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML) at diagnosis selected to represent the major AML genetic subgroups: CBFB-MYH11 (n = 13), PML-RARA (n = 12); RUNX1-RUNX1T1 (n = 12), normal karyotype (n = 11), and MLL gene fusions other than MLL-SEPT2 (n = 10). We also studied all three MLL-SEPT2 myeloid neoplasia cases reported in the literature, namely two AML patients and a t-MDS patient. Results When compared with normal controls, we found a 12.8-fold reduction of wild-type SEPT2 and MLL-SEPT2 combined expression in cases with the MLL-SEPT2 gene fusion (p = 0.007), which is accompanied by a 12.4-fold down-regulation of wild-type MLL and MLL-SEPT2 combined expression (p = 0.028). The down-regulation of SEPT2 in MLL-SEPT2 myeloid neoplasias was statistically significant when compared with all other leukemia genetic subgroups (including those with other MLL gene fusions). In addition, MLL expression was also down-regulated in the group of MLL fusions other than MLL-SEPT2, when compared with the normal control group (p = 0.023) Conclusion We found a significant down-regulation of both SEPT2 and MLL in MLL-SEPT2 myeloid neoplasias. In addition, we also found that MLL is under-expressed in AML patients with MLL fusions other than MLL-SEPT2. PMID:19445675

  13. Inactivating Mutation in the Prostaglandin Transporter Gene, SLCO2A1, Associated With Familial Digital Clubbing, Colon Neoplasia, and NSAID Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Guda, Kishore; Fink, Stephen P.; Milne, Ginger L.; Molyneaux, Neil; Ravi, Lakshmeswari; Lewis, Susan M.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.; Montgomery, Courtney G.; Zhang, Shulin; Willis, Joseph; Wiesner, Georgia L.; Markowitz, Sanford D.

    2014-01-01

    HPGD and SLCO2A1 genes encode components of the prostaglandin catabolic pathway, HPGD encoding the degradative enzyme 15-PGDH, and SLCO2A1 encoding the prostaglandin transporter PGT that brings substrate to 15-PGDH. HPGD null mice show increased PGE2, marked susceptibility to developing colon tumors, and resistance to colon tumor prevention by NSAIDs. But in humans, HPGD and SLCO2A1 mutations have only been associated with familial digital clubbing. We here characterize a family with digital clubbing and early onset colon neoplasia. Whole exome sequencing identified a heterozygous nonsense mutation (G104X) in the SLCO2A1 gene segregating in three males with digital clubbing. Two of these males further demonstrated notably early onset colon neoplasia, one with an early onset colon cancer and another with an early onset sessile serrated colon adenoma. Two females also carried the mutation, and both these women developed sessile serrated colon adenomas without any digital clubbing. Males with clubbing also showed marked elevations in the levels of urinary prostaglandin E2 metabolite, PGE-M; whereas, female mutation carriers were in the normal range. Furthermore, in the male proband urinary PGE-M remained markedly elevated during NSAID treatment with either celecoxib or sulindac. Thus, in this human kindred, a null SLCO2A1 allele mimics the phenotype of the related HPGD null mouse, with increased prostaglandin levels that cannot be normalized by NSAID therapy, plus with increased colon neoplasia. The development of early onset colon neoplasia in male and female human SLCO2A1 mutation carriers suggests that disordered prostaglandin catabolism can mediate inherited susceptibility to colon neoplasia in man. PMID:24838973

  14. Total parathyroidectomy in a large cohort of cases with hyperparathyroidism associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: experience from a single academic center

    PubMed Central

    de Menezes Montenegro, Fabio Luiz; Lourenço, Delmar Muniz; Tavares, Marcos Roberto; Arap, Sergio Samir; Nascimento, Climerio Pereira; Neto, Ledo Mazzei Massoni; D'Alessandro, André; Toledo, Rodrigo Almeida; Coutinho, Flávia Lima; Brandão, Lenine Garcia; de Britto e Silva Filho, Gilberto; Cordeiro, Anói Castro; Toledo, Sergio Pereira Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Most cases of sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism present disturbances in a single parathyroid gland and the surgery of choice is adenomectomy. Conversely, hyperparathyroidism associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (hyperparathyroidism/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1) is an asynchronic, asymmetrical multiglandular disease and it is surgically approached by either subtotal parathyroidectomy or total parathyroidectomy followed by parathyroid auto-implant to the forearm. In skilful hands, the efficacy of both approaches is similar and both should be complemented by prophylactic thymectomy. In a single academic center, 83 cases of hyperparathyroidism/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 were operated on from 1987 to 2010 and our first surgical choice was total parathyroidectomy followed by parathyroid auto-implant to the non-dominant forearm and, since 1997, associated transcervical thymectomy to prevent thymic carcinoid. Overall, 40% of patients were given calcium replacement (mean intake 1.6 g/day) during the first months after surgery, and this fell to 28% in patients with longer follow-up. These findings indicate that several months may be needed in order to achieve a proper secretion by the parathyroid auto-implant. Hyperparathyroidism recurrence was observed in up to 15% of cases several years after the initial surgery. Thus, long-term follow-up is recommended for such cases. We conclude that, despite a tendency to subtotal parathyroidectomy worldwide, total parathyroidectomy followed by parathyroid auto-implant is a valid surgical option to treat hyperparathyroidism/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Larger comparative systematic studies are needed to define the best surgical approach to hyperparathyroidism/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. PMID:22584718

  15. Anal Cytology and Human Papillomavirus Genotyping in Women With a History of Lower Genital Tract Neoplasia Compared With Low-Risk Women

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Katina; Cronin, Beth; Bregar, Amy; Luis, Christine; DiSilvestro, Paul; Schechter, Steven; Pisharodi, Latha; Raker, Christina; Clark, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the prevalence of abnormal anal cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) among women with a history of HPV-related genital neoplasia with women without a history of HPV-related genital neoplasia. METHODS A cross-sectional cohort study was performed from December 2012 to February 2014. Women were recruited from outpatient clinics at an academic medical center. Women with a history of high-grade cervical, vulvar, or vaginal cytology, dysplasia, or cancer were considered the high-risk group. Women with no history of high-grade anogenital dysplasia or cancer were considered the low-risk group. Human immunodeficiency virus–positive women were excluded. Anal cytology and HPV genotyping were performed. Women with abnormal anal cytology were referred for high-resolution anoscopy. RESULTS There were 190 women in the high-risk group and 83 in the low-risk group. The high-risk group was slightly older: 57 years compared with 47 years (P=.045); 21.7% of low-risk women had abnormal anal cytology compared with 41.2% of high-risk women (P=.006). High-risk HPV was detected in the anal canal of 1.2% of the low-risk group compared with 20.8% of the high-risk group (P<.001). Among women who underwent anoscopy, no anal dysplasia was detected in the low-risk group, whereas 13.4% in the high-risk group had anal dysplasia with 4.2% having anal intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or greater (P<.001). CONCLUSION Human immunodeficiency virus–negative women with a history of lower genital tract neoplasia are more likely to have positive anal cytology, anal high-risk HPV, and anal intraepithelial neoplasia. Anal cancer screening should be considered for these high-risk women. PMID:26551180

  16. Embolization as an Alternative Treatment of Insulinoma in a Patient with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Peppa, Melpomeni; Brountzos, Elias; Economopoulos, Nicolaos; Boutati, Eleni; Pikounis, Vasilios; Patapis, Paul; Economopoulos, Theofanis; Raptis, Sotirios A.; Hadjidakis, Dimitrios

    2009-07-15

    Insulinoma is a rare neuroendocrine tumor, most commonly originating from the pancreas, which is either sporadic or familial as a component of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome (MEN1). It is characterized by increased insulin secretion leading to hypoglycemia. Surgical removal is considered the treatment of choice, with limited side effects and relatively low morbidity and mortality, both being improved by the laparoscopic procedure. We present the case of a 30-year-old patient with MEN1 and recurrent insulinoma with severe hypoglycemic episodes who could not be surgically treated due to the adherence of the tumor to large blood vessels and to prior multiple surgical operations. He was treated by repeated embolization using spherical polyvinyl alcohol particles, resulting in shrinkage of the tumor, improvement of the frequency and severity of the hypoglycemic episodes, and better quality of life.

  17. Successful treatment of biliary intraepithelial neoplasia in the common bile duct via local excision: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, WEI; CHEN, WEI; LI, KEWEI; WANG, JIAN

    2016-01-01

    Biliary intraepithelial neoplasia (BilIN), a precursor lesion of bile duct adenocarcinomas, rarely occurs in the extrahepatic bile duct, and therefore uniform treatment guidelines are lacking. The present study reports a case of BilIN in the common bile duct (CBD) in a 77-year-old man, who presented with upper abdominal malaise without jaundice. Imaging modalities revealed a CBD luminal tumor and dilated intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts. To the best of our knowledge, local excision of the lesion was performed for the first time for this type of tumor in the present study. Pathological examination gave a definite diagnosis of high-grade BilIN in the CBD. No evidence of recurrence was observed during a 3-year follow-up period. This case report suggests that local excision is able to successfully treat BilIN in the CBD. PMID:27123079

  18. Molecular Biomarkers of Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Their Implications in Early Diagnosis and Therapeutic Intervention of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Junli; Xie, Keping; Zheng, Shaojiang

    2016-01-01

    Lack of early detection and effective interventions is a major reason for the poor prognosis and dismal survival rates for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) is the most common precursor of invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Each stage in the progression from PanIN to PDAC is well characterized by multiple significant genetic alterations affecting signaling pathways. Understanding the biological behavior and molecular alterations in the progression from PanIN to PDAC is crucial to the identification of noninvasive biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis and the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies for control of pancreatic cancer progression. This review focuses on molecular biomarkers of PanIN and their important roles in early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26929736

  19. When and how should patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 be screened for thymic and bronchial carcinoid tumours?

    PubMed

    Singh Ospina, Naykky; Maraka, Spyridoula; Montori, Victor; Thompson, Geoffrey B; Young, William F

    2016-01-01

    Patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) are commonly evaluated for clinical manifestations of this syndrome with the rationale that early diagnosis and adequate treatment will result in improved survival and quality of life. Thymic and bronchial carcinoid tumours are uncommon but important manifestations of MEN1. Current practice guidelines recommend evaluation with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan of the chest every 1-2 years to detect these neoplasms. However, the certainty that patients will be better off (increased survival or quality of life) as a result of this case detection strategy is based on evidence at moderate-high risk of bias that yields only imprecise results of indirect relevance to these patients. In order to improve the care that patients with MEN1 receive, co-ordinated efforts from different stakeholders are required so that large, prospective, multicentre studies evaluating patient important outcomes are carried out. PMID:26562483

  20. Adenovirus-mediated suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis as potential therapy of human malignant neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Stefania; Portella, Giuseppe; Fedele, Monica; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Fusco, Alfredo

    2000-01-01

    High mobility group I (HMGI) proteins are overexpressed in several human malignant tumors. We previously demonstrated that inhibition of HMGI synthesis prevents thyroid cell transformation. Here, we report that an adenovirus carrying the HMGI(Y) gene in an antisense orientation (Ad-Yas) induced programmed cell death of two human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cell lines (ARO and FB-1), but not normal thyroid cells. The Ad-Yas virus led to death of lung, colon, and breast carcinoma cells. A control adenovirus carrying the lacZ gene did not inhibit the growth of either normal or neoplastic cells. Ad-Yas treatment of tumors induced in athymic mice by ARO cells caused a drastic reduction in tumor size. Therefore, suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis by an HMGI(Y) antisense adenoviral vector may be a useful treatment strategy in a variety of human malignant neoplasias, in which HMGI(Y) gene overexpression is a general event. PMID:10759549

  1. Case of multiple endocrine neoplasia 2B with probable ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting liver metastasis from medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurozumi, Akira; Okada, Yosuke; Arao, Tadashi; Nakamoto, Yuji; Togashi, Kaori; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2013-09-01

    A 31 year old woman was diagnosed with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2B at 10 years old. Dark pigmentation gradually developed on her skin and her serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) was high, suggesting concurrent ectopic ACTH syndrome (EAS). Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) loading test ruled out Cushing's disease and supported the diagnosis of EAS. Multiple low attenuation mass in the liver was observed in a computed tomography (CT) scan, and was suspected as ectopic ACTH-secreting metastatic tumor from medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). ACTH production by MTC is relatively rare, particularly in patients with MEN; patients with ectopic ACTH-secreting liver metastatic tumor from MTC in MEN 2B have never been reported previously. PMID:24077587

  2. In vivo three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and multiphoton microscopy in a mouse model of ovarian neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jennifer M.; Marion, Samuel L.; Rice, Photini Faith; Bentley, David L.; Besselsen, David; Utzinger, Urs; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2013-03-01

    Our goal is to use optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to detect early tumor development in a mouse model of ovarian neoplasia. We hope to use information regarding early tumor development to create a diagnostic test for high-risk patients. In this study we collect in vivo images using OCT, second harmonic generation and two-photon excited fluorescence from non-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD)-dosed and VCD-dosed mice. VCD causes follicular apoptosis (simulating menopause) and leads to tumor development. Using OCT and MPM we visualized the ovarian microstructure and were able to see differences between non-VCD-dosed and VCD-dosed animals. This leads us to believe that OCT and MPM may be useful for detecting changes due to early tumor development.

  3. CTNNB1 (β-Catenin)-altered Neoplasia: A Review Focusing on Soft Tissue Neoplasms and Parenchymal Lesions of Uncertain Histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Agaimy, Abbas; Haller, Florian

    2016-01-01

    β-catenin (CTNNB1) is a key regulatory molecule of the Wnt signaling pathway, which is important for tissue homeostasis and regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and function. Abnormal stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin as a consequence of missense mutations or alternative molecular mechanisms occurs at a high frequency in a variety of epithelial cancers. In mesenchymal neoplasia, the role of β-catenin has been traditionally considered limited to desmoid-type fibromatosis. However, the spectrum of β-catenin-driven (β-catenin-altered) neoplasia of mesenchymal origin has been steadily widening to include, in addition to desmoid tumors, a variety of benign and intermediate-biology neoplasms of soft tissue (intranodal palisaded myofibroblastoma), head and neck (juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and sinonasal hemangiopericytoma/glomangiopericytoma), and ovarian (microcystic stromal tumor) origin. In addition, several old and newly reported distinctive site-specific β-catenin-driven parenchymal neoplasms of uncertain histogenesis have been well characterized in recent studies, including solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas and its recently described ovarian counterpart, sclerosing hemangioma of lung and calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumor of the liver. This review addresses the most relevant pathobiological and differential diagnostic aspects of β-catenin-altered neoplasms with emphasis on site-specific histologic and biological variations. In addition, the morphologic overlap and analogy as well as distinctness between these uncommon tumors will be presented and discussed. Furthermore, a note is made on association of some of these lesions with hereditary tumor syndromes, in particular with the familial adenomatous polyposis coli. PMID:26645457

  4. META-ANALYSIS OF HIGH RISK FACTORS OF RESIDUE OR RELAPSE OF CERVICAL INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA AFTER CONIZATION.

    PubMed

    Jin, J; Li, L; Zhang, F

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the high risk factors of residue or relapse after conization of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Literature on high risk factors of residue or relapse after conization of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia from January 2006 to June 2011 were selected from the Pubmed Database, Elsevier Database, Chinese Biomedicine Database and Chinese Journal Full-text Database of China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI). Software RevMan 4. 2 provided by Cochrane collaboration network was used in the statistical analysis of the data. According to the inclusion criteria, 10 essays were retrieved, including 348 cases in case groups and 1,608 cases in control groups. Information about residue or relapse after conization, incisal edge, HIV infection after six months of surgery, age, menopause status was obtained through the above method. Meta-analysis showed that positive surgical margin groups had a higher residual or recurrence rate than negative surgical margin groups after conization; groups where glands were involved had a higher residual or recurrence rate than non-involved glands groups after conization; positive HR-HPV infection after six months of conization groups had higher residual or recurrence rates than negative HR-HPV infection groups; 50 years or older groups had higher residual or recurrence rate than under 50 year-old groups after conization; postmenopausal groups had higher residual or recurrence rate than premenopausal groups. Menopause, 50 years old or older, gland involvement, positive surgical margin and HR-HPV infection after six months are high risk factors of residue or relapse after α - β conization of CIN. PMID:26122236

  5. Accuracy and interrater reliability for the diagnosis of Barrett's neoplasia among users of a novel, portable high-resolution microendoscope

    PubMed Central

    Vila, P. M.; Kingsley, M. J.; Polydorides, A. D.; Protano, M.-A.; Pierce, M. C.; Sauk, J.; Kim, M. K.; Patel, K.; Godbold, J. H.; Waye, J. D.; Richards-Kortum, R.; Anandasabapathy, S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) is a novel imaging modality that may be useful in the surveillance of Barrett's esophagus in low-resource or community-based settings. In order to assess accuracy and interrater reliability of microendoscopists in identifying Barrett's-associated neoplasia using HRME images, we recruited 20 gastroenterologists with no microendoscopic experience and three expert microendoscopists in a large academic hospital in New York City to interpret HRME images. They prospectively reviewed 40 HRME images from 28 consecutive patients undergoing surveillance for metaplasia and low-grade dysplasia and/or evaluation for high-grade dysplasia or cancer. Images were reviewed in a blinded fashion, after a 4-minute training with 11 representative images. All imaged sites were biopsied and interpreted by an expert pathologist. Sensitivity of all endoscopists for identification of high-grade dysplasia or cancer was 0.90 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.88–0.92) and specificity was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.79–0.85). Positive and negative predictive values were 0.72 (95% CI: 0.68–0.77) and 0.94 (95% CI: 0.92–0.96), respectively. No significant differences in accuracy were observed between experts and novices (0.90 vs. 0.84). The kappa statistic for all raters was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.54–0.58), and the difference between groups was not significant (0.64 vs. 0.55). These data suggest that gastroenterologists can diagnose Barrett's-related neoplasia on HRME images with high sensitivity and specificity, without the aid of prior microendoscopy experience. PMID:23442220

  6. Role of Mast Cells in Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Neoplasia in IL-10-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chichlowski, Maciej; Westwood, Greg S.; Abraham, Soman N.; Hale, Laura P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is hypothesized to result from stimulation of immune responses against resident intestinal bacteria within a genetically susceptible host. Mast cells may play a critical role in IBD pathogenesis, since they are typically located just beneath the intestinal mucosal barrier and can be activated by bacterial antigens. Methodology/Principal Findings This study investigated effects of mast cells on inflammation and associated neoplasia in IBD-susceptible interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice with and without mast cells. IL-10-deficient mast cells produced more pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro both constitutively and when triggered, compared with wild type mast cells. However despite this enhanced in vitro response, mast cell-sufficient Il10−/− mice actually had decreased cecal expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interferon (IFN)-γ mRNA, suggesting that mast cells regulate inflammation in vivo. Mast cell deficiency predisposed Il10−/− mice to the development of spontaneous colitis and resulted in increased intestinal permeability in vivo that preceded the development of colon inflammation. However, mast cell deficiency did not affect the severity of IBD triggered by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAID) exposure or helicobacter infection that also affect intestinal permeability. Conclusions/Significance Mast cells thus appear to have a primarily protective role within the colonic microenvironment by enhancing the efficacy of the mucosal barrier. In addition, although mast cells were previously implicated in progression of sporadic colon cancers, mast cells did not affect the incidence or severity of colonic neoplasia in this inflammation-associated model. PMID:20808919

  7. The Spatial Predilection for Early Esophageal Squamous Cell Neoplasia: A "Hot Zone" for Endoscopic Screening and Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Lun; Chang, I-Wei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chang, Chi-Yang; Lin, Jaw-Town; Mo, Lein-Ray; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Lee, Ching-Tai

    2016-04-01

    Early esophageal squamous cell neoplasias (ESCNs) are easily missed with conventional white-light endoscopy. This study aimed to assess whether early ESCNs have a spatial predilection and the patterns of recurrence after endoscopic treatment.We analyzed the circumferential and longitudinal location of early ESCNs, as well as their correlations with exposure to carcinogens in a cohort of 162 subjects with 248 early ESCNs; 219 of which were identified by screening and 29 by surveillance endoscopy. The circumferential location was identified using a clock-face orientation, and the longitudinal location was identified according to the distance from the incisor.The most common circumferential and longitudinal distributions of the early ESCNs were found in the 6 to 9 o'clock quadrant (38.5%) and at 26 to 30 cm from the incisor (41.3%), respectively. A total of 163 lesions (75%) were located in the lower hemisphere arc, and 149 (68.4%) were located at 26 to 35 cm from the incisor. One hundred eleven (51%) early ESCNs were centered within the "hot zone" (i.e., lower hemisphere arc of the esophagus at 26 to 35 cm from the incisor), which comprised 20% of the esophageal area. Exposure to alcohol, betel nut, or cigarette was risk factors for the development of early ESCNs in the lower hemisphere. After complete endoscopic treatment, the mean annual incidence of metachronous tumors was 10%. In addition, 43% of the metachronous recurrent neoplasias developed within the "hot zone." Cox regression analysis revealed that the index tumor within the hot zone (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.19; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-8.68; P = 0.02) and the presence of numerous Lugol-voiding lesions in the esophageal background mucosa were independent predictors for metachronous recurrence (HR: 4.61; 95% CI: 1.36-15.56; P = 0.01).We identified a hot zone that may be used to enhance the detection of early ESCNs during endoscopic screening and surveillance, especially in areas that lack resources and have a high prevalence of ESCNs. PMID:27082574

  8. Association of Combined Tobacco Smoking and Oral Contraceptive Use With Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 2 or 3 in Korean Women

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hea Young; Kim, Mi Kyung; Seo, Sang-Soo; Lee, Jae-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking and oral contraceptive (OC) use have been associated with cervical neoplasia, and the combination of smoking and OC use could influence cervical carcinogenesis. We aimed to assess the joint effect of smoking and OC use on the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Methods From a cohort of human papillomavirus-positive subjects recruited from 6 hospitals in Korea from March 2006 to November 2012, a total of 678 subjects (411 control, 133 CIN 1, and 134 CIN 2 or 3 cases) were selected for this study (mean age, 43 years). The risk of CIN associated with smoking and OC use on additive and multiplicative scales was estimated via multinomial logistic regression after adjustment for potential confounding factors. The relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) and the synergy index (S) were used to evaluate the additive interaction. Results OC users (odds ratio [OR] 1.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07–3.69) and long-term OC use (≥20 months; OR 2.71; 95% CI, 1.11–6.59) had a higher risk of CIN 2/3, but had no association with CIN 1, compared to non-OC users. Smokers and heavy smoking (≥8 cigarettes/day) were not associated with any CIN grade. Combined smoking and OC use (OR 4.91; 95% CI, 1.68–14.4; RERI/S, 3.77/27.4; P for multiplicative interaction = 0.003) and combined heavy smoking and long-term OC use (OR 11.5; 95% CI, 1.88–70.4; RERI/S, 9.93/18.8; P for multiplicative interaction = 0.009) had a higher risk of CIN 2/3 but had no association with CIN 1 compared to combined non-smoking and non-OC use. Conclusions OC use and smoking acted synergistically to increase the risk of CIN 2 or 3 in Korean women. PMID:26441210

