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Sample records for nerve root displacement

  1. Spinal nerve root stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Christopher P; Kellner, Michael A; Winfree, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    Spinal nerve root stimulation (SNRS) is a neuromodulation technique that is used to treat chronic pain. This modality places stimulator electrode array(s) along the spinal nerve roots, creating stimulation paresthesias within the distribution of the target nerve root(s), thereby treating pain in that same distribution. There are several different forms of spinal nerve root stimulation, depending upon the exact electrode positioning along the nerve roots. SNRS combines the minimally invasive nature, central location, and ease of placement of spinal cord stimulation with the focal targeting of stimulation paresthesias of peripheral nerve stimulation. This hybrid technique may be an effective alternative for patients in whom other forms of neurostimulation are either ineffective or inappropriate. PMID:21422788

  2. Transforaminal nerve root stimulation: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Haque, Raqeeb; Winfree, Christopher J

    2009-07-01

    Objectives.?This technical report provides a detailed description of a method of transforaminal nerve root stimulation useful in the treatment of chronic pain conditions. Material and Methods.?We describe a patient who presented with a medically refractory peripheral neuropathy and suffered from bilateral foot pain. We utilized transforaminal nerve root stimulation to provide robust stimulation paresthesias to the painful areas. Implementing progressively angled stylets, we were able to successfully navigate the stimulators into the intervertebral foramenae with a retrograde approach. Results.?The patient experienced appropriate pain relief after the stimulation and did not have any complications related to the procedure. Conclusions.?We describe a method of transforaminal nerve root stimulation that can be easily implemented by providers using the standard tools available to them. Transforaminal nerve root stimulation may be appropriate for patients in whom more traditional approaches such as spinal cord stimulation or peripheral nerve stimulation are suboptimal. PMID:22151370

  3. L5 nerve root decompression after malunion of surgically managed vertically unstable pelvic ring injuries.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jamie J; Brennan, Michael; Rahm, Mark D

    2013-04-01

    We describe the outcomes of late decompression of the L5 nerve root after malunion of surgically managed pelvis injuries. Four patients underwent decompression of the L5 nerve root. Surgery included hemilaminotomy with facetectomy at L5-S1 followed by decompression of the L5 nerve root laterally from the surrounding displaced sacral ala. L5-S1 fusion was not performed. Radiographs and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores were obtained for each patient at latest follow-up. In all patients, adequate decompression required removal of bone to the anterior aspect of the sacral ala inferiorly to the level of the superior endplate of S1, and there was resolution of L5 radicular pain. Late decompression of the proximal course of the L5 nerve root provided pain relief without resultant radiographic pelvis or L5-S1 instability. PMID:23630679

  4. Reconstruction of nerve root sheaths for sacral extradural spinal meningeal cysts with spinal nerve root fibers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianjun; Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Zhendong; Wu, Haibo; Yen, Ruyu; Zheng, Mei; Chang, Qing; Liu, Isabelle Yisha

    2013-11-01

    This study analyzed the clinical characteristics and outcomes of sacral extradural spinal meningeal cysts with spinal nerve root fibers treated by reconstruction of the nerve root sheaths. The relationships between the cysts and spinal nerve root fibers were examined microscopically, the cysts were partially excised, and the defects were oversewn to reconstruct the nerve root sheaths. The Improved Japanese Orthopedic Association (IJOA) scoring system was used to evaluate preoperative and postoperative neurological function. Thirty-eight patients were included in this study, with a mean age of 41.4 15.57 years. The mean IJOA score was 18.8 1.32 preoperatively and 19.6 0.65 postoperatively, which was a significant difference (t=-3.77, P=0.001). These results indicate a significant improvement in neurological function after surgery. The most significant improvement in neurological function was sensation (z=-2.86, P=0.004), followed by bowel/bladder function (z=-2.31, P=0.02). PMID:24008383

  5. Massive nerve root enlargement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schady, W; Goulding, P J; Lecky, B R; King, R H; Smith, C M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report three patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) presenting with symptoms suggestive of cervical (one patient) and lumbar root disease. METHODS: Nerve conduction studies, EMG, and nerve biopsy were carried out, having found the nerve roots to be very enlarged on MRI, CT myelography, and at surgery. RESULTS: Clinically, peripheral nerve thickening was slight or absent. Subsequently one patient developed facial nerve hypertrophy. This was mistaken for an inner ear tumour and biopsied, with consequent facial palsy. Neurophysiological tests suggested a demyelinating polyneuropathy. Sural nerve biopsy showed in all cases some loss of myelinated fibres, inflammatory cell infiltration, and a few onion bulbs. Hypertrophic changes were much more prominent on posterior nerve root biopsy in one patient: many fibres were surrounded by several layers of Schwann cell cytoplasm. There was an excellent response to steroids in two patients but not in the third (most advanced) patient, who has benefited only marginally from intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. CONCLUSIONS: MRI of the cauda equina may be a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of CIDP. Images PMID:8971116

  6. Scoliosis caused by section of dorsal spinal nerve roots.

    PubMed

    Pincott, J R; Davies, J S; Taffs, L F

    1984-01-01

    Experimental evidence has accumulated in recent years to suggest that scoliosis can be caused by asymmetrical spinal muscle weakness due to sensorineural loss, though this suggestion has not achieved universal acceptance. The evidence is supported by histopathological observations on cases of clinical idiopathic scoliosis. A study is presented in which cynomolgus monkeys had one, two or three dorsal spinal nerve roots cut. Scoliosis developed, convex to the damaged side; its severity was dependent on the number of nerve roots cut. Section of the first lumbar dorsal spinal nerve root had a marked tendency to cause scoliosis. The study supports the view that scoliosis may be caused by asymmetrical paraspinal muscle weakness acting through loss of proprioception. PMID:6693473

  7. Optical Lever Recording of Displacements from Activated Lobster Nerve Bundles and Nitella Internodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; Rector, David M.; George, John S.

    2003-06-01

    An optical lever was designed for studying physical displacements associated with electrophysiological activation of lobster nerve bundles. Stimulation current pulses generated a compound action potential volley, and upward physical displacements of <1 nm were recorded. The swelling displacement propagated in the same direction as the action potential volley, occurred simultaneously with the action potentials, and required 10 ms to relax after the electrical potential was restored. For comparison with previous reports, we also recorded the displacement of Nitella internodes associated with electrical stimulation. We found that a rapid swelling displacement ( ~10 nm) was followed by a larger, slow-shrinking displacement ( ~100 nm).

  8. Characterization of a chondroitin sulfate hydrogel for nerve root regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conovaloff, Aaron; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-10-01

    Brachial plexus injury is a serious medical problem that affects many patients annually, with most cases involving damage to the nerve roots. Therefore, a chondroitin sulfate hydrogel was designed to both serve as a scaffold for regenerating root neurons and deliver neurotrophic signals. Capillary electrophoresis showed that chondroitin sulfate has a dissociation constant in the micromolar range with several common neurotrophins, and this was determined to be approximately tenfold stronger than with heparin. It was also revealed that nerve growth factor exhibits a slightly stronger affinity for hyaluronic acid than for chondroitin sulfate. However, E8 chick dorsal root ganglia cultured in the presence of nerve growth factor revealed that ganglia cultured in chondroitin sulfate scaffolds showed more robust growth than those cultured in control gels of hyaluronic acid. It is hypothesized that, despite the stronger affinity of nerve growth factor for hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate serves as a better scaffold for neurite outgrowth, possibly due to inhibition of growth by hyaluronic acid chains.

  9. Infrared neural stimulation of human spinal nerve roots in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cayce, Jonathan M.; Wells, Jonathon D.; Malphrus, Jonathan D.; Kao, Chris; Thomsen, Sharon; Tulipan, Noel B.; Konrad, Peter E.; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a neurostimulation modality that uses pulsed infrared light to evoke artifact-free, spatially precise neural activity with a noncontact interface; however, the technique has not been demonstrated in humans. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of INS in humans in vivo. The feasibility of INS in humans was assessed in patients (n=7) undergoing selective dorsal root rhizotomy, where hyperactive dorsal roots, identified for transection, were stimulated in vivo with INS on two to three sites per nerve with electromyogram recordings acquired throughout the stimulation. The stimulated dorsal root was removed and histology was performed to determine thermal damage thresholds of INS. Threshold activation of human dorsal rootlets occurred in 63% of nerves for radiant exposures between 0.53 and 1.23  J/cm2. In all cases, only one or two monitored muscle groups were activated from INS stimulation of a hyperactive spinal root identified by electrical stimulation. Thermal damage was first noted at 1.09  J/cm2 and a 2∶1 safety ratio was identified. These findings demonstrate the success of INS as a fresh approach for activating human nerves in vivo and providing the necessary safety data needed to pursue clinically driven therapeutic and diagnostic applications of INS in humans. PMID:26157986

  10. Chronic sciatic nerve compression induces fibrosis in dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    LI, QINWEN; CHEN, JIANGHAI; CHEN, YANHUA; CONG, XIAOBIN; CHEN, ZHENBING

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, pathological alterations in neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were investigated in a rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression. The rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression was established by placing a 1 cm Silastic tube around the right sciatic nerve. Histological examination was performed via Masson's trichrome staining. DRG injury was assessed using Fluoro Ruby (FR) or Fluoro Gold (FG). The expression levels of target genes were examined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. At 3 weeks post-compression, collagen fiber accumulation was observed in the ipsilateral area and, at 8 weeks, excessive collagen formation with muscle atrophy was observed. The collagen volume fraction gradually and significantly increased following sciatic nerve compression. In the model rats, the numbers of FR-labeled DRG neurons were significantly higher, relative to the sham-operated group, however, the numbers of FG-labeled neurons were similar. In the ipsilateral DRG neurons of the model group, the levels of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were elevated and, surrounding the neurons, the levels of collagen type I were increased, compared with those in the contralateral DRG. In the ipsilateral DRG, chronic nerve compression was associated with significantly higher levels of phosphorylated (p)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and significantly lower levels of p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p-p38, compared with those in the contralateral DRGs. Chronic sciatic nerve compression likely induced DRG pathology by upregulating the expression levels of TGF-β1, CTGF and collagen type I, with involvement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. PMID:26820076

  11. Clinical applications of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar foraminal nerve root entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Ohtori, Seiji; Yamashita, Masaomi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Munetaka; Orita, Sumihisa; Kamoda, Hiroto; Arai, Gen; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Masuda, Yoshitada; Ochi, Shigehiro; Kikawa, Takashi; Takaso, Masashi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Toyone, Tomoaki; Suzuki, Takane; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can provide valuable structural information about tissues that may be useful for clinical applications in evaluating lumbar foraminal nerve root entrapment. Our purpose was to visualize the lumbar nerve root and to analyze its morphology, and to measure its apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in healthy volunteers and patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis using 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging. Fourteen patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis and 14 healthy volunteers were studied. Regions of interest were placed at the fourth and fifth lumbar root at dorsal root ganglia and distal spinal nerves (at L4 and L5) and the first sacral root and distal spinal nerve (S1) on DWI to quantify mean ADC values. The anatomic parameters of the spinal nerve roots can also be determined by neurography. In patients, mean ADC values were significantly higher in entrapped roots and distal spinal nerve than in intact ones. Neurography also showed abnormalities such as nerve indentation, swelling and running transversely in their course through the foramen. In all patients, leg pain was ameliorated after selective decompression (n = 9) or nerve block (n = 5). We demonstrated the first use of DWI and neurography of human lumbar nerves to visualize and quantitatively evaluate lumbar nerve entrapment with foraminal stenosis. We believe that DWI is a potential tool for diagnosis of lumbar nerve entrapment. PMID:20632042

  12. Autologous nerve graft repair of different degrees of sciatic nerve defect: stress and displacement at the anastomosis in a three-dimensional fnite element simulation model.

