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Sample records for nerve constriction injury

  1. Berberine Ameliorates Allodynia Induced by Chronic Constriction Injury of the Sciatic Nerve in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jee

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether berberine could ameliorate allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After inducement of CCI, significant increases in the number of paw lifts from a cold plate test (cold allodynia) and decreased paw withdrawal threshold in the von Frey hair stimulation test (mechanical allodynia) were observed. However, these cold and mechanical allodynia were markedly alleviated by berberine administration in a dose-dependent manner. Sciatic nerve myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activities were also attenuated by berberine administration. Continuous injection for 7 days induced no development of tolerance. The antiallodynic effect of 20 mg/kg berberine was comparable to that of amitriptyline 10 mg/kg. This study demonstrated that berberine could mitigate allodynia induced by CCI, a neuropathic pain model, and it suggested that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties of berberine contributed to the antiallodynic effect in the CCI model. PMID:25674823

  2. Swim therapy reduces mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia induced by chronic constriction nerve injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jun; Fox, Lyle E.; Cheng, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    Objective Neuropathic pain is common and often difficult to treat because it generally does not respond well to the currently available pain medications or nerve blocks. Recent studies in both humans and animals have suggested that exercise may induce a transient analgesia and reduce acute pain in normal healthy individuals. We examined whether swim therapy could alleviate neuropathic pain in rats. Design Rats were trained to swim over a two week period in warm water. After the rats were trained, neuropathic pain was induced by constricting the right sciatic nerve and regular swimming was resumed. The sensitivity of each hind paw was monitored using the Hargreaves test and von Frey test to evaluate the withdrawal response thresholds to heat and touch. Results The paw ipsilateral to the nerve ligation expressed pain-like behaviors including thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Regular swim therapy sessions significantly reduced the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Swim therapy had little effect on the withdrawal thresholds for the contralateral paw. In addition, swim therapy alone did not alter the thermal or mechanical thresholds of normal rats. Conclusions The results suggest that regular exercise, including swim therapy, may be an effective treatment for neuropathic pain caused by nerve injuries. This study, showing that swim therapy reduces neuropathic pain behavior in rats, provides a scientific rationale for clinicians to test the efficacy of exercise in the management of neuropathic pain. It may prove to be a safe and cost-effective therapy in a variety of neuropathic pain states. PMID:23438327

  3. Behavioural pain-related disorders and contribution of the saphenous nerve in crush and chronic constriction injury of the rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Attal, N; Filliatreau, G; Perrot, S; Jazat, F; Di Giamberardino, L; Guilbaud, G

    1994-11-01

    This study evaluated the pain-related behaviours induced by 2 models of peripheral sciatic nerve injuries in the rat: transient nerve crush and chronic constriction injury (CCI). Various lesions of the saphenous nerve were performed in order to investigate the role of saphenous innervation in behavioural disorders induced by these nerve injuries. Behavioural testing included assessment of responses to phasic stimulation (mechanical and thermal) and observation of 'spontaneous' pain-related behaviour. Results confirmed that the model of CCI induces marked and prolonged phasic and spontaneous pain-related disorders (up to week 7). Rats with crush injury exhibited moderate and transient hyperalgesia and allodynia to mechanical and thermal stimulation on the lesioned side (with a maximum at day 3 and a recovery by week 1). Section plus ligation of the ipsilateral saphenous nerve on the day of surgery prevented nociceptive behaviours and induced persistent mechanical and thermal anaesthesia or hypoesthesia of the lesioned paw in both models (lasting up to 3-4 weeks). Section without ligation of the saphenous nerve induced comparable results in rats with sciatic crush, but did not significantly modify nociceptive behaviours in rats with CCI. These data emphasise the role of adjacent saphenous nerve in the mechanisms of pain-related disorders induced by these peripheral nerve lesions. On the contralateral paw, pain-related modifications were also observed in both models, suggesting that unilateral nerve lesions induce remote modifications extending beyond the site of the injured nerve. PMID:7892028

  4. Dynamic effects of TNF-α on synaptic transmission in mice over time following sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongmei; Zhang, Haijun

    2013-01-01

    Nerve injury-induced central sensitization can manifest as an increase in excitatory synaptic transmission and/or as a decrease in inhibitory synaptic transmission in spinal dorsal horn neurons. Cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are induced in the spinal cord under various injury conditions and contribute to neuropathic pain. In this study we examined the effect of TNF-α in modulating excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input to spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons over time in mice following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Whole cell patch-clamp studies from SG neurons showed that TNF-α enhanced overall excitability of the spinal cord early in time following nerve injury 3 days after CCI compared with that in sham control mice. In contrast, the effects of TNF were blunted 14 days after CCI in nerve-injured mice compared with sham surgery mice. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the expression of TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) was increased at 3 days but decreased at 14 days following CCI in the ipsilateral vs. the contralateral spinal cord dorsal horn. These results suggest that TNF-α acting at TNFR1 is important in the development of neuropathic pain by facilitating excitatory synaptic signaling in the acute phases after nerve injury but has a reduced effect on spinal neuron signaling in the later phases of nerve injury-induced pain. Failure of the facilatory effects of TNF-α on excitatory synaptic signaling in the dorsal horn to resolve following nerve injury may be an important component in the transition between acute and chronic pain conditions. PMID:23864372

  5. Neurotropin attenuates local inflammatory response and inhibits demyelination induced by chronic constriction injury of the mouse sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Shunsuke; Okada, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Michio; Fujisawa, Hiroki; Okada, Tomoyuki; Naiki, Mitsuru; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2016-07-01

    Neuropathic pain caused by nerve damage in the central and/or peripheral nervous systems is a refractory disorder and the management of such chronic pain has become a major issue. Neurotropin is a drug widely used in Japan and China to treat chronic pain. Although Neurotropin has been demonstrated to suppress chronic pain through the descending pain inhibitory system, the mechanism of analgesic action in the peripheral nervous system remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the local effects of Neurotropin on peripheral nerve damage in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Neurotropin reduced mRNA expressions of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in the sciatic nerve 1 day after the injury. Activation of Erk was also inhibited locally in the Neurotropin treatment group. Since Erk activation results in demyelination along with dedifferentiation of Schwann cells, we investigated the expression level of myelin basic protein. Five days after the injury, Neurotropin attenuated the downregulation of myelin basic protein in the sciatic nerve in the CCI model. Local effects of Neurotropin around the injury site may result in discovery of new treatments for not only neuropathic pain but also demyelinating diseases and peripheral nervous system injury. PMID:27233579

  6. Feasibility of Human Amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells in Alleviation of Neuropathic Pain in Chronic Constrictive Injury Nerve Model

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chien-Yi; Liu, Shih-An; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Fu-Chou; Chen, Chun-Jung; Su, Hong-Lin; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The neurobehavior of neuropathic pain by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve is very similar to that in humans, and it is accompanied by a profound local inflammation response. In this study, we assess the potentiality of human amniotic fluid derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAFMSCs) for alleviating the neuropathic pain in a chronic constriction nerve injury model. Methods and Methods This neuropathic pain animal model was conducted by four 3–0 chromic gut ligatures loosely ligated around the left sciatic nerve in Sprague—Dawley rats. The intravenous administration of hAFMSCs with 5x105 cells was conducted for three consecutive days. Results The expression IL-1β, TNF-α and synaptophysin in dorsal root ganglion cell culture was remarkably attenuated when co-cultured with hAFMSCs. The significant decrease of PGP 9.5 in the skin after CCI was restored by administration of hAFMSCs. Remarkably increased expression of CD 68 and TNF-α and decreased S-100 and neurofilament expression in injured nerve were rescued by hAFMSCs administration. Increases in synaptophysin and TNF-α over the dorsal root ganglion were attenuated by hAFMSCs. Significant expression of TNF-α and OX-42 over the dorsal spinal cord was substantially attenuated by hAFMSCs. The increased amplitude of sensory evoked potential as well as expression of synaptophysin and TNF-α expression was alleviated by hAFMSCs. Human AFMSCs significantly improved the threshold of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia as well as various parameters of CatWalk XT gait analysis. Conclusion Human AFMSCs administration could alleviate the neuropathic pain demonstrated in histomorphological alteration and neurobehavior possibly through the modulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:27441756

  7. Effect of delayed intrathecal administration of capsaicin on neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Ramamurthy, Somayaji; Prihoda, Thomas J; Eckmann, Maxim S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The current study was designed to examine the antinociceptive effect of intrathecally administered capsaicin, a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor agonist, in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by unilateral sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury. Methods Male adult Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to six groups, and all rats underwent unilateral sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury. Two weeks after injury, five groups received intrathecal administration of either capsaicin in three different dosing regimens or equal volumes of vehicle. The other group received intrathecal capsaicin on the third day after nerve injury. The antinociceptive effect of capsaicin was assessed by measuring the capsaicin-induced change in thermal and mechanical response thresholds. Results Capsaicin (150–300 μg/100–200 μL), when administered by fast infusion or chronic infusions at 8 μL/hour or 1 μL/hour, attenuated thermal hyperalgesia as indicated by significantly prolonging paw withdrawal latency to noxious thermal stimulation. The antinociceptive effect of capsaicin was more profound in the injured limb compared to that in the uninjured limb. When capsaicin was administered on the third day after nerve injury, it failed to attenuate thermal hyperalgesia. No significant effect on the mechanical response threshold was observed with intrathecally administered capsaicin. Conclusion Our data suggest that intrathecal capsaicin could significantly attenuate thermal hyperalgesia, depending on the time when the drug is given after nerve injury, and that the antinociceptive efficacy of intrathecal capsaicin positively correlates with the previously reported dynamic profile of spinal transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 activity after nerve injury. PMID:25246806

  8. Changes in cardiovascular parameters and plasma norepinephrine level in rats after chronic constriction injury on the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yu; Sato, Jun; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Omura, Sayaka; Funakubo, Megumi; Senoo, Shiori; Aoyama, Morihiko; Mizumura, Kazue

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate whether neuropathic pain affects autonomic nervous activities, we investigated daily change in cardiovascular parameters and plasma norepinephrine (NE) in free-moving rats after chronic constriction injury (CCI) on the sciatic nerve. Arterial blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and the power spectrum of pulse interval variability were analyzed. Daily change in motor activity and nociceptive behavior was also measured from some CCI rats. In others, NE from daily blood samples was quantified and spontaneous pain was evaluated by daily monitoring of foot guarding behavior. We identified three stages in the daily change of cardiovascular parameters and plasma NE level over 3 weeks following CCI. The first stage (up to 3 days after the surgery) was characterized by increased MAP and HR, especially in the daytime, even though plasma NE was unchanged and motor activity decreased. The second stage (mid first to mid second postoperative weeks) was characterized by increased daytime MAP and HR, and the animals developed punctate hyperalgesia in the affected hindpaw. An NE surge that may have been related to spontaneous pain was present 3-5 days after CCI. The third stage, which appeared after the second postoperative week, was characterized by normalized MAP and decreased HR, and increased high-frequency (0.8-3.0Hz) power in pulse interval variability, which is an index of cardiac parasympathetic tone. These results demonstrated that cardiovascular function was kept high through sympathetic and non-sympathetic activity for 2 weeks after CCI, followed by a predominance of parasympathetic tone. PMID:17611035

  9. Adenoviral-Mediated Glial Cell Line–Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Transfer Has a Protective Effect on Sciatic Nerve Following Constriction-Induced Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chou, An-Kuo; Yang, Ming-Chang; Tsai, Hung-Pei; Chai, Chee-Yin; Tai, Ming-Hong; Kwan, Aij-Li; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain due to peripheral nerve injury may be associated with abnormal central nerve activity. Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) can help attenuate neuropathic pain in different animal models of nerve injury. However, whether GDNF can ameliorate neuropathic pain in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in constriction-induced peripheral nerve injury remains unknown. We investigated the therapeutic effects of adenoviral-mediated GDNF on neuropathic pain behaviors, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and programmed cell death in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) nerve injury animal model. In this study, neuropathic pain was produced by CCI on the ipsilateral SCDH. Mechanical allodynia was examined with von Frey filaments and thermal sensitivity was tested using a plantar test apparatus post-operatively. Target proteins GDNF-1, GDNFRa-1, MMP2, MMP9, p38, phospho-p38, ED1, IL6, IL1β, AIF, caspase-9, cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, PARP, cleaved PARP, SPECTRIN, cleaved SPECTRIN, Beclin-1, PKCσ, PKCγ, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS were detected. Microglial activity was measured by observing changes in immunoreactivity with OX-42. NeuN and TUNEL staining were used to reveal whether apoptosis was attenuated by GDNF. Results showed that administrating GDNF began to attenuate both allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at day 7. CCI-rats were found to have lower GDNF and GDNFRa-1 expression compared to controls, and GDNF re-activated their expression. Also, GDNF significantly down-regulated CCI-induced protein expression except for MMP2, eNOS and nNOS, indicating that the protective action of GDNF might be associated with anti-inflammation and prohibition of microglia activation. Immunocytochemistry staining showed that GDNF reduced CCI-induced neuronal apoptosis. In sum, GDNF enhanced the neurotrophic effect by inhibiting microglia activation and cytokine production via p38 and PKC signaling. GDNF could be a good

  10. Novel Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) Derivative as a New Therapeutic Strategy for Reducing Neuropathic Pain after Chronic Constriction Nerve Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xifró, Xavier; Vidal-Sancho, Laura; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Turrado, Carlos; Alberch, Jordi; Puig, Teresa; Verdú, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in peripheral nerve injury and often fails to respond to ordinary medication. Here, we investigated whether the two novel epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) polyphenolic derivatives, compound 23 and 30, reduce the neuropathic pain in mice chronic constriction nerve injury (CCI). First, we performed a dose-response study to evaluate nociceptive sensation after administration of EGCG and its derivatives 23 and 30, using the Hargreaves test at 7 and 21 days after injury (dpi). We daily administered EGCG, 23 and 30 (10 to 100 mg/Kg; i.p.) during the first week post-CCI. None of the doses of compound 23 caused significant pain diminution, whereas 50mg/kg was optimal for both EGCG and 30 to delay the latency of paw withdrawal. With 50 mg/Kg, we showed that EGCC prevented the thermal hyperalgesia from 7 to 21 dpi and compound 30 from 14 to 56 dpi. To evaluate the molecular mechanisms underpinning why EGCG and compound 30 differentially prevented the thermal hyperalgesia, we studied several biochemical parameters in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord at 14 and 56 dpi. We showed that the effect observed with EGCG and compound 30 was related to the inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FASN), a known target of these polyphenolic compounds. Additionally, we observed that EGCG and compound 30 reduced the expression of CCI-mediated inflammatory proteins and the nuclear localization of nuclear factor-kappa B at 14 dpi, but not at 56 dpi. We also strongly detected a decrease of synaptic plasma membrane levels of N-methyl-D-asparte receptor 2B in CCI-mice treated with compound 30 at 56 dpi. Altogether, compound 30 reduced the chronic thermal hyperalgesia induced by CCI better than the natural compound EGCG. Thus, our findings provide a rationale for the preclinical development of compound 30 as an agent to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:25855977

  11. High frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation with diphenidol administration results in an additive antiallodynic effect in rats following chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng-Teng; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2015-03-01

    The impact of coadministration of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and diphenidol is not well established. Here we estimated the effects of diphenidol in combination with TENS on mechanical allodynia and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression. Using an animal chronic constriction injury (CCI) model, the rat was estimated for evidence of mechanical sensitivity via von Frey hair stimulation and TNF-α expression in the sciatic nerve using the ELISA assay. High frequency (100Hz) TENS or intraperitoneal injection of diphenidol (2.0μmol/kg) was applied daily, starting on postoperative day 1 (POD1) and lasting for the next 13 days. We demonstrated that both high frequency TENS and diphenidol groups had an increase in mechanical withdrawal thresholds of 60%. Coadministration of high frequency TENS and diphenidol gives better results of paw withdrawal thresholds in comparison with high frequency TENS alone or diphenidol alone. Both diphenidol and coadministration of high frequency TENS with diphenidol groups showed a significant reduction of the TNF-α level compared with the CCI or HFS group (P<0.05) in the sciatic nerve on POD7, whereas the CCI or high frequency TENS group exhibited a higher TNF-α level than the sham group (P<0.05). Our resulting data revealed that diphenidol alone, high frequency TENS alone, and the combination produced a reduction of neuropathic allodynia. Both diphenidol and the combination of diphenidol with high frequency TENS inhibited TNF-α expression. A moderately effective dose of diphenidol appeared to have an additive effect with high frequency TENS. Therefore, multidisciplinary treatments could be considered for this kind of mechanical allodynia. PMID:25596445

  12. Orofacial cold hyperalgesia due to infraorbital nerve constriction injury in rats: reversal by endothelin receptor antagonists but not non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Chichorro, Juliana Geremias; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Souza, Gloria Emilia Petto; Rae, Giles Alexander

    2006-07-01

    The susceptibility of changes in responsiveness to noxious cold stimulation of rats submitted to chronic constriction of the infraorbital nerve (CION) or carrageenan to drug inhibition was compared. Nocifensive responses were measured as total time rats engaged in bilateral facial grooming with both forepaws over the first 2 min following tetrafluoroethane spray application to the snout. Carrageenan (50 microg, s.c. into upper lip) caused short-lived ipsilateral cold hyperalgesia (peak at 3 h: vehicle 8.4+/-1.3, carrageenan 21.2+/-3.0 s) which was markedly suppressed by i.p. indomethacin (4 mg/kg), celecoxib (10mg/kg) or s.c. dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg), endothelin ET(A) or ET(B) receptor antagonists (BQ-123 and BQ-788, respectively; 10 nmol/lip). CION caused ipsilateral cold hyperalgesia between Days 2 and 12, which peaked on Days 4 (sham 15.3+/-1.8, CION 32.4+/-5.3s) to 6. Established peak CION-induced cold hyperalgesia was unaffected by indomethacin and celecoxib, whereas dexamethasone, BQ-123, BQ-788, and i.v. injections of selective antagonists of ET(A) (atrasentan, 3-10 mg/kg) or ET(B) (A-192621, 5-20 mg/kg) receptors caused significant inhibitions lasting 1-2.5h (peaks approximately 65-90%). Bosentan (dual ET(A)/ET(B) receptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg, i.v.) abolished CION-induced cold hyperalgesia for up to 6h. Thus, once established, CION-induced orofacial hyperalgesia to cold stimuli appears to lack an inflammatory component, but is alleviated by endothelin ET(A) and/or ET(B) receptor antagonists. If this CION injury model bears predictive value to trigeminal neuralgia (i.e., paroxysmal orofacial pain triggered by various stimuli), endothelin receptors might constitute new targets for treatment of this disorder. PMID:16563629

  13. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  14. Baclofen reversed thermal place preference in rats with chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Salte, K; Lea, G; Franek, M; Vaculin, S

    2016-06-20

    Chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve was used as an animal model of neuropathic pain. Instead of frequently used reflex-based tests we used an operant thermal place preference test to evaluate signs of neuropathic pain and the effect of baclofen administration in rats with neuropathy. Chronic constriction injury was induced by four loose ligations of the sciatic nerve. Thermal place preference (45 °C vs. 22 °C and 45 °C vs. 11 °C) was measured after the ligation and after the administration of baclofen in sham and experimental rats. Rats with the chronic constriction injury spent significantly less time on the colder plate compared to sham operated animals at the combination 45 °C vs. 11 °C. After administration of baclofen (10 mg/kg s.c.), the aversion to the colder plate in rats with chronic constriction injury disappeared. At the combination 45 °C vs. 22 °C, no difference in time spent on colder and/or warmer plate was found between sham and experimental animals. These findings show the importance of cold allodynia evaluation in rats with chronic constriction injury and the effectiveness of baclofen in this neuropathic pain model. PMID:26447518

  15. High Median Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Jonathan; Ugwu-Oju, Obinna

    2016-08-01

    The median nerve serves a crucial role in extrinsic and intrinsic motor and sensory function to the radial half of the hand. High median nerve injuries, defined as injuries proximal to the anterior interosseous nerve origin, therefore typically result in significant functional loss prompting aggressive surgical management. Even with appropriate recognition and contemporary nerve reconstruction, however, motor and sensory recovery may be inadequate. With isolated persistent high median nerve palsies, a variety of available tendon transfers can improve key motor functions and salvage acceptable use of the hand. PMID:27387077

  16. Sciatic nerve injection injury.

    PubMed

    Jung Kim, Hyun; Hyun Park, Sang

    2014-06-11

    Nerve injury is a common complication following intramuscular injection and the sciatic nerve is the most frequently affected nerve, especially in children, the elderly and underweight patients. The neurological presentation may range from minor transient pain to severe sensory disturbance and motor loss with poor recovery. Management of nerve injection injury includes drug treatment of pain, physiotherapy, use of assistive devices and surgical exploration. Early recognition of nerve injection injury and appropriate management are crucial in order to reduce neurological deficit and to maximize recovery. Sciatic nerve injection injury is a preventable event. Total avoidance of intramuscular injection is recommended if other administration routes can be used. If the injection has to be administered into the gluteal muscle, the ventrogluteal region (gluteal triangle) has a more favourable safety profile than the dorsogluteal region (the upper outer quadrant of the buttock). PMID:24920643

  17. Ameliorative potential of Ocimum sanctum in chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar S

    2015-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential of Ocimum sanctum and its saponin rich fraction in chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The chronic constriction injury was induced by placing four loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve, proximal to its trifurcation. The mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, paw heat hyperalgesia and cold tail hyperalgesia were assessed by performing the pinprick, acetone, hot plate and cold tail immersion tests, respectively. Biochemically, the tissue thio-barbituric acid reactive species, super-oxide anion content (markers of oxidative stress) and total calcium levels were measured. Chronic constriction injury was associated with the development of mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, heat and cold hyperalgesia along with an increase in oxidative stress and calcium levels. However, administration of Ocimum sanctum (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) and its saponin rich fraction (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) for 14 days significantly attenuated chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain as well as decrease the oxidative stress and calcium levels. It may be concluded that saponin rich fraction of Ocimum sanctum has ameliorative potential in attenuating painful neuropathic state, which may be attributed to a decrease in oxidative stress and calcium levels. PMID:25673470

  18. Antinociceptive activity of astragaloside IV in the animal model of chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guo-Bing; Fan, Rong; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Chen; Wang, Qi; Song, Juan; Gao, Yue; Hou, Ming-Xiao; Chen, Yu-Feng; Wang, Tong-Chao; Cai, Guo-Jun

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the applicability of astragaloside IV (AG) for the treatment of refractory neuropathic pain, we systemically evaluated the antinociceptive activity of AG in the animal model of chronic constriction injury. We studied behaviors, electrophysiology, and biochemistry from day 2 to day 23 after the surgery. We found that when administered intraperitoneally at the dose of 60 mg/kg, AG caused significant inhibition of allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by mechanic and thermal stimuli as well as downregulation of the expressions of a series of proteins involved in mediating neuropathic pain in the dorsal root ganglia, such as P2X purinoceptor 3, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α1, and transient receptor potential cation channel subtypes A1 and V1. Further investigation showed that AG restored the nerve conduction velocity and the histological structure of the damaged sciatic nerve on day 23 after the surgery. Moreover, results from immunoelectron microscope showed that glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α1 induced by AG could form a circular band in the myelin debris between the injured axons and Schwann cells, contributing toward restoration of the damaged nerve. In conclusion, in our animal model, AG effectively inhibited the neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury. PMID:25974189

  19. Decreased voltage-gated potassium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons after chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Wu, Yang; Zhao, Bo; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2016-01-20

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) regulate pain transmission by controlling neuronal excitability. Changes in KV expression patterns may thus contribute toward hyperalgesia following nerve injury. The aim of this study was to characterize KV current density in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the right sciatic nerve, a robust model of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. The study examined changes in small-diameter potassium ion currents (<30 µm) in neurons in the L4-L6 DRG following CCI by whole-cell patch-clamping and the association with post-CCI mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. Compared with the control group, 7 days after CCI, the mechanical force and temperature required to elicit ipsilateral foot withdrawal decreased significantly, indicating tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Post-CCI neurons had a significantly lower rheobase current and depolarized resting membrane potential than controls, suggesting KV current downregulation. Some ipsilateral DRG neurons also had spontaneous action potentials and repetitive firing. There was a 55% reduction in the total KV current density caused by a 55% decrease in the sustained delayed rectifier potassium ion current (IK) density and a 17% decrease in the transient A-type potassium ion current (IA) density. These results indicated that changes in DRG neuron IK and IA current density and concomitant afferent hyperexcitability may contribute toward neuropathic pain following injury. The rat CCI model may prove valuable for examining pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapies, such as KV channel modulators. PMID:26671526

  20. High Ulnar Nerve Injuries: Nerve Transfers to Restore Function.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jennifer Megan M

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are challenging problems. Nerve transfers are one of many options available to surgeons caring for these patients, although they do not replace tendon transfers, nerve graft, or primary repair in all patients. Distal nerve transfers for the treatment of high ulnar nerve injuries allow for a shorter reinnervation period and improved ulnar intrinsic recovery, which are critical to function of the hand. PMID:27094893

  1. [Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Sports].

    PubMed

    Tettenborn, B; Mehnert, S; Reuter, I

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries due to sports are relatively rare but the exact incidence is not known due to a lack of epidemiological studies. Particular sports activities tend to cause certain peripheral nerve injuries including direct acute compression or stretching, repetitive compression and stretching over time, or another mechanism such as ischemia or laceration. These nerve lesions may be severe and delay or preclude the athlete's return to sports, especially in cases with delayed diagnosis. Repetitive and vigorous use or overuse makes the athlete vulnerable to disorders of the peripheral nerves, and sports equipment may cause compression of the nerves. Depending on etiology, the treatment is primarily conservative and includes physiotherapy, modification of movements and sports equipment, shoe inserts, splinting, antiphlogistic drugs, sometimes local administration of glucocorticoids or, lately, the use of extracorporeal shock waves. Most often, cessation of the offending physical activity is necessary. Surgery is only indicated in the rare cases of direct traumatic nerve injury or when symptoms are refractory to conservative therapy. Prognosis mainly depends on the etiology and the available options of modifying measures.This article is based on the publications "Reuter I, Mehnert S. Engpasssyndrome peripherer Nerven bei Sportlern". Akt Neurol 2012;39:292-308 and Sportverl Sportschad 2013;27:130-146. PMID:27607069

  2. Peripheral nerve injuries in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, J H; Nadler, S F; Krivickas, L S

    1997-12-01

    Peripheral nerves are susceptible to injury in the athlete because of the excessive physiological demands that are made on both the neurological structures and the soft tissues that protect them. The common mechanisms of injury are compression, traction, ischaemia and laceration. Seddon's original classification system for nerve injuries based on neurophysiological changes is the most widely used. Grade 1 nerve injury is a neuropraxic condition, grade 2 is axonal degeneration and grade 3 is nerve transection. Peripheral nerve injuries are more common in the upper extremities than the lower extremities, tend to be sport specific, and often have a biomechanical component. While the more acute and catastrophic neurological injuries are usually obvious, many remain subclinical and are not recognised before neurological damage is permanent. Early detection allows initiation of a proper rehabilitation programme and modification of biomechanics before the nerve injury becomes irreversible. Recognition of nerve injuries requires an understanding of peripheral neuroanatomy, knowledge of common sites of nerve injury and an awareness of the types of peripheral nerve injuries that are common and unique to each sport. The electrodiagnostic exam, usually referred to as the 'EMG', consists of nerve conduction studies and the needle electrode examination. It is used to determine the site and degree of neurological injury and to predict outcome. It should be performed by a neurologist or physiatrist (physician specialising in physical medicine and rehabilitation), trained and skilled in this procedure. Timing is essential if the study is to provide maximal information. Findings such as decreased recruitment after injury and conduction block at the site of injury may be apparent immediately after injury but other findings such as abnormal spontaneous activity may take several weeks to develop. The electrodiagnostic test assists with both diagnosis of the injury and in predicting

  3. Attenuation of neuropathic pain by saikosaponin a in a rat model of chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Cheng, Hong; Xu, Dedong; Yin, Qing; Cheng, Lei; Wang, Lei; Song, Shasha; Zhang, Mengyuan

    2014-11-01

    Despite immense advances in the treatment strategies, the effective treatment of patients suffering from neuropathic pain remains challenging. Saikosaponin a possesses anti-inflammatory activity. However, the role of saikosaponin a in neuropathic pain is still unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of saikosaponin a on neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After CCI, rats were administered saikosaponin a (6.25, 12.50 and 25.00 mg/kg intraperitoneal, once daily) for 14 days. Mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were assessed before surgery and on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 after CCI. Our results showed that CCI significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency on days 1, 3, 7 and 14, as compared with sham groups, however, saikosaponin a reversed this effects. In addition, saikosaponin a inhibited CCI-induced the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2 in spinal cord. Western blot analysis demonstrated that saikosaponin a reduced the elevated expression of p-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB in the spinal cord induced by CCI. These results suggest that saikosaponin a could effectively attenuate neuropathic pain in CCI rats by inhibiting the activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways in spinal cord. PMID:25107300

  4. Nerve injury associated with orthognathic surgery. Part 1: UK practice and motor nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Bowe, D C; Gruber, E A; McLeod, N M H

    2016-05-01

    The head and neck is anatomically complex, and several nerves are at risk during orthognathic operations. Some injuries to nerves are reported more commonly than others. To find out what consultant surgeons tell their patients about the prevalence of common nerve injuries before orthognathic operations, we did a postal survey of fellows of the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (BAOMS). We also reviewed published papers to find out the reported incidence of injuries to cranial motor nerves during orthognathic operations. Only injuries to the facial nerve were commonly reported, and we found only case reports about injuries to the oculomotor, abducens, and trochlear nerves. The risk of temporary facial nerve palsy reported was 0.30/100 nerves (95% CI 0.23 to 0.50) and permanent facial nerve palsy was 0.06/100 nerves (95% CI 0.02 to 0.15). PMID:26935213

  5. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuates peripheral nerve degeneration in rat sciatic nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Maghrebi, May; Alshammari, Ahmad; George, Preethi

    2013-02-01

    Recently, we have shown that green tea (GT) consumption improves both reflexes and sensation in unilateral chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve. Considering the substantial neuroprotective properties of GT polyphenols, we sought to investigate whether (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) could protect the sciatic nerve and improve functional impairments induced by a crushing injury. We also examined whether neuronal cell apoptosis induced by the crushing injury is affected by EGCG treatment. Histological examination of sciatic nerves from EGCG-treated (50mg/kg; i.p.) showed that axonotmized rats had a remarkable axonal and myelin regeneration with significant decrease in the number of myelinated axonal fibers compared to vehicle-treated crush group. Similarly, ultrastructural evaluation of EGCG-treated nerves displayed normal unmyelinated and myelinated axons with regular myelin sheath thickness and normalized appearance of Schmidt-Lantermann clefts. Extracellular matrix displayed normal collagen fibers appearance with distinctively organized distribution similar to sham animals. Analysis of foot position and extensor postural thrust test showed a progressive and faster recovery in the EGCG-treated group compared to vehicle-treated animals. EGCG-treated rats showed significant increase in paw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical stimulation compared to vehicle-treated crush group. EGCG treatment also restored the mRNA expression of Bax, Bcl-2 and survivin but not that of p53 to sham levels on days 3 and 7 post-injury. Our results demonstrate that EGCG treatment enhanced functional recovery, advanced morphological nerve rescue and accelerated nerve regeneration following crush injury partly due to the down regulation of apoptosis related genes. PMID:23313191

  6. What Protects Certain Nerves from Stretch Injury?

    PubMed

    Schraut, Nicholas B; Walton, Sharon; Bou Monsef, Jad; Shott, Susan; Serici, Anthony; Soulii, Lioubov; Amirouche, Farid; Gonzalez, Mark H; Kerns, James M

    2016-01-01

    The human tibial nerves is less prone to injury following joint arthroplasty compared with the peroneal nerves. Besides the anatomical distribution, other features may confer protection from stretch injury. We therefore examined the size, shape and connective tissue distribution for the two nerves. The tibial and peroneal nerves from each side of nine fresh human cadavers we reharvested mid-thigh. Proximal segments manually stretched 20%-25% were fixed in aldehyde, while the adjacent distal segments were fixed in their natural length. Paraffin sections stained by Masson's trichrome method for connective tissue were examined by light microscopy. Tibial nerves had 2X more fascicles compared with the peroneal, but the axonal content appeared similar. Analysis showed that neither nerve had a significant reduction in cross sectional area of the fascicles following stretch. However, fascicles from stretched tibial nerves become significantly more oval compared with those from unstretched controls and peroneal nerves. Tibial nerves had a greater proportion that was extrafascicular tissue (50-55%) compared with peroneal nerves (38%-42%). This epineurium was typically adipose tissue. Perineurial thickness in both nerves was directly related to fascicular size. Tibial nerves have several unique histological features associated with size, shape and tissue composition compared with the peroneal nerve. We suggest that more fascicles with their tightly bound perineurium and more robust epineurium afford protection against stretch injury. Mechanical studies should clarify how size and shape contribute to nerve protection and/or neurapraxia. PMID:26529568

  7. Nerve injuries due to obstetric trauma.

    PubMed

    Bhat, V; Ravikumara; Oumachigui, A

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of nerve injuries among 32,637 deliveries over a period of ten years was 1.81/1000. Brachial plexus injury (1/1000) and facial nerve injury (0.74/1000) accounted for 98% of nerve injuries. Both the right and left side were involved equally. Bilateral nerve injury was not seen. Lack of antenatal care, macrosomia, abnormal presentations, and operative vaginal deliveries significantly increased the risk of nerve injuries. These babies had significantly higher incidence of meconium stained liquor and intrapartum asphyxia. Parity of the mother, gestational age and sex of the baby did not have significant role in the causation of nerve injuries. Injuries to brachial plexus and facial nerve were seen even in babies born by caesarean section, when it was performed for obstructed labour caused by cephalo-pelvic disproportion and abnormal presentations. Three babies with injuries expired and forty-three could be followed up for varying periods. None of the babies had residual defects. Detection of cephalopelvic disproportion and abnormal lie in the third trimester and their appropriate management would decrease the incidence of obstetric palsies to a significant extent. PMID:10829869

  8. Investigation of nerve injury through microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Rezina; Thakor, Nitish

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic injuries, both in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS), can potentially lead to irreversible damage resulting in permanent loss of function. Investigating the complex dynamics involved in these processes may elucidate the biological mechanisms of both nerve degeneration and regeneration, and may potentially lead to the development of new therapies for recovery. A scientific overview on the biological foundations of nerve injury is presented. Differences between nerve regeneration in the central and PNS are discussed. Advances in microtechnology over the past several years have led to the development of invaluable tools that now facilitate investigation of neurobiology at the cellular scale. Microfluidic devices are explored as a means to study nerve injury at the necessary simplification of the cellular level, including those devices aimed at both chemical and physical injury, as well as those that recreate the post-injury environment. PMID:24227311

  9. Low intensity laser treatment of nerve injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Luo, Qing-Ming

    2007-05-01

    The neural regeneration and functional recovery after nerve injuries has long been an important field in neuroscience. Low intensity laser (LIL) irradiation is a novel and useful tool for the treatment of many injuries and disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the role of LIL irradiation in the treatment of peripheral and central nerve injuries. Some animal experiments and clinical investigations have shown beneficial effects of LIL irradiation on neural tissues, but its therapeutic value and efficacy are controversial. Reviewing the data of experimental and clinical studies by using the biological information model of photobiomodulation, we conclude that LIL irradiation in specific parameters can promote the regeneration of injured peripheral and central nerves and LIL therapy is a safe and valuable treatment for superficial peripheral nerve injuries and spinal cord injury. The biological effects of LIL treatment depend largely on laser wavelength, power and dose per site and effective irradiation doses are location-specific.

  10. Pupil constriction evoked in vitro by stimulation of the oculomotor nerve in the turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    PubMed

    Dearworth, James R; Brenner, J E; Blaum, J F; Littlefield, T E; Fink, D A; Romano, J M; Jones, M S

    2009-01-01

    The pond turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans) exhibits a notably sluggish pupillary light reflex (PLR), with pupil constriction developing over several minutes following light onset. In the present study, we examined the dynamics of the efferent branch of the reflex in vitro using preparations consisting of either the isolated head or the enucleated eye. Stimulation of the oculomotor nerve (nIII) using 100-Hz current trains resulted in a maximal pupil constriction of 17.4% compared to 27.1% observed in the intact animal in response to light. When current amplitude was systematically increased from 1 to 400 microA, mean response latency decreased from 64 to 45 ms, but this change was not statistically significant. Hill equations fitted to these responses indicated a current threshold of 3.8 microA. Stimulation using single pulses evoked a smaller constriction (3.8%) with response latencies and threshold similar to that obtained using train stimulation. The response evoked by postganglionic stimulation of the ciliary nerve using 100-Hz trains was largely indistinguishable from that of train stimulation of nIII. However, application of single-pulse stimulation postganglionically resulted in smaller pupil constriction at all current levels relative to that of nIII stimulation, suggesting that there is amplification of efferent drive at the ganglion. Time constants for constrictions ranged from 88 to 154 ms with relaxations occurring more slowly at 174-361 ms. These values for timing from in vitro are much faster than the time constant 1.66 min obtained for the light response in the intact animal. The rapid dynamics of pupil constriction observed here suggest that the slow PLR of the turtle observed in vivo is not due to limitations of the efferent pathway. Rather, the sluggish response probably results from photoreceptive mechanisms or central processing. PMID:19523265

  11. Management of Pain in Complex Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gabrielle; Curtin, Catherine M

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic nerve injuries can be devastating and life-changing events, leading to functional morbidity and psychological stress and social constraints. Even in the event of a successful surgical repair with recovered motor function, pain can result in continued disability and poor quality of life. Pain after nerve injury can also prevent recovery and return to preinjury life. It is difficult to predict which patients will develop persistent pain; once incurred, pain can be even challenging to manage. This review seeks to define the types of pain following peripheral nerve injuries, investigate the pathophysiology and causative factors, and evaluate potential treatment options. PMID:27094896

  12. Antinociceptive effects of gentiopicroside on neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury in mice: a behavioral and electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Li, Yu-Xiang; Gong, Shuai-Shuai; Du, Juan; Liu, Gang; Jin, Shao-Ju; Zhao, Cheng-Jun; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Gentiopicroside (Gent) is promising as an important protective secoiridoid compound against pain. The present study was designed to investigate whether administration of Gent would alleviate the expression of nociceptive behaviors and whether it would cause the relevant electrophysiological changes in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain in mice. Gent was administered from the seventh day after surgery for 8 consecutive days. Behavioral parameters and sciatic functional index were assessed immediately before surgery and on days 7, 8, 10, 12, and 14 post-CCI, and electrophysiological activities of sciatic nerve were recorded immediately after the behavioral test on the last day. The present study has shown that administration of Gent (at a dose of 50 and 100 mg/kg) increased behavioral parameters from day 8 compared with the CCI-NS group. Electrophysiological data indicated that CCI caused a significant reduction in nerve conduction velocities in the sciatic nerves and the amplitudes of compound action potential, while Gent at a dose of 50 or 100 mg/kg caused a significant recovery of electrophysiological changes induced by CCI. Our data indicated that Gent has antinociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced by CCI. PMID:27175624

  13. Perioperative lower extremity peripheral nerve traction injuries.

    PubMed

    Plastaras, Christopher T; Chhatre, Akhil; Kotcharian, Ashot S

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve traction injuries may occur after surgical care and can involve any of the lower extremity large peripheral nerves. In this review, the authors discuss injuries after knee or hip surgical intervention. The diagnosis, including electrodiagnostic studies, is time sensitive and also relies on a detailed history and physical examination. Successful prevention and treatment involve familiarity with risk and predisposing factors as well as prophylactic measures. PMID:24267207

  14. Mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Scollard, David M; Truman, Richard W; Ebenezer, Gigi J

    2015-01-01

    All patients with leprosy have some degree of nerve involvement. Perineural inflammation is the histopathologic hallmark of leprosy, and this localization may reflect a vascular route of entry of Mycobacterium leprae into nerves. Once inside nerves, M. leprae are ingested by Schwann cells, with a wide array of consequences. Axonal atrophy may occur early in this process; ultimately, affected nerves undergo segmental demyelination. Knowledge of the mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy has been greatly limited by the minimal opportunities to study affected nerves in man. The nine-banded armadillo provides the only animal model of the pathogenesis of M. leprae infection. New tools available for this model enable the study and correlation of events occurring in epidermal nerve fibers, dermal nerves, and nerve trunks, including neurophysiologic parameters, bacterial load, and changes in gene transcription in both neural and inflammatory cells. The armadillo model is likely to enhance understanding of the mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy and offers a means of testing proposed interventions. PMID:25432810

  15. Tendon Transfers for Combined Peripheral Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Makarewich, Christopher A; Hutchinson, Douglas T

    2016-08-01

    Combined peripheral nerve injuries present a unique set of challenges to the hand surgeon when considering tendon transfers. They are often associated with severe soft tissue trauma, including lacerations to remaining innervated muscles and tendons, significant scar formation, and substantial sensory loss. In the case of combined nerve injuries, there are typically fewer options for tendon transfers due to fewer tendons of shared function that are expendable as well as associated injuries to tendon or muscle bellies. As such, careful preoperative planning must be performed to make the most of remaining muscle tendon units. PMID:27387081

  16. The nitroxyl donor, Angeli's salt, reduces chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Longhi-Balbinot, Daniela T; Rossaneis, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Bertozzi, Mariana M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Alves-Filho, José C; Cunha, Thiago M; Peron, Jean P S; Miranda, Katrina M; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2016-08-25

    Chronic pain is a major health problem worldwide. We have recently demonstrated the analgesic effect of the nitroxyl donor, Angeli's salt (AS) in models of inflammatory pain. In the present study, the acute and chronic analgesic effects of AS was investigated in chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain in mice. Acute (7th day after CCI) AS treatment (1 and 3 mg/kg; s.c.) reduced CCI-induced mechanical, but not thermal hyperalgesia. The acute analgesic effect of AS was prevented by treatment with 1H-[1,2, 4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor), KT5823 (an inhibitor of protein kinase G [PKG]) or glibenclamide (GLB, an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker). Chronic (7-14 days after CCI) treatment with AS (3 mg/kg, s.c.) promoted a sustained reduction of CCI-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Acute AS treatment reduced CCI-induced spinal cord allograft inflammatory factor 1 (known as Iba-1), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and ST2 receptor mRNA expression. Chronic AS treatment reduced CCI-induced spinal cord glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), Iba-1, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-33 (IL-33) and ST2 mRNA expression. Chronic treatment with AS (3 mg/kg, s.c.) did not alter aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, urea or creatinine plasma levels. Together, these results suggest that the acute analgesic effect of AS depends on activating the cGMP/PKG/ATP-sensitive potassium channel signaling pathway. Moreover, chronic AS diminishes CCI-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia by reducing the activation of spinal cord microglia and astrocytes, decreasing TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-33 cytokines expression. This spinal cord immune modulation was more prominent in the chronic treatment with AS. Thus, nitroxyl limits CCI-induced neuropathic pain by reducing spinal cord glial cells activation. PMID:27287419

  17. Nerve Injury in Athletes Caused by Cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Terry R.; Engelhardt, David L.; Kirkpatrick, John S.; Bassett, Frank H.

    1992-01-01

    Cryotherapy is a therapeutic modality frequently used in the treatment of athletic injuries. In very rare circumstances, inappropriate use in some individuals can lead to nerve injury resulting in temporary or permanent disability of the athlete. Six cases of cold-induced peripheral nerve injury from 1988 to 1991 at the Sports Medicine Center at Duke University are reported. Although disability can be severe and can render an athlete unable to compete for several months, each of these cases resolved spontaneously. Whereas the application of this modality is typically quite safe and beneficial, clinicians must be aware of the location of major peripheral nerves, the thickness of the overlying subcutaneous fat, the method of application (with inherent or additional compression), the duration of tissue cooling, and the possible cryotherapy sensibility of some individuals. PMID:16558167

  18. Calbindin-D-28K like immunoreactivity in superficial dorsal horn neurons and effects of sciatic chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Stebbing, M J; Balasubramanyan, S; Smith, P A

    2016-06-01

    The neuropathic pain that results from peripheral nerve injury is associated with alterations in the properties of neurons in the superficial spinal laminae. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the rat sciatic nerve increases excitatory synaptic drive to excitatory neurons in the substantia gelatinosa while limiting that to inhibitory neurons. Since the calcium-binding protein calbindin D-28K has been associated with excitatory neurons, we examined whether CCI altered the properties of neurons expressing calbindin-like immunoreactivity (Cal+). These account for 30% of the neurons in lamina I and II. Calbindin did not co-localize with any particular electrophysiological phenotype of neuron; in substantia gelatinosa, it was found in some tonic, delay, irregular, phasic and transient firing neurons and in some cells that displayed central, radial or vertical morphology. When neuronal phenotype was defined more precisely in terms of both morphology and electrophysiological properties, no strong correlation with calbindin expression was found. The frequency and amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSC) in calbindin negative (Cal-) neurons was greater than that in Cal+ neurons. CCI did not alter the proportion of Cal+ neurons in the dorsal horn. Although CCI promoted a fourfold increase in sEPSC frequency in Cal+ neurons, sEPSC amplitude was reduced by 22% and charge transfer per second was unchanged. Since synaptic drive to Cal+ neurons is weak and there is no firm correlation between neuronal phenotype and calbindin expression, it is doubtful whether these neurons play a major role in the generation of central sensitization. PMID:26975894

  19. Nerve Transfers for the Restoration of Wrist, Finger, and Thumb Extension After High Radial Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Pet, Mitchell A; Lipira, Angelo B; Ko, Jason H

    2016-05-01

    High radial nerve injury is a common pattern of peripheral nerve injury most often associated with orthopedic trauma. Nerve transfers to the wrist and finger extensors, often from the median nerve, offer several advantages when compared to nerve repair or grafting and tendon transfer. In this article, we discuss the forearm anatomy pertinent to performing these nerve transfers and review the literature surrounding nerve transfers for wrist, finger, and thumb extension. A suggested algorithm for management of acute traumatic high radial nerve palsy is offered, and our preferred surgical technique for treatment of high radial nerve palsy is provided. PMID:27094891

  20. Vitamin B complex attenuated heat hyperalgesia following infraorbital nerve constriction in rats and reduced capsaicin in vivo and in vitro effects.

    PubMed

    Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Reis, Renata C; Bressan, Elisangela; Reeh, Peter W; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2015-09-01

    Vitamins of the B complex attenuate some neuropathic pain sensory aspects in various animal models and in patients, but the mechanisms underlying their effects remain to be elucidated. Herein it was investigated if the treatment with a vitamin B complex (VBC) reduces heat hyperalgesia in rats submitted to infraorbital nerve constriction and the possibility that TRPV1 receptors represent a target for B vitamins. In the present study, the VBC refers to a combination of vitamins B1, B6 and B12 at low- (18, 18 and 1.8mg/kg, respectively) or high- (180, 180 and 18mg/kg, respectively) doses. Acute treatment of rats with either the low- or the high-doses combination reduced heat hyperalgesia after nerve injury, but the high-doses combination resulted in a long-lasting effect. Repeated treatment with the low-dose combination reduced heat hyperalgesia on day four after nerve injury and showed a synergist effect with a single injection of carbamazepine (3 or 10mg/kg), which per se failed to modify the heat threshold. In naïve rats, acute treatment with the high-dose of VBC or B1 and B12 vitamins independently reduced heat hyperalgesia evoked by capsaicin (3µg into the upper lip). Moreover, the VBC, as well as, each one of the B vitamins independently reduced the capsaicin-induced calcium responses in HEK 293 cells transiently transfected with the human TRPV1 channels. Altogether, these results indicate that B vitamins can be useful to control heat hyperalgesia associated with trigeminal neuropathic pain and that modulation of TRPV1 receptors may contribute to their anti-hyperalgesic effects. PMID:26048309

  1. Lateral Pectoral Nerve Injury Mimicking Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Ilknur; Palamar, Deniz; Akgun, Kenan

    2015-07-01

    The lateral pectoral nerve (LPN) is commonly injured along with the brachial plexus, but its isolated lesions are rare. Here, we present a case of an isolated LPN lesion confused with cervical radiculopathy. A 41-year-old man was admitted to our clinic because of weakness in his right arm. Previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination revealed right posterolateral protrusion at the C6-7 level. At the initial assessment, atrophy of the right pectoralis major muscle was evident, and mild weakness of the right shoulder adductor, internal rotator, and flexor muscles was observed. Therefore, electrodiagnostic evaluation was performed, and a diagnosis of isolated LPN injury was made. Nerve injury was thought to have been caused by weightlifting exercises and traction injury. Lateral pectoral nerve injury can mimic cervical radiculopathy, and MRI examination alone may lead to misdiagnosis. Repeated physical examinations during the evaluation and treatment phase will identify the muscle atrophy that occurs 1 or more months after the injury. PMID:25290103

  2. The Antinociceptive Effects of Tramadol and/or Gabapentin on Rat Neuropathic Pain Induced by a Chronic Constriction Injury.

    PubMed

    Corona-Ramos, Janette Nallely; De la O-Arciniega, Minarda; Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Medina-López, José Raúl; Domínguez-Ramírez, Adriana Miriam; Jaramillo-Morales, Osmar Antonio; Espinosa-Juárez, Josué Vidal; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier

    2016-08-01

    Preclinical Research The current work evaluates the interaction between two commonly used drugs, tramadol (Tra) and gabapentin (Gbp). Dose-response curves (DRC) and isobolographic analysis were used to confirm their synergistic antihyperalgesic and anti-allodynic responses in a rat neuropathic pain model involving chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve and in von Frey and acetone tests. Tra and Gbp produced dose-dependent antihyperalgesic and anti-allodynic effects. Dose-response studies of combinations of Tra and Gbp in combination showed the DRC was leftward-shifted compared to the DRCs for each compound alone. One combination demonstrated both antihyperalgesic and anti-allodynic effects greater than those observed after individual administration. The remaining combinations demonstrated an additive effect. The Tra+Gbp combination demonstrated a potentiative effect with smaller doses of Tra. Additionally, it was determined lethal dose 50 (LD50 ) of Tra alone and tramadol + Gbp 10 using mice to 48 h post administration. The DRC (death) were similar for Tra alone and in Tra in combination, despite the improved effectiveness of Tra in the presence of GBP, 10 mg/kg. A combination of these drugs could be effective in neuropathic pain therapy because they can produce potentiative (at a low dose) or additive effects. Drug Dev Res 77 : 217-226, 2016.   © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27300150

  3. [Right median nerve injury following laparoscopic sigmoidectomy].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ju; Yonenaga, Kazumichi; Arita, Hideko; Hanaoka, Kazuo

    2008-06-01

    Brachial plexus injury has often occurred secondary to malposition of the patient during general anesthesia. We have experienced median nerve injury following laparoscopic sigmoidectomy. A 61-year-old man with diabetes and hypertension received laparoscopic sigmoidectomy under general and epidural anesthesia. Tracheal intubation was easy without excessive retroflextion of his neck after anesthesia induction with fentanyl, propofol, and vecuronium. Both his upper arms were abducted to 80 degrees and his elbows were extended on a padded arm board. The shoulder braces were placed over both his acromioclavicular joints. His head remained in neutral position. Anesthesia was maintained with air, oxygen, sevoflurane, fentanyl, and vecuronium using mepivacaine via epidural catheter. During surgical procedures, he was in a combined lithotomy and head down position at maximum of 20 degrees. The operative table was tilted to the right at maximum of 20 degrees. The operation was finished successfully in 2 hours and 40 minutes without a special event. Postoperatively, he complained of numbness of the first, second, and third digits, and the radial side of fourth digit in his right hand. The redness on both his shoulders was observed. Muscle weakness and motor disturbance were not observed. Orthopedic surgeon diagnosed him as right median nerve injury. His symptoms improved gradually by physical training and disappeared one week after the operation. We suspect that his right median nerve injury was caused by compression and stretching of the brachial plexus in head down position, right lateral tilt table, use of shoulder brace, laparoscopy, abduction of the upper arm, and extension of the elbow. In laparoscopic operation in head down position, we should avoid using the shoulder brace to minimize the risk of brachial plexus injury. The arms should be approximated to the sides as nearly as possible and the elbows should be gently flexed to unload the median nerve and relieve

  4. Fibular nerve injury after small saphenous vein surgery.

    PubMed

    de Alvarenga Yoshida, Ricardo; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti; Sardenberg, Trajano; Sobreira, Marcone Lima; Rollo, Hamilton Almeida; Moura, Regina

    2012-07-01

    Superficial nerve injuries are very common during varicose vein surgery. In contrast, deep nerve injuries are rare and reported especially when surgery involves the small saphenous vein (SSV). The deep motor nerves most commonly injured are the tibial nerve and the peroneal nerve, which are directly or indirectly affected by extrinsic compression, stretching, or healing process involvement. In this report, two cases of common fibular nerve injury after SSV stripping are described, including treatment used and patient outcomes. Nerve damage mechanisms, anatomy, and prevention strategies are also discussed. In conclusion, fibular nerve damage may occur during SSV stripping. Preventive measures include careful preoperative ultrasonographic investigation of the anatomy of the vein, determining location of the saphenopopliteal joint, and careful dissection far from fibular nerve and restricted to the popliteal fossa. PMID:22664286

  5. Loss of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors in synapses of tonic firing substantia gelatinosa neurons in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yishen; Derkach, Victor A; Smith, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    Synapses transmitting nociceptive information in the spinal dorsal horn undergo enduring changes following peripheral nerve injury. Indeed, such injury alters the expression of the GluA2 subunit of glutamatergic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the substantia gelatinosa and this predicts altered channel conductance and calcium permeability, leading to an altered function of excitatory synapses. We therefore investigated the functional properties of synaptic AMPA receptors in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons following 10-20d chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve; a model of neuropathic pain. We measured their single-channel conductance and sensitivity to a blocker of calcium permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs), IEM1460 (50μM). In putative inhibitory, tonic firing neurons, CCI reduced the average single-channel conductance of synaptic AMPAR from 14.4±3.5pS (n=12) to 9.2±1.0pS (n=10, p<0.05). IEM1460 also more effectively antagonized evoked, spontaneous and miniature EPSCs in tonic neurons from sham operated animals than in those from animals that had been subjected to CCI. By contrast, CCI did not change the effectiveness of IEM1460 in delay firing neurons although average single channel conductance was increased from 7.6±1.2pS (n=11) to 12.2±1.5pS (n=10, p<0.01). CCI thus elicits plastic changes in a specific set of glutamatergic synapses of substantia gelatinosa due to subunit recomposition and loss of GluA2-lacking CP-AMPAR. These insights reveal a molecular mechanism of nerve injury acting at synapses of inhibitory neurons to reduce their drive and therefore inhibitory tone in the spinal cord, therefore contributing to the central sensitization associated with neuropathic pain. PMID:26948545

  6. Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations.

    PubMed

    Murayama, M; Sasaki, K; Shibahara, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury by determining degrees of nerve disturbance using the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Crush and partial and complete nerve amputation injuries were applied to the IAN of rabbits, then SNAPs and histomorphometric observations were recorded at 1, 5, and 10 weeks. For crush injury, most nerves were smaller in diameter at 5 weeks than at 1 week, however after 10 weeks, extensive nerve regeneration was observed. The SNAP showed a decrease in SCV at weeks 1 and 5, followed by an increase at week 10. For partial nerve amputation, small to medium-sized nerve fibres were observed at weeks 1 and 5, then larger nerves were seen at week 10. Minimal changes in SCV were observed at weeks 1 and 5, however SCV increased at week 10. For complete nerve amputation, nerve fibres were sparse at week 1, but gradual nerve regeneration was observed at weeks 5 and 10. SNAPs were detectable from week 10, however the SCV was extremely low. This study showed SCV to be an effective factor in the evaluation of nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:26433750

  7. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xing-long; Wang, Pei; Sun, Bo; Liu, Shi-bo; Gao, Yun-feng; He, Xin-ze; Yu, Chang-yu

    2015-01-01

    Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery. PMID:26692866

  8. Changes in the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 in rat trigeminal ganglia following chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenhua; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yuanyin; Wang, Liecheng; Wang, Xuxia

    2016-08-17

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), especially the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Nav1.3 and Nav1.7, and the tetrodotoxin-resistant Nav1.8 and Nav1.9, have been implicated in acute and chronic neuropathic pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of VGSC Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 after nerve injury and their roles in the development of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We used the infraorbital nerve-chronic constriction injury model of TN in the rat. The time course of changes in the mechanical pain threshold was examined. In addition, real-time PCR and double immunofluorescence staining of VGSC α subunits were used to evaluate messenger RNA and protein expression, respectively, in the trigeminal ganglion. Behavioral tests showed that the mechanical pain threshold decreased significantly 4-42 days after surgery and reached the lowest observed value by day 12. Compared with sham-operated controls, we found that trigeminal ganglion in rats subjected to an infraorbital nerve-chronic constriction injury showed upregulation of Nav1.3 and downregulation of Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 messenger RNA and protein levels. Our findings suggest that VGSC may participate in the regulation of TN. PMID:27327156

  9. Research progress of stem cells on glaucomatous optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ya-Sha; Xu, Jian; Peng, Jun; Li, Ping; Wen, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Yue; Chen, Ke-Zhu; Liu, Jia-Qi; Wang, Ying; Peng, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is an irreversible optic neuropathy. The mechanism of optic nerve injury caused by glaucoma is undefined at present. There is no effective treatment method for the injury. Stem cells have the capacity of self-renewal and differentiation. These two features have made them become the research focus on improving the injury at present. This paper reviews the application progress on different types of stem cells therapy for optic nerve injury caused by glaucoma. PMID:27588279

  10. Research progress of stem cells on glaucomatous optic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ya-Sha; Xu, Jian; Peng, Jun; Li, Ping; Wen, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Yue; Chen, Ke-Zhu; Liu, Jia-Qi; Wang, Ying; Peng, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is an irreversible optic neuropathy. The mechanism of optic nerve injury caused by glaucoma is undefined at present. There is no effective treatment method for the injury. Stem cells have the capacity of self-renewal and differentiation. These two features have made them become the research focus on improving the injury at present. This paper reviews the application progress on different types of stem cells therapy for optic nerve injury caused by glaucoma. PMID:27588279

  11. Silencing of Id2 Alleviates Chronic Neuropathic Pain Following Chronic Constriction Injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liuming; Wu, Qun; Yang, Tao

    2016-05-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation 2 (Id2) belongs to a helix-loop-helix family of proteins. Recent studies have showed that Id2 plays a pivotal role in neuronal survival and neuroprotection. However, under neuropathic pain conditions, the role of Id2 is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of Id2 on neuropathic pain in a rat chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Our results demonstrated that Id2 was upregulated in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in a CCI rat in a time-dependent manner. Intrathecal short-hairpin RNA (shRNA)-Id2 attenuates mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats, and inhibits the expression of TNF-α and IL-1β in the DRG in CCI rats. Furthermore, knockdown of Id2 reduces the expression of NF-κB p65 in the DRG of CCI rats. Taken together, our findings suggest that knockdown of Id2 may alleviate neuropathic pain by inhibiting the NF-κB activation to inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. Therefore, Id2 may provide an important target of neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:26768262

  12. Hyperalgesia due to nerve injury: role of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Perkins, N M; Tracey, D J

    2000-01-01

    The hypothesis that the early inflammatory cell, the neutrophil, contributes to the hyperalgesia resulting from peripheral nerve injury was tested in rats in which the sciatic nerve was partially transected on one side. The extent and time-course of neutrophilic infiltration of the sciatic nerve and innervated paw skin after partial nerve damage was characterized using immunocytochemistry. The number of endoneurial neutrophils was significantly elevated in sections of operated nerve compared to sections of sham-operated nerve for the entire period studied, i.e. up to seven days post-surgery. This considerable elevation in endoneurial neutrophil numbers was only observed at the site of nerve injury. Depletion of circulating neutrophils at the time of nerve injury significantly attenuated the induction of hyperalgesia. However, depletion of circulating neutrophils at day 8 post-injury did not alleviate hyperalgesia after its normal induction. It is concluded that endoneurial accumulation of neutrophils at the site of peripheral nerve injury is important in the early genesis of the resultant hyperalgesia. The findings support the notion that a neuroimmune interaction occurs as a result of peripheral nerve injury and is important in the subsequent development of neuropathic pain. PMID:11113323

  13. [Surgical treatment of lower extremity peripheral nerve injuries].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Radek

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries of the lower extremities are not frequent. The most common are traction injury of the peroneal nerve at the knee level or iatrogenic trauma of the pelvic nerves during abdominal surgery. Civil sharp injuries are rare.Indications for surgical revision follow the general rules of nerve surgery. Sharp injury should be treated as soon as possible, ideally within 72 hours. Closed lesions are indicated for surgery if a complete denervation remains unchanged three months after the injury. Best results can be achieved within six months from the injury. Irritations caused by bone fragments or scarring or by iatrogenic injury (clamps, cement, screws, etc.) may be revised later. However, the most important is early clinical examination in a specialized neurosurgical department. PMID:27256143

  14. Edaravone promotes functional recovery after mechanical peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Teng; Li, Zhengwei; Dong, Jianli; Nan, Feng; Li, Tao; Yu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Edaravone has been shown to reduce ischemia/reperfusion-induced peripheral nerve injury. However, the therapeutic effect of edaravone on peripheral nerve injury caused by mechanical factors is unknown. In the present study, we established a peripheral nerve injury model by crushing the sciatic nerve using hemostatic forceps, and then administered edaravone 3 mg/kg intraperitoneally. The sciatic functional index and superoxide dismutase activity of the sciatic nerve were increased, and the malondialdehyde level was decreased in animals in the edaravone group compared with those in the model group. Bcl-2 expression was increased, but Bax expression was decreased in anterior horn cells of the L4-6 spinal cord segments. These results indicated that edaravone has a neuroprotective effect following peripheral nerve injury caused by mechanical factors through alleviating free radical damage to cells and inhibiting lipid peroxidation, as well as regulating apoptosis-related protein expression. PMID:25374594

  15. Intradermal injection of Botulinum toxin type A alleviates infraorbital nerve constriction-induced thermal hyperalgesia in an operant assay.

    PubMed

    Kumada, A; Matsuka, Y; Spigelman, I; Maruhama, K; Yamamoto, Y; Neubert, J K; Nolan, T A; Watanabe, K; Maekawa, K; Kamioka, H; Yamashiro, T; Kuboki, T; Oguma, K

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that infraorbital nerve constriction (IoNC)-induced mechanical allodynia has been attenuated by administration of highly purified 150-kDa Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). Here, we extend these studies to determine whether BoNT/A could attenuate IoNC-induced symptoms of thermal hyperalgesia. Instead of testing head withdrawal thresholds, a thermal operant assay was used to evaluate cortical processing of sensory input following IoNC. In this assay, a fasted rat's desire to obtain a food reward (sweetened condensed milk) is coupled to its ability to tolerate facial contact with a warm (45 °C) thermode. Bilateral IoNC decreased the ratio of thermode contact duration/event, which is an indicative of thermal hyperalgesia. BoNT/A injection intradermally in the area of infraorbital nerve (IoN) innervation 7 days after IoNC resulted in decreased number of facial contacts and increased the ratio of contact duration/event (measured at 14 days after IoNC). The BoNT/A (2-200 pg) effects were dose dependent and statistically significant at 100 and 200 pg (P < 0·05). Complete reversal of thermal hyperalgesia symptoms was obtained with a 200-pg dose, without affecting sham rat behaviour. Off-site (neck) injection of BoNT/A did not relieve thermal hyperalgesia, while co-injection of BoNT/A with a neutralising antibody in the area of IoN innervation prevented relief of thermal hyperalgesia. Neither IoNC nor BoNT/A injection affected operant assay parameters with a 24 °C thermode, indicating selectivity of thermal hyperalgesia measurements. These results strongly suggest that intradermal injection of BoNT/A in the area of IoN innervation alleviates IoNC-induced thermal hyperalgesia in an operant assay. PMID:21793870

  16. Dynamic regulation of Schwann cell enhancers after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Hung, Holly A; Sun, Guannan; Keles, Sunduz; Svaren, John

    2015-03-13

    Myelination of the peripheral nervous system is required for axonal function and long term stability. After peripheral nerve injury, Schwann cells transition from axon myelination to a demyelinated state that supports neuronal survival and ultimately remyelination of axons. Reprogramming of gene expression patterns during development and injury responses is shaped by the actions of distal regulatory elements that integrate the actions of multiple transcription factors. We used ChIP-seq to measure changes in histone H3K27 acetylation, a mark of active enhancers, to identify enhancers in myelinating rat peripheral nerve and their dynamics after demyelinating nerve injury. Analysis of injury-induced enhancers identified enriched motifs for c-Jun, a transcription factor required for Schwann cells to support nerve regeneration. We identify a c-Jun-bound enhancer in the gene for Runx2, a transcription factor induced after nerve injury, and we show that Runx2 is required for activation of other induced genes. In contrast, enhancers that lose H3K27ac after nerve injury are enriched for binding sites of the Sox10 and early growth response 2 (Egr2/Krox20) transcription factors, which are critical determinants of Schwann cell differentiation. Egr2 expression is lost after nerve injury, and many Egr2-binding sites lose H3K27ac after nerve injury. However, the majority of Egr2-bound enhancers retain H3K27ac, indicating that other transcription factors maintain active enhancer status after nerve injury. The global epigenomic changes in H3K27ac deposition pinpoint dynamic changes in enhancers that mediate the effects of transcription factors that control Schwann cell myelination and peripheral nervous system responses to nerve injury. PMID:25614629

  17. Nerve injuries about the elbow in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joshua D; Lintner, David M

    2014-09-01

    The athlete's elbow is a remarkable example of motion, strength, and durability. The stress placed on the elbow during sport, including the throwing motion, may lead to soft-tissue ligamentous and nerve injury. The thrower's elbow illustrates one example of possible nerve injury about the elbow in sport, related to chronic repetitive tensile and compressive stresses to the ulnar nerve associated with elbow flexion and valgus position. Besides the throwing athlete, nerve injury from high-energy direct-impact forces may also damage nerves around the elbow in contact sports. Detailed history and physical examination can often make the diagnosis of most upper extremity neuropathies. The clinician must be aware of the possibility of isolated or combined nerve injury as far proximal as the cervical nerve roots, through the brachial plexus, to the peripheral nerve terminal branches. Electrodiagnostic studies are occasionally beneficial for diagnosis with certain nerves. Nonoperative management is often successful in most elbow and upper extremity neuropathies. If conservative treatment fails, then surgical treatment should address all potentially offending structures. In the presence of medial laxity and concurrent ulnar neuritis, the medial ulnar collateral ligament warrants surgical treatment, in addition to transposition of the ulnar nerve. The morbidity of open surgical decompression of nerves in and around the elbow is potentially career threatening in the throwing athlete. This mandates an assessment of the adequacy of the nonsurgical treatment and a thorough preoperative discussion of the risks and benefits of surgery. PMID:25077754

  18. Abnormal DNA methylation in the lumbar spinal cord following chronic constriction injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Lin, Zhi-Ping; Zheng, Hui-Zhe; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Zong-Luan; Chen, Yan; You, Yi-Sheng; Yang, Ming-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of neuropathic pain is complex and not clearly understood. Glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD 67) is a key synthetic enzyme for the main inhibitory transmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and diminishes in the spinal dorsal horn in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI). GAD 67 is coded by gene GAD 1. DNA methylation can regulate the expression of GAD 67 by regulating the methylation of GAD 1 promoter in the psychotic brain. DNA methylation is primarily mediated by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and methyl-DNA binding domain proteins (MBDs). In this study, in order to discover whether DNA methylation regulates GAD 67 expression in the spinal cord in CCI rats and is involved in neuropathic pain, we examined mRNA levels of DNMTs, MBDs and GAD 67 with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and methylation of GAD 1 promoter with Pyromark CpG Assays in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. Our results showed that DNMT3a, DNMT3b and methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) expression increased, MBD2 expression decreased, and DNMT1, MBD1 and MBD3 expression hardly changed in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. GAD 67 expression decreased, and methylation of GAD 1 promoter increased in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. These results indicate that decreased GAD 67 may be associated with increased GAD 1 promoter methylation, which may be mediated by DNMT3a, DNMT3b, MeCP2 and MBD2 in CCI rats. These indicate that abnormal DNA methylation may be highly involved in CCI-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:26515497

  19. [Nerve injury following implant placement: prevention, diagnosis and treatment modalities].