  9. EMR is not inferior to ESD for early Barrett’s and EGJ neoplasia: An extensive review on outcome, recurrence and complication rates

    PubMed Central

    Komeda, Yoriaki; Bruno, Marco; Koch, Arjun

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aims In recent years, it has been reported that early Barrett’s and esophagogastric junction (EGJ) neoplasia can be effectively and safely treated using endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Multiband mucosectomy (MBM) appears to be the safest EMR method. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the safety and efficacy of MBM compared with ESD for the treatment of early neoplasia in Barrett’s or at the EGJ. Methods A literature review of studies published up to May 2013 on EMR and ESD for early Barrett’s esophagus (BE) neoplasia and adenocarcinoma at the EGJ was performed through MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Results on outcome parameters such as number of curative resections, complications and procedure times are compared and reported. Results A total of 16 studies met the inclusion criteria for analysis in this study. There were no significant differences in recurrence rates when comparing EMR (10/380, 2.6 %) to ESD (1/333, 0.7 %) (OR 8.55; 95 %CI, 0.91 – 80.0, P = 0.06). All recurrences after EMR were treated with additional endoscopic resection. The risks of delayed bleeding, perforation and stricture rates in both groups were similar. The procedure was considerably less time-consuming in the EMR group (mean time 36.7 min, 95 %CI, 34.5 – 38.9) than in the ESD group (mean time 83.3 min, 95 %CI, 57.4 – 109.2). Conclusions The MBM technique for EMR is as effective as ESD when comparing outcomes related to recurrence and complication rates for the treatment of early Barrett’s or EGJ neoplasia. The MBM technique is considerably less time-consuming. PMID:26135261

  10. “Indefinite for Dysplasia” in Barrett's Esophagus: Inflammation and DNA Content Abnormality are Significant Predictors of Early Detection of Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Tak; Emond, Mary J; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Ahn, Joseph; Upton, Melissa P; Westerhoff, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysplasia arising from Barrett's esophagus precedes esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Cases that are difficult to diagnose as dysplastic, especially in the setting of inflammation, may be designated “indefinite for dysplasia (IND).” Although flow cytometric analysis of DNA content has shown some promise in detecting EAC, there are few reports that have specifically evaluated the outcome of IND. Aims and methods: We analyzed a series of 96 IND patients seen at the University of Washington between 2005 and 2013 to determine the outcome of IND and to identify factors (including histologic features and DNA flow cytometric data) associated with subsequent detection of neoplasia. Results: Twenty-five percent of IND cases were found to have low-grade dysplasia, high-grade dysplasia (HGD), or EAC within 1 year, with 37% and 47% detected within 2 and 3 years, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year detection rates of HGD or EAC were 10%, 13%, and 20%, respectively. Active inflammation (hazard ratio (HR)=3.4, P=0.0005) and abnormal DNA content (HR=5.7, P=0.003) were significant risk factors of neoplasia. When active inflammation and DNA flow cytometric results were considered together, the HR for the combined markers was 18.8 (P<0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of the combined markers for predicting detection of subsequent neoplasia within 3 years were 100% and 60%, respectively, with 100% negative and 89% positive predictive values. Conclusions: Histology with the support of DNA flow cytometry can identify a subset of IND patients who may have a higher risk for subsequent detection of neoplasia. PMID:25761942

  11. Neurological diseases of ruminant livestock in Australia. I: general neurological examination, necropsy procedures and neurological manifestations of systemic disease, trauma and neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Finnie, J W; Windsor, P A; Kessell, A E

    2011-07-01

    Disease surveillance is an integral part of most veterinary practices in Australia. The aim of this series of invited reviews is to facilitate the differential and ultimately definitive diagnosis of some of the previously known, as well as the novel and emerging, neurological disorders of ruminant livestock, which is of particular importance in the surveillance for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. General principles of a systematic neurological examination, necropsy procedures and the neurological manifestations of systemic disease, trauma and neoplasia are described here. PMID:21696371

  12. Studies and comparison of pterin patterns in the plasma of dogs and cats and their alteration in various neoplasias and virus infections.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, M; Fuchs, C

    1996-06-01

    Physiological pterin levels were evaluated in plasma samples of healthy dogs and cats. Biopterin and 7-xanthopterin were determined quantitatively by HPLC after partial purification by ion exchange chromatography. Neopterin, pterin and 6-hydroxymethylpterin were not detectable in plasma samples. Pterin levels in plasma of dogs with neoplasias and cats with neoplasias or viral infections (FeLV, FIV, FIP) were determined. Dogs with various tumours did not show qualitative but distinct quantitative alterations in the pterin concentration in plasma. Biopterin concentrations in plasma of dogs after tumour exstirpation significantly decreased compared to the levels before surgery. There was only a moderate increase of the biopterin levels in plasma of cats with neoplasias in comparison to healthy animals of this species. Cats suffering from viral infections, however, showed a significant rise in biopterin concentrations. The results underscore the importance of pterins as sensitive indicators for the presence of activation of cell mediated immune response. With emphasis on biopterin the role of pterins as helpful parameters for the preventation and the monitoring of diseases is pointed out. PMID:8767729

  13. Lack of association between the rs2294008 polymorphism in the prostate stem cell antigen gene and colorectal neoplasia: a case-control and immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several solid tumours, either due to changes in protein expression, or through association with the rs2294008 polymorphism in the PSCA gene. To our knowledge, the role of PSCA in the development of colorectal neoplasia has not been explored. We performed a genotyping study to assess for associations between the rs2294008 polymorphism and risk of adenomatous polyps and colorectal cancer. DNA samples were available from 388 individuals with colorectal neoplasia and 496 controls, all of whom had undergone screening colonoscopy. In addition, we performed immunohistochemical staining for PSCA in colonic tissue representing all stages of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Results No genotypic associations were found between the rs2294008 polymorphism and the risk of colorectal adenomata or cancer. Immunohistochemical staining did not reveal any alteration in PSCA expression accompanying the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Conclusion From these data it seems unlikely that PSCA has a role in the initiation or progression of colorectal neoplasia. PMID:22824379

  14. Progress in chemoprevention drug development: the promise of molecular biomarkers for prevention of intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer--a plan to move forward.

    PubMed

    Kelloff, Gary J; Lippman, Scott M; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Sigman, Caroline C; Pearce, Homer L; Reid, Brian J; Szabo, Eva; Jordan, V Craig; Spitz, Margaret R; Mills, Gordon B; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vali A; Lotan, Reuben; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Bresalier, Robert S; Kim, Jeri; Arun, Banu; Lu, Karen H; Thomas, Melanie E; Rhodes, Helen E; Brewer, Molly A; Follen, Michele; Shin, Dong M; Parnes, Howard L; Siegfried, Jill M; Evans, Alison A; Blot, William J; Chow, Wong-Ho; Blount, Patricia L; Maley, Carlo C; Wang, Kenneth K; Lam, Stephen; Lee, J Jack; Dubinett, Steven M; Engstrom, Paul F; Meyskens, Frank L; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce; Hawk, Ernest T; Levin, Bernard; Nelson, William G; Hong, Waun Ki

    2006-06-15

    This article reviews progress in chemopreventive drug development, especially data and concepts that are new since the 2002 AACR report on treatment and prevention of intraepithelial neoplasia. Molecular biomarker expressions involved in mechanisms of carcinogenesis and genetic progression models of intraepithelial neoplasia are discussed and analyzed for how they can inform mechanism-based, molecularly targeted drug development as well as risk stratification, cohort selection, and end-point selection for clinical trials. We outline the concept of augmenting the risk, mechanistic, and disease data from histopathologic intraepithelial neoplasia assessments with molecular biomarker data. Updates of work in 10 clinical target organ sites include new data on molecular progression, significant completed trials, new agents of interest, and promising directions for future clinical studies. This overview concludes with strategies for accelerating chemopreventive drug development, such as integrating the best science into chemopreventive strategies and regulatory policy, providing incentives for industry to accelerate preventive drugs, fostering multisector cooperation in sharing clinical samples and data, and creating public-private partnerships to foster new regulatory policies and public education. PMID:16778094

  15. An Intelligent Clinical Decision Support System for Patient-Specific Predictions to Improve Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Detection

    PubMed Central

    Bountris, Panagiotis; Haritou, Maria; Pouliakis, Abraham; Margari, Niki; Kyrgiou, Maria; Spathis, Aris; Pappas, Asimakis; Panayiotides, Ioannis; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos A.; Karakitsos, Petros; Koutsouris, Dimitrios-Dionyssios

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, there are molecular biology techniques providing information related to cervical cancer and its cause: the human Papillomavirus (HPV), including DNA microarrays identifying HPV subtypes, mRNA techniques such as nucleic acid based amplification or flow cytometry identifying E6/E7 oncogenes, and immunocytochemistry techniques such as overexpression of p16. Each one of these techniques has its own performance, limitations and advantages, thus a combinatorial approach via computational intelligence methods could exploit the benefits of each method and produce more accurate results. In this article we propose a clinical decision support system (CDSS), composed by artificial neural networks, intelligently combining the results of classic and ancillary techniques for diagnostic accuracy improvement. We evaluated this method on 740 cases with complete series of cytological assessment, molecular tests, and colposcopy examination. The CDSS demonstrated high sensitivity (89.4%), high specificity (97.1%), high positive predictive value (89.4%), and high negative predictive value (97.1%), for detecting cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+). In comparison to the tests involved in this study and their combinations, the CDSS produced the most balanced results in terms of sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV. The proposed system may reduce the referral rate for colposcopy and guide personalised management and therapeutic interventions. PMID:24812614

  16. An intelligent clinical decision support system for patient-specific predictions to improve cervical intraepithelial neoplasia detection.

    PubMed

    Bountris, Panagiotis; Haritou, Maria; Pouliakis, Abraham; Margari, Niki; Kyrgiou, Maria; Spathis, Aris; Pappas, Asimakis; Panayiotides, Ioannis; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos A; Karakitsos, Petros; Koutsouris, Dimitrios-Dionyssios

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, there are molecular biology techniques providing information related to cervical cancer and its cause: the human Papillomavirus (HPV), including DNA microarrays identifying HPV subtypes, mRNA techniques such as nucleic acid based amplification or flow cytometry identifying E6/E7 oncogenes, and immunocytochemistry techniques such as overexpression of p16. Each one of these techniques has its own performance, limitations and advantages, thus a combinatorial approach via computational intelligence methods could exploit the benefits of each method and produce more accurate results. In this article we propose a clinical decision support system (CDSS), composed by artificial neural networks, intelligently combining the results of classic and ancillary techniques for diagnostic accuracy improvement. We evaluated this method on 740 cases with complete series of cytological assessment, molecular tests, and colposcopy examination. The CDSS demonstrated high sensitivity (89.4%), high specificity (97.1%), high positive predictive value (89.4%), and high negative predictive value (97.1%), for detecting cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+). In comparison to the tests involved in this study and their combinations, the CDSS produced the most balanced results in terms of sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV. The proposed system may reduce the referral rate for colposcopy and guide personalised management and therapeutic interventions. PMID:24812614

  17. Thymic and Bronchial Carcinoid Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: The Mayo Clinic Experience from 1977 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Singh Ospina, Naykky; Thompson, Geoffrey B; C Nichols, Francis; Cassivi, Stephen D; Young, William F

    2015-12-01

    The clinical features of thymic carcinoid (TC) and bronchial carcinoid (BC) tumors as part of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) have been rarely described and their importance in clinical practice is debated. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical presentation and outcome of this uncommon manifestation of MEN1 in a tertiary care center setting. We present the clinical features of patients with MEN1 and either TC or BC evaluated at the Mayo Clinic from 1977 to 2013. A total of 348 patients with MEN1 were evaluated and the prevalence of TC was 2.0% (n = 7) and of BC 4.9% (n = 17). The majority of the patients with BC were men (61%) diagnosed on routine screening (77%) and BC was not the confirmed cause of death in any patient. In contrast, TC patients were all men and during follow-up 43% died due to TC complications. We conclude that TC and BC tumors are uncommon, but important components of MEN1. BC were most commonly diagnosed during routine screening and associated with an indolent course. TC were predominantly seen in men and associated with a more aggressive behavior. PMID:26070346

  18. Duodenal adenocarcinoma with neuroendocrine features in a patient with acromegaly and thyroid papillary adenocarcinoma: a unique combination of endocrine neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ken-Ichiro; Takeshita, Yumie; Misu, Hirofumi; Ishikura, Kazuhide; Kakinoki, Kaheita; Sawada-Kitamura, Seiko; Kaneko, Shuichi; Takamura, Toshinari

    2012-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman with familial clustering of thyroid papillary adenocarcinoma was diagnosed with acromegaly due to pituitary macroadenoma. She had multiple skin vegetations, but had no parathyroid and pancreas diseases. Before transsphenoidal surgery, she was further diagnosed as having a duodenal tumor and multiple hypervascular liver nodules. Biopsy specimens from the duodenal tumor and liver nodules were diagnosed histologically as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for chromogranin, synaptophysin and somatostatin receptor 2a, suggestive for neuroendocrine features. After surgery, the patient was not in biochemical remission, and octreotide treatment was initiated. The duodenal cancer was treated with chemotherapy (neoadjuvant cisplatin and S-1). After 24 months, the patient's insulin-like growth factor I level had been normalized, and her liver tumors had not progressed macroscopically. This is a rare case of acromegaly associated with multiple endocrine tumors, not being categorized as conventional multiple endocrine neoplasia. Octreotide treatment might have had beneficial effects on our patient's duodenal adenocarcinoma and liver metastases, both directly via SSTR2a and indirectly via GH suppression, thereby contributing to their slow progression. PMID:22673565

  19. The relationship between semaphorin 3C and microvessel density in the progression of breast and oral neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Cole-Healy, Zachary; Vergani, Patricia; Hunter, Keith; Brown, Nicola J; Reed, Malcolm W R; Staton, Carolyn A

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to identify the expression of semaphorin 3C (SEMA3C) in the normal-metastatic spectrum of breast and oral cancers, and correlate expression with microvessel density (MVD, CD31), a surrogate marker of angiogenesis. Histological analysis revealed that SEMA3C expression was reduced in the development of oral cancer from normal oral tissue (P<0.0001) and expression was inversely correlated with MVD (r=-0.394, P=0.05). In contrast, SEMA3C expression increased in the transition from normal to invasive breast disease in epithelial/tumour cells (P=0.001) and endothelial cells (P=0.006), with both correlating weakly with MVD (r=0.35, p=0.03 and r=0.243, p=0.041 respectively). Furthermore, histological analysis of a breast cancer tissue microarray revealed a weak positive correlation with tumour grade (r=0.305, P=<0.001) and biological phenotype (r=0.237, p=0.004) with tumour cell expression of SEMA3C highest in triple negative and ER-, PR-, HER2+ subtypes. These data suggest that SEMA3C expression is differentially regulated in the development and progression of breast versus oral neoplasia, and that increased expression of SEMA3C may be modulating breast cancer progression and angiogenesis, and could represent a biomarker of metastatic disease. PMID:25910410

  20. Dissecting Molecular Events in Thyroid Neoplasia Provides Evidence for Distinct Evolution of Follicular Thyroid Adenoma and Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Kerstin; Prawitt, Susanne; Eszlinger, Markus; Ihling, Christian; Sinz, Andrea; Schierle, Katrin; Gimm, Oliver; Dralle, Henning; Steinert, Frank; Sheu, Sien-Yi; Schmid, Kurt W.; Fuhrer, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    Benign hypofunctional cold thyroid nodules (CTNs) are a frequent scintiscan finding and need to be distinguished from thyroid carcinomas. The origin of CTNs with follicular morphologic features is unresolved. The DNA damage response might act as a physiologic barrier, inhibiting the progression of preneoplastic lesions to neoplasia. We investigated the following in hypofunctional follicular adenoma (FA) and follicular thyroid cancer (FTC): i) the mutation rate of frequently activated oncogenes, ii) the activation of DNA damage response checkpoints, and iii) the differential proteomic pattern between FA and FTC. Both FTC and FA, which did not harbor RAS, phosphoinositide-3-kinase, or PAX/peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ mutations, express various proteins in common and others that are more distinctly expressed in FTC rather than in FA or normal thyroid tissue. This finding is in line with the finding of constitutive DNA damage checkpoint activation (p-Chk2, γ-H2AX) and evidence for replicative stress causing genomic instability (increased cyclin E, retinoblastoma, or E2F1 mRNA expression) in FTC but not FA. We discuss the findings of the increased expression of translationally controlled tumor protein, phosphatase 2A inhibitor, and DJ-1 in FTC compared with FA identified by proteomics and their potential implication in follicular thyroid carcinogenesis. Our present findings argue for the definition of FA as a truly benign entity and against progressive development of FA to FTC. PMID:21983636

  1. [Screening and therapy of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and anal carcinoma in patients with HIV-infection].

    PubMed

    Kreuter, A; Reimann, G; Esser, S; Rasokat, H; Hartmann, M; Swoboda, J; Conant, M A; Tschachler, E; Arasteh, K; Altmeyer, P; Brockmeyer, N H

    2003-09-19

    Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is a potential precursor of invasive anal carcinoma. Introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the treatment of HIV infection substantially reduced the incidence of some diseases associated with opportunistic viral infections. However, the incidence of AIN is reported to increase and HAART seems to have only little impact on the regression or progression of AIN. Paradoxically, improvement of survival in the HAART era results in an increased risk of anal cancer. The incidence of anal carcinoma amongst homosexual men is substantially higher compared to the normal population (35/100.000). This incidence is similar to the incidence of cervical cancer before screening for CIN with cervical cytology. Recent data suggest that the incidence of AIN and anal cancer is even higher among HIV-infected individuals. Both cancer entities share biologic similarities, including the association with human papillomavirus infection (HPV). Screening for CIN with cervical cytology and early treatment has resulted in a significant decline in the incidence of cervical carcinoma. Like cervical cancer, anal carcinoma may be preventable through identification and treatment of its precursors. Future efforts should focus on a screening protocol, training of clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment of AIN and anal carcinoma, and novel approaches to treatment of these lesions. This screening protocol could help to reduce anal cancer in HIV-infection as well as save limited resources in health care system. PMID:14502448

  2. Preliminary whole-exome sequencing reveals mutations that imply common tumorigenicity pathways in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 patients

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Minerva Angélica Romero; Fowler, Richard G.; Lucas, F. Anthony San; Shen, Jie; Rich, Thereasa A.; Grubbs, Elizabeth G.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Scheet, Paul; Perrier, Nancy D.; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background Whole-exome sequencing studies have not established definitive somatic mutation patterns among patients with sporadic hyperparathyroidism (HPT). No sequencing has evaluated multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)-related HPT. We sought to perform whole-exome sequencing in HPT patients to identify somatic mutations and associated biological pathways and tumorigenic networks. Methods Whole-exome sequencing was performed on blood and tissue from HPT patients (MEN1 and sporadic) and somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were identified. Stop-gain and stop-loss SNVs were analyzed with Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was also assessed. Results Sequencing was performed on 4 MEN1 and 10 sporadic cases. Eighteen stop-gain/stop-loss SNV mutations were identified in 3 MEN1 patients. One complex network was identified on IPA: Cellular function and maintenance, tumor morphology, and cardiovascular disease (IPA score = 49). A nonsynonymous SNV of TP53 (lysine-to-glutamic acid change at codon 81) identified in a MEN1 patient was suggested to be a driver mutation (Cancer-specific High-throughput Annotation of Somatic Mutations; P = .002). All MEN1 and 3/10 sporadic specimens demonstrated LOH of chromosome 11. Conclusion Whole-exome sequencing revealed somatic mutations in MEN1 associated with a single tumorigenic network, whereas sporadic pathogenesis seemed to be more diverse. A somatic TP53 mutation was also identified. LOH of chromosome 11 was seen in all MEN1 and 3 of 10 sporadic patients. PMID:25456907

  3. Persistence of HPV infection and risk of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in a cohort of Colombian women

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, N; Hernandez-Suarez, G; Méndez, F; Molano, M; Posso, H; Moreno, V; Murillo, R; Ronderos, M; Meijer, C; Muñoz, Á

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the dynamics of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and subsequent development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3), particularly in women >30 years of age. This information is needed to assess the impact of HPV vaccines and consider new screening strategies. A cohort of 1728 women 15–85 years old with normal cytology at baseline was followed every 6 months for an average of 9 years. Women with squamous intraepithelial lesions were referred for biopsy and treatment. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to estimate the median duration of infection and Cox regression analysis was undertaken to assess determinants of clearance and risk of CIN2/3 associated with HPV persistence. No difference in the likelihood of clearance was observed by HPV type or woman's age, with the exception of lower clearance for HPV16 infection in women under 30 years of age. Viral load was inversely associated with clearance. In conclusion, viral load is the main determinant of persistence, and persistence of HPV16 infections carry a higher risk of CIN2/3. PMID:19293802

  4. Symptomatic Improvement in Human Papillomavirus-Induced Epithelial Neoplasia by Specific Targeting of the CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Meuris, Floriane; Gaudin, Françoise; Aknin, Marie-Laure; Hémon, Patrice; Berrebi, Dominique; Bachelerie, Françoise

    2016-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is estimated to be the causal agent in 5% of all human cancers and is the leading cause of genital warts, which is the most common sexually transmitted viral disease. Currently, there are no medications to treat HPV infection, and therapeutic strategies primarily target HPV-related cancer rather than viral infection. HPV infection has severe effects on patients who display selective susceptibility to the virus in the context of primary immunodeficiencies, such as the warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, and myelokathexis syndrome, which is caused by dysfunctions of CXCR4, the receptor for the CXCL12 chemokine. In this study we showed in a transgenic mouse model of HPV-induced epidermal neoplasia the beneficial effects of Cxcl12/Cxcr4 pathway blockade with the selective CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. Daily treatment with AMD3100 for 28 days potently reduced the abnormal ear epidermal thickening in all mice. This effect was associated with reductions in keratinocyte hyperproliferation and immune cell infiltration, both of which are linked to neoplastic progression. Moreover, we observed the abnormal coordinate expression of Cxcl12 and p16INK4a (a surrogate marker of HPV-induced cancers) in dysplastic epidermal keratinocytes, which was inhibited by AMD3100 treatment. These results provide strong evidence for the therapeutic potential of CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway blockade in HPV-induced pathogenesis. PMID:26967480

  5. Safety and tolerability of DIM-based therapy designed as personalized approach to reverse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been shown previously that novel formulation of 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) substance with high bioavailability (Infemin) inhibits tumor development due to the tumor growth rate reduction in the xenograft model of prostate cancer. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) is considered to be promising as a personalized and preventive treatment strategy of prostate cancer (PC). We assessed the safety of Infemin in men with PIN and discussed the interim results. Materials and methods A total of 14 patients with PIN were enrolled. They were randomized to 900 mg DIM or placebo daily for 3 months. Safety was evaluated by adverse events (AEs), laboratory tests and physical examinations. Results and conclusion The trial revealed that Infemin treatment is associated with minimal toxicity and no serious adverse events when administered orally for 3 months. We noted three adverse events including nausea and diarrhea in two patients (14%). Combined 95% confidence interval (CI) was 1.8%–42.8%. Therapy was continued in all cases of adverse events. Good tolerability of DIM-based formulation allows us to recommend it for further clinical trials among men diagnosed with PIN for its efficacy and long-term safety parameters. PMID:25309637