    PubMed

    Piao, Cheng-Dong; Yang, Kun; Li, Peng; Luo, Min

    2015-05-01

    In the repair of peripheral nerve injury using autologous or synthetic nerve grafting, the magnitude of tensile forces at the anastomosis affects its response to physiological stress and the ultimate success of the treatment. One-dimensional stretching is commonly used to measure changes in tensile stress and strain; however, the accuracy of this simple method is limited. Therefore, in the present study, we established three-dimensional finite element models of sciatic nerve defects repaired by autologous nerve grafts. Using PRO E 5.0 finite element simulation software, we calculated the maximum stress and displacement of an anastomosis under a 5 N load in 10-, 20-, 30-, 40-mm long autologous nerve grafts. We found that maximum displacement increased with graft length, consistent with specimen force. These findings indicate that three-dimensional finite element simulation is a feasible method for analyzing stress and displacement at the anastomosis after autologous nerve grafting. PMID:26109958

  13. Organization of peripheral nerves and spinal roots of the Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina.

    PubMed

    Coggeshall, R E; Leonard, R B; Applebaum, M L; Willis, W D

    1978-01-01

    1. The sizes and numbers of axons in peripheral nerves and spinal roots were investigated in the stingray, Dasyatis sabina. 2. The axons of the dorsal and ventral roots do not mingle in peripheral nerves of this animal as they do in higher vertebrates. Thus, it was usually possible to split the peripheral nerve into two portions, one containing only dorsal root axons, the other containing only ventral root axons. This feature was useful for the analysis of certain aspects of spinal cord organization. 3. The fact that dorsal and ventral root axons were segregated in peripheral nerves enabled us to demonstrate, without experimental surgery, that the central processes of the dorsal root ganglion cells and the proximal ventral root axons were 10-20% narrower, on the average, than the distal processes of the same dorsal root ganglion cells or the distal parts of the same ventral root axons. 4. The stingray is remarkable in having very few unmyelinated axons in the dorsal roots, ventral roots, or peripheral nerves. This paucity of unmyelinated axons distinguishes the Atlantic stingrays from all other vertebrates whose roots and nerves have been examined for unmyelinated fibers. 5. Similar findings were obtained for one spotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari) and two cow-nose rays (Rhinoptera bonasus). PMID:621549

  14. Ultrasonographic reference sizes of the median and ulnar nerves and the cervical nerve roots in healthy Japanese adults.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Takamichi; Ochi, Kazuhide; Hosomi, Naohisa; Mukai, Tomoya; Ueno, Hiroki; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify, for practical use, ultrasonographic reference values for nerve sizes at multiple sites, including entrapment and non-entrapment sites along the median and ulnar nerves and among the cervical nerve roots. We verified reliable sites and site-based differences between the reference values. In addition, we found associations between the reference nerve sizes and several physical characteristics (gender, dominant hand, age, height, weight, body mass index [BMI] and wrist circumference). Nerves were measured bilaterally at 26 sites or levels in 60 healthy Japanese adults (29 males; age, 35.4 9.7 y; BMI, 22.3 3.6 kg/m(2); wrist circumference, 16.0 1.3 cm on the right side and 15.9 1.2 cm on the left side). The mean reference nerve sizes were 5.6-9.1 mm(2) along the median nerve, 4.1-6.7 mm(2) along the ulnar nerve and 2.14-3.39 mm among the cervical nerve roots. Multifactorial regression analyses revealed that the physical characteristics most strongly associated with nerve size were age, BMI and wrist circumference at the entrapment sites (F= 7.6, p < 0.01, at the pisiform bone level of the carpal tunnel; F= 15.1, p < 0.001, at the level of Guyon's canal), as well as wrist circumference and gender at the non-entrapment sites (F= 70.6, p < 0.001, along the median nerve; F= 24.7, p < 0.001, along the ulnar nerve). Our results suggest that the factors with the greatest influence on nerve size differed between entrapment and non-entrapment sites. Site-based differences in nerve size were determined using one-way analyses of variance (p < 0.001). Intra- and inter-observer reliability was highest for the median nerve, at both the distal wrist crease and mid-humerus; at the arterial split along the ulnar nerve; and at the fifth cervical nerve root level. No systematic error was indicated by Bland-Altman analysis; the coefficients of variation were 5.5%-9.2% for intra-observer reliability and 7.1%-8.7% for inter-observer reliability. PMID:23830101

  15. Changes in lumbosacral spinal nerve roots on diffusion tensor imaging in spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhong-Jun; Huang, Yong; Fan, Zi-Wen; Li, Xin-Chun; Cao, Bing-Yi

    2015-11-01

    Lumbosacral degenerative disc disease is a common cause of lower back and leg pain. Conventional T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) scans are commonly used to image spinal cord degeneration. However, these modalities are unable to image the entire lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Thus, in the present study, we assessed the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for quantitative assessment of compressed lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Subjects were 20 young healthy volunteers and 31 patients with lumbosacral stenosis. T2WI showed that the residual dural sac area was less than two-thirds that of the corresponding normal area in patients from L3 to S1 stenosis. On T1WI and T2WI, 74 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots from 31 patients showed compression changes. DTI showed thinning and distortion in 36 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (49%) and abruption in 17 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (23%). Moreover, fractional anisotropy values were reduced in the lumbosacral spinal nerve roots of patients with lumbosacral stenosis. These findings suggest that DTI can objectively and quantitatively evaluate the severity of lumbosacral spinal nerve root compression. PMID:26807125

  16. Changes in lumbosacral spinal nerve roots on diffusion tensor imaging in spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Zhong-jun; Huang, Yong; Fan, Zi-wen; Li, Xin-chun; Cao, Bing-yi

    2015-01-01

    Lumbosacral degenerative disc disease is a common cause of lower back and leg pain. Conventional T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) scans are commonly used to image spinal cord degeneration. However, these modalities are unable to image the entire lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Thus, in the present study, we assessed the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for quantitative assessment of compressed lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Subjects were 20 young healthy volunteers and 31 patients with lumbosacral stenosis. T2WI showed that the residual dural sac area was less than two-thirds that of the corresponding normal area in patients from L3 to S1 stenosis. On T1WI and T2WI, 74 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots from 31 patients showed compression changes. DTI showed thinning and distortion in 36 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (49%) and abruption in 17 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (23%). Moreover, fractional anisotropy values were reduced in the lumbosacral spinal nerve roots of patients with lumbosacral stenosis. These findings suggest that DTI can objectively and quantitatively evaluate the severity of lumbosacral spinal nerve root compression. PMID:26807125

  17. The effect of the rotational angle on MR diffusion indices in nerves: Is the rms displacement of the slow-diffusing component a good measure of fiber orientation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Shir, Amnon; Cohen, Yoram

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, much effort has been made to increase our ability to infer nerve fiber direction through the use of diffusion MR. The present study examines the effect of the rotational angle ( ?), i.e. the angle between the diffusion sensitizing gradients and the main axis of the fibers in the nerves, on different NMR indices. The indices examined were the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), extracted from low b-values ( bmax ? 1200 s/mm 2), and the root mean square (rms) displacement of the fast and the slow-diffusing components extracted from high b-value q-space diffusion MR data. In addition, the effect of both the diffusion time and myelination was evaluated. We found that the most sensitive index to the rotational angle is the rms displacement of the slow-diffusing component extracted from the high b-value q-space diffusion MR experiment. For this component the rms displacement was nearly constant for ? values ranging from -10 to +80 (where ? = 0 is the z direction), but it changed dramatically when diffusion was measured nearly perpendicular to the nerve fiber direction, i.e., for ? = 90 10. The ADC and the rms displacement of the fast-diffusing component exhibited only gradual changes, with a maximal change at ? = 45 15. The sensitivity of the rms displacement of the slow-diffusing component to the rotational angle was found to be higher at longer diffusion times and in mature fully myelinated nerves. The relevance of these observations for determining the fiber direction is briefly discussed.