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Y; Eliav, E; Nahlieli, O

    2003-07-01

    Nerve injury is a well-known complication following oral and maxillofacial surgery. Direct trauma, inflammation and infection are postoperative neural disturbances main causes. The most inflicted nerves associated with endosseous implant placement are those innervating the mandible: the inferior alveolar nerve, the mental nerve and the lingual nerve. Evaluation of the nerve injury characteristics and severity as early as possible has always imposed a great challenge for clinicians. We demonstrate a reliable yet simple way of dealing with this kind of problem in conjunction with comparing preoperative and postoperative sensation of the chin, the tongue and the lower lip. On the other hand, it is considerably important to take preventive measures for such injuries by using appropriate radiographic images. If a nerve damage has occurred, best prognosis is to be expected by early and appropriate treatment. It is imperative to treat such injuries in four months following the injury, otherwise a permanent nerve damage may occur. Further investigation of nerve damage risks following implant placement should be performed in order to enable patient to decide whether having implants dependent rehabilitation or choosing an alternative. PMID:14515628

  20. How to Avoid Facial Nerve Injury in Mastoidectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Nam-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Unexpected iatrogenic facial nerve paralysis not only affects facial disfiguration, but also imposes a devastating effect on the social, psychological, and economic aspects of an affected person's life at once. The aims of this study were to postulate where surgeons had mistakenly drilled or where obscured by granulations or by fibrous bands and to look for surgical approach with focused on the safety of facial nerve in mastoid surgery. We had found 14 cases of iatrogenic facial nerve injury (IFNI) during mastoid surgery for 5 years in Korea. The medical records of all the patients were obtained and analyzed injured site of facial nerve segment with surgical technique of mastoidectomy. Eleven patients underwent facial nerve exploration and three patients had conservative management. 43% (6 cases) of iatrogenic facial nerve injuries had occurred in tympanic segment, 28.5% (4 cases) of injuries in second genu combined with tympanic segment, and 28.5% (4 cases) of injuries in mastoid segment. Surgeons should try to identify the facial nerve using available landmarks and be kept in mind the anomalies of the facial nerve. With use of intraoperative facial nerve monitoring, the avoidance of in order to avoid IFNI would be possible in more cases. Many authors emphasized the importance of intraoperative facial nerve monitoring, even in primary otologic surgery. However, anatomical understanding of intratemporal landmarks with meticulous dissection could not be emphasized as possible to prevent IFNI.

  1. Comorbid anxiety-like behavior and locus coeruleus impairment in diabetic peripheral neuropathy: A comparative study with the chronic constriction injury model.

    PubMed

    Alba-Delgado, Cristina; Cebada-Aleu, Alberto; Mico, Juan Antonio; Berrocoso, Esther

    2016-11-01

    Anxiety frequently appears in patients with diabetic neuropathic pain, a highly prevalent clinical condition. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of this comorbidity are poorly known. Anxiogenic phenotype has been associated with alterations of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) after peripheral nerve entrapment. We have examined the sensorial (pain) and affective (anxiety) behaviors, and the LC activity in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. A comparative study with the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of sciatic nerve was also carried out. Diabetic nociceptive hypersensitivity was observed to appear gradually, reaching their maximum at fourth week. In contrast, CCI displayed a sharp decrease in their sensorial threshold at seventh day. In both models, anxiety-like phenotype was evident after four weeks but not earlier, coincident with the LC alterations. Indeed, STZ animals showed reduced LC firing activity, tyrosine hydroxylase, pCREB and noradrenaline transporter levels, contrary to observed in CCI animals. However, in both models, enhanced LC alpha2-adrenoceptor sensitivity was presented at this time point. This study demonstrated that diabetes induced anxiety-like behavior comorbid with LC impairment at long-term. However, the nociceptive sensitivity time-course, as well as the LC functions, showed distinct features compared to the CCI model, indicating that specific neuroplastic mechanisms are at play in every model. PMID:27328428

  2. Effects of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) Stigma Extract and its Active Constituent Crocin on Neuropathic Pain Responses in a Rat Model of Chronic Constriction Injury.

    PubMed

    Safakhah, Hossein Ali; Taghavi, Tahereh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Sokhanvar, Mina; Mohebbi, Narges; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the therapeutic effects of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) and its main constituent crocin on neuropathic pain behavioral responses induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 250 g) were randomly assigned into 5 groups: Sham + saline, CCI + saline, CCI+ saffron (30 mg/kg), CCI + crocin (15 mg/kg) and CCI + crocin (30 mg/kg). CCI was induced by applying 4 loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve. Two weeks after nerve lesion, injections of saline, saffron or crocin were started and continued until 26(th) day post-surgery. Pain behavioral responses including mechanical allodynia (von Frey filament testing) and thermal hyperalgesia were measured in 14, 17, 20, 23, 26, and 40(th) days after CCI. CCI significantly increased pain behavioral responses. Saffron and crocin (30 mg/kg) decreased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia on day 26, and this effect continued until the day 40. Crocin at lower dose (15 mg/kg) was ineffective. These findings indicate that treatment of saffron and crocin after CCI may have a therapeutic effect against neuropathic pain, suggesting that these substances may offer new strategies for the treatment of this highly debilitating condition. PMID:27610166

  3. Effects of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) Stigma Extract and its Active Constituent Crocin on Neuropathic Pain Responses in a Rat Model of Chronic Constriction Injury

    PubMed Central

    Safakhah, Hossein Ali; Taghavi, Tahereh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Sokhanvar, Mina; Mohebbi, Narges; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the therapeutic effects of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) and its main constituent crocin on neuropathic pain behavioral responses induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 250 g) were randomly assigned into 5 groups: Sham + saline, CCI + saline, CCI+ saffron (30 mg/kg), CCI + crocin (15 mg/kg) and CCI + crocin (30 mg/kg). CCI was induced by applying 4 loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve. Two weeks after nerve lesion, injections of saline, saffron or crocin were started and continued until 26th day post-surgery. Pain behavioral responses including mechanical allodynia (von Frey filament testing) and thermal hyperalgesia were measured in 14, 17, 20, 23, 26, and 40th days after CCI. CCI significantly increased pain behavioral responses. Saffron and crocin (30 mg/kg) decreased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia on day 26, and this effect continued until the day 40. Crocin at lower dose (15 mg/kg) was ineffective. These findings indicate that treatment of saffron and crocin after CCI may have a therapeutic effect against neuropathic pain, suggesting that these substances may offer new strategies for the treatment of this highly debilitating condition. PMID:27610166

  4. Delayed Sciatic Nerve Injury Resulting From Myositis Ossificans Traumatica.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhe; Wilson, Thomas J; Jacobson, Jon A; Hollon, Todd C; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2016-05-01

    A motorcyclist sustained multiple-system trauma, including a left buttock hematoma requiring decompression and evacuation. Presentation for severe hip pain and lower extremity weakness was delayed. Imaging revealed myositis ossificans traumatica compressing the sciatic nerve in the buttock. The patient underwent sciatic nerve decompression with resection of heterotopic calcification, resulting in improvement in pain and left lower extremity function. This case illustrates the contrast in differential diagnosis of peripheral nerve injury immediately posttrauma and that occurring in a slow, delayed fashion posttrauma. Myositis ossificans may be an underrecognized complication of trauma but should be considered in cases of delayed peripheral nerve injury after trauma. PMID:26548968

  5. Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury in colorectal surgery. An update.

    PubMed

    Colsa Gutiérrez, Pablo; Viadero Cervera, Raquel; Morales-García, Dieter; Ingelmo Setién, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury during colorectal surgery procedures is a potentially serious complication that is often underestimated. The Trendelenburg position, use of inappropriately padded armboards and excessive shoulder abduction may encourage the development of brachial plexopathy during laparoscopic procedures. In open colorectal surgery, nerve injuries are less common. It usually involves the femoral plexus associated with lithotomy position and self-retaining retractor systems. Although in most cases the recovery is mostly complete, treatment consists of physical therapy to prevent muscular atrophy, protection of hypoesthesic skin areas and analgesics for neuropathic pain. The aim of the present study is to review the incidence, prevention and management of intraoperative peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26008880

  6. A novel bioactive nerve conduit for the repair of peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin-bin; Yin, Yi-xia; Yan, Qiong-jiao; Wang, Xin-yu; Li, Shi-pu

    2016-01-01

    The use of a nerve conduit provides an opportunity to regulate cytokines, growth factors and neurotrophins in peripheral nerve regeneration and avoid autograft defects. We constructed a poly-D-L-lactide (PDLLA)-based nerve conduit that was modified using poly{(lactic acid)-co-[(glycolic acid)-alt-(L-lysine)]} and β-tricalcium phosphate. The effectiveness of this bioactive PDLLA-based nerve conduit was compared to that of PDLLA-only conduit in the nerve regeneration following a 10-mm sciatic nerve injury in rats. We observed the nerve morphology in the early period of regeneration, 35 days post injury, using hematoxylin-eosin and methylene blue staining. Compared with the PDLLA conduit, the nerve fibers in the PDLLA-based bioactive nerve conduit were thicker and more regular in size. Muscle fibers in the soleus muscle had greater diameters in the PDLLA bioactive group than in the PDLLA only group. The PDLLA-based bioactive nerve conduit is a promising strategy for repair after sciatic nerve injury. PMID:26981105

  7. [Development of Researches on Acupuncture Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Injury].

    PubMed

    Tao, Xing; Ma, Tie-ming

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical disease. Acupuncture therapy has been demonstrated to be effective in improving nerve injury in clinical practice, but its underlying mechanisms in prompting tissue repair basically remain unknown. In the present paper, the authors reviewed some descriptions of traditional Chinese medicine on peripheral nerve injury and treatment, and recent development of researches on acupuncture treatment of it in both clinical practice and animal studies. Clinical trials demonstrated that acupuncture treatment can relieve nerve injury induced pain, ameliorate both sensory and motor functions. Experimental studies showed that acupuncture stimulation may promote nerve repair by reducing desquamation of medullary sheath of nerve fibers, inhibiting apoptosis of nerve cells, and up-regulating expression of myelin basic protein, Slit-1 protein and gene, etc. In addition, acupuncture intervention may also improve the microenvironment of neural regeneration including increase of the proliferation and differentiation of Schwann cells and release of various types of neurotrophic factors. However, its mechanisms underlying accelerating rehabilitation of peripheral nerve injury need being researched further. PMID:27141630

  8. Trigeminal nerve injury induced thrombospondin-4 upregulation contributes to orofacial neuropathic pain states in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang-Wu; Kim, Doo-Sik; Zaucke, Frank; Luo, Z. David

    2013-01-01

    Background Injury to the trigeminal nerve often results in the development of chronic pain states including tactile allodynia, or hypersensitivity to light touch, in orofacial area, but its underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Peripheral nerve injury has been shown to cause upregulation of thrombospondin-4 (TSP4) in dorsal spinal cord that correlates with neuropathic pain development. In this study, we examined whether injury-induced TSP4 is critical in mediating orofacial pain development in a rat model of chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION). Methods Orofacial sensitivity to mechanical stimulation was examined in a unilateral infraorbital nerve ligation rat model. The levels of TSP4 in trigeminal ganglia and associated spinal subnucleus caudalis and C1/C2 spinal cord (Vc/C2) from injured rats were examined at time points correlating with the initiation and peak orofacial hypersensitivity. TSP4 antisense and mismatch oligodeoxynucleotides were intrathecally injected into injured rats to see if antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment could reverse injury-induced TSP4 upregulation and orofacial behavioral hypersensitivity. Results Our data indicated that trigeminal nerve injury induced TSP4 upregulation in Vc/C2 at a time point correlated with orofacial tactile allodynia. In addition, intrathecal treatment with TSP4 antisense, but not mismatch, oligodeoxynucleotides blocked both injury-induced TSP4 upregulation in Vc/C2 and behavioral hypersensitivity. Conclusions Our data support that infraorbital nerve injury leads to TSP4 upregulation in trigeminal spinal complex that contributes to orofacial neuropathic pain states. Blocking this pathway may provide an alternative approach in management of orofacial neuropathic pain states. PMID:24019258

  9. Changes in the blood-nerve barrier after sciatic nerve cold injury: indications supporting early treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Jia, Jian-ping; Xu, Min; Zhang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Severe edema in the endoneurium can occur after non-freezing cold injury to the peripheral nerve, which suggests damage to the blood-nerve barrier. To determine the effects of cold injury on the blood-nerve barrier, the sciatic nerve on one side of Wistar rats was treated with low temperatures (3–5°C) for 2 hours. The contralateral sciatic nerve was used as a control. We assessed changes in the nerves using Evans blue as a fluid tracer and morphological methods. Excess fluid was found in the endoneurium 1 day after cold injury, though the tight junctions between cells remained closed. From 3 to 5 days after the cold injury, the fluid was still present, but the tight junctions were open. Less tracer leakage was found from 3 to 5 days after the cold injury compared with 1 day after injury. The cold injury resulted in a breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier function, which caused endoneurial edema. However, during the early period, the breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier did not include the opening of tight junctions, but was due to other factors. Excessive fluid volume produced a large increase in the endoneurial fluid pressure, prevented liquid penetration into the endoneurium from the microvasculature. These results suggest that drug treatment to patients with cold injuries should be administered during the early period after injury because it may be more difficult for the drug to reach the injury site through the microcirculation after the tissue fluid pressure becomes elevated. PMID:25878590

  10. [Morphological and functional studies on nerve regeneration after corneal nerve injuries].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z Q; Xie, L X; Dong, X G

    1994-07-01

    Using gold chloride impregnation of nerves and horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) axoplasma retrograde tracing technique, we monitored nerve regeneration over a period of 6 months following penetrating perilimbal incisions and penetrating keratoplasties (PKP) in rabbits. Post-operatively, at 1 month after a 180 degrees perilimbal incision, loose unconnected subepithelial plexus were present in the limbus, at 2 months 1-2 bundles of deep stromal nerve were seen in the stroma and by 6 months only a few stromal nerves regenerated. There was no difference in nerve regeneration between post-operative autograft and allograft PKP. By 6 months, the quantity of HRP-labelled cells in the trigeminal ganglia was less than the normal level. The results indicated that nerve regeneration by 6 months after corneal nerve injuries was inadequate to restore a normal corneal nerve extent and function. PMID:7843026

  11. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Fei; Wang, Yi-Ru; Huo, Hui-Ping; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Tang, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration. PMID:26807123

  12. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-fei; Wang, Yi-ru; Huo, Hui-ping; Wang, Yue-xiang; Tang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration. PMID:26807123

  13. Morin Mitigates Chronic Constriction Injury (CCI)-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress Induced PARP Over-Activation and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Komirishetty, Prashanth; Areti, Aparna; Sistla, Ramakrishna; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is initiated or caused due to the primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system and is proposed to be linked to a cascade of events including excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptosis. Oxidative/nitrosative stress aggravates the neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration through poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) overactivation. Hence, the present study investigated the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of the phytoconstituent; morin in chronic constriction injury (CCI) induced neuropathy. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction of the left sciatic nerve in rats, and the effect of morin (15 and 30 mg/kg, p.o.) was evaluated by measuring behavioural and biochemical changes. Mechanical, chemical and thermal stimuli confirmed the CCI-induced neuropathic pain and treatment with morin significantly improved these behavioural deficits and improved the sciatic functional index by the 14th day after CCI induction. After 14 days of CCI induction, oxidative/nitrosative stress and inflammatory markers were elevated in rat lumbar spinal cord. Oxidative stress induced PARP overactivation resulted in depleted levels of ATP and elevated levels of poly (ADP) ribose (PAR). Treatment with morin reduced the levels of nitrites, restored glutathione levels and abrogated the oxidant induced DNA damage. It also mitigated the increased levels of TNF-α and IL-6. Protein expression studies confirmed the PARP inhibition and anti-inflammatory activity of morin. Findings of this study suggest that morin, by virtue of its antioxidant properties, limited PARP overactivation and neuroinflammation and protected against CCI induced functional, behavioural and biochemical deficits. PMID:27084773

  14. Low-dose methotrexate reduces peripheral nerve injury-evoked spinal microglial activation and neuropathic pain behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Joachim; Abele, Andrea; Marian, Claudiu; Häussler, Annett; Herbert, Teri A.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries that provoke neuropathic pain are associated with microglial activation in the spinal cord. We have investigated the characteristics of spinal microglial activation in three distinct models of peripheral neuropathic pain: spared nerve injury (SNI), chronic constriction injury, and spinal nerve ligation. In all models, dense clusters of cells immunoreactive for the microglial marker CD11b formed in the ipsilateral dorsal horn 7 days after injury. Microglial expression of ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) increased by up to 40% and phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, a marker of microglial activity, by 45%. Expression of the lysosomal ED1-antigen indicated phagocytic activity of the cells. Unlike the peripheral nerve lesions, rhizotomy produced only a weak microglial reaction within the spinal gray matter but a strong activation of microglia and phagocytes in the dorsal funiculus at lumbar and thoracic spinal cord levels. This suggests that although degeneration of central terminals is sufficient to elicit microglial activation, it does not account for the inflammatory response in the dorsal horn after peripheral nerve injury. Early intrathecal treatment with low-dose methotrexate, beginning at the time of injury, decreased microglial activation, reduced p38 phosphorylation, and attenuated pain-like behavior after SNI. In contrast, systemic or intrathecal delivery of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone did not inhibit the activation of microglia or reduce pain-like behavior. We confirm that microglial activation is crucial for the development of pain after nerve injury, and demonstrate that suppression of this cellular immune response is a promising approach for preventing neuropathic pain. PMID:18215468

  15. Cellular reactions of the choroid plexus induced by peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Joukal, Marek; Klusáková, Ilona; Solár, Peter; Kuklová, Adéla; Dubový, Petr

    2016-08-15

    The choroid plexus (CP) of brain ventricles forms the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (blood-CSF) barrier that is involved in many diseases affecting the central nervous system (CNS). We used ED1 and ED2 immunostaining to investigate epiplexus cell changes in rat CP after chronic constriction injury (CCI). In contrast to naïve CP, the CP of sham-operated rats showed an increase in the number of ED1+ cells of a similar magnitude during all periods of survival up to 3 weeks, while the number of ED2+ increased only at 3 days from operation. In comparison to naïve and sham-operated animals, the number of ED1+ and ED2+ cells in the epiplexus position increased with the duration of nerve compression. We detected no or negligible cell proliferation in the CP after sham- or CCI-operation. This suggests that increased number of ED1+ and ED2+ cells in the epiplexus position of the CP is derived from peripheral monocytes passing through altered blood-CSF barrier. The changes in epiplexus cells indicate that the CP reacts to tissue injury after the surgical approach itself and that the response to peripheral nerve lesion is greater. This suggests a role for an altered blood-CSF barrier allowing for propagation of signal molecules from damaged tissue and nerve to the CNS. PMID:27291457

  16. An unusual presentation of whiplash injury: long thoracic and spinal accessory nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Omar, N.; Srinivasan, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    Whiplash injuries from motor vehicle accidents are very common. The usual presentation and course of this condition normally results in resolution of symptoms within a few weeks. Brachial plexus traction injuries without any bone or joint lesion of the cervical spine have been reported before. We report a case where a gentleman was involved in a rear end vehicle collision, sustained a whiplash injury and was later found to have a long thoracic nerve palsy and spinal accessory nerve palsy. Although isolated injuries of both nerves following a whiplash injury have been reported, combined injury of the two nerves following a whiplash injury is very uncommon and is being reported for the first time. PMID:17587067

  17. A simple model of radial nerve injury in the rhesus monkey to evaluate peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Huang, Xijun; Fu, Guo; Gu, Liqiang; Liu, Xiaolin; Wang, Honggang; Hu, Jun; Yi, Jianhua; Niu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Qingtang

    2014-05-15

    Current research on bone marrow stem cell transplantation and autologous or xenogenic nerve transplantation for peripheral nerve regeneration has mainly focused on the repair of peripheral nerve defects in rodents. In this study, we established a standardized experimental model of radial nerve defects in primates and evaluated the effect of repair on peripheral nerve injury. We repaired 2.5-cm lesions in the radial nerve of rhesus monkeys by transplantation of autografts, acellular allografts, or acellular allografts seeded with autologous bone marrow stem cells. Five months after surgery, regenerated nerve tissue was assessed for function, electrophysiology, and histomorphometry. Postoperative functional recovery was evaluated by the wrist-extension test. Compared with the simple autografts, the acellular allografts and allografts seeded with bone marrow stem cells facilitated remarkable recovery of the wrist-extension functions in the rhesus monkeys. This functional improvement was coupled with radial nerve distal axon growth, a higher percentage of neuron survival, increased nerve fiber density and diameter, increased myelin sheath thickness, and increased nerve conduction velocities and peak amplitudes of compound motor action potentials. Furthermore, the quality of nerve regeneration in the bone marrow stem cells-laden allografts group was comparable to that achieved with autografts. The wrist-extension test is a simple behavioral method for objective quantification of peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:25206757

  18. Nerve injury and neuropathic pain — A question of age

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Maria; McKelvey, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The effects of peripheral nerve injury on somatosensory processing and pain are highly dependent upon the age at which the damage occurs. Adult nerve injury rapidly triggers neuropathic pain, but this is not so if the same nerve injury is performed in animals below postnatal day (P) 28, consistent with observations in paediatric patients. However, longitudinal studies show that pain hypersensitivity emerges later in life, when the animal reaches adolescence, an observation that could be of clinical importance. Here we discuss the evidence that the central consequences of nerve damage are critically determined by the status of neuroimmune regulation at different ages. In the first postnatal weeks, when spinal somatosensory circuits are undergoing synaptic reorganisation, the ‘default’ neuroimmune response is skewed in an anti-inflammatory direction, suppressing the excitation of dorsal horn neurons and preventing the onset of neuropathic pain. As animals grow up and the central nervous system matures, the neuroimmune profile shifts in a pro-inflammatory direction, unmasking a ‘latent’ pain response to an earlier nerve injury. The data predicts that nerve injury in infancy and childhood could go unnoticed at the time, but emerge as clinically ‘unexplained’ or ‘functional’ pain in adolescence. PMID:26220898

  19. Median and ulnar nerve injuries; what causes different repair outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Nouraei, Mohammad Hadi; Hosseini, Alireza; Salek, Shadi; Nouraei, Farhad; Bina, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peripheral nerve injuries have significant effects on patients’ life quality. To make patients’ therapeutic expectations more realistic, prediction of repair outcome has significant importance. Materials and Methods: Totally, 74 patients with 94 nerve injuries (44 median and 50 ulnar nerves) were evaluated and followed up for 5 years between 2008 and 2013 in two main university hospitals of Isfahan. Patients’ age was 6–64 years. 24 nerves were excluded from the study and among the remaining; 53 nerves were repaired primarily and 17 nerves secondarily. 42 nerves were injured at a low-level, 17 nerves at intermediate and 11 at a high one. Medical Research Council Scale used for sensory and motor assessment. S3+ and S4 scores for sensory recovery and M4 and M5 scores for motor recovery were considered as favorable results. The follow-up time was between 8 and 24 months. Results: There was no significant difference between favorable sensory outcomes of median and ulnar nerves. The difference between favorable motor outcomes of the median nerve was higher than ulnar nerve (P = 0.03, odds ratio = 2.9). More favorable results were seen in high-level injuries repair than low ones (P = 0.035), and also cases followed more than 18 months compared to less than 12 months (P = 0.041), respectively. The favorable outcomes for patients younger than 16 were more than 40 and older, however, their difference was not significant (P = 0.059). The difference between primary and secondary repair favorable outcomes was not significant (P = 0.37). Conclusion: In patients older than 40 or injured at a high-level, there is a high possibility of repetitive operations and reconstructive measures. The necessity for long-term follow-up and careful attentions during a postoperative period should be pointed to all patients. PMID:26605244

  20. Past, Present, and Future of Nerve Conduits in the Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Ao, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    With significant advances in the research and application of nerve conduits, they have been used to repair peripheral nerve injury for several decades. Nerve conduits range from biological tubes to synthetic tubes, and from nondegradable tubes to biodegradable tubes. Researchers have explored hollow tubes, tubes filled with scaffolds containing neurotrophic factors, and those seeded with Schwann cells or stem cells. The therapeutic effect of nerve conduits is improving with increasing choice of conduit material, new construction of conduits, and the inclusion of neurotrophic factors and support cells in the conduits. Improvements in functional outcomes are expected when these are optimized for use in clinical practice. PMID:26491662

  1. [Anatomical rationale for lingual nerve injury prevention during mandibular block].

    PubMed

    Semkin, V A; Dydikin, S S; Kuzin, A V; Sogacheva, V V

    2015-01-01

    The topographic and anatomical study of lingual nerve structural features was done. It was revealed that during mandibular anesthesia possible lingual nerve injury can occur if puncture needle is lower than 1 cm. of molars occlusal surface level. The position of the lingual nerve varies withmandible movements. At the maximum open mouth lingual nerve is not mobile and is pressed against the inner surface of the mandibular ramus by the medial pterygoid muscle and the temporal muscle tendon. When closing the mouth to 1.25±0.2 cmfrom the physiological maximum, lingual nerve is displaced posteriorly from the internal oblique line of the mandible and gets mobile. On the basis of topographic and anatomic features of the lingual nervestructure the authors recommend the re-do of inferior alveolar nerve block, a semi-closed mouth position or the use the "high block techniques" (Torus anesthesia, Gow-Gates, Vazirani-Akinozi). PMID:26271698

  2. Endothelin-1 impairs retrograde axonal transport and leads to axonal injury in rat optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Takazumi; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Sasaoka, Masaaki; Shimazaki, Atsushi; Hara, Hideaki

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of endothelin-1 (ET-1) on retrograde axonal transport in the rat optic nerve. Vehicle or ET-1 (0.2, 1, or 5 pmol/eye) were injected into the vitreous body in Sprague-Dawley rats. Retinal vessels were observed, using a fundus camera, before, and at 10 min, 3 days and 7 days after a single intravitreous injection. Two days after the injection, a neuronal tracer, fluoro gold, was administered via the superior colliculi to retrogradely label active retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Five days after the tracer administration, retrogradely labeled RGCs were evaluated in the flat-mounted retina, and cross sections from each optic nerve were graded for injury by four independent, masked observers. ET-1 at 5 pmol/eye caused a significant constriction of retinal vessels (versus the vehicle-treated group) at 10 min after the injection. Intravitreous injection of ET-1 caused a dose-related decrease in the number of retrogradely labeled RGCs. Injection of 5 pmol/eye ET-1 led to a statistically significant decrease in the number of retrogradely labeled RGCs (versus the vehicle-treated group). ET-1 at 1 and 5 pmol/eye caused histological optic nerve damage (evaluated using a graded scale). The histological optic nerve damage correlated with the number of retrogradely labeled RGCs. In conclusion, a single intravitreous injection of ET-1 impaired retrograde axonal transport in the rat optic nerve and this impairment correlated with the histological optic nerve damage. PMID:16719791

  3. Intrathecal Administration of Tempol Reduces Chronic Constriction Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Rats by Increasing SOD Activity and Inhibiting NGF Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baisong; Pan, Yongying; Wang, Zixin; Tan, Yonghong; Song, Xingrong

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the antinociceptive effect of intrathecal and intraperitoneal tempol administration in a rat model of chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and explore the underlying antinociceptive mechanisms of tempol. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 8 per group): sham group, CCI group, Tem1 group (intrathecal injection of tempol), and Tem2 group (intraperitoneal injection of tempol). Neuropathic pain was induced by CCI of the sciatic nerve. Tempol was intrathecally or intraperitoneally administered daily for 7 days beginning on postoperative day one. The mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were tested on preoperative day 3 and postoperative days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, and 21. Structural changes were examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining, toluidine blue staining, and electron microscopy. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were determined using the thiobarbituric acid and nitroblue tetrazolium methods, respectively. Nerve growth factor (NGF) expression levels were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Intrathecal, but not intraperitoneal, injection of tempol produced a persistent antinociceptive effect. Intraperitoneal injection of tempol did not result in high enough concentration of tempol in the cerebrospinal fluid. Intrathecal, but not intraperitoneal, injection of tempol inhibited CCI-induced structural damage in the spinal cord reduced MDA levels, and increased SOD activities in the spinal cord. Furthermore, intrathecal, but not intraperitoneal, injection of tempol further downregulated the expression of NGF in the spinal cord following CCI, and this effect was blocked by p38MAPK inhibitor. Intrathecal injection of tempol produces antinociceptive effects and reduces CCI-induced structural damage in the spinal cord by increasing SOD activities and downregulating the expression of NGF via the p38MAPK pathway. Intraperitoneal administration of tempol does

  4. Nociceptive responses and spinal plastic changes of afferent C-fibers in three neuropathic pain models induced by sciatic nerve injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Casals-Díaz, Laura; Vivó, Meritxell; Navarro, Xavier

    2009-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries induce plastic changes on primary afferent fibers and on the spinal circuitry, which are related to the emergence of neuropathic pain. In this study we compared three models of sciatic nerve injury in the rat with different degrees of damage and impact on regeneration capability: crush nerve injury, chronic constriction injury (CCI) and spared nerve injury (SNI). All three models were characterized by means of nerve histology, in order to describe the degenerative and regenerative process of injured axons. Nociceptive responses were evaluated by mechanical and thermal algesimetry tests. Crush animals displayed higher withdrawal thresholds on the ipsilateral paw compared to the contralateral during the time of denervation, while CCI and SNI animals showed mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Central plasticity was evaluated by immunohistochemical labeling of non-peptidergic (IB4-positive) and peptidergic (substance P-positive) nociceptive C-fibers on L4-L6 spinal cord sections. After crush nerve injury and SNI, we observed progressive and sustained reduction of IB4 and SP immunolabeling at the sciatic projection territory in the superficial laminae of the dorsal horn, which affected only the tibial and peroneal nerves projection areas in the case of SNI. After CCI, changes on SP-immunoreactivity were not observed, and IB4-immunoreactive area decreased initially but recovered to normal levels on the second week post-injury. Thus, nociceptive responses depend on the type of injury, and the immunoreactivity pattern of afferent fibers at the spinal cord display changes less pronounced after partial than complete sciatic nerve injury. Although signs of neuropathic pain appear in all three lesion models, nociceptive responses and central plasticity patterns differ between them. PMID:19416675

  5. Ulnar Nerve Injury after Flexor Tendon Grafting.

    PubMed

    McCleave, Michael John

    2016-10-01

    A 43-year-old female is presented who underwent a two-stage tendon reconstruction and developed a low ulnar nerve palsy postoperatively. Exploration found that the tendon graft was passing through Guyon's canal and that the ulnar nerve was divided. This is a previously unreported complication. The reconstruction is discussed, the literature reviewed and a guide is given on how to identify the correct tissue plane when passing a tendon rod. PMID:27595967

  6. Neuroprotective Activity of Thioctic Acid in Central Nervous System Lesions Consequent to Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ghelardini, Carla; Nwankwo, Innocent E.; Pacini, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are heterogeneous disorders presenting often with hyperalgesia and allodynia. This study has assessed if chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and central nervous system (CNS) changes and if these changes are sensitive to treatment with thioctic acid. Thioctic acid is a naturally occurring antioxidant existing in two optical isomers (+)- and (−)-thioctic acid and in the racemic form. It has been proposed for treating disorders associated with increased oxidative stress. Sciatic nerve CCI was made in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and in normotensive reference cohorts. Rats were untreated or treated intraperitoneally for 14 days with (+/−)-, (+)-, or (−)-thioctic acid. Oxidative stress, astrogliosis, myelin sheets status, and neuronal injury in motor and sensory cerebrocortical areas were assessed. Increase of oxidative stress markers, astrogliosis, and neuronal damage accompanied by a decreased expression of neurofilament were observed in SHR. This phenomenon was more pronounced after CCI. Thioctic acid countered astrogliosis and neuronal damage, (+)-thioctic acid being more active than (+/−)- or (−)-enantiomers. These findings suggest a neuroprotective activity of thioctic acid on CNS lesions consequent to CCI and that the compound may represent a therapeutic option for entrapment neuropathies. PMID:24527432

  7. Electrical stimulation accelerates nerve regeneration and functional recovery in delayed peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinghui; Zhang, Yongguang; Lu, Lei; Hu, Xueyu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2013-12-01

    The present study aims to investigate the potential of brief electrical stimulation (ES; 3 V, 20 Hz, 20 min) in improving functional recovery in delayed nerve injury repair (DNIR). The sciatic nerve of Sprague Dawley rats was transected, and the repair of nerve injury was delayed for different time durations (2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks). Brief depolarizing ES was applied to the proximal nerve stump when the transected nerve stumps were bridged with a hollow nerve conduit (5 mm in length) after delayed periods. We found that the diameter and number of regenerated axons, the thickness of myelin sheath, as well as the number of Fluoro-Gold retrograde-labeled motoneurons and sensory neurons were significantly increased by ES, suggesting that brief ES to proximal nerve stumps is capable of promoting nerve regeneration in DNIR with different delayed durations, with the longest duration of 24 weeks. In addition, the amplitude of compound muscle action potential (gastrocnemius muscle) and nerve conduction velocity were also enhanced, and gastrocnemius muscle atrophy was partially reversed by brief ES, indicating that brief ES to proximal nerve stump was able to improve functional recovery in DNIR. Furthermore, brief ES was capable of increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the spinal cord in DNIR, suggesting that BDNF-mediated neurotrophin signaling might be one of the contributing factors to the beneficial effect of brief ES on DNIR. In conclusion, the present findings indicate the potential of using brief ES as a useful method to improve functional recovery for delayed repair of peripheral nerve lesions. PMID:24118464

  8. [Peroneal nerve injury: anesthesia is not always to blame].

    PubMed

    Curt Nuño, F; López Álvarez, S; Juncal Díaz, J; Domínguez Chaos, A; Llorca González, F; Pensado Castiñeiras, A

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a case report of a woman that was operated of foot surgery under locoregional anesthesia with an echo-guided peripheral sciatic-popliteal nerve block. As post operatory complication a peroneal nerve injury was noticed. We revised differential diagnosis of peripheral nerve block and therapeutic strategy we should take. In our case the finding was a high degree axonotmesis secondary to extrinsic compressure due to pneumatic tourniquet placed in the ankle used during surgery. There was no relationship with the anesthetic technique. PMID:25048997

  9. [Incarcerated epitrochlear fracture with a cubital nerve injury].

    PubMed

    Moril-Peñalver, L; Pellicer-Garcia, V; Gutierrez-Carbonell, P

    2013-01-01

    Injuries of the medial epicondyle are relatively common, mostly affecting children between 7 and 15 years. The anatomical characteristics of this apophysis can make diagnosis difficult in minimally displaced fractures. In a small percentage of cases, the fractured fragment may occupy the retroepitrochlear groove. The presence of dysesthesias in the territory of the ulnar nerve requires urgent open reduction of the incarcerated fragment. A case of a seven-year-old male patient is presented, who required surgical revision due to a displaced medial epicondyle fracture associated with ulnar nerve injury. A review of the literature is also made. PMID:24071050

  10. Treatment of peroneal nerve injuries with simultaneous tendon transfer and nerve exploration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Common peroneal nerve palsy leading to foot drop is difficult to manage and has historically been treated with extended bracing with expectant waiting for return of nerve function. Peroneal nerve exploration has traditionally been avoided except in cases of known traumatic or iatrogenic injury, with tendon transfers being performed in a delayed fashion after exhausting conservative treatment. We present a new strategy for management of foot drop with nerve exploration and concomitant tendon transfer. Method We retrospectively reviewed a series of 12 patients with peroneal nerve palsies that were treated with tendon transfer from 2005 to 2011. Of these patients, seven were treated with simultaneous peroneal nerve exploration and repair at the time of tendon transfer. Results Patients with both nerve repair and tendon transfer had superior functional results with active dorsiflexion in all patients, compared to dorsiflexion in 40% of patients treated with tendon transfers alone. Additionally, 57% of patients treated with nerve repair and tendon transfer were able to achieve enough function to return to running, compared to 20% in patients with tendon transfer alone. No patient had full return of native motor function resulting in excessive dorsiflexion strength. Conclusion The results of our limited case series for this rare condition indicate that simultaneous nerve repair and tendon transfer showed no detrimental results and may provide improved function over tendon transfer alone. PMID:25099247

  11. "Zone of vulnerability" for radial nerve injury: anatomic study.

    PubMed

    Ashfaq Hasan, S; Rauls, Russell B; Cordell, Cari L; Bailey, Mark S; Nguyen, Thao

    2014-01-01

    The authors of this study sought improved understanding of the radial nerve course through the brachium and hypothesized that the most proximal aspect of the triceps tendon (PATT) serves as a useful superficial landmark for localizing the nerve. It was also hypothesized that a poorly appreciated area of vulnerability for nerve injury exists where the radial nerve runs along the lateral cortex of the humerus proximal to its transit through the lateral intermuscular septum (LIMS). The authors assessed 33 fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens. A 6.7-cm span of the nerve lies directly on the periosteum of the humerus before piercing the LIMS. The proximal 4.6~cm abuts the posterior cortex. The final 2.1~cm just proximal to the LIMS runs along the lateral cortex. The nerve at the posterior midline of the humerus is 2.3~cm proximal to the level of the PATT. The radial nerve lies directly on the lateral humeral cortex for 2~cm proximal to its transit through the LIMS. The PATT appears to be a consistent and practical superficial landmark to determine the location of the radial nerve from a posterior approach. PMID:24875341

  12. Injury-Dependent and Disability-Specific Lumbar Spinal Gene Regulation following Sciatic Nerve Injury in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Austin, Paul J; Bembrick, Alison L; Denyer, Gareth S; Keay, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    Allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain are cardinal sensory signs of neuropathic pain. Clinically, many neuropathic pain patients experience affective-motivational state changes, including reduced familial and social interactions, decreased motivation, anhedonia and depression which are severely debilitating. In earlier studies we have shown that sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) disrupts social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle and endocrine function in one third of rats, a subgroup reliably identified six days after injury. CCI consistently produces allodynia and hyperalgesia, the intensity of which was unrelated either to the altered social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle or endocrine changes. This decoupling of the sensory consequences of nerve injury from the affective-motivational changes is reported in both animal experiments and human clinical data. The sensory changes triggered by CCI are mediated primarily by functional changes in the lumbar dorsal horn, however, whether lumbar spinal changes may drive different affective-motivational states has never been considered. In these studies, we used microarrays to identify the unique transcriptomes of rats with altered social behaviours following sciatic CCI to determine whether specific patterns of lumbar spinal adaptations characterised this subgroup. Rats underwent CCI and on the basis of reductions in dominance behaviour in resident-intruder social interactions were categorised as having Pain & Disability, Pain & Transient Disability or Pain alone. We examined the lumbar spinal transcriptomes two and six days after CCI. Fifty-four 'disability-specific' genes were identified. Sixty-five percent were unique to Pain & Disability rats, two-thirds of which were associated with neurotransmission, inflammation and/or cellular stress. In contrast, 40% of genes differentially regulated in rats without disabilities were involved with more general homeostatic processes (cellular structure

  13. Injury-Dependent and Disability-Specific Lumbar Spinal Gene Regulation following Sciatic Nerve Injury in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Denyer, Gareth S.; Keay, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain are cardinal sensory signs of neuropathic pain. Clinically, many neuropathic pain patients experience affective-motivational state changes, including reduced familial and social interactions, decreased motivation, anhedonia and depression which are severely debilitating. In earlier studies we have shown that sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) disrupts social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle and endocrine function in one third of rats, a subgroup reliably identified six days after injury. CCI consistently produces allodynia and hyperalgesia, the intensity of which was unrelated either to the altered social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle or endocrine changes. This decoupling of the sensory consequences of nerve injury from the affective-motivational changes is reported in both animal experiments and human clinical data. The sensory changes triggered by CCI are mediated primarily by functional changes in the lumbar dorsal horn, however, whether lumbar spinal changes may drive different affective-motivational states has never been considered. In these studies, we used microarrays to identify the unique transcriptomes of rats with altered social behaviours following sciatic CCI to determine whether specific patterns of lumbar spinal adaptations characterised this subgroup. Rats underwent CCI and on the basis of reductions in dominance behaviour in resident-intruder social interactions were categorised as having Pain & Disability, Pain & Transient Disability or Pain alone. We examined the lumbar spinal transcriptomes two and six days after CCI. Fifty-four ‘disability-specific’ genes were identified. Sixty-five percent were unique to Pain & Disability rats, two-thirds of which were associated with neurotransmission, inflammation and/or cellular stress. In contrast, 40% of genes differentially regulated in rats without disabilities were involved with more general homeostatic processes (cellular structure

  14. Peptide therapy with pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in traumatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Gjurasin, Miroslav; Miklic, Pavle; Zupancic, Bozidar; Perovic, Darko; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Brcic, Luka; Kolenc, Danijela; Radic, Bozo; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2010-02-25

    We focused on the healing of rat transected sciatic nerve and improvement made by stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (10 microg, 10ng/kg) applied shortly after injury (i) intraperitoneally/intragastrically/locally, at the site of anastomosis, or after (ii) non-anastomozed nerve tubing (7 mm nerve segment resected) directly into the tube. Improvement was shown clinically (autotomy), microscopically/morphometrically and functionally (EMG, one or two months post-injury, walking recovery (sciatic functional index (SFI)) at weekly intervals). BPC 157-rats exhibited faster axonal regeneration: histomorphometrically (improved presentation of neural fascicles, homogeneous regeneration pattern, increased density and size of regenerative fibers, existence of epineural and perineural regeneration, uniform target orientation of regenerative fibers, and higher proportion of neural vs. connective tissue, all fascicles in each nerve showed increased diameter of myelinated fibers, thickness of myelin sheet, number of myelinated fibers per area and myelinated fibers as a percentage of the nerve transected area and the increased blood vessels presentation), electrophysiologically (increased motor action potentials), functionally (improved SFI), the autotomy absent. Thus, BPC 157 markedly improved rat sciatic nerve healing. PMID:19903499

  15. Inter-hemispheric plasticity in patients with median nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Fornander, Lotta; Nyman, Torbjörn; Hansson, Thomas; Brismar, Tom; Engström, Maria

    2016-08-15

    Peripheral nerve injuries result in reorganization within the contralateral hemisphere. Furthermore, recent animal and human studies have suggested that the plastic changes in response to peripheral nerve injury also include several areas of the ipsilateral hemisphere. The objective of this study was to map the inter-hemispheric plasticity in response to median nerve injury, to investigate normal differences in contra- and ipsilateral activation, and to study the impact of event-related or blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design on ipsilateral activation. Four patients with median nerve injury at the wrist (injured and epineurally sutured >2 years earlier) and ten healthy volunteers were included. 3T fMRI was used to map the hemodynamic response to brain activity during tactile stimulation of the fingers, and a laterality index (LI) was calculated. Stimulation of Digits II-III of the injured hand resulted in a reduction in contralateral activation in the somatosensory area SI. Patients had a lower LI (0.21±0.15) compared to healthy controls (0.60±0.26) indicating greater ipsilateral activation of the primary somatosensory cortex. The spatial dispersion of the coordinates for areas SI and SII was larger in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral hemisphere in the healthy controls, and was increased in the contralateral hemisphere of the patients compared to the healthy controls. There was no difference in LI between the event-related and blocked paradigms. In conclusion, patients with median nerve injury have increased ipsilateral SI area activation, and spatially more dispersed contralateral SI activation during tactile stimulation of their injured hand. In normal subjects ipsilateral activation has larger spatial distribution than the contralateral. Previous findings in patients performed with the blocked fMRI paradigm were confirmed. The increase in ipsilateral SI activation may be due to an interhemispheric disinhibition associated with

  16. Injuries to the spinal accessory nerve: a lesson to surgeons.

    PubMed

    Camp, S J; Birch, R

    2011-01-01

    The integrity of the spinal accessory nerve is fundamental to thoracoscapular function and essential for scapulohumeral rhythm. This nerve is vulnerable along its superficial course. This study assessed the delay in diagnosis and referral for management of damage to this nerve, clarified its anatomical course and function, and documented the results of repair. From examination of our records, 111 patients with lesions of the spinal accessory nerve were treated between 1984 and 2007. In 89 patients (80.2%) the damage was iatropathic. Recognition and referral were seldom made by the surgeon responsible for the injury, leading to a marked delay in instituting treatment. Most referrals were made for painful loss of shoulder function. The clinical diagnosis is straightforward. There is a characteristic downward and lateral displacement of the scapula, with narrowing of the inferior scapulohumeral angle and loss of function, with pain commonly present. In all, 80 nerves were explored and 65 were repaired. The course of the spinal accessory nerve in relation to the sternocleidomastoid muscle was constant, with branches from the cervical plexus rarely conveying motor fibres. Damage to the nerve was predominantly posterior to this muscle. Despite the delay, the results of repair were surprising, with early relief of pain, implying a neuropathic source, which preceded generally good recovery of muscle function. PMID:21196545

  17. Axillary nerve neurotization with the anterior deltopectoral approach in brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Jerome, J Terrence Jose; Rajmohan, Bennet

    2012-09-01

    Combined neurotization of both axillary and suprascapular nerves in shoulder reanimation has been widely accepted in brachial plexus injuries, and the functional outcome is much superior to single nerve transfer. This study describes the surgical anatomy for axillary nerve relative to the available donor nerves and emphasize the salient technical aspects of anterior deltopectoral approach in brachial plexus injuries. Fifteen patients with brachial plexus injury who had axillary nerve neurotizations were evaluated. Five patients had complete avulsion, 9 patients had C5, six patients had brachial plexus injury pattern, and one patient had combined axillary and suprascapular nerve injury. The long head of triceps branch was the donor in C5,6 injuries; nerve to brachialis in combined nerve injury and intercostals for C5-T1 avulsion injuries. All these donors were identified through the anterior approach, and the nerve transfer was done. The recovery of deltoid was found excellent (M5) in C5,6 brachial plexus injuries with an average of 134.4° abduction at follow up of average 34.6 months. The shoulder recovery was good with 130° abduction in a case of combined axillary and suprascapular nerve injury. The deltoid recovery was good (M3) in C5-T1 avulsion injuries patients with an average of 64° shoulder abduction at follow up of 35 months. We believe that anterior approach is simple and easy for all axillary nerve transfers in brachial plexus injuries. PMID:22434572

  18. Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment at Various Stages following Chronic Constriction Injury Produces Different Antinociceptive Effects via Regulation of P2X4R Expression and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bai-Song; Song, Xing-Rong; Hu, Pei-Ying; Meng, Ling-Xin; Tan, Yong-Hong; She, Ying-Jun; Ding, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment at various stages following chronic constriction injury (CCI) and to explore the underlying mechanisms of HBO treatment. Methods Forty adult male Sprague—Dawley rats were randomly assigned to five groups (n = 8 for each group): the sham group, CCI group, HBO1 group, HBO2 group, and HBO3 group. Neuropathic pain was induced by CCI of the sciatic nerve. HBO treatment began on postoperative days 1, 6, and 11 and continued for 5 days. The mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were tested on preoperative day 3 and postoperative days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, and 21. The expression of P2X4R was determined by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Cell apoptosis was measured using TUNEL staining. The expression of caspase 3 was measured using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Electron microscopy was used to determine the ultrastructural changes. Results Early HBO treatment beginning on postoperative day 1 produced a persistent antinociceptive effect and inhibited the CCI-induced increase in the expression of P2X4R without changing CCI-induced apoptosis. In contrast, late HBO treatment beginning on postoperative day 11 produced a persistent antinociceptive effect and inhibited CCI-induced apoptosis and upregulation of caspase-3 without changing the expression of P2X4R. In addition, late HBO treatment reduced CCI-induced ultrastructural damage. However, HBO treatment beginning on postoperative day 6 produced a transient antinociceptive effect without changing the expression of P2X4R or CCI-induced apoptosis. Conclusion HBO treatment at various stages following CCI can produce antinociceptive effects via different mechanisms. Early HBO treatment is associated with inhibition of P2X4R expression, and late HBO treatment is associated with inhibition of cell apoptosis. PMID:25789619

  19. Human periodontal ligament stem cells repair mental nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bohan; Jung, Hun-Jong; Kim, Soung-Min; Kim, Myung-Jin; Jahng, Jeong Won; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells are easily accessible and can differentiate into Schwann cells. We hypothesized that human periodontal ligament stem cells can be used as an alternative source for the autologous Schwann cells in promoting the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. To validate this hypothesis, human periodontal ligament stem cells (1 × 106) were injected into the crush-injured left mental nerve in rats. Simultaneously, autologous Schwann cells (1 × 106) and PBS were also injected as controls. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that at 5 days after injection, mRNA expression of low affinity nerve growth factor receptor was significantaly increased in the left trigeminal ganglion of rats with mental nerve injury. Sensory tests, histomorphometric evaluation and retrograde labeling demonstrated that at 2 and 4 weeks after injection, sensory function was significantly improved, the numbers of retrograde labeled sensory neurons and myelinated axons were significantly increased, and human periodontal ligament stem cells and autologous Schwann cells exhibited similar therapeutic effects. These findings suggest that transplantation of human periodontal ligament stem cells show a potential value in repair of mental nerve injury. PMID:25206604

  20. JAB1 is Involved in Neuropathic Pain by Regulating JNK and NF-κB Activation After Chronic Constriction Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Chen, Xiangdong; Yu, Jiang; Xu, Xingguo; Wei, Xiaojia; Gu, Xiaoling; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Dongmei; Xu, Zhongling

    2016-05-01

    Neuropathic pain, caused by a lesion or dysfunction of the somatosensory nervous system, is a severe debilitating condition with which clinical treatment remains challenging. Jun activation domain-binding protein (JAB1) is a multifunctional protein that participates in several signaling pathways, controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis. However, the expression and possible function of JAB1 in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain has not been elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the possible involvement of JAB1. Here, employing a neuropathic pain model induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) on rats, we reported the role of JAB1 in the maintenance of neuropathic pain. By western blot, we found that CCI markedly up-regulated JAB1 expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord. Immunofluorescent assay demonstrated that JAB1 was extensively localized in IB4-, CGRP- and NF200-positive neurons in the injured L5 DRG, and mainly co-localized with NeuN in spinal cord. In addition, we showed that CCI induced phosphorylation of p65 and JNK in vivo. Intrathecal injection of JAB1 siRNA significantly attenuated the CCI-induced JNK and p65 phosphorylation and alleviated both mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in rats. Taken together, these results suggested that JAB1 promotes neuropathic pain via positively regulating JNK and NF-κB activation. PMID:26700435

  1. Postoperative splinting for isolated digital nerve injuries in the hand.

    PubMed

    Vipond, Nicole; Taylor, William; Rider, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Digital nerve injuries in the hand are common and can result in significant impairment and functional restriction. Despite this, there is relatively little literature, particularly with respect to postoperative rehabilitation. Splinting after repair, purported to protect the repaired nerve from excessive stretch is still commonly used. Recent cadaveric studies indicate postoperative rehabilitation is not necessary with resection up to 2.5mm. A randomized controlled trial was therefore undertaken to determine whether splinting after isolated 5th degree digital nerve transection is in fact necessary. Twenty-six subjects were recruited over a two-year period and randomized to either three weeks of hand-based splinting or free active motion. ANCOVA indicated no differences in sensibility at six months between the two groups. Subjects also reported their greatest functional limitations were because of hyperesthesia. Although this study is underpowered, these limited results suggest splinting may not be required postoperatively. PMID:17658415

  2. Nerve Injury and Pain after Operative Repair of Calcaneal Fractures: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Haugsdal, Jaclyn; Dawson, Jeremiah; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common problem in foot and ankle surgery. We look at evidence of nerve injury as it relates to different operative approaches to the fractured calcaneus. The direct lateral, extended lateral, smile, sinus tarsi, and percutaneous approaches are discussed and the reported incidence of nerve injury in each is identified. We expect to identify divergent rates of injury between approaches and stimulate further investigation into prevention and treatment. PMID:24027484

  3. Bridging long gap peripheral nerve injury using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro

    2014-07-15

    Long gap peripheral nerve injuries usually reulting in life-changing problems for patients. Skeletal muscle derived-multipotent stem cells (Sk-MSCs) can differentiate into Schwann and perineurial/endoneurial cells, vascular relating pericytes, and endothelial and smooth muscle cells in the damaged peripheral nerve niche. Application of the Sk-MSCs in the bridging conduit for repairing long nerve gap injury resulted favorable axonal regeneration, which showing superior effects than gold standard therapy--healthy nerve autograft. This means that it does not need to sacrifice of healthy nerves or loss of related functions for repairing peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25221587

  4. Sleep Deprivation Aggravates Median Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain and Enhances Microglial Activation by Suppressing Melatonin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying; Chen, Chih-Li; Tsai, Yi-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep deprivation is common in patients with neuropathic pain, but the effect of sleep deprivation on pathological pain remains uncertain. This study investigated whether sleep deprivation aggravates neuropathic symptoms and enhances microglial activation in the cuneate nucleus (CN) in a median nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Also, we assessed if melatonin supplements during the sleep deprived period attenuates these effects. Design: Rats were subjected to sleep deprivation for 3 days by the disc-on-water method either before or after CCI. In the melatonin treatment group, CCI rats received melatonin supplements at doses of 37.5, 75, 150, or 300 mg/kg during sleep deprivation. Melatonin was administered at 23:00 once a day. Participants: Male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 180-250 g (n = 190), were used. Measurements: Seven days after CCI, behavioral testing was conducted, and immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for qualitative and quantitative analyses of microglial activation and measurements of proinflammatory cytokines. Results: In rats who underwent post-CCI sleep deprivation, microglia were more profoundly activated and neuropathic pain was worse than those receiving pre-CCI sleep deprivation. During the sleep deprived period, serum melatonin levels were low over the 24-h period. Administration of melatonin to CCI rats with sleep deprivation significantly attenuated activation of microglia and development of neuropathic pain, and markedly decreased concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusions: Sleep deprivation makes rats more vulnerable to nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, probably because of associated lower melatonin levels. Melatonin supplements to restore a circadian variation in melatonin concentrations during the sleep deprived period could alleviate nerve injury-induced behavioral hypersensitivity. Citation: Huang CT, Chiang RP, Chen CL, Tsai YJ. Sleep

  5. Implant Injury Case Series and Review of the Literature Part 1: Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Du Toit, Jonathan; Gluckman, Howard; Gamil, Rami; Renton, Tara

    2015-08-01

    Injury to adjacent structures is an unfortunate and avoidable outcome of oral implant placement surgery. Paramount among these is perforation into paranasal sinus; into neighboring tooth root; through cortical plate; and into vessels, canals, and, most importantly, nerves. In most cases, injudicious oral implant placement can be attributed to poor treatment planning. We present the cases of several patients referred for postsurgical radiology that illustrate injury to the inferior alveolar canal by implant impingement, penetration, and even complete obliteration of the nerve and canal in the absence of proper treatment planning and imaging modalities. The authors stress the importance of thorough implant case preparation and planning, which may include the use of cone beam computerized tomography in order to minimize nerve injury. PMID:24945089

  6. Nerve injury associated with orthognathic surgery. Part 2: inferior alveolar nerve.

    PubMed

    McLeod, N M H; Bowe, D C

    2016-05-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) is the most commonly injured structure during mandibular osteotomies. The prevalence of temporary injury has been reported as 70/100 patients (95% CI 67 to 73/100) or 56/100 nerves (95% CI 46 to 65/100), and the prevalence of permanent alteration in sensation was 33/100 patients (95% CI 30 to 35/100) or 20/100 nerves (95% CI 18 to 21/100) when assessed subjectively. The prevalence varied significantly between different operations (p<0.0001). It was significantly higher for sagittal split osteotomy (SSO) combined with genioplasty than for SSO alone (p<0.0001) or vertical ramus osteotomy (VRO) (p<0.0001). Injury may result from traction during stripping or manipulation of the distal fragment, incorrect placement of the cuts, or misjudged placement of fixation in ramus ostotomy. During SSO, they can occur during retraction to make cuts in the medial ramus, when the bone is cut or split, and on fixation. The impact of injury is generally said to be low as it does not seem to affect patients' opinions about the operation. PMID:26922403

  7. Axillary nerve injuries in contact sports: recommendations for treatment and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Perlmutter, G S; Apruzzese, W

    1998-11-01

    Axillary nerve injuries are some of the most common peripheral nerve injuries in athletes who participate in contact sports. Resulting deltoid muscle paralysis is secondary to nerve trauma which occurs following shoulder dislocation or a direct blow to the deltoid muscle. Compression neuropathy has been reported to occur in quadrilateral space syndrome as the axillary nerve exits this anatomic compartment. The axillary nerve is also extremely vulnerable during any operative procedure involving the inferior aspect of the shoulder, and iatrogenic injury to the axillary nerve remains a serious complication of shoulder surgery. Accurate diagnosis of axillary nerve injury is based on a careful history and physical examination as well as an understanding of the anatomy of the shoulder and the axillary nerve in particular. Inspection, palpation and neurological testing provide the bases for diagnosis. A clinically suspected axillary nerve injury should be confirmed by electrophysiological testing, including electromyography and nerve conduction studies. During the acute phase of injury, the athlete should be rested and any ligamentous or bony injury should be treated as indicated. Patients should undergo an extensive rehabilitation programme emphasising active and passive range of motion as well as strengthening of the rotator cuff, deltoid and periscapular musculature. Shoulder joint contracture should be avoided at all costs as a loss of shoulder mobility may ultimately affect functional outcome despite a return of axillary nerve function. If no axillary nerve recovery is observed by 3 to 4 months following injury, surgical exploration is indicated. Athletes who sustain injury to the axillary nerve have a variable prognosis for nerve recovery, although the return of function of the involved shoulder is typically good to excellent. We recommend that athletes who sustain axillary nerve injury may return to contact sport participation when they achieve full active range of

  8. Follow-up evaluation with ultrasonography of peripheral nerve injuries after an earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Man; Wang, Yue; Yue, Linxian; Chiu, Jack; He, Fanding; Wu, Xiaojing; Zang, Bin; Lu, Bin; Yao, Xiaoke; Jiang, Zirui

    2014-01-01

    Published data on earthquake-associated peripheral nerve injury is very limited. Ultrasonography has been proven to be efficient in the clinic to diagnose peripheral nerve injury. The aim of this study was to assess the role of ultrasound in the evaluation of persistent peripheral nerve injuries 1 year after the Wenchuan earthquake. Thirty-four patients with persistent clinical symptoms and neurologic signs of impaired nerve function were evaluated with sonography prior to surgical repair. Among 34 patients, ultrasonography showed that 48 peripheral nerves were entrapped, and 11 peripheral nerves were disrupted. There was one case of misdiagnosis on ultrasonography. The concordance rate of ultrasonographic findings with those of surgical findings was 98%. A total of 48 involved nerves underwent neurolysis and the symptoms resolved. Only five nerves had scar tissue entrapment. Preoperative and postoperative clinical and ultrasonographic results were concordant, which verified that ultrasonography is useful for preoperative diagnosis and postoperative evaluation of injured peripheral nerves. PMID:25206859

  9. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of regeneration/degeneration after rat sciatic nerve injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sig Hwang, Min; Perrin, George; Muir, David; Mareci, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging was performed to investigate myelination and demyelination spatiotemporally in cut or crushed excised rat sciatic nerves in a 17.6 T magnet with a solenoid RF coil. Orientation independent measures of water diffusion, fractional anisotropy (FA) and averaged diffusivity (), were examined as MR parameters for the quantification of the myelin within the major peripheral nerve. Crushed nerves initially demonstrated decreased FA, followed by increase to FA of normal nerve with time. At 14 days post injury, FA of the nerve is high, 0.85, at the site proximal to the injury then FA decreases in a proximodistal gradient because the nerve remains more demyelinated toward the distal area. Cut sciatic nerves displayed a prolonged decrease of FA with time after injury. Also FA correlates with in these nerves. Therefore FA or may be a good indicator of myelination and demyelination in rat sciatic nerves and FA appears to be a more sensitive indicator of myelin.

  10. Enhanced Expression of TREK-1 Is Related with Chronic Constriction Injury of Neuropathic Pain Mouse Model in Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyo Jo; Lee, Seung Wook; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Eun-Jin; Kwon, Byeonghun; Kang, Dawon; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Kwang-Suk

    2016-05-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex state showing increased pain response with dysfunctional inhibitory neurotransmission. The TREK family, one of the two pore domain K⁺ (K2P) channel subgroups were focused among various mechanisms of neuropathic pain. These channels influence neuronal excitability and are thought to be related in mechano/thermosensation. However, only a little is known about the expression and role of TREK-1 and TREK-2, in neuropathic pain. It is performed to know whether TREK-1 and/ or 2 are positively related in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of a mouse neuropathic pain model, the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Following this purpose, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were performed using mouse DRG of CCI model and compared to the sham surgery group. Immunofluorescence staining of isolectin- B4 (IB4) and TREK were performed. Electrophysiological recordings of single channel currents were analyzed to obtain the information about the channel. Interactions with known TREK activators were tested to confirm the expression. While both TREK-1 and TREK-2 mRNA were significantly overexpressed in DRG of CCI mice, only TREK-1 showed significant increase (~9 fold) in western blot analysis. The TREK-1-like channel recorded in DRG neurons of the CCI mouse showed similar current-voltage relationship and conductance to TREK-1. It was easily activated by low pH solution (pH 6.3), negative pressure, and riluzole. Immunofluorescence images showed the expression of TREK-1 was stronger compared to TREK-2 on IB4 positive neurons. These results suggest that modulation of the TREK-1 channel may have beneficial analgesic effects in neuropathic pain patients. PMID:27133259

  11. Enhanced Expression of TREK-1 Is Related with Chronic Constriction Injury of Neuropathic Pain Mouse Model in Dorsal Root Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyo Jo; Lee, Seung Wook; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Eun-Jin; Kwon, Byeonghun; Kang, Dawon; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Kwang-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex state showing increased pain response with dysfunctional inhibitory neurotransmission. The TREK family, one of the two pore domain K+ (K2P) channel subgroups were focused among various mechanisms of neuropathic pain. These channels influence neuronal excitability and are thought to be related in mechano/thermosensation. However, only a little is known about the expression and role of TREK-1 and TREK-2, in neuropathic pain. It is performed to know whether TREK-1 and/or 2 are positively related in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of a mouse neuropathic pain model, the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Following this purpose, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were performed using mouse DRG of CCI model and compared to the sham surgery group. Immunofluorescence staining of isolectin-B4 (IB4) and TREK were performed. Electrophysiological recordings of single channel currents were analyzed to obtain the information about the channel. Interactions with known TREK activators were tested to confirm the expression. While both TREK-1 and TREK-2 mRNA were significantly overexpressed in DRG of CCI mice, only TREK-1 showed significant increase (∼9 fold) in western blot analysis. The TREK-1-like channel recorded in DRG neurons of the CCI mouse showed similar current-voltage relationship and conductance to TREK-1. It was easily activated by low pH solution (pH 6.3), negative pressure, and riluzole. Immunofluorescence images showed the expression of TREK-1 was stronger compared to TREK-2 on IB4 positive neurons. These results suggest that modulation of the TREK-1 channel may have beneficial analgesic effects in neuropathic pain patients. PMID:27133259

  12. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CDNF promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •CDNF was successfully transfected by a lentiviral vector into the distal sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved S-100, NF200 expression and nerve regeneration after sciatic injury. •CDNF improved the remyelination and thickness of the regenerated sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved gastrocnemius muscle weight and sciatic functional recovery. -- Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is often followed by incomplete and unsatisfactory functional recovery and may be associated with sensory and motor impairment of the affected limb. Therefore, a novel method is needed to improve the speed of recovery and the final functional outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. This report investigates the effect of lentiviral-mediated transfer of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) on regeneration of the rat peripheral nerve in a transection model in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after recombinant CDNF lentiviral vector application. We evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after surgery using light and electron microscopy and the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and target muscle weight. HE staining revealed better ordered structured in the CDNF-treated group at 8 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of NF200 and S-100 in the CDNF group revealed significant improvement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration compared with the control groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after injury. The thickness of the myelination around the axons in the CDNF group was significantly higher than in the control groups at 8 weeks post-surgery. The CDNF group displayed higher muscle weights and significantly increased sciatic nerve index values. Our findings suggest that CDNF gene therapy could provide durable and stable CDNF protein concentration and has the potential to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, morphological and functional recovery following nerve injury, which suggests a

  13. Cranial nerve injuries with supraglottic airway devices: a systematic review of published case reports and series.

    PubMed

    Thiruvenkatarajan, V; Van Wijk, R M; Rajbhoj, A

    2015-03-01

    Cranial nerve injuries are unusual complications of supraglottic airway use. Branches of the trigeminal, glossopharyngeal, vagus and the hypoglossal nerve may all be injured. We performed a systematic review of published case reports and case series of cranial nerve injury from the use of supraglottic airway devices. Lingual nerve injury was the most commonly reported (22 patients), followed by recurrent laryngeal (17 patients), hypoglossal (11 patients), glossopharyngeal (three patients), inferior alveolar (two patients) and infra-orbital (one patient). Injury is generally thought to result from pressure neuropraxia. Contributing factors may include: an inappropriate size or misplacement of the device; patient position; overinflation of the device cuff; and poor technique. Injuries other than to the recurrent laryngeal nerve are usually mild and self-limiting. Understanding the diverse presentation of cranial nerve injuries helps to distinguish them from other complications and assists in their management. PMID:25376257

  14. Prevention of iatrogenic inferior alveolar nerve injuries in relation to dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Renton, T

    2010-09-01

    This article aims to review current hypotheses on the aetiology and prevention of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injuries in relation to dental procedures. The inferior alveolar nerve can be damaged during many dental procedures, including administration of local anaesthetic, implant bed preparation and placement, endodontics, third molar surgery and other surgical interventions. Damage to sensory nerves can result in anaesthesia, paraesthesia, pain, or a combination of the three. Pain is common in inferior alveolar nerve injuries, resulting in significant functional problems. The significant disability associated with these nerve injuries may also result in increasing numbers of medico-legal claims. Many of these iatrogenic nerve injuries can be avoided with careful patient assessment and planning. Furthermore, if the injury occurs there are emerging strategies that may facilitate recovery. The emphasis of this review is on how we may prevent these injuries and facilitate resolution in the early post surgical phase. PMID:21133047

  15. Vitamin B complex and vitamin B12 levels after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Altun, Idiris; Kurutaş, Ergül Belge

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether tissue levels of vitamin B complex and vitamin B12 were altered after crush-induced peripheral nerve injury in an experimental rat model. A total of 80 male Wistar rats were randomized into one control (n = 8) and six study groups (1, 6, 12, 24 hours, 3, and 7 days after experimental nerve injury; n = 12 for each group). Crush-induced peripheral nerve injury was performed on the sciatic nerves of rats in six study groups. Tissue samples from the sites of peripheral nerve injury were obtained at 1, 6, 12, 24 hours, 3 and 7 days after experimental nerve injury. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that tissue levels of vitamin B complex and vitamin B12 in the injured sciatic nerve were significantly greater at 1 and 12 hours after experimental nerve injury, while they were significantly lower at 7 days than in control group. Tissue level of vitamin B12 in the injured sciatic nerve was significantly lower at 1, 6, 12 and 24 hours than in the control group. These results suggest that tissue levels of vitamin B complex and vitamin B12 vary with progression of crush-induced peripheral nerve injury, and supplementation of these vitamins in the acute period may be beneficial for acceleration of nerve regeneration. PMID:27335572

  16. Inferior alveolar nerve injury in implant dentistry: diagnosis, causes, prevention, and management.

    PubMed

    Alhassani, Ahmed Ali; AlGhamdi, Ali Saad Thafeed

    2010-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve injury is one of the most serious complications in implant dentistry. This nerve injury can occur during local anesthesia, implant osteotomy, or implant placement. Proper understanding of anatomy, surgical procedures, and implant systems and proper treatment planning is the key to reducing such an unpleasant complication. This review discusses the causes of inferior alveolar nerve injury and its diagnosis, prevention, and management. PMID:20545547

  17. Microencapsulation improves inhibitory effects of transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells on pain after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hao; Yang, Bao-lin; Liu, Zeng-xu; Yu, Qing; Zhang, Wen-jun; Yuan, Keng; Zeng, Hui-hong; Zhu, Gao-chun; Liu, De-ming; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory bulb tissue transplantation inhibits P2X2/3 receptor-mediated neuropathic pain. However, the olfactory bulb has a complex cellular composition, and the mechanism underlying the action of purified transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) remains unclear. In the present study, we microencapsulated OECs in alginic acid, and transplanted free and microencapsulated OECs into the region surrounding the injured sciatic nerve in rat models of chronic constriction injury. We assessed mechanical nociception in the rat models 7 and 14 days after surgery by measuring paw withdrawal threshold, and examined P2X2/3 receptor expression in L4–5 dorsal root ganglia using immunohistochemistry. Rats that received free and microencapsulated OEC transplants showed greater withdrawal thresholds than untreated model rats, and weaker P2X2/3 receptor immunoreactivity in dorsal root ganglia. At 14 days, paw withdrawal threshold was much higher in the microencapsulated OEC-treated animals. Our results confirm that microencapsulated OEC transplantation suppresses P2X2/3 receptor expression in L4–5 dorsal root ganglia in rat models of neuropathic pain and reduces allodynia, and also suggest that transplantation of microencapsulated OECs is more effective than transplantation of free OECs for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:26487865

  18. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Pushchina, Evgeniya V.; Shukla, Sachin; Varaksin, Anatoly A.; Obukhov, Dmitry K.