  6. Epigenetic inactivation of the candidate tumor suppressor USP44 is a frequent and early event in colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sloane, Mathew A; Wong, Jason WH; Perera, Dilmi; Nunez, Andrea C; Pimanda, John E; Hawkins, Nicholas J; Sieber, Oliver M; Bourke, Michael J; Hesson, Luke B; Ward, Robyn L

    2014-01-01

    In mouse models, loss of the candidate tumor suppressor gene Ubiquitin Specific Protease 44 (USP44) is associated with aneuploidy and cancer. USP44 is also transcriptionally silenced in human cancers. Here we investigated the molecular mechanism of USP44 silencing and whether this correlated with aneuploidy in colorectal adenomas. DNA methylation at the USP44 CpG island (CGI) promoter was measured using combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA) in colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines (n = 18), and with COBRA and bisulfite sequencing in colorectal adenomas (n = 89) and matched normal colonic mucosa (n = 51). The USP44 CGI was hypermethylated in all CRC cell lines, in most colorectal adenomas (79 of 89, 89%) but rarely in normal mucosa samples (3 of 51, 6%). USP44 expression was also compared between normal mucosa and paired hypermethylated adenomas in six patients using qRT-PCR. Hypermethylation of the USP44 CGI in adenomas was associated with a 1.8 to 5.5-fold reduction in expression compared with paired normal mucosa. Treatment of CRC cell lines with the DNA hypomethylating agent decitabine resulted in a 14 to 270-fold increase in USP44 expression. Whole genome SNP array data showed that gain or loss of individual chromosomes occurred in adenomas, but hypermethylation did not correlate with more aneuploidy. In summary, our data shows that USP44 is epigenetically inactivated in colorectal adenomas, but this alone is not sufficient to cause aneuploidy in colorectal neoplasia. PMID:24837038

  7. Immunohistochemical expression of SP-NK-1R-EGFR pathway and VDR in colonic inflammation and neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Isidro, Raymond A; Cruz, Myrella L; Isidro, Angel A; Baez, Axel; Arroyo, Axel; Gonzlez-Marqus, William A; Gonzlez-Keelan, Carmen; Torres, Esther A; Appleyard, Caroline B

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the expression of neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R), phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (pEGFR), cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), and vitamin D receptor (VDR) in normal, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and colorectal neoplasia tissues from Puerto Ricans. METHODS: Tissues from patients with IBD, colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC), sporadic dysplasia, and sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC), as well as normal controls, were identified at several centers in Puerto Rico. Archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were de-identified and processed by immunohistochemistry for NK-1R, pEGFR, Cox-2, and VDR. Pictures of representative areas of each tissues diagnosis were taken and scored by three observers using a 4-point scale that assessed intensity of staining. Tissues with CAC were further analyzed by photographing representative areas of IBD and the different grades of dysplasia, in addition to the areas of cancer, within each tissue. Differences in the average age between the five patient groups were assessed with one-way analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons test. The mean scores for normal tissues and tissues with IBD, dysplasia, CRC, and CAC were calculated and statistically compared using one-way analysis of variance and Dunnetts multiple comparisons test. Correlations between protein expression patterns were analyzed with the Pearsons product-moment correlation coefficient. Data are presented as mean SE. RESULTS: On average, patients with IBD were younger (34.60 5.81) than normal (63.20 6.13, P < 0.01), sporadic dysplasia (68.80 4.42, P < 0.01), sporadic cancer (74.80 4.91, P < 0.001), and CAC (57.50 5.11, P < 0.05) patients. NK-1R in cancer tissue (sporadic CRC, 1.73 0.34; CAC, 1.57 0.53) and sporadic dysplasia (2.00 0.45) were higher than in normal tissues (0.73 0.19). pEGFR was significantly increased in sporadic CRC (1.53 0.43) and CAC (2.25 0.47) when compared to normal tissue (0.07 0.25, P < 0.05, P < 0.001, respectively). Cox-2 was significantly increased in sporadic colorectal cancer (2.20 0.23 vs 0.80 0.37 for normal tissues, P < 0.05). In comparison to normal (2.80 0.13) and CAC (2.50 0.33) tissues, VDR was significantly decreased in sporadic dysplasia (0.00 0.00, P < 0.001 vs normal, P < 0.001 vs CAC) and sporadic CRC (0.47 0.23, P < 0.001 vs normal, P < 0.001 vs CAC). VDR levels negatively correlated with NK-1R (r = -0.48) and pEGFR (r = -0.56) in normal, IBD, sporadic dysplasia and sporadic CRC tissue, but not in CAC. CONCLUSION: Immunohistochemical NK-1R and pEGFR positivity with VDR negativity can be used to identify areas of sporadic colorectal neoplasia. VDR immunoreactivity can distinguish CAC from sporadic cancer. PMID:25684939

  8. Inhibition of conjugated linoleic acid on mouse forestomach neoplasia induced by benzo (a) pyrene and chemopreventive mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing-Qing; Xue, Ying-Ben; Liu, Jia-Ren; Yang, Yan-Mei; Zheng, Yu-Mei; Wang, Xuan-Lin; Liu, Rui-Hai

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the inhibition of conjugated linoleic acid isomers in different purity (75% purity c9, t11-, 98% purity c9, t11- and 98% purity t10,c12-CLA) on the formation of forestomach neoplasm and cheopreventive mechanisms. METHODS: Forestomach neoplasm model induced by B (a) P in KunMing mice was established. The numbers of tumor and diameter of each tumor in forestomach were counted; the mice plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured by TBARS assay; TUNEL assay was used to analyze the apoptosis in forestomach neoplasia and the expression of MEK-1, ERK-1, MKP-1 protein in forestomach neoplasm were studied by Western Blotting assay. RESULTS: The incidence of neoplasm in B (a) P group, 75% purity c9,t11-CLA group, 98% purity c9,t11-CLA group and 98% purity t10,c12-CLA group was 100%, 75.0% (P > 0.05), 69.2% (P < 0.05) and 53.8% (P < 0.05) respectively and the effect of two CLA isomers in 98% purity on forestomach neoplasia was significant; CLA showed no influence on the average tumor numbers in tumor-bearing mouse, but significantly decreased the tumor size, the tumor average diameter of mice in 75% purity c9,t11-CLA group, 98% purity c9,t11-CLA group and 98% purity t10,c12-CLA group was 0.157 ± 0.047 cm, 0.127 ± 0.038 cm and 0.128 ± 0.077 cm (P < 0.05) and 0.216 ± 0.088 cm in B (a) P group; CLA could also significantly increase the apoptosis cell numbers by 144.00 ± 20.31, 153.75 ± 23.25, 157.25 ± 15.95 (P < 0.05) in 75% purity c9,t11-CLA group, 98% purity c9,t11-CLA group and 98% purity t10,c12-CLA group (30.88 ± 3.72 in BP group); but there were no significant differences between the effects of 75% purity c9,t11-CLA and two isomers in 98% purity on tumor size and apoptotic cell numbers; the plasma levels of MDA in were increased by 75% purity c9,t11-CLA, 98% purity c9,t11-CLA and 98% purity t10,c12-CLA. The 75% purity c9,t11-CLA showed stronger inhibition; CLA could also inhibit the expression of ERK-1 protein and promote the expression of MKP-1 protein, however no influence of CLA on MEK-1 protein was observed. CONCLUSION: Two isomers in 98% purity show stronger inhibition on carcinogenesis. However, the inhibitory mechanisms of CLA on carcinogenesis is complicated, which may be due to the increased mice plasma MDA, the inducing apoptosis in tumor tissues. And the effect of CLA on the expression of ERK-1 and MKP-1 may be one of the mechanisms of the inhibition of CLA on the tumor. PMID:12508349

  9. Pathogenicity of DNA Variants and Double Mutations in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2 and Von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Erlic, Zoran; Hoffmann, Michael M.; Sullivan, Maren; Franke, Gerlind; Peczkowska, Mariola; Harsch, Igor; Schott, Matthias; Gabbert, Helmut E.; Valimäki, Matti; Preuss, Simon F.; Hasse-Lazar, Kornelia; Waligorski, Dariusz; Robledo, Mercedes; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Eng, Charis; Neumann, Hartmut P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Cancer genetics is fundamental for preventive medicine, in particular in pheochromocytoma-associated syndromes. Variants in two susceptibility genes, SDHC and RET, were found in a kindred with head and neck paraganglioma. This observation of coincident DNA variants, both reported as pathogenic, in two known susceptibility genes prompted the question of their pathogenic relevance. Objective: Our objective was to elucidate the pathogenic role of the detected variants and study the prevalence of such variants. Patients: Patients were registrants from the European-American Pheochromocytoma-Paraganglioma and German von Hippel-Lindau Disease Registries. Design: Analysis of germline mutation screening results for all pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma susceptibility genes, including RET [multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2)] and VHL [von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL)]. Cases in which more than one DNA variant was found were clinically reevaluated, and cosegregation of the disease with the variant was analyzed within the registrants’ families. A total of 1000 controls were screened for the presence of detected variants, and in silico analyses were performed. Results: Three variants were identified, RET p.Tyr791Phe and p.Ser649Leu and VHL p.Pro81Ser. The frequencies of RET p.Ser649Leu (0.07%) and p.Tyr791Phe (0.9%) compared with controls excluded the two variants’ role in the etiology of MEN 2 and VHL. None of the carriers of the RET variants who underwent prophylactic thyroidectomy showed medullary thyroid carcinoma. Clinical reinvestigation of 18 variant carriers excluded MEN 2. VHL variant p.Pro81Ser, also previously described as a mutation, did not segregate with the VHL in one family. In silico analyses for these variants predicted unmodified protein function. Conclusions: RET p.Tyr791Phe and p.Ser649Leu and VHL p.Pro81Ser are definitely not pathogenic mutations for VHL and MEN 2. Misinterpretation results in irreversible clinical consequences. PMID:19906784

  10. Altered membrane lipid composition and functional parameters of circulating cells in cockles (Cerastoderma edule) affected by disseminated neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Le Grand, Fabienne; Soudant, Philippe; Marty, Yanic; Le Goïc, Nelly; Kraffe, Edouard

    2013-01-01

    Membrane lipid composition and morpho-functional parameters were investigated in circulating cells of the edible cockle (Cerastoderma edule) affected by disseminated neoplasia (neoplastic cells) and compared to those from healthy cockles (hemocytes). Membrane sterol levels, phospholipid (PL) class and subclass proportions and their respective fatty acid (FA) compositions were determined. Morpho-functional parameters were evaluated through total hemocyte count (THC), mortality rate, phagocytosis ability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Both morpho-functional parameters and lipid composition were profoundly affected in neoplastic cells. These dedifferentiated cells displayed higher THC (5×), mortality rate (3×) and ROS production with addition of carbonyl cyanide m-chloro phenylhydrazone (1.7×) but lower phagocytosis ability (½×), than unaffected hemocytes. Total PL amounts were higher in neoplastic cells than in hemocytes (12.3 and 5.1 nmol×10(-6) cells, respectively). However, sterols and a particular subclass of PL (plasmalogens; 1-alkenyl-2-acyl PL) were present in similar amounts in both cell type membranes. This led to a two times lower proportion of these membrane lipid constituents in neoplastic cells when compared to hemocytes (20.5% vs. 42.1% of sterols in total membrane lipids and 21.7% vs. 44.2% of plasmalogens among total PL, respectively). Proportions of non-methylene interrupted FA- and 20:1n-11-plasmalogen molecular species were the most impacted in neoplastic cells when compared to hemocytes (⅓× and ¼×, respectively). These changes in response to this leukemia-like disease in bivalves highlight the specific imbalance of plasmalogens and sterols in neoplastic cells, in comparison to the greater stability of other membrane lipid components. PMID:23333874

  11. Prognostic role of the CDNK1B V109G polymorphism in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

    PubMed Central

    Circelli, Luisa; Ramundo, Valeria; Marotta, Vincenzo; Sciammarella, Concetta; Marciello, Francesca; Del Prete, Michela; Sabatino, Lina; Pasquali, Daniela; Izzo, Francesco; Scala, Stefania; Colao, Annamaria; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colantuoni, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    CDKN1B encodes the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27/Kip1. CDKN1B mutations and polymorphisms are involved in tumorigenesis; specifically, the V109G single nucleotide polymorphism has been linked to different tumours with controversial results. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome, characterized by the development of different types of neuroendocrine tumours and increased incidence of other malignancies. A clear genotype–phenotype correlation in MEN1 has not been established yet. In this study, we assessed whether the CDKN1B V109G polymorphism was associated with the development of aggressive tumours in 55 consecutive patients affected by MEN1. The polymorphism was investigated by PCR amplification of germline DNA followed by direct sequencing. Baseline and follow-up data of tumour types and their severity were collected and associated with the genetic data. MEN1-related aggressive and other malignant tumours of any origin were detected in 16.1% of wild-type and 33.3% of polymorphism allele-bearing patients (P = NS). The time interval between birth and the first aggressive tumour was significantly shorter in patients with the CDKN1B V109G polymorphism (median 46 years) than in those without (median not reached; P = 0.03). Similarly, shorter was the time interval between MEN1 diagnosis and age of the first aggressive tumour (P = 0.02). Overall survival could not be estimated as 96% patients were still alive at the time of the study. In conclusion, CDKN1B V109G polymorphism seems to play a role in the development of aggressive tumours in MEN1. PMID:25824098

  12. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization

    PubMed Central

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2–ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for intraductal carcinoma adjacent to invasive adenocarcinoma. These findings represent a potentially undervalued indicator of pre-existing invasive prostate cancer and have significant implications for prostate cancer diagnosis and risk stratification. PMID:26331372

  13. VEGF elicits epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN)-like cells via an autocrine loop

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Moreno, Oscar; Lecanda, Jon; Green, Jeffrey E.; Segura, Victor; Catena, Raul; Serrano, Diego; Calvo, Alfonso

    2010-02-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is overexpressed during the transition from prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) to invasive carcinoma. We have mimicked such a process in vitro using the PIN-like C3(1)/Tag-derived Pr-111 cell line, which expresses low levels of VEGF and exhibits very low tumorigenicity in vivo. Elevated expression of VEGF164 in Pr-111 cells led to a significant increase in tumorigenicity, invasiveness, proliferation rates and angiogenesis. Moreover, VEGF164 induced strong changes in cell morphology and cell transcriptome through an autocrine mechanism, with changes in TGF-beta1- and cytoskeleton-related pathways, among others. Further analysis of VEGF-overexpressing Pr-111 cells or following exogenous addition of recombinant VEGF shows acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) features, with an increased expression of mesenchymal markers, such as N-cadherin, Snail1, Snail2 (Slug) and vimentin, and a decrease in E-cadherin. Administration of VEGF led to changes in TGF-beta1 signaling, including reduction of Smad7 (TGF-beta inhibitory Smad), increase in TGF-betaR-II, and translocation of phospho-Smad3 to the nucleus. Our results suggest that increased expression of VEGF in malignant cells during the transition from PIN to invasive carcinoma leads to EMT through an autocrine loop, which would promote tumor cell invasion and motility. Therapeutic blockade of VEGF/TGF-beta1 in PIN lesions might impair not only tumor angiogenesis, but also the early dissemination of malignant cells outside the epithelial layer.

  14. Genetic variation in the bioactivation pathway for polycyclic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic amines in relation to risk of colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hansong; Yamamoto, Jennifer F.; Caberto, Christian; Saltzman, Barbara; Decker, Robert; Vogt, Thomas M.; Yokochi, Lance; Chanock, Stephen; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Le Marchand, Loïc

    2011-01-01

    Animal work implicates chemical carcinogens, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) as contributing to the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). The epidemiologic evidence, however, remains inconsistent possibly due to intra-individual variation in bioactivation of these compounds. We conducted a case–control study of colorectal adenoma (914 cases, 1185 controls) and CRC (496 cases, 607 controls) among Japanese Americans, European Americans and Native Hawaiians to investigate the association of genetic variation in the PAH and HAA bioactivation pathway (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, AHR and ARNT) identified through sequencing with risk of colorectal neoplasia, as well as their interactions with smoking and intakes of red meat and HAAs. The A allele for ARNT rs12410394 was significantly inversely associated with CRC [odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for GG, AG and AA genotypes: 1.00, 0.66 (0.48–0.89), 0.54 (0.37–0.78), Ptrend = 0.0008] after multiple comparison adjustment. CYP1A2 rs11072508 was marginally significantly associated with CRC, where each copy of the T allele was associated with reduced risk (OR: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.58–0.88, Ptrend = 0.0017). No heterogeneity of genetic effects across racial/ethnic groups was detected. In addition, no significant interaction was observed after adjusting for multiple testing between genetic variants and pack-years of smoking, intake of red meat or HAAs (PhIP, MeIQx, Di-MeIQx or total HAAs) or NAT2 genotype (Rapid versus Slow or Intermediate). This study suggests that the genomic region around ARNT rs12410394 may harbor variants associated with CRC. PMID:21081473

  15. The RET protooncogene in sporadic pheochromocytomas: Frequent multiple endocrine neoplasias type 2 - like mutations and new molecular defects

    SciTech Connect

    Beldjord, C.; Desclaux-Arramond, F.; Raffin-Sanson, M.

    1994-09-01

    To assess the pathophysiological role of the RET protooncogene in sporadic pheochromocytomas, we examined the two regions of the gene in which molecular defects are specifically associated with the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasias (MEN) type 2A (exons 8-11) and type 2B (exon 16). The sequences of both regions were amplified by RT-PCR or PCR from tumor RNA and/or constitutive DNA. The amplified products were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis using chemical clamps. In 28 patients with unilateral sporadic tumors six RET mutations were found: three in the MEN2A region, and three in the MEN2B region. Five patients had missense mutations: two in the MEN2A region (C634W and D631Y), and three in the MEN2B region (M918T). Analysis of leukocyte DNA in three of these patients confirmed that RET mutations were only present in tumor DNA. The sixth patient had lost exon 10 in the tumor cDNA due to the deletion of the dinucleotide AG at the 3{prime} splice acceptor site of intron 9; this molecular defect was only found in the tumor DNA. Thus RET mutations of the MEN 2A and MEN 2B regions are also found in ca. 20% of sporadic pheochromocytomas. We describe new types of molecular defects of the RET protooncogene in the MEN2A region which involve non-cysteine residues and the loss of exon 10. Further studies should be extended to analyze the entire RET gene. These findings have a profound clinical impact for the management of patients with supposedly sporadic pheochromocytomas.

  16. Evaluation of HPV Infection and Smoking Status Impacts on Cell Proliferation in Epithelial Layers of Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Guillaud, Martial; Buys, Timon P. H.; Carraro, Anita; Korbelik, Jagoda; Follen, Michele; Scheurer, Michael; Storthz, Karen Adler; van Niekerk, Dirk; MacAulay, Calum E.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN) lesion grading is needed for effective patient management. We applied computer-assisted scanning and analytic approaches to immuno-stained CIN lesion sections to more accurately delineate disease states and decipher cell proliferation impacts from HPV and smoking within individual epithelial layers. A patient cohort undergoing cervical screening was identified (n = 196) and biopsies of varying disease grades and with intact basement membranes and epithelial layers were obtained (n = 261). Specimens were sectioned, stained (Mib1), and scanned using a high-resolution imaging system. We achieved semi-automated delineation of proliferation status and epithelial cell layers using Otsu segmentation, manual image review, Voronoi tessellation, and immuno-staining. Data were interrogated against known status for HPV infection, smoking, and disease grade. We observed increased cell proliferation and decreased epithelial thickness with increased disease grade (when analyzing the epithelium at full thickness). Analysis within individual cell layers showed a ≥50% increase in cell proliferation for CIN2 vs. CIN1 lesions in higher epithelial layers (with minimal differences seen in basal/parabasal layers). Higher rates of proliferation for HPV-positive vs. -negative cases were seen in epithelial layers beyond the basal/parabasal layers in normal and CIN1 tissues. Comparing smokers vs. non-smokers, we observed increased cell proliferation in parabasal (low and high grade lesions) and basal layers (high grade only). In sum, we report CIN grade-specific differences in cell proliferation within individual epithelial layers. We also show HPV and smoking impacts on cell layer-specific proliferation. Our findings yield insight into CIN progression biology and demonstrate that rigorous, semi-automated imaging of histopathological specimens may be applied to improve disease grading accuracy. PMID:25210770

  17. Evaluation of Ki67, p16 and CK17 Markers in Differentiating Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Benign Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sari Aslani, Fatemeh; Safaei, Akbar; Pourjabali, Masoumeh; Momtahan, Mozhdeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is a premalignant lesion capable of progressing to cervical cancer. Despite the existing well-defined criteria, the histomorphologic diagnosis is subject to high rates of discordance among pathologists. The aim of this study was to evaluate Ki-67 (MIB-1), CK17 and p16 INK4a (p16) markers by immunohistochemical methods in differentiating CIN from benign cervical lesions. Methods: The present study reviewed and re-classified 77 cervical biopsies, originally diagnosed as 31 non-CIN, and 46 CIN, as 54 non-CIN, and 23 CIN based on at least two similar diagnoses. Immunostaining by Ki67, p16 and CK17 markers was performed on all cases and the results were compared with pervious and consensus diagnosis. Results: The overall agreement between pervious and consensus diagnosis was 67.5% (Kappa=0.39, P<0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of Ki67 immunostaining were 95.6% and 85.1% respectively, while for p16 the corresponding values were 91.3% and 98.1%. The overall agreement, for both p16 and Ki67, with consensus diagnosis were significant (P<0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of CK17 negative staining in CIN detection were 39.1% and 40.7% respectively. Conclusion: Ki67 and p16 markers are recommended as complementary tests for differentiating between dysplastic and non-dysplastic lesions. CK17 does not discriminate between immature metaplasia with and without dysplasia. PMID:23645953

  18. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution in cervical glandular neoplasias: Results from a European multinational epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Holl, Katsiaryna; Nowakowski, Andrzej M; Powell, Ned; McCluggage, W Glenn; Pirog, Edyta C; Collas De Souza, Sabrina; Tjalma, Wiebren A; Rosenlund, Mats; Fiander, Alison; Castro Sánchez, Maria; Damaskou, Vasileia; Joura, Elmar A; Kirschner, Benny; Koiss, Robert; O'Leary, John; Quint, Wim; Reich, Olaf; Torné, Aureli; Wells, Michael; Rob, Lukas; Kolomiets, Larisa; Molijn, Anco; Savicheva, Alevtina; Shipitsyna, Elena; Rosillon, Dominique; Jenkins, David

