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Sample records for neptunium bromides

  1. Neptunium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Zenko; Johnson, Stephen G.; Kimura, Takaumi; Krsul, John R.

    The first report on the discovery of neptunium was in 1940 by McMillan and Abelson (1940), although McMillan did the preliminary work in 1939 and published his findings (McMillan, 1939). He did not claim that a new element had been discovered until confirmatory measurements had been undertaken in the following year. The production of neptunium was accomplished by placing a layer of uranium trioxide on paper with several aluminum or paper foils and then exposing this to neutrons from a cyclotron. Examination of the uranium paper sample containing the non-recoiling fraction displayed that two new radioactive components had been created. One component displayed a 23 min half-life, later identified as U-239, while the second exhibited a 2.3 day half-life. Both components decayed via β particle emission. Preliminary chemical analysis was performed to determine the behavior of the 2.3 day component and resulted in the contradictory assignment of this component as that exhibiting an atomic number of 93, but not being transuranic in nature (Segrè, 1939). Segrè noted in his paper that his conclusions were contradictory. However, the following quotation is from his paper, “The necessary conclusion seems to be that the 23 minute uranium decays into a very long-lived 93 and that transuranic elements have not yet been observed.” The primary stumbling block to the proper assignment of the material as transuranic in nature was the lack of observation of any alpha decay activity that would emanate from the daughter product of the beta decay of this new material with an atomic number 93. It was this work by Segrè (1939) that led McMillan and Abelson to revisit the chemical analysis and determine its properties in greater depth.

  2. NEPTUNIUM SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, L.R.; Fields, P.R.

    1959-10-01

    The separation of neptunium from an aqueous solution by solvent extraction and the extraction of neptunium from the solvent solution are described. Neptunium is separated from an aqueous solution containing tetravalent or hexavalent neptunium nitrate, nitric acid, and a nitrate salting out agent, such as sodium nitrate, by contacting the solution with an organic solvent such as diethyl ether. Subsequently, the neptunium nitrate is extracted from the organic solvent extract phase with water.

  3. ELECTRODEPOSITION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Wahl, A.C.

    1960-08-30

    A process of electrodepositing neptunium from solutions is given which comprises conducting the electrodeposition from an absolute alcohol bath containing a neptunium nitrate and lanthanum nitrate at a potential of approximately 50 volts and a current density of between about 1.8 and 4.7 ma/dm/ sup 2/.

  4. NEPTUNIUM OXIDE PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J; Watkins, R; Hensel, S

    2009-05-27

    The Savannah River Site's HB-Line Facility completed a campaign in which fifty nine cans of neptunium oxide were produced and shipped to the Idaho National Laboratory in the 9975 shipping container. The neptunium campaign was divided into two parts: Part 1 which consisted of oxide made from H-Canyon neptunium solution which did not require any processing prior to conversion into an oxide, and Part 2 which consisted of oxide made from additional H-Canyon neptunium solutions which required processing to purify the solution prior to conversion into an oxide. The neptunium was received as a nitrate solution and converted to oxide through ion-exchange column extraction, precipitation, and calcination. Numerous processing challenges were encountered in order make a final neptunium oxide product that could be shipped in a 9975 shipping container. Among the challenges overcome was the issue of scale: translating lab scale production into full facility production. The balance between processing efficiency and product quality assurance was addressed during this campaign. Lessons learned from these challenges are applicable to other processing projects.

  5. Neptunium storage at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, C.J.; Shiraga, S.S.; Schwartz, R.A.; Smith, R.J.; Wootan, D.W.

    1993-06-01

    A decision must be made regarding whether the United State`s stockpile of neptunium should be discarded into the waste stream or kept for the production of Pu-238. Although the cost of long term storage is not inconsequential, to dispose of the material means the closing of our option to maintain control over our Pu-238 stockpile. Within the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility at Hanford there exists a remotely operated facility that can be converted for neptunium storage. This paper describes the facility and the anticipated handling requirements.

  6. METHOD OF SEPARATING NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1961-10-24

    plutonium in an aqueous solution containing sulfate ions. The process consists of contacting the solution with an alkali metal bromate, digesting the resulting mixture at 15 to 25 deg C for a period of time not more than that required to oxidize the neptunium, adding lanthanum ions and fluoride ions, and separating the plutonium-containing precipitate thus formed from the supernatant solution. (AEC)

  7. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Butler, J.P.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of neptuniunn from dissolver solutions by solvent extraction. The neptunium containing solution should be about 5N, in nitric acid.and about 0.1 M in ferrous ion. The organic extracting agent is tributyl phosphate, and the neptuniunn is recovered from the organic solvent phase by washing with water.

  8. Results of Neptunium Disposal Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    2003-10-07

    Researchers investigated the neutralization of neptunium solution from H-Canyon Tank 16.4 and the properties of the resulting slurry. This work investigated slurry properties from a single neutralization protocol and limited storage times.

  9. Cyanogen bromide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cyanogen bromide ; CASRN 506 - 68 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  10. Vinyl bromide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl bromide ; CASRN 593 - 60 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  11. Neptunium nitrate solution. Neptunium TiOA - TTA method. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    An analytical solvent extraction method for separating neptunium from plutonium, americium, curium, uranium, thorium, and fission products using tri-iso-octylamine (TiOA) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) is described. Neptunium is separated from the bulk of the plutonium, americium, curium, and fission products by the extraction of neptunium(IV) into RiOA, dissolved in xylene, from an aqueous nitric acid reducing solution. The neptunium bearing organic solution is then scrubbed with a nitric acid reducing solution to achieve further purification. Final purification is obtained by stripping neptunium from tri-iso-octylaminexylene solution into dilute hydrochloric acid and then extracting the neptunium(IV) into TTA dissolved in xylene. A quantitative neptunium measurement is then made by alpha counting and alpha pulse height analysis. Most of the neptunium bearing sample solutions associated with the chemical processing of irradiated uranium are aqueous nitric acid solutions, and with the exception of uranium(IV) are free from interfering materials.

  12. Direct chemical reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium and calcium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Leah N.; Lessing, Paul

    2016-04-01

    A process of direct reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium metal as the reducing agent is discussed. After reduction of the oxide to metal, the metal is separated by density from the other components of the reaction mixture and can be easily removed upon cooling. The direct reduction technique consistently produces high purity (98%-99% pure) neptunium metal.

  13. OXIDATIVE METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Beaufait, L.J. Jr.

    1958-06-10

    A method is described of separating neptunium from plutonium in an aqueous solution containing neptunium and plutonium in valence states not greater than +4. This may be accomplished by contacting the solution with dichromate ions, thus oxidizing the neptunium to a valence state greater than +4 without oxidizing any substantial amount of plutonium, and then forming a carrier precipitate which carries the plutonium from solution, leaving the neptunium behind. A preferred embodiment of this invention covers the use of lanthanum fluoride as the carrier precipitate.

  14. Phonon dynamics of neptunium chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aynyas, Mahendra; Rukmangad, Aditi; Arya, Balwant S.; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2012-06-01

    We have performed phonon calculations of Neptunium Chalcogenides (NpX) (X= S, Se, Te) based on breathing shell model (BSM) which includes breathing motion of electron of the Np-atoms due to f-d hybridization. The model predicts that the short range breathing phenomenon play a dominant role in the phonon properties. We also report, for the first time specific heat for these compounds.

  15. Radiotoxicity of neptunium(V) and neptunium(V)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) complexes towards Chelatobacter heintzii

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J.E. |; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1997-03-10

    The objective of this work was to investigate the toxicity mechanisms of neptunium and the neptunium-NTA complex towards Chelatobacter heintzii. The results show that metal toxicity of aquo NpO{sub 2}{sup +} may significantly limit growth of Cl heintzii at free metal ion concentrations greater than {approx} 10{sup {minus}5} M. However, neptunium concentrations {ge} 10{sup {minus}4} M do not cause measurable radiotoxicity effects in C. heintzii when present in the form of a neptunium-NTA complex or colloidal/precipitated neptunium-phosphate. The neptunium-NTA complex, which is stable under aerobic conditions, is destabilized by microbial degradation of NTA. When phosphate was present, degradation of NTA led to the precipitation of a neptunium-phosphate phase.

  16. Packaging and Transportation of Additional Neptunium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, R.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

    2010-05-05

    The Savannah River Site's HB-Line Facility completed a second neptunium oxide production campaign in which nine (9) additional cans of neptunium oxide were produced and shipped to the Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the 9975 shipping container. These additional cans were from a different feed solution than the first fifty (50) cans of neptunium oxide that were previously produced and shipped via a Letter of Amendment to the 9975 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) content table. This paper will address the challenges associated with demonstrating the neptunium oxide produced from the additional feed solution was equivalent to the original neptunium oxide and within the content description of the Letter of Amendment.

  17. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements. PMID:27442286

  18. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal–ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  19. PRECIPITATION METHOD OF SEPARATION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Magnusson, L.B.

    1958-07-01

    A process is described for the separation of neptunium from plutonium in an aqueous solution containing neptunium ions in a valence state not greater than +4, plutonium ioms in a valence state not greater than +4, and sulfate ions. The Process consists of adding hypochlorite ions to said solution in order to preferentially oxidize the neptunium and then adding lanthanum ions and fluoride ions to form a precipitate of LaF/sub 3/ carrying the plutonium, and thereafter separating the supernatant solution from the precipitate.

  20. PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, R; Steve Hensel, S; Jeffrey Jordan, J

    2009-03-03

    The Savannah River Site's HB-Line Facility completed a campaign in which fifty (50) cans of neptunium oxide were produced and shipped to the Idaho National Laboratory in the 9975 shipping container. This shipping campaign involved the addition of neptunium oxide to the 9975 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) as a new content and subsequently a Letter of Amendment to the SARP content table. This paper will address the proper steps which should be taken to add a new content table to a SARP. It will also address the importance of product sampling and understanding the material shipping requirements of a SARP.

  1. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, Jr., Jerry; Avens, Larry R.; Trujillo, Eddie A.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride is provided.

  2. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

    1992-03-24

    A process is described for preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride.

  3. Methyl Bromide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Rathus, E. M.; Landy, P. J.

    1961-01-01

    Seven cases of methyl bromide poisoning which occurred amongst workers engaged on a fumigation project are described. The methods adopted for investigation of the environmental situation are discussed and the measurement of blood bromide levels on random samples of workers is suggested as an index of the effectiveness of equipment and working methods. PMID:13739738

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF NDA METHODS FOR NEPTUNIUM METAL

    SciTech Connect

    C. MOSS; ET AL

    2000-10-01

    Many techniques have been developed and applied in the US and other countries for the control of the special nuclear materials (SNM) plutonium and uranium, but no standard methods exist for the determination of neptunium in bulk containers. Such methods are needed because the U.S. Department of Energy requires all Government-owned {sup 237}Np be treated as if it were SNM and the International Atomic Energy Agency is considering how to monitor this material. We present the results of the measurements of several samples of neptunium metal with a variety of techniques. Analysis of passive gamma-ray spectra uniquely identifies the material, provides isotopic ratios for contaminants, such as {sup 243}Am, and may provide information about the shielding, mass, and time since processing. Active neutron interrogation, using the delayed neutron technique in a package monitor, provides useful data even if the neptunium is shielded. The tomographic gamma scanner yields a map of the distribution of the neptunium and shielding in a container. Active photon interrogation with pulses from a 10-MeV linac produces delayed neutrons between pulses, even when the container is heavily shielded. Data from one or more of these techniques can be used to identify the material and estimate a mass in a bulk container.

  5. Neptunium_Oxide_Precipitation_Kinetics_AJohnsen

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, A M; Roberts, K E; Prussin, S G

    2012-06-08

    We evaluate the proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation system at elevated temperatures to obtain primary information on the effects of temperature, ionic strength, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Experiments conducted on unfiltered solutions at 10{sup -4} M NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq), neutral pH, and 200 C indicated that solution colloids strongly affect precipitation kinetics. Subsequent experiments on filtered solutions at 200, 212, and 225 C showed consistent and distinctive temperature-dependent behavior at reaction times {le} 800 hours. At longer times, the 200 C experiments showed unexpected dissolution of neptunium solids, but experiments at 212 C and 225 C demonstrated quasi steady-state neptunium concentrations of 3 x 10{sup -6} M and 6 x 10{sup -6} M, respectively. Solids from a representative experiment analyzed by X-ray diffraction were consistent with NpO{sub 2}(cr). A 200 C experiment with a NaCl concentration of 0.05 M showed a dramatic increase in the rate of neptunium loss. A 200 C experiment in an argon atmosphere resulted in nearly complete loss of aqueous neptunium. Previously proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation mechanisms in the literature specified a 1:1 ratio of neptunium loss and H{sup +} production in solution over time. However, all experiments demonstrated ratios of approximately 0.4 to 0.5. Carbonate equilibria can account for only about 40% of this discrepancy, leaving an unexpected deficit in H+ production that suggests that additional chemical processes are occurring.

  6. DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2009-01-12

    This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

  7. New neptunium(V) borates that exhibit the alexandrite effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    A new neptunium(V) borate, K[(NpO(2))B(10)O(14)(OH)(4)], was synthesized using boric acid as a reactive flux. The compound possesses a layered structure in which Np(V) resides in triangular holes, creating a hexagonal-bipyramidal environment around neptunium. This compound is unusual in that it exhibits the Alexandrite effect, a property that is typically restricted to neptunium(IV) compounds. PMID:22145669

  8. Investigation of Neptunium Precipitator Cleanout Options

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.C.

    2003-09-08

    Oxalate precipitation followed by filtration is used to prepare plutonium oxalate. Historically, plutonium oxalate has tended to accumulate in the precipitation tanks. These solids are periodically removed by flushing with concentrated (64 percent) nitric acid. The same precipitation tanks will now be used in the processing of neptunium. Literature values indicate that neptunium oxalate may not be as soluble as plutonium oxalate in nitric acid. Although a wide variety of options is available to improve neptunium oxalate solubility for precipitator flushing, most of these options are not practical for use. Many of these options require the use of incompatible or difficult to handle chemicals. Other options would require expensive equipment modifications or are likely to lead to product contamination. Based on review of literature and experimental results, the two best options for flushing the precipitator are (1) 64 percent nitric acid and (2) addition of sodium permanganate follow ed by sodium nitrite. Nitric acid is the easiest option to implement. It is already used in the facility and will not lead to product contamination. Experimental results indicate that neptunium oxalate can be dissolved in concentrated nitric acid (64 percent) at 60 degree C to a concentration of 2.6 to 5.6 grams of Np/liter after at least three hours of heating. A lower concentration (1.1 grams of Np/liter) was measured at 60 degree C after less than two hours of heating. These concentrations are acceptable for flushing if precipitator holdup is low (approximately 100-250 grams), but a second method is required for effective flushing if precipitator holdup is high (approximately 2 kilograms). The most effective method for obtaining higher neptunium concentrations is the use of sodium permanganate followed by the addition of sodium nitrite. There is concern that residual manganese from these flushes could impact product purity. Gas generation during permanganate addition is also a concern

  9. Incorporation of neptunium(VI) into a uranyl selenite.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Nathan A; Polinski, Matthew J; Lin, Jian; Simonetti, Antonio; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2012-10-15

    The incorporation of neptunium(VI) into the layered uranyl selenite Cs[(UO(2))(HSeO(3))(SeO(3))] has yielded the highest level of neptunium uptake in a uranyl compound to date with an average of 12(±3)% substitution of Np(VI) for U(VI). Furthermore, this is the first case in nearly 2 decades of dedicated incorporation studies in which the oxidation state of neptunium has been determined spectroscopically in a doped uranyl compound and also the first time in which neptunium incorporation has resulted in a structural transformation. PMID:23030830

  10. Neptunium flow-sheet verification at reprocessing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rance, P.; Chesnay, B.; Killeen, T.; Murray, M.; Nikkinen, M.; Petoe, A.; Plumb, J.; Saukkonen, H.

    2007-07-01

    Due to their fissile nature, neptunium and americium have at least a theoretical potential application as nuclear explosives and their proliferation potential was considered by the IAEA in studies in the late 1990's. This work was motivated by an increased awareness of the proliferation potential of americium and neptunium and a number of emerging projects in peaceful nuclear programmes which could result in an increase in the available quantities of these minor actinides. The studies culminated in proposals for various voluntary measures including the reporting of international transfers of separated americium and neptunium, declarations concerning the amount of separated neptunium and americium held by states and the application of flow-sheet verification to ensure that facilities capable of separating americium or neptunium are operated in a manner consistent with that declared. This paper discusses the issue of neptunium flowsheet verification in reprocessing plants. The proliferation potential of neptunium is first briefly discussed and then the chemistry of neptunium relevant to reprocessing plants described with a view to indicating a number of issues relevant to the verification of neptunium flow-sheets. Finally, the scope of verification activities is discussed including analysis of process and engineering design information, plant monitoring and sampling and the potential application of containment and surveillance measures. (authors)

  11. High temperature adsorption process for solidification of plutonium and neptunium

    SciTech Connect

    Korchenkin, K.; Mashkin, A.; Nardova, A.

    1995-12-31

    The problem of plutonium and neptunium converting into solid form has been considered. It was recently been discovered that plutonium and neptunium absorbed well on inorganic porous matrices (silica gel) under definite conditions. In the work presented in this paper plutonium and neptunium sorption on silica gel followed by calcining saturated granules was experimentally investigated. Calcination may proceed at the different temperatures to give the solid dustless plutonium and neptunium compounds suitable both for controlled temporary storage (with possible return radionuclides in nuclear fuel cycle) and for long life disposal.

  12. Dissolution of Neptunium Oxide in Unirradiated Mark 53 Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.S.

    2002-12-06

    Nine unirradiated Mark 53 targets currently stored at the K-Reactor must be dissolved to allow recovery of the neptunium content. The Mark 53 targets are an aluminum clad, neptunium oxide (NpO2)/aluminum metal cermet used for the production of plutonium-238. The targets will be dissolved in H-Canyon and blended with solutions generated from routine fuel dissolutions for purification by solvent extraction. The increased neptunium concentration should not have a significant effect on the neptunium decontamination factor achieved by the 1st cycle of solvent extraction; however, the neptunium content of the uranium product (1CU) will likely increase in proportion to the increase in the neptunium feed concentration. The recovered neptunium will be combined with the existing inventory of neptunium solution currently stored in H-Canyon. The combined inventory will undergo subsequent purification and conversion to an oxide for shipment to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory where plutonium- 238 will be manufactured using the High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  13. Comparison of neptunium sorption results using batch and column techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Triay, I.R.; Furlano, A.C.; Weaver, S.C.; Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1996-08-01

    We used crushed-rock columns to study the sorption retardation of neptunium by zeolitic, devitrified, and vitric tuffs typical of those at the site of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We used two sodium bicarbonate waters (groundwater from Well J-13 at the site and water prepared to simulate groundwater from Well UE-25p No. 1) under oxidizing conditions. It was found that values of the sorption distribution coefficient, Kd, obtained from these column experiments under flowing conditions, regardless of the water or the water velocity used, agreed well with those obtained earlier from batch sorption experiments under static conditions. The batch sorption distribution coefficient can be used to predict the arrival time for neptunium eluted through the columns. On the other hand, the elution curves showed dispersivity, which implies that neptunium sorption in these tuffs may be nonlinear, irreversible, or noninstantaneous. As a result, use of a batch sorption distribution coefficient to calculate neptunium transport through Yucca Mountain tuffs would yield conservative values for neptunium release from the site. We also noted that neptunium (present as the anionic neptunyl carbonate complex) never eluted prior to tritiated water, which implies that charge exclusion does not appear to exclude neptunium from the tuff pores. The column experiments corroborated the trends observed in batch sorption experiments: neptunium sorption onto devitrified and vitric tuffs is minimal and sorption onto zeolitic tuffs decreases as the amount of sodium and bicarbonate/carbonate in the water increases.

  14. PERFORMANCE OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE COULOMETER FOR NEPTUNIUM PROCESSACCOUNTABILITY AND NEPTUNIUM OXIDE PRODUCT CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, M; Patterson Nuessle, P; Sheldon Nichols, S; Joe Cordaro, J; George Reeves, G

    2008-06-04

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) H-Area B-Line (HB-Line) nuclear facility is processing neptunium solutions for stabilization as an oxide. The oxide will eventually be reprocessed and fabricated into target material and the 237Np irradiated to produce {sup 238}Pu in support of National Aeronautics and Space Administration space program missions. As part of nuclear materials accountability, solution concentrations were measured using a high-precision controlled-potential coulometer developed and manufactured at the SRS for plutonium accountability measurements. The Savannah River Site Coulometer system and measurement methodology for plutonium meets performance standards in ISO 12183-2005, 'Controlled-Potential Coulometric Assay of Plutonium'. The Department of Energy (DOE) does not produce or supply a neptunium metal certified reference material, which makes qualifying a measurement method and determining accuracy and precision difficult. Testing and performance of the Savannah River Site Coulometer indicates that it can be used to measure neptunium process solutions and dissolved neptunium oxide without purification for material control and accountability purposes. Savannah River Site's Material Control and Accountability organization has accepted the method uncertainty for accountability and product characterization measurements.

  15. Transport of neptunium through Yucca Mountain tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    Triay, I.R.; Robinson, B.A.; Mitchell, A.J.; Overly, C.M.; Lopez, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    Neptunium has a high solubility in groundwaters from Yucca Mountain. Uranium in nuclear reactors produces {sup 237}Np which has a half-life of 2.14 {times} 10{sup 6} years. Consequently, the transport of {sup 237}Np through tuffs is of major importance in assessing the performance of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The objective of this work is to determine the amount of Np retardation that is provided by the materials in Yucca Mountain tuffs as a function of groundwater chemistry.

  16. The production of Neptunium-236g.

    PubMed

    Jerome, S M; Ivanov, P; Larijani, C; Parker, D J; Regan, P H

    2014-12-01

    Radiochemical analysis of (237)Np is important in a number of fields, such as nuclear forensics, environmental analysis and measurements throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. However analysis is complicated by the lack of a stable isotope of neptunium. Although various tracers have been used, including (235)Np, (239)Np and even (236)Pu, none are entirely satisfactory. However, (236g)Np would be a better candidate for a neptunium yield tracer, as its long half-life means that it is useable as both a radiometric and mass spectrometric measurements. This radionuclide is notoriously difficult to prepare, and limited in scope. In this paper, we examine the options for the production of (236g)Np, based on work carried out at NPL since 2011. However, this work was primarily aimed at the production of (236)Pu, and not (236g)Np and therefore the rate of production are based on the levels of (236)Pu generated in the irradiation of (i) (238)U with protons, (ii) (235)U with deuterons, (iii) (236)U with protons and (iv) (236)U with deuterons. The derivation of a well-defined cross section is complicated by the relevant paucity of information on the variation of the (236m)Np:(236g)Np production ratio with incident particle energy. Furthermore, information on the purity of (236g)Np so produced is similarly sparse. Accordingly, the existing data is assessed and a plan for future work is presented. PMID:24731718

  17. Neptunium(III) application in extraction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Nadeau, Kenny; Larivière, Dominic

    2011-12-15

    This paper describes a novel strategy for actinide separation by extraction chromatography with Np(III) valence adjustment. Neptunium(IV) was reduced to Np(III) using Cr(II) and then selectively separated from uranium (IV) on a TEVA resin. After elution, Np(III) was retained on a DGA resin in order to remove any detrimental chromium impurities. Neptunium(III) formation was demonstrated by the complete and selective elution of Np from TEVA resin (99 ± 7%) in less than 12 mL of 9M HCl from U(IV) (0.7 ± 0.7%). It was determined by UV-visible and kinetic studies that Cr(II) was the only species responsible for the elution of Np(IV) as Np(III) and that the Cr(II) solution could be prepared from 2 to 30 min before its use without the need of complex degassing systems to prevent the oxidation of Np(III) by oxygen. The methodology proposed here with TEVA/DGA resins provides removal of Cr(III) impurities produced at high decontamination factors (2.8 × 10(3) and 7.3 × 10(4) respectively). PMID:22099641

  18. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  19. Surface Complexation of Neptunium(V) with Goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Jerden, James L.; Kropf, A. Jeremy

    2007-07-01

    Batch adsorption experiments in which neptunium-bearing solutions were reacted with goethite (alpha-FeOOH) have been performed to study uptake mechanisms in sodium chloride and calcium-bearing sodium silicate solutions. This paper presents results identifying and quantifying the mechanisms by which neptunium is adsorbed as a function of pH and reaction time (aging). Also presented are results from tests in which neptunium is reacted with goethite in the presence of other cations (uranyl and calcium) that may compete with neptunium for sorption sites. The desorption of neptunium from goethite has been studied by re-suspending the neptunium-loaded goethite samples in solutions containing no neptunium. Selected reacted sorbent samples were analyzed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine the oxidation state and molecular speciation of the adsorbed neptunium. Results have been used to establish the pH adsorption edge of neptunium on goethite in sodium chloride and calcium-bearing sodium silicate solutions. The results indicate that neptunium uptake on goethite reaches 95% at a pH of approximately 7 and begins to decrease at pH values greater than 8.5. Distribution coefficients for neptunium sorption range from less than 1000 (moles/kg){sub sorbed} / (moles/kg){sub solution} at pH less than 5.0 to greater than 10,000 (moles/kg){sub sorbed} / (moles/kg){sub solution} at pH greater than 7.0. Distribution coefficients as high as 100,000 (moles/kg){sub sorbed} / (moles/kg){sub solution} were recorded for the tests done in calcite equilibrated sodium silicate solutions. XAS results show that neptunium complexes with the goethite surface mainly as Np(V) (although Np(IV) is prevalent in some of the longer-duration sorption tests). The neptunium adsorbed to goethite shows Np-O bond length of approximately 1.8 angstroms which is representative of the Np-O axial bond in the neptunyl(V) complex. This neptunyl(V) ion is coordinated to 5 or 6 equatorial oxygens with Np

  20. Bromide affecting drinking water mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Myllykangas, T; Nissinen, T K; Mäki-Paakkanen, J; Hirvonen, A; Vartiainen, T

    2003-11-01

    The effect of bromide on the mutagenicity of artificially recharged groundwater and purified artificially recharged groundwater after chlorine, ozone, hydrogen peroxide, permanganate, and UV treatments alone and in various combinations was studied. The highest mutagenicity was observed after chlorination, while hydrogen peroxide-ozone-chlorine treatment produced the lowest value for both waters. Chlorinated waters, which were spiked with bromide, had up to 3.7 times more mutagenic activity than waters without bromide after every preoxidation method. 3-Chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) was found to correspond as much as 76% of the overall mutagenicity in the waters not spiked with bromide. MX formation was found to be lower when the treated water contained bromide, implicating the formation of brominated MX analogues. Trihalomethane formation increased when the treated water contained bromide. PMID:13129514

  1. Dissolution of Neptunium Oxide in Unirradiated Mark 53 Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.S.

    2002-06-07

    Nine unirradiated Mark 53 targets currently stored at the K-Reactor must be dissolved to allow recovery of the neptunium content. The Mark 53 targets are an aluminum clad neptunium oxide (NpO2)/aluminum metal cermet used for the production of plutonium-238. The targets will be dissolved in H-Canyon and blended with solutions generated from routine fuel dissolutions for purification by solvent extraction

  2. Neptunium Disposal to the Savannah River Site Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    2004-02-26

    Researchers investigated the neutralization of an acidic neptunium solution from a Savannah River Site (SRS) processing canyon and the properties of the resulting slurry to determine the feasibility of disposal in the SRS tank farm. The acidic solution displayed no properties that precluded the proposed disposal route. Neutralization of the acidic neptunium forms a 4 wt per cent slurry of precipitated metal hydroxides. The insoluble solids consist largely of iron (92 per cent) and neptunium hydroxides (2 per cent). The concentration of soluble neptunium remaining after neutralization equaled much less than previous solubility measurements predicted. Researchers used an apparatus similar to an Ostwald-type viscometer to estimate the consistency of the neptunium slurry with the solids present. The yield stress and consistency of the 4 wt per cent slurry will allow transfer through the tank farm, although concentration of the insoluble solids above 4 wt per cent may cause significant problems due to increased consistency and yield stress. The consistency of the 4 wt per cent slurry is 7.6 centipoise (cP) with a yield stress less than 1 Pascal (Pa). The neptunium slurry, when combined with actual washed radioactive sludge, slightly reduces the yield stress and consistency of the sludge and produces a combined slurry with acceptable rheological properties for vitrification.

  3. Neptunium(III) copper(I) diselenide

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Daniel M.; Skanthakumar, S.; Soderholm, L.; Ibers, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, NpCuSe2, is the first ternary neptunium transition-metal chalcogenide. It was synthesized from the elements at 873 K in an evacuated fused-silica tube. Single crystals were grown by vapor transport with I2. NpCuSe2 crystallizes in the LaCuS2 structure type and can be viewed as a stacking of layers of CuSe4 tetra­hedra and of double layers of NpSe7 monocapped trigonal prisms along [100]. Because there are no Se—Se bonds in the structure, the formal oxidation states of Np/Cu/Se may be assigned as +III/+I/−II, respectively. PMID:21582032

  4. Aqueous Zinc Bromide Waste Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    2002-07-23

    The goal of this study was to select one or more commercially available aqueous sorbents to solidify the zinc bromide solution stored in C-Area, identify the polymer to zinc bromide solution ratio (waste loading) for the selected sorbents, and identify processing issues that require further testing in pilot-scale testing.

  5. Tiotropium Bromide: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Heredia, Josep Lluis

    2009-01-01

    Tiotropium bromide is a once-daily inhaled anticholinergic bronchodilator. It works by blocking the muscarinic receptors in airway smooth muscle. Tiotropium has a wide therapeutic margin, due to its poor gastrointestinal absorption and its very low systemic bioavailability. The drug is mainly indicated in COPD patients. Clinically relevant outcomes such as significant improvements in spirometry, hyperinflation, dyspnea, heath status, acute exacerbations and mortality have been consistently observed in tiotropium clinical trials, and the drug has been shown to reduce the risk of mortality due to cardiac-vascular disease and respiratory failure. The main side effect reported is dryness of the mouth. Some subgroups of asthmatics also seem to respond to anticholinergic drugs: among them, those with the Arg/Arg genotype for the β2-adrenergic receptor and those with a high percentage of neutrophils in sputum. PMID:19461900

  6. Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, JM

    2004-01-30

    Elevated temperature gas generation tests have been conducted using neptunium dioxide produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet. These tests were performed to determine what effect elevated temperatures would have on the neptunium dioxide in comparison to neptunium dioxide tested at ambient temperature. The headspace gas compositions following storage at elevated temperatures associated with normal conditions of transport (NCT) have been measured. These test results show an increase in hydrogen generation rate at elevated temperature and significant removal of oxygen from the headspace gas. The elevated temperature gas generation tests described in this report involved heating small test vessels containing neptunium dioxide and measuring the headspace gas pressure and composition at the end of the test period. Four samples were used in these tests to evaluate the impact of process variables on the gas generation rate. Two samples were calcined to 600 degrees Celsius and two were calcined to 650 degrees Celsius. Each test vessel contained approximately 9.5 g of neptunium dioxide. Following exposure to 75 per cent relative humidity (RH) for five days, these samples were loaded in air and then heated to between 105 and 115 degrees Celsius for about one month. At the conclusion of the test period, the headspace gas of each container was analyzed using a micro-gas chromatograph installed in the glovebox where the experiments were conducted. The pressure, volume, and composition data for the headspace gas samples were used to calculate average H2 generation rates.

  7. Modified Purex first-cycle extraction for neptunium recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Binh; Moisy, Philippe; Baron, Pascal; Calor, Jean-Noel; Espinoux, Denis; Lorrain, Brigitte; Benchikouhne-Ranchoux, Magali

    2008-07-01

    A new PUREX first-cycle flowsheet was devised to enhance the extraction yield of neptunium at the extraction step of this cycle. Simulation results (using a qualified process-simulation tool), le d to raising the nitric acid concentration of the feed from 3 M to 4.5 M to allow extraction of more than 99% of the neptunium. This flowsheet was operated in the shielded process cell of ATALANTE facility using pulsed columns and mixer-settlers banks. A 15 kg quantity of genuine oxide fuel of average burn up of 52 GWd/t with cooling time of nearly five years was treated, and the neptunium extraction yield obtained was greater than 99.6%. (authors)

  8. Neptunium(V) Incorporation/Sorption with Uranium(VI) Alteration Products

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Judah I.; Douglas, Matthew; Buck, Edgar C.; Clark, Susan B.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2004-04-01

    An initial uranium phase that has been observed to form during the corrosion of spent nuclear fuel is the uranium oxy-hydroxide metaschoepite. It has been proposed that neptunium(V) solubility can be limited by its association with this uranium phase. Metaschoepite has been synthesized in the presence of neptunium(V) over the pH range modeled in the proposed Yucca Mountain geologic repository. Uranium (VI) phaseswere synthesized by varying pH and neptunium concentrations. Results of neptunium association with the uranium alteration phases are presented and the relationship to dissolved neptunium concentrations discussed.

  9. Effect of natural organic materials on cadmium and neptunium sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, K.S.; Triay, I.R.

    1994-10-01

    In a batch sorption study of the effect of naturally occurring organic materials on the sorption of cadmium and neptunium on oxides and tuff surfaces, the model sorbents were synthetic goethite, boehmite, amorphous silicon oxides, and a crushed tuff material from Yucca Mountain, Nevada. An amino acid, 3-(3,4-dihydroxypheny)-DL-alanine (DOPA), and an aquatic-originated fulvic material, Nordic aquatic fulvic acid (NAFA), were used as model organic chemicals. Sorption isotherm results showed that DOPA sorption followed the order aluminum oxide > iron oxide > silicon oxide and that the amount of DOAP sorption for a given sorbent increased as the solution pH was raised. The sorption of cadmium and neptunium on the iron oxide was about ten times higher than that on the aluminum oxide. The sorption of cadmium and neptunium on natural tuff material was much lower than that on aluminum and iron oxides. The sorption of cadmium on iron and aluminum oxides was found to be influenced by the presence of DOPA, and increasing the amount of DOPA coating resulted in higher cadmium sorption on aluminum oxide. However, for iron oxide, cadmium sorption decreased with increasing DOPA concentration. The presence of the model organic materials DOPA and NAFA did not affect the sorption of neptunium on tuff material or on the iron and aluminum oxides. Spectroscopic results indicate that cadmium complexes strongly with DOPA. Therefore, the effect of the organic material, DOPA, on the cadmium sorption is readily observed. However, neptunium is possibly complexed weakly with organic material. Thus, DOPA and NAFA have little effect on neptunium sorption on all sorbents selected for study.

  10. Neptunium redox speciation at the illite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsac, Rémi; Banik, Nidhu lal; Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Marquardt, Christian Michael; Dardenne, Kathy; Schild, Dieter; Rothe, Joerg; Diascorn, Alexandre; Kupcik, Tomas; Schäfer, Thorsten; Geckeis, Horst

    2015-03-01

    Neptunium (Np(V)) sorption onto a purified illite is investigated as a function of pH (3-10) and [NpVO2+]tot(3 × 10-8-3 × 10-4 M) in 0.1 M NaCl under Ar atmosphere. After about one week reaction time, only insignificant variation of Np sorption is observed and the establishment of reaction equilibrium can be assumed. Surprisingly, solid-liquid distribution ratios (Rd) are clearly higher than those measured for Np(V) sorption onto illite under aerobic conditions. The observation that Rd increases with decreasing pe (pe = -log ae-) suggests partial reduction to Np(IV), although measured redox potentials (pe values) at a first glance suggest the predominance of Np(V). Reduction to Np(IV) at the illite surface could indeed be confirmed by X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). Np speciation in presence of the purified Na-illite under given conditions is consistently described by applying the 2 sites protolysis non-electrostatic surface complexation and cation exchange model. Measured pe data are taken to calculate Np redox state and surface complexation constants for Np(IV) are derived by applying a data fitting procedure. Constants are very consistent with results obtained by applying an existing linear free energy relationship (LFER). Taking Np(IV) surface complexation constants into account shifts the calculated Np(V)/Np(IV) redox borderline in presence of illite surfaces by 3-5 pe units (0.2-0.3 V) towards redox neutral conditions. Our study suggests that Np(V) reduction in presence of a sorbing mineral phase is thermodynamically favored.

  11. Sasse Modeling of First Cycle Neptunium (VI) Recovery Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J. E.

    2006-04-01

    A flowsheet has been proposed to separate neptunium from solutions in H-Canyon Tanks 16.4, 12.5, and 11.7 in the First Cycle solvent extraction banks, in which cerium(IV) (Ce(IV)) serves as an agent to oxidize neptunium to neptunium(VI) (Np(VI)). A SASSE (Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction) spreadsheet model indicates that the proposed flowsheet is a feasible method for separating neptunium and uranium from sulfates, thorium, and other metal impurities. The proposed flowsheet calls for stripping the sulfates, thorium, and other metal impurities into the 1AW stream and extracting and then stripping the neptunium and uranium into the 1BP stream. SASSE predicts that separation of thorium from the other actinides can be accomplished with actinide losses of 0.01% or less. It is assumed that other metal impurities such as iron, aluminum, and fission products will follow the thorium into 1AW. Due to an organic/aqueous distribution coefficient that is close to one, SASSE predicts that plutonium(VI) (Pu(VI)) is split between the A Bank and B Bank aqueous output streams, with 27% going to 1AW and 73% going to 1BP. An extrapolated distribution coefficient based on unvalidated Ce(IV) distribution measurements at a single nitrate concentration and a comparison with thorium(IV) (Th(IV)) distributions indicates that Ce(IV) could reflux in 1B Bank. If the Ce(IV) distribution coefficient is lower than would be predicted by this single point extrapolation, but still higher than the distribution coefficient for Th(IV), then Ce(IV) would follow Np(VI) and uranium(VI) (U(VI)) into 1BP. The SASSE model was validated using data from a 1964 oxidizing flowsheet for the recovery of Np(VI) in Second Cycle. For the proposed flowsheet to be effective in recovering neptunium, the addition of approximately 0.025 M ceric ammonium nitrate (Ce(NH4)2(NO3)6) to both the 1AF and 1AS streams is required to stabilize the neptunium in the +6

  12. Precipitation of neptunium dioxide from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, K E

    1999-12-01

    Tens of thousands of metric tons of highly radioactive, nuclear waste have been generated in the US. Currently, there is no treatment or disposal facility for these wastes. Of the radioactive elements in high-level nuclear waste, neptunium (Np) is of particular concern because it has a long half-life and may potentially be very mobile in groundwaters associated with a proposed underground disposal site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Aqueous Np concentrations observed in previous, short-term solubility experiments led to calculated potential doses exceeding proposed long-term regulatory limits. However, thermodynamic data for Np at 25 C showed that these observed aqueous Np concentrations were supersaturated with respect to crystalline NpO{sub 2}. It was hypothesized that NpO{sub 2} is the thermodynamically stable solid phase in aqueous solution, but it is slow to form in an aqueous solution of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} on the time scale of previous experiments. The precipitation of NpO{sub 2} would provide significantly lower aqueous Np concentrations leading to calculated doses below proposed regulatory limits. To test this hypothesis, solubility experiments were performed at elevated temperature to accelerate any slow precipitation kinetics. Ionic NpO{sub 2}{sup +} (aq) was introduced into very dilute aqueous solutions of NaCl with initial pH values ranging from 6 to 10. The reaction vessels were placed in an oven and allowed to react at 200 C until steady-state aqueous Np concentrations were observed. In all cases, aqueous Np concentrations decreased significantly from the initial value of 10{sup {minus}4} M. The solids that formed were analyzed by x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The solids were determined to be high-purity crystals of NpO{sub 2}. This is the first time that crystalline NpO{sub 2} has been observed to precipitate from NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq) in near-neutral aqueous solutions. The results obtained

  13. Neptunium (VI) and neptunium (VI/V) mixed valence cluster compounds

    SciTech Connect

    May, Iain

    2008-01-01

    Neptunium has three readily accessible oxidation states, IV, V and VI, which can coexist under certain conditions, with the aqueous soluble neptunyl(V) moiety, {l_brace}NpO{sub 2}{r_brace}{sup +}, of most environmental relevance. Careful control of Np chemistry is required during actinide separation processes. In addition, the long half life of the major alpha emitting isotope ({sup 237}Np, t{sub 1/2} = 2.144 x 10{sup 6} years) renders Np a major contributor to the radiotoxicity of nuclear waste as a function of time. Significant quantities of neptunium are generated in nuclear reactors and the current surge in interest in nuclear power will lead to an increase in our need to further understand the chemistry of this element. It is clearly of importance that Np chemistry is well understood and there have been several recent investigations into the structural, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of Np compounds. However, the vast majority of this chemistry has been performed in aqueous solution, prohibiting the use of air and moisture sensitive ligands. This is in stark contrast to uranium and thorium where inert atmosphere chemistry with moisture sensitive donor ligands has flourished, yielding greater insight into the structural and electronic properties of these early actinides. For the uranyl(VI) moiety, {l_brace}UO{sub 2}{r_brace}{sup 2+}, UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(thf){sub 3} (and the desolvated dimer [UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(thf)]{sub 2}) have proven to be excellent moisture-free reagents for inert atmosphere uranyl chemistry. These starting reagents have been used extensively within our group to study soft donor ligand coordination in the uranyl equatorial plane and oxo-activation to Lewis acid coordination. However, until now the absence of such a starting reagent for Np has limited our ability to extend this chemistry any further across the actinide series, which is required if we are to gain a more complete understanding of 5f element chemistry. The synthesis of [Np

  14. Neptunium and plutonium complexes with a sterically encumbered triamidoamine (TREN) scaffold

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Jessie L.; Gaunt, Andrew J.; King, David M.; Liddle, Stephen T.; Reilly, Sean D.; Scott, Brian L.; Wooles, Ashley J.

    2016-03-11

    Here, the syntheses and characterization of isostructural neptunium(IV) and plutonium(IV) complexes [MIV(TRENTIPS)(Cl)] [An = Np, Pu; TRENTIPS = {N(CH2CH2NSiPri3)3}3] are reported, along with the demonstration that they are likely reduced to the corresponding neptunium(III) and plutonium(III) products [MIII(TRENTIPS)]; this chemistry provides new platforms from which to target a plethora of unprecedented molecular functionalities in transuranic chemistry and the neptunium(IV) molecule is the first structurally characterized neptunium(IV)–amide complex.

  15. Neptunium and plutonium complexes with a sterically encumbered triamidoamine (TREN) scaffold.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessie L; Gaunt, Andrew J; King, David M; Liddle, Stephen T; Reilly, Sean D; Scott, Brian L; Wooles, Ashley J

    2016-04-01

    The syntheses and characterisation of isostructural neptunium(iv) and plutonium(iv) complexes [An(IV)(TREN(TIPS))(Cl)] [An = Np, Pu; TREN(TIPS) = {N(CH2CH2NSiPr(i)3)3}(3-)] are reported, along with the demonstration that they are likely reduced to the corresponding neptunium(iii) and plutonium(iii) products [An(III)(TREN(TIPS))]; this chemistry provides new platforms from which to target a plethora of unprecedented molecular functionalities in transuranic chemistry and the neptunium(iv) molecule is the first structurally characterised neptunium(iv)-amide complex. PMID:27009799

  16. Speciation-dependent toxicity of neptunium(V) toward chelatobacter heintzii.

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J. E.; Reed, D. T.; Rittmann, B. E.; Chemical Engineering; Northwestern Univ.

    1998-04-15

    This work investigates how chemical speciation controls the toxicity of neptunium and the neptunium-NTA complex toward Chelatobacter heintzii. We studied the effect of aquo and complexed/precipitated neptunium on the growth of C. heintzii in noncomplexing glucose and phosphate-buffered nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) growth media. Equilibrium chemical speciation modeling and absorption spectroscopy were used to link neptunium speciation to biological growth inhibition. Our results show that metal toxicity of aquo NpO{sub 2}{sup +} significantly limits the growth of C. heintzii at free metal ion concentrations greater than {approx}10{sup -5} M. However, neptunium concentrations {ge}10{sup -4} M do not cause measurable radiotoxicity effects in C. heintzii when present in the form of a neptunium-NTA complex or colloidal/precipitated neptunium phosphate. The neptunium-NTA complex, which is stable under aerobic conditions, is destabilized by microbial degradation of NTA. When phosphate was present, degradation of NTA led to the precipitation of a neptunium-phosphate phase.

  17. Bromide Adsorption by Reference Minerals and Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bromide, Br-, adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous Al and Fe oxide, montmorillonite, kaolinite, and temperate and tropical soils. Bromide adsorption decreased with increasing solution pH with minimal adsorption occurring above pH 7. Bromide adsorption was higher for amorphous oxides t...

  18. Possible Incorporation of Neptunium in Uranyl (VI) Alteration Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Edgar C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Douglas, Matthew; Hanson, Brady D.

    2003-11-25

    This study examines existing data on Np behavior from both spent fuel and borosilicate glass tests in effort to resolve issues concerning the selection of possible solubility limiting phases for neptunium and the methods for detecting neptunium at low levels in spent fuel. These issues were raised in a recent report by Finch and Fortner (2002) that argues that the Np analysis with Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) reported by Buck et al., (1998) is incorrect and that based on a series of experiments with Np-doped U3O8, NpO2 should be adopted as the solubility controlling phase for Np, in the Yucca Mountain performance assessment model. In this report, we will refute the claim that EELS is unable to detect Np and will suggest that the use of NpO2 as the Np solubility controlling phase is not supported by available scientific data from both spent fuel and borosilicate glass.

  19. Extraction of Uranium, Neptunium and Plutonium from Caustic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia H.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Engle, Nancy L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Xu, Jade

    2004-03-28

    5 Fundamental research on uranium, neptunium and plutonium separation from alkaline media using solvent extraction is being conducted. Specific extractants for these actinides from alkaline media have been synthesized to investigate the feasibility of selective removal of these elements. Two families of extractants have been studied: terephthalamide and tetra(hydroxybenzyl)ethylene diamine derivatives. Fundamental studies were conducted to characterize their extraction behavior from a wide variety of aqueous conditions. The terephthalamide derivatives exhibit a significant extraction strength along with a discriminatory behavior among the actinides, plutonium being extracted the most strongly. Quantitative extraction of plutonium and moderate extraction of neptunium and uranium was achieved from a simple caustic solution. Interestingly, strontium is also quantitatively extracted by these derivatives. However, their stability to highly caustic solutions still needs to be imp roved. Tetra(hydroxybenzyl)ethylene diamine derivatives exhibit a very good stability to caustic conditions and are currently being studied.

  20. Plutonium, americium, and neptunium speciation in selected groundwaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cleveland, J.M.; Rees, T.F.; Nash, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    Speciation was determined at 25 and 90 degree C in four groundwaters from diverse sources: the Sparta aquifer in Louisiana, near the Vacherie salt dome; Mansfield No. 2 well in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas; the Stripa mine in Sweden; and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. Neptunium generally was soluble in all waters and was present exclusively as Np(V) and Np(VI), regardless of initial oxidation state. The results indicated that plutonium and neptunium solubilities were determined by the oxidation-reduction properties of the waters, i. e. , their abilities to convert these elements to soluble oxidation states. This was not the case for americium, however; Am(IV) was not detected, and the solubility of this element was determined entirely by the chemical properties of Am(III).

  1. Syntheses of neptunium trichloride and measurements of its melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Hirokazu; Takano, Masahide; Kurata, Masaki; Minato, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Neptunium trichloride (NpCl3) of high purity was synthesized by the solid state reaction of neptunium nitride with cadmium chloride. Lattice parameters of hexagonal NpCl3 were determined from the powder X-ray diffraction pattern to be a = 0.7428 ± 0.0001 nm and c = 0.4262 ± 0.0003 nm, which fairly agree with the reported values. The melting temperature of NpCl3 was measured on a sample of about 1 mg, hermetically encapsulated in a gold crucible with a differential thermal analyzer. The value determined was 1070 ± 3 K which is close to the recommended value (1075 ± 30 K) derived from the mean value of the melting temperature of UCl3 and of PuCl3.

  2. RAPID MEASUREMENTS OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDATION STATES USING CHROMATOGRAPHIC RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D; C Diprete, C; Mira Malek, M; Eddie Kyser, E

    2009-03-24

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) H-Canyon facility uses ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) to separate impure neptunium (Np) from a high sulfate feed stream. The material is processed using a two-pass solvent extraction purification which relies on CAN to oxidize neptunium to Np(VI) during the first pass prior to extraction. Spectrophotometric oxidation-state analyses normally used to validate successful oxidation to Np(VI) prior to extraction were compromised by this feed stream matrix. Therefore, a rapid chromatographic method to validate successful Np oxidation was developed using Eichrom Industries TRU and TEVA{reg_sign} resins. The method was validated and subsequently transferred to existing operations in the process analytical laboratories.

  3. SEPARATION OF NEPTUNIUM FROM PLUTONIUM BY CHLORINATION AND SUBLIMATION

    DOEpatents

    Fried, S.M.

    1958-11-18

    A process is described for separating neptunium from plutonium. The method consists in chlorinating a mixture of the oxides of Np and Pu by contacting the mixture with carbon tetrachloride at about 500 icient laborato C. ln this manner the Np is converted to the tetrachlorlde and the Pu converted to the trichloride. Since NpCl/sub 4/ is more latile than PuCl/sub 3/, the separation ls effected by vaporing sad subsequently condenslng the NpCl/sub 4/.

  4. Uranium and Neptunium Desorption from Yucca Mountain Alluvium

    SciTech Connect

    C.D. Scism; P.W. Reimus; M. Ding; S.J. Chipera

    2006-03-16

    Uranium and neptunium were used as reactive tracers in long-term laboratory desorption studies using saturated alluvium collected from south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objective of these long-term experiments is to make detailed observations of the desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium to provide Yucca Mountain with technical bases for a more realistic and potentially less conservative approach to predicting the transport of adsorbing radionuclides in the saturated alluvium. This paper describes several long-term desorption experiments using a flow-through experimental method and groundwater and alluvium obtained from boreholes along a potential groundwater flow path from the proposed repository site. In the long term desorption experiments, the percentages of uranium and neptunium sorbed as a function of time after different durations of sorption was determined. In addition, the desorbed activity as a function of time was fit using a multi-site, multi-rate model to demonstrate that different desorption rate constants ranging over several orders of magnitude exist for the desorption of uranium from Yucca Mountain saturated alluvium. This information will be used to support the development of a conceptual model that ultimately results in effective K{sub d} values much larger than those currently in use for predicting radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain.

  5. XAS and TRLIF spectroscopy of uranium and neptunium in seawater.

    PubMed

    Maloubier, Melody; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Moisy, Philippe; Monfort, Marguerite; Den Auwer, Christophe; Moulin, Christophe

    2015-03-28

    Seawater contains radionuclides at environmental levels; some are naturally present and others come from anthropogenic nuclear activity. In this report, the molecular speciation in seawater of uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) at a concentration of 5 × 10(-5) M has been investigated for the first time using a combination of two spectroscopic techniques: Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLIF) for U and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) for U and Np at the LIII edge. In parallel, the theoretical speciation of uranium and neptunium in seawater at the same concentration is also discussed and compared to spectroscopic data. The uranium complex was identified as the neutral carbonato calcic complex UO2(CO3)3Ca2, which has been previously described in other natural systems. In the case of neptunium, the complex identified is mainly a carbonato complex whose exact stoichiometry is more difficult to assess. The knowledge of the actinide molecular speciation and reactivity in seawater is of fundamental interest in the particular case of uranium recovery and more generally regarding the actinide life cycle within the biosphere in the case of accidental release. This is the first report of actinide direct speciation in seawater medium that can complement inventory data. PMID:25689216

  6. Neptunium multipoles and resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction by neptunium dioxide (NpO2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovesey, S. W.; Detlefs, C.; Rodríguez-Fernández, A.

    2012-06-01

    The low-temperature ordered state of neptunium dioxide (NpO2) remains enigmatic. After decades of experimental and theoretical efforts, long-range order of a time-odd (magnetic) high-order atomic multipole moment is now generally considered to be the fundamental order parameter, the most likely candidate being a magnetic triakontadipole (rank 5). To date, however, direct experimental observation of the primary order parameter remains outstanding. In the light of new experimental findings, we re-examine the effect of crystal symmetry on the atomic multipoles and the resulting x-ray resonant scattering signature. Our simulations use the crystallographic point group \\bar {3}m (D3d), because corresponding magnetic groups \\bar {3}{m}^{\\prime}, {\\bar {3}}^{\\prime}{m}^{\\prime} and {\\bar {3}}^{\\prime}m are shown by us to be at odds with a wealth of experimental results. In addition to the previously observed (secondary) quadrupole order, we derive expressions for higher-order multipoles that might be observed in future experiments. In particular, magnetic octupole moments are predicted to contribute to Np M2,3 and L2,3 resonant scattering via E2-E2 events. The Lorentzian-squared lineshape observed at the M4 resonance is shown to be the result of the anisotropy of the 3p3/2 core levels. Quantitative comparison of our calculations to the measured data yields a core-hole width Γ = 2.60(7) eV and a core-state exchange energy \\vert \\varepsilon (\\frac{1}{2})\\vert =0.7 6(2) eV.

  7. Neptunium multipoles and resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction by neptunium dioxide (NpO2).

    PubMed

    Lovesey, S W; Detlefs, C; Rodríguez-Fernández, A

    2012-06-27

    The low-temperature ordered state of neptunium dioxide (NpO(2)) remains enigmatic. After decades of experimental and theoretical efforts, long-range order of a time-odd (magnetic) high-order atomic multipole moment is now generally considered to be the fundamental order parameter, the most likely candidate being a magnetic triakontadipole (rank 5). To date, however, direct experimental observation of the primary order parameter remains outstanding. In the light of new experimental findings, we re-examine the effect of crystal symmetry on the atomic multipoles and the resulting x-ray resonant scattering signature. Our simulations use the crystallographic point group ̅3m (D(3d)), because corresponding magnetic groups ̅3m', ̅3'm', and ̅3'm are shown by us to be at odds with a wealth of experimental results. In addition to the previously observed (secondary) quadrupole order, we derive expressions for higher-order multipoles that might be observed in future experiments. In particular, magnetic octupole moments are predicted to contribute to Np M(2,3) and L(2,3) resonant scattering via E2–E2 events. The Lorentzian-squared lineshape observed at the M(4) resonance is shown to be the result of the anisotropy of the 3p(3/2) core levels. Quantitative comparison of our calculations to the measured data yields a core–hole width Γ = 2.60(7) eV and a core-state exchange energy [absolute value]ε(1/2)[absolute value] = 0.76(2) eV. PMID:22652978

  8. Re-evaluating neptunium in uranyl phases derived from corroded spent fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, J. A.; Finch, R. J.; Kropf, A. J.; Cunnane, J. C.; Chemical Engineering

    2004-11-01

    Interest in mechanisms that may control radioelement release from corroded commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) has been heightened by the selection of the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as the repository for high-level nuclear waste in the United States. Neptunium is an important radionuclide in repository models owing to its relatively long half-life and its high aqueous mobility as neptunyl [Np(V)O+2]. The possibility of neptunium sequestration into uranyl alteration phases produced by corroding CSNF would suggest-a process for lowering neptunium concentration and subsequent migration from a geologic repository. However, there remains little experimental evidence that uranyl compounds will, in fact, serve as long-term host phases for the retention of neptunium under conditions expected in a deep geologic repository. To directly explore this possibility, we examined specimens of uranyl alteration phases derived from humid-air-corroded CSNF by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to better determine neptunium uptake in these phases. Although neptunium fluorescence was readily observed from as-received CSNF, it was not observed from the uranyl alteration rind. We establish upper limits for neptunium incorporation into CSNF alteration phases that are significantly below previously reported concentrations obtained by using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We attribute the discrepancy to a plural-scattering event that creates a spurious EELS peak at the neptunium-MV energy.