  18. Ultrasonographic cross-sectional area of spinal nerve roots in cervical radiculopathy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkuk; Yoon, Joon-Shik; Kang, Hyo Jung

    2015-02-01

    Recently, sonographic assessment has been considered an alternative method for evaluating cervical root lesions. The aim of this pilot study was to measure cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of cervical spinal nerve roots using high-resolution ultrasonography in patients with cervical radiculopathy, to compare the CSA of nerve roots between the affected and unaffected sides. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral cervical radiculopathy, who were referred to the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in the University General Hospital by general practitioners, were prospectively recruited. The selected nerve roots were sonographically imaged at the most proximal location possible, where they exited over the transverse processor, just distal to that point. The CSA was measured three times using the trace tool available on the ultrasonography device. The CSA of each contralateral nerve root served as a control. Twenty-four patients (9 women; mean age, 53.7 yrs) were enrolled in this study. The CSAs were measured by ultrasonography in 5 pairs of C5 roots, 12 pairs of C6 roots, and 7 pairs of C7 roots. The mean CSAs of the affected and unaffected sides were 9.74 1.95 and 9.47 1.95 mm, respectively (P = 0.019). Spearman rank-order correlation test showed a positive relationship between the CSA of the affected nerve root and the duration of symptoms (?22 = 0.467, P = 0.021).This is, to the authors' knowledge, the first comparative study to obtain the CSA of spinal nerve roots in cervical radiculopathy. Increased CSA of the affected nerve root relative to the unaffected side, as demonstrated by ultrasonography, may be useful as an additive clue for the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy. PMID:25415392

  19. A widely displaced Galeazzi-equivalent lesion with median nerve compromise

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Fogg, Quentin; Ashwood, Neil; Fu, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 14-year-old boy with a right distal radial fracture accompanied by a severely displaced complete distal ulnar physeal separation and associated median nerve compromise. This injury is known as Galeazzi-equivalent lesion in children and is an extremely rare injury associated with growth arrest. Recognition of the lesion can be difficult but wide displacement may be associated with other significant injuries such as neurovascular compromise. Prompt intervention reversed the neurological symptoms. At 10-month postoperation there was neither growth arrest nor loss of motion. Complete separation of the ulna physis remains often because of soft tissue interposition or capsule problems and prompt reduction is recommended in the literature as a priority. PMID:22907852

  20. The Relation Between Rotation Deformity and Nerve Root Stress in Lumbar Scoliosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Kang, Kyoung-Tak

    Even though several finite element models of lumbar spine were introduced, there has been no model including the neural structure. Therefore, the authors made the novel lumbar spine finite element model including neural structure. Using this model, we investigated the relation between the deformity pattern and nerve root stress. Two lumbar models with different types of curve pattern (lateral bending and lateral bending with rotation curve) were made. In the model of lateral bending curves without rotation, the principal compressive nerve root stress on the concave side was greater than the principal tensile stress on the convex side at the apex vertebra. Contrarily, in the lateral bending curve with rotational deformity, the nerve stress on the convex side was higher than that on the concave side. Therefore, this study elicit that deformity pattern could have significantly influence on the nerve root stress in the lumbar spine.

  1. Implantation of cauda equina nerve roots through a biodegradable scaffold at the conus medullaris in rat

    PubMed Central

    Grahn, Peter J.; Vaishya, Sandeep; Knight, Andrew; Chen, Bingkun K.; Schmeichel, Ann; Currier, Bradford; Spinner, Robert; Yaszemski, Michael; Windebank, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Background context Traumatic injuries occurring at the conus medullaris of the spinal cord cause both permanent damage to the central nervous system, and to the cauda equina nerve roots. Purpose This proof of concept study determined whether implanting the nerve roots into a biodegradable scaffold would improve regeneration after injury. Study design/setting All experimental work involving rats was performed according to approved guidelines by the Mayo Clinic Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). Surgical procedures were performed on 32 Sprague Dawley rats. Four ventral cauda equina nerve roots were re-implanted either directly into the ventral cord stump or through a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold. These experimental groups were compared to a control group in which the nerves were inserted into a muscle fascia barrier that was placed between the spinal cord and nerve roots. Animals were sacrificed at four weeks. Methods This work was funded by the authors' institution; Morton Cure Paralysis Fund; The Craig H. Neilsen Foundation; and NIBIB grant R01 EB 02390. There was no conflict of interest between the study funding and the conclusions drawn. Results There was no difference in motor neuron counts in the spinal cord rostral to the injury in all treatment groups, implying equal potential for regeneration into implanted nerve roots. One-way ANOVA testing, with Tukey's post-test, showed a statistically significant improvement in axon regeneration through the injury in the PLGA scaffold treatment group compared to the control (p<0.05, scaffold n=11, control n=11). Conclusion This pilot study demonstrated that a PLGA scaffold improved regeneration of axons into peripheral nerve roots. However, the number of regenerating axons observed was limited and did not lead to functional recovery. Future experiments will employ a different scaffold material and possible growth factors or enzymes to increase axon populations. PMID:24509005

  2. Diagnostic value of history and physical examination in patients suspected of lumbosacral nerve root compression

    PubMed Central

    Vroomen, P; de Krom, M C T F M; Wilmink, J; Kester, A; Knottnerus, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate patient characteristics, symptoms, and examination findings in the clinical diagnosis of lumbosacral nerve root compression causing sciatica. Methods: The study involved 274 patients with pain radiating into the leg. All had a standardised clinical assessment and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The associations between patient characteristics, clinical findings, and lumbosacral nerve root compression on MR imaging were analysed. Results: Nerve root compression was associated with three patient characteristics, three symptoms, and four physical examination findings (paresis, absence of tendon reflexes, a positive straight leg raising test, and increased finger-floor distance). Multivariate analysis, analysing the independent diagnostic value of the tests, showed that nerve root compression was predicted by two patient characteristics, four symptoms, and two signs (increased finger-floor distance and paresis). The straight leg raise test was not predictive. The area under the curve of the receiver-operating characteristic was 0.80 for the history items. It increased to 0.83 when the physical examination items were added. Conclusions: Various clinical findings were found to be associated with nerve root compression on MR imaging. While this set of findings agrees well with those commonly used in daily practice, the tests tended to have lower sensitivity and specificity than previously reported. Stepwise multivariate analysis showed that most of the diagnostic information revealed by physical examination findings had already been revealed by the history items. PMID:11971050

  3. Skin Sympathetic Nerve Activity is Modulated during Slow Sinusoidal Linear Displacements in Supine Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Philip S.; Hammam, Elie; Kwok, Kenny; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency sinusoidal linear acceleration (0.08 Hz, ±4 mG) modulates skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) in seated subjects (head vertical), suggesting that activation of the utricle in the peripheral vestibular labyrinth modulates SSNA. The aim of the current study was to determine whether SSNA is also modulated by input from the saccule. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted into the common peroneal nerve to record oligounitary SSNA in 8 subjects laying supine on a motorized platform with the head aligned with the longitudinal axis of the body. Slow sinusoidal (0.08 Hz, 100 cycles) linear acceleration-decelerations (peak ±4 mG) were applied rostrocaudally to predominately activate the saccules, or mediolaterally to predominately activate the utricles. Cross-correlation histograms were constructed between the negative-going sympathetic spikes and the positive peaks of the sinusoidal stimuli. Sinusoidal linear acceleration along the rostrocaudal axis or mediolateral axis both resulted in sinusoidal modulation of SSNA (Median, IQR 27.0, 22–33% and 24.8, 17–39%, respectively). This suggests that both otolith organs act on sympathetic outflow to skin and muscle in a similar manner during supine displacements. PMID:26909019

  4. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery: Let's tell someone

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In a recent study entitled: “More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery, especially extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF): A review”, Epstein documented that more nerve root injuries occurred utilizing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) versus open lumbar surgery for diskectomy, decompression of stenosis (laminectomy), and/or fusion for instability. Methods: In large multicenter Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial reviews performed by Desai et al., nerve root injury with open diskectomy occurred in 0.13–0.25% of cases, occurred in 0% of laminectomy/stenosis with/without fusion cases, and just 2% for open laminectomy/stenosis/degenerative spondylolisthesis with/without fusion. Results: In another MIS series performed largely for disc disease (often contained nonsurgical disc herniations, therefore unnecessary procedures) or spondylolisthesis, the risk of root injury was 2% for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus 7.8% for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Furthermore, the high frequencies of radiculitis/nerve root/plexus injuries incurring during anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIF: 15.8%) versus extreme lumbar interbody fusions (XLIF: 23.8%), addressing disc disease, failed back surgery, and spondylolisthesis, were far from acceptable. Conclusions: The incidence of nerve root injuries following any of the multiple MIS lumbar surgical techniques (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF) resulted in more nerve root injuries when compared with open conventional lumbar surgical techniques. Considering the majority of these procedures are unnecessarily being performed for degenerative disc disease alone, spine surgeons should be increasingly asked why they are offering these operations to their patients? PMID:26904373

  5. [Sciatica due to unusual causes: Tarlov cysts and nerve roots anomalies].

    PubMed

    Younes, M; Korbaa, W; Zrour, S; Bejia, I; Touzi, M; Bergaoui, N

    2009-03-01

    Tarlov cysts and nerve roots anomalies usually involve lumbosacral roots and are often asymptomatic. MRI has enabled recognition of many conditions that used to be missed by CT or myelography investigations performed for back and leg pain. However, even without additional compressive impingement (disc hernia, spondylolisthesis or lumbar canal stenosis) these anomalies can be responsible for sciatica, motor deficit and bladder sphincter dysfunction. Tarlov cysts are perinervous dilatations of the dorsal root ganglion. CT and especially MRI can reveal these cysts and their precise relations with the neighboring structures. Delayed filling of the cysts can be visualized on the myelogram. MRI is more sensitive than CT myelography for a positive diagnosis of nerve root anomalies, a differential diagnosis with disc hernia and classification of these anomalies. Surgical treatment is indicated for symptomatic Tarlov cysts and nerve root anomalies resistant to conservative treatment. Better outcome is observed in patients with an additional compressive impingement component. We report two cases of sciatica: one caused by Tarlov cysts diagnosed by MRI and the other by nerve root anomalies diagnosed by CT myelography. In both cases, conservative treatment was undertaken. The clinical, radiological and therapeutic aspects of these disorders are discussed. PMID:18809189

  6. Development of a duration threshold for modulating evoked neuronal responses after nerve root compression injury.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Kristen J; Quindlen, Julia C; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2011-11-01

    Cervical nerve roots are susceptible to compression injuries of various durations. The duration of an applied compression has been shown to contribute to both the onset of persistent pain and also the degree of spinal cellular and molecular responses related to nociception. This study investigated the relationship between peripherally-evoked activity in spinal cord neurons during a root compression and the resulting development of axonal damage. Electrically-evoked spikes were measured in the spinal cord as a function of time during and after (post-compression) a 15 minute compression of the C7 nerve root. Compression to the root significantly (p=0.035) reduced the number of spikes that were evoked over time relative to sham. The critical time for compression to maximally reduce evoked spikes was 6.63.0 minutes. A second study measured the post- compression evoked neuronal activity following compression applied for a shorter, sub-threshold time (three minutes). Ten minutes after compression was removed, the discharge rate remained significantly (p=0.018) less than baseline by 5825% relative to sham after the 15 minute compression, but returned to within 333% of baseline after the three minute compression. Axonal damage was evident in the nerve root at day seven after nerve root compression only after a 15 minute compression. These studies demonstrate that even a transient mechanical insult to the nerve root is sufficient to induce sustained neuronal dysfunction and axonal pathology associated with pain, and results provide support that such minor neural tissue traumas can actually induce long-lasting functional deficits. PMID:22869302