    2015-12-15

    Cervical glandular neoplasias (CGN) present a challenge for cervical cancer prevention due to their complex histopathology and difficulties in detecting preinvasive stages with current screening practices. Reports of human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and type-distribution in CGN vary, providing uncertain evidence to support prophylactic vaccination and HPV screening. This study [108288/108290] assessed HPV prevalence and type-distribution in women diagnosed with cervical adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS, N = 49), adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC, N = 104), and various adenocarcinoma subtypes (ADC, N = 461) from 17 European countries, using centralised pathology review and sensitive HPV testing. The highest HPV-positivity rates were observed in AIS (93.9%), ASC (85.6%), and usual-type ADC (90.4%), with much lower rates in rarer ADC subtypes (clear-cell: 27.6%; serous: 30.4%; endometrioid: 12.9%; gastric-type: 0%). The most common HPV types were restricted to HPV16/18/45, accounting for 98.3% of all HPV-positive ADC. There were variations in HPV prevalence and ADC type-distribution by country. Age at diagnosis differed by ADC subtype, with usual-type diagnosed in younger women (median: 43 years) compared to rarer subtypes (medians between 57 and 66 years). Moreover, HPV-positive ADC cases were younger than HPV-negative ADC. The six years difference in median age for women with AIS compared to those with usual-type ADC suggests that cytological screening for AIS may be suboptimal. Since the great majority of CGN are HPV16/18/45-positive, the incorporation of prophylactic vaccination and HPV testing in cervical cancer screening are important prevention strategies. Our results suggest that special attention should be given to certain rarer ADC subtypes as most appear to be unrelated to HPV. PMID:26096203

  19. The role of low-level magnification in visual inspection with acetic acid for the early detection of cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Shastri, Surendra S; Basu, Parthasarathi; Mahé, Cédric; Mandal, Ranajit; Amin, Geethanjali; Roy, Chinmayi; Muwonge, Richard; Goswami, Smriti; Das, Pradip; Chinoy, Roshini; Frappart, Lucien; Patil, Sharmila; Choudhury, Devjani; Mukherjee, Titha; Dinshaw, Ketayun

    2004-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the accuracy of naked eye visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) in the early detection of cervical neoplasia. It is not clear whether low-level (2-4x) magnification (VIAM) can improve the sensitivity and specificity of VIA. The accuracy of both VIA and VIAM, provided by independent health workers, were evaluated in three cross-sectional studies involving 18,675 women aged 25-65 years in Kolkata and Mumbai in India. All screened women were investigated with colposcopy and biopsies were obtained based on colposcopy findings. The final disease status was based on the reference standard of histology (if biopsies had been taken) or colposcopy. Data from the studies were pooled to calculate the test characteristics for the detection of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). 14.1% and 14.2% were positive on testing with VIA and VIAM respectively. Two hundred twenty-nine were diagnosed with HSIL and 68 with invasive cancer. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for VIA in detecting high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) were 60.3% (95% CI: 53.6-66.7), 86.8% (95% CI: 86.3-87.3), 5.9% (95% CI: 5.0-7.0), and 99.4% (95% CI: 99.2-99.5), respectively. The values were 64.2% (95% CI: 57.6-70.4), 86.8% (95% CI: 86.2-87.3), 6.3% (95% CI: 5.3-7.3) and 99.4% (95% CI: 99.3-99.6), respectively, for VIAM. Low-level magnification did not improve the test performance of naked eye visualization of acetic acid impregnated uterine cervix. PMID:15542259

  20. Low risk of type-specific carcinogenic HPV re-appearance with subsequent cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Bratti, Concepción; Sherman, Mark E; Solomon, Diane; Guillén, Diego; Alfaro, Mario; Morales, Jorge; Hutchinson, Martha; Cheung, Li; Wacholder, Sholom; Burk, Robert D

    2012-10-15

    Carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are very common after sexual debut and nearly all become undetectable ("clear") within a few years. Following clearance, the long-term risks of type-specific HPV re-appearance and subsequent risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+) are not well defined. In the 7-year, population-based cohort study in Guanacaste, Costa Rica, we studied how often type-specific carcinogenic HPV infections re-appeared after clearance and how often re-appearance led to CIN2+. We considered 1,740 carcinogenic HPV infections detected by MY09/11 PCR among 2,805 women (18-91 years old, median 34) who were actively followed at 6- or 12-month intervals. We identified women with one or more type-specific HPV infections that cleared and re-appeared and further defined a subgroup of "definite clearance and re-appearance" (≥2 intervening negative results over a period of ≥1 year). We determined the absolute risk of CIN2+ among the different groups. p values are two-sided. Only 7.7% (81/1,052) of HPV-infected women had intervening negative results. Very few (3.7%, 39/1,052) had "definite clearance and re-appearance", of which 5.1% (2/39) subsequently persisted to a diagnosis of CIN2. There were zero CIN3+ lesions. Extremely few women (2/2,805 of women in our cohort) had a type-specific carcinogenic HPV infection clear, re-appear and lead to CIN2+. If confirmed, this argues against vaccination to avoid re-appearance that leads to precursor lesions and against the need of frequent HPV screening after initial negative results. PMID:22213126

  1. Role of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1).

    PubMed

    Lastoria, Secondo; Marciello, Francesca; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Aloj, Luigi; Caracò, Corradina; Aurilio, Michela; D'Ambrosio, Laura; Di Gennaro, Francesca; Ramundo, Valeria; Camera, Luigi; De Luca, Leonardo; Fonti, Rosa; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a hereditary syndrome predisposing to many endocrine and neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Conventional imaging (CI) cannot provide satisfactory results for all the different types of MEN1-related tumors. Objective of this prospective observational study was to evaluate the role of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in MEN1 compared to CI. Diagnostic performance of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT for the detection of NET was evaluated as well as the prognostic role of SUVmax. Eighteen patients with genetically confirmed MEN1 were evaluated by (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, endoscopic ultrasounds, multidetector-row computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and hormone/markers serum measurements. Four MEN1-related tumor sites (pancreas, pituitary, parathyroids, adrenals) were considered. Sensitivity and specificity of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT for the detection of NET were calculated. There was (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT uptake in 11/11 patients with pancreatic lesions, in 9/12 with pituitary adenoma, in 5/15 with parathyroid enlargements, and in 5/7 with adrenal lesions. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT showed sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 100 % in pancreas, 75 and 83 % in pituitary, 28 and 100 % in parathyroids, and 62.5 and 100 % in adrenals, respectively. Compared with CI, no significant difference in sensitivity for pancreas, pituitary, and adrenals was found, while CI had a better sensitivity for parathyroids (p = 0.002). On the ROC analysis, progression of pancreatic lesions was significantly associated to SUVmax <12.3 (p < 0.05). (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is greatly helpful in the work-up of MEN1 providing a panoramic view of MEN1-related lesions. There is also a prognostic role of (68)Ga-PET in patients with MEN1-pancreatic lesions. PMID:26242621

  2. Research resource: estrogen-driven prolactin-mediated gene-expression networks in hormone-induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Tam, Neville N C; Szeto, Carol Y Y; Freudenberg, Johannes M; Fullenkamp, Amy N; Medvedovic, Mario; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2010-11-01

    Cotreatment with testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E2) is an established regimen for inducing of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer in rodent models. We previously used the pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI) and bromocriptine, a dopamine receptor agonist, to inhibit PIN induction and systemic hyperprolactinemia in Noble rats and found that the carcinogenic action of T+E2 is mediated directly by the effects of E2 on the prostate and/or indirectly via E2-induced hyperprolactinemia. In this study, we delineate the specific action(s) of E2 and prolactin (PRL) in early prostate carcinogenesis by an integrated approach combining global transcription profiling, gene ontology, and gene-network mapping. We identified 2504 differentially expressed genes in the T+E2-treated lateral prostate. The changes in expression of a subset of 1990 genes (∼80%) were blocked upon cotreatment with ICI and bromocriptine, respectively, whereas those of 262 genes (∼10%) were blocked only by treatment with ICI, suggesting that E2-induced pituitary PRL is the primary mediator of the prostatic transcriptional response to the altered hormone milieu. Bioinformatics analyses identified hormone-responsive gene networks involved in immune responses, stromal tissue remodeling, and the ERK pathway. In particular, our data suggest that IL-1β may mediate, at least in part, hormone-induced changes in gene expression during PIN formation. Together, these data highlight the importance of pituitary PRL in estrogen-induced prostate tumorigenesis. The identification of both E2- and pituitary PRL-responsive genes provides a comprehensive resource for future investigations of the complex mechanisms by which changes in the endocrine milieu contribute to prostate carcinogenesis in vivo. PMID:20861223

  3. Trisomy of the Dscr1 gene suppresses early progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia driven by oncogenic Kras

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jang Choon; Shin, Jimin; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •A single extra copy of Dscr1 restrains progression of PanIN-1A to PanIN-1B lesions. •Dscr1 trisomy attenuates calcineurin–NFAT pathway in neoplastic ductal epithelium. •Dscr1 trisomy leads to upregulation of p15{sup INK4b} in neoplastic ductal epithelium. •A single extra copy of Dscr1 reduces epithelial proliferation in early PanIN lesions. •Dscr1 trisomy may protect Down syndrome individuals from pancreatic cancer. -- Abstract: Individuals with Down syndrome exhibit remarkably reduced incidence of most solid tumors including pancreatic cancer. Multiple mechanisms arising from the genetic complexity underlying Down syndrome has been suggested to contribute to such a broad cancer protection. In this study, utilizing a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic cancer, we demonstrate that trisomy of the Down syndrome critical region-1 (Dscr1), an endogenous calcineurin inhibitor localized on chromosome 21, suppresses the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-1A (PanIN-1A) to PanIN-1B lesions without affecting the initiation of PanIN lesions mediated by oncogenic Kras{sup G12D}. In addition, we show that Dscr1 trisomy attenuates nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) accompanied by upregulation of the p15{sup Ink4b} tumor suppressor and reduction of cell proliferation in early PanIN lesions. Our data suggest that attenuation of calcineurin–NFAT signaling in neoplastic pancreatic ductal epithelium by a single extra copy of Dscr1 is sufficient to inhibit the progression of early PanIN lesions driven by oncogenic Kras, and thus may be a potential mechanism underlying reduced incidence of pancreatic cancer in Down syndrome individuals.

  4. Effects of Referral Bias on Estimates of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia Progression and Regression Rates in a 3-State Markov Model.

    PubMed

    Mathews, William Christopher; Cachay, Edward Rafael; Agmas, Wollelaw; Jackson, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    The study aim is to compare anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) progression and regression rates in a cytology inception cohort to estimates based on the subcohort referred for ≥1 high-resolution anoscopies (HRAs).A cytology-based retrospective cohort was assembled including the anal cytology histories and invasive anal cancer (IAC) outcomes of all HIV-infected adults under care between 2001 and 2012. A 3-state Markov model (400, and to have HSIL at baseline and thereafter. They also had more anal cytology examinations (median 6 vs 3) and longer follow-up (median 5.5 vs 3.6 years). State transition rates were overestimated in the HRA subcohort relative to inception cohort, but the degree of discordance varied by transition: for

  5. Trends in the Occurrence of High-Grade Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia in San Francisco: 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Simard, Edgar P.; Watson, Meg; Saraiya, Mona; Clarke, Christina A.; Palefsky, Joel M.; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although screening of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals for anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN; a precursor of anal cancer) has been practiced in San Francisco among HIV health care providers since the early 1990s, to the authors’ knowledge no study to date has focused on evaluating recent AIN trends. METHODS Cases of high-grade AIN 3 and invasive anal cancer from 2000 to 2009 were obtained from the San Francisco/Oakland Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based cancer registry. Age-standardized rates of AIN 3 and anal cancer were calculated overall and by demographic characteristics (sex, race, and age group). Log-linear regression calculated annual percent change in rates during 2000 to 2009, and rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), evaluated differences in rates during 2000 through 2004 and 2005 through 2009. RESULTS During 2000 through 2009, the majority of AIN 3 cases occurred among men (1152 of 1320 men; 87.3%). Rates of AIN 3 during the corresponding period increased by 11.48% per year (P <.05) among men and were stable among women. Comparing rates among men during 2000 to 2004 with those during 2005 to 2009, the largest increases were noted among those aged 50 years to 64 years (RR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.93–3.17) and among black individuals (RR, 3.49; 95% CI, 2.14–5.85). During the same period, anal cancer rates were stable among men and women. CONCLUSIONS Rates of AIN 3 increased in San Francisco during 2000 through 2009, in conjunction with an anal cytology screening program for high-risk groups, whereas rates of invasive anal cancer were unchanged. Continued surveillance is necessary to evaluate the impact of screening and human papillomavirus vaccination on the prevention of human papillomavirus-related AIN and anal cancer. PMID:23861091

  6. Risk Factors for the Presence of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia in HIV+ Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Richel, Olivier; De Vries, Henry J. C.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Van Noesel, Carel J. M.; Prins, Jan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia (AIN) is present in the majority of HIV+ men who have sex with men (MSM) and routine AIN-screening is subject of discussion. In this study we analysed a wide range of potential risk factors for AIN in order to target screening programs. Methods We screened 311 HIV+ MSM by high resolution anoscopy, with biopsies of suspect lesions. HIV-parameters, previous sexual transmitted infections (STI’s), anal pathology, sexual practices and substance use were analysed in relation to AIN by uni- and multivariable logistic regression. Results AIN (any grade) was found in 175/311 MSM (56%), high grade (HG)AIN in 30%. In the univariable analysis, years since HIV diagnosis, years of antiretroviral therapy (cART) and anal XTC use decreased AIN risk, while a history of anogenital warts and use of GHB (γ-hydroxybutyric acid) increased this risk. In the multivariable analysis three parameters remained significant: years of cART (OR=0.92 per year, p=0.003), anal XTC use (OR=0.10, p=0.002) and GHB use (OR=2.60, p=0.003). No parameters were significantly associated with HGAIN, but there was a trend towards increased risk with anal enema use prior to sex (>50 times ever; p=0.07) and with a history of AIN (p=0.06). CD4 count, STI’s, anal pathology, smoking, number of sex partners and anal fisting were not associated with (HG)AIN. Conclusion GHB use increases the risk for AIN, while duration of cART and anal XTC use are negatively correlated with AIN. Given the high prevalence of AIN in HIV+ MSM, these associations are not helpful to guide a screening program. PMID:24367625

  7. A phase I and pharmacodynamic study of the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat plus azacitidine in advanced myeloid neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Odenike, Olatoyosi; Halpern, Anna; Godley, Lucy A; Madzo, Jozef; Karrison, Theodore; Green, Margaret; Fulton, Noreen; Mattison, Ryan J; Yee, Karen W L; Bennett, Meghan; Koval, Gregory; Malnassy, Gregory; Larson, Richard A; Ratain, Mark J; Stock, Wendy

    2015-04-01

    Background We hypothesized that targeting two mechanisms of epigenetic silencing would be additive or synergistic with regard to expression of specific target genes. The primary objective of the study was to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of belinostat in combination with a fixed dose of azacitidine (AZA). Methods In Part A of the study, patients received a fixed dose of AZA, with escalating doses of belinostat given on the same days 1-5, in a 28 day cycle. Part B was designed to evaluate the relative contribution of belinostat to the combination based on analysis of pharmacodynamic markers, and incorporated a design in which patients were randomized during cycle 1 to AZA alone, or the combination, at the maximally tolerated dose of belinostat. Results 56 patients with myeloid neoplasia were enrolled. Dose escalation was feasible in part A, up to 1000 mg/m(2) dose level of belinostat. In Part B, 18 patients were assessable for quantitative analysis of specific target genes. At day 5 of therapy, MDR1 was significantly up-regulated in the belinostat/AZA arm compared with AZA alone arm (p = 0.0023). There were 18 responses among the 56 patients. Conclusions The combination of belinostat and AZA is feasible and associated with clinical activity. The recommended phase II dose is 1000 mg/m(2) of belinostat plus 75 mg/m(2) of AZA on days 1-5, every 28 days. Upregulation in MDR1 was observed in the combination arm at day 5 compared with the AZA alone arm, suggesting a relative biologic contribution of belinostat to the combination. PMID:25483416

  8. Genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) in histological sections of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical carcinoma in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution and co-infection occurrence was studied in cervical specimens from the city of Madrid (Spain), as a contribution to the knowledge of Human Papillomavirus genotype distribution and prevalence of carcinogenic HPV types in cervical lesions in Spain. Methods A total of 533 abnormal specimens, from the Hospital General Universitario “Gregorio Marañón” of Madrid, were studied. These included 19 benign lesions, 349 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias 1 (CIN1), 158 CIN2-3 and 7 invasive cervical carcinomas (ICC). HPV genotyping was performed using PCR and tube array hybridization. Results We detected 20 different HPV types: 13 carcinogenic high-risk HPV types (HR-HPVs), 2 probably carcinogenic high-risk HPV types (PHR-HPVs) and 5 carcinogenic low-risk HPV types (LR-HPVs). The most frequent HPV genotypes found in all specimens were HPV16 (26.0%), 31 (10.7%) and 58 (8.0%). HPV 18 was only detected in 5.0%. Co-infections were found in 30.7% of CIN 1 and 18.4% cases of CIN2-3. The highest percentage of HR HPVs was found in those specimens with a CIN2-3 lesion (93.7%). Conclusion As our study shows the current tetravalent vaccine could be effective in our geographical area for preventing all the invasive cervical carcinomas. In addition, upon the estimates of the important presence of other HR-HPV types – such as 31, 58, 33 and 52 – in different preneoplasic lesions the effectiveness of HPV vaccination in our geographical area, and others with similar genotype distribution, should be limited. PMID:23167826

  9. Effects of Referral Bias on Estimates of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia Progression and Regression Rates in a 3-State Markov Model

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, William Christopher; Cachay, Edward Rafael; Agmas, Wollelaw; Jackson, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The study aim is to compare anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) progression and regression rates in a cytology inception cohort to estimates based on the subcohort referred for ≥1 high-resolution anoscopies (HRAs). A cytology-based retrospective cohort was assembled including the anal cytology histories and invasive anal cancer (IAC) outcomes of all HIV-infected adults under care between 2001 and 2012. A 3-state Markov model (400, and to have HSIL at baseline and thereafter. They also had more anal cytology examinations (median 6 vs 3) and longer follow-up (median 5.5 vs 3.6 years). State transition rates were overestimated in the HRA subcohort relative to inception cohort, but the degree of discordance varied by transition: for

  10. Cervical Microbiota Associated with Higher Grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia in Women Infected with High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Piyathilake, Chandrika J; Ollberding, Nicholas J; Kumar, Ranjit; Macaluso, Maurizio; Alvarez, Ronald D; Morrow, Casey D

    2016-05-01

    It is increasingly recognized that microbes that reside in and on human body sites play major roles in modifying the pathogenesis of several diseases, including cancer. However, specific microbes or microbial communities that can be mechanistically linked to cervical carcinogenesis remain largely unexplored. The purpose of the study was to examine the association between cervical microbiota and high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2+) in women infected with high-risk (HR) human papillomaviruses (HPV) and to assess whether the cervical microbiota are associated with oxidative DNA damage as indicated by the presence of cervical cells positive for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. The study included 340 women diagnosed with CIN 2+ (cases) and 90 diagnosed with CIN 1 (non-cases). Microbiota composition was determined by Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene amplified from DNA extracted from cervical mucus samples. Measures of alpha/beta-diversity were not associated with either CIN severity or oxidative DNA damage. However, a cervical mucosal community type (CT) dominated by L. iners and unclassified Lactobacillus spp was associated with CIN 2+ (OR = 3.48; 95% CI, 1.27-9.55). Sequence reads mapping to Lactobacillaceae, Lactobacillus, L. reuteri, and several sub-genus level Lactobacillus operational taxonomic units were also associated with CIN 2+ when examined independently (effect size >2.0; P < 0.05). Our 16S rRNA sequencing results need confirmation in independent studies using whole-genome shotgun sequencing and that would allow sharpening the suggested associations at finer taxonomic levels. Our results provide little evidence that DNA oxidative damage mediates the effect of the microbiome on the natural history of HPV infection and CIN severity. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 357-66. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26935422

  11. Lack of commensal flora in H. pylori-infected INS-GAS mice reduces gastritis and delays intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lofgren, Jennifer L.; Whary, Mark T.; Ge, Zhongming; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Taylor, Nancy S.; Mobley, Melissa; Potter, Amanda; Varro, Andrea; Eibach, Daniel; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Wang, Timothy C.; Fox, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Transgenic, insulin–gastrin (INS–GAS) mice have high circulating levels of gastrin. On a FVB/N background, these mice develop spontaneous atrophic gastritis and gastrointestinal intraepithelial neoplasia (GIN) with 80% prevalence 6 months after Helicobacter pylori infection. GIN is associated with gastric atrophy and achlorhydria, predisposing mice to non-helicobacter microbiota overgrowth. We determined if germ-free INS–GAS mice spontaneously develop GIN and if H. pylori accelerates GIN in gnotobiotic INS–GAS mice. Methods We compared gastric lesions and levels of mRNA, serum inflammatory mediators, antibodies, and gastrin among germ-free and H. pylori-monoinfected INS-GAS mice. Microbiota composition of specific pathogen-free (SPF) INS-GAS mice was quantified by pyro-sequencing. Results Germ-free INS-GAS mice had mild hypergastrinemia but did not develop significant gastric lesions until they were 9 months old; they did not develop GIN through 13 months. H. pylori monoassociation caused progressive gastritis, epithelial defects, oxyntic gland atrophy, marked foveolar hyperplasia and dysplasia, and strong serum and tissue proinflammatory immune responses (particularly in male mice) between 5 and 11 months post infection (P<0.05, compared with germ-free controls). Only 2 of 26 female, whereas 8 of 18 male, H. pylori-infected INS-GAS mice developed low- to high-grade GIN by 11 months post infection. Stomachs of H. pylori-infected SPF male mice had significant reductions in Bacteroidetes and significant increases in Firmicutes. Conclusions Gastric lesions take 13 months longer to develop in germ-free INS–GAS mice than male SPF INS-GAS mice. H. pylori-monoassociation accelerated gastritis and GIN but caused less-severe gastric lesions and delayed onset of GIN compared to H. pylori-infected INS-GAS mice with complex gastric microbiota. Changes of gastric microbiota composition might promote GIN in the achlorhydric stomachs of SPF mice. PMID:20950613

  12. Epithelial neoplasia coincides with exacerbated injury and fibrotic response in the lungs of Gprc5a-knockout mice following silica exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shuangshuang; Song, Hongyong; Sun, Beibei; Zhou, Binhua P.; Deng, Jiong; Han, Baohui

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to crystalline silica is suggested to increase the risk for a variety of lung diseases, including fibrosis and lung cancer. However, epidemiological evidences for the exposure-risk relationship are ambiguous and conflicting, and experimental study from a reliable animal model to explore the relationship is lacking. We reasoned that a mouse model that is sensitive to both lung injury and tumorigenesis would be appropriate to evaluate the exposure-risk relationship. Previously, we showed that, Gprc5a−/− mice are susceptible to both lung tumorigenesis and endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. In this study, we investigated the biological consequences in Gprc5a−/− mouse model following silica exposure. Intra-tracheal administration of fine silica particles in Gprc5a−/− mice resulted in more severe lung injury and pulmonary inflammation than in wild-type mice. Moreover, an enhanced fibrogenic response, including EMT-like characteristics, was induced in the lungs of Gprc5a−/− mice compared to those from wild-type ones. Importantly, increased hyperplasia or neoplasia coincided with silica-induced tissue injury and fibrogenic response in lungs from Gprc5a−/− mice. Consistently, expression of MMP9, TGFβ1 and EGFR was significantly increased in lungs from silica-treated Gprc5a−/− mice compared to those untreated or wild-type ones. These results suggest that, the process of tissue repair coincides with tissue damages; whereas persistent tissue damages leads to abnormal repair or neoplasia. Thus, silica-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury contribute to increased neoplasia development in lungs from Gprc5a−/− mouse model. PMID:26447616