  9. Re-Evaluating Neptunium in Uranyl Phases Derived from Corroded Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, Jeffrey A.; Finch, Robert J.; Kropf, A. Jeremy; Cunnane, James C.

    2004-11-15

    Interest in mechanisms that may control radioelement release from corroded commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) has been heightened by the selection of the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as the repository for high-level nuclear waste in the United States. Neptunium is an important radionuclide in repository models owing to its relatively long half-life and its high aqueous mobility as neptunyl [Np(V)O{sub 2}{sup +}]. The possibility of neptunium sequestration into uranyl alteration phases produced by corroding CSNF would suggest a process for lowering neptunium concentration and subsequent migration from a geologic repository. However, there remains little experimental evidence that uranyl compounds will, in fact, serve as long-term host phases for the retention of neptunium under conditions expected in a deep geologic repository. To directly explore this possibility, we examined specimens of uranyl alteration phases derived from humid-air-corroded CSNF by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to better determine neptunium uptake in these phases. Although neptunium fluorescence was readily observed from as-received CSNF, it was not observed from the uranyl alteration rind. We establish upper limits for neptunium incorporation into CSNF alteration phases that are significantly below previously reported concentrations obtained by using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We attribute the discrepancy to a plural-scattering event that creates a spurious EELS peak at the neptunium-M{sub V} energy.

  10. Evaluation of the Effects of Tank 50H Solids on Dissolved Uranium, Plutonium and Neptunium

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.N.

    2003-12-02

    The study of the effects of contacting a simulated salt solution spiked with uranium, plutonium, and neptunium with Tank 50H solids. General findings include: There is no evidence for interaction between Tank 50H solids and uranium from the spiked salt solution. Lack of uranium removal may reflect prior removal of uranium. There is evidence for interaction between Tank 50H solids with plutonium and neptunium as evidenced by loss of these two actinides from the salt solution. The amount of plutonium and neptunium lost from solution increased with an increase in the quantity of Tank 50H solids for a fixed simulant volume. The removal of plutonium and neptunium fit typical sorption isotherms allowing development of loading curves for estimating maximum solids loading. The maximum loading capacities for plutonium and neptunium in the simulants are, respectively, 2.01 and 4.48 micrograms per gram of Tank 50H solids. The oxalate in the Tank 50H solids is not directly responsible for the loss of plutonium and neptunium from the salt solution. The removal of plutonium and neptunium may be attributed to other minor components of the Tank 50H solids. We recommend additional testing to identify the component responsible for the plutonium and neptunium removal.

  11. Neptunium and americium speciation in selected basalt, granite, shale, and tuff ground waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cleveland, J.M.; Rees, T.F.; Nash, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    Neptunium and americium are relatively insoluble in ground waters containing high sulfate concentrations, particularly at 90??C. The insoluble neptunium species is Np(IV); hence reducing waters should enhance its formation. Americium can exist only in the trivalent state under these conditions, and its solubility also should be representative of that of curium.

  12. Chemical Speciation of Neptunium in Spent Fuel. 1st Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Czerwinski, Ken; Sherman, Christi; Reed, Don

    2000-03-02

    This project will examine the chemical speciation of neptunium in spent nuclear fuel. The R&D fields covered by the project include waste host materials and actinide chemistry. Examination of neptunium is chosen since it was identified as a radionuclide of concern by the NERI workshop. Additionally, information on the chemical form of neptunium in spent fuel is lacking. The identification of the neptunium species in spent fuel would allow a greater scientific based understanding of its long-term fate and behavior in waste forms. Research to establish the application and development of X-ray synchrotrons radiation (XSR) techniques to determine the structure of aqueous, adsorbed, and solid actinide species of importance to nuclear considerations is being conducted at Argonne. These studies extend current efforts within the Chemical Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory to investigate actinide speciation with more conventional spectroscopic and solids characterization (e.g. SEM, TEM, and XRD) methods. Our project will utilize all these techniques for determining neptunium speciation in spent fuel. We intend to determine the chemical species and oxidation state of neptunium in spent fuel and alteration phases. Different types of spent fuel will be examined. Once characterized, the chemical behavior of the identified neptunium species will be evaluated if it is not present in the literature. Special attention will be given to the behavior of the neptunium species under typical repository near-field conditions (elevated temperature, high pH, varying Eh). This will permit a timely inclusion of project results into near-field geochemical models. Additionally, project results and methodologies have applications to neptunium in the environment, or treatment of neptunium containing waste.

  13. Lanthanum Bromide Detectors for Safeguards Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.

    2011-05-25

    Lanthanum bromide has advantages over other popular inorganic scintillator detectors. Lanthanum bromide offers superior resolution, and good efficiency when compared to sodium iodide and lanthanum chloride. It is a good alternative to high purity germanium detectors for some safeguards applications. This paper offers an initial look at lanthanum bromide detectors. Resolution of lanthanum bromide will be compared lanthanum chloride and sodium-iodide detectors through check source measurements. Relative efficiency and angular dependence will be looked at. Nuclear material spectra, to include plutonium and highly enriched uranium, will be compared between detector types.

  14. Radiochemistry of uranium, neptunium and plutonium: an updating

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.A.; Choppin, G.R.; Wild, J.F.

    1986-02-01

    This report presents some procedures used in the radiochemical isolation, purification and/or analysis of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium. In this update of the procedures, we have not attempted to discuss the developments in the chemistry of U, Np, and Pu but have restricted the report to the newer procedures, most of which have resulted from the increased emphasis in environmental concern which requires analysis of extremely small amounts of the actinide element in quite complex matrices. The final section of this report describes several schemes for isolation of actinides by oxidation state.

  15. Measuring methyl bromide emissions from fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.R.; Gan, J.; Ernst, F.F.; Yates, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    Methyl bromide is used extensively for pest control. Recent evidence suggests that methyl bromide may react with stratospheric ozone and, due to the Clean Air Act, is scheduled for phase-out within the next 5 to 10 years. As indicated in a recent report from The National Agricultural Pesticide Impact Assessment Program, there will be substantial economic impact on the agricultural community if the use of methyl bromide is restricted. There are several areas of uncertainty concerning the agricultural use of methyl bromide. Foremost is the quantification of mass emitted to the atmosphere from agricultural fields. To address this, two field experiments were conducted to directly measure methyl bromide emissions. In the first experiment, methyl bromide was injected at approximately 25 cm depth and the soil was covered with 1 mil high-density polyethylene plastic. The second experiment was similar except that methyl bromide was injected at approximately 68 cm depth and the soil was not covered. From these experiments, the emission rate into the atmosphere and the subsurface transport of methyl bromide was determined. Both experiments include a field-scale mass balance to verify the accuracy of the flux-measurement methods as well as to check data consistency. The volatilization rate and mass lost was determined from estimates of the degradation and from several atmospheric and chamber flux methods.

  16. 77 FR 35295 - Methyl Bromide; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 RIN 2070-ZA16 Methyl Bromide; Pesticide Tolerances AGENCY: Environmental... methyl bromide in or on cotton, undelinted seed under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA.... Background In the Federal Register of April 6, 2012 (77 FR 20752) (FRL-9345- 1), EPA issued a proposed...

  17. METHYL BROMIDE ALTERNATIVES FOR VINEYARD REPLANT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fumigation with methyl bromide is needed by grape growers in central California to control soilborne pests. However, use of methyl bromide is banned and soil fumigation with other chemicals subjects to strict regulations to protect human health and air quality. The objective was to determine,...

  18. Dose rate dependence of the speciation of neptunium in irradiated solutions of nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Precek, M.; Paulenova, A.; Mincher, B.J.; Mezyk, S.P.

    2013-07-01

    The effects of radiation on the redox speciation of neptunium are of interest due to their impact on the performance of separation of neptunium from highly radioactive solutions of dissolved used nuclear fuel. In this study, the influence of dose rate change from 0.4 kGy/h to 6 kGy/h was examined during irradiation of solutions of initially hexavalent 2.0-2.5 mM neptunium in nitric acid of two different concentrations (0.5 and 1 M). Results indicate that the immediate radiolytic steady-state concentration of neptunium(V) were depressed and its initial radiolytic yield was up to 2-times lower (in 1 M HNO{sub 3} solutions)during irradiations with the higher dose rate. The finding is explained on the basis of the enhancement of the role of oxidizing radicals during the radiolytic process. (authors)

  19. Neurological manifestation of methyl bromide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Suwanlaong, Kanokrat; Phanthumchinda, Kammant

    2008-03-01

    Methyl bromide is a highly toxic gas with poor olfactory warning properties. It is widely used as insecticidal fumigant for dry foodstuffs and can be toxic to central and peripheral nervous systems. Most neurological manifestations of methyl bromide intoxication occur from inhalation. Acute toxicity characterized by headache, dizziness, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and visual disturbances. Tremor, convulsion, unconsciousness and permanent brain damage may occur in severe poisoning. Chronic exposure can cause neuropathy, pyramidal and cerebellar dysfunction, as well as neuropsychiatric disturbances. The first case of methyl bromide intoxication in Thailand has been described. The patient was a 24-year-old man who worked in a warehouse of imported vegetables fumigated with methyl bromide. He presented with unstable gait, vertigo and paresthesia of both feet, for two weeks. He had a history of chronic exposure to methyl bromide for three years. His fourteen co-workers also developed the same symptoms but less in severity. Neurological examination revealed ataxic gait, decreased pain and vibratory sense on both feet, impaired cerebellar signs and hyperactive reflex in all extremities. The serum concentration of methyl bromide was 8.18 mg/dl. Electrophysilogical study was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain (MRI) revealed bilateral symmetrical lesion of abnormal hypersignal intensity on T2 and fluid-attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences at bilateral dentate nuclei of cerebellum and periventricular area of the fourth ventricle. This incident stresses the need for improvement of worker education and safety precautions during all stages of methyl bromide fumigation. PMID:18575299

  20. Existing Evidence for the Fate of Neptunium in the Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Judah I. ); Buck, Edgar C. ); McNamara, Bruce K. ); Hanson, Brady D. ); Marschman, Steven C. )

    2003-06-18

    Neptunium, because of its long half life, is an element of long-term interest to the Yucca Mountain repository. The fate of neptunium under repository settings is unknown. This report provides a review and new interpretation of past tests on commercial spent nuclear fuel and experimental evidence on the fate of neptunium. Tests on commercial spent nuclear fuel preformed previously at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) used a bathtub setup by immersing spent fuel in either deionized water or a groundwater typical of those at Yucca Mountain. The main goal of the tests was to determine the different concentrations of radionuclides in solution with different types of cladding defects. Neptunium was not the focus of these tests, nor were the tests designed to study neptunium. Drip tests performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are unsaturated tests that drip water at different rates on spent fuel. Relatively new tests at ANL examine the corrosion of Np-doped U3O8 in humid air at various temperatures. This review concludes that all tests reported here have analytical problems (i.e., relatively high detection limits for Np) and have been configured such that they limit the ability to interpret the available neptunium data. Past tests on spent nuclear fuel do not unambiguously describe neptunium chemistry as there are multiple mechanisms that may explain the observed behavior in each test. One apparently major shortcoming of most tests is that the extent of fuel reaction was limited by the amount of oxygen present in the system. Further detailed studies under repository-relevant conditions, which include the assumption of a constant 20 percent oxygen atmosphere, are needed to provide the data necessary for the development and validation of models used to predict the long-term fate of neptunium and other radionuclides at Yucca Mountain.

  1. Potassium bromide method of infrared sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milkey, R.G.

    1958-01-01

    In the preparation of potassium bromide pressed windows for use in the infrared analysis of solids, severe grinding of the potassium bromide powder may produce strong absorption bands that could interfere seriously with the spectra of the sample. These absorption bands appear to be due to some crystal alteration of the potassium bromide as a result of the grinding process. They were less apt to occur when the coarser powder, which had received a relatively gentle grinding, was used. Window blanks prepared from the coarser powders showed smaller adsorbed water peaks and generally higher over-all transmittance readings than windows pressed from the very fine powders.

  2. Reduction and precipitation of neptunium(V) by sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J. E.; Rittmann, B. E.; Reed, D. T.

    1999-10-21

    Migration of neptunium, as NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, has been identified as a potentially important pathway for actinide release at nuclear waste repositories and existing sites of subsurface contamination. Reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) will likely reduce its volubility, resulting in lowered subsurface migration. The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to utilize Np(V) as an electron acceptor was investigated, because these bacteria are active in many anaerobic aquifers and are known to facilitate the reduction of metals and radionuclides. Pure and mixed cultures of SRB were able to precipitate neptunium during utilization of pyruvate, lactate, and hydrogen as electron donors in the presence and absence of sulfate. The neptunium in the precipitate was identified as Np(IV) using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis. In mixed-culture studies, the addition of hydrogen to consortia grown by pyruvate fermentation stimulated neptunium reduction and precipitation. Experiments with pure cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, growing by lactate fermentation in the absence of sulfate or by sulfate reduction, confirm that the organism is active in neptunium reduction and precipitation. Based on our results, the activity of SRB in the subsurface may have a significant, and potentially beneficial, impact on actinide mobility by reducing neptunium volubility.

  3. SORPTION OF URANIUM, PLUTONIUM AND NEPTUNIUM ONTO SOLIDS PRESENT IN HIGH CAUSTIC NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L; Bill Wilmarth, B; David Hobbs, D

    2008-05-30

    Solids such as granular activated carbon, hematite and sodium phosphates, if present as sludge components in nuclear waste storage tanks, have been found to be capable of precipitating/sorbing actinides like plutonium, neptunium and uranium from nuclear waste storage tank supernatant liqueur. Thus, the potential may exists for the accumulation of fissile materials in such nuclear waste storage tanks during lengthy nuclear waste storage and processing. To evaluate the nuclear criticality safety in a typical nuclear waste storage tank, a study was initiated to measure the affinity of granular activated carbon, hematite and anhydrous sodium phosphate to sorb plutonium, neptunium and uranium from alkaline salt solutions. Tests with simulated and actual nuclear waste solutions established the affinity of the solids for plutonium, neptunium and uranium upon contact of the solutions with each of the solids. The removal of plutonium and neptunium from the synthetic salt solution by nuclear waste storage tank solids may be due largely to the presence of the granular activated carbon and transition metal oxides in these storage tank solids or sludge. Granular activated carbon and hematite also showed measurable affinity for both plutonium and neptunium. Sodium phosphate, used here as a reference sorbent for uranium, as expected, exhibited high affinity for uranium and neptunium, but did not show any measurable affinity for plutonium.

  4. Thermodynamics of neptunium(V) fluoride and sulfate at elevatedtemperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin; Xia, Yuanxian; Friese, Judah I.

    2006-10-31

    Complexation of neptunium(V) with fluoride and sulfate at elevated temperatures was studied by microcalorimetry. Thermodynamic parameters, including the equilibrium constants and enthalpy of protonation of fluoride and sulfate, and the enthalpy of complexation between Np(V) and fluoride and sulfate at 25 - 70 C were determined. Results show that the complexation of Np(V) with fluoride and sulfate is endothermic and that the complexation is enhanced by the increase in temperature - a three-fold increase in the stability constants of NpO{sub 2}F(aq) and NpO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{sup -} as the temperature is increased from 25 to 70 C.

  5. Complexation of Neptunium(V) with Fluoride at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin; Xia, Yuanxian; Friese, Judah I.

    2008-06-16

    Complexation of neptunium(V) with fluoride at elevated temperatures was studied by spectrophotometry and microcalorimetry. Two successive complexes, NpO{sub 2}F(aq) and NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}{sup -}, were identified by spectrophotometry in the temperature range of 10-70 C. Thermodynamic parameters, including the equilibrium constants and enthalpy of complexation between Np(V) and fluoride at 10-70 C were determined. Results show that the complexation of Np(V) with fluoride is endothermic and that the complexation is enhanced by the increase in temperature - a two-fold increase in the stability constants of NpO{sub 2}F(aq) and more than five-fold increase in the stability constants of NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}{sup -} as the temperature is increased from 10 to 70 C.

  6. Geomicrobiological redox cycling of the transuranic element neptunium.

    PubMed

    Law, Gareth T W; Geissler, Andrea; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Livens, Francis R; Boothman, Christopher; Begg, James D C; Denecke, Melissa A; Rothe, Jörg; Dardenne, Kathy; Burke, Ian T; Charnock, John M; Morris, Katherine

    2010-12-01

    Microbial processes can affect the environmental behavior of redox sensitive radionuclides, and understanding these reactions is essential for the safe management of radioactive wastes. Neptunium, an alpha-emitting transuranic element, is of particular importance because of its long half-life, high radiotoxicity, and relatively high solubility as Np(V)O(2)(+) under oxic conditions. Here, we describe experiments to explore the biogeochemistry of Np where Np(V) was added to oxic sediment microcosms with indigenous microorganisms and anaerobically incubated. Enhanced Np removal to sediments occurred during microbially mediated metal reduction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed this was due to reduction to poorly soluble Np(IV) on solids. In subsequent reoxidation experiments, sediment-associated Np(IV) was somewhat resistant to oxidative remobilization. These results demonstrate the influence of microbial processes on Np solubility and highlight the critical importance of radionuclide biogeochemistry in nuclear legacy management. PMID:21047117

  7. Application of the underscreened Kondo lattice model to neptunium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simoes, Acirete S.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Coqublin, B.

    2012-12-01

    The coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order has been observed in many uranium and neptunium compounds such as UTe or Np2PdGa3. This coexistence can be described within the underscreened Anderson lattice model with two f-electrons and S = 1 spins on each site. After performing the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation on this model, we have obtained an effective Hamiltonian with a f-band term in addition to the Kondo interaction for S = 1 spins. The results indicate a coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order, with different relative values of the Kondo TK and Curie TC temperatures. We emphasize here especially the case TK < TC where there is a Kondo behavior below TC and a clear decrease of the magnetization below TK. Such a behavior has been observed in the magnetization curves of NpNiSi2 at low temperatures.

  8. Gamma-ray measurements of a 6-kilogram neptunium sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C. E.; Frankle, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    In order to better determine the properties of {sup 237}Np for criticality safety and nuclear nonproliferation, especially its critical mass, 6070-gram solid sphere was cast on 15 May 2001 in a hot cell. The casting sprue was cut off on a lathe and the casting ground to a final diameter of 8.29 cm. The sphere was enclosed in a spherical tungsten shell 0.523-cm thick to reduce the gamma-ray dose. The neptunium and the tungsten were doubly encapsulated in welded, spherical nickel shells, each 0.381-cm thick. The sprue material was analyzed by mass spectrometry. Here we report the results of the first gamma-ray measurements of this unique item.

  9. Nuclear forensics of a non-traditional sample: Neptunium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doyle, Jamie L.; Schwartz, Daniel; Tandon, Lav

    2016-05-16

    Recent nuclear forensics cases have focused primarily on plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) materials. By definition however, nuclear forensics can apply to any diverted nuclear material. This includes neptunium (Np), an internationally safeguarded material like Pu and U, that could offer a nuclear security concern if significant quantities were found outside of regulatory control. This case study couples scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with quantitative analysis using newly developed specialized software, to evaluate a non-traditional nuclear forensic sample of Np. Here, the results of the morphological analyses were compared with another Np sample of known pedigree, as well as other traditionalmore » actinide materials in order to determine potential processing and point-of-origin.« less

  10. Emission of methyl bromide from biomass burning

    SciTech Connect

    Manoe, S.; Andreae, M.O. )

    1994-03-04

    Bromine is, per atom, far more efficient than chlorine in destroying stratospheric ozone, and methyl bromide is the single largest source of stratospheric bromine. The two main previously known sources of this compound are emissions from the ocean and from the compound's use as an agricultural pesticide. Laboratory biomass combustion experiments showed that methyl bromide was emitted in the smoke from various fuels tested. Methyl bromide was also found in smoke plumes from wildfires in savannas, chaparral, and boreal forest. Global emissions of methyl bromide from biomass burning are estimated to be in the range of 10 to 50 gigagrams per year, which is comparable to the amount produced by ocean emission and pesticide use and represents a major contribution ([approximately]30 percent) to the stratospheric bromine budget.

  11. Growth and characterization of lead bromide crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Gottlieb, M.; Henningsen, T.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mazelsky, R.; Glicksman, M. E.; Coriell, S. R.; Santoro, G. J.; Duval, W. M. B.

    1992-01-01

    Lead(II) bromide was purified by a combination of directional freezing and zone-refining methods. Differential thermal analysis of the lead bromide showed that a destructive phase transformation occurs below the melting temperature. This transformation causes extensive cracking, making it very difficult to grow a large single crystal. Energy of phase transformation for pure lead bromide was determined to be 24.67 cal/g. To circumvent this limitation, crystals were doped by silver bromide which decreased the energy of phase transformation. The addition of silver helped in achieving the size, but enhanced the inhomogeneity in the crystal. The acoustic attenuation constant was almost identical for the pure and doped (below 3000 ppm) crystals.

  12. Investigation of drug interactions with pinaverium bromide.

    PubMed

    Devred, C; Godeau, P; Guerot, C; Librez, P; Mougeot, G; Orsetti, A; Segrestaa, J M

    1986-01-01

    A series of studies was carried out at 6 centres to investigate possible drug interaction between the spasmolytic, pinaverium bromide, and cardiac glycosides, anticoagulants and hypoglycaemic agents given to patients as part of the long-term treatment of their condition. The results of clinical and laboratory investigations did not show any evidence of pinaverium bromide interfering with the action or activity of any of the drugs studied. PMID:3084176

  13. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. 173.193 Section 173.193 Transportation Other Regulations... bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. (a) Bromoacetone must...

  14. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. 173.193 Section 173.193 Transportation Other Regulations... bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. (a) Bromoacetone must...

  15. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. 173.193 Section 173.193 Transportation Other Regulations... bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. (a) Bromoacetone must...

  16. Metabolism and gastrointestinal absorption of neptunium and protactinium in adult baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Ralston, L.G.; Cohen, N.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Ayres, L.; Oldham, R.D.; Moretti, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of neptunium and protactinium was studied in adult female baboons following intravenous injection and intragastric intubation. Immediately following intravenous injection (10/sup -1/ to 10/sup -10/ mg Np per kg body wt), neptunium cleared rapidly from blood, deposited primarily in the skeleton (54 +- 5%) and liver (3 +- 0.2%), and was excreted predominantly via urine (40 +- 3%). For the first year post injection, neptunium was retained with a biological half-time of approx.100 days in liver and 1.5 +- 0.2 yr in bone. In comparison, injected protactinium (10/sup -9/ mg/kg) was retained in blood in higher concentrations and was initially eliminated in urine to a lesser extent (6 +- 3%). In vivo measurements indicated that protactinium was retained in bone (65 +- 0.3%) with a half-time of 3.5 +- 0.6 yr. Differences in the physicochemical states of the neptunium or protactinium solutions injected did not alter the metabolic behavior of these nuclides. The gastrointestinal absorption value for neptunium in two fasted baboons, sacrificed at 1 day post administration, was determined to be 0.92 +- 0.04%. Of the total amount of neptunium absorbed, 52 +- 3% was retained in bone, 6 +- 2% was in liver, and 42 +- 0.1% was excreted in urine. A method was developed to estimate GI absorption values for both nuclides in baboons which were not sacrificed. Absorption values calculated by this method for neptunium and protactinium in fasted baboons were 1.8 +- 0.8% and 0.65 +- 0.01%, respectively. Values for fed animals were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude less than those for fasted animals. 14 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs. (DT)

  17. Neptunium Solubility in the Near-Field Environment of A Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect

    D.C. Sassani

    2004-05-14

    For representing the source-term of a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, NV, total system performance assessment models evaluate the disequilibrium degradation of the waste forms to capture a bounding rate for radionuclide source-term availability and use solubility constraints that are more representative of longer-term, equilibrium processes to limit radionuclide mass transport from the source-term. These solubility limits capture precipitation processes occurring either as the waste forms alter, or in the near-field environment as chemical conditions evolve. A number of alternative models for solubility controls on dissolved neptunium concentrations have been evaluated. These include idealized models based on precipitation of neptunium as separate oxide minerals and more complex considerations of trace amounts of neptunium being incorporated into the secondary uranyl phases from waste form alteration. Thermodynamic models for neptunium under oxidizing conditions indicate that tetravalent neptunium (NpO{sub 2}) solids are more stable relative to pentavalent (Np{sub 2}O{sub 5}) phases, and thereby set lower dissolved concentrations of neptunyl species. Data on solids and solutions from slow flow through (dripping) tests on spent fuel grains indicate that neptunium is tetravalent in the spent fuel and that over {approx}9 years the neptunium concentrations are near to or below calculated NpO{sub 2} solubility. The possibility of kinetic rate limitations to NpO{sub 2} precipitation has led to temperature-dependent studies of NpO{sub 2} precipitation kinetics and solubility to reduce uncertainties and confirm application of the model.

  18. The effect of high ionic strength on neptunium (V) adsorption to a halophilic bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ams, David A.; Swanson, Juliet S.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Richmann, Michael; Reed, Donald T.

    2013-06-01

    The mobility of neptunium (V) in subsurface high ionic strength aqueous systems may be strongly influenced by adsorption to the cell wall of the halophilic bacteria Chromohalobacter sp. This study is the first to evaluate the adsorption of neptunium (V) to the surface of a halophilic bacterium as a function of pH from approximately 2 to 10 and at ionic strengths of 2 and 4 M. This is also the first study to evaluate the effects of carbonate complexation with neptunium (V) on adsorption to whole bacterial cells under high pH conditions. A thermodynamically-based surface complexation model was adapted to describe experimental adsorption data under high ionic strength conditions where traditional corrections for aqueous ion activity are invalid. Adsorption of neptunium (V) was rapid and reversible under the conditions of the study. Adsorption was significant over the entire pH range evaluated for both ionic strength conditions and was shown to be dependent on the speciation of the sites on the bacterial surface and neptunium (V) in solution. Adsorption behavior was controlled by the relatively strong electrostatic attraction of the positively charged neptunyl ion to the negatively charged bacterial surface at pH below circum-neutral. At pH above circum-neutral, the adsorption behavior was controlled by the presence of negatively charged neptunium (V) carbonate complexes resulting in decreased adsorption, although adsorption was still significant due to the adsorption of negatively charged neptunyl-carbonate species. Adsorption in 4 M NaClO4 was enhanced relative to adsorption in 2 M NaClO4 over the majority of the pH range evaluated, likely due to the effect of increasing aqueous ion activity at high ionic strength. The protonation/deprotonation characteristics of the cell wall of Chromohalobacter sp. were evaluated by potentiometric titrations in 2 and 4 M NaClO4. Bacterial titration results indicated that Chromohalobacter sp. exhibits similar proton buffering

  19. Effect of Precipitation Conditions on the Specific Surface Area of Neptunium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    HILL, BENJAMINC.

    2004-06-01

    Neptunium oxalate was precipitated under nominal and bounding HB-Line flowsheet conditions. The nominal case represents expected normal HB-Line operation. The bounding case represents process flowsheet extremes that could occur which are anticipated to decrease particle size and increase surface area. The neptunium oxalate produced under bounding conditions was used to validate the effectiveness of HB-Line calcination conditions. The maximum specific surface area of the neptunium oxide (NpO2) used in gas generation testing was 5.34 m2/g. Experiments were conducted to verify that even under bounding precipitation conditions the SSA of NpO2 produced would remain within the range evaluated during gas generation testing. The neptunium oxalate from nominal and bounding precipitation conditions was calcined at 600 degrees Celsius and 625 degrees Celsius, respectively, to form NpO2. Samples from each batch of neptunium oxalate were calcined for one, two, or four hours. Results indicate that the SSA of NpO2 continues to decrease between one and four hours. After two hours of calcination at 625 degrees Celsius, the SSA of NpO2 from the bounding case meets the surface area requirements for limiting moisture uptake.

  20. Neptunium as a Tool for Reducing Proliferation Risks with Plutonium: A Technical Analysis of its Efficiency and its Drawbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Greneche, Dominique; Ng, Selena; Guesdon, Bernard; Vinoche, Richard; Delpech, Marc; Golfier, Herve; Dolci, Florence; Poinot-Salanon, Christine

    2006-07-01

    Introducing neptunium into the nuclear fuel cycle has been proposed in the past as a way to impede the diversion or the direct use of plutonium to fabricate a nuclear explosive device. This paper aims to technically analyze the industrial consequences should this proposal be implemented. Two scenarios are considered: 1) adding neptunium to fresh uranium oxide (UOX) fuel before irradiation in a light water reactor; 2) separating neptunium together with plutonium from used UOX fuel and using this combined oxide to fabricate mixed oxide (MOX) fuel before subsequent irradiation in a light water reactor. In both cases, assembly calculations for a pressurized water reactor using fresh fuel doped with neptunium are presented for a wide range of neptunium proportions. Consequences on core and fuel performances and the fuel cycle are analyzed. These are weighed against the potential proliferation resistance benefits of adding neptunium due to the increased quantity of the plutonium isotope {sup 238}Pu in the discharged fuel, or due to the potentially increased detectability through gamma ray emissions of a plutonium-neptunium oxide mixture. Finally, the proliferation risk presented by neptunium itself is discussed. (authors)

  1. Batch sorption results for neptunium transport through Yucca Mountain tuffs. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program milestone 3349

    SciTech Connect

    Triay, I.R.; Cotter, C.R.; Huddleston, M.H.; Leonard, D.E.

    1996-09-01

    We studied the sorption of neptunium onto tuffs characteristic of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The neptunium was in the Np(V) oxidation state under oxidizing conditions in groundwaters from two wells located close to the repository site (J-13 and UE-25 p No.1). We used devitrified, vitric, zeolitic (with emphasis on clinoptilolite-rich samples), and calcite-rich tuffs characteristic of the geology of the site. Neptunium sorbed well onto calcite and calcite-rich tuffs, indicating that a significant amount of neptunium retardation can be expected under fractured-flow scenarios because of calcite coating of the fractures. Neptunium sorption onto clinoptilolite-rich zeolitic tuffs in J-13 well water (pH from 7 to 8.5) was moderate, increased with decreasing pH, and correlated to surface area and amount of clinoptilolite. Neptunium sorbed poorly onto zeolitic tuffs from UE-25 p No.1 groundwater (pH from 7 to 9) and onto devitrified and vitric tuffs from J-13 and UE-25 p No.1 waters (pH from 7 to 9). Iron oxides appeared to be passivated in tuffs, not seeming to contribute to the observed neptunium sorption, even though neptunium sorption onto synthetic iron oxide is significant.

  2. Speciation of neptunium during sorption and diffusion in natural clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, T.; Amayri, S.; Bӧrner, P. J. B.; Drebert, J.; Frӧhlich, D. R.; Grolimund, D.; Kaplan, U.

    2016-05-01

    In argillaceous rocks, which are considered as a potential host rock for nuclear waste repositories, sorption and diffusion processes govern the migration behaviour of actinides like neptunium. For the safety analysis of such a repository, a molecular-level understanding of the transport and retardation phenomena of radioactive contaminants in the host rock is mandatory. The speciation of Np during sorption and diffusion in Opalinus Clay was studied at near neutral pH using a combination of spatially resolved synchrotron radiation techniques. During the sorption and diffusion experiments, the interaction of 8 μM Np(V) solutions with the clay lead to the formation of spots at the clay-water interface with increased Np concentrations as determined by μ-XRF. Several of these spots are correlated with areas of increased Fe concentration. Np L3-edge μ-XANES spectra revealed that up to 85% of the initial Np(V) was reduced to Np(IV). Pyrite could be identified by μ-XRD as a redox-active mineral phase responsible for the formation of Np(IV). The analysis of the diffusion profile within the clay matrix after an in-diffusion experiment for two months showed that Np(V) is progressively reduced with diffusion distance, i.e. Np(IV) amounted to ≈12% and ≈26% at 30 μm and 525 μm, respectively.

  3. Gastrointestinal absorption of protactinium, uranium, and neptunium in the hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.D.; Stather, J.W.

    1981-10-01

    The gastrointestinal absorption of protactinium, uranium, and neptunium in adult hamsters was measured. The actinide preparations were administered intragastrically and animals were kept 2 to 4 weeks prior to the radiochemical analysis of selected tissue samples. Total absorption was estimated using data for the distribution of the actinides after intravenous injection in soluble form. The values obtained were 3.9 and 0.22% for /sup 231/Pa citrate and /sup 231/Pa fluoride, respectively; 0.77 and 0.11% for /sup 233/U (uranyl) nitrate and /sup 233/U dioxide, respectively; and 0.06 and 0.05% for /sup 237/Np citrate and /sup 237/Np nitrate, respectively. The absorption factors recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for use in calculating annual limits on intake for occupationally exposed workers are: 0.1% for all compounds of Pa; 5 and 0.2% for soluble hexavalent and relatively insoluble tetravalent forms of U, respectively; and 1.0% for all chemical forms of Np. The experimental basis for these values is discussed.

  4. Fate of neptunium in an anaerobic, methanogenic microcosm.

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J. E.

    1998-12-21

    Neptunium is found predominantly as Np(IV) in reducing environments, but Np(V) in aerobic environments. However, currently it is not known how the interplay between biotic and abiotic processes affects Np redox speciation in the environment. In order to evaluate the effect of anaerobic microbial activity on the fate of Np in natural systems, Np(V) was added to a microcosminoculated with anaerobic sediments from a metal-contaminated fresh water lake. The consortium included metal-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic microorganisms, and acetate was supplied as the only exogenous substrate. Addition of more than 10{sup {minus}5} M Np did not inhibit methane production. Total Np volubility in the active microcosm, as well as in sterilized control samples, decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude. A combination of analytical techniques, including VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy and XANES, identified Np(IV) as the oxidation state associated with the sediments. The similar results from the active microcosm and the abiotic controls suggest that microbian y produced Mn(II/HI) and Fe(II) may serve as electron donors for Np reduction.

  5. Report on neptunium speciation by NMR and optical spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, C.D.; Palmer, P.D.; Ekberg, S.A.; Clark, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    Hydrolysis and carbonate complexation reactions were examined for NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and NpO{sub 2}{sup +} ions by a variety of techniques including potentiometric titration, UV-Vis-NIR and NMR spectroscopy. The equilibrium constant for the reaction 3NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} + 3H{sup +} {rightleftharpoons} (NpO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} + 3HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} was determined to be logK = 19.7 ({plus_minus} 0.8) (I = 2.5 m). {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy of NpO{sub 2}{sup n+} ions (n = 1,2) reveals a readily observable {sup 17}O resonance for n = 2, but not for n = 1. The first hydrolysis constant for NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was studied as a function of temperature, and the functional form for the temperature-dependent equilibrium constant for the reaction written as NpO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} NpO{sub 2}OH + H{sup +} was found to be logK = 2.28 {minus} 3780/T, where T is in {degree}K. Finally, the temperature dependence of neptunium(V) carbonate complexation constants was studied. For the first carbonate complexation constant, the appropriate functional form was found to be log{beta}{sub 01} = 1.47 + 786/T.

  6. [The clinical pharmacological profile of pinaverium bromide].

    PubMed

    Guslandi, M

    1994-04-01

    Pinaverium bromide is a locally acting spasmolytic agent of the digestive tract. Its mechanism of action relies upon inhibition of calcium ion entrance into smooth muscle cells (calcium-antagonist effect). In humans pinaverium facilitates gastric emptying and decreases intestinal transit time in patients with constipation. Pinaverium is very effective in improving symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (abdominal pain, gas, diarrhea or constipation). In this respect the drug proved to be significantly superior to placebo, at least as effective as trimebutine and on the whole more active than otilonium and prifinium bromide, being always extremely well tolerated. PMID:8028745

  7. Effects of pinaverium bromide on Oddi's sphincter.

    PubMed

    DiSomma, C; Reboa, G; Patrone, M G; Mortola, G P; Sala, G; Ciampini, M

    1986-01-01

    Twelve to 15 days after cholecystectomy, endocholedochal pressure was measured in ten patients before and one hour after oral administration of 15 mg of pinaverium bromide (six patients) or placebo. The mean endocholedochal pressure was 7.1 +/- 0.25 mmHg before and 3.1 +/- 0.2 mmHg after pinaverium (P less than 0.01), and 7.0 +/- 0.2 and 6.8 +/- 1.2 mmHg in the placebo-treated patients. The results suggest that pinaverium bromide has a specific effect on the common bile duct and probably on Oddi's sphincter. PMID:3815457

  8. Factors Controlling Redox Speciation of Plutonium and Neptunium in Extraction Separation Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Paulenova, Alena; Vandegrift, III, George F.

    2013-09-24

    The objective of the project was to examine the factors controlling redox speciation of plutonium and neptunium in UREX+ extraction in terms of redox potentials, redox mechanism, kinetics and thermodynamics. Researchers employed redox-speciation extractions schemes in parallel to the spectroscopic experiments. The resulting distribution of redox species w studied uring spectroscopic, electrochemical, and spectro-electrochemical methods. This work reulted in collection of data on redox stability and distribution of redox couples in the nitric acid/nitrate electrolyte and the development of redox buffers to stabilize the desired oxidation state of separated radionuclides. The effects of temperature and concentrations on the redox behavior of neptunium were evaluated.

  9. Characterization of Neptunium Oxide Generated Using the HB-Line Phase II Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, J

    2003-08-29

    Approximately 98 grams of neptunium(IV) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) were produced at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for use in gas generation tests to support the neptunium stabilization program at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The NpO{sub 2} was produced according to the anticipated HB-Line flowsheet consisting of anion exchange, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. Characterization of the NpO{sub 2} product to be used in gas generation tests included bulk and tap density measurements, X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution, specific surface area measurements, and moisture analysis.

  10. Intrinsic formation of nanocrystalline neptunium dioxide under neutral aqueous conditions relevant to deep geological repositories.

    PubMed

    Husar, Richard; Hübner, René; Hennig, Christoph; Martin, Philippe M; Chollet, Mélanie; Weiss, Stephan; Stumpf, Thorsten; Zänker, Harald; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi

    2015-01-25

    The dilution of aqueous neptunium carbonate complexes induces the intrinsic formation of nanocrystalline neptunium dioxide (NpO2) particles, which are characterised by UV/Vis and X-ray absorption spectroscopies and transmission electron microscopy. This new route of nanocrystalline NpO2 formation could be a potential scenario for the environmental transport of radionuclides from the waste repository (i.e. under near-field alkaline conditions) to the geological environment (i.e. under far-field neutral conditions). PMID:25479067

  11. Methyl Bromide Alternatives for Vineyard Replant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The project is part of the USDA-ARS Pacific Area-Wide Pest Management Program for Methyl Bromide Alternatives. This is the first year of a three-year project. The research was initiated in summer 2007 with a field study planned for October 2007 at the USDA-ARS San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Scienc...

  12. METHYL BROMIDE ALTERNATIVES FOR CALIFORNIA STRAWBERRY NURSERIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of methyl bromide (MB) alternative fumigants on soil pests, plant productivity in nursery and fruiting fields, as well as production costs, were evaluated in California strawberry nurseries by an interdisciplinary team. Our trials followed nursery stock through low and high elevation ph...

  13. Zinc Bromide Waste Solution Treatment Options

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, C.A.

    2001-01-16

    The objective of this effort was to identify treatment options for 20,000 gallons of low-level radioactively contaminated zinc bromide solution currently stored in C-Area. These options will be relevant when the solutions are declared waste.

  14. Challenges in Weed Management Without Methyl Bromide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide has been used for several decades for pre-plant soil fumigation in high value agricultural and horticultural crops because it can provide broad-spectrum control of insects, nematodes, pathogens, and weeds. However, MeBr has been identified as a powerful ozone-depleting chemical and i...

  15. Methyl bromide emissions from tarped fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cicerone, R.J.; Williams, J.; Wang, N.Y.

    1995-12-31

    Once in the stratosphere, bromine atoms can destroy ozone effectively. Because of this potential effect, certain organobromine compounds including methyl bromide (MeBr) are being controlled or eliminated by national and international regulations. It would be valuable to determine the fraction of MeBr used in soil fumigations that subsequently enters the atmosphere to better assess the need for, and value of, strong regulations. We have designed and conducted several experiments accompanying field fumigations with MeBr/chloropicrin mixtures. In each of three field-fumigation experiments new Irvine, CA in which the fumigated field was covered immediately with plastic tarping, we have deployed static flux chambers on top of the tarping and measured escape fluxes of MeBr. After tarp removal, the same chambers were replaced on the bare soil to continue the measurements. We have also measured soil bromide contents before and after the fumigation. One experiment yielded an escape fraction of 80 to 87% (with 19% remaining as bromide) while the other two experiments yielded escape fractions of 30 to 35% (with about 70% remaining as bromide). This paper will summarize stratospheric bromine chemistry, describe the field experiments and discuss factors that influence emissions, including soil pH, moisture and organic content and injection technique. We acknowledge TriCal, Inc. for many helpful discussions and for professional field applications of MeBr.

  16. Can Georgia growers replace methyl bromide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The price and availability of methyl bromide is limiting its use on Georgia farms; the need for an alternative is essential for sustainable vegetable production in GA. Three alternatives were evaluated in on-farm trials in the spring 2007 in Tift, Colquitt and Echols Counties. Treatments were replic...

  17. A comparison of the action of otilonium bromide and pinaverium bromide: study conducted under clinical control.

    PubMed

    Defrance, P; Casini, A

    1991-11-01

    We studied 40 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) which received in a simple-blind fashion otilonium and pinaverium bromide (15 days each drug). During each 15-day period we evaluated: number of pain episodes, intensity of pain, number of bowel movements, side effects. Otilonium bromide, (OB), compared with pinaverium bromide was able to significantly (p less than 0.05) reduce the number of pain attacks, whereas no significant differences were found between the 2 groups as regards the other parameters. The occurrence of side effects was similar in the two treatment courses. We can conclude that the two types of treatment were similarly useful in IBS, although OB seems more effective than pinaverium bromide. PMID:1756286

  18. Sensitive redox speciation of neptunium by CE-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Stöbener, Nils; Amayri, Samer; Gehl, Aaron; Kaplan, Ugras; Malecha, Kurtis; Reich, Tobias

    2012-11-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to separate the neptunium oxidation states Np(IV) and Np(V), which are the only oxidation states of Np that are stable under environmental conditions. The CE setup was coupled to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (Agilent 7500ce) using a Mira Mist CE nebulizer and a Scott-type spray chamber. The combination of the separation capacity of CE with the detection sensitivity of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) allows identification and quantification of Np(IV) and Np(V) at the trace levels expected in the far field of a nuclear waste repository. Limits of detection of 1 × 10(-9) and 5 × 10(-10) mol L(-1) for Np(IV) and Np(V), respectively, were achieved, with a linear range from 10(-9) to 10(-6) mol L(-1). The method was applied to study the redox speciation of the Np remaining in solution after interaction of 5 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) Np(V) with Opalinus Clay. Under mildly oxidizing conditions, a Np sorption of 31% was found, with all the Np remaining in solution being Np(V). A second sorption experiment performed in the presence of Fe(2+) led to complete sorption of the Np onto the clay. After desorption with HClO(4), a mixture of Np(IV) and Np(V) was found in solution by CE-ICP-MS, indicating that some of the sorbed Np had been reduced to Np(IV) by Fe(2+). PMID:23052867

  19. Experimental study on neptunium migration under in situ geochemical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumata, M.; Vandergraaf, T. T.

    1998-12-01

    Results are reported for migration experiments performed with Np under in situ geochemical conditions over a range of groundwater flow rates in columns of crushed rock in a specially designed facility at the 240-level of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada. This laboratory is situated in an intrusive granitic rock formation, the Lac du Bonnet batholith. Highly altered granitic rock and groundwater were obtained from a major subhorizontal fracture zone at a depth of 250 m in the URL. The granite was wet-crushed and wet-sieved with groundwater from this fracture zone. The 180-850-μm size fraction was selected and packed in 20-cm long, 2.54-cm in diameter Teflon™-lined stainless steel columns. Approximately 30-ml vols of groundwater containing 3HHO and 237Np were injected into the columns at flow rates of 0.3, 1, and 3 ml/h, followed by elution with groundwater, obtained from the subhorizontal fracture, at the same flow rates, for a period of 95 days. Elution profiles for 3HHO were obtained, but no 237Np was detected in the eluted groundwater. After terminating the migration experiments, the columns were frozen, the column material was removed and cut into twenty 1-cm thick sections and each section was analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Profiles of 237Np were obtained for the three columns. A one-dimensional transport model was fitted to the 3HHO breakthrough curves to obtain flow parameters for this experiment. These flow parameters were in turn applied to the 237Np concentration profiles in the columns to produce sorption and dispersion coefficients for Np. The results show a strong dependence of retardation factors ( Rf) on flow rate. The decrease in the retarded velocity of the neptunium ( Vn) varied over one order of magnitude under the geochemical conditions for these experiments.

  20. Spectroscopic investigations of neptunium`s and plutonium`s oxidation states in sol-gel glasses as a function of initial valance and thermal history

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, N.A.; Haire, R.G.; Dai, S.

    1996-12-01

    Several oxidation states of neptunium and plutonium, Pu(III),Pu (IV), PU(VI), Np(IV), Np(V) and Np (VI), were studied in glasses prepared by a sol-gel technology. The oxidation state of these actinides was determined primarily by absorption spectrometry and followed as a function of the solidification process, subsequent aging and thermal treatments. It was determined that the initial oxidation state of the actinides in the starting solutions was essentially maintained through the solidification process to form the glasses. However, during densification and removal of residual solvents at elevated temperatures, both actinides in the different sol-gel products converted completely to their tetravalent states. These results are discussed in terms of our findings in comparable studies that only the tetravalent states of plutonium and neptunium are formed in glasses prepared by dissolving their dioxides in different molten- glass formulations.

  1. Neptunium - Uranium - Plutonium Co-Extraction in TBP-based Solvent Extraction Processes for Spent Nuclear Fuel Recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Arm, S.T.; Abrefah, J.; Lumetta, G.J.; Sinkov, S.I.

    2007-07-01

    The US, through the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, is currently engaged in efforts aimed at closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neptunium behavior is important to understand for transuranic recycling because of its complex oxidation chemistry. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is investigating neptunium oxidation chemistry in the context of the PUREX process. Neptunium extraction in the PUREX process relies on maintaining either IV or V oxidation states. Qualitative conversion of neptunium(V) to neptunium(VI) was achieved within 5 hours in 6 M nitric acid at 95 deg. C. However, the VI state was not maintained during a batch contact test simulating the PUREX process and neptunium reduced to the V state, rendering it inextractable. Vanadium(V) was found to be effective in maintaining neptunium(VI) by adding it to a simulated irradiated nuclear fuel feed in 6 M nitric acid and to the scrub acid in the batch contact simulation of the PUREX process. Computer simulations of the PUREX process with a typical irradiated nuclear fuel in 6 M nitric acid as feed indicated little impact of the higher acid concentration on the behavior of fission products of moderate extractability. We plan to perform countercurrent tests of this modified PUREX process in the near future. (authors)

  2. Boronic acid flux synthesis and crystal growth of uranium and neptunium boronates and borates: a low-temperature route to the first neptunium(V) borate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Miller, Hannah M; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2010-11-01

    Molten methylboronic acid has been used as a reactive flux to prepare the first neptunium(V) borate, NpO(2)[B(3)O(4)(OH)(2)] (NpBO-1), and the first actinide boronate, UO(2)(CH(3)BO(2))(H(2)O) (UCBO-1). NpBO-1 contains cation-cation interactions between the neptunyl units. In contrast, the presence of the methyl groups in the uranyl boronate leads to a one-dimensional structure. PMID:20919728

  3. EVALUATION OF PROPARGYL BROMIDE AS A SOIL FUMIGANT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cut flower and bulb industry has relied heavily upon the use of methyl bromide as a key soil treatment for soilborne pest control. Due to the phase-out of methyl bromide it is important to develop alternatives to manage pests now managed by methyl bromide. The emphasis of this work was to eval...

  4. 21 CFR 522.275 - N-Butylscopolammonium bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false N-Butylscopolammonium bromide. 522.275 Section 522....275 N-Butylscopolammonium bromide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 20 milligrams (mg) N-butylscopolammonium bromide. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000010 in § 510.600(c) of this...

  5. 21 CFR 522.275 - N-Butylscopolammonium bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false N-Butylscopolammonium bromide. 522.275 Section 522....275 N-Butylscopolammonium bromide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 20 milligrams (mg) N-butylscopolammonium bromide. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000010 in § 510.600(c) of this...

  6. 21 CFR 522.275 - N-Butylscopolammonium bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false N-Butylscopolammonium bromide. 522.275 Section 522....275 N-Butylscopolammonium bromide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 20 milligrams (mg) N-butylscopolammonium bromide. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000010 in § 510.600(c) of this...

  7. 21 CFR 522.275 - N-Butylscopolammonium bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false N-Butylscopolammonium bromide. 522.275 Section 522....275 N-Butylscopolammonium bromide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 20 milligrams (mg) N-butylscopolammonium bromide. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000010 in § 510.600(c) of this...

  8. WEED CONTROL IN THE LIFE AFTER METHYL BROMIDE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable growers are losing the soil fumigant methyl bromide. Efforts are on-going to extend the deadline for using methyl bromide until suitable alternatives are developed. Regardless of whether the deadline is extended or not, growers need to begin to study alternatives to methyl bromide and be...

  9. 75 FR 5582 - Methyl Bromide; Amendments to Terminate Uses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... AGENCY Methyl Bromide; Amendments to Terminate Uses AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... requested by the registrants and accepted by the Agency, of products containing the pesticide methyl bromide... Requests from the registrants listed in Table 2 to amend to terminate post-harvest methyl bromide uses...

  10. 40 CFR 180.124 - Methyl bromide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methyl bromide; tolerances for... § 180.124 Methyl bromide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for residues of the fumigant methyl bromide, including metabolites and degradates, in or on the commodity in...

  11. 7 CFR 305.6 - Methyl bromide fumigation treatment schedules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Methyl bromide fumigation treatment schedules. 305.6..., fumigation with methyl bromide for sapote fruit fly. Regulated citrus fruits originating inside an area... equal concentrations of methyl bromide throughout the chamber, a fan should be placed near the point...

  12. Mixed-valent neptunium(IV/V) compound with cation-cation-bound six-membered neptunyl rings.

    PubMed

    Jin, Geng Bang

    2013-11-01

    A new mixed-valent neptunium(IV/V) compound has been synthesized by evaporation of a neptunium(V) acidic solution. The structure of the compound features cation-cation-bound six-membered neptunyl(V) rings. These rings are further connected by Np(IV) ions through cation-cation interactions (CCIs) into a three-dimensional neptunium cationic open framework. This example illustrates the possibility of isolating neptunyl(V) CCI oligomers in inorganic systems using other cations to compete with Np(V) in bonding with the neptunyl oxygen. PMID:24187926

  13. Photoelectron, nuclear gamma-ray and infrared absorption spectroscopic studies of neptunium in sodium silicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Veal, B.W.; Carnall, W.T.; Dunlap, B.D.; Mitchell, A.W.; Lam, D.J.

    1986-04-01

    The valence state of neptunium ions in sodium silicate glasses prepared under reducing and oxidizing conditions has been investigated by the x-ray photoelectron, Moessbauer and optical absorption spectroscopic techniques. Results indicate that the Np ions are tetravalent in glasses prepared under reducing conditions and pentavalent in glasses prepared under oxidizing conditions.

  14. Gastrointestinal absorption of neptunium in primates: effect of ingested mass, diet, and fasting

    SciTech Connect

    Metivier, H.; Bourges, J.; Fritsch, P.; Nolibe, D.; Masse, R.

    1986-05-01

    Absorption and retention of neptunium were determined in baboons after intragastric administration of neptunium nitrate solutions at pH 1. The effects of mass, diet, and fasting on absorption were studied. At higher mass levels (400-800 micrograms Np/kg), absorption was about 1%; at lower mass intakes (0.0009-0.005 micrograms Np/kg), absorption was reduced by 10- to 20-fold. The addition of an oxidizing agent (Fe3+) increased gastrointestinal absorption and supported the hypothesis of a reduction of Np (V) when loss masses were ingested. Diets depleted of or enriched with hydroxy acids did not modify retention of neptunium but increased urinary excretion with increasing hydroxy acid content. The diet enriched with milk components reduced absorption by a factor of 5. Potatoes increased absorption and retention by a factor 5, not necessarily due to the effect of phytate. Fasting for 12 or 24 h increased retention and absorption by factors of about 3 and 10, respectively. Data obtained in baboons when low masses of neptunium were administered suggest that the f1 factor used by ICRP should be decreased. However, fasting as encountered in certain nutritional habits is a factor to be taken into consideration.

  15. Criticality of a Neptunium-237 sphere surrounded with highly enriched uranium shells and an iron reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R. G.; Loaiza, D. J.; Hayes, D. K.; Kimpland, R. H.

    2004-01-01

    An additional experiment has been performed using the recently cast 6-kg {sup 237}Np sphere. The experiment consisted of surrounding the neptunium sphere with highly enriched uranium and an iron reflector. The purpose of the critical experiment is to provide additional criticality data that can be used to validate criticality safety evaluations involving the deposition of neptunium. It is well known that {sup 237}Np is primarily produced by successive neutron capture events in {sup 235}U or through the (n, 2n) reaction in {sup 238}U. These nuclear reactions lead to the production of {sup 237}U, which decays by beta emission into {sup 237}Np. In addition, in the spent fuel, {sup 241}Am decays by alpha emission into {sup 237}Np. Because {sup 237}Np is a threshold fissioner, the best reflectors for critical systems containing neptunium are those materials that exhibit good neutron scattering properties such as low carbon steel (99 wt % Fe). In this experiment, the iron reflector reduced the amount of uranium used in the critical experiment and increased the importance of the neptunium sphere.

  16. High-temperature X-ray diffraction study of uranium-neptunium mixed oxides.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Mélanie; Belin, Renaud C; Richaud, Jean-Christophe; Reynaud, Muriel; Adenot, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    Incorporating minor actinides (MAs = Am, Np, Cm) in UO2 fertile blankets is a viable option to recycle them. Despite this applied interest, phase equilibria between uranium and MAs still need to be thoroughly investigated, especially at elevated temperatures. In particular, few reports on the U-Np-O system are available. In the present work, we provide for the first time in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction results obtained during the oxidation of (U1-yNpy)O2 uranium-neptunium mixed oxides up to 1373 K and discuss subsequent phase transformations. We show that (i) neptunium stabilizes the UO2-type fluorite structure at high temperature and that (ii) the U3O8-type orthorhombic structure is observed in a wide range of compositions. We clearly demonstrate the incorporation of neptunium in this phase, which was a controversial question in previous studies up to now. We believe it is the particular stability of the tetravalent state of neptunium that is responsible for the observed phase relationships. PMID:23409700

  17. The influence of phonon anharmonicity on thermal and elastic properties of neptunium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filanovich, A.; Povzner, A.

    2013-06-01

    A self-consistent thermodynamic model describing the thermal and elastic properties of α- and β-phases of neptunium was developed. The presence of strong phonon anharmonicity of Np is established. The obtained results are in good agreement with the experimental data and enable to predict the Np properties in wide temperature range.