    2016-01-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve fibers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantitative assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal concentration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury. In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1–4 days of culture. The present findings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration. PMID:27212918

  19. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Pushchina, Evgeniya V; Shukla, Sachin; Varaksin, Anatoly A; Obukhov, Dmitry K

    2016-04-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve fibers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantitative assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal concentration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury. In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1-4 days of culture. The present findings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration. PMID:27212918

  20. Phrenic Nerve Injury After Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sacher, Frederic; Jais, Pierre; Stephenson, Kent; O'Neill, Mark D; Hocini, Meleze; Clementy, Jacques; Stevenson, William G; Haissaguerre, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Phrenic Nerve Injury (PNI) has been well studied by cardiac surgeons. More recently it has been recognized as a potential complication of catheter ablation with a prevalence of 0.11 to 0.48 % after atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. This review will focus on PNI after AF ablation Anatomical studies have shown a close relationship between the right phrenic nerve and it's proximity to the superior vena cava (SVC), and the antero-inferior part of the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV). In addition, the proximity of the left phrenic nerve to the left atrial appendage has been well established. Independent of the type of ablation catheter (4mm, 8 mm, irrigated tip, balloon) or energy source used (radiofrequency (RF), ultrasound, cryothermia, and laser); the risk of PNI exists during ablation at the critical areas listed above. Although up to thirty-one percent of patients with PNI after AF ablation remain asymptomatic, dyspnea remain the cardinal symptom and is present in all symptomatic patients. Despite the theoretical risk for significant adverse effect on functional status and quality of life, short-term outcomes from published studies appear favorable with 81% of patients with PNI having a complete recovery after 7 ± 7 months. Conclusion Existing studies have described PNI as an uncommon but avoidable complication in patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation for AF. Prior to ablation at the SVC, antero-inferior RSPV ostium or the left atrial appendage, pacing should be performed before energy delivery. If phrenic nerve capture is documented, energy delivery should be avoided at this site. Electrophysiologist's vigilance as well as pacing prior to ablation at high risk sites in close proximity to the phrenic nerve are the currently available tools to avoid the complication of PNI. PMID:17235367

  1. Bruxism elicited by inferior alveolar nerve injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Melis, Marcello; Coiana, Carlo; Secci, Simona

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the history of a patient who received an injury to the right inferior alveolar nerve after placement of a dental implant, with bruxism noted afterward. The symptoms were managed by the use of an occlusal appliance worn at night and occasionally during the day, associated with increased awareness of parafunction during the day to reduce muscle pain and fatigue. Paresthesia of the teeth, gingiva, and lower lip persisted but were reduced during appliance use. PMID:22254232

  2. Immune cell distribution and immunoglobulin levels change following sciatic nerve injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; Feng, Xinhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the systemic and local immune status of two surgical rat models of sciatic nerve injury, a crushed sciatic nerve, and a sciatic nerve transection Materials and Methods: Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group), sciatic nerve crush, and sciatic nerve transaction. Sciatic nerve surgery was performed. The percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ratio were determined by flow cytometry. Serum IgM and IgG levels were analyzed by ELISA. T-cells (CD3) and macrophages (CD68) in sciatic nerve tissue sections were identified through immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared to sham-operated controls, in rats that underwent nerve injury, the percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the peripheral blood were significantly decreased 7 days after surgery, serum IgM levels were increased 14 days after surgery, and serum IgG levels were increased 21 days after surgery. There were a large number of CD3+ cells and a small number of CD68+ cells in sciatic nerve tissue sections 21 days after surgery, indicating T-cell and macrophage activation and infiltration. Local IgG deposition was also detected at the nerve injury site 21 days after surgery. Conclusion: Rat humoral and cellular immune status changed following sciatic nerve injury, particularly with regard to the cellular immune response at the nerve injury site.

  3. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates non-freezing cold injury of rat sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Zhiwei; Tong, Xiaoyan; Jia, Hongjuan

    2015-01-01

    Non-freezing cold injury is an injury characterized by neuropathy, developing when patients expose to cold environments. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been shown as a contributing factor for the non-freezing cold nerve injury. However, the detailed connections between non-freezing cold nerve injury and ROS have not been described. In order to investigate the relationship between non-freezing cold nerve injury and reactive oxygen species, we study the effects of two cooling methods-the continuous cooling and the intermittent cooling with warming intervals-on rat sciatic nerves. Specifically, we assess the morphological changes and ROS production of the sciatic nerves underwent different cooling treatments. Our data shows both types of cooling methods cause nerve injury and ROS production. However, despite of identical cooling degree and duration, the sciatic nerves processed by intermittent cooling with warming intervals present more ROS production, severer reperfusion injury and pathological destructions than the sciatic nerves processed by continuous cooling. This result indicates reactive oxygen species, as a product of reperfusion, facilitates non-freezing cold nerve injury. PMID:26629065

  4. Clinical characteristics of trigeminal nerve injury referrals to a university centre.

    PubMed

    Tay, A B G; Zuniga, J R

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the aetiology and characteristics of trigeminal nerve injuries referred to a university centre with nerve injury care. Fifty-nine patients with 73 injured trigeminal nerves were referred in 10 months. The most common aetiologies were odontectomy (third molar surgery) (52.1% of nerves), local anaesthetic (LA) injections (12.3%), orthognathic surgery (12.3%) and implant surgery (11.0%). The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) was most commonly injured nerve (64.4%), followed by the lingual nerve (LN) (28.8%). About a quarter of IAN injuries (27.3%) and half of LN injuries (57.1%) from odontectomy had severe sensory impairment. There were twice as many LN than IAN injuries from local anaesthetic injections, but all had mild or no sensory impairment. Nerve injuries from implant surgery occurred only in IAN injuries; none had severe sensory impairment. Neuropathic pain occurred in 14.9% of IAN injuries and only in those with mild or no sensory impairment. Nerve surgery was offered to 45.8% of patients; a third underwent surgery. PMID:17875382

  5. Early Systemic Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Treatment Attenuates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Lin; Chen, Jin-Chung; Wang, Hung-Li; Yang, Yi-Ling; Cheng, Mei-Yun; Liao, Ming-Feng; Ro, Long-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that opioid treatment can reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production and counteract various neuropathic pain syndromes. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can promote immune cell differentiation by increasing leukocytes (mainly opioid-containing polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells), suggesting a potential beneficial role in treating chronic pain. This study shows the effectiveness of exogenous G-CSF treatment (200 µg/kg) for alleviating thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI), during post-operative days 1–25, compared to that of vehicle treatment. G-CSF also increases the recruitment of opioid-containing PMN cells into the injured nerve. After CCI, single administration of G-CSF on days 0, 1, and 2, but not on day 3, relieved thermal hyperalgesia, which indicated that its effect on neuropathic pain had a therapeutic window of 0–48 h after nerve injury. CCI led to an increase in the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) protein in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). These high levels of IL-6 mRNA and TNF-α were suppressed by a single administration of G-CSF 48–144 h and 72–144 h after CCI, respectively. Furthermore, G-CSF administered 72–144 h after CCI suppressed the CCI-induced upregulation of microglial activation in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn, which is essential for sensing neuropathic pain. Moreover, the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone methiodide (NLXM) reversed G-CSF-induced antinociception 3 days after CCI, suggesting that G-CSF alleviates hyperalgesia via opioid/opioid receptor interactions. These results suggest that an early single systemic injection of G-CSF alleviates neuropathic pain via activation of PMN cell-derived endogenous opioid secretion to activate opioid receptors in the injured nerve, downregulate IL-6 and TNF-α inflammatory cytokines, and attenuate microglial activation in the spinal dorsal horn. This

  6. Light-Activated Sealing of Acellular Nerve Allografts following Nerve Gap Injury.

    PubMed

    Fairbairn, Neil G; Ng-Glazier, Joanna; Meppelink, Amanda M; Randolph, Mark A; Valerio, Ian L; Fleming, Mark E; Kochevar, Irene E; Winograd, Jonathan M; Redmond, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) uses visible light to create sutureless, watertight bonds between two apposed tissue surfaces stained with photoactive dye. In phase 1 of this two-phase study, nerve gaps repaired with bonded isografts were superior to sutured isografts. When autograft demand exceeds supply, acellular nerve allograft (ANA) is an alternative although outcomes are typically inferior. This study assesses the efficacy of PTB when used with ANA. Methods Overall 20 male Lewis rats had 15-mm left sciatic nerve gaps repaired using ANA. ANAs were secured using epineurial suture (group 1) or PTB (group 2). Outcomes were assessed using sciatic function index (SFI), gastrocnemius muscle mass retention, and nerve histomorphometry. Historical controls from phase 1 were used to compare the performance of ANA with isograft. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance and Bonferroni all-pairs comparison. Results All ANAs had signs of successful regeneration. Mean values for SFI, muscle mass retention, nerve fiber diameter, axon diameter, and myelin thickness were not significantly different between ANA + suture and ANA + PTB. On comparative analysis, ANA + suture performed significantly worse than isograft + suture from phase 1. However, ANA + PTB was statistically comparable to isograft + suture, the current standard of care. Conclusion Previously reported advantages of PTB versus suture appear to be reduced when applied to ANA. The lack of Schwann cells and neurotrophic factors may be responsible. PTB may improve ANA performance to an extent, where they are equivalent to autograft. This may have important clinical implications when injuries preclude the use of autograft. PMID:26878685

  7. Spared nerve injury model to study orofacial pain

    PubMed Central

    Pozza, Daniel Humberto; Castro-Lopes, José Manuel; Neto, Fani Lourença; Avelino, António

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: There are many difficulties in generating and testing orofacial pain in animal models. Thus, only a few and limited models that mimic the human condition are available. The aim of the present research was to develop a new model of trigeminal pain by using a spared nerve injury (SNI) surgical approach in the rat face (SNI-face). Methods: Under anaesthesia, a small incision was made in the infraorbital region of adult male Wistar rats. Three of the main infraorbital nerve branches were tightly ligated and a 2 mm segment distal to the ligation was resected. Control rats were sham-operated by exposing the nerves. Chemical hyperalgesia was evaluated 15 days after the surgery by analyzing the time spent in face grooming activity and the number of head withdrawals in response to the orofacial formalin test. Results: SNI-face rats presented a significant increase of the formalin-induced pain-related behaviours evaluated both in the acute and tonic phases (expected biphasic pattern), in comparison to sham controls. Interpretation & conclusions: The SNI-face model in the rat appears to be a valid approach to evaluate experimental trigeminal pain. Ongoing studies will test the usefulness of this model to evaluate therapeutic strategies for the treatment of orofacial pain. PMID:27241642

  8. Nerve growth factor enhances Clara cell proliferation after lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S S; Schwinge, D; Kilic, A; Yildirim, A O; Conrad, M L; Seidler, K; Müller, B; Renz, H; Nockher, W A

    2010-07-01

    The lung epithelia facilitate wound closure by secretion of various cytokines and growth factors. Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been well described in airway inflammation; however, its likely role in lung repair has not been examined thus far. To investigate the repair function of NGF, experiments were performed in vitro using cultured alveolar epithelial cells and in vivo using a naphthalene-induced model of Clara epithelial cell injury. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed airway epithelial cell proliferation following injury to be dependent on NGF and the expression of its receptor, tropomyosin-receptor-kinase A. Additionally, NGF also augmented in vitro migration of alveolar type II cells. In vivo, transgenic mice over-expressing NGF in Clara cells (NGFtg) did not reveal any proliferation or alteration in Clara cell phenotype. However, following Clara cell specific injury, proliferation was increased in NGFtg and impaired upon inhibition of NGF. Furthermore, NGF also promoted the expression of collagen I and fibronectin in vitro and in vivo during repair, where significantly higher levels were measured in re-epithelialising NGFtg mice. Our study demonstrates that NGF promotes the proliferation of lung epithelium in vitro and the renewal of Clara cells following lung injury in vivo. PMID:20075049

  9. Far-Infrared Therapy Promotes Nerve Repair following End-to-End Neurorrhaphy in Rat Models of Sciatic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tai-Yuan; Yang, Yi-Chin; Sha, Ya-Na; Chou, Jiun-Rou

    2015-01-01

    This study employed a rat model of sciatic nerve injury to investigate the effects of postoperative low-power far-infrared (FIR) radiation therapy on nerve repair following end-to-end neurorrhaphy. The rat models were divided into the following 3 groups: (1) nerve injury without FIR biostimulation (NI/sham group); (2) nerve injury with FIR biostimulation (NI/FIR group); and (3) noninjured controls (normal group). Walking-track analysis results showed that the NI/FIR group exhibited significantly higher sciatic functional indices at 8 weeks after surgery (P < 0.05) compared with the NI/sham group. The decreased expression of CD4 and CD8 in the NI/FIR group indicated that FIR irradiation modulated the inflammatory process during recovery. Compared with the NI/sham group, the NI/FIR group exhibited a significant reduction in muscle atrophy (P < 0.05). Furthermore, histomorphometric assessment indicated that the nerves regenerated more rapidly in the NI/FIR group than in the NI/sham group; furthermore, the NI/FIR group regenerated neural tissue over a larger area, as well as nerve fibers of greater diameter and with thicker myelin sheaths. Functional recovery, inflammatory response, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessment all indicated that FIR radiation therapy can accelerate nerve repair following end-to-end neurorrhaphy of the sciatic nerve. PMID:25722734

  10. Electrodiagnostic study of peripheral nerves in high-voltage electrical injury.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ki Han; Kim, Se Hoon; Minn, Yang Ki

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that peripheral nerves are very vulnerable to electricity. However, only a small portion of individuals who have had high-voltage electrical injury exhibit peripheral nerve damage. The aim of this study was to investigate peripheral nerve damage in high-voltage electrical injury, which often occurs in the industrial field. The authors reviewed the medical records of patients who were admitted to their hospital from January 2009 to December 2011, because of electrical injuries. The results of nerve conduction studies (NCSs) were reviewed retrospectively. NCS data of the injured site were compared with those of the opposite noninjured site and follow-up data. Thirty-seven extremities were reviewed. The authors found that 18 of 33 median nerves (48.6%) showed abnormalities in at least one parameter and 15 of 36 ulnar nerves (41.7%) exhibited abnormalities. There was no evidence of demyelination. Eight patients had undergone NCS on the opposite normal extremities. The compound muscle action potential and nerve conduction velocity were higher at the normal site. Follow-up NCS were performed in 14 patients: the compound muscle action potential and nerve conduction velocity values of all patients were improved. High-voltage electricity damaged peripheral nerves by causing axonal injury rather than demyelinating injury. Hence, even if NCSs yield normal findings, peripheral nerves may be damaged. F/U studies and opposite examinations are required for the exact evaluation of peripheral nerve damage. PMID:23877148

  11. Nerve injury-induced changes in Homer/glutamate receptor signaling contribute to the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Obara, Ilona; Goulding, Scott P; Hu, Jia-Hua; Klugmann, Matthias; Worley, Paul F; Szumlinski, Karen K

    2013-10-01

    While group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and ionotropic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors regulate nociception, the precise molecular mechanism(s) contributing to glutamate signaling in chronic pain remain unclear. Here we not only confirmed the key involvement of Homer proteins in neuropathic pain, but also distinguished between the functional roles for different Homer family members and isoforms. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve induced long-lasting, time-dependent increases in the postsynaptic density expression of the constitutively expressed (CC) isoforms Homer1b/c and/or Homer2a/b in the spinal dorsal horn and supraspinal structures involved in nociception (prefrontal cortex, thalamus), that co-occurred with increases in their associated mGluRs, NR2 subunits of the NMDA receptor, and the activation of downstream kinases. Virus-mediated overexpression of Homer1c and Homer2b after spinal (intrathecal) virus injection exacerbated CCI-induced mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, however, Homer1 and Homer2 gene knockout (KO) mice displayed no changes in their neuropathic phenotype. In contrast, overexpression of the immediate early gene (IEG) Homer1a isoform reduced, while KO of Homer1a gene potentiated neuropathic pain hypersensitivity. Thus, nerve injury-induced increases in CC-Homers expression promote pain in pathological states, but IEG-Homer induction protects against both the development and maintenance of neuropathy. Additionally, exacerbated pain hypersensitivity in transgenic mice with reduced Homer binding to mGluR5 supports also an inhibitory role for Homer interactions with mGluR5 in mediating neuropathy. Such data indicate that nerve injury-induced changes in glutamate receptor/Homer signaling contribute in dynamic but distinct ways to neuropathic pain processing, which has relevance for the etiology of chronic pain symptoms and its treatment. PMID:23685007

  12. Involvement of astroglial glutamate-glutamine shuttle in modulation of the jaw-opening reflex following infraorbital nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Mostafeezur, Rahman Md; Shinoda, Masamichi; Unno, Syunpei; Zakir, Hossain Md; Takatsuji, Hanako; Takahashi, Kojiro; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Kensuke; Iwata, Koichi; Kitagawa, Junichi

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the mechanisms underlying orofacial motor dysfunction associated with trigeminal nerve injury, we studied the astroglial cell activation following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the infraorbital nerve (ION) immunohistochemically, nocifensive behavior in ION-CCI rats, and the effect of the glutamine synthase (GS) blocker methionine sulfoximine (MSO) on the jaw-opening reflex (JOR), and also studied whether glutamate-glutamine shuttle mechanism is involved in orofacial motor dysfunction. GFAP-immunoreactive (IR) cells were observed in the trigeminal motor nucleus (motV) 3 and 14 days after ION-CCI, and the nocifensive behavior and JOR amplitude were also strongly enhanced at these times. The number of GS- and GFAP-IR cells was also significantly higher in ION-CCI rats on day 7. The amplitude and duration of the JOR were strongly suppressed after MSO microinjection (m.i.) into the motV compared with that before MSO administration in ION-CCI rats. After MSO administration, the JOR amplitude was strongly suppressed, and the duration of the JOR was shortened. Forty minutes after m.i. of glutamine, the JOR amplitude was gradually returned to the control level and the strongest attenuation of the suppressive effect of MSO was observed at 180 min after glutamine m.i. In addition, glutamine also attenuated the MSO effect on the JOR duration, and the JOR duration was extended and returned to the control level thereafter. The present findings suggest that astroglial glutamate-glutamine shuttle in the motV is involved in the modulation of excitability of the trigeminal motoneurons affecting the enhancement of various jaw reflexes associated with trigeminal nerve injury. PMID:24666367

  13. Correlation between muscle electrophysiology and strength after fibular nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Won, Yu Hui; Kim, Kang-Won; Choi, Jun Tak; Ko, Myoung-Hwan; Park, Sung-Hee; Seo, Jeong-Hwan

    2016-08-01

    Muscle strength measurement is important when evaluating the degree of impairment in patients with nerve injury. However, accurate and objective evaluation may be difficult in patients with severe pain or those who intentionally try to avoid full exertion. We investigated the usefulness of the affected-to-unaffected side electrophysiological parameter ratios as a measure of objective ankle dorsiflexion (ADF) strength in patients with unilateral fibular nerve injury (FNI). ADF strength was measured in patients with FNI via handheld dynamometer and manual muscle test (MMT). Fibular nerve compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude and latency and ADF strength of the affected side were presented as ratios to the corresponding measurements of the unaffected side. We analysed the correlation of the CMAP ratio with the ADF strength ratio using a dynamometer and compared the CMAP ratios according to MMT grade. Fifty-two patients with FNI were enrolled. The mean CMAP latency ratio did not differ between MMT groups (p = 0.573). The CMAP amplitude ratio proportionally increased with the quantified ADF strength ratio via dynamometer increase (ρ = 0.790; p < 0.001), but the CMAP latency ratio and the quantified ADF strength ratio did not significantly correlate (ρ = 0.052; p = 0.713). The average CMAP amplitude ratio significantly differed between MMT groups (p < 0.001), and post hoc tests showed significant differences in all paired comparisons except of Fair and Good grades (p = 0.064). Electrophysiological parameter ratio, such as the affected-to-unaffected side CMAP amplitude ratio, might be sensitive parameters for ADF power estimation after FNI. PMID:27142447

  14. Low-level laser irradiation improves functional recovery and nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve crush rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm(2) and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm(2). Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm(2) had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm(2). Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm(2). Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm(2) and 8 J/cm(2)) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury. PMID:25119457

  15. Botulinum toxin type a (150 kDa) decreases exaggerated neurotransmitter release from trigeminal ganglion neurons and relieves neuropathy behaviors induced by infraorbital nerve constriction.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Y; Matsuka, Y; Spigelman, I; Ishihara, Y; Yamamoto, Y; Sonoyama, W; Kamioka, H; Yamashiro, T; Kuboki, T; Oguma, K

    2009-04-10

    Many patients with trigeminal neuropathies suffer severe chronic pain which is inadequately alleviated with centrally-acting drugs. These drugs also possess severe side effects making compliance difficult. One strategy is to develop new treatments without central side effects by targeting peripheral sensory neurons, since sensory neuron excitability and neurotransmitter release increase in chronic pain states. Such treatments may include the highly purified botulinum toxin type A 150 kDa (BoNT/A) which reportedly blocks vesicular neurotransmitter release. We set out to determine if experimental trigeminal neuropathy induced by infraorbital nerve constriction (IoNC) in rats could alter neurotransmitter release from somata of trigeminal sensory neurons and if it could be attenuated by BoNT/A. Thus, we monitored the secretory activity of acutely dissociated trigeminal ganglion (TRG) neurons from naïve and IoNC rats by measuring the fluorescence intensity of the membrane-uptake marker (N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(6-(4-(diethylamino)phenyl)hexatrienyl)pyridinium dibromide (FM4-64). FM4-64 staining showed that neurons possess a pool of recycled vesicles which could be released by high KCl (75 mM) application. BoNT/A pre-treatment of acutely dissociated TRG neurons from naïve rats significantly reduced the rate of FM4-64 dye release. Neurons isolated from TRG ipsilateral to IoNC exhibited significantly faster onset of FM4-64 release than neurons contralateral to IoNC (sham surgery). IoNC also produced long-lasting ipsilateral tactile allodynia, measured as large decreases of withdrawal thresholds to mechanical stimulation. Intradermal injection of BoNT/A in the area of infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve (IoN) innervation alleviated IoNC-induced mechanical allodynia and reduced the exaggerated FM4-64 release in TRG neurons from these rats. Our results suggest that BoNT/A decreases neuropathic pain behaviors by decreasing the exaggerated neurotransmitter

  16. Nerve Transfers in Birth Related Brachial Plexus Injuries: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed

    Davidge, Kristen M; Clarke, Howard M; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the assessment and management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The potential role of distal nerve transfers in the treatment of infants with Erb's palsy is discussed. Current evidence for motor outcomes after traditional reconstruction via interpositional nerve grafting and extraplexal nerve transfers is reviewed and compared with the recent literature on intraplexal distal nerve transfers in obstetrical brachial plexus injury. PMID:27094890

  17. Accelerating axonal growth promotes motor recovery after peripheral nerve injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chi Him Eddie; Omura, Takao; Cobos, Enrique J.; Latrémolière, Alban; Ghasemlou, Nader; Brenner, Gary J.; van Veen, Ed; Barrett, Lee; Sawada, Tomokazu; Gao, Fuying; Coppola, Giovanni; Gertler, Frank; Costigan, Michael; Geschwind, Dan; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2011-01-01

    Although peripheral nerves can regenerate after injury, proximal nerve injury in humans results in minimal restoration of motor function. One possible explanation for this is that injury-induced axonal growth is too slow. Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is a regeneration-associated protein that accelerates axonal growth in vitro. Here, we have shown that it can also do this in mice after peripheral nerve injury. While rapid motor and sensory recovery occurred in mice after a sciatic nerve crush injury, there was little return of motor function after sciatic nerve transection, because of the delay in motor axons reaching their target. This was not due to a failure of axonal growth, because injured motor axons eventually fully re-extended into muscles and sensory function returned; rather, it resulted from a lack of motor end plate reinnervation. Tg mice expressing high levels of Hsp27 demonstrated enhanced restoration of motor function after nerve transection/resuture by enabling motor synapse reinnervation, but only within 5 weeks of injury. In humans with peripheral nerve injuries, shorter wait times to decompression surgery led to improved functional recovery, and, while a return of sensation occurred in all patients, motor recovery was limited. Thus, absence of motor recovery after nerve damage may result from a failure of synapse reformation after prolonged denervation rather than a failure of axonal growth. PMID:21965333

  18. Morphological and functional aspects of sciatic nerve regeneration after crush injury.

    PubMed

    Răducan, Andreea; Mirică, Silvia; Duicu, Oana; Răducan, S; Muntean, Danina; Fira-Mlădinescu, O; Lighezan, Rodica

    2013-01-01

    Experimental models for the investigation of nerve regeneration are critical in studying new strategies able to promote the repair process. The aim of the present work was to characterize morphological and functional aspects of sciatic nerve regeneration after mechanical crush injury in rodents. Morphological changes were assessed after a four minutes sciatic nerve injury induced by means of a standardized compression clip. Rat nerve samples were collected before injury and after 24 hours, four days, two weeks, and four weeks after injury, respectively. In an additional group with unilateral sciatic nerve injury, animals were evaluated for four weeks using walking track analysis and the sciatic static index (SSI) measured in both rearing and normal standing position. Histological study showed important axonal degeneration at four days and axonal regeneration at four weeks after injury. We observed no significant differences between SSI in rearing and normal standing stance and a strong correlation between SSI values measured in the two positions during the evaluation period. Positive correlations were also found for the footprint parameters. Our data provide a baseline characterization of the sciatic nerve crush injury that will further allow the investigation of peripheral nerve regeneration in the presence of potential neuroprotective agents in post-traumatic nerve repair. PMID:24322020

  19. Go-sha-jinki-Gan (GJG) ameliorates allodynia in chronic constriction injury model mice via suppression of TNF-α expression in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Miho; Nakae, Aya; Kishida, Yuki; Baba, Kousuke; Sakashita, Noriko; Shibata, Masahiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Background Alternative medicine is noted for its clinical effect and minimal invasiveness in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Go-sha-jinki-Gan, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, has been used for meralgia and numbness in elderly patients. However, the exact mechanism of GJG is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of the analgesic effect of GJG in a chronic constriction injury model. Results GJG significantly reduced allodynia and hyperalgesia from the early phase (von Frey test, p < 0.0001; cold-plate test, p < 0.0001; hot-plate test p = 0.011; two-way repeated measures ANOVA). Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis revealed that GJG decreased the expression of Iba1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord. Double staining immunohistochemistry showed that most of the tumor necrosis factor-α was co-expressed in Iba1-positive cells at day 3 post-operation. GJG decreased the phosphorylation of p38 in the ipsilateral dorsal horn. Moreover, intrathecal injection of tumor necrosis factor-α opposed the anti-allodynic effect of GJG in the cold-plate test. Conclusions Our data suggest that GJG ameliorates allodynia in chronic constriction injury model mice via suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α expression derived from activated microglia. GJG is a promising drug for the treatment of neuropathic pain induced by neuro-inflammation. PMID:27296622

  20. Radiation Pretreatment Does Not Protect the Rat Optic Nerve From Elevated Intraocular Pressure–Induced Injury

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Elaine C.; Cepurna, William O.; Choi, Dongseok; Choe, Tiffany E.; Morrison, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Optic nerve injury has been found to be dramatically reduced in a genetic mouse glaucoma model following exposure to sublethal, head-only irradiation. In this study, the same radiation treatment was used prior to experimental induction of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) to determine if radiation is neuroprotective in another glaucoma model. Methods. Episcleral vein injection of hypertonic saline was used to elevate IOP unilaterally in two groups of rats: (1) otherwise untreated and (2) radiation pretreated, n > 25/group. Intraocular pressure histories were collected for 5 weeks, when optic nerves were prepared and graded for injury. Statistical analyses were used to compare IOP history and nerve injury. The density of microglia and macrophages in two nerve head regions was determined by Iba1 immunolabeling. Results. Mean and peak IOP elevations were not different between the two glaucoma model groups. Mean optic nerve injury grades were not different in glaucoma model optic nerves and were equivalent to approximately 35% of axons degenerating. Nerves selected for lower mean or peak IOP elevations did not differ in optic nerve injury. Similarly, nerves selected for lower injury grade did not differ in IOP exposure. By multiple regression modeling, nerve injury grade was most significantly associated with mean IOP (P < 0.002). There was no significant effect of radiation treatment. Iba1+ cell density was not altered by radiation treatment. Conclusions. In contrast to previous observations in a mouse genetic glaucoma model, head-only irradiation offers the adult rat optic nerve no protection from optic nerve degeneration due to chronic, experimentally induced IOP elevation. PMID:25525172

  1. Effect of combined nicotine and shrapnel exposure on pain measures and gait after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Rittenhouse, Bradley; Hill-Pryor, Crystal D; McConathy, Adam; Parker, Peter; Franco, Nelson; Toussaint, Esra; Barker, Darrell; Prasad, Balakrishna; Pizarro, Jose M

    2011-11-01

    A significant fraction of military soldiers sustain nerve injury and use tobacco or nicotine containing products. Healing of nerve injuries is influenced by many factors, such as degree of original injury, healing potential of the nerve, and general health of patient. However, recently, it has been demonstrated that the presence of retained insoluble metal fragments decreases healing. The effects of systemic nicotine administration, with or without metal fragments at the site of nerve injury, were evaluated. Both the nicotine-administered groups (nicotine, nicotine + shrapnel) showed significant increase in the peroneal function compared with untreated controls, as assessed by paw area (p < 0.05). Furthermore, to test possible role of altered sensory function, we used the hot plate assay. Latency to withdraw paw from a hot plate was significantly shorter in nicotine groups (p < 0.05). These data indicate that nicotine improves sensory and motor aspects of nerve function, in the presence or absence of shrapnel. PMID:22165666

  2. Peripheral Nerve Reconstruction after Injury: A Review of Clinical and Experimental Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Grinsell, D.; Keating, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike other tissues in the body, peripheral nerve regeneration is slow and usually incomplete. Less than half of patients who undergo nerve repair after injury regain good to excellent motor or sensory function and current surgical techniques are similar to those described by Sunderland more than 60 years ago. Our increasing knowledge about nerve physiology and regeneration far outweighs our surgical abilities to reconstruct damaged nerves and successfully regenerate motor and sensory function. It is technically possible to reconstruct nerves at the fascicular level but not at the level of individual axons. Recent surgical options including nerve transfers demonstrate promise in improving outcomes for proximal nerve injuries and experimental molecular and bioengineering strategies are being developed to overcome biological roadblocks limiting patient recovery. PMID:25276813

  3. Infraorbital nerve transpositioning into orbital floor: a modified technique to minimize nerve injury following zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kotrashetti, Sharadindu Mahadevappa; Kale, Tejraj Pundalik; Bhandage, Supriya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Transpositioning of the inferior alveolar nerve to prevent injury in lower jaw has been advocated for orthognathic, pre-prosthetic and for implant placement procedures. However, the concept of infra-orbital nerve repositioning in cases of mid-face fractures remains unexplored. The infraorbital nerve may be involved in trauma to the zygomatic complex which often results in sensory disturbance of the area innervated by it. Ten patients with infraorbital nerve entrapment were treated in similar way at our maxillofacial surgery centre. Materials and Methods In this article we are reporting three cases of zygomatico-maxillary complex fracture in which intra-operative repositioning of infra-orbital nerve into the orbital floor was done. This was done to release the nerve from fractured segments and to reduce the postoperative neural complications, to gain better access to fracture site and ease in plate fixation. This procedure also decompresses the nerve which releases it off the soft tissue entrapment caused due to trauma and the organized clot at the fractured site. Results There was no evidence of sensory disturbance during their three month follow-up in any of the patient. Conclusion Infraorbital nerve transposition is very effective in preventing paresthesia in patients which fracture line involving the infraorbital nerve. PMID:25922818

  4. Direct nerve suture and knee immobilization in 90° flexion as a technique for treatment of common peroneal, tibial and sural nerve injuries in complex knee trauma.

    PubMed

    Döring, Robert; Ciritsis, Bernhard; Giesen, Thomas; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    There are different ways to treat peripheral nerve injuries with concomitant defects in the lower extremity. One option is a direct nerve suture followed by immobilization of the knee in flexion as it is described for gunshot wounds that lead to lesions of the sciatic nerve and its terminal branches as well as isolated nerve lesions. We used this technique to treat a case of multiple nerve injuries of the lower extremity combined with a complex knee trauma including a lesion of both bones and the posterior capsule. To our knowledge, this technique has not yet been described for such a combined injury in literature. PMID:24968417

  5. Spatial and temporal pattern of changes in the number of GAD65-immunoreactive inhibitory terminals in the rat superficial dorsal horn following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Louis-Etienne; Magnussen, Claire; Bailey, Andrea L; St Louis, Manon; De Koninck, Yves; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons are an important component of dorsal horn circuitry where they serve to modulate spinal nociception. There is now considerable evidence indicating that reduced inhibition in the spinal dorsal horn contributes to neuropathic pain. A loss of these inhibitory neurons after nerve injury is one of the mechanisms being proposed to account for reduced inhibition; however, this remains controversial. This is in part because previous studies have focused on global measurements of inhibitory neurons without assessing the number of inhibitory synapses. To address this, we conducted a quantitative analysis of the spatial and temporal changes in the number of inhibitory terminals, as detected by glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) immunoreactivity, in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord following a chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve in rats. Isolectin B4 (IB4) labelling was used to define the location within the dorsal horn directly affected by the injury to the peripheral nerve. The density of GAD65 inhibitory terminals was reduced in lamina I (LI) and lamina II (LII) of the spinal cord after injury. The loss of GAD65 terminals was greatest in LII with the highest drop occurring around 3-4 weeks and a partial recovery by 56 days. The time course of changes in the number of GAD65 terminals correlated well with both the loss of IB4 labeling and with the altered thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimuli. Our detailed analysis of GAD65+ inhibitory terminals clearly revealed that nerve injury induced a transient loss of GAD65 immunoreactive terminals and suggests a potential involvement for these alterations in the development and amelioration of pain behaviour. PMID:25189404

  6. A 2-year follow-up survey of 523 cases with peripheral nerve injuries caused by the earthquake in Wenchuan, China

    PubMed Central

    He, Chun-qing; Zhang, Li-hai; Liu, Xian-fei; Tang, Pei-fu

    2015-01-01

    We performed a 2-year follow-up survey of 523 patients with peripheral nerve injuries caused by the earthquake in Wenchuan, Sichuan Province, China. Nerve injuries were classified into three types: type I injuries were nerve transection injuries, type II injuries were nerve compression injuries, and type III injuries displayed no direct neurological dysfunction due to trauma. In this study, 31 patients had type I injuries involving 41 nerves, 419 had type II injuries involving 823 nerves, and 73 had type III injuries involving 150 nerves. Twenty-two patients had open transection nerve injury. The restoration of peripheral nerve function after different treatments was evaluated. Surgical decompression favorably affected nerve recovery. Physiotherapy was effective for type I and type II nerve injuries, but not substantially for type III nerve injury. Pharmacotherapy had little effect on type II or type III nerve injuries. Targeted decompression surgery and physiotherapy contributed to the effective treatment of nerve transection and compression injuries. The Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center score for nerve injury severity declined with increasing duration of being trapped. In the first year after treatment, the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center score for grades 3 to 5 nerve injury increased by 28.2% to 81.8%. If scores were still poor (0 or 1) after a 1-year period of treatment, further treatment was not effective. PMID:25883624

  7. Genetic factors for nerve susceptibility to injuries – lessons from PMP22 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Genetic factors may be learnt from families with gene mutations that render nerve-injury susceptibility even to ordinary physical activities. A typical example is hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). HNPP is caused by a heterozygous deletion of PMP22 gene. PMP22 deficiency disrupts myelin junctions (such as tight junction and adherens junctions), leading to abnormally increased myelin permeability that explains the nerve susceptibility to injury. This finding should motivate investigators to identify additional genetic factors contributing to nerve vulnerability of injury. PMID:25374586

  8. Genetic factors for nerve susceptibility to injuries - lessons from PMP22 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun

    2014-09-15

    Genetic factors may be learnt from families with gene mutations that render nerve-injury susceptibility even to ordinary physical activities. A typical example is hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). HNPP is caused by a heterozygous deletion of PMP22 gene. PMP22 deficiency disrupts myelin junctions (such as tight junction and adherens junctions), leading to abnormally increased myelin permeability that explains the nerve susceptibility to injury. This finding should motivate investigators to identify additional genetic factors contributing to nerve vulnerability of injury. PMID:25374586

  9. Attenuating effect of Acorus calamus extract in chronic constriction injury induced neuropathic pain in rats: an evidence of anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and calcium inhibitory effects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acorus calamus (family: Araceae), is an indigenous plant, traditionally it is used as an ingredient of various cocktail preparations and for the management of severe inflammatory disorders in Indian system of medicine. Present study investigated the attenuating role of Acorus calamus plant extract in chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve induced peripheral neuropathy in rats. Methods Hot plate, plantar, Randall Selitto, Von Frey Hair, pin prick, acetone drop, photoactometer and rota-rod tests were performed to assess degree of thermal, radiant, mechanical, chemical sensation, spontaneous motor activity and motor co-ordination changes respectively, at different time intervals i.e., day 0, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21. Tissue myeloperoxidase, superoxide anion and total calcium levels were determined after 21st day to assess biochemical alterations. Histopathological evaluations were also performed. Hydroalcoholic extract of Acorus calamus (HAE-AC, 100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) and pregabalin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) were administered from the day of surgery for 14 days. Results CCI of sciatic nerve significantly induced thermal, radiant, mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal, chemical, tactile allodynia, along with increase in the levels of superoxide anion, total calcium and myeloperoxidase activity. Moreover significant histological changes were also observed. HAE-AC attenuated CCI induced development of painful behavioural, biochemical and histological changes in a dose dependent manner similar to that of pregabalin serving as positive control. Conclusions Acorus calamus prevented CCI induced neuropathy which may be attributed to its multiple actions including anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and calcium inhibitory actions. PMID:21426568

  10. Collateral development and spinal motor reorganization after nerve injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Youlai; Zhang, Peixun; Han, Na; Kou, Yuhui; Yin, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery is often unsatisfactory after severe extended nerve defects or proximal nerve trunks injuries repaired by traditional repair methods, as the long regeneration distance for the regenerated axons to reinnervate their original target end-organs. The proximal nerve stump can regenerate with many collaterals that reinnervate the distal stump after peripheral nerve injury, it may be possible to use nearby fewer nerve fibers to repair more nerve fibers at the distal end to shorten the regenerating distance. In this study, the proximal peroneal nerve was used to repair both the distal peroneal and tibial nerve. The number and location of motor neurons in spinal cord as well as functional and morphological recovery were assessed at 2 months, 4 months and 8 months after nerve repair, respectively. Projections from the intact peroneal and tibial nerves were also studied in normal animals. The changes of motor neurons were assessed using the retrograde neurotracers FG and DiI to backlabel motor neurons that regenerate axons into two different pathways. To evaluate the functional recovery, the muscle forces and sciatic function index were examined. The muscles and myelinated axons were assessed using electrophysiology and histology. The results showed that all labeled motor neurons after nerve repair were always confined within the normal peroneal nerve pool and nearly all the distribution of motor neurons labeled via distal different nerves was disorganized as compared to normal group. However, there was a significant decline in the number of double labeled motor neurons and an obvious improvement with respect to the functional and morphological recovery between 2 and 8 months. In addition, the tibial/peroneal motor neuron number ratio at different times was 2.11±0.05, 2.13±0.08, 2.09±0.12, respectively, and was close to normal group (2.21±0.09). Quantitative analysis showed no significant morphological differences between myelinated nerve fibers

  11. Evidence-based outcomes following inferior alveolar and lingual nerve injury and repair: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kushnerev, E; Yates, J M

    2015-10-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) and lingual (LN) are susceptible to iatrogenic surgical damage. Systematically review recent clinical evidence regarding IAN/LN repair methods and to develop updated guidelines for managing injury. Recent publications on IAN/LN microsurgical repair from Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases were screened by title/abstract. Main texts were appraised for exclusion criteria: no treatment performed or results provided, poor/lacking procedural description, cohort <3 patients. Of 366 retrieved papers, 27 were suitable for final analysis. Treatment type for injured IANs/LNs depended on injury type, injury timing, neurosensory disturbances and intra-operative findings. Best functional nerve recovery occurred after direct apposition and suturing if nerve ending gaps were <10 mm; larger gaps required nerve grafting (sural/greater auricular nerve). Timing of microneurosurgical repair after injury remains debated. Most authors recommend surgery when neurosensory deficit shows no improvement 90 days post-diagnosis. Nerve transection diagnosed intra-operatively should be repaired in situ; minor nerve injury repair can be delayed. No consensus exists regarding optimal methods and timing for IAN/LN repair. We suggest a schematic guideline for treating IAN/LN injury, based on the most current evidence. We acknowledge that additional RCTs are required to provide definitive confirmation of optimal treatment approaches. PMID:26059454

  12. Outcomes Following Closed Axillary Nerve Injury: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Galvin, Joseph W; Eichinger, Josef K

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of a 43-year-old male who sustained an axillary nerve injury secondary to a glenohumeral joint dislocation at a young age, and who has served over 20 years in the military with near normal shoulder function. In addition, we review the literature for the natural history of axillary nerve injury. A 43-year-old male sustained a left anterior glenohumeral dislocation in a motor vehicle accident as an 18-year-old. Following prompt manual reduction and subsequent physical therapy, the patient developed a permanent axillary nerve palsy. Despite the development of complete atrophy of his deltoid musculature and persistent sensory loss in the axillary nerve distribution, he experienced restoration of function with minimal to no deficit. Ultimately, he enlisted in the military 4 years after the injury and has served 22 years, which includes combat deployments with normal shoulder function and absence of pain. Axillary nerve injury is a relatively common injury after anterior glenohumeral joint dislocation. There is little known about the long-term outcome of patient's with permanent axillary nerve injury. This case suggests that it is possible for a young athletic individual to function at a high level of activity after permanent loss of axillary nerve function. PMID:26926757

  13. Dexamethasone enhanced functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinhong; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone is currently used for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury, but its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is known to be an essential trigger of the pathological changes that have a critical impact on nerve repair and regeneration. In this study, we observed the effects of various doses of dexamethasone on the functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model. Motor functional recovery was monitored by walking track analysis and gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio. The myelinated axon number was counted by morphometric analysis. Rats administered dexamethasone by local intramuscular injection had a higher nerve function index value, increased gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio, reduced Wallerian degeneration severity, and enhanced regenerated myelinated nerve fibers. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for CD3 expression, which is a marker for T-cell activation, and infiltration in the sciatic nerve. Dexamethasone-injected rats had fewer CD3-positive cells compared to controls. Furthermore, we found increased expression of GAP-43, which is a factor associated with development and plasticity of the nervous system, in rat nerves receiving dexamethasone. These results provide strong evidence that dexamethasone enhances sciatic nerve regeneration and function recovery in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury through immunosuppressive and potential neurotrophic effects. PMID:25839037

  14. Dexamethasone Enhanced Functional Recovery after Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xinhong; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone is currently used for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury, but its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is known to be an essential trigger of the pathological changes that have a critical impact on nerve repair and regeneration. In this study, we observed the effects of various doses of dexamethasone on the functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model. Motor functional recovery was monitored by walking track analysis and gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio. The myelinated axon number was counted by morphometric analysis. Rats administered dexamethasone by local intramuscular injection had a higher nerve function index value, increased gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio, reduced Wallerian degeneration severity, and enhanced regenerated myelinated nerve fibers. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for CD3 expression, which is a marker for T-cell activation, and infiltration in the sciatic nerve. Dexamethasone-injected rats had fewer CD3-positive cells compared to controls. Furthermore, we found increased expression of GAP-43, which is a factor associated with development and plasticity of the nervous system, in rat nerves receiving dexamethasone. These results provide strong evidence that dexamethasone enhances sciatic nerve regeneration and function recovery in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury through immunosuppressive and potential neurotrophic effects. PMID:25839037

  15. Global analysis of transcriptome in dorsal root ganglia following peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Leilei; Wu, Jiancheng; Zhou, Songlin; Wang, Yaxian; Qin, Jing; Yu, Bin; Gu, Xiaosong; Yao, Chun

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nervous system has intrinsic regeneration ability after injury, accompanied with the coordination of numerous cells, molecules and signaling pathways. These post-injury biological changes are complex with insufficient understanding. Thus, to obtain a global perspective of changes following nerve injury and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying nerve regeneration are of great importance. By RNA sequencing, we detected transcriptional changes in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons at 0 h, 3 h, 9 h, 1 d, 4 d and 7 d following sciatic nerve crush injury in rats. Differentially expressed genes were then selected and classified into major clusters according to their expression patterns. Cluster 2 (with genes high expressed before 9 h and then down expressed) and cluster 6 (combination of cluster 4 and 5 with genes low expressed before 1 d and then up expressed) were underwent GO annotation and KEGG pathway analysis. Gene act networks were then constructed for these two clusters and the expression of pivotal genes was validated by quantitative real-time PCR. This study provided valuable information regarding the transcriptome changes in DRG neurons following nerve injury, identified potential genes that could be used for improving axon regeneration after nerve injury, and facilitated to elucidate the biological process and molecular mechanisms underlying peripheral nerve injury. PMID:27450809

  16. Protective effect of intraoperative nerve monitoring against recurrent laryngeal nerve injury during re-exploration of the thyroid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous thyroid or parathyroid surgery induces scarring or distorts anatomy, and increases the risk of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury for a reoperation. The benefit of intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) for re-exploration (a second nerve exploration) and reoperation has not been established. Methods Two hundred and ten patients were given a thyroid or parathyroid reoperation at our hospital between 2001 and 2010. Using IONM, we re-explored 56 patients who had been operated on before June 2007. The injury rate in these patients was compared with that of the 15 patients re-explored without IONM between 2001 and 2006. Results Of the 70 nerves that were re-explored using IONM, only one was incidentally injured, significantly fewer than the three injured in the 15 nerves re-explored without using IONM (1.43% vs. 20%, P = 0.0164). Conclusions IONM helped prevent RLN damage when re-exploring nerves during thyroid and parathyroid surgery. We recommend the routine use of IONM in thyroid and parathyroid reoperations. PMID:23618223

  17. Transforming Growth Factor-β Promotes Axonal Regeneration After Chronic Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Wale A R

    2016-04-01

    When spinal cord injury (SCI) occurs, injured cells must survive and regenerate to close gaps caused by the injury and to create functional motor units. After peripheral nerve injury, Wallerian degeneration in the distal nerve stump creates a neurotrophic and growth-supportive environment for injured neurons and axons via Schwann cells and secreted cytokines/neurotrophins. In both SCI and peripheral nerve injury, injured motor and sensory neurons must regenerate axons, eventually reaching and reinnervating target tissue (SDC Figure 1, http://links.lww.com/BRS/B116). This process is often unsuccessful after SCI, and the highly complex anatomy of branching axons and nerves in the peripheral nervous system leads to slow recovery of function, even with careful and appropriate techniques. PMID:27015069

  18. An alternative video footprint analysis to assess functional loss following injury to the rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Bervar, M

    2002-01-01

    The rat sciatic nerve is a well-established animal model for the study of recovery from peripheral nerve injuries. Footprint analysis is the most widely used non-invasive method of measuring functional recovery after injury in this model. We describe a new, alternative video analysis of standing (or static footprint video analysis) to assess functional loss following injury to the rat sciatic nerve, while the animal is standing or at periodic rest on a flat transparent surface. We found that this alternative video analysis is technically easier to perform than the corresponding footprint video analysis while walking, but still preserves all advantages of video versus conventional ink track method: i.e. few non-measurable footprints, better repeatability, high accuracy and more precise quantification of the degree of functional loss after sciatic nerve injury in the rat. PMID:12514995

  19. Factors predicting sensory and motor recovery after the repair of upper limb peripheral nerve injuries

    PubMed Central

    He, Bo; Zhu, Zhaowei; Zhu, Qingtang; Zhou, Xiang; Zheng, Canbin; Li, Pengliang; Zhu, Shuang; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jiakai

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the factors associated with sensory and motor recovery after the repair of upper limb peripheral nerve injuries. DATA SOURCES: The online PubMed database was searched for English articles describing outcomes after the repair of median, ulnar, radial, and digital nerve injuries in humans with a publication date between 1 January 1990 and 16 February 2011. STUDY SELECTION: The following types of article were selected: (1) clinical trials describing the repair of median, ulnar, radial, and digital nerve injuries published in English; and (2) studies that reported sufficient patient information, including age, mechanism of injury, nerve injured, injury location, defect length, repair time, repair method, and repair materials. SPSS 13.0 software was used to perform univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses and to investigate the patient and intervention factors associated with outcomes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensory function was assessed using the Mackinnon-Dellon scale and motor function was assessed using the manual muscle test. Satisfactory motor recovery was defined as grade M4 or M5, and satisfactory sensory recovery was defined as grade S3+ or S4. RESULTS: Seventy-one articles were included in this study. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that repair time, repair materials, and nerve injured were independent predictors of outcome after the repair of nerve injuries (P < 0.05), and that the nerve injured was the main factor affecting the rate of good to excellent recovery. CONCLUSION: Predictors of outcome after the repair of peripheral nerve injuries include age, gender, repair time, repair materials, nerve injured, defect length, and duration of follow-up. PMID:25206870

  20. Association of Electroencephalography (EEG) Power Spectra with Corneal Nerve Fiber Injury in Retinoblastoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianliang; Sun, Juanjuan; Diao, Yumei; Deng, Aijun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In our clinical experience we discovered that EEG band power may be correlated with corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. This study aimed to investigate biomarkers obtained from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings to reflect corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Our study included 20 retinoblastoma patients treated at the Department of Ophthalmology, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University between 2010 and 2014. Twenty normal individuals were included in the control group. EEG activity was recorded continuously with 32 electrodes using standard EEG electrode placement for detecting EEG power. A cornea confocal microscope was used to examine corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients and normal individuals. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to analyze the correlation between corneal nerve injury and EEG power changes. The sensitivity and specificity of changed EEG power in diagnosis of corneal nerve injury were also analyzed. RESULTS The predominantly slow EEG oscillations changed gradually into faster waves in retinoblastoma patients. The EEG pattern in retinoblastoma patients was characterized by a distinct increase of delta (P<0.01) and significant decrease of theta power P<0.05). Corneal nerves were damaged in corneas of retinoblastoma patients. Corneal nerve injury was positively correlated with delta EEG spectra power and negatively correlated with theta EEG spectra power. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity by compounding in the series were 60% and 67%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Changes in delta and theta of EEG appear to be associated with occurrence of corneal nerve injury. Useful information can be provided for evaluating corneal nerve damage in retinoblastoma patients through analyzing EEG power bands. PMID:27592207

  1. Sciatic Nerve Injury Related to Hip Replacement Surgery: Imaging Detection by MR Neurography Despite Susceptibility Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marcel; Bäumer, Philipp; Pedro, Maria; Dombert, Thomas; Staub, Frank; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    Sciatic nerve palsy related to hip replacement surgery (HRS) is among the most common causes of sciatic neuropathies. The sciatic nerve may be injured by various different periprocedural mechanisms. The precise localization and extension of the nerve lesion, the determination of nerve continuity, lesion severity, and fascicular lesion distribution are essential for assessing the potential of spontaneous recovery and thereby avoiding delayed or inappropriate therapy. Adequate therapy is in many cases limited to conservative management, but in certain cases early surgical exploration and release of the nerve is indicated. Nerve-conduction-studies and electromyography are essential in the diagnosis of nerve injuries. In postsurgical nerve injuries, additional diagnostic imaging is important as well, in particular to detect or rule out direct mechanical compromise. Especially in the presence of metallic implants, commonly applied diagnostic imaging tests generally fail to adequately visualize nervous tissue. MRI has been deemed problematic due to implant-related artifacts after HRS. In this study, we describe for the first time the spectrum of imaging findings of Magnetic Resonance neurography (MRN) employing pulse sequences relatively insensitive to susceptibility artifacts (susceptibility insensitive MRN, siMRN) in a series of 9 patients with HRS procedure related sciatic nerve palsy. We were able to determine the localization and fascicular distribution of the sciatic nerve lesion in all 9 patients, which clearly showed on imaging predominant involvement of the peroneal more than the tibial division of the sciatic nerve. In 2 patients siMRN revealed direct mechanical compromise of the nerve by surgical material, and in one of these cases indication for surgical release of the sciatic nerve was based on siMRN. Thus, in selected cases of HRS related neuropathies, especially when surgical exploration of the nerve is considered, siMRN, with its potential to largely

  2. Study of the effects of semiconductor laser irradiation on peripheral nerve injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, G. X.; Li, P.

    2012-11-01

    In order to study to what extent diode laser irradiation effects peripheral nerve injury, the experimental research was made on rabbits. Experimental results show that low-energy semiconductor laser can promote axonal regeneration and improve nervous function. It is also found that simultaneous exposure of the injured peripheral nerve and corresponding spinal segments to laser irradiation may achieve the most significant results.

  3. Identification of Changes in Gene expression of rats after Sensory and Motor Nerves Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Guo, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Xun; Lu, Shi-bi; Xu, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is a sequence of events in the distal stump of axotomized nerves. Despite large numbers of researches concentrating on WD, the biological mechanism still remains unclear. Hence we constructed a rat model with both motor and sensory nerves injury and then conducted a RNA-seq analysis. Here the rats were divided into the 4 following groups: normal motor nerves (NMN), injured motor nerves (IMN), normal sensory nerves (NSN) and injured sensory nerves (ISN). The transcriptomes of rats were sequenced by the Illumina HiSeq. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of 4 combinations including NMN vs. IMN, NSN vs. ISN, NMN vs. NSN and IMN vs. ISN were identified respectively. For the above 4 combinations, we identified 1666, 1514, 95 and 17 DEGs. We found that NMN vs. IMN shared the most common genes with NSN vs. ISN indicating common mechanisms between motor nerves injury and sensory nerves injury. At last, we performed an enrichment analysis and observed that the DEGs of NMN vs IMN and NSN vs. ISN were significantly associated with binding and activity, immune response, biosynthesis, metabolism and development. We hope our study may shed light on the molecular mechanisms of nerves degeneration and regeneration during WD. PMID:27253193

  4. Identification of Changes in Gene expression of rats after Sensory and Motor Nerves Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Guo, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Xun; Lu, Shi-Bi; Xu, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is a sequence of events in the distal stump of axotomized nerves. Despite large numbers of researches concentrating on WD, the biological mechanism still remains unclear. Hence we constructed a rat model with both motor and sensory nerves injury and then conducted a RNA-seq analysis. Here the rats were divided into the 4 following groups: normal motor nerves (NMN), injured motor nerves (IMN), normal sensory nerves (NSN) and injured sensory nerves (ISN). The transcriptomes of rats were sequenced by the Illumina HiSeq. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of 4 combinations including NMN vs. IMN, NSN vs. ISN, NMN vs. NSN and IMN vs. ISN were identified respectively. For the above 4 combinations, we identified 1666, 1514, 95 and 17 DEGs. We found that NMN vs. IMN shared the most common genes with NSN vs. ISN indicating common mechanisms between motor nerves injury and sensory nerves injury. At last, we performed an enrichment analysis and observed that the DEGs of NMN vs IMN and NSN vs. ISN were significantly associated with binding and activity, immune response, biosynthesis, metabolism and development. We hope our study may shed light on the molecular mechanisms of nerves degeneration and regeneration during WD. PMID:27253193

  5. Results of nerve grafting in radial nerve injuries occurring proximal to the humerus, including those within the posterior cord.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Results of radial nerve grafting are largely unknown for lesions of the radial nerve that occur proximal to the humerus, including those within the posterior cord. METHODS The authors describe 13 patients with proximal radial nerve injuries who were surgically treated and then followed for at least 24 months. The patients' average age was 26 years and the average time between accident and surgery was 6 months. Sural nerve graft length averaged 12 cm. Recovery was scored according to the British Medical Research Council (BMRC) scale, which ranges from M0 to M5 (normal muscle strength). RESULTS After grafting, all 7 patients with an elbow extension palsy recovered elbow extension, scoring M4. Six of the 13 recovered M4 wrist extension, 6 had M3, and 1 had M2. Thumb and finger extension was scored M4 in 3 patients, M3 in 2, M2 in 2, and M0 in 6. CONCLUSIONS The authors consider levels of strength of M4 for elbow and wrist extension and M3 for thumb and finger extension to be good results. Based on these criteria, overall good results were obtained in only 5 of the 13 patients. In proximal radial nerve lesions, the authors now advocate combining nerve grafts with nerve or tendon transfers to reconstruct wrist, thumb, and finger extension. PMID:26274998

  6. Vagal nerve stimulation protects against burn-induced intestinal injury through activation of enteric glia cells.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Todd W; Bansal, Vishal; Krzyzaniak, Michael; Putnam, James G; Peterson, Carrie Y; Loomis, William H; Wolf, Paul; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P; Coimbra, Raul

    2010-12-01

    The enteric nervous system may have an important role in modulating gastrointestinal barrier response to disease through activation of enteric glia cells. In vitro studies have shown that enteric glia activation improves intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering the expression of tight junction proteins. We hypothesized that severe injury would increase expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of enteric glial activation. We also sought to define the effects of vagal nerve stimulation on enteric glia activation and intestinal barrier function using a model of systemic injury and local gut mucosal involvement. Mice with 30% total body surface area steam burn were used as model of severe injury. Vagal nerve stimulation was performed to assess the role of parasympathetic signaling on enteric glia activation. In vivo intestinal permeability was measured to assess barrier function. Intestine was collected to investigate changes in histology; GFAP expression was assessed by quantitative PCR, by confocal microscopy, and in GFAP-luciferase transgenic mice. Stimulation of the vagus nerve prevented injury-induced intestinal barrier injury. Intestinal GFAP expression increased at early time points following burn and returned to baseline by 24 h after injury. Vagal nerve stimulation prior to injury increased GFAP expression to a greater degree than burn alone. Gastrointestinal bioluminescence was imaged in GFAP-luciferase transgenic animals following either severe burn or vagal stimulation and confirmed the increased expression of intestinal GFAP. Injection of S-nitrosoglutathione, a signaling molecule released by activated enteric glia cells, following burn exerts protective effects similar to vagal nerve stimulation. Intestinal expression of GFAP increases following severe burn injury. Stimulation of the vagus nerve increases enteric glia activation, which is associated with improved intestinal barrier function. The vagus nerve may mediate the

  7. Nerve Regeneration in the Peripheral Nervous System versus the Central Nervous System and the Relevance to Speech and Hearing after Nerve Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Tessa; Gordon, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells normally form myelin sheaths around axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and support nerve regeneration after nerve injury. In contrast, nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is not supported by the myelinating cells known as oligodendrocytes. We have found that: 1) low frequency electrical stimulation can be…

  8. Effects of age-related loss of P/Q-type calcium channels in a mice model of peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Sara; Eleuteri, Cecilia; Vacca, Valentina; Strimpakos, Georgios; Mattei, Elisabetta; Severini, Cinzia; Pavone, Flaminia; Luvisetto, Siro

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the role of P/Q-type calcium channels in sciatic nerve regeneration after lesion induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) in heterozygous null mutant mice lacking the CaV2.1α1 subunit of these channels (Cacna1a+/-). Compared with wild type, Cacna1a+/- mice showed an initial reduction of the CCI-induced allodynia, indicating a reduced pain perception, but they also evidenced a lack of recovery over time, with atrophy of the injured hindpaw still present 3 months after CCI when wild-type mice fully recovered. In parallel, Cacna1a+/- mice exhibited an early onset of age-dependent loss of P/Q-type channels, which can be responsible for the lack of functional recovery. Moreover, Cacna1a+/- mice showed an early age-dependent reduction of muscular strength, as well as of Schwann cells proliferation and sciatic nerve remyelination. This study demonstrates the important role played by P/Q-type channels in recovery from nerve injury and has important implications for the knowledge of age-related processes. PMID:25150573

  9. Lingual nerve injury after third molar removal: Unilateral atrophy of fungiform papillae

    PubMed Central

    de-Pablo-Garcia-Cuenca, Alba; Bescós-Atín, Maria S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain and sensory changes due to lingual nerve injury are one of the most common alterations that follow surgical removal of third molar. They are usually transient but other less common complications, such as the atrophy of fungiform papillae, have an uncertain prognosis. Case Description: We report a case of a 34-year-old woman who presented a unilateral lingual atrophy of fungiform papillae after third molar extraction accompanied by severe dysesthesia that altered her daily life significantly during the following months and how this complication evolved over time. We conducted a literature review on the different factors that can lead to a lingual nerve injury. Clinical Implications: The clinical evolution of temporary and permanent somatosensitve injuries is an important fact to take into consideration during the postoperative management because it will indicate the lesion prognosis. Key words:Lingual nerve, third molar removal, somatosensitive alteration, papillae atrophy, permanent injury, temporary injury. PMID:24790723

  10. Dual Nerve Transfers for Restoration of Shoulder Function After Brachial Plexus Avulsion Injury.

    PubMed

    Chu, Bin; Wang, Huan; Chen, Liang; Gu, Yudong; Hu, Shaonan

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of shoulder function restoration by dual nerve transfers, spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve and 2 intercostal nerves to the anterior branch of the axillary nerve, in patients with shoulder paralysis that resulted from brachial plexus avulsion injury. It was a retrospective analysis to assess the impact of a variety of factors on reanimation of shoulder functions with dual nerve transfers. A total of 19 patients were included in this study. Most of these patients sustained avulsions of C5, C6, and C7 nerve roots (16 patients). Three of them had avulsions of C5 and C6 roots only. Through a posterior approach, direct coaptation of the intercostal nerves and the anterior branch of the axillary nerve was performed, along with accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve. Satisfactory shoulder function recovery (93.83° of shoulder abduction and 54.00° of external rotation on average) was achieved after a 62-month follow-up. This dual nerve transfer procedure provided us with a reliable and effective method for shoulder function reconstruction after brachial plexus root avulsion, especially C5/C6/C7 avulsion. The level of evidence is therapeutic IV. PMID:26835823

  11. Risk of nerve injury during arthroscopy portal placement in the elbow joint: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Chaware, Prashant N; Santoshi, John A; Pakhare, Abhijit P; Rathinam, Bertha A D

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elbow arthroscopy has become a routine procedure now. However, placing portals is fraught with dangers of injuring the neurovascular structures around elbow. There are not enough data documenting the same amongst the Indians. We aimed to determine the relative distances of nerves around the elbow to the arthroscopy portals and risk of injury in different positions of the elbow. Materials and Methods: Six standard elbow arthroscopy portals were established in 12 cadaveric upper limbs after joint distension. Then using standard dissection techniques all the nerves around the elbow were exposed, and their distances from relevant portals were measured using digital vernier caliper in 90° elbow flexion and 0° extension. Descriptive statistical analysis was used for describing distance of the nerves from relevant portal. Wilcoxon-signed rank test and Friedman's test were used for comparison. Results: There was no major nerve injury at all the portals studied in both positions of the elbow. The total incidence of cutaneous nerve injury was 8.3% (12/144); medial cutaneous nerve of forearm 10/48 and posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm 2/24. No significant changes were observed in the distance of a nerve to an individual portal at 90° flexion or 0° extension position of the elbow. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the risk of injury to different nerves at the standard portals of elbow arthroscopy. In practice, the actual incidence of nerve injury may still be lower. We conclude that elbow arthroscopy is a safe procedure when all precautions as described are duly followed. PMID:26952128

  12. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injury after Mandibular Third Molar Extraction: a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this study was to systematically review the comprehensive overview of literature data about injury to the inferior alveolar nerve after lower third molar extraction to discover the prevalence of injury, the risk factors, recovery rates, and alternative methods of treatment. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic databases. Articles from January 2009 to June 2014 were searched. English language articles with a minimum of 6 months patient follow-up and injury analysis by patient’s reporting, radiographic, and neurosensory testing were selected. Results In total, 84 literature sources were reviewed, and 14 of the most relevant articles that are suitable to the criteria were selected. Articles were analyzed on men and women. The influence of lower third molar extraction (especially impacted) on the inferior alveolar nerve was clearly seen. Conclusions The incidence of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve after lower third molar extraction was about 0.35 - 8.4%. The injury of the inferior alveolar nerve can be predicted by various radiological signs. There are few risk factors that may increase the risk of injury to the nerve such as patients over the age of 24 years old, with horizontal impactions, and extraction by trainee surgeons. Recovery is preferable and permanent injury is very rare. PMID:25635208

  13. Connexin 43 contributes to ectopic orofacial pain following inferior alveolar nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Honda, Kuniya; Unno, Syumpei; Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinically, it is well known that injury of mandibular nerve fiber induces persistent ectopic pain which can spread to a wide area of the orofacial region innervated by the uninjured trigeminal nerve branches. However, the exact mechanism of such persistent ectopic orofacial pain is not still known. The present study was undertaken to determine the role of connexin 43 in the trigeminal ganglion on mechanical hypersensitivity in rat whisker pad skin induced by inferior alveolar nerve injury. Here, we examined changes in orofacial mechanical sensitivity following inferior alveolar nerve injury. Furthermore, changes in connexin 43 expression in the trigeminal ganglion and its localization in the trigeminal ganglion were also examined. In addition, we investigated the functional significance of connexin 43 in relation to mechanical allodynia by using a selective gap junction blocker (Gap27). Results Long-lasting mechanical allodynia in the whisker pad skin and the upper eyelid skin, and activation of satellite glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion, were induced after inferior alveolar nerve injury. Connexin 43 was expressed in the activated satellite glial cells encircling trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the whisker pad skin, and the connexin 43 protein expression was significantly increased after inferior alveolar nerve injury. Administration of Gap27 in the trigeminal ganglion significantly reduced satellite glial cell activation and mechanical hypersensitivity in the whisker pad skin. Moreover, the marked activation of satellite glial cells encircling trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the whisker pad skin following inferior alveolar nerve injury implies that the satellite glial cell activation exerts a major influence on the excitability of nociceptive trigeminal ganglion neurons. Conclusions These findings indicate that the propagation of satellite glial cell activation throughout the trigeminal ganglion via gap junctions, which are

  14. A Romanian therapeutic approach to peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zegrea, I; Chivu, Laura Ioana; Albu, Mădălina Georgiana; Zamfirescu, D; Chivu, R D; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Lascăr, I

    2012-01-01

    The study of nerve regeneration and functional recovery of the injured peripheral nerves represents a worldwide subject of clinical and scientific research. Our team aimed to obtain the first guide for nerve regeneration, bioartificial and biodegradable, using exclusively Romanian resources and having the advantages of price and quality, over the imported nerve conduits already used in clinical practice. First steps of this project consisted in obtaining the prototype of nerve guide conduit and its' testing in vitro and in vivo. Tests of physicochemical characterization, FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) spectrometry, thermal analysis (differential calorimetry, thermo-gravimetry), electron microscopy, water absorption and enzymatic degradation of the obtained prototype were followed by in vivo testing. The first results, obtained on a group of Brown Norway rats who suffered experimental lesions of 1 cm at the level of left sciatic nerve, which have then been repaired using the Romanian conduit prototype, are favorable in terms of biocompatibility, biodegradable capacity and support of nerve regeneration. PMID:22732806

  15. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  16. Experimental study on the effect of electrostimulation on neural regeneration after oculomotor nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ningxi; Zhang, Chunmei; Li, Zhen; Meng, Youqiang; Feng, Baohui; Wang, Xuhui; Yang, Min; Wan, Liang; Ning, Bo; Li, Shiting

    2014-12-01

    The oculomotor nerve can regenerate anatomically and histologically after injury; however, the degree of functional recovery of extraocular muscles and the pupil sphincter muscle was not satisfactory. Electrostimulation was one potential intervention that was increasingly being studied for use in nerve injury settings. However, the effect of electrostimulation on regeneration of the injured oculomotor nerve was still obscure. In this study, we studied the effects of electrostimulation on neural regeneration in terms of neurofunction, myoelectrophysiology, neuroanatomy, and neurohistology after oculomotor nerve injury and found that electrostimulation on the injured oculomotor nerve enhanced the speed and final level of its functional and electrophysiological recovery, promoted neural regeneration, and enhanced the selectivity and specificity of reinnervation of the regenerated neuron, the conformity among the electrophysiological and functional recovery of extraocular muscles, and neural regeneration, and that the function of extraocular muscles recovered slower than electrophysiology. Thus, we speculated that electrostimulation on the injured oculomotor nerve produced a marked effect on all phases of neural regeneration including neuronal survival, sprout formation, axonal elongation, target reconnection, and synaptogenesis. We think that neural electrostimulation can be used in oculomotor nerve injury. PMID:25022883

  17. MicroRNA machinery responds to peripheral nerve lesion in an injury-regulated pattern

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Raafat, Mohamed; Pak, Elena; Hammond, Scott; Murashov, Alexander K.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, functional and potent RNA interference (RNAi) has been reported in peripheral nerve axons transfected with short-interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, components of RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) have been identified in axotomized sciatic nerve fibers as well as in regenerating dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in vitro. Based on these observations, and on the fact that siRNA and microRNAs (miRNA) share the same effector enzymes, we hypothesized that the endogenous miRNA biosynthetic pathway would respond to peripheral nerve injury. To answer this question, we investigated changes in the expression of miRNA biosynthetic enzymes following peripheral nerve crush injury in mice. Here we show that several pivotal miRNA biosynthetic enzymes are expressed in an injury-regulated pattern in sciatic nerve in vivo, and in DRG axons in vitro. Moreover, the sciatic nerve lesion induced expression of mRNA-processing bodies (P-bodies), which are the local foci of mRNA degradation in DRG axons. In addition, a group of injury-regulated miRNAs was identified by miRNA microarray and validated by qPCR and in situ hybridization analyses. Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that the peripheral nerve regeneration processes may be regulated by miRNA pathway. PMID:21689732

  18. Restorative effect and mechanism of mecobalamin on sciatic nerve crush injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lin; Qian, Minquan; Shi, Keqin; Chen, Gang; Gu, Yanglin; Du, Wei; Zhu, Guoxing

    2014-11-15

    Mecobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 containing a central metal element (cobalt), is one of the most important mediators of nervous system function. In the clinic, it is often used to accelerate recovery of peripheral nerves, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we performed sciatic nerve crush injury in mice, followed by daily intraperitoneal administration of mecobalamin (65 μg/kg or 130 μg/kg) or saline (negative control). Walking track analysis, histomorphological examination, and quantitative real-time PCR showed that mecobalamin significantly improved functional recovery of the sciatic nerve, thickened the myelin sheath in myelinated nerve fibers, and increased the cross-sectional area of target muscle cells. Furthermore, mecobalamin upregulated mRNA expression of growth associated protein 43 in nerve tissue ipsilateral to the injury, and of neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor) in the L4-6 dorsal root ganglia. Our findings indicate that the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of mecobalamin after sciatic nerve injury involves the upregulation of multiple neurotrophic factor genes. PMID:25598780

  19. Restorative effect and mechanism of mecobalamin on sciatic nerve crush injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lin; Qian, Minquan; Shi, Keqin; Chen, Gang; Gu, Yanglin; Du, Wei; Zhu, Guoxing

    2014-01-01

    Mecobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 containing a central metal element (cobalt), is one of the most important mediators of nervous system function. In the clinic, it is often used to accelerate recovery of peripheral nerves, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we performed sciatic nerve crush injury in mice, followed by daily intraperitoneal administration of mecobalamin (65 μg/kg or 130 μg/kg) or saline (negative control). Walking track analysis, histomorphological examination, and quantitative real-time PCR showed that mecobalamin significantly improved functional recovery of the sciatic nerve, thickened the myelin sheath in myelinated nerve fibers, and increased the cross-sectional area of target muscle cells. Furthermore, mecobalamin upregulated mRNA expression of growth associated protein 43 in nerve tissue ipsilateral to the injury, and of neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor) in the L4–6 dorsal root ganglia. Our findings indicate that the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of mecobalamin after sciatic nerve injury involves the upregulation of multiple neurotrophic factor genes. PMID:25598780

  20. Profiling of the dynamically alteredgene expression in peripheral nerve injury using NGS RNA sequencing technique.

    PubMed

    Han, Duanyang; Chen, Yixun; Kou, Yuhui; Weng, Jian; Chen, Bo; Yu, Youlai; Zhang, Peixun; Jiang, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery of peripheral nerve injuries is of major demand in clinical practice worldwide. Although, to some extent, peripheral nervous system can spontaneously regenerate, post-injury recovery is often associated with poor functional outcome. The molecular mechanism controlling the peripheral nerve repair process is still majorly unclear. In this study, by utilizing the Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) RNA sequencing technique, we aim to profile the gene expression spectrum of the peripheral nerve repair. In total, we detected 2847 were differentially expressed at day 7 post crush nerve injury. The GO, Panther, IPA and GSEA analysis was performed to decipher the biological processes involving the differentially expressed genes. Collectively, our results highlighted the inflammatory response and related signaling pathway (NFkB and TNFa signaling) play key role in peripheral nerve repair regulation. Furthermore, Network analysis illustrated that the IL10, IL18, IFN-γ and PDCD1 were four key regulators with multiple participations in peripheral nerve repair and potentially exert influence to the repair process. The expression changes of IL10, IL18, IFN-γ, PDCD1 and TNFSF14 (LIGHT) were further validated by western blot analysis. Hopefully, the present study may provide useful platform to further reveal the molecular mechanism of peripheral nerve repair and discover promising treatment target to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27158375

  1. Profiling of the dynamically alteredgene expression in peripheral nerve injury using NGS RNA sequencing technique

    PubMed Central

    Han, Duanyang; Chen, Yixun; Kou, Yuhui; Weng, Jian; Chen, Bo; Yu, Youlai; Zhang, Peixun; Jiang, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery of peripheral nerve injuries is of major demand in clinical practice worldwide. Although, to some extent, peripheral nervous system can spontaneously regenerate, post-injury recovery is often associated with poor functional outcome. The molecular mechanism controlling the peripheral nerve repair process is still majorly unclear. In this study, by utilizing the Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) RNA sequencing technique, we aim to profile the gene expression spectrum of the peripheral nerve repair. In total, we detected 2847 were differentially expressed at day 7 post crush nerve injury. The GO, Panther, IPA and GSEA analysis was performed to decipher the biological processes involving the differentially expressed genes. Collectively, our results highlighted the inflammatory response and related signaling pathway (NFkB and TNFa signaling) play key role in peripheral nerve repair regulation. Furthermore, Network analysis illustrated that the IL10, IL18, IFN-γ and PDCD1 were four key regulators with multiple participations in peripheral nerve repair and potentially exert influence to the repair process. The expression changes of IL10, IL18, IFN-γ, PDCD1 and TNFSF14 (LIGHT) were further validated by western blot analysis. Hopefully, the present study may provide useful platform to further reveal the molecular mechanism of peripheral nerve repair and discover promising treatment target to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27158375

  2. Iatrogenic Ulnar Nerve Injury post Laceration Suturing - An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mothilal, Murali; Mothilal, S N; Ravichandran, S; Mohammad, Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nerve entrapment while suturing a lacerated wound is a complication that is easily avoidable. We report a case low ulnar nerve palsy due to nerve entrapment while suturing a lacerated wound. Case Report: A 48 year old lady came with complaints of pain and a lacerated wound over the dorsomedial aspect of lower third of the left forearm. The lacerated wound was sutured elsewhere one week back. She had fracture of lower third of the ulna which was stabilised with plates and screws using a separate dorsal incision. She developed ulnar claw hand on the third postoperative day. Strength duration curve revealed neurotmesis of ulnar nerve. Ulnar nerve exploration was done and the nerve was found to be ligated at the site of original laceration. The ligature was released and nerve was found to be thinned out at the site. There was no neurological recovery at 5 months follow up and reconstruction procedures in form of tendon tranfer are planned for the patient. Conclusion: This is a case of iatrogenic ulnar nerve palsy which is very rare in our literature. This can be easily avoided if proper care is taken while suturing the primary laceration. A nerve can be mistakenly sutured for a bleeding vein and proper exposure while suturing will be necessary especially at areas where nerves are superficial. PMID:27298911

  3. Saphenous nerve injury during harvesting of one or two hamstring tendons for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction☆

    PubMed Central

    de Padua, Vitor Barion Castro; Nascimento, Paulo Emílio Dourado; Silva, Sergio Candido; de Gusmão Canuto, Sergio Marinho; Zuppi, Guilherme Nunes; de Carvalho, Sebastião Marcos Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether harvesting of two hamstring tendons (semitendinosus and gracilis) has the same rate of nerve injury as harvesting of the semitendinosus tendon alone, used as a triple graft. Methods Changes in sensitivity relating to injury of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve were evaluated in 110 patients six months after they underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using hamstring tendons. They were divided into two groups: one in which only the semitendinosus was used and the other, the semitendinosus and gracilis. Results The group in which only the semitendinosus was used as a graft presented a nerve injury rate of 36.1%. In the group in which the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons were used, 58.1% of the patients presented altered sensitivity. In the general assessment on all the patients, the nerve injury rate was 50.9%. Conclusion Harvesting the semitendinosus alone and using it in triple form is a viable option for ACL reconstruction and may give rise to fewer nerve injuries relating to branches of the saphenous nerve. PMID:26535201

  4. Management of radial nerve injury associated with humeral shaft fractures: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Elton, Suzanne G; Rizzo, Marco

    2008-11-01

    Injury to the radial nerve is not uncommonly associated with fractures of the humerus. Despite a considerable amount of information and literature regarding management of these associated injuries, a universally accepted algorithm for treatment remains elusive. This article assimilates the data and provides evidence-based recommendations regarding treatment. PMID:18925550

  5. [Neuropathic pain intensity depends on the degree of peripheral nerve injury in the rat].