  13. The serrated neoplasia pathway of colorectal tumors: Identification of MUC5AC hypomethylation as an early marker of polyps with malignant potential.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Florence; Mariette, Christophe; Vincent, Audrey; Wacrenier, Agns; Maunoury, Vincent; Leclerc, Julie; Coppin, Lucie; Crpin, Michel; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Buisine, Marie-Pierre

    2016-03-15

    The serrated neoplasia pathway accounts for 20-30% of colorectal cancers (CRC), which are characterized by extensive methylation (CpG island methylation phenotype, CIMP), frequent BRAF mutation and high microsatellite instability (MSI). We recently identified MUC5AC mucin gene hypomethylation as a specific marker of MSI CRC. The early identification of preneoplastic lesions among serrated polyps is currently challenging. Here, we performed a detailed pathological and molecular analysis of a large series of colorectal serrated polyps and evaluated the usefulness of mucin genes MUC2 and MUC5AC to differentiate serrated polyps and to identify lesions with malignant potential. A series of 330 colorectal polyps including 218 serrated polyps [42 goblet cell-rich hyperplastic polyps (GCHP), 68 microvesicular hyperplastic polyps (MVHP), 100 sessile serrated adenoma (SSA) and eight traditional serrated adenoma (TSA)] and 112 conventional adenomas was analyzed for BRAF/KRAS mutations, MSI, CIMP, MLH1 and MGMT methylation, and MUC2 and MUC5AC expression and methylation. We show that MUC5AC hypomethylation is an early event in the serrated neoplasia pathway, and specifically detects MVHP and SSA, arguing for a filiation between MVHP, SSA and CIMP-H/MSI CRC, whereas GCHP and TSA arise from a distinct pathway. Moreover, MUC5AC hypomethylation specifically identified serrated lesions with BRAF mutation, CIMP-H or MSI, suggesting that it may be useful to identify serrated neoplasia pathway-related precursor lesions. Our data suggest that MVHP should be recognized among HP and require particular attention. PMID:26476272

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ is downregulated in ulcerative colitis and is involved in experimental colitis-associated neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    DOU, XIAOTAN; XIAO, JUNHUA; JIN, ZILIANG; ZHENG, PING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and to also identify the association between PPAR-γ and the clinical features of patients with IBD. An azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) animal model of colitis-associated neoplasia was established to investigate the protective effect of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and to explore the changes in the expression of PPAR-γ during this process. A total of 66 specimens of colorectal tissue obtained from biopsy performed on IBD patients and 30 healthy control individuals were immunohistochemically stained for PPAR-γ. An AOM/DSS animal model of colitis-associated neoplasia was then established. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was conducted and it was found that, compared with the control group and patients with Crohn's disease (CD), the expression of PPAR-γ in the intestinal tissue of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) was significantly decreased (P=0.027 and 0.046, respectively). The expression of PPAR-γ was found to be negatively associated with the disease activity of UC and was not associated with the severity of disease, site of lesions or CD characteristics. Administration of 5-ASA decreased the colitis and tumor burden of colons. The expression level of PPAR-γ in the intestinal tissue was also increased in the AOM/DSS/5-ASA group compared with AOM/DSS group (P<0.001). PPAR-γ is an important factor in the pathogenesis of UC and colitis-associated cancer. The present study found that 5-ASA significantly alleviates the colitis and tumor burden in a mouse model of AOM/DSS-induced colitis-associated neoplasia, and promotes the expression of PPAR-γ in the intestinal tract. PMID:26622660

  15. Helicobacter typhlonius and Helicobacter rodentium Differentially Affect the Severity of Colon Inflammation and Inflammation-Associated Neoplasia in IL10-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chichlowski, Maciej; Sharp, Julie M; Vanderford, Deborah A; Myles, Matthew H; Hale, Laura P

    2008-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter species is endemic in many animal facilities and may alter the penetrance of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) phenotypes. However, little is known about the relative pathogenicity of H. typhlonius, H. rodentium, and combined infection in IBD models. We infected adult and neonatal IL10−/− mice with H. typhlonius, H. rodentium, or both bacteria. The severity of IBD and incidence of inflammation-associated colonic neoplasia were assessed in the presence and absence of antiHelicobacter therapy. Infected IL10−/− mice developed IBD with severity of noninfected (minimal to no inflammation) < H. rodentium < H. typhlonius < mixed H. rodentium + H. typhlonius (severe inflammation). Inflammation-associated colonic neoplasia was common in infected mice and its incidence correlated with IBD severity. Combined treatment with amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and omeprazole eradicated Helicobacter in infected mice and ameliorated established IBD in both infected and noninfected mice. Infection of IL10−/− mice with H. rodentium, H. typhlonius, or both organisms can trigger development of severe IBD that eventually leads to colonic neoplasia. The high incidence and multiplicity of neoplastic lesions in infected mice make this model well-suited for future research related to the development and chemoprevention of inflammation-associated colon cancer. The similar antiinflammatory effect of antibiotic therapy in Helicobacter-infected and -noninfected IL10−/− mice with colitis indicates that unidentified microbiota in addition to Helicobacter drive the inflammatory process in this model. This finding suggests a complex role for both Helicobacter and other intestinal microbiota in the onset and perpetuation of IBD in these susceptible hosts. PMID:19149410

  16. The discriminatory capability of existing scores to predict advanced colorectal neoplasia: a prospective colonoscopy study of 5,899 screening participants

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin C. S.; Ching, Jessica Y. L.; Ng, Simpson; Lam, Thomas Y. T.; Luk, Arthur K. C.; Wong, Sunny H.; Ng, Siew C.; Ng, Simon S. M.; Wu, Justin C. Y.; Chan, Francis K. L.; Sung, Joseph J. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of seven existing risk scoring systems in predicting advanced colorectal neoplasia in an asymptomatic Chinese cohort. We prospectively recruited 5,899 Chinese subjects aged 50–70 years in a colonoscopy screening programme(2008–2014). Scoring systems under evaluation included two scoring tools from the US; one each from Spain, Germany, and Poland; the Korean Colorectal Screening(KCS) scores; and the modified Asia Pacific Colorectal Screening(APCS) scores. The c-statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values(PPVs), and negative predictive values(NPVs) of these systems were evaluated. The resources required were estimated based on the Number Needed to Screen(NNS) and the Number Needed to Refer for colonoscopy(NNR). Advanced neoplasia was detected in 364 (6.2%) subjects. The German system referred the least proportion of subjects (11.2%) for colonoscopy, whilst the KCS scoring system referred the highest (27.4%). The c-statistics of all systems ranged from 0.56–0.65, with sensitivities ranging from 0.04–0.44 and specificities from 0.74–0.99. The modified APCS scoring system had the highest c-statistics (0.65, 95% C.I. 0.58–0.72). The NNS (12–19) and NNR (5-10) were similar among the scoring systems. The existing scoring systems have variable capability to predict advanced neoplasia among asymptomatic Chinese subjects, and further external validation should be performed. PMID:26838178

  17. Epithelial neoplasia coincides with exacerbated injury and fibrotic response in the lungs of Gprc5a-knockout mice following silica exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofei; Xu, Dongliang; Liao, Yueling; Zhong, Shuangshuang; Song, Hongyong; Sun, Beibei; Zhou, Binhua P; Deng, Jiong; Han, Baohui

    2015-11-24

    Exposure to crystalline silica is suggested to increase the risk for a variety of lung diseases, including fibrosis and lung cancer. However, epidemiological evidences for the exposure-risk relationship are ambiguous and conflicting, and experimental study from a reliable animal model to explore the relationship is lacking. We reasoned that a mouse model that is sensitive to both lung injury and tumorigenesis would be appropriate to evaluate the exposure-risk relationship. Previously, we showed that, Gprc5a-/- mice are susceptible to both lung tumorigenesis and endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. In this study, we investigated the biological consequences in Gprc5a-/- mouse model following silica exposure. Intra-tracheal administration of fine silica particles in Gprc5a-/- mice resulted in more severe lung injury and pulmonary inflammation than in wild-type mice. Moreover, an enhanced fibrogenic response, including EMT-like characteristics, was induced in the lungs of Gprc5a-/- mice compared to those from wild-type ones. Importantly, increased hyperplasia or neoplasia coincided with silica-induced tissue injury and fibrogenic response in lungs from Gprc5a-/- mice. Consistently, expression of MMP9, TGFβ1 and EGFR was significantly increased in lungs from silica-treated Gprc5a-/- mice compared to those untreated or wild-type ones. These results suggest that, the process of tissue repair coincides with tissue damages; whereas persistent tissue damages leads to abnormal repair or neoplasia. Thus, silica-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury contribute to increased neoplasia development in lungs from Gprc5a-/- mouse model. PMID:26447616

  18. Association of stem-like cells in gender-specific chemoprevention against intestinal neoplasia in MIN mouse.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Seema R; Tiwari, Ashish K; Kunte, Dhananjay P; De la Cruz, Mart Angelo; Stypula, Yolanda; Gibson, Tina; Brasky, Jeffrey; Backman, Vadim; Wali, Ramesh K; Roy, Hemant K

    2011-11-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the gender-sensitivity and chemopreventive responsiveness of celecoxib on intestinal stem-like cells as a biomarker of colon carcino-genesis, using the MIN mouse model. Male and female MIN mice (6-7-weeks old) were randomized to either control diet or to a diet supplemented with celecoxib (1,500 ppm). The animals were euthanized ten weeks later and the intestines were flushed and opened longitudinally to assess tumor count. Small intestinal segments were formalin-fixed and tissue sections were subjected to immunohistochemical evaluation of DCAMKL1, a known marker of stem-like cells. We found that in animals receiving control (AIN 76A diet) alone, female MIN mice had a higher polyp count than males (52.32 ± 13.89 vs. 35.43 ± 16.05; p<0.0005). However, compared to control diet groups, celecoxib supplementation caused a larger reduction in the number of polyps in females than their male cohorts (6.38 ± 1.43 vs. 12.83 ± 6.74; a reduction of 88% in females to 64% in males). Significant differences (p=0.013) were observed in the number of DCAMKL1-stained cells in the crypts of the wild-type (WT) (10.01 ± 1.07 stem cells per high powered field; HPF) compared to the MIN mice (24.15 ± 8.08 stem cells per HPF), illustrating increased stem-like cells in animals that are more prone to neoplasia. DCAMKL1 labeled stem-like cells were equal in number in the male and female groups receiving the control AIN 76A diet alone (females, 25.73 stem-like cells/HPF); males, 24.15 stem-like cells/HPF). However, females showed a greater reduction in the number of DCAMKL1-labeled stem-like cells with celecoxib supplementation than the respective males (16.63 ± 4.23 vs. 21.56 ± 9.06; a reduction of 35.4% in females to 10.7% in males). We conclude that a higher number of stem-like cells in the uninvolved mucosa paralleled tumorigenesis and mirrored greater chemopreventive responsiveness of female MIN mice compared to males. PMID:21769438

  19. Association of stem-like cells in gender-specific chemoprevention against intestinal neoplasia in MIN mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Seema R; Tiwari, Ashish K; Kunte, Dhananjay P; De la Cruz, Mart Angelo; Stypula, Yolanda; Gibson, Tina; Brasky, Jeffrey; Backman, Vadim; Wali, Ramesh K; Roy, Hemant K

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine gender sensitivity and chemopreventive responsiveness of celecoxib on intestinal stem-like cells as biomarker of colon carcinogenesis, using the MIN mouse model. Male and female MIN mice (6–7 weeks old) were randomized to either control diet or to one supplemented with celecoxib (1500 ppm). The animals were euthanized ten weeks later and the intestines were flushed and opened longitudinally to assess tumor count. Small intestinal segments were formalin fixed and tissue sections were subjected to immunohistochemical evaluation of DCAMKL1, a known marker of stem-like cells. We found that in animals receiving control (AIN 76A diet) alone, female MIN mice had higher polyp count than that of males (52.32±13.89 vs. 35.43±16.05; p<0.0005). However, compared to control diet groups, celecoxib supplementation caused a larger reduction in the number of polyps in females than their male cohorts (6.38±1.43 vs. 12.83±6.74; a reduction of 88% in females to 64% in males). Significant differences (p=0.013) were observed in the number of DCAMKL1 stained cells in the crypts of the wildtype (WT) (10.01 ± 1.07 stem cells per high powered field; HPF) compared to the MIN mice (24.15 ± 8.08 stem cells per HPF), illustrating increased stem-like cells in animals that are more prone to neoplasia. DCAMKL1 labeled stem-like cells were equal in number in the male and female groups receiving the control AIN 76A diet alone (females= 25.73 stem-like cells/HPF); males= 24.15 stem-like cells/HPF). However females showed a greater reduction in the number of DCAMKL1 labeled stem like cells with the celecoxib supplementation than the males (16.63±4.23 vs. 21.56±9.06; a reduction of 35.4% in females to 10.7% in males). We conclude that a higher number of stem-like cells in the uninvolved mucosa paralleled tumorigenesis and mirrored greater chemopreventive responsiveness of female MIN mice to males. PMID:21769438

  20. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia in China: A pooled analysis of 17 Population-based Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fang-Hui; Lewkowitz, Adam K.; Hu, Shang-Ying; Chen, Feng; Li, Long-Yu; Zhang, Qing-Ming; Wu, Rui-Fang; Li, Chang-Qing; Wei, Li-Hui; Xu, Ai-Di; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Pan, Qin-Jing; Zhang, Xun; Belinson, Jerome L.; Sellors, John W.; Smith, Jennifer S.; Qiao, You-Lin; Franceschi, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    High-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence has been shown to correlate well with cervical cancer incidence rates. Our study aimed to estimate the prevalence of HR-HPV and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in China and indirectly inform on the cervical cancer burden in the country. 30,207 women from 17 population-based studies throughout China were included. All women received HPV DNA testing (HC2, Qiagen), visual inspection with acetic acid, and liquid-based cytology. Women positive for any test received colposcopy-directed or 4-quadrant biopsies. 29,579 women had HR-HPV testing results, of whom 28,761 had biopsy-confirmed (9019, 31.4%) or assumed (19,742, 68.6%) final diagnosis. Overall crude HR-HPV prevalence was 17.7%. HR-HPV prevalence was similar in rural and urban areas but showed dips in different age groups: at age 25–29 years (11.3%) in rural and at age 35–39 (11.3%) in urban women. In rural and urban women, age-standardized CIN2 prevalence was 1.5% (95%CI: 1.4%–1.6%) and 0.7% (95%CI: 0.7%–0.8%), and CIN3+ prevalence was 1.2% (95%CI: 1.2%–1.3%) and 0.6% (95%CI: 0.5%–0.7%), respectively. Prevalence of CIN3+ as a percentage of either all women or HR-HPV positive women steadily increased with age, peaking in 45–49 year-old women. High prevalence of HR-HPV and CIN3+ was detected in both rural and urban China. The steady rise of CIN3+ up to the age group 45–49 is attributable to lack of lesion removal through screening. Our findings document the inadequacy of current screening in China while indirectly raising the possibility that the cervical cancer burden in China is under-reported. PMID:22488743

  1. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2-ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for intraductal carcinoma adjacent to invasive adenocarcinoma. These findings represent a potentially undervalued indicator of pre-existing invasive prostate cancer and have significant implications for prostate cancer diagnosis and risk stratification. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26331372

  2. [PCA3 AND TMPRSS2:ERG GENES EXPRESSION IN BIOPSIES OF BENIGN PROSTATE HYPERPLASIA, INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA, AND PROSTATE CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhaylenko, D S; Perepechin, D V; Grigoryeva, M V; Zhinzhilo, T A; Safronova, N Yu; Efremov, G D; Sivkov, A V

    2015-01-01

    Morphological analysis of the biopsies for prostate cancer (PCa) often is a difficult task due to heterogeneity and multifocality of tumors. At the same time, a lot of data exist about the potential molecular genetic markers of PCa. The aim of our study is to determine of PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG genes expression in benign hyperplasia (BPH), low and high grade intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), PCa for revealing of diagnostic value of those genes expression in benign and precancerous changes in prostate. Total RNA was isolated from 53 biopsies, reverse transcription was performed, gene expression was determined by real time PCR (RT-PCR) then deltaCt index was determined as Ct(PCA3)--Ct(KLK3). Average deltaCt and its SD in BPH were 8.28 ± 3.13, low PIN--8.56 ± 2.64, high PIN--8.98 ±1.69, PCa--1.08 ± 2.36. We have demonstarted that deltaCt did not differ in patients with BPH, low and high grade PIN, whereas significantly increased in PCa relative to any of the three groups listed above (p < 0.0001). Expression of TMPRSS2:ERG was absent in BPH, PIN, but it was detected in 40% (4/10) of PCa cases. ROC-analysis showed that the AUC (area under ROC-curve with 95% CI, p < 0.0001) was 0.98 ± 0.02 in the analysis of a combination of overexpression of PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG. Thus, the expression analysis of the PCA3 and chimeric oncogene TMPRSS2:ERG in biopsy cannot be used for differential diagnosis of BPH, low and high grade PIN. However, overexpression of PCA3 and expression of TMPRSS2:ERG are characteristic in PCa. Expression analysis of these genes by the proposed RT-PCR modification at the threshold level deltaCt 3,22 has diagnostic accuracy 90% to detect PCa in biopsy specimens. PMID:26859937

  3. Comparison of Seven Tests for High-Grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia in Women with Abnormal Smears: the Predictors 2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Mesher, David; Cadman, Louise; Austin, Janet; Ashdown-Barr, Lesley; Ho, Linda; Terry, George; Liddle, Stuart; Young, Martin; Stoler, Mark; McCarthy, Julie; Wright, Corrina; Bergeron, Christine; Soutter, W. P; Lyons, Deirdre; Cuzick, Jack

    2012-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA/RNA testing provides higher sensitivity but lower specificity than cytology for the identification of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Several new HPV tests are now available for this purpose, and a direct comparison of their properties is needed. Seven tests were evaluated with samples in liquid PreservCyt transport medium from 1,099 women referred for colposcopy: the Hybrid Capture 2 (Qiagen), Cobas (Roche), PreTect HPV-Proofer (NorChip), Aptima HPV (Gen-Probe), and Abbott RealTime assays, the BD HPV test, and CINtec p16INK4a cytology (mtm laboratories) immunocytochemistry. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) were based on the worst histology found on either the biopsy or the treatment specimen after central review. Three hundred fifty-nine women (32.7%) had CIN grade 2+ (CIN2+), with 224 (20.4%) having CIN3+. For detection of CIN2+, Hybrid Capture 2 had 96.3% sensitivity, 19.5% specificity, and 37.4% PPV. Cobas had 95.2% sensitivity, 24.0% specificity, and 37.6% PPV. The BD HPV test had 95.0% sensitivity, 24.2% specificity, and 37.8% PPV. Abbott RealTime had 93.3% sensitivity, 27.3% specificity, and 38.2% PPV. Aptima had 95.3% sensitivity, 28.8% specificity, and 39.3% PPV. PreTect HPV-Proofer had 74.1% sensitivity, 70.8% specificity, and 55.4% PPV. CINtec p16INK4a cytology had 85.7% sensitivity, 54.7% specificity, and 49.1% PPV. Cytology of a specimen taken at colposcopy (mild dyskaryosis or worse) had 88.9% sensitivity, 58.1% specificity, and 50.7% PPV. Our study confirms that, in a referral setting, HPV testing by a number of different tests provides high sensitivity for high-grade disease. Further work is needed to confirm these findings in a routine screening setting. PMID:22422852

  4. Comparison of seven tests for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in women with abnormal smears: the Predictors 2 study.