  18. Measurements of atmospheric methyl bromide and bromoform

    SciTech Connect

    Cicerone, R.J.; Heidt, L.E.; Pollock, W.H.

    1988-04-20

    We have measured gaseous methyl bromide (CH/sub 3/Br) and bromoform (CHBr/sub 3/) in air samples that were gathered approximately weekly from five ground-level sites: Point Barrow, Alaska; Mauna Loa Observatory and Cape Kumukahi, Hawaii; Matatula, Samoa; and Kaitorete Spit, New Zealand. Approximately 750 samples have been analyzed for CH/sub 3/Br between January 1985 and October 1987 and 990 samples have been analyzed for CHBr/sub 3/ between early 1984 and September 1987, all by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Methyl bromide concentrations are typically 10--11 parts per trillion (ppt) by volume; there are no clear indications of temporal increases. Bromoform concentrations are typically 2--3 ppt, but large seasonal variations are seen at Point Barrow. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  19. Removal of bromide and natural organic matter by anion exchange.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Susan; Singer, Philip C

    2010-04-01

    Bromide removal by anion exchange was explored for various water qualities, process configurations, and resin characteristics. Simulated natural waters containing different amounts of natural organic matter (NOM), bicarbonate, chloride, and bromide were treated with a polyacrylate-based magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) resin on a batch basis to evaluate the effectiveness of the resin for removal of bromide. While bromide removal was achieved to some degree, alkalinity (bicarbonate), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and chloride were shown to inhibit bromide removal in waters with bromide concentrations of 100 and 300 microg/L. Water was also treated using a two-stage batch MIEX process. Two-stage treatment resulted in only a slight improvement in bromide removal compared to single-stage treatment, presumably due to competition with the high concentration of chloride which is present along with bromide in natural waters. In view of the relatively poor bromide removal results for the MIEX resin, a limited set of experiments was performed using polystyrene resins. DOC and bromide removal were compared by treating model waters with MIEX and two polystyrene resins, Ionac A-641 and Amberlite IRA910. The two polystyrene resins were seen to be more effective for bromide removal, while the MIEX resin was more effective at removing DOC. PMID:20045170

  20. [Research advances in methyl bromide in the ocean].

    PubMed

    Du, Hui-na; Xie, Wen-xia; Cui, Yu-qian; Chen, Jian-lei; Ye, Si-yuan

    2014-12-01

    Methyl bromide is an important atmospheric trace gas, which plays significant roles in the global warming and atmospheric chemistry. The ocean plays important and complex roles in the global biogeochemical cycles of methyl bromide, not only the source of atmospheric methyl bromide, but also the sink. Therefore, developing the chemical research of the soluble methyl bromide in the ocean, will not only have a certain guiding significance to the atmospheric ozone layer protection, but also provide a theoretical basis for estimating methyl bromide's contribution to the global environmental change on global scale. This paper reviewed the research advances on methyl bromide in the ocean, from the aspects of the biogeochemical cycle of methyl bromide in the ocean, the analysis and determination method, the concentration distribution, the sea-to-air flux and its sources and sinks in the atmosphere. Some deficiencies in the current studies were put forward, and the directions of the future studies were prospected. PMID:25876424

  1. Methyl bromide: Ocean sources, ocean sinks, and climate sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Anbar, A.D.; Yung, Y.L.; Chavez, F.P.

    1996-03-01

    This study was performed to examine conflicting conclusions of two previously published studies which estimated the size of oceanic sources of methyl bromide. In addition, the sensitivity of atmospheric methyl bromide to climatic variations was examined. A steady state mass balance model was used to reexamine data from the previous studies. Linear scaling of methyl bromide production rates to chlorophyll content provided agreement between the two models. The results suggest that the open ocean is a small net sink for atmospheric methyl bromide, rather than a large net source. A high rate of biological production of methyl bromide in seawater is also strongly indicated. A coupled ocean-atmosphere model indicated that methyl bromide variations induced by climatic change can be larger than those resulting from 25% variations in anthropogenic sources. Quantifying marine production rates of methyl bromide is suggested as a necessary step in assessing stratospheric ozone loss. 63 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. PLUTONIUM-238 RECOVERY FROM IRRADIATED NEPTUNIUM TARGETS USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Herbst; Terry Todd; Jack Law; Bruce Mincher; Steve Frank; John Swanson

    2006-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy proposes to re-establish a domestic capability for producing plutonium-238 (238Pu) to fuel radioisotope power systems primarily in support of future space missions. A conceptual design report is currently being prepared for a new 238Pu, and neptunium-237 (237Np) target fabrication and processing facility tentatively to be built at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in the USA. The facility would be capable of producing at least 5 kg of 238Pu-oxide powder per year. Production of 238Pu requires fabrication of 237Np targets with subsequent irradiation in the existing Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the INL. The targets are 237Np oxide dispersed in a compact of powdered aluminum and clad with aluminum metal. The 238Pu product is separated and purified from the residual 237Np, aluminum matrix, and fission products. The unconverted 237Np is also a valuable starting material and is separated, purified and recycled to the target fabrication process. The proposed baseline method for separating and purifying 238Pu and unconverted 237Np post irradiation is by anion exchange (IX). Separation of Pu from Np by IX was chosen as the baseline method because of the method’s proven ability to produce a quality Pu product and because it is amenable to the relatively small scale, batch type production methods used (small batches of ~200g 238Pu are processed at a time). Multiple IX cycles are required involving substantial volumes of nitric acid and other process solutions which must be cleaned and recycled or disposed of as waste. Acid recycle requires rather large evaporator systems, including one contained in a hot cell for remote operation. Finally, the organic based anion exchange resins are rapidly degraded due to the high a-dose and associated heat production from 238Pu decay, and must be regularly replaced (and disposed of as waste). In summary, IX is time consuming, cumbersome, and requires substantial tankage to accommodate the

  3. Lattice vibrations in lead bromide and chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabatos-Nédelec, C.; Bréhat, F.; Wyncke, B.

    Lead bromide and lead chloride lattice dynamics studies by polarized IR reflectivity and Raman scattering are reported at room temperature and at 10 K. Reflectivity spectra from 20 to 300 cm -1 have been fitted with a model of the factorized form of the dielectric function. The lattice modes frequencies, damping factors and oscillators strengths are given, as well as the effective charges of the polar modes. The study concludes the ionic character of the compounds.

  4. Methyl bromide users search for science

    SciTech Connect

    Winegar, E.D.

    1995-01-01

    Workers, neighbors and the ozone are protected by regulation from this chemical, but those needing it complain that a solid foundation is lacking for the rules. Although not yet featured on {open_quotes}60 Minutes,{close_quotes} the pesticide methyl bromide is gaining widespread attention because of its central position in debates about worker health and safety, environmental toxics exposure and global ozone depletion.

  5. Methyl bromide volatility measurements from treated fields

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, M.S.; Woodrow, J.E.; Seiber, J.N. |

    1995-12-31

    Methyl bromide is used as an agricultural soil fumigant and concern is growing over the role it may play in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Methyl bromide is applied using various techniques and little is known about how much of the applied fumigant volatilizes into the atmosphere after application. The post-application volatilization losses of methyl bromide from two fields using different application practices were measured using an aerodynamic-gradient technique. One field was covered with a high-barrier plastic film tarp during application and the other was left uncovered, but the furrows made by the injection shanks were bedded over. The cumulative volatilization losses from the tarped field were 22% of the nominal application within the first 5 days of the experiment and about 32% of the nominal application within 9 days including the one day after the tarp was removed on day 8. The nontarped field lost 89%of the nominal application by volatilization in 5 days. The error associated, with each flux measurement, as well as variations in daily flux losses with differing sampling period lengths show the degree of variability inherent in this type of study.

  6. Methyl bromide fate in fumigated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.A.; Rice, P.J.; Cink, J.H.

    1995-12-31

    Although widespread use of methyl bromide (MeBr) as a sail and structure fumigant has previously been recognized as a potential significant source of atmospheric MeBr, losses have not been well quantified. Our research indicates that, in laboratory studies, MeBr is volatilized rapidly from fumigated soils and that volatility increases with temperature (35{degrees}C > 25{degrees}C and 15{degrees}C) and moisture (0.03 bar and 0.3 bar > 1 bar > 3 bar). Degradation of MeBr in soil, as indicated by production of bromide ion, was also directly related to temperature and moisture. Most of the soil degradation of MeBr in these studies appears to be abiotic based on the observation of toxicity (reduced microbial respiration) in fumigated soils. We also determined the transformation and movement of MeBr in undisturbed soil columns. These studies also indicated that MeBT volatilizes rapidly (> 50% in 48 h) from soil. In addition, MeBr was not detected in the leachate from the soil columns, however, bromide ion was detected at levels above background 48 h after fumigation and peaked at 5 weeks.

  7. Bromate oxidized from bromide during sonolytic ozonation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ning; Wu, Xue-Fei; Zhou, Ji-Zhi; Huang, Xin; Ding, Guo-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Sonolytic ozonation (US/O3) is an effective way to degrade many pollutants in drinking water as the elevated mass transfer rate of ozone gas and the enhanced forming of hydroxyl radicals (OH). This work investigated the formation of bromate (BrO3(-)) from bromide (Br(-)) in sonolytic ozonation. At neutral pH, the bromate conversion rate ([BrO3(-)]/[Br(-)]0) was increased to 60% by ultrasound at continuous ozone flow (0-0.2Lmin(-1)), much higher than that without ultrasound or without bubbling. This indicates that the promoting effect of sonolysis on BrO3(-) formation is mainly due to the sonolytic decomposition of ozone and the enhancement of gas-liquid transfer. The [BrO3(-)]/[Br(-)]0 was increased with increasing pH. In addition, the reduction of HOBr/OBr(-) with ultrasound demonstrates that bromate may be inhibited as the bromide was formed with the H2O2 generation under ultrasound. This suggests the competition between bromate and bromide during the US/O3 led to the inhibition of bromate formation at high ozone flow. Therefore, our result reveals that the bromate formation under ultrasound is improved remarkably in US/O3 in quick treatment with proper ozone flow (<0.2Lmin(-1)). PMID:24931426

  8. A Structural Study of Neptunium-Bearing Uranium Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, R. J.

    2002-05-01

    Neptunium is an element of significant concern at several contaminated DOE sites, as well as being potentially the largest long-term contributor of radiation dose to people living near the high-level nuclear-waste repository recently recommended by the President for construction at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In order to understand potential structural effects of Np substitution into uranium minerals, we have synthesized a series of Np-doped U oxides and present here results of a structural study of Np-doped U3O8 (NpxU3-xO8). Although not a mineral, U3O8 bears significant structural similarities to numerous uranyl minerals with both known and potential importance as radionuclide hosts in the environment (Burns et al., Can. Mineral. 34, 845, 1997). Qualitative chemical analyses of U3O8 powders by energy-dispersive x-ray emission spectroscopy (EDS) in a scanning electron microscope indicate that sample powders are homogeneous at the micrometer scale. Further examinations by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and EDS in a transmission electron microscope do not reveal compositional inhomogeneities or discernable variability in the Np:U ratios within samples having Np:U ratios of 1:80 and 1:8. Bulk samples of Np-doped U3O8 powders having Np:U ratios of 1:160, 1:80, 1:25, and 1:8, were also analyzed by X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), which indicates that Np occupies distorted U sites and is predominantly tetravalent. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analyses of pure U3O8 and Np-doped U3O8 show that incorporation of Np into U3O8 affects positions and intensities of diffraction peaks, but that all samples are isostructural with alpha-U3O8. No spurious diffraction peaks are observed in any powder patterns of U3O8 with Np:U from 1:160 to 1:8. Lattice parameters vary smoothly as a function of Np concentration. The c cell parameter (perpendicular to the plane of the structural sheets in U3O8) shows little or no dependence on Np concentration, whereas the a

  9. Boronic Acid Flux Synthesis and Crystal Growth of Uranium and Neptunium Boronates and Borates: A Low Temperature Route to the First Neptunium(V) Borate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Miller, Hannah M.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2010-10-04

    Molten methylboronic acid has been used as a reactive flux to prepare the first neptunium(V) borate, NpO2[B3O4(OH)2] (NpBO-1), and the first actinide boronate, UO2(CH3BO2)(H2O) (UCBO-1). NpBO-1 contains cation-cation interactions between the neptunyl units. In contrast, the presence of the methyl groups in the uranyl boronate leads to a one-dimensional structure.

  10. Europium-doped barium bromide iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiah, Gautam; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Hollander, Fredrick J.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    2009-10-21

    Single crystals of Ba0.96Eu0.04BrI (barium europium bromide iodide) were grown by the Bridgman technique. The title compound adopts the ordered PbCl2 structure [Braekken (1932). Z. Kristallogr. 83, 222-282]. All atoms occupy the fourfold special positions (4c, site symmetry m) of the space group Pnma with a statistical distribution of Ba and Eu. They lie on the mirror planes, perpendicular to the b axis at y = +-0.25. Each cation is coordinated by nine anions in a tricapped trigonal prismatic arrangement.

  11. Chemical speciation of neptunium in spent fuel. Annual report for period 15 August 1999 to 15 August 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Czerwinski; Don Reed

    2000-09-01

    (B204) This project will examine the chemical speciation of neptunium in spent nuclear fuel. The R&D fields covered by the project include waste host materials and actinide chemistry. Examination of neptunium is chosen since it was identified as a radionuclide of concern by the NERI workshop. Additionally, information on the chemical form of neptunium in spent fuel is lacking. The identification of the neptunium species in spent fuel would allow a greater scientific based understanding of its long-term fate and behavior in waste forms. Research to establish the application and development of X-ray synchrotrons radiation (XSR) techniques to determine the structure of aqueous, adsorbed, and solid actinide species of importance to nuclear considerations is being conducted at Argonne. These studies extend current efforts within the Chemical Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory to investigate actinide speciation with more conventional spectroscopic and solids characterization (e.g. SEM, TEM, and XRD) methods. Our project will utilize all these techniques for determining neptunium speciation in spent fuel. We intend to determine the chemical species and oxidation state of neptunium in spent fuel and alteration phases. Different types of spent fuel will be examined. Once characterized, the chemical behavior of the identified neptunium species will be evaluated if it is not present in the literature. Special attention will be given to the behavior of the neptunium species under typical repository near-field conditions (elevated temperature, high pH, varying Eh). This will permit a timely inclusion of project results into near-field geochemical models. Additionally, project results and methodologies have applications to neptunium in the environment, or treatment of neptunium containing waste. Another important aspect of this project is the close cooperation between a university and a national laboratory. The PI has a transuranic laboratory at MIT where

  12. Advanced hydrogen electrode for hydrogen-bromide battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosek, Jack A.; Laconti, Anthony B.

    1987-01-01

    Binary platinum alloys are being developed as hydrogen electrocatalysts for use in a hydrogen bromide battery system. These alloys were varied in terms of alloy component mole ratio and heat treatment temperature. Electrocatalyst evaluation, performed in the absence and presence of bromide ion, includes floating half cell polarization studies, electrochemical surface area measurements, X ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy analysis and corrosion measurements. Results obtained to date indicate a platinum rich alloy has the best tolerance to bromide ion poisoning.

  13. Long-term desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium in heterogeneous volcanic tuff materials /

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, Cynthia A.

    2010-05-01

    Uranium and neptunium desorption were studied in long-term laboratory experiments using four well-characterized volcanic tuff cores collected from southeast of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives of the experiments were to 1. Demonstrate a methodology aimed at characterizing distributions of sorption parameters (attributes of multiple sorption sites) that can be applied to moderately-sorbing species in heterogeneous systems to provide more realistic reactive transport parameters and a more realistic approach to modeling transport in heterogeneous systems. 2. Focus on uranium and neptunium because of their high solubility, relatively weak sorption, and high contributions to predicted dose in Yucca Mountain performance assessments. Also, uranium is a contaminant of concern at many DOE legacy sites and uranium mining sites.

  14. Development of Defined, Minimal, and Complete Media for the Growth of Hyphomicrobium neptunium

    PubMed Central

    Havenner, Jeffrey A.; McCardell, Barbara A.; Weiner, Ronald M.

    1979-01-01

    A complete synthetic medium containing 15 amino acids, a minimal synthetic medium (GAMS) containing 4 amino acids, and a supplemented minimal medium (GAMS + calcium pantothenate) have been developed for the cultivation of Hyphomicrobium neptunium ATCC 15444. Depending on the complexity of the synthetic media, generation times were approximately 2 to 3 times longer, and maximum cell densities were 0.3 to 0.9 log10 lower than in ZoBell marine broth 2216. The fates of 14C-labeled amino acids in GAMS were monitored. Results suggested that H. neptunium was auxotrophic for methionine, utilized glutamic acid as a primary energy source, and readily anabolized and catabolized serine and aspartic acid. Individual amino acid concentrations above 125 mM induced prolonged lag periods, whereas only methionine was not growth limiting at a concentration as low as 2 mM. PMID:16345413

  15. Kinetics of oxidation of pentavalent neptunium by pentavalent vanadium in solutions of nitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Precek, Martin; Paulenova, Alena

    2010-03-01

    Management of the oxidation state of neptunium in the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel by solvent extraction is very important. The kinetics of the oxidation of neptunium(V) by vanadium(V) in solutions of nitrate acid was investigated at constant ionic strength 4M. The reaction rate is first order with respect to Np(V) and V(V). The effects of proton concentration on the apparent second order rate constant k1" was determined for temperature 25°C as k1" = (0.99±0.03)·[H+]1.21M-1s-1. Activation parameters associated with the overall reaction have been calculated; the standard reaction enthalpy and entropy were 52.6±0.9 kJ/mol and -55.8±0.9 J/K/mol respectively.

  16. Theoretical studies on level structures and transition properties of neptunium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W. D.; Dong, C. Z.; Wang, Q. M.; Wang, X. L.; Saber, I. A.

    2012-10-01

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the ionization potentials, ionic radii, excitation energies and oscillator strengths for neptunium ions. In the calculations, main valence correlation effects, Breit interaction and QED effects were taken into account. The good consistency with other available theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present calculations. These theoretical results therefore can be used to predict some physicochemical properties of Np and its oxides.

  17. Comparison of sample preparation methods for reliable plutonium and neptunium urinalysis using automatic extraction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Xu, Yihong; Hou, Xiaolin; Miró, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes improvement and comparison of analytical methods for simultaneous determination of trace-level plutonium and neptunium in urine samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Four sample pre-concentration techniques, including calcium phosphate, iron hydroxide and manganese dioxide co-precipitation and evaporation were compared and the applicability of different techniques was discussed in order to evaluate and establish the optimal method for in vivo radioassay program. The analytical results indicate that the various sample pre-concentration approaches afford dissimilar method performances and care should be taken for specific experimental parameters for improving chemical yields. The best analytical performances in terms of turnaround time (6h) and chemical yields for plutonium (88.7 ± 11.6%) and neptunium (94.2 ± 2.0%) were achieved by manganese dioxide co-precipitation. The need of drying ashing (≥ 7h) for calcium phosphate co-precipitation and long-term aging (5d) for iron hydroxide co-precipitation, respectively, rendered time-consuming analytical protocols. Despite the fact that evaporation is also somewhat time-consuming (1.5d), it endows urinalysis methods with better reliability and repeatability compared with co-precipitation techniques. In view of the applicability of different pre-concentration techniques proposed previously in the literature, the main challenge behind relevant method development is pointed to be the release of plutonium and neptunium associated with organic compounds in real urine assays. In this work, different protocols for decomposing organic matter in urine were investigated, of which potassium persulfate (K2S2O8) treatment provided the highest chemical yield of neptunium in the iron hydroxide co-precipitation step, yet, the occurrence of sulfur compounds in the processed sample deteriorated the analytical performance of the ensuing extraction chromatographic separation with chemical

  18. Influence of dissolved organic substances in groundwater on sorption behavior of americium and neptunium

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, S. Jr.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Groundwaters typically contain dissolved organic carbon consisting largely of high molecular weight compounds of humic and fulvic acids. To evaluate whether these dissolved organic substances can enhance the tranport of radionuclides through the groundwater system, experiments were conducted to examine the sorption of americium and neptunium onto crushed basalt in the presence of dissolved humic- and fulvic-acid organic carbon introduced into synthetic groundwater. The partitioning experiments with synthetic groundwater show that increasing the concentration of either humic or fulvic acid in the water has a significant inhibiting effect on sorption of both americium and neptunium. At 22/sup 0/C, adsorption of these radionuclides, as measured by distribution ratios (the ratio of nuclide sorbed onto the solid to nuclide in solution at the end of the experiment), decreased by 25% to 50% by addition of as little as 1 mg/L dissolved organic carbon and by one to two orders of magnitude by addition of 100 to 200 mg/L dissolved organic carbon. Distribution ratios measured in solutions reacted at 90/sup 0/C similarly decreased with the addition of dissolved organic carbon but generally ranged from one to two orders of magnitude higher than those determined in the 22/sup 0/C experiment. These results suggest that organic carbon dissolved in deep groundwaters may significantly enhance the mobility of radionuclides of americium and neptunium. 23 references, 5 figures, 11 tables.

  19. Molecular toolbox for genetic manipulation of the stalked budding bacterium Hyphomonas neptunium.

    PubMed

    Jung, Alexandra; Eisheuer, Sabrina; Cserti, Emöke; Leicht, Oliver; Strobel, Wolfgang; Möll, Andrea; Schlimpert, Susan; Kühn, Juliane; Thanbichler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The alphaproteobacterium Hyphomonas neptunium proliferates by a unique budding mechanism in which daughter cells emerge from the end of a stalk-like extension emanating from the mother cell body. Studies of this species so far have been hampered by the lack of a genetic system and of molecular tools allowing the regulated expression of target genes. Based on microarray analyses, this work identifies two H. neptunium promoters that are activated specifically by copper and zinc. Functional analyses show that they have low basal activity and a high dynamic range, meeting the requirements for use as a multipurpose expression system. To facilitate their application, the two promoters were incorporated into a set of integrative plasmids, featuring a choice of two different selection markers and various fluorescent protein genes. These constructs enable the straightforward generation and heavy metal-inducible synthesis of fluorescent protein fusions in H. neptunium, thereby opening the door to an in-depth analysis of polar growth and development in this species. PMID:25398860

  20. Effects of Titanium Doping in Titanomagnetite on Neptunium Sorption and Speciation.

    PubMed

    Wylie, E Miller; Olive, Daniel T; Powell, Brian A

    2016-02-16

    Neptunium-237 is a radionuclide of great interest owing to its long half-life (2.14 × 10(6) years) and relative mobility as the neptunyl ion (NpO2(+)) under many surface and groundwater conditions. Reduction to tetravalent neptunium (Np(IV)) effectively immobilizes the actinide in many instances due to its low solubility and strong interactions with natural minerals. One such mineral that may facilitate the reduction of neptunium is magnetite (Fe(2+)Fe(3+)2O4). Natural magnetites often contain titanium impurities which have been shown to enhance radionuclide sorption via titanium's influence on the Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) ratio (R) in the absence of oxidation. Here, we provide evidence that Ti-substituted magnetite reduces neptunyl species to Np(IV). Titanium-substituted magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized and reacted with NpO2(+) under reducing conditions. Batch sorption experiments indicate that increasing Ti concentration results in higher Np sorption/reduction values at low pH. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the Ti-magnetite particles provides no evidence of NpO2 nanoparticle precipitation. Additionally, X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirms the nearly exclusive presence of Np(IV) on the titanomagnetite surface and provides supporting data indicating preferential binding of Np to terminal Ti-O sites as opposed to Fe-O sites. PMID:26756748

  1. Molecular Toolbox for Genetic Manipulation of the Stalked Budding Bacterium Hyphomonas neptunium

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Alexandra; Eisheuer, Sabrina; Cserti, Emöke; Leicht, Oliver; Strobel, Wolfgang; Möll, Andrea; Schlimpert, Susan; Kühn, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    The alphaproteobacterium Hyphomonas neptunium proliferates by a unique budding mechanism in which daughter cells emerge from the end of a stalk-like extension emanating from the mother cell body. Studies of this species so far have been hampered by the lack of a genetic system and of molecular tools allowing the regulated expression of target genes. Based on microarray analyses, this work identifies two H. neptunium promoters that are activated specifically by copper and zinc. Functional analyses show that they have low basal activity and a high dynamic range, meeting the requirements for use as a multipurpose expression system. To facilitate their application, the two promoters were incorporated into a set of integrative plasmids, featuring a choice of two different selection markers and various fluorescent protein genes. These constructs enable the straightforward generation and heavy metal-inducible synthesis of fluorescent protein fusions in H. neptunium, thereby opening the door to an in-depth analysis of polar growth and development in this species. PMID:25398860

  2. Complexation of neptunium(V) with fluoride in aqueous solutions at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Friese, Judah I.

    2009-02-01

    Over the past several decades, the production and testing of nuclear weapons in the U.S. have created significant amounts of high-level nuclear wastes (HLW) that are currently stored in underground tanks across the U.S. DOE (Department of Energy) sites. Eventually, the HLW will be made into the waste form and disposed of in geological repositories for HLW. Among the radioactive materials, neptunium is of great concern in the post-closure chemical environment in the repository because of the long half-life of 237Np (2.14•106 years) and the high mobility of Np(V), the most stable oxidation state of neptunium. It is estimated that 237Np, together with 129I and 99Tc, will be the major contributors to the potential total annual dose from the repository beyond 10000 years [1]. Due to the high radiation energy released from the HLW, the postclosure repository is expected to remain at elevated temperatures for thousands of years [1]. If the waste package is breached and becomes in contact with groundwater, neptunium, as well as other radioactive materials will be in aqueous solutions at elevated temperatures. Interactions of radioactive materials with the chemical components in groundwater play an important role in determining their migration in the repository. To predict the migration behavior of neptunium, it is necessary to have sufficient and reliable thermodynamic data on its complexation with the ligands that are present in the groundwater of the repository (e.g., OH–, F–, SO42– ,PO43– and CO32) at elevated temperatures. However, such data are scarce and scattered for 25°C, and nearly nonexistent for elevated temperatures [2]. To provide reliable thermodynamic data, we have conducted investigations of the complexation of actinides, including thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium, at elevated temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, including formation constants, enthalpy and heat capacity of complexation are experimentally determined. This paper

  3. Mineralogic controls on aqueous neptunium(V) concentrations in silicate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, Daniel S.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Forbes, Tori Z.; Quicksall, Andrew N.; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2013-02-01

    The presence of radioactive neptunium in commercially spent nuclear fuel is problematic due to its mobility in environmental systems upon oxidation to the pentavalent state. As uranium is the major component of spent fuel, incorporation of neptunium into resulting U(VI) mineral phases would potentially influence its release into environmental systems. Alternatively, aqueous neptunium concentrations may be buffered by solid phase Np2O5. In this study, we investigate both of these controls on aqueous neptunium(V) concentrations. We synthesize two uranyl silicates, soddyite, (UO2)2SiO4·2H2O, and boltwoodite, (K, Na)(UO2)(SiO3OH)·1.5H2O, each in the presence of two concentrations of aqueous Np(V). Electron microscopy and electron diffraction analyses of the synthesized phases show that while significant neptunyl incorporation occurred into soddyite, the Np(V) in the boltwoodite systems largely precipitated as a secondary phase, Np2O5(s). The release of Np(V) from each system into aqueous solution was measured for several days, until steady-state concentrations were achieved. Using existing solubility constants (Ksp) for pure soddyite and boltwoodite, we compared predicted equilibrium aqueous U(VI) concentrations with the U(VI) concentrations released in the solubility experiments. Our experiments reveal that Np(V) incorporation into soddyite increases the concentration of aqueous U in equilibrium with the solid phase, perhaps via the formation of a metastable phase. In the mixed boltwoodite - Np2O5(s) system, the measured aqueous U(VI) activities are consistent with those predicted to be in equilibrium with boltwoodite under the experimental conditions, a result that is consistent with our conclusion that little Np(V) incorporation occurred into the boltwoodite. In the boltwoodite systems, the measured Np concentrations are likely controlled by the presence of Np2O5 nanoparticles, suggesting an additional potential mobility vector for Np in geologic systems. Our

  4. 40 CFR 180.124 - Methyl bromide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methyl bromide; tolerances for residues. 180.124 Section 180.124 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.124 Methyl bromide; tolerances...

  5. An Ill Wind: Methyl Bromide Use Near California Schools, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Zev; Walker, Bill

    A California study investigates the use of the toxic pesticide methyl bromide near the state's public schools, explains why proposed safety rules have failed to protect children and others from exposure, and examines regions at particular exposure risk. Study results show an increasing exposure to methyl bromide near schools already at risk while…

  6. 40 CFR 180.124 - Methyl bromide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methyl bromide; tolerances for residues. 180.124 Section 180.124 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.124 Methyl bromide; tolerances...

  7. EVALUATING EFFECTS OF NEPTUNIUM ON THE SRS METHOD FOR CONTROLLED POTENTIAL COULOMETRIC ASSAY OF PLUTONIUM IN SULFURIC ACID SUPPORTING ELECTROLYTE

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, M; Sheldon Nichols, S

    2008-05-09

    A study of the impact of neptunium on the coulometric assay of plutonium in dilute sulfuric acid was performed. Weight aliquots of plutonium standard solutions were spiked with purified neptunium solution to evaluate plutonium measurement performance for aliquots with Pu:Np ratios of 50:1, 30:1, 20:1, 15:1, and 10:1. Weight aliquots of the pure plutonium standard solution were measured as controls. Routine plutonium instrument control standards were also measured. The presence of neptunium in plutonium aliquots significantly increases the random uncertainty associated with the plutonium coulometric measurement performed in accordance with ISO12183:2005.7 However, the presence of neptunium does not appear to degrade electrode performance and conditioning as aliquots of pure plutonium that were interspersed during the measurement of the mixed Pu:Np aliquots continued to achieve the historical short-term random uncertainty for the method. Lack of adequate control of the neptunium oxidation state is suspected to be the primary cause of the elevated measurement uncertainty and will be pursued in a future study.

  8. Interaction of methyl bromide with soil.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ting; Maciel, Gary E

    2002-02-15

    Because methyl bromide (CH3Br) is a widely used agricultural fumigant for soil disinfection, it is important to know the chemical behavior and fate of CH3Br as a result of its use for soil treatment. A solid-state 13C NMR study of 13CH3Br-treated soil and soil-component samples shows that methylation of soil organic matter may be the major pathway for degradation of CH3Br in soils. Adsorption of CH3Br on a dried clay like Ca-montmorillonite or kaolinite does not contribute directly to the degradation of CH3Br. The results are interpreted in terms of the chemical structures of separated soil fractions and the nature of the separation procedure. PMID:11878373

  9. Degradation of methyl bromide in anaerobic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G.; Strohmaler, F.E.

    1994-01-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) was anaerobically degraded in saltmarsh sediments after reaction with sulfide. The product of this nucleophilic substitution reaction was methanethiol, which underwent further chemical and bacterial reactions to form dimethyl sulfide. These two gases appeared transiently during sediment incubations because they were metabolized by methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A second, less significant reaction of MeBr was the exchange with chloride, forming methyl chloride, which was also susceptible to attack by sulfide. Incubation of 14C-labeled methyl iodide as an analogue of MeBr resulted in the formation of 14CH4 and 14CO2 and also indicated that sulfate-reducing bacteria as well as methanogens metabolized the methylated sulfur intermediates. These results suggest that exposed sediments with abundant free sulfide, such as coastal salt-marshes, may constitute a sink for atmospheric MeBr.

  10. Single ion dynamics in molten sodium bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, O.; Trullas, J.; Demmel, F.

    2014-12-28

    We present a study on the single ion dynamics in the molten alkali halide NaBr. Quasielastic neutron scattering was employed to extract the self-diffusion coefficient of the sodium ions at three temperatures. Molecular dynamics simulations using rigid and polarizable ion models have been performed in parallel to extract the sodium and bromide single dynamics and ionic conductivities. Two methods have been employed to derive the ion diffusion, calculating the mean squared displacements and the velocity autocorrelation functions, as well as analysing the increase of the line widths of the self-dynamic structure factors. The sodium diffusion coefficients show a remarkable good agreement between experiment and simulation utilising the polarisable potential.

  11. Glycopyrronium bromide for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Riario-Sforza, Gian Galeazzo; Ridolo, Erminia; Riario-Sforza, Edoardo; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2015-02-01

    Glycopyrronium bromide is a new long-acting muscarinic antagonist to be used once-daily, which is approved as a bronchodilator for the symptomatic maintenance treatment of adult patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the Glycopyrronium bromide in chronic Obstructive pulmonary disease airWays trials, treatment with inhaled glycopyrronium bromide at 50 μg once daily achieved a significantly better lung function than placebo, as measured by the trough forced expiratory volume in 1 s in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. The lung function improvement was maintained for up to 52 weeks. Other improved indexes were dyspnea scores, health status, exacerbation rates and time of exercise endurance. Studies comparing the efficacy of glycopyrronium versus tiotropium bromide found substantial equivalence of the two drugs. Glycopyrronium was generally well tolerated. These data add inhaled glycopyrronium bromide to the treatment of patients with moderate to severe COPD as an effective once-daily LAMA. PMID:25547422

  12. Atmosphere-plant canopy interactions of methyl bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.E. Jr.; Leonard, T.D.; Gustin, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    In the planetary boundary layer, parcels of air containing background and elevated concentrations of methyl bromide commonly pass through plant canopies in managed (agriculture) and natural (forests, grasslands) ecosystems. It is hypothesized that leaf surfaces are a significant sink or methyl bromide on a local and regional scale and that failure to account for this sink results in a significant overestimation of methyl bromide transport to the stratosphere. Using highly controlled environments, studies are investigating the reactivity of leaf surfaces for methyl bromide at elevated and global background concentrations. Estimates of pathway resistances are being calculated and sites of deposition determined. The results indicate that plant canopies are a significant unrecognized sink for methyl bromide in the atmosphere.

  13. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. 173.193 Section 173.193 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  14. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. 173.193 Section 173.193 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  15. Selective oxidation of bromide in wastewater brines from hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Lowry, Gregory V; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2013-07-01

    Brines generated from oil and natural gas production, including flowback water and produced water from hydraulic fracturing of shale gas, may contain elevated concentrations of bromide (~1 g/L). Bromide is a broad concern due to the potential for forming brominated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during drinking water treatment. Conventional treatment processes for bromide removal is costly and not specific. Selective bromide removal is technically challenging due to the presence of other ions in the brine, especially chloride as high as 30-200 g/L. This study evaluates the ability of solid graphite electrodes to selectively oxidize bromide to bromine in flowback water and produced water from a shale gas operation in Southwestern PA. The bromine can then be outgassed from the solution and recovered, as a process well understood in the bromine industry. This study revealed that bromide may be selectively and rapidly removed from oil and gas brines (~10 h(-1) m(-2) for produced water and ~60 h(-1) m(-2) for flowback water). The electrolysis occurs with a current efficiency between 60 and 90%, and the estimated energy cost is ~6 kJ/g Br. These data are similar to those for the chlor-alkali process that is commonly used for chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide production. The results demonstrate that bromide may be selectively removed from oil and gas brines to create an opportunity for environmental protection and resource recovery. PMID:23726709

  16. EFFECT OF COMPOSITION OF SELECTED GROUNDWATERS FROM THE BASIN AND RANGE PROVINCE ON PLUTONIUM, NEPTUNIUM, AND AMERICIUM SPECIATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rees, Terry F.; Cleveland, Jess M.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    1984-01-01

    The speciation of plutonium, neptunium, and americium was determined in groundwaters from four sources in the Basin and Range Province: the lower carbonate aquifer, Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Crystal Pool); alluvial fill, Frenchman Flat, NTS (well 5C); Hualapai Valley, Arizona (Red Lake south well); and Tularosa Basin, New Mexico (Rentfrow well). The results were interpreted to indicate that plutonium and, to a lesser extent, neptunium are least soluble in reducing groundwaters containing a large concentration of sulfate ion and a small concentration of strongly complexing anions. The results further emphasize the desirability of including studies such as this among the other site-selection criteria for nuclear waste repositories.

  17. Crystal and Electronic Structures of Neptunium Nitrides Synthesized Using a Fluoride Route

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, G W Chinthaka M; Weck, Dr. Phil F.; Eunja, Dr. Kim; Yeamans, Dr. Charles B.; Cerefice, Gary S.; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Czerwinski, Ken R.

    2012-01-01

    A low-temperature fluoride route was utilized to synthesize neptunium mononitride, NpN. Through the development of this process, two new neptunium nitride species, NpN{sub 2} and Np{sub 2}N{sub 3}, were identified. The NpN{sub 2} and Np{sub 2}N{sub 3} have crystal structures isomorphous to those of UN{sub 2} and U{sub 2}N{sub 3}, respectively. NpN{sub 2} crystallizes in a face-centered cubic CaF{sub 2}-type structure with a space group of Fm3m and a refined lattice parameter of 5.3236(1) {angstrom}. The Np{sub 2}N{sub 3} adopts the body-centered cubic Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}-type structure with a space group of Ia{bar 3}. Its refined lattice parameter is 10.6513(4) {angstrom}. The NpN synthesis at temperatures {le} 900 C using the fluoride route discussed here was also demonstrated. Previous computational studies of the neptunium nitride system have focused exclusively on the NpN phase because no evidence was reported experimentally on the presence of NpN{sub x} systems. Here, the crystal structures of NpN{sub 2} and Np{sub 2}N{sub 3} are discussed for the first time, confirming the experimental results by density functional calculations (DFT). These DFT calculations were performed within the local-density approximation (LDA+U) and the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA+U) corrected with an effective Hubbard parameter to account for the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion between Np 5f electrons. The effects of the spin-orbit coupling in the GGA+U calculations have also been investigated for NpN{sub 2} and NpN.

  18. Crystal and electronic structures of neptunium nitrides synthesized using a fluoride route.

    PubMed

    Silva, G W Chinthaka; Weck, Philippe F; Kim, Eunja; Yeamans, Charles B; Cerefice, Gary S; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Czerwinski, Kenneth R

    2012-02-15

    A low-temperature fluoride route was utilized to synthesize neptunium mononitride, NpN. Through the development of this process, two new neptunium nitride species, NpN(2) and Np(2)N(3), were identified. The NpN(2) and Np(2)N(3) have crystal structures isomorphous to those of UN(2) and U(2)N(3), respectively. NpN(2) crystallizes in a face-centered cubic CaF(2)-type structure with a space group of Fm3m and a refined lattice parameter of 5.3236(1) Å. The Np(2)N(3) adopts the body-centered cubic Mn(2)O(3)-type structure with a space group of Ia3. Its refined lattice parameter is 10.6513(4) Å. The NpN synthesis at temperatures ≤900 °C using the fluoride route discussed here was also demonstrated. Previous computational studies of the neptunium nitride system have focused exclusively on the NpN phase because no evidence was reported experimentally on the presence of NpN(x) systems. Here, the crystal structures of NpN(2) and Np(2)N(3) are discussed for the first time, confirming the experimental results by density functional calculations (DFT). These DFT calculations were performed within the local-density approximation (LDA+U) and the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA+U) corrected with an effective Hubbard parameter to account for the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion between Np 5f electrons. The effects of the spin-orbit coupling in the GGA+U calculations have also been investigated for NpN(2) and NpN. PMID:22280303

  19. The synthesis and characterization of neptunium hydroxysulfate, Np(OH)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, D.W.; Mulak, J.; Banks, R.; Carnall, W.T.

    1982-11-15

    Neptunium (IV) hydroxysulfate, Np(OH)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, was synthesized using hydrothermal techniques. The X-ray powder diffraction pattern indicates that the compound is isomorphous with the Th(IV) and U(IV) analogs. Cell constants for the three compounds clearly show the effects of the actinide contraction. Visible and near-ir spectra are consistent with the presence of Np(IV) and are compared to spectra of Np(IV) in acidic solution. The ir spectrum contains bands which are assigned to the hydroxy and sulfate groups.

  20. Gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium, uranium and neptunium in fed and fasted adult baboons: Application to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Oldham, R.D.; Moretti, E.S. ); Cohen, N.; Ralston, L.G.; Ayres, L. )

    1992-03-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) absorption values of plutonium, uranium, and neptunium were determined in fed and fasted adult baboons. A dual isotope method of determining GI absorption, which does not require animal sacrifice, was validated and shown to compare well with the sacrifice method (summation of oral isotope in urine with that in tissues at sacrifice). For all three elements, mean GI absorption values were significantly high (5- to 50-fold) in 24-hour (h)-fasted animals than in fed animals, and GI absorption values for baboons agreed well with those for humans.

  1. Determination of neptunium in environmental samples by extraction chromatography after valence adjustment.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Langevin, Marc-Antoine; Nadeau, Kenny; Labrecque, Charles; Gagné, Alexandre; Larivière, Dominic

    2010-12-01

    Neptunium(V) ions are unstable in acid media, which limits their extraction on chromatographic resins. We developed a novel analytical method to measure Np by either α-spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after extraction chromatography as Np(VI). We investigated the reactivity of various oxidizing reagents, and determined the retention capacity of Np(IV, V, and VI) on various extraction chromatographic supports. A simple method using two UTEVA resins was used to rapidly detect Np in soil and sediment samples. PMID:20630769

  2. Unusual redox stability of neptunium in the ionic liquid [Hbet][Tf(2)N].

    PubMed

    Long, Kristy; Goff, George; Runde, Wolfgang

    2014-07-25

    The behavior of neptunium in the ionic liquid betaine bistriflimide, [Hbet][Tf2N], has been studied spectroscopically at room temperature and 60 °C for the first time. An unprecedented complex redox chemistry is observed, with up to three oxidation states (iv, v and vi) and up to six Np species existing simultaneously. Both redox reactions and coordination of betaine are observed for Np(iv), (v) and (vi). Elevating the temperature accelerates the coordination of Np(v) with betaine and reduction reactions slow down. PMID:24752760

  3. Lithium bromide chiller technology in gas processing

    SciTech Connect

    Huey, M.A.; Leppin, D.

    1995-12-31

    Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption Chillers have been in use for more than half a century, mainly in the commercial air conditioning industry. The Gas Research Institute and EnMark Natural Gas Company co-funded a field test to determine the viability of this commercial air conditioning technology in the gas industry. In 1991, a 10 MMCFC natural gas conditioning plant was constructed in Sherman, Texas. The plant was designed to use a standard, off-the-shelf chiller from Trane with a modified control scheme to maintain tight operating temperature parameters. The main objective was to obtain a 40 F dewpoint natural gas stream to meet pipeline sales specifications. Various testing performed over the past three years has proven that the chiller can be operated economically and on a continuous basis in an oilfield environment with minimal operation and maintenance costs. This paper will discuss how a LiBr absorption chiller operates, how the conditioning plant performed during testing, and what potential applications are available for LiBr chiller technology.

  4. Health and Environmental Effects Profile for methyl bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    The Health and Environmental Effects Profile for methyl bromide was prepared to support listings of hazardous constituents of a wide range of waste streams under Section 3001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and to provide health-related limits for emergency actions under Section 101 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). Both published literature and information obtained from Agency program office files were evaluated as they pertained to potential human health, aquatic life, and environmental effects. Quantitative estimates are presented provided sufficient data are available. Methyl bromide has been determined to be a systemic toxicant. An Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI), for methyl bromide is 0.0014 mg/kg/day for oral exposure. The Reportable Quantity (RQ) value for methyl bromide is 100.

  5. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Chlorate-Bromide Reaction.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T P; Faria, Roberto B

    2015-11-01

    The chlorate-bromide reaction, ClO3(-) + 6Br(-) + 6H(+) → 3Br2 + Cl(-) + 3H2O, was followed at the Br3(-)/Br2 isosbestic point (446 nm). A fifth-order rate law was found: (1)/3 d[Br2]/dt = k[ClO3(-)][Br(-)][H(+)](3) (k = 5.10 × 10(-6) s(-1) L(4) mol(-4)) at 25 °C and I = 2.4 mol L(-1). At high bromide concentrations, the bromide order becomes close to zero, indicating a saturation profile on bromide concentration, similar to the chloride saturation profile observed in the chlorate-chloride reaction. A mechanism is proposed that considers the formation of the intermediate BrOClO2(2-), similar to the intermediate ClOClO2(2-) proposed in the mechanism of the chlorate-chloride reaction. PMID:26467822

  6. The oceans: A source or a sink of methyl bromide?

    SciTech Connect

    Pilinis, C.; King, D.B.; Saltzman, E.S.

    1996-04-15

    The global ocean/atmosphere flux of methyl bromide has been estimated from shipboard measurements of the saturation anomaly. When such data are extrapolated globally on the basis of constant saturation anomaly, the ocean is a net sink for methyl bromide [Lobert et al.]. The same data can also be extrapolated on the basis of steady-state production rate of methyl bromide in the water column, allowing regional and seasonal variations in temperature to affect the saturation anomaly. The authors have carried out this type of extrapolation, and they found that the oceans are a strong net source of methyl bromide to the atmosphere. The difference arises mainly due to slow degradation rates in water of higher latitudes. A reduction of the applied production rate by more than 35% is needed in order to switch the ocean from a source to a sink of methyl bromide. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of current estimates of oceanic flux to assumptions about methyl bromide production and destruction in the water column. 19 refs., 2 fig.

  7. Peak Stripping Methodology for Plutonium Analysis in the Presence of Neptunium

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, Christ

    2005-05-17

    Quantitative Plutonium analysis depends upon the accurate identification of the assay peak. The Np[Pa] equilibrium pair introduces interfering peaks in {sup 239}Pu, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 235}U assay peak region. When an interfering peak is present, it negates the assay unless an appropriate technique can be developed to deal with the interference. Peak Stripping is one such technique. Peak stripping involves an algorithm to strip an entire peak from another, resulting in a spectrum that can then be analyzed for the isotope of interest. A simpler method is a ''pseudo-peak-stripping'' whereby the effects of the interfering peak are quantified and those effects are stripped from the assay data. In this case the integrated peak areas are analyzed and corrected. There are two methods presented in this paper. Both assimilate the integrated data for the assay peak regions (in this case {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 235}U) and for the Neptunium/Protactinium secular equilibrium pair (Np[Pa]). Using Np[Pa] assumes that the Protactinium has come to equilibrium with Neptunium. This requires only {approx}6 months from the time chemical purification. Therefore it is a valid assumption in most cases. A correction is then applied to the assay peak areas to ''strip'' the underlying effects of Np[Pa].

  8. The toxic chemistry of methyl bromide.

    PubMed

    Bulathsinghala, A T; Shaw, I C

    2014-01-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) is a chemically reactive compound that has found use as a fire retardant and fumigant used for wood, soil, fruits and grains. Its use is banned in many countries because of its ozone-depleting properties. Despite this ban, the use of MeBr persists in some parts of the world (e.g. New Zealand) due to its important role in maintaining strict biosecurity of exported and imported products. Its high chemical reactivity leads to a broad toxicological profile ranging from acute respiratory toxicity following inhalation exposure, through carcinogenicity to neurotoxicty. In this article, we discuss the chemistry of MeBr in the context of its mechanisms of toxicity. The chemical reactivity of MeBr clearly underlies its toxicity. Bromine (Br) is electronegative and a good leaving group; the δ+ carbon thus facilitates electrophilic methylation of biological molecules including glutathione (GSH) via its δ- sulphur atom, leading to downstream effects due to GSH depletion. DNA alkylation, either directly by MeBr or indirectly due to reduction in GSH-mediated detoxification of reactive alkylating chemical species, might explain the carcinogenicity of MeBr. The neurotoxicity of MeBr is much more difficult to understand, but we speculate that methyl phosphates formed in cells might contribute to its neurone-specific toxicity via cholinesterase inhibition. Finally, evidence reviewed shows that it is unlikely for Br⁻ liberated by the metabolism of MeBr to have any toxicological effect because the Br⁻ dose is very low. PMID:23800997

  9. Electronic structure of the Np MT 5 ( M = Fe, Co, Ni; T = Ga, In) series of neptunium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukoyanov, A. V.; Shorikov, A. O.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of the electronic structure of the Np MGa5 ( M = Fe, Co, Ni) series of neptunium compounds, whose crystal structure is similar to that of the known family of Pu115 superconductors, was studied by the LDA + U + SO method. The calculations took into account both the strong electron correlations and the spin‒orbit coupling in the 5 f shell of neptunium. For the first time, the electronic structure was calculated for a hypothetical series of compounds in which gallium is replaced with indium. Parameters of the crystal structure of the given series were obtained using the relationship between the parameters of the crystal structure of the earlier-studied compounds PuCoGa5 and PuCoIn5. The analysis of the electronic structure and characteristics of neptunium ions calculated in the framework of the LDA + U + SO method showed that the neptunium ions in Np MIn5 with M = Fe, Co, and Ni should have an electron configuration closer to f 4, but a spin and magnetic characteristics close to those in Np MGa5.

  10. PROCESS FOR EXTRACTING NEPTUNIUM AND PLUTONIUM FROM NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS OF SAME CONTAINING URANYL NITRATE WITH A TERTIARY AMINE

    DOEpatents

    Sheppard, J.C.

    1962-07-31

    A process of selectively extracting plutonium nitrate and neptunium nitrate with an organic solution of a tertiary amine, away from uranyl nitrate present in an aqueous solution in a maximum concentration of 1M is described. The nitric acid concentration is adjusted to about 4M and nitrous acid is added prior to extraction. (AEC)

  11. Assessment of Ethidium bromide and Ethidium monoazide bromide removal from aqueous matrices by adsorption on cupric oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Ali

    2014-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to develop an effective adsorbent and to study the adsorption of Ethidium bromide and Ethidium monoazide bromide from aqueous solution using the CuO nanoparticles. The characteristics of CuO nanoparticles were determined and found to have a surface area 89.59m(2)/g. Operational parameters such as pH, contact time and adsorbent concentration, initial concentration and temperature were also studied. The amount of removal increases with the increase in pH from one to seven and reaches the maximum when the pH is nine. Adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Florry-Huggins models. The results show that the best fit was achieved with the Langmuir isotherm equation with maximum adsorption capacities of 0.868 and 0.662mg/g for Ethidium bromide and Ethidium monoazide bromide, respectively. The adsorption process was found to follow pseudo-second-order kinetics. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, namely ΔG, ΔH and ΔS showed that adsorption of Ethidium bromide and Ethidium monoazide bromide was spontaneous and endothermic under examined conditions. PMID:24630576

  12. Loading Capacities for Uranium, Plutonium and Neptunium in High Caustic Nuclear Waste Storage Tanks Containing Selected Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    OJI, LAWRENCE

    2004-11-16

    In this study the loading capacities of selected actinides onto some of the most common sorbent materials which are present in caustic nuclear waste storage tanks have been determined. Some of these transition metal oxides and activated carbons easily absorb or precipitate plutonium, neptunium and even uranium, which if care is not taken may lead to unwanted accumulation of some of these fissile materials in nuclear waste tanks during waste processing. Based on a caustic synthetic salt solution simulant bearing plutonium, uranium and neptunium and ''real'' nuclear waste supernate solution, the loading capacities of these actinides onto iron oxide (hematite), activated carbon and anhydrous sodium phosphate have been determined. The loading capacities for plutonium onto granular activated carbon and iron oxide (hematite) in a caustic synthetic salt solution were, respectively, 3.4 0.22 plus or minus and 5.5 plus or minus 0.38 microgram per gram of sorbent. The loading capacity for plutonium onto a typical nuclear waste storage tank sludge solids was 2.01 microgram per gram of sludge solids. The loading capacities for neptunium onto granular activated carbon and iron oxide (hematite) in a caustic synthetic salt solution were, respectively, 7.9 plus or minus 0.52 and greater than 10 microgram per gram of sorbent. The loading capacity for neptunium onto a typical nuclear waste storage tank sludge solids was 4.48 microgram per gram of sludge solids. A typical nuclear waste storage tank solid material did not show any significant affinity for uranium. Sodium phosphate showed significant affinity for both neptunium and uranium, with loading capacities of 6.8 and 184.6 plus or minus 18.5 microgram per gram of sorbent, respectively.

  13. Disposition of ( UC)methyl bromide in rats after inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, J.A.; Dutcher, J.S.; Medinsky, M.A.; Henderson, R.F.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the disposition and metabolism of ( UC)methyl bromide in rats after inhalation. Male Fischer-344 rats were exposed nose only to a vapor concentration of 337 nmol ( UC)methyl bromide/liter air (9.0 ppm, 25C, 620 torr) for 6 hr. Urine, feces, expired air, and tissues were collected for up to 65 hr after exposure. Elimination of UC as UCO2 was the major route of excretion with about 47% (3900 nmol/rat) of the total ( UC)methyl bromide absorbed excreted by this route. CO2 excretion exhibited a biphasic elimination pattern with 85% of the UCO2 being excreted with a half-time of 3.9 +/- 0.1 hr (anti x +/- SE) and 15% excreted with a half-time of 11.4 +/- 0.2 hr. Half-times for elimination of UC in urine and feces were 9.6 +/- 0.1 and 16.1 +/- 0.1 hr, respectively. By 65 hr after exposure, about 75% of the initial radioactivity had been excreted with 25% remaining in the body. Radioactivity was widely distributed in tissues immediately following exposure with lung (250 nmol equivalents/g), adrenal (240 nmol equivalents/g), and nasal turbinates (110 nmol equivalents/g) containing the highest concentrations of UC. Radioactivity in livers immediately after exposure accounted for about 17% of the absorbed methyl bromide. Radioactivity in all other tissues examined accounted for about 10% of the absorbed methyl bromide. Elimination half-times of UC from tissues were on the order of 1.5 to 8 hr. In all tissues examined, over 90% of the UC in the tissues was methyl bromide metabolities. The data from this study indicate that after inhalation methyl bromide is rapidly metabolized in tissues and readily excreted. 22 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  14. LIBS Spectral Data for a Mixed Actinide Fuel Pellet Containing Uranium, Plutonium, Neptunium and Americium

    SciTech Connect

    Judge, Elizabeth J.; Berg, John M.; Le, Loan A.; Lopez, Leon N.; Barefield, James E.

    2012-06-18

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze a mixed actinide fuel pellet containing 75% UO{sub 2}/20% PuO{sub 2}/3% AmO{sub 2}/2% NpO{sub 2}. The preliminary data shown here is the first report of LIBS analysis of a mixed actinide fuel pellet, to the authors knowledge. The LIBS spectral data was acquired in a plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory where the sample was contained within a glove box. The initial installation of the glove box was not intended for complete ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) transmission, therefore the LIBS spectrum is truncated in the UV and NIR regions due to the optical transmission of the window port and filters that were installed. The optical collection of the emission from the LIBS plasma will be optimized in the future. However, the preliminary LIBS data acquired is worth reporting due to the uniqueness of the sample and spectral data. The analysis of several actinides in the presence of each other is an important feature of this analysis since traditional methods must chemically separate uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium prior to analysis. Due to the historic nature of the sample fuel pellet analyzed, the provided sample composition of 75% UO{sub 2}/20% PuO{sub 2}/3% AmO{sub 2}/2% NpO{sub 2} cannot be confirm without further analytical processing. Uranium, plutonium, and americium emission lines were abundant and easily assigned while neptunium was more difficult to identify. There may be several reasons for this observation, other than knowing the exact sample composition of the fuel pellet. First, the atomic emission wavelength resources for neptunium are limited and such techniques as hollow cathode discharge lamp have different dynamics than the plasma used in LIBS which results in different emission spectra. Secondly, due to the complex sample of four actinide elements, which all have very dense electronic energy levels, there may be reactions and

  15. UV photodissociation of methyl bromide and methyl bromide cation studied by velocity map imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Valerie; Samartzis, Peter C.; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2009-01-21

    We employ the velocity map imaging technique to measure kinetic energy and angular distributions of state selected CH{sub 3} (v{sub 2}=0,1,2,3) and Br ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}, {sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) photofragments produced by methyl bromide photolysis at 215.9 nm. These results show unambiguously that the Br and Br* forming channels result in different vibrational excitations of the umbrella mode of the methyl fragment. Low energy structured features appear on the images, which arise from CH{sub 3}Br{sup +} photodissociation near 330 nm. The excess energy of the probe laser photon is channeled into CH{sub 3}{sup +} vibrational excitation, most probably in the {nu}{sub 4} degenerate bend.