    PubMed

    Abuduhadeer, Tayier

    2004-12-01

    Partial peripheral nerve injury produces a persistent neuropathic pain which is difficult to relieve. In order to determine whether different degrees of peripheral nerve injury are related with the severity of neuropathic pain, we examined pain-related behaviors, histological changes and NGF in the skin in rats treated with different types of spinal nerve injury: tight ligation of the left L5 spinal nerve, incomplete ligation of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves and incomplete crush of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves. In all model rats, the thresholds of paw withdrawal in response to mechanical and heat stimuli began to decrease on the injured side 1 day after the operation, and the decreases in the thresholds persisted for more than 1 month. Incomplete ligation and incomplete crush of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves caused more severe allodynia and hyperalgesia than tight ligation of the left L5 spinal nerve on the injured side. In rats treated with incomplete crush, the threshold of withdrawal response to mechanical or heat stimuli was improved on day 32 after the operation as compared with that on day 15. Histological analysis revealed that about 80% of the fibers in the sciatic nerve were injured after incomplete ligation and incomplete crush of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves on day 15, while about 50% of the fibers were damaged by tight ligation of the left L5 spinal nerve. In accordance with pain-relieving, the sciatic nerve fibers regenerated to about 50% of the number of the intact sciatic nerve fibers on day 32 in the crush model. Nerve growth factor (NGF) in the skin of the hindpaw on the injured side was accumulated after incomplete ligation and incomplete crush of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves, but not tight ligation of the left L5 spinal nerve, on day 15 after the operation, possibly due to impairment of transport via unmyelinated primary afferents. Regeneration of the sciatic nerve alleviated the accumulation of NGF in the injured side hindpaw

  6. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-yue; Zhang, Ze-peng; Mo, Zhou-yun; Chen, Shi-jie; Xiang, Si-yu; Zhang, Qing-shan; Xue, Min

    2015-01-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury. PMID:26604912

  7. Use of adjunctive palmaris longus abductorplasty (Camitz) tendon transfer in pediatric median nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Baluch, Narges; Borschel, Gregory H

    2013-05-01

    A number of tendon transfers have been described for opponensplasty. Transfer of the palmaris longus (PL) tendon with a palmar fascial extension was initially described by Camitz. This technique has mostly been combined with carpal tunnel release in patients with long standing median neuropathy with atrophy of the thenar muscles. However, the Camitz transfer has not been previously described in the setting of pediatric median nerve injury. We report 4 cases of Camitz transfer in pediatric patients with median nerve injuries. Four children (all female; age range 3-15 yrs) underwent PL tendon transfer following median nerve injury. The causes of injury included trauma, iatrogenic injury, and neuritis of the brachial plexus. The Camitz procedure was performed at the time of median nerve decompression and/or reconstruction. All patients had excellent early return of function. Transfer of the palmaris longus tendon reliably restores palmar abduction, with minimal to no additional morbidity, in carefully selected pediatric patients with median nerve injury undergoing release of the carpal tunnel. PMID:22981385

  8. Sciatic Nerve Injury Caused by a Stretching Exercise in a Trained Dancer

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Ho Yong; Bae, Keun Hwan; Park, Seok Min; Lee, Ju Kang; Park, Ki Deok

    2013-01-01

    Sciatic nerve injury after stretching exercise is uncommon. We report a case of an 18-year-old female trained dancer who developed sciatic neuropathy primarily involving the tibial division after routine stretching exercise. The patient presented with dysesthesia and weakness of the right foot during dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The mechanism of sciatic nerve injury could be thought as hyperstretching alone, not caused by both hyperstretching and compression. Electrodiagnostic tests and magnetic resonance imaging revealed evidence of the right sciatic neuropathy from the gluteal fold to the distal tibial area, and partial tear of the left hamstring origin and fluid collection between the left hamstring and ischium without left sciatic nerve injury. Recovery of motor weakness was obtained by continuous rehabilitation therapy and some evidence of axonal regeneration was obtained by follow-up electrodiagnostic testing performed at 3, 5, and 12 months after injury. PMID:24466525

  9. Changes induced by peripheral nerve injury in the morphology and nanomechanics of sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzina, Ouafa; Szabo, Vivien; Lucas, Olivier; Saab, Marie-belle; Cloitre, Thierry; Scamps, Frédérique; Gergely, Csilla; Martin, Marta

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injury in vivo promotes a regenerative growth in vitro characterized by an improved neurite regrowth. Knowledge of the conditioning injury effects on both morphology and mechanical properties of live sensory neurons could be instrumental to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to this regenerative growth. In the present study, we use differential interference contrast microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show that conditioned axotomy, induced by sciatic nerve injury, does not increase somatic size of sensory neurons from adult mice lumbar dorsal root ganglia but promotes the appearance of longer and larger neurites and growth cones. AFM on live neurons is also employed to investigate changes in morphology and membrane mechanical properties of somas of conditioned neurons following sciatic nerve injury. Mechanical analysis of the soma allows distinguishing neurons having a regenerative growth from control ones, although they show similar shapes and sizes.

  10. L-carnitine alleviates sciatic nerve crush injury in rats: functional and electron microscopy assessments

    PubMed Central

    Avsar, Ümmü Zeynep; Avsar, Umit; Aydin, Ali; Yayla, Muhammed; Ozturkkaragoz, Berna; Un, Harun; Saritemur, Murat; Mercantepe, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. It is hypothesized that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats. Rat sciatic nerve was crush injured by a forceps and exhibited degenerative changes. After intragastric administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg L-carnitine for 30 days, axon area, myelin sheath area, axon diameter, myelin sheath diameter, and numerical density of the myelinated axons of injured sciatic nerve were similar to normal, and the function of injured sciatic nerve also improved significantly. These findings suggest that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on sciatic nerve crush injury in rats. PMID:25206754

  11. Improved regeneration after femoral nerve injury in mice lacking functional T- and B-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Ali; Szpotowicz, Emanuela; Schachner, Melitta; Jakovcevski, Igor

    2014-11-01

    The immune system plays important functional roles in regeneration after injury to the mammalian central and peripheral nervous systems. After damage to the peripheral nerve several types of immune cells, invade the nerve within hours after the injury. To gain insights into the contribution of T- and B-lymphocytes to recovery from injury we used the mouse femoral nerve injury paradigm. RAG2-/- mice lacking mature T- and B-lymphocytes due to deletion of the recombination activating gene 2 were subjected to resection and surgical reconstruction of the femoral nerve, with the wild-type mice of the same inbred genetic background serving as controls. According to single frame motion analyses, RAG2-/- mice showed better motor recovery in comparison to control mice at four and eight weeks after injury. Retrograde tracing of regrown/sprouted axons of spinal motoneurons showed increased numbers of correctly projecting motoneurons in the lumbar spinal cord of RAG2-/- mice compared with controls. Whereas there was no difference in the motoneuron soma size between genotypes, RAG2-/- mice displayed fewer cholinergic and inhibitory synaptic terminals around somata of spinal motoneurons both prior to and after injury, compared with wild-type mice. Extent of myelination of regrown axons in the motor branch of the femoral nerve measured as g-ratio was more extensive in RAG2-/- than in control mice eight weeks after injury. We conclude that activated T- and B-lymphocytes restrict motor recovery after femoral nerve injury, associated with the increased survival of motoneurons and improved remyelination. PMID:24967682

  12. Cold intolerance following median and ulnar nerve injuries: prognosis and predictors.

    PubMed

    Ruijs, A C J; Jaquet, J-B; van Riel, W G; Daanen, H A M; Hovius, S E R

    2007-08-01

    This study describes the predictors for cold intolerance and the relationship to sensory recovery after median and ulnar nerve injuries. The study population consisted of 107 patients 2 to 10 years after median, ulnar or combined median and ulnar nerve injuries. Patients were asked to fill out the Cold Intolerance Severity Score (CISS) questionnaire and sensory recovery was measured using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments. Fifty-six percent of the patients with a single nerve injury and 70% with a combined nerve injury suffered abnormal cold intolerance. Patients with no return of sensation had dramatically higher CISS-scores than patients with normal sensory recovery. Females had higher CISS scores post-injury than males. Cold intolerance did not diminish over the years. Patients with higher CISS scores needed more time to return to their work. Age, additional arterial injury, site or type of the injury and dominance of the hand were not found to have a significant influence on cold intolerance. PMID:17482322

  13. The Effects of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor on Regeneration in Nerve Crush Injuries in Rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Yi-Sun; Joe, Jun-Ho; Joo, Hyun-Woo; Park, In-Hwa; Shen, Guang-Yin; Kim, Ki-Jun; Lee, Yonggu; Shin, Jeong Hun; Kim, Hyuck; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2016-07-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely known to have a neuroprotective effect, but its effects on function and morphology in mechanical nerve injury are not well understood. The aim of this study was to confirm the time course of the functional changes and morphological effects of G-CSF in a rat model of nerve crush injury. Twelve-eight rats were divided into three group: sham-operated control group, G-CSF-treated group, and saline treated group. 2 weeks after the nerve crush injury, G-CSF was injected for 5 days. After 4 weeks, functional tests such as motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), mechanical and cold allodynia tests, and morphological studies were performed. G-CSF-treated rats had significantly improved nerve function including MNCV and mechanical and cold allodynia. In addition, G-CSF-treated rats had significantly higher the density of myelinated fibers than saline-treated rats. In conclusion, we found that 100 μg/kg administration of G-CSF promoted long-term functional recovery in a rat model of nerve crush injury. PMID:26980007

  14. The neuroprotective effects of aspirin following crush injury to rat sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yi; Li, Jun; Zhu, Yueliang; Tang, Hui; He, Xiaoqing; Xu, Yongqing

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been reported to be neuroprotective and produce some benefits for central nervous system diseases. However, the possibility of using aspirin as a neuroprotective agent for peripheral nerve injuries has rarely been reported thus far. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibly beneficial effects of aspirin on sciatic nerve crush injury therapy in rats. Crush injury animal model was prepared with Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were evenly divided into high-dose aspirin group, low-dose aspirin group, and vehicle group. Aspirin solution or normal saline were intraperitoneally injected once a day for 28 days after sciatic nerve crush injury. A sham-operative group was also added as normal control. The results from walking track analysis and electrophysiological assessment indicated that motor functional recovery in the aspirin groups were better than that in the vehicle group. Morphometric analysis of regenerated nerves and Fluoro-Gold retrograde tracing demonstrated that axonal regeneration in the aspirin groups was superior to that in the vehicle group. Our findings suggest that aspirin might be used as a neuroprotective agent for treating peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26770418

  15. Identification of the effects of peripheral nerves injury on the muscle control - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaj, Anna; Zmyslowski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Impairment of motor function following peripheral nerve injury is a serious clinical problem. Generally nerve injury leads to erroneous control of muscle activity that results in gait and voluntary movement abnormalities followed by muscle atrophy. This article presents a review of studies on the effects of peripheral nerve injury on the motor system performed on animal models. We focused our attention on the results that are fundamental for better understanding of the degenerative and regenerative processes induced by nerve injury as well as of the mechanisms of structural changes in neuronal networks controlling movement. Quoted results are also important for clinical applications because they allow to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques that can be used after nerve injury inducing motor deficits. However, till now no efficient therapy inducing satisfactory recovery was found. There is still a need to continue an advanced basic research directed to develop effective therapies. Thus the aim of this review is to compare the results of recent studies performed on various animal models in order to propose new methods for identification of mechanisms responsible for muscle deficits and propose targets for new pharmacological therapies.

  16. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injuries Following Implant Placement - Importance of Early Diagnosis and Treatment: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this article is to systematically review diagnostic procedures and risk factors associated with inferior alveolar nerve injury following implant placement, to identify the time interval between inferior alveolar nerve injury and its diagnosis after surgical dental implant placement and compare between outcomes of early and delayed diagnosis and treatment given based on case series recorded throughout a period of 10 years. Material and Methods We performed literature investigation through MEDLINE (PubMed) electronic database and manual search through dental journals to find articles concerning inferior alveolar nerve injury following implant placement. The search was restricted to English language articles published during the last 10 years, from December 2004 to March 2014. Results In total, we found 33 articles related to the topic, of which 27 were excluded due to incompatibility with established inclusion criteria. Six articles were eventually chosen to be suitable. The studies presented diagnostic methods of inferior alveolar nerve sensory deficit, and we carried out an assessment of the proportion of patients diagnosed within different time intervals from the time the injury occurred. Conclusions Various diagnostic methods have been developed throughout the years for dealing with 1 quite frequent complication in the implantology field - inferior alveolar nerve injury. Concurrently, the importance of early diagnosis and treatment was proved repeatedly. According to the results of the data analysis, a relatively high percentage of the practitioners successfully accomplished this target and achieved good treatment outcomes. PMID:25635209

  17. Functional and morphological assessment of a standardized crush injury of the rat median nerve.

    PubMed

    Ronchi, G; Nicolino, S; Raimondo, S; Tos, P; Battiston, B; Papalia, I; Varejão, A S P; Giacobini-Robecchi, M G; Perroteau, I; Geuna, S

    2009-04-30

    The availability of effective experimental models for investigating nerve regeneration and designing new strategies for promoting this unique repair process is important. The aim of this study was to standardize a rat median nerve crush injury model using a non-serrated clamp exerting a compression force of 17.02 MPa for a duration of 30s. Results showed that functional recovery, evaluated by grasping test, was already detectable at day-12 and progressively increased until day-28 after which animal performance plateaued until the end of testing (day-42), reaching a range of 75-80% of pre-operative values. Morphological analysis on the median nerve segments, distal to the crush lesion, which were withdrawn at the end of the experiment showed that regenerated nerve fibers are significantly more numerous and densely packed; they are also smaller and have a thinner myelin sheath compared to controls. Together, these results provide a baseline characterization of the crush median nerve injury experimental model for its employment in the investigation of nerve regeneration research, especially when a reproducible regeneration process is required, such as for the study of biological mechanisms of peripheral nerve fiber regeneration or development of new therapeutic agents for promoting posttraumatic nerve repair. PMID:19428511

  18. Constrictive Pericarditis Long after a Gunshot Wound.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Ho; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Lee, Sang-Eun; Chun, Kyung-Hyeon; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Lee, Seung Hyun; Hong, Geu-Ru; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2015-07-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is an uncommon post-inflammatory disorder characterized by a variably thickened, fibrotic, and frequently calcified, pericardium. Etiology of the constriction can occur for many reasons. Although foreign bodies are not the common cause of constrictive pericarditis, the long-term presence of foreign bodies, like bullets, is presumed to cause chronic constrictive pericarditis even after a very long asymptomatic period. A 69-year-old patient with atrial flutter was admitted to the hospital. A cardiac computed tomography showed a bullet located adjacent to the right atrium. The transthoracic echocardiography showed a thickened pericardium and septal bouncing motion, which were compatible with constrictive pericarditis. The history of the patient revealed an injury by gunshot during the Korean War in 1950. Radiofrequency ablation of the atrial flutter was performed, and after ablation, the bullet was removed surgically. The patient was discharged home after surgery without complications. PMID:26240588

  19. Localized and Sustained Delivery of Erythropoietin from PLGA Microspheres Promotes Functional Recovery and Nerve Regeneration in Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Jianheng; Zhang, Licheng; Long, Anhua; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been demonstrated to exert neuroprotective effects on peripheral nerve injury recovery. Though daily intraperitoneal injection of EPO during a long period of time was effective, it was a tedious procedure. In addition, only limited amount of EPO could reach the injury sites by general administration, and free EPO is easily degraded in vivo. In this study, we encapsulated EPO in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres. Both in vitro and in vivo release assays showed that the EPO-PLGA microspheres allowed sustained release of EPO within a period of two weeks. After administration of such EPO-PLGA microspheres, the peripheral nerve injured rats had significantly better recovery compared with those which received daily intraperitoneal injection of EPO, empty PLGA microspheres, or saline treatments. This was supported by the functional, electrophysiological, and histological evaluations of the recovery done at week 8 postoperatively. We conclude that sustained delivery of EPO could be achieved by using EPO-PLGA microspheres, and such delivery method could further enhance the recovery function of EPO in nerve injury recovery. PMID:25821803

  20. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery: Let's tell someone

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In a recent study entitled: “More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery, especially extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF): A review”, Epstein documented that more nerve root injuries occurred utilizing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) versus open lumbar surgery for diskectomy, decompression of stenosis (laminectomy), and/or fusion for instability. Methods: In large multicenter Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial reviews performed by Desai et al., nerve root injury with open diskectomy occurred in 0.13–0.25% of cases, occurred in 0% of laminectomy/stenosis with/without fusion cases, and just 2% for open laminectomy/stenosis/degenerative spondylolisthesis with/without fusion. Results: In another MIS series performed largely for disc disease (often contained nonsurgical disc herniations, therefore unnecessary procedures) or spondylolisthesis, the risk of root injury was 2% for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus 7.8% for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Furthermore, the high frequencies of radiculitis/nerve root/plexus injuries incurring during anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIF: 15.8%) versus extreme lumbar interbody fusions (XLIF: 23.8%), addressing disc disease, failed back surgery, and spondylolisthesis, were far from acceptable. Conclusions: The incidence of nerve root injuries following any of the multiple MIS lumbar surgical techniques (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF) resulted in more nerve root injuries when compared with open conventional lumbar surgical techniques. Considering the majority of these procedures are unnecessarily being performed for degenerative disc disease alone, spine surgeons should be increasingly asked why they are offering these operations to their patients? PMID:26904373

  1. Decreases in endomorphin-2-like immunoreactivity concomitant with chronic pain after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, R R; Martin-Schild, S; Kastin, A J; Zadina, J E

    2001-01-01

    Nerve injury often leads to chronic, sometimes excruciating, pain. The mechanisms contributing to this syndrome include neurochemical plasticity in neurons involved in the earliest stages of pain transmission. Endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH(2)) is an endogenous morphine-like substance that binds to the mu-opioid receptor with high affinity and selectivity. Endomorphin-2-like immunoreactivity (LI) is present in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn in the spinal cord and in primary afferents, suggesting a role for this peptide in pain transmission. To determine whether spinal endomorphin-2-LI is altered in an animal model of chronic pain, the left sciatic nerve of Swiss Webster and ICR mice was ligated in a modified Seltzer model of nerve injury. Changes in endomorphin-2-LI were assessed by immunocytochemistry at 2, 4 and 14 days after nerve injury. The side of the spinal cord ipsilateral to the nerve injury exhibited a dramatic decrease in endomorphin-2-LI relative to the contralateral side and to control animals. The change was restricted to the medial dorsal horn in the lumbar segments innervated by the sciatic nerve. Substance P-LI showed a small decrease, while calcitonin gene-related peptide-LI was unchanged. Both thermal hyperalgesia, as evidenced by significantly decreased paw withdrawal latencies, and decreased endomorphin-2-LI were observed within 2 days of injury and were most pronounced at 2 weeks after injury. The decrease in endomorphin-2-LI during the development of chronic pain is consistent with the loss of an inhibitory influence on pain transmission. These results provide the first evidence that reduction of an endogenous opioid in primary afferents is associated with injury-induced chronic pain. PMID:11516840

  2. Effects of acute selective pudendal nerve electrical stimulation after simulated childbirth injury

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Bradley C.; Dissaranan, Charuspong; Zutshi, Massarat; Balog, Brian M.; Lin, Danli; Damaser, Margot S.

    2013-01-01

    During childbirth, a combinatorial injury occurs and can result in stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Simulated childbirth injury, consisting of vaginal distension (VD) and pudendal nerve crush (PNC), results in slowed recovery of continence, as well as decreased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a regenerative cytokine. Electrical stimulation has been shown to upregulate BDNF in motor neurons and facilitate axon regrowth through the increase of βII-tubulin expression after injury. In this study, female rats underwent selective pudendal nerve motor branch (PNMB) stimulation after simulated childbirth injury or sham injury to determine whether such stimulation affects bladder and anal function after injury and whether the stimulation increases BDNF expression in Onuf's nucleus after injury. Rats received 4 h of VD followed by bilateral PNC and 1 h of subthreshold electrical stimulation of the left PNMB and sham stimulation of the right PNMB. Rats underwent filling cystometry and anal pressure recording before, during, and after the stimulation. Bladder and anal contractile function were partially disrupted after injury. PNMB stimulation temporarily inhibited bladder contraction after injury. Two days and 1 wk after injury, BDNF expression in Onuf's nucleus of the stimulated side was significantly increased compared with the sham-stimulated side, whereas βII-tubulin expression in Onuf's nucleus of the stimulated side was significantly increased only 1 wk after injury. Acute electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve proximal to the crush site upregulates BDNF and βII-tubulin in Onuf's nucleus after simulated childbirth injury, which could be a potential preventive option for SUI after childbirth injury. PMID:23152293

  3. Preoperative evaluation of peripheral nerve injuries: What is the place for ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Toia, Francesca; Gagliardo, Andrea; D'Arpa, Salvatore; Gagliardo, Cesare; Gagliardo, Giuseppe; Cordova, Adriana

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound in the preoperative workup of peripheral nerve lesions and illustrate how nerve ultrasonography can be integrated in routine clinical and neurophysiological evaluation and in the management of focal peripheral nerve injuries. The diagnostic role and therapeutic implications of ultrasonography for different neuropathies are described. METHODS The authors analyzed the use of ultrasound in 119 entrapment, tumoral, posttraumatic, or postsurgical nerve injuries of limbs evaluated in 108 patients during 2013 and 2014. All patients were candidates for surgery, and in all cases the evaluation included clinical examination, electrodiagnostic studies (nerve conduction study and electromyography), and ultrasound nerve study. Ultrasound was used to explore the nerve fascicular echotexture, continuity, and surrounding tissues. The maximum cross-sectional area (CSA) and the presence of epineurial hyperechogenicity or intraneural hyper- or hypoechogenicity, of anatomical anomalies, dynamic nerve dislocations, or compressions were recorded. The concordance rate of neurophysiological and ultrasonographic data was analyzed, classifying ultrasound findings as confirming, contributive, or nonconfirming with respect to electrodiagnostic data. The correlation between maximum nerve CSA and neurophysiological severity degree in entrapment syndromes was statistically analyzed. RESULTS Ultrasonography confirmed electrodiagnostic findings in 36.1% of cases and showed a contributive role in the diagnosis and surgical planning in 53.8% of all cases; the findings were negative ("nonconfirming") in only 10.1% of the patients. In 16% of cases, ultrasound was not only contributive, but had a key diagnostic role in the presence of doubtful electrodiagnostic findings. The contributive role differed according to etiology, being higher for tumors (100%) and for posttraumatic or postsurgical neuropathies (72.2%) than for

  4. Avoiding injury to the inferior alveolar nerve by routine use of intraoperative radiographs during implant placement.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Jeffrey; Mastin, Chris; Le, Bach

    2008-01-01

    Injury to the inferior alveolar nerve during implant placement in the posterior atrophic mandible is a rare but serious complication. Although a preoperative computerized tomography scan can help determine the distance from the alveolar ridge to the nerve canal, variables such as magnification errors, ridge anatomy, and operator technique can increase the chance for complications. The routine use of intraoperative periapical radiographs during the drilling sequence is an inexpensive and reliable tool, allowing the operator to confidently adjust the direction and depth of the implant during placement. Most important, it helps avoid the risk of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve in cases in which there is limited vertical alveolar bone. Using this technique for 21 implants placed in the posterior atrophic mandible, with less than 10 mm of vertical bone to the inferior alveolar nerve canal, the authors observed no incidents of postoperative paresthesia. PMID:18390241

  5. Macrophage polarization in nerve injury: do Schwann cells play a role?

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Jo Anne; Shah, Prajay T.

    2016-01-01

    In response to peripheral nerve injury, the inflammatory response is almost entirely comprised of infiltrating macrophages. Macrophages are a highly plastic, heterogenic immune cell, playing an indispensable role in peripheral nerve injury, clearing debris and regulating the microenvironment to allow for efficient regeneration. There are several cells within the microenvironment that likely interact with macrophages to support their function – most notably the Schwann cell, the glial cell of the peripheral nervous system. Schwann cells express several ligands that are known to interact with receptors expressed by macrophages, yet the effects of Schwann cells in regulating macrophage phenotype remains largely unexplored. This review discusses macrophages in peripheral nerve injury and how Schwann cells may regulate their behavior. PMID:26981078

  6. Stretch-induced nerve injury: a proposed technique for the study of nerve regeneration and evaluation of the influence of gabapentin on this model

    PubMed Central

    Machado, J.A.; Ghizoni, M.F.; Bertelli, J.; Teske, Gabriel C.; Teske, Guilherme C.; Martins, D.F.; Mazzardo-Martins, L.; Cargnin-Ferreira, E.; Santos, A.R.S.; Piovezan, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    The rat models currently employed for studies of nerve regeneration present distinct disadvantages. We propose a new technique of stretch-induced nerve injury, used here to evaluate the influence of gabapentin (GBP) on nerve regeneration. Male Wistar rats (300 g; n=36) underwent surgery and exposure of the median nerve in the right forelimbs, either with or without nerve injury. The technique was performed using distal and proximal clamps separated by a distance of 2 cm and a sliding distance of 3 mm. The nerve was compressed and stretched for 5 s until the bands of Fontana disappeared. The animals were evaluated in relation to functional, biochemical and histological parameters. Stretching of the median nerve led to complete loss of motor function up to 12 days after the lesion (P<0.001), compared to non-injured nerves, as assessed in the grasping test. Grasping force in the nerve-injured animals did not return to control values up to 30 days after surgery (P<0.05). Nerve injury also caused an increase in the time of sensory recovery, as well as in the electrical and mechanical stimulation tests. Treatment of the animals with GBP promoted an improvement in the morphometric analysis of median nerve cross-sections compared with the operated vehicle group, as observed in the area of myelinated fibers or connective tissue (P<0.001), in the density of myelinated fibers/mm2 (P<0.05) and in the degeneration fragments (P<0.01). Stretch-induced nerve injury seems to be a simple and relevant model for evaluating nerve regeneration. PMID:24270909

  7. Responsiveness of the somatosensory system after nerve injury and amputation in the human hand.

    PubMed

    Schady, W; Braune, S; Watson, S; Torebjörk, H E; Schmidt, R

    1994-07-01

    We studied the responsiveness of the somatosensory system in humans after prolonged deprivation of peripheral input. Eight patients with traumatic transection of the median or ulnar nerve and 6 patients with amputation of a finger or hand underwent microneurography and intraneural stimulation. Bundles of nerve fibers were electrically stimulated through a microelectrode placed in the affected nerve proximally to the site of damage or in the case of amputees, in a nerve fascicle supplying the stump. During intraneural stimulation the subjects with nerve injuries reported distinct percepts in the hypoesthetic skin. Their projections were usually confined to the territory of a single or two adjacent palmar digital nerves, similar to the fascicular territories of healthy nerves in control subjects, but there was much less microneurographically recordable afferent activity than in normal subjects. In amputees intraneural stimulation evoked sensations in a phantom digit or digits in over three fourths of the fascicles studied. We conclude that (1) the somatosensory system remains able to process information from a nerve fascicle that has lost its cutaneous territory, and (2) somatosensory localization remains accurate despite the presumed central reorganization that takes place after nerve division or amputation. This lack of functional adaptation has important implications with regard to our understanding of human central nervous system plasticity. PMID:8024265

  8. Laryngeal Adductor Function in Experimental Models of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Paniello, Randal C.; Rich, Jason T.; Debnath, Nick L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Most patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis experience some degree of spontaneous reinnervation, which depends upon the type and severity of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury. After partial recovery, the paretic vocal fold may or may not adduct adequately to allow glottic closure, which in turn affects phonatory and swallowing outcomes. This process was studied in a series of canine laryngeal nerve injury models. Study Design Animal (canine) experiments. Methods Maximum stimulable laryngeal adductor pressure (LAP) was measured pre-treatment (baseline) and at 6 months following experimental RLN injuries (total n=59). The 9 study groups were designed to simulate a range of severities of RLN injury. Results The greatest LAP recovery, at 108% of original baseline, was seen in a 50% transection model; the least recovery was seen when the RLN underwent complete transection with repair, at 56% with precise alignment and 50% with alignment reversed. Intermediate models (partial RLN injuries) gave intermediate results. Crush models recovered 105% of LAP, while a half-transection, half-crush injury recovered 72% and cautery injuries recovered 61%. Controls (complete transection without repair) had no measurable recovery. Conclusions The injured RLN has a strong tendency to recover. Restoration of adductor strength, as determined by the LAP, was predictably related to the severity of RLN injury. The model RLN injuries studied provide a range of expected outcomes that can be used for future experiments exploring interventions that may improve post-injury adductor function. PMID:25283381

  9. Recovery of laryngeal function after intraoperative injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hydman, Jonas; Svensson, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) during thyroid/parathyroid surgery, despite a macroscopically intact nerve, is a challenge which highlights the sensitivity and complexity of laryngeal innervation. Furthermore, the uncertain prognosis stresses a lack of capability to diagnose the reason behind the impaired function. There is a great deal of literature considering risk factors, surgical technique and mechanisms outside the nerve affecting the incidence of RLN paresis during surgery. To be able to prognosticate recovery in cases of laryngeal dysfunction and voice changes after thyroid surgery, the surgeon would first need to define the presence, location, and type of laryngeal nerve injury. There is little data describing the events within the nerve and the neurobiological reasons for the impaired function related to potential recovery and prognosis. In addition, very little data has been presented in order to clarify any differences between the transient and permanent injury of the RLN. This review aims, from an anatomical and neurobiological perspective, to provide an update on the current understandings of surgically-induced injury to the laryngeal nerves. PMID:25713777

  10. Delayed Presentation of Sciatic Nerve Injury after Total Hip Arthroplasty: Neurosurgical Considerations, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linda W.; Veeravagu, Anand; Azad, Tej D.; Harraher, Ciara; Ratliff, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Background  Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an established treatment for end-stage arthritis, congenital deformity, and trauma with good long-term clinical and functional outcomes. Delayed sciatic nerve injury is a rare complication after THA that requires prompt diagnosis and management. Methods  We present a case of sciatic nerve motor and sensory deficit in a 52-year-old patient 2 years after index left THA. Electromyography (EMG) results and imaging with radiographs and CT of the affected hip demonstrated an aberrant acetabular cup screw in the posterior-inferior quadrant adjacent to the sciatic nerve. Case Description  The patient underwent surgical exploration that revealed injury to the peroneal division of the sciatic nerve due to direct injury from screw impingement. A literature review identified 11 patients with late-onset neuropathy after THA. Ten patients underwent surgical exploration and pain often resolved after surgery with 56% of patients recovering sensory function and 25% experiencing full recovery of motor function. Conclusions  Delayed neuropathy of the sciatic nerve is a rare complication after THA that is most often due to hardware irritation, component failure, or wear-related pseudotumor formation. Operative intervention is often pursued to explore and directly visualize the nerve with limited results in the literature showing modest relief of pain and sensory symptoms and poor restoration of motor function. PMID:27602309

  11. Iatrogenic ulnar nerve injury resulting from a venous cut down procedure

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi Kumar; Kansay, Rajiv; Aggarwal, Varun; Gupta, Parmanand

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of an iatrogenic left ulnar nerve injury caused during the basilic vein cut down in a 25-year-old woman presenting with a ruptured ectopic pregnancy and requiring an emergency laparotomy. Two months after her discharge from the hospital, the patient presented to the hand surgery clinic with a weak grip strength and paraesthesias in the left hand, diagnosed to be resulting from a deficient ulnar nerve function. Surgical exploration of the nerve showed a complete section of the nerve. End to end repair and anterior transposition of the nerve was done. At 10 months follow up, the patient showed recovery in the flexor digitorum profundus and flexor carpi ulnaris, thus partially improving the grip strength. The patient was still under follow-up at the time this report was prepared. PMID:21716827

  12. Blockade of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 promotes regeneration after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Ren, Fei; Zhang, Hong; Qi, Chao; Gao, Mei-Ling; Wang, Hong; Li, Xia-Qing

    2015-08-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) provides the sensation of pain (nociception). However, it remains unknown whether TRPV1 is activated after peripheral nerve injury, or whether activation of TRPV1 affects neural regeneration. In the present study, we established rat models of unilateral sciatic nerve crush injury, with or without pretreatment with AMG517 (300 mg/kg), a TRPV1 antagonist, injected subcutaneously into the ipsilateral paw 60 minutes before injury. At 1 and 2 weeks after injury, we performed immunofluorescence staining of the sciatic nerve at the center of injury, at 0.3 cm proximal and distal to the injury site, and in the dorsal root ganglia. Our results showed that Wallerian degeneration occurred distal to the injury site, and neurite outgrowth and Schwann cell regeneration occurred proximal to the injury. The number of regenerating myelinated and unmyelinated nerve clusters was greater in the AMG517-pretreated rats than in the vehicle-treated group, most notably 2 weeks after injury. TRPV1 expression in the injured sciatic nerve and ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia was markedly greater than on the contralateral side. Pretreatment with AMG517 blocked this effect. These data indicate that TRPV1 is activated or overexpressed after sciatic nerve crush injury, and that blockade of TRPV1 may accelerate regeneration of the injured sciatic nerve. PMID:26487864

  13. Blockade of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 promotes regeneration after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Fei; Zhang, Hong; Qi, Chao; Gao, Mei-ling; Wang, Hong; Li, Xia-qing

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) provides the sensation of pain (nociception). However, it remains unknown whether TRPV1 is activated after peripheral nerve injury, or whether activation of TRPV1 affects neural regeneration. In the present study, we established rat models of unilateral sciatic nerve crush injury, with or without pretreatment with AMG517 (300 mg/kg), a TRPV1 antagonist, injected subcutaneously into the ipsilateral paw 60 minutes before injury. At 1 and 2 weeks after injury, we performed immunofluorescence staining of the sciatic nerve at the center of injury, at 0.3 cm proximal and distal to the injury site, and in the dorsal root ganglia. Our results showed that Wallerian degeneration occurred distal to the injury site, and neurite outgrowth and Schwann cell regeneration occurred proximal to the injury. The number of regenerating myelinated and unmyelinated nerve clusters was greater in the AMG517-pretreated rats than in the vehicle-treated group, most notably 2 weeks after injury. TRPV1 expression in the injured sciatic nerve and ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia was markedly greater than on the contralateral side. Pretreatment with AMG517 blocked this effect. These data indicate that TRPV1 is activated or overexpressed after sciatic nerve crush injury, and that blockade of TRPV1 may accelerate regeneration of the injured sciatic nerve. PMID:26487864

  14. Reversal of Peripheral Nerve Injury-induced Hypersensitivity in the Postpartum Period: Role of Spinal Oxytocin

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Silvia; Liu, Baogang; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Houle, Timothy T.; Eisenach, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Physical injury, including surgery, can result in chronic pain; yet chronic pain following childbirth, including cesarean delivery in women, is rare. The mechanisms involved in this protection by pregnancy or delivery have not been explored. Methods We examined the effect of pregnancy and delivery on hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli of the rat hindpaw induced by peripheral nerve injury (spinal nerve ligation) and after intrathecal oxytocin, atosiban and naloxone. Additionally, oxytocin concentration in lumbar spinal cerebrospinal fluid was determined. Results Spinal nerve ligation performed at mid-pregnancy resulted in similar hypersensitivity to nonpregnant controls, but hypersensitivity partially resolved beginning after delivery. Removal of pups after delivery prevented this partial resolution. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of oxytocin were greater in normal postpartum rats prior to weaning. To examine the effect of injury at the time of delivery rather than during pregnancy, spinal nerve ligation was performed within 24 h of delivery. This resulted in acute hypersensitivity that partially resolved over the next 2–3 weeks. Weaning of pups resulted only in a temporary return of hypersensitivity. Intrathecal oxytocin effectively reversed the hypersensitivity following separation of the pups. Postpartum resolution of hypersensitivity was transiently abolished by intrathecal injection of the oxytocin receptor antagonist, atosiban. Conclusions These results suggest that the postpartum period rather than pregnancy protects against chronic hypersensitivity from peripheral nerve injury and that this protection may reflect sustained oxytocin signaling in the central nervous system during this period. PMID:23249932

  15. Quantification of Gene Expression after Painful Nerve Injury: Validation of Optimal Reference Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bangaru, Madhavi Latha Yadav; Park, Frank; Hudmon, Andy; McCallum, J. Bruce; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2011-01-01

    Stably expressed housekeeping genes (HKGs) are necessary for standardization of transcript measurement by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). Peripheral nerve injury disrupts expression of numerous genes in sensory neurons, but the stability of conventional HKGs has not been tested in this context. We examined the stability of candidate HKGs during nerve injury, including the commonly used 18s ribosomal RNA (18s rRNA), β tubulin I (Tubb5) and β tubulin III (Tubb3), actin, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase 1 (HPRT1), and mitogen activated protein kinase 6 (MAPK6). Total RNA for cDNA synthesis was isolated from dorsal root ganglia of rats at 3, 7 and 21 days following either skin incision alone or spinal nerve ligation, after which the axotomized and adjacent ganglia were analyzed separately. Relative stability of HKGs was determined using statistical algorithms geNorm and NormFinder. Both analyses identified MAPK6 and GAPDH as the two most stable HKGs for normalizing gene expression for qRT-PCR analysis in the context of peripheral nerve injury. Our findings indicate that a priori analysis of HKG expression levels is important for accurate normalization of gene expression in models of nerve injury. PMID:21863315

  16. Ectopic Muscle Expression of Neurotrophic Factors Improves Recovery After Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Glat, Micaela Johanna; Benninger, Felix; Barhum, Yael; Ben-Zur, Tali; Kogan, Elena; Steiner, Israel; Yaffe, David; Offen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Sciatic nerve damage is a common medical problem. The main causes include direct trauma, prolonged external nerve compression, and pressure from disk herniation. Possible complications include leg numbness and the loss of motor control. In mild cases, conservative treatment is feasible. However, following severe injury, recovery may not be possible. Neuronal regeneration, survival, and maintenance can be achieved by neurotrophic factors (NTFs). In this study, we examined the potency of combining brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) on the recovery of motor neuron function after crush injury of the sciatic nerve. We show that combined NTF application increases the survival of motor neurons exposed to a hypoxic environment. The ectopic expression of NTFs in the injured muscle improves the recovery of the sciatic nerve after crush injury. A significantly faster recovery of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude and conduction velocity is observed after muscle injections of viral vectors expressing a mixture of the four NTF genes. Our findings suggest a rationale for using genetic treatment with a combination of NTF-expressing vectors, as a potential therapeutic approach for severe peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26385386

  17. Reducing the risk of nerve injury during Bernese periacetabular osteotomy: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Kalhor, M; Gharehdaghi, J; Schoeniger, R; Ganz, R

    2015-05-01

    The modified Smith-Petersen and Kocher-Langenbeck approaches were used to expose the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh and the femoral, obturator and sciatic nerves in order to study the risk of injury to these structures during the dissection, osteotomy, and acetabular reorientation stages of a Bernese peri-acetabular osteotomy. Injury of the lateral cutaneous nerve of thigh was less likely to occur if an osteotomy of the anterior superior iliac spine had been carried out before exposing the hip. The obturator nerve was likely to be injured during unprotected osteotomy of the pubis if the far cortex was penetrated by > 5 mm. This could be avoided by inclining the osteotome 45° medially and performing the osteotomy at least 2 cm medial to the iliopectineal eminence. The sciatic nerve could be injured during the first and last stages of the osteotomy if the osteotome perforated the lateral cortex of ischium and the ilio-ischial junction by > 10 mm. The femoral nerve could be stretched or entrapped during osteotomy of the pubis if there was significant rotational or linear displacement of the acetabulum. Anterior or medial displacement of < 2 cm and lateral tilt (retroversion) of < 30° were safe margins. The combination of retroversion and anterior displacement could increase tension on the nerve. Strict observation of anatomical details, proper handling of the osteotomes and careful manipulation of the acetabular fragment reduce the neurological complications of Bernese peri-acetabular osteotomy. PMID:25922457

  18. The Effect of Sildenafil on Recuperation from Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Mehmet Fatih; Parlakpınar, Hakan; Ceylan, Mehmet Fethi; Ediz, Levent; Şamdancı, Emine; Kekilli, Ersoy; Sağır, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Severe functional and anatomical defects can be detected after the peripheral nerve injury. Pharmacological approaches are preferred rather than surgical treatment in the treatment of nerve injuries. Aims: The aim of this study is to perform histopathological, functional and bone densitometry examinations of the effects of sildenafil on nerve regeneration in a rat model of peripheral nerve crush injury. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: The study included a total of thirty adult Sprague-Dawley rats that were divided into three groups of ten rats each. In all rats, a crush injury was created by clamping the right sciatic nerve for one minute. One day before the procedure, rats in group 1 were started on a 28-day treatment consisting of a daily dose of 20 mg/kg body weight sildenafil citrate given orally via a nasogastric tube, while the rats in group 2 were started on an every-other-day dose of 10 mg/kg body weight sildenafil citrate. Rats from group 3 were not administered any drugs. Forty-two days after the nerve damage was created, functional and histopathological examination of both sciatic nerves and bone densitometric evaluation of the extremities were conducted. Results: During the rotarod test, rats from group 3 spent the least amount of time on the rod compared to the drug treatment groups at speeds of 20 rpm, 30 rpm and 40 rpm. In addition, the duration for which each animal could stay on the rod throughout the accelerod test significantly reduced in rats from group 3 compared to rats from groups 1 and 2 in the 4-min test. For the hot-plate latency time, there were no differences among the groups in either the basal level or after sciatic nerve injury. Moreover, there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of the static sciatic index (SSI) on the 42nd day (p=0.147). The amplitude was better evaluated in group 1 compared to the other two groups (p<0.05). Under microscopic evaluation, we observed the greatest amount of

  19. [Repair and revision 9. Peripheral trigeminal nerve injury].

    PubMed

    Vriens, J P M; van der Glas, H W; Koole, R

    2002-03-01

    A review is given about long-term incidence of sensory disturbance in the areas of innervation of the n. trigeminus for different types of trauma and/or treatment. Diagnosis, clinical course and possible types of treatment are in addition reviewed. Regarding diagnosis, the outcome of a test on sensory function is not always related to the degree of nerve damage because methods differ in the type of afferent nerve fibers of which function is tested, and some specificity might occur in nerve damage, i.e. either thick or thin afferent fibers might be predominantly affected at a particular time. An initial quick testing of sensory function is recommended. This testing includes examining two sensory modalities, which are related to functioning of thick and thin afferent fibers respectively and which have a dichotomous yes/no outcome on the incidence of a pronounced sensory disturbance. PMID:11933529

  20. Bilateral elevation of interleukin-6 protein and mRNA in both lumbar and cervical dorsal root ganglia following unilateral chronic compression injury of the sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current research implicates interleukin (IL)-6 as a key component of the nervous-system response to injury with various effects. Methods We used unilateral chronic constriction injury (CCI) of rat sciatic nerve as a model for neuropathic pain. Immunofluorescence, ELISA, western blotting and in situ hybridization were used to investigate bilateral changes in IL-6 protein and mRNA in both lumbar (L4-L5) and cervical (C7-C8) dorsal root ganglia (DRG) following CCI. The operated (CCI) and sham-operated (sham) rats were assessed after 1, 3, 7, and 14 days. Withdrawal thresholds for mechanical hyperalgesia and latencies for thermal hyperalgesia were measured in both ipsilateral and contralateral hind and fore paws. Results The ipsilateral hind paws of all CCI rats displayed a decreased threshold of mechanical hyperalgesia and withdrawal latency of thermal hyperalgesia, while the contralateral hind and fore paws of both sides exhibited no significant changes in mechanical or thermal sensitivity. No significant behavioral changes were found in the hind and fore paws on either side of the sham rats, except for thermal hypersensitivity, which was present bilaterally at 3 days. Unilateral CCI of the sciatic nerve induced a bilateral increase in IL-6 immunostaining in the neuronal bodies and satellite glial cells (SGC) surrounding neurons of both lumbar and cervical DRG, compared with those of naive control rats. This bilateral increase in IL-6 protein levels was confirmed by ELISA and western blotting. More intense staining for IL-6 mRNA was detected in lumbar and cervical DRG from both sides of rats following CCI. The DRG removed from sham rats displayed a similar pattern of staining for IL-6 protein and mRNA as found in naive DRG, but there was a higher staining intensity in SGC. Conclusions Bilateral elevation of IL-6 protein and mRNA is not limited to DRG homonymous to the injured nerve, but also extended to DRG that are heteronymous to the injured nerve. The

  1. CatWalk gait analysis in assessment of functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, A; Deumens, R; Scheffel, J; O'Dey, D M; Weis, J; Joosten, E A; Führmann, T; Brook, G A; Pallua, N

    2008-08-15

    Following peripheral nerve injury repair, improved behavioural outcome may be the most important evidence of functionality of axon regeneration after any repair strategy. A range of behavioural testing paradigms have been developed for peripheral nerve injury research. Complete injury of the adult rat sciatic nerve is frequently used in combination with walking track analysis. Despite its wide-spread use, these walking track analyses are unsuitable for the simultaneous assessment of both dynamic and static gait parameters. Conversely, a novel automated gait analysis system, i.e. CatWalk can simultaneously measure dynamic as well as static gait parameters and, importantly, it's easy to control for the speed of locomotion which can strongly affect gait parameters. In a previous study, CatWalk was already successfully used to examine deficits in both dynamic and static gait parameters using the sciatic nerve lesion model with a 1cm gap characterized by absence of recovery [Deumens R, Jaken RJ, Marcus MA, Joosten EA. The CatWalk gait analysis in assessment of both dynamic and static gait changes after adult rat sciatic nerve resection. J Neurosci Methods 2007;164:120-30]. Using the sciatic nerve crush injury model (validated with the static sciatic index) and a follow-up period of 12 weeks, we now show that CatWalk can also measure behavioural recovery. In particular dynamic gait parameters, coordination measures, and the intensity of paw prints are of interest in detecting recovery as far as these parameters completely return to pre-operative values after crush injury. We conclude that CatWalk can be used as a complementary approach to other behavioural testing paradigms to assess clinically relevant behavioural benefits, with a main advantage that CatWalk demonstrates both static and dynamic gait parameters at the same time. PMID:18577402

  2. Median Nerve Injury following K-wire Fixation of Bennett’s Fracture—Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sanath K.; Hanna, Amir W.

    2010-01-01

    Bennett's fracture is a relatively common injury. The fracture is unstable due to the displacing forces acting on the distal fragment and very commonly treated by stabilization with Kirschner wires. This would seem a relatively safe procedure, and injury to the median nerve has never been reported. We present this unusual complication following one such procedure with the evaluation of a safe approach utilizing the relevant surgical and radiological anatomy. PMID:22131930

  3. Topography and time course of changes in spinal neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity after spared nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Intondi, A B; Zadina, J E; Zhang, X; Taylor, B K

    2010-02-01

    We used a new computer-assisted method to precisely localize and efficiently quantify increases in neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity (NPY-ir) along the mediolateral axis of the L4 dorsal horn (DH) following transection of either the tibial and common peroneal nerves (thus sparing the sural branch, spared nerve injury (SNI)), the tibial nerve, or the common peroneal and sural nerves. Two weeks after SNI, NPY-ir increased within the tibial and peroneal innervation territories; however, NPY-ir in the central-lateral region (innervated by the spared sural nerve) was indistinguishable from that of sham. Conversely, transection of the sural and common peroneal nerves induced an increase in NPY-ir in the central-lateral region, while leaving the medial region (innervated by the tibial nerve) unaffected. All nerve injuries increased NPY-ir in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and nucleus gracilis (NG). By 24 weeks, both NPY-ir upregulation in the DH and hyper-responsivity to cold and noxious mechanical stimuli had resolved. Conversely, NPY-ir in DRG and NG, and hypersensitivity to non-noxious static mechanical stimuli, did not resolve within 24 weeks. Over this time course, the average cross-sectional area of NPY-immunoreactive DRG neurons increased by 151 mum(2). We conclude that the upregulation of NPY after SNI is restricted to medial zones of the DH, and therefore cannot act directly upon synapses within the more lateral (sural) zones to control sural nerve hypersensitivity. Instead, we suggest that NPY in the medial DH tonically inhibits hypersensitivity by interrupting mechanisms of central sensitization and integration of sensory signals at the spinal and supraspinal levels. PMID:19879928

  4. Supplementary motor area deactivation impacts the recovery of hand function from severe peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ye-chen; Liu, Han-qiu; Hua, Xu-yun; Shen, Yun-dong; Xu, Wen-dong; Xu, Jian-guang; Gu, Yu-dong

    2016-01-01

    Although some patients have successful peripheral nerve regeneration, a poor recovery of hand function often occurs after peripheral nerve injury. It is believed that the capability of brain plasticity is crucial for the recovery of hand function. The supplementary motor area may play a key role in brain remodeling after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, we explored the activation mode of the supplementary motor area during a motor imagery task. We investigated the plasticity of the central nervous system after brachial plexus injury, using the motor imagery task. Results from functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that after brachial plexus injury, the motor imagery task for the affected limbs of the patients triggered no obvious activation of bilateral supplementary motor areas. This result indicates that it is difficult to excite the supplementary motor areas of brachial plexus injury patients during a motor imagery task, thereby impacting brain remodeling. Deactivation of the supplementary motor area is likely to be a serious problem for brachial plexus injury patients in terms of preparing, initiating and executing certain movements, which may be partly responsible for the unsatisfactory clinical recovery of hand function. PMID:27212933

  5. Nerve injury stimulates the secretion of apolipoprotein E by nonneuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Snipes, G.J.; McGuire, C.B.; Norden, J.J.; Freeman, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    Nerve trauma initiates significant changes in the composition of proteins secreted by nonneuronal cells. The most prominent of these proteins is a 37-kDa protein, whose expression correlates with the time course of nerve development, degeneration, and regeneration. The authors report that the 37-kDa protein is apolipoprotein E (apoE). They produced a specific antiserum against the 37-kDa protein isolated from previously crushed nerves. This antiserum recognizes a 36-kDa protein in rat serum that they have purified and identified as apoE. The anti-37-kDa antiserum also recognizes apoE on electrophoretic transfer blots of authentic samples of high and very low density lipoproteins. The nerve 37-kDa protein comigrates with apoE by two-dimensional electrophoresis, shares a similar amino acid composition, and reacts with an antiserum against authentic apoE. The purified apoE specifically blocks the immunoprecipitation of (TVS)methionine-labeled 37-kDa protein synthesized by nonneuronal cells. Thus, on the basis of its molecular mass, isoelectric point, amino acid composition, and immunological properties, they conclude that the 37-kDa protein is apoE. They also used light microscopic immunochemistry to localize apoE following nerve injury. They propose that apoE is synthesized by phagocytic cells in response to nerve injury for the purpose of mobilizing lipids produced as a consequence of axon degeneration.

  6. Role of oxidative stress in surgical cavernous nerve injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ding, Xie-Gang; Li, Shi-Wen; Zheng, Hang; Zheng, Xin-Min; Navin, Shrestha; Li, Lu; Wang, Xing-Huan

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the role of oxidative stress in surgical cavernous nerve (CN) injury in a rat model. Eighty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, sham-operated rats; group 2, bilateral CN-crushed rats; and group 3, bilateral CN-transection-and-sutured-immediately rats. Oxidative stress was evaluated by malondialdehyde levels, super oxide dismutase (SOD) activities, and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities in serum. Erectile function was assessed by CN electrostimulation at 3 months with mean maximal intracavernous pressure (ICP) and maximal ICP per mean arterial pressure. Nerve injury was assessed by toluidine blue staining of CNs and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase staining of penile tissue. GPX protein expression and nitrotyrosine-3 (NT-3) levels in penile tissue were measured. Erectile function and the number of myelinated axons of CNs and NADPH-diaphorase-positive nerve fibers were statistically decreased between groups, from sham to crush to transection. For markers, both nerve-injury groups showed increased oxidative stress markers at early time points, with the transection group showing greater oxidative stress than the crushed group and values normalizing to sham levels by week 12. GPX expression and NT-3 levels in penile tissue were in concordance with the results of SOD and GPX. These results show that oxidative stress plays an important role in injured CNs, and different methods of CN injury can lead to different degrees of oxidative stress in a rat model. PMID:25597854

  7. A case of scrotal pain associated with genitofemoral nerve injury following cystectomy.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tetsuya; Murata, Hiroaki; Hara, Tetsuya

    2016-08-01

    The genitofemoral neuropathy is one of the most common causes of groin pain after surgery. Especially, the groin pain induced by genitofemoral nerve injury during herniorrhaphy is a well-known complication. In contrast, much attention is not paid for groin pain induced by genitofemoral nerve injury after pelvic surgery, and there have been few reports in males, although it has been reported in females. We report a 59-year-old male patient who suffered from scrotal pain caused by presumed genitofemoral nerve injury during radical cystectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy for bladder cancer. The surgical procedure was performed in a supine position under general anesthesia, without epidural anesthesia. Postoperatively, he complained of burning and lancinating pain in bilateral scrotal area. Abnormal findings were not evident using computed tomography and ultrasonography of the pelvis, including the scrotum and testicles. He had severe allodynia of the ventral scrotum and bilateral ventromedial thigh region, with absence of cremasteric reflex. We speculated that his pain might have been surgery-induced genitofemoral neuropathy, which was caused by nerve injury during lymphadenectomy near the external iliac vessels. His scrotal pain and allodynia following the cystectomy were partially and gradually relieved after administering pregabalin, further supporting the contention that his scrotal pain was a surgery-induced neuropathy. PMID:27290965

  8. Cerebellopontine angle mass mimicking lingual nerve injury after dental implant placement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Momota, Y; Kani, K; Takano, H; Azuma, M

    2015-09-01

    This is a rare case report of a cerebellopontine angle (CPA) mass mimicking lingual nerve injury after a dental implant placement. Lingual nerve injury is a common complication following dental implant placement. CPA masses are likely to cause symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia, and thus can mimic and be easily confused with oral diseases. We experienced a case of CPA mass mimicking lingual nerve injury after dental implant placement. The patient was a 57-year-old Japanese female who complained of glossalgia. She underwent dental implant placement in the mandible before visiting our clinic. Panoramic x-ray radiography revealed no abnormalities; the salivary flow rate by gum test was 7.0 ml/10 min. She was diagnosed with lingual nerve injury and secondary burning mouth syndrome. Vitamin B12 and oral moisturizer did not provide relief; furthermore, numbness in the lower lip emerged. A Semmes Weinstein test demonstrated elevation of her sensitivity threshold. Finally, magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 20-mm diameter mass in the CPA. The patient is now being followed under conservative management. Our experience underscores the importance of including CPA mass in the differential diagnosis of dental diseases. PMID:25280059

  9. Large-Scale Functional Reorganization in Adult Monkey Cortex after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garraghty, Preston E.; Kaas, Jon H.

    1991-08-01

    In adult monkeys, peripheral nerve injuries induce dramatic examples of neural plasticity in somatosensory cortex. It has been suggested that a cortical distance limit exists and that the amount of plasticity that is possible after injury is constrained by this limit. We have investigated this possibility by depriving a relatively large expanse of cortex by transecting and ligating both the median and the ulnar nerves to the hand. Electrophysiological recording in cortical areas 3b and 1 in three adult squirrel monkeys no less than 2 months after nerve transection has revealed that cutaneous responsiveness is regained throughout the deprived cortex and that a roughly normal topographic order is reestablished for the reorganized cortex.

  10. In vivo detection of nerve injury in familial amyloid polyneuropathy by magnetic resonance neurography.

    PubMed

    Kollmer, Jennifer; Hund, Ernst; Hornung, Benjamin; Hegenbart, Ute; Schönland, Stefan O; Kimmich, Christoph; Kristen, Arnt V; Purrucker, Jan; Röcken, Christoph; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko

    2015-03-01

    Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy is a rare, autosomal-dominant inherited multisystem disorder usually manifesting with a rapidly progressive, axonal, distally-symmetric polyneuropathy. The detection of nerve injury by nerve conduction studies is limited, due to preferential involvement of small-fibres in early stages. We investigated whether lower limb nerve-injury can be detected, localized and quantified in vivo by high-resolution magnetic resonance neurography. We prospectively included 20 patients (12 male and eight female patients, mean age 47.9 years, range 26-66) with confirmed mutation in the transthyretin gene: 13 with symptomatic polyneuropathy and seven asymptomatic gene carriers. A large age- and sex-matched cohort of healthy volunteers served as controls (20 male and 20 female, mean age 48.1 years, range 30-73). All patients received detailed neurological and electrophysiological examinations and were scored using the Neuropathy Impairment Score-Lower Limbs, Neuropathy Deficit and Neuropathy Symptom Score. Magnetic resonance neurography (3 T) was performed with large longitudinal coverage from proximal thigh to ankle-level and separately for each leg (140 axial slices/leg) by using axial T2-weighted (repetition time/echo time = 5970/55 ms) and dual echo (repetition time 5210 ms, echo times 12 and 73 ms) turbo spin echo 2D sequences with spectral fat saturation. A 3D T2-weighted inversion-recovery sequence (repetition time/echo time 3000/202 ms) was acquired for imaging of the spinal nerves and lumbar plexus (50 axial slice reformations). Precise manual segmentation of the spinal/sciatic/tibial/common peroneal nerves was performed on each slice. Histogram-based normalization of nerve-voxel signal intensities was performed using the age- and sex-matched control group as normative reference. Nerve-voxels were subsequently classified as lesion-voxels if a threshold of >1.2 (normalized signal-intensity) was exceeded. At distal thigh level

  11. The role of spinal serotonin receptor and alpha adrenoceptor on the antiallodynic effects induced by intrathecal milnacipran in chronic constriction injury rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takehiro; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Takeda, Ryuichiro; Igawa, Kaori; Naono-Nakayama, Rumi; Sakoda, Sumio; Nishimori, Toshikazu; Ishida, Yasushi

    2014-09-01

    Milnacipran, a reuptake inhibitor of noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT), elicits an antiallodynic effect in rats with neuropathic pain; however, the role of NA and 5-HT receptors in the induction of the antiallodynic effect of milnacipran remains unclear. Thus, we examined the effects of prazosin as an α1 adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine as an α2 adrenoceptor antagonist, metergoline as a 5-HT1, 5-HT2 and 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, cyanopindolol as a 5-HT1A/1B receptor antagonist, ketanserin as a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, and ondansetoron as a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist on the antiallodynic effect of milnacipran in neuropathic rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI). The CCI rats expressed mechanical and thermal allodynia, which was attenuated by intrathecal injection of milnacipran. Yohimbine, but not prazosin, reversed the milnacipran-induced antiallodynic effect. The antiallodynic effect of milnacipran was also reversed by metergoline, ketanserin and ondansetron, while cyanopindolol reversed the antiallodynic effect on mechanical, but not thermal stimulation. Furthermore, c-Fos expression in lamina I/II of the spinal dorsal horn was enhanced by thermal stimulation and the enhanced expression of c-Fos was suppressed by milnacipran. This effect of milnacipran was reversed by yohimbine, metergoline, katanserin and ondansetron, but not prazosin. These results indicate that the effect of milnacipran on mechanical and thermal allodynia and c-Fos expression is elicited through the α2 adrenoceptor, but not α1 adrenoceptor, and 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors; furthermore, the 5-HT1A/1B receptor is involved in mechanical allodynia, but not thermal allodynia. PMID:24876059

  12. Intrathecal SRT1720, a SIRT1 agonist, exerts anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects on chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Chen; Hu, Hong-Yi; Zhao, Li; Zheng, Hui; Luo, Xian-Zhe; Zhang, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by lesion or inflammation of the nervous system and characterized by the symptoms of allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain. SIRT1 (Sir2) is a NAD-dependent deacetylase and is reported to regulate a wide variety of cellular processes including inflammation, aging and lifespan extension. Nevertheless, the role of SIRT1 in neuropathic pain is not fully understood. The present study was intended to detect the effect of intrathecal SRT1720, a SIRT1 agonist, using quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis over time in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI) or sham surgery. In addition, the effect of intrathecal injection of SRT1720 on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia was evaluated in CCI rats. It was found that daily intrathecal injection of SRT1720 before and 1, 3, 5, 7 days after CCI surgery produced a transient inhibitory effect on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in CCI rats. In addition, an intrathecal injection of STR1-siRNA before SRT1720 administration reversed the anti-nociceptive effect of SRT1720. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of SRT1720 significantly down-regulated the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mROT), NF-κB and inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA. These data indicate that intrathecal SRT1720 may be an alternative strategy for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Our findings suggest that intrathecal SRT1720, a SIRT1 agonist, exerts antihyperalgesic and antiinflammatory effects on CCI-induced neuropathic pain in rats. PMID:26221253

  13. New Treatments for Spinal Nerve Root Avulsion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Carlstedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Further progress in the treatment of the longitudinal spinal cord injury has been made. In an inverted translational study, it has been demonstrated that return of sensory function can be achieved by bypassing the avulsed dorsal root ganglion neurons. Dendritic growth from spinal cord sensory neurons could replace dorsal root ganglion axons and re-establish a reflex arch. Another research avenue has led to the development of adjuvant therapy for regeneration following dorsal root to spinal cord implantation in root avulsion injury. A small, lipophilic molecule that can be given orally acts on the retinoic acid receptor system as an agonist. Upregulation of dorsal root ganglion regenerative ability and organization of glia reaction to injury were demonstrated in treated animals. The dual effect of this substance may open new avenues for the treatment of root avulsion and spinal cord injuries. PMID:27602018

  14. New Treatments for Spinal Nerve Root Avulsion Injury.

    PubMed

    Carlstedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Further progress in the treatment of the longitudinal spinal cord injury has been made. In an inverted translational study, it has been demonstrated that return of sensory function can be achieved by bypassing the avulsed dorsal root ganglion neurons. Dendritic growth from spinal cord sensory neurons could replace dorsal root ganglion axons and re-establish a reflex arch. Another research avenue has led to the development of adjuvant therapy for regeneration following dorsal root to spinal cord implantation in root avulsion injury. A small, lipophilic molecule that can be given orally acts on the retinoic acid receptor system as an agonist. Upregulation of dorsal root ganglion regenerative ability and organization of glia reaction to injury were demonstrated in treated animals. The dual effect of this substance may open new avenues for the treatment of root avulsion and spinal cord injuries. PMID:27602018

  15. Serious axillary nerve injury caused by subscapular artery compression resulting from use of backpacks.

    PubMed

    Haninec, Pavel; Mencl, Libor; Bačinský, Peter; Kaiser, Radek

    2013-12-01

    A palsy of the brachial plexus elements caused by carrying a heavy backpack is a very rare injury usually occurring in soldiers or hikers, and recovery is usually spontaneous. We describe here the case of male civilian presenting with an isolated serious axillary nerve palsy associated with chronic backpack use. During the surgery, a dumbbell-shaped neuroma-in-continuity was found which was caused by direct pressure from the subscapular artery. After resection of the neuroma, a nerve graft from the sural nerve was used to reconstruct the nerve. Reinnervation was successful and the patient was able to abduct his arm to its full range, with full muscle strength, within 24 months. PMID:23696291

  16. Nerve Growth Factor Inhibits Sympathetic Neurons' Response to an Injury Cytokine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadiack, Annette M.; Vaccariello, Stacey A.; Sun, Yi; Zigmond, Richard E.