    PubMed

    Szarewski, Anne; Mesher, David; Cadman, Louise; Austin, Janet; Ashdown-Barr, Lesley; Ho, Linda; Terry, George; Liddle, Stuart; Young, Martin; Stoler, Mark; McCarthy, Julie; Wright, Corrina; Bergeron, Christine; Soutter, W P; Lyons, Deirdre; Cuzick, Jack

    2012-06-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA/RNA testing provides higher sensitivity but lower specificity than cytology for the identification of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Several new HPV tests are now available for this purpose, and a direct comparison of their properties is needed. Seven tests were evaluated with samples in liquid PreservCyt transport medium from 1,099 women referred for colposcopy: the Hybrid Capture 2 (Qiagen), Cobas (Roche), PreTect HPV-Proofer (NorChip), Aptima HPV (Gen-Probe), and Abbott RealTime assays, the BD HPV test, and CINtec p16(INK4a) cytology (mtm laboratories) immunocytochemistry. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) were based on the worst histology found on either the biopsy or the treatment specimen after central review. Three hundred fifty-nine women (32.7%) had CIN grade 2+ (CIN2+), with 224 (20.4%) having CIN3+. For detection of CIN2+, Hybrid Capture 2 had 96.3% sensitivity, 19.5% specificity, and 37.4% PPV. Cobas had 95.2% sensitivity, 24.0% specificity, and 37.6% PPV. The BD HPV test had 95.0% sensitivity, 24.2% specificity, and 37.8% PPV. Abbott RealTime had 93.3% sensitivity, 27.3% specificity, and 38.2% PPV. Aptima had 95.3% sensitivity, 28.8% specificity, and 39.3% PPV. PreTect HPV-Proofer had 74.1% sensitivity, 70.8% specificity, and 55.4% PPV. CINtec p16(INK4a) cytology had 85.7% sensitivity, 54.7% specificity, and 49.1% PPV. Cytology of a specimen taken at colposcopy (mild dyskaryosis or worse) had 88.9% sensitivity, 58.1% specificity, and 50.7% PPV. Our study confirms that, in a referral setting, HPV testing by a number of different tests provides high sensitivity for high-grade disease. Further work is needed to confirm these findings in a routine screening setting. PMID:22422852

  5. Posttreatment human papillomavirus testing for residual or recurrent high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: a pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective We conducted a pooled analysis of published studies to compare the performance of human papillomavirus (HPV) testing and cytology in detecting residual or recurrent diseases after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or 3 (CIN 2/3). Methods Source articles presenting data on posttreatment HPV testing were identified from the National Library of Medicine (PubMed) database. We included 5,319 cases from 33 articles published between 1996 and 2013. Results The pooled sensitivity of high-risk HPV testing (0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90 to 0.94) for detecting posttreatment CIN 2 or worse (CIN 2+) was much higher than that of cytology (0.76; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.80). Co-testing of HPV testing and cytology maximized the sensitivity (0.93; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.96), while HPV genotyping (detection of the same genotype between pre- and posttreatments) did not improve the sensitivity (0.89; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.94) compared with high-risk HPV testing alone. The specificity of high-risk HPV testing (0.83; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.84) was similar to that of cytology (0.85; 95% CI, 0.84 to 0.87) and HPV genotyping (0.83; 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.85), while co-testing had reduced specificity (0.76; 95% CI, 0.75 to 0.78). For women with positive surgical margins, high-risk HPV testing provided remarkable risk discrimination between test-positives and test-negatives (absolute risk of residual CIN 2+ 74.4% [95% CI, 64.0 to 82.6] vs. 0.8% [95% CI, 0.15 to 4.6]; p<0.001). Conclusion Our findings recommend the addition of high-risk HPV testing, either alone or in conjunction with cytology, to posttreatment surveillance strategies. HPV testing can identify populations at greatest risk of posttreatment CIN 2+ lesions, especially among women with positive section margins. PMID:26463429

  6. Calcium Intake and Ion Transporter Genetic Polymorphisms Interact in Human Colorectal Neoplasia Risk in a 2-Phase Study123

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiangzhu; Liang, Ji; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Ness, Reid M.; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Chen, Zhi; Li, Guoliang; Wiese, Dawn; Zhang, Bing; Smalley, Walter E.; Edwards, Todd L.; Giovannucci, Edward; Zheng, Wei; Dai, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The kidney-specific sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter (NKCC2) protein encoded by solute carrier family 12 member 1 (SLC12A1) is the direct downstream effector of the inward-rectifier potassium channel (ROMK) encoded by potassium inwardly-rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 1 (KCNJ1), both of which are critical for calcium reabsorption in the kidney. Objective: We hypothesized that polymorphisms in KCNJ1, SLC12A1, and 7 other genes may modify the association between calcium intake and colorectal neoplasia risk. Methods: We conducted a 2-phase study in 1336 cases and 2891 controls from the Tennessee Colorectal Polyp Study. Results: In phase I, we identified 5 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly interacted with calcium intake in adenoma risk. In phase II, rs2855798 in KCNJ1 was replicated. In combined analysis of phases I and II, the P values for interactions between calcium intake and rs2855798 were 1 10?4 for all adenoma and 5 10?3 for multiple/advanced adenoma. The highest calcium intake was not associated with risk among those with no variant allele but was significantly associated with a 41% reduced adenoma risk among those who carried at least 1 variant allele in KCNJ1. The corresponding reduction in risk of multiple or advanced adenomas was 52% among those with at least 1 variant allele. The P values for interactions between calcium intake and combined SNPs from the KCNJ1 and SLC12A1 genes were 7.5 10?5 for adenoma and 9.9 10?5 for multiple/advanced adenoma. The highest calcium intake was not associated with risk among those with nonvariant alleles in 2 genes but was significantly associated with a 34% reduced adenoma risk among those who carried a variant allele in 1 of the genes. The corresponding reduction in risk of multiple or advanced adenomas was 64% among those with variant alleles in both genes. Conclusion: These findings, if confirmed, will be critical for the development of personalized prevention strategies for colorectal cancer. PMID:25165391

  7. A Blood Test for Methylated BCAT1 and IKZF1 vs. a Fecal Immunochemical Test for Detection of Colorectal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, Erin L; Pedersen, Susanne K; Baker, Rohan T; Murray, David H; Gaur, Snigdha; Cole, Stephen R; Gopalsamy, Geetha; Mangira, Dileep; LaPointe, Lawrence C; Young, Graeme P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the performance of a new blood test for colorectal cancer (CRC) to an established fecal immunochemical test (FIT) in a study population with the full range of neoplastic and non-neoplastic pathologies encountered in the colon and rectum. Methods: Volunteers were asked to complete a FIT prior to colonoscopy. Blood was collected after bowel preparation but prior to colonoscopy, and plasma was assayed for the presence of methylated BCAT1 and IKZF1 DNA using a multiplex real-time PCR assay. Sensitivity and specificity estimates for the blood test were calculated from true- and false-positive rates for neoplasia and compared with FIT at a range of fecal hemoglobin (Hb) concentration positivity thresholds. Results: In total, 1,381 volunteers (median age 64 years; 49% male) completed both tests prior to colonoscopy. Estimated sensitivity of the BCAT1/IKZF1 blood test for CRC was 62% (41/66; 95% confidence interval 49–74%) with a specificity of 92% (1207/1315; 90–93%). FIT returned the same specificity at a cutoff of 60 μg Hb/g, at which its corresponding sensitivity for cancer was 64% (42/66; 51–75%). In the range of commonly used FIT cutoffs, respective cancer sensitivity and specificity estimates with FIT were: 59% (46–71%) and 93% (92–95%) at 80 μg Hb/g, and 79% (67–88%) and 81% (78–83%) at 10 μg Hb/g. Although estimated sensitivities were not significantly different between the two tests for any stage of cancer, FIT showed a significantly higher sensitivity for advanced adenoma at the lower cutoffs. Specificity of FIT, but not of the BCAT1/IKZF1 blood test, deteriorated substantially in people with overt blood in the feces. When combining FIT (cutoff 10 μg Hb/g) with the BCAT1/IKZF1 blood test, sensitivity for cancer was 89% (79–96%) at 74% (72–77%) specificity. Conclusions: A test based on detection of methylated BCAT1/IKZF1 DNA in blood has comparable sensitivity but better specificity for CRC than FIT at the commonly used positivity threshold of 10 μg Hb/g. Further evaluation of the new test relative to FIT in the population screening context is now required to fully understand the potential advantages and disadvantages of these biomarkers in screening. PMID:26765125

  8. Altered Gene Expression Patterns During the Initiation and Promotion Stages of Neonatally Diethylstilbestrol-Induced Hyperplasia/Dysplasia/Neoplasia in the Hamster Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, William J.; Hariri, Hussam Y.; Alwis, Imala D.; Gunewardena, Sumedha S.; Hendry, Isabel R.

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal treatment of hamsters with diethylstilbestrol (DES) induces uterine hyperplasia/dysplasia/neoplasia (endometrial adenocarcinoma) in adult animals. We subsequently determined that the neonatal DES exposure event directly and permanently disrupts the developing hamster uterus (initiation stage) so that it responds abnormally when it is stimulated with estrogen in adulthood (promotion stage). To identify candidate molecular elements involved in progression of the disruption/neoplastic process, we performed: 1) immunoblot analyses and 2) microarray profiling (Affymetrix Gene Chip System) on sets of uterine protein and RNA extracts, respectively, and 3) immunohistochemical analysis on uterine sections; all from both initiation stage and promotion stage groups of animals. Here we report that: 1) progression of the neonatal DES-induced hyperplasia/dysplasia/neoplasia phenomenon in the hamster uterus involves a wide spectrum of specific gene expression alterations and 2) the gene products involved and their manner of altered expression differ dramatically during the initiation vs. promotion stages of the phenomenon. Particularly interesting changes included members in the functional categories of nuclear receptors (progesterone receptor), cell-cell interactions (E-cadherin, connexins), cytokine action (IRF-1, Stat5A), growth factor action (IRS-1), extracellular matrix component (tenascin-C), transcription factors (Nrf2, Sp1), and multi-functional nuclear protein (SAFB1). PMID:25242112

  9. ProEx(™) C is a useful ancillary study for grading anal intraepithelial neoplasia alone and in combination with other biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Larson, Brent K; Mohanty, Sambit K; Wu, Julie M; Bose, Shikha; Walts, Ann E

    2016-03-01

    Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is a precursor to invasive anal squamous cell carcinoma. Histologic evaluation is hampered by intra- and interobserver variability. Various biomarkers have been investigated to improve the accuracy and reproducibility of diagnosis and grading, but interpretation can be challenging. ProEx(™) C is an antibody cocktail for proteins upregulated in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. This study investigated ProEx(™) C's role alone and with p16 and Ki-67 in the diagnosis and grading of AIN. Sixty-seven anal tissue samples (22 AIN I, 25 AIN II/III, and 20 non-dysplastic) were stained for ProEx(™) C, Ki-67, and p16. Staining patterns were recorded and correlated with morphologic diagnoses. Considering AIN II/III vs I, full-thickness ProEx(™) C staining was more frequent in AIN II/III (p = 0.0373), and showed the highest sensitivity of the biomarkers. In combination with Ki-67, sensitivity was lower, but specificity for AIN II/III rose to 83%. For differentiating non-dysplasia from AIN I, negative ProEx(™) C staining correlated with non-dysplasia (p < 0.0001) and had the highest sensitivity (90%). In combination with Ki-67, sensitivity dropped to 80%, but specificity was high (96%). ProEx(™) C is useful for diagnosing and grading AIN, performing as well or better than other markers at identifying AIN II/III and non-dysplastic epithelium. PMID:26590011

  10. Accuracy of optical spectroscopy for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia without colposcopic tissue information; a step toward automation for low resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Zewdie, Getie A.; Cox, Dennis D.; Neely Atkinson, E.; Cantor, Scott B.; MacAulay, Calum; Davies, Kalatu; Adewole, Isaac; Buys, Timon P. H.; Follen, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Optical spectroscopy has been proposed as an accurate and low-cost alternative for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. We previously published an algorithm using optical spectroscopy as an adjunct to colposcopy and found good accuracy (sensitivity=1.00 [95% confidence interval (CI)=0.92 to 1.00], specificity=0.71 [95% CI=0.62 to 0.79]). Those results used measurements taken by expert colposcopists as well as the colposcopy diagnosis. In this study, we trained and tested an algorithm for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (i.e., identifying those patients who had histology reading CIN 2 or worse) that did not include the colposcopic diagnosis. Furthermore, we explored the interaction between spectroscopy and colposcopy, examining the importance of probe placement expertise. The colposcopic diagnosis-independent spectroscopy algorithm had a sensitivity of 0.98 (95% CI=0.89 to 1.00) and a specificity of 0.62 (95% CI=0.52 to 0.71). The difference in the partial area under the ROC curves between spectroscopy with and without the colposcopic diagnosis was statistically significant at the patient level (p=0.05) but not the site level (p=0.13). The results suggest that the device has high accuracy over a wide range of provider accuracy and hence could plausibly be implemented by providers with limited training. PMID:22559693

  11. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine increases the numbers of tumors, cystic crypts and aberrant crypt foci in multiple intestinal neoplasia mice.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, I L; Paulsen, J E; Eide, T J; Alexander, J

    1997-05-01

    The multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mice have a mutation in the murine adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene rendering them highly susceptible to spontaneous intestinal adenoma formation, similar to the familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) syndrome in humans. We studied whether the most abundant mutagenic heterocyclic amine isolated from cooked food, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), could influence early intestinal neoplasia in C57BL/6J-Min/+ and C57BL/6J- +/+ (wild-type) mice of both sexes. PhIP was given in 4 weekly i.p. injections of 50 mg/kg. Ten weeks after the start of the experiment, PhIP had significantly increased the numbers of small tumors and cystic crypts in the proximal section of the small intestine in male Min/+ mice, and the numbers of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the large intestines of both males and females. The effects of PhIP were more pronounced in male than in female Min/+ mice. In +/+ mice, no tumors or cystic crypts in the small intestine, and no tumors and only a very few ACF in the large intestine, were induced by PhIP. These results show that a substance frequently present in the human diet is able to enhance the neoplastic process induced by a genetic lesion, which is also commonly found both in inherited and sporadic colon carcinomas in humans. PMID:9163695

  12. Comparison of captive lifespan, age-associated liver neoplasias and age-dependent gene expression between two annual fish species: Nothobranchius furzeri and Nothobranchius korthause.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Mario; Di Cicco, Emiliano; Rossi, Giacomo; Cellerino, Alessandro; Tozzini, Eva Terzibasi

    2015-02-01

    Nothobranchius is a genus of annual fish broadly distributed in South-Eastern Africa and found into temporary ponds generated during the rain seasons and their lifespan is limited by the duration of their habitats. Here we compared two Nothobranchius species from radically different environments: N. furzeri and N. korthausae. We found a large difference in life expectancy (29- against 71-weeks of median life span, 40- against 80-weeks of maximum lifespan, respectively), which correlates with a diverse timing in the onset of several age dependent processes: our data show that N. korthause longer lifespan is associated to retarded onset of age-dependent liver-neoplasia and slower down-regulation of collagen 1 alpha 2 (COL1A2) expression in the skin. On the other hand, the expression of cyclin B1 (CCNB1) in the brain was strongly age-regulated, but with similar profiles in N. furzeri and N. korthausae. In conclusion, our data suggest that the different ageing rate of two species of the same genus could be used as novel tool to investigate and better understand the genetic bases of some general mechanism leading to the complex ageing process, providing a strategy to unravel some of the genetic mechanisms regulating longevity and age-associate pathologies including neoplasias. PMID:25315356

  13. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quiz) Overhydration (Video) Insulin Delivery (News) Special Infant Formulas Don't Shield Against Asthma, Allergies: Study (News) ... I Correct? More Videos News HealthDay Special Infant Formulas Don't Shield Against Asthma, Allergies: Study TUESDAY, ...

  14. Asbestos exposure and neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Selikoff, I.J.; Churg, J.; Hammond, E.C.

    1984-07-06

    Builiding trades insulation workers have relatively light, intermittent, exposure to asbestos. Of 632 insulation workers, who entered the trade before 1943 and were traced through 1962, forty-five died of cancer of the lung or pleura, whereas only 6.6 such deaths were expected. Three of the pleural tumors were mesotheliomas; there was also one peritoneal mesothelioma. Four mesotheliomas in a total of 255 deaths is an exceedingly high incidence for such a rare tumor. In addition, an unexpectedly large number of men died of cancer of the stomach, colon, or rectum (29 compared with 9.4 expected). Other cancers were not increased; 20.5 were expected, 21 occurred. Twelve men died of asbestosis. This landmark article appeared originally in this journal 188:22-26, 1964.

  15. Translational pathology of neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Grizzle, William E; Srivastava, Sudhir; Manne, Upender

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing use of individualized medical care (personalized medicine) in treating and managing patients with cancer, the utilization of biomarkers in selecting and tailoring such medical approaches also is increasing and becoming more important. Specifically, many therapies are effective against only a subgroup of a specific type of tumors and exposing patients with different non-responsive subgroups of the same tumor to ineffective therapies, not only exposes these patients needlessly to acute and chronic side effects of the therapy, but also adds to the costs of medical care. For example, the Oncotype Dx test for estrogen receptor positive tumors that are node negative has been used to identify low risk tumors for which surgery alone is an adequate therapy. Biomarkers may be used to aid in multiple aspects of medical care related to cancer, including early detection, diagnosis, risk assessment, as well as in predicting the aggressiveness of cancers (i.e., prognosis) and predicting the therapeutic efficacy of treatments (i.e., prediction). Biomarkers may be also used as surrogate endpoints to aid in evaluating therapies and preventive approaches. Types of biomarkers vary greatly and include histopathologic appearance, stage of the lesion, quantitative morphologic features, size of the lesion, metastatic pattern and extent of metastasis, as well as imaging and molecular features. The types of measurements of biomarkers also vary; for example, molecular features can be measured at the DNA, mRNA or protein levels as well as at regulatory levels (e.g., microRNA). The usefulness of each biomarker is limited by its sensitivity and specificity in fulfilling its role (e.g., in early detection) and the requirements of sensitivity and specificity to accomplish specific tasks are affected by multiple variables. For example, both very high specificity and sensitivity of a test are required to screen a population with a low prevalence of a specific tumor. The goal of this manuscript is to introduce the reader to how biomarkers may be used and the limitations on the uses of biomarkers in translational research. PMID:22112467

  16. Cytokine gene polymorphisms, cytokine levels and the risk of colorectal neoplasia in a screened population of Northeast Scotland.

    PubMed

    Basavaraju, Umesh; Shebl, Fatma M; Palmer, Andrew J; Berry, Susan; Hold, Georgina L; El-Omar, Emad M; Rabkin, Charles S

    2015-07-01

    Cytokine gene polymorphisms modify expression and their circulating protein levels reflect inflammatory response. Chronic inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia (CRN) associated with inflammatory bowel disease, but it is not clear whether inflammation is a cause or an effect of tumours in sporadic CRN. We therefore investigated the association of cytokine gene polymorphisms and circulating cytokine levels on the risk of CRN in Northeast Scotland, which has a high incidence of CRN. We recruited two groups of patients from a screening colonoscopy cohort, either preprocedure or 3-24 months postprocedure. Participants with CRN were compared with participants with no evidence of CRN (controls). Blood-derived DNA was used to genotype polymorphisms in IL1B, IL1-RN, IL6, IL8, IL10, PTGS2 and TNFA genes. Circulating levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and six cytokines [interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)] were measured. To examine the effect of CRN resection on marker levels, we used propensity score matching. A total of 884 patients were eligible for analysis, including 388 CRN cases and 496 controls. Cases were older (mean age 64 vs. 62 years, P<0.01) and more likely to be men (67 vs. 55%, P<0.001). Controls were more likely to be regular users of NSAID (P<0.0001). Compared with homozygous carriage of respective common alleles, proinflammatory CC genotypes of IL1B-31C>T [odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.68 (1.03-2.73)] and PTGS2-765 C>G [OR (95% CI) 2.97 (1.05-8.46)] were each associated with an increased risk of CRN. Conversely, carriage of the A allele of IL8-251A>T was associated with a lower risk of CRN compared with the TT genotype [ORs (95% CI) 0.60 (0.41-0.86) for heterozygous, 0.88 (0.57-1.37) for homozygous, and 0.68 (0.48-0.95) for heterozygous and homozygous combined]. Compared with postprocedure cases, IL8, TNF-α and C-reactive protein levels were significantly higher in preprocedure cases, but IL4 and IL10 protein levels were significantly lower. Proinflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms in IL1B-31 and PTGS2-765 increase the risk of developing CRN. Levels of proinflammatory IL8, TNF-α and C-reactive protein markers are significantly higher while CRN is in situ. Along with the NSAID findings, these data point to inflammation as an underlying pathogenetic mechanism in CRN. PMID:25350634

  17. Update on intraepithelial neoplasia of the vulva: proceedings of a Workshop at the 2009 World Congress of the International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Diseases, Edinburgh, Scotland, September 2009.

    PubMed

    Heller, Debra S; van Seters, Manon; Marchitelli, Claudia; Moyal-Barracco, Michelline; Preti, Mario; van Beurden, Marc

    2010-10-01

    A workshop on updates on intraepithelial neoplasia of the vulva was held at the 2009 World Congress of the International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Diseases in Edinburgh, Scotland, September 2009. This is a review of the information presented. PMID:20885166

  18. Zinc finger arrays binding human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 genomic DNA: precursors of gene-therapeutics for in-situ reversal of associated cervical neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are the high-risk, sexually transmitted infectious causes of most cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN) or cancers. While efficacious vaccines to reduce the sexual acquisition of these high-risk HPVs have recently been introduced, no virus-targeted therapies exist for those already exposed and infected. Considering the oncogenic role of the transforming (E6 and E7) genes of high-risk HPVs in the slow pathogenesis of cervical cancer, we hypothesize that timely disruption or abolition of HPV genome expression within pre-cancerous lesions identified at screening may reverse neoplasia. We aimed to derive model zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) for mutagenesis of the genomes of two high-risk HPV (types 16 & 18). Methods and results Using ZiFiT software and the complete genomes of HPV types16 and 18, we computationally generated the consensus amino acid sequences of the DNA-binding domains (F1, F2, & F3) of (i) 296 & 327 contextually unpaired (or single) three zinc-finger arrays (sZFAs) and (ii) 9 & 13 contextually paired (left and right) three- zinc-finger arrays (pZFAs) that bind genomic DNA of HPV-types 16 and 18 respectively, inclusive of the E7 gene (s/pZFAHpV/E7). In the absence of contextually paired three-zinc-finger arrays (pZFAs) that bind DNA corresponding to the genomic context of the E6 gene of either HPV type, we derived the DNA binding domains of another set of 9 & 14 contextually unpaired E6 gene-binding ZFAs (sZFAE6) to aid the future quest for paired ZFAs to target E6 gene sequences in both HPV types studied (pZFAE6). This paper presents models for (i) synthesis of hybrid ZFNs that cleave within the genomic DNA of either HPV type, by linking the gene sequences of the DNA-cleavage domain of the FokI endonuclease FN to the gene sequences of a member of the paired-HPV-binding ZFAs (pZFAHpV/E7 + FN), and (ii) delivery of the same into precancerous lesions using HPV-derived viral plasmids or vectors. Conclusions With further optimization, these model ZFNs offer the opportunity to induce target-mutagenesis and gene-therapeutic reversal of cervical neoplasia associated with HPV types 16 & 18. PMID:22840184

  19. Cryospray ablation using pressurized CO2 for ablation of Barrett’s esophagus with early neoplasia: early termination of a prospective series

    PubMed Central

    Verbeek, Romy E.; Vleggaar, Frank P.; ten Kate, Fiebo J.; van Baal, Jantine W. P. M.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cryotherapy is a relatively novel ablation modality for the endoscopic ablation of Barrett’s esophagus (BE). Data on the use of pressurized carbon dioxide (CO2) gas for cryoablation are scarce. Study aim: To determine the efficacy and safety of cryospray ablation using pressurized CO2 gas in the treatment of BE with early neoplasia. Methods: In this prospective single center case series, we aimed to include 30 patients with BE and early neoplasia. Nodular neoplastic lesions were treated with endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Residual BE mucosa was treated with cryospray ablation every 4 weeks until the complete BE segment was eliminated or up to seven treatment sessions. If no reduction of the BE segment was observed after two subsequent treatment sessions, cryoablation was terminated. Patients were contacted at days 1 and 4 post-treatment to evaluate the level of discomfort. Endoscopic and histologic follow-up evaluations were performed up to 24 months post-treatment. Results: After the inclusion of 10 patients, insufficient effect of cryoablation was observed, resulting in early termination of the study. In total, seven patients with intramucosal carcinoma (IMC) and three with high grade dysplasia (HGD) were included. Prior EMR was performed in nine patients. A median of 2.5 (IQR 2.0 – 4.0) cryoablation sessions were performed. At 6 months of follow-up, complete eradication of intestinal metaplasia was observed in 11 % (1 /9; one patient died, not treatment or disease related) of the patients and complete eradication of dysplasia in 44 % (4 /9). In three patients, HGD or IMC was detected during follow-up, and was endoscopically treated. Apart from a gastric perforation as a result of gastric distension caused by CO2 gas during the first treatment, cryospray treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion: After a short learning curve, cryoablation using CO2 gas was found to be a safe and well tolerated treatment modality. However, in our experience, the efficacy of CO2 cryoablation combined with EMR for nodular lesions is disappointing for the treatment of BE associated neoplasia. PMID:26135648

  20. Multiple therapeutic and preventive effects of 3,3′-diindolylmethane on cancers including prostate cancer and high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, William Weiben; Feng, Zhenqing; Narod, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cruciferous vegetables belong to the plant family that has flowers with four equal-sized petals in the pattern of a crucifer cross. These vegetables are an abundant source of dietary phytochemicals, including glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products such as indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM). By 2013, the total number of natural glucosinolates that have been documented is estimated to be 132. Recently, cruciferous vegetable intake has garnered great interest for its multiple health benefits such as anticancer, antiviral infections, human sex hormone regulation, and its therapeutic and preventive effects on prostate cancer and high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). DIM is a hydrolysis product of glucosinolates and has been used in various trials. This review is to provide an insight into the latest developments of DIM in treating or preventing both prostate cancer and HGPIN. PMID:25332705