  16. Neptunium(V) adsorption to bacteria at low and high ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Ams, David A; Swanson, Juliet S; Reed, Donald T; Fein, Jeremy B

    2010-12-08

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO{sub 2}{sup +} aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, weakly interacting with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface contaminant. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO{sub 2}{sup +}) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacterialNp mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight the key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. Similarities in adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities in the characteristics of the moieties between all bacterial cell walls. Differences in adsorption behavior may reflect differences in ionic strength effects, rather than

  17. Neptunium(V) Adsorption to Bacteria at Low and High Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ams, D.; Swanson, J. S.; Reed, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO2+ aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, interacts weakly with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface containment. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO2+) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacteria/Np mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria used were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. The observed adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities and differences in the characteristics of the moieties between the cell walls of common gram-negative soil and halophilic bacteria. Moreover, differences in adsorption behavior may also reflect ionic

  18. Zinc Bromide Combustion: Implications for the Consolidated Incinerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.N.

    1998-12-16

    In the nuclear industry, zinc bromide (ZnBr2) is used for radiation shielding. At Savannah River Site (SRS) zinc bromide solution, in appropriate configurations and housings, was used mainly for shielding in viewing windows in nuclear reactor and separation areas. Waste stream feeds that will be incinerated at the CIF will occasionally include zinc bromide solution/gel matrices.The CIF air pollution systems control uses a water-quench and steam atomizer scrubber that collects salts, ash and trace metals in the liquid phase. Water is re-circulated in the quench unit until a predetermined amount of suspended solids or dissolved salts are present. After reaching the threshold limit, "dirty liquid", also called "blowdown", is pumped to a storage tank in preparation for treatment and disposal. The air pollution control system is coupled to a HEPA pre-filter/filter unit, which removes particulate matter from the flue gas stream (1).The objective of this report is to review existing literature data on the stability of zinc bromide (ZnBr2) at CIF operating temperatures (>870 degrees C (1600 degrees F) and determine what the combustion products are in the presence of excess air. The partitioning of the combustion products among the quencher/scrubber solution, bottom ash and stack will also be evaluated. In this report, side reactions between zinc bromide and its combustion products with fuel oil were not taken into consideration.

  19. Cross-Coupling of Aromatic Bromides with Allylic Silanolate Salts

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E; Werner, Nathan S.

    2009-01-01

    The sodium salts of allyldimethylsilanol and 2-butenyldimethylsilanol undergo palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling with a wide variety of aryl bromides to afford allylated and crotylated arenes. The coupling of both silanolates required extensive optimization to deliver the expected products in high yields. The reaction of the allyldimethylsilanolate takes place at 85 °C in DME with allylpalladium chloride dimer (2.5 mol %) to afford 7–95% yields of the allylation products. Both electron-rich and sterically-hindered bromides reacted smoothly, whereas electron-poor bromides cross-coupled in poor yield because of a secondary isomerization to the 1-propenyl isomer (and subsequent polymerization). The 2-butenyldimethylsilanolate (E/Z, 80:20) required additional optimization to maximize the formation of the branched (γ-substitution product). A remarkable influence of added alkenes (dibenzylideneacetone and norbornadiene) led to good selectivities for electron-rich and electron-poor bromides in 4–83% yields. However, bromides containing coordinating groups (particularly in the ortho position) gave lower, and in one case even reversed, selectivity. Configurationally homogeneous E-silanolates gave slightly higher γ-selectivity than the pure Z-silanolates. A unified mechanistic picture involving initial γ-transmetalation followed by direct reductive elimination or σ–π isomerization can rationalize all of the observed trends. PMID:18998687

  20. Effect of Bromide-Hypochlorite Bactericides on Microorganisms1

    PubMed Central

    Shere, Lewis; Kelley, Maurice J.; Richardson, J. Harold

    1962-01-01

    A new principle in compounding stable, granular bactericidal products led to unique combinations of a water-soluble inorganic bromide salt with a hypochlorite-type disinfectant of either inorganic or organic type. Microbiological results are shown for an inorganic bactericide composed of chlorinated trisodium phosphate containing 3.1% “available chlorine” and 2% potassium bromide, and for an organic bactericide formulated from sodium dichloroisocyanurate so as to contain 13.4% “available chlorine” and 8% potassium bromide. Comparison of these products with their nonbromide counterparts are reported for Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus lactis, Aerobacter aerogenes, and Proteus vulgaris. Test methods employed were the Chambers test, the A.O.A.C. Germicidal and Detergent Sanitizer-Official test, and the Available Chlorine Germicidal Equivalent Concentration test. The minimal killing concentrations for the bromide-hypochlorite bactericides against this variety of organisms were reduced by a factor 2 to 24 times those required for similar hypochlorite-type disinfectants not containing the bromide. PMID:13977149

  1. Electrophysiological study of intravenous pinaverium bromide in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Guerot, C; Khemache, A; Sebbah, J; Noel, B

    1988-01-01

    Pinaverium bromide is a musculotropic spasmolytic agent which acts by inhibiting transmembrane calcium movements, an effect similar to that of verapamil. Because of this, an investigation was carried out to see if it had any electrophysiological effects in patients with various cardiac disorders. In an open study, 10 patients received 2 mg pinaverium bromide intravenously. In a double-blind study, 10 patients received 4 mg pinaverium bromide intravenously and 10 patients placebo. Patients included those with either normal or pathological basal conduction, such as bundle-branch block and 1st degree atrioventricular block. Measurements were made of electrophysiological parameters before and 10 minutes after injection. The results showed that neither of the two doses of pinaverium bromide had any effect on atrial excitability, sino-atrial conduction, node and trunk atrioventricular conduction or on intraventricular conduction. No significant difference was seen in comparison with placebo. Pinaverium bromide had no anti-arrhythmic properties in these studies. Local, cardiac and general clinical tolerability was good in all patients. PMID:3219882

  2. Cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide assisted hydrothermal growth of hematite hollow cubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei-Wei; Yao, Jia-Liang

    2010-11-15

    Hematite hollow cubes have been prepared by forced hydrolysis of ferric chloride solutions under hydrothermal conditions. The effects of reaction time, reaction temperature and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide on the transformation process from akageneite to hematite were investigated in detail. The products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide was a critical factor influencing the phase transformation process of akageneite and the final morphology of the as-prepared products. With cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, hematite hollow cubes and porous spheres were obtained. Otherwise only dense cubes were observed even prolonging reaction time or increasing reaction temperature. The mechanism was proposed.

  3. Straightforward reductive routes to air-stable uranium(III) and neptunium(III) materials.

    PubMed

    Cross, Justin N; Villa, Eric M; Darling, Victoria R; Polinski, Matthew J; Lin, Jian; Tan, Xiaoyan; Kikugawa, Naoki; Shatruk, Michael; Baumbach, Ryan; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2014-07-21

    Studies of trivalent uranium (U(3+)) and neptunium (Np(3+)) are restricted by the tendency of these ions to oxidize in the presence of air and water, requiring manipulations to be carried out in inert conditions to produce trivalent products. While the organometallic and high-temperature reduction chemistry of U(3+) and, to a much smaller extent, Np(3+) has been explored, the study of the oxoanion chemistry of these species has been limited despite their interesting optical and magnetic properties. We report the synthesis of U(3+) and Np(3+) sulfates by utilizing zinc amalgam as an in situ reductant with absolutely no regard to the exclusion of O2 or water. By employing this method we have developed a family of alkali metal U(3+) and Np(3+) sulfates that are air and water stable. The structures, electronic spectra, and magnetic behavior are reported. PMID:24964279

  4. Young geologist trades neptunium for newspapers as 2012 AGU Mass Media Fellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Mary Catherine

    2012-05-01

    Though the lure of rocks, minerals, and radioactive elements took her away from her original studies, one geology Ph.D. candidate is returning to her journalism roots this summer as AGU's 2012 Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellow. Jessica Morrison is one of 12 young scientists nationwide who are trading in their lab coats for reporters' notebooks in mid-June as part of the program coordinated by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, which helps young scientists cultivate communication skills to help disseminate scientific information to general audiences. Morrison is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences at the University of Notre Dame. She spends her days in a laboratory investigating the geochemistry of actinides, the radioactive elements in the "no man's land" of the periodic table—the section that often gets left off or moved to the bottom. These are elements like uranium, neptunium, and plutonium.

  5. Mineralogical Charecteristics of Yucca Mountain Alluvium and Effects on Neptunium (V) Sorption

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ding; S.J. Chipera; P.W. Reimus

    2006-09-05

    Saturated alluvium is expected to serve as an important natural barrier to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain, the proposed geological repository for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. {sup 237}Np(V) (half-life = 2.4 x 10{sup 5} years) has been identified as one of the radionuclides that could potentially contribute the greatest dose to humans because of its relatively high solubility and weak adsorption to volcanic tuffs under oxidizing conditions. The previous studies suggested that the mineralogical characteristics of the alluvium play an important role in the interaction between Np(V) and the alluvium. The purpose of this study is to further evaluate the mineralogical basis for Neptunium (V) sorption by saturated alluvium located down-gradient of Yucca Mountain.

  6. THERMODYNAMICS OF NEPTUNIUM(V) FLOURIDE AND SULFATE AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    L. Rao; G. Tian; Y. Xia; J.I. Friese

    2006-03-06

    Complexation of neptunium(V) with fluoride and sulfate at elevated, temperatures was studied by microcalorimetry. Thermodynamic parameters, including the equilibrium constants and enthalpy of protonation of fluoride and sulfate, and the enthalpy of complexation between Np(V) and fluoride and sulfate at 25-70 C were determined. Results show that the complexation of Np(V) with fluoride and sulfate is endothermic and that the complexation is enhanced by the increase in temperature--a threefold increase in the stability constants of NpO{sub 2}F(aq) and NpO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{sup -} as the temperature is increased from 25 to 70 C.

  7. Experimental Measurements of Short-Lived Fission Products from Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium and Americium

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, Lori A.; Payne, Rosara F.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Pierson, Bruce D.

    2009-11-01

    Fission yields are especially well characterized for long-lived fission products. Modeling techniques incorporate numerous assumptions and can be used to deduce information about the distribution of short-lived fission products. This work is an attempt to gather experimental (model-independent) data on the short-lived fission products. Fissile isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium were irradiated under pulse conditions at the Washington State University 1 MW TRIGA reactor to achieve ~108 fissions. The samples were placed on a HPGe (high purity germanium) detector to begin counting in less than 3 minutes post irradiation. The samples were counted for various time intervals ranging from 5 minutes to 1 hour. The data was then analyzed to determine which radionuclides could be quantified and compared to the published fission yield data.

  8. Investigation of pyridine/propargyl bromide reaction and strong fluorescence enhancements of the resultant poly(propargyl pyridinium bromide).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changming; Gao, Yong; Chen, Daoyong

    2012-09-20

    Poly(propargyl pyridinium bromide), a kind of conjugated polyelectrolyte with polyacetylene as the backbone and pyridinium as side groups, was synthesized simply via reaction between pyridine and propargyl bromide under mild conditions. The resultant polymer was characterized by (1)H NMR, elemental analysis, FT-IR, and GPC-MALLS. An alkyne group was confirmed as the end group of the polymer chains by the alkyne/azide click chemistry, which reveals that the polymerization is terminated by the reaction between propargyl bromide and carbon anions. It is known that monosubstituted polyacetylenes reported have very weak fluorescence intensities, which limit their applications. As a monosubstituted polyacetylene, the freshly prepared poly(propargyl pyridinium bromide) also has a very weak fluorescence. However, we confirmed that addition of some anions to the polymer solution in DMF or DMSO leads to the fluorescence enhancements up to 25 times. Besides, heating the polymer solution at a temperature between 70 and 130 °C for longer than 0.5 h greatly enhanced the fluorescence intensity. The interaction with the anions or the heating enhances the effective exciton confinement within the conjugated backbone and thus results in the fluorescence enhancements. After the fluorescence enhancements, poly(propargyl pyridinium bromide) has relatively strong fluorescence emissions, which will make it promising in fluorescence-based applications. PMID:22928912

  9. Oxidation of manganese(II) during chlorination: role of bromide.

    PubMed

    Allard, S; Fouche, L; Dick, J; Heitz, A; von Gunten, U

    2013-08-01

    The oxidation of dissolved manganese(II) (Mn(II)) during chlorination is a relatively slow process which may lead to residual Mn(II) in treated drinking waters. Chemical Mn(II) oxidation is autocatalytic and consists of a homogeneous and a heterogeneous process; the oxidation of Mn(II) is mainly driven by the latter process. This study demonstrates that Mn(II) oxidation during chlorination is enhanced in bromide-containing waters by the formation of reactive bromine species (e.g., HOBr, BrCl, Br2O) from the oxidation of bromide by chlorine. During oxidation of Mn(II) by chlorine in bromide-containing waters, bromide is recycled and acts as a catalyst. For a chlorine dose of 1 mg/L and a bromide level as low as 10 μg/L, the oxidation of Mn(II) by reactive bromine species becomes the main pathway. It was demonstrated that the kinetics of the reaction are dominated by the adsorbed Mn(OH)2 species for both chlorine and bromine at circumneutral pH. Reactive bromine species such as Br2O and BrCl significantly influence the rate of manganese oxidation and may even outweigh the reactivity of HOBr. Reaction orders in [HOBr]tot were found to be 1.33 (±0.15) at pH 7.8 and increased to 1.97 (±0.17) at pH 8.2 consistent with an important contribution of Br2O which is second order in [HOBr]tot. These findings highlight the need to take bromide, and the subsequent reactive bromine species formed upon chlorination, into account to assess Mn(II) removal during water treatment with chlorine. PMID:23859083

  10. Intensification of sonochemical degradation of malachite green by bromide ions.

    PubMed

    Moumeni, Ouarda; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2012-05-01

    Sonochemical oxidation has been investigated as a viable advanced oxidation process (AOP) for the destruction of various pollutants in water. Ultrasonic irradiation generates ()OH radicals that can recombine, react with other gaseous species present in the cavity, or diffuse out of the bubble into the bulk liquid medium where they are able to react with solute molecules. The extent of degradation of an organic dye such as malachite green (MG) is limited by the quantity of hydroxyl radicals diffused from cavitation bubbles. In this work, the effect of bromide ions on sonolytic degradation of MG was investigated. The obtained results clearly demonstrated the considerable enhancement of sonochemical destruction of MG in the presence of bromide. No significant differences were observed in the presence of chloride and sulfate, excluding the salting-out effect. Positive effect of bromide ions, which increases with increasing bromide level and decreasing MG concentration, is due to the generation of dibromine radical anion (Br(2)(-)) formed by reaction of Br(-) with ()OH radicals followed by rapid complexation with another anion. The generated Br(2)(-) radicals, reactive but less than ()OH, are likely able to migrate far from the cavitation bubbles towards the solution bulk and are suitable for degradation of an organic dye such as MG. Additionally, Br(2)(-) radicals undergo radical-radical recombination at a lesser extent than hydroxyl radicals and would be more available than ()OH for substrate degradation, both at the bubble surface and in the solution bulk. This effect compensates for the lower reactivity of Br(2)(-) compared to ()OH toward organic substrate. Addition of bromide to natural and sea waters induces a slight positive effect on MG degradation. In the absence of bromide, ultrasonic treatment for the removal of MG was promoted in complex matrices such as natural and sea waters. PMID:21911308

  11. Methyl bromide emissions from a covered field: II. Volatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.R.; Gan, J.; Ernst, F.F.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment to investigate the environmental fate and transport of methyl bromide in agricultural fields is described. The methyl bromide volatilization rate was determined as a function of time for conditions where methyl bromide was applied at a rate of 843 kg in a 3.5-ha (i.e., 240 kg/ha) field covered with plastic at a depth of 25 cm. Three methods were used to estimate the methyl bromide volatilization rate, including: the aerodynamic, theoretical profile shape and integrated horizontal flux methods. The highest methyl bromide volatilization rates were at the beginning of the experiment. Within the first 24 h, approximately 36% of the applied methyl bromide mass was lost. Diurnally, the largest volatilization rates occurred during the day when temperatures were high and the atmosphere was unstable. Cooler temperatures, light winds, and neutral to stable atmospheric conditions were present at night, reducing the flux. The total emission calculated using these methods was found to be approximately 64% ({+-} 10%) of the applied mass. A mass balance was calculated using each flux estimation technique and several methods for analyzing the data. The average mass recovery using all the flux methods was 867 kg ({+-}83 kg), which was 102.8% ({+-}9.8%) of the applied (i.e., 843 kg). The range in the mass balance percent (i.e., percent of applied mass that is measured) is from 88 to 112%. The averaged mass balance percent for the aerodynamic method, which involved using the measured data directly, was approximately 100.8%. The total emission calculated using the aerodynamic method was found to be approximately 62% ({+-}11%) of the applied mass. 29 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Photochemistry of alkyl bromides trapped in water ice films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrems, O.; Okaikwei, B.; Bluszcz, Th.

    2012-04-01

    Photochemical reactions of atmospheric trace gases taking place at the surface of atmospheric ice particles and in bulk ice are important in stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry but also in polar and alpine snowpack chemistry. Consequently, the understanding of the uptake und incorporation of atmospheric trace gases in water ice as well as their interactions with water molecules is very important for the understanding of processes which occur in ice particles and at the air/ice interface. Reactive atmospheric trace gases trapped in ice are subject of photochemical reactions when irradiated with solar UV radiation. Among such compounds bromine species are highly interesting due to their potential of depleting ozone both in the stratosphere and troposphere. Organic bromine gases can carry bromine to the stratosphere. Methyl bromide (CH3Br) is the largest bromine carrier to the stratosphere. It has both natural and anthropogenic sources. In this contribution we will present the results of our laboratory studies of alkyl bromides (methyl, bromide (CH3Br), dimethyl bromide (CH2Br2), n-propyl bromide (C3H7Br), 1,2-dibromoethane C2H4Br2)), trapped in water ice. We have simulated the UV photochemistry of these brominated alkanes isolated in ice films kept at 16 K and for comparison in solid argon matrices. The photoproducts formed in the ice have been identified by means of FTIR spectroscopy. Reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) is especially useful to study nascent ice surfaces, kinetics of adsorption/decomposition, and heterogeneous catalysis. Among the observed photoproducts we could identify carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide for each alkyl bromide studied. The photoproduct HBr is dissociated in the bulk ice. Based on the experimental observations possible reaction mechanisms will be discussed.

  13. Neptunium(V) sorption on quartz and albite in aqueous suspension; Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, M.; Leckie, J.O.

    1991-10-01

    The behavior of neptunium in the subsurface environment is of interest since neptunium isotopes are included in nuclear waste. Previous work investigated the sorption behavior of Np onto {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite), an accessory mineral of the Yucca Mountain repository. The work reported herein involves the much more abundant silicate minerals quartz and albite, and is a logical continuation of the ongoing task. In previous work increased sorption was observed in systems containing hematite and EDTA, a ligand which acts as a surrogate for organic complexing agents. In addition, increased partial pressures of CO{sub 2} are common in many ground waters and the effects of carbonate on sorption of radionuclides have to be studied as well. At concentration levels of 10{sup {minus}7} M, Np(V) does not adsorb strongly on quartz and albite up to pH values of approximately 9 at solid/solution ratios of 30 to 40 g/l. Significant adsorption (> 20%) occurs on both minerals only at pH > 9. Pretreatment of albite affects the sorption behavior of this mineral at pH > 9, possibly due to the formation of secondary mineral phases at the albite surface. EDTA does not adsorb on quartz at concentrations of 10{sup {minus}6} M. In the presence of 50 {mu}M EDTA, Np(V) sorption seems to be restricted. EDTA at the 10{sup {minus}6} M level adsorbs onto albite to an appreciable degree at pH values < 7.5. One {mu}M EDTA has no effect on Np(V) adsorption onto albite. Carbonate species adsorb on quartz and albite, both cases showing a maximum in sorption at pH 6.5 to 7 where HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} is the predominant solution species.

  14. Versatile Route to Arylated Fluoroalkyl Bromide Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Peter T; Vicic, David A

    2016-02-19

    New difunctionalized and fluoroalkylated silyl reagents have been prepared that react with silver and copper salts to afford active catalysts that can be used to synthesize arylated fluoroalkyl bromide building blocks. It has been shown that the [(phen)Ag(CF2)nBr] intermediates are capable of transferring both the phenanthroline ligand and the fluoroalkyl bromide chain to copper iodide, eliminating the need for a preligated copper salt precursor. The methodology is compatible with various chain lengths of the fluoroalkyl halide functionality. PMID:26820388

  15. Investigation of possible interaction between pinaverium bromide and digoxin.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, O; Seidel, G; Engelbert, S; Berksoy, M; Eberhardt, G; Bode, R

    1983-01-01

    A single-blind study was carried out in 25 patients, who were receiving maintenance therapy for congestive heart failure with digoxin, to investigate the effect on steady-state plasma digoxin levels of concomitant administration of the spasmolytic, pinaverium bromide (50 mg 3-times daily). Patients received pinaverium bromide for 12 days followed by placebo for a further 7 days. Assessment of the results in 21 patients showed no evidence of any statistically significant variations in plasma digoxin levels during either treatment period or in the clinical observations which might indicate drug interaction. PMID:6653138

  16. Action of pinaverium bromide on calmodulin-regulated functions.

    PubMed

    Wuytack, F; De Schutter, G; Casteels, R

    1985-08-01

    Pinaverium bromide at concentrations below 10(-5) M did not inhibit calmodulin-dependent enzymes such as phosphodiesterase and the Ca transport ATPase of the plasma membrane. At higher concentrations the compound interacted with the stimulation of those enzymes by calmodulin and also inhibited the calmodulin-independent activity. A similar inhibitory action was observed for the NaK ATPase. It is concluded that the inhibitory action of pinaverium bromide on smooth muscle concentration at concentrations below 10(-5) M was due to its interaction with the voltage-dependent Ca channels and not to its interference with the calmodulin-dependent activation of the contractile proteins. PMID:2995077

  17. Magnesium Lewis Acid Assisted Oxidative Bromoetherification Involving Bromine Transfer from Alkyl Bromides with Aldehydes by Umpolung of Bromide.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Katsuhiko; Nishinohara, Chihiro; Togo, Hideo

    2016-08-16

    An oxidative bromoetherification involving a bromine transfer from alkyl bromides upon reacting them with aldehydes in a Grignard reaction with a concurrent oxidation of bromide was developed to provide substituted tetrahydrofurans in high yields. This reaction, which proceeds through two types of bromine transfer, was promoted by the addition of a Brønsted acid. Mechanistic studies suggested that a magnesium Lewis acid activates hypobromate, which is generated in situ from the reaction of bromide and Oxone to improve the electrophilicity of the bromonium ion (Br(+) ) for the oxidative bromoetherification of alkenyl alcohols. Furthermore, the magnesium Lewis acid catalyzed oxidative bromoetherification of an alkenyl alcohol proceeded to provide a cyclization product in 92 % yield. PMID:27304660

  18. Nickel-Catalyzed Reductive Cross-Coupling of Aryl Bromides with Alkyl Bromides: Et3N as the Terminal Reductant.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhengli; Li, Wu; Lei, Aiwen

    2016-08-19

    Reductive cross-coupling has emerged as a direct method for the construction of carbon-carbon bonds. Most cobalt-, nickel-, and palladium-catalyzed reductive cross-coupling reactions to date are limited to stoichiometric Mn(0) or Zn(0) as the reductant. One nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling paradigm using Et3N as the terminal reductant is reported. By using this photoredox catalysis and nickel catalysis approach, a direct Csp(2)-Csp(3) reductive cross-coupling of aryl bromides with alkyl bromides is achieved under mild conditions without stoichiometric metal reductants. PMID:27472556

  19. Radioactive waste forms stabilized by ChemChar gasification: characterization and leaching behavior of cerium, thorium, protactinium, uranium, and neptunium.

    PubMed

    Marrero, T W; Morris, J S; Manahan, S E

    2004-02-01

    The uses of a thermally reductive gasification process in conjunction with vitrification and cementation for the long-term disposal of low level radioactive materials have been investigated. gamma-ray spectroscopy was used for analysis of carrier-free protactinium-233 and neptunium-239 and a stoichiometric amount of cerium (observed cerium-141) subsequent to gasification and leaching, up to 48 days. High resolution ICP-MS was used to analyze the cerium, thorium, and uranium from 46 to 438 days of leaching. Leaching procedures followed the guidance of ASTM Procedure C 1220-92, Standard Test Method for Static Leaching of Monolithic Waste Forms for Disposal of Radioactive Waste. The combination of the thermally reductive pretreatment, vitrification and cementation produced a highly non-leachable form suitable for long-term disposal of cerium, thorium, protactinium, uranium, and neptunium. PMID:14637345

  20. Methyl Bromide Alternatives for Floriculture Production in a Problem Site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful methyl bromide alternatives must manage a variety of pest problems in floriculture and vegetable production systems including weeds, plant-parasitic nematodes, and soil-borne diseases. Methods that may be successful in some situations may be challenged in sites with unusually heavy pest p...

  1. EFFECT OF BROMIDE ION ON FORMATION OF HAAS DURING CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    loacetic acids (HAAs) during chlorination and he effects of independent variables, including pH, reaction time, and chlorine dosage. Almost all of the indpendent loaetic acids (HAAs) during chlorin...designed to statistically evaluate the influence of bromide ion on the formatio...

  2. Methyl bromide alternatives for postharvest insect disinfestation of California walnuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Before shipment, California inshell walnuts destined for the valuable export market must be disinfested of both field pests (codling moth and navel orangeworm) and common storage pests (Indianmeal moth and red flour beetle). Until recently fumigation with methyl bromide has been the most common dis...

  3. A COMPARISON OF BROMIDE AND NITRATE TRANSPORT IN SOILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sandy soils (with sand content 95-98%) are used for agricultural production, which require careful management of water, chemicals, and nutrients to minimize leaching below the rooting zone. Bromide is used as an indicator of downward transport of soluble nutrients in soils. A leching column study ...

  4. HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS PROFILE FOR METHYL BROMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Health and Environmental Effects Profile for Methyl Bromide was prepared to support listings of hazardous constituents of a wide range of waste streams under Section 3001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and to provide health-related limits for emergency a...

  5. Nickel-Catalyzed Reductive Amidation of Unactivated Alkyl Bromides.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Eloisa; Martin, Ruben

    2016-09-01

    A user-friendly, nickel-catalyzed reductive amidation of unactivated primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl bromides with isocyanates is described. This catalytic strategy offers an efficient synthesis of a wide range of aliphatic amides under mild conditions and with an excellent chemoselectivity profile while avoiding the use of stoichiometric and sensitive organometallic reagents. PMID:27357076

  6. Reactive films for mitigating methyl bromide emissions from fumigated soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions of methyl bromide (MeBr) from agricultural fumigation can lead to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, and so its use is being phased out. However, as MeBr is still widely used under Critical Use Exemptions, strategies are still required to control such emissions. In this work, nove...

  7. Calla lily production with methyl bromide alternatives – Year 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cut flower and ornamental bulb industries rely heavily on a methyl bromide/chloropicrin (MB/Pic) mixture as a key pest management tool. The loss of MB will seriously affect the cut flower and bulb industry, and, in the future, will require growers to use alternative fumigants. Past experiments have...

  8. Depleting methyl bromide residues in soil by reaction with bases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite generally being considered the most effective soil fumigant, methyl bromide (MeBr) use is being phased out because its emissions from soil can lead to stratospheric ozone depletion. However, a large amount is still currently used due to Critical Use Exemptions. As strategies for reducing the...

  9. Methyl bromide alternatives for postharvest insect disinfestation of California walnuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Before shipment, California inshell walnuts destined for the valuable export market must be disinfested of both field pests (codling moth and navel orangeworm) and common storage pests (Indianmeal moth and red flour beetle). Until recently fumigation with methyl bromide has been the most common disi...

  10. The Fate of Alternative Soil Funigants to Methyl Bromide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fumigation is an important agricultural practice for the control of soil-borne pests. Since the phase–out of methyl bromide, due to its role in the depletion of stratospheric ozone, several alternatives such as 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D), chloropicrin (CP), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) are b...

  11. Status of Alternatives for Methyl Bromide in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide is a fumigant used for disinfestation of soils, commodities and structures. Listed as an ozone-depleting chemical international environmental protocols and the U.S. Clean Air Act require that its use be severely restricted. Although use of this fumigant has fallen considerably, the U....

  12. Weed Control with Methyl Bromide Alternatives: A Review.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) has been used for several decades for pre-plant soil fumigation in high value agricultural and horticultural crops because it can provide broad-spectrum control of insects, nematodes, pathogens, and weeds. However, MeBr has been identified as a powerful ozone-depleting chemica...

  13. Methyl bromide phase out could affect future reforestation efforts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide has long been an integral component in producing healthy tree seedlings in forest nurseries of California, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. The fumigant was supposed to be completely phased out of use in the United States of America by 2005, but many forest nurseries continue to...

  14. REVIEW OF CONTROL OPTIONS FOR METHYL BROMIDE IN COMMODITY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes recent developments in the control of methyl bromide (MeBr) and discusses technical considerations and requirements for and economic feasibility of recovery. (NOTE: MeBr, fumigant for agricultural commodities, is an ozone depleting chemical. The U.S. EPA has ...

  15. Investigation of bromide's spectra by high resolution UV-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Ma, Jian-guo

    2011-12-01

    Experimental investigation has been carried out for dissociation/ionisation of methyl bromide using time of flight mass spectrometer, then, the mass signals were assigned to H+, CHm+ (m= 0-3), iBr+ (i = 79, 81), and the main processes of multi-photon ionization and dissociation of CH3Br were given.

  16. PHYTOREMEDIATON POTENTIALS OF SELECTED TROPICAL PLANTS FOR ETHIDIUM BROMIDE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research and development has its own benefits and inconveniences. One of the inconveniences is the generation of enormous quantity of diverse toxic and hazardous wastes and its eventual contamination to soil and groundwater resources. Ethidium bromide (EtBr) is one of the commonly used substances i...

  17. BROMIDE-OXIDANT INTERACTIONS AND THM (TRIHALOMETHANE) FORMATION: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The review focuses on the interactions, not only of bromide and chlorine, but also of bromide and two common oxidation alternatives to chlorine--chlorine dioxide and monochloramine. The data evaluations include discussions of reaction products, potentials for trihalomethane (THM)...

  18. T-type Ca2+ channel modulation by otilonium bromide

    PubMed Central

    Strege, Peter R.; Sha, Lei; Beyder, Arthur; Bernard, Cheryl E.; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Evangelista, Stefano; Gibbons, Simon J.; Szurszewski, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    Antispasmodics are used clinically to treat a variety of gastrointestinal disorders by inhibition of smooth muscle contraction. The main pathway for smooth muscle Ca2+ entry is through L-type channels; however, there is increasing evidence that T-type Ca2+ channels also play a role in regulating contractility. Otilonium bromide, an antispasmodic, has previously been shown to inhibit L-type Ca2+ channels and colonic contractile activity. The objective of this study was to determine whether otilonium bromide also inhibits T-type Ca2+ channels. Whole cell currents were recorded by patch-clamp technique from HEK293 cells transfected with cDNAs encoding the T-type Ca2+ channels, CaV3.1 (α1G), CaV3.2 (α1H), or CaV3.3 (α1I) alpha subunits. Extracellular solution was exchanged with otilonium bromide (10−8 to 10−5 M). Otilonium bromide reversibly blocked all T-type Ca2+ channels with a significantly greater affinity for CaV3.3 than CaV3.1 or CaV3.2. Additionally, the drug slowed inactivation in CaV3.1 and CaV3.3. Inhibition of T-type Ca2+ channels may contribute to inhibition of contractility by otilonium bromide. This may represent a new mechanism of action for antispasmodics and may contribute to the observed increased clinical effectiveness of antispasmodics compared with selective L-type Ca2+ channel blockers. PMID:20203058

  19. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  20. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  1. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  2. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  3. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4090 - Ethanaminium, N-[bis(diethylamino)-methylene]-N-ethyl-, bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide... Substances § 721.4090 Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4090 - Ethanaminium, N-[bis(diethylamino)-methylene]-N-ethyl-, bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide... Substances § 721.4090 Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4090 - Ethanaminium, N-[bis(diethylamino)-methylene]-N-ethyl-, bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide... Substances § 721.4090 Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4090 - Ethanaminium, N-[bis(diethylamino)-methylene]-N-ethyl-, bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide... Substances § 721.4090 Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide (PMN...

  8. 2-Page Summary for Neptunium solubility in the Near-field Environment of A Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect

    D. Sassani; A. Van Luik; J. Summerson

    2005-03-29

    The total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, NV, includes a wide variety of processes to evaluate the potential release of radionuclides from the Engineered Barrier System into the unsaturated zone of the geosphere. The principal processes controlling radionuclide release and mobilization from the waste forms are captured in the model to assess the dissolved concentrations of radionuclides in the source-term. The TSPA model of the source-term incorporates the far-from-equilibrium dissolution of, for example, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to capture bounding rates of radionuclide availability as the SNF degrades. In addition, for individual radionuclides, the source-term model evaluates solubility constraints that are more indicative of longer-term, equilibrium processes that can limit the potential mass transport from the source term in those cases. These solubility limits represent phase saturation and precipitation processes that can occur either at the waste form as it alters, or at other locations in the near-field environment (e.g., within the invert) if chemical conditions are different. Identification and selection of applicable constraints for solubility-limited radionuclide concentrations is a primary focus in formulating the source-term model for the TSPA. Neptunium is a long-lived radionuclide that becomes a larger fraction of the potential dose as radioactive decay of other radionuclides proceeds. To delineate appropriate long-term source-term controls on dissolved neptunium concentrations, a number of alternative models have been defined. The models are based on data both collected within the Yucca Mountain Project and taken from published literature, and have been evaluated against independent data sets to assess their applicability. The alternative models encompass ones based on precipitation of neptunium within its own separate oxide phases (i.e., ''pure'' Np-phases), and those where neptunium is

  9. Separation of plutonium and neptunium species by capillary electrophoresis-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and application to natural groundwater samples.

    PubMed

    Kuczewski, Bernhard; Marquardt, Christian M; Seibert, Alice; Geckeis, Horst; Kratz, Jens Volker; Trautmann, Norbert

    2003-12-15

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was coupled to ICPMS in order to combine the good performance of this separation technique with the high sensitivity of the ICPMS for the analysis of plutonium and neptunium oxidation states. The combination of a fused-silica capillary with a MicroMist AR 30-I-FM02 nebulizer and a Cinnabar small-volume cyclonic spray chamber yielded the best separation results. With this setup, it was possible to separate a model element mixture containing neptunium (NpO2(+)), uranium (UO2(2+)), lanthanum (La3+), and thorium (Th4+) in 1 M acetic acid. The same conditions were also suitable for the separation of various oxidation states of plutonium and neptunium in different aqueous samples. All separations were obtained within less than 15 min. A detection limit of 50 ppb identical with 2 x 10(-7) M (3-fold standard deviation of a blank) was achieved. To prove the negligible disturbance of the plutonium and neptunium redox equilibria during the CE separations, plutonium and neptunium speciation by CE-ICPMS in acidic solutions was compared with the results of UV/visible absorption spectroscopy and was found to be in good agreement. The CE-ICPMS system was also applied to study the reduction of Pu(VI) in a humic acid-containing groundwater at different pH values. PMID:14670034

  10. Lithium bromide absorption chiller passes gas conditioning field test

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M.J.; Huey, M.A.

    1995-07-31

    A lithium bromide absorption chiller has been successfully used to provide refrigeration for field conditioning of natural gas. The intent of the study was to identify a process that could provide a moderate level of refrigeration necessary to meet the quality restrictions required by natural-gas transmission companies, minimize the initial investment risk, and reduce operating expenses. The technology in the test proved comparatively less expensive to operate than a propane refrigeration plant. Volatile product prices and changes in natural-gas transmission requirements have created the need for an alternative to conventional methods of natural-gas processing. The paper describes the problems with the accumulation of condensed liquids in pipelines, gas conditioning, the lithium bromide absorption cycle, economics, performance, and operating and maintenance costs.

  11. Aluminium Electroplating on Steel from a Fused Bromide Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhat Tripathy; Laura Wurth; Eric Dufek; Toni Y. Gutknecht; Natalie Gese; Paula Hahn; Steven Frank; Guy Fredrickson; J Stephen Herring

    2014-08-01

    A quaternary bromide bath (LiBr-KBr-CsBr-AlBr3) was used to electro-coat aluminium on steel substrates. The electrolyte was prepared by the addition of AlBr3 into the eutectic LiBr-KBr-CsBr melt. A smooth, thick, adherent and shiny aluminium coating could be obtained with 80 wt.% AlBr3 in the ternary melt. The SEM photographs of the coated surfaces suggest the formation of thick and dense coatings with good aluminium coverage. Both salt immersion and open circuit potential measurement suggest that the coatings did display good corrosion-resistance behavior. Annealing of the coated surfaces, prior to corrosion tests, suggested the robustness of the metallic aluminium coating in preventing the corrosion of the steel surfaces. Studies also indicated that the quaternary bromide plating bath can potentially provide a better aluminium coating on both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, including complex surfaces/geometries.

  12. Aluminum electroplating on steel from a fused bromide electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhat K. Tripathy; Laura A. Wurth; Eric J. Dufek; Toni Y. Gutknecht; Natalie J. Gese; Paula Hahn; Steven M. Frank; Guy L. Frederickson; J. Stephen Herring

    2014-08-01

    A quaternary bromide bath (LiBr–KBr–CsBr–AlBr3) was used to electro-coat aluminum on steel substrates. The electrolytewas prepared by the addition of AlBr3 into the eutectic LiBr–KBr–CsBr melt. A smooth, thick, adherent and shiny aluminum coating could be obtained with 80 wt.% AlBr3 in the ternary melt. The SEM photographs of the coated surfaces suggest the formation of thick and dense coatings with good aluminum coverage. Both salt immersion and open circuit potential measurement suggested that the coatings did display a good corrosionresistance behavior. Annealing of the coated surfaces, prior to corrosion tests, suggested the robustness of the metallic aluminum coating in preventing the corrosion of the steel surfaces. Studies also indicated that the quaternary bromide plating bath can potentially provide a better aluminumcoating on both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, including complex surfaces/geometries.

  13. A novel and robust conditioning lesion induced by ethidium bromide

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Edmund R; Ishiko, Nao; Tolentino, Kristine; Doherty, Ernest; Rodriguez, Maria J.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Zou, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the peripheral conditioning lesion remain unsolved. We show here that injection of a chemical demyelinating agent, ethidium bromide, into the sciatic nerve induces a similar set of regeneration-associated genes and promotes a 2.7-fold greater extent of sensory axon regeneration in the spinal cord than sciatic nerve crush. We found that more severe peripheral demyelination correlates with more severe functional and electrophysiological deficits, but more robust central regeneration. Ethidium bromide injection does not activate macrophages at the demyelinated sciatic nerve site, as observed after nerve crush, but briefly activates macrophages in the dorsal root ganglion. This study provides a new method for investigating the underlying mechanisms of the conditioning response and suggests that loss of the peripheral myelin may be a major signal to change the intrinsic growth state of adult sensory neurons and promote regeneration. PMID:25541322

  14. Viscosity and density of some lower alkyl chlorides and bromides

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, W.M.

    1988-07-01

    A high-pressure capillary viscometer, used previously to measure the viscosity of methyl chloride was rebuilt to eliminate the first-order dependence of the measured viscosity on the value assumed for the density of the fluid being investigated. At the same time, the system was arranged so that part of the apparatus could be used to measure density by a volumetric displacement technique. Viscosity and density were measured for ethyl chloride, 1-chloropropane, 1-chlorobutane, methyl bromide, ethyl bromide, and 1-bromopropane. The temperature and pressure ranges of the experiments were 20-150 /sup 0/C and 0.27-6.99 MPa, respectively. The accuracy of the viscosity measurements was estimated to be +-1% and of the density measurements, +-0.2%.

  15. [The use of syntropium bromide as an antispasmodic].

    PubMed

    Galeone, M; Cacioli, D; Moise, G; Bossi, M; Benazzi, E; Monti, G

    1985-09-22

    The following trials were carried out to evaluate the antispasmodic effect of sintropium bromide in a group of 30 patients. The antispasmodic effect on the gastroduodenal system was observed endoscopically. The results were compared by means of double blind tests carried out using placebo and rociverine. The effect in a group of 10 patients was examined by X-ray of the digestive tract. The effect on another group of 20 patients suffering from abdominal colic was clinically evaluated. Sintropium bromide has a prompt anticholinergic action and for this reason may be used in the treatment of painful conditions of the bile, gastro-enteric and renal tracts, and also during the course of endoscopic examinations. PMID:3900811

  16. Factors influencing the formation of polybromide monoanions in solutions of ionic liquid bromide salts.

    PubMed

    Easton, Max E; Ward, Antony J; Chan, Bun; Radom, Leo; Masters, Anthony F; Maschmeyer, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Six different bromide salts - tetraethylammonium bromide ([N2,2,2,2]Br, Br), 1-ethyl-1-methylpiperidinium bromide ([C2MPip]Br, Br), 1-ethyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bromide ([C2MPyrr]Br, Br), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C2MIm]Br, Br), 1-ethylpyridinium bromide ([C2Py]Br, Br), and 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)pyridinium bromide ([C2OHPy]Br, Br) - were studied in regards to their capacity to form polybromide monoanion products on addition of molecular bromine in acetonitrile solutions. Using complementary spectroscopic and computational methods for the examination of tribromide and pentabromide anion formation, key factors influencing polybromide sequestration were identified. Here, we present criteria for the targeted synthesis of highly efficient bromine sequestration agents. PMID:26890026

  17. Quantitative NDA measurements of advanced reprocessing product materials containing uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden

    The ability of inspection agencies and facility operators to measure powders containing several actinides is increasingly necessary as new reprocessing techniques and fuel forms are being developed. These powders are difficult to measure with nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques because neutrons emitted from induced and spontaneous fission of different nuclides are very similar. A neutron multiplicity technique based on first principle methods was developed to measure these powders by exploiting isotope-specific nuclear properties, such as the energy-dependent fission cross sections and the neutron induced fission neutron multiplicity. This technique was tested through extensive simulations using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code and by one measurement campaign using the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and two measurement campaigns using the Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC) with various (alpha,n) sources and actinide materials. Four potential applications of this first principle technique have been identified: (1) quantitative measurement of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium materials; (2) quantitative measurement of mixed oxide (MOX) materials; (3) quantitative measurement of uranium materials; and (4) weapons verification in arms control agreements. This technique still has several challenges which need to be overcome, the largest of these being the challenge of having high-precision active and passive measurements to produce results with acceptably small uncertainties.

  18. Dissolution of Neptunium and Plutonium Oxides Using a Catalyzed Electrolytic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Hylton, TD

    2004-10-25

    This report discusses the scoping study performed to evaluate the use of a catalyzed electrolytic process for dissolving {sup 237}Np oxide targets that had been irradiated to produce {sup 238}Pu oxide. Historically, these compounds have been difficult to dissolve, and complete dissolution was obtained only by adding hydrofluoric acid to the nitric acid solvent. The presence of fluoride in the mixture is undesired because the fluoride ions are corrosive to tank and piping systems and the fluoride ions cause interferences in the spectrophotometric analyses. The goal is to find a dissolution method that will eliminate these issues and that can be incorporated into a processing system to support the domestic production and purification of {sup 238}Pu. This study evaluated the potential of cerium(IV) ions, a strong oxidant, to attack and dissolve the oxide compounds. In the dissolution process, the cerium(IV) ions are reduced to cerium(III) ions, which are not oxidants. Therefore, an electrolytic process was incorporated to continuously convert cerium(III) ions back to cerium(IV) ions so that they can dissolve more of the oxide compounds. This study showed that the neptunium and plutonium oxides were successfully dissolved and that more development work should be performed to optimize the procedure.

  19. Thermodynamic modeling of neptunium(V)-acetate complexation in concentrated NaCl media

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, C.F.; Borkowski, M.; Choppin, G.R.

    1995-09-01

    The complexation of neptunium(V), Np(V), with the acetate anion, Ac{sup -}, was measured in sodium chloride media to high concentration using an extraction technique. The data were interpreted using the thermodynamic formalism of Pitzer, which is valid to high electrolyte concentrations. A consistent model for the deprotonation constants of acetic acid in NaCl and NaClO{sub 4} media was developed. For the concentrations of acetate expected in a waste repository, only the neutral complex NpO{sub 2}Ac(aq) was important in describing the interactions between the neptunyl ion and acetate. The thermodynamic stability constant log {beta}{sup 0}{sub 101} for the reaction NpO{sub 2}{sup +} + Ac{sup -} {leftrightarrow} NpO{sub 2}Ac was calculated to be 1.46{plus_minus}0.11. This weak complexing behavior between the neptunyl ion and acetate indicates that acetate will not significantly enhance dissolved Np(V) concentrations in ground waters associated with nuclear waste repositories that may contain acetate.

  20. Application of the S=1 underscreened Anderson lattice model to Kondo uranium and neptunium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simões, Acirete S.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing the coexistence of the Kondo screening effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the Anderson lattice Hamiltonian with a two-fold degenerate f level in each site, corresponding to 5f2 electronic configuration with S=1 spins. A derivation of the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation is presented and the resulting Hamiltonian has an effective f-band term, in addition to the regular exchange Kondo interaction between the S=1 f spins and the s=1/2 spins of the conduction electrons. The resulting effective Kondo lattice model can describe both the Kondo regime and a weak delocalization of the 5f electrons. Within this model we compute the Kondo and Curie temperatures as a function of model parameters, namely the Kondo exchange interaction constant JK, the magnetic intersite exchange interaction JH, and the effective f bandwidth. We deduce, therefore, a phase diagram of the model which yields the coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and also accounts for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of uranium compounds such as UTe.

  1. Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide Generated Using the HB-Line Phase IIFlowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, J

    2003-08-29

    The hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas generation rate for neptunium dioxide (NpO{sub 2}) samples produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet has been measured following exposure to 75% relative humidity (RH). As expected, the observed H{sub 2} generation rates for these samples increase with increasing moisture content. A maximum H{sub 2} generation rate of 1.8 x 10{sup -6} moles per day per kilogram (mol {center_dot} day{sup -1} kg{sup -1}) was observed for NpO{sub 2} samples with approximately one and one-half times (1 1/2 X) the expected specific surface area (SSA) for the HB-Line Phase II product. The SSA of NpO{sub 2} samples calcined at 650 C is similar to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) calcined at 950 C according to the Department of Energy (DOE) standard for packaging and storage of PuO{sub 2}. This low SSA of the HB-Line Phase II product limits moisture uptake to less than 0.2 weight percent (wt %) even with extended exposure to 75% RH.

  2. Oceanic Uptake of Methyl Bromide: Implications for Oceanic Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvon-Lewis, S. A.; Butler, J. H.; King, D. B.; Saltzman, E. S.; Tokarczyk, R.

    2002-12-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) is a source of inorganic bromine (Br) in the stratosphere, where it contributes to the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Unlike the chlorofluorocarbons, which are entirely anthropogenic, methyl bromide has both natural and anthropogenic sources. At ~10 parts per trillion in the troposphere, methyl bromide is believed to be the single largest contributor of stratospheric Br. Once in the stratosphere, Br is approximately 50 times more effective in depleting stratospheric ozone than Cl. However, the budget for CH3Br remains largely unbalanced with known sinks outweighing sources by ~50%. With production and degradation occurring in the ocean, the ocean is both a source and a sink for CH3Br. The balance between production and degradation results in the net undersaturation of CH3Br that has been observed over much of the world's ocean with an estimated global net ocean sink ranging from -11 to -20 Gg/y [King et al., 2000 and references therein]. However, effects of climate change, such as changes in windspeed distribution or sea-surface temperature could alter this balance. Modeling the potential effect of such forcing on the net flux of this important trace gas requires an understanding of the factors controlling the distributions of production and degradation in the surface ocean. During three recent research cruises (North Atlantic, North Pacific, and Southern Ocean), CH3Br degradation rate constants were measured along with saturation anomalies. Here we incorporate these data into a gridded global box model to examine the distribution of oceanic production rates necessary to support the observations. King, D.B., J.H. Butler, S.A. Montzka, S.A. Yvon-Lewis, and J.W. Elkins, Implications of methyl bromide supersaturations in the temperate North Atlantic Ocean, J. of Geophys. Res., 105 (D15), 19763-19769, 2000.

  3. Problems with NIOSH method 2520 for methyl bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Tharr, D.

    1994-03-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) publishes the NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods (NMAM), a collection of analytical methods for characterizing exposures to environmental chemicals. When an industrial hygienist selects a method to monitor worker exposure, it is important to remember that not all the methods in the NMAM have undergone the same level of evaluation, as the following case demonstrates. As part of an industrywide study of the health effects resulting from methyl bromide exposure in structural and agricultural applicators, NIOSH researchers conducted industrial hygiene monitoring for methyl bromide in Florida during July 1990. NIOSH method 2520 was used. This method recommends use of two charcoal tubes (400 mg/100 mg) in series, desorption with carbon disulfide, and analysis by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector. Sampling results from these surveys indicated a capacity problem. A project was then initiated to determine the reason for the methyl bromide breakthrough that occurred during industrial hygiene monitoring. While conducting research to define and solve this problem, several other problems were identified: reduced adsorption capacity caused by high humidity, difficulty in preparing standard solutions, sample instability, change in recovery with loading, and insufficiently low quantitation limit. The addition of a drying tube to the sampling train, as well as changes to the analytical technique, to the desorption solvent, and to the time till analysis, resulted in an improved method for methyl bromide. This case study demonstrates the importance of noting the conditions under which a method was evaluated and the benefit of testing method performance under conditions likely to exist at a field site. 5 refs.

  4. Criticality in aqueous solutions of 3-methylpyridine and sodium bromide.

    PubMed

    Kostko, A F; Anisimov, M A; Sengers, J V

    2004-08-01

    We address a controversial issue regarding the nature of critical behavior in ternary electrolyte solutions of water, 3-methylpyridine, and sodium bromide. Earlier light-scattering studies showed an anomalous critical behavior in this system that was attributed to the formation of a microheterogeneous phase associated with ion-molecule clustering [M.A. Anisimov, J. Jacob, A. Kumar, V.A. Agayan, and J. V. Sengers, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2336 (2000)

  5. Methyl Bromide Poisoning—A Bizarre Neurological Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Raymond P.

    1965-01-01

    Methyl bromide, a widely used fumigant, may cause burns of the skin, fatalities accompanied by coma and convulsions, or prolonged neurologic and psychiatric symptoms. Burns are more likely to occur where evaporation is prevented under protective clothing. Symptoms of serious illness may not develop for hours after exposure. Since action appears to be one of methylation, especially of SH groups, B.A.L. may be helpful if used promptly. PMID:14347974

  6. Structural, vibrational and theoretical studies of L-histidine bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, A. Ben; Feki, H.; Abid, Y.; Boughzala, H.; Mlayah, A.

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents the results of our calculations of the geometric parameters, vibrational spectra and hyperpolarizability of a non linear optical material, L-histidine bromide. Due to the lack of sufficiently precise information on the geometric structure available in literature, theoretical calculations were preceded by re-determination of the crystal X-ray structure. Single crystals of L-histidine bromide have been grown by slow evaporation of an aqueous solution at room temperature. The compound crystallizes in the non-Centro symmetric space group P2 12 12 1 of the orthorhombic system. Raman spectra have been recorded in the range [200-3500 cm -1]. All observed vibrational bands have been discussed and assigned to normal mode or to combinations and overtones on the basis of our calculations. The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by using HF and DFT (B3LYP and BLYP) show good agreement with the experimental data. Comparison between the measured and the calculated vibrational frequencies indicate that B3LYP is superior to the scaled HF approach for molecular vibrational problems. To investigate microscopic second order non linear optical properties of L-histidine bromide, the electric dipole μ, the polarizability α and the hyperpolarizability β were computed using DFT//B3LYP/6-31G(d) method. According to our calculations, the title compound exhibits non-zero β value revealing microscopic second order NLO behaviour.

  7. The Thz Absorption of Methyl Bromide (CH_3BR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Marlon; Drouin, Brian J.

    2011-06-01

    The possibility of monitoring Methyl Bromide is of interest for both environmental and health concerns. It has an ozone depletion potential of 0.2% and falls under regulations of the Clean Air Act. Neurological effects from long term exposure may result from its major use as a pesticide. Recent improvements in microwave limb sounding at mm & submm wavelengths have resulted in retrievals of Methyl Chloride from atmospheric spectra. It is conceivable that Methyl Bromide would also be measurable by this technique. In an effort to extend and improve the previous work, the THz spectrum of Methyl Bromide has been measured at JPL. We used an isotopically enriched 13CH_3Br (90%) sample and recorded spectra from 750 - 1200 GHz. Our assignment covers the CH_379Br, CH_381Br, 13CH_379Br and 13CH_381Br isotopologues with J< 66 and K< 17 for the ground vibrational state. We plan to assign vibrational satellites and investigate possible perturbations near K =12 in the ground state.

  8. [Manometric effects of pinaverium bromide in irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Soifer, L; Varela, E; Olmos, J

    1992-01-01

    The effects of pinaverium bromide on colonic motility were investigated in a controlled, controlled, cross-over study in 32 patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Constipation was clearly predominant in one group of 16 patients, and diarrhea in the other group of 16. Manometric measurements were taken of the colonic motor response generated by distention of a balloon inserted to the rectosigmoid junction. Measurements were taken before and one hour after ingestion of two tablets containing placebo or two tablets each containing 50 mg of pinaverium bromide. Following intake of placebo the motility index increased from the basal value in patients with constipation, and resistance to distention decreased in the diarrhea group. These changes were attributable to repetition of the mechanical stimulus within a relatively brief time lapse, or more probably to the ingestion of liquid which accompanied intake of tablets. Compared with placebo, pinaverium bromide induced inhibition of both effects. From the therapeutic point of view, the decrease in motility index seen in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and constipation is particularly interesting. PMID:1295286

  9. L-Tryptophan L-tryptophanium bromide: Anhydrous and monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazaryan, V. V.; Giester, G.; Fleck, M.; Petrosyan, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    L-Tryptophan L-tryptophanium bromide (I) and L-tryptophan L-tryptophanium bromide monohydrate (II) are new salts with (A⋯A+) type dimeric cation. The salt (I) crystallizes in the monoclinic system (space group P21, Z = 2) and is isostructural with respective chloride (V.V. Ghazaryan et al., Spectrochim. Acta A 136(2015) 743-750), while the salt (II) was obtained previously (T. Takigawa et al., Bull. Chem. Soc. Jap. 39(1966) 2369-2378) and described as hemyhydrate without structure determination. The salt (II) crystallizes in orthorhombic system (space group P212121, Z = 4). The dimeric cations in (I) and (II) are formed by O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds with the O⋯O distances equal to 2.538(3) Å and 2.481(3) Å respectively. The infrared and Raman spectra of the crystals are studied and compared with the spectra of L-tryptophan L-tryptophanium chloride and L-tryptophanium bromide.