  7. A conduction block in sciatic nerves can be detected by magnetic motor root stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Konoma, Yuko; Fujii, Kengo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-15

    Useful diagnostic techniques for the acute phase of sciatic nerve palsy, an entrapment neuropathy, are not well established. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the diagnostic utility of magnetic sacral motor root stimulation for sciatic nerve palsy. We analyzed the peripheral nerves innervating the abductor hallucis muscle using both electrical stimulations at the ankle and knee and magnetic stimulations at the neuro-foramina and conus medullaris levels in a patient with sciatic nerve palsy at the level of the piriformis muscle due to gluteal compression related to alcohol consumption. On the fourth day after onset, magnetic sacral motor root stimulation using a MATS coil (the MATS coil stimulation method) clearly revealed a conduction block between the knee and the sacral neuro-foramina. Two weeks after onset, needle electromyography supported the existence of the focal lesion. The MATS coil stimulation method clearly revealed a conduction block in the sciatic nerve and is therefore a useful diagnostic tool for the abnormal neurophysiological findings associated with sciatic nerve palsy even at the acute phase. PMID:23809191

  8. Bony spinal canal changes that differentiate conjoined nerve roots from herniated nucleus pulposus

    SciTech Connect

    Hoddick, W.K.; Helms, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    CT examinations of the lumbar spine in 12 consecutive patients with conjoined nerve roots were reviewed. Asymmetry of the bony spinal canal, seen as slight dilatation of the ipsilateral lateral recess, was present in all cases. This finding, which is not typically associated with extruded free intervertebral disk fragments, should serve to distinguish these two entities.

  9. Mechanical properties of nerve roots and rami radiculares isolated from fresh pig spinal cords

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Norihiro; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Ohgi, Junji; Ichihara, Kazuhiko; Chen, Xian; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    No reports have described experiments designed to determine the strength characteristics of spinal nerve roots and rami radiculares for the purpose of explaining the complexity of symptoms of medullary cone lesions and cauda equina syndrome. In this study, to explain the pathogenesis of cauda equina syndrome, monoaxial tensile tests were performed to determine the strength characteristics of spinal nerve roots and rami radiculares, and analysis was conducted to evaluate the stress-strain relationship and strength characteristics. Using the same tensile test device, the nerve root and ramus radiculares isolated from the spinal cords of pigs were subjected to the tensile test and stress relaxation test at load strain rates of 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 s-1 under identical settings. The tensile strength of the nerve root was not rate dependent, while the ramus radiculares tensile strength tended to decrease as the strain rate increased. These findings provide important insights into cauda equina symptoms, radiculopathy, and clinical symptoms of the medullary cone. PMID:26807127

  10. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising in the setting of cervical nerve root schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Nolan; Abode-Iyamah, Kingsley; Kirby, Patricia; Smith, Mark; Reddy, Chandan

    2015-10-01

    We present a 23-year-old woman who was diagnosed with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST), 17 months following the resection of a schwannoma. MPNST is rare and is usually associated with neurofibromatosis. The typical treatment of resection and radiation is difficult to achieve in the spine. PMID:26117359

  11. The transcriptional landscape of dorsal root ganglia after sciatic nerve transection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiying; Xue, Chengbin; Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Ruirui; Wang, Yaxian; Wang, Yongjun; Yu, Bin; Liu, Jie; Ding, Fei; Yang, Yuming; Gu, Xiaosong

    2015-01-01

    Following peripheral nerve injury, transcriptional responses are orchestrated to regulate the expression of numerous genes in the lesioned nerve, thus activating the intrinsic regeneration program. To better understand the molecular regulation of peripheral nerve regeneration, we aimed at investigating the transcriptional landscape of dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) after sciatic nerve transection in rats. The cDNA microarray analysis was used to identify thousands of genes that were differentially expressed at different time points post nerve injury (PNI). The results from Euclidean distance matrix, principal component analysis, and hierarchical clustering indicated that 2 nodal transitions in temporal gene expressions could segregate 3 distinct transcriptional phases within the period of 14 d PNI. The 3 phases were designated as “a stress response phase”, “a pre-regeneration phase”, and “a regeneration phase”, respectively, by referring to morphological observation of post-nerve-injury changes. The gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed the distinct features of biological process, cellular component, and molecular function at each transcriptional phase. Moreover, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis suggested that differentially expressed genes, mainly transcription factors and genes associated with neurite/axon growth, might be integrated into regulatory networks to mediate the regulation of peripheral nerve regeneration in a highly cooperative manner. PMID:26576491

  12. The Incidence of Lumbar Discectomy after Epidural Steroid Injections or Selective Nerve Root Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Mroz, Thomas; Lieberman, Isador

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the use of Central Epidural Steroid Injections (ESI) and Selective Nerve Root Blocks (SNRB) along with the crossover rate to lumbar discectomy in patients with a lumbar disc herniation using retrospective records database search. Butterman et al found a crossover rate for patients with symptomatic disc herniations treated with ESI of 54% (27/50), while Riew similarly found a 53% (29/55) crossover patients receiving SNRB. Methods The database was searched in a sequential Boolean style for patients with the diagnosis of a lumbar disc herniation (Displaced Lumbar Disc - 722.1) and a SNRB (64483) or ESI (62311) who subsequently underwent a Lumbar Discectomy (63030) over a three year time period from January 2004 through December 2006. Statistical analysis was preformed examining the impact of injection type, age, location, gender, and year. Results Of 482,893 patients with the diagnosis of a disc herniation, 27,799(5.76%) underwent a lumbar discectomy. The 29,941 patients who received at least one SNRB for a disc herniation, 10.80% later underwent a lumbar discectomy. The 41,420 patients who received at least one ESI for a disc herniation 9.34% later underwent a lumbar discectomy. There was a noted increase in injection procedures, particularly SNRB during the study with a greater than 50% increase. Conclusions Our examination found a much smaller, but similar crossover rate to surgery between both injection methods, which argues against one method being more effective than another in avoiding surgery. It is likely that patients are receiving these procedures more frequently during the course of conservative treatment for a disc herniation. Level of Evidence This was a Level III study. PMID:26056627

  13. Migratory Reed Warblers Need Intact Trigeminal Nerves to Correct for a 1,000 km Eastward Displacement.

    PubMed

    Kishkinev, Dmitry; Chernetsov, Nikita; Heyers, Dominik; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that experienced night-migratory songbirds can determine their position, but it has remained a mystery which cues and sensory mechanisms they use, in particular, those used to determine longitude (east-west position). One potential solution would be to use a magnetic map or signpost mechanism like the one documented in sea turtles. Night-migratory songbirds have a magnetic compass in their eyes and a second magnetic sense with unknown biological function involving the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve (V1). Could V1 be involved in determining east-west position? We displaced 57 Eurasian reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) with or without sectioned V1. Sham operated birds corrected their orientation towards the breeding area after displacement like the untreated controls did. In contrast, V1-sectioned birds did not correct for the displacement. They oriented in the same direction after the displacement as they had done at the capture site. Thus, an intact ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve is necessary for detecting the 1,000 km eastward displacement in this night-migratory songbird. Our results suggest that V1 carries map-related information used in a large-scale map or signpost sense that the reed warblers needed to determine their approximate geographical position and/or an east-west coordinate. PMID:23840374

  14. Migratory Reed Warblers Need Intact Trigeminal Nerves to Correct for a 1,000 km Eastward Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Heyers, Dominik; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that experienced night-migratory songbirds can determine their position, but it has remained a mystery which cues and sensory mechanisms they use, in particular, those used to determine longitude (eastwest position). One potential solution would be to use a magnetic map or signpost mechanism like the one documented in sea turtles. Night-migratory songbirds have a magnetic compass in their eyes and a second magnetic sense with unknown biological function involving the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve (V1). Could V1 be involved in determining eastwest position? We displaced 57 Eurasian reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) with or without sectioned V1. Sham operated birds corrected their orientation towards the breeding area after displacement like the untreated controls did. In contrast, V1-sectioned birds did not correct for the displacement. They oriented in the same direction after the displacement as they had done at the capture site. Thus, an intact ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve is necessary for detecting the 1,000 km eastward displacement in this night-migratory songbird. Our results suggest that V1 carries map-related information used in a large-scale map or signpost sense that the reed warblers needed to determine their approximate geographical position and/or an eastwest coordinate. PMID:23840374

  15. Intraoral management of iatrogenically displaced lower third molar roots in the sublingual space: a report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sufeng; Huang, Zheng; Geng, Tengyu; Huang, Lanzhu

    2015-01-01

    Surgical removal of the mandibular third molars is one of the most common procedures performed by dentists, as well as by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Accidental displacement of teeth or roots into the fascial spaces, during surgical removal of the mandibular third molars, is a rare, but serious complication. Herein, we present 2 cases of iatrogenically displaced mandibular third molar roots into the sublingual space, which were successfully removed under local anesthesia intraorally. In addition to methods to minimize the risk of accidental tooth or root displacement, the importance of recognizing this complication and the methods of retrieval are also discussed. PMID:26770616

  16. Chronic infection of a Brindley sacral nerve root stimulator.

    PubMed

    Bramall, Alexa; Chaudhary, Bednash; Ahmad, Jamil; Shamji, Mohammed F

    2016-01-01

    The Finetech-Brindley sacral anterior root stimulator (SARS) is implanted for the treatment of bladder dysfunction following spinal cord injury (SCI) and has been successful in improving micturition in many patients with SCI. This case describes a 62-year-old man who presented with a chronic Staphylococcus aureus infection of a Brindley SARS 26?years after implantation following a T5 American Spinal Injury Association A spinal cord injury (T5 ASIA A SCI). He presented with chronic sacral osteomyelitis with a history of periodic implant erosion through the skin. Following a series of interventions, definitive management involved removal of the intradural electrodes and epidural and intradural phlegmon, ligation of the thecal sac and flap reconstruction. In the case of delayed infection of a Brindley SARS, removal of the entire system should be considered, especially if extension of the infection to the intradural compartment is suspected. PMID:26917791

  17. Intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor induces gliogenesis in sensory ganglia, dorsal root, and within the dorsal root entry zone.