    1998-06-01

    Axonal damage to adult peripheral neurons causes changes in neuronal gene expression. For example, axotomized sympathetic, sensory, and motor neurons begin to express galanin mRNA and protein, and recent evidence suggests that galanin plays a role in peripheral nerve regeneration. Previous studies in sympathetic and sensory neurons have established that galanin expression is triggered by two consequences of nerve transection: the induction of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and the reduction in the availability of the target-derived factor, nerve growth factor. It is shown in the present study that no stimulation of galanin expression occurs following direct application of LIF to intact neurons in the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion. Injection of animals with an antiserum to nerve growth factor concomitant with the application of LIF, on the other hand, does stimulate galanin expression. The data suggest that the response of neurons to an injury factor, LIF, is affected by whether the neurons still receive trophic signals from their targets.

  17. Allotransplanted Neurons Used to Repair Peripheral Nerve Injury Do Not Elicit Overt Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weimin; Ren, Yi; Bossert, Adam; Wang, Xiaowei; Dayawansa, Samantha; Tong, Jing; He, Xiaoshen; Smith, Douglas H.; Gelbard, Harris A.; Huang, Jason H.

    2012-01-01

    A major problem hindering the development of autograft alternatives for repairing peripheral nerve injuries is immunogenicity. We have previously shown successful regeneration in transected rat sciatic nerves using conduits filled with allogeneic dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells without any immunosuppression. In this study, we re-examined the immunogenicity of our DRG neuron implanted conduits as a potential strategy to overcome transplant rejection. A biodegradable NeuraGen® tube was infused with pure DRG neurons or Schwann cells cultured from a rat strain differing from the host rats and used to repair 8 mm gaps in the sciatic nerve. We observed enhanced regeneration with allogeneic cells compared to empty conduits 16 weeks post-surgery, but morphological analyses suggest recovery comparable to the healthy nerves was not achieved. The degree of regeneration was indistinguishable between DRG and Schwann cell allografts although immunogenicity assessments revealed substantially increased presence of Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in Schwann cell allografts compared to the DRG allografts by two weeks post-surgery. Macrophage infiltration of the regenerated nerve graft in the DRG group 16 weeks post-surgery was below the level of the empty conduit (0.56 fold change from NG; p<0.05) while the Schwann cell group revealed significantly higher counts (1.29 fold change from NG; p<0.001). Major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I) molecules were present in significantly increased levels in the DRG and Schwann cell allograft groups compared to the hollow NG conduit and the Sham healthy nerve. Our results confirmed previous studies that have reported Schwann cells as being immunogenic, likely due to MHC I expression. Nerve gap injuries are difficult to repair; our data suggest that DRG neurons are superior medium to implant inside conduit tubes due to reduced immunogenicity and represent a potential treatment strategy that could be preferable to the current gold standard of

  18. Dexamethasone prevents vascular damage in early-stage non-freezing cold injury of the sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Non-freezing cold injury is a prevalent cause of peripheral nerve damage, but its pathogenic mechanism is poorly understood, and treatment remains inadequate. Glucocorticoids have anti-inflammatory and lipid peroxidation-inhibiting properties. We therefore examined whether dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid compound, would alleviate early-stage non-freezing cold injury of the sciatic nerve. We established Wistar rat models of non-freezing cold injury by exposing the left sciatic nerve to cold (3–5°C) for 2 hours, then administered dexamethasone (3 mg/kg intraperitoneally) to half of the models. One day after injury, the concentration of Evans blue tracer in the injured sciatic nerve of rats that received dexamethasone was notably lower than that in the injured sciatic nerve of rats that did not receive dexamethasone; neither Evans blue dye nor capillary stenosis was observed in the endoneurium, but myelinated nerve fibers were markedly degenerated in the injured sciatic nerve of animals that received dexamethasone. After dexamethasone administration, however, endoneurial vasculopathy was markedly improved, although damage to the myelinated nerve fiber was not alleviated. These findings suggest that dexamethasone protects the blood-nerve barrier, but its benefit in non-freezing cold injury is limited to the vascular system. PMID:26981107

  19. Nanostructured Guidance for Peripheral Nerve Injuries: A Review with a Perspective in the Oral and Maxillofacial Area

    PubMed Central

    Sivolella, Stefano; Brunello, Giulia; Ferrarese, Nadia; Puppa, Alessandro Della; D’Avella, Domenico; Bressan, Eriberto; Zavan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Injury to peripheral nerves can occur as a result of various surgical procedures, including oral and maxillofacial surgery. In the case of nerve transaction, the gold standard treatment is the end-to-end reconnection of the two nerve stumps. When it cannot be performed, the actual strategies consist of the positioning of a nerve graft between the two stumps. Guided nerve regeneration using nano-structured scaffolds is a promising strategy to promote axon regeneration. Biodegradable electrospun conduits composed of aligned nanofibers is a new class of devices used to improve neurite extension and axon outgrowth. Self assembled peptide nanofibrous scaffolds (SAPNSs) demonstrated promising results in animal models for central nervous system injuries, and, more recently, for peripheral nerve injury. Aims of this work are (1) to review electrospun and self-assembled nanofibrous scaffolds use in vitro and in vivo for peripheral nerve regeneration; and (2) its application in peripheral nerve injuries treatment. The review focused on nanofibrous scaffolds with a diameter of less than approximately 250 nm. The conjugation in a nano scale of a natural bioactive factor with a resorbable synthetic or natural material may represent the best compromise providing both biological and mechanical cues for guided nerve regeneration. Injured peripheral nerves, such as trigeminal and facial, may benefit from these treatments. PMID:24562333

  20. Peripheral nerve injury is accompanied by chronic transcriptome-wide changes in the mouse prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve injury can have long-term consequences including pain-related manifestations, such as hypersensitivity to cutaneous stimuli, as well as affective and cognitive disturbances, suggesting the involvement of supraspinal mechanisms. Changes in brain structure and cortical function associated with many chronic pain conditions have been reported in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The PFC is implicated in pain-related co-morbidities such as depression, anxiety and impaired emotional decision-making ability. We recently reported that this region is subject to significant epigenetic reprogramming following peripheral nerve injury, and normalization of pain-related structural, functional and epigenetic abnormalities in the PFC are all associated with effective pain reduction. In this study, we used the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain to test the hypothesis that peripheral nerve injury triggers persistent long-lasting changes in gene expression in the PFC, which alter functional gene networks, thus providing a possible explanation for chronic pain associated behaviors. Results SNI or sham surgery where performed in male CD1 mice at three months of age. Six months after injury, we performed transcriptome-wide sequencing (RNAseq), which revealed 1147 differentially regulated transcripts in the PFC in nerve-injured vs. control mice. Changes in gene expression occurred across a number of functional gene clusters encoding cardinal biological processes as revealed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Significantly altered biological processes included neurological disease, skeletal muscular disorders, behavior, and psychological disorders. Several of the changes detected by RNAseq were validated by RT-QPCR and included transcripts with known roles in chronic pain and/or neuronal plasticity including the NMDA receptor (glutamate receptor, ionotropic, NMDA; grin1), neurite outgrowth (roundabout 3; robo3), gliosis (glial fibrillary acidic protein

  1. Anterior shoulder dislocation with axillary artery and nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Razif, M A Mohamed; Rajasingam, V

    2002-12-01

    We report a rare case of left axillary artery injury associated with anterior dislocation of the left shoulder in a 25 yrs old male as a result of a road traffic accident. The shoulder dislocation was reduced. A left upper limb angiogram showed an obstructed left axillary artery. The obstructed segment was surgically reconstructed with a Dacron graft. Six months post operation in follow up, he was found to have good left shoulder function and no neurovascular deficit. This is an injury that could have been easily missed without a simple clinical examination. PMID:12733178

  2. Expression and regulation of redoxins at nociceptive signaling sites after sciatic nerve injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Valek, Lucie; Kanngießer, Maike; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    Injury of the sciatic nerve results in regulations of pro- and anti-oxidative enzymes at sites of nociceptive signaling including the injured nerve, dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), dorsal horn of the spinal cord, thalamus and somatosensory cortex (Valek et al., 2015) [1]. The present DiB paper shows immunohistochemistry of redoxins including peroxiredoxins (Prdx1–6), glutaredoxins (Glrx1, 2, 3, 5), thioredoxins (Txn1, 2) and thioredoxin reductases (Txnrd1, 2) in the DRGs, spinal cord and sciatic nerve and thalamus in naïve mice and 7 days after Spared sciatic Nerve Injury (SNI) in control mice (Hif1α-flfl) and in mice with a specific deletion of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (SNS-HIF1α−/−) in DRG neurons. The sciatic nerves were immunostained for the respective redoxins and counterstained with hematoxylin. The redoxin immunoreactivity was quantified with ImageJ. For the DRGs and spinal cord the data show the quantitative assessment of the intensity of redoxin immunoreactivity transformed to rainbow pseudocolors. In addition, some redoxin examples of the ipsi and contralateral dorsal and ventral horns of the lumbar spinal cord and some redoxin examples of the thalamus are presented. PMID:26693520

  3. Recovery from rat sciatic nerve injury in vivo through the use of differentiated MDSCs in vitro

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, XIANGYI; ZHANG, LI; SUN, LIANG; ZHANG, DAI; ZHAO, HENGWU; JIA, JUN; WANG, WEI

    2013-01-01

    In this study, muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) whose differentiation into neuron-like cells was induced by ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and Salvia (Salvia miltiorrhiza) in vitro were used to repair rat sciatic nerve injuries in vivo, in order to investigate their multifunctional characteristics as pluripotent stem cells. The sciatic nerve in the right side of the lower limb was exposed under the anesthetized condition of 10% chloral hydrate (0.3 ml/100 g) injection into the abdominal cavity. The tissue which was 0.5 cm above the sciatic nerve bifurcation was broken using a hemostat. After induction, MDSCs were transferred in sodium hyaluronate gel and were placed into the damaged area. An untreated control group was also included in this study. The surgical area was sutured after washing with gentamycin sulfate solution. Sciatic nerve function index (SFI) was calculated, electrophysiological tests were performed and the recovery rate of gastrocnemius muscle wet weight was also calculated. Four weeks post-surgery, the SFI and the recovery rate of gastrocnemius muscle wet weight in the MDSC group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). MDSCs whose differentiation is induced by CNTF and Salvia play an active role in the repair of peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23251266

  4. Activation of the unfolded protein response promotes axonal regeneration after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Oñate, Maritza; Catenaccio, Alejandra; Martínez, Gabriela; Armentano, Donna; Parsons, Geoffrey; Kerr, Bredford; Hetz, Claudio; Court, Felipe A

    2016-01-01

    Although protein-folding stress at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is emerging as a driver of neuronal dysfunction in models of spinal cord injury and neurodegeneration, the contribution of this pathway to peripheral nerve damage remains poorly explored. Here we targeted the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive reaction against ER stress, in mouse models of sciatic nerve injury and found that ablation of the transcription factor XBP1, but not ATF4, significantly delay locomotor recovery. XBP1 deficiency led to decreased macrophage recruitment, a reduction in myelin removal and axonal regeneration. Conversely, overexpression of XBP1s in the nervous system in transgenic mice enhanced locomotor recovery after sciatic nerve crush, associated to an improvement in key pro-regenerative events. To assess the therapeutic potential of UPR manipulation to axonal regeneration, we locally delivered XBP1s or an shRNA targeting this transcription factor to sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia using a gene therapy approach and found an enhancement or reduction of axonal regeneration in vivo, respectively. Our results demonstrate a functional role of specific components of the ER proteostasis network in the cellular changes associated to regeneration and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26906090

  5. Th17 Cell Response in SOD1G93A Mice following Motor Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Allen; Yang, Tao; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A.; Gutierrez, Rafael; Stubbs, Evan B.; McGuire, Susan O.; Sanders, Virginia M.; Jones, Kathryn J.; Foecking, Eileen M.; Xin, Junping

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of ALS has been reported for veterans, varsity athletes, and professional football players. The mechanism underlying the increased risk in these populations has not been identified; however, it has been proposed that motor nerve injury may trigger immune responses which, in turn, can accelerate the progression of ALS. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal immune reactions and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, but the specific immune cells involved have not been clearly defined. To understand how nerve injury and immune responses may contribute to ALS development, we investigated responses of CD4+ T cell after facial motor nerve axotomy (FNA) at a presymptomatic stage in a transgenic mouse model of ALS (B6SJL SOD1G93A). SOD1G93A mice, compared with WT mice, displayed an increase in the basal activation state of CD4+ T cells and higher frequency of Th17 cells, which were further enhanced by FNA. In conclusion, SOD1G93A mice exhibit abnormal CD4+ T cell activation with increased levels of Th17 cells prior to the onset of neurological symptoms. Motor nerve injury exacerbates Th17 cell responses and may contribute to the development of ALS, especially in those who carry genetic susceptibility to this disease. PMID:27194826

  6. TGF-β1 is critical for Wallerian degeneration after rat sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Zhang, P; Li, H; Zhu, Y; Cui, S; Yao, D

    2015-01-22

    Wallerian degeneration (WD) is a process of axonal degeneration distal to the injury site followed by a robust regenerative response. It involves degeneration and regeneration which can be directly induced by nerve injury and activated by transcription factors. Although WD has been studied extensively, the precise mechanisms of transcription factors regulating WD are still elusive. In this study, we reported the effect of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) on WD after rat sciatic nerve injury. The data showed that TGF-β1 may express in injured rat sciatic nerve and cultured Schwann cells (SCs). Knock down of TGF-β1 expressions resulted in the reduction of SC proliferation and apoptosis, up regulation of cytokines and Smad2, 4. Enhanced expression of TGF-β1 could promote SC proliferation and apoptosis, down regulation of cytokines and Smad2, 4. Altered expressions of TGF-β1 may affect Smad and AKT but not c-Jun and extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathways. Our results revealed the role of TGF-β1 on WD and provided the basis for the molecular mechanisms of TGF-β1-regulated nerve degeneration and/or regeneration. PMID:25451291

  7. Spontaneous pain in partial nerve injury models of neuropathy and the role of nociceptive sensory cover.

    PubMed

    Koplovitch, Pini; Minert, Anne; Devor, Marshall

    2012-07-01

    Spontaneous pain is difficult to measure in animals. One proposed biomarker of spontaneous pain is autotomy, a behavior frequently observed in rats with complete hindpaw denervation (the neuroma model of neuropathic pain). A large body of evidence suggests that this behavior reflects spontaneous dysesthesic sensations akin to phantom limb pain or anesthesia dolorosa. After partial paw denervation, such as in the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain, autotomy is rare. Does this mean that spontaneous pain is absent? We denervated hindpaws in two stages: SNI surgery completed 7 or 28 days later by transection of the saphenous and sural nerves (SaSu). Minimal autotomy was evoked by the first stage. But it started rapidly after SaSu surgery rendered the limb numb, much more rapidly than after denervation in a single stage (neuroma model). The acceleration was proportional to the delay between the two surgeries. This "priming" effect of the first surgery indicates that the neural substrate of autotomy, spontaneous neuropathic pain, was not initiated by the onset of numbness, but rather by the first, SNI surgery. But the animal's pain experience was occult. The saphenous and sural nerves provided nociceptive sensory cover for the paw, preventing the behavioral expression of the spontaneous pain in the form of autotomy. The results support prior observations suggesting that partial nerve injury triggers spontaneous pain as well as allodynia, and illustrate the importance of nociceptive sensory cover in the prevention of self-inflicted limb injury. PMID:22548979

  8. Pain Management for Nerve Injury following Dental Implant Surgery at Tokyo Dental College Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Ken-ichi; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    By allowing reconstruction of compromised occlusion, dental implants contribute to an improvement in quality of life (QOL) and diet. Injury to a nerve during such treatment, however, can result in a sudden decline in QOL. And once a nerve has been injured, the chances of a full recovery are slim unless the damage is only slight. If such damage causes neuropathic pain severe enough to prevent sleep, the patient's QOL will deteriorate dramatically. While damage to skin tissue or bone invariably heals over time, damage to nerves does not, indicating the need to avoid such injury while performing implant insertion, for example. This means not relying solely on X-ray images, which can be rather unclear, but also using computed tomography to allow preoperative planning and intraoperative execution to be performed as accurately as possible. Moreover, if sensory damage does occur it is essential to avoid breaking the bond of trust between dentist and patient by giving false assurances of recovery. In such cases, appropriate measures must be taken promptly. This paper describes pain management for nerve injury following dental implant surgery at the Orofacial Pain Center of Tokyo Dental College Suidoubashi Hospital. PMID:22899928

  9. Expression pattern of myostatin in gastrocnemius muscle of rats after sciatic nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Zhang, Donglei; Shao, Chenxin; Liu, Jie; Ding, Fei; Gu, Xiaosong

    2007-05-01

    Myostatin is a strong inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth. The purpose of this study was to investigate myostatin expression profiles during denervation-induced muscle atrophy in order to understand the relationship between myostatin expression and muscle atrophy. We constructed a sciatic nerve crush model, undertook morphometric analyses of rat gastrocnemius muscle to evaluate the degree of muscle atrophy, and utilized a real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis to measure myostatin mRNA and protein expression levels, respectively, in the gastrocnemius at different time-points after nerve injury. Muscle atrophy changed in a parabola-like manner from day 1 to day 28 after nerve injury, with a maximum value at day 14. During this time, myostatin expression changed in the reverse manner, with myostatin mRNA or protein expression gradually increasing from days 1-14, and then gradually declining to day 28, when the normal level was reached. Statistical analyses further provided evidence for a significant negative linear correlation between myostatin expression and muscle atrophy within a 28-day period after nerve injury. Our study thus describes the expression pattern of myostatin in response to a specific type of muscle atrophy and raises the possibility of developing myostatin as a therapeutic target for future clinical applications. PMID:17326119

  10. Activation of the unfolded protein response promotes axonal regeneration after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Oñate, Maritza; Catenaccio, Alejandra; Martínez, Gabriela; Armentano, Donna; Parsons, Geoffrey; Kerr, Bredford; Hetz, Claudio; Court, Felipe A.

    2016-01-01

    Although protein-folding stress at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is emerging as a driver of neuronal dysfunction in models of spinal cord injury and neurodegeneration, the contribution of this pathway to peripheral nerve damage remains poorly explored. Here we targeted the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive reaction against ER stress, in mouse models of sciatic nerve injury and found that ablation of the transcription factor XBP1, but not ATF4, significantly delay locomotor recovery. XBP1 deficiency led to decreased macrophage recruitment, a reduction in myelin removal and axonal regeneration. Conversely, overexpression of XBP1s in the nervous system in transgenic mice enhanced locomotor recovery after sciatic nerve crush, associated to an improvement in key pro-regenerative events. To assess the therapeutic potential of UPR manipulation to axonal regeneration, we locally delivered XBP1s or an shRNA targeting this transcription factor to sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia using a gene therapy approach and found an enhancement or reduction of axonal regeneration in vivo, respectively. Our results demonstrate a functional role of specific components of the ER proteostasis network in the cellular changes associated to regeneration and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26906090

  11. Th17 Cell Response in SOD1(G93A) Mice following Motor Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ni, Allen; Yang, Tao; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A; Gutierrez, Rafael; Stubbs, Evan B; McGuire, Susan O; Sanders, Virginia M; Jones, Kathryn J; Foecking, Eileen M; Xin, Junping

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of ALS has been reported for veterans, varsity athletes, and professional football players. The mechanism underlying the increased risk in these populations has not been identified; however, it has been proposed that motor nerve injury may trigger immune responses which, in turn, can accelerate the progression of ALS. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal immune reactions and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, but the specific immune cells involved have not been clearly defined. To understand how nerve injury and immune responses may contribute to ALS development, we investigated responses of CD4(+) T cell after facial motor nerve axotomy (FNA) at a presymptomatic stage in a transgenic mouse model of ALS (B6SJL SOD1(G93A)). SOD1(G93A) mice, compared with WT mice, displayed an increase in the basal activation state of CD4(+) T cells and higher frequency of Th17 cells, which were further enhanced by FNA. In conclusion, SOD1(G93A) mice exhibit abnormal CD4(+) T cell activation with increased levels of Th17 cells prior to the onset of neurological symptoms. Motor nerve injury exacerbates Th17 cell responses and may contribute to the development of ALS, especially in those who carry genetic susceptibility to this disease. PMID:27194826

  12. Pharmacologic rescue of motor and sensory function by the neuroprotective compound P7C3 following neonatal nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Kemp, S W P; Szynkaruk, M; Stanoulis, K N; Wood, M D; Liu, E H; Willand, M P; Morlock, L; Naidoo, J; Williams, N S; Ready, J M; Mangano, T J; Beggs, S; Salter, M W; Gordon, T; Pieper, A A; Borschel, G H

    2015-01-22

    Nerve injuries cause pain, paralysis and numbness that can lead to major disability, and newborns often sustain nerve injuries during delivery that result in lifelong impairment. Without a pharmacologic agent to enhance functional recovery from these injuries, clinicians rely solely on surgery and rehabilitation to treat patients. Unfortunately, patient outcomes remain poor despite application of the most advanced microsurgical and rehabilitative techniques. We hypothesized that the detrimental effects of traumatic neonatal nerve injury could be mitigated with pharmacologic neuroprotection, and tested whether the novel neuroprotective agent P7C3 would block peripheral neuron cell death and enhance functional recovery in a rat neonatal nerve injury model. Administration of P7C3 after sciatic nerve crush injury doubled motor and sensory neuron survival, and also promoted axon regeneration in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with P7C3 also enhanced behavioral and muscle functional recovery, and reversed pathological mobilization of spinal microglia after injury. Our findings suggest that the P7C3 family of neuroprotective compounds may provide a basis for the development of a new neuroprotective drug to enhance recovery following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25313000

  13. Stereological and somatotopic analysis of the spinal microglial response to peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Simon; Salter, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of glia, and glia-neuronal signalling in enhancing nociceptive transmission has become an area of intense scientific interest. In particular, a role has emerged for activated microglia in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury. Following activation, spinal microglia proliferate and release many substances which are capable of modulating neuronal excitability within the spinal cord. Here, we the investigated the response of spinal microglia to a unilateral spared nerve injury (SNI) in terms of the quantitative increase in cell number and the spatial distribution of the increase. Design-based stereological techniques were combined with iba-1 immunohistochemistry to estimate the total number of microglia in the spinal dorsal horn in naïve and peripheral nerve-injured adult rats. In addition, by mapping the central terminals of hindlimb nerves, the somatotopic distribution of the microglial response was mapped. Following SNI there was a marked increase in the number of spinal microglia: The total number of microglia (mean ± SD) in the dorsal horn sciatic territory of the naïve rat was estimated to be 28,591 ± 2715. Following SNI the number of microglia was 82,034 ± 8828. While the pattern of microglial activation generally followed somatotopic boundaries, with the majority of microglia within the territory occupied by peripherally axotomised primary afferents, some spread was seen into regions occupied by intact, ‘spared’ central projections of the sural nerve. This study provides a reproducible method of assaying spinal microglial dynamics following peripheral nerve injury both quantitatively and spatially. PMID:17267172

  14. Effect of Axon Misdirection on Recovery of Electromyographic Activity and Kinematics after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sabatier, Manning J.; To, Bao Ngoc; Nicolini, Jennifer; English, Arthur W.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, patterns of activity in the soleus (Sol) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles and hindlimb kinematics were evaluated during slope walking in rats after transection and surgical repair either of the entire sciatic nerve (Sci group) or of its two branches separately, the tibial and common fibular nerves (T/CF group). With the latter method, axons from the tibial and common fibular nerves could not reinnervate targets of the other nerve branch after injury, reducing the opportunity for misdirection. Activity in the TA shifted from the swing phase in intact rats to nearly the entire step cycle in both injured groups. Since these changes occur without misdirection of regenerating axons, they are interpreted as centrally generated. Sol activity was changed from reciprocal to that of TA in intact rats to coactivate with TA, but only in the Sci group rats. In the T/CF group rats, Sol activity was not altered from that observed in intact rats. Despite effects of injury that limited foot movements, hindlimb kinematics were conserved during downslope walking in both injury groups and during level walking in the T/CF group. During level walking in the Sci group and during upslope walking in both groups of injured rats, the ability to compensate for the effects of the nerve injury was less effective and resulted in longer limb lengths held at more acute angles throughout the step cycle. Changes in limb movements occur irrespective of axon misdirection and reflect compensatory changes in the outputs of the neural circuits that drive locomotion. PMID:21411964

  15. Androgen induced acceleration of functional recovery after rat sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Brown, Todd J.; Khan, Talat; Jones, Kathryn J.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Testosterone (T) treatment accelerates recovery from facial paralysis after facial nerve crush in hamsters. In this study, we extended those studies to another injury model and asked the following question: Will T treatment accelerate recovery from lower limb paralysis following sciatic nerve crush in the rat? METHODS: Castrated adult male rats received a right side sciatic nerve crush at the level of the sciatic notch, with the left side serving as control. Half the animals received a subcutaneous implant of a propionated form of T (TP), the others were sham-implanted. Weekly testing using the Sciatic Functional Index (SFI), a quantitative measure of locomotion, was done for 7 weeks postoperative (wpo). RESULTS: Between 3 and 5 weeks post-op, the average SFI score of the TP-treated group was higher than controls. This difference was significant at 4 wpo, indicating an accelerated degree of functional recovery. At these timepoints, the differences were attributable to the footprint or paw length and associated with calf muscle reinnervation rather than the toespreading component associated with intrinsic foot muscle rein-nervation. Beyond 5 wpo, there were no differences in the SFI scores. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that, as with facial nerve regeneration in the hamster, testosterone accelerates functional recovery from hind limb paralysis following sciatic nerve injury in the rat. While the responses of spinal motoneurons to injury can differ from those of cranial motoneurons, in this case it appears that they share a similar response to the trophic actions of androgen. This is important in the context of designing therapeutic strategies for dealing with direct trauma to motoneurons resulting from both peripheral and central nervous system trauma, such as spinal cord injury. PMID:12671219

  16. Nitrogen Substituent Polarity Influences Dithiocarbamate-Mediated Lipid Oxidation, Nerve Copper Accumulation, and Myelin Injury

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Holly L.; Viquez, Olga M.; Amarnath, Kalyani; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Zyskowski, Justin; Kassa, Endalkachew N.; Valentine, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates have a wide spectrum of applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine, with new applications being investigated. Past studies have suggested that the neurotoxicity of some dithiocarbamates may result from copper accumulation, protein oxidative damage, and lipid oxidation. The polarity of a dithiocarbamate’s nitrogen substituents influences the lipophilicity of the copper complexes it generates and thus potentially determines its ability to promote copper accumulation within nerve and induce myelin injury. In the current study, a series of dithiocarbamate-copper complexes differing in their lipophilicity were evaluated for their relative abilities to promote lipid peroxidation determined by malondialdehyde levels generated in an ethyl arachidonate oil-in-water emulsion. In a second component of this study, rats were exposed to either N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate or sarcosine dithiocarbamate; both generate dithiocarbamate-copper complexes that are lipid and water soluble, respectively. Following the exposures, brain, tibial nerve, spinal cord and liver tissue copper levels were measured by inductively coupled mass spectroscopy to assess the relative abilities of these two dithiocarbamates to promote copper accumulation. Peripheral nerve injury was evaluated using grip strengths, nerve conduction velocities and morphologic changes at the light microscope level. Additionally, the protein expression levels of glutathione transferase alpha and heme-oxygenase-1 in nerve were determined and the quantity of protein carbonyls measured to assess levels of oxidative stress and injury. The data provide evidence that dithiocarbamate-copper complexes are redox active; and that the ability of dithiocarbamate complexes to promote lipid peroxidation is correlated to the lipophilicity of the complex. Consistent with neurotoxicity requiring the formation of a lipid soluble copper complex, significant increases in copper accumulation, oxidative stress and myelin

  17. [Effects of a vitamin B complex on functional recovery after nerve injury (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, K; Mikuni, N; Sakai, Y

    1978-09-01

    Functional recovery after nerve crushing was investigated in the following manner: Under pentobarbital anesthesia the sciatic nerve of the rat was crushed at the level of the hip (proximal crush) or the thigh (distal crush). The recovery processes after the nerve crushing were followed by measuring distances between the first and fifth digits(DBD.1 approximately 5) and between the second and fourth digits (DBD.2 approximately 4) of the hind paw, and by observing changes in "behavior" scored on a scale of 10 according to the degree of behavioral disorder of the hind paw and leg. Results obtained by these methods showed good reproducibility. The DBD values and the scores for behavior recovered significantly faster after weak nerve crushing than after strong crushing, and after distal rather than after proximal crushing. When a segment of the sciatic nerve was resected, there was no recovery. These results suggest that DBD.1 approximately 5, DBD.2 approximately 4, and the behavior observed in these experiments serve as good indices for evaluating the degree of functional recovery after nerve injury in unanesthetized and unrestrained animals. Effects of a preparation of vitamins B1, B6, and B12 (B complex) on these three parameters and on weights of 9 muscles of the hind leg were also studied. These studies showed that the B complex facilitated functional recovery from nerve injury faster than its components, and that on muscle atrophy the B complex had its most effects on the soleus. It was also shown that B1 and B12 by themselves had significant facilitating effects on the functional recovery. PMID:711031

  18. Different dose-dependent effects of ebselen in -sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ozyigit, Filiz; Kucuk, Aysegul; Akcer, Sezer; Tosun, Murat; Kocak, Fatma Emel; Kocak, Cengiz; Kocak, Ahmet; Metineren, Hasan; Genc, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Ebselen is an organoselenium compound which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the neuroprotective role of ebselen pretreatment in rats with experimental sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups (N = 7 in each group). Before sciatic nerve I/R was induced, ebselen was injected intraperitoneally at doses of 15 and 30 mg/kg. After a 2 h ischemia and a 3 h reperfusion period, sciatic nerve tissues were excised. Tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO), and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) were measured. Sciatic nerve tissues were also examined histopathologically. The 15 mg/kg dose of ebselen reduced sciatic nerve damage and apoptosis (P < 0.01), levels of MDA, NO, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) positive cells (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively), and increased SOD, GPx, and CAT activities (P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively) compared with the I/R group that did not receive ebselen. Conversely, the 30 mg/kg dose of ebselen increased sciatic nerve damage, apoptosis, iNOS positive cells (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, P < 0.001) and MDA and NO levels (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) and decreased SOD, GPx, and CAT activities (P < 0.05) compared with the sham group. The results of this study suggest that ebselen may cause different effects depending on the dose employed. Ebselen may be protective against sciatic nerve I/R injury via antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities at a 15 mg/kg dose, conversely higher doses may cause detrimental effects. PMID:26614850

  19. Reinnervation of the Tibialis Anterior Following Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury: A Confocal Microscopic Study in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Magill, Christina K.; Tong, Alice; Kawamura, David; Hayashi, Ayato; Hunter, Daniel A.; Parsadanian, Alexander; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Myckatyn, Terence M.

    2007-01-01

    Transgenic mice whose axons and Schwann cells express fluorescent chromophores enable new imaging techniques and augment concepts in developmental neurobiology. The utility of these tools in the study of traumatic nerve injury depends on employing nerve models that are amenable to microsurgical manipulation and gauging functional recovery. Motor recovery from sciatic nerve crush injury is studied here by evaluating motor endplates of the tibialis anterior muscle, which is innervated by the deep peroneal branch of the sciatic nerve. Following sciatic nerve crush, the deep surface of the tibialis anterior muscle is examined using whole mount confocal microscopy, and reinnervation is characterized by imaging fluorescent axons or Schwann cells (SCs). One week following sciatic crush injury, 100% of motor endplates are denervated with partial reinnervation at two weeks, hyperinnervation at three and four weeks, and restoration of a 1:1 axon to motor endplate relationship six weeks after injury. Walking track analysis reveals progressive recovery of sciatic nerve function by six weeks. SCs reveal reduced S100 expression within two weeks of denervation, correlating with regression to a more immature phenotype. Reinnervation of SCs restores S100 expression and a fully differentiated phenotype. Following denervation, there is altered morphology of circumscribed terminal Schwann cells demonstrating extensive process formation between adjacent motor endplates. The thin, uniformly innervated tibialis anterior muscle is well suited for studying motor reinnervation following sciatic nerve injury. Confocal microscopy may be performed coincident with other techniques of assessing nerve regeneration and functional recovery. PMID:17628540

  20. Risk of injury to vascular-nerve bundle after calcaneal fracture: comparison among three techniques

    PubMed Central

    Labronici, Pedro José; Reder, Vitor Rodrigues; de Araujo Marins Filho, Guilherme Ferreira; Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos; Fernandes, Hélio Jorge Alvachian; Mercadante, Marcelo Tomanik

    2016-01-01

    Objective To ascertain whether the number of screws or pins placed in the calcaneus might increase the risk of injury when three different techniques for treating calcaneal fractures. Method 126 radiographs of patients who suffered displaced calcaneal fractures were retrospectively analyzed. Three surgical techniques were analyzed on an interobserver basis: 31 radiographs of patients treated using plates that were not specific for the calcaneus, 48 using specific plates and 47 using an external fixator. The risk of injury to the anatomical structures in relation to each Kirschner wire or screw was determined using a graded system in accordance with the Licht classification. The total risk of injury to the anatomical structures through placement of more than one wire/screw was quantified using the additive law of probabilities for the product, for independent events. Results All of the models presented high explanatory power for the risk evaluated, since the coefficient of determination values (R2) were greater than 98.6 for all the models. Therefore, the set of variables studied explained more than 98.6% of the variations in the risks of injury to arteries, veins or nerves and can be classified as excellent models for prevention of injuries. Conclusion The risk of injury to arteries, veins or nerves is not defined by the total number of pins/screws. The region and the number of pins/screws in each region define and determine the best distribution of the risk. PMID:27069891

  1. Dorsal root ganglion transcriptome analysis following peripheral nerve injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaogen; Marie Lutz, Brianna; Miao, Xuerong; Liang, Lingli; Mo, Kai; Chang, Yun-Juan; Du, Peicheng; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Tian, Bin; Kaufman, Andrew G.; Bekker, Alex; Hu, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve injury leads to changes in gene expression in primary sensory neurons of the injured dorsal root ganglia. These changes are believed to be involved in neuropathic pain genesis. Previously, these changes have been identified using gene microarrays or next generation RNA sequencing with poly-A tail selection, but these approaches cannot provide a more thorough analysis of gene expression alterations after nerve injury. Methods The present study chose to eliminate mRNA poly-A tail selection and perform strand-specific next generation RNA sequencing to analyze whole transcriptomes in the injured dorsal root ganglia following spinal nerve ligation. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay was carried out to verify the changes of some differentially expressed RNAs in the injured dorsal root ganglia after spinal nerve ligation. Results Our results showed that more than 50 million (M) paired mapped sequences with strand information were yielded in each group (51.87 M–56.12 M in sham vs. 51.08 M–57.99 M in spinal nerve ligation). Six days after spinal nerve ligation, expression levels of 11,163 out of a total of 27,463 identified genes in the injured dorsal root ganglia significantly changed, of which 52.14% were upregulated and 47.86% downregulated. The largest transcriptional changes were observed in protein-coding genes (91.5%) followed by noncoding RNAs. Within 944 differentially expressed noncoding RNAs, the most significant changes were seen in long interspersed noncoding RNAs followed by antisense RNAs, processed transcripts, and pseudogenes. We observed a notable proportion of reads aligning to intronic regions in both groups (44.0% in sham vs. 49.6% in spinal nerve ligation). Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we confirmed consistent differential expression of selected genes including Kcna2, Oprm1 as well as lncRNAs Gm21781 and 4732491K20Rik following spinal nerve

  2. Traumatic peripheral nerve injuries: epidemiological findings, neuropathic pain and quality of life in 158 patients.

    PubMed

    Ciaramitaro, Palma; Mondelli, Mauro; Logullo, Francesco; Grimaldi, Serena; Battiston, Bruno; Sard, Arman; Scarinzi, Cecilia; Migliaretti, Giuseppe; Faccani, Giuliano; Cocito, Dario

    2010-06-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) epidemiological analysis of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries; (2) assessment of neuropathic pain and quality of life in patients affected by traumatic neuropathies. All consecutive patients with a diagnosis of traumatic neuropathies from four Italian centres were enrolled. Electromyography confirmed clinical level and site diagnosis of peripheral nerve injury. All patients were evaluated by disability scales, pain screening tools, and quality of life tests. 158 consecutive patients for a total of 211 traumatic neuropathies were analysed. The brachial plexus was a frequent site of traumatic injury (36%) and the radial, ulnar, and peroneal were the most commonly involved nerves with 15% of iatrogenic injuries. Seventy-two percent of the traumatic neuropathies were painful. Pain was present in 66% and neuropathic pain in 50% of all patients. Patients had worse quality of life scores than did the healthy Italian population. Moreover, there was a strong correlation between the quality of life and the severity of the pain, particularly neuropathic pain (Short Form-36 [SF-36] p < 0.005; Beck Depression Inventory [BDI] p < 0.0001). Traumatic neuropathies were more frequent in young males after road accidents, mainly in the upper limbs. Severe neuropathic pain and not only disability contributed to worsening the quality of life in patients with traumatic neuropathies. PMID:20626775

  3. Activity dependent therapies modulate the spinal changes that motoneurons suffer after a peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; Torres-Espín, Abel; Navarro, Xavier; Udina, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Injury of a peripheral nerve not only leads to target denervation, but also induces massive stripping of spinal synapses on axotomized motoneurons, with disruption of spinal circuits. Even when regeneration is successful, unspecific reinnervation and the limited reconnection of the spinal circuits impair functional recovery. The aim of this study was to describe the changes that axotomized motoneurons suffer after peripheral nerve injury and how activity-dependent therapies and neurotrophic factors can modulate these events. We observed a marked decrease in glutamatergic synapses, with a maximum peak at two weeks post-axotomy, which was only partially reversed with time. This decrease was accompanied by an increase in gephyrin immunoreactivity and a disintegration of perineuronal nets (PNNs) surrounding the motoneurons. Direct application of neurotrophins at the proximal stump was not able to reverse these effects. In contrast, activity-dependent treatment, in the form of treadmill running, reduced the observed destructuring of perineuronal nets and the loss of glutamatergic synapses two weeks after injury. These changes were proportional to the intensity of the exercise protocol. Blockade of sensory inputs from the homolateral hindlimb also reduced PNN immunoreactivity around intact motoneurons, and in that case treadmill running did not reverse that loss, suggesting that the effects of exercise on motoneuron PNN depend on increased sensory activity. Preservation of motoneuron PNN and reduction of synaptic stripping by exercise could facilitate the maintenance of the spinal circuitry and benefit functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25448160

  4. Cathepsin B-dependent motor neuron death after nerve injury in the adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li; Wu, Zhou; Baba, Masashi; Peters, Christoph; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Cathepsin B (CB), a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in neuron and glia. {yields} CB increased in hypogrossal nucleus neurons after nerve injury in adult mice. {yields} CB-deficiency significantly increased the mean survival ratio of injured neurons. {yields} Thus, CB plays a critical role in axotomy-induced neuronal death in adult mice. -- Abstract: There are significant differences in the rate of neuronal death after peripheral nerve injury between species. The rate of neuronal death of motor neurons after nerve injury in the adult rats is very low, whereas that in adult mice is relatively high. However, the understanding of the mechanism underlying axotomy-induced motor neuron death in adult mice is limited. Cathepsin B (CB), a typical cysteine lysosomal protease, has been implicated in three major morphologically distinct pathways of cell death; apoptosis, necrosis and autophagic cell death. The possible involvement of CB in the neuronal death of hypogrossal nucleus (HGN) neurons after nerve injury in adult mice was thus examined. Quantitative analyses showed the mean survival ratio of HGN neurons in CB-deficient (CB-/-) adult mice after nerve injury was significantly greater than that in the wild-type mice. At the same time, proliferation of microglia in the injured side of the HGN of CB-/- adult mice was markedly reduced compared with that in the wild-type mice. On the injured side of the HGN in the wild-type adult mice, both pro- and mature forms of CB markedly increased in accordance with the increase in the membrane-bound form of LC3 (LC3-II), a marker protein of autophagy. Furthermore, the increase in CB preceded an increase in the expression of Noxa, a major executor for axotomy-induced motor neuron death in the adult mouse. Conversely, expression of neither Noxa or LC3-II was observed in the HGN of adult CB-/- mice after nerve injury. These observations strongly suggest that CB plays a critical role in axotomy

  5. Factors Associated With Periesophageal Vagal Nerve Injury After Pulmonary Vein Antrum Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Shinsuke; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Kusa, Shigeki; Komatsu, Yuki; Ichihara, Noboru; Takagi, Takamitsu; Iwasawa, Jin; Kuroi, Akio; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Hachiya, Hitoshi; Hirao, Kenzo; Iesaka, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    Background Periesophageal vagal nerve injury is recognized as a rare complication in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. We investigated the factors associated with the occurrence of symptomatic periesophageal vagal nerve injury after pulmonary vein antrum isolation. Methods and Results Overall, 535 consecutive patients who underwent sole pulmonary vein antrum isolation were included. Point‐by‐point radiofrequency applications were applied using irrigated‐tip catheters under minimal sedation without esophageal temperature monitoring. In the initial 165 patients, the ablation settings for the posterior left atrium were a maximum energy of 25 to 30 W and a duration of 30 seconds. In the subsequent 370 patients, the power was additionally limited to 20 to 25 W at specific parts of the posterior left atrium where the ablation line transversed the esophagus. Symptomatic gastric hypomotility was found in 13 patients, and all were observed during the initial period (7.9%). No other collateral damage was observed. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the body mass index was the only independent predictor for identifying patients with gastric hypomotility (odds ratio 0.770; 95% confidence interval 0.643 to 0.922; P=0.0045) during the initial period. The prevalence of gastric hypomotility was significantly higher in the initial study period than subsequently (0 of 370, 0%; P<0.0001). All except for 1 patient recovered completely with conservative treatment within 4 months after the procedure. Conclusions Periesophageal vagal nerve injury is more common collateral damage than direct esophageal injury in pulmonary vein antrum isolation procedures. Titrating the radiofrequency energy at specific areas where the ablation line transverses the esophagus and taking account of the body mass index might reduce occurrences not only of direct esophageal damage but also of periesophageal vagal nerve injury in pulmonary vein antrum isolation procedures. PMID:25249299

  6. Developing Extracellular Matrix Technology to Treat Retinal or Optic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    van der Merwe, Yolandi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adult mammalian CNS neurons often degenerate after injury, leading to lost neurologic functions. In the visual system, retinal or optic nerve injury often leads to retinal ganglion cell axon degeneration and irreversible vision loss. CNS axon degeneration is increasingly linked to the innate immune response to injury, which leads to tissue-destructive inflammation and scarring. Extracellular matrix (ECM) technology can reduce inflammation, while increasing functional tissue remodeling, over scarring, in various tissues and organs, including the peripheral nervous system. However, applying ECM technology to CNS injuries has been limited and virtually unstudied in the visual system. Here we discuss advances in deriving fetal CNS-specific ECMs, like fetal porcine brain, retina, and optic nerve, and fetal non-CNS-specific ECMs, like fetal urinary bladder, and the potential for using tissue-specific ECMs to treat retinal or optic nerve injuries in two platforms. The first platform is an ECM hydrogel that can be administered as a retrobulbar, periocular, or even intraocular injection. The second platform is an ECM hydrogel and polymer “biohybrid” sheet that can be readily shaped and wrapped around a nerve. Both platforms can be tuned mechanically and biochemically to deliver factors like neurotrophins, immunotherapeutics, or stem cells. Since clinical CNS therapies often use general anti-inflammatory agents, which can reduce tissue-destructive inflammation but also suppress tissue-reparative immune system functions, tissue-specific, ECM-based devices may fill an important need by providing naturally derived, biocompatible, and highly translatable platforms that can modulate the innate immune response to promote a positive functional outcome. PMID:26478910

  7. Aloperine attenuated neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury via anti-oxidation activity and suppression of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ya-Qiong; Jin, Shao-Ju; Liu, Ning; Li, Yu-Xiang; Zheng, Jie; Ma, Lin; Du, Juan; Zhou, Ru; Zhao, Cheng-Jun; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Aloperine has anti-nociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced CCI. • Aloperine reduces ROS in neuropathic pain mice. • Aloperine down-regulates the expression of NF-κB and its downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines in neuropathic pain mice. - Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether aloperine (ALO) has antinociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury, whether ALO reduces ROS against neuropathic pain, and what are the mechanisms involved in ALO attenuated neuropathic pain. Methods: Mechanical and cold allodynia, thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia and spinal thermal hyperalgesia were estimated by behavior methods such as Von Frey filaments, cold-plate, radiant heat, paw pressure and tail immersion on one day before surgery and days 7, 8, 10, 12 and 14 after surgery, respectively. In addition, T-AOC, GSH-PX, T-AOC and MDA in the spinal cord (L4/5) were measured to evaluate anti-oxidation activity of ALO on neuropathic pain. Expressions of NF-κB and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β) in the spinal cord (L4/5) were analyzed by using Western blot. Results: Administration of ALO (80 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased paw withdrawal threshold, paw pressure, paw withdrawal latencies, tail-curling latencies, T-AOC, GSH-PX and T-SOD concentration, reduced the numbers of paw lifts and MDA concentration compared to CCI group. ALO attenuated CCI induced up-regulation of expressions of NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β at the dose of 80 mg/kg (i.p.). Pregabalin produced similar effects serving as positive control at the dose of 10 mg/kg (i.p.). Conclusion: ALO has antinociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced by CCI. The antinociceptive effects of ALO against neuropathic pain is related to reduction of ROS, via suppression of NF-κB pathway.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of an HSP27-targeted nanoprobe for in vivo photoacoustic imaging of early nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongjiang; Yang, Sihua; Zhou, Ting; Xu, Jiankun; Hu, Jun; Xing, Da

    2016-08-01

    Imaging is routinely used for clinical and diagnostic purposes, but techniques capable of high specificity and resolution for the early detection of nerve injury are still limited. In this study, we found that heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) becomes highly upregulated within 3 to 7 days of nerve injury. Taking advantage of this expression pattern, we conjugated gold nanorods (GNRs) to HSP27-specific antibodies to generate a nanoprobe (GNR-HSP27Abs) that could be targeted to the site of nerve injury and detected by near-infrared photoacoustic imaging. Notably, photoacoustic images acquired 12hours after local administration of GNR-HSP27Abs demonstrated that the nanoprobe can distinguish between injured and uninjured nerves in rats. Taken together, these findings expand the application of nanoprobe-targeted photoacoustic imaging to the detection of injured nerves, and prompt further development of this novel imaging platform for clinical application. PMID:27046663

  9. Iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve: etiology, signs and symptoms, and observations on recovery.

    PubMed

    Hillerup, S

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this prospective, non-randomised, descriptive study is to characterise the neurosensory deficit and associated neurogenic discomfort in 52 patients with iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). All patients were examined and followed up according to a protocol assessing tactile, thermal, and positional perception as well as two-point discrimination and pain. In 48 patients with IAN injuries of differing etiologies who did not undergo surgery, 32 patients with injury associated with third molar surgery exhibited significant spontaneous improvement of sensory function. Recovery improvement of sensory function was insignificant in the patients with other etiologies. In most patients the level of sensory perception was such that microsurgical repair was only occasionally indicated. Four patients had microsurgical repair; the outcome was favourable in three. IAN injuries associated with third molar surgery, other dento-alveolar surgery or implant surgery occur sufficiently often to render prevention a key issue. PMID:18501561

  10. Increase of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and lysosomes in rat DRG neurons and their transportation to the central nerve terminal in dorsal horn after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Jung, J; Uesugi, N; Jeong, N Y; Park, B S; Konishi, H; Kiyama, H

    2016-01-28

    In the spinal dorsal horn (DH), nerve injury activates microglia and induces neuropathic pain. Several studies clarified an involvement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the microglial activation. However, the origin of ATP together with the release mechanism is unclear. Recent in vitro study revealed that an ATP marker, quinacrine, in lysosomes was released from neurite terminal of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to extracellular space via lysosomal exocytosis. Here, we demonstrate a possibility that the lysosomal ingredient including ATP released from DRG neurons by lysosomal-exocytosis is an additional source of the glial activation in DH after nerve injury. After rat L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL), mRNA for transcription factor EB (TFEB), a transcription factor controlling lysosomal activation and exocytosis, was induced in the DRG. Simultaneously both lysosomal protein, LAMP1- and vesicular nuclear transporter (VNUT)-positive vesicles were increased in L5 DRG neurons and ipsilateral DH. The quinacrine staining in DH was increased and co-localized with LAMP1 immunoreactivity after nerve injury. In DH, LAMP1-positive vesicles were also co-localized with a peripheral nerve marker, Isolectin B4 (IB4) lectin. Injection of the adenovirus encoding mCherry-LAMP1 into DRG showed that mCherry-positive lysosomes are transported to the central nerve terminal in DH. These findings suggest that activation of lysosome synthesis including ATP packaging in DRG, the central transportation of the lysosome, and subsequent its exocytosis from the central nerve terminal of DRG neurons in response to nerve injury could be a partial mechanism for activation of microglia in DH. This lysosome-mediated microglia activation mechanism may provide another clue to control nociception and pain. PMID:26601776

  11. Median Nerve Injury Due to High-Pressure Water Jet Injection: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Emre, Ufuk; Unal, Aysun

    2009-08-01

    High-pressure injuries that occur accidentally are potentially destructive injuries that often affect the nondominant hands of young men. A variety of products such as paint, gasoline, grease, fuel oil, cement, thinner and solvents have been reported as destructive agents. High-pressure water jet injection injuries to soft tissues have rarely been reported. In this study, we present the first case of median nerve injury due to high-pressure water jet injection by a water spray gun. PMID:26815059

  12. Interlimb Reflexes Induced by Electrical Stimulation of Cutaneous Nerves after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Jane E.; Godfrey, Sharlene; Thomas, Christine K.

    2016-01-01

    Whether interlimb reflexes emerge only after a severe insult to the human spinal cord is controversial. Here the aim was to examine interlimb reflexes at rest in participants with chronic (>1 year) spinal cord injury (SCI, n = 17) and able-bodied control participants (n = 5). Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by delivering up to 30 trains of stimuli to either the superficial peroneal nerve on the dorsum of the foot or the radial nerve at the wrist (5 pulses, 300 Hz, approximately every 30 s). Participants were instructed to relax the test muscles prior to the delivery of the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded bilaterally in proximal and distal arm and leg muscles. Superficial peroneal nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in ipsilateral and contralateral arm and contralateral leg muscles of SCI and control participants. Radial nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in the ipsilateral leg and contralateral arm muscles of control and SCI participants but only contralateral leg muscles of control participants. Interlimb reflexes evoked by superficial peroneal nerve stimulation were longer in latency and duration, and larger in magnitude in SCI participants. Interlimb reflex properties were similar for both SCI and control groups for radial nerve stimulation. Ascending interlimb reflexes tended to occur with a higher incidence in participants with SCI, while descending interlimb reflexes occurred with a higher incidence in able-bodied participants. However, the overall incidence of interlimb reflexes in SCI and neurologically intact participants was similar which suggests that the neural circuitry underlying these reflexes does not necessarily develop after central nervous system injury. PMID:27049521

  13. Primary repair of crush nerve injuries by means of biological tubulization with muscle-vein-combined grafts.

    PubMed

    Tos, Pierluigi; Battiston, Bruno; Ciclamini, Davide; Geuna, Stefano; Artiaco, Stefano

    2012-07-01

    Despite extensive research and surgical innovation, the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries remains a complex issue, particularly in nonsharp lesions. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcome in a group of 16 patients who underwent, in emergency, a primary repair for crush injury of sensory and mixed nerves of the upper limb with biological tubulization, namely, the muscle-vein-combined graft. The segments involved were sensory digital nerves in eight cases and mixed nerves in another eight cases (four median nerves and four ulnar nerves). The length of nerve defect ranged from 0.5 to 4 cm (mean 1.9 cm). Fifteen of 16 patients showed some degree of functional recovery. Six patients showed diminished light touch (3.61), six had protective sensation (4.31), and three showed loss of protective sensation (4.56) using Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test. All the patients who underwent digital nerve repair had favorable results graded as S4 in one case, S3+ in six cases, and S3 in one case. With respect to mixed nerve repair, we observed two S4, two S3+, two S3, one S2, and one S0 sensory recovery. Less favorable results were observed for motor function with three M4, one M3, two M2, and two M0 recoveries. Altogether, the results of this retrospective study demonstrates that tubulization nerve repair in emergency, in case of short nerve gaps, may restore the continuity of the nerve avoiding secondary nerve grafting. This technique preserves donor nerve and, in case of failure, does not preclude a delayed repair with a nerve graft. PMID:22422438

  14. Pulsed electrical stimulation protects neurons in the dorsal root and anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Bao-an; Zi, Jin-hua; Wu, Li-sheng; Zhang, Cun-hua; Chen, Yun-zhen

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on peripheral nerve injury have focused on repair at the site of injury, but very few have examined the effects of repair strategies on the more proximal neuronal cell bodies. In this study, an approximately 10-mm-long nerve segment from the ischial tuberosity in the rat was transected and its proximal and distal ends were inverted and sutured. The spinal cord was subjected to pulsed electrical stimulation at T10 and L3, at a current of 6.5 mA and a stimulation frequency of 15 Hz, 15 minutes per session, twice a day for 56 days. After pulsed electrical stimulation, the number of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and anterior horn was increased in rats with sciatic nerve injury. The number of myelinated nerve fibers was increased in the sciatic nerve. The ultrastructure of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord was noticeably improved. Conduction velocity of the sciatic nerve was also increased. These results show that pulsed electrical stimulation protects sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia as well as motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury, and that it promotes the regeneration of peripheral nerve fibers. PMID:26692864

  15. Pulsed electrical stimulation protects neurons in the dorsal root and anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Pei, Bao-An; Zi, Jin-Hua; Wu, Li-Sheng; Zhang, Cun-Hua; Chen, Yun-Zhen

    2015-10-01

    Most studies on peripheral nerve injury have focused on repair at the site of injury, but very few have examined the effects of repair strategies on the more proximal neuronal cell bodies. In this study, an approximately 10-mm-long nerve segment from the ischial tuberosity in the rat was transected and its proximal and distal ends were inverted and sutured. The spinal cord was subjected to pulsed electrical stimulation at T10 and L3, at a current of 6.5 mA and a stimulation frequency of 15 Hz, 15 minutes per session, twice a day for 56 days. After pulsed electrical stimulation, the number of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and anterior horn was increased in rats with sciatic nerve injury. The number of myelinated nerve fibers was increased in the sciatic nerve. The ultrastructure of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord was noticeably improved. Conduction velocity of the sciatic nerve was also increased. These results show that pulsed electrical stimulation protects sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia as well as motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury, and that it promotes the regeneration of peripheral nerve fibers. PMID:26692864

  16. The role of neuregulin-1 in the response to nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Fricker, Florence R; Bennett, David LH

    2011-01-01

    Axons and Schwann cells exist in a highly interdependent relationship: damage to one cell type invariably leads to pathophysiological changes in the other. Greater understanding of communication between these cell types will not only give insight into peripheral nerve development, but also the reaction to and recovery from peripheral nerve injury. The type III isoform of neuregulin-1 (NRG1) has emerged as a key signaling factor that is expressed on axons and, through binding to erbB2/3 receptors on Schwann cells, regulates multiple phases of their development. In adulthood, NRG1 is dispensable for the maintenance of the myelin sheath; however, this factor is required for both axon regeneration and remyelination following nerve injury. The outcome of NRG1 signaling depends on interactions with other pathways within Schwann cells such as Notch, integrin and cAMP signaling. In certain circumstances, this signaling pathway may be maladaptive; for instance, direct binding of Mycobacterium leprae onto erbB2 receptors produces excessive activation and can actually promote demyelination. Attempts to modulate this pathway in order to promote nerve repair will therefore need to give consideration to the exact isoform used, as well as how it is processed and the context in which it is presented to the Schwann cell. PMID:22121335

  17. Wallerian degeneration: gaining perspective on inflammatory events after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we first provide a brief historical perspective, discussing how peripheral nerve injury (PNI) may have caused World War I. We then consider the initiation, progression, and resolution of the cellular inflammatory response after PNI, before comparing the PNI inflammatory response with that induced by spinal cord injury (SCI). In contrast with central nervous system (CNS) axons, those in the periphery have the remarkable ability to regenerate after injury. Nevertheless, peripheral nervous system (PNS) axon regrowth is hampered by nerve gaps created by injury. In addition, the growth-supportive milieu of PNS axons is not sustained over time, precluding long-distance regeneration. Therefore, studying PNI could be instructive for both improving PNS regeneration and recovery after CNS injury. In addition to requiring a robust regenerative response from the injured neuron itself, successful axon regeneration is dependent on the coordinated efforts of non-neuronal cells which release extracellular matrix molecules, cytokines, and growth factors that support axon regrowth. The inflammatory response is initiated by axonal disintegration in the distal nerve stump: this causes blood-nerve barrier permeabilization and activates nearby Schwann cells and resident macrophages via receptors sensitive to tissue damage. Denervated Schwann cells respond to injury by shedding myelin, proliferating, phagocytosing debris, and releasing cytokines that recruit blood-borne monocytes/macrophages. Macrophages take over the bulk of phagocytosis within days of PNI, before exiting the nerve by the circulation once remyelination has occurred. The efficacy of the PNS inflammatory response (although transient) stands in stark contrast with that of the CNS, where the response of nearby cells is associated with inhibitory scar formation, quiescence, and degeneration/apoptosis. Rather than efficiently removing debris before resolving the inflammatory response as in other tissues

  18. Regeneration of putative sensory and sympathetic cutaneous nerve endings in the rat foot after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, N; Johansson, O; Hildebrand, C

    1996-01-01

    The present study examines the occurrence of calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P- and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles in glabrous and hairy foot skin from normal and nerve-injured rats. After neurotomy/suture, glabrous skin samples contain few calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P- and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profies. The number of calcitonin gene-related peptide- and substance P-like immunoreacive profiles in the epidermis is significantly subnormal. Hairy skin from these rats does also contain few calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P- and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles. In addition, the presence of epidermal calcitonin gene-related peptide-like imunoreactive profiles in glabrous skin is subnormal on the contralateral side. After nerve crush injury, the occurrence of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like, but not substance P-like, immunoreactive profiles in th epidermis of the glabrous skin is significantly subnormal. The occurrence of tyrosine hylase-like immnunoreactive fibres in relation to the digital artery is also subnormal. The occurrence in hairy skin of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactive, substance P-like immunoreactive and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles is subnormal. In both skin types, the contralateral occurrence of such profiles is subjectively normal. These results show that the occurrence of calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P-, and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles in glabrous and hairy foot skin is clearly subnormal after neurotomy and suture and less abnormal after nerve crush. After neurotomy and suture the contralateral side is also affected. PMID:10970110

  19. Evaluating the effect of polytetrafluoroethylene and extractum cepae-heparin-allantoin gel in peripheral nerve injuries in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kahraman, Ahmet; Kahveci, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripheral nerves can be injured by congenital, mechanical, thermal or chemical causes. Peripheral nerve injuries are increasing in frequency, particularly in countries that are becoming more industrialized. Nerve and extremity injuries result in work loss and high treatment costs, and can lead to separation of patients from their social environment. Failure of nerve repair causes muscle functional losses, sensory losses and painful neuropathies. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of condensed polytetrafluoroethylene (cPTFE) and cPTFE-extractum cepae-heparin-allantoin (cPTFE-EHA) gel compound on nerve and functional recovery, and the prevention of adhesion and scar tissue formation after total peripheral nerve injury repaired by primary suture in a rat model. RESULTS: cPTFE alone and cPTFE-EHA gel was found to provide better functional recovery and nerve regeneration compared with primary repair only. In the macroscopic evaluation, the cPTFE-EHA gel was found to have no negative effect on wound healing and, despite increasing extra-neural scar tissue and adhesions, it had no negative effect on nerve function; in addition, it facilitated functional recovery. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the cPTFE application alone, the application of perineural cPTFE-EHA gel during peripheral nerve surgery appeared to provide better functional recovery without causing any significant changes in epineural and extraneural scar tissue formation. PMID:25821766

  20. Managing iatrogenic trigeminal nerve injury: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Renton, T; Yilmaz, Z

    2012-05-01

    This study describes the management of 216 patients with post-traumatic iatrogenic lingual nerve injuries (LNIs; n=93) and inferior alveolar nerve injuries (IANI; n=123). At initial consultation, 6% IANI and 2% LNI patients had undergone significant resolution requiring no further reviews. Reassurance and counselling was adequate management for 51% IANI and 55% LNI patients. Systemic or topical medication was offered as pain relief to 5% of patients. Additional cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) was offered to 8% of patients. Topical 5% lidocaine patches reduced pain and allodynia in 7% of IANI patients, most often used without any other form of management. A small percentage of IANI patients (4%) received a combination of therapies involving CBT, surgery, medication and 5% lidocaine patches. Exploratory surgery improved symptoms and reduced neuropathic area in 18 LNI and 15 IANI patients resulting in improved quality of life. In conclusion, the authors suggest a more diverse and perhaps holistic strategy for management of patients with iatrogenic trigeminal nerve injuries and recommend pragmatic assessment criteria for measurement of treatment success in these patients. PMID:22326447

  1. Exacerbation of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2E neuropathy following traumatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Villalón, Eric; Dale, Jeffrey M; Jones, Maria; Shen, Hailian; Garcia, Michael L

    2015-11-19

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. CMT disease signs include distal limb neuropathy, abnormal gait, sensory defects, and deafness. We generated a novel line of CMT2E mice expressing hNF-L(E397K), which displayed muscle atrophy of the lower limbs without denervation, proximal reduction in large caliber axons, and decreased nerve conduction velocity. In this study, we challenged wild type, hNF-L and hNF-L(E397K) mice with crush injury to the sciatic nerve. We analyzed functional recovery by measuring toe spread and analyzed gait using the Catwalk system. hNF-L(E397K) mice demonstrated reduced recovery from nerve injury consistent with increased susceptibility to neuropathy observed in CMT patients. In addition, hNF-L(E397K) developed a permanent reduction in their ability to weight bear, increased mechanical allodynia, and premature gait shift in the injured limb, which led to increasingly disrupted interlimb coordination in hNF-L(E397K). Exacerbation of neuropathy after injury and identification of gait alterations in combination with previously described pathology suggests that hNF-L(E397K) mice recapitulate many of clinical signs associated with CMT2. Therefore, hNF-L(E397K) mice provide a model for determining the efficacy of novel therapies. PMID:26423936

  2. Transforming growth factor-β3 promotes facial nerve injury repair in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YANMEI; ZHAO, XINXIANG; HUOJIA, MUHTER; XU, HUI; ZHUANG, YOUMEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 on the regeneration of facial nerves in rabbits. A total of 20 adult rabbits were randomly divided into three equal groups: Normal control (n=10), surgical control (n=10) and TGF-β3 treatment (n=10). The total number and diameter of the regenerated nerve fibers was significantly increased in the TGF-β3 treatment group, as compared with in the surgical control group (P<0.01). Furthermore, in the TGF-β3 treatment group, the epineurial repair of the facial nerves was intact and the nerve fibers, which were arranged in neat rows, were morphologically intact with visible myelin swelling. However, in the surgical control group, the epineurial repair was incomplete, as demonstrated by: Atrophic nerve fibers, partially disappeared axons and myelin of uneven thickness with fuzzy borders. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the regenerated fibers in the TGF-β3 treatment group were predominantly myelinated, with clear-layered myelin sheath structures and axoplasms rich in organelles. Although typical layered myelin sheath structures were observed in the surgical control group, the myelin sheaths of the myelinated nerve fibers were poorly developed and few organelles were detected in the axoplasms. Neuro-electrophysiological examination demonstrated that, as compared with the surgical control group, the latency period of the action potentials in the TGF-β3 treatment group were shorter, whereas the stimulus amplitudes of the action potentials were significantly increased (P<0.01). The results of the present study suggest that TGF-β3 may improve the regeneration of facial nerves following trauma or injury. PMID:26997982

  3. N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate produces copper accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and myelin injury in rat peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, Elizabeth G; Valentine, Holly L; Milatovic, Dejan M; Valentine, William M

    2004-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of the dithiocarbamate, disulfiram, to produce a peripheral neuropathy in humans and experimental animals and have also provided evidence that N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDC) is a proximate toxic species of disulfiram. The ability of DEDC to elevate copper levels in the brain suggests that it may also elevate levels of copper in peripheral nerve, possibly leading to oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation from redox cycling of copper. The study presented here investigates the potential of DEDC to promote copper accumulation and lipid peroxidation in peripheral nerve. Rats were administered either DEDC or deionized water by ip osmotic pumps and fed a normal diet or diet containing elevated copper, and the levels of metals, isoprostanes, and the severity of lesions in peripheral nerve and brain were assessed by ICP-AES/AAS, GC/MS, and light microscopy, respectively. Copper was the only metal that demonstrated any significant compound-related elevations relative to controls, and total copper was increased in both brain and peripheral nerve in animals administered DEDC on both diets. In contrast, lesions and elevated F2-isoprostanes were significantly increased only in peripheral nerve for the rats administered DEDC on both diets. Autometallography staining of peripheral nerve was consistent with increased metal content along the myelin sheath, but in brain, focal densities were observed, and a periportal distribution occurred in liver. These data are consistent with the peripheral nervous system being more sensitive to DEDC-mediated demyelination and demonstrate the ability of DEDC to elevate copper levels in peripheral nerve. Additionally lipid peroxidation appears to either be a contributing event in the development of demyelination, possibly through an increase of redox active copper, or a consequence of the myelin injury. PMID:15187237

  4. An approach to identify microRNAs involved in neuropathic pain following a peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Norcini, Monica; Sideris, Alexandra; Martin Hernandez, Lourdes A.; Zhang, Jin; Blanck, Thomas J. J.; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury alters the expression of hundreds of proteins in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Targeting some of these proteins has led to successful treatments for acute pain, but not for sustained post-operative neuropathic pain. The latter may require targeting multiple proteins. Since a single microRNA (miR) can affect the expression of multiple proteins, here, we describe an approach to identify chronic neuropathic pain-relevant miRs. We used two variants of the spared nerve injury (SNI): Sural-SNI and Tibial-SNI and found distinct pain phenotypes between the two. Both models induced strong mechanical allodynia, but only Sural-SNI rats maintained strong mechanical and cold allodynia, as previously reported. In contrast, we found that Tibial-SNI rats recovered from mechanical allodynia and never developed cold allodynia. Since both models involve nerve injury, we increased the probability of identifying differentially regulated miRs that correlated with the quality and magnitude of neuropathic pain and decreased the probability of detecting miRs that are solely involved in neuronal regeneration. We found seven such miRs in L3-L5 DRG. The expression of these miRs increased in Tibial-SNI. These miRs displayed a lower level of expression in Sural-SNI, with four having levels lower than those in sham animals. Bioinformatic analysis of how these miRs could affect the expression of some ion channels supports the view that, following a peripheral nerve injury, the increase of the seven miRs may contribute to the recovery from neuropathic pain while the decrease of four of them may contribute to the development of chronic neuropathic pain. The approach used resulted in the identification of a small number of potentially neuropathic pain relevant miRs. Additional studies are required to investigate whether manipulating the expression of the identified miRs in primary sensory neurons can prevent or ameliorate chronic neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve

  5. Vagal nerve stimulation blocks peritoneal macrophage inflammatory responsiveness after severe burn injury.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Nicole E; Krzyzaniak, Michael; Costantini, Todd W; De Maio, Antonio; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P; Coimbra, Raul

    2012-08-01

    Large surface area burn injuries lead to activation of the innate immune system, which can be blocked by parasympathetic inputs mediated by the vagus nerve. We hypothesized that vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) would alter the inflammatory response of peritoneal macrophages after severe burn injury. Male BALB/c mice underwent right cervical VNS before 30% total body surface area steam burn and were compared with animals subjected to burn alone. Peritoneal macrophages were harvested at several time points following injury and exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in culture conditions. The inflammatory response of peritoneal macrophages was measured by analyzing changes in nuclear factor κB p65 phosphorylation using flow cytometry. We found that peritoneal macrophages isolated from mice subjected to burn injury were hyperresponsive to LPS challenge, suggesting burn-induced macrophage activation. We identified a protective role for VNS in blocking peritoneal macrophage activation. Analysis of the phosphorylation state of nuclear factor κB pathway mediator, p65 Rel A, revealed a VNS-mediated reduction in p65 phosphorylation levels after exposure to LPS compared with burn alone. In combination, these studies suggest VNS mediates the inflammatory response in peritoneal macrophages by affecting the set point of LPS responsiveness. PMID:22683732

  6. Nerve injury induces a new profile of tactile and mechanical nociceptor input from undamaged peripheral afferents

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Silvia; Aschenbrenner, Carol A.; Houle, Timothy T.; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Ririe, Douglas G.; Eisenach, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain after nerve injury is often accompanied by hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli, yet whether this reflects altered input, altered processing, or both remains unclear. Spinal nerve ligation or transection results in hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli in skin innervated by adjacent dorsal root ganglia, but no previous study has quantified the changes in receptive field properties of these neurons in vivo. To address this, we recorded intracellularly from L4 dorsal root ganglion neurons of anesthetized young adult rats, 1 wk after L5 partial spinal nerve ligation (pSNL) or sham surgery. One week after pSNL, hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold in awake, freely behaving animals was decreased in the L4 distribution on the nerve-injured side compared with sham controls. Electrophysiology revealed that high-threshold mechanoreceptive cells of A-fiber conduction velocity in L4 were sensitized, with a seven-fold reduction in mechanical threshold, a seven-fold increase in receptive field area, and doubling of maximum instantaneous frequency in response to peripheral stimuli, accompanied by reductions in after-hyperpolarization amplitude and duration. Only a reduction in mechanical threshold (minimum von Frey hair producing neuronal activity) was observed in C-fiber conduction velocity high-threshold mechanoreceptive cells. In contrast, low-threshold mechanoreceptive cells were desensitized, with a 13-fold increase in mechanical threshold, a 60% reduction in receptive field area, and a 40% reduction in instantaneous frequency to stimulation. No spontaneous activity was observed in L4 ganglia, and the likelihood of recording from neurons without a mechanical receptive field was increased after pSNL. These data suggest massively altered input from undamaged sensory afferents innervating areas of hypersensitivity after nerve injury, with reduced tactile and increased nociceptive afferent response. These findings differ importantly from previous preclinical

  7. Peripheral Nerve Grafts after Cervical Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Cats

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Marie-Pascale; Hanna, Amgad; Lemay, Michel A.; Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Santi, Lauren; Miller, Kassi; Monaghan, Rebecca; Houlé, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral nerve grafts (PNG) into the rat spinal cord support axon regeneration after acute or chronic injury, with synaptic reconnection across the lesion site and some level of behavioral recovery. Here, we grafted a peripheral nerve into the injured spinal cord of cats as a preclinical treatment approach to promote regeneration for eventual translational use. Adult female cats received a partial hemisection lesion at the cervical level (C7) and immediate apposition of an autologous tibial nerve segment to the lesion site. Five weeks later, a dorsal quadrant lesion was performed caudally (T1), the lesion site treated with Chondroitinase ABC two days later to digest growth inhibiting extracellular matrix molecules, and the distal end of the PNG apposed to the injury site. After 4–20 weeks, the grafts survived in 10/12 animals with several thousand myelinated axons present in each graft. The distal end of 9/10 grafts was well apposed to the spinal cord and numerous axons extended beyond the lesion site. Intraspinal stimulation evoked compound action potentials in the graft with an appropriate latency illustrating normal axonal conduction of the regenerated axons. Although stimulation of the PNG failed to elicit responses in the spinal cord distal to the lesion site, the presence of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons close to the distal apposition site indicates that regenerated axons formed functional synapses with host neurons. This study demonstrates the successful application of a nerve grafting approach to promote regeneration after spinal cord injury in a non-rodent, large animal model. PMID:20599980

  8. Contralateral Metabolic Activation Related to Plastic Changes in the Spinal Cord after Peripheral Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Won, Ran; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported the crossed-withdrawal reflex in which the rats with nerve injury developed behavioral pain responses of the injured paw to stimuli applied to the contralateral uninjured paw. This reflex indicates that contralateral plastic changes may occur in the spinal cord after unilateral nerve injury. The present study was performed to elucidate the mechanisms and morphological correlates underlying the crossed-withdrawal reflex by using quantitative 14C-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) autoradiography which can examine metabolic activities and spatial patterns simultaneously. Under pentobarbital anesthesia, rats were subjected to unilateral nerve injury. Mechanical allodynia was tested for two weeks after nerve injury. After nerve injury, neuropathic pain behaviors developed progressively. The crossed-withdrawal reflex was observed at two weeks postoperatively. Contralateral enhancement of 2-DG uptake in the ventral horn of the spinal cord to electrical stimulation of the uninjured paw was observed. These results suggest that the facilitation of information processing from the uninjured side to the injured side may contribute to the crossed-withdrawal reflex by plastic changes in the spinal cord of nerve-injured rats. PMID:26491570

  9. Possible involvement of convergent nociceptive input to medullary dorsal horn neurons in intraoral hyperalgesia following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Terayama, Ryuji; Tsuchiya, Hiroki; Omura, Shinji; Maruhama, Kotaro; Mizutani, Masahide; Iida, Seiji; Sugimoto, Tomosada

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the number of c-Fos protein-like immunoreactive (c-Fos-IR) neurons in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH) evoked by noxious stimulation was increased after peripheral nerve injury, and such increase has been proposed to reflect the development of neuropathic pain state. The aim of this study was to examine the MDH for convergent collateral primary afferent input to second order neurons deafferented by peripheral nerve injury, and to explore a possibility of its contribution to the c-Fos hyperinducibility. Double immunofluorescence labeling for c-Fos and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) was performed to detect convergent synaptic input. c-Fos expression and the phosphorylation of ERK were induced by the intraoral application of capsaicin and by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), respectively. The number of c-Fos-IR neurons in the MDH induced by the intraoral application of capsaicin was increased after IAN injury, whereas the number of p-ERK immunoreactive neurons remained unchanged. The number of double-labeled neurons, that presumably received convergent primary afferent input from the lingual nerve and the IAN, was significantly increased after IAN injury. These results indicated that convergent primary nociceptive input through neighboring intact nerves may contribute to the c-Fos hyperinducibility in the MDH and the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain following trigeminal nerve injury. PMID:25407627

  10. Contralateral Metabolic Activation Related to Plastic Changes in the Spinal Cord after Peripheral Nerve Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Won, Ran; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported the crossed-withdrawal reflex in which the rats with nerve injury developed behavioral pain responses of the injured paw to stimuli applied to the contralateral uninjured paw. This reflex indicates that contralateral plastic changes may occur in the spinal cord after unilateral nerve injury. The present study was performed to elucidate the mechanisms and morphological correlates underlying the crossed-withdrawal reflex by using quantitative (14)C-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) autoradiography which can examine metabolic activities and spatial patterns simultaneously. Under pentobarbital anesthesia, rats were subjected to unilateral nerve injury. Mechanical allodynia was tested for two weeks after nerve injury. After nerve injury, neuropathic pain behaviors developed progressively. The crossed-withdrawal reflex was observed at two weeks postoperatively. Contralateral enhancement of 2-DG uptake in the ventral horn of the spinal cord to electrical stimulation of the uninjured paw was observed. These results suggest that the facilitation of information processing from the uninjured side to the injured side may contribute to the crossed-withdrawal reflex by plastic changes in the spinal cord of nerve-injured rats. PMID:26491570

  11. [Monitoring of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury using an electromyographic endotracheal tube in thyroid and parathyroid surgery. Anesthetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Martín Jaramago, J; Tamarit Conejeros, M; Escudero Torrella, M; Solaz Roldán, C

    2013-12-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury remains one of the main complications in thyroid and parathyroid surgery. When this injury is bilateral, an acute upper airway obstruction may occur, leading to a potentially life-threatening situation for the patient. The visual identification of the nerve during surgery is the best way to preserve its integrity. However identification of the nerves by means of electromyographic stimuli through electrodes attached to endotracheal tubes could help in decreasing nerve injury. In these cases the experience and role of the anesthetist is essential to correctly place the electromyographic endotracheal tube and ensure that the electrodes are in touch with the vocal cords during the surgery. Moreover, the results of the electromyography can be affected by the neuromuscular blocking agents. Therefore, the choice and dose must be adapted, in order to ensure a suitable anesthetic depth, and adequate response. PMID:23886448

  12. Enhanced synthesis and secretion of apolipoprotein E from sciatic nerves of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats after injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, S.; Yamada, N.; Oka, Y.; Shimano, H.; Mori, N.; Yoon, T.H.; Shimada, M.; Kanazawa, Y.; Akanuma, Y.; Murase, T.