  10. Anomalous signal of solvent bromides used for phasing of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Dauter, Z; Dauter, M

    1999-05-28

    The anomalous signal of bromide ions, present in the crystal structure of tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme through the substitution of NaCl by NaBr in the crystallization medium, was used for phasing of X-ray data collected to 1.7 A resolution with a wavelength near the absorption edge of bromine. Phasing of a single wavelength data set, based purely on anomalous deltaf " contribution, led to easily interpretable electron density, equivalent to the complete multiwavelength anonalous dispersion phasing based on four-wavelength data. The classic small-structure direct methods program SHELXS run against all anomalous differences gave a successful solution of six highest peaks corresponding to six bromide ions in the structure with data limited up to a resolution of 3.5 A. Interpretable maps were obtained at a resolution up to 3.0 A using programs MLPHARE and DM. Bromide ions occupy well ordered positions at the protein surface. Phasing based on the single wavelength signal of anomalous scatterers introduced into the ordered solvent shell can be proposed as a tool for solving structures of well diffracting crystals. PMID:10339408

  11. 40 CFR 180.123a - Inorganic bromide residues in peanut hay and peanut hulls; statement of policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... containing residues of inorganic bromides from the use of methyl bromide are unsuitable as an ingredient in... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic bromide residues in peanut... RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.123a Inorganic bromide residues in peanut hay and peanut...

  12. 40 CFR 180.123a - Inorganic bromide residues in peanut hay and peanut hulls; statement of policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... containing residues of inorganic bromides from the use of methyl bromide are unsuitable as an ingredient in... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inorganic bromide residues in peanut... RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.123a Inorganic bromide residues in peanut hay and peanut...

  13. 40 CFR 180.123a - Inorganic bromide residues in peanut hay and peanut hulls; statement of policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... containing residues of inorganic bromides from the use of methyl bromide are unsuitable as an ingredient in... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inorganic bromide residues in peanut... RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.123a Inorganic bromide residues in peanut hay and peanut...

  14. EFFECT OF BROMIDE ION IN WATER TREATMENT. 2. A LITERATURE REVIEW OF OZONE AND BROMIDE ION INTERACTIONS AND THE FORMATION OF ORGANIC BROMINE COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Where bromide ion is found in water used as a source of drinking water, and chlorination is used for disinfection, bromide ion is oxidized to bromine and can result in the formation of organic bromine compounds. There are presently no treatment techniques available for economic r...

  15. Spatial Variation Scales of Rainfall Characteristics and Bromide Leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendroth, O. O.; Vasquez, V.; Matocha, C.

    2010-12-01

    Amount and intensity of rainfall are known as important characteristics that affect the leaching of surface-applied agri-chemicals. Besides these, the effect of the time interval between a fertilizer, pesticide or tracer application and subsequent rainfall on solute leaching is not well understood. Moreover, little is known about the spatial representativity of the solute concentration based on a relatively small soil sample in field-scale transport studies. To know the spatial representativity of a solute concentration sample at a time is crucial for analyzing solute leaching behavior over time as well as over space. The objectives of this study were to identify the impact of rainfall intensity and amount as well as the application time delay on solute transport in a well-drained Maury silt loam soil. Moreover, an experimental design and protocol had to be developed that exhibited spatial variability structure and representativity of bromide concentration. For this purpose, the variation scale of each of the factors investigated was chosen differently to apply frequency domain statistics. The study was conducted in a Maury silt loam soil at the University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture Experimental Farm Spindletop. Along a 64-m transect, 32 plots each 2-m long and 4-m wide were established. The three different treatments were spatially laid out in sinusoidal patterns at three respective wavelengths. Two different rainfall amounts were applied in blocks of eight consecutive plots, hence a wavelength of 32 m. These two different rainfall amounts were applied at four rates, spatially distributed in two waves each of 16 m length. Individual plots received the irrigation at specific times after the tracer had been applied. Four application delay times were chosen, hence the wavelength for this treatment was 8 m. Bromide concentration was measured for soil samples that were taken with a percussion auger at every 50 cm distance along the 64-m-transect. Auger cores

  16. Comparison of Heat and Bromide as Ground Water Tracers Near Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Cox, M.H.; Su, G.W.

    2003-01-01

    Heat and bromide were compared as tracers for examining stream/ground water exchanges along the middle reaches of the Santa Clara River, California, during a 10-hour surface water sodium bromide injection test. Three cross sections that comprise six shallow (<1 m) piezometers were installed at the upper, middle, and lower sections of a 17 km long study reach, to monitor temperatures and bromide concentrations in the shallow ground water beneath the stream. A heat and ground water transport simulation model and a closely related solute and ground water transport simulation model were matched up for comparison of simulated and observed temperatures and bromide concentrations in the streambed. Vertical, one-dimensional simulations of sediment temperature were fitted to observed temperature results, to yield apparent streambed hydraulic conductivities in each cross section. The temperature-based hydraulic conductivities were assigned to a solute and ground water transport model to predict sediment bromide concentrations, during the sodium bromide injection test. Vertical, one-dimensional simulations of bromide concentrations in the sediments yielded a good match to the observed bromide concentrations, without adjustment of any model parameters except solute dispersivities. This indicates that, for the spatial and temporal scales examined on the Santa Clara River, the use of heat and bromide as tracers provide comparable information with respect to apparent hydraulic conductivities and fluxes for sediments near streams. In other settings, caution should be used due to differences in the nature of conservative (bromide) versus nonconservative (heat) tracers, particularly when preferential flowpaths are present.

  17. The effect of temperature on the sorption of technetium, uranium, neptunium and curium on bentonite, tuff and granodiorite

    SciTech Connect

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Brownsword, M.; Heath, T.G.; Ilett, D.J.; Tweed, C.J.; Yui, M.

    1997-12-31

    A study of the sorption of the radioelements technetium; uranium; neptunium; and curium onto geological materials has been carried out as part of the PNC program to increase confidence in the performance assessment for a high-level radioactive waste repository in Japan. Batch sorption experiments have been performed in order to study the sorption of the radioelements onto bentonite, tuff and granodiorite from equilibrated de-ionized water under strongly-reducing conditions at both room temperature and at 60 C. Mathematical modelling using the geochemical speciation program HARPHRQ in conjunction with the HATCHES database has been undertaken in order to interpret the experimental results.

  18. ELECTRONICS UPGRADE TO THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY COULOMETER FOR PLUTONIUM AND NEPTUNIUM ASSAY

    SciTech Connect

    Cordaro, J.; Holland, M.; Reeves, G.; Nichols, S.; Kruzner, A.

    2011-07-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has the analytical measurement capability to perform high-precision plutonium concentration measurements by controlled-potential coulometry. State-of-the-art controlled-potential coulometers were designed and fabricated by the Savannah River National Laboratory and installed in the Analytical Laboratories process control laboratory. The Analytical Laboratories uses coulometry for routine accountability measurements of and for verification of standard preparations used to calibrate other plutonium measurement systems routinely applied to process control, nuclear safety, and other accountability applications. The SRNL Coulometer has a demonstrated measurement reliability of {approx}0.05% for 10 mg samples. The system has also been applied to the characterization of neptunium standard solutions with a comparable reliability. The SRNL coulometer features: a patented current integration system; continuous electrical calibration versus Faraday's Constants and Ohm's Law; the control-potential adjustment technique for enhanced application of the Nernst Equation; a wide operating room temperature range; and a fully automated instrument control and data acquisition capability. Systems have been supplied to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Russia, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL). The most recent vintage of electronics was based on early 1990's integrated circuits. Many of the components are no longer available. At the request of the IAEA and the Department of State, SRNL has completed an electronics upgrade of their controlled-potential coulometer design. Three systems have built with the new design, one for the IAEA which was installed at SAL in May 2011, one system for Los Alamos National Laboratory, (LANL) and one for the SRS Analytical Laboratory. The LANL and SRS systems are undergoing startup testing with installation scheduled for this summer.

  19. Kinetics of neptunium(V) sorption and desorption on goethite: An experimental and modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, Ruth M.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Powell, Brian A.; Kersting, Annie B.

    2011-11-01

    Various sorption phenomena, such as aging, hysteresis and irreversible sorption, can cause differences between contaminant (ad)sorption and desorption behavior and lead to apparent sorption 'asymmetry'. We evaluate the relevance of these characteristics for neptunium(V) (Np(V)) sorption/desorption on goethite using a 34-day flow-cell experiment and kinetic modeling. Based on experimental results, the Np(V) desorption rate is much slower than the (ad)sorption rate, and appears to decrease over the course of the experiment. The best model fit with a minimum number of fitting parameters was achieved with a multi-reaction model including (1) an equilibrium Freundlich site (site 1), (2) a kinetically-controlled, consecutive, first-order site (site 2), and (3) a parameter ψ, which characterizes the desorption rate on site 2 based on a concept related to transition state theory (TST). This approach allows us to link differences in adsorption and desorption kinetics to changes in overall reaction pathways, without assuming different adsorption and desorption affinities (hysteresis) or irreversible sorption behavior a priori. Using modeling as a heuristic tool, we determined that aging processes are relevant. However, hysteresis and irreversible sorption behavior can be neglected within the time-frame (desorption over 32 days) and chemical solution conditions evaluated in the flow-cell experiment. In this system, desorption reactions are very slow, but they are not irreversible. Hence, our data do not justify an assumption of irreversible Np(V) sorption to goethite in transport models, which effectively limits the relevance of colloid-facilitated Np(V) transport to near-field environments. However, slow Np(V) desorption behavior may also lead to a continuous contaminant source term when metals are sorbed to bulk mineral phases. Additional long-term experiments are recommended to definitely rule out irreversible Np(V) sorption behavior at very low surface loadings and

  20. Complex formation between neptunium(V) and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chuguryan, D.G.; Dzyubenko, V.I.; Gerbeleu, N.V.

    1987-01-01

    Complex formation between neptunium(V) and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives in solution has been studied spectrophotometrically in the pH range 4-10. Stepwise formation of three types of complexes, with composition NpO/sub 2/HA, NpO/sub 2/A/sup -/, and NpOHA/sup 2 -/, has been demonstrated with salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/L) and salicylaldehyde S-methyl-isothiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/Q) at t = 25 +/- 1/sup 0/C and ..mu.. = 0.05. The logarithmic stability constants of the first two complexes are 5.14 +/- 0.06, 11.85 +/- 0.04 and 8.42 +/- 0.09, 13.33 +/- 0.015 for H/sub 2/L and H/sub 2/Q, respectively; equilibrium constants for the formation of hydroxo complexes of the form NpO/sub 2/OHL/sup 2 -/ and NpO/sub 2/OHQ/sup 2 -/ were also determined, and found to be equal to (2.23 +/-0.37) x 10/sup -5/ and (5.02 +/- 0.9) x 10/sup -5/, respectively. In the case of S-methyl-N/sub 1/,N/sub 4/-bis(salicylidene)isothiosemicarbazide (H/sub 2/Z), only one type of complex is formed under these experimental conditions, namely, NpO/sub 2/Z/sup -/, with a logarithmic stability constant of 4.78 +/- 0.03. Dissociation constants for H/sub 2/Q and H/sub 2/Z were also determined.

  1. Immobilization and recovery of thorium, a neptunium surrogate, using phase-separated glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Meaker, T.F.; Karraker, D.; Tosten, M.; Pareizs, J.M.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1997-12-31

    The Savannah River Site has the majority of the United States` supply of neptunium currently stored in an acid solution in one of their canyon facilities. A program is being developed that could be utilized to ship this material, as glass, to Oak Ridge National Laboratory where the Np could be leached from the glass, purified by ion exchange and made into target material for the production of Pu-238. Ion exchange purification dictates no material be in the leachate making the isolation of the Np difficult. The authors have developed a process using thorium as a surrogate for Np that could immobilize the Np into a soda borosilicate glass for shipment. To achieve recovery of the Np, the glass can be phase separated prior to leaching with nitric acid. Phase separation would produce a Np-rich sodium-borate phase and a Si-rich phase similar to a Vycor{reg_sign} glass. The nitric acid selectively attacks the sodium-borate phase allowing high Np recovery in a solution that contains only sodium and boron. These can be easily separated from Np by ion exchange. Essentially all of the silicon which would interfere with ion exchange by precipitation is retained in the Vycor{reg_sign}-type phase. This technology may also be applied to other actinides stored in relatively pure solutions. This paper will report the optimization of variables for maximizing Th (a Np surrogate) recovery while minimizing Si release. Th solubility in glass, heat treatment conditions and leaching parameters will be discussed. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) data will be included to show phase separation after heat treatment.

  2. Neptunium(V) sorption to goethite at attomolar to micromolar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Snow, Mathew S; Zhao, Pihong; Dai, Zurong; Kersting, Annie B; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2013-01-15

    Sorption of 10(-18)-10(-5)M neptunium (Np) to goethite was examined using liquid scintillation counting and gamma spectroscopy. A combination approach using (239)Np and long lived (237)Np was employed to span this wide concentration range. (239)Np detection limits were determined to be 2×10(-18)M and 3×10(-17)M for liquid scintillation counting and gamma spectroscopy, respectively. Sorption was found to be linear below 10(-11)M, in contrast to the non-linear behavior observed at higher concentrations both here and in the literature. 2-site and 3-site Langmuir models were used to simulate sorption behavior over the entire 10(-18)-10(-5)M range. The 3-site model fit yielded Type I and II site densities of 3.56 sites/nm(2) (99.6%) and 0.014±0.007 sites/nm(2) (0.4±0.1%), consistent with typical "high affinity" and "low affinity" sites reported in the literature [21]. Modeling results for both models suggest that sorption below ~10(-11)M is controlled by a third (Type III) site with a density on the order of ~7×10(-5)sites/nm(2) (~0.002%). While the nature of this "site" cannot be determined from isotherm data alone, the sorption data at ultra-low Np concentrations indicate that Np(V) sorption to goethite at environmentally relevant concentrations will be (1) linear and (2) higher than previous (high concentration) laboratory experiments suggest. PMID:23079039

  3. Automated determination of bromide in waters by ion chromatography with an amperometric detector

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pyen, G.S.; Erdmann, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    An automated ion chromatograph, including a program controller, an automatic sampler, an integrator, and an amperometric detector, was used to develop a procedure for the determination of bromide in rain water and many ground waters. Approximately 10 min is required to obtain a chromatogram. The detection limit for bromide is 0.01 mg l-1 and the relative standard deivation is <5% for bromide concentrations between 0.05 and 0.5 mg l-1. Chloride interferes if the chloride-to-bromide ratio is greater than 1 000:1 for a range of 0.01-0.1 mg l-1 bromide; similarly, chloride interferes in the 0.1-1.0 mg l-1 range if the ratio is greater than 5 000:1. In the latter case, a maximum of 2 000 mg l-1 of chloride can be tolerated. Recoveries of known concentrations of bromide added to several samples, ranged from 97 to 110%. ?? 1983.

  4. Interaction between gaseous ozone and crystalline potassium bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanov, A. V.; Maksimov, I. B.; Isaikina, O. Ya.; Antipenko, E. E.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    The formation of nonvolatile products of the oxidation of a bromide ion during the interaction between gaseous ozone and powdered crystalline KBr is studied. It is found that potassium bromate KBrO3 is the main product of the reaction. The influence of major experimental factors (the duration of ozonation, the concentration of ozone, the humidity of the initial gas, and the temperature) on the rate of formation of bromate is studied. The effective constants of the formation of bromate during the interaction between O3 and Br- in a heterogeneous gas-solid body system and in a homogeneous aqueous solution are compared.

  5. Photodissociation of methyl chloride and methyl bromide in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Methyl chloride (CH3Cl) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) have been suggested to be significant sources of the stratospheric halogens. The breakup of these compounds in the stratosphere by photodissociation or reaction with OH releases halogen atoms which catalytically destroy ozone. Experimental results are presented for ultraviolet photoabsorption cross sections of CH3Cl and CH3Br. Calculations are presented of loss rates for the methyl halides due to photodissociation and reaction with OH and of mixing ratios of these species in the stratosphere.

  6. Effects of pinaverium bromide and verapamil on the motility of the rat isolated colon.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, A; Drack, E; Halter, F; Scheurer, U

    1985-09-01

    Pinaverium bromide was 30 times less potent than verapamil in inhibiting intraluminal pressure responses of in vitro rat colonic segments to barium chloride, acetylcholine, FK 33-824 or field stimulation. The inhibitory effects of both verapamil and pinaverium bromide on the pressure responses to field stimulation were antagonized similarly by exogenous calcium administration. These results support the concept that pinaverium bromide acts on calcium channels in the smooth muscle cell membrane. PMID:4052731

  7. Effects of pinaverium bromide and verapamil on the motility of the rat isolated colon.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, A.; Drack, E.; Halter, F.; Scheurer, U.

    1985-01-01

    Pinaverium bromide was 30 times less potent than verapamil in inhibiting intraluminal pressure responses of in vitro rat colonic segments to barium chloride, acetylcholine, FK 33-824 or field stimulation. The inhibitory effects of both verapamil and pinaverium bromide on the pressure responses to field stimulation were antagonized similarly by exogenous calcium administration. These results support the concept that pinaverium bromide acts on calcium channels in the smooth muscle cell membrane. PMID:4052731

  8. Kinetics of reduction of plutonium(VI) and neptunium(VI) by sulfide in neutral and alkaline solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nash, K.L.; Cleveland, J.M.; Sullivan, J.C.; Woods, M.

    1986-01-01

    The rate of reduction of plutonium(VI) and neptunium(VI) by bisulfide ion in neutral and mildly alkaline solutions has been investigated by the stopped-flow technique. The reduction of both of these ions to the pentavalent oxidation state appears to occur in an intramolecular reaction involving an unusual actinide(VI)-hydroxide-bisulfide complex. For plutonium the rate of reduction is 27.4 (??4.1) s-1 at 25??C with ??H* = +33.2 (??1.0) kJ/mol and ??S* = -106 (??4) J/(mol K). The apparent stability constant for the transient complex is 4.66 (??0.94) ?? 103 M-1 at 25??C with associated thermodynamic parameters of ??Hc = +27.7 (??0.4) kJ/mol and ??Sc = +163 (??2) J/(mol K). The corresponding rate and stability constants are determined for the neptunium system at 25??C (k3 = 139 (??30) s-1, Kc. = 1.31 (??0.32) ?? 103 M-1), but equivalent parameters cannot be determined at reduced temperatures. The reaction rate is decreased by bicarbonate ion. At pH > 10.5, a second reaction mechanism, also involving a sulfide complex, is indicated. ?? 1986 American Chemical Society.

  9. Transient neuromyopathy after bromide intoxication in a dog with idiopathic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A seven-year old Australian Shepherd, suffering from idiopathic epilepsy under treatment with phenobarbitone and potassium bromide, was presented with generalised lower motor neuron signs. Electrophysiology and muscle-nerve biopsies revealed a neuromyopathy. The serum bromide concentration was increased more than two-fold above the upper reference value. Clinical signs disappeared after applying diuretics and reducing the potassium bromide dose rate. This is the first case report describing electrophysiological and histopathological findings associated with bromide induced lower motor neuron dysfunction in a dog. PMID:23216950

  10. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 94. Rare Earth Metal Iodides and Bromides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 2. Bromides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioduski, Tomasz; Gumiński, Cezary; Zeng, Dewen; Voigt, Heidelore

    2013-03-01

    This work presents solubility data for rare earth metal bromides in water and in aqueous ternary systems. Compilations of all available experimental data are introduced for each rare earth metal bromide with a corresponding critical evaluation. Every such evaluation contains a collection of all solubility results in water, a selection of suggested solubility data and a brief discussion of the multicomponent systems. Because the ternary systems were almost never studied more than once, no critical evaluations of such data were possible. Only simple bromides (no complexes) are treated as the input substances in this work. The literature has been covered through the end of 2011.

  11. Bromoform formation in ozonated groundwater containing bromide and humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.J.; Amy, G.L.; Moore, C.A.; Zika, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of bromide ion, organic carbon concentration (natural aquatic humic substances), pH, and solar irradiation on the formation of bromoform in ozonated groundwater has been studied. The studies were conducted on four unique samples of groundwater taken from different regions of the Biscayne Aquifer in southern Florida. All other conditions being equal, increases in bromide ion concentrations resulted in increases in CHBr/sub 3/ formation. In three of the four samples, CHBr/sub 3/ formation decreased as the pH level increased from 5 to 9. The fourth sample exhibited an opposite trend whereby the CHBr/sub 3/ concentration increased with increasing pH. Bromoform concentration increased with increased O/sub 3/ concentration over an ozone dosage range of 3.4 to 6.7 mg/L. Ozonated samples placed in sunlight immediately after ozone addition showed a decrease in the formation of CHBr/sub 3/ presumably due to the photodecomposition of HOBr/OBr.

  12. The distribution of bromide in water in the Floridan aquifer system, Duval County, northeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    German, E.R.; Taylor, G.F.

    1995-01-01

    Although Duval County, Florida, has ample ground-water resources for public supply, the potential exists for a problem with excessive disinfectant by-products. These disinfectant by-products result from the treatment of raw water containing low concentrations of bromide and naturally occurring organic compounds. Because of this potential problem, the relation of bromide concentrations to aquifer tapped, well location and depth, and chemical characteristics of water in the Floridan aquifer system underlying Duval County were studied to determine if these relations could be applied to delineate water with low-bromide concentrations for future supplies. In 1992, water samples from 106 wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system were analyzed for bromide and major dissolved constituents. A comparison of bromide concentrations from the 1992 sampling with data from earlier studies (1979-80) indicates that higher bromide concentrations were detected during the earlier studies. The difference between the old and new data is probably because of a change in analytical methodology in the analysis of samples. Bromide concentrations exceeded the detection limit (0.10 milligrams per liter) in water from 28 of the 106 wells (26 percent) sampled in 1992. The maximum concentration was 0.56 milligrams per liter. There were no relations between bromide and major dissolved constituents, well depth, or aquifer tapped that would be useful for determining bromide concentrations. Areal patterns of bromide occurrence are not clearly defined, but areas with relatively high bromide concentrations tend to be located in a triangular area near the community of Sunbeam, Florida, and along the St. Johns River throughout Duval County.

  13. Validation of an automated fluorescein method for determining bromide in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, M. J.; Schroder, L.J.; Friedman, L.C.

    1985-01-01

    Surface, atmospheric precipitation and deionized water samples were spiked with ??g l-1 concentrations of bromide, and the solutions stored in polyethylene and polytetrafluoroethylene bottles. Bromide was determined periodically for 30 days. Automated fluorescein and ion chromatography methods were used to determine bromide in these prepared samples. Analysis of the data by the paired t-test indicates that the two methods are not significantly different at a probability of 95% for samples containing from 0.015 to 0.5 mg l-1 of bromide. The correlation coefficient for the same sets of paired data is 0.9987. Recovery data, except for the surface water samples to which 0.005 mg l-1 of bromide was added, range from 89 to 112%. There appears to be no loss of bromide from solution in either type of container.Surface, atmospheric precipitation and deionized water samples were spiked with mu g l** minus **1 concentrations of bromide, and the solutions stored in polyethylene and polytetrafluoroethylene bottles. Bromide was determined periodically for 30 days. Automated fluorescein and ion chromatography methods were used to determine bromide in these prepared samples. Analysis of the data by the paired t-test indicates that the two methods are not significantly different at a probability of 95% for samples containing from 0. 015 to 0. 5 mg l** minus **1 of bromide. The correlation coefficient for the same sets of paired data is 0. 9987. Recovery data, except for the surface water samples to which 0. 005 mg l** minus **1 of bromide was added, range from 89 to 112%. Refs.

  14. Surface complexation of neptunium (V) onto whole cells and cell componets of Shewanella alga

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Donald Timothy; Deo, Randhir P; Rittmann, Bruce E; Songkasiri, Warinthorn

    2008-01-01

    We systematically quantified surface complexation of neptunium(V) onto whole cells of Shewanella alga strain BrY and onto cell wall and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of S. alga. We first performed acid and base titrations and used the mathematical model FITEQL with constant-capacitance surface-complexation to determine the concentrations and deprotonation constants of specific surface functional groups. Deprotonation constants most likely corresponded to a carboxyl site associated with amino acids (pK{sub a} {approx} 2.4), a carboxyl group not associated with amino acids (pK{sub a} {approx} 5), a phosphoryl site (pK{sub a} {approx} 7.2), and an amine site (pK{sub a} > 10). We then carried out batch sorption experiments with Np(V) and each of the S. alga components at different pHs. Results show that solution pH influenced the speciation of Np(V) and each of the surface functional groups. We used the speciation sub-model of the biogeochemical model CCBATCH to compute the stability constants for Np(V) complexation to each surface functional group. The stability constants were similar for each functional group on S. alga bacterial whole cells, cell walls, and EPS, and they explain the complicated sorption patterns when they are combined with the aqueous-phase speciation of Np(V). For pH < 8, NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was the dominant form of Np(V), and its log K values for the low-pK{sub a} carboxyl, other carboxyl, and phosphoryl groups were 1.75, 1.75, and 2.5 to 3.1, respectively. For pH greater than 8, the key surface ligand was amine >XNH3+, which complexed with NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-}. The log K for NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-} complexed onto the amine groups was 3.1 to 3.6. All of the log K values are similar to those of Np(V) complexes with aqueous carboxyl and N-containing carboxyl ligands. These results point towards the important role of surface complexation in defining key actinide-microbiological interactions in the subsurface.

  15. Chemical speciation of neptunium(VI) under strongly alkaline conditions. Structure, composition, and oxo ligand exchange.

    PubMed

    Clark, David L; Conradson, Steven D; Donohoe, Robert J; Gordon, Pamela L; Keogh, D Webster; Palmer, Phillip D; Scott, Brian L; Tait, C Drew

    2013-04-01

    Hexavalent neptunium can be solubilized in 0.5-3.5 M aqueous MOH (M = Li(+), Na(+), NMe4(+) = TMA(+)) solutions. Single crystals were obtained from cooling of a dilute solution of Co(NH3)6Cl3 and NpO2(2+) in 3.5 M [N(Me)4]OH to 5 °C. A single-crystal X-ray diffraction study revealed the molecular formula of [Co(NH3)6]2[NpO2(OH)4]3·H2O, isostructural with the uranium analogue. The asymmetric unit contains three distinct NpO2(OH)4(2-) ions, each with pseudooctahedral coordination geometry with trans-oxo ligands. The average Np═O and Np-OH distances were determined to be 1.80(1) and 2.24(1) Å, respectively. EXAFS data and fits at the Np L(III)-edge on solid [Co(NH3)6]2[NpO2(OH)4]3·H2O and aqueous solutions of NpO2(2+) in 2.5 and 3.5 M (TMA)OH revealed bond lengths nearly identical with those determined by X-ray diffraction but with an increase in the number of equatorial ligands with increasing (TMA)OH concentration. Raman spectra of single crystals of [Co(NH3)6]2[NpO2(OH)4]3·H2O reveal a ν1(O═Np═O) symmetric stretch at 741 cm(-1). Raman spectra of NpO2(2+) recorded in a 0.6-2.2 M LiOH solution reveal a single ν1 frequency of 769 cm(-1). Facile exchange of the neptunyl oxo ligands with the water solvent was also observed with Raman spectroscopy performed with (16)O- and (18)O-enriched water solvent. The combination of EXAFS and Raman data suggests that NpO2(OH)4(2-) is the dominant solution species under the conditions of study and that a small amount of a second species, NpO2(OH)5(3-), may also be present at higher alkalinity. Crystal data for [Co(NH3)6]2[NpO2(OH)4]3·H2O: monoclinic, space group C2/c, a = 17.344(4) Å, b = 12.177(3) Å, c = 15.273 Å, β = 120.17(2)°, Z = 4, R1 = 0.0359, wR2 = 0.0729. PMID:23485079

  16. Effect of Oxalate on the Recycle of Neptunium Filtrate Solution by Anion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2004-11-18

    A series of laboratory column runs has been performed that demonstrates the recovery of neptunium (Np) containing up to 0.05 M oxalate. Np losses were generally less than one percent to the raffinate for feed solutions that contained 2 to 10 g Np/L. Up to 16 percent Np losses were observed with lower Np feed concentrations, but those losses were attributed to the shortened residence times rather than the higher oxalate to Np ratios. Losses in the plant are expected to be significantly less due to the lower cross-section flowrate possible with existing plant pumps. Elimination of the permanganate treatment of filtrates appears to be reasonable since the amount of Np in those filtrates does not appear to be practical to recover. Combination of untreated filtrates with other actinide rich solutions is not advisable as precipitation problems are likely. If untreated filtrates are kept segregated from other actinide rich streams, the recovery of the remaining Np is probably still possible, but could be limited due to the excessively high oxalate to Np ratio. The persistence of hydrazine/hydrazoic acid in filtrate solutions dictates that the nitrite treatment be retained to eliminate those species from the filtrates prior to transfer to the canyon. Elimination of the permanganate treatment of precipitator flushes and recovery by anion exchange does not appear to be limited by the oxalate effect on anion exchange. Np from solutions with higher oxalate to Np molar ratios than expected in precipitator flushes was recovered with low to modest losses. Solubility problems appear to be unlikely when the moles of oxalate involved are less than the total number of moles of Np due to complexation effects. The presence of significant concentrations of iron (Fe) in the solutions will further decrease the probability of Np oxalate precipitation due the formation of Fe oxalate complexes. Np oxalate solubility data in 8 M HNO{sub 3} with from one to six times as much oxalate as Np have

  17. New Synthetic Methods and Structure-Property Relationships in Neptunium, Plutonium, and Americium Borates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas Edward

    2013-09-14

    The past three years of support by the Heavy Elements Chemistry Program have been highly productive in terms of advanced degrees awarded, currently supported graduate students, peer-reviewed publications, and presentations made at universities, national laboratories, and at international conferences. Ph.D. degrees were granted to Shuao Wang and Juan Diwu, who both went on to post-doctoral appointments at the Glenn T. Seaborg Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with Jeff Long and Ken Raymond, respectively. Pius Adelani completed his Ph.D. with me and is now a post-doc with Peter C. Burns. Andrea Alsobrook finished her Ph.D. and is now a post-doc at Savannah River with Dave Hobbs. Anna Nelson completed her Ph.D. and is now a post-doc with Rod Ewing at the University of Michigan. As can be gleaned from this list, students supported by the Heavy Elements Chemistry grant have remained interested in actinide science after leaving my program. This follows in line with previous graduates in this program such as Richard E. Sykora, who did his post-doctoral work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with R. G. Haire, and Amanda C. Bean, who is a staff scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Philip M. Almond and Thomas C. Shehee, who are both staff scientists at Savannah River National Laboratory, Gengbang Jin who is a staff scientist at Argonne National Lab, and Travis Bray who has been a post-doc at both LBNL and ANL. Clearly this program is serving as a pipe-line for students to enter into careers in the national laboratories. About half of my students depart the DOE complex for academia or industry. My undergraduate researchers also remain active in actinide chemistry after leaving my group. Dan Wells was a productive undergraduate of mine, and went on to pursue a Ph.D. on uranium and neptunium chalcogenides with Jim Ibers at Northwestern. After earning his Ph.D., he went directly into the nuclear industry.

  18. Removal of bromide by aluminium chloride coagulant in the presence of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Ge, Fei; Shu, Haimin; Dai, Youzhi

    2007-08-17

    Bromide can form disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water disinfection process, which have adverse effects on human health. Using aluminium chloride as a model coagulant, removal of bromide by coagulation was investigated in the absence or presence of humic acid (HA) in synthetic water and then was conducted in raw water. Results demonstrated that in synthetic water, 93.3-99.2% removal efficiency of bromide was achieved in the absence of HA with 3-15 mg/L coagulant, while 78.4-98.4% removal efficiency of bromide was obtained in the presence of HA with the same coagulant dosage and 86.8-98.8% HA was removed simultaneously. Bromide in raw water was removed 87.0% with 15 mg/L coagulant. HA apparently reduced the removal of bromide with low coagulant dosage or at high pH, while minor influence on removal of bromide was observed with high coagulant dosage or at low pH. Thus, bromide could be reduced effectively by enhanced coagulation in drinking water treatment. PMID:17289257

  19. Solid phase microextraction for active or passive sampling of methyl bromide during fumigations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The high diffusivity and volatility of methyl bromide make it an ideal compound for Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME)-based sampling of air prior to gas-chromatographic quantifications. SPME fibers can be used as active methyl bromide samplers, with high capacities and an equilibrium time of 1-2 m...

  20. Enthalpies of complex formation of boron and aluminum bromides with organic bases of high donor power

    SciTech Connect

    Grigor-ev, A.A.; Kondrat'ev, Y.V.; Suvorov, A.V.

    1986-11-20

    By the calorimetric method enthalpies of complex formation were determined for boron and aluminum bromides with piperidine and hexamethylphosphoric triamide in benzene solutions and for boron bromide with pyridine in dichloroethane, and also enthalpies of solution were determined for BBr/sub 3/ and the adducts AlBr/sub 3/ x PPy and BBr/sub 2/ x Py in benzene and pyridine.

  1. Destruction of methyl bromide sorbed to activated carbon by thiosulfate and electrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide is widely used as a fumigant for post-harvest and quarantine uses at port facilities due to the low treatment times required, but it is vented to the atmosphere after its use. Due to the potential contributions of methyl bromide to stratospheric ozone depletion, technologies for the c...

  2. Palladium-Catalyzed Selective α-Alkenylation of Pyridylmethyl Ethers with Vinyl Bromides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodong; Kim, Byeong-Seon; Li, Minyan; Walsh, Patrick J

    2016-05-20

    An efficient palladium-catalyzed α-alkenylation of pyridylmethyl ethers with vinyl bromides is presented. A Pd/NIXANTPHOS-based catalyst system enables a mild and chemoselective coupling between a variety of pyridylmethyl ethers and vinyl bromides in good to excellent yields. Under the mild conditions, β,γ-unsaturated products are obtained without isomerization or Heck byproducts observed. PMID:27160421

  3. 77 FR 48153 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ...On May 17, 2012, the EPA published a notice in the Federal Register requesting applications for the Critical Use Exemption from the phaseout of methyl bromide for 2015. On August 3, 2012, EPA received a letter from methyl bromide stakeholders requesting an extension to the August 15, 2012 deadline for submitting Critical Use Exemption applications. The letter requested a deadline of August 29,......

  4. 76 FR 34700 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... AGENCY Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption Applications... exemption from the phaseout of methyl bromide for 2014. Critical use exemptions last only one year. All... interested parties to provide EPA with new data on the technical and economic feasibility of methyl...

  5. 75 FR 41177 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... AGENCY Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption Applications... exemption from the phaseout of methyl bromide for 2013. Critical use exemptions last only one year. All... interested parties to provide EPA with new data on the technical and economic feasibility of methyl...

  6. In vivo and in vitro bromide equilibration time course in adults and sample handling effect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extracellular water is a major component of body weight and an indicator of nutritional status. Bromide dilution has been used to estimate this compartment. Recent evidence, however, indicates that the bromide equilibration time is longer than the 4 hr assumed in many studies. The aim of this stud...

  7. Methyl bromide fumigation of packed table grapes: Effect of shipping box on gas concentrations and phytotoxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current methyl bromide schedules for table grapes to control mealybugs are approved for fruit packed in Toyon Kraft Veneer (TKV) boxes. The question arose concerning equivalence of exposure to methyl bromide if an Extruded Polystyrene (EPS) box was used in lieu of the TKV box for table grapes being ...

  8. Performance of soil solarization and methyl bromide in sites infested with root-knot nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fumigation with methyl bromide has been the principal means of managing soil-borne pest problems on ornamental crops in the United States for many years. Interest in effective alternatives increased during the phase-out of methyl bromide, and will become more acute as existing stocks are deple...

  9. Classifying the Basic Parameters of Ultraviolet Copper Bromide Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gocheva-Ilieva, S. G.; Iliev, I. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Vuchkov, N. K.; Sabotinov, N. V.

    2009-10-01

    The performance of deep ultraviolet copper bromide lasers is of great importance because of their applications in medicine, microbiology, high-precision processing of new materials, high-resolution laser lithography in microelectronics, high-density optical recording of information, laser-induced fluorescence in plasma and wide-gap semiconductors and more. In this paper we present a statistical study on the classification of 12 basic lasing parameters, by using different agglomerative methods of cluster analysis. The results are based on a big amount of experimental data for UV Cu+ Ne-CuBr laser with wavelengths 248.6 nm, 252.9 nm, 260.0 nm and 270.3 nm, obtained in Georgi Nadjakov Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The relevant influence of parameters on laser generation is also evaluated. The results are applicable in computer modeling and planning the experiments and further laser development with improved output characteristics.

  10. Unveiling Residual Molecular Binding in Triply Charged Hydrogen Bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Penent, F.; Lablanquie, P.; Palaudoux, J.; Gamblin, G.; Carniato, S.; Andric, L.; Hikosaka, Y.; Ito, K.

    2011-03-11

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of triply charged hydrogen bromide ions formed by photoionization of the inner 3d shell of Br. The experimental results, obtained by detecting the 3d photoelectron in coincidence with the two subsequent Auger electrons, are analyzed using calculated potential energy curves of HBr{sup 3+}. The competition between the short-range chemical binding potential and the Coulomb repulsion in the dissociative process is shown. Two different mechanisms are observed for double Auger decay: one, a direct process with simultaneous ejection of two Auger electrons to final HBr{sup 3+} ionic states and the other, a cascade process involving double Auger decay characterized by the autoionization of Br*{sup +} ion subsequent to the HBr{sup 2+} fragmentation.

  11. Thermal parameters of carbon nanotubes and potassium bromide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depriester, Michael; Hus, Philippe; Sahraoui, Abdelhak Hadj; Roussel, Frédérick

    2011-04-01

    Photothermal radiometry is employed to investigate the thermal parameters (diffusivity, effusivity, conductivity, and heat capacity) of carbon nanotubes [single-walled (SWNT) or multiple-walled (MWNT)] and potassium bromide (KBr) pressed pellets as a function of SWNT or MWNT mass fraction. A significant enhancement of the thermal conductivity for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) contents up to 2 wt. % was observed. Above 3 wt. % CNT, a morphological transition from a compacted to an unconsolidated granular media occurs leading to a sharp decrease of the thermal conductivity (k) caused by the presence of air interfaces. A geometrical model based on interpenetrating continua is applied to describe the unusual evolution of the thermal conductivity. The behavior of k is also discussed in regard to the latest theoretical reports.

  12. Timing resolution measurements of a 3 in. lanthanum bromide detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, L.; De Gerone, M.; Dussoni, S.; Nicolò, D.; Papa, A.; Tenchini, F.; Signorelli, G.

    2013-08-01

    Cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) is a scintillator that presents very good energy and timing resolutions and it is a perfect candidate for photon detector in future experiments to search for lepton flavor violation as in μ → eγ or μ → e conversion. While energy resolution was thoroughly investigated, timing resolution at several MeV presents some experimental challenge. We measured the timing resolution of a 3 in.×3 in. cylindrical LaBr3(Ce) crystal versus few reference detectors by means of a nuclear reaction from a Cockcroft-Walton accelerator that produces coincident γ-rays in the 4.4-11.6 MeV range. Preliminary results allow us to extrapolate the properties of a segmented γ-ray detector in the 50-100 MeV range.

  13. Tiotropium Bromide in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Bronchial Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Gonzalez, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacological treatment for stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including β2-agonists and muscarinic antagonists. Tiotropium bromide, a long-acting antimuscarinic bronchodilator (LAMA), is a treatment choice for moderate-to-severe COPD; its efficacy and safety have been demonstrated in recent trials. Studies also point to a beneficial role of tiotropium in the treatment of difficult-to-control asthma and a potential function in the asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Combination of different bronchodilator molecules and addition of inhaled corticosteroids are viable therapeutic alternatives. A condensation of the latest trials and the rationale behind these therapies will be presented in this article. PMID:26491494

  14. Simultaneous electrochemical determination of three sunscreens using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Juliano Carvalho; Armondes, Bruna Milca Lenzi; Ferreira, João Bosco Galindo Júnior e Valdir Souza

    2008-05-01

    This paper proposes a methodology based on electrochemical reduction for the simultaneous determination of three sunscreen agents, namely 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (MBC), benzophenone-3 (BENZO) and 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC) by differential-pulse polarography (DPP). The highest peak currents and optimal separation of reduction peaks were obtained by using a supporting electrolyte consisted of Britton-Robinson buffer-methanol (8:2) solution at pH 4.0 and cationic surfactant 3.0 x 10(-4)mol L(-1) cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The methodology was validated using four commercial sunscreen preparation as a sample and the results showed high recovery rates. The efficiency of the proposed methodology was demonstrated by comparing the results obtained by DPP with those obtained by the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. PMID:18093812

  15. Absorption of Water Vapor into Aqueous Solutions of Lithium Bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahara, Tsutomu; Hayashida, Atsushi; Yabase, Hajime; Hihara, Eiji; Saito, Takamoto

    Heat and mass transfer processes are experimentally investigated for the case of water absorption into aqueous solutions of lithium bromide flowing over a flat plate. Variables considered are inlet solution flow rate,concentration of an additive,and inclination angle of the plate. The use of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol as an additive results in about a four to five fold improvement in absorption rate. The occurrence of surface distrbances dose not has a direct connection with the solubility limit of the additive. The cause of the surface disturbances in the presence of additives is investigated through experiments for pool absorption By regulating the flow of water vapor,the form of the Marangoni convection can be controlled. A qualitative discussion of addictives in the role of inducing surface disturbances is presented.

  16. Location of Bromide Ions in Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Nadarajah, Arunan; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Anions have been shown to play a dominant role in the crystallization of chicken egg white lysozyme from salt solutions. Previous studies employing X-ray crystallography had found one chloride ion binding site in the tetragonal crystal form of the protein and four nitrate ion binding sites in the monoclinic form. In this study the anion positions in the tetragonal form were determined from the difference Fourier map obtained from lysozyme crystal grown in bromide and chloride solutions. Five possible anion binding sites were found in this manner. Some of these sites were in pockets containing basic residues while others were near neutral, but polar, residues. The sole chloride ion binding site found in previous studies was confirmed, while four of these sites corresponded to four binding sites found for nitrate ions in monoclinic crystals. The study suggests that most of the anion binding sites in lysozyme remain unchanged, even when different anions and different crystal forms of lysozyme are employed.

  17. Detecting Arbitrary DNA Mutations Using Graphene Oxide and Ethidium Bromide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiahao; Wang, Zhenyu; Kim, Jang-Kyo; Su, Xuefen; Li, Zhigang

    2015-12-15

    We propose a simple and fast method for detecting arbitrary DNA mutations. Single-stranded DNA probes labeled with fluorescein amidite (FAM-ssDNA), ethidium bromide (EB), and graphene oxide (GO) are employed in the sensing system. The detection is achieved in two steps. In the first step, the sensing system contains FAM-ssDNA probes and EB molecules. It exhibits different fluorescence emissions in the presence of perfectly matched, mismatched, and random DNA sequences. With the addition of GO in the second step, the fluorescence signal for perfectly matched and random DNA does not vary greatly, which, however, experiences a significant change for mismatched DNA targets. The signal ratio before and after the addition of GO can clearly distinguish mutations from normal and random DNA sequences. The detection method works well regardless of the mutation positions and only requires "mix-and-detect" steps, which are completed within 15 min. PMID:26559174

  18. N-(2-Bromo­benz­yl)cinchoninium bromide

    PubMed Central

    Skórska-Stania, Agnieszka; Jezierska-Zięba, Magdalena; Kąkol, Barbara; Fedoryński, Michał; Oleksyn, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    The title compound {systematic name: 1-(2-bromo­benz­yl)-5-ethenyl-2-[hy­droxy(quinolin-4-yl)meth­yl]-1-aza­bicyclo­[2.2.2]octan-1-ium bromide}, C26H28BrN2O+·Br−, is a chiral quater­nary ammonium salt of one of the Cinchona alkaloids. The planes of the quinoline and of the bromo­benzyl substituent are inclined to one another by 9.11 (9)°. A weak intra­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bond occurs. The crystal structure features strong O—H⋯Br hydrogen bonds and weak C—H⋯Br inter­actions. PMID:22969676

  19. Error Evaluation of Methyl Bromide Aerodynamic Flux Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Methyl bromide volatilization fluxes were calculated for a tarped and a nontarped field using 2 and 4 hour sampling periods. These field measurements were averaged in 8, 12, and 24 hour increments to simulate longer sampling periods. The daily flux profiles were progressively smoothed and the cumulative volatility losses increased by 20 to 30% with each longer sampling period. Error associated with the original flux measurements was determined from linear regressions of measured wind speed and air concentration as a function of height, and averaged approximately 50%. The high errors resulted from long application times, which resulted in a nonuniform source strength; and variable tarp permeability, which is influenced by temperature, moisture, and thickness. The increase in cumulative volatilization losses that resulted from longer sampling periods were within the experimental error of the flux determination method.

  20. Rejection of Bromide and Bromate Ions by a Ceramic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Mohammadreza; Davies, Simon H.; Masten, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Effects of pH and the addition of calcium chloride (CaCl2) on bromate (BrO3−) and bromide (Br−) rejection by a ceramic membrane were investigated. Rejection of both ions increased with pH. At pH 8, the rejection of BrO3− and Br− was 68% and 63%, respectively. Donnan exclusion appears to play an important role in determining rejection of BrO3− and Br−. In the presence of CaCl2, rejection of BrO3− and Br− ions was greatly reduced, confirming the importance of electrostatic interactions in determining rejection of BrO3− and Br−. The effect of Ca2+ is so pronounced that in most natural waters, rejection of both BrO3− and Br− by the membrane would be extremely small. PMID:23236251

  1. Action of pinaverium bromide, a calcium-antagonist, on gastrointestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Christen, M O

    1990-01-01

    1. The evidence reviewed here indicates that pinaverium bromide (Dicetel) relaxes gastrointestinal (GI) structures primarily by inhibiting Ca2+ influx through potential-dependent channels of surface membranes of smooth muscle cells. 2. The in vivo selectivity of pinaverium bromide for the GI tract appears to be due mainly to its pharmacokinetic properties. Because of its low absorption (typical for quaternary ammonium compounds) and marked hepatobiliary excretion, most of the orally-administered dose of pinaverium bromide remains in the GI tract. 3. Orally-administered pinaverium bromide does not elicit adverse cardiovascular side-effects at doses that effectively relieve GI spasm, pain, transit disturbances and other symptoms related to motility disorders. 4. Pinaverium bromide is the only Ca2(+)-antagonist with known therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and certain other functional intestinal disorders. PMID:2177709

  2. Comparative mobility of sulfonamides and bromide tracer in three soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurwadkar, S.T.; Adams, C.D.; Meyer, M.T.; Kolpin, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    In animal agriculture, sulfonamides are one of the routinely used groups of antimicrobials for therapeutic and sub-therapeutic purposes. It is observed that, the animals when administered the antimicrobials, often do not completely metabolize them; and excrete the partially metabolized forms into the environment. Due to the continued use of antimicrobials and disposal of untreated waste, widespread occurrence of partially metabolized antimicrobials in aquatic and terrestrial environments has been reported in various scientific journals. In this research, the mobility of two sulfonamides - sulfamethazine (SMN), sulfathiazole (STZ) and a conservative bromide tracer was investigated in three soils collected from regions in the United States with large number of concentrated animal-feed operations. Results of a series of column studies indicate that the mobility of these two sulfonamides was dependent on pH, soil charge density, and contact time. At low pH and high charge density, substantial retention of sulfonamides was observed in all three soils investigated, due to the increased fraction of cationic and neutral forms of the sulfonamides. Conversely, enhanced mobility was observed at high pH, where the sulfonamides are predominantly in the anionic form. The results indicate that when both SMN and STZ are predominantly in anionic forms, their mobility approximates the mobility of a conservative bromide tracer. This observation is consistent for the mobility of both SMN and STZ individually, and also in the presence of several other antimicrobials in all three soils investigated. Higher contact time indicates lower mobility due to increased interaction with soil material. ?? 2011.

  3. ELECTRONIC SOLUTION SPECTRA FOR URANIUM AND NEPTUNIUM IN OXIDATION STATES (III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Baluka, M.; Edelstein, N.; O'Donnell, T. A.

    1980-10-01

    Spectra have been recorded for solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium and neptunium in oxidation states (III) to (VI). The spectra for U(III), Np(III) and Np(IV) in AHF are very similar to those in acidified aqueous solution, but that for U(IV) suggests that the cationic species is UF{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The AHF spectra for the elements in oxidation states (V) and (VI) are not comparable with those of the formally analogous aqueous solutions, where the elements exist as well-defined dioxo-cations. However, the AHF spectra can be related to spectra in the gas phase, in the solid state or in non-aqueous solvents for each element in its appropriate oxidation state.

  4. A theoretical study of the structures and chemical bonds of neptunium (III) molecules by a density functional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yao-Peng; Dong, Chen-Zhong; Du, Lei-Qiang; Wu, Fang-Xian; Ding, Xiao-Bin

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, equilibrium structures and chemical bond characteristics of neptunium trihalide molecules NpX3 (X = F, Cl, Br and I) have been investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). The influences of the size of the relativistic effective core potential (RECP) have been examined on the molecular structures. The chemical bond characteristics have also been systematically studied by calculating the density of states (DOS), bond length differences and electronic charge distributions. We have determined that the chemical bonds are mainly ionic in those molecules, and the covalency is enhancing while ionicity decreases from NpF3 to NpI3. The calculated bond energies show that the interaction strength in NpX3 molecules becomes weaker as the halogen atoms becoming heavier.

  5. ESTIMATED NEPTUNIUM SEDIMENT SORPTION VALUES AS A FUNCTION OF PH AND MEASURED BARIUM AND RADIUM KD VALUES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.

    2011-01-13

    The objective of this document is to provide traceability and justification for a select few new geochemical data used in the Special Analysis entitled 'Special Analysis for the Dose Assessment of the Final Inventories in Center Slit Trenches One through Five'. Most values used in the Special Analysis came from the traditional geochemical data package, however, some recent laboratory measurements have made it possible to estimate barium K{sub d} values. Additionally, some recent calculations were made to estimate neptunium K{sub d} values as a function of pH. The assumptions, justifications, and calculations needed to generate these new values are presented in this document, and the values are summarized.

  6. Sorption of uranium(6+) and neptunium(5+) by surfactant-modified natural zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Prikryl, J.D.; Pabalan, R.T.

    1999-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the ability of surfactant-modification to enhance the ability of natural zeolites to sorb U(6+) and Np(5+). Natural zeolite material, comprised mainly of clinoptilolite and treated with the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium-bromide (HDTMA), was reacted with U(6+) and Np(5+) solutions open to the atmosphere and having a range of radionuclide concentration, pH, and NaCl concentration. The results indicate surfactant-modification of the zeolite enhances its ability to sorb U(6+), particularly at pHs greater than six where U(6+) sorption on unmodified zeolite is typically low due to formation of anionic U(6+) aqueous carbonate complexes. In contrast, there is little enhancement of Np(5+) sorption onto surfactant-modified zeolite. The presence of chloride anions in solution makes surfactant-modification less effective. The enhanced sorption of U(6+) is interpreted to be due to anion exchange with counterions on the external portion of a surfactant bilayer or admicelles.

  7. The reactivity of phenancyl bromide under β-cyclodextrin as supramolecular catalyst: a computational survey.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yali; Wang, Xueye; Liu, Na

    2015-05-01

    Phenacyl bromide as one starting material in multicomponent reactions (MCRs) with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) as catalyst can get an excellent yield in short reaction times. The interaction of β-CD with phenacyl bromide plays an important role in this process. This paper studies the complex of β-CD with phenacyl bromide using density functional theory (DFT) method. Energy is investigated to find out the lowest energy of two possible complexation models. Hydrogen bonds are researched on the basis of natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis. The relative position between phenacyl bromide and β-CD is confirmed by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)HNMR). The results of frontier molecular orbitals and charge distribution reveal that β-CD catalyst improves the reactivity and electrophilicity of phenacyl bromide, meanwhile, the carbonyl group of phenacyl bromide more easily gives a carbocationic intermediate in the presence of β-CD as catalyst. The reactivity of phenancyl bromide under β-CD as supramolecular catalysis is improved. PMID:25929992

  8. Methyl bromide emissions from a covered field: I. Experimental conditions and degradation in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.R.; Gan, J.; Ernst, F.F.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment is described to investigate the environmental fate and transport of methyl bromide in agricultural systems. The experiment was designed to determine the dynamics of methyl bromide movement through soil, degradation, and total emissions to the atmosphere. This is of particular interest because it will allow an assessment of the environmental impacts (i.e., stratospheric ozone depletion) resulting from the agricultural use of methyl bromide. Methyl bromide was applied at a rate of 843 kg in a 3.5-ha (i.e., 240 kg/ha) field at a depth of 0.25 m and covered with a sheet of 1-mil polyethylene plastic. The maximum methyl bromide concentration in the atmosphere occurred at night between 0200 and 0600 h. During the first 3 d of the experiment, the maximum daily concentrations at 0.2 m above the soil surface were 30, 5, and 1 mg/(m{sup 3} of air), respectively. The trend of reduced emissions with time continued until the plastic was removed, when a momentary increase in the methyl bromide emissions occurred. The maximum soil gas concentration 24 h after injection was 30 g/m{sup 3} located at a 0.25-m depth. When the plastic was removed from the field (at 5.6 d), the maximum soil gas concentration was approximately 2 g/m{sup 3} at a 0.5-m depth. A mass-difference method for estimating the total methyl bromide emissions from the soil, based on degradation of methyl bromide to Br{sup -}, indicates that approximately 39% or 325 kg ({+-} 164 kg) of the applied methyl bromide was converted to Br{sup -} and, therefore, 61% or 518 kg ({+-} 164 kg) was lost via volatilization. 16 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Palladium-Catalyzed Alkoxycarbonylation of Unactivated Secondary Alkyl Bromides at Low Pressure.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Brendon T; Alexanian, Erik J

    2016-06-22

    Catalytic carbonylations of organohalides are important C-C bond formations in chemical synthesis. Carbonylations of unactivated alkyl halides remain a challenge and currently require the use of alkyl iodides under harsh conditions and high pressures of CO. Herein we report a palladium-catalyzed alkoxycarbonylation of secondary alkyl bromides that proceeds at low pressure (2 atm CO) under mild conditions. Preliminary mechanistic studies are consistent with a hybrid organometallic-radical process. These reactions efficiently deliver esters from unactivated alkyl bromides across a diverse range of substrates and represent the first catalytic carbonylations of alkyl bromides with carbon monoxide. PMID:27267421

  10. The action of structural analogues of ethidium bromide on the mitochondrial genome of yeast.

    PubMed

    Hall, R M; Mattick, J S; Nagley, P; Cobon, G S; Eastwood, F W; Linnane, A W

    1977-12-01

    We have studied the effects on the yeast mitochondrial genome of four analogues of ethidium bromide, in which the phenyl moieyt has been replaced by linear alkyl chains of lengths varying from seven to fifteen carbon atoms. These analogues are more efficient than ethidium bromide in inducing petite mutants in Saccharomyces cervisiae. The drugs also cause a loss of mtDNA from the cells in vivo; however these analogues are in fact less effective inhibitors of mitochondrial DNA replication per se, as shown by direct in vitro studies. It is concluded that these analogues are more efficient than ethidium bromide in causing the fragmentation of mitochondrial DNA in S. cervisiae. PMID:339057

  11. Determination of technetium-99, neptunium-237 and isotopes of thorium in uranyl nitrate solutions from a reprocessing plant, using double-focusing ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Mitterrand, B.; Leprovost, P.; Delaunay, J.; Vian, A.M.