  1. High grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia among HIV-1-infected men screening for a multi-center clinical trial of a human papillomavirus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wilkin, Timothy; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Lensing, Shelly Y.; Stier, Elizabeth A.; Goldstone, Stephen E.; Berry, J. Michael; Jay, Naomi; Aboulafia, David M.; Einstein, Mark H.; Saah, Alfred; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN) is the precursor lesion to invasive anal cancer. HPV vaccination holds great promise for preventing anal cancer. Methods We examined 235 HIV-1-infected men screening for participation in a multi-site clinical trial of a quadrivalent HPV vaccine. All participants had anal swabs obtained for HPV testing and cytology, and high resolution anoscopy with biopsies of visible lesions to assess for HGAIN. Results HPV 16 and 18 were detected in 23% and 10%, respectively; abnormal anal cytology was found in 56% and HGAIN in 30%. HGAIN prevalence was significantly higher in those with HPV 16 detection compared to those without (38% vs. 17%, P=.01). Use of antiretroviral therapy, nadir and current CD4+ cell count were not associated with abnormal anal cytology or HGAIN. Conclusion HGAIN is highly prevalent in HIV-infected men. Further studies are needed on treatment and prevention of HGAIN. PMID:23611828

  2. Evaluation and Management of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia in HIV-Negative and HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Park, Ina U; Palefsky, Joel M

    2010-03-01

    The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated anal cancer in men who have sex with men (MSM) is striking and has not been mitigated by the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Detection and treatment of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN) may reduce the incidence of anal cancer. Anal cytology is a useful tool to detect HGAIN; annual screening of HIV-positive MSM and biennial screening of HIV-negative MSM appears to be cost-effective. MSM with abnormal cytology should be referred for high-resolution anoscopy and biopsy. Individuals with HGAIN should receive treatment; treatment modalities for HGAIN demonstrate moderate efficacy and are usually well tolerated, but greater study is required to determine which treatment is optimal. Large prospective studies are needed to document the efficacy of screening and treatment of HGAIN on anal cancer incidence. The HPV vaccine holds promise for primary prevention of anal cancer in MSM, but significant implementation challenges remain. PMID:20461117

  3. Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogense-1B and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2, alcohol flushing, mean corpuscular volume, and aerodigestive tract neoplasia in Japanese drinkers.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Akira; Mizukami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase-1B (ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) modulate exposure levels to ethanol/acetaldehyde. Endoscopic screening of 6,014 Japanese alcoholics yielded high detection rates of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; 4.1%) and head and neck SCC (1.0%). The risks of upper aerodigestive tract SCC/dysplasia, especially of multiple SCC/dysplasia, were increased in a multiplicative fashion by the presence of a combination of slow-metabolizing ADH1B*1/*1 and inactive heterozygous ALDH2*1/*2 because of prolonged exposure to higher concentrations of ethanol/acetaldehyde. A questionnaire asking about current and past facial flushing after drinking a glass (?180 mL) of beer is a reliable tool for detecting the presence of inactive ALDH2. We invented a health-risk appraisal (HRA) model including the flushing questionnaire and drinking, smoking, and dietary habits. Esophageal SCC was detected at a high rate by endoscopic mass-screening in high HRA score persons. A total of 5.0% of 4,879 alcoholics had a history of (4.0%) or newly diagnosed (1.0%) gastric cancer. Their high frequency of a history of gastric cancer is partly explained by gastrectomy being a risk factor for alcoholism because of altered ethanol metabolism, e.g., by blood ethanol level overshooting. The combination of H. pylori-associated atrophic gastritis and ALDH2*1/*2 showed the greatest risk of gastric cancer in alcoholics. High detection rates of advanced colorectal adenoma/carcinoma were found in alcoholics, 15.7% of 744 immunochemical fecal occult blood test (IFOBT)-negative alcoholics and 31.5% of the 393 IFOBT-positive alcoholics. Macrocytosis with an MCV?106 fl increased the risk of neoplasia in the entire aerodigestive tract of alcoholics, suggesting that poor nutrition as well as ethanol/acetaldehyde exposure plays an important role in neoplasia. PMID:25427912

  4. Importance of universal mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry in patients with sebaceous neoplasia as an initial screening tool for Muir-Torre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jessup, Chad J; Redston, Mark; Tilton, Erin; Reimann, Julie D R

    2016-03-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome, a Lynch syndrome variant, is characterized by sebaceous neoplasia plus one or more malignancies, typically colon cancer. The significance of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency detection by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in colorectal carcinomas is well established and is recommended as a screening tool for Lynch syndrome in newly diagnosed colorectal carcinomas. In comparison, literature on IHC application to detect MMR proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) in sebaceous neoplasia has been less studied and has been derived almost exclusively from tertiary care centers. Herein we describe the largest series to date characterizing MMR deficiency in sebaceous neoplasms, as well as the relative frequencies of each deficiency. Two hundred sixteen consecutive sebaceous neoplasms (216 patients) were analyzed from a community practice setting (133 sebaceous adenomas, 68 sebaceomas, 15 sebaceous carcinomas). One hundred forty-three were MMR deficient (66%), of which 90 were MSH2/MSH6 deficient (63%), 27 MLH1/PMS2 deficient (19%), 22 MSH6 deficient (15%), and 4 PMS2 deficient (3%). MMR deficiency was significantly associated with site, with tumors off of the head and neck more likely to be MMR deficient (specificity 96%). In contrast to prior reports, no significant trend in MMR-deficient versus -nondeficient tumors was seen in age at presentation (median age, 68 versus 66), tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, or tumor type. Given the low sensitivity of age < 60 years (30%), location off of the head and neck (41%), or presence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (29%) in MMR deficiency detection, IHC screening programs should test all sebaceous neoplasms for MMR deficiency, regardless of their clinicopathological features. PMID:26826402

  5. Evaluation of T, B and natural killer lymphocyte in the cervical stroma of HIV-positive and negative patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Adriana A S; Guimarães, Mírian Viviane M B; Michelin, Márcia A; Lodi, Cláudia T C; Lima, Maria Inês M; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido; Melo, Victor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN) are closely associated with oncogenic subtypes of the human papillomavirus (HPV). In the presence of this virus, it is known that the activation or suppression of immune system is the key to the development, progression and/or regression of cervical lesions. Therefore, the objective of this study is to compare the local immune response among HIV-seropositive and seronegative patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia regarding the expression of T lymphocytes (CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+), B lymphocytes (CD20+) and natural killers cells (CD56+) in the cervical stroma. A cross-sectional study of paraffin blocks containing cervical tissue after conization by the Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP) from 47 HIV-seropositive and 38 seronegative patients with CIN. Cervical stroma immunohistochemistry was performed in the CIN area. The Fisher's exact test was used for the statistical analysis. When HIV-seropositive and seronegative women were compared, the seropositive women had a higher count of CD8+ T lymphocytes (52.1% versus 28.9%, P<0.04). Considering CIN degree (CIN 1 and CIN 2/3), the HIV-seronegative patients with CIN 1 had a low count of CD20+B-lymphocytes (7.1%) in comparison with CIN 1 HIV seropositive and with CIN 2/3 HIV-seronegative patients, respectively 50% (P<0.018) and 54.5% (P<0.0048). The HIV infection and degree of CIN influenced the cytotoxic lymphocytes inducing an increase in the number of cells high count of CD20+ lymphocytes with CIN 1. PMID:26545568

  6. A Phase I Safety, Pharmacokinetic, and Pharmacodynamic Presurgical Trial of Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol in Patients with Pancreatic Ductal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Springett, Gregory M.; Husain, Kazim; Neuger, Anthony; Centeno, Barbara; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Hutchinson, Tai Z.; Lush, Richard M.; Sebti, Saïd; Malafa, Mokenge P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol (VEDT), a natural vitamin E from plants, has shown anti-neoplastic and chemoprevention activity in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. Here, we investigated VEDT in patients with pancreatic ductal neoplasia in a window-of-opportunity preoperative clinical trial to assess its safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and apoptotic activity. Methods Patients received oral VEDT at escalating doses (from 200 to 3200 mg) daily for 13 days before surgery and one dose on the day of surgery. Dose escalation followed a three-plus-three trial design. Our primary endpoints were safety, VEDT pharmacokinetics, and monitoring of VEDT-induced neoplastic cell apoptosis (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00985777). Findings In 25 treated patients, no dose-limiting toxicity was encountered; thus no maximum-tolerated dose was reached. One patient had a drug-related adverse event (diarrhea) at a 3200-mg daily dose level. The effective half-life of VEDT was ~ 4 h. VEDT concentrations in plasma and exposure profiles were quite variable but reached levels that are bioactive in preclinical models. Biological activity, defined as significant induction of apoptosis in neoplastic cells as measured by increased cleaved caspase-3 levels, was seen in the majority of patients at the 400-mg to 1600-mg daily dose levels. Interpretation VEDT from 200 to 1600 mg daily taken orally for 2 weeks before pancreatic surgery was well tolerated, reached bioactive levels in blood, and significantly induced apoptosis in the neoplastic cells of patients with pancreatic ductal neoplasia. These promising results warrant further clinical investigation of VEDT for chemoprevention and/or therapy of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26844278

  7. Galaxias australes con núcleo doble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno, G.; Díaz, R.; Carranza, G.

    Se estudia una muestra de galaxias australes con núcleo doble a partir de una búsqueda extensiva en la literatura. Se analizan las características morfológicas, fotométricas y espectroscópicas de la muestra. Para algunas galaxias se han realizado observaciones con el espectrógrafo multifunción (EMF) de la Estación Astrofísica de Bosque Alegre a partir de las cuales se determinaron parámetros cinemáticos.

  8. Histological and cytological evidence of viral infection and human papillomavirus type 16 DNA sequences in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and normal tissue in the west of Scotland: evaluation of treatment policy

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, J B; Cassidy, L J; Fletcher, K; Cordiner, J W; Macnab, J C M

    1988-01-01

    Biopsy samples from 27 patients referred to a colposcopy clinic in Glasgow for cervical abnormalities were assessed for the relations among colposcopic appearances, cytological and histological diagnosis, expression of papillomavirus antigen, and the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, and 18 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences. Specimens were from colposcopically abnormal areas of the transformation zone and from colposcopically apparently normal areas of the zone in the same patients (paired matched internal control tissue). All 27 women referred for abnormal smears had colposcopic abnormalities. HPV-16 or 18 DNA sequences were detected in 20 of the 27 colposcopically abnormal biopsy samples and 13 of the 27 paired normal samples. Twelve samples of colposcopically normal tissue contained histological evidence of viral infection but only four of these contained HPV DNA sequences. The other nine samples of colposcopically normal tissue which contained HPV DNA sequences were, however, histologically apparently normal. HPV-6 and 11 were not detected. Integration of the HPV-16 genome into the host chromosome was indicated in both cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and control tissues. In two thirds of the HPV DNA positive samples the histological grade was classed as normal, viral atypia, or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1. Papillomavirus antigen was detected in only six of the abnormal and three of the normal biopsy samples, and HPV DNA was detected in all of these. The detection of HPV DNA correlates well with a combination of histological and cytological evidence of viral infection (20 of 22 cases in this series). A poor correlation between the site on the cervix of histologically confirmed colposcopic abnormality and the presence of HPV DNA sequences implies that a cofactor other than HPV is required for preneoplastic disease to develop. A separate study in two further sets of biopsy samples examined the state of HPV DNA alone. The sets were (a) 43 samples from cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and nine external controls and (b) 155 samples from cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, cervical cancer, vulval intraepithelial neoplasia, and vulval cancer and external controls. HPV-11 was found in only two (4·7%) of the 43 specimens from cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, whereas HPV-16 was found in 90 (58%) of the other 155 specimens. These results also suggest that HPV subtype is subject to geographical location rather than being an indicator of severity of the lesion or of prognosis. ImagesFIG 1FIG 2 PMID:2830935

  9. InterCon Travel Health: Case B

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truman, Gregory E.; Pachamanova, Dessislava A.; Goldstein, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    InterCon provides services to health insurers of foreign tourists who travel to the United States and Canada. Management wants to implement a new information system that will deal with several operational problems, but it is having difficulty securing the capital resources to fund the system's development. After an initial failure, the chief…

  10. The pros and cons of hospital employment.

    PubMed

    Bert, Jack M

    2013-09-01

    The pros and cons of hospital employment vary significantly in today's economic environment. This chapter summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of hospital employment with an emphasis on the critical aspect of formalizing an agreement with the hospital employer to prevent future salary reductions and/or termination. PMID:23924751

  11. Certificate of Need (CON) for Cardiac Care: Controversy over the Contributions of CON

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Vivian; Ku-Goto, Meei-Hsiang; Jollis, James G

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To test whether state Certificate of Need (CON) regulations influence procedural mortality or the provision of coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Data Sources Medicare inpatient claims obtained for 1989–2002 for patients age 65+ who received CABG or PCI. Study Design We used differences-in-differences regression analysis to compare states that dropped CON during the sample period with states that kept the regulations. We examined procedural mortality, the number of hospitals in the state performing CABG or PCI, mean hospital volume, and statewide procedure volume for CABG and PCI. Principal Findings States that dropped CON experienced lower CABG mortality rates relative to states that kept CON, although the differential is not permanent. No such mortality difference is found for PCI. Dropping CON is associated with more providers statewide and lower mean hospital volume for both CABG and PCI. However, statewide procedure counts remain the same. Conclusions We find no evidence that CON regulations are associated with higher quality CABG or PCI. Future research should examine whether the greater number of hospitals performing revascularization after CON removal raises expenditures due to the building of more facilities, or lowers expenditures due to enhanced price competition. PMID:19207590

  12. Ependimoma myxopapilar sacro gigante con osteolisis

    PubMed Central

    Ajler, Pablo; Landriel, Federico; Goldschmidt, Ezequiel; Campero, Álvaro; Yampolsky, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Objetivo: la presentación de un caso de una paciente con un ependimoma sacro con extensa infiltración y destrucción ósea local. Descripción del caso: una mujer de 53 años acudió a la consulta por dolor lumbosacro y alteraciones sensitivas perineales y esfinterianas. La imágenes por Resonancia Magnética (IRM) y la Tomografía Axial Computada (TAC) mostraron una lesión expansiva gigante a nivel S2-S4 con extensa osteólisis e invasión de tejidos adyacentes. Se realizó una exéresis tumoral completa con mejoría del estatus funcional. La anatomía patológica informó ependimoma mixopapilar. Discusión: la extensión de la resección quirúrgica es el mejor predictor de buen pronóstico. El tratamiento radiante se reserva como opción adyuvante para las resecciones incompletas y recidiva tumoral. La quimioterapia sólo debería utilizarse en casos en que la cirugía y la radioterapia estén contraindicadas. Conclusión: Los ependimomas mixopapilares sacros con destrucción ósea y presentación intra y extradural son muy infrecuentes y deben ser tenidos en cuenta entre los diagnósticos diferenciales preoperatorios. Su resección total, siempre que sea posible, es la mejor alternativa terapéutica. PMID:25165615

  13. In-Vivo Nonlinear Optical Microscopy (NLOM) of Epithelial-Connective Tissue Interface (ECTI) Reveals Quantitative Measures of Neoplasia in Hamster Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Rahul; Yang, Jinping; Ortiz, Daniel; Qiu, Suimin; Resto, Vicente; McCammon, Susan; Vargas, Gracie

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial-connective tissue interface (ECTI) plays an integral role in epithelial neoplasia, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). This interface undergoes significant alterations due to hyperproliferating epithelium that supports the transformation of normal epithelium to precancers and cancer. We present a method based on nonlinear optical microscopy to directly assess the ECTI and quantify dysplastic alterations using a hamster model for oral carcinogenesis. Neoplastic and non-neoplastic normal mucosa were imaged in-vivo by both multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy (MPAM) and second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM) to obtain cross-sectional reconstructions of the oral epithelium and lamina propria. Imaged sites were biopsied and processed for histopathological grading and measurement of ECTI parameters. An ECTI shape parameter was calculated based on deviation from the linear geometry (ΔLinearity) seen in normal mucosa was measured using MPAM-SHGM and histology. The ECTI was readily visible in MPAM-SHGM and quantitative shape analysis showed ECTI deformation in dysplasia but not in normal mucosa. ΔLinearity was significantly (p < 0.01) higher in dysplasia (0.41±0.24) than normal (0.11±0.04) as measured in MPAM-SHGM and results were confirmed in histology which showed similar trends in ΔLinearity. Increase in ΔLinearity was also statistically significant for different grades of dysplasia. In-vivo ΔLinearity measurement alone from microscopy discriminated dysplasia from normal tissue with 87.9% sensitivity and 97.6% specificity, while calculations from histology provided 96.4% sensitivity and 85.7% specificity. Among other quantifiable architectural changes, a progressive statistically significant increase in epithelial thickness was seen with increasing grade of dysplasia. MPAM-SHGM provides new noninvasive ways for direct characterization of ECTI which may be used in preclinical studies to investigate the role of this interface in early transformation. Further development of the method may also lead to new diagnostic approaches to differentiate non-neoplastic tissue from precancers and neoplasia, possibly with other cellular and layer based indicators of abnormality. PMID:25633927

  14. ERBB2 in Cat Mammary Neoplasias Disclosed a Positive Correlation between RNA and Protein Low Expression Levels: A Model for erbB-2 Negative Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Rui M. V.; Bastos, Estela; Amorim, Irina; Gut, Ivo G.; Grtner, Ftima; Chaves, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Human ERBB2 is a proto-oncogene that codes for the erbB-2 epithelial growth factor receptor. In human breast cancer (HBC), erbB-2 protein overexpression has been repeatedly correlated with poor prognosis. In more recent works, underexpression of this gene has been described in HBC. Moreover, it is also recognised that oncogenes that are commonly amplified or deleted encompass point mutations, and some of these are associated with HBC. In cat mammary lesions (CMLs), the overexpression of ERBB2 (27%59.6%) has also been described, mostly at the protein level and although cat mammary neoplasias are considered to be a natural model of HBC, molecular information is still scarce. In the present work, a cat ERBB2 fragment, comprising exons 10 to 15 (ERBB2_1015) was achieved for the first time. Allelic variants and genomic haplotype analyses were also performed, and differences between normal and CML populations were observed. Three amino acid changes, corresponding to 3 non-synonymous genomic sequence variants that were only detected in CMLs, were proposed to damage the 3D structure of the protein. We analysed the cat ERBB2 gene at the DNA (copy number determination), mRNA (expression levels assessment) and protein levels (in extra- and intra protein domains) in CML samples and correlated the last two evaluations with clinicopathological features. We found a positive correlation between the expression levels of the ERBB2 RNA and erbB-2 protein, corresponding to the intracellular region. Additionally, we detected a positive correlation between higher mRNA expression and better clinical outcome. Our results suggest that the ERBB2 gene is post-transcriptionally regulated and that proteins with truncations and single point mutations are present in cat mammary neoplastic lesions. We would like to emphasise that the recurrent occurrence of low erbB-2 expression levels in cat mammary tumours, suggests the cat mammary neoplasias as a valuable model for erbB-2 negative HBC. PMID:24386251

  15. Large duct type invasive adenocarcinoma of the pancreas with microcystic and papillary patterns: a potential microscopic mimic of non-invasive ductal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Bagci, Pelin; Andea, Aleodor A; Basturk, Olca; Jang, Kee-Taek; Erbarut, Ipek; Adsay, Volkan

    2012-03-01

    A morphological variant of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma forming large ductal elements, large duct type ductal adenocarcinoma, is documented and its clinicopathological features are studied. These tumors may have microcystic and papillary growth patterns that closely mimic the non-invasive cystic and papillary pancreatic tumors such as: intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasia, including the oncocytic variant, mucinous cystic neoplasms, and ducts involved by pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. In a review of 230 pancreatectomy specimens with ductal adenocarcinoma, 28 (8%) cases of large duct type ductal adenocarcinomas were identified according to following criteria: more than 50% of the tumor sections available for examination contained infiltrative ducts with a diameter larger than 0.5 mm or had a macroscopically identifiable microcystic pattern. Overall characteristics of large duct type ductal adenocarcinomas were not too different than those of conventional ductal adenocarcinomas, except that there was a slight female predominance in the former (F/M=2.3). The mean age was 67 (vs 63 in conventional ductal adenocarcinomas; P=0.015), and occurrence in the tail was slightly more common (40% vs 18% in conventional ductal adenocarcinomas; P=0.006). Grossly, cysts measuring up to 1 cm was noted in 10 cases. Microscopically, large duct type adenocarcinomas were characterized by irregularly distributed large ducts with jagged edges, lined by columnar mucinous cells often having deceptively bland cytological features and variable degrees of papillomatosis. Stromal desmoplasia had a hypercellular quality (morphologically distinct from ovarian-like stroma) in four cases, and had a myxoid quality in others. KRAS oncogene mutation was identified in 9 out of 11 cases. Median, 1-year and 2-year survival rates were 16 months, 77% and 30%, respectively, as opposed to 12 months, 52% and 30%, respectively, in conventional ductal adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, it should be recognized that, some (8%) pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas exhibit a large duct pattern that may microscopically mimic non-invasive pancreatic tumors characterized by cystic and papillary patterns. They may be distinguished by the relatively smaller size of the cysts, irregularity of the duct contours, clustering of the ducts, presence of intraluminal neutrophils and granular debris, degree of cytological pleomorphism, and myxoid quality of the stroma. Clinical behavior appears to be slightly better than that of conventional ductal adenocarcinoma, which may be accounted by the well-differentiated nature of these tumors. PMID:22056954

  16. The role of prostaglandin E2 (PGE 2) in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated colitis-associated neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We have previously found that TLR4-deficient (TLR4-/-) mice demonstrate decreased expression of mucosal PGE 2 and are protected against colitis-associated neoplasia. However, it is still unclear whether PGE 2 is the central factor downstream of TLR4 signaling that promotes intestinal tumorigenesis. To further elucidate critical downstream pathways involving TLR4-mediated intestinal tumorigenesis, we examined the effects of exogenously administered PGE 2 in TLR4-/- mice to see if PGE 2 bypasses the protection from colitis-associated tumorigenesis. Method Mouse colitis-associated neoplasia was induced by azoxymethane (AOM) injection followed by two cycles of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) treatment. Two different doses of PGE 2 (high dose group, 200 μg, n = 8; and low dose group, 100 μg, n = 6) were administered daily during recovery period of colitis by gavage feeding. Another group was given PGE 2 during DSS treatment (200 μg, n = 5). Inflammation and dysplasia were assessed histologically. Mucosal Cox-2 and amphiregulin (AR) expression, prostanoid synthesis, and EGFR activation were analyzed. Results In control mice treated with PBS, the average number of tumors was greater in WT mice (n = 13) than in TLR4-/- mice (n = 7). High dose but not low dose PGE 2 treatment caused an increase in epithelial proliferation. 28.6% of PBS-treated TLR4-/- mice developed dysplasia (tumors/animal: 0.4 ± 0.2). By contrast, 75.0% (tumors/animal: 1.5 ± 1.2, P < 0.05) of the high dose group and 33.3% (tumors/animal: 0.3 ± 0.5) of the low dose group developed dysplasia in TLR4-/- mice. Tumor size was also increased by high dose PGE 2 treatment. Endogenous prostanoid synthesis was differentially affected by PGE 2 treatment during acute and recovery phases of colitis. Exogenous administration of PGE 2 increased colitis-associated tumorigenesis but this only occurred during the recovery phase. Lastly, PGE 2 treatment increased mucosal expression of AR and Cox-2, thus inducing EGFR activation and forming a positive feedback mechanism to amplify mucosal Cox-2. Conclusions These results highlight the importance of PGE 2 as a central downstream molecule involving TLR4-mediated intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:20637112

  17. Design and methods of a population-based natural history study of cervical neoplasia in a rural province of Costa Rica: the Guanacaste Project.