    PubMed

    Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Pizzo, Donald P; Morrissette, Debbi A; Winkler, Jrgen

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) leads to massive Schwann cell hyperplasia surrounding the medulla oblongata and spinal cord. This study was designed to characterize the proliferation of peripheral glial cells, that is, Schwann and satellite cells, in the trigeminal ganglia and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult rats during two weeks of NGF infusion using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. The trigeminal ganglia as well as the cervical and lumbar DRG were analyzed. Along the entire neuraxis a small number of dividing cells were observed within these regions under physiological condition. NGF infusion has dramatically increased the generation of new cells in the neuronal soma and axonal compartments of sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root and the dorsal root entry zone. Quantification of BrdU positive cells within sensory ganglia revealed a 2.3- to 3-fold increase in glial cells compared to controls with a similar response to NGF for the different peripheral ganglia examined. Immunofluorescent labeling with S100? revealed that Schwann and satellite cells underwent mitosis after NGF administration. These data indicate that intracerebroventricular NGF infusion significantly induces gliogenesis in trigeminal ganglia and the spinal sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root entry zone as well as the dorsal root. PMID:24738070

  18. Spinal Cord and Spinal Nerve Root Involvement (Myeloradiculopathy) in Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rahul; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Verma, Rajesh; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Most of the information about spinal cord and nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis is available in the form of isolated case reports or case series. In this article, we evaluated the incidence, predictors, and prognostic impact of spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis. In this prospective study, 71 consecutive patients of newly diagnosed tuberculous meningitis were enrolled. In addition to clinical evaluation, patients were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain and spine. Patients were followed up for at least 6 months. Out of 71 patients, 33 (46.4%) had symptoms/signs of spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement, 22 (30.9%) of whom had symptoms/signs at enrolment. Eleven (15.4%) patients had paradoxical involvement. Paraparesis was present in 22 (31%) patients, which was of upper motor neuron type in 6 (8.4%) patients, lower motor neuron type in 10 (14%) patients, and mixed type in 6 (8.4%) patients. Quadriparesis was present in 3 (4.2%) patients. The most common finding on spinal MRI was meningeal enhancement, seen in 40 (56.3%) patients; in 22 (30.9%), enhancement was present in the lumbosacral region. Other MRI abnormalities included myelitis in 16 (22.5%), tuberculoma in 4 (5.6%), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) loculations in 4 (5.6%), cord atrophy in 3 (4.2%), and syrinx in 2 (2.8%) patients. The significant predictor associated with myeloradiculopathy was raised CSF protein (>250?mg/dL). Myeloradiculopathy was significantly associated with poor outcome. In conclusion, spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis is common. Markedly raised CSF protein is an important predictor. Patients with myeloradiculopathy have poor outcome. PMID:25621686

  19. Combined Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery and Posterior Spinal Surgery for the Treatment of Dumbbell Tumor of the First Thoracic Nerve Root

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Kota; Kitagawa, Tomoaki; Sato, Yusuke; Maehara, Takamitsu; Mikami, Yoji

    2015-01-01

    Although several cases of a dumbbell tumor of thoracic nerve roots have been reported, reports on the surgical procedures for a dumbbell tumor of the first thoracic (T1) nerve root are rare. Surgeons should be cautious, especially when performing a surgical procedure for a dumbbell tumor of the T1 nerve root because the tumor is anatomically located adjacent to important organs and because the T1 nerve root composes the lower trunk of the brachial plexus with the eighth cervical nerve root. We present cases with dumbbell tumors of the T1 nerve root that were treated with combined surgical treatment to remove the tumor. We first performed video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) to release the organs anteriorly and then performed posterior spinal surgery in the prone position. The combined VATS and posterior spinal surgery may become a standard surgical procedure for the treatment of dumbbell tumors of the T1 nerve root. PMID:26240720

  20. Extramedullary Conus Ependymoma Involving a Lumbar Nerve Root with Filum Terminale Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Takashi; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Ninomiya, Koshi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE In the current report, we describe a case of an extramedullary ependymoma involving a lumbar nerve root near conus medullaris. Spinal ependymomas commonly present as intramedullary tumors in the cervical or thoracic cord or as tumors arising from the conus medullaris or the filum terminale. In this case, we showed an extramedullary conus ependymoma involving a lumbar nerve root with filum terminale attachment. CASE PRESENTATION A 69-year-old woman presented with lower back pain, but without sensory disturbance or motor weakness in her lower extremities. CLINICAL ASSESSMENT Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural mass at T12L1 at the conus medullaris, which was totally resected. Histopathology revealed a non-myxopapillary ependymoma (WHO grade 2). Postoperatively, the patient did well and displayed no neurological deficits. Moreover, no radiotherapy was required. CONCLUSIONS This report documented a rare case of intradural extramedullary ependymoma located at the conus medullaris, involving the lumbar nerve root, and attached to the filum terminale. Although extramedullary ependymomas at this region are more frequently classified as myxopapillary, histopathological examination revealed this tumor as a non-myxopapillary ependymoma. PMID:26648765

  1. Potential risk of thermal damage to cervical nerve roots by a high-speed drill.

    PubMed

    Hosono, N; Miwa, T; Mukai, Y; Takenaka, S; Makino, T; Fuji, T

    2009-11-01

    Using the transverse processes of fresh porcine lumbar spines as an experimental model we evaluated the heat generated by a rotating burr of a high-speed drill in cutting the bone. The temperature at the drilled site reached 174 degrees C with a diamond burr and 77 degrees C with a steel burr. With water irrigation at a flow rate of 540 ml/hr an effective reduction in the temperature was achieved whereas irrigation with water at 180 ml/hr was much less effective. There was a significant negative correlation between the thickness of the residual bone and the temperature measured at its undersurface adjacent to the drilling site (p < 0.001). Our data suggest that tissues neighbouring the drilled bone, especially nerve roots, can be damaged by the heat generated from the tip of a high-speed drill. Nerve-root palsy, one of the most common complications of cervical spinal surgery, may be caused by thermal damage to nerve roots arising in this manner. PMID:19880905

  2. Autotaxin and lysophosphatidic acid1 receptor-mediated demyelination of dorsal root fibers by sciatic nerve injury and intrathecal lysophosphatidylcholine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although neuropathic pain is frequently observed in demyelinating diseases such as Guillain-Barr syndrome and multiple sclerosis, the molecular basis for the relationship between demyelination and neuropathic pain behaviors is poorly understood. Previously, we found that lysophosphatidic acid receptor (LPA1) signaling initiates sciatic nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and demyelination. Results In the present study, we have demonstrated that sciatic nerve injury induces marked demyelination accompanied by myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) down-regulation and damage of Schwann cell partitioning of C-fiber-containing Remak bundles in the sciatic nerve and dorsal root, but not in the spinal nerve. Demyelination, MAG down-regulation and Remak bundle damage in the dorsal root were abolished in LPA1 receptor-deficient (Lpar1-/-) mice, but these alterations were not observed in sciatic nerve. However, LPA-induced demyelination in ex vivo experiments was observed in the sciatic nerve, spinal nerve and dorsal root, all which express LPA1 transcript and protein. Nerve injury-induced dorsal root demyelination was markedly attenuated in mice heterozygous for autotaxin (atx+/-), which converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) to LPA. Although the addition of LPC to ex vivo cultures of dorsal root fibers in the presence of recombinant ATX caused potent demyelination, it had no significant effect in the absence of ATX. On the other hand, intrathecal injection of LPC caused potent dorsal root demyelination, which was markedly attenuated or abolished in atx+/- or Lpar1-/- mice. Conclusions These results suggest that LPA, which is converted from LPC by ATX, activates LPA1 receptors and induces dorsal root demyelination following nerve injury, which causes neuropathic pain. PMID:21062487

  3. Rapid identification of anterior and posterior root of cauda equina nerves by near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shaofei; Xiang, Bingren; Bu, Shoushan; Cao, Xiaojian; Ye, Ye; Lu, Jun; Deng, Haishan

    2009-03-01

    A new rapid chemometric method has been developed to identify the anterior and posterior roots of cauda equina nerves by near-infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. NIR spectra of nerves were measured using a Fourier transform NIR spectrometer equipped with a fiber-optic probe. The result revealed no observable difference in the spectra between the anterior and posterior root samples, but the two roots could be identified by cluster analysis based on the differences of their spectral features. The overall accuracy of the cluster analysis model was 87.5%, and the accuracy for the actual anterior root and actual posterior root were 95% and 80%, respectively. The result suggested that NIR spectroscopy in combination with the chemometrics method (cluster analysis) could be used to classify the anterior and posterior roots of cauda equina nerves. The proposed method required only a few minutes, while classical methods commonly required at least one hour. It was demonstrated that the new method could provide a rapid, correct, nondestructive and low-cost potential means to quickly differentiate anterior and posterior roots in mixed cauda equina nerves, which would be helpful for surgeons to align nerve stumps correctly.