    1998-12-31

    The determination of some radionuclides in uranyl nitrate solutions from a reprocessing plant through chemical or radiochemical methods may be tedious, with poor precision. Quadrupole ICP-MS and, more recently, double-focusing ICP-MS, with high resolution capabilities, have proved to be very efficient tools for such determinations. These improvements will be illustrated by the examples of Technetium-99, Neptunium-237 and Thorium.

  12. Evaluation of alkali bromide salts for potential pyrochemical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathy, P.K.; Gutknecht, T.Y.; Herrmann, S.D.; Fredrickson, G.L.; Lister, T.E.

    2013-07-01

    Transient techniques were employed to study the electrochemical behavior, reduction mechanism and transport properties of REBr{sub 3} (RE - La, Nd and Gd) in pure LiBr, LiBr-KBr (eutectic) and LiBr-KBr-CsBr (eutectic) melts. Gd(III) showed a reversible single step soluble-insoluble exchange phenomenon in LiBr melt at 973 K. Although La (III), Nd(III) and Gd(III) ions showed reversible behavior in eutectic LiBr-KBr melts, these ions showed a combination of temperature dependent reversible and pseudo-reversible behavior. While both La(III) and Gd(III) showed one step reduction, the reduction of Nd(III) was observed to be a two step process. La metal could be electrodeposited from the ternary electrolyte at a temperature of 673 K. Various electrochemical measurements suggest that both binary and ternary bromide melts can potentially be used to electro-deposit high purity RE metals at comparatively lower operating temperatures. (authors)

  13. Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vliet, G. C.; Lawson, M. B.; Lithgow, R. A.

    1980-12-01

    A numerical model was developed for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine and was used to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The variables considered include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicates that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy.

  14. [Treatment of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide wastewater by potassium ferrate].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-hua; Wang, Hong-hui; Zeng, Xiao-xu; Huang, Ting-ting

    2009-08-15

    A novel oxidant potassium ferrate (K2FeO4) was used to remove cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) at room temperature. The effects of various conditions on the removal ratio, such as reaction time, dosing quantity of K2FeO4 and initial pH, were investigated. The experiments results show that the removal ratio reaches 79.4% when the reaction time is 30 min, the dosing quantity of K2FeO4 to CTAB is 1:1, the initial pH of the solution is 7. In the reaction progress, the oxidation of K2FeO4 and the flocculation of the reduction product have synergistic effect on the removal of CTAB. In addition, infrared spectra of CTAB before and after being treated with K2FeO4 were further studied. The results indicate that the degradation process involves the interruption of chain and the subsequent mineralization to inorganic molecules. Furthermore, the reaction of K2FeO4 and CTAB follows second order kinetics law. PMID:19799287

  15. Structural and electronic properties of Diisopropylammonium bromide molecular ferroelectric crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaad, A.; Qattan, I. A.; Ahmad, A. A.; Al-Aqtash, N.; Sabirianov, R. F.

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of ab-initio calculations based on Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA) and hybrid functional (HSE06) of electronic band structure, density of states and partial density of states to get a deep insight into structural and electronic properties of P21 ferroelectric phase of Diisopropylammonium Bromide molecular crystal (DIPAB). We found that the optical band gap of the polar phase of DIPAB is ∼ 5 eV confirming it as a good dielectric. Examination of the density of states and partial density of states reveal that the valence band maximum is mainly composed of bromine 4p orbitals and the conduction band minimum is dominated by carbon 2p, carbon 2s, and nitrogen 2s orbitals. A unique aspect of P21 ferroelectric phase is the permanent dipole within the material. We found that P21 DIPAB has a spontaneous polarization of 22.64 consistent with recent findings which make it good candidate for the creation of ferroelectric tunneling junctions (FTJs) which have the potential to be used as memory devices.

  16. 4-Bromophenacyl Bromide Specifically Inhibits Rhoptry Secretion during Toxoplasma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sandeep; Lodoen, Melissa B.; Verhelst, Steven H. L.; Bogyo, Matthew; Boothroyd, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a eukaryotic parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa that is able to infect a wide variety of host cells. During its active invasion process it secretes proteins from discrete secretory organelles: the micronemes, rhoptries and dense granules. Although a number of rhoptry proteins have been shown to be involved in important interactions with the host cell, very little is known about the mechanism of secretion of any Toxoplasma protein into the host cell. We used a chemical inhibitor of phospholipase A2s, 4-bromophenacyl bromide (4-BPB), to look at the role of such lipases in the secretion of Toxoplasma proteins. We found that 4-BPB was a potent inhibitor of rhoptry secretion in Toxoplasma invasion. This drug specifically blocked rhoptry secretion but not microneme secretion, thus effectively showing that the two processes can be de-coupled. It affected parasite motility and invasion, but not attachment or egress. Using propargyl- or azido-derivatives of the drug (so-called click chemistry derivatives) and a series of 4-BPB-resistant mutants, we found that the drug has a very large number of target proteins in the parasite that are involved in at least two key steps: invasion and intracellular growth. This potent compound, the modified “click-chemistry” forms of it, and the resistant mutants should serve as useful tools to further study the processes of Toxoplasma early invasion, in general, and rhoptry secretion, in particular. PMID:19956582

  17. 4-Bromophenacyl bromide specifically inhibits rhoptry secretion during Toxoplasma invasion.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Sandeep; Lodoen, Melissa B; Verhelst, Steven H L; Bogyo, Matthew; Boothroyd, John C

    2009-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a eukaryotic parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa that is able to infect a wide variety of host cells. During its active invasion process it secretes proteins from discrete secretory organelles: the micronemes, rhoptries and dense granules. Although a number of rhoptry proteins have been shown to be involved in important interactions with the host cell, very little is known about the mechanism of secretion of any Toxoplasma protein into the host cell. We used a chemical inhibitor of phospholipase A2s, 4-bromophenacyl bromide (4-BPB), to look at the role of such lipases in the secretion of Toxoplasma proteins. We found that 4-BPB was a potent inhibitor of rhoptry secretion in Toxoplasma invasion. This drug specifically blocked rhoptry secretion but not microneme secretion, thus effectively showing that the two processes can be de-coupled. It affected parasite motility and invasion, but not attachment or egress. Using propargyl- or azido-derivatives of the drug (so-called click chemistry derivatives) and a series of 4-BPB-resistant mutants, we found that the drug has a very large number of target proteins in the parasite that are involved in at least two key steps: invasion and intracellular growth. This potent compound, the modified "click-chemistry" forms of it, and the resistant mutants should serve as useful tools to further study the processes of Toxoplasma early invasion, in general, and rhoptry secretion, in particular. PMID:19956582

  18. Associated anisotropy decays of ethidium bromide interacting with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Sabnis, Sarika; Singhal, Preeti; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2014-03-01

    Ethidium Bromide (EB) is a commonly used dye in a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) study. Upon an intercalation, this dye significantly increases its brightness and fluorescence lifetime. In this report we have studied the time resolved fluorescence properties of EB existing simultaneously in free and DNA-bound forms in the solution. Fluorescence intensity decays were fitted globally to a double exponential model with lifetimes corresponding to free (1.6 ns) and bound (22 ns) forms, and molar fractions were determined for all used solutions. Anisotropy decays displayed characteristic time dependence with an initial rapid decline followed by recovery and slow decay. The short-lived fraction associated with free EB molecules decreases faster than long-lived fraction associated with EB bound to DNA. Consequently, contribution from fast rotation leads to initial rapid decay in anisotropy. On the other hand bound fraction, due to slow rotation helps recover anisotropy in time. This effect of associated anisotropy decays in systems such as EB free/EB-DNA is clearly visible in a wide range of concentrations, and should be taken into account in polarization assays and biomolecule dynamics studies.

  19. Fabrication of double-sided thallium bromide strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, Keitaro; Nagano, Nobumichi; Onodera, Toshiyuki; Kim, Seong-Yun; Ito, Tatsuya; Ishii, Keizo

    2016-07-01

    Double-sided strip detectors were fabricated from thallium bromide (TlBr) crystals grown by the traveling-molten zone method using zone-purified materials. The detectors had three 3.4-mm-long strips with 1-mm widths and a surrounding electrode placed orthogonally on opposite surfaces of the crystals at approximately 6.5×6.5 mm2 in area and 5 mm in thickness. Excellent charge transport properties for both electrons and holes were observed from the TlBr crystals. The mobility-lifetime products for electrons and holes in the detector were measured to be ~3×10-3 cm2/V and ~1×10-3 cm2/V, respectively. The 137Cs spectra corresponding to the gamma-ray interaction position were obtained from the detector. An energy resolution of 3.4% of full width at half maximum for 662-keV gamma rays was obtained from one "pixel" (an intersection of the strips) of the detector at room temperature.

  20. Locations of Bromide Ions in Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Nadarajah, Arunan; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Anions have been shown to play a dominant role in the crystallization of chicken egg-white lysozyme from salt solutions. Previous studies employing X-ray crystallography have found one chloride ion binding site in the tetragonal crystal form of the protein and four nitrate ion binding sites in the monoclinic form. In this study the anion positions in the tetragonal form were determined from the difference Fourier map obtained from lysozyme crystals grown in bromide and chloride solutions. Five possible anion-binding sites were found in this manner. Some of these sites were in pockets containing basic residues while others were near neutral, but polar, residues. The sole chloride ion binding site found in previous studies was confirmed, while four further sites were found which corresponded to the four binding sites found for nitrate ions in monoclinic crystals. The study suggests that most of the anion-binding sites in lysozyme remain unchanged even when different anions and different crystal forms of lysozyme are employed.

  1. Fluorometric Determination of Deoxyribonucleic Acid in Bacteria with Ethidium Bromide

    PubMed Central

    Donkersloot, J. A.; Robrish, S. A.; Krichevsky, M. I.

    1972-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, and rapid method is presented for the determination of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. It is based upon the fluorometric determination of DNA with ethidium bromide after alkaline digestion of the bacteria to hydrolyze the interfering ribonucleic acid. The assay takes less than 2 hr. Its sensitivity is at least 0.2 μg of DNA in a final solution of 4 ml and it uses commonly available filter or double monochromator fluorometers. Judicious choice of light source and filters allows an additional 10-fold increase in sensitivity with a filter fluorometer. Turbidity caused by bacteria or insoluble polysaccharides does not interfere with the fluorescence measurements. There was no significant difference between the results obtained with this method and those obtained with the indole and diphenylamine methods when these assays were applied to Escherichia coli and sucrose- or glucose-grown Streptococcus mutans. The method was also tested by determining the specific growth rate of E. coli. This new procedure should be especially useful for the determination of bacterial DNA in dilute suspensions and for the estimation of bacterial growth or DNA replication where more conventional methods are not applicable or sensitive enough. PMID:4561101

  2. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium doping

    DOEpatents

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2014-08-26

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  3. Bacterial oxidation of methyl bromide in Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connell, T.L.; Joye, S.B.; Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation of methyl bromide (MeBr) in the water column of Mono Lake, CA, was studied by measuring the formation of H14CO3 from [14C]MeBr. Potential oxidation was detected throughout the water column, with highest rates occurring in the epilimnion (5-12 m depth). The oxidation of MeBr was eliminated by filter-sterilization, thereby demonstrating the involvement of bacteria. Vertical profiles of MeBr activity differed from those obtained for nitrification and methane oxidation, indicating that MeBr oxidation is not simply a co-oxidation process by either nitrifiers or methanotrophs. Furthermore, specific inhibitors of methane oxidation and/or nitrification (e.g., methyl fluoride, acetylene, allyl sulfide) had no effect upon the rate of MeBr oxidation in live samples. Of a variety of potential electron donors added to Mono Lake water, only trimethylamine resulted in the stimulation of MeBr oxidation. Cumulatively, these results suggest that the oxidation of MeBr in Mono Lake waters is attributable to trimethylamine-degrading methylotrophs. Neither methyl chloride nor methanol inhibited the oxidation of [14C]MeBr in live samples, indicating that these bacteria directly oxidized MeBr rather than the products of MeBr nucleophilic substitution reactions.

  4. Bioreactors for removing methyl bromide following contained fumigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Baesman, S.M.; Oremland, R.S.

    2003-01-01

    Use of methyl bromide (MeBr) as a quarantine, commodity, or structural fumigant is under scrutiny because its release to the atmosphere contributes to the depletion of stratospheric ozone. A closed-system bioreactor consisting of 0.5 L of a growing culture of a previously described bacterium, strain IMB-1, removed MeBr (> 110 ??mol L-1) from recirculating air. Strain IMB-1 grew slowly to high cell densities in the bioreactor using MeBr as its sole carbon and energy source. Bacterial oxidation of MeBr produced CO2 and hydrobromic acid (HBr), which required continuous neutralization with NaOH for the system to operate effectively. Strain IMB-1 was capable of sustained oxidation of large amounts of MeBr (170 mmol in 46 d). In an open-system bioreactor (10-L fermenter), strain IMB-1 oxidized a continuous supply of MeBr (220 ??mol L-1 in air). Growth was continuous, and 0.5 mol of MeBr was removed from the air supply in 14 d. The specific rate of MeBr oxidation was 7 ?? 10-16 mol cell-1 h-1. Bioreactors such as these can therefore be used to remove large quantities of contaminant MeBr, which opens the possibility of biodegradation as a practical means for its disposal.

  5. Atmospheric methyl bromide: Trends and global mass balance

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, M.A.K.; Rasmussen, R.A.; Gunawardena, R. )

    1993-02-20

    Atmospheric methyl bromide is of considerable environmental importance as the largest reservoir of gaseous bromine in the atmosphere. Bromine gases can catalytically destroy stratospheric ozone. Since agricultural activities, automobiles, biomass burning, and other human activities produce CH[sub 3]Br, it is of interest to know its global mass balance and particularly the specific sources and sinks. In this paper the authors provide a decadal time series of global CH[sub 3]Br concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere. The data show that average concentrations are about 10 pptv and during the last 4 years may be increasing at 0.3 [plus minus] 0.1 pptv/yr (3%/yr [plus minus] 1%/yr). They estimate that the atmospheric lifetime of CH[sub 3]Br that is due to reaction with OH, is about 2 years, resulting in a calculated global emission rate of about 100 Gy/yr. Ocean supersaturations of 140-180% are observed, and atmospheric concentrations over the open oceans are higher than at comparably located coastal sites. The ocean source is estimated to be about 35 Gg/yr. The remaining emissions must come from other natural sources and anthropogenic activities. The results are based on some 2,200 samples obtained over more than a decade. Mass balance calculations explain most aspects of the present data but other implications are not easily reconciled, leaving open the possibility of undiscovered sources and sinks. 20 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Polarization effects in thallium bromide x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kozorezov, A.; Wigmore, J. K.; Gostilo, V.; Shorohov, M.; Owens, A.; Quarati, F.; Webb, M. A.

    2010-09-15

    We present the results of a detailed experimental study of polarization effects in thallium bromide planar x-ray detectors. Measurements were carried out in the range 10-100 keV by scanning a highly focused x-ray beam, 50 {mu}m in diameter, from a synchrotron source across the detector. Above a certain radiation threshold the detector response showed a systematic degradation of its spectroscopic characteristics, peak channel position, peak height, and energy resolution. Using a pump-and-probe technique, we studied the dynamics of spectral degradation, the spatial extent and relaxation of the polarized region, and the dependence of the detector response on bias voltage and temperature. For comparison, we modeled polarization effects induced by the charging of traps by both electrons and holes using a model based on recent theoretical work of Bale and Szeles. We calculated the charge collection efficiency and spectral line shapes as functions of exposure time, beam position, count rate, and photon energy, and obtained credible agreement with experimental results.

  7. Nanocapsules of perfluorooctyl bromide for theranostics: from formulation to targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diou, O.; Fattal, E.; Payen, T.; Bridal, S. L.; Valette, J.; Tsapis, N.

    2014-03-01

    The need to detect cancer at its early stages, as well as, to deliver chemotherapy to targeted site motivates many researchers to build theranostic platforms which combine diagnostic and therapy. Among imaging modalities, ultrasonography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are widely available, non invasive and complement each other. Both techniques often require the use of contrast agents. We have developed nanocapsules of perfluorooctyl bromide as dual contrast agent for both imaging modalities. The soft, amorphous polymer shell provides echogenicity, while the high-density perfluorinated liquid core allows detection by 19F MRI. We have used a shell of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) since this polymer is biodegradable, biocompatible and can be loaded with drugs. These capsules were shown to be efficient in vitro as contrast agents for both 19F MRI and ultrasonography. In addition, for in vivo applications a poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) coating promotes stability and prolonged circulation. Being stealth, nanocapsule can accumulate passively into implanted tumors by the EPR effect. We will present nanocapsule formulation and characterization, and will show promising in vivo results obtained for both ultrasonography and 19F MRI.

  8. Improved spectrometric characteristics of thallium bromide nuclear radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, K.; Murayama, T.; Shoji, T.; Suehiro, T.; Hiratate, Y.

    1999-06-01

    Thallium bromide (TlBr) is a compound semiconductor with a high atomic number and wide band gap. In this study, nuclear radiation detectors have been fabricated from the TlBr crystals. The TlBr crystals were grown by the horizontal travelling molten zone (TMZ) method using the materials purified by many pass zone refining. The crystals were characterized by measuring the resistivity, the mobility-lifetime ( μτ) product and the energy required to create an electron-hole pair (the ɛ value). Improved energy resolution has been obtained by the TlBr radiation detectors. At room temperature the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) for the 59.5, 122 and 662 keV γ-ray photo peak obtained from the detectors were 3.3, 8.8 and 29.5 keV, respectively. By comparing the saturated peak position of the TlBr detector with that of the CdTe detector, the ɛ value has been estimated to be about 5.85 eV for the TlBr crystal.

  9. Evaluation of Alkali Bromide Salts for Potential Pyrochemical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhat K. Tripathy; Steven D. Herrmann; Guy L. Fredrickson; Tedd E. Lister; Toni Y. Gutknecht

    2013-10-01

    Transient techniques were employed to study the electrochemical behavior, reduction mechanism and transport properties of REBr3 (RE - La, Nd and Gd) in pure LiBr, LiBr-KBr (eutectic) and LiBr-KBr-CsBr (eutectic) melts. Gd(III) showed a reversible single step soluble-insoluble exchange phenomenon in LiBr melt at 973K. Although La (III), Nd(III) and Gd(III) ions showed reversible behavior in eutectic LiBr-KBr melts, these ions showed a combination of temperature dependent reversible and pseudo-reversible behavior. While both La(III) and Gd(III) showed one step reduction, the reduction of Nd(III) was observed to be a two step process. La metal could be electrodeposited from the ternary electrolyte at a temperature of 673K. Various electrochemical measurements suggest that both binary and ternary bromide melts can potentially be used to electrodeposit high purity RE metals at comparatively lower operating temperatures.

  10. Reduced effect of bromide on the genotoxicity in secondary effluent of a municipal wastewater treatment plant during chlorination.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian-Yuan; Li, Yi; Hu, Hong-Ying; Sun, Ying-Xue; Zhao, Feng-Yun

    2010-07-01

    Chlorination of wastewater can form genotoxic, mutagenic, and/or carcinogenic disinfection byproduct (DBPs). In this study, the effect of bromide on genotoxicity in secondary effluent of a municipal wastewater treatment plant during chlorination was evaluated by the SOS/umu test. The presence of bromide notably decreased the genotoxicity in secondary effluent during chlorination, especially under conditions of high ammonia concentration. Bromide significantly decreased the concentration of ofloxacin, a genotoxic chemical in secondary effluent, during chlorination with high concentration of ammonia, while genotoxic DBPs formation of humic acid and aromatic amino acids associated with bromide limitedly contributed to the changes of genotoxicity in secondary effluent under the conditions of this study. By fractionating dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the secondary effluent into different fractions, the fractions containing hydrophilic substances (HIS) and hydrophobic acids (HOA) contributed to the decrease in genotoxicity induced by bromide. Chlorination of HOA without bromide increased genotoxicity, while the addition of bromide decreased genotoxicity. PMID:20521844

  11. High-throughput sequential injection method for simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental solids using macroporous anion-exchange chromatography, followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per; Miró, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports an automated analytical method for rapid and simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in soil, sediment, and seaweed, with detection via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A chromatographic column packed with a macroporous anion exchanger (AG MP-1 M) was incorporated in a sequential injection (SI) system for the efficient retrieval of plutonium, along with neptunium, from matrix elements and potential interfering nuclides. The sorption and elution behavior of plutonium and neptunium onto AG MP-1 M resin was compared with a commonly utilized AG 1-gel-type anion exchanger. Experimental results reveal that the pore structure of the anion exchanger plays a pivotal role in ensuring similar separation behavior of plutonium and neptunium along the separation protocol. It is proven that plutonium-242 ((242)Pu) performs well as a tracer for monitoring the chemical yield of neptunium when using AG MP-1 M resin, whereby the difficulties in obtaining a reliable and practicable isotopic neptunium tracer are overcome. An important asset of the SI setup is the feasibility of processing up to 100 g of solid substrates using a small-sized (ca. 2 mL) column with chemical yields of neptunium and plutonium being ≥79%. Analytical results of three certified/standard reference materials and two solid samples from intercomparison exercises are in good agreement with the reference values at the 0.05 significance level. The overall on-column separation can be completed within 3.5 h for 10 g of soil samples. Most importantly, the anion-exchange mini-column suffices to be reused up to 10-fold with satisfactory chemical yields (>70%), as demanded in environmental monitoring and emergency scenarios, making the proposed automated assembly well-suited for unattended and high-throughput analysis. PMID:21121695

  12. BROMIDE'S EFFECT ON DBP FORMATION, SPECIATION, AND CONTROL: PART 1, OZONATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of variable ozone dosage and bromide concentration on the formation of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and bromate were evaluated. Low ozone dosages resulted in oxidation of organic precursors, yielding decreases in the formation potential for total trihalometha...

  13. Palladium-catalyzed direct α-arylation of methyl sulfones with aryl bromides.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bing; Jia, Tiezheng; Walsh, Patrick J

    2013-04-01

    A direct and efficient approach for palladium-catalyzed arylation of aryl and alkyl methyl sulfones with aryl bromides has been developed. The catalytic system affords arylated sulfones in good to excellent yields (73-90%). PMID:23517309

  14. Electrochemical removal of bromide and reduction of THM formation potential in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kimbrough, David Eugene; Suffet, I H

    2002-11-01

    Trihalomethanes (THMs), a by-product of the chlorination of natural waters containing dissolved organic carbon and bromide, are the focus of considerable public health concern and regulation due to their potential as a carcinogen by ingestion. This paper presents a promising new water treatment process that lowers the concentration of bromide in drinking water and thus, lowers the THM formation potential. Bromide is oxidized by electrolysis to bromine and then the bromine apparently volatilized. The electrolyzed water, when chlorinated, produces measurably lower amounts of THMs and proportionately fewer brominated THMs, which are of greater public health concern than the chlorinated THMs. Removing bromide should also reduce the formation of other disinfection by-products such as bromate and haloacetic acids. PMID:12448534

  15. Factors affecting performance of methyl bromide alternatives - a South Atlantic perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumigant application methods and equipment were identified as a source of variability in the performance of methyl bromide alternatives during several field demonstration trials conducted in 2007. Shank injection systems incorrectly modified to accommodate reduced fumigant flow rates through deliv...

  16. CHLORPYRIFOS TRANSFORMATION BY AQUEOUS CHLORINE IN THE PRESENCE OF BROMIDE AND NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aqueous chlorination of chlorpyrifos (CP) was investigated in the presence of bromide and natural organic matter (NOM), which were identified as naturally occurring aqueous constituents that could impact CP transformation rates to the toxic product chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO). Br...

  17. Uptake and excretion of ( UC)methyl bromide as influenced by exposure concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Medinsky, M.A.; Dutcher, J.S.; Bond, J.A.; Henderson, R.F.; Mauderly, J.L.; Snipes, M.B.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Cheng, Y.S.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    Uptake of methyl bromide and pathways for excretion of UC were investigated in male Fischer-344 rats after nose-only inhalation of 50, 300, 5700, or 10,400 nmol (1.6 to 310 ppm) of ( UC)methyl bromide/liter of air for 6 hr. Fractional uptake of methyl bromide decreased at the highest concentrations, 5700 and 10,400 nmol/liter, with 37 and 27% of the inhaled methyl bromide absorbed, respectively, compared to 48% at the lower levels. Total methyl bromide absorbed was 9 or 40 mol/kg body wt after exposure to 50 or 300 nmol/liter, respectively. Elimination of UC was linearly related to the amount of methyl bromide absorbed as determined from urine, feces, expired CO2, and parent compound collected for 66 hr after the end of exposure. Exhaled UCO2 was the dominant route of excretion, with from 1.2 to 110 mol (50% of amount absorbed) exhaled, and was described by a two-component negative exponential function; 85% was exhaled with t1/2 of 4 hr, and the remaining 15% was exhaled with a t1/2 of 17 hr. The rate of exhalation of UCO2 was not affected by the amount of ( UC)methyl bromide absorbed. From 0.4 to 54 mol was excreted in urine (20% of amount absorbed). The half-time for excretion of UC in urine was approximately 10 hr, and the rate of excretion was not dependent on the amount of ( UC)methyl bromide absorbed. Little UC was exhaled as methyl bromide (<4% of the dose) or excreted in feces (<2%). At the end of 66 hr, 25% of the UC absorbed remained in the rats. Liver, kidneys, adrenals, lungs, thymus, and turbinates (maxilloturbinates, ethmoturbinates, and nasal epithelial membrane) contained the highest concentrations of UC. Results indicated that uptake of inhaled methyl bromide could be saturated. Any ( UC)methyl bromide equivalents absorbed, however, would be excreted by concentration-independent mechanisms. 20 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  18. Laboratory And Lysimeter Experimentation And Transport Modeling Of Neptunium And Strontium In Savannah River Site Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Powell, B. A.; Miller, Todd J.

    2012-09-24

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) conducts performance assessment (PA) calculations to determine the appropriate amount of low-level radiological waste that can be safely disposed on site. Parameters are included in these calculations that account for the interaction between the immobile solid phase and the mobile aqueous phase. These parameters are either the distribution coefficient (K{sub d} value) or the apparent solubility value (K{sub sp}). These parameters are readily found in the literature and are used throughout the DOE complex. One shortcoming of K{sub d} values is that they are only applicable to a given set of solid and aqueous phase conditions. Therefore, a given radionuclide may have several K{sub d} values as it moves between formations and comes into contact with different solids and different aqueous phases. It is expected that the K{sub d} construct will be appropriate to use for a majority of the PA and for a majority of the radionuclides. However, semi-mechanistic models would be more representative in isolated cases where the chemistry is especially transitory or the radionuclide chemistry is especially complex, bringing to bear multiple species of varying sorption tendencies to the sediment. Semi-mechanistic models explicitly accommodate the dependency of K{sub d} values, or other sorption parameters, on contaminant concentration, competing ion concentrations, pH-dependent surface charge on the adsorbent, and solute species distribution. Incorporating semi-mechanistic concepts into geochemical models is desirable to make the models more robust and technically defensible. Furthermore, these alternative models could be used to augment or validate a Kd?based DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessment. The objectives of this study were to: 1) develop a quantitative thermodynamically-based model for neptunium sorption to SRS sediments, and 2) determine a sorption constant from an SRS 11-year lysimeter study. The modeling studies were conducted with

  19. Bromide transport in a sandy and a silty soil - a comparative lysimeter study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, L.; Iden, S. C.; Durner, W.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was a comparison of bromide leaching through a silty and a sandy soil and the characterization of systematic differences in solute transport in these undisturbed soils of differing texture. The amount of seepage water and bromide concentrations in the water were measured in 5 lysimeters for each soil type for a period of 460 days. Additionally, meteorological data were measured next to the lysimeter station for this period. The water transport regime of the lysimeters was simulated by means of a numerical solution of the Richards equation using the software package HYDRUS 1D. The observed bromide transport was simulated by steady-state approximation, applying the simulation tool CXTFIT, which is implemented in the software package STANMOD, version 2.0. Analysis of the measured data showed that a correct reproduction of the water balance was possible, but required the adaptation of soil-dependent crop coefficients for the potential transpiration of Phacelia and Winter Rape. The mean bromide transport through the sandy soil could be approximately reproduced assuming a bromide uptake by plants. Observed double peaks of some of the individual breakthrough curves, however, indicated that the actual transport regime in the lysimeters was subject to local heterogeneity which cannot be covered by the effective one-dimensional transport model. Bromide transport through the silty soil showed an unexplained mass deficit of nearly 90 % of the applied bromide and the detection of a mean distinct bromide peak in seepage water after percolation of only 0.5 pore volumes. It was not possible to simulate this behaviour with an effective 1D equilibrium or nonequilibrium convection-dispersion model.

  20. Stabilized thallium bromide radiation detectors and methods of making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Leao, Cedric Rocha; Lordi, Vincenzo

    2015-11-24

    According to one embodiment, a crystal includes thallium bromide (TlBr), one or more positively charged dopants, and one or more negatively charged dopants. According to another embodiment, a system includes a monolithic crystal including thallium bromide (TlBr), one or more positively charged dopants, and one or more negatively charged dopants; and a detector configured to detect a signal response of the crystal.

  1. The effect of pinaverium bromide (LA 1717) on the lower oesophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Wöltje, M; Huchzermeyer, H

    1982-01-01

    An acute, double-blind study was carried out in 8 healthy male volunteers to investigate any effect of a new antispasmodic, pinaverium bromide, compared with placebo on the lower oesophageal sphincter. Manometric measurements showed no significant differences in resting pressures either after placebo or a therapeutic dose (200 mg) of pinaverium bromide, suggesting that the active drug does not cause any impairment of function of the lower oesophageal sphincter. PMID:7128186

  2. Flow Boiling Heat Transfer to Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution in Subcooled Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Kaji, Masao; Nishizumi, Takeharu; Ozaki, Shinji; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    To improve the thermal performance of high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater, heat transfer characteristics of flow boiling of lithium bromide aqueous solution in the subcooled region were experimentally investigated. Experiments were made for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution flowing in a rectangular channel (5 mm × 20 mm cross section) with one side wall heated. Boiling onset quality of lithium bromide aqueous solution is greater than that of water. The heat transfer coefficient of lithium bromide aqueous solution is about a half of that of water under the same experimental conditions of inlet velocity and heat flux. The experimental data of heat transfer coefficient for water are compared with the empirical correlation of Thom et al.11) and a fairly good agreement is obtained. The predictive calculations by the method of Sekoguchi et al.12) are compared with the data for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution. Agreement between them is good for water, while the results for lithium bromide aqueous solution are not satisfactory.

  3. Methyl bromide intoxication in four field-workers during removal of soil fumigation sheets.

    PubMed

    Herzstein, J; Cullen, M R

    1990-01-01

    Methyl bromide is a highly toxic and penetrating compound used extensively as an insecticide for dry foodstuffs and as a soil fumigant (in greenhouses and fields) for the control of nematodes, fungi, and weeds. More than 300 cases of systemic poisoning and 60 fatalities attributable to methyl bromide have been reported [Alexeeff and Kilgore, 1983], resulting in substantial regulations concerning its handling, storage, application, and disposal. A recent exposure incident at a Connecticut nursery represents to our knowledge the first report of toxicity stemming from exposures in the field during removal of plastic sheets days after injection of methyl bromide into soil. Following removal of polyethylene sheets covering soil fumigated with methyl bromide, four field-workers developed fatigue and light-headedness and 3 workers noted progressive respiratory, gastrointestinal (GI), and neurologic symptoms. The acute systemic symptoms improved over several days, but later-onset neuropsychiatric symptoms persisted for several weeks. This incident stresses the need for improved worker education and strict adherence to safety precautions during all stages of methyl bromide fumigation and raises the possibility of an increased risk of toxicity associated with methyl bromide fumigation during a cool season. PMID:2305812

  4. Predicting bromide incorporation in a chlorinated indoor swimming pool.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Mazumder, Abu Jafar; Husain, Tahir

    2016-06-01

    The water in and air above swimming pools often contain high levels of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) due to chemical reactions between chlorine- or bromine-based disinfectants and organic/inorganic matter in the source water and released from swimmers. Exposure to these DBPs, though inevitable, can pose health threats to humans. In this study, DBPs in tap water (S1), and water from a chlorinated indoor swimming pool before (S2) and after swimming (S3) were measured. The brominated species constituted the majority of DBPs formed in S1, S2, and S3. Trihalomethanes (THMs) in S3 was 6.9 (range 2.9-11.1) and 1.4 (range 0.52-2.9) times those in S1 and S2, respectively; and the haloacetic acids (HAAs) in S3 was 4.2 (range 2.5-7.5) and 1.2 (range 0.6-2.6) times those in S1 and S2, respectively. The mean THMs in air above the swimming pool before (S2-A) and after swimming (S3-A) were 72.2 and 93.0 μg/m(3), respectively, and their ranges were 36.3-105.8 and 44.1-133.6 μg/m(3), respectively. The average percentages of bromide incorporation (BI) into THMs in S1, S2, and S3 were 3.0, 9.3, and 10.6 %, respectively; and the BI into HAAs in S1, S2, and S3 were 6.6, 12.0, and 12.2 %, respectively. Several models were trained for predicting the BI into THMs and HAAs. The results indicate that additional information is required to develop predictive models for BI in swimming pools. PMID:26971516

  5. Bacterial oxidation of methyl bromide in fumigated agricultural soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Connell, T.L.; Guidetti, J.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation of [14C]methyl bromide ([14C]MeBr) to 14CO2 was measured in field experiments with soils collected from two strawberry plots fumigated with mixtures of MeBr and chloropicrin (CCI3NO2). Although these fumigants are considered potent biocides, we found that the highest rates of MeBr oxidation occurred 1 to 2 days after injection when the fields were tarped, rather than before or several days after injection. No oxidation of MeBr occurred in heat-killed soils, indicating that microbes were the causative agents of the oxidation. Degradation of MeBr by chemical and/or biological processes accounted for 20 to 50% of the loss of MeBr during fumigation, with evasion to the atmosphere inferred to comprise the remainder. In laboratory incubations, complete removal of [14C]MeBr occurred within a few days, with 47 to 67% of the added MeBr oxidized to 14CO2 and the remainder of counts associated with the solid phase. Chloropicrin inhibited the oxidation of MeBr, implying that use of this substance constrains the extent of microbial degradation of MeBr during fumigation. Oxidation was by direct bacterial attack of MeBr and not of methanol, a product of the chemical hydrolysis of MeBr. Neither nitrifying nor methane-oxidizing bacteria were sufficiently active in these soils to account for the observed oxidation of MeBr, nor could the microbial degradation of MeBr be linked to cooxidation with exogenously supplied electron donors. However, repeated addition of MeBr to live soils resulted in higher rates of its removal, suggesting that soil bacteria used MeBr as an electron donor for growth. To support this interpretation, we isolated a gram-negative, aerobic bacterium from these soils which grew with MeBr as a sole source of carbon and energy.

  6. Carbon isotope fractionation of methyl bromide during agricultural soil fumigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bill, M.; Miller, L.G.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2002-01-01

    The isotopic composition of methyl bromide (CH3Br) has been suggested to be a potentially useful tracer for constraining the global CH3Br budget. In order to determine the carbon isotopic composition of CH3Br emitted from the most significant anthropogenic application (pre-plant fumigation) we directly measured the ??13C of CH3Br released during commercial fumigation. We also measured the isotopic fractionation associated with degradation in agricultural soil under typical field fumigation conditions. The isotopic composition of CH3Br collected in soil several hours after injection of the fumigant was -44.5??? and this value increased to -20.7??? over the following three days. The mean kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with degradation of CH3Br in agricultural soil (12???) was smaller than the reported value for methylotrophic bacterial strain IMB-1, isolated from previously fumigated agricultural soil, but was similar to methylotrophic bacterial strain CC495, isolated from a pristine forest litter zone. Using this fractionation associated with the degradation of CH3Br in agricultural soil and the mean ??13C of the industrially manufactured CH3Br (-54.4???), we calculate that the agricultural soil fumigation source has a carbon isotope signature that ranges from -52.8??? to -42.0???. Roughly 65% of industrially manufactured CH3Br is used for field fumigations. The remaining 35% is used for structural and post-harvest fumigations with a minor amount used during industrial chemical manufacturing. Assuming that the structural and post-harvest fumigation sources of CH3Br are emitted without substantial fractionation, we calculate that the ??13C of anthropogenically emitted CH3Br ranges from -53.2??? to -47.5???.

  7. Dicationic Alkylammonium Bromide Gemini Surfactants. Membrane Perturbation and Skin Irritation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, João A. S.; Faneca, Henrique; Carvalho, Rui A.; Marques, Eduardo F.; Pais, Alberto A. C. C.

    2011-01-01

    Dicationic alkylammonium bromide gemini surfactants represent a class of amphiphiles potentially effective as skin permeation enhancers. However, only a limited number of studies has been dedicated to the evaluation of the respective cytotoxicity, and none directed to skin irritation endpoints. Supported on a cell viability study, the cytotoxicity of gemini surfactants of variable tail and spacer length was assessed. For this purpose, keratinocyte cells from human skin (NCTC 2544 cell line), frequently used as a model for skin irritation, were employed. The impact of the different gemini surfactants on the permeability and morphology of model vesicles was additionally investigated by measuring the leakage of calcein fluorescent dye and analyzing the NMR spectra of 31P, respectively. Detail on the interaction of gemini molecules with model membranes was also provided by a systematic differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. An irreversible impact on the viability of the NCTC 2544 cell line was observed for gemini concentrations higher than 25 mM, while no cytotoxicity was found for any of the surfactants in a concentration range up to 10 mM. A higher cytotoxicity was also found for gemini surfactants presenting longer spacer and shorter tails. The same trend was obtained in the calorimetric and permeability studies, with the gemini of longest spacer promoting the highest degree of membrane destabilization. Additional structural and dynamical characterization of the various systems, obtained by 31P NMR and MD, provide some insight on the relationship between the architecture of gemini surfactants and the respective perturbation mechanism. PMID:22102870

  8. Clinical potential of aclidinium bromide in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    Three long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) are now available in Europe, providing clinicians and patients with a choice of interventions, which is important in COPD, which is clinically a heterogeneous disease. The first LAMA, tiotropium, has been widely used over the last decade as a once-daily maintenance therapy in stable COPD to improve patients’ health-related quality of life and to reduce the risk of exacerbations. Administered via the HandiHaler® device, it is safe and well tolerated. Another new once-daily LAMA, glycopyrronium, has also been shown to improve health status and reduce exacerbations, and is well tolerated. The subject of this review is a third LAMA, aclidinium bromide, which was approved as a twice-daily maintenance bronchodilator treatment. In the pivotal Phase III clinical trials, patients receiving aclidinium achieved significantly greater improvements in lung function, reductions in breathlessness, and improvements in health status compared with placebo, for up to 24 weeks. In continuation studies, these improvements were sustained for up to 52 weeks. Pooled data showed exacerbation frequency was significantly reduced with aclidinium versus placebo. Preclinical and pharmacological studies demonstrating low systemic bioavailability and a low propensity to induce cardiac arrhythmias were translated into a favorable tolerability profile in the clinical trial program – the adverse event profile of aclidinium was similar to placebo, with a low incidence of anticholinergic and cardiac adverse events. While additional studies are needed to evaluate its full clinical potential, aclidinium is an important part of this recent expansion of LAMA therapeutic options, providing clinicians and patients with an effective and well-tolerated COPD treatment. PMID:25848244

  9. Tiotropium bromide inhalation powder: a review of its use in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2012-01-22

    The anticholinergic agent tiotropium bromide (Spiriva®) is a long-acting bronchodilator that is indicated for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This article reviews the clinical efficacy and tolerability of tiotropium bromide inhalation powder, administered using the HandiHaler® device, in patients with COPD, as well as reviewing its pharmacological properties and the results of pharmacoeconomic analyses. Shorter-term placebo-controlled trials in patients with COPD demonstrated significantly higher trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) responses with tiotropium bromide than with placebo, confirming it has a duration of action of ≥24 hours and is suitable for once-daily administration. Lung function improved to a greater extent with tiotropium bromide than with ipratropium bromide or, in most instances, salmeterol. Indacaterol was shown to be noninferior to tiotropium bromide in terms of the trough FEV(1) response. The large, 4-year UPLIFT® trial did not show a significant reduction in the annual rate of decline in FEV(1) with tiotropium bromide versus placebo in patients with COPD, although subgroup analyses demonstrated a significantly lower rate of decline with tiotropium bromide than with placebo in some patient groups (e.g. patients with moderate COPD, patients aged ≥50 years, patients not receiving maintenance therapy at baseline). Tiotropium bromide prevented exacerbations in patients with COPD, with a significantly lower exacerbation rate and a significantly longer time to first exacerbation seen with tiotropium bromide than with placebo or salmeterol. Exacerbation rates did not significantly differ between patients receiving tiotropium bromide and those receiving salmeterol/fluticasone propionate. Tiotropium bromide also had beneficial effects on health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) and other endpoints, such as dyspnoea and rescue medication use. Combination therapy with tiotropium bromide plus

  10. Verifying the Presence of Low Levels of Neptunium in a Uranium Matrix with Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Edgar C.; Douglas, Matthew; Wittman, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the problems associated with the analysis of low levels of neptunium (Np) in a uranium (U) matrix with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) on the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The detection of Np in a matrix of uranium (U) can be impeded by the occurrence of a plural scattering event from U (U-M5 + U-O4,5) that results in severe overlap on the Np-M5 edge at 3665 eV. Low levels (1600 - 6300 ppm) of Np can be detected in U solids by confirming the energy gap between the Np-M5 and Np-M4 edges is at 184 eV and showing that the M4/M5 ratio for the Np is smaller than that for U. The Richardson-Lucy deconvolution method was applied to energy-loss spectral images and was shown to increase the signal to noise. This method also improves the limits of detection for Np in a U matrix.

  11. Formation of neptunium(IV)-silica colloids at near-neutral and slightly alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Husar, Richard; Weiss, Stephan; Hennig, Christoph; Hübner, René; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Zänker, Harald

    2015-01-01

    The reducing conditions in a nuclear waste repository render neptunium tetravalent. Thus, Np is often assumed to be immobile in the subsurface. However, tetravalent actinides can also become mobile if they occur as colloids. We show that Np(IV) is able to form silica-rich colloids in solutions containing silicic acid at concentrations of both the regions above and below the "mononuclear wall" of silicic acid at 2 × 10(-3) M (where silicic acid is expected to start polymerization). These Np(IV)-silica colloids have a size of only very few nanometers and can reach significantly higher concentrations than Np(IV) oxyhydroxide colloids. They can be stable in the waterborne form over longer spans of time. In the Np(IV)-silica colloids, the actinide--oxygen--actinide bonds are increasingly replaced by actinide--oxygen--silicon bonds due to structural incorporation of Si. Possible implications of the formation of such colloids for environmental scenarios are discussed. PMID:25401282

  12. Potential for radionuclide immobilization in the EBS/NFE: solubility limiting phases for neptunium, plutonium, and uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Rard, J. A., LLNL

    1997-10-01

    Retardation and dispersion in the far field of radionuclides released from the engineered barrier system/near field environment (EBS/NFE) may not be sufficient to prevent regulatory limits being exceeded at the accessible environment. Hence, a greater emphasis must be placed on retardation and/or immobilization of radionuclides in the EBS/NFE. The present document represents a survey of radionuclide-bearing solid phases that could potentially form in the EBS/NFE and immobilize radionuclides released from the waste package and significantly reduce the source term. A detailed literature search was undertaken for experimental solubilities of the oxides, hydroxides, and various salts of neptunium, plutonium, and uranium in aqueous solutions as functions of pH, temperature, and the concentrations of added electrolytes. Numerous solubility studies and reviews were identified and copies of most of the articles were acquired. However, this project was only two months in duration, and copies of some the identified solubility studies could not be obtained at short notice. The results of this survey are intended to be used to assess whether a more detailed study of identified low- solubility phase(s) is warranted, and not as a data base suitable for predicting radionuclide solubility. The results of this survey may also prove useful in a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of incorporating chemical additives to the EBS/NFE that will enhance radionuclide immobilization.

  13. Glutathione transferase activity and formation of macromolecular adducts in two cases of acute methyl bromide poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, R; Rambourg-Schepens, M O; Müller, A; Hallier, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the activity of glutathione transferase and to measure the S-methylcysteine adducts in blood proteins, after acute inhalation exposure to methyl bromide. To examine the influence of the polymorphism of glutathione-S-transferase theta (GSTT1) on the neurotoxicity of methyl bromide. METHODS: Two workers acutely exposed to methyl bromide with inadequate respiratory protective devices were poisoned. Seven weeks after the accident, blood samples were drawn from both patients, for measurement of glutathione transferase activity in erythrocytes (conjugator status--that is, GSTT1 phenotype) and measurement of binding products of methyl bromide with blood proteins. Conjugator status was determined by a standard procedure. The binding product of methyl bromide, S-methylcysteine, was measured in globin and albumin. RESULTS: Duration and intensity of exposure were identical for both patients as they worked together with the same protective devices and with similar physical effort. However, one patient had very severe poisoning, whereas the other only developed mild neurotoxic symptoms. The first patient was a "conjugator" with normal glutathone transferase activity, whereas this activity was undetectable in the erythrocytes of the second patient, who consequently had higher concentrations of S-methylcysteine adduct in albumin (149 v 91 nmol/g protein) and in globin (77 v 30 nmol/g protein). CONCLUSIONS: Methyl bromide is genotoxic and neurotoxic. Its genotoxicity seems to be the consequence of the alkylating activity of the parent compound, and conjugation to glutathione has a protective effect. The data presented here suggest a different mechanism for methyl bromide neurotoxicity which could be related to the transformation of methylglutathione into toxic metabolites such as methanethiol and formaldehyde. If such metabolites are the ultimate toxic species, N-acetylcysteine treatment could have a toxifying rather than a detoxifying effect. PMID:8704864

  14. Aclidinium bromide combined with formoterol inhibits remodeling parameters in lung epithelial cells through cAMP.

    PubMed

    Lambers, Christopher; Costa, Luigi; Ying, Qi; Zhong, Jun; Lardinois, Didier; Dekan, Gerhard; Schuller, Elisabeth; Roth, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Combined muscarinic receptor antagonists and long acting β2-agonists improve symptom control in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) significantly. In clinical studies aclidinium bromide achieved better beneficial effects than other bronchodilators; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. This study assessed the effect of aclidinium bromide combined with formoterol on COPD lung (n=20) and non-COPD lung (n=10) derived epithelial cells stimulated with TGF-β1+carbachol on: (i) the generation of mesenchymal cells in relation to epithelial cells, (II) extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, and (iii) the interaction of ECM on the generation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells. TGF-β1+carbachol enhanced the generation of mesenchymal cells, which was significantly reduced by aclidinium bromide or formoterol. The effect of combined drugs was additive. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase and Smad by specific inhibitors or aclidinium bromide reduced the generation of mesenchymal cells. In mesenchymal cells, TGF-β1+carbachol induced the deposition of collagen-I and fibronectin which was prevented by both drugs dose-dependently. Formoterol alone reduced collagen-I deposition via cAMP, this however, was overruled by TGF-β1+carbachol and rescued by aclidinium bromide. Inhibition of fibronectin was cAMP independent, but involved p38 MAP kinase and Smad. Seeding epithelial cells on ECM collagen-I and fibronectin induced mesenchymal cell generation, which was reduced by aclidinium bromide and formoterol. Our results suggest that the beneficial effect of aclidinium bromide and formoterol involves cAMP affecting both, the accumulation of mesenchymal cells and ECM remodeling, which may explain the beneficial effect of the drugs on lung function in COPD. PMID:26546746

  15. Bromine and bromide content in soils: Analytical approach from total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Helena; Queralt, Ignasi; Tapias, Josefina; Candela, Lucila; Margui, Eva

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring total bromine and bromide concentrations in soils is significant in many environmental studies. Thus fast analytical methodologies that entail simple sample preparation and low-cost analyses are desired. In the present work, the possibilities and drawbacks of low-power total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) for the determination of total bromine and bromide contents in soils were evaluated. The direct analysis of a solid suspension using 20 mg of fine ground soil (<63 μm) gave a 3.7 mg kg(-1) limit of detection for bromine which, in most cases, was suitable for monitoring total bromine content in soils (Br content range in soils = 5-40 mg kg(-1)). Information about bromide determination in soils is also possible by analyzing the Br content in water soil extracts. In this case, the TXRF analysis can be directly performed by depositing 10 μL of the internal standardized soil extract sample on a quartz glass reflector in a measuring time of 1500 s. The bromide limit of detection by this approach was 10 μg L(-1). Good agreement was obtained between the TXRF results for the total bromine and bromide determinations in soils and those obtained by other popular analytical techniques, e.g. energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (total bromine) and ionic chromatography (bromide). As a study case, the TXRF method was applied to study bromine accumulation in two agricultural soils fumigated with a methyl bromide pesticide and irrigated with regenerated waste water. PMID:27179429

  16. Residential Proximity to Methyl Bromide Use and Birth Outcomes in an Agricultural Population in California

    PubMed Central

    Gemmill, Alison; Gunier, Robert B.; Bradman, Asa; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Background: Methyl bromide, a fungicide often used in strawberry cultivation, is of concern for residents who live near agricultural applications because of its toxicity and potential for drift. Little is known about the effects of methyl bromide exposure during pregnancy. Objective: We investigated the relationship between residential proximity to methyl bromide use and birth outcomes. Methods: Participants were from the CHAMACOS (Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas) study (n = 442), a longitudinal cohort study examining the health effects of environmental exposures on pregnant women and their children in an agricultural community in northern California. Using data from the California Pesticide Use Reporting system, we employed a geographic information system to estimate the amount of methyl bromide applied within 5 km of a woman’s residence during pregnancy. Multiple linear regression models were used to estimate associations between trimester-specific proximity to use and birth weight, length, head circumference, and gestational age. Results: High methyl bromide use (vs. no use) within 5 km of the home during the second trimester was negatively associated with birth weight (β = –113.1 g; CI: –218.1, –8.1), birth length (β = –0.85 cm; CI: –1.44, –0.27), and head circumference (β = –0.33 cm; CI: –0.67, 0.01). These outcomes were also associated with moderate methyl bromide use during the second trimester. Negative associations with fetal growth parameters were stronger when larger (5 km and 8 km) versus smaller (1 km and 3 km) buffer zones were used to estimate exposure. Conclusions: Residential proximity to methyl bromide use during the second trimester was associated with markers of restricted fetal growth in our study. PMID:23603811

  17. Bacterial Oxidation of Methyl Bromide in Fumigated Agricultural Soils

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L. G.; Connell, T. L.; Guidetti, J. R.; Oremland, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation of [(sup14)C]methyl bromide ([(sup14)C]MeBr) to (sup14)CO(inf2) was measured in field experiments with soils collected from two strawberry plots fumigated with mixtures of MeBr and chloropicrin (CCl(inf3)NO(inf2)). Although these fumigants are considered potent biocides, we found that the highest rates of MeBr oxidation occurred 1 to 2 days after injection when the fields were tarped, rather than before or several days after injection. No oxidation of MeBr occurred in heat-killed soils, indicating that microbes were the causative agents of the oxidation. Degradation of MeBr by chemical and/or biological processes accounted for 20 to 50% of the loss of MeBr during fumigation, with evasion to the atmosphere inferred to comprise the remainder. In laboratory incubations, complete removal of [(sup14)C]MeBr occurred within a few days, with 47 to 67% of the added MeBr oxidized to (sup14)CO(inf2) and the remainder of counts associated with the solid phase. Chloropicrin inhibited the oxidation of MeBr, implying that use of this substance constrains the extent of microbial degradation of MeBr during fumigation. Oxidation was by direct bacterial attack of MeBr and not of methanol, a product of the chemical hydrolysis of MeBr. Neither nitrifying nor methane-oxidizing bacteria were sufficiently active in these soils to account for the observed oxidation of MeBr, nor could the microbial degradation of MeBr be linked to cooxidation with exogenously supplied electron donors. However, repeated addition of MeBr to live soils resulted in higher rates of its removal, suggesting that soil bacteria used MeBr as an electron donor for growth. To support this interpretation, we isolated a gram-negative, aerobic bacterium from these soils which grew with MeBr as a sole source of carbon and energy. PMID:16535728

  18. Chlorine-36, bromide, and the origin of spring water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, S.N.; Cecil, L.D.; Zreda, M.; Moysey, S.

    2001-01-01

    Natural ratios of chlorine-36 (36Cl) to stable chlorine (i.e., 36Cl/Cl ?? 10-15) vary in shallow groundwater of the United States from about 50 in coastal areas to about 1400 in the northern Rocky Mountains. Ratios lower than these indicate the presence of chloride (Cl-) that has been isolated from the atmosphere for hundreds of thousands of years, if not longer. Higher ratios, which can exceed 5000, usually originate from fallout from testing thermonuclear devices in the western Pacific in the 1950s. Natural mass ratios of chloride to bromide (Cl-/Br-) in precipitation vary in the United States from about 250 in coastal areas to about 50 in the north-central states. Lower ratios may suggest contamination from human sources. Higher ratios, which may exceed 2000, commonly reflect the dissolution of halite. Seawater has a Cl-/Br- ratio of 290. Both 36Cl and Cl-/Br- ratios have been measured in 21 samples of spring water collected from springs in 10 different states. Brackish water from Saratoga Springs area in New York has low values for both 36Cl and Cl-/Br- ratios. This indicates that a large component of the water has a very deep origin. Brackish water from Alexander Springs in Florida has a low 36Cl ratio but a high Cl-/Br- ratio similar to seawater. This suggests the addition of ancient seawater that may be trapped in the aquifer. Big Spring in Iowa discharges water with a very high Cl-/Br- ratio but a moderate 36Cl ratio. The high ratio of Cl-/Br- may be produced by dissolution of road salt or agricultural chemicals. Of the 21 springs sampled, only 10 appeared to have potable water not significantly affected by human activity. Chlorine-36 from testing of nuclear devices is still being flushed out of four of the spring systems that were sampled. Thus, more than 45 years have passed since 36Cl was introduced into the aquifers feeding the springs and the systems, as yet, have not been purged. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Bacterial oxidation of methyl bromide in fumigated agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Miller, L G; Connell, T L; Guidetti, J R; Oremland, R S

    1997-11-01

    The oxidation of [(sup14)C]methyl bromide ([(sup14)C]MeBr) to (sup14)CO(inf2) was measured in field experiments with soils collected from two strawberry plots fumigated with mixtures of MeBr and chloropicrin (CCl(inf3)NO(inf2)). Although these fumigants are considered potent biocides, we found that the highest rates of MeBr oxidation occurred 1 to 2 days after injection when the fields were tarped, rather than before or several days after injection. No oxidation of MeBr occurred in heat-killed soils, indicating that microbes were the causative agents of the oxidation. Degradation of MeBr by chemical and/or biological processes accounted for 20 to 50% of the loss of MeBr during fumigation, with evasion to the atmosphere inferred to comprise the remainder. In laboratory incubations, complete removal of [(sup14)C]MeBr occurred within a few days, with 47 to 67% of the added MeBr oxidized to (sup14)CO(inf2) and the remainder of counts associated with the solid phase. Chloropicrin inhibited the oxidation of MeBr, implying that use of this substance constrains the extent of microbial degradation of MeBr during fumigation. Oxidation was by direct bacterial attack of MeBr and not of methanol, a product of the chemical hydrolysis of MeBr. Neither nitrifying nor methane-oxidizing bacteria were sufficiently active in these soils to account for the observed oxidation of MeBr, nor could the microbial degradation of MeBr be linked to cooxidation with exogenously supplied electron donors. However, repeated addition of MeBr to live soils resulted in higher rates of its removal, suggesting that soil bacteria used MeBr as an electron donor for growth. To support this interpretation, we isolated a gram-negative, aerobic bacterium from these soils which grew with MeBr as a sole source of carbon and energy. PMID:16535728

  20. The ocean in near equilibrium with atmospheric methyl bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lei; Yvon-Lewis, Shari; Liu, Yina; Bianchi, Thomas S.