    1988-08-30

    To elucidate the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy, synthesis and secretion of apolipoprotein E (apo E) from sciatic nerves after injury was studied in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Seven, 14, 28, 45 and 59 days after making crush injury on sciatic nerves with concomitant administration of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body weight), the nerves were taken out and incubated with (/sup 35/S)methionine. The (/sup 35/S)labeled apo E was precipitated with specific antiserum. The amounts of apo E secreted into medium by nerves of diabetic rats were 7 times greater than those of non-diabetic rats 7 days after injury. This enhanced secretion of apo E was relatively selective for this protein, since the ratio of the immunoprecipitable apo E to the TCA preciptitable protein in the medium increased in diabetic rats. Intriguing possibility deduced from these results is that the secretion of apo E is involved in the development of diabetic neuropathy.

  13. Vatalanib decrease the positive interaction of VEGF receptor-2 and P2X2/3 receptor in chronic constriction injury rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuangmei; Xu, Changshui; Li, Guilin; Liu, Han; Xie, Jinyan; Tu, Guihua; Peng, Haiying; Qiu, Shuyi; Liang, Shangdong

    2012-05-01

    Neuropathic pain can arise from a lesion affecting the peripheral nervous system. Selective P2X(3) and P2X(2/3) receptors' antagonists effectively reduce neuropathic pain. VEGF inhibitors are effective for pain relief. The present study investigated the effects of Vatalanib (VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) inhibitor) on the neuropathic pain to address the interaction of VEGFR-2 and P2X(2/3) receptor in dorsal root ganglia of chronic constriction injury (CCI) rats. Neuropathic pain symptoms following CCI are similar to most peripheral lesions as assessed by the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham group, CCI group and CCI rats treated with Vatalanib group. Mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were measured. Co-expression of VEGFR-2 and P2X(2) or P2X(3) in L4-6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was detected by double-label immunofluorescence. The modulation effect of VEGF on P2X(2/3) receptor agonist-activated currents in freshly isolated DRG neurons of rats both of sham and CCI rats was recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL) in CCI group were lower than those in sham group (p<0.05). MWT and TWL in CCI rats treated with Vatalanib group were increased compared with those in CCI group (p<0.05). VEGFR-2 and P2X(2) or P2X(3) receptors were co-expressed in the cytoplasm and surface membranes of DRG. The co-expression of VEGFR-2 and P2X(2) or P2X(3) receptor in CCI group exhibited more intense staining than those in sham group and CCI rats treated with Vatalanib group, respectively. VEGF enhanced the amplitude of ATP and α,β-meATP -activated currents of both sham and CCI rats. Increment effects of VEGF on ATP and α,β-meATP -activated currents in CCI rats were higher than those in sham rats. Both ATP (100 μM) and α,β-meATP (10 μM)- activated currents enhanced by VEGF ( 1nM) were significantly blocked by Vatalanib (1

  14. Calpain 3 Expression Pattern during Gastrocnemius Muscle Atrophy and Regeneration Following Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ronghua; Yan, Yingying; Yao, Jian; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Jianmei; Liu, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Calpain 3 (CAPN3), also known as p94, is a skeletal muscle-specific member of the calpain family that is involved in muscular dystrophy; however, the roles of CAPN3 in muscular atrophy and regeneration are yet to be understood. In the present study, we attempted to explain the effect of CAPN3 in muscle atrophy by evaluating CAPN3 expression in rat gastrocnemius muscle following reversible sciatic nerve injury. After nerve injury, the wet weight ratio and cross sectional area (CSA) of gastrocnemius muscle were decreased gradually from 1–14 days and then recovery from 14–28 days. The active form of CAPN3 (~62 kDa) protein decreased slightly on day 3 and then increased from day 7 to 14 before a decrease from day 14 to 28. The result of linear correlation analysis showed that expression of the active CAPN3 protein level was negatively correlated with muscle wet weight ratio. CAPN3 knockdown by short interfering RNA (siRNA) injection improved muscle recovery on days 7 and 14 after injury as compared to that observed with control siRNA treatment. Depletion of CAPN3 gene expression could promote myoblast differentiation in L6 cells. Based on these findings, we conclude that the expression pattern of the active CAPN3 protein is linked to muscle atrophy and regeneration following denervation: its upregulation during early stages may promote satellite cell renewal by inhibiting differentiation, whereas in later stages, CAPN3 expression may be downregulated to stimulate myogenic differentiation and enhance recovery. These results provide a novel mechanistic insight into the role of CAPN3 protein in muscle regeneration after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26569227

  15. Redistribution of Kv2.1 ion channels on spinal motoneurons following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Romer, Shannon H; Dominguez, Kathleen M; Gelpi, Marc W; Deardorff, Adam S; Tracy, Robert C; Fyffe, Robert E W

    2014-02-14

    Pathophysiological responses to peripheral nerve injury include alterations in the activity, intrinsic membrane properties and excitability of spinal neurons. The intrinsic excitability of α-motoneurons is controlled in part by the expression, regulation, and distribution of membrane-bound ion channels. Ion channels, such as Kv2.1 and SK, which underlie delayed rectifier potassium currents and afterhyperpolarization respectively, are localized in high-density clusters at specific postsynaptic sites (Deardorff et al., 2013; Muennich and Fyffe, 2004). Previous work has indicated that Kv2.1 channel clustering and kinetics are regulated by a variety of stimuli including ischemia, hypoxia, neuromodulator action and increased activity. Regulation occurs via channel dephosphorylation leading to both declustering and alterations in channel kinetics, thus normalizing activity (Misonou et al., 2004; Misonou et al., 2005; Misonou et al., 2008; Mohapatra et al., 2009; Park et al., 2006). Here we demonstrate using immunohistochemistry that peripheral nerve injury is also sufficient to alter the surface distribution of Kv2.1 channels on motoneurons. The dynamic changes in channel localization include a rapid progressive decline in cluster size, beginning immediately after axotomy, and reaching maximum within one week. With reinnervation, the organization and size of Kv2.1 clusters do not fully recover. However, in the absence of reinnervation Kv2.1 cluster sizes fully recover. Moreover, unilateral peripheral nerve injury evokes parallel, but smaller effects bilaterally. These results suggest that homeostatic regulation of motoneuron Kv2.1 membrane distribution after axon injury is largely independent of axon reinnervation. PMID:24355600

  16. Short-term peripheral nerve stimulation ameliorates axonal dysfunction after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Kiernan, Matthew C.; Macefield, Vaughan G.; Lee, Bonne B.; Lin, Cindy S.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that peripheral motor axons deteriorate following spinal cord injury (SCI). Secondary axonal dysfunction can exacerbate muscle atrophy, contribute to peripheral neuropathies and neuropathic pain, and lead to further functional impairment. In an attempt to ameliorate the adverse downstream effects that developed following SCI, we investigated the effects of a short-term peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) program on motor axonal excitability in 22 SCI patients. Axonal excitability studies were undertaken in the median and common peroneal nerves (CPN) bilaterally before and after a 6-wk unilateral PNS program. PNS was delivered percutaneously over the median nerve at the wrist and CPN around the fibular head, and the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) from the abductor pollicis brevis and tibialis anterior was recorded. Stimulus intensity was above motor threshold, and pulses (450 μs) were delivered at 100 Hz with a 2-s on/off cycle for 30 min 5 days/wk. SCI patients had consistently high thresholds with a reduced CMAP consistent with axonal loss; in some patients the peripheral nerves were completely inexcitable. Nerve excitability studies revealed profound changes in membrane potential, with a “fanned-in” appearance in threshold electrotonus, consistent with membrane depolarization, and significantly reduced superexcitability during the recovery cycle. These membrane dysfunctions were ameliorated after 6 wk of PNS, which produced a significant hyperpolarizing effect. The contralateral, nonstimulated nerves remained depolarized. Short-term PNS reversed axonal dysfunction following SCI, may provide an opportunity to prevent chronic changes in axonal and muscular function, and may improve rehabilitation outcomes. PMID:25787956

  17. Short-term peripheral nerve stimulation ameliorates axonal dysfunction after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael; Kiernan, Matthew C; Macefield, Vaughan G; Lee, Bonne B; Lin, Cindy S-Y

    2015-05-01

    There is accumulating evidence that peripheral motor axons deteriorate following spinal cord injury (SCI). Secondary axonal dysfunction can exacerbate muscle atrophy, contribute to peripheral neuropathies and neuropathic pain, and lead to further functional impairment. In an attempt to ameliorate the adverse downstream effects that developed following SCI, we investigated the effects of a short-term peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) program on motor axonal excitability in 22 SCI patients. Axonal excitability studies were undertaken in the median and common peroneal nerves (CPN) bilaterally before and after a 6-wk unilateral PNS program. PNS was delivered percutaneously over the median nerve at the wrist and CPN around the fibular head, and the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) from the abductor pollicis brevis and tibialis anterior was recorded. Stimulus intensity was above motor threshold, and pulses (450 μs) were delivered at 100 Hz with a 2-s on/off cycle for 30 min 5 days/wk. SCI patients had consistently high thresholds with a reduced CMAP consistent with axonal loss; in some patients the peripheral nerves were completely inexcitable. Nerve excitability studies revealed profound changes in membrane potential, with a "fanned-in" appearance in threshold electrotonus, consistent with membrane depolarization, and significantly reduced superexcitability during the recovery cycle. These membrane dysfunctions were ameliorated after 6 wk of PNS, which produced a significant hyperpolarizing effect. The contralateral, nonstimulated nerves remained depolarized. Short-term PNS reversed axonal dysfunction following SCI, may provide an opportunity to prevent chronic changes in axonal and muscular function, and may improve rehabilitation outcomes. PMID:25787956

  18. Rapid loss of motor nerve terminals following hypoxia–reperfusion injury occurs via mechanisms distinct from classic Wallerian degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Becki; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Parson, Simon H

    2008-01-01

    Motor nerve terminals are known to be vulnerable to a wide range of pathological stimuli. To further characterize this vulnerability, we have developed a novel model system to examine the response of mouse motor nerve terminals in ex vivo nerve/muscle preparations to 2 h hypoxia followed by 2 h reperfusion. This insult induced a rapid loss of neurofilament and synaptic vesicle protein immunoreactivity at pre-synaptic motor nerve terminals but did not appear to affect post-synaptic endplates or muscle fibres. The severity of nerve terminal loss was dependent on the age of the mouse and muscle type: in 8–12-week-old mice the predominantly fast-twitch lumbrical muscles showed an 82.5% loss, whereas the predominantly slow-twitch muscles transversus abdominis and triangularis sterni showed a 57.8% and 27.2% loss, respectively. This was contrasted with a > 97% loss in the predominantly slow-twitch muscles from 5–6-week-old mice. We have also demonstrated that nerve terminal loss occurs by a mechanism distinct from Wallerian degeneration, as the slow Wallerian degeneration (Wlds) gene did not modify the extent of nerve terminal pathology. Together, these data show that our new model of hypoxia–reperfusion injury is robust and repeatable, that it induces rapid, quantitative changes in motor nerve terminals and that it can be used to further examine the mechanisms regulating nerve terminal vulnerability in response to hypoxia–reperfusion injury. PMID:18510509

  19. Vagus Nerve Stimulation to Augment Recovery from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Impeding Consciousness: A Prospective Pilot Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chen; Flanagan, Steven R.; Samadani, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Traumatic brain injury has a high morbidity and mortality in both civilian and military populations. Blast and other mechanisms of traumatic brain injury damage the brain by causing neurons to disconnect and atrophy. Such traumatic axonal injury can lead to persistently vegetative and minimally conscious states, for which limited treatment options exist, including physical, occupational, speech and cognitive therapies. More than 60,000 patients have received vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy and depression. In addition to decreased seizure frequency and severity, patients report enhanced mood, reduced daytime sleepiness independent of seizure control, increased slow wave sleep, and improved cognition, memory, and quality of life. Early stimulation of the vagus nerve accelerates the rate and extent of behavioral and cognitive recovery after fluid percussion brain injury in rats. Methods We recently obtained FDA approval for a pilot prospective randomized crossover trial to demonstrate objective improvement in clinical outcome by placement of a vagus nerve stimulator in patients who are recovering from severe traumatic brain injury. Our hypothesis is that stimulation of the vagus nerve results in increased cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the forebrain, thalamus and reticular formation, which promotes arousal and improved consciousness, thereby improving outcome after traumatic brain injury resulting in minimally conscious or persistent vegetative states. Discussion If this study demonstrates that vagus nerve stimulation can safely and positively impact outcome, then a larger randomized prospective crossover trial will be proposed. PMID:23485054

  20. Painful nerve injury increases plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity in axotomized sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) is the principal means by which sensory neurons expel Ca2+ and thereby regulate the concentration of cytoplasmic Ca2+ and the processes controlled by this critical second messenger. We have previously found that painful nerve injury decreases resting cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels and activity-induced cytoplasmic Ca2+ accumulation in axotomized sensory neurons. Here we examine the contribution of PMCA after nerve injury in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Results PMCA function was isolated in dissociated sensory neurons by blocking intracellular Ca2+ sequestration with thapsigargin, and cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration was recorded with Fura-2 fluorometry. Compared to control neurons, the rate at which depolarization-induced Ca2+ transients resolved was increased in axotomized neurons after spinal nerve ligation, indicating accelerated PMCA function. Electrophysiological recordings showed that blockade of PMCA by vanadate prolonged the action potential afterhyperpolarization, and also decreased the rate at which neurons could fire repetitively. Conclusion We found that PMCA function is elevated in axotomized sensory neurons, which contributes to neuronal hyperexcitability. Accelerated PMCA function in the primary sensory neuron may contribute to the generation of neuropathic pain, and thus its modulation could provide a new pathway for peripheral treatment of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. PMID:22713297

  1. Effect of Perioperative Perineural Injection of Dexamethasone and Bupivacaine on a Rat Spared Nerve Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Beom; Choi, Seong Soo; Ahn, Eun Hye; Hahm, Kyung Don; Suh, Jeong Hun; Leem, Jung Gil

    2010-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain resulting from diverse causes is a chronic condition for which effective treatment is lacking. The goal of this study was to test whether dexamethasone exerts a preemptive analgesic effect with bupivacaine when injected perineurally in the spared nerve injury model. Methods Fifty rats were randomly divided into five groups. Group 1 (control) was ligated but received no drugs. Group 2 was perineurally infiltrated (tibial and common peroneal nerves) with 0.4% bupivacaine (0.2 ml) and dexamethasone (0.8 mg) 10 minutes before surgery. Group 3 was infiltrated with 0.4% bupivacaine (0.2 ml) and dexamethasone (0.8 mg) after surgery. Group 4 was infiltrated with normal saline (0.2 ml) and dexamethasone (0.8 mg) 10 minutes before surgery. Group 5 was infiltrated with only 0.4% bupivacaine (0.2 ml) before surgery. Rat paw withdrawal thresholds were measured using the von Frey hair test before surgery as a baseline measurement and on postoperative days 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21. Results In the group injected preoperatively with dexamethasone and bupivacaine, mechanical allodynia did not develop and mechanical threshold forces were significantly different compared with other groups, especially between postoperative days 3 and 9 (P < 0.05). Conclusions In conclusion, preoperative infiltration of both dexamethasone and bupivacaine showed a significantly better analgesic effect than did infiltration of bupivacaine or dexamethasone alone in the spared nerve injury model, especially early on after surgery. PMID:20830261

  2. Novel TRPM8 antagonist attenuates cold hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ryan; Gonçalves, Leonor; Newman, Robert; Jiang, Feng Li; Goldby, Anne; Reeve, Jennifer; Hendrick, Alan; Teall, Martin; Hannah, Duncan; Almond, Sarah; Brice, Nicola; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2014-04-01

    Abnormal cold sensitivity is a common feature of a range of neuropathies. In the murine somatosensory system, multiple aspects of cold sensitivity are dependent on TRPM8, both short term and in response to peripheral nerve injury. The specialized nature of cold-sensitive afferents and the restricted expression of TRPM8 render it an attractive target for the treatment of cold hypersensitivity. This current study examines the effect of a novel TRPM8 antagonist (M8-An) in naive and spinal nerve-ligated rats through behavioral and in vivo electrophysiological approaches. In vitro, M8-An inhibited icilin-evoked Ca(2+) currents in HEK293 cells stably expressing human TRPM8 with an IC(50) of 10.9 nM. In vivo, systemic M8-An transiently decreased core body temperature. Deep dorsal horn recordings were made in vivo from neurons innervating the hind paw. M8-An inhibited neuronal responses to innocuous and noxious cooling of the receptive field in spinal nerve-ligated rats but not in naive rats. No effect on neuronal responses to mechanical and heat stimulation was observed. In addition, M8-An also attenuated behavioral responses to cold but not mechanical stimulation after nerve ligation without affecting the uninjured contralateral response. The data presented here support a contribution of TRPM8 to the pathophysiology of cold hypersensitivity in this model and highlight the potential of the pharmacological block of TRPM8 in alleviating the associated symptoms. PMID:24472724

  3. Electrophysiology of Axonal Constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher; Jung, Peter; Brown, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Axons of myelinated neurons are constricted at the nodes of Ranvier, where they are directly exposed to the extracellular space and where the vast majority of the ion channels are located. These constrictions are generated by local regulation of the kinetics of neurofilaments the most important cytoskeletal elements of the axon. In this paper we discuss how this shape affects the electrophysiological function of the neuron. Specifically, although the nodes are short (about 1 μm) in comparison to the distance between nodes (hundreds of μm) they have a substantial influence on the conduction velocity of neurons. We show through computational modeling that nodal constrictions (all other features such as numbers of ion channels left constant) reduce the required fiber diameter for a given target conduction velocity by up to 50% in comparison to an unconstricted axon. We further show that the predicted optimal fiber morphologies closely match reported fiber morphologies. Supported by The National Science Foundation (IOS 1146789)

  4. A wakeboarding injury presented as acute carpal syndrome and median nerve contusion after wrist strangulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We present a case of combined median nerve contusion with immediate loss of sensation after the strangulation with a wakeboarding rope and prolonged referral to our department 72 hours after the injury accompanied by an acute carpal tunnel syndrome with immediate relief of numbness of a significant proportion of the median nerve following surgical decompression. Case presentation The palmar branch of the median nerve was surrounded by a significant haematoma in addition to the strangulation damage caused by its more superficial location in contrast to the median nerve. Conclusion In case of acute median neuropathy, urgent surgical intervention with exploration, decompression of both, the median nerve and the superficial branch of the median nerve, accompanied by compartment measurements of the forearm should be performed to regain or re-establish neurological integrity. PMID:19178709

  5. Sympathetic sprouting near sensory neurons after nerve injury occurs preferentially on spontaneously active cells and is reduced by early nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith Ann; Li, Huiqing; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Some chronic pain conditions are maintained or enhanced by sympathetic activity. In animal models of pathological pain, abnormal sprouting of sympathetic fibers around large- and medium-size sensory neurons is observed in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Large and medium size cells are also more likely to be spontaneously active, suggesting that sprouting may be related to neuron activity. We previously showed that sprouting could be reduced by systemic or locally applied lidocaine. In the complete sciatic nerve transection model in rats, spontaneous activity initially originates in the injury site; later, the DRG become the major source of spontaneous activity. In this study, spontaneous activity reaching the DRG soma was reduced by early nerve blockade (local perfusion of the transected nerve with TTX for the first 7 days after injury). This significantly reduced sympathetic sprouting. Conversely, increasing spontaneous activity by local nerve perfusion with K+ channel blockers increased sprouting. The hyperexcitability and spontaneous activity of DRG neurons observed in this model were also significantly reduced by early nerve blockade. These effects of early nerve blockade on sprouting, excitability, and spontaneous activity were all observed 4 to 5 weeks after the end of early nerve blockade, indicating that the early period of spontaneous activity in the injured nerve is critical for establishing the more long-lasting pathologies observed in the DRG. Individual spontaneously active neurons, labeled with fluorescent dye, were 5–6 times more likely than quiescent cells to be co-localized with sympathetic fibers, suggesting a highly localized correlation of activity and sprouting. PMID:17065247

  6. Microglia and monocytes synergistically promote the transition from acute to chronic pain after nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jiyun; Gu, Nan; Zhou, Lijun; B Eyo, Ukpong; Murugan, Madhuvika; Gan, Wen-Biao; Wu, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microglia and peripheral monocytes contribute to hypersensitivity in rodent models of neuropathic pain. However, the precise respective function of microglia and peripheral monocytes has not been investigated in these models. To address this question, here we combined transgenic mice and pharmacological tools to specifically and temporally control the depletion of microglia and monocytes in a mouse model of spinal nerve transection (SNT). We found that although microglia and monocytes are required during the initiation of mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesia, these cells may not be as important for the maintenance of hypersensitivity. Moreover, we demonstrated that either resident microglia or peripheral monocytes are sufficient in gating neuropathic pain after SNT. We propose that resident microglia and peripheral monocytes act synergistically to initiate hypersensitivity and promote the transition from acute to chronic pain after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:27349690

  7. Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury following reoperative anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Erwood, Matthew S; Hadley, Mark N; Gordon, Amber S; Carroll, William R; Agee, Bonita S; Walters, Beverly C

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is one of the most frequent complications of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) procedures. The frequency of RLN is reported as 1%-11% in the literature. (4 , 15) The rate of palsy after reoperative ACDF surgery is not well defined. This meta-analysis was performed to review the current medical evidence on RLN injury after ACDF surgery and to determine a relative rate of RLN injury after reoperative ACDF. METHODS MEDLINE, PubMed, and Google Scholar searches were performed using several key words and phrases related to ACDF surgery. Included studies were written in English, addressed revisionary ACDF surgery, and studied outcomes of RLN injury. Statistical analysis was then performed using a random-effects model to calculate a pooled rate of RLN injury. The heterogeneity of the studies was assessed using Cochran's Q statistic and I(2) statistic, and a funnel plot was constructed to evaluate publication bias. RESULTS The search initially identified 345 articles on this topic. Eight clinical articles that met all inclusion criteria were included in the meta-analysis. A total of 238 patients were found to have undergone reoperative ACDF. Thirty-three of those patients experienced an RLN injury. This analysis identified a rate of RLN injury in the literature after reoperative ACDF of 14.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.8%-19.1%). CONCLUSIONS The rate of RLN palsy of 14.1% was greater than any published rate of RLN injury after primary ACDF operations, suggesting that there is a greater risk of hoarseness and dysphagia with reoperative ACDF surgeries than with primary procedures as reported in these studies. PMID:27015129

  8. Effects on Spatial Cognition and Nociceptive Behavior Following Peripheral Nerve Injury in Rats with Lesion of the Striatal Marginal Division Induced by Kainic Acid.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuxin; Zhou, Chang; Li, Guoying; Tian, Yinghong; Liu, Jing; Yan, Li; Jiang, Yuyun; Tian, Sumin

    2015-11-01

    Neuropathic pain and cognitive deficit are frequently comorbidity in clinical, but their underlying correlation and mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we utilized a combined rat model including kainic acid (KA) injection into bilateral striatal marginal division and chronic constriction nerve injury (CCI). PET/CT scans revealed that the SUVmax of KA rats was significantly decreased when compared to naive and saline rats. In contrast to the naive and saline rats, KA rats had longer latencies in locating the hidden platform on day 4, 5 in Morris water maze task. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia of KA rats were alleviated following CCI. Immunostaining results showed that substance P was markedly increased within ipsilateral spinal cord dorsal horn of KA rats after CCI, especially on the post-operative day 14. By means of real-time PCR, the up-regulation of GluR within ipsilateral spinal cord dorsal horn was observed in all KA and CCI rats. PKCγ, IL-6 and NF-κB were up-regulated in both CCI rats when compared to naive and their respective sham rats. These results suggest that cognitive impairment of rats altered the pain behaviors, and these intracellular regulators play crucial roles in the process of neuropathic pain. PMID:26415594

  9. Netrin-1 overexpression in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes functional recovery in a rat model of peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xianjin; Li, Qian; Xu, Li; Zhang, Ying; Li, Dongmei; Ma, Jianhua; Mao, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) has been developed as a new method of treating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. While netrin-1 is a critical molecule for axonal path finding and nerve growth, it may also affect vascular network formation. Here, we investigated the effect of transplanting BMSCs that produce netrin-1 in a rat model of sciatic nerve crush injury. We introduced a sciatic nerve crush injury, and then injected 1×106 BMSCs infected by a recombinant adenovirus expressing netrin-1 Ad5-Netrin-1-EGFP or culture medium into the injured part in the next day. At day 7, 14 and 28 after injection, we measured motor nerve conduction and detected mRNA expressions of netrin-1 receptors UNC5B and Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC), and neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) by real-time PCR. We also detected protein expressions of BDNF and NGF by Western blotting assays and examined BMSCs that incorporated into myelin and vascellum. The results showed that BMSCs infected by Ad5-Netrin-1-EGFP significantly improved the function of the sciatic nerve, and led to increased expression of BDNF and NGF (P<0.05). Moreover, 28 days after injury, more Schwann cells were found in BMSCs infected by Ad5-Netrin-1-EGFP compared to control BMSCs. In conclusion, transplantation of BMSCs that produce netrin-1 improved the function of the sciatic nerve after injury. This method may be a new treatment of nerve injury. PMID:26445571

  10. A longitudinal study of pain, personality, and brain plasticity following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Ruma; Anastakis, Dimitri J; Katz, Joel; Davis, Karen D

    2016-03-01

    We do not know precisely why pain develops and becomes chronic after peripheral nerve injury (PNI), but it is likely due to biological and psychological factors. Here, we tested the hypotheses that (1) high Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) scores at the time of injury and repair are associated with pain and cold sensitivity after 1-year recovery and (2) insula gray matter changes reflect the course of injury and improvements over time. Ten patients with complete median and/or ulnar nerve transections and surgical repair were tested ∼3 weeks after surgical nerve repair (time 1) and ∼1 year later for 6 of the 10 patients (time 2). Patients and 10 age-/sex-matched healthy controls completed questionnaires that assessed pain (patients) and personality and underwent quantitative sensory testing and 3T MRI to assess cortical thickness. In patients, pain intensity and neuropathic pain correlated with pain catastrophizing. Time 1 pain catastrophizing trended toward predicting cold pain thresholds at time 2, and at time 1 cortical thickness of the right insula was reduced. At time 2, chronic pain was related to the time 1 pain-PCS relationship and cold sensitivity, pain catastrophizing correlated with cold pain threshold, and insula thickness reversed to control levels. This study highlights the interplay between personality, sensory function, and pain in patients following PNI and repair. The PCS-pain association suggests that a focus on affective or negative components of pain could render patients vulnerable to chronic pain. Cold sensitivity and structural insula changes may reflect altered thermosensory or sensorimotor awareness representations. PMID:26588697

  11. Human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor for optic nerve injury: a biomechanical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Jun; Li, Ya-Jun; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Huang, Feng-Xiao; Liu, Tie-Jun; Jiang, Dong-Mei; Lv, Xue-Man; Luo, Min

    2015-07-01

    Treatment for optic nerve injury by brain-derived neurotrophic factor or the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells has gained progress, but analysis by biomechanical indicators is rare. Rabbit models of optic nerve injury were established by a clamp. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body received a one-time injection of 50 μg brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 10(6) human umbilical cord blood stem cells. After 30 days, the maximum load, maximum stress, maximum strain, elastic limit load, elastic limit stress, and elastic limit strain had clearly improved in rabbit models of optical nerve injury after treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor or human umbilical cord blood stem cells. The damage to the ultrastructure of the optic nerve had also been reduced. These findings suggest that human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor effectively repair the injured optical nerve, improve biomechanical properties, and contribute to the recovery after injury. PMID:26330839

  12. Nociceptive and Neuronal Evaluation of the Sciatic Nerve of Wistar Rats Subjected to Compression Injury and Treated with Resistive Exercise.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Karvat, Jhenifer; Peretti, Ana Luiza; Vieira, Lizyana; Higuchi, Guilherme Hideaki; Brancalhão, Rose Meire Costa; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the climb stairs resistance exercise on nociception and axonal regeneration in the sciatic nerve of rats. Methods. 24 Wistar rats were divided: control group (CG-no injury), exercise group (EG-no injury with physical exercise), lesion group (LG-injury, but without exercise), and treated group (LEG-injury and physical exercise). LG and LEG were subjected to sciatic nerve compression with hemostat. From the 3rd day after injury began treatment with exercise, and after 22 days occurs the removal of a nerve fragment for morphological analysis. Results. Regarding allodynia, CG obtained values less than EG (p = 0.012) and larger than LG and LEG (p < 0.001). Histological results showed that CG and EG had normal appearance, as LG and LEG showed up with large amounts of inflammatory infiltration, degeneration and disruption of nerve fibers, and reduction of the myelin sheath; however LEG presented some regenerated fibers. From the morphometric data there were significant differences, for nerve fiber diameter, comparing CG with LG and LEG and comparing axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin of the CG to others. Conclusion. Climb stairs resistance exercise was not effective to speed up the regenerative process of axons. PMID:27594795

  13. Nociceptive and Neuronal Evaluation of the Sciatic Nerve of Wistar Rats Subjected to Compression Injury and Treated with Resistive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Karvat, Jhenifer; Peretti, Ana Luiza; Vieira, Lizyana; Higuchi, Guilherme Hideaki; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the climb stairs resistance exercise on nociception and axonal regeneration in the sciatic nerve of rats. Methods. 24 Wistar rats were divided: control group (CG—no injury), exercise group (EG—no injury with physical exercise), lesion group (LG—injury, but without exercise), and treated group (LEG—injury and physical exercise). LG and LEG were subjected to sciatic nerve compression with hemostat. From the 3rd day after injury began treatment with exercise, and after 22 days occurs the removal of a nerve fragment for morphological analysis. Results. Regarding allodynia, CG obtained values less than EG (p = 0.012) and larger than LG and LEG (p < 0.001). Histological results showed that CG and EG had normal appearance, as LG and LEG showed up with large amounts of inflammatory infiltration, degeneration and disruption of nerve fibers, and reduction of the myelin sheath; however LEG presented some regenerated fibers. From the morphometric data there were significant differences, for nerve fiber diameter, comparing CG with LG and LEG and comparing axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin of the CG to others. Conclusion. Climb stairs resistance exercise was not effective to speed up the regenerative process of axons. PMID:27594795

  14. Efficacy of low level laser therapy on neurosensory recovery after injury to the inferior alveolar nerve

    PubMed Central

    Ozen, Tuncer; Orhan, Kaan; Gorur, Ilker; Ozturk, Adnan

    2006-01-01

    Background The most severe complication after the removal of mandibular third molars is injury to the inferior alveolar nerve or the lingual nerve. These complications are rather uncommon (0.4% to 8.4%) and most of them are transient. However, some of them persist for longer than 6 months, which can leave various degrees of long-term permanent disability. While several methods such as pharmacologic therapy, microneurosurgery, autogenous and alloplastic grafting can be used for the treatment of long-standing sensory aberrations in the inferior alveolar nerve, there are few reports regarding low level laser treatment. This paper reports the effects of low level laser therapy in 4 patients with longstanding sensory nerve impairment following mandibular third molar surgery. Methods Four female patients had complaints of paresthesia and dysesthesia of the lip, chin and gingiva, and buccal regions. Each patient had undergone mandibular third molar surgery at least 1 year before. All patients were treated with low level laser therapy. Clinical neurosensory tests (the brush stroke directional discrimination test, 2-point discrimination test, and a subjective assessment of neurosensory function using a visual analog scale) were used before and after treatment, and the responses were plotted over time. Results When the neurosensory assessment scores after treatment with LLL therapy were compared with the baseline values prior to treatment, there was a significant acceleration in the time course, as well as in the magnitude, of neurosensory return. The VAS analysis revealed progressive improvement over time. Conclusion Low level laser therapy seemed to be conducive to the reduction of long-standing sensory nerve impairment following third molar surgery. Further studies are worthwhile regarding the clinical application of this treatment modality. PMID:16480503

  15. Localization of E-cadherin in peripheral glia after nerve injury and repair.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, M; Seto, A; Uchiyama, N; Kida, S; Yamashima, T; Yamashita, J

    1996-04-01

    Peripheral nerve injury results in histological and histochemical changes in neurons and glia. We have recently found that Ca(2+)-dependent cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin plays an important role in the selective fasciculation of a particular subset of unmyelinated sensory fibers. In the present immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses, the temporal profile of the subcellular expression of this molecule in spinal nerves was examined after crushing, transecting, or ligaturing the sciatic nerve in mice with special attention paid to E-cadherin expression in glial cells. After axotomy of the sciatic nerve, distal axons of the proximal stump and the fibers of the distal stump degenerated, but E-cadherin was still detectable at the outer mesaxons of the myelinated axons as long as they remained morphologically intact. Subsequently, Schwann cells proliferated and migrated to form Schwann cell columns (Büngner's bands) as initial responses to denervation, and expressed E-cadherin at their site of contact with each other and later with sprouting axons. At the initial stage of myelin formation, slender processes of a single Schwann cell interdigitated with an enveloped axons, and expressed E-cadherin at the contact site elaborated by a single Schwann cell. Immunoblot analysis on day 7 revealed that E-cadherin was detected in both the proximal nerve segments and the regenerative distal segments, but was negative in the degenerative distal segments. On the basis of present data, it is suggested that E-cadherin might be involved in the stabilization of the peripheral glial network which provides the guidance of sprouting axons and myelination. PMID:8786402

  16. Foot Drop after Ethanol Embolization of Calf Vascular Malformation: A Lesson on Nerve Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, Vincent Khwee-Soon; Mohan, P. Chandra; Liew, Wendy Kein Meng; Mahadev, Arjandas; Tay, Kiang Hiong

    2013-08-01

    Ethanol is often used in sclerotherapy to treat vascular malformations. Nerve injury is a known complication of this procedure. However, the management of this complication is not well described in literature. This case describes a 10-year-old boy with a slow flow vascular malformation in the right calf who underwent transarterial ethanol embolization following prior unsuccessful direct percutaneous sclerotherapy. The development of a dense foot drop that subsequently recovered is described, and the management of this uncommon but distressful complication is discussed.

  17. Bilateral Cranial IX and X Nerve Palsies After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Don; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Seung Ah; Joo, Hye In; Yeo, Jin Ah

    2016-01-01

    We report a 57-year-old man with bilateral cranial nerve IX and X palsies who presented with severe dysphagia. After a mild head injury, the patient complained of difficult swallowing. Physical examination revealed normal tongue motion and no uvular deviation. Cervical X-ray findings were negative, but a brain computed tomography revealed a skull fracture involving bilateral jugular foramen. Laryngoscopy indicated bilateral vocal cord palsy. In a videofluoroscopic swallowing study, food residue remained in the vallecula and pyriform sinus, and there was reduced motion of the pharynx and larynx. Electromyography confirmed bilateral superior and recurrent laryngeal neuropathy. PMID:26949684

  18. Sodium Hydrosulfide Relieves Neuropathic Pain in Chronic Constriction Injured Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian-qing; Luo, Hui-qin; Lin, Cai-zhu; Chen, Jin-zhuan; Lin, Xian-zhong

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant neuronal activity in injured peripheral nerves is believed to be an important factor in the development of neuropathic pain (NPP). Channel protein pCREB of that activity has been shown to mitigate the onset of associated molecular events in the nervous system, and sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) could inhibit the expression of pCREB. However, whether NaHS could relieve the pain, it needs further experimental research. Furthermore, the clinical potential that NaHS was used to relieve pain was limited so it would be required. To address these issues, the rats of sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) were given intraperitoneal injection of NaHS containing hydrogen sulfide (H2S). The experimental results showed that NaHS inhibited the reduction of paw withdrawal thermal latency (PWTL), mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT), and the level of pCREB in CCI rats in a dose-dependent manner and they were greatly decreased in NaHSM group (P < 0.05). NaHS alleviates chronic neuropathic pain by inhibiting expression of pCREB in the spinal cord of Sprague-Dawley rats. PMID:25506383

  19. α-Conotoxin RgIA protects against the development of nerve injury-induced chronic pain and prevents both neuronal and glial derangement

    PubMed Central

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Cinci, Lorenzo; Micheli, Laura; Zanardelli, Matteo; Pacini, Alessandra; McIntosh, J. Michael; Ghelardini, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain affects millions of people worldwide causing substantial disability and greatly impairing quality of life. Commonly used analgesics or anti-hyperalgesic compounds are generally characterized by limited therapeutic outcomes. Thus, there is a compelling need for novel therapeutic strategies able to prevent nervous tissue alterations responsible for chronic pain. The α9α10 nAChR antagonist α-conotoxin RgIA (RgIA), a peptide isolated from the venom of a carnivorous cone snail, induces relief in both acute and chronic pain models. To evaluate potential disease-modifying effects of RgIA, the compound was given to rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Two or 10 nmol RgIA injected intramuscularly once a day for 14 days reduced the painful response to suprathreshold stimulation, increased pain threshold to non-noxious stimuli, and normalized alterations in hind limb weight bearing. Histological analysis of the sciatic nerve revealed that RgIA prevented CCI-induced decreases of axonal compactness and diameter, loss of myelin sheath and decreases in the fiber number. Moreover, RgIA significantly reduced edema and inflammatory infiltrate, including a decrease of CD86+ macrophages. In L4–L5 dors the inflammatory infiltrate consistent with a disease-modifying effect. In the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, RgIA prevented CCI-induced activation of microglia and astrocytes. These data suggest that RgIA-like compounds may represent a novel class of therapeutics for neuropathic pain that protects peripheral nervous tissues as well as prevents central maladaptive plasticity by inhibiting glial cell activation. PMID:25008370

  20. α-conotoxin RgIA protects against the development of nerve injury-induced chronic pain and prevents both neuronal and glial derangement.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Cinci, Lorenzo; Micheli, Laura; Zanardelli, Matteo; Pacini, Alessandra; McIntosh, J Michael; Ghelardini, Carla

    2014-10-01

    Neuropathic pain affects millions of people worldwide, causing substantial disability and greatly impairing quality of life. Commonly used analgesics or antihyperalgesic compounds are generally characterized by limited therapeutic outcomes. Thus, there is a compelling need for novel therapeutic strategies able to prevent nervous tissue alterations responsible for chronic pain. The α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist α-conotoxin RgIA (RgIA), a peptide isolated from the venom of a carnivorous cone snail, induces relief in both acute and chronic pain models. To evaluate potential disease-modifying effects of RgIA, the compound was given to rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Two or 10 nmol RgIA injected intramuscularly once a day for 14 days reduced the painful response to suprathreshold stimulation, increased pain threshold to nonnoxious stimuli, and normalized alterations in hind limb weight bearing. Histological analysis of the sciatic nerve revealed that RgIA prevented CCI-induced decreases of axonal compactness and diameter, loss of myelin sheath, and decreases in the fiber number. Moreover, RgIA significantly reduced edema and inflammatory infiltrate, including a decrease of CD86(+) macrophages. In L4-L5 dorsal root ganglia, RgIA prevented morphometric changes and reduced the inflammatory infiltrate consistent with a disease-modifying effect. In the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, RgIA prevented CCI-induced activation of microglia and astrocytes. These data suggest that RgIA-like compounds may represent a novel class of therapeutics for neuropathic pain that protects peripheral nervous tissues as well as prevents central maladaptive plasticity by inhibiting glial cell activation. PMID:25008370

  1. End-to-side nerve suture in traumatic injuries of brachial plexus: review of the literature and personal case series.

    PubMed

    Battiston, B; Artiaco, S; Conforti, L G; Vasario, G; Tos, P

    2009-10-01

    We used end-to-side nerve coaptation combined with standard end-to-end neurotisations to treat 11 patients who presented with complete (six cases) or incomplete (five cases) traumatic brachial plexus injuries. All patients were available for functional evaluation at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. In three patients with shoulder abduction recovery, electromyographical studies (EMG) showed a contribution from the end-to-side neurotisation. In the remaining cases end-to-side neurotisations were unsuccessful. Our study did not demonstrate a reliable role for end-to-side nerve suture in brachial plexus surgery. We believe that at present end-to-side suture must not be a substitute for standard reconstructive techniques in brachial plexus surgery. Occasionally termino-lateral nerve sutures may represent a support to standard reconstructive procedures especially in case of severe injuries when few undamaged donor nerves are available. PMID:19587073

  2. Outcomes of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury following congenital heart surgery: A contemporary experience

    PubMed Central

    Alfares, Fahad A.; Hynes, Conor F.; Ansari, Ghedak; Chounoune, Reginald; Ramadan, Manelle; Shaughnessy, Conner; Reilly, Brian K.; Zurakowski, David; Jonas, Richard A.; Nath, Dilip S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve can lead to significant morbidity during congenital cardiac surgery. The objective is to expand on the limited understanding of the severity and recovery of this iatrogenic condition. Design A six-year retrospective review of all congenital heart operations at a single institution from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2013 was performed. All patients with documented vocal cord paralysis on laryngoscopic examination comprised the study cohort. Evaluation of time to vocal cord recovery and need for further surgical intervention was the primary focus. Results The incidence of post-operative vocal cord paralysis was 1.1% (32 out of 3036 patients; 95% confidence interval: 0.7–1.5%). The majority were left-sided injuries (71%). Overall rate of recovery was 61% with a median time of 10 months in those who recovered, and a total follow up of 46 months. Due to feeding complications, 45% of patients required gastrostomy tube after the injury, and these patients were found to have longer duration of post-operative days of intubation (median 10 vs. 5 days, p = 0.03), ICU length of stay (50 vs. 8 days, p = 0.002), and hospital length of stay (92 vs. 41 days, p = 0.01). No pre-operative variables were identified as predictive of recovery or need for gastrostomy placement. Conclusion Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury is a serious complication of congenital heart surgery that impacts post-operative morbidity, in some cases leading to a need for further intervention, in particular, gastrostomy tube placement. A prospective, multi-center study is needed to fully evaluate factors that influence severity and time to recovery. PMID:26778899

  3. Treatment with analgesics after mouse sciatic nerve injury does not alter expression of wound healing-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Danzi, Matt C.; Motti, Dario; Avison, Donna L.; Bixby, John L.; Lemmon, Vance P.

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of sciatic nerve injury are commonly used to study neuropathic pain as well as axon regeneration. Administration of post-surgical analgesics is an important consideration for animal welfare, but the actions of the analgesic must not interfere with the scientific goals of the experiment. In this study, we show that treatment with either buprenorphine or acetaminophen following a bilateral sciatic nerve crush surgery does not alter the expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons of a panel of genes associated with wound healing. These findings indicate that the post-operative use of buprenorphine or acetaminophen at doses commonly suggested by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees does not change the intrinsic gene expression response of DRG neurons to a sciatic nerve crush injury, for many wound healing-associated genes. Therefore, administration of post-operative analgesics may not confound the results of transcriptomic studies employing this injury model. PMID:26981104

  4. Inferior alveolar nerve injuries associated with mandibular fractures at risk: a two-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Boffano, Paolo; Roccia, Fabio; Gallesio, Cesare; Karagozoglu, K; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury in mandibular fractures. This study is based on two databases that have continuously recorded patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures in two departments-Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Vrije Universiteit University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Division of Maxillofacial Surgery, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Turin, Italy. Demographic, anatomic, and etiology variables were considered for each patient and statistically assessed in relation to the neurosensory IAN impairment. Statistically significant associations were found between IAN injury and fracture displacement (p = 0.03), isolated mandibular fractures (p = 0.01), and angle fractures (p = 0.004). A statistically significant association was also found between IAN injury and assaults (p = 0.03). Displaced isolated mandibular angle fractures could be considered at risk for increased incidence of IAN injury. Assaults seem to be the most important etiological factor that is responsible for IAN lesions. PMID:25383147

  5. Effects of nerve injury and segmental regeneration on the cellular correlates of neural morphallaxis.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Veronica G; Manson, Josiah M B; Zoran, Mark J

    2008-09-15

    Functional recovery of neural networks after injury requires a series of signaling events similar to the embryonic processes that governed initial network construction. Neural morphallaxis, a form of nervous system regeneration, involves reorganization of adult neural connectivity patterns. Neural morphallaxis in the worm, Lumbriculus variegatus, occurs during asexual reproduction and segmental regeneration, as body fragments acquire new positional identities along the anterior-posterior axis. Ectopic head (EH) formation, induced by ventral nerve cord lesion, generated morphallactic plasticity including the reorganization of interneuronal sensory fields and the induction of a molecular marker of neural morphallaxis. Morphallactic changes occurred only in segments posterior to an EH. Neither EH formation, nor neural morphallaxis was observed after dorsal body lesions, indicating a role for nerve cord injury in morphallaxis induction. Furthermore, a hierarchical system of neurobehavioral control was observed, where anterior heads were dominant and an EH controlled body movements only in the absence of the anterior head. Both suppression of segmental regeneration and blockade of asexual fission, after treatment with boric acid, disrupted the maintenance of neural morphallaxis, but did not block its induction. Therefore, segmental regeneration (i.e., epimorphosis) may not be required for the induction of morphallactic remodeling of neural networks. However, on-going epimorphosis appears necessary for the long-term consolidation of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the morphallaxis of neural circuitry. PMID:18561185

  6. The development of military medical care for peripheral nerve injuries during World War I.

    PubMed

    Hanigan, William

    2010-05-01

    Although the clinical and electrical diagnoses and treatments of peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs) had been described prior to World War I, many reports were fragmented and incomplete. Individual physicians' experiences were not extensive, and in 1914 the patient with a PNI remained a subject of medical curiosity, and was hardly a focus of comprehensive care. World War I altered these conditions; casualties with septic wounds and PNIs swamped the general hospitals. By 1915, specialized hospitals or wards were developed to care for neurological injuries. In the United Kingdom, Sir Robert Jones developed the concept of Military Orthopedic Centres, with coordinated specialized care and rehabilitation. Military appointments of neurologists and electrotherapists sharpened clinical diagnoses and examinations. Surgical techniques were introduced, then discarded or accepted as surgeons developed skills to meet the new conditions. The US Surgeon General, William Gorgas, and his consultant in neurosurgery, Charles Frazier, went a step further, with the organization of a research laboratory as well as the establishment of a Peripheral Nerve Commission and Registry. Despite these developments and good intentions, postwar follow-up for PNIs remained incomplete at best. Records were lost, personnel transferred, and patients discharged from the system. The lack of a standardized grading system seriously impaired the ability to record clinical changes and compare outcomes. Nevertheless, specialized treatment of a large number of PNIs during World War I established a foundation for comprehensive care that influenced military medical services in the next world war. PMID:20568941

  7. Postsynaptic potentiation of corticospinal projecting neurons in the anterior cingulate cortex after nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is the key cellular mechanism for physiological learning and pathological chronic pain. In the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), postsynaptic recruitment or modification of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluA1 contribute to the expression of LTP. Here we report that pyramidal cells in the deep layers of the ACC send direct descending projecting terminals to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (lamina I-III). After peripheral nerve injury, these projection cells are activated, and postsynaptic excitatory responses of these descending projecting neurons were significantly enhanced. Newly recruited AMPARs contribute to the potentiated synaptic transmission of cingulate neurons. PKA-dependent phosphorylation of GluA1 is important, since enhanced synaptic transmission was abolished in GluA1 phosphorylation site serine-845 mutant mice. Our findings provide strong evidence that peripheral nerve injury induce long-term enhancement of cortical-spinal projecting cells in the ACC. Direct top-down projection system provides rapid and profound modulation of spinal sensory transmission, including painful information. Inhibiting cortical top-down descending facilitation may serve as a novel target for treating neuropathic pain. PMID:24890933

  8. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic field and swimming exercise on rats with experimental sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Kavlak, Erdoğan; Belge, Ferda; Unsal, Cengiz; Uner, Aykut Göktürk; Cavlak, Uğur; Cömlekçi, Selçuk

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The current study aimed to reveal the therapeutic effects of a pulsed electromagnetic field and swimming exercises on rats with experimental sciatic nerve injury, which was induced with crush-type neuropathy model damage, using electrophysiological methods. [Subjects] In the current study, the sample consisted of 28 adult male Wistar albino rats. [Methods] The rats were randomized into four groups (n=7). Swimming exercise and PEMF (2 Hz and 0.3 MT) were applied one hour a day, five days a week, for four weeks. Electroneuromyographic (ENMG) measurements were taken on day 7. [Results] When the data were evaluated, it was found that the 4 weeks of PEMF and swimming exercises led to an increase in motor conduction rates and a decrease in latency values, but the changes were not significant in comparison with the control and injury groups. The compound muscle action potential (CMAP) values of the left leg were lower in weeks 2, 3, and 4 in the swimming exercise group in comparison with the control group, although for the PEMF group, the CMAP values of the left leg reached the level observed in the control group beginning in week 3. [Conclusion] PEMF and swimming exercise made positive contributions to nerve regeneration after week 1, and regeneration was enhanced. PMID:25276015

  9. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field and Swimming Exercise on Rats with Experimental Sciatic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kavlak, Erdoğan; Belge, Ferda; Ünsal, Cengiz; Üner, Aykut Göktürk; Cavlak, Uğur; Çömlekçi, Selçuk

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The current study aimed to reveal the therapeutic effects of a pulsed electromagnetic field and swimming exercises on rats with experimental sciatic nerve injury, which was induced with crush-type neuropathy model damage, using electrophysiological methods. [Subjects] In the current study, the sample consisted of 28 adult male Wistar albino rats. [Methods] The rats were randomized into four groups (n=7). Swimming exercise and PEMF (2 Hz and 0.3 MT) were applied one hour a day, five days a week, for four weeks. Electroneuromyographic (ENMG) measurements were taken on day 7. [Results] When the data were evaluated, it was found that the 4 weeks of PEMF and swimming exercises led to an increase in motor conduction rates and a decrease in latency values, but the changes were not significant in comparison with the control and injury groups. The compound muscle action potential (CMAP) values of the left leg were lower in weeks 2, 3, and 4 in the swimming exercise group in comparison with the control group, although for the PEMF group, the CMAP values of the left leg reached the level observed in the control group beginning in week 3. [Conclusion] PEMF and swimming exercise made positive contributions to nerve regeneration after week 1, and regeneration was enhanced. PMID:25276015

  10. Spinal Microgliosis Due to Resident Microglial Proliferation Is Required for Pain Hypersensitivity after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Gu, Nan; Peng, Jiyun; Murugan, Madhuvika; Wang, Xi; Eyo, Ukpong B; Sun, Dongming; Ren, Yi; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel; Young, Wise; Dong, Hailong; Wu, Long-Jun

    2016-07-19

    Peripheral nerve injury causes neuropathic pain accompanied by remarkable microgliosis in the spinal cord dorsal horn. However, it is still debated whether infiltrated monocytes contribute to injury-induced expansion of the microglial population. Here, we found that spinal microgliosis predominantly results from local proliferation of resident microglia but not from infiltrating monocytes after spinal nerve transection (SNT) by using two genetic mouse models (CCR2(RFP/+):CX3CR1(GFP/+) and CX3CR1(creER/+):R26(tdTomato/+) mice) as well as specific staining of microglia and macrophages. Pharmacological inhibition of SNT-induced microglial proliferation correlated with attenuated neuropathic pain hypersensitivities. Microglial proliferation is partially controlled by purinergic and fractalkine signaling, as CX3CR1(-/-) and P2Y12(-/-) mice show reduced spinal microglial proliferation and neuropathic pain. These results suggest that local microglial proliferation is the sole source of spinal microgliosis, which represents a potential therapeutic target for neuropathic pain management. PMID:27373153

  11. Interleukin-1β overproduction is a common cause for neuropathic pain, memory deficit, and depression following peripheral nerve injury in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Wen-Shan; Wei, Xiao; Mai, Chun-Lin; Murugan, Madhuvika; Wu, Long-Jun; Xin, Wen-Jun; Zhou, Li-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is often accompanied by short-term memory deficit and depression. Currently, it is believed that short-term memory deficit and depression are consequences of chronic pain. Here, we test the hypothesis that the symptoms might be caused by overproduction of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in the injured nerve independent of neuropathic pain following spared nerve injury in rats and mice. Results Mechanical allodynia, a behavioral sign of neuropathic pain, was not correlated with short-term memory deficit and depressive behavior in spared nerve injury rats. Spared nerve injury upregulated IL-1β in the injured sciatic nerve, plasma, and the regions in central nervous system closely associated with pain, memory and emotion, including spinal dorsal horn, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala. Importantly, the spared nerve injury-induced memory deficits, depressive, and pain behaviors were substantially prevented by peri-sciatic administration of IL-1β neutralizing antibody in rats or deletion of IL-1 receptor type 1 in mice. Furthermore, the behavioral abnormalities induced by spared nerve injury were mimicked in naïve rats by repetitive intravenous injection of re combinant rat IL-1β (rrIL-1β) at a pathological concentration as determined from spared nerve injury rats. In addition, microglia were activated by both spared nerve injury and intravenous injection of rrIL-1β and the effect of spared nerve injury was substantially reversed by peri-sciatic administration of anti-IL-1β. Conclusions Neuropathic pain was not necessary for the development of cognitive and emotional disorders, while the overproduction of IL-1β in the injured sciatic nerve following peripheral nerve injury may be a common mechanism underlying the generation of neuropathic pain, memory deficit, and depression. PMID:27175012

  12. TRESK channel contribution to nociceptive sensory neurons excitability: modulation by nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuronal hyperexcitability is a crucial phenomenon underlying spontaneous and evoked pain. In invertebrate nociceptors, the S-type leak K+ channel (analogous to TREK-1 in mammals) plays a critical role of in determining neuronal excitability following nerve injury. Few data are available on the role of leak K2P channels after peripheral axotomy in mammals. Results Here we describe that rat sciatic nerve axotomy induces hyperexcitability of L4-L5 DRG sensory neurons and decreases TRESK (K2P18.1) expression, a channel with a major contribution to total leak current in DRGs. While the expression of other channels from the same family did not significantly change, injury markers ATF3 and Cacna2d1 were highly upregulated. Similarly, acute sensory neuron dissociation (in vitro axotomy) produced marked hyperexcitability and similar total background currents compared with neurons injured in vivo. In addition, the sanshool derivative IBA, which blocked TRESK currents in transfected HEK293 cells and DRGs, increased intracellular calcium in 49% of DRG neurons in culture. Most IBA-responding neurons (71%) also responded to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, indicating that they were nociceptors. Additional evidence of a biological role of TRESK channels was provided by behavioral evidence of pain (flinching and licking), in vivo electrophysiological evidence of C-nociceptor activation following IBA injection in the rat hindpaw, and increased sensitivity to painful pressure after TRESK knockdown in vivo. Conclusions In summary, our results clearly support an important role of TRESK channels in determining neuronal excitability in specific DRG neurons subpopulations, and show that axonal injury down-regulates TRESK channels, therefore contributing to neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:21527011

  13. Characterization of tests of functional recovery after median and ulnar nerve injury and repair in the rat forelimb.

    PubMed

    Galtrey, Clare M; Fawcett, James W

    2007-03-01

    The majority of human peripheral nerve injuries occur in the upper limb but the majority of studies in the rat are performed in the hindlimb. The upper and lower limbs differ in dexterity and control by supraspinal systems, so an upper limb model is a better representation of the common form of human injury. The purpose of this study was to further develop a rat model involving lesions of the median and ulnar nerves. To produce different degrees of misdirection of axons following nerve repair, we studied nerve crush, cut and repair of the two nerves, and cut and repair with crossover. Assessment of functional recovery was performed using a battery of motor and sensory tests: the staircase test, which assesses skilled forepaw reaching; grip strength meter, which assesses grip strength; pawprint analysis, which assesses toe spread and print length; horizontal ladder, which assesses forepaw placement during skilled locomotion; modified Randall-Selitto device and electronic von Frey probes, which assess fine touch; and cold probes, which assess temperature sensation. All tests revealed deficits in forepaw function after nerve injury except the print length and modified Randall-Selitto device. The time course of functional recovery was observed over 15 weeks. The final degree of functional recovery achieved was related to the misdirection of axon regeneration. The tests that most clearly revealed the effects of axon misdirection on function were the skilled paw reaching and grip strength tests. The lesion model and functional tests that we have developed will be useful in testing therapeutic strategies for treating the consequences of inaccurate axon regeneration following peripheral nerve injury in humans. PMID:17374098

  14. Local and remote immune-mediated inflammation after mild peripheral nerve compression in rats.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Annina B; Coppieters, Michel W; Ruitenberg, Marc J; McLachlan, Elspeth M

    2013-07-01

    After experimental nerve injuries that extensively disrupt axons, such as chronic constriction injury, immune cells invade the nerve, related dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), and spinal cord, leading to hyperexcitability, raised sensitivity, and pain. Entrapment neuropathies, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, involve minimal axon damage, but patients often report widespread symptoms. To understand the underlying pathology, a tube was placed around the sciatic nerve in 8-week-old rats, leading to progressive mild compression as the animals grew. Immunofluorescence was used to examine myelin and axonal integrity, glia, macrophages, and T lymphocytes in the nerve, L5 DRGs, and spinal cord after 12 weeks. Tubes that did not constrict the nerve when applied caused extensive and ongoing loss of myelin, together with compromise of small-, but not large-, diameter axons. Macrophages and T lymphocytes infiltrated the nerve and DRGs. Activated glia proliferated in DRGs but not in spinal cord. Histologic findings were supported by clinical hyperalgesia to blunt pressure and cold allodynia. Tubes that did not compress the nerve induced only minor local inflammation. Thus, progressive mild nerve compression resulted in chronic local and remote immune-mediated inflammation depending on the degree of compression. Such neuroinflammation may explain the widespread symptoms in patients with entrapment neuropathies. PMID:23771220

  15. Up-regulated uridine kinase gene identified by RLCS in the ventral horn after crush injury to rat sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Yuh, I; Yaoi, T; Watanabe, S; Okajima, S; Hirasawa, Y; Fushiki, S

    1999-12-01

    Rat sciatic nerve crush injury is one of the models commonly employed for studying the mechanisms of nerve regeneration. In this study, we analyzed the temporal change of gene expression after injury in this model, to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in nerve regeneration. First, a cDNA analysis method, Restriction Landmark cDNA Scanning (RLCS), was applied to cells in the ventral horn of the spinal cord during a 7-day period after the crush injury. A total of 1991 cDNA species were detected as spots on gels, and 37 of these were shown to change after the injury. Temporally changed patterns were classified into three categories: the continuously up-regulated type (10 species), the transiently up-regulated type (22 species), and the down-regulated type (5 species). These complex patterns of gene expression demonstrated after the injury suggest that precise regulation in molecular pathways is required for accomplishing nerve regeneration. Secondly, the rat homologue of uridine kinase gene was identified as one of the up-regulated genes. Northern blot analysis on rat ventral horn tissue and brain revealed that the UK gene had three transcripts with different sizes (4.3, 1. 4, and 1.35 kb, respectively). All of the transcripts, especially the 4.3 kb one, were up-regulated mainly in a bimodal fashion during the 28-day period after the injury. The RLCS method that we employed in the present study shows promise as a means to fully analyze molecular changes in nerve regeneration in detail. PMID:10581173

  16. Diffuse Traumatic Axonal Injury in the Optic Nerve Does Not Elicit Retinal Ganglion Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaqiong; Fox, Michael A.; Povlishock, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Much of the morbidity following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Although most TAI studies focus on corpus callosum white matter, the visual system has received increased interest. To assess visual system TAI, we developed a mouse model of optic nerve TAI. It is unknown, however, whether this TAI causes retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. To address this issue, YFP-16 transgenic mice were subjected to mild TBI and followed from 2 to 28 days. Neither TUNEL-positive or cleaved caspase-3 immunoreactive RGCs were observed from 2 to 28 days post-TBI. Quantification of immunoreactivity of Brn3a, an RGC marker, demonstrated no RGC loss; parallel electron microscopic analysis confirmed RGC viability. Persistent RGC survival was also consistent with the finding of reorganization in the proximal axonal segments following TAI wherein microglia/macrophages remained inactive. In contrast, activated microglia/macrophages closely enveloped the distal disconnected, degenerating axonal segments at 7 to 28 days post-injury, thereby confirming that this model consistently evoked TAI followed by disconnection. Collectively, these data provide novel insight into the evolving pathobiology associated with TAI that will form a foundation for future studies exploring TAI therapy and its downstream consequences. PMID:23860030

  17. Immediate electrical stimulation enhances regeneration and reinnervation and modulates spinal plastic changes after sciatic nerve injury and repair.