  4. Comparison with Magnetic Resonance Three-Dimensional Sequence for Lumbar Nerve Root with Intervertebral Foramen

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Hiroyuki; Shishido, Hiroki; Yoshimoto, Mitsunori; Imamura, Rui; Akatsuka, Yoshihiro; Terashima, Yoshinori; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Nagae, Masateru; Kubo, Toshikazu; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study based on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the lumbar spinal root of the intervertebral foramen. Purpose This study was to compare MR three-dimensional (3D) sequences for the evaluation of the lumbar spinal root of the intervertebral foramen. Overview of Literature The diagnosis of spinal disorders by MR imaging is commonly performed using two-dimensional T1- and T2-weighted images, whereas 3D MR images can be used for acquiring further detailed data using thin slices with multi-planar reconstruction. Methods On twenty healthy volunteers, we investigated the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the lumbar spinal root of the intervertebral foramen with a 3D balanced sequence. The sequences used were the fast imaging employing steady state acquisition and the coherent oscillatory state acquisition for the manipulation of image contrast (COSMIC). COSMIC can be used with or without fat suppression (FS). We compared these sequence to determine the optimized visualization sequence for the lumbar spinal root of the intervertebral foramen. Results For the CNR between the nerve root and the peripheral tissue, these were no significant differences between the sequences at the entry of foramen. There was a significant difference and the highest CNR was seen with COSMIC-FS for the intra- and extra-foramen. Conclusions In this study, the findings suggest that the COSMIC-FS sequences should be used for the internal or external foramen for spinal root disorders. PMID:26949459

  5. Pulsed electrical stimulation protects neurons in the dorsal root and anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Bao-an; Zi, Jin-hua; Wu, Li-sheng; Zhang, Cun-hua; Chen, Yun-zhen

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on peripheral nerve injury have focused on repair at the site of injury, but very few have examined the effects of repair strategies on the more proximal neuronal cell bodies. In this study, an approximately 10-mm-long nerve segment from the ischial tuberosity in the rat was transected and its proximal and distal ends were inverted and sutured. The spinal cord was subjected to pulsed electrical stimulation at T10 and L3, at a current of 6.5 mA and a stimulation frequency of 15 Hz, 15 minutes per session, twice a day for 56 days. After pulsed electrical stimulation, the number of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and anterior horn was increased in rats with sciatic nerve injury. The number of myelinated nerve fibers was increased in the sciatic nerve. The ultrastructure of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord was noticeably improved. Conduction velocity of the sciatic nerve was also increased. These results show that pulsed electrical stimulation protects sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia as well as motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury, and that it promotes the regeneration of peripheral nerve fibers. PMID:26692864

  6. Pulsed electrical stimulation protects neurons in the dorsal root and anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Pei, Bao-An; Zi, Jin-Hua; Wu, Li-Sheng; Zhang, Cun-Hua; Chen, Yun-Zhen

    2015-10-01

    Most studies on peripheral nerve injury have focused on repair at the site of injury, but very few have examined the effects of repair strategies on the more proximal neuronal cell bodies. In this study, an approximately 10-mm-long nerve segment from the ischial tuberosity in the rat was transected and its proximal and distal ends were inverted and sutured. The spinal cord was subjected to pulsed electrical stimulation at T10 and L3, at a current of 6.5 mA and a stimulation frequency of 15 Hz, 15 minutes per session, twice a day for 56 days. After pulsed electrical stimulation, the number of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and anterior horn was increased in rats with sciatic nerve injury. The number of myelinated nerve fibers was increased in the sciatic nerve. The ultrastructure of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord was noticeably improved. Conduction velocity of the sciatic nerve was also increased. These results show that pulsed electrical stimulation protects sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia as well as motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury, and that it promotes the regeneration of peripheral nerve fibers. PMID:26692864

  7. Neuronal death in the dorsal root ganglion after sciatic nerve injury does not depend on sortilin.

    PubMed

    Gürgör, P; Pallesen, L T; Johnsen, L; Ulrichsen, M; de Jong, I E M; Vaegter, C B

    2016-04-01

    Injury to the sciatic nerve induces loss of sensory neurons in the affected dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). Previous studies have suggested the involvement of the neurotrophin receptors p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) and sortilin, proposing that sensory neuron subpopulations undergo proneurotrophin-induced apoptosis in a similar manner to what can be observed in the CNS following injury. To further investigate this hypothesis we induced sciatic nerve injury in sortilin-deficient mice, thereby preventing apoptotic signaling of proneurotrophins via the sortilin-p75(NTR) receptor complex. Using an unbiased stereological approach we found that loss of sortilin did not prevent the injury-induced loss of DRG neurons. This result demonstrates that previous findings linking p75(NTR) and proneurotrophins to loss of sensory neurons need to involve sortilin-independent pathways and suggests that proneurotrophins may elicit different functions in the CNS and PNS. PMID:26812033

  8. Intraoral management of displaced root into submandibular space under local anaesthesia A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Satnam Singh; Rattan, Vidya; Rai, Sachin Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Accidental displacement of an impacted third molar, either a root fragment, crown, or the entire tooth, is a rare complication that occurs during exodontia. The most common sites of dislodgment of an impacted mandibular third molar fragment are the sublingual, submandibular, and pterygomandibular spaces. Removal of a displaced root tip from these spaces may be complex due to poor visualization and limited access. A thorough evaluation of all significant risk factors must be performed in advance to prevent complications. This paper reports the case of a patient who presented with a mandibular third molar root that was displaced into submandibular space. The case was managed intraorally under local anaesthesia and review of the literature. PMID:25382952

  9. Sector computed tomographic spine scanning in the diagnosis of lumbar nerve root entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Risius, B.; Modic, M.T.; Hardy, R.W. Jr.; Duchesneau, P.M.; Weinstein, M.A.

    1982-04-01

    The diagnosis of lumbar nerve root entrapment was made by sector computed tomography (CT) scanning in 25 patients whose myelograms were normal at the site of the CT scan abnormalities. Sector CT scanning demonstrates preoperatively which neural foramina are narrow. This information, correlated with the patient's history and physical examination, indicates which foramina should be operated on and prevents unnecessary exploration of normal neutral foramina. CT findings were confirmed surgically in 14 patients. Eleven of these 14 patients had excellent postoperative results and remain pain free.

  10. [Spontaneous nerve root cerebrospinal fluid leaks and intracranial hypotension: case report].

    PubMed

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Ferraz, Fernando Antonio Patriani; Boscato, Giovana; Shimokawa, Marcos

    2003-03-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a rare syndrome, characterized by pressure in the cerebrospinal fluid ranging between 50 and 70 mmH2O and postural headache. Its diagnosis is made through the clinical presentation, measurement of the cerebrospinal fluid pressure and neurorimage features. The clinical recognition of this pathology has been increasing and the differential diagnosis must be made with inflammatory meningeal processes and tumor. We report a case of spontaneous nerve root cerebrospinal fluid leaks in a 34 year-old man and intracranial hypotension. A literature review was performed evaluating the clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of this unusual pathology. PMID:12715038

  11. Differentiation of peripheral nerve functions and properties with spectral analysis and Karnovsky-Roots staining: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qintong; Chen, Zenggan; Li, Qiong; Liu, Haifei; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Wenhua; Zhang, Ren; Li, Qingli; Liu, Hongying; Zhang, Feng; Lineaweaver, William C

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the possibility for analyzing and differentiating between motor and sensory functions of peripheral nerve axons using spectral technology. Methods: 10 ?m slide section of S1 anterior and posterior rabbit spinal nerve roots were made and then stained with Karnovsky-Roots method for molecular hyperspectral imaging microscopy analysis. In addition, Raman spectra data of nerve axons on each slide was collected after Karnovsky-Roots staining for 30 minutes. Results: Motor axons were differentiated from sensory axons in a nerve axon section hyperspectral image via Spectral angle mapper algorithm. Raman scatterings could be detected near 2110 cm-1, and 2155 cm-1 in motor axons after Karnvosky-Roots staining. The value of I2100/I1440 in motor axons are significantly different (P0.001) than in sensory axons after staining for 30 minutes. Conclusions: Motor and sensory nerve axons can be differentiated from their counterparts in 30 minutes by using Raman micro-spectroscopy analysis assisted with Karnovsky-Roots staining. PMID:25419356

  12. Arteriovenous Fistula in a Nerve Root of the Cauda Equina Fed by a Proximal Radiculo-Medullary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Ohtonari, T.; Ota, S.; Nishihara, N.; Suwa, K.; Ota, T.; Sekihara, Y.; Tanaka, A.; Koyama, T.

    2011-01-01

    Summary While there have been a few reports on cases of intradural spinal arteriovenous fistula located on the filum terminale, no cases of its location in a nerve root of the cauda equina have been reported to date. We describe two such cases and describe the intraoperative findings. A 40-year-old man presented weakness of his left leg. Another 62-year-old man presented paraparesis dominantly in his left leg with urinary hesitation. In both cases, spinal T2-weighted magnetic resonance images showed edema of the spinal cord, indicating a flow void around it. Digital subtraction angiography disclosed an anterior radicular artery branching from the anterior spinal artery on the surface of the conus medullaris and a turnaround vein running in the opposite direction within the cauda equina. In the first patient, while the feeding artery running along a nerve root was detected, the draining vein and the fistula were not identified at first sight. An incision into the respective nerve root exposed their location within it. In the second patient, unlike the first case, the feeding artery and the fistula were buried in a nerve root, while the draining vein was running along the nerve’s surface. In both cases, permanent clips were applied to the draining vein closest to the fistula. The recognition of a hidden fistulous point in a nerve root of the cauda equina is essential for successful obliteration of the fistula. PMID:21696662

  13. Experimental bypass surgery between the spinal cord and caudal nerve roots for spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Dam-Hieu, P; Liu, S; Tadi, M

    2004-11-01

    Spinal cord injuries often cause permanent neurological deficits and are still considered as inaccessible to efficient therapy. Injured spinal cord axons are unable to spontaneously regenerate in adult mammalians. Re-establishing functional activity especially in the lower limbs by reinnervating the caudal infra-lesional territories could represent an attractive therapeutic strategy. For several years, we have studied and developed surgical bypasses using peripheral nerve grafts bridging the supra-lesional rostral spinal cord to the caudal infra-lesional lumbar roots. Main objectives were: 1- to overcome the spinal cord lesion and the consecutive glial barrier blocking the axonal regeneration; 2- to find and bring an alternative source of regenerating axons; 3- to guide those axons toward precisely definite targets (for example, lower limb muscles). We report here the results of our experimental research, which led us from animal experimental models (rodents, primates) to the first human experimentation. Limitations of the method (especially technical pitfalls) are numerous. However, we have obtained encouraging results in our attempts to "repair" the motor pathway. Functional recovery with strong evidence of centrifugal axonal regeneration from the spinal cord to the periphery has been observed. Regarding the sensory pathway, we have found evidence of centripetal axonal regeneration from the periphery toward the spinal cord. Further studies are obviously advocated, but our experimental model of spinal cord - nerve roots bypasses may be integrated in future "repair" strategies of both motor and sensory pathways following spinal cord injury. PMID:15654303

  14. Effects of ischemic phrenic nerve root ganglion injury on respiratory disturbances in subarachnoid hemorrhage: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Recep; Aygl, Recep; Kotan, Dilcan; alik, Muhammet

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Phrenic nerves have important roles on the management of respiration rhythm. Diaphragm paralysis is possible in phrenic nerve roots ischemia in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We examined whether there is a relationship between phrenic nerve root ischemia and respiratory disturbances in SAH. Material and methods This study was conducted on 5 healthy control and 14 rabbits with experimentally induced SAH by injecting autologous blood into their cisterna magna. Animals were followed up via monitors for detecting the heart and respiration rhythms for 20 days and then decapitaed by humanely. Normal and degenerated neuron densities of phrenic nerve root at the level of C4 dorsal root ganglia (C4DRG) were estimated by Stereological methods. Between the mean numerical density of degenerated neurons of C4DRG and respiratory rate/minute of groups were compared statistically. Results Phrenic nerve roots, artery and diaphragm muscles degeneration was detected in respiratory arrest developed animals. The mean neuronal density of C4DRG was 13272 1201/mm3 with a mean respiration rate of 23 4/min in the control group. The mean degenerated neuron density was 2.240 450/mm3 and respiration rhythm was 31 6/min in survivors. But, the mean degenerated neuron density was 5850 650/mm3 and mean respiration rhythm was 34 7/min in respiratory arrest developed animals (n = 7). A linear relationship was noticed between the degenerated neuron density of C4DRG and respiraton rate (r = 0.758; p < 0.001). Conclusions Phrenic nerve root ischemia may be an important factor in respiration rhythms deteriorations in SAH which has not been mentioned in the literature. PMID:24482661

  15. Selective suppression of sphincter activation during sacral anterior nerve root stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bhadra, Narendra; Grnewald, Volker; Creasey, Graham; Mortimer, J Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to electrically activate small-diameter motor fibers in the sacral anterior roots innervating the urinary bladder, without activating the large-diameter fibers to the sphincter. Quasitrapezoidal current pulses were applied through tripolar spiral nerve electrodes on selected anterior sacral roots during acute experiments on eight dogs, maintained under pentobarbital anesthesia. Pressures were recorded from the bladder and sphincter with catheter-mounted gauges. Stimulation with biphasic quasitrapezoidal pulses showed decrease in sphincter recruitment with increasing pulse amplitudes. The minimum current amplitude that resulted in maximum sphincter suppression was used to stimulate the roots with trains of 20 Hz pulses, with 60 mL of saline filling the bladder. Pressures were also recorded when 100 micros rectangular pulse trains at 20 Hz, both continuous and intermittent, were applied. Trains of stimuli were applied before and after dorsal root rhizotomy. Suppression of sphincter activation was defined to be a percentage, [(Maximum pressure -Minimum pressure)/Maximum pressure x100. The results from 22 roots in eight animals show that with single pulses, the average percentage suppression of sphincter activation was 76.3% (+/-14.0). The minimum current for maximum sphincter suppression was 1.29 mA (+/-0.62). The average bladder pressure evoked was 50 cm of water during pulse train stimulation, with no significant difference due to pulse type. With pulse trains, the sphincter pressures were significantly higher when the bladder was filled. Evacuation of fluid occurred in three animals with average flow rates of 1.0 mL/s. PMID:11835425

  16. Generation of New Neurons in Dorsal Root Ganglia in Adult Rats after Peripheral Nerve Crush Injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The evidence of neurons generated ex novo in sensory ganglia of adult animals is still debated. In the present study, we investigated, using high resolution light microscopy and stereological analysis, the changes in the number of neurons in dorsal root ganglia after 30 days from a crush lesion of the rat brachial plexus terminal branches. Results showed, as expected, a relevant hypertrophy of dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, we reported, for the first time in the literature, that neuronal hypertrophy was accompanied by massive neuronal hyperplasia leading to a 42% increase of the number of primary sensory neurons. Moreover, ultrastructural analyses on sensory neurons showed that there was not a relevant neuronal loss as a consequence of the nerve injury. The evidence of BrdU-immunopositive neurons and neural progenitors labeled with Ki67, nanog, nestin, and sox-2 confirmed the stereological evidence of posttraumatic neurogenesis in dorsal root ganglia. Analysis of morphological changes following axonal damage in addition to immunofluorescence characterization of cell phenotype suggested that the neuronal precursors which give rise to the newly generated neurons could be represented by satellite glial cells that actively proliferate after the lesion and are able to differentiate toward the neuronal lineage. PMID:25722894

  17. Slowed motor conduction in lumbosacral nerve roots in cauda equina lesions: a new diagnostic technique.

    PubMed Central

    Swash, M; Snooks, S J

    1986-01-01

    New techniques have been developed for the electrophysiological assessment of patients with suspected cauda equina lesions using transcutaneous spinal stimulation (500-1500 V: time constant 50 microseconds) to measure motor latencies to the external and sphincter and puborectalis muscles from L1 and L4 vertebral levels. These latencies represent motor conduction in the S3 and S4 motor roots of the cauda equina between these levels. Similarly motor latencies can be recorded from spinal stimulation to the anterior tibial muscles (L4 and L5 motor roots). Transrectal stimulation of the pudendal nerves is used to measure the pudendal nerve terminal motor latency. In 32 control subjects, matched for age and sex, mean motor latencies from L1 and L4 spinal stimulation were 5.5 +/- 0.4 ms and 4.4 +/- 0.4 ms (mean + SD). In the 10 patients with cauda equina disease including ependymoma, spinal stenosis, arachnoiditis and trauma, these latencies were 7.2 +/- 0.8 ms and 4.6 +/- 0.9 ms, a significant increase in the L1 latency. The L1/L4 latency ratios to the puborectalis muscle were 1.36 +/- 0.09 in control subjects and 1.72 +/- 0.13 in cauda equina patients. Pudendal nerve terminal motor latencies were normal in eight of the 10 patients with cauda equina disease. The single fibre EMG fibre density in the external and sphincter muscle (normal, 1.5 +/- 0.16) was increased in patients with cauda equina lesions (1.73 +/- 0.28), but was increased more than two standard deviations from the mean only in three patients. This increase in fibre density was not of diagnostic value since it was also found in two of the four patients with low back pain. Slowing of motor conduction in the cauda equina is thus a useful indication of damage to these intraspinal motor roots. These investigations can be used in the selection of patients for myelography, and to follow progress in patients managed conservatively. Images PMID:3018168

  18. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery, especially extreme lateral interbody fusion: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the lumbar spine, do more nerve root injuries occur utilizing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques versus open lumbar procedures? To answer this question, we compared the frequency of nerve root injuries for multiple open versus MIS operations including diskectomy, laminectomy with/without fusion addressing degenerative disc disease, stenosis, and/or degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods: Several of Desai et al. large Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial studies showed the frequency for nerve root injury following an open diskectomy ranged from 0.13% to 0.25%, for open laminectomy/stenosis with/without fusion it was 0%, and for open laminectomy/stenosis/degenerative spondylolisthesis with/without fusion it was 2%. Results: Alternatively, one study compared the incidence of root injuries utilizing MIS transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) techniques; 7.8% of PLIF versus 2% of TLIF patients sustained root injuries. Furthermore, even higher frequencies of radiculitis and nerve root injuries occurred during anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIFs) versus extreme lateral interbody fusions (XLIFs). These high frequencies were far from acceptable; 15.8% following ALIF experienced postoperative radiculitis, while 23.8% undergoing XLIF sustained root/plexus deficits. Conclusions: This review indicates that MIS (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF) lumbar surgery resulted in a higher incidence of root injuries, radiculitis, or plexopathy versus open lumbar surgical techniques. Furthermore, even a cursory look at the XLIF data demonstrated the greater danger posed to neural tissue by this newest addition to the MIS lumbar surgical armamentariu. The latter should prompt us as spine surgeons to question why the XLIF procedure is still being offered to our patients? PMID:26904372

  19. GABAA receptor modulation in dorsal root ganglia in vivo affects chronic pain after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Naik, A K; Pathirathna, S; Jevtovic-Todorovic, V

    2008-07-17

    Neuropathic pain (NPP) due to sensory nerve injury is, in part, the result of peripheral sensitization leading to a long-lasting increase in synaptic plasticity in the spinal dorsal horn. Thus, activation of GABA-mediated inhibitory inputs from sensory neurons could be beneficial in the alleviation of NPP symptoms. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) conduct painful stimulation from the periphery to the spinal cord. Long-lasting down-regulation in GABA tone or sensitivity in DRG neurons has been reported in animals with neuropathy. To determine the function of GABA in DRG in the development of NPP, we examined how the acute pharmacological GABA(A)-receptor modulation of L5 DRG in vivo affects the development of NPP in rats with crush injury to the sciatic nerve. Direct application of muscimol and gaboxadol, GABA(A) agonists, to L5 DRG immediately after injury induced dose-dependent alleviation, whereas bicuculline and picrotoxin, GABA(A) antagonists, worsened NPP postaxonal injury. The pain-alleviating effects of muscimol and gaboxadol were blocked by bicuculline. Muscimol, applied at the time of injury, caused complete and long-lasting abolishment of NPP development. However, when muscimol was applied after NPP had already developed, its pain-alleviating effect, although significant, was short-lived. Using a fluorescent tracer, sodium fluorescein, we confirmed that local DRG application results in minimal spread into the corresponding dorsal horn of the ipsilateral spinal cord. GABA(A) receptors in DRG are important in the development of NPP after peripheral nerve injury, making timely exogenous GABAergic manipulation at the DRG level a potentially useful therapeutic modality. PMID:18554816

  20. Chronic nerve injury-induced Mas receptor expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons alleviates neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YUANTING; QIN, YUE; LIU, TUANJIANG; HAO, DINGJUN

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, which is characterized by hyperalgesia, allodynia and spontaneous pain, is one of the most painful symptoms that can be experienced in the clinic. It often occurs as a result of injury to the peripheral nerves, dorsal root ganglion (DRG), spinal cord or brain. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in nociception. As an essential component of the RAS, the angiotensin (Ang)-(17)/Mas axis may be involved in antinociception. The aim of the present study was to explore the expression pattern of Mas in DRG neurons following chronic nerve injury and examine the effects of Mas inhibition and activation on neuropathic pain in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) rat model. The results showed, that compared with the sham group, CCI caused a time-dependent induction of Mas expression at both the mRNA and the protein levels in DRG neurons. Consistent with the results, isolated DRG neurons showed a time-dependent increase in Ang-(17) binding on the cell membrane following the CCI surgery, but not the sham surgery. Compared with the sham control groups, CCI significantly decreased the paw withdrawal latency and threshold, and this was markedly improved and aggravated by intrathecal injection of the selective Mas agonist Ang-(17) and the selective Mas inhibitor D-Pro7-Ang-(17), respectively. In conclusion, this study has provided the first evidence, to the best of our knowledge, that the Mas expression in DRG neurons is time-dependently induced by chronic nerve injury and that the intrathecal activation and inhibition of Mas can improve and aggravate CCI-induced neuropathic pain, respectively. This study has provided novel insights into the pathophysiological process of neuropathic pain and suggests that the Ang-(17)/Mas axis could be an effective therapeutic target for neuropathic pain, warranting further study. PMID:26668645