    2012-09-01

    Saturation-anomaly measurements of methyl bromide (CH3Br) were made in the eastern Pacific (3/30-4/27, 2010) and the eastern Atlantic (10/25-11/26, 2010) to assess the oceanic saturation state as the phaseout of fumigation - non-Quarantine and Pre-Shipment (non-QPS) uses of CH3Br nears completion and atmospheric concentrations continue to decline. These cruises occurred 16 years after the Bromine Latitudinal Air-Sea Transect (BLAST) cruises, which were conducted in the same regions and first established a global oceanic net sink of -12.6 Gg yr-1 for atmospheric CH3Br in 1994. Results from this study suggest saturation anomalies of CH3Br in the surface ocean have become less negative than those observed 16 years ago as the atmospheric burden has declined over the past decade. The global net sea-to-air flux was estimated at 0 to 3 Gg yr-1 in 2010, suggesting that the ocean may become a net small source to atmospheric CH3Br. There are no significant differences between this study and previous studies for measured biological loss rate constants and calculated annual production rates, suggesting that annual production rates and biological degradation rate constants for CH3Br in the surface ocean have likely remained relatively constant over the past 16 years. When including the biological loss rate constants from this study and all previous studies, the mean global biological loss rate constant is constrained to 0.05 ± 0.01 d-1 (at a 95% confidence level). Combining chemical and eddy degradation rate constants, and using an updated gas transfer velocity, we estimate the CH3Br partial atmospheric lifetime with respect to oceanic loss to be 3.1 (2.3 to 5.0) years. Although the new partial atmospheric lifetime is about 1.3 years longer than the best prior estimate, it does not change the overall atmospheric lifetime of CH3Br, 0.8 (0.7-0.9) years.

  1. Formation of NDMA and halogenated DBPs by chloramination of tertiary amines: the influence of bromide ion.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Julien; Gallard, Hervé; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2012-02-01

    The formation of NDMA and other DBPs (including THMs, HANs, and HKs) has been investigated by chloramination of several tertiary amines in the absence and presence of bromide ion. NDMA formation from the most reactive tertiary amines (e.g., dimethylaminomethylfurfuryl alcohol or DMP30) was enhanced in the presence of bromide due to the formation of brominated oxidant species such as bromochloramine (NHBrCl) and the hypothetical UDMH-Br as an intermediate. The formation of NDMA by chloramination of less reactive model compounds was inhibited in the presence of bromide. This can be explained by competitive reactions leading to the production of brominated DBPs (i.e., THMs). In the presence of bromide, the formation of brominated THMs during chloramination can be attributed to the presence of small amounts of HOBr produced by the decomposition of chloramines and bromamines. The results are of particular interest to understand NDMA formation mechanisms, especially during chloramination of wastewaters impacted by anthropogenic tertiary amines and containing bromide ion. PMID:22214364

  2. Determination of methyl bromide in air samples by headspace gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Woodrow, J.E.; McChesney, M.M.; Seiber, J.N.

    1988-03-01

    Methyl bromide is extensively used in agriculture (4 x 10/sup 6/ kg for 1985 in California alone as a fumigant to control nematodes, weeds, and fungi in soil and insect pests in harvested grains and nuts. Given its low boiling point (3.8/sup 0/C) and high vapor pressure (approx. 1400 Torr at 20/sup 0/C), methyl bromide will readily diffuse if not rigorously contained. Methods for determining methyl bromide and other halocarbons in air vary widely. A common practice is to trap the material from air on an adsorbent, such as polymeric resins, followed by thermal desorption either directly into the analytical instrumentation or after intermediary cryofocusing. While in some cases analytical detection limits were reasonable (parts per million range), many of the published methods were labor intensive and required special handling techniques that precluded high sample throughput. They describe here a method for the sampling and analysis of airborne methyl bromide that was designed to handle large numbers of samples through automating some critical steps of the analysis. The result was a method that allowed around-the-clock operation with a minimum of operator attention. Furthermore, the method was not specific to methyl bromide and could be used to determine other halocarbons in air.

  3. [Bowel obstruction-induced cholinergic crisis with progressive respiratory failure following distigmine bromide treatment].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuki; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Nobuhiro; Hirose, Yasuo

    2016-03-01

    A 54-year-old female experienced rapid respiratory failure while being transported in an ambulance to our emergency department for evaluation and management of constipation and abdominal pain. The patient was on treatment with distigmine bromide for postoperative urination disorder and magnesium oxide for constipation. Increased salivary secretions, diminished respiratory excursion, type 2 respiratory failure (PaCO2 : 65 mmHg), low serum cholinesterase, and hypermagnesemia were detected. Imaging studies revealed that the patient had bilateral aspiration pneumonia, fecal impaction in the rectum, and a distended colon causing ileus. The patient was mechanically ventilated and was weaned off the ventilator on day 3. Therapeutic drug monitoring after discharge revealed that the serum level of distigmine bromide on admission was markedly elevated (377.8 ng/mL vs. the normal therapeutic level of 5-10 ng/mL). Distigmine bromide induced a cholinergic crisis with a resultant increase in airway secretions and respiratory failure. In this particular case, orally administered distigmine bromide was excessively absorbed because of prolonged intestinal transit time secondary to fecal impaction and sluggish bowel movement; this caused a cholinergic crisis and hypermagnesemia contributing to respiratory failure. Clinicians should be aware that bowel obstruction in a patient treated with distigmine bromide can increase the risk of a cholinergic crisis. PMID:27255021

  4. Mepenzolate bromide promotes diabetic wound healing by modulating inflammation and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yongjun; Wang, Xingtong; Ji, Shizhao; Tian, Song; Wu, Haibin; Luo, Pengfei; Fang, He; Wang, Li; Wu, Guosheng; Xiao, Shichu; Xia, Zhaofan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic wounds are characterized by persistent inflammation and the excessive production of reactive oxygen species, thus resulting in impaired wound healing. Mepenzolate bromide, which was originally used to treat gastrointestinal disorders in clinical settings, has recently been shown to display beneficial effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis of a mouse model by inhibiting inflammatory responses and reducing oxidative stress. However,the role of mepenzolate bromide in diabetic wound healing is still unclear. In this study, full-thickness excisional skin wounds were created on the backs of db/db mice, and mepenzolate bromide was topically applied to the wound bed. We found that mepenzolate bromide significantly promoted diabetic wound healing by measuring wound closure rate and histomorphometric analyses. Further studies showed that inflammation was inhibited by assessing the number of macrophages and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-healing cytokines in the wounds. Furthermore, oxidative stress was reduced by monitoring the levels of MDA and H2O2 and the activities of glutathione peroxidase and catalase in the wounds. These results demonstrated the potential application of mepenzolate bromide for treating diabetic ulcers and other chronic wounds in clinics. PMID:27398156

  5. Current and Potential Future Bromide Loads from Coal-Fired Power Plants in the Allegheny River Basin and Their Effects on Downstream Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Good, Kelly D; VanBriesen, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    The presence of bromide in rivers does not affect ecosystems or present a human health risk; however, elevated concentrations of bromide in drinking water sources can lead to difficulty meeting drinking water disinfection byproduct (DBP) regulations. Recent attention has focused on oil and gas wastewater and coal-fired power plant wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater bromide discharges. Bromide can be added to coal to enhance mercury removal, and increased use of bromide at some power plants is expected. Evaluation of potential increases in bromide concentrations from bromide addition for mercury control is lacking. The present work utilizes bromide monitoring data in the Allegheny River and a mass-balance approach to elucidate bromide contributions from anthropogenic and natural sources under current and future scenarios. For the Allegheny River, the current bromide is associated approximately 49% with oil- and gas-produced water discharges and 33% with coal-fired power plants operating wet FGD, with 18% derived from natural sources during mean flow conditions in August. Median wet FGD bromide loads could increase 3-fold from 610 to 1900 kg/day if all plants implement bromide addition for mercury control. Median bromide concentrations in the lower Allegheny River in August would rise to 410, 200, and 180 μg/L under low-, mean-, and high-flow conditions, respectively, for the bromide-addition scenario. PMID:27538590

  6. Radionuclide sorption in Yucca Mountain tuffs with J-13 well water: Neptunium, uranium, and plutonium. Yucca Mountain site characterization program milestone 3338

    SciTech Connect

    Triay, I.R.; Cotter, C.R.; Kraus, S.M.; Huddleston, M.H.

    1996-08-01

    We studied the retardation of actinides (neptunium, uranium, and plutonium) by sorption as a function of radionuclide concentration in water from Well J-13 and of tuffs from Yucca Mountain. Three major tuff types were examined: devitrified, vitric, and zeolitic. To identify the sorbing minerals in the tuffs, we conducted batch sorption experiments with pure mineral separates. These experiments were performed with water from Well J-13 (a sodium bicarbonate groundwater) under oxidizing conditions in the pH range from 7 to 8.5. The results indicate that all actinides studied sorb strongly to synthetic hematite and also that Np(V) and U(VI) do not sorb appreciably to devitrified or vitric tuffs, albite, or quartz. The sorption of neptunium onto clinoptilolite-rich tuffs and pure clinoptilolite can be fitted with a sorption distribution coefficient in the concentration range from 1 X 10{sup -7} to 3 X 10{sup -5} M. The sorption of uranium onto clinoptilolite-rich tuffs and pure clinoptilolite is not linear in the concentration range from 8 X 10{sup -8} to 1 X 10{sup -4} M, and it can be fitted with nonlinear isotherm models (such as the Langmuir or the Freundlich Isotherms). The sorption of neptunium and uranium onto clinoptilolite in J-13 well water increases with decreasing pH in the range from 7 to 8.5. The sorption of plutonium (initially in the Pu(V) oxidation state) onto tuffs and pure mineral separates in J-13 well water at pH 7 is significant. Plutonium sorption decreases as a function of tuff type in the order: zeolitic > vitric > devitrified; and as a function of mineralogy in the order: hematite > clinoptilolite > albite > quartz.

  7. Methyl bromide: ocean sources, ocean sinks, and climate sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Anbar, A D; Yung, Y L; Chavez, F P

    1996-03-01

    The oceans play an important role in the geochemical cycle of methyl bromide (CH3Br), the major carrier of O3-destroying bromine to the stratosphere. The quantity of CH3Br produced annually in seawater is comparable to the amount entering the atmosphere each year from natural and anthropogenic sources. The production mechanism is unknown but may be biological. Most of this CH3Br is consumed in situ by hydrolysis or reaction with chloride. The size of the fraction which escapes to the atmosphere is poorly constrained; measurements in seawater and the atmosphere have been used to justify both a large oceanic CH3Br flux to the atmosphere and a small net ocean sink. Since the consumption reactions are extremely temperature-sensitive, small temperature variations have large effects on the CH3Br concentration in seawater, and therefore on the exchange between the atmosphere and the ocean. The net CH3Br flux is also sensitive to variations in the rate of CH3Br production. We have quantified these effects using a simple steady state mass balance model. When CH3Br production rates are linearly scaled with seawater chlorophyll content, this model reproduces the latitudinal variations in marine CH3Br concentrations observed in the east Pacific Ocean by Singh et al. [1983] and by Lobert et al. [1995]. The apparent correlation of CH3Br production with primary production explains the discrepancies between the two observational studies, strengthening recent suggestions that the open ocean is a small net sink for atmospheric CH3Br, rather than a large net source. The Southern Ocean is implicated as a possible large net source of CH3Br to the atmosphere. Since our model indicates that both the direction and magnitude of CH3Br exchange between the atmosphere and ocean are extremely sensitive to temperature and marine productivity, and since the rate of CH3Br production in the oceans is comparable to the rate at which this compound is introduced to the atmosphere, even small

  8. Methyl bromide: ocean sources, ocean sinks, and climate sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Yung, Y. L.; Chavez, F. P.

    1996-01-01

    The oceans play an important role in the geochemical cycle of methyl bromide (CH3Br), the major carrier of O3-destroying bromine to the stratosphere. The quantity of CH3Br produced annually in seawater is comparable to the amount entering the atmosphere each year from natural and anthropogenic sources. The production mechanism is unknown but may be biological. Most of this CH3Br is consumed in situ by hydrolysis or reaction with chloride. The size of the fraction which escapes to the atmosphere is poorly constrained; measurements in seawater and the atmosphere have been used to justify both a large oceanic CH3Br flux to the atmosphere and a small net ocean sink. Since the consumption reactions are extremely temperature-sensitive, small temperature variations have large effects on the CH3Br concentration in seawater, and therefore on the exchange between the atmosphere and the ocean. The net CH3Br flux is also sensitive to variations in the rate of CH3Br production. We have quantified these effects using a simple steady state mass balance model. When CH3Br production rates are linearly scaled with seawater chlorophyll content, this model reproduces the latitudinal variations in marine CH3Br concentrations observed in the east Pacific Ocean by Singh et al. [1983] and by Lobert et al. [1995]. The apparent correlation of CH3Br production with primary production explains the discrepancies between the two observational studies, strengthening recent suggestions that the open ocean is a small net sink for atmospheric CH3Br, rather than a large net source. The Southern Ocean is implicated as a possible large net source of CH3Br to the atmosphere. Since our model indicates that both the direction and magnitude of CH3Br exchange between the atmosphere and ocean are extremely sensitive to temperature and marine productivity, and since the rate of CH3Br production in the oceans is comparable to the rate at which this compound is introduced to the atmosphere, even small

  9. Seeded Growth of Monodisperse Gold Nanorods Using Bromide-Free Surfactant Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, XC; Gao, YZ; Chen, J; Reifsnyder, DC; Zheng, C; Murray, CB

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that monodisperse gold nanorods (NRs) with broadly tunable dimensions and longitudinal surface plasmon resonances can be synthesized using a bromide-free surfactant mixture composed of alkyltrimethylammonium chloride and sodium oleate. It is found that uniform gold NRs can be obtained even with an iodide concentration approaching 100 mu M in the growth solution. In contrast to conventional wisdom, our results provide conclusive evidence that neither bromide as the surfactant counterion nor a high concentration of bromide ions in the growth solution is essential for gold NR formation. Correlated electron microscopy study of three-dimensional structures of gold NRs reveals a previously unprecedented octagonal prismatic structure enclosed predominantly by high index {310} crystal planes. These findings should have profound implications for a comprehensive mechanistic understanding of seeded growth of anisotropic metal nanocrystals.

  10. A comparison between the gastric and salivary concentration of iodide, pertechnetate, and bromide in man

    PubMed Central

    Harden, R. McG.; Alexander, W. D.; Shimmins, J.; Chisholm, D.

    1969-01-01

    The concentration of iodide (I−) and pertechnetate (TcO4−) and bromide (Br−) has been measured simultaneously in gastric juice and parotid saliva. The combined gastric and salivary clearance for iodide and pertechnetate is more than twice the clearance of these ions by the thyroid gland. The concentration of the ions was in the order I−>TcO4−>Br− in both gastric juice and saliva. Differences exist between the secretion of iodide, pertechnetate, and bromide. Bromide, in contrast to iodide and pertechnetate, was found to be more concentrated in gastric juice than in saliva. The ratio of the iodide to pertechnetate clearance was greater in gastric juice than in saliva. PMID:5358585

  11. Salty glycerol versus salty water surface organization: bromide and iodide surface propensities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zishuai; Hua, Wei; Verreault, Dominique; Allen, Heather C

    2013-07-25

    Salty NaBr and NaI glycerol solution interfaces are examined in the OH stretching region using broadband vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are used to further understand the VSFG spectroscopic signature. The VSFG spectra of salty glycerol solutions reveal that bromide and iodide anions perturb the interfacial glycerol organization in a manner similar as that found in aqueous halide salt solutions, thus confirming the presence of bromide and iodide anions at the glycerol surface. Surface tension measurements are consistent with the surface propensity suggested by the VSFG data and also show that the surface excess increases with increasing salt concentration, similar to that of water. In addition, iodide is shown to have more surface prevalence than bromide, as has also been determined from aqueous solutions. These results suggest that glycerol behaves similarly to water with respect to surface activity and solvation of halide anions at its air/liquid interface. PMID:23663033

  12. Bromide and iodide removal from waters under dynamic conditions by Ag-doped aerogels.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Polo, M; Rivera-Utrilla, J; von Gunten, U

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the efficiency of Ag-doped aerogels in the removal of bromide and iodide from water. To test the applicability of these aerogels in water treatment, adsorption of bromide and iodide was studied under dynamic conditions using waters from Lake Zurich and a mineral water. The results obtained by using these waters showed a high breakthrough volume (V(0.02)=0.4 L) of the columns, while the height of the mass transfer zone (H(MTZ)=6.8 cm) was low, regardless of the anion under study. Bromide- and iodide-saturated columns were regenerated with NH4OH. No change in the column characteristics was observed after two regeneration treatments, regardless of the type of water considered. PMID:17109877

  13. Calculated interactions of a nitro group with aromatic rings of crystalline picryl bromide

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lulu; Massa, Lou; Karle, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    Several crystalline polymorphs have been discovered for picryl bromide. Among the several forces that control the formation of such polymorphs are the interactions among the nitro groups and phenyl rings of those crystals. Although there are >300 structures to be found in the Cambridge Structural Database displaying the nitro-phenyl interaction, nonetheless this interesting, and apparently important, interaction, seems not to have been discussed within any of the papers reporting the structures. In this article, quantum calculations are reported that assess the strength of these nitro-phenyl interactions within a crystal of picryl bromide. The rather flat molecules of picryl bromide are arranged in layered planes within the crystal, and we examine the attractive interactions that occur within a given plane, and between adjacent planes. Calculations of Hartree Fock and Møller Plesset perturbation theory carried to a second-order expansion are used. Both quantum mechanical approximations are implemented with 6–31G* basis functions. PMID:18780785

  14. Dispersion characteristics and sinks for methyl bromide vapors downwind of treated agricultural fields

    SciTech Connect

    Seiber, J.N.; Woodrow, J.E.; Dowling, K.

    1995-12-31

    A study of methyl bromide volatilization and fate from a treated agricultural field was conducted in Monterey County, California, in 1994. Air concentrations were measured above and downwind from the field with the objective of comparing vertical and horizontal flux terms. Another objective was to compare observed downwind concentrations with those predicted by the Industrial Source Complex model, to begin the process of identifying potential sinks which might scavenge methyl bromide from the atmosphere. The final objective was to determine the limit of detection of our analytical method for airborne methyl bromide using field samples representing a wide range of concentrations. A description of the methods and results of the study will be presented, along with a discussion of data quality and interpretation.

  15. Inhibitory effect of pinaverium bromide on gastrointestinal contractile activity in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Z; Takahashi, I

    1981-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of 4-(6-bromoveratryl)-4-(2-[2-(6,6-dimethyl-2-norpinyl)-ethoxy]-ethyl)-morpholinium hydroxide (pinaverium bromide), a quaternary ammonium derivative, on the contractile activity of the gastrointestinal tract from the stomach to the colon was investigated in six conscious dogs. Gastrointestinal motor activity was monitored by means of chronically implanted force transducers. Pinaverium bromide was continuously administered i.v. for 30 min in doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg/h during both the digestive and interdigestive states. It was found that pinaverium bromide strongly inhibited gastrointestinal contractile activity during both the digestive and interdigestive states; contractions in the stomach were most strongly inhibited; however, those in the small and large bowels were also significantly inhibited. No significant side effects in the circulatory and respiratory systems and the gastrointestinal tract such as nausea, vomiting or diarrhea were observed during and after the infusion of this agent. PMID:7197953

  16. [Distigmine bromide improves chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a case of MELAS].

    PubMed

    Nakae, Yoshiharu; Kishida, Hitaru; Hakii, Yasuhito; Koyano, Shigeru; Suzuki, Yume; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki

    2007-04-01

    A 34-year-old man with MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) showed chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO), which was improved by the administration of distigmine bromide. He exhibited generalized tonic clonic seizures at the age of 21, and mitochondrial DNA analysis showed the MELAS mutation. At the age of 34, he became akinetic mutism after nonconvulsive status epilepticus and needed enteral nutrition through a nasogasrtic tube. However, he developed abdominal distention and vomiting, and was diagnosed as CIPO, therefore tube feeding was stopped. Although the administration of domperidone, mosapride citrate, butyric acid bacteria, sodium picosulfate, prostaglandin F2 alpha, pantothenic acid, dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate, and so on, was ineffective, the administration of distigmine bromide improved his bowel motion disturbance and abnormal distention. The present case is the first MELAS patient with CIPO to be ameliorated by distigmine bromide, which might work acetylcholine receptor on the interstitial cells of Cajal. PMID:17511291

  17. Critical Role of Water Content in the Formation and Reactivity of Uraniu, Neptunium, and Plutonium Iodates Under Hydrothermal Conditions: Implications for the Oxidative Dissolution of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, T. H.; Ling, Jie; Choi, E- Sang; Brooks, James S.; Beitz, James V.; Sykora, Richard E.; Haire, Richard {Dick} G; Stanbury, David M.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The reactions of {sup 237}NpO{sub 2} with excess iodate under acidic hydrothermal conditions result in the isolation of the neptunium(IV), neptunium(V), and neptunium(VI) iodates, Np(IO{sub 3}){sub 4}, Np(IO{sub 3}){sub 4}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O{center_dot}nHIO{sub 3}, NpO2(IO3), NpO2(IO3)2(H2O), and NpO{sub 2}(IO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, depending on both the pH and the amount of water present in the reactions. Reactions with less water and lower pH favor reduced products. Although the initial redox processes involved in the reactions between {sup 237}NpO{sub 2} or {sup 242}PuO{sub 2} and iodate are similar, the low solubility of Pu(IO{sub 3}){sub 4} dominates product formation in plutonium iodate reactions to a much greater extent than does Np(IO{sub 3}){sub 4} in the neptunium iodate system. UO{sub 2} reacts with iodate under these conditions to yield uranium(VI) iodates solely. The isotypic structures of the actinide(IV) iodates, An(IO{sub 3}){sub 4} (An = Np, Pu), are reported and consist of one-dimensional chains of dodecahedral An(IV) cations bridged by iodate anions. The structure of Np(IO3)4{center_dot}nH2O{center_dot}nHIO3 is constructed from NpO9 tricapped-trigonal prisms that are bridged by iodate into a polar three-dimensional framework structure. Second-harmonic-generation measurements on a polycrystalline sample of the Th analogue of Np(IO{sub 3}){sub 4}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O{center_dot}nHIO{sub 3} reveal a response of approximately 12x that of {alpha}-SiO{sub 2}. Single-crystal magnetic susceptibility measurements of Np(IO{sub 3}){sub 4} show magnetically isolated Np(IV) ions.

  18. Measurement of total alpha activity of neptunium, plutonium, and americium in highly radioactive Hanford waste by iron hydroxide precipitation and 2-heptanone solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, T.C.; Kaye, J.H.

    1992-06-01

    An improved method has been developed to concentrate the major alpha-emitting actinide elements neptunium, plutonium, and americium from samples with high salt content such as those resulting from efforts to characterize Hanford storage tank waste. Actinide elements are concentrated by coprecipitation of their hydroxides using iron carrier. The iron is removed by extraction from 8M HCI with 2-heptanone. The actinide elements remain in the aqueous phase free from salts, iron, and long-lived fission products. Recoveries averaged 98 percent.

  19. Effect of chloramphenicol and ethidium bromide on the level of ornithine carbamoyltransferase in Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Zerez, C.R.; Weiss, R.L.

    1986-05-01

    The specific activity of the nuclear-gene-encoded, mitochondrial arginine biosynthetic enzyme ornithine carbamoyltransferase in Neurospora crassa was elevated in mycelia treated with chloramphenicol or ethidium bromide. The increase in specific activity was caused by an increase in the number of mature enzyme molecules rather than by the activation of a preexisting enzyme. Chloramphenicol and ethidium bromide appeared to act indirectly via arginine-mediated derepression. However, derepression did not appear to result from a drug-mediated decrease in the arginine pool.

  20. Lithium Bromide/Water as Additives in Dearomatizing Samarium-Ketyl (Hetero)Arene Cyclizations.

    PubMed

    Rao, Chintada Nageswara; Bentz, Christoph; Reissig, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-11-01

    New conditions for dearomatizing samarium-ketyl (hetero)arene cyclizations are reported. In many examples of these samarium diiodide-mediated reactions, lithium bromide and water can be used as additives instead of the carcinogenic and mutagenic hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA). The best results were obtained for the cyclizations of N-acylated indole derivatives delivering the expected indolines in good yields and excellent diastereoselectivities. A new type of cyclization delivering indolyl-substituted allene derivatives is also described. The scope and limitations of the lithium bromide/water system are discussed. PMID:26368916

  1. The determination of molecular weights of biologically active proteins by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Akin, D T; Shapira, R; Kinkade, J M

    1985-02-15

    A novel cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system which is useful for the separation of native forms of proteins consistent with their molecular weights is reported here. Many proteins examined in this system demonstrated the same association patterns which have been shown by other techniques to exist under nondenaturing conditions. In addition, biological activity could be assayed directly in the gel after electrophoresis. Based on the peculiar characteristics of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, a possible explanation which may account for the behavior of proteins in this system is presented. PMID:4003759

  2. Bromide, Chloride, and Sulfate Concentrations, and Specific Conductance, Lake Texoma, Texas and Oklahoma, 2007-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldys, Stanley

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Dallas Water Utilities Division, collected water-quality data from 11 sites on Lake Texoma, a reservoir on the Texas-Oklahoma border, during April 2007-September 2008. At 10 of the sites, physical properties (depth, specific conductance, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and alkalinity) were measured and samples were collected for analysis of selected dissolved constituents (bromide, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride, and sulfate); at one site, only physical properties were measured. The primary constituent of interest was bromide. Bromate can form when ozone is used to disinfect raw water containing bromide, and bromate is a suspected human carcinogen. Chloride and sulfate were of secondary interest. Only the analytical results for bromide, chloride, sulfate, and measured specific conductance are discussed in this report. Median dissolved bromide concentrations ranged from 0.28 to 0.60 milligrams per liter. The largest median dissolved bromide concentration (0.60 milligram per liter at site 11) was from the Red River arm of Lake Texoma. Dissolved bromide concentrations generally were larger in the Red River arm of Lake Texoma than in the Washita arm of the lake. Median dissolved chloride concentrations were largest in the Red River arm of Lake Texoma at site 11 (431 milligrams per liter) and smallest at site 8 (122 milligrams per liter) in the Washita arm. At site 11 in the Red River arm, the mean and median chloride concentrations exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 milligrams per liter for chloride established by the 'Texas Surface Water Quality Standards' for surface-water bodies designated for the public water supply use. Median dissolved sulfate concentrations ranged from 182 milligrams per liter at site 4 in the Big Mineral arm to 246 milligrams per liter at site 11 in the Red River arm. None of the mean or median sulfate concentrations

  3. Improved light olefin yield from methyl bromide coupling over modified SAPO-34 molecular sieves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Shouli; Komon, Zachary J A; Osterwalder, Neil; Gadewar, Sagar; Stoimenov, Peter; Auerbach, Daniel J; Stucky, Galen D; McFarland, Eric W

    2011-02-21

    As an alternative to the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas followed by methanol synthesis and the subsequent generation of olefins, we have studied the production of light olefins (ethylene and propylene) from the reaction of methyl bromide over various modified microporous silico-aluminophosphate molecular-sieve catalysts with an emphasis on SAPO-34. Some comparisons of methyl halides and methanol as reaction intermediates in their conversion to olefins are presented. Increasing the ratio of Si/Al and incorporation of Co into the catalyst framework improved the methyl bromide yield of light olefins over that obtained using standard SAPO-34. PMID:21203621

  4. Active Control of Interface Shape During the Crystal Growth of Lead Bromide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, W. M. B.; Batur, C.; Singh, N. B.

    2003-01-01

    A thermal model for predicting and designing the furnace temperature profile was developed and used for the crystal growth of lead bromide. The model gives the ampoule temperature as a function of the furnace temperature, thermal conductivity, heat transfer coefficients, and ampoule dimensions as variable parameters. Crystal interface curvature was derived from the model and it was compared with the predicted curvature for a particular furnace temperature and growth parameters. Large crystals of lead bromide were grown and it was observed that interface shape was in agreement with the shape predicted by this model.

  5. Breakdown of ionic character of molecular alkali bromides in inner-valence photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Karpenko, A. Iablonskyi, D.; Kettunen, J. A.; Cao, W.; Huttula, M.; Aksela, H.; Urpelainen, S.

    2014-05-28

    The inner-valence region of alkali bromide XBr (X=Li, Na, K, Rb) vapours has been studied experimentally by means of synchrotron radiation excited photoelectron spectroscopy. Experimental spectra were analyzed by comparing them with available theoretical results and previous experiments. Ionic character of alkali bromides is seen to change in the inner-valence region with increasing atomic number of the alkali atom. A mechanism involving mixing between Br 4s and Rb 4p orbitals has been suggested to account for the fine structure observed in inner-valence ionization region of RbBr.

  6. Sequential injection approach for simultaneous determination of ultratrace plutonium and neptunium in urine with accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per; Lachner, Johannes; Christl, Marcus; Xu, Yihong

    2013-09-17

    An analytical method was developed for simultaneous determination of ultratrace level plutonium (Pu) and neptunium (Np) using iron hydroxide coprecipitation in combination with automated sequential injection extraction chromatography separation and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurement. Several experimental parameters affecting the analytical performance were investigated and compared including sample preboiling operation, aging time, amount of coprecipitating reagent, reagent for pH adjustment, sedimentation time, and organic matter decomposition approach. The overall analytical results show that preboiling and aging are important for obtaining high chemical yields for both Pu and Np, which is possibly related to the aggregation and adsorption behavior of organic substances contained in urine. Although the optimal condition for Np and Pu simultaneous determination requires 5-day aging time, an immediate coprecipitation without preboiling and aging could also provide fairly satisfactory chemical yields for both Np and Pu (50-60%) with high sample throughput (4 h/sample). Within the developed method, (242)Pu was exploited as chemical yield tracer for both Pu and Np isotopes. (242)Pu was also used as a spike in the AMS measurement for quantification of (239)Pu and (237)Np concentrations. The results show that, under the optimal experimental condition, the chemical yields of (237)Np and (242)Pu are nearly identical, indicating the high feasibility of (242)Pu as a nonisotopic tracer for (237)Np determination in real urine samples. The analytical method was validated by analysis of a number of urine samples spiked with different levels of (237)Np and (239)Pu. The measured values of (237)Np and (239)Pu by AMS exhibit good agreement (R(2) ≥ 0.955) with the spiked ones confirming the reliability of the proposed method. PMID:23952680

  7. INCORPORATION OF PENTAVALENT NEPTUNIUM INTO URANYL PHASES THAT MAY FORM AS ALTERATION PRODUCTS OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2005-06-21

    Laboratory-scale simulations and studies of natural analogues have shown that alteration of spent nuclear fuel in a moist, oxidizing environment results in the formation of a variety of uranyl phases. Neptunium-237 has a half-life of 2.14 million years, and the pentavalent oxidation state is soluble in groundwater. Release of Np-237 from spent nuclear fuel in a geological repository may significantly impact the long-term performance of such a repository. Incorporation of Np, in the pentavalent oxidation state, into uranyl phases by substitution for hexavalent U is likely because of the similarity of the coordination environments of these two cations, but a charge-balance mechanism is required for substitution. A preliminary study has shown incorporation of pentavalent Np into powders of the uranyl silicate uranophane, and Na-compreignacite, a uranyl oxyhydrate [1]. Using synthesis experiments under mild hydrothermal conditions, we are examining the incorporation of pentavalent Np into selected uranyl oxyhydrates and silicates as a function of temperature and the pH of the mother solution. Analyses of powders of these uranyl phases has demonstrated both temperature and pH dependences for incorporation. Experiments are underway directed at the synthesis of single crystals of uranyl phases in the presence of 500-750 ppm pentavalent Np. The intent is to develop a basic understanding of the crystallographic and crystal chemical factors that impact incorporation of pentavalent Np into uranyl phases. Following synthesis, crystals are analyzed for Np using laser ablation ICP-MS. Preliminary results for Na-substituted metaschoepite indicate significant Np has been incorporated into the crystals. Additional phases under study include compreignacite, becquerelite, soddyite, zippeite, and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}.

  8. 78 FR 14508 - Notice of Affirmation of Addition of a Treatment Schedule for Methyl Bromide Fumigation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... Treatment Schedule for Methyl Bromide Fumigation of Cottonseed AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection... methyl bromide fumigation of cottonseed for the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp... Manual of the treatment described in the notice published at 77 FR 31564-31566 on May 29, 2012....

  9. OZONATION BYPRODUCTS: IDENTIFICATION OF BROMOHYDRINS FROM THE OZONATION OF NATURAL WATERS WITH ENHANCED BROMIDE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When ozone is used in the treatment of drinking water, it reacts with both inorganic and organic compounds to form byproducts. f bromide is present, it may be oxidized to hydrobromous acid, which may than react with natural organic matter to form brominated organic compounds. he ...

  10. Experimental study of negative temperatures in lithium-bromide absorption refrigerating machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, K. I.; Mukhin, D. G.; Alekseenko, S. V.; Volkova, O. V.

    2015-07-01

    The authors have developed a method and presented experimental data for obtaining negative temperatures of evaporation in lithium-bromide absorption chillers driven by heat recovery. It has been found that the attainable temperature of the refrigerated medium is the value of -5 °C.

  11. Palladium-catalyzed carbonylative synthesis of quinazolinones from 2-aminobenzamide and aryl bromides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Feng; He, Lin; Neumann, Helfried; Beller, Matthias

    2013-09-16

    C from CO! A straightforward procedure for the carbonylative synthesis of quinazolinones from readily available 2-aminobenzamide and aryl bromides has been developed. In the presence of a palladium catalyst, various quinazolinones were produced in moderate to excellent yields. Remarkably, no chromatography was needed for purification (see scheme). PMID:24175339

  12. WEED COMMUNITY COMPOSITION IN TREE FRUIT NURSERIES TREATED WITH METHYL BROMIDE AND ALTERNATIVE FUMIGANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several agricultural cropping systems, for decades, have relied on methyl bromide (MeBr) for pest control including weeds. Alternative fumigants are being sought worldwide because MeBr has been identified as an ozone-layer depleting substance. Weed communities respond dynamically to alterations in...

  13. 78 FR 36507 - Notice of Availability of a Treatment Evaluation Document; Methyl Bromide Fumigation of Blueberries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ...We are advising the public that we have determined that it is necessary to immediately add to the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual an additional treatment schedule for methyl bromide fumigation of blueberries for Mediterranean fruit fly and South American fruit fly. We have prepared a treatment evaluation document that describes the new treatment schedule and explains why we......

  14. WATER AND BROMIDE RECOVERY IN WICK AND PAN LYSIMETERS UNDER CONVENTIONAL AND ZERO TILLAGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying in situ solute transport through soils and the landscape has been widely acknowledged as important and yet challenging. The objective of this study was to evaluate water and bromide movement in no-tilled (NT) and conventionally tilled (CT) corn using two different types of in situ lysime...

  15. BROMIDES'S EFFECT ON DBP FORMATION, SPECIATION, AND CONTROL: PART 1, OZONATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many factors should be taken into account in the assessment of the impact of ozonation on the speciation of the THMs and HAAS. n this study, the behavior of the individual species with varying bromide and ozone concentrations was examined. n general, the formation behavior for th...

  16. PERENNIAL CROP NURSERIES TREATED WITH METHYL BROMIDE AND ALTERNATIVE FUMIGANTS: EFFECT ON WEED COMMUNITY COMPOSTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed communities can respond dynamically to shifts in management systems. Thus, transition from methyl bromide (MeBr) to alternative fumigants for pre-plant soil treatments may cause shifts in weed species composition. This hypothesis was tested in four perennial crop nurseries in California. The...

  17. Mechanism of HERG potassium channel inhibition by tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yan; Lin, Zuoxian; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei; Li, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride are synthetic quaternary ammonium salts that are widely used in hospitals and industries for the disinfection and surface treatment and as the preservative agent. Recently, the activities of HERG channel inhibition by these compounds have been found to have potential risks to induce the long QT syndrome and cardiac arrhythmia, although the mechanism of action is still elusive. This study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of HERG channel inhibition by these compounds using whole-cell patch clamp experiments in a CHO cell line stably expressing HERG channels. Tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride exhibited concentration-dependent inhibitions of HERG channel currents with IC50 values of 4 nM and 17 nM, respectively, which were also voltage-dependent and use-dependent. Both compounds shifted the channel activation I-V curves in a hyperpolarized direction for 10-15 mV and accelerated channel activation and inactivation processes by 2-fold. In addition, tetra-n-octylammonium bromide shifted the inactivation I-V curve in a hyperpolarized direction for 24.4 mV and slowed the rate of channel deactivation by 2-fold, whereas benzethonium chloride did not. The results indicate that tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride are open-channel blockers that inhibit HERG channels in the voltage-dependent, use-dependent and state-dependent manners. PMID:23313619

  18. Mild Pd-Catalyzed Aminocarbonylation of (Hetero)Aryl Bromides with a Palladacycle Precatalyst

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A palladacyclic precatalyst is employed to cleanly generate a highly active XantPhos-ligated Pd-catalyst. Its use in low temperature aminocarbonylations of (hetero)aryl bromides provides access to a range of challenging products in good to excellent yields with low catalyst loading and only a slight excess of CO. Some products are unattainable by traditional carbonylative coupling. PMID:25090373

  19. Methyl bromide and sulfuryl fluoride effectiveness against red flour beetle life stages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of methyl bromide (MB) and sulfuryl fluoride (SF) for managing all life stages of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, was investigated in the Hal Ross Flour Mill at Kansas State University. Eggs, young larvae, large larvae, pupae, and adults confined in plastic compartments with ...

  20. Bromate formation from bromide oxidation by the UV/persulfate process.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing-Yun; Shang, Chii

    2012-08-21

    Bromate formation from bromide oxidation by the UV/persulfate process was investigated, along with changes in pH, persulfate dosages, and bromide concentrations in ultrapure water and in bromide-spiked real water. In general, the bromate formation increased with increasing persulfate dosage and bromide concentration. The bromate formation was initiated and primarily driven by sulfate radicals (SO(4)(•-)) and involved the formation of hypobromous acid/hypobromite (HOBr/OBr(-)) as an intermediate and bromate as the final product. Under the test conditions, the rate of the first step driven by SO(4)(•-) is slower than that of the second step. Direct UV photolysis of HOBr/OBr(-) to form bromate and the photolysis of bromate are insignificant. The bromate formation was similar for pH 4-7 but decreased over 90% with increasing pH from 7 to above 9. Less bromate was formed in the real water sample than in ultrapure water, which was primarily attributable to the presence of natural organic matter that reacts with bromine atoms, HOBr/OBr(-) and SO(4)(•-). The extent of bromate formation and degradation of micropollutants are nevertheless coupled processes unless intermediate bromine species are consumed by NOM in real water. PMID:22831804

  1. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of bromide by periodate in aqueous acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Szél, Viktor; Csekő, György; Horváth, Attila K

    2014-11-13

    The periodate–bromide reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically mainly in excess of bromide ion, monitoring the formation of the total amount of bromine at 450 nm at acidic buffered conditions and at a constant ionic strength in the presence of a phosphoric acid/dihydrogen phosphate buffer. The stoichiometry of the reaction was established to be strictly IO4(–) + 2Br(–) + 2H(+) → Br2 + IO3(–) + H2O. The formal kinetic order of the reactants was found to be perfectly one and two in the cases of periodate and bromide, respectively, but that of the hydrogen ion lies between one and two. We have also provided experimental evidence that dihydrogen phosphate accelerates the formation of bromine, suggesting the appearance of strong buffer assistance. On the basis of the experiments, a simple two-step kinetic model is proposed involving BrIO3 as a key intermediate that perfectly explains all of the experimental findings. Furthermore, we have also shown that in huge excess of bromide, the apparent rate coefficient obtained from the individual curve fitting method of the absorbance–time series is necessarily independent of the initial periodate concentration that may falsely be interpreted as the rate of bromine formation is also independent of the concentration of periodate. PMID:25365468

  2. 40 CFR 721.4090 - Ethanaminium, N-[bis(diethylamino)-methylene]-N-ethyl-, bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide. 721.4090 Section 721.4090 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4090 Ethanaminium,...

  3. Status of methyl bromide alternatives for ornamental crop production in Florida and California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phase-out of methyl bromide presents critical challenges to producers of cut-flowers and in-ground ornamentals. Work in California and Florida has included combinations of chemicals, various formulations, and application methods for registered compounds, including 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D), ch...

  4. Comparing copper sulfate, diquat bromide, formalin, and hydrogen peroxide treatments on channel catfish eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced fish egg survival is often associated with fungal infestation (Saprolegnia spp.) of the eggs. Chemical treatments have been used to limit these infestations on fish eggs and increase survival. The effect of copper sulfate (10 mg/L), diquat bromide (25 mg/L diquat cation), formalin (433 mg/...

  5. Methods to facilitate the adoption of alternatives to methyl bromide soil fumigation by California strawberry growers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this project is to facilitate the adoption of strawberry production systems that do not use methyl bromide (MB). The five year project initially focused on fumigant alternatives to MB. The project has resulted in increased use of barrier films that reduce fumigant emission. The focus s...

  6. TRIBROMOPYRROLE, BROMINATED ACIDS, AND OTHER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS PRODUCED BY DISINFECTION OF DRINKING WATER RICH IN BROMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), we investigated the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from high bromide waters (2 mg/L) treated with chlorine or chlorine dioxide used in combination with chlorine and chloramines. This study represents the first comp...

  7. Photoredox-Catalyzed Bromodifluoromethylation of Alkenes with (Difluoromethyl)triphenylphosphonium Bromide.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qing-Yu; Ran, Yang; Xu, Xiu-Hua; Qing, Feng-Ling

    2016-05-20

    Under visible-light photoredox conditions, difluoromethyltriphenylphosphonium bromide was used as the precursor of the CF2H radical for bromodifluoromethylation of alkenes. The presence of catalytic CuBr2 resulted in the selective formation of the bromodifluoromethylated products. PMID:27136958

  8. Steam disinfestation as a methyl bromide alternative in California cut flower nurseries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steam may be an effective alternative to methyl bromide in cut flower production in California. Advantages of steam include broad spectrum pest control and a zero hour re-entry interval. The principle disadvantage of sheet steaming is cost effectiveness due to current energy prices and application...

  9. Effect of increasing bromide concentration on toxicity in treated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Sawade, Emma; Fabris, Rolando; Humpage, Andrew; Drikas, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Research is increasingly indicating the potential chronic health effects of brominated disinfection by-products (DBPs). This is likely to increase with elevated bromide concentrations resulting from the impacts of climate change, projected to include extended periods of drought and the sudden onset of water quality changes. This will demand more rigorous monitoring throughout distribution systems and improved water quality management at water treatment plants (WTPs). In this work the impact of increased bromide concentration on formation of DBPs following conventional treatment and chlorination was assessed for two water sources. Bioanalytical tests were utilised to determine cytotoxicity of the water post disinfection. Coagulation was shown to significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of the water, indicating that removal of natural organic matter DBP precursors continues to be an important factor in drinking water treatment. Most toxic species appear to form within the first half hour following disinfectant addition. Increasing bromide concentration across the two waters was shown to increase the formation of trihalomethanes and shifted the haloacetic acid species distribution from chlorinated to those with greater bromine substitution. This correlated with increasing cytotoxicity. This work demonstrates the challenges faced by WTPs and the possible effects increasing levels of bromide in source waters could have on public health. PMID:27105403

  10. The use of agricultural by-products to capture methyl bromide following post-harvest fumigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activated carbons were prepared from plum and peach stone as well as almond and walnut shell and comparatively evaluated as sorbents to minimize the atmospheric emission of methyl bromide following postharvest fumigations. A variety of methods were used to make the activated carbons and each is desc...

  11. Copper-catalyzed conversion of aryl and heteroaryl bromides into the corresponding chlorides.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiujuan; Qu, Yiping; Han, Yanlei; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Bao, Ming; Yamamoto, Yoshinori

    2012-10-01

    An efficient method for the synthesis of aryl and heteroaryl chlorides is described. The reactions of aryl and heteroaryl bromides with tetramethylammonium chloride proceeded smoothly in the presence of a copper catalyst under mild reaction conditions to produce the corresponding chlorides in satisfactory to excellent yields. PMID:22895409

  12. The stereoselective synthesis of dienes through dehalogenative homocoupling of terminal alkenyl bromides on Cu(110).

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Cai, Liangliang; Ma, Honghong; Yuan, Chunxue; Xu, Wei

    2016-05-21

    We have successfully achieved the stereoselective synthesis of a specific cis-diene moiety through a dehalogenative homocoupling of alkenyl bromides on the Cu(110) surface, where the formation of a cis-form organometallic intermediate is the key to such a stereoselectivity as determined by DFT calculations. PMID:27063567

  13. Fumigant use and transition from methyl bromide to alternatives in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports fumigant use status and changes in response to the phase-out of methyl bromide (MeBr) and transition to alternative chemicals based on the 2010 Pesticide Use Reporting (PUR) database compiled by California Department of Pesticide Regulation. The data were analyzed from 2000 throug...

  14. 77 FR 29341 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... part 2 subpart B; 41 FR 36752, 43 FR 40000, 50 FR 51661. If no claim of confidentiality accompanies the... to the provisions of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer for... AGENCY Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption...

  15. Methyl bromide release from activated carbon and the soil/water/carbon interface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl Bromide (MB) is a major source of stratospheric bromine radical, a known depletor of ozone. The use of ozone-depleting chemicals, including MB, is regulated by the Montreal Protocol. Critical uses of MB are permitted, such as when postharvest fumigation is mandated by an importing country. Fo...

  16. EVALUATION OF CONTAINMENT AND CONTROL OPTIONS FOR METHYL BROMIDE IN COMMODITY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an investigation of means for methyl bromide (MeBr) recovery, reuse, and destruction to prevent atmospheric emissions if its limited use were still allowed. (NOTE: MeBr is an ozone-depleting chemical scheduled to be phased out by the Clean Air Act by t...

  17. 77 FR 31564 - Notice of Availability of a Treatment Evaluation Document; Methyl Bromide Fumigation of Cottonseed

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    ... Federal Register on April 6, 2012 (77 FR 20752-20756), EPA proposed to reinstate the tolerance of methyl...; Methyl Bromide Fumigation of Cottonseed AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... add to the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual a treatment schedule for methyl...

  18. Headspace gas chromatographic method for determination of methyl bromide in food ingredients

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, J.W.; Broge, J.M.; Schroeder, J.P.; Bowers, R.H.; Larson, P.A.; Burns, N.M.

    1985-11-01

    A headspace gas chromatographic (GC) method, which can be automated, has been developed for determination of methyl bromide. This method has been applied to wheat, flour, cocoa, and peanuts. Samples to be analyzed are placed in headspace sample vials, water is added, and the vials are sealed with Teflon-lined septa. After an appropriate equilibration time at 32 degrees C, the samples are analyzed within 10 h. A sample of the headspace is withdrawn and analyzed on a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector (ECD). Methyl bromide levels were quantitated by comparison of peak area with a standard. The standard was generated by adding a known amount of methyl bromide to a portion of the matrix being analyzed and which was known to be methyl bromide free. The detection limit of the method was 0.4 ppb. The coefficient of variation (CV) was 6.5% for wheat, 8.3% for flour, 3.3% for cocoa, and 11.6% for peanuts.

  19. Recovery of bromine from methyl bromide using amorphous MnO{sub x} photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jung-Chou; Suib, S.L.; Cutlip, M.B.

    1996-07-01

    Amorphous MnO{sub x} (AMO) has been prepared by the reaction of potassium permanganate and oxalic acid. Surface area measurements and pore size distribution analyses show that AMO has high surface (200 m{sup 2}/g) area and a microporous structure. Kinetic results indicate that methyl bromide degradation using AMO photocatalysts is due to a combination of thermocatalytic and photocatalytic reactions; however, the photocatalytic reaction is predominant. Detailed studies show that both molecular oxygen and bulk lattice oxygen of AMO can be involved in the oxidation of methyl bromide to carbon dioxide. Kinetic data, Auger analyses, and FTIR spectra suggest that both oxidation state changes of Mn and the presence of bromide adsorbed on the surface might lead to deactivation of the catalyst. According to mass balance calculations and analyses with potassium iodide solutions with starch, the final products are bromine, carbon dioxide, and water. The overall reaction for methyl bromide degradation under illumination using AMO photocatalyst can be expressed as CH{sub 3}Br{sub (g)} + 7/4O{sub 2(g)} {yields} CO{sub 2(g)} + 3/2H{sub 2}O(g) + {1/2}Br{sub 2(g)}. 27 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Quantitative gas chromatographic mass spectrometric determination of pinaverium-bromide in human serum.

    PubMed

    de Weerdt, G A; Beke, R P; Verdievel, H G; Barbier, F; Jonckheere, J A; de Leenheer, A P

    1983-03-01

    A method has been developed for quantitative determination of pinaverium-bromide, a quaternary ammonium derivative with papaverine-like activity, in human serum. The method involves a chloroform extraction of serum spiked with N-(6,6-dimethyl bicyclo[3.1.1]2-heptenyl-ethoxyethyl) perhydro-1,4-oxazine as internal standard. After evaporation of the solvent, and reduction of the residue with Raney-Nickel, the internal standard and the reduced pinaverium-bromide are re-extracted from the reaction mixture with toluene and analysed isothermally on a fused silica column coated with OV-101. Although chemical ionization with methane revealed intense protonated molecular ions for both pinaverium-bromide and the internal standard, selectivity and sensitivity were significantly lower in comparison with electron impact ionization at 70 e V. Therefore, quantification was performed in the electron impact mode by single ion monitoring of the common fragment ion at m/z 100.2. A linear detector response was observed up to 160 ng ml-1. A within-run assay precision better than 2% CV (n = 5) was found, and a detection limit of 1 ng pinaverium-bromide ml-1 of serum was attained. PMID:6850068

  1. Combinatorial electrochemistry using metal nanoparticles: from proof-of-concept to practical realisation for bromide detection.

    PubMed

    Sljukić, Biljana; Baron, Ronan; Salter, Chris; Crossley, Alison; Compton, Richard G

    2007-05-01

    Principles and practical application of combinatorial electrochemistry in search for new electroactive materials in electroanalysis have been explored. Nanoparticles of three different metals: silver, gold and palladium have been independently synthesized on the glassy carbon spherical powder surface by electroless deposition process and characterized using both spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. These three materials were then combined together onto basal plane pyrolytic graphite electrode surface and the application of the combinatorial approach to find the electrode material for bromide detection as model target analyte was demonstrated. The component electroactive for bromide detection was next identified and it was found that silver nanoparticles were the active ones. A composite electrode based on silver nanoparticle modified glassy carbon powder and epoxy resin was then fabricated and it was found to allow accurate determination of bromide. The electroactivity for the bromide determination of the composite electrode was compared with that of a bulk silver electrode and it was shown that the composite electrode is very efficient with a comparable electroactivity with only a portion of precious metals being used for its construction. PMID:17416224

  2. Reduced rates and alternatives to methyl bromide for snapdragon production in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field trial was conducted to evaluate soil solarization, Midas™ (iodomethane:chloropicrin 50:50, Arysta LifeScience Corp., Cary, NC) and different rates and formulations of methyl bromide under standard and metalized films for the production of snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) in Martin County, Flor...

  3. Comparison of Shank-and-Drip-Applied Methyl Bromide Alternatives in Perenial Crop Field Nurseries.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide has been used extensively at open-field perennial crop nurseries to ensure the production of plants that are free of soilborne pests and pathogens. California regulations require that nursery stock for farm planting be commercially clean with respect to economically important nematod...

  4. Forest nurseries face critical choices with the loss of methyl bromide fumigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forest nurseries in the western United States have relied for decades on methyl bromide for the control of soilborne pathogens such as Cylindrocarpoin, Fusarium, and Pythium species that affect bareroot tree seedling production. However, increased state and federal regulations have led to a substan...

  5. 76 FR 7200 - Methyl Bromide; Notice of Receipt of Requests To Voluntarily Amend Registrations To Terminate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Hawaii (use allowed until December 31, 2012); (2) soils on golf courses and athletic/recreational fields..., Vidalia onions grown in Georgia, ginger grown in Hawaii; (2) soils on golf courses and athletic... bromide on soil for resurfacing/replanting turf or sod on golf courses and athletic/recreational...

  6. Methyl Bromide Alternatives Area-Wide Pest Management Project - South Atlantic Progress Report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protocols and Standard Operational Procedures (SOPs) were developed for collecting environmental and soil edaphic information during and after application of methyl bromide alternatives. Parameters measured included soil moisture, soil bulk density, percent moisture at field capacity (-0.3 bars wat...

  7. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FORMED IN THE PRESENCE OF BROMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using a combination of mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy, disinfection by-products (DBPs) were identified in ozonated drinking water containing elevated bromide levels, and in ozonated water treated with secondary chlorine or chloramine. Only one brominated by-product-d...