    PubMed

    Vivó, Meritxell; Puigdemasa, Antoni; Casals, Laura; Asensio, Elena; Udina, Esther; Navarro, Xavier

    2008-05-01

    We have studied whether electrical stimulation immediately after nerve injury may enhance axonal regeneration and modulate plastic changes at the spinal cord level underlying the appearance of hyperreflexia. Two groups of adult rats were subjected to sciatic nerve section followed by suture repair. One group (ES) received electrical stimulation (3 V, 0.1 ms at 20 Hz) for 1 h after injury. A second group served as control (C). Nerve conduction, H reflex, motor evoked potentials, and algesimetry tests were performed at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 weeks after surgery, to assess muscle reinnervation and changes in excitability of spinal cord circuitry. The electrophysiological results showed higher levels of reinnervation, and histological results a significantly higher number of regenerated myelinated fibers in the distal tibial nerve in group ES in comparison with group C. The monosynaptic H reflex was facilitated in the injured limb, to a higher degree in group C than in group ES. The amplitudes of motor evoked potentials were similar in both groups, although the MEP/M ratio was increased in group C compared to group ES, indicating mild central motor hyperexcitability. Immunohistochemical labeling of sensory afferents in the spinal cord dorsal horn showed prevention of the reduction in expression of substance P at one month postlesion in group ES. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation applied after sciatic nerve injury promotes axonal regeneration over a long distance and reduces facilitation of spinal motor responses. PMID:18316076

  18. A standardized method to create peripheral nerve injury in dogs using an automatic non-serrated forceps★

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuhui; Wan, Liang; Li, Xinyuan; Meng, Youqiang; Zhu, Ningxi; Yang, Min; Feng, Baohui; Zhang, Wenchuan; Zhu, Shugan; Li, Shiting

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a method that not only generates an automatic and standardized crush injury in the skull base, but also provides investigators with the option to choose from a range of varying pressure levels. We designed an automatic, non-serrated forceps that exerts a varying force of 0 to 100 g and lasts for a defined period of 0 to 60 seconds. This device was then used to generate a crush injury to the right oculomotor nerve of dogs with a force of 10 g for 15 seconds, resulting in a deficit in the pupil-light reflex and ptosis. Further testing of our model with Toluidine-blue staining demonstrated that, at 2 weeks post-surgery disordered oculomotor nerve fibers, axonal loss, and a thinner than normal myelin sheath were visible. Electrophysiological examination showed occasional spontaneous potentials. Together, these data verified that the model for oculomotor nerve injury was successful, and that the forceps we designed can be used to establish standard mechanical injury models of peripheral nerves. PMID:25337103

  19. Plasticity-Related PKMζ Signaling in the Insular Cortex Is Involved in the Modulation of Neuropathic Pain after Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jeongsoo; Kwon, Minjee; Cha, Myeounghoon; Tanioka, Motomasa; Hong, Seong-Karp; Bai, Sun Joon; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The insular cortex (IC) is associated with important functions linked with pain and emotions. According to recent reports, neural plasticity in the brain including the IC can be induced by nerve injury and may contribute to chronic pain. Continuous active kinase, protein kinase Mζ (PKMζ), has been known to maintain the long-term potentiation. This study was conducted to determine the role of PKMζ in the IC, which may be involved in the modulation of neuropathic pain. Mechanical allodynia test and immunohistochemistry (IHC) of zif268, an activity-dependent transcription factor required for neuronal plasticity, were performed after nerve injury. After ζ-pseudosubstrate inhibitory peptide (ZIP, a selective inhibitor of PKMζ) injection, mechanical allodynia test and immunoblotting of PKMζ, phospho-PKMζ (p-PKMζ), and GluR1 and GluR2 were observed. IHC demonstrated that zif268 expression significantly increased in the IC after nerve injury. Mechanical allodynia was significantly decreased by ZIP microinjection into the IC. The analgesic effect lasted for 12 hours. Moreover, the levels of GluR1, GluR2, and p-PKMζ were decreased after ZIP microinjection. These results suggest that peripheral nerve injury induces neural plasticity related to PKMζ and that ZIP has potential applications for relieving chronic pain. PMID:26457205

  20. Comparison of cutaneous nerve injury and vessel disruption complications following saphenous vein stripping using big or small olive heads

    PubMed Central

    Cicek, Mustafa Cuneyt; Cicek, Omer Faruk; Lafci, Gokhan; Uzun, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the nerve injury and vessel disruption complicaitons in patients undergoing saphenous vein stripping using olive heads of different sizes. Methods: Big olive heads were used in group A (n=50) and small olive heads were used in group B (n=50) from the ankle to the groin; in group C (n=50), the vein was stripped in two sections; in an upward fashion by stripping the distal portion from the ankle to the level of the knee using small olive heads and by stripping the proximal portion from the knee to the level of the groin using big olive heads. Results: Six months after the operation, nerve injury symptoms were identified in 26%, 4%, 6% of patients in groups A, B, and C respectively. Vessel disruption occurred 2% in group A, 32% in group B, and 4% in group C. Both vessel disruption and nerve injury complications of group C were significantly lower than group A and B (p<0.001). Conclusion: Saphenous stripping using big olive heads for the proximal portion from the groin down to the level of the knee and using small olive heads for the distal portion from the knee to the level of the ankle is the alternative method which results in minimal nerve injury and vessel disruption. PMID:27375703

  1. Cortical plasticity induced by different degrees of peripheral nerve injuries: a rat functional magnetic resonance imaging study under 9.4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major peripheral nerve injuries not only result in local deficits but may also cause distal atrophy of target muscles or permanent loss of sensation. Likewise, these injuries have been shown to instigate long-lasting central cortical reorganization. Methods Cortical plasticity changes induced after various types of major peripheral nerve injury using an electrical stimulation technique to the rat upper extremity and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were examined. Studies were completed out immediately after injury (acute stage) and at two weeks (subacute stage) to evaluate time affect on plasticity. Results After right-side median nerve transection, cortical representation of activation of the right-side ulnar nerve expanded intra-hemispherically into the cortical region that had been occupied by the median nerve representation After unilateral transection of both median and ulnar nerves, cortical representation of activation of the radial nerve on the same side of the body also demonstrated intra-hemispheric expansion. However, simultaneous electrical stimulation of the contralateral uninjured median and ulnar nerves resulted in a representation that had expanded both intra- and inter-hemispherically into the cortical region previously occupied by the two transected nerve representations. Conclusions After major peripheral nerve injury, an adjacent nerve, with similar function to the injured nerve, may become significantly over-activated in the cortex when stimulated. This results in intra-hemispheric cortical expansion as the only component of cortical plasticity. When all nerves responsible for a certain function are injured, the same nerves on the contralateral side of the body are affected and become significantly over-activated during a task. Both intra- and inter-hemispheric cortical expansion exist, while the latter dominates cortical plasticity. PMID:23659705

  2. A Review of Bioactive Release from Nerve Conduits as a Neurotherapeutic Strategy for Neuronal Growth in Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, Yahya E.; Bijukumar, Divya; du Toit, Lisa C.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration strategies employ the use of polymeric engineered nerve conduits encompassed with components of a delivery system. This allows for the controlled and sustained release of neurotrophic growth factors for the enhancement of the innate regenerative capacity of the injured nerves. This review article focuses on the delivery of neurotrophic factors (NTFs) and the importance of the parameters that control release kinetics in the delivery of optimal quantities of NTFs for improved therapeutic effect and prevention of dose dumping. Studies utilizing various controlled-release strategies, in attempt to obtain ideal release kinetics, have been reviewed in this paper. Release strategies discussed include affinity-based models, crosslinking techniques, and layer-by-layer technologies. Currently available synthetic hollow nerve conduits, an alternative to the nerve autografts, have proven to be successful in the bridging and regeneration of primarily the short transected nerve gaps in several patient cases. However, current research emphasizes on the development of more advanced nerve conduits able to simulate the effectiveness of the autograft which includes, in particular, the ability to deliver growth factors. PMID:25143934

  3. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery, especially extreme lateral interbody fusion: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the lumbar spine, do more nerve root injuries occur utilizing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques versus open lumbar procedures? To answer this question, we compared the frequency of nerve root injuries for multiple open versus MIS operations including diskectomy, laminectomy with/without fusion addressing degenerative disc disease, stenosis, and/or degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods: Several of Desai et al. large Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial studies showed the frequency for nerve root injury following an open diskectomy ranged from 0.13% to 0.25%, for open laminectomy/stenosis with/without fusion it was 0%, and for open laminectomy/stenosis/degenerative spondylolisthesis with/without fusion it was 2%. Results: Alternatively, one study compared the incidence of root injuries utilizing MIS transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) techniques; 7.8% of PLIF versus 2% of TLIF patients sustained root injuries. Furthermore, even higher frequencies of radiculitis and nerve root injuries occurred during anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIFs) versus extreme lateral interbody fusions (XLIFs). These high frequencies were far from acceptable; 15.8% following ALIF experienced postoperative radiculitis, while 23.8% undergoing XLIF sustained root/plexus deficits. Conclusions: This review indicates that MIS (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF) lumbar surgery resulted in a higher incidence of root injuries, radiculitis, or plexopathy versus open lumbar surgical techniques. Furthermore, even a cursory look at the XLIF data demonstrated the greater danger posed to neural tissue by this newest addition to the MIS lumbar surgical armamentariu. The latter should prompt us as spine surgeons to question why the XLIF procedure is still being offered to our patients? PMID:26904372

  4. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice display cold allodynia, but enhanced recovery from spared-nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Piskoun, Boris; Russo, Lori; Norcini, Monica; Blanck, Thomas; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Background The function of the Cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Mounting evidence suggest that CB1R expression and activation may contribute to pain. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice (CB1R−/−) generated on a C57Bl/6 background exhibit hypoalgesia in the hotplate assay and formalin test. These findings suggest that Cannabinoid 1 receptor expression mediates the responses to at least some types of painful stimuli. By using this mouse line, we sought to determine if the lack of Cannabinoid 1 receptor unveils a general hypoalgesic phenotype, including protection against the development of neuropathic pain. The acetone test was used to measure cold sensitivity, the electronic von Frey was used to measure mechanical thresholds before and after spared-nerve injury, and analysis of footprint patterns was conducted to determine if motor function is differentially affected after nerve-injury in mice with varying levels of Cannabinoid 1 receptor. Results At baseline, CB1R−/− mice were hypersensitive in the acetone test, and this phenotype was maintained after spared-nerve injury. Using calcium imaging of lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures, a higher percentage of neurons isolated from CB1R−/− mice were menthol sensitive relative to DRG isolated from wild-type (CB1R+/+) mice. Baseline mechanical thresholds did not differ among genotypes, and mechanical hypersensitivity developed similarly in the first two weeks following spared-nerve injury (SNI). At two weeks post-SNI, CB1R−/− mice recovered significantly from mechanical hypersensitivity, while the CB1R+/+ mice did not. Heterozygous knockouts (CB1R+/−) transiently developed cold allodynia only after injury, but recovered mechanical thresholds to a similar extent as the CB1R−/− mice. Sciatic functional indices, which reflect overall nerve health, and alternation coefficients, which indicate uniformity of strides, were not significantly different

  5. Patient outcome after surgical management of the spinal accessory nerve injury: A long-term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Göransson, Harry; Leppänen, Olli V; Vastamäki, Martti

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: A lesion in the spinal accessory nerve is typically iatrogenic: related to lymph node biopsy or excision. This injury may cause paralysis of the trapezius muscle and thus result in a characteristic group of symptoms and signs, including depression and winging of the scapula, drooped shoulder, reduced shoulder abduction, and pain. The elements evaluated in this long-term follow-up study include range of shoulder motion, pain, patients’ satisfaction, delay of surgery, surgical procedure, occupational status, functional outcome, and other clinical findings. Methods: We reviewed the medical records of a consecutive 37 patients (11 men and 26 women) having surgery to correct spinal accessory nerve injury. Neurolysis was the procedure in 24 cases, direct nerve repair for 9 patients, and nerve grafting for 4. Time elapsed between the injury and the surgical operation ranged from 2 to 120 months. The patients were interviewed and clinically examined after an average of 10.2 years postoperatively. Results: The mean active range of movement of the shoulder improved at abduction 44° (43%) in neurolysis, 59° (71%) in direct nerve repair, and 30° (22%) in nerve-grafting patients. No or only slight atrophy of the trapezius muscle was observable in 75%, 44%, and 50%, and no or controllable pain was observable in 63%, 56%, and 50%. Restriction of shoulder abduction preceded deterioration of shoulder flexion. Patients’ overall dissatisfaction with the state of their upper extremity was associated with pain, lower strength in shoulder movements, and occupational problems. Conclusion: We recommend avoiding unnecessary delay in the exploration of the spinal accessory nerve, if a neural lesion is suspected. PMID:27152195

  6. Functional and morphological assessment of a standardized rat sciatic nerve crush injury with a non-serrated clamp.

    PubMed

    Varejão, Artur S P; Cabrita, António M; Meek, Marcel F; Bulas-Cruz, José; Melo-Pinto, Pedro; Raimondo, Stefania; Geuna, Stefano; Giacobini-Robecchi, Maria G

    2004-11-01

    Peripheral nerve researchers frequently use the rat sciatic nerve crush as a model for axonotmesis. Unfortunately, studies from various research groups report results from different crush techniques and by using a variety of evaluation tools, making comparisons between studies difficult. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the sequence of functional and morphologic changes after an acute sciatic nerve crush injury with a non-serrated clamp, giving a final standardized pressure of p = 9 MPa. Functional recovery was evaluated using the sciatic functional index (SFI), the extensor postural thrust (EPT) and the withdrawal reflex latency (WRL), before injury, and then at weekly intervals until week 8 postoperatively. The rats were also evaluated preoperatively and at weeks 2, 4, and 8 by ankle kinematics, toe out angle (TOA), and gait-stance duration. In addition, the motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and the gastrocnemius-soleus weight parameters were measured just before euthanasia. Finally, structural, ultrastructural and histomorphometric analyses were carried out on regenerated nerve fibers. At 8 weeks after the crush injury, a full functional recovery was predicted by SFI, EPT, TOA, and gait-stance duration, while all the other parameters were still recovering their original values. On the other hand, only two of the histomorphometric parameters of regenerated nerve fibers, namely myelin thickness/axon diameter ratio and fiber/axon diameter ratio, returned to normal values while all other parameters were significantly different from normal values. The employment of traditional methods of functional evaluation in conjunction with the modern techniques of computerized analysis of gait and histomorphometric analysis should thus be recommended for an overall assessment of recovery in the rat sciatic nerve crush model. PMID:15684656

  7. Plasticity of α2-adrenergic spinal antinociception following nerve injury: selective, bidirectional interaction with the delta opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Aira, Zigor; Barrenetxea, Teresa; Buesa, Itsaso; Azkue, Jon Jatsu

    2015-01-12

    Interactions of opioid receptors with other receptor families can be made use of to improve analgesia and reduce adverse effects of opioid analgesics. We investigated interactions of the α2-adrenergic receptor (α2AR) with opioid receptors of the mu (MOR) and delta (DOR) types in the spinal dorsal horn in an animal model of neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve ligation. Nine days after nerve injury, immunoreactivity for the α2AR subtype A (α2AAR) was increased both in tissue homogenates and at pre- and post-synaptic sites in transverse sections. The efficacy of spinally administered α2AAR agonist guanfacine at reducing C-fiber-evoked field potentials was increased in nerve-ligated rats. This reducing effect was impaired by simultaneous administration of DOR antagonist naltrindole, but not MOR antagonist CTOP, suggesting that concurrent DOR activation was required for α2AAR-mediated inhibition. While DOR agonist deltorphin II and MOR agonist DAMGO both effectively depressed C-fiber-evoked spinal field potentials, DOR- but not MOR-mediated depression was enhanced by subclinical guanfacine. In conscious, nerve-ligated rats, chronically administered deltorphin II produced stable thermal and mechanical antinociception over the 9 following days after nerve injury without apparent signs of habituation. Such an effect was dramatically enhanced by co-administration of a low dose of guanfacine, which reversed thermal and mechanical thresholds to levels near those prior to injury. The results suggest that spinal, α2AAR-mediated antinociception is increased after nerve injury and based on DOR co-activation. We demonstrate in vivo that α2AAR/DOR interaction can be exploited to provide effective behavioral antinociception during neuropathic pain. PMID:25446445

  8. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Tashima, Ryoichi; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Shiratori-Hayashi, Miho; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controversial because of experimental adverse effects of strong irradiation used for generating BM chimeric mice. In this study, we evaluated the PNI-induced spinal infiltration of BM-derived cells not only by irradiation-induced myeloablation with various conditioning regimens, but also by parabiosis and mice with genetically labelled microglia, models without irradiation and BM transplantation. Results obtained from these independent approaches provide compelling evidence indicating little contribution of circulating BM-derived cells to the population of spinal microglia after PNI. PMID:27005516

  9. Isolated muscle hypertrophy as a sign of radicular or peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed Central

    Mattle, H P; Hess, C W; Ludin, H P; Mumenthaler, M

    1991-01-01

    Two patients with isolated neurogenic hypertrophy of the trapezius muscle due to accessory nerve injury and a patient with neurogenic hypertrophy of the anterior tibial muscle due to chronic radicular lesion L4 are described. Electromyography of the affected muscles showed dense continuing spontaneous discharges of complex potentials. Muscle biopsy performed in two patients showed abundant hypertrophic muscle fibres, identified in one case by ATP-ase reaction as being of predominantly type I. In the majority of previously reported patients with neurogenic muscle hypertrophy confined to the calf muscle, a passive stretch mechanism was suggested as a cause of the hypertrophy. It is assumed that the excessive spontaneous muscle activity gave rise to the hypertrophy in these patients. This may also be true in previously reported patients with neurogenic hypertrophy and similar spontaneous activity in electromyography. Images PMID:2056318

  10. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Tashima, Ryoichi; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Shiratori-Hayashi, Miho; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controversial because of experimental adverse effects of strong irradiation used for generating BM chimeric mice. In this study, we evaluated the PNI-induced spinal infiltration of BM-derived cells not only by irradiation-induced myeloablation with various conditioning regimens, but also by parabiosis and mice with genetically labelled microglia, models without irradiation and BM transplantation. Results obtained from these independent approaches provide compelling evidence indicating little contribution of circulating BM-derived cells to the population of spinal microglia after PNI. PMID:27005516

  11. Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls and nerve injury: restoring an imbalance between descending monoamine inhibitions and facilitations.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Kirsty; Patel, Ryan; Goncalves, Leonor; Townson, Louisa; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNICs) utilize descending inhibitory controls through poorly understood brain stem pathways. The human counterpart, conditioned pain modulation, is reduced in patients with neuropathy aligned with animal data showing a loss of descending inhibitory noradrenaline controls together with a gain of 5-HT3 receptor-mediated facilitations after neuropathy. We investigated the pharmacological basis of DNIC and whether it can be restored after neuropathy. Deep dorsal horn neurons were activated by von Frey filaments applied to the hind paw, and DNIC was induced by a pinch applied to the ear in isoflurane-anaesthetized animals. Spinal nerve ligation was the model of neuropathy. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control was present in control rats but abolished after neuropathy. α2 adrenoceptor mechanisms underlie DNIC because the antagonists, yohimbine and atipamezole, markedly attenuated this descending inhibition. We restored DNIC in spinal nerve ligated animals by blocking 5-HT3 descending facilitations with the antagonist ondansetron or by enhancing norepinephrine modulation through the use of reboxetine (a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, NRI) or tapentadol (μ-opioid receptor agonist and NRI). Additionally, ondansetron enhanced DNIC in normal animals. Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls are reduced after peripheral nerve injury illustrating the central impact of neuropathy, leading to an imbalance in descending excitations and inhibitions. Underlying noradrenergic mechanisms explain the relationship between conditioned pain modulation and the use of tapentadol and duloxetine (a serotonin, NRI) in patients. We suggest that pharmacological strategies through manipulation of the monoamine system could be used to enhance DNIC in patients by blocking descending facilitations with ondansetron or enhancing norepinephrine inhibitions, so possibly reducing chronic pain. PMID:26010460

  12. Neuroprotective role of nerve growth factor in hypoxicischemic injury. From brain to skin.

    PubMed

    Chiaretti, Antonio; Falsini, Benedetto; Aloe, Luigi; Pierri, Filomena; Fantacci, Claudia; Riccardi, Riccardo

    2011-06-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic injuries (HII) of the brain, optic pathways, and skin are frequently associated with poor neurological and clinical outcome. Unfortunately, no new therapeutic approaches have been proposed for these conditions. Recently, experimental and clinical studies showed that nerve growth factor (NGF) can improve neurological deficits, visual loss and skin damage after HII. Based on these studies, we report the effects of NGF administration in different lesions of the brain, optic pathways and skin. 2.5S NGF purified and lyophilized from male mouse submaxillary glands was utilized for the treatment. NGF administration was started in absence of recovery after conventional and standardized treatment. One mg NGF was administered via the external catheter into the brain, by drop administration in the eye, and by subcutaneous administration in the skin. We treated 4 patients: 2 children with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage, an adult patient with an optic glioma-induced visual loss and a child with a severe crush syndrome of the lower left limb. After NGF treatment, we observed an amelioration of both neurological and electrophysiological function of the brain, a subjective and objective improvement of visual function, and a gradual improvement of ischemic skin lesion. No side effects were related to NGF treatment in all patients studied. Our observation shows that NGF administration may be an effective and safe adjunct therapy in patients with severe HII. The beneficial and prolonged effect on nerve function suggests a neuroprotective mechanism exerted by NGF on the residual viable neurological pathways of these patients. PMID:21702000

  13. Galectin-3 Inhibition Is Associated with Neuropathic Pain Attenuation after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhicong; Han, Qi; Wang, Xiaolei; Ai, Zisheng; Zheng, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains a prevalent and persistent clinical problem because it is often poorly responsive to the currently used analgesics. It is very urgent to develop novel drugs to alleviate neuropathic pain. Galectin-3 (gal3) is a multifunctional protein belonging to the carbohydrate-ligand lectin family, which is expressed by different cells. Emerging studies showed that gal3 elicits a pro-inflammatory response by recruiting and activating lymphocytes, macrophages and microglia. In the study we investigated whether gal3 inhibition could suppress neuroinflammation and alleviate neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury. We found that L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) increases the expression of gal3 in dorsal root ganglions at the mRNA and protein level. Intrathecal administration of modified citrus pectin (MCP), a gal3 inhibitor, reduces gal3 expression in dorsal root ganglions. MCP treatment also inhibits SNL-induced gal3 expression in primary rat microglia. SNL results in an increased activation of autophagy that contributes to microglial activation and subsequent inflammatory response. Intrathecal administration of MCP significantly suppresses SNL-induced autophagy activation. MCP also inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced autophagy in cultured microglia in vitro. MCP further decreases LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory mediators including IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 by regulating autophagy. Intrathecal administration of MCP results in adecreased mechanical and cold hypersensitivity following SNL. These results demonstrated that gal3 inhibition is associated with the suppression of SNL-induced inflammatory process andneurophathic pain attenuation. PMID:26872020

  14. The Efficacy of Jing Wan Hong Ointment for Nerve Injury Diabetic Foot Ulcer and Its Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shumei; Zhang, Mixia; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Xuebin; Cui, Guangzhi; Zhang, Yanjun

    2014-01-01

    Jing Wan Hong ointment contains 30 kinds of Chinese herbs, with functions of activating blood circulation to disperse blood stasis, clearing heat, eliminating dampness, and reducing swelling by detoxification. Therefore, Jing Wan Hong ointment may facilitate the healing of ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and mechanisms of Jing Wan Hong ointment for healing diabetic foot ulceration in Wistar rats induced by streptozotocin and sciatic nerve damage. The results showed that Jing Wan Hong ointment had a marked effect on foot ulcers in diabetic rats induced by initial nerve injury. These effects were manifested by reducing the foot ulcer size and Wagner grade after seven days of treatment. The diabetic rats with foot ulcers were almost healed after 21 days of treatment. Moreover, the mechanisms of this effect seem to be dependent on increased expression of PDGF mRNA, but there was no influence on the expression of TGF-β, VEGF, and FLT-1 mRNA. PMID:25538944

  15. Galectin-3 Inhibition Is Associated with Neuropathic Pain Attenuation after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Zisheng; Zheng, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains a prevalent and persistent clinical problem because it is often poorly responsive to the currently used analgesics. It is very urgent to develop novel drugs to alleviate neuropathic pain. Galectin-3 (gal3) is a multifunctional protein belonging to the carbohydrate-ligand lectin family, which is expressed by different cells. Emerging studies showed that gal3 elicits a pro-inflammatory response by recruiting and activating lymphocytes, macrophages and microglia. In the study we investigated whether gal3 inhibition could suppress neuroinflammation and alleviate neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury. We found that L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) increases the expression of gal3 in dorsal root ganglions at the mRNA and protein level. Intrathecal administration of modified citrus pectin (MCP), a gal3 inhibitor, reduces gal3 expression in dorsal root ganglions. MCP treatment also inhibits SNL-induced gal3 expression in primary rat microglia. SNL results in an increased activation of autophagy that contributes to microglial activation and subsequent inflammatory response. Intrathecal administration of MCP significantly suppresses SNL-induced autophagy activation. MCP also inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced autophagy in cultured microglia in vitro. MCP further decreases LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory mediators including IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 by regulating autophagy. Intrathecal administration of MCP results in adecreased mechanical and cold hypersensitivity following SNL. These results demonstrated that gal3 inhibition is associated with the suppression of SNL-induced inflammatory process andneurophathic pain attenuation. PMID:26872020

  16. Purinergic Modulation of Spinal Neuroglial Maladaptive Plasticity Following Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Giovanni; Colangelo, Anna Maria; Berbenni, Miluscia; Ippolito, Vita Maria; De Luca, Ciro; Verdesca, Francesco; Savarese, Leonilde; Alberghina, Lilia; Maggio, Nicola; Papa, Michele

    2015-12-01

    Modulation of spinal reactive gliosis following peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a promising strategy to restore synaptic homeostasis. Oxidized ATP (OxATP), a nonselective antagonist of purinergic P2X receptors, was found to recover a neuropathic behavior following PNI. We investigated the role of intraperitoneal (i.p.) OxATP treatment in restoring the expression of neuronal and glial markers in the mouse spinal cord after sciatic spared nerve injury (SNI). Using in vivo two-photon microscopy, we imaged Ca(2+) transients in neurons and astrocytes of the dorsal horn of spinal cord at rest and upon right hind paw electrical stimulation in sham, SNI, and OxATP-treated mice. Neuropathic behavior was investigated by von Frey and thermal plantar test. Glial [glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1)] and GABAergic [vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT) and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65/76 (GAD65/67)] markers and glial [glutamate transporter (GLT1) and GLAST] and neuronal amino acid [EAAC1, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGLUT1)] transporters have been evaluated. In SNI mice, we found (i) increased glial response, (ii) decreased glial amino acid transporters, and (iii) increased levels of neuronal amino acid transporters, and (iv) in vivo analysis of spinal neurons and astrocytes showed a persistent increase of Ca(2+) levels. OxATP administration reduced glial activation, modulated the expression of glial and neuronal glutamate/GABA transporters, restored neuronal and astrocytic Ca(2+) levels, and prevented neuropathic behavior. In vitro studies validated that OxATP (i) reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), (ii) reduced astrocytic proliferation, (iii) increase vGLUT expression. All together, these data support the correlation between reactive gliosis and perturbation of the spinal synaptic homeostasis and the role played by the purinergic system in modulating spinal plasticity following PNI. PMID:25352445

  17. Improvement in acupoint selection for acupuncture of nerves surrounding the injury site: electro-acupuncture with Governor vessel with local meridian acupoints.

    PubMed

    He, Guan-Heng; Ruan, Jing-Wen; Zeng, Yuan-Shan; Zhou, Xin; Ding, Ying; Zhou, Guang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury not only affects the site of the injury, but can also induce neuronal apoptosis at the spinal cord. However, many acupuncture clinicians still focus only on the injury site, selecting acupoints entirely along the injured nerve trunk and neglecting other regions; this may delay onset of treatment efficacy and rehabilitation. Therefore, in the present study, we compared the clinical efficacy of acupuncture at Governor vessel and local meridian acupoints combined (GV/LM group) with acupuncture at local meridian acupoints alone (LM group) in the treatment of patients with peripheral nerve injury. In the GV/LM group (n = 15), in addition to meridian acupoints at the injury site, the following acupoints on the Governor vessel were stimulated: Baihui (GV20), Fengfu (GV16), Dazhui (GV14), and Shenzhu (GV12), selected to treat nerve injury of the upper limb, and Jizhong (GV6), Mingmen (GV4), Yaoyangguan (GV3), and Yaoshu (GV2) to treat nerve injury of the lower limb. In the LM group (n = 15), only meridian acupoints along the injured nerve were selected. Both groups had electroacupuncture treatment for 30 minutes, once a day, 5 times per week, for 6 weeks. Two cases dropped out of the LM group. A good or excellent clinical response was obtained in 80% of the patients in the GV/LM group and 38.5% of the LM group. In a second study, an additional 20 patients underwent acupuncture with the same prescription as the GV/LM group. Electomyographic nerve conduction tests were performed before and after acupuncture to explore the mechanism of action of the treatment. An effective response was observed in 80.0% of the patients, with greater motor nerve conduction velocity and amplitude after treatment, indicating that electroacupuncture on specific Governor vessel acupoints promotes functional motor nerve repair after peripheral nerve injury. In addition, electromyography was performed before, during and after electroacupuncture in one patient with radial

  18. Functional recovery from sciatic nerve crush injury is delayed because of increased distal atrophy in mice lacking the p75 receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Xianjun; Bi, Jianzhong

    2016-08-17

    Peripheral nerve injuries are becoming more common, but without effective treatment, the outcome is often very poor. Recent research shows that p75 plays an important role in nerve regeneration, but its mechanisms of action during behavioral recovery and axon regrowth remain unclear. To investigate these mechanisms, we examined recovery from sciatic nerve crush injury in wild-type and p75 knockout mice. We found that sciatic nerve crush injury upregulates mRNA and protein expressions of p75 and p75 deficiency alters gene and protein expression of molecules associated with distal portion atrophy. However, p75 deletion did not alter gene and protein expression in the spinal cord of molecules related to neuronal intrinsic growth capacity. Behavioral testing showed that functional recovery was delayed in mice lacking p75. These results suggest that p75 regulates gene and protein expression that limits the distal atrophy after sciatic nerve injury, thereby regulating axonal growth and functional recovery. PMID:27348017

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Forearm Nerve Blocks: A Novel Application for Pain Control in Adult Patients with Digit Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Patricia Javedani, Parisa; Amini, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Phalanx fractures and interphalangeal joint dislocations commonly present to the emergency department. Although these orthopedic injuries are not complex, the four-point digital block used for anesthesia during the reduction can be painful. Additionally, cases requiring prolonged manipulation or consultation for adequate reduction may require repeat blockade. This case series reports four patients presenting after mechanical injuries resulting in phalanx fracture or interphalangeal joint dislocations. These patients received an ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block of the forearm with successful subsequent reduction. To our knowledge, use of ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks of the forearm for anesthesia in reduction of upper extremity digit injuries in adult patients in the emergency department setting has not been described before. PMID:27555971

  20. Analysis of the Istanbul Forensic Medicine Institute expert decisions on recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries due to thyroidectomy between 2008–2012

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, M. Arif; Koç, Okay; Ekiz, Feza; Ağaçhan, A. Feran; Göret, Nuri Emrah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the approach of Forensic Medicine Institution for recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries. In addition, parameters that were taken into consideration by Forensic Medicine Institution in the differentiation of complication and malpractice were evaluated. Material and Methods: The files of 38 patients, with recurrent laryngeal nerve injury following thyroidectomy, that were referred to Istanbul Forensic Medicine Institute with request of expert opinion between 2008–2012 were retrospectively investigated. Data regarding expert decisions, age, gender, diagnosis, hospital type, preoperative vocal cord examination, intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM), identification of nerve injury during operation, repair of nerve during operation, and type of injury were assessed. Results: Surgeons were found to be faulty in all files with bilateral nerve injury, however, one-sided injury files were considered as a medical complication. Twenty-one (55.2%) patients were female, and 17 (44.8%) were male, with a mean age of 35,8 in women, and 34,1 in men. None of these patients had undergone preoperative vocal cord assessment. The recurrent laryngeal nerve was intraoperatively identified in 21 (55.2%) patients, while it was not seen in 17 (44.8%) patients. IONM was not applied in any patients. There was no attempt for nerve repair during any operation. Nineteen patients had unilateral, and 19 patients had bilateral nerve damage. Conclusion: Bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries are considered as malpractice, when imaging or pathology reports fail to state a cause for difficulty in nerve identification. PMID:26985157

  1. Publications on Peripheral Nerve Injuries during World War I: A Dramatic Increase in Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Publications from French (Jules Tinel and Chiriachitza Athanassio-Bénisty), English (James Purves-Stewart, Arthur Henry Evans and Hartley Sidney Carter), German (Otfrid Foerster and Hermann Oppenheim) and American (Charles Harrison Frazier and Byron Stookey) physicians from both sides of the front during World War I (WWI) contributed to a dramatic increase in knowledge about peripheral nerve injuries. Silas Weir Mitchell's original experience with respect to these injuries, and particularly causalgia, during the American Civil War was further expanded in Europe during WWI. Following the translation of one of his books, he was referred to mainly by French physicians. During WWI, several French books were in turn translated into English, which influenced American physicians, as was observed in the case of Byron Stookey. The establishment of neurological centres played an important role in the concentration of experience and knowledge. Several eponyms originated during this period (including the Hoffmann-Tinel sign and the Froment sign). Electrodiagnostic tools were increasingly used. PMID:27035152

  2. A minocycline derivative reduces nerve injury-induced allodynia, LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 microglial production and signaling via toll-like receptors 2 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Leandro F. S.; Godin, Adriana M.; Zhang, Yingning; Jarussophon, Suwatchai; Ferreira, Bruno C. S.; Machado, Renes R.; Maier, Steven F.; Konishi, Yasuo; de Freitas, Rossimiriam P.; Fiebich, Bernd L.; Watkins, Linda R.; Coelho, Márcio M.; Moraes, Márcio F. D.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have shown that minocycline, an antibacterial tetracycline, suppresses experimental pain. While minocycline’s positive effects on pain resolution suggest that clinical use of such drugs may prove beneficial, minocycline’s antibiotic actions and divalent cation (Ca2+; Mg2+) chelating effects detract from its potential utility. Thus, we tested the antiallodynic effect induced by a non-antibacterial, non-chelating minocycline derivative in a model of neuropathic pain and performed an initial investigation of its anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. Intraperitoneal minocycline (100 mg/kg) and 12S-hydroxy-1,12-pyrazolinominocycline (PMIN; 23.75, 47.50 or 95.00 mg/kg) reduce the mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of mouse sciatic nerve. PMIN reduces the LPS-induced production of PGE2 by primary microglial cell cultures. Human embryonic kidney cells were transfected to express human toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and the signaling via both receptors stimulated with PAM3CSK4 or LPS (respectively) was affected either by minocycline or PMIN. Importantly, these treatments did not affect the cell viability, as assessed by MTT test. Altogether, these results reinforce the evidence that the anti-inflammatory and experimental pain suppressive effects induced by tetracyclines are neither necessarily linked to antibacterial nor to Ca2+ chelating activities. This study supports the evaluation of the potential usefulness of PMIN in the management of neuropathic pain, as its lack of antibacterial and Ca2+ chelating activities might confer greater safety over conventional tetracyclines. PMID:23523650

  3. A minocycline derivative reduces nerve injury-induced allodynia, LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 microglial production and signaling via toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Leandro F S; Godin, Adriana M; Zhang, Yingning; Jarussophon, Suwatchai; Ferreira, Bruno C S; Machado, Renes R; Maier, Steven F; Konishi, Yasuo; de Freitas, Rossimiriam P; Fiebich, Bernd L; Watkins, Linda R; Coelho, Márcio M; Moraes, Márcio F D

    2013-05-24

    Many studies have shown that minocycline, an antibacterial tetracycline, suppresses experimental pain. While minocycline's positive effects on pain resolution suggest that clinical use of such drugs may prove beneficial, minocycline's antibiotic actions and divalent cation (Ca(2+); Mg(2+)) chelating effects detract from its potential utility. Thus, we tested the antiallodynic effect induced by a non-antibacterial, non-chelating minocycline derivative in a model of neuropathic pain and performed an initial investigation of its anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. Intraperitoneal minocycline (100mg/kg) and 12S-hydroxy-1,12-pyrazolinominocycline (PMIN; 23.75 mg/kg, 47.50mg/kg or 95.00 mg/kg) reduce the mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of mouse sciatic nerve. PMIN reduces the LPS-induced production of PGE2 by primary microglial cell cultures. Human embryonic kidney cells were transfected to express human toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and the signaling via both receptors stimulated with PAM3CSK4 or LPS (respectively) was affected either by minocycline or PMIN. Importantly, these treatments did not affect the cell viability, as assessed by MTT test. Altogether, these results reinforce the evidence that the anti-inflammatory and experimental pain suppressive effects induced by tetracyclines are neither necessarily linked to antibacterial nor to Ca(2+) chelating activities. This study supports the evaluation of the potential usefulness of PMIN in the management of neuropathic pain, as its lack of antibacterial and Ca(2+) chelating activities might confer greater safety over conventional tetracyclines. PMID:23523650

  4. Corticotrigeminal Projections from the Insular Cortex to the Trigeminal Caudal Subnucleus Regulate Orofacial Pain after Nerve Injury via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Activation in Insular Cortex Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Li, Zhi-Hua; Feng, Ban; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Han; Li, Hui; Chen, Tao; Cui, Jing; Zang, Wei-Dong; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Cortical neuroplasticity alterations are implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic orofacial pain. However, the relationship between critical cortex excitability and orofacial pain maintenance has not been fully elucidated. We recently demonstrated a top-down corticospinal descending pain modulation pathway from the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to the spinal dorsal horn that could directly regulate nociceptive transmission. Thus, we aimed to investigate possible corticotrigeminal connections that directly influence orofacial nociception in rats. Infraorbital nerve chronic constriction injury (IoN-CCI) induced significant orofacial nociceptive behaviors as well as pain-related negative emotions such as anxiety/depression in rats. By combining retrograde and anterograde tract tracing, we found powerful evidence that the trigeminal caudal subnucleus (Vc), especially the superficial laminae (I/II), received direct descending projections from granular and dysgranular parts of the insular cortex (IC). Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), an important signaling molecule involved in neuroplasticity, was significantly activated in the IC following IoN-CCI. Moreover, in IC slices from IoN-CCI rats, U0126, an inhibitor of ERK activation, decreased both the amplitude and the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and reduced the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of Vc-projecting neurons. Additionally, U0126 also reduced the number of action potentials in the Vc-projecting neurons. Finally, intra-IC infusion of U0126 obviously decreased Fos expression in the Vc, accompanied by the alleviation of both nociceptive behavior and negative emotions. Thus, the corticotrigeminal descending pathway from the IC to the Vc could directly regulate orofacial pain, and ERK deactivation in the IC could effectively alleviate neuropathic pain as well as pain-related negative emotions in IoN-CCI rats, probably through this top–down pathway. These findings may

  5. Traditional Chinese Medicine Tang-Luo-Ning Ameliorates Sciatic Nerve Injuries in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Da-Wei; Gao, Yan-Bin; Zhu, Zhi-Yao; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Tao-Jing; Li, Bu-Man; Wang, Jin-Yang; Li, Min-Zhou; Ma, Ming-Fei; Zhang, Na

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common microvascular complication of diabetes associated with high disability rate and low quality of life. Tang-Luo-Ning (TLN) is an effective traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of DPN. To illustrate the underlying neural protection mechanisms of TLN, the effect of TLN on electrophysiology and sciatic nerve morphology was investigated in a model of streptozotocin-induced DPN, as well as the underlying mechanism. Sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and digital sensory nerve conduction velocity were reduced in DPN and were significantly improved by TLN or α-lipoic acid at 10 and 20 weeks after streptozotocin injection. It was demonstrated that TLN intervention for 20 weeks significantly alleviated pathological injury as well as increased the phosphorylation of ErbB2, Erk, Bad (Ser112), and the mRNA expression of neuregulin 1 (Nrg1), GRB2-associated binding protein 1 (Gab1), and mammalian target of rapamycin (Mtor) in injured sciatic nerve. These novel therapeutic properties of TLN to promote Schwann cell survival may offer a promising alternative medicine for the patients to delay the progression of DPN. The underlying mechanism may be that TLN exerts neural protection effect after sciatic nerve injury through Nrg1/ErbB2→Erk/Bad Schwann cell survival signaling pathway. PMID:24288572

  6. Schwann cells transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding Fgf-2 promote motor neuron regeneration following sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Allodi, Ilary; Mecollari, Vasil; González-Pérez, Francisco; Eggers, Ruben; Hoyng, Stefan; Verhaagen, Joost; Navarro, Xavier; Udina, Esther

    2014-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) is a trophic factor expressed by glial cells and different neuronal populations. Addition of FGF-2 to spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants demonstrated that FGF-2 specifically increases motor neuron axonal growth. To further explore the potential capability of FGF-2 to promote axon regeneration, we produced a lentiviral vector (LV) to overexpress FGF-2 (LV-FGF2) in the injured rat peripheral nerve. Cultured Schwann cells transduced with FGF-2 and added to collagen matrix embedding spinal cord or DRG explants significantly increased motor but not sensory neurite outgrowth. LV-FGF2 was as effective as direct addition of the trophic factor to promote motor axon growth in vitro. Direct injection of LV-FGF2 into the rat sciatic nerve resulted in increased expression of FGF-2, which was localized in the basal lamina of Schwann cells. To investigate the in vivo effect of FGF-2 overexpression on axonal regeneration after nerve injury, Schwann cells transduced with LV-FGF2 were grafted in a silicone tube used to repair the resected rat sciatic nerve. Electrophysiological tests conducted for up to 2 months after injury revealed accelerated and more marked reinnervation of hindlimb muscles in the animals treated with LV-FGF2, with an increase in the number of motor and sensory neurons that reached the distal tibial nerve at the end of follow-up. PMID:24989458

  7. Effects of exogenous neurotrophin-3 on myocyte apoptosis and Ca2+-ATP enzyme levels following nerve injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yu-Zhen; Yang, Lin; Lu, Tan; Zhao, Hong-Xing; Ma, Chao; Zhao, Yi-Lei

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the influence of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) plasmids on neuronal apoptosis and Ca2+-ATP enzyme levels in injured muscles. We also investigated the mechanism underlying the role of NT-3 in delaying muscle atrophy following a peripheral nerve injury. Sixty adult Wistar rats were used to generate the peripheral nerve injury models. The rats were randomly assigned to the saline and NT-3 groups. Related indicators, such as caspase-3 protein expression, skeletal muscle cell apoptosis, and Ca2+-ATP enzyme expression were quantified. The expression levels of caspase-3 and the histone-muscle cell apoptosis rate in the NT-3 group decreased at different post-operative times following peripheral nerve injury, whereas NT-3 expression and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATP enzyme levels increased. Statistically significant differences were observed in the NT-3 group as compared to the saline group (P < 0.05). NT-3 mitigated muscle atrophy following peripheral nerve damage by inhibiting caspase-3 gene expression and increasing Ca2+-ATP enzymatic activity, ultimately reducing muscle apoptosis. PMID:26770627

  8. Upregulation of EMMPRIN (OX47) in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to the Development of Mechanical Allodynia after Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Sun, Yanyuan; Ren, Yingna; Gao, Yandong; Tian, Li; Liu, Yang; Pu, Yanan; Gou, Xingchun; Chen, Yanke; Lu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are widely implicated in inflammation and tissue remodeling associated with various neurodegenerative diseases and play an important role in nociception and allodynia. Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) plays a key regulatory role for MMP activities. However, the role of EMMPRIN in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Western blotting, real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), and immunofluorescence were performed to determine the changes of messenger RNA and protein of EMMPRIN/OX47 and their cellular localization in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) after nerve injury. Paw withdrawal threshold test was examined to evaluate the pain behavior in spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model. The lentivirus containing OX47 shRNA was injected into the DRG one day before SNL. The expression level of both mRNA and protein of OX47 was markedly upregulated in ipsilateral DRG after SNL. OX47 was mainly expressed in the extracellular matrix of DRG. Administration of shRNA targeted against OX47 in vivo remarkably attenuated mechanical allodynia induced by SNL. In conclusion, peripheral nerve injury induced upregulation of OX47 in the extracellular matrix of DRG. RNA interference against OX47 significantly suppressed the expression of OX47 mRNA and the development of mechanical allodynia. The altered expression of OX47 may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain after nerve injury. PMID:26697232

  9. Active skin perfusion and thermoregulatory response in the hand following nerve injury and repair in human upper extremities.

    PubMed

    Deng, Aidong; Liu, Dan; Gu, Chen; Gu, Xiaosong; Gu, Jianhui; Hu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous vasoconstriction/vasodilatation occurs in response to whole body and local cooling/heating, and the vasomotor activities play a pivotal role in thermal control of the human body. The mechanisms underlying regulation of skin blood flow involve both neurogenic and humeral/local chemical influence, contributing to the initial response to thermal stimuli and the prolonged phase of response, respectively. Previous studies have suggested the impairment of cutaneous thermal regulation after nerve injury. However, the evidence regarding how the skin perfusion and thermoregulatory response evolve after nerve injury and repair remains limited. Here we observed, by utilizing laser-Doppler perfusion imaging, baseline skin perfusion and perfusion change in response to thermal stimuli after median and ulnar nerve injury, and the results showed that baseline perfusion in autonomous skin area profoundly decreased and active rewarming after clod stress dramatically diminished before sensory recovery of the skin became detectable. In addition, baseline cutaneous perfusion was recovered as the skin regained touch sensation, and exhibited positive correlation to touch sensibility of the skin. These data indicate that both active perfusion and thermoregulatory response of the skin are markedly compromised during skin denervation and can be recovered by re-innervation. This suggests the importance of timely repair of injured nerve, especially in the practice of replantation. PMID:26529641

  10. Resuscitation therapy for traumatic brain injury-induced coma in rats: mechanisms of median nerve electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhen; Zhong, Ying-jun; Wang, Liang; Wei, Tian-qi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, rats were put into traumatic brain injury-induced coma and treated with median nerve electrical stimulation. We explored the wake-promoting effect, and possible mechanisms, of median nerve electrical stimulation. Electrical stimulation upregulated the expression levels of orexin-A and its receptor OX1R in the rat prefrontal cortex. Orexin-A expression gradually increased with increasing stimulation, while OX1R expression reached a peak at 12 hours and then decreased. In addition, after the OX1R antagonist, SB334867, was injected into the brain of rats after traumatic brain injury, fewer rats were restored to consciousness, and orexin-A and OXIR expression in the prefrontal cortex was downregulated. Our findings indicate that median nerve electrical stimulation induced an up-regulation of orexin-A and OX1R expression in the prefrontal cortex of traumatic brain injury-induced coma rats, which may be a potential mechanism involved in the wake-promoting effects of median nerve electrical stimulation. PMID:26170820

  11. Comparison of trophic factors' expression between paralyzed and recovering muscles after facial nerve injury. A quantitative analysis in time course.

    PubMed

    Grosheva, Maria; Nohroudi, Klaus; Schwarz, Alisa; Rink, Svenja; Bendella, Habib; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Klimaschewski, Lars; Gordon, Tessa; Angelov, Doychin N

    2016-05-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, recovery of motor performance negatively correlates with the poly-innervation of neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) due to excessive sprouting of the terminal Schwann cells. Denervated muscles produce short-range diffusible sprouting stimuli, of which some are neurotrophic factors. Based on recent data that vibrissal whisking is restored perfectly during facial nerve regeneration in blind rats from the Sprague Dawley (SD)/RCS strain, we compared the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), insulin growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF1, IGF2) and nerve growth factor (NGF) between SD/RCS and SD-rats with normal vision but poor recovery of whisking function after facial nerve injury. To establish which trophic factors might be responsible for proper NMJ-reinnervation, the transected facial nerve was surgically repaired (facial-facial anastomosis, FFA) for subsequent analysis of mRNA and proteins expressed in the levator labii superioris muscle. A complicated time course of expression included (1) a late rise in BDNF protein that followed earlier elevated gene expression, (2) an early increase in FGF2 and IGF2 protein after 2 days with sustained gene expression, (3) reduced IGF1 protein at 28 days coincident with decline of raised mRNA levels to baseline, and (4) reduced NGF protein between 2 and 14 days with maintained gene expression found in blind rats but not the rats with normal vision. These findings suggest that recovery of motor function after peripheral nerve injury is due, at least in part, to a complex regulation of lesion-associated neurotrophic factors and cytokines in denervated muscles. The increase of FGF-2 protein and concomittant decrease of NGF (with no significant changes in BDNF or IGF levels) during the first week following FFA in SD/RCS blind rats possibly prevents the distal branching of regenerating axons resulting in reduced poly-innervation of motor endplates. PMID:26940083

  12. Methylcobalamin increases Erk1/2 and Akt activities through the methylation cycle and promotes nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve injury model.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Temporin, Ko; Okamoto, Michio; Kuroda, Yusuke; Moritomo, Hisao; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2010-04-01

    Methylcobalamin is a vitamin B12 analog and is necessary for the maintenance of the nervous system. Although some previous studies have referred to the effects of methylcobalamin on neurons, the precise mechanism of this effect remains obscure. Here we show that methylcobalamin at concentrations above 100 nM promotes neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival and that these effects are mediated by the methylation cycle, a metabolic pathway involving methylation reactions. We also demonstrate that methylcobalamin increases Erk1/2 and Akt activities through the methylation cycle. In a rat sciatic nerve injury model, continuous administration of high doses of methylcobalamin improves nerve regeneration and functional recovery. Therefore, methylcobalamin may provide the basis for better treatments of nervous disorders through effective systemic or local delivery of high doses of methylcobalamin to target organs. PMID:20045411

  13. Early co-administration of vitamin E acetate and methylcobalamin improves thermal hyperalgesia and motor nerve conduction velocity following sciatic nerve crush injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Morani, Aashish S; Bodhankar, Subhash L

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that early administration of vitamin E acetate (50 mg/kg, ip (VEA)) and methylcobalamin (500 microg/kg, ip (MCA)) for 30 days improved conduction velocity and neuropathic pain behavior. Here, we evaluated the effect of early co-administration of VEA and MCA (MVE) on thermal hyperlagesia (TH) and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) in rats with sciatic nerve crush injury (SNCI). Fifteen days post-surgery, a reduction in paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was observed in untreated (UNTR) rats. However, latency improved in MVE-treated animals, comparable to the placebo. On day 15, a decrease in MNCV was observed in the UNTR group of animals, and this effect was not observed for the MVE and placebo groups of animals. The results of this study indicate that early exposure to MVE attenuates the progression of TH and improves MNCV in rats with SNCI. PMID:20508297

  14. Inhibition of the NMDA receptor protects the rat sciatic nerve against ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    KE, TIE; LI, RENBIN; CHEN, WENCHANG

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor by MK-801 reduces ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in the central nervous system. However, few previous studies have evaluated the neuroprotective effects of MK-801 against peripheral I/R injury. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of MK-801 pretreatment against I/R injury in the rat sciatic nerve (SN). Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a sham surgery (n=8) or to a 5-h ischemic insult by femoral artery clamping (I/R and I/R+MK-801 groups; n=48 per group). I/R+MK-801 rats were intraperitoneally injected with MK-801 (0.5 ml or 1 mg/kg) at 15 min prior to reperfusion. The rats were sacrificed at 0, 6, 12, 24, 72 h, or 7 days following reperfusion. Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations, and SN inducible NO synthase (iNOS) protein expression levels, were measured using colorimetry. In addition, the protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured using immunohistochemistry, and histological analyses of the rat SN were conducted using light and electron microscopy. Alterations in the mRNA expression levels of TNF-α and TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE) in the rat SN were detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In the I/R group, plasma concentrations of NO (175.3±4.2 µmol/l) and MDA (16.2±1.9 mmol/l), and the levels of iNOS (2.5±0.3) in the SN, peaked at 24 h post-reperfusion. At 24 h, pretreatment with MK-801 significantly reduced plasma NO (107.3±3.6 µmol/l) and MDA (11.8±1.6 mmol/l), and SN iNOS (1.65±0.2) levels (all P<0.01). The mRNA expression levels of TNF-α and TACE in the SN were significantly reduced in the I/R+MK-801 group, as compared with the I/R group (P<0.05). Furthermore, MK-801 pretreatment was shown to have alleviated histological signs of I/R injury, including immune cell infiltration and axon demyelination. The results of the present study suggested that pretreatment

  15. Invasive hemodynamics of constrictive pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Shrenik; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization and hemodynamic study is the gold standard for the diagnosis of pericardial constriction. Careful interpretation of the hemodynamic data is essential to differentiate it from other diseases with restrictive physiology. In this hemodynamic review we shall briefly discuss the physiologic basis of various hemodynamic changes seen in a patient with constrictive pericarditis. PMID:26071303

  16. [Repositioning injuries of nerve root L5 after surgical treatment of high degree spondylolistheses and spondyloptosis--in vitro studies].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, S; Kleihues, H; Gill, C; Reinhardt, A; Noack, W

    1998-01-01

    Temporary or persistent paralysis of the fifth lumbar nerve root have been frequently reported as complications following reposition of high degree spondylolisthesis. According to an outcome analysis of sixty-four patients, we found an increased incidence of motor damages after reduction of Meyerding degree four anterolisthesis or spondyloptosis. There were no signs of intradural root compression or nerve injury tracable. In order to detect extraforaminal strictures, the anatomic course of the lumbosacral plexus and its relation to neighbouring structures, especially pelvivertebral connective tissue junctions were recorded in cadavric measurements. Beside an number of variations in origin and course of the iliolumbar ligament complex, we observed a junction between os sacrum and the anterior part of the fifth lumbar vertebrae in 14/30 specimen, constantly running anterior to the fifth lumbar nerve root. In addition the nerve was fixed to the sacral periostium a few centimeters distal this crossing in about 20% of all cases. Pathophysiological effects were measured in reposition trials, using a continuous pressure monitoring system. A reposition of more than 20 mm resulted in a perineural pressure > 30 mmHg. This caused a nerve fiber deformation at the edge of the compressed nerve segment. Increased pressure leads to a nodular displacement of perineural fat as well as intraneural fascicles. PMID:9615983

  17. Cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine administration prevents peripheral neuropathic pain after sciatic nerve crush injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Emril, Dessy R; Wibowo, Samekto; Meliala, Lucas; Susilowati, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine (citicoline) has been shown to have beneficial effects in central nervous system injury as well as in motoric functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. This study aimed to examine the effect of citicoline on prevention of neuropathic pain in a rat model of sciatic nerve crush injury. Methods Forty experimental rats were divided into four groups. In three groups, the right sciatic nerves were crushed in the mid-thigh region, and a gelatin sponge moistened with 0.4 or 0.8 mL of 100 µmol/L citicoline, or saline 0.4 mL in the control group, was applied. The fourth group of rats was sham-operated, ie the sciatic nerve was exposed with no crush. Functional assessments were performed 4 weeks after crush injury. von Frey filaments (100 g threshold) were used to assess neuropathic pain. In addition, the sciatic functional index and extensor postural thrust (EPT) tests were used to assess motoric function. Results The crush/citicoline 0.4 mL group had a lower percentage of pain (23.53%, n=17) compared with the crush/saline group (53.33%, n=15, P<0.005). The crush/citicoline 0.4 mL group also showed better motoric recovery, as seen in stronger EPT results (P<0.001). However, the sciatic functional index analysis did not show significant differences between groups (P=0.35). The crush/citicoline 0.8 mL group showed a higher percentage of pain (66.67%, n=18) and less EPT recovery. These results may be explained by more severe nerve injury due to compression with a larger administered volume. Conclusion In situ administration of 0.4 mL of 100 µmol/L citicoline prevents the occurrence of neuropathic pain and induces motoric recovery, evaluated by EPT test, 4 weeks after sciatic nerve injury. PMID:27284264

  18. Consequences and adaptation in daily life – patients’ experiences three decades after a nerve injury sustained in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To explore the patients’ experiences during the three decades following repair of a nerve injury in the forearm and its consequences for daily life. Strategies that were used to facilitate adaptation were also investigated. Methods Fifteen participants with a complete median and/or ulnar nerve injury repaired in the ages from 13–20 years were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The median follow-up time was 31 years (range 23–40). The participants were asked to describe the past and present symptoms of the injured hand, the consequences of the injury for daily life, personal qualities and support from others. In addition, they were asked to describe strategies used to facilitate adaptation. The interviews were subjected to content analysis. Results The nerve injury lead to sensory and motor deficits in the injured hand, as well as sensitivity to cold and secondary back problems. Emotional reactions to trauma and symptoms related to post-traumatic stress disorder were described, as well as how they managed to cope with such reactions. There was a noticeable impact on education, leisure, professional or domestic life for some, while others could continue by changing e.g. their performance pattern. The participants’ life roles and relations were also affected. Both emotion- and problem-based strategies were used to manage challenges in daily life. Conclusions The present qualitative study can help us to provide the patient with honest and realistic information about what to expect after a nerve injury at forearm level, without eliminating hope. Emotional reactions to trauma should be identified and dealt with. In addition, health-care professionals can promote a variety of coping mechanisms to facilitate daily living for the injured patients. PMID:23968274

  19. Unusual radial nerve injury by a locking compression plate for humerus fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kinaci, Ahmet; Kloen, Peter; Videler, Annemieke; Kreulen, Mick

    2014-01-01

    The management of primary and secondary radial nerve palsy associated with humeral shaft fractures is still controversial. Radial nerve function is likely to return spontaneously after primary as well as secondary radial nerve palsy in the absence of any level of neurotmesis. Identification and protection of the radial nerve during surgery may prevent secondary nerve palsy, but is not always performed and depends on the location of the fracture, and the experience and preference of the surgeon. We report a case of a healthy 40-year-old woman, referred to our hospital with a complete radial nerve palsy and a failed plate fixation of a right humeral shaft fracture. During exploration of the radial nerve and surgical revision of the fracture, we found the nerve entrapped by the plate and partially transected by a screw. Full recovery of radial nerve function occurred after neurolysis and microscopic neurorrhaphy. PMID:24862412

  20. Periprostatic implantation of neural differentiated mesenchymal stem cells restores cavernous nerve injury-mediated erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia-Feng; Jia, Chang-Chang; Zheng, Zong-Heng; Ye, Xiao-Long; Wei, Bo; Huang, Li-Jun; Wei, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been utilized to restore erectile function in animal models of cavernous nerve injury (CNI). However, transplantation of primary MSCs may lead to unpredictable therapeutic outcomes. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of neural differentiated MSCs (d-MSCs) on the restoration of erectile function in CNI rats. Rat bone marrow MSCs (r-BM-MSCs) were treated with all-trans retinoic acid to induce neural differentiation. Rats were divided into five groups: a sham operation group; a bilateral CNI group that received an intracavernous injection of r-BM-MSCs (IC group); and three groups that received periprostatic implantation of either r-BM-MSCs (IP group), d-MSCs (IP-d group), or PBS (PBS group). The data revealed that IP injection of d-MSCs ameliorated erectile function in a similar manner to an IC injection of MSCs and enhanced erectile function compared to an IP injection of MSCs. An in vivo time course of d-MSCs survival revealed that PKH26-labled d-MSCs were detectable either within or surrounding the cavernous nerve tissue. In addition, the expression of caspase-3 significantly increased in the PBS group and decreased after treatment with MSCs, especially in the IC and IP-d groups. Furthermore, the expression levels of neurotrophic factors increased significantly in d-MSCs. This study demonstrated that periprostatic implantation of d-MSCs effectively restored erectile function in CNI rats. The mechanism might be ascribed to decreases in the frequency of apoptotic cells, as well as paracrine signaling by factors derived from d-MSCs. PMID:27398139

  1. Melatonin preserves superoxide dismutase activity in hypoglossal motoneurons of adult rats following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hung-Ming; Huang, Yi-Lun; Lan, Chyn-Tair; Wu, Un-In; Hu, Ming-E; Youn, Su-Chung

    2008-03-01

    Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) produces functional changes in lesioned neurons in which oxidative stress is considered to be the main cause of neuronal damage. As superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an important antioxidative enzyme involved in redox regulation of oxidative stress, the present study determined whether melatonin would exert its beneficial effects by preserving the SOD reactivity following PNI. Adult rats subjected to hypoglossal nerve transection were intraperitoneally injected with melatonin at ones for 3, 7, 14, 30 and 60 days successively. The potential neuroprotective effects of melatonin were quantitatively demonstrated by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), mitochondrial manganese SOD (Mn-SOD), and cytosolic copper-zinc SOD (Cu/Zn-SOD) immunohistochemistry. The functional recovery of the lesioned neurons was evaluated by choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunohistochemistry along with the electromyographic (EMG) recordings of denervation-induced fibrillation activity. The results indicate that following PNI, the nNOS immunoreactivity was significantly increased in lesioned neurons peaking at 14 days. The up-regulation of nNOS temporally coincided with the reduction of ChAT and SOD in which the Cu/Zn-SOD showed a greater diminution than Mn-SOD. However, following melatonin administration, the nNOS augmentation was successfully suppressed and the activities of Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD, and ChAT were effectively preserved at all postaxotomy periods. EMG data also showed a decreased fibrillation in melatonin-treated groups, suggesting a potential effect of melatonin in promoting functional recovery. In association with its significant capacity in preserving SOD reactivity, melatonin is suggested to serve as a powerful therapeutic agent for treating PNI-relevant oxidative damage. PMID:18289169

  2. Transient long thoracic nerve injury during posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Al-Hourani, Khalid

    2013-11-01

    We present the transient long thoracic nerve (LTN) injury during instrumented posterior spinal arthrodesis for idiopathic scoliosis. The suspected mechanism of injury, postoperative course and final outcome is discussed. The LTN is susceptible to injury due to its long and relatively superficial course across the thoracic wall through direct trauma or tension. Radical mastectomies with resection of axillary lymph nodes, first rib resection to treat thoracic outlet syndrome and cardiac surgery can be complicated with LTN injury. LTN injury producing scapular winging has not been reported in association with spinal deformity surgery. We reviewed the medical notes and spinal radiographs of two adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal arthrodesis and developed LTN neuropraxia. Scoliosis surgery was uneventful and intraoperative spinal cord monitoring was stable throughout the procedure. Postoperative neurological examination was otherwise normal, but both patients developed winging of the scapula at 4 and 6 days after spinal arthrodesis, which did not affect shoulder function. Both patients made a good recovery and the scapular winging resolved spontaneously 8 and 11 months following surgery with no residual morbidity. We believe that this LTN was due to positioning of our patients with their head flexed, tilted and rotated toward the contralateral side while the arm was abducted and extended. The use of heavy retractors may have also applied compression or tension to the nerve in one of our patients contributing to the development of neuropraxia. This is an important consideration during spinal deformity surgery to prevent potentially permanent injury to the nerve, which can produce severe shoulder dysfunction and persistent pain. PMID:24379470

  3. Lingual nerve injury subsequent to wisdom teeth removal--a 5-year retrospective audit from a high street dental practice.

    PubMed

    Malden, N J; Maidment, Y G

    2002-08-24

    Lingual nerve damage subsequent to lower wisdom tooth removal affects a small number of patients, sometimes producing permanent sensory loss or impairment. A number of surgical techniques have been described which are associated with low incidences of this distressing post-operative complication. When a technique is adopted by an individual clinician then a personal audit may be prudent to establish how effective it is in relation to established nerve injury rates. This audit looks at a technique involving the minimal interference of lingual soft tissues during lower wisdom tooth removal in a high street practice situation for patients having mild to moderate impacted wisdom teeth removed under local anaesthetic. It was concluded that the technique employed was associated with a low incidence of lingual nerve trauma, comparable with that reported elsewhere. PMID:12222906

  4. Effects of peripheral nerve injuries and tissue inflammation on the levels of neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity in rat primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, S; Kajander, K C; Bennett, G J

    1992-12-11

    Changes in neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity (NPYir) in the rat L4 and L5 spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were examined after different sciatic nerve injuries (transection, loose ligation, and crush) and a localized, painful inflammation of the hind paw. Inflammation had no effect on NPYir. All the nerve injuries produced comparable increases in NPYir in ipsilateral laminae III-V axons and varicosities, and induction of NPYir in many DRG cells. Most NPYir DRG cells were medium to large (mean diameters: 40-45 microns); less than 2% of the cells had diameters of 25 microns or less. We conclude that the nerve injury-evoked increase in NPYir occurs mostly in the somata and intraspinal arbors of low-threshold mechanoreceptors; very few, if any, C-fiber afferents are involved. Nerve injury, rather than a painful condition, appears to be the stimulus for the induction of NPYir synthesis. PMID:1486499

  5. Biomechanical Contributions of Posterior Deltoid and Teres Minor in the Context of Axillary Nerve Injury: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Dustin L.; Plate, Johannes F.; Li, Zhongyu; Saul, Katherine R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine if transfer to only the anterior branch of the axillary nerve will restore useful function following axillary nerve injury with persistent posterior deltoid and teres minor paralysis. Methods We used a computational musculoskeletal model of the upper limb to determine the relative contributions of posterior deltoid and teres minor to maximum joint moment generated during a simulated static strength assessment and to joint moments during 3 sub-maximal shoulder movements. Movement simulations were performed with and without simulated posterior deltoid and teres minor paralysis to identify muscles which may compensate for their paralysis. Results In the unimpaired limb model, teres minor and posterior deltoid accounted for 16% and 14% of the total isometric shoulder extension and external rotation joint moments, respectively. During the 3 movement simulations, posterior deltoid produced as much as 20% of the mean shoulder extension moment, while teres minor accounted for less than 5% of the mean joint moment in all directions of movement. When posterior deltoid and teres minor were paralyzed, the mean extension moments generated by the supraspinatus, long head of triceps, latissimus dorsi, and middle deltoid increased to compensate. Compensatory muscles were not fully activated during movement simulations when posterior deltoid and teres minor were paralyzed. Conclusions Reconstruction of the anterior branch of the axillary nerve only is an appropriate technique for restoring shoulder abduction strength following isolated axillary nerve injury. When shoulder extension strength is compromised by extensive neuromuscular shoulder injury, reconstruction of both the anterior and posterior branches of the axillary nerve should be considered. Clinical Relevance By quantifying the biomechanical role of muscles during sub-maximal movement, in addition to quantifying muscle contributions to maximal shoulder strength, we can inform pre-operative planning and

  6. [REACTIVE CHANGES IN SPINAL CORD MOTONEURONS AFTER SCIATIC NERVE INJURY AFTER HIGH-FREQUENCY ELECTROSURGICAL INSTRUMENT APPLICATION].