  1. NUCLEOSIDE PHOSPHATASE AND CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITIES IN DORSAL ROOT GANGLIA AND PERIPHERAL NERVE

    PubMed Central

    Novikoff, Alex B.; Quintana, Nelson; Villaverde, Humberto; Forschirm, Regina

    1966-01-01

    In dorsal root ganglia and peripheral nerve of the rat and other species, nucleoside phosphatase and unspecific cholinesterase reaction products are found in the plasma membranes and spaces between them at two sites: (1) Schwann cell-axon interfaces and mesaxons of unmyelinated fibers, and (2) sheath cell-perikaryon interfaces and interfaces between adjacent sheath cells. Acetylcholinesterase reaction product is found in the perikaryon (within the endoplasmic reticulum) and the axon (axoplasmic surface). Nucleoside phosphatase reaction product is also found in the numerous vacuoles at the surface of perineurium cells, ganglion sheath cells, and cells surrounding some ganglion blood vessels. Nucleoside phosphatase activities in the sections fail to respond, in the manner described for "transport ATPase," to diisopropylphosphofluoridate, sodium and potassium ions, and ouabain. Nucleoside diphosphates are hydrolyzed more slowly than triphosphates in unmyelinated fibers, and are not hydrolyzed at the perikaryon surface. Nucleoside monophosphates are either not hydrolyzed or hydrolyzed very slowly. In contrast to these localizations, which are believed to demonstrate sites of enzyme activity, it is considered likely that diffusion artifacts account for the nucleoside phosphatase reaction product frequently found along the outer surfaces of myelinated fibers and within vacuoles at the Schwann cell surfaces of these fibers. The diffuse reaction product seen in basement membranes of ganglion and nerve may also be artifact. PMID:4225492

  2. A Simple, 10-minute Procedure for Transforaminal Injection under Ultrasonic Guidance to Effect Cervical Selective Nerve Root Block

    PubMed Central

    TAKEUCHI, Mikinobu; KAMIYA, Mitsuhiro; WAKAO, Norimitsu; OSUKA, Koji; YASUDA, Muneyoshi; TERASAWA, Toshiaki; YAMADA, Takahisa; TAKAYASU, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    The aim is to provide a detailed procedure of a simple and 10-minute cervical nerve root block (CNRB) under ultrasonic guidance, and to report the clinical outcomes, disorders, and complications. Records of patients who had undergone CNRB, were reviewed under ultrasonic guidance at the hospital from 2010 through 2012. The procedure is described in detail. Arm and shoulder pain was evaluated by use of the visual analogue scale (VAS). Forty-three patients agreed to undergo CNRB under ultrasonic guidance. Nerve roots from C5 to C8 were affected in 41, and these nerve roots were readily distinguished. Two of the 43 participants did not receive injections because impediments in visualizing the affected nerve root. Of the 41 who received injections, radicular pain immediately disappeared in 39, who continued to feel pain relief 1 month later. However, pain recurred in 15 patients (38%), of whom 11 underwent cervical spine surgery. The rest of 24 patients felt sustained pain relief longer than 3 months after the injection, significantly. Although one patient had recurrent radicular pain 10 months later, the pain could be controlled by medication. At the final follow-up periods, 17.2 (1024 months), the median VAS score of the patients, 23 (0 to 71 mm), was significantly improvement (P = 0.001) in comparison to before injection 88 (range; 56100). No complications occurred. The cervical nerve root block under ultrasonic guidance simply, safely, and efficaciously decreased radicular pain for 17.2 months in 62% patients with intolerable radicular pain. PMID:24614822

  3. The comparative performance of Roots type aircraft engine superchargers as affected by change in impeller speed and displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, Marsden; Wilson, Ernest E

    1929-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests made on three sizes of roots type aircraft engine superchargers. The impeller contours and diameters of these machines were the same, but the length were 11, 8 1/4, and 4 inches, giving displacements of 0.509, 0.382, and 0.185 cubic foot per impeller revolution. The information obtained serves as a basis for the examination of the individual effects of impeller speed and displacement on performance and of the comparative performance when speed and displacement are altered simultaneously to meet definite service requirements. According to simple theory, when assuming no losses, the air weight handled and the power required for a given pressure difference are directly proportional to the speed and the displacement. These simple relations are altered considerably by the losses. When comparing the performance of different sizes of machines whose impeller speeds are so related that the same service requirements are met, it is found that the individual effects of speed and displacement are canceled to a large extent, and the only considerable difference is the difference in the power losses which decrease with increase in the displacement and the accompanying decrease in speed. This difference is small in relation to the net power of the engine supercharger unit, so that a supercharger with short impellers may be used in those applications where the space available is very limited with any considerable sacrifice in performance.

  4. Multidimensional ultrasound imaging of the wrist: Changes of shape and displacement of the median nerve and tendons in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Filius, Anika; Scheltens, Marjan; Bosch, Hans G; van Doorn, Pieter A; Stam, Henk J; Hovius, Steven E R; Amadio, Peter C; Selles, Ruud W

    2015-09-01

    Dynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel may alter in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) due to fibrotic changes and increased carpal tunnel pressure. Ultrasound can visualize these potential changes, making ultrasound potentially an accurate diagnostic tool. To study this, we imaged the carpal tunnel of 113 patients and 42 controls. CTS severity was classified according to validated clinical and nerve conduction study (NCS) classifications. Transversal and longitudinal displacement and shape (changes) were calculated for the median nerve, tendons and surrounding tissue. To predict diagnostic value binary logistic regression modeling was applied. Reduced longitudinal nerve displacement (p??0.019), increased nerve cross-sectional area (p??0.006) and perimeter (p??0.007), and a trend of relatively changed tendon displacements were seen in patients. Changes were more convincing when CTS was classified as more severe. Binary logistic modeling to diagnose CTS using ultrasound showed a sensitivity of 70-71% and specificity of 80-84%. In conclusion, CTS patients have altered dynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel. PMID:25865180

  5. Selective Nerve Root Stimulation (SNRS) in the Treatment of End-Stage, Diabetic, Peripheral Neuropathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Al, K M; Zidan, A M

    2000-10-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for the treatment of painful peripheral neuropathy (PN) has been met with mixed results. It has been suggested that early-stage symptoms that are sympathetically maintained (SMP) are more likely to respond to SCS, while progressive sympathetically independent symptoms (SIP) will not. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS), however, has successfully treated certain SIP presentations. With the advent of new selective nerve root stimulation (SNRS) strategies, the possibility of utilizing epidural, peripheral neurostimulation was investigated in a patient with endstage, diabetic, "dying back" peripheral SIP. PMID:22151525

  6. Biomechanical response in the ankle to stimulation of lumbosacral nerve roots with spiral cuff multielectrode--preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bosnjak, R; Dolenc, V V; Kralj, A

    1999-09-01

    Biomechanical response in the ankle to tetanic stimulation of the lumbosacral root was investigated to assess the potential for lower limb functional neurostimulation. Myotomal response in the leg was measured as the three-dimensional isometric torque in the ankle after extradural tetanic stimulation of the L3-S1 roots exposed surgically for herniated disc removal in five patients. The cuff multielectrode was employed to investigate functional topography of the roots by monopolar, bipolar, and tripolar electrode configurations. Four response patterns in the direction of three-dimensional torque vectors were observed. The L-5 and S-1 roots had the same response pattern, but S-1 roots produced stronger torques. Dorsiflexion torque was not obtained by stimulation of L-5 roots despite coactivation of the tibial anterior and peroneal muscles. Dorsiflexion torques were produced only by stimulating the L-4 roots. More selective bipolar and tripolar stimulations recruited force at higher thresholds and less gain. Additionally, some muscles were not activated by tripolar stimulation of the same root. In one L-4 root, the torque at lower electrical threshold was replaced by inverse torque at higher threshold, providing indirect evidence that different muscles may have motoneuron populations that differ in diameter or location within the root. Although dorsiflexion and plantarflexion torques are functional per se, they are accompanied by foot inversion and leg rotation torques (as well as proximal muscle contractions). Further experimental investigations on direct extradural stimulation of lumbosacral roots, either single or in combination, are recommended to explore the potential of lumbosacral nerve root stimulation for restoration of leg function. PMID:10563116

  7. Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 with multiple neurofibromas of the entire spinal nerve roots

    PubMed Central

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Peters-Willke, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The coexistence of polyneuropathy which has the definite clinical and electromyographical findings consistent with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) has infrequently been reported. We describe a patient with both CMT and NF1, who had multiple neurofibromas involving the entire spinal neural axis. In addition, he had multiple neurofibromas distributed within the ileopsoas and gluteus muscles and subcutaneous tissues. These lesions were detected readily by MRI and the patient underwent successful surgical resection of the largest tumours compressing bilateral C2 nerve roots. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of CMT syndrome coexisting with NF1 in which multiple neurofibromas involved the entire spinal nerve roots. We discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, emphasising the role of MRI and electrophysiology in such cases and provide a literature review. PMID:23853192

  8. Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 with multiple neurofibromas of the entire spinal nerve roots.

    PubMed

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Peters-Willke, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The coexistence of polyneuropathy which has the definite clinical and electromyographical findings consistent with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) has infrequently been reported. We describe a patient with both CMT and NF1, who had multiple neurofibromas involving the entire spinal neural axis. In addition, he had multiple neurofibromas distributed within the ileopsoas and gluteus muscles and subcutaneous tissues. These lesions were detected readily by MRI and the patient underwent successful surgical resection of the largest tumours compressing bilateral C2 nerve roots. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of CMT syndrome coexisting with NF1 in which multiple neurofibromas involved the entire spinal nerve roots. We discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, emphasising the role of MRI and electrophysiology in such cases and provide a literature review. PMID:23853192

  9. Yiqi Huayu recipe relieves nerve root constriction induced radicular neuralgia by down-regulating TRPV4 expression in dorsal root ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhanying; Cui, Xuejun; Hu, Zhijun; Xiao, Jing; Li, Weiwei; Yang, Qiangling; Liu, Dan