  8. Removal of bromide and iodide anions from drinking water by silver-activated carbon aerogels.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Polo, M; Rivera-Utrilla, J; Salhi, E; von Gunten, U

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the use of Ag-doped activated carbon aerogels for bromide and iodide removal from drinking water and to study how the activation of Ag-doped aerogels affects their behavior. It has been observed that the carbonization treatment and activation process of Ag-doped aerogels increased the surface area value ( [Formula: see text] ), whereas the volume of meso-(V(2)) and macropores (V(3)) decreased slightly. Chemical characterization of the materials revealed that carbonization and especially activation process considerably increased the surface basicity of the sample. Original sample (A) presented acidic surface properties (pH(PZC)=4.5) with 21% surface oxygen, whereas the sample that underwent activation showed mainly basic surface chemical properties (pH(PZC)=9.5) with only 6% of surface oxygen. Carbonization and especially, activation process considerable increased the adsorption capacity of bromide and iodide ions. This would mainly be produced by (i) an increase in the microporosity of the sample, which increases Ag-adsorption sites available to halide anions, and (ii) a rise of the basicity of the sample, which produces an increase in attractive electrostatic interactions between the aerogel surface, positively charged at the working pH (pH(solution)bromide and iodide was studied under dynamic conditions using waters from Lake Zurich. Results obtained showed that the carbonization and activation processes increased the adsorptive capacity of the aerogel sample. However, results showed that the adsorption capacity of the aerogel samples studied was considerably lower in water from Lake Zurich. Results showed X(0.02) (amount adsorbed to initial breakthrough) values of 0.1 and 4.3 mg/g for chloride anion and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), respectively, during bromide adsorption process in water from Lake Zurich

  9. Kinetics of Chlorination of Benzophenone-3 in the Presence of Bromide and Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Pamela; Deborde, Marie; Dossier Berne, Florence; Karpel Vel Leitner, Nathalie

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of chlorination on the degradation of one of the most commonly used UV filters (benzophenone-3 (BP-3)) and the effects of bromide and ammonia on the kinetics of BP-3 elimination. Bromide and ammonia are rapidly converted to bromine and chloramines during chlorination. At first, the rate constants of chlorine, bromine and monochloramine with BP-3 were determined at various pH levels. BP-3 was found to react rapidly with chlorine and bromine, with values of apparent second order rate constants equal to 1.25(±0.14) × 10(3) M(-1)·s(-1) and 4.04(±0.54) × 10(6) M(-1)·s(-1) at pH 8.5 for kChlorine/BP-3 and kBromine/BP-3, respectively, whereas low monochloramine reactivity was observed (kNH2Cl/BP-3 = 0.112 M(-1)·s(-1)). To assess the impact of the inorganic content of water on BP-3 degradation, chlorination experiments with different added concentrations of bromide and/or ammonia were conducted. Under these conditions, BP-3 degradation was found to be enhanced in the presence of bromide due to the formation of bromine, whereas it was inhibited in the presence of ammonia. However, the results obtained were pH dependent. Finally, a kinetic model considering 18 reactions was developed using Copasi to estimate BP-3 degradation during chlorination in the presence of bromide and ammonia. PMID:26587868

  10. A novel explicit approach to model bromide and pesticide transport in connected soil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, J.; Zehe, E.

    2011-07-01

    The present study tests whether an explicit treatment of worm burrows and tile drains as connected structures is feasible for simulating water flow, bromide and pesticide transport in structured heterogeneous soils at hillslope scale. The essence is to represent worm burrows as morphologically connected paths of low flow resistance in a hillslope model. A recent Monte Carlo study (Klaus and Zehe, 2010, Hydrological Processes, 24, p. 1595-1609) revealed that this approach allowed successful reproduction of tile drain event discharge recorded during an irrigation experiment at a tile drained field site. However, several "hillslope architectures" that were all consistent with the available extensive data base allowed a good reproduction of tile drain flow response. Our second objective was thus to find out whether this "equifinality" in spatial model setups may be reduced when including bromide tracer data in the model falsification process. We thus simulated transport of bromide for the 13 spatial model setups that performed best with respect to reproduce tile drain event discharge, without any further calibration. All model setups allowed a very good prediction of the temporal dynamics of cumulated bromide leaching into the tile drain, while only four of them matched the accumulated water balance and accumulated bromide loss into the tile drain. The number of behavioural model architectures could thus be reduced to four. One of those setups was used for simulating transport of Isoproturon, using different parameter combinations to characterise adsorption according to the Footprint data base. Simulations could, however, only reproduce the observed leaching behaviour, when we allowed for retardation coefficients that were very close to one.

  11. Utility of Bromide and Heat Tracers for Aquifer Characterization Affected by Highly Transient Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Zachara, John M.; Tonkin, Matthew J.

    2012-08-29

    A tracer test using both bromide and heat tracers conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Hanford 300 Area (300A), Washington, provided an instrument for evaluating the utility of bromide and heat tracers for aquifer characterization. The bromide tracer data were critical to improving the calibration of the flow model complicated by the highly dynamic nature of the flow field. However, most bromide concentrations were obtained from fully screened observation wells, lacking depth-specific resolution for vertical characterization. On the other hand, depth-specific temperature data were relatively simple and inexpensive to acquire. However, temperature-driven fluid density effects influenced heat plume movement. Moreover, the temperature data contained “noise” caused by heating during fluid injection and sampling events. Using the hydraulic conductivity distribution obtained from the calibration of the bromide transport model, the temperature depth profiles and arrival times of temperature peaks simulated by the heat transport model were in reasonable agreement with observations. This suggested that heat can be used as a cost-effective proxy for solute tracers for calibration of the hydraulic conductivity distribution, especially in the vertical direction. However, a heat tracer test must be carefully designed and executed to minimize fluid density effects and sources of noise in temperature data. A sensitivity analysis also revealed that heat transport was most sensitive to hydraulic conductivity and porosity, less sensitive to thermal distribution factor, and least sensitive to thermal dispersion and heat conduction. This indicated that the hydraulic conductivity remains the primary calibration parameter for heat transport.

  12. [Effectiveness of pinaverium bromide therapy on colonic motility disorders in irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wittmann, T; Fehér, A; Rosztóczy, A; Jánosi, J

    1999-02-28

    The special patterns of the slow wave activity in irrittable bowel syndrome by means of surface electromyography were examined and the effect of pinaverium bromide on the symptoms and on the colonic motility in this disease was estimated. Twenty two patients with irritable bowel syndrome and 7 healthy controls were selected to the study. The clinical symptoms were abdominal pain and bloating in all patients, constipation in 9, and diarrhoea in 6 cases. Surface electromyography was carried out before and on the 14th day of the treatment with pinaverium bromide (50 mg t. i. d). The colonic motility was analysed in a 2 hour fasting and a 2 hour postprandial period following a standard (800 kCal) meal. The slow wave frequency of 0.01-0.04 Hz were selected and analysed. The mean frequency of activity peaks (n/10 min) and power-index (area under curve, microV 10 min) were measured. For statistical analysis Student's t-test was applied. Electromyogram of patients with irritable bowel syndrome showed a significant increase of the measured colonic motility parameters both in fasting and postprandial states. Fourteen days of pinaverium bromide treatment was able to significantly reduce the intensity of the colonic motor activity. Administration of pinaverium bromide completely released in 6 and significantly improved the abdominal pain in other 12 patients, while the bloating disappeared in 12 and was significantly improved in 5 from 22 patients. Pinaverium bromide was able to normalise the stool frequency: the weekly number of stools was decreased from 16 to 7 in the patients complaining diarrhoea ant it was increased from 2 to 6 in the patients with constipation. PMID:10204402

  13. The role of bromide ions in seeding growth of Au nanorods.

    PubMed

    Garg, Niti; Scholl, Clark; Mohanty, Ashok; Jin, Rongchao

    2010-06-15

    We report our findings on the important role of bromide ions in the seeding growth process of Au nanorods. The seed-mediated process constitutes a well-developed method for synthesizing gold nanorods in high yield, which is facilitated by a micelle-forming surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTA-Br). Despite the tremendous work in recent years, the growth mechanism of Au nanorods has not been fully understood. Contrary to the widely accepted mechanism of CTA(+) micelle-templated growth of Au nanorods, we have identified the critical role of bromide ions in the seeding growth of Au nanorods. We found that even when the micelle-forming agent (CTA(+)) concentration is below its critical micelle concentration (cmc), bromide ions added in the form of NaBr can successfully effect the growth of Au nanorods in good yield. By controlling the concentration of externally added bromide ions, the rod shape and dimensions of the resulting Au nanoparticles can be readily controlled in the presence of only a minimum amount of CTABr (as a steric stabilizer for nanorods). High-resolution TEM studies show that the as-formed nanorods are perfectly single crystalline, instead of penta-twinned ones, and are bound by {111} and {100} facets with a [110] direction as the elongation direction. A mechanism is proposed to account for the seeding growth of single crystalline Au nanorods. Overall, this work explicitly demonstrates that Br(-) indeed serves as an important shape-directing agent for gold nanorod formation in the seed-mediated process. PMID:20394386

  14. Sensitive redox speciation of iron, neptunium, and plutonium by capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Graser, Carl-Heinrich; Banik, Nidhu Lal; Bender, Kerstin Anne; Lagos, Markus; Marquardt, Christian Michael; Marsac, Rémi; Montoya, Vanessa; Geckeis, Horst

    2015-10-01

    The long-term safety assessment for nuclear waste repositories requires a detailed understanding of actinide (geo)chemistry. Advanced analytical tools are required to gain insight into actinide speciation in a given system. The geochemical conditions in the vicinity of a nuclear repository control the redox state of radionuclides, which in turn has a strong impact on their mobility. Besides the long-lived radionuclides plutonium (Pu) and neptunium (Np), which are key elements in high level nuclear waste, iron (Fe) represents a main component in natural systems controlling redox-related geochemical processes. Measuring the oxidation state distribution for redox sensitive radionuclides and other metal ions is challenging at trace concentrations below the detection limit of most available spectroscopic methods (≥10(-6) M). Consequently, ultrasensitive new analytical techniques are required. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a suitable separation method for metal cations. CE hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (CE-ICP-SF-MS) was used to measure the redox speciation of Pu (III, IV, V, VI), Np (IV, V, VI), and Fe (II, III) at concentrations lower than 10(-7) M. CE coupling and separation parameters such as sample gas pressure, make up flow rate, capillary position, auxiliary gas flow, as well as the electrolyte system were optimized to obtain the maximum sensitivity. We obtain detection limits of 10(-12) M for Np and Pu. The various oxidation state species of Pu and Np in different samples were separated by application of an acetate-based electrolyte system. The separation of Fe (II) and Fe (III) was investigated using different organic complexing ligands, EDTA, and o-phenanthroline. For the Fe redox system, a limit of detection of 10(-8) M was calculated. By applying this analytical system to sorption studies, we were able to underline previously published results for the sorption behavior of Np in highly diluted concentrations, and

  15. Bromate formation in bromide-containing water through the cobalt-mediated activation of peroxymonosulfate.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaobing; Chen, Zhi; Xiang, Yingying; Ling, Li; Fang, Jingyun; Shang, Chii; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2015-10-15

    Bromate formation in bromide-containing water through the cobalt (Co)-mediated activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) was investigated. Increasing the PMS dosage and the cobalt dosage increased the formation of bromate and bromate yields of up to 100% were recorded under the test conditions. The bromate yield increased to a maximum as the pH rose from 2.7 to 6 before decreasing by over 90% as the pH rose further from 6 to above 9. The bromate formation is a two-step process involving free bromine as a key intermediate and bromate as the final product. In the first step, apart from the known oxidation of bromide to free bromine and of free bromine to bromate by sulfate radicals (SO4(-)), Co(III) produced from the oxidation of Co(II) by PMS and SO4(-) also oxidizes bromide to free bromine. The contribution of Co(III) to the bromate formation was verified with the addition of methanol and EDTA, a radical scavenger and a Co(III) ligand, respectively. In the presence of methanol, free bromine formation increased with increasing Co(II) dosage but no bromate was detected, indicating that Co(III) oxidized bromide to form free bromine but not bromate. In the presence of both EDTA and methanol, no free bromine or bromate was detected, as Co(III) was stabilized by EDTA to form the Co(III)EDTA(-) complex, which could not oxidize bromide. Mathematical simulation further suggested that Co(III) outweighed SO4(-) to oxidize bromide to free bromine. On the other hand, SO4(-) is essential for the oxidation of free bromine to bromate in the second step. In real water, the presence of NOM significantly decreased the bromate formation but caused the brominated organic DBP formation with high quantity. This is the first study to demonstrate the significant bromate formation in the Co/PMS system and the substantial contribution of Co(III) to the formation. PMID:26143270

  16. Cobalt-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of Grignards with Allylic and Vinylic Bromides: Use of Sarcosine as a Natural Ligand.

    PubMed

    Frlan, Rok; Sova, Matej; Gobec, Stanislav; Stavber, Gaj; Časar, Zdenko

    2015-08-01

    Sarcosine was discovered to be an excellent ligand for cobalt-catalyzed carbon-carbon cross-coupling of Grignard reagents with allylic and vinylic bromides. The Co(II)/sarcosine catalytic system is shown to perform efficiently when phenyl and benzyl Grignards are coupled with alkenyl bromides. Notably, previously unachievable Co-catalyzed coupling of allylic bromides with Grignards to linearly coupled α-products was also realized with Co(II)/sarcosine catalyst. This method was used for efficient preparation of the key intermediate in an alternative synthesis of the antihyperglycemic drug sitagliptin. PMID:26158563

  17. Flow Boiling Heat Transfer to Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution in Subcooled Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Masao; Furukawa, Masahiro; Nishizumi, Takeharu; Ozaki, Shinji; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    A theoretical prediction model of the boiling heat transfer coefficient in the subcooled region for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution flowing in a rectangular channel is proposed. In the present heat transfer model, a heat flux is assumed to consist of both the forced convective and the boiling effect components. The forced convective component is evaluated from the empirical correlation of convective heat transfer coefficient for single-phase flow considering the effect of increase of liquid velocity due to net vapor generation. Empirical correlations for determining the heat flux due to the boiling effect and the quality at the onset point of net vapor generation are obtained from the data presented in the first report1). Agreement between the present theoretical prediction and the experimental data is satisfactorily good both for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution.

  18. Intermolecular Photocatalyzed Heck-like Coupling of Unactivated Alkyl Bromides by a Dinuclear Gold Complex.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jin; Li, Jian; Weingand, Vanessa; Rudolph, Matthias; Hashmi, A Stephen K

    2016-08-26

    A practical protocol for a photocatalyzed alkyl-Heck-like reaction of unactivated alkyl bromides and different alkenes promoted by dinuclear gold photoredox catalysis in the presence of an inorganic base is reported. Primary, secondary, and tertiary unactivated alkyl bromides with β-hydrogen can be applied. Esters, aldehydes, ketones, nitriles, alcohols, heterocycles, alkynes, alkenes, ethers, and halogen moieties are all well tolerated. In addition to 1,1-diarylalkenes, silylenolethers and enamides can also be applied, which further increases the synthetic potential of the reaction. The mild reaction conditions, broad substrate scope, and an excellent functional-group tolerance deliver an ideal tool for synthetic chemists that can even be used for challenging late-stage modifications of complex natural products. PMID:27348503

  19. Study of the corrosion resistance of metals in a lithium bromide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mel'nik, V.V.; Spivak, R.Sh.; Sokolov, V.V.; Trofimenko, A.G.

    1988-07-01

    Results are reported of a study of the corrosion resistance of the stainless steels 12Kh19N10T, 10Kh17N13M3T, 08Kh17N15M3T, 10Kh21N6M2T, and 06KhI28MDT, cupronickel MNZhMts 30-1-1, nickel NP-2, and titanium alloys VT1-0, PT-1M, and PT-3V in a solution of lithium bromide for purposes of assessing these alloys for use in absorption-type refrigerating units using the bromide as an absorbent. The uniform corrosion rate was determined from the weight loss; the nonuniform corrosion rate was determined by measuring the maximum depth of the pits under a microscope. Results are comparatively evaluated.

  20. Cooperative dual palladium/silver catalyst for direct difluoromethylation of aryl bromides and iodides.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yang; Leng, Xuebing; Shen, Qilong

    2014-01-01

    Difluoromethylated arenes are one of the privileged structural motifs that are important for fine tuning the biological properties of drug molecules. No general catalytic method exists for the formation of difluoromethylarenes. Previous methods for the preparation of difluoromethylarenes typically required harsh conditions, multiple steps or stoichiometric amount of catalysts. Here we report a cooperative dual palladium/silver catalyst system for direct difluoromethylation of aryl bromides and iodides under mild conditions. We develop the system by initial preparation of the putative intermediates in the dual-catalytic cycles, followed by studying the elemental steps to demonstrate the viability of the proposed cooperative catalytic cycle. The reaction is compatible with a variety of functional groups such as ester, amide, protected phenoxide, protected ketone, cyclopropyl, bromide and heteroaryl subunits such as pyrrole, benzothiazole, carbazole or pyridine. PMID:25377759

  1. Underpotential deposition of Cu on Pt(001): Interface structure and the influence of adsorbed bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, C. A.; Markovic, N. M.; Ross, P. N.

    1998-05-01

    Using in situ x-ray diffraction, we studied the underpotential deposition (UPD) of copper onto a Pt(001) electrode both in pure perchloric acid and in the presence of bromide anions. In pure perchloric acid, the Cu is deposited in pseudomorphic p(1×1) islands. In the presence of bromide anions, the strong Pt-Br interaction significantly broadens the potential range of Cu UPD. We propose that Br remains in the interface region throughout the UPD process, at first in a disordered Cu-Br phase and then, at more negative potential, forming a c(2×2) closed-packed monolayer on top of the completed p(1×1) Cu monolayer. The structures are compared to those found during Cu UPD onto Pt(111), and explained in terms of the metal-halide interactions and the Pt surface atomic geometry.

  2. A neutron scattering and modelling study of aqueous solutions of tetramethylammonium and tetrapropylammonium bromide.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Emelie J; Alfredsson, Viveka; Bowron, Daniel T; Edler, Karen J

    2016-04-20

    We have investigated the properties in water of two tetraalkylammonium bromides (tetramethylammonium, TMA(+), and tetrapropylammonium, TPA(+)), at 0.4 M, using neutron scattering coupled with empirical potential structure refinement to arrive at an atomistic description. Having both a polar and an apolar moiety, it is of interest to determine the strength of each moiety as a function of the alkyl chain length. TMA(+) and TPA(+), having different impact as structure directors in zeolite synthesis, were chosen for this study. Water arranges tetrahedrally around TMA(+) and in an almost featureless manner around TPA(+). TMA(+) and TPA(+) show an apolar hydration with TPA(+) being slightly more apolar. TPA(+) has a tendency to form small clusters of 2-4 molecules and to fold into a compact configuration. Both molecules correlate similarly with the bromide ion but do not dissociate completely at this concentration. PMID:27051995

  3. Ultrasound-assisted coating of polyester fiber with silver bromide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Raziyeh; Abbasi, Amir Reza; Yousefi, Mohammad; Ramazani, Ali; Morsali, Ali

    2012-11-01

    The growth of silver bromide nanoparticles on polyester fiber was achieved by sequential dipping steps in alternating bath of potassium bromide and silver nitrate under ultrasound irradiation. The effects of ultrasound irradiation, concentration and sequential dipping steps in growth of the AgBr nanoparticles have been studied. Particle sizes and morphology of nanoparticle are depending on power of ultrasound irradiation, sequential dipping steps and concentration. These systems depicted a decrease in the particles size accompanying an increase in the sonication power. Results suggest that an increasing of sequential dipping steps and concentration led to an increasing of particle size. The physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles were determined by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PMID:22494594

  4. Visible Light-Induced Photoredox Construction of Trifluoromethylated Quaternary Carbon Centers from Trifluoromethylated Tertiary Bromides.

    PubMed

    Huan, Feng; Chen, Qing-Yun; Guo, Yong

    2016-08-19

    A mild, operationally simple, visible light-induced photoredox method for constructing novel trifluoromethylated quaternary carbon centers from trifluoromethylated tertiary bromides has been developed. Using this method, a wide range of alkenes were successfully bifunctionalized to γ-butyrolactams. As for electron-rich alkenes, reactions catalyzed by Ir(dF(CF3)ppy)2(dtbbpy)(PF6) were kinetic processes with high yields and short times. For styrenes, reactions catalyzed by Ir(ppy)2(dtbbpy)(PF6) were thermodynamic processes with moderate yields and prolonged reaction times. For aliphatic alkenes, the reactions were neither thermodynamic nor kinetic and fac-Ir(ppy)3 was used as catalyst. Thus, reactions were not as efficient as electron-rich alkenes. The atom-transfer radical addition reactions of trifluoromethylated tertiary bromides with alkynes were also achieved. The configuration of products we separated was E type only. Some of the products exhibited bactericidal activity. PMID:27438228

  5. Preparation and optical characteristics of layered perovskite-type lead-bromide-incorporated azobenzene chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, Ryo; Shinomura, Hisashi

    2013-02-01

    Lead bromide-based layered perovskite powders with azobenzene derivatives were prepared by a homogeneous precipitation method. From the diffuse reflectance (DR) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the hybrid powder materials, the present hybrids exhibited sharp absorption and PL peaks originating from excitons produced in the PbBr42- layer. When the present hybrid powder was irradiated with UV light at 350 nm, the absorption band from the trans-azobenzene chromophore, observed around 350 nm, decreased, while the absorption band from the cis-azobenzene chromophore, observed around 450 nm, increased. These results indicate that azobenzene chromophores in the present hybrid materials exhibit reversible photoisomerization. Moreover, it was found that the PL intensity from the exciton also varied due to photoisomerization of the azobenzene chromophores in the present hybrid. Thus, for the first time we succeeded in preparing the azobenzene derivative lead-bromide-based layered perovskite with photochromism before and after UV light irradiation.

  6. Uses of chloride/bromide ratios in studies of potable water

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.N.; Whittemore, D.O.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1998-03-01

    In natural ground water systems, both chlorine and bromine occur primarily as monovalent anions, chloride and bromide. Although dissolution or precipitation of halite, biological activity in the root zone, anion sorption, and exchange can affect chloride/bromide ratios in some settings, movement of the ions in potable ground water is most often conservative. Atmospheric precipitation will generally have mass ratios between 50 and 150; shallow ground water, between 100 and 200; domestic sewage, between 300 and 600; water affected by dissolution of halite, between 1,000 and 10,000; and summer runoff from urban streets, between 10 and 100. These, and other distinctive elemental ratios, are useful in the reconstruction of the origin and movement of ground water, as illustrated by case studies investigating sources of salinity in ground water from Alberta, Kansas, and Arizona, and infiltration rates and pathways at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  7. Atmospheric methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br) from agricultural soil fumigations

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, K.; Williams, J.; Wang, N.Y.; Cicerone, R.J.

    1995-03-31

    The treatment of agricultural soils with CH{sub 3}Br (MeBr) has been suggested to be a significant source of atmospheric MeBr which is involved in stratospheric ozone loss. A field fumigation experiment showed that, after 7 days, 34 percent of the applied MeBr had escaped into the atmosphere. The remaining 66 percent should have caused an increase in bromide in the soil; soil bromide increased by an amount equal to 70 percent of the applied MeBr, consistent with the flux measurements to within 4 percent. Comparison with an earlier experiment in which the escape of MeBr to the atmosphere was greater showed that higher soil pH, organic content and soil moisture, and deeper, more uniform injection of MeBr may in combination reduce the escape of MeBr. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Atmospheric chemistry of toxic contaminants 4. Saturated halogenated aliphatics: Methyl bromide, epichlorhydrin, phosgene

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D. )

    1991-01-01

    Mechanisms are outlined for the reactions that contribute to in-situ formation and atmospheric removal of the saturated halogenated aliphatic contaminants methyl bromide, epichlorhydrin, and phosgene. In-situ formation is important only for phosgene and involves the reaction of OH with chloroethenes and other chlorinated hydrocarbons. A ranking of these phosgene precursors is given using data for precursor ambient concentrations and chemical reactivity. The three toxic compounds studied are long-lived in the atmosphere, where removal of phosgene and methyl bromide by chemical reactions is negligibly slow. Epichlorhydrin is removed slowly by reaction with OH, leading to formaldehyde, chloroacetaldehyde, and the chlorinated peroxyacyl nitrate CH{sub 2}ClC(O)OONO{sub 2}.

  9. Effect of pinaverium bromide on jejunal motility and colonic transit time in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Bouchoucha, M; Salles, J P; Fallet, M; Frileux, P; Cugnenc, P H; Barbier, J P

    1992-01-01

    Pinaverium bromide is a specific calcium channel blocker used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) for its spasmolytic activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of orally administered pinaverium bromide on jejunal motility and total and segmental colonic transit time in control subjects. Gastrointestinal studies were performed in 10 healthy volunteers (30 +/- 3 years), before and after a treatment phase of 14 days (150 mg/d). Jejunal motility was measured by prolonged manometry (14 h) and colonic transit time by a multiple ingestion, single marker technique. No significant modification of phase III of the migrating motor complexes was demonstrated. On the contrary, a significant (p < 0.01) but weak decrease of the frequency of contraction was found. Unlike previous studies, no decrease of total or segmental colonic transit time was demonstrated. PMID:1421047

  10. Maintaining Flatness of a Large Aperture Potassium Bromide Beamsplitter through Mounting and Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losch, Patricia; Lyons, James, III; Morell, Armando; Heaney, Jim

    1998-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument on the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997. The CIRS instrument contains a mid-infrared and a far-infrared interferometer and operates at 170 Kelvin. The mid-infrared interferometer is a Michelson- type Fourier transform spectrometer utilizing a 3 inch diameter potassium bromide beamsplitter/compensator pair. The potassium bromide elements were tested to verify effects of cooldown and vibration prior to integration into the instrument. The instrument was then aligned at ambient temperatures, tested cryogenically and re-verified after vibration. The stringent design optical figure requirements for the beamsplitter and compensator included fabrication errors, mounting stresses and vibration load effects. This paper describes the challenges encountered in mounting the elements to minimize distortion and to survive vibration.

  11. Maintaining Flatness of a Large Aperture Potassium Bromide Beamsplitter Through Mounting and Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losch, Patricia; Lyons, James J., III; Morell, Armando; Heaney, Jim

    1998-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument on the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997. The CIRS instrument contains a mid-infrared (MIR) and a far-infrared interferometer (FIR) and operates at 170 Kelvin. The MIR is a Michelson Fourier transform spectrometer utilizing a 76 mm (3 inch) diameter potassium bromide beamsplitter and compensator pair. The potassium bromide elements were tested to verify effects of cooldown and vibration prior to integration into the instrument. The instrument was then aligned at ambient temperatures, tested cryogenically and re-verified after vibration. 'Me stringent design optical figure requirements for the beamsplitter and compensator included fabrication errors, mounting stresses and vibration load effects. This paper describes the challenges encountered in mounting the elements to minimize distortion and to survive vibration.

  12. Effect of Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide (CTAB) on the Growth Rate and Morphology of Borax Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suharso; Parkinson, Gordon; Ogden, Mark

    An investigation of the effect of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on both growth rate and morphology of borax crystal has been carried out. This experiment was carried out at temperature of 25°C and relative supersaturation of 0.21 and 0.74 under in situ cell optical microscopy method. The result shows that CTAB inhibits the growth rate and changes the morphology of borax crystal.

  13. Mechanism of HERG potassium channel inhibition by tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Yan; Lin, Zuoxian; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei; Li, Zhiyuan

    2013-03-01

    Tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride are synthetic quaternary ammonium salts that are widely used in hospitals and industries for the disinfection and surface treatment and as the preservative agent. Recently, the activities of HERG channel inhibition by these compounds have been found to have potential risks to induce the long QT syndrome and cardiac arrhythmia, although the mechanism of action is still elusive. This study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of HERG channel inhibition by these compounds by using whole-cell patch clamp experiments in a CHO cell line stably expressing HERG channels. Tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride exhibited concentration-dependent inhibitions of HERG channel currents with IC{sub 50} values of 4 nM and 17 nM, respectively, which were also voltage-dependent and use-dependent. Both compounds shifted the channel activation I–V curves in a hyperpolarized direction for 10–15 mV and accelerated channel activation and inactivation processes by 2-fold. In addition, tetra-n-octylammonium bromide shifted the inactivation I–V curve in a hyperpolarized direction for 24.4 mV and slowed the rate of channel deactivation by 2-fold, whereas benzethonium chloride did not. The results indicate that tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride are open-channel blockers that inhibit HERG channels in the voltage-dependent, use-dependent and state-dependent manners. - Highlights: ► Tetra-n-octylammonium and benzethonium are potent HERG channel inhibitors. ► Channel activation and inactivation processes are accelerated by the two compounds. ► Both compounds are the open-channel blockers to HERG channels. ► HERG channel inhibition by both compounds is use-, voltage- and state dependent. ► The in vivo risk of QT prolongation needs to be studied for the two compounds.

  14. Laboratory Evaluation of Drop-in Solvent Alternatives to n-Propyl Bromide for Vapor Degreasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2012-01-01

    Based on this limited laboratory study, solvent blends of trans-1,2 dichloroethylene with HFEs, HFCs, or PFCs appear to be viable alternatives to n-propyl bromide for vapor degreasing. The lower boiling points of these blends may lead to greater solvent loss during use. Additional factors must be considered when selecting a solvent substitute, including stability over time, VOC, GWP, toxicity, and business considerations.

  15. Carbonylative Suzuki Couplings of Aryl Bromides with Boronic Acid Derivatives under Base-Free Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The carbonylative Suzuki–Miyaura reaction between aryl bromides and arylboronic acid equivalents is herein reported, using base-free conditions and a limited excess of carbon monoxide generated ex situ from stable CO-precursors. Under these conditions, unsymmetrical biaryl ketones were obtained in modest to excellent yields. This method was adapted to the synthesis of the triglyceride and cholesterol regulator drug, fenofibrate, and its 13C-labeled derivative in good yields from the appropriate CO-precursor. PMID:24635142

  16. Reactions of ground-state and electronically excited sodium atoms with methyl bromide and molecular chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.S.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Schmidt, H.; Covinsky, M.H.; Lee, Y.T. )

    1991-04-18

    The reactions of ground- and excited-state Na atoms with methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br) and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) have been studied by using the crossed molecular beams method. For both reactions, the cross sections increase with increasing electronic energy. The product recoil energies change little with increasing Na electronic energy, implying that the product internal energies increase substantially. For Na + CH{sub 3}Br, the steric angle of acceptance opens with increasing electronic energy.

  17. Role of pinaverium bromide in south Indian patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jayanthi, V; Malathi, S; Ramathilakam, B; Dinakaran, N; Balasubramanian, V; Mathew, S

    1998-04-01

    The effect of pinaverium bromide in controlling gastrointestinal symptoms in 61 patients with irritable bowel syndrome was studied, as an open trial. Individually, there was significant relief in abdominal discomfort/pain as well as in bowel symptoms in most of the patients. Abdominal pain was reduced in 49%, stool consistency improved in 74%, straining and urgency decreased in 71% and mucus decreased in 64%. Tolerance to the drug administered was good and side-effects reported were few. PMID:11273320

  18. Toxic impact of bromide and iodide on drinking water disinfected with chlorine or chloramines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Komaki, Yukako; Kimura, Susana Y; Hu, Hong-Ying; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-10-21

    Disinfectants inactivate pathogens in source water; however, they also react with organic matter and bromide/iodide to form disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Although only a few DBP classes have been systematically analyzed for toxicity, iodinated and brominated DBPs tend to be the most toxic. The objectives of this research were (1) to determine if monochloramine (NH2Cl) disinfection generated drinking water with less toxicity than water disinfected with free chlorine (HOCl) and (2) to determine the impact of added bromide and iodide in conjunction with HOCl or NH2Cl disinfection on mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genomic DNA damage induction. Water disinfected with chlorine was less cytotoxic but more genotoxic than water disinfected with chloramine. For both disinfectants, the addition of Br(-) and I(-) increased cytotoxicity and genotoxicity with a greater response observed with NH2Cl disinfection. Both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were highly correlated with TOBr and TOI. However, toxicity was weakly and inversely correlated with TOCl. Thus, the forcing agents for cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were the generation of brominated and iodinated DBPs rather than the formation of chlorinated DBPs. Disinfection practices need careful consideration especially when using source waters containing elevated bromide and iodide. PMID:25222908

  19. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer to Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Kaji, Masuo; Suyama, Takayuki; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    An experimental study on enhancement of nucleate pool boiling heat tranfer by placing a sponge metal close to a plain heated surface was conducted in order to improve the heat transfer performance of the high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater. The sponge metal has three dimensional porous mesh framework like sponge. Boiling curves of water under the atmospheric pressure were compared with those of lithium bromide aqueous solution of mass concentration 55 to 58%. Heat transfer characteristics were improved by 2 to3 times both for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution when the sponge metal was placed on the heated surface with and without cleareance. Three kinds of sponge metals were used for lithium bromide aqueous solution under the reduced pressure (24 kPa). At lower heat fluxes,#6 sponge metal which has the finest mesh and the lowest porosity shows excellent results. At high heat fluxes, however,it causes deterioration of heat transfer. Over the wide range of heat fluxes,# 4 sponge metal was found to be most suitable and the optimal clearence was determined as 0.5 mm. The sponge metal is of good practical use as a device to enhance the boiling, since no special manufacturing is required for placing it on the heated surface.

  20. Study on Durability and Stability of an Aqueous Electrolyte Solution for Zinc Bromide Hybrid Flow Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyeon; Jeon, Joonhyeon

    2015-01-01

    Zinc-bromine flow battery using aqueous electrolyte has advantages of cost effective and high energy density, but there still remains a problem improving stability and durability of electrolyte materials during long-time cell operation. This paper focuses on providing a homogeneous aqueous solution for durability and stability of zinc bromide electrolyte. For performance experiments of conventional and proposed electrolyte solutions, detailed cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements (at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1 in the range of -1.5 V~1.5 V) are carried out for 40 cycles and five kinds of electrolytes containing which has one of additives, such as (conventionally) zinc chloride, potassium chloride, (newly) lithium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate and zeolite-Y are compared with the 2.0 M ZnBr2 electrolyte, respectively. Experimental results show that using the proposed three additives provides higher anodic and cathodic peak current density of electrolytes than using other two conventional additives, and can lead to improved chemical reversibility of zinc bromide electrolyte. Especially, the solution of which the zeolite-Y added, shows enhanced electrochemical stability of zinc bromide electrolyte. Consequently, proposed electrolytes have a significant advantage in comparison with conventional electrolytes on higher stability and durability.

  1. Granular Activated Carbon Treatment May Result in Higher Predicted Genotoxicity in the Presence of Bromide.

    PubMed

    Krasner, Stuart W; Lee, Tiffany Chih Fen; Westerhoff, Paul; Fischer, Natalia; Hanigan, David; Karanfil, Tanju; Beita-Sandí, Wilson; Taylor-Edmonds, Liz; Andrews, Robert C

    2016-09-01

    Certain unregulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are more of a health concern than regulated DBPs. Brominated species are typically more cytotoxic and genotoxic than their chlorinated analogs. The impact of granular activated carbon (GAC) on controlling the formation of regulated and selected unregulated DBPs following chlorine disinfection was evaluated. The predicted cyto- and genotoxicity of DBPs was calculated using published potencies based on the comet assay for Chinese hamster ovary cells (assesses the level of DNA strand breaks). Additionally, genotoxicity was measured using the SOS-Chromotest (detects DNA-damaging agents). The class sum concentrations of trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, and unregulated DBPs, and the SOS genotoxicity followed the breakthrough of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), however the formation of brominated species did not. The bromide/DOC ratio was higher than the influent through much of the breakthrough curve (GAC does not remove bromide), which resulted in elevated brominated DBP concentrations in the effluent. Based on the potency of the haloacetonitriles and halonitromethanes, these nitrogen-containing DBPs were the driving agents of the predicted genotoxicity. GAC treatment of drinking or reclaimed waters with appreciable levels of bromide and dissolved organic nitrogen may not control the formation of unregulated DBPs with higher genotoxicity potencies. PMID:27467860

  2. Evaluation of the potential carcinogenicity of cadmium, cadium acetate, cadmium bromide, cadmium chloride. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    Cadmium is a probable human carcinogen, classified as weight-of-evidence Group B1 under the EPA Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment (U.S. EPA, 1986a). Evidence on potential carcinogenicity from animal studies is Sufficient, and the evidence from human studies is Limited. The potency factor (F) for cadmium is estimated to be 57.9/(mg/kg/day) (based on epidemiology data for cadmium workers), placing it in potency group 2 according to the CAG's methodology for evaluating potential carcinogens (U.S. EPA, 1986b). Cadmium weight of evidence and potency are based on epidemiology data for cadmium workers exposed to cadmium oxide and/or cadmium fume. Although human data for cadmium salts are lacking, due to the responsiveness of animals to soluble cadmium compounds, especially cadmium chloride, the weight of evidence and potency for cadmium acetate, cadmium bromide and cadmium chloride are considered to be the same as those cadmium compounds to which workers are exposed. Thus, cadmium acetate, cadmium bromide, and cadmium chloride are all classified as weight-of-evidence Group and the potency group, cadmium, cadmium acetate, cadmium bromide, and cadmium chloride are assigned MEDIUM hazard rankings for the purposes of RQ adjustment. Combining the weight-of-evidence group and the potency group, carbon tetrachloride is assigned a MEDIUM hazard ranking for the purposes of RQ adjustment.

  3. Flight Experiment to Study Double-Diffusive Instabilities in Silver-Doped Lead Bromide Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Rosch, W. R.; Suhre, D. R.; Coriell, S. R.; Duval, W. M. B.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed study on the effect of convection on crystal quality was carried out by growing lead bromide crystals in transparent Bridgman furnace. Direct observations were made on the solid-liquid interface and a new kind of instability was observed. This could be explained on the basis of toroidal flow in the AgBr-doped lead bromide sample. With the increasing translation velocity, the interface changed from flat to depressed, and then formed a cavity in the center of the growth tube. The crystal grown at the lowest thermal Rayleigh number showed the highest quality and crystal grown at the largest thermal Rayleigh number showed the worst quality. Numerical studies were carried out to provide a framework for interpreting the observed convective and morphological instabilities, and to determine the critical (limiting) concentration of dopant for a particular growth velocity and gravity level. Theoretical instability diagrams were compared with data obtained from the experimental studies. These studies provided basic data on convective behavior in doped lead bromide crystals grown by the commercially important Bridgman process.

  4. Room temperature synthesis of silver nanowires from tabular silver bromide crystals in the presence of gelatin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Suwen; Wehmschulte, Rudolf J. . E-mail: rwehmsch@fit.edu; Lian Guoda; Burba, Christopher M.

    2006-03-15

    Long silver nanowires were synthesized at room temperature by a simple and fast process derived from the development of photographic films. A film consisting of an emulsion of tabular silver bromide grains in gelatin was treated with a photographic developer (4-(methylamino)phenol sulfate (metol), citric acid) in the presence of additional aqueous silver nitrate. The silver nanowires have lengths of more than 50 {mu}m, some even more than 100 {mu}m, and average diameters of about 80 nm. Approximately, 70% of the metallic silver formed in the reduction consists of silver nanowires. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) results indicate that the silver nanowires grow along the [111] direction. It was found that the presence of gelatin, tabular silver bromide crystals and silver ions in solution are essential for the formation of the silver nanowires. The nanowires appear to originate from the edges of the silver bromide crystals. They were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), SAED, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD)

  5. A Systematic Study on the Mesomorphic Behavior of Asymmetrical 1-Alkyl-3-dodecylimidazolium Bromides

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mei; Mallick, Bert; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-04-02

    To determine the essential parameters for mesophase formation in imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs), a library of 1-alkyl-3-dodecylimidazolium bromides was synthesized, abbreviated as CnC12, where 0 ≤ n ≤ 13, as the general notion is that a dodecyl side chain would guarantee the formation of an ionic liquid crystal (ILC). All salts were fully characterized by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Their thermal properties were recorded, and mesophase formation was assessed. An odd–even effect is observed for 5 ≤ n ≤ 10 in the temperatures of melting transitions. While the majority of this series, as expected, formed mesophases, surprisingly compounds C2C12 and C6C12 could not be classified as ILCs, the latter being a room temperature IL, while C2C12 is a crystalline solid with melting point at 37 °C. The single crystal structure of compound 1-ethyl-3-dodecylimidazolium bromide (C2C12) was successfully obtained. Remarkably, the arrangement of imidazolium cores in the structure is very complicated due to multiple nonclassical hydrogen bonds between bromide anions and imidazolium head groups. In this arrangement, neighboring imidazolium rings are forced by hydrogen bonds to form a “face-to-face” conformation. This seems to be responsible for the elimination of a mesophase. To conclude, the general view of a dodecyl chain being a functional group to generate a mesophase is not entirely valid.

  6. Ethidium Bromide MIC Screening for Enhanced Efflux Pump Gene Expression or Efflux Activity in Staphylococcus aureus▿

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Diixa; Kosmidis, Christos; Seo, Susan M.; Kaatz, Glenn W.

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance efflux pumps contribute to antimicrobial and biocide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. The detection of strains capable of efflux is time-consuming and labor-intensive using currently available techniques. A simple and inexpensive method to identify such strains is needed. Ethidium bromide is a substrate for all but one of the characterized S. aureus multidrug-resistant (MDR) efflux pumps (NorC), leading us to examine the utility of simple broth microtiter MIC determinations using this compound in identifying efflux-proficient strains. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR identified the increased expression of one or more MDR efflux pump genes in 151/309 clinical strains (49%). Ethidium bromide MIC testing was insensitive (48%) but specific (92%) in identifying strains with gene overexpression, but it was highly sensitive (95%) and specific (99%) in identifying strains capable of ethidium efflux. The increased expression of norA with or without other genes was most commonly associated with efflux, and in the majority of cases that efflux was inhibited by reserpine. Ethidium bromide MIC testing is a simple and straightforward method to identify effluxing strains and can provide accurate predictions of efflux prevalence in large strain sets in a short period of time. PMID:20855743

  7. The suppression of opposed-jet methane-air flames by methyl bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.; McMillion, L.G. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports on an opposed-jet diffusion flame burner that was used in conjunction with an emission infrared spectrometer to study the effects of the addition of methyl bromide on the combustion of methane with air. An optical system permitted incremental scanning of a laminar diffusion flame formed between two horizontally opposed burner tubes. The image of the flat flame was focused on an auxiliary slit of the spectrometer by optical mirrors and scanned by moving the slit passed the image. For a methane-air flame with an overall stoichiometric ratio, {phi}, of 0.86, the spectra for the 3700-2400 cm{sup {minus}1} region (H{sub 2}O, OH, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}, and HCHO bands) and 2400 to 2000 cm{sup {minus}1} (CO and CO{sub 2} bands) were compared with the spectra obtained when methyl bromide was added to the air-side of the burner. Supplementary measurements were made on methane-air and methane-oxygen-nitrogen flames with {phi} values in the range of 0.74 - 2.0. In some cases, the methane was diluted with nitrogen, and the methyl bromide was added to either the fuel or the air side of the burner.

  8. Determination of methyl bromide in air resulting from pre-plant fumigations of plowed fields

    SciTech Connect

    Woodrow, J.E.; Honaganahalli, P.; Seiber, J.N.

    1995-12-31

    A method for measuring residues of methyl bromide in air entails concentrating the fumigant on charcoal from an airstream at a flowrate of 100 ml/min, desorption of the trapped material with benzyl alcohol solvent in a sealed vial at 60-110{degrees}C for 10-15 min, and then sampling of the equilibrated vapor for gas chromatographic assay using electron-capture detection. The desorbed vapor is chromatographed on a 27 in x 0.32 mm (id) porous-layer open tubular column, on which methyl bromide has a retention time of about 6 min at 90{degrees}C and at a carrier gas flowrate of 3-3.5 ml/min. Using this method, standard curves were linear over at least three orders of magnitude and a practical limit of detection for field air was about 20 ng/m{sup 3} ({approximately}5 ppt). This method has been used in studies concerned with methyl bromide volatilization from fumigated fields and with ambient background levels.

  9. Leisingera methylohalidivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine methylotroph that grows on methyl bromide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, J.K.; Goodwin, K.D.; McDonald, I.R.; Murrell, J.C.; Oremland, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    A marine methylotroph, designated strain MB2T, was isolated for its ability to grow on methyl bromide as a sole carbon and energy source. Methyl chloride and methyl iodide also supported growth, as did methionine and glycine betaine. A limited amount of growth was observed with dimethyl sulfide. Growth was also noted with unidentified components of the complex media marine broth 2216, yeast extract and Casamino acids. No growth was observed on methylated amines, methanol, formate, acetate, glucose or a variety of other substrates. Growth on methyl bromide and methyl iodide resulted in their oxidation to CO2 with stoichiometric release of bromide and iodide, respectively. Strain MB2T exhibited growth optima at NaCl and Mg2+ concentrations similar to that of seawater. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence placed this strain in the ??-Proteobacteria in proximity to the genera Ruegeria and Roseobacter. It is proposed that strain MB2T (= ATCC BAA-92T = DSM 14336T) be designated Leisingera methylohalidivorans gen. nov., sp. nov.

  10. Inhibition of the colonic motor response to eating by pinaverium bromide in irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Fioramonti, J; Frexinos, J; Staumont, G; Bueno, L

    1988-01-01

    The effect of pinaverium bromide on the colonic motor response to eating was investigated in 10 irritable bowel syndrome patients, by means of an intraluminal probe supporting 8 groups of electrodes. At each site examined from transverse to sigmoid colon, the electromyograms exhibited 2 kinds of spike bursts: short spike bursts (SSB) localized at one electrode, and long spike bursts (LSB), isolated, propagated orally or aborally over a few centimeters, or aborally propagated over the whole length of the colon investigated (migrating long spike bursts, MLSB). Recordings were continuously performed over 24 hr. Each patient received at 7.00 p.m. on day 1 and at noon on day 2 an 800-1000 Kcal meal preceded by IV administration of pinaverium bromide (4 mg) or placebo. After placebo administration, the duration of LSB activity and the number of MLSB were significantly increased over 3 postprandial hr by comparison with the 2 hr preceding the meal. After pinaverium injection no significant postprandial change in LSB and MLSB activity was noted. The SSB activity was not modified after the meals preceded by placebo or pinaverium injection. These results suggest that the inhibitory action of pinaverium bromide on postprandial colonic motility may support the clinical efficacy of this agent in the treatment of the irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:3371838

  11. Effects of oral pinaverium bromide on colonic response to food in irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Bouchoucha, M; Faye, A; Devroede, G; Arsac, M

    2000-08-01

    We have recently developed a simple method to investigate the colonic response to food (CRF). This study describes the modifications of CRF induced by treatment with oral pinaverium bromide in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Thirty healthy subjects and 43 patients suffering from IBS were studied. Colonic transit time (CTT) was measured in fasting conditions and after eating a standard test meal. Colonic response to food was quantified by calculating the variation in number of markers in each zone of interest of the large bowel between the X-ray films of the abdomen taken before and after eating. CRF is characterized by caudal propulsion of colonic contents in the two groups. In controls, there is emptying of the caecum-ascending colon region and filling of the rectosigmoid. In IBS patients, only the left transverse colon and the splenic flexure empty. Pinaverium bromide exerts no effect in controls but reverses the CRF of the right colon in IBS patients by inhibiting right colon emptying. These results suggest that the inhibitory action of pinaverium bromide on CRF may support the clinical efficacy of this calcium channel blocker in the treatment of IBS. PMID:10989977

  12. Continuous Inhalation of Ipratropium Bromide for Acute Asthma Refractory to β2-agonist Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mastropietro, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    To present the case of a patient with persistent bronchospasm, refractory to treatment with β2-agonists, that resolved promptly with continuous inhalation of large dose (1000 mcg/hr) ipratropium bromide, and to discuss the possibility of tolerance to β2-agonists as the cause for his failure to respond to adrenergic medications. The patient had received multiple doses of albuterol, as well as subcutaneous terbutaline (0.3 mg), intravenous magnesium sulfate (1 g) and intravenous dexamethasone (10 mg) prior to his admission to the intensive care unit. He remained symptomatic despite systemic intravenous steroids, continuous intravenous terbutaline (up to 0.6 mcg/kg/min), and continuous nebulized albuterol (up to 20 mg/hr for 57 hr) followed by 49 hours of continuous levalbuterol (7 mg/hr). Due to the lack of response, all β2-agonists were discontinued at 106 hours post-admission, and he was started on large dose ipratropium bromide (1000 mcg/hr) by continuous nebulization. Clinical improvement was evident within 1 hour and complete resolution of his symptoms within 4 hours. Continuous inhalation of large dose ipratropium bromide may be an effective regimen for the treatment of patients hospitalized with acute asthma who are deemed to be nonresponsive and/or tolerant to β2-agonist therapy. PMID:25859173

  13. Continuous Inhalation of Ipratropium Bromide for Acute Asthma Refractory to β2-agonist Treatment.

    PubMed

    Koumbourlis, Anastassios C; Mastropietro, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    To present the case of a patient with persistent bronchospasm, refractory to treatment with β2-agonists, that resolved promptly with continuous inhalation of large dose (1000 mcg/hr) ipratropium bromide, and to discuss the possibility of tolerance to β2-agonists as the cause for his failure to respond to adrenergic medications. The patient had received multiple doses of albuterol, as well as subcutaneous terbutaline (0.3 mg), intravenous magnesium sulfate (1 g) and intravenous dexamethasone (10 mg) prior to his admission to the intensive care unit. He remained symptomatic despite systemic intravenous steroids, continuous intravenous terbutaline (up to 0.6 mcg/kg/min), and continuous nebulized albuterol (up to 20 mg/hr for 57 hr) followed by 49 hours of continuous levalbuterol (7 mg/hr). Due to the lack of response, all β2-agonists were discontinued at 106 hours post-admission, and he was started on large dose ipratropium bromide (1000 mcg/hr) by continuous nebulization. Clinical improvement was evident within 1 hour and complete resolution of his symptoms within 4 hours. Continuous inhalation of large dose ipratropium bromide may be an effective regimen for the treatment of patients hospitalized with acute asthma who are deemed to be nonresponsive and/or tolerant to β2-agonist therapy. PMID:25859173

  14. Transport of bromide measured by soil coring, suction plates, and lysimeters under transient flow conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasteel, R.; Pütz, Th.; Vereecken, H.

    2003-04-01

    Lysimeter studies are one step within the registration procedure of pesticides. Flow and transport in these free-draining lysimeters do not reflect the field situation mainly because of the occurence of a zone of local saturation at the lower boundary (seepage face). The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of flow and transport behaviour of bromide detected with different measuring devices (lysimeters, suction plates, and soil coring) by comparing experimental results with numerical simulations in heterogeneous flow domains. We applied bromide as a small pulse to the bare soil surface (Orthic Luvisol) of the three devices and the displacement of bromide was regurlarly sampled for three years under natural wheather conditions. Based on the mean breakthrough curves we observe experimentally that lysimeters have a lower effective pore-water velocity and exhibit more solute spreading resulting in a larger dispersivity than the suction plates. This can be ascribed to the artefact of the lower boundary. We performed numerical transport simulations in 2-D heterogeneous flow fields (scaling approach) choosing appropriate boundary conditions for the various devices. The simulations allow to follow the temporal evolution of flow and transport processes in the various devices and to gain additional process understanding. We conclude that the model is essentially capable to reproduce the main experimental findings only if we account for the spatial correlation structure of the hydraulic properties, i.e. soil heterogeneity.

  15. Metabolism of proposed nerve agent pretreatment, pyridostigmine bromide. Final report, December 1995-December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Leo, K.U.

    1996-12-01

    A reverse phase High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) method was developed to separate pyridostigmine bromide from four potential metabolites. Using male and female microsomes from both rat and human, our data suggest that pyridostigmine bromide is not metabolized by the human live microsomes or DNA expressed human CYP-450s via direct observation of no metabolites being formed for incubations up to 90 minutes. Indirect evidence that pyridostigmine metabolism is not via the major human hepatic CYP-450s involved in drug metabolism, 1A2, 2C9, 2E1, 2D6, and 3A4, was observed by failure to inhibit these isozymes while co-incubated with substrates specific for those isozymes at concentrations of 2-3 times Km. The following CYP-450 substrates were co-incubated with pyridostigmine: phenacetin, tolbutamide, chlorzoxazone, bufuralol, and testosterone. Using unlabelled and 14C-pyridostigmine, metabolite formation was not observed in both male and female rat and human subcellular fractions, specifically cytosol and S9, or under conditions favoring human FMO activity (pH 8.3). These findings indicate the metabolism of pyridostigmine bromide is unlikely to be under any component of sexual dimorphism.

  16. Expansion of the rich structures and magnetic properties of neptunium selenites: soft ferromagnetism in Np(SeO3)2.

    PubMed

    Diefenbach, Kariem; Lin, Jian; Cross, Justin N; Dalal, Naresh S; Shatruk, Michael; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2014-07-21

    Two new neptunium selenites with different oxidation states of the metal centers, Np(IV)(SeO3)2 and Np(VI)O2(SeO3), have been synthesized under mild hydrothermal conditions at 200 °C from the reactions of NpO2 and SeO2. Np(SeO3)2 crystallizes as brown prisms (space group P21/n, a = 7.0089(5) Å, b = 10.5827(8) Å, c = 7.3316(5) Å, β = 106.953(1)°); whereas NpO2(SeO3) crystals are garnet-colored with an acicular habit (space group P21/m, a = 4.2501(3) Å, b = 9.2223(7) Å, c = 5.3840(4) Å, β = 90.043(2)°). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that the structure of Np(SeO3)2 features a three-dimensional (3D) framework consisting of edge-sharing NpO8 units that form chains that are linked via SeO3 units to create a 3D framework. NpO2(SeO3) possesses a lamellar structure in which each layer is composed of NpO8 hexagonal bipyramids bridged via SeO3(2-) anions. Bond-valence sum calculations and UV-vis-NIR absorption spectra support the assignment of tetravalent and hexavalent states of neptunium in Np(SeO3)2 and NpO2(SeO3), respectively. Magnetic susceptibility data for Np(SeO3)2 deviates substantially from typical Curie-Weiss behavior, which can be explained by large temperature-independent paramagnetic (TIP) effects. The Np(IV) selenite shows weak ferromagnetic ordering at 3.1(1) K with no detectable hysteresis, suggesting soft ferromagnetic behavior. PMID:24964359

  17. Estimating Potential Increased Bladder Cancer Risk Due to Increased Bromide Concentrations in Sources of Disinfected Drinking Waters - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public water systems are increasingly facing higher bromide levels in their source waters from anthropogenic contamination through coal-fired powerplants, conventional oil and gas extraction, and hydraulic fracturing. Climate change is likely to exacerbate this in coming years. W...

  18. Detection of water contamination from hydraulic fracturing wastewater: a μPAD for bromide analysis in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Loh, Leslie J; Bandara, Gayan C; Weber, Genevieve L; Remcho, Vincent T

    2015-08-21

    Due to the rapid expansion in hydraulic fracturing (fracking), there is a need for robust, portable and specific water analysis techniques. Early detection of contamination is crucial for the prevention of lasting environmental damage. Bromide can potentially function as an early indicator of water contamination by fracking waste, because there is a high concentration of bromide ions in fracking wastewaters. To facilitate this, a microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD) has been developed and optimized for the quantitative colorimetric detection of bromide in water using a smartphone. A paper microfluidic platform offers the advantages of inexpensive fabrication, elimination of unstable wet reagents, portability and high adaptability for widespread distribution. These features make this assay an attractive option for a new field test for on-site determination of bromide. PMID:26161586

  19. Improving food and agriculture productivity and the environment: Canadian initiatives in methyl bromide alternatives and emission control technologies. Revised edition

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, M.; Tibelius, C.

    1998-12-31

    Methyl bromide, a fumigant used in the agricultural sector, was listed as an ozone-depleting substance under the Montreal Protocol and is scheduled for phasing out in Canada. This report begins with a review of the joint industry/government approach being taken to plan and manage this phase-out. It then reviews alternative solutions that have been formulated and tested as replacements for the use of methyl bromide in greenhouse cultivation, soil fumigation, strawberry transplant production, tobacco production, grain production, and food processing facilities. Contact names and addresses are provided for those seeking further information. The final sections describe activities in methyl bromide recovery and recycling and list industry and government organizations that have expertise in methyl bromide alternatives.

  20. Estimating Potential Increased Bladder Cancer Risk Due to Increased Bromide Concentrations in Sources of Disinfected Drinking Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public water systems are increasingly facing higher bromide levels in their source waters from anthropogenic contamination through coal-fired power plants, conventional oil and gas extraction, and hydraulic fracturing. Climate change is likely to exacerbate this in coming years. ...