    PubMed

    Korsak, A; Chaikovsky, Yu; Sokurenko, L; Likhodiievskyi, V; Neverovskyi, A

    2016-02-01

    A new experimental model for tissues connection at peripheral nerve injury site in form of tissues welding was designed. In current study we investigated motoneuron state 1, 3, 6 and 12 weeks after peripheral nerve injury and surgical repair with high-frequency electrosurgical technology. Spinal cord sections was stained by Nissl method and observed with light microscopy. We found that postoperative period in animals from experimental groups characterized by qualitative changes in neurons from spinal motor centers that can be interpreted as compensatory processes as response to alteration. In animals from group with high-frequency electrosurgical technology usage stabilization processes passes more quickly comparatively to animals with epineural sutures. High-frequency electrosurgical technology usage provides less harmful effects on motoneurons than epineural suturing. PMID:27001790

  7. The antiallodynic action of pregabalin may depend on the suppression of spinal neuronal hyperexcitability in rats with spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lei; Cai, Jie; Guo, Xiang-Yang; Meng, Xiu-Li; Xing, Guo-Gang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregabalin (PGB) is a novel antiepileptic drug and is also used as a first-line medication for the treatment of neuropathic pain. However, the mechanisms of its analgesic effects remain largely unknown. OBJECTIVES: To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the antiallodynic action of PGB in rats with neuropathic pain. METHODS: In a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by spared nerve injury, mechanical allodynia, as a behavioural sign of neuropathic pain, was assessed by measuring 50% paw withdrawal threshold with von Frey filaments. Activities of dorsal horn wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons were examined by extracellular electrophysiological recording in vivo. RESULTS: Spinal administration of PGB exerted a significant antiallodynic effect and a prominent inhibitory effect on the hypersensitivity of dorsal horn WDR neurons in rats with spared nerve injury. CONCLUSION: The antiallodynic action of PGB is likely dependent on the suppression of WDR neuron hyperexcitability in rats with neuropathic pain. PMID:24851240

  8. Computerized tomography myelography with coronal and oblique coronal view for diagnosis of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background The authors describe a new computerized tomography (CT) myelography technique with coronal and oblique coronal view to demonstrate the status of the cervical nerve rootlets involved in brachial plexus injury. They discuss the value of this technique for diagnosis of nerve root avulsion compared with CT myelography with axial view. Methods CT myelography was performed with penetration of the cervical subarachnoid space by the contrast medium. Then the coronal and oblique coronal reconstructions were created. The results of CT myelography were evaluated and classified with presence of pseudomeningocele, intradural ventral nerve rootlets, and intradural dorsal nerve rootlets. The diagnosis was by extraspinal surgical exploration with or without spinal evoked potential measurements and choline acetyl transferase activity measurement in 25 patients and recovery by a natural course in 3 patients. Its diagnostic accuracy was compared with that of CT myelography with axial view, correlated with surgical findings or a natural course in 57 cervical roots in 28 patients. Results Coronal and oblique coronal views were superior to axial views in visualization of the rootlets and orientation of the exact level of the root. Sensitivity and specificity for coronal and oblique coronal views of unrecognition of intradural ventral and dorsal nerve root shadow without pseudomeningocele in determining pre-ganglionic injury were 100% and 96%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between coronal and oblique coronal views and axial views. Conclusion The information by the coronal and oblique coronal slice CT myelography enabled the authors to assess the rootlets of the brachial plexus and provided valuable data for helping to decide whether to proceed with exploration, nerve repair, primary reconstruction. PMID:17651476

  9. Neuroprotective effect of docosahexaenoic acid nanoemulsion on erectile function in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chun-Hou; Wu, Yi-No; Chen, Bin-Huei; Lin, Ying-Hung; Ho, Hsiu-O; Chiang, Han-Sun

    2016-01-01

    There is an unmet need for treatment of erectile dysfunction resulting from radical prostatectomy and cavernous nerve (CN) injury. Given the neuroprotective properties of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), we investigated its effect on penile functional and structural recovery in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve injury. Rats were subject to CN injury and received intraperitoneal administration of either vehicle or a DHA nanoemulsion (nano-DHA) at 10, 50, or 250 μg/kg. Functional testing and histological analyses were performed at 28 days post-injury. The maximum intracavernosal pressure (ICP) and other measures of erectile function were significantly higher in the nano-DHA groups than in the vehicle group (p < 0.05). The ratio of area of expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/β-III tubulin, numbers of axon and smooth muscle cell content were significantly higher in the 50 μg/kg nano-DHA group than in the vehicle group (p < 0.05). A qualitative increase in the smooth muscle cells/collagen ratio and decrease in apoptosis was observed in the nano-DHA groups relative to the vehicle group: however, these differences were not statistically significant. Our data demonstrate that nano-DHA, particularly the 50 μg/kg regimen, improves erectile function after bilateral CN injury in rats by neuroprotection and other anti-fibrotic and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:27625175

  10. Patterns of nerve injury and neuropathic pain in ischemic neuropathy after ligation-reperfusion of femoral artery in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jing-Er; Wang, Kuo-Chuan; Chiang, Hou-Yu; Hsieh, Jung-Hsien; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2012-09-01

    Ischemia is an important etiology of painful neuropathies. We generated a mouse system of ischemic neuropathy by ligation-reperfusion of the femoral artery to mimic neuropathic pain and nerve injury patterns observed clinically. Mice exhibited spontaneous neuropathic pain behaviors, which were most obvious after ischemia for 5 h. Mechanical and cold allodynia developed by post-operative day (POD) 7 and persisted through the experimental period up to POD 56. Neuropathic pain behaviors were alleviated with intraperitoneal gabapentin (50 and 100 mg/kg) in a dose-dependent manner. Large-fiber deficit assessed with nerve conduction studies was demonstrated by reduced amplitudes of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) on POD 7 (48.4% of the control side, p < 0.001). Small-fiber impairment was demonstrated by decreased epidermal nerve density (END) on POD 7 (29.1% of the control side, p < 0.001). Reductions in CMAP amplitudes and ENDs persisted through POD 56. Our system replicated the clinical manifestations of ischemic neuropathy: (1) neuropathic pain with cold and mechanical allodynia and (2) nerve injury to both large and small fibers with pathologic and physiologic evidence. This system produced by a simple procedure provides an opportunity to investigate mechanisms and further treatments of ischemic neuropathy on genetically engineered mice. PMID:22971092

  11. Transcriptional repression of the M channel subunit Kv7.2 in chronic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kirstin; Ooi, Lezanne; Dalle, Carine; Robertson, Brian; Wood, Ian C; Gamper, Nikita

    2011-04-01

    Neuropathic pain is a severe health problem for which there is a lack of effective therapy. A frequent underlying condition of neuropathic pain is a sustained overexcitability of pain-sensing (nociceptive) sensory fibres. Therefore, the identification of mechanisms for such abnormal neuronal excitability is of utmost importance for understanding neuropathic pain. Despite much effort, an inclusive model explaining peripheral overexcitability is missing. We investigated transcriptional regulation of the Kcnq2 gene, which encodes the Kv7.2 subunit of membrane potential-stabilizing M channel, in peripheral sensory neurons in a model of neuropathic pain-partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). We show that Kcnq2 is the major Kcnq gene transcript in dorsal root ganglion (DRG); immunostaining and patch-clamp recordings from acute ganglionic slices verified functional expression of Kv7.2 in small-diameter nociceptive DRG neurons. Neuropathic injury induced substantial downregulation of Kv7.2 expression. Levels of repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), which is known to suppress Kcnq2 expression, were upregulated in response to neuropathic injury identifying the likely mechanism of Kcnq2 regulation. Behavioural experiments demonstrated that neuropathic hyperalgesia following PSNL developed faster than the downregulation of Kcnq2 expression could be detected, suggesting that this transcriptional mechanism may contribute to the maintenance rather than the initiation of neuropathic pain. Importantly, the decrease in the peripheral M channel abundance could be functionally compensated by peripherally applied M channel opener flupirtine, which alleviated neuropathic hyperalgesia. Our work suggests a novel mechanism for neuropathic overexcitability and brings focus on M channels and REST as peripheral targets for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:21345591

  12. High Resolution Ultrasound in the Evaluation and Management of Traumatic Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Alaqeel, Ahmed; Alshomer, Feras

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasound has been used as an important tool in the diagnosis, management and monitoring of both acute and chronic peripheral nerve injuries. According to literature, it demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of specific pathologies and its ability to differentiate between them. Literature has been reviewed, summarizing the specific finding of such modality in various peripheral neuropathies and with a specific focus over its role in evaluation and management of traumatic peripheral neuropathies. PMID:25337305

  13. Effect of an Adipose-Derived Stem Cell and Nerve Growth Factor-Incorporated Hydrogel on Recovery of Erectile Function in a Rat Model of Cavernous Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In Gul; Piao, Shuyu; Lee, Ji Young; Hong, Sung Hoo; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Kim, Sae Woong; Kim, Choung Soo; Ra, Jeong Chan; Noh, Insup

    2013-01-01

    Postprostatectomy erectile dysfunction (ED) is the major problem for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Recently, gene and stem cell-based therapy of the corpus cavernosum has been attempted for postprostatectomy ED, but those therapies are limited by rapid blood flow and disruption of the normal architecture of the corpus cavernosum. In this study, we attempted to regenerate the damaged cavernous nerve (CN), which is the main cause of ED. We investigated the effectiveness of human adipose-derived stem cell (hADSC) and nerve growth factor-incorporated hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel (NGF-hydrogel) application on the CN in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury. Four weeks after the operation, erectile function was assessed by detecting the intracavernous pressure (ICP)/arterial pressure level by CN electrostimulation. The ICP was significantly increased by application of hADSC with NGF-hydrogel compared to the other experimental groups. CN and penile tissue were collected for histological examination. PKH-26 labeled hADSC colocalized with beta III tubulin were shown in CN tissue sections. hADSC/NGF-hydrogel treatment prevented smooth muscle atrophy in the corpus cavernosum. In addition, the hADSC/NGF-hydrogel group showed increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression. This study suggests that application of hADSCs with NGF-hydrogel on the CN might be a promising treatment for postprostatectomy ED. PMID:22834730

  14. Vagus nerve stimulation mediates protection from kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury through α7nAChR+ splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Chikara; Sung, Sun-Sang J; Moscalu, Stefan; Jankowski, Jakub; Huang, Liping; Ye, Hong; Rosin, Diane L; Guyenet, Patrice G; Okusa, Mark D

    2016-05-01

    The nervous and immune systems interact in complex ways to maintain homeostasis and respond to stress or injury, and rapid nerve conduction can provide instantaneous input for modulating inflammation. The inflammatory reflex referred to as the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway regulates innate and adaptive immunity, and modulation of this reflex by vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is effective in various inflammatory disease models, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Effectiveness of VNS in these models necessitates the integration of neural signals and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) on splenic macrophages. Here, we sought to determine whether electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve attenuates kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), which promotes the release of proinflammatory molecules. Stimulation of vagal afferents or efferents in mice 24 hours before IRI markedly attenuated acute kidney injury (AKI) and decreased plasma TNF. Furthermore, this protection was abolished in animals in which splenectomy was performed 7 days before VNS and IRI. In mice lacking α7nAChR, prior VNS did not prevent IRI. Conversely, adoptive transfer of VNS-conditioned α7nAChR splenocytes conferred protection to recipient mice subjected to IRI. Together, these results demonstrate that VNS-mediated attenuation of AKI and systemic inflammation depends on α7nAChR-positive splenocytes. PMID:27088805

  15. Atf3 mutant mice show reduced axon regeneration and impaired regeneration-associated gene induction after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Gey, Manuel; Wanner, Renate; Schilling, Corinna; Pedro, Maria T; Sinske, Daniela; Knöll, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Axon injury in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) induces a regeneration-associated gene (RAG) response. Atf3 (activating transcription factor 3) is such a RAG and ATF3's transcriptional activity might induce 'effector' RAGs (e.g. small proline rich protein 1a (Sprr1a), Galanin (Gal), growth-associated protein 43 (Gap43)) facilitating peripheral axon regeneration. We provide a first analysis of Atf3 mouse mutants in peripheral nerve regeneration. In Atf3 mutant mice, facial nerve regeneration and neurite outgrowth of adult ATF3-deficient primary dorsal root ganglia neurons was decreased. Using genome-wide transcriptomics, we identified a neuropeptide-encoding RAG cluster (vasoactive intestinal peptide (Vip), Ngf, Grp, Gal, Pacap) regulated by ATF3. Exogenous administration of neuropeptides enhanced neurite growth of Atf3 mutant mice suggesting that these molecules might be effector RAGs of ATF3's pro-regenerative function. In addition to the induction of growth-promoting molecules, we present data that ATF3 suppresses growth-inhibiting molecules such as chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2. In summary, we show a pro-regenerative ATF3 function during PNS nerve regeneration involving transcriptional activation of a neuropeptide-encoding RAG cluster. ATF3 is a general injury-inducible factor, therefore ATF3-mediated mechanisms identified herein might apply to other cell and injury types. PMID:27581653

  16. Vagus nerve stimulation mediates protection from kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury through α7nAChR+ splenocytes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Chikara; Sung, Sun-sang J.; Moscalu, Stefan; Jankowski, Jakub; Huang, Liping; Ye, Hong; Guyenet, Patrice G.

    2016-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems interact in complex ways to maintain homeostasis and respond to stress or injury, and rapid nerve conduction can provide instantaneous input for modulating inflammation. The inflammatory reflex referred to as the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway regulates innate and adaptive immunity, and modulation of this reflex by vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is effective in various inflammatory disease models, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Effectiveness of VNS in these models necessitates the integration of neural signals and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) on splenic macrophages. Here, we sought to determine whether electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve attenuates kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), which promotes the release of proinflammatory molecules. Stimulation of vagal afferents or efferents in mice 24 hours before IRI markedly attenuated acute kidney injury (AKI) and decreased plasma TNF. Furthermore, this protection was abolished in animals in which splenectomy was performed 7 days before VNS and IRI. In mice lacking α7nAChR, prior VNS did not prevent IRI. Conversely, adoptive transfer of VNS-conditioned α7nAChR splenocytes conferred protection to recipient mice subjected to IRI. Together, these results demonstrate that VNS-mediated attenuation of AKI and systemic inflammation depends on α7nAChR-positive splenocytes. PMID:27088805

  17. Impacts of Rho kinase inhibitor Fasudil on Rho/ROCK signaling pathway in rabbits with optic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jianglong; Lin, Lin; Luan, Xinping; Jing, Xiepan; Maierab

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to study the impacts of Rho kinase inhibitor Fasudil on expressions of Rho/ROCK signaling pathway associated genes in rabbits with optic nerve injury (ONI), and to explore the therapeutic mechanisms towards ONI. Methods: The rabbit ONI model was established, then the rabbits were divided into model group (treated with saline), control group (treated with dexamethasone, Dex), and intervention group (treated with Fasudil, Fas). The eyeball and optic nerve were sampled at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after injury. The morphological changes of retina and optic nerve were observed. The expressions of RhoA, Caspase-3, Rock 2 and Nogo-A gene were determined by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methods. Results: At different time after injury, there were significant differences of RhoA, Caspase-3, Rock 2 and Nogo-A gene expression among three groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: After ONI, Fas can decrease the expression of Caspase-3 gene, and down-regulate the expressions of Nogo-A and Rock 2 gene. Therefore, it can treat ONI through affecting the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway. PMID:26823796

  18. Atf3 mutant mice show reduced axon regeneration and impaired regeneration-associated gene induction after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Gey, Manuel; Wanner, Renate; Schilling, Corinna; Pedro, Maria T.; Sinske, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Axon injury in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) induces a regeneration-associated gene (RAG) response. Atf3 (activating transcription factor 3) is such a RAG and ATF3's transcriptional activity might induce ‘effector’ RAGs (e.g. small proline rich protein 1a (Sprr1a), Galanin (Gal), growth-associated protein 43 (Gap43)) facilitating peripheral axon regeneration. We provide a first analysis of Atf3 mouse mutants in peripheral nerve regeneration. In Atf3 mutant mice, facial nerve regeneration and neurite outgrowth of adult ATF3-deficient primary dorsal root ganglia neurons was decreased. Using genome-wide transcriptomics, we identified a neuropeptide-encoding RAG cluster (vasoactive intestinal peptide (Vip), Ngf, Grp, Gal, Pacap) regulated by ATF3. Exogenous administration of neuropeptides enhanced neurite growth of Atf3 mutant mice suggesting that these molecules might be effector RAGs of ATF3's pro-regenerative function. In addition to the induction of growth-promoting molecules, we present data that ATF3 suppresses growth-inhibiting molecules such as chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2. In summary, we show a pro-regenerative ATF3 function during PNS nerve regeneration involving transcriptional activation of a neuropeptide-encoding RAG cluster. ATF3 is a general injury-inducible factor, therefore ATF3-mediated mechanisms identified herein might apply to other cell and injury types. PMID:27581653

  19. Therapeutic targets for the management of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2011-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of treatment resistant chronic pain and responds poorly to the clinically available therapies. Studies from animal models of neuropathic pain have led to understanding of its pathobiology which includes complex interrelated pathways leading to peripheral and central neuronal sensitization. Advancements in the elucidation of neuropathic pain mechanisms have revealed a number of key targets that have been hypothesized to modulate clinical status. The present review discusses these therapeutic targets including noradrenaline and 5-HT reuptake inhibitors; sodium, calcium and potassium channels; inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters; neuropeptides including bradykinin, tachykinin, cholecystokinin, neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and CGRP; pro-inflammatory cytokines; MAP kinases; PPAR γ; Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger; nitric oxide; purinergic receptors; neuronal nicotinic receptors; cation-dependent chloride transporters; oxidative stress; matrix metalloproteinase and plasminogen activators; growth factors; transient receptor potential (TRP) channels; endocannabinoids; histamine receptors; dopamine; sigma receptors, beta adrenergic receptors, endothelins, and D-amino acid oxidase. The exploitation of these targets may provide effective therapeutic agents for the management of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:21631400

  20. The Thermal Sensitivity Test in Evaluating Outcome after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ceynowa, Marcin; Mazurek, Tomasz; Pankowski, Rafał; Rocławski, Marek; Treder, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability to discriminate temperatures in patients following peripheral nerve injury. Knowing that temperature sensibility is mediated by different receptors, the scores were compared to other functional hand scores in order to determine whether the ability to discriminate temperatures is restored to a different extent compared with other commonly evaluated hand function modalities. The test was performed using the NTE-2 device (Physitemp Instruments Inc., 154 Huron Avenue, Clifton, New Jersey, USA). Out of 57 patients, 27 had normal thermal discrimination scores, and 9 could not tell the temperatures apart in the differences set on the measuring device. Overall, patients with better thermal discrimination had also better hand function as evaluated with different methods. However, some patients who did regain the ability to differentiate temperatures correctly did not have any measurable return of hand function in other tests. Thermal discrimination scores correlated similarly with different functional scores, except for vibration sensibility, which did not show any significant correlation. The development and severity of cold intolerance seem to be unrelated to temperature sense. PMID:26199942

  1. The Thermal Sensitivity Test in Evaluating Outcome after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ceynowa, Marcin; Mazurek, Tomasz; Pankowski, Rafał; Rocławski, Marek; Treder, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability to discriminate temperatures in patients following peripheral nerve injury. Knowing that temperature sensibility is mediated by different receptors, the scores were compared to other functional hand scores in order to determine whether the ability to discriminate temperatures is restored to a different extent compared with other commonly evaluated hand function modalities. The test was performed using the NTE-2 device (Physitemp Instruments Inc., 154 Huron Avenue, Clifton, New Jersey, USA). Out of 57 patients, 27 had normal thermal discrimination scores, and 9 could not tell the temperatures apart in the differences set on the measuring device. Overall, patients with better thermal discrimination had also better hand function as evaluated with different methods. However, some patients who did regain the ability to differentiate temperatures correctly did not have any measurable return of hand function in other tests. Thermal discrimination scores correlated similarly with different functional scores, except for vibration sensibility, which did not show any significant correlation. The development and severity of cold intolerance seem to be unrelated to temperature sense. PMID:26199942

  2. Vagus Nerve Stimulation and Other Neuromodulation Methods for Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Neren, Daniel; Johnson, Matthew D; Legon, Wynn; Bachour, Salam P; Ling, Geoffrey; Divani, Afshin A

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the current literature regarding the use of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) in preclinical models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) as well as discuss the potential role of VNS along with alternative neuromodulation approaches in the treatment of human TBI. Data from previous studies have demonstrated VNS-mediated improvement following TBI in animal models. In these cases, VNS was observed to enhance motor and cognitive recovery, attenuate cerebral edema and inflammation, reduce blood brain barrier breakdown, and confer neuroprotective effects. Yet, the underlying mechanisms by which VNS enhances recovery following TBI remain to be fully elucidated. Several hypotheses have been offered including: a noradrenergic mechanism, reduction in post-TBI seizures and hyper-excitability, anti-inflammatory effects, attenuation of blood-brain barrier breakdown, and cerebral edema. We present other potential mechanisms by which VNS acts including enhancement of synaptic plasticity and recruitment of endogenous neural stem cells, stabilization of intracranial pressure, and interaction with the ghrelin system. In addition, alternative methods for the treatment of TBI including deep brain stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and focused ultrasound stimulation are discussed. Although the primary source data show that VNS improves TBI outcomes, it remains to be determined if these findings can be translated to clinical settings. PMID:26399249

  3. Additive Antinociceptive Effects of a Combination of Vitamin C and Vitamin E after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ruirui; Kallenborn-Gerhardt, Wiebke; Geisslinger, Gerd; Schmidtko, Achim

    2011-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contributes to the development of exaggerated pain hypersensitivity during persistent pain. In the present study, we investigated the antinociceptive efficacy of the antioxidants vitamin C and vitamin E in mouse models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. We show that systemic administration of a combination of vitamins C and E inhibited the early behavioral responses to formalin injection and the neuropathic pain behavior after peripheral nerve injury, but not the inflammatory pain behavior induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant. In contrast, vitamin C or vitamin E given alone failed to affect the nociceptive behavior in all tested models. The attenuated neuropathic pain behavior induced by the vitamin C and E combination was paralleled by a reduced p38 phosphorylation in the spinal cord and in dorsal root ganglia, and was also observed after intrathecal injection of the vitamins. Moreover, the vitamin C and E combination ameliorated the allodynia induced by an intrathecally delivered ROS donor. Our results suggest that administration of vitamins C and E in combination may exert synergistic antinociceptive effects, and further indicate that ROS essentially contribute to nociceptive processing in special pain states. PMID:22195029

  4. Generation of New Neurons in Dorsal Root Ganglia in Adult Rats after Peripheral Nerve Crush Injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The evidence of neurons generated ex novo in sensory ganglia of adult animals is still debated. In the present study, we investigated, using high resolution light microscopy and stereological analysis, the changes in the number of neurons in dorsal root ganglia after 30 days from a crush lesion of the rat brachial plexus terminal branches. Results showed, as expected, a relevant hypertrophy of dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, we reported, for the first time in the literature, that neuronal hypertrophy was accompanied by massive neuronal hyperplasia leading to a 42% increase of the number of primary sensory neurons. Moreover, ultrastructural analyses on sensory neurons showed that there was not a relevant neuronal loss as a consequence of the nerve injury. The evidence of BrdU-immunopositive neurons and neural progenitors labeled with Ki67, nanog, nestin, and sox-2 confirmed the stereological evidence of posttraumatic neurogenesis in dorsal root ganglia. Analysis of morphological changes following axonal damage in addition to immunofluorescence characterization of cell phenotype suggested that the neuronal precursors which give rise to the newly generated neurons could be represented by satellite glial cells that actively proliferate after the lesion and are able to differentiate toward the neuronal lineage. PMID:25722894

  5. Patterns of Phrenic Nerve Discharge after Complete High Cervical Spinal Cord Injury in the Decerebrate Rat.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki; Marchenko, Vitaliy

    2016-06-15

    Studies conducted since the second half of the 19th century have revealed spontaneous as well as pharmacologically induced phasic/rhythmic discharge in spinal respiratory motor outputs of cats, dogs, rabbits, and neonatal rats following high cervical transection (Tx). The extent to which these various studies validate the existence of a true spinal respiratory rhythm generator remains debated. In this set of studies, we seek to characterize patterns of spontaneous phasic/rhythmic, asphyxia-induced, and pharmacologically induced activity occurring in phrenic nerve (PhN) discharge after complete high cervical (C1-C2) spinal cord transection. Experiments were performed on 20 unanesthetized decerebrate Sprague-Dawley adult male rats. Patterns of spontaneous activity after spinalization included tonic, phasic, slow oscillatory, and long-lasting tonic discharges. Topical application of antagonists of GABAA and glycine receptors to C1- and C2- spinal segments induced left-right synchronized phasic decrementing activity in PhN discharge that was abolished by an additional C2Tx. Asphyxia elicited increases in tonic activity and left-right synchronized gasp-like bursts in PhN discharge, demonstrating the presence of spinal circuits that may underlie a spinal gasping-like mechanism. We conclude that intrinsic slow oscillators and a phasic burst/rhythm generator exist in the spinal cord of the adult rat. If present in humans, this mechanism may be exploited to recover respiratory function in patients sustaining severe spinal cord injury. PMID:26239508

  6. Antral bony wall erosion, trigeminal nerve injury, and enophthalmos after root canal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Eduardo; Antunes, Luís; Dinis, Paulo Borges

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The frequently used irrigant in dental surgery, sodium hypochlorite, is occasionally the cause of minor, usually circumscribed, adverse effects. Severe, extensive complications, with lasting sequelae, however, also can occur, as in the case we report herein. Case Report: A 55-year-old woman underwent an endodontic procedure on a maxillary molar, whose roots, unknown to the surgeon, were protruding into the maxillary sinus. After sodium hypochlorite root canal irrigation, the patient immediately developed intense facial pain, facial edema, and periorbital cellulitis. An emergency department evaluation diagnosed an intense inflammatory disease of the maxillary sinus, with significant destruction of its bony walls, accompanied by midface paraesthesia due to infraorbital nerve injury. In the following weeks, the patient slowly developed enophthalmos due to bone erosion of the orbit floor. Treatment, besides prolonged oral steroids, required the endoscopic endonasal opening of the maxillary sinus for profuse irrigation. Two years later, the patient maintained a complete loss of function of the maxillary sinus, anesthesia-paraesthesia of the midface, and inferior dystonia of the eye with an enophthalmos. Conclusion: Dentists, maxillofacial surgeons, and otorhinolaryngologists should all be aware of the whole spectrum of complications of even the simplest dental work. Sodium hypochlorite irrigations should be used cautiously in root canal surgery, with the full awareness of its potential for causing soft-tissue damage. PMID:27465790

  7. Interhemispheric Plasticity Protects the Deafferented Somatosensory Cortex from Functional Takeover After Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Koretsky, Alan P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Functional changes across brain hemispheres have been reported after unilateral cortical or peripheral nerve injury. Interhemispheric callosal connections usually underlie this cortico-cortical plasticity. However, the effect of the altered callosal inputs on local cortical plasticity in the adult brain is not well studied. Ipsilateral functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation has been reliably detected in the deafferented barrel cortex (BC) at 2 weeks after unilateral infraorbital denervation (IO) in adult rats. The ipsilateral fMRI signal relies on callosal-mediated interhemispheric plasticity. This form of interhemispheric plasticity provides a good chronic model to study the interaction between callosal inputs and local cortical plasticity. The receptive field of forepaw in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1), which is adjacent to the BC, was mapped with fMRI. The S1 receptive field expanded to take over a portion of the BC in 2 weeks after both ascending inputs and callosal inputs were removed in IO rats with ablated contralateral BC (IO+ablation). This expansion, estimated specifically by fMRI mapping, is significantly larger than what has been observed in the IO rats with intact callosal connectivity, as well as in the rats with sham surgery. This work indicates that altered callosal inputs prevent the functional takeover of the deafferented BC from adjacent cortices and may help preserve the functional identity of the BC. PMID:25117691

  8. Elevated Neurosteroids in the Lateral Thalamus Relieve Neuropathic Pain in Rats with Spared Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Meng-Meng; Wu, Honghai; Hou, Yanning; Li, Yun-Feng; Yin, Yuxin; Zheng, Lemin; Liu, Feng-Yu; Yi, Ming; Wan, You

    2016-08-01

    Neurosteroids are synthesized in the nervous system from cholesterol or steroidal precursors imported from peripheral sources. These compounds are important allosteric modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid A receptors (GABAARs), which play a vital role in pain modulation in the lateral thalamus, a main gate where somatosensory information enters the cerebral cortex. Using high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, we found increased levels of neurosteroids (pregnenolone, progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, allopregnanolone, and tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone) in the chronic stage of neuropathic pain (28 days after spared nerve injury) in rats. The expression of the translocator protein TSPO, the upstream steroidogenesis rate-limiting enzyme, increased at the same time. In vivo stereotaxic microinjection of neurosteroids or the TSPO activator AC-5216 into the lateral thalamus (AP -3.0 mm, ML ±3.0 mm, DV 6.0 mm) alleviated the mechanical allodynia in neuropathic pain, while the TSPO inhibitor PK 11195 exacerbated it. The analgesic effects of AC-5216 and neurosteroids were significantly attenuated by the GABAAR antagonist bicuculline. These results suggested that elevated neurosteroids in the lateral thalamus play a protective role in the chronic stage of neuropathic pain. PMID:27325509

  9. Leg lengthening of more than 5 cm is a risk factor for sciatic nerve injury after total hip arthroplasty for adult hip dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Yoshitoshi; Hasegawa, Yukiharu; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with high hip dislocation is challenging and technically demanding. Nerve injury is a problem associated with leg lengthening after THA. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors for sciatic nerve injury after THA in patients with high hip dislocation. Thirty-seven patients (41 THAs) with Crowe type IV hips were consecutively treated. The average leg lengthening (LL) was 3.2 cm. The average Harris hip score was improved from 57.5 points to 83.1 points at the final follow-up. The clinical outcomes after an average 6.4-years follow-up were satisfactory. Sciatic nerve injury was observed in two joints. LL in the two joints (two patients) with sciatic nerve injury was 5.2 cm and 6.7 cm, respectively. Leg lengthening of >5 cm was a risk factor for sciatic nerve injury. Therefore, leg lengthening of >5 cm should be avoided to prevent sciatic nerve injury. PMID:26412892

  10. Median nerve fascicle transfer versus ulnar nerve fascicle transfer to the biceps motor branch in C5-C6 and C5-C7 brachial plexus injuries: nonrandomized prospective study of 23 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Alvaro Baik; Paulos, Renata Gregorio; de Resende, Marcelo Rosa; Kiyohara, Leandro Yoshinobu; Sorrenti, Luiz; Wei, Teng Hsiang; Bolliger Neto, Raul; Mattar Júnior, Rames

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe whether the results of the median nerve fascicle transfer to the biceps are equivalent to the classical ulnar nerve fascicle transfer, in terms of elbow flexion strength and donor nerve morbidity. Twenty-five consecutive patients were operated between March 2007 and July 2013. The patients were divided into two groups. In Group 1 (n = 8), the patients received an ulnar nerve fascicle transfer to the biceps motor branch. In Group 2 (n = 15), the patients received a median nerve fascicle transfer to the biceps motor branch. Two patients with follow-up less than six months were excluded. Both groups were similar regarding age (P = 0.070), interval of injury (P = 0.185), and follow-up period (P = 0.477). Elbow flexion against gravity was achieved in 7 of 8 (87.5%) patients in Group 1, versus 14 of 15 (93.3%) patients in Group 2 (P = 1.000). The level of injury (C5-C6 or C5-C7) did not affect anti-gravity elbow flexion recovery in both the groups (P = 1.000). It was concluded that the median nerve fascicle transfer to the biceps is as good as the ulnar nerve fascicle transfer, even in C5-C7 injuries. PMID:24753064

  11. Nerve Injury Diminishes Opioid Analgesia through Lysine Methyltransferase-mediated Transcriptional Repression of μ-Opioid Receptors in Primary Sensory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhao; Chen, Shao-Rui; Laumet, Geoffroy; Chen, Hong; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-04-15

    The μ-opioid receptor (MOR, encoded by Oprm1) agonists are the mainstay analgesics for treating moderate to severe pain. Nerve injury causes down-regulation of MORs in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and diminishes the opioid effect on neuropathic pain. However, the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the diminished MOR expression caused by nerve injury are not clear. G9a (encoded by Ehmt2), a histone 3 at lysine 9 methyltransferase, is a key chromatin regulator responsible for gene silencing. In this study, we determined the role of G9a in diminished MOR expression and opioid analgesic effects in animal models of neuropathic pain. We found that nerve injury in rats induced a long-lasting reduction in the expression level of MORs in the DRG but not in the spinal cord. Nerve injury consistently increased the enrichment of the G9a product histone 3 at lysine 9 dimethylation in the promoter of Oprm1 in the DRG. G9a inhibition or siRNA knockdown fully reversed MOR expression in the injured DRG and potentiated the morphine effect on pain hypersensitivity induced by nerve injury. In mice lacking Ehmt2 in DRG neurons, nerve injury failed to reduce the expression level of MORs and the morphine effect. In addition, G9a inhibition or Ehmt2 knockout in DRG neurons normalized nerve injury-induced reduction in the inhibitory effect of the opioid on synaptic glutamate release from primary afferent nerves. Our findings indicate that G9a contributes critically to transcriptional repression of MORs in primary sensory neurons in neuropathic pain. G9a inhibitors may be used to enhance the opioid analgesic effect in the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:26917724

  12. Dopaminergic inhibition by G9a/Glp complex on tyrosine hydroxylase in nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Shen, Xiaofeng; Bao, Senzhu; Feng, Shan-Wu; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yusheng; Wang, Yiquan; Wang, Xian; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Wu, Haibo; Lei, Liming; Xu, Shiqin; Wang, Fuzhou

    2016-01-01

    The neural balance between facilitation and inhibition determines the final tendency of central sensitization. Nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity was considered as the results from the enhanced ascending facilitation and the diminished descending inhibition. The role of dopaminergic transmission in the descending inhibition has been well documented, but its underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Previous studies demonstrated that the lysine dimethyltransferase G9a/G9a-like protein (Glp) complex plays a critical role in cocaine-induced central plasticity, and given cocaine's role in the nerve system is relied on its function on dopamine system, we herein proposed that the reduced inhibition of dopaminergic transmission was from the downregulation of tyrosine hydroxylase expression by G9a/Glp complex through methylating its gene Th After approval by the Animal Care and Use Committee, C57BL/6 mice were used for pain behavior using von Frey after spared nerve injury, and Th CpG islands methylation was measured using bisulfite sequencing at different nerve areas. The inhibitor of G9a/Glp, BIX 01294, was administered intraventricularly daily with bolus injection. The protein levels of G9a, Glp, and tyrosine hydroxylase were measured with immunoblotting. Dopamine levels were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography. The expression of G9a but not Glp was upregulated in ventral tegmental area at post-injury day 4 till day 49 (the last day of the behavioral test). Correspondingly, the Th CpG methylation is increased, but the tyrosine hydroxylase expression was downregulated and the dopamine level was decreased. After the intracerebroventriclar injection of BIX 01294 since the post-injury days 7 and 14 for consecutive three days, three weeks, and six weeks, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase was upregulated with a significant decrease in Th methylation and increase in dopamine level. Moreover, the pain after G9a/Glp inhibitor was attenuated

  13. Dopaminergic inhibition by G9a/Glp complex on tyrosine hydroxylase in nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Shen, Xiaofeng; Bao, Senzhu; Feng, Shan-Wu; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yusheng; Wang, Yiquan; Wang, Xian; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Wu, Haibo; Lei, Liming; Wang, Fuzhou

    2016-01-01

    The neural balance between facilitation and inhibition determines the final tendency of central sensitization. Nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity was considered as the results from the enhanced ascending facilitation and the diminished descending inhibition. The role of dopaminergic transmission in the descending inhibition has been well documented, but its underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Previous studies demonstrated that the lysine dimethyltransferase G9a/G9a-like protein (Glp) complex plays a critical role in cocaine-induced central plasticity, and given cocaine’s role in the nerve system is relied on its function on dopamine system, we herein proposed that the reduced inhibition of dopaminergic transmission was from the downregulation of tyrosine hydroxylase expression by G9a/Glp complex through methylating its gene Th. After approval by the Animal Care and Use Committee, C57BL/6 mice were used for pain behavior using von Frey after spared nerve injury, and Th CpG islands methylation was measured using bisulfite sequencing at different nerve areas. The inhibitor of G9a/Glp, BIX 01294, was administered intraventricularly daily with bolus injection. The protein levels of G9a, Glp, and tyrosine hydroxylase were measured with immunoblotting. Dopamine levels were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography. The expression of G9a but not Glp was upregulated in ventral tegmental area at post-injury day 4 till day 49 (the last day of the behavioral test). Correspondingly, the Th CpG methylation is increased, but the tyrosine hydroxylase expression was downregulated and the dopamine level was decreased. After the intracerebroventriclar injection of BIX 01294 since the post-injury days 7 and 14 for consecutive three days, three weeks, and six weeks, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase was upregulated with a significant decrease in Th methylation and increase in dopamine level. Moreover, the pain after G9a/Glp inhibitor was attenuated

  14. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine constrict cerebral arteries by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Madden, J A; Konkol, R J; Keller, P A; Alvarez, T A

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to determine possible mechanisms underlying the vasoconstrictor activity of cocaine and its principal metabolite, benzoylecgonine (BE) in cat isolated cerebral arteries. The arteries constricted significantly in response to single doses of cocaine, BE and norepinephrine (NE; (P < 0.05). After 6-OHDA treatment to remove adrenergic nerve endings, NE-induced constrictions were essentially unchanged from those before treatment. Denervated arteries exposed to cocaine dilated significantly (P < 0.05) but those exposed to BE constricted as much as before denervation. Following exposure to prazosin and yohimbine, arterial constrictions to NE and cocaine were significantly reduced from control (P < 0.05) but the BE-induced constriction was unchanged. Ryanodine eliminated the cocaine-induced contraction (P < 0.05) whereas verapamil eliminated the BE response (P < 0.05). These data suggest that while cocaine's vasoconstrictor action may be significantly mediated through adrenergic transmission, BE may act through a mechanism involving calcium (Ca2+) channels. Cocaine levels peak and decline in the body more rapidly than BE levels which can remain detectable for days. This study suggests there may also be different pharmacological mechanisms as well as temporal differences underlying the vasoreactivity of these two substances. Our findings may have implications for pharmacological management of cocaine-induced toxic vascular events. PMID:7869849

  15. Delaying the onset of treadmill exercise following peripheral nerve injury has different effects on axon regeneration and motoneuron synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Jaclyn; Evans, Jonathan T.; Mildenhall, Taylor; Mulligan, Amanda; Konieczny, Aimee; Rose, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Transection of a peripheral nerve results in withdrawal of synapses from motoneurons. Some of the withdrawn synapses are restored spontaneously, but those containing the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), and arising mainly from primary afferent neurons, are withdrawn permanently. If animals are exercised immediately after nerve injury, regeneration of the damaged axons is enhanced and no withdrawal of synapses from injured motoneurons can be detected. We investigated whether delaying the onset of exercise until after synapse withdrawal had occurred would yield similar results. In Lewis rats, the right sciatic nerve was cut and repaired. Reinnervation of the soleus muscle was monitored until a direct muscle (M) response was observed to stimulation of the tibial nerve. At that time, rats began 2 wk of daily treadmill exercise using an interval training protocol. Both M responses and electrically-evoked H reflexes were monitored weekly for an additional seven wk. Contacts made by structures containing VGLUT1 or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) with motoneurons were studied from confocal images of retrogradely labeled cells. Timing of full muscle reinnervation was similar in both delayed and immediately exercised rats. H reflex amplitude in delayed exercised rats was only half that found in immediately exercised animals. Unlike immediately exercised animals, motoneuron contacts containing VGLUT1 in delayed exercised rats were reduced significantly, relative to intact rats. The therapeutic window for application of exercise as a treatment to promote restoration of synaptic inputs onto motoneurons following peripheral nerve injury is different from that for promoting axon regeneration in the periphery. PMID:25632080

  16. Delaying the onset of treadmill exercise following peripheral nerve injury has different effects on axon regeneration and motoneuron synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Jaclyn; Evans, Jonathan T; Mildenhall, Taylor; Mulligan, Amanda; Konieczny, Aimee; Rose, Samuel J; English, Arthur W

    2015-04-01

    Transection of a peripheral nerve results in withdrawal of synapses from motoneurons. Some of the withdrawn synapses are restored spontaneously, but those containing the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), and arising mainly from primary afferent neurons, are withdrawn permanently. If animals are exercised immediately after nerve injury, regeneration of the damaged axons is enhanced and no withdrawal of synapses from injured motoneurons can be detected. We investigated whether delaying the onset of exercise until after synapse withdrawal had occurred would yield similar results. In Lewis rats, the right sciatic nerve was cut and repaired. Reinnervation of the soleus muscle was monitored until a direct muscle (M) response was observed to stimulation of the tibial nerve. At that time, rats began 2 wk of daily treadmill exercise using an interval training protocol. Both M responses and electrically-evoked H reflexes were monitored weekly for an additional seven wk. Contacts made by structures containing VGLUT1 or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) with motoneurons were studied from confocal images of retrogradely labeled cells. Timing of full muscle reinnervation was similar in both delayed and immediately exercised rats. H reflex amplitude in delayed exercised rats was only half that found in immediately exercised animals. Unlike immediately exercised animals, motoneuron contacts containing VGLUT1 in delayed exercised rats were reduced significantly, relative to intact rats. The therapeutic window for application of exercise as a treatment to promote restoration of synaptic inputs onto motoneurons following peripheral nerve injury is different from that for promoting axon regeneration in the periphery. PMID:25632080

  17. Function-Triggering Antibodies to the Adhesion Molecule L1 Enhance Recovery after Injury of the Adult Mouse Femoral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Guseva, Daria; Loers, Gabriele; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-01-01

    L1 is among the few adhesion molecules that favors repair after trauma in the adult central nervous system of vertebrates by promoting neuritogenesis and neuronal survival, among other beneficial features. In the peripheral nervous system, L1 is up-regulated in Schwann cells and regrowing axons after nerve damage, but the functional consequences of this expression remain unclear. Our previous study of L1-deficient mice in a femoral nerve injury model showed an unexpected improved functional recovery, attenuated motoneuronal cell death, and enhanced Schwann cell proliferation, being attributed to the persistent synthesis of neurotrophic factors. On the other hand, transgenic mice over-expressing L1 in neurons led to improved remyelination, but not improved functional recovery. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the monoclonal L1 antibody 557 that triggers beneficial L1 functions in vitro would trigger these also in femoral nerve repair. We analyzed femoral nerve regeneration in C57BL/6J mice that received this antibody in a hydrogel filled conduit connecting the cut and sutured nerve before its bifurcation, leading to short-term release of antibody by diffusion. Video-based quantitative analysis of motor functions showed improved recovery when compared to mice treated with conduits containing PBS in the hydrogel scaffold, as a vehicle control. This improved recovery was associated with attenuated motoneuron loss, remyelination and improved precision of preferential motor reinnervation. We suggest that function-triggering L1 antibodies applied to the lesion site at the time of injury over a limited time period will not only be beneficial in peripheral, but also central nervous system regeneration. PMID:25393007

  18. Electrospun and woven silk fibroin/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nerve guidance conduits for repairing peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Ling; Gu, Xiao-Mei; Kong, Yan; Feng, Qi-Lin; Yang, Yu-Min

    2015-10-01

    We have designed a novel nerve guidance conduit (NGC) made from silk fibroin and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) through electrospinning and weaving (ESP-NGCs). Several physical and biological properties of the ESP-NGCs were assessed in order to evaluate their biocompatibility. The physical properties, including thickness, tensile stiffness, infrared spectroscopy, porosity, and water absorption were determined in vitro. To assess the biological properties, Schwann cells were cultured in ESP-NGC extracts and were assessed by morphological observation, the MTT assay, and immunohistochemistry. In addition, ESP-NGCs were subcutaneously implanted in the backs of rabbits to evaluate their biocompatibility in vivo. The results showed that ESP-NGCs have high porosity, strong hydrophilicity, and strong tensile stiffness. Schwann cells cultured in the ESP-NGC extract fluids showed no significant differences compared to control cells in their morphology or viability. Histological evaluation of the ESP-NGCs implanted in vivo indicated a mild inflammatory reaction and high biocompatibility. Together, these data suggest that these novel ESP-NGCs are biocompatible, and may thus provide a reliable scaffold for peripheral nerve repair in clinical application. PMID:26692862

  19. Electrospun and woven silk fibroin/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nerve guidance conduits for repairing peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-ling; Gu, Xiao-mei; Kong, Yan; Feng, Qi-lin; Yang, Yu-min

    2015-01-01

    We have designed a novel nerve guidance conduit (NGC) made from silk fibroin and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) through electrospinning and weaving (ESP-NGCs). Several physical and biological properties of the ESP-NGCs were assessed in order to evaluate their biocompatibility. The physical properties, including thickness, tensile stiffness, infrared spectroscopy, porosity, and water absorption were determined in vitro. To assess the biological properties, Schwann cells were cultured in ESP-NGC extracts and were assessed by morphological observation, the MTT assay, and immunohistochemistry. In addition, ESP-NGCs were subcutaneously implanted in the backs of rabbits to evaluate their biocompatibility in vivo. The results showed that ESP-NGCs have high porosity, strong hydrophilicity, and strong tensile stiffness. Schwann cells cultured in the ESP-NGC extract fluids showed no significant differences compared to control cells in their morphology or viability. Histological evaluation of the ESP-NGCs implanted in vivo indicated a mild inflammatory reaction and high biocompatibility. Together, these data suggest that these novel ESP-NGCs are biocompatible, and may thus provide a reliable scaffold for peripheral nerve repair in clinical application. PMID:26692862

  20. Peripheral nerve injuries resulting from common surgical procedures in the lower portion of the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Stulz, P; Pfeiffer, K M

    1982-03-01

    Twenty-three patients had a painful ilioinguinal and/or iliohypogastric nerve entrapment syndrome following common surgical procedures in the lower portion of the abdomen (appendectomy, repair of inguinal hernia, and gynecologic procedures through transverse incision). The diagnostic triad of nerve entrapment after operation comprises (1) typical burning or lancinating pain near the incision that radiates to the area supplied by the nerve, (2) clear evidence of impaired sensory perception of the nerve, and (3) pain relieved by infiltration with anesthetic for local effects at the site where the two nerves leave the internal oblique muscle. Surgical repair of the scar with resection of the compromised nerve is the most effective treatment. Sixteen patients became symptom free after neurectomy, seven still suffer chronic pain in the scar. PMID:7065874

  1. Increased production of omega-3 fatty acids protects retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shanshan; Shi, Zhe; Su, Huanxing; So, Kwok-Fai; Cui, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Injury to the central nervous system causes progressive degeneration of injured axons, leading to loss of the neuronal bodies. Neuronal survival after injury is a prerequisite for successful regeneration of injured axons. In this study, we investigated the effects of increased production of omega-3 fatty acids and elevation of cAMP on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axonal regeneration after optic nerve (ON) crush injury in adult mice. We found that increased production of omega-3 fatty acids in mice enhanced RGC survival, but not axonal regeneration, over a period of 3 weeks after ON injury. cAMP elevation promoted RGC survival in wild type mice, but no significant difference in cell survival was seen in mice over-producing omega-3 fatty acids and receiving intravitreal injections of CPT-cAMP, suggesting that cAMP elevation protects RGCs after injury but does not potentiate the actions of the omega-3 fatty acids. The observed omega-3 fatty acid-mediated neuroprotection is likely achieved partially through ERK1/2 signaling as inhibition of this pathway by PD98059 hindered, but did not completely block, RGC protection. Our study thus enhances our current understanding of neural repair after CNS injury, including the visual system. PMID:27264241

  2. Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy with Multiple-Ligament Knee Injury and Distal Avulsion of the Biceps Femoris Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Takeshi; Nakase, Junsuke; Numata, Hitoaki; Takata, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    A multiple-ligament knee injury that includes posterolateral corner (PLC) disruption often causes palsy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN), which occurs in 44% of cases with PLC injury and biceps femoris tendon rupture or avulsion of the fibular head. Approximately half of these cases do not show functional recovery. This case report aims to present a criteria-based approach to the operation and postoperative management of CPN palsy that resulted from a multiple-ligament knee injury in a 22-year-old man that occurred during judo. We performed a two-staged surgery. The first stage was to repair the injuries to the PLC and biceps femoris. The second stage involved anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The outcomes were excellent, with a stable knee, excellent range of motion, and improvement in the palsy. The patient was able to return to judo competition 27 weeks after the injury. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a return to sports following CPN palsy with multiple-ligament knee injury. PMID:26064740

  3. Peripheral nerve injury induces loss of nociceptive neuron-specific Gαi-interacting protein in neuropathic pain rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Fei; Fischer, Gregory; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Gαi-interacting protein (GINIP) is expressed specifically in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and functions in modulation of peripheral gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptor (GBR). Genetic deletion of GINIP leads to impaired responsiveness to GBR agonist-mediated analgesia in rodent. It is, however, not defined whether nerve injury changes GINIP expression. Results Immunolabeling with validated antibody revealed GINIP expression in ∼40% of total lumbar DRG neurons in normal adult rats. GINIP immunoreactivity was detected in ∼80% of IB4-positive (nonpeptidergic) and ∼30% of CGRP-positive (peptidergic) neurons. GINIP immunoreactivity in the spinal cord dorsal horn was colabeled with IB4 and partially with CGRP. In addition, GINIP was expressed in DRG neurons immunopositive for GBR1, GBR2, Gαi(s), and Gαo and was also extensively colabeled with multiple nociceptive neuronal markers, including Trpv1, NaV1.7, CaV2.2α1b, CaV3.2α1b, TrkA, and Trek2. Peripheral nerve injury by L5 spinal nerve ligation significantly decreased the proportion of GINIP immunoreactivity-positive neurons from 40 ± 8.4% to 0.8 ± 0.1% (p < 0.01, mean ± SD, four weeks after spinal nerve ligation) and the total GINIP protein to 1.3% ± 0.04% of its basal level (p < 0.01, n = 6 animals in each group, two weeks after spinal nerve ligation) in the ipsilateral L5 DRGs. Conclusion Our results show that GINIP is predominantly expressed by small nonpeptidergic nociceptive neurons and that nerve injury triggers loss of GINIP expression. Signal transduction roles of GINIP may be diverse as it colabeled with various subgroups of nociceptive neurons. Future studies may investigate details of the signaling mechanism engaged by GINIP, as well as the pathophysiological significance of lost expression of GINIP in neuropathic pain. PMID:27145804

  4. Sialylated intravenous immunoglobulin suppress anti-ganglioside antibody mediated nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Massaad, Cynthia A; Gao, Tong; Pillai, Laila; Bogdanova, Nataliia; Ghauri, Sameera; Sheikh, Kazim A

    2016-08-01

    The precise mechanisms underlying the efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in autoimmune neurological disorders including Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) are not known. Anti-ganglioside antibodies have been reported to be pathogenic in some variants of GBS, and we have developed passive transfer animal models to study anti-ganglioside antibody mediated-endoneurial inflammation and associated neuropathological effects and to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic approaches. Some studies indicate that IVIg's anti-inflammatory activity resides in a minor sialylated IVIg (sIVIg) fractions and is dependent on an innate Th2 response via binding to a specific ICAM3-grabbing nonintegrin related 1 receptor (SIGN-R1). Therefore the efficacy of IVIg, IVIg fractions with various IgG Fc sialylation status, and the involvement of Th2 pathway were examined in one of our animal model of antibody-mediated inhibition of axonal regeneration. We demonstrate that both IVIg and sIVIg ameliorated anti-glycan antibody mediated-pathological effect, whereas, the unsialylated fractions of IVIg were not beneficial in our model. Tenfold lower doses of sIVIg compared to whole IVIg provided equivalent efficacy in our studies. Moreover, we found that whole IVIg and sIVIg significantly upregulates the gene expression of IL-33, which itself can provide protection from antibody-mediated nerve injury in our model. Our results support that the SIGN-R1-Th2 pathway is involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of IVIg on endoneurium in our model and elements of this pathway including IL-33 can provide novel therapeutics in inflammatory neuropathies. PMID:27208700

  5. Chylothorax and Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury Associated with Robotic Video-Assisted Mediastinal Lymph Node Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Sarkaria, Inderpal S.; Finley, David J.; Bains, Manjit S.; Adusumilli, Prasad S.; Rizk, Nabil P.; Huang, James; Downey, Robert J.; Rusch, Valerie W.; Jones, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Although the technical aspects of robotic video-assisted thoracic surgery (RVATS) for lung resections may be advantageous, compared with standard thoracoscopy, complications of chylothorax and recurrent laryngeal nerve injury (RLNI) associated with mediastinal lymph node dissection (MLND) may be significant. Methods Consecutive patients who underwent RVATS anatomic lung resection for suspected or confirmed cancer and experienced RLNI or chylothorax were identified and reviewed from a prospectively maintained database. Complications were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results From July 28, 2010, to December 20, 2013, 251 patients underwent RVATS segmentectomy, lobectomy, or bilobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection (MLND). Eleven patients (4.4%) experienced MLND-related complications and composed the study group; 81.8% were right-sided resections, and median lymph node counts in right station IV and station VII were 9 (range, 1–23) and 5.5 (range, 1–10); 72.7% of cases were performed for early-stage I and II lung cancers. Chylothorax (6/251 [2.4%]) and RLNI (6/251 [2.4%]) were significantly more common in the RVATS group than in the open thoracotomy and standard VATS groups. Complications requiring procedural intervention (Grade 3) are as follows: 4 cases of RLNI in patients undergoing percutaneous vocal cord medialization and 3 cases of chylothorax in patients undergoing image-guided thoracic duct embolization or maceration. No operative interventions were required. Conclusions RVATS MLND may be associated with increased rates of chylothorax and RLNI. Attention must be paid to identifying potential technical pitfalls with RVATS lung resections, adjusting surgical techniques accordingly, and minimizing patient morbidity. PMID:26165562

  6. Accidental injury of the inferior alveolar nerve due to the extrusion of calcium hydroxide in endodontic treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yooseok; Roh, Byoung-Duck; Kim, Yemi; Kim, Taehyeon; Kim, Hyungjun

    2016-02-01

    During clinical endodontic treatment, we often find radiopaque filling material beyond the root apex. Accidental extrusion of calcium hydroxide could cause the injury of inferior alveolar nerve, such as paresthesia or continuous inflammatory response. This case report presents the extrusion of calcium hydroxide and treatment procedures including surgical intervention. A 48 yr old female patient experienced Calcipex II extrusion in to the inferior alveolar canal on left mandibular area during endodontic treatment. After completion of endodontic treatment on left mandibular first molar, surgical intervention was planned under general anesthesia. After cortical bone osteotomy and debridement, neuroma resection and neurorrhaphy was performed, and prognosis was observed. But no improvement in sensory nerve was seen following surgical intervention after 20 mon. A clinician should be aware of extrusion of intracanal medicaments and the possibility of damage on inferior alveolar canal. Injectable type of calcium hydroxide should be applied with care for preventing nerve injury. The alternative delivery method such as lentulo spiral was suggested on the posterior mandibular molar. PMID:26877992

  7. Accidental injury of the inferior alveolar nerve due to the extrusion of calcium hydroxide in endodontic treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    During clinical endodontic treatment, we often find radiopaque filling material beyond the root apex. Accidental extrusion of calcium hydroxide could cause the injury of inferior alveolar nerve, such as paresthesia or continuous inflammatory response. This case report presents the extrusion of calcium hydroxide and treatment procedures including surgical intervention. A 48 yr old female patient experienced Calcipex II extrusion in to the inferior alveolar canal on left mandibular area during endodontic treatment. After completion of endodontic treatment on left mandibular first molar, surgical intervention was planned under general anesthesia. After cortical bone osteotomy and debridement, neuroma resection and neurorrhaphy was performed, and prognosis was observed. But no improvement in sensory nerve was seen following surgical intervention after 20 mon. A clinician should be aware of extrusion of intracanal medicaments and the possibility of damage on inferior alveolar canal. Injectable type of calcium hydroxide should be applied with care for preventing nerve injury. The alternative delivery method such as lentulo spiral was suggested on the posterior mandibular molar. PMID:26877992

  8. Differential Effects of 670 and 830 nm Red near Infrared Irradiation Therapy: A Comparative Study of Optic Nerve Injury, Retinal Degeneration, Traumatic Brain and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Giacci, Marcus K.; Wheeler, Lachlan; Lovett, Sarah; Dishington, Emma; Majda, Bernadette; Bartlett, Carole A.; Thornton, Emma; Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Leonard, Anna; Vink, Robert; Harvey, Alan R.; Provis, Jan; Dunlop, Sarah A.; Fitzgerald, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Red/near-infrared irradiation therapy (R/NIR-IT) delivered by laser or light-emitting diode (LED) has improved functional outcomes in a range of CNS injuries. However, translation of R/NIR-IT to the clinic for treatment of neurotrauma has been hampered by lack of comparative information regarding the degree of penetration of the delivered irradiation to the injury site and the optimal treatment parameters for different CNS injuries. We compared the treatment efficacy of R/NIR-IT at 670 nm and 830 nm, provided by narrow-band LED arrays adjusted to produce equal irradiance, in four in vivo rat models of CNS injury: partial optic nerve transection, light-induced retinal degeneration, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI). The number of photons of 670 nm or 830 nm light reaching the SCI injury site was 6.6% and 11.3% of emitted light respectively. Treatment of rats with 670 nm R/NIR-IT following partial optic nerve transection significantly increased the number of visual responses at 7 days after injury (P≤0.05); 830 nm R/NIR-IT was partially effective. 670 nm R/NIR-IT also significantly reduced reactive species and both 670 nm and 830 nm R/NIR-IT reduced hydroxynonenal immunoreactivity (P≤0.05) in this model. Pre-treatment of light-induced retinal degeneration with 670 nm R/NIR-IT significantly reduced the number of Tunel+ cells and 8-hydroxyguanosine immunoreactivity (P≤0.05); outcomes in 830 nm R/NIR-IT treated animals were not significantly different to controls. Treatment of fluid-percussion TBI with 670 nm or 830 nm R/NIR-IT did not result in improvements in motor or sensory function or lesion size at 7 days (P>0.05). Similarly, treatment of contusive SCI with 670 nm or 830 nm R/NIR-IT did not result in significant improvements in functional recovery or reduced cyst size at 28 days (P>0.05). Outcomes from this comparative study indicate that it will be necessary to optimise delivery devices, wavelength, intensity and duration of R

  9. Nur77 Was Essential for Neurite Outgrowth and Involved in Schwann Cell Differentiation After Sciatic Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weidong; Zhu, Xudong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Minhao; Yan, Shixian; Mao, Xingxing; Liu, Zhongbing; Wu, Weijie; Chen, Chen; Xu, Xinbao; Wang, Youhua

    2015-09-01

    Nur77, together with Nurr1 and NOR-1, constitutes the NR4A subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors and plays critical roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. Among them, Nur77 is universally well known to contribute to neurite outgrowth. However, information regarding its regulation and possible function in the peripheral nervous system is still limited. In this study, we performed a sciatic nerve injury model in adult rats and detected an increased expression of Nur77 in the sciatic nerve, which was similar to the expression of Oct-6. Immunofluorescence indicated that Nur77 was located in both axons and Schwann cells. In vitro, we observed enhanced expression of Nur77 during the process of both basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced Schwann cells differentiation and nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth. In vitro and in vivo experiments indicated that inhibiting the function of Nur77 by specific short hairpin RNA could depress Schwann cells myelinization and axons regeneration. Collectively, all these results suggested that upregulation of Nur77 might be involved in Schwann cells differentiation and neurite elongation following sciatic nerve crush. PMID:25957997

  10. [Injury to the median nerve after minimally invasive decompression: discrepancy between the surgical report and actual course of surgery].

    PubMed

    Kernt, B; Neu, J

    2011-06-01

    A 72-year-old man suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome had undergone minimally invasive decompression by using a SafeGuard® Mini-Open Carpal Tunnel Release System. After the operation the patient presented with a paraesthesia in the median nerve distribution. Two months later an operative revision was performed in another hospital. A partial transection of the median nerve and an incomplete release was seen. The surgeon of the first operation stated that detailed informed consent including the risk of iatrogenic nerve injury had been obtained. Furthermore he referred to the operative report, which mentioned the accuracy of the procedure without any problems or complications during surgery. The Arbitration Board stated that the operative report could not exculpate the surgeon because the findings of the operative revision disagreed with the first operative report. The expert opinion declared that the lesion was a result of an inaccurate operative procedure as the surgeon was not able to demonstrate an anatomical variation of the median nerve. PMID:21604030

  11. Electrical Stimulation of the Vagus Nerve Enhances Cognitive and Motor Recovery following Moderate Fluid Percussion Injury in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, DOUGLAS C.; MODGLIN, ARLENE A.; ROOSEVELT, RODNEY W.; NEESE, STEVEN L.; JENSEN, ROBERT A.; BROWNING, RONALD A.; CLOUGH, RICHARD W.

    2006-01-01

    Intermittent, chronically delivered electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve (VNS) is an FDA-approved procedure for the treatment of refractory complex/partial epilepsy in humans. Stimulation of the vagus has also been shown to enhance memory storage processes in laboratory rats and human subjects. Recent evidence suggests that some of these effects of VNS may be due to the activation of neurons in the nucleus locus coeruleus resulting in the release of norepinephrine (NE) throughout the neuraxis. Because antagonism of NE systems has been shown to delay recovery of function following brain damage, it is possible that enhanced release of NE in the CNS may facilitate recovery of function. To evaluate this hypothesis the lateral fluid percussion injury (LFP) model of traumatic brain injury was used and a variety of motor and cognitive behavioral tests were employed to assess recovery in pre-trained stimulated, control, and sham-injured laboratory rats. Two hours following moderate LFP, vagus nerve stimulation (30.0-sec trains of 0.5 mA, 20.0 Hz, biphasic pulses) was initiated. Stimulation continued in each animal’s home cage at 30-min intervals for a period of 14 days, with the exception of brief periods when the animals were disconnected for behavioral assessments. Motor behaviors were evaluated every other day following LFP and tests included beam walk, locomotor placing, and skilled forelimb reaching. In each measure an enhanced rate of recovery and/or level of final performance was observed in the VNS-LFP animals compared to non-stimulated LFP controls. Behavior in the Morris water maze was assessed on days 11–14 following injury. Stimulated LFP animals showed significantly shorter latencies to find the hidden platform than did controls. Despite these behavioral effects, neurohistological examination did not reveal significant differences in lesion extent, density of fluorojade positive neurons, reactive astrocytes or numbers of spared neurons in the CA3

  12. Occupational causes of constrictive bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Kreiss, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review New literature from 2009 to 2012 regarding occupational constrictive bronchiolitis challenges textbook descriptions of this disease, formerly thought to be limited to fixed airflow limitation arising in the wake of accidental overexposure to noxious chemicals. Indolent evolution of dyspnea without a recognized hazardous exposure is a more common presentation. Recent findings Biopsy-confirmed case series of constrictive bronchiolitis from US soldiers, Iranian survivors of sulfur mustard gassing, hospital-based studies, and flavoring-related cases document that indolent constrictive bronchiolitis cases can have normal spirometry or either restrictive or obstructive abnormalities. High-resolution computerized tomography studies can be normal or reflect air-trapping and mosaic attenuation on expiratory films. Thus, in the absence of noninvasive abnormalities, the diagnosis in dyspneic patients may require thoracoscopic biopsy in settings in which exposure risk has not been recognized. Many workers with occupational constrictive bronchiolitis stabilize with cessation of exposures causing bronchiolar epithelial necrosis. Summary Clinicians need a high index of suspicion for constrictive bronchiolitis in young patients with rapidly progressing exertional dyspnea, regardless of spirometric and radiologic findings. Identification of novel causes and exposure-response relations for known causes are needed to provide guidance for protecting workers at risk for this largely irreversible lung disease. PMID:23407121

  13. Spinal Cord T-Cell Infiltration in the Rat Spared Nerve Injury Model: A Time Course Study

    PubMed Central

    Gattlen, Christophe; Clarke, Christine B.; Piller, Nicolas; Kirschmann, Guylène; Pertin, Marie; Decosterd, Isabelle; Gosselin, Romain-Daniel; Suter, Marc R.

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is involved in the development of neuropathic pain. In particular, the infiltration of T-lymphocytes into the spinal cord following peripheral nerve injury has been described as a contributor to sensory hypersensitivity. We used the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain in Sprague Dawley adult male rats to assess proliferation, and/or protein/gene expression levels for microglia (Iba1), T-lymphocytes (CD2) and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CD8). In the dorsal horn ipsilateral to SNI, Iba1 and BrdU stainings revealed microglial reactivity and proliferation, respectively, with different durations. Iba1 expression peaked at D4 and D7 at the mRNA and protein level, respectively, and was long-lasting. Proliferation occurred almost exclusively in Iba1 positive cells and peaked at D2. Gene expression observation by RT-qPCR array suggested that T-lymphocytes attracting chemokines were upregulated after SNI in rat spinal cord but only a few CD2/CD8 positive cells were found. A pronounced infiltration of CD2/CD8 positive T-cells was seen in the spinal cord injury (SCI) model used as a positive control for lymphocyte infiltration. Under these experimental conditions, we show early and long-lasting microglia reactivity in the spinal cord after SNI, but no lymphocyte infiltration was found. PMID:27005622

  14. Delayed radiation injury to the retrobulbar optic nerves and chiasm. Clinical syndrome and treatment with hyperbaric oxygen and corticosteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, D.; Bosley, T.M.; Fowble, B.; Clark, J.; Savino, P.J.; Sergott, R.C.; Schatz, N.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Thirteen patients with delayed radiation injury to the optic nerves and chiasm were treated with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) and corticosteroids. These patients experienced painless, abrupt loss of vision in one (6 patients) or both (7 patients) eyes between 4 and 35 months after receiving radiation doses of at least 4500 cGy to the region of the chiasm. Diagnostic evaluation including neuro-imaging and lumbar puncture showed no recurrent tumor and no other cause for visual loss. No patient's vision improved during treatment or follow-up lasting between 1 and 4 years. There were no serious complications of treatment.

  15. Effect of transgenic human insulin-like growth factor-1 on spinal motor neurons following peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    GU, JIAXIANG; LIU, HONGJUN; ZHANG, NAICHEN; TIAN, HENG; PAN, JUNBO; ZHANG, WENZHONG; WANG, JINGCHENG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the protective effect of exogenous human insulin-like growth factor-1 (hIGF-1) on spinal motor neurons, following its local transfection into an area of peripheral nerve injury. A total of 90 male Wistar rats that had been established as sciatic nerve crush injury models were randomly divided into three groups: hIGF-1 treatment, sham-transfected control and blank control groups. The different phases of hIGF-1 expression were observed in the spinal cord via postoperative immunostaining and the apoptosis of motor neurons was observed using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method. Pathological changes of the motor neurons and Nissl bodies within cell bodies were observed via Marsland and Luxol fast blue double staining, while changes in the neuropil of the spinal cord anterior horn were investigated via ultrastructural observation. It was found that hIGF-1, locally transfected into an area of peripheral nerve injury, was expressed in the spinal anterior horn following axoplasmic transport; the peak hIGF-1 expression occurred approximately a week following transfection. The number of apoptotic spinal cord motor neurons observed in the hIGF-1 treatment group was fewer than that in the sham-transfected and blank control groups at days 7, 14 and 21 following transfection (P<0.01). Furthermore, the quantity of motor neuron cells in the anterior horn of the spinal cord in the hIGF-1 treatment group was higher compared with those in the sham-transfected and blank control groups at days 2, 7, 14 and 28 following transfection (P<0.01). The degenerative changes of Nissl bodies within the cytoplasm of the hIGF-1 treatment group were less severe compared with those of the sham-transfected and blank control groups. At day 56 following transfection, the spinal anterior horn neuropil ultrastructure in the hIGF-1 treatment group was generally normal, while the sham-transfected and blank control

  16. Laryngeal nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Laryngeal nerve damage is injury to one or both of the nerves that are attached to the voice box. ... Injury to the laryngeal nerves is uncommon. When it does occur, it can be from: A complication of neck or chest surgery (especially thyroid, lung, ...

  17. Aetiology of chronic constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Blake, S; Bonar, S; O'Neill, H; Hanly, P; Drury, I; Flanagan, M; Garrett, J

    1983-01-01

    In a consecutive series of 32 cases of chronic constrictive pericarditis treated by pericardiectomy during the past 25 years, four were attributable to rheumatoid disease, two to trauma, one to sarcoidosis, and four, at a maximum, to tuberculosis. In the remaining 21 cases of undetermined aetiology there was no evidence of tuberculosis. It appears, therefore, that tuberculosis was not a common cause of chronic constrictive pericarditis during the period under review, which included the 1950s and early 1960s when tuberculosis was widespread. PMID:6615663

  18. The Fibular Nerve Injury Method: A Reliable Assay to Identify and Test Factors That Repair Neuromuscular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Dalkin, William; Taetzsch, Thomas; Valdez, Gregorio

    2016-01-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) undergoes deleterious structural and functional changes as a result of aging, injury and disease. Thus, it is imperative to understand the cellular and molecular changes involved in maintaining and repairing NMJs. For this purpose, we have developed a method to reliably and consistently examine regenerating NMJs in mice. This nerve injury method involves crushing the common fibular nerve as it passes over the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle tendon near the knee. Using 70 day old female mice, we demonstrate that motor axons begin to reinnervate previous postsynaptic targets within 7 days post-crush. They completely reoccupy their previous synaptic areas by 12 days. To determine the reliability of this injury method, we compared reinnervation rates between individual 70 day old female mice. We found that the number of reinnervated postsynaptic sites was similar between mice at 7, 9, and 12 days post-crush. To determine if this injury assay can also be used to compare molecular changes in muscles, we examined levels of the gamma-subunit of the muscle nicotinic receptor (gamma-AChR) and the muscle-specific kinase (MuSK). The gamma-AChR subunit and MuSK to are highly upregulated following denervation and return to normal levels following reinnervation of NMJs. We found a close relationship between transcript levels for these genes and innervation status of muscles. We believe that this method will accelerate our understanding of the cellular and molecular changes involved in repairing the NMJ and other synapses. PMID:27585036

  19. Potential flow through channel constriction.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    Potential flow through an eccentric, normal constriction of zero thickness in an infinitely long, straight channel of constant width and unit depth is studied by use of a Schwarz-Christoffel transformation. The transformation is integrated by a direct approach. Parametric equations for streamlines are obtained and used to compute an average streamline length for a potential-flow field. -from ASCE Publications Information

  20. A Possible Role of Neuroglobin in the Retina After Optic Nerve Injury: A Comparative Study of Zebrafish and Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Sugitani, Kayo; Koriyama, Yoshiki; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Wakasugi, Keisuke; Kato, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a new member of the family of heme proteins and is specifically expressed in neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems in all vertebrates. In particular, the retina has a 100-fold higher concentration of Ngb than do other nervous tissues. The role of Ngb in the retina is yet to be clarified. Therefore, to understand the functional role of Ngb in the retina after optic nerve injury (ONI), we used two types of retina, from zebrafish and mice, which have permissible and non-permissible capacity for nerve regeneration after ONI, respectively. After ONI, the Ngb protein in zebrafish was upregulated in the amacrine cells within 3 days, whereas in the mouse retina, Ngb was downregulated in the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) within 3 days. Zebrafish Ngb (z-Ngb) significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in retinal explant culture. According to these results, we designed an overexpression experiment with the mouse Ngb (m-Ngb) gene in RGC-5 cells (retinal precursor cells). The excess of m-Ngb actually rescued RGC-5 cells under hypoxic conditions and significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in cell culture. These data suggest that mammalian Ngb has positive neuroprotective and neuritogenic effects that induce nerve regeneration after ONI. PMID:26427474

  1. Recovery of slow and fast muscles following nerve injury during early post-natal development in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, M B; Krishnan, S; Vrbová, G

    1982-01-01

    1. The sciatic nerve was crushed in 5-6-day-old rats and the recovery of function of slow and fast muscles was studied. The first signs of recovery of function were seen 10-12 days after the operation. 2. Maximal tetanic tension developed by the reinnervated muscles was recorded and taken as an indication of their recovery. Two months after nerve crush, slow soleus muscles developed only slightly less tension than the control unoperated soleus muscles. The reinnervated fast muscles tibialis anterior (t.a.) and extensor digitorum longus (e.d.l.) developed only about 50% of the tension of the unoperated controls. 3. The fast muscles never recovered, remaining weaker and smaller throughout the animals' life. 4. The number of muscle fibres in the reinnervated fast muscles was substantially reduced and their fibre composition altered in that they contained mainly muscle fibres with high levels of oxidative enzymes. 5. The reinnervated fast muscles became much more fatigue resistant than the unoperated controls. 6. The possibility that these changes are due to motoneurone death was examined. The motoneurones innervating the fast muscles were labelled by retrograde transport of HRP. No significant reduction in the number of motoneurones innervating the operated muscles was found. 7. These results show that nerve injury during early post-natal life causes permanent changes in fast muscles that are not caused by motoneurone death. Images PLATE 1 (cont.) PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:7153915

  2. MHC-I and PirB Upregulation in the Central and Peripheral Nervous System following Sciatic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bombeiro, André Luis; Thomé, Rodolfo; Oliveira Nunes, Sérgio Luiz; Monteiro Moreira, Bárbara; Verinaud, Liana; de Oliveira, Alexandre Leite Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class one (MHC-I) antigen-presenting molecules participate in central nervous system (CNS) synaptic plasticity, as does the paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PirB), an MHC-I ligand that can inhibit immune-cells and bind to myelin axon growth inhibitors. Based on the dual roles of both molecules in the immune and nervous systems, we evaluated their expression in the central and peripheral nervous system (PNS) following sciatic nerve injury in mice. Increased PirB and MHC-I protein and gene expression is present in the spinal cord one week after nerve transection, PirB being mostly expressed in the neuropile region. In the crushed nerve, MHC-I protein levels increased 2 weeks after lesion (wal) and progressively decreased over the next eight weeks. The same kinetics were observed for infiltrating cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) but not for PirB expression, which continuously increased. Both MHC-I and PirB were found in macrophages and Schwann cells but rarely in axons. Interestingly, at 8 wal, PirB was mainly restricted to the myelin sheath. Our findings reinforce the participation of MHC-I and PirB in CNS plasticity events. In contrast, opposing expression levels of these molecules were found in the PNS, so that MHC-I and PirB seem to be mostly implicated in antigen presentation to CTLs and axon myelination, respectively. PMID:27551751