    PubMed

    Herrero, R; Schiffman, M H; Bratti, C; Hildesheim, A; Balmaceda, I; Sherman, M E; Greenberg, M; Crdenas, F; Gmez, V; Helgesen, K; Morales, J; Hutchinson, M; Mango, L; Alfaro, M; Potischman, N W; Wacholder, S; Swanson, C; Brinton, L A

    1997-05-01

    This paper reports on the enrollment phase of a population-based natural history study of cervical neoplasia in Guanacaste, a rural province of Costa Rica with consistently high rates of invasive cervical cancer. The main goals of the study are to investigate the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and its co-factors in the etiology of high-grade cervical neoplasia, and to evaluate new cervical cancer screening technologies. To begin, a random sample of censal segments was selected and enumeration of all resident women 18 years of age and over was conducted with the aid of outreach workers of the Costa Rican Ministry of Health. Of the 10738 women who were eligible to participate, 10049 (93.6%) were interviewed after giving written informed consent. After the interview on cervical cancer risk factors was administered, a pelvic examination was performed on those women who reported previous sexual activity. The pelvic examination included a vaginal pH determination and collection of cervical cells for cytologic diagnosis using three different techniques. Additional cervical cells were collected for determination of the presence and amount of DNA from 16 different types of HPV, and two photographic images of the cervix were taken and interpreted offsite by an expert colposcopist. Finally, blood samples were collected for immunologic and micronutrient assays. Women with any abnormal cytologic diagnosis or a positive Cervigram, as well as a sample of the whole group, were referred for colposcopy, and biopsies were taken when lesions were observed. The enrollment screening will serve as the basis for a prevalent case-control study, and the members of the cohort free from serious disease will be followed actively, at intervals of no more than a year, to study the natural history of HPV infection and the origins of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Details of the field operation are outlined, with particular reference to the realization of this kind of study in developing countries. Descriptive data on the prevalence of disease and exposure to various risk factors are also presented. PMID:9180057

  18. Conditional Expression of Human 15-Lipoxygenase-1 in Mouse Prostate Induces Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia: The FLiMP Mouse Model1

    PubMed Central

    Kelavkar, Uddhav P; Parwani, Anil V; Shappell, Scott B; Martin, W David

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The incidence and mortality of prostate cancer (PCa) vary greatly in different geographic regions, for which lifestyle factors, such as dietary fat intake, have been implicated. Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LO-1), which metabolizes polyunsaturated fatty acids, is a highly regulated, tissue-specific, lipid-peroxidating enzyme that functions in physiological membrane remodeling and in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. We have shown that aberrant overexpression of 15-LO-1 occurs in human PCa, particularly high-grade PCa, and in high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), and that the murine orthologue is increased in SV40-based genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models of PCa, such as LADY and TRansgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate. To further define the role of 15-LO-1 in prostate carcinogenesis, we established a novel GEM model with targeted overexpression of h15-LO-1 in the prostate [human fifteen lipoxygenase-1 in mouse prostate (FLiMP)]. We used a Cre- mediated and a loxP-mediated recombination strategy to target h15-LO-1 specifically to the prostate of C57BL/6 mice. Wild-type (wt), FLiMP+/-, and FLiMP+/+ mice aged 7 to 21, 24 to 28, and 35 weeks were characterized by histopathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and DNA/RNA and enzyme analyses. Compared to wt mice, h15-LO-1 enzyme activity was increased similarly in both homozygous FLiMP+/+ and hemizygous FLiMP+/- prostates. Dorsolateral and ventral prostates of FLiMP mice showed focal and progressive epithelial hyperplasia with nuclear atypia, indicative of the definition of mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN) according to the National Cancer Institute. These foci showed increased proliferation by Ki-67 IHC. No progression to invasive PCa was noted up to 35 weeks. By IHC, h15-LO-1 expression was limited to luminal epithelial cells, with increased expression in mPIN foci (similar to human HGPIN). In summary, targeted overexpression of h15-LO-1 (a gene overexpressed in human PCa and HGPIN) to mouse prostate is sufficient to promote epithelial proliferation and mPIN development. These results support 15-LO-1 as having a role in prostate tumor initiation and as an early target for dietary or other prevention strategies. The FLiMP mouse model should also be useful in crosses with other GEM models to further define the combinations of molecular alterations necessary for PCa progression. PMID:16820097

  19. Clinical data and characterization of the liver conditional mouse model exclude neoplasia as a non-neurological manifestation associated with Friedreich’s ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Alain; Friedman, Lisa S.; Reutenauer, Laurence; Messaddeq, Nadia; Perlman, Susan L.; Lynch, David R.; Fedosov, Kathrin; Schulz, Jörg B.; Pandolfo, Massimo; Puccio, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA) is the most common hereditary ataxia in the caucasian population and is characterized by a mixed spinocerebellar and sensory ataxia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and increased incidence of diabetes. FRDA is caused by impaired expression of the FXN gene coding for the mitochondrial protein frataxin. During the past ten years, the development of mouse models of FRDA has allowed better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. Among the mouse models of FRDA, the liver conditional mouse model pointed to a tumor suppressor activity of frataxin leading to the hypothesis that individuals with FRDA might be predisposed to cancer. In the present work, we investigated the presence and the incidence of neoplasia in the largest FRDA patient cohorts from the USA, Australia and Europe. As no predisposition to cancer could be observed in both cohorts, we revisited the phenotype of the liver conditional mouse model. Our results show that frataxin-deficient livers developed early mitochondriopathy, iron-sulfur cluster deficits and intramitochondrial dense deposits, classical hallmarks observed in frataxin-deficient tissues and cells. With age, a minority of mice developed structures similar to the ones previously associated with tumor formation. However, these peripheral structures contained dying, frataxin-deficient hepatocytes, whereas the inner liver structure was composed of a pool of frataxin-positive cells, due to inefficient Cre-mediated recombination of the Fxn gene, that contributed to regeneration of a functional liver. Together, our data demonstrate that frataxin deficiency and tumorigenesis are not associated. PMID:22736457

  20. A potential pathogenetic mechanism for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 syndromes involves ret-induced impairment of terminal differentiation of neuroepithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Califano, D; D'Alessio, A; Colucci-D'Amato, G L; De Vita, G; Monaco, C; Santelli, G; Di Fiore, P P; Vecchio, G; Fusco, A; Santoro, M; de Franciscis, V

    1996-01-01

    Germ-line missense mutations of the receptor-like tyrosine kinase ret are the causative genetic event of the multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A and type 2B syndromes and of the familial medullary thyroid carcinoma. We have used the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12, as a model system to investigate the mechanism or mechanisms by which expression of activated ret alleles contributes to the neoplastic phenotype in neuroendocrine cells. Here we show that stable expression of ret mutants (MEN2A and MEN2B alleles) in PC12 cells causes a dramatic conversion from a round to a flat morphology, accompanied by the induction of genes belonging to the early as well as the delayed response to nerve growth factor. However, in the transfected PC12 cells, the continuous expression of neuronal specific genes is not associated with the suppression of cell proliferation. Furthermore, expression of ret mutants renders PC12 cells unresponsive to nerve growth factor-induced inhibition of proliferation. These results suggest that induction of an aberrant pattern of differentiation, accompanied by unresponsiveness to growth-inhibitory physiological signals, may be part of the mechanism of action of activated ret alleles in the pathogenesis of neuroendocrine tumors associated with MEN2 syndromes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:8755580

  1. 5th International ACC Symposium: The New Genetics of Benign Adrenocortical Neoplasia: Hyperplasias, Adenomas, and Their Implications for Progression into Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Lawrence S; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-02-01

    Genetic tools for the analysis of human tumors have developed rapidly over the past 20 years. Adrenocortical neoplasms have been subject to multiple analyses using these new genetic tools. Analysis of adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs) has been complicated by the fact that these tumors tend to exhibit multiple somatic abnormalities, so that identifying driver mutations is complex task. In contrast, benign adrenocortical neoplasms have proven to be a fertile ground for the identification of the genetic causes of adrenocortical adenomas, as well as a variety of adrenocortical hyperplasia. Analysis of cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenomas has revealed alterations leading to enhanced signaling through the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) pathway. In contrast, macronodular cortisol-producing neoplasias have been shown to result from mutations in the ARMC5 gene, whose function is not yet quite so clear. In contrast, adrenal tumors resulting in excess production of the blood pressure hormone aldosterone almost always result from abnormalities of calcium handling, both in single adenomas and in bilateral hyperplasias. In both cases, there is elevation of a signaling pathway responsible both for hormone secretion and for gland growth and maintenance, thus confirming the linkage of these two output of cellular physiology. The connection between the benign hyperplasia observed in these states and adrenocortical carcinogenesis is not nearly as clear, although genetic studies are beginning to elucidate the relationship between benign and malignant tumors of this gland. PMID:26684645

  2. High expression of astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) is associated with progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and unfavorable prognosis in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Astrocyte elevated gene-1(AEG-1) plays an important role in the development and progression of certain types of human cancers. However, the expression dynamics of AEG-1 in cervical cancer and its clinical/prognostic significance are unclear. Method In present study, the methods of tissue microarrays (TMA) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were utilized to investigate AEG-1 expression in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, χ2 test, Kaplan-Meier plots, and multivariate Cox regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Results The expression level of AEG-1 was increased from CIN I to CIN III. High expression of AEG-1 could be observed in 61.1% (55/90) of cervical cancer. Moreover, high expression of AEG-1 correlated with tumor size and lymph node metastasis (all P <0.05). More importantly, high expression of AEG-1 was closely associated with cervical cancer patient shortened survival time as evidenced by univariate and multivariate analysis (P <0.05). Conclusions Our data suggest for the first time that high expression of AEG-1 is associated significantly with progression of cervical cancer. AEG-1 overexpression, as examined by IHC, has the potential to be used as an immunomarker to predict prognosis of cervical cancer patients. PMID:24256614

  3. Helper T Lymphocyte Response in the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Intraepithelial Neoplasia Submitted to Immunotherapy with Pegylated Interferon-α

    PubMed Central

    Michelin, Márcia Antoniazi; Montes, Letícia; Nomelini, Rosekeila Simões; Trovó, Marco Aurélio; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy in cancer patients is a very promising treatment and the development of new protocols and the study of the mechanisms of regression is imperative. The objective of this study was to evaluate the production of cytokines in helper T (CD4+) lymphocytes during immunotherapy with pegylated IFN-α in patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). We conducted a prospective study with 17 patients with CIN II-III using immunotherapy with pegylated IFN-α subcutaneouly weekly, and using flow cytometry we evaluated the peripheric CD4+ T lymphocytes. The results show that in the regression group the patients presented a significant increase in the amount of IFN-γ during the entire immunotherapy, compared with the group without a response. The amount of CD4+ T lymphocytes positive for IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β is significantly lower in patients with good clinical response. The results also demonstrate that patients with regression have a higher amount of intracellular TNF-α in CD4+ T lymphocytes before the start of treatment. Analyzing these data sets, it can be concluded that immunotherapy is a viable clinical treatment for patients with high-grade CIN and that the regression is dependent on the change in the immune response to a Th1 pattern. PMID:25764160

  4. Single missense mutation in the tyrosine kinase catalytic domain of the RET protooncogene is associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, K M; Dou, S; Chi, D; Scavarda, N; Toshima, K; Jackson, C E; Wells, S A; Goodfellow, P J; Donis-Keller, H

    1994-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN 2B) is a human cancer syndrome characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), pheochromocytomas, mucosal neuromas, ganglioneuromas of the intestinal tract, and skeletal and ophthalmic abnormalities. It appears both as an inherited disorder and as de novo disease. Sequence analysis of germ-line DNA from MEN 2B patients revealed the existence of the same point mutation in the RET protooncogene in 34 unrelated individuals. This sequence difference was not observed in 93 unaffected individuals, including the normal parents of 14 de novo MEN 2B patients. The mutation (ATG-->ACG) results in the replacement of methionine with threonine within the catalytic core region of the tyrosine kinase domain. We propose that this amino acid replacement effects substrate interactions and results in dominant oncogenic activity by the RET protein. Missense mutations in the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the RET protooncogene previously have been associated with two other disorders [MEN 2A and familial MTC (FMTC)] in which MTC is observed. MEN 2B represents the third form of heritable MTC known to be an allele of RET. Alterations in two different functional domains of the putative receptor protein tyrosine kinase are implicated in development of MTC. Images PMID:7906417

  5. Is prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in the transition/central zone a true precursor of cancer? A long-term retrospective study in Norway.

    PubMed Central

    Harvei, S.; Skjørten, F. J.; Robsahm, T. E.; Berner, A.; Tretli, S.

    1998-01-01

    Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) has been considered as a precursor of prostatic cancer. Few reports have dealt with the long-term follow-up of PIN lesions, and there is still a lack of proof that PIN is a true premalignant lesion. The objective of this study was to evaluate PIN in the transition/central zone as a marker for subsequent development of prostatic cancer. The PIN status of tissue specimens from 789 men without prostate cancer was determined in 508 transurethral resections and 281 transvesical prostatic enucleations. All slides were reviewed blind and independently by two pathologists. The patients were followed for an average of 11 years, and the incidence of subsequent cancer and cause-specific survival were analysed. Thirty-six cases of clinical prostatic cancer occurred among the cohort of 789 men through follow-up. No association between the presence of PIN in the transition/central zone and subsequent cancer development was found. There was also no difference in survival related to PIN status among the subsequent cancer patients. PMID:9662249

  6. Development of Cryptosporidium parvum-Induced Gastrointestinal Neoplasia in Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) Mice: Severity of Lesions Is Correlated with Infection Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Certad, Gabriela; Creusy, Colette; Ngouanesavanh, Tramy; Guyot, Karine; Gantois, Nausicaa; Mouray, Anthony; Chassat, Thierry; Flament, Nicolas; Fleurisse, Laurence; Pinon, Anthony; Delhaes, Laurence; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    We reported previously that Cryptosporidium parvum was able to induce intestinal tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice treated with corticoids. To further characterize this Cryptosporidium-induced cell transformation, SCID mice treated with dexamethasone were challenged with C. parvum oocysts, and euthanatized sequentially after infection for histologic examination. Ki-67 was used as a marker of cellular proliferation. Our previous results were confirmed, and it was also found that mice receiving higher inocula (106–107) experienced more severe neoplastic development. Additionally, neoplastic changes were observed not only in the caecum but also in the stomach and duodenum of some animals. Interestingly, SCID mice (6/6) inoculated with 105–107 oocysts showed high grade intraepithelial neoplasia or adenomas with high grade dysplasia in the caecum after Day 46 post-infection (PI). Immunohistochemistry for Ki-67 staining indicated the neoplastic process associated to cryptosporidiosis, and evidenced the first immunohistochemical alterations at early stages of the process, even at 3 weeks PI. PMID:20134002

  7. Development of Cryptosporidium parvum-induced gastrointestinal neoplasia in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice: severity of lesions is correlated with infection intensity.

    PubMed

    Certad, Gabriela; Creusy, Colette; Ngouanesavanh, Tramy; Guyot, Karine; Gantois, Nausicaa; Mouray, Anthony; Chassat, Thierry; Flament, Nicolas; Fleurisse, Laurence; Pinon, Anthony; Delhaes, Laurence; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2010-02-01

    We reported previously that Cryptosporidium parvum was able to induce intestinal tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice treated with corticoids. To further characterize this Cryptosporidium-induced cell transformation, SCID mice treated with dexamethasone were challenged with C. parvum oocysts, and euthanatized sequentially after infection for histologic examination. Ki-67 was used as a marker of cellular proliferation. Our previous results were confirmed, and it was also found that mice receiving higher inocula (10(6)-10(7)) experienced more severe neoplastic development. Additionally, neoplastic changes were observed not only in the caecum but also in the stomach and duodenum of some animals. Interestingly, SCID mice (6/6) inoculated with 10(5)-10(7) oocysts showed high grade intraepithelial neoplasia or adenomas with high grade dysplasia in the caecum after Day 46 post-infection (PI). Immunohistochemistry for Ki-67 staining indicated the neoplastic process associated to cryptosporidiosis, and evidenced the first immunohistochemical alterations at early stages of the process, even at 3 weeks PI. PMID:20134002

  8. A rapid screening method for the detection of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma families

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, D.J.; Andrew, S.; Richardson, A.L.

    1994-09-15

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A) and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) are autosomal dominant inherited cancer syndromes with incomplete penetrance. Following the identification of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene that segregate with the disease phenotype in MEN2A, MEN2B, and FMTC, genetic screening of individuals with mutations in RET may be performed. The authors have employed restriction endonuclease digestion of polymerase chain reaction products as an alternative to sequence analysis for rapid identification of mutant gene carriers in families in which MEN2A and RMTC are segregating. Twenty-one Australasian MEN2A and FMTC families have been screened for mutations in a cysteine-rich region of the RET proto-oncogene. Seven independent mutations were identified in key individuals in 16 of these families. The authors have identified a mutation in codon 620, 2053 T {r_arrow}C (Cys620Arg), and two mutations in codon 634 of exon 11 of RET, 2095 T {r_arrow} C (Cys634Arg) and 2096 G {r_arrow} A (Cys634Tyr), all three of which were present in both MEN2A and FMTC families. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Differences in the pathological diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia between the East and the West: Present status and future perspectives from Japan.

    PubMed

    Yao, Takashi; Shiono, Saori

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that there are discrepancies in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal neoplasia between Western and Japanese pathologists. In the West, colorectal cancer (CRC) is defined by invasion through the muscularis mucosa into the submucosa, especially depending on the presence of desmoplasia. In Japan, however, CRC is defined based on a combination of nuclear and architectural abnormalities, regardless of invasion status. As a result, intramucosal carcinoma is diagnosed as high-grade dysplasia and even intramucosal carcinoma with poorly differentiated component is classified as 'Tis' in the West. It is logical and reasonable that the term 'T1' is used to currently describe intramucosal carcinoma. Use of the term 'high-grade dysplasia' for intramucosal CRC is outdated. In order to determine appropriate clinical treatment of CRC, the various risk factors of metastasis should be fully evaluated. With improved contributions and communication between pathologists and clinicians, overtreatment and inadequate follow up can be avoided. The discrepancies in the diagnosis of CRC between Western and Japanese pathologists may be addressed by an increase in East-West exchange. In addition, in the future, molecular analysis may also be useful for establishment of standardized diagnostic criteria of CRC. PMID:26295687

  10. AGR2 is a SMAD4-suppressible gene that modulates MUC1 levels and promotes the initiation and progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Norris, A.M.; Gore, A.; Balboni, A.; Young, A.; Longnecker, D.S.; Korc, M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling expression of the putative oncogene AGR2 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are not well understood. We now show that AGR2 is a TGF-?-responsive gene in human pancreatic cancer cells, whose down-regulation is SMAD4-dependent. We also provide evidence supporting a role for AGR2 as an ER-chaperone for the cancer-associated mucin, MUC1. AGR2 is both sufficient and required for MUC1 expression in pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, AGR2 is co-expressed with MUC1 in mouse pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPanIN)-like lesions and in the cancer cells of four distinct genetically engineered mouse models of PDAC. We also show that Pdx1-Cre/LSL-KrasG12D/Smad4lox/lox mice heterozygous for Agr2 exhibit a delay in mPanIN initiation and progression to PDAC. It is proposed that loss of Smad4 may convert TGF-? from a tumor suppressor to a tumor promoter by causing the up-regulation of AGR2, which then leads to increased MUC1 expression, at which point both AGR2 and MUC1 facilitate mPanIN initiation and progression to PDAC. PMID:22945649

  11. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Huseyin; Liu, Jun; Tat, Pollyanna; Heffernan, Corey; Jones, Karen L; Verma, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    Even though the technique of mammalian SCNT is just over a decade old it has already resulted in numerous significant advances. Despite the recent advances in the reprogramming field, SCNT remains the bench-mark for the generation of both genetically unmodified autologous pluripotent stem cells for transplantation and for the production of cloned animals. In this review we will discuss the pros and cons of SCNT, drawing comparisons with other reprogramming methods. PMID:20232594

  12. Experimental and Computational Studies of Carbonyl Diazide (CON6) as a Precursor to Diazirinone (CON2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esselman, Brian J.; Amberger, Brent K.; Nolan, Alex M.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, R. J.

    2011-10-01

    Intrigued by the reported 2005 synthesis of diazirinone (1), we carried out further experimental and theoretical studies aimed at the detailed matrix-isolation and millimeter-wave spectroscopic characterizations of 1. Diazirinone (1) is a peculiar isoconjugate of two very stable molecules and may be of astrochemical interest. Unfortunately, the original reported methods of diazirinone (1) generation did not yield this species, rather its decomposition products. Inspired by a more recent gas phase pyrolysis of CON6 (2) to yield CON2 (1), we proposed a new method of generating CON6 (2) in solution as a precursor of diazirinone (1). This new synthesis may allow us to generate larger quantities of both CON6 and CON2 for investigation by millimeter-wave spectroscopy. We are able to safely generate carbonyl diazide (2) in sufficient yield from the reaction of triphosgene (3) and tetrabutylammonium azide in diethyl ether. This has allowed us to obtain both matrix-isolation and gas phase IR spectra of carbonyl diazide (2). After purification, it has a gas-phase lifetime that allows samples to be useable for up to several weeks. However, it is a shock-sensitive material that must be handled with care to prevent violent decomposition. In order to provide better mechanistic insight into the decomposition of carbonyl diazide (2) to diazirinone (1), we have engaged in a DFT and ab initio computational study. We have found a pathway between the two species via the triplet acylnitrene, CON4, and an oxaziridine CON2 species, but not at sufficiently low energies to allow for the trapping and detection of diazirinone (1). Preliminary millimeter-wave spectra have been obtained from several synthesized and purified samples of CON6 (2). However, the assignment of the spectra lines has been unexpectedly problematic. We have placed several CON6 (2) samples, confirmed by IR spectroscopy at the time of sample loading, into our instrument and obtained two different sets of rotational lines. This rotational puzzle will be investigated further with a significantly upgraded millimeter-wave spectrometer.

  13. 9 CFR 319.301 - Chili con carne with beans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chili con carne with beans. 319.301 Section 319.301 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.301 Chili con carne with beans. Chili con carne with beans shall...

  14. 9 CFR 319.301 - Chili con carne with beans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Chili con carne with beans. 319.301 Section 319.301 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.301 Chili con carne with beans. Chili con carne with beans shall...

  15. Multiple cores of high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and any core of atypia on first biopsy are significant predictor for cancer detection at a repeat biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Sun; Ko, Kwang Jin; Shin, Seung Jea; Ryoo, Hyun Soo; Song, Wan; Sung, Hyun Hwan; Han, Deok Hyun; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Kyu Sung; Lee, Sung Won; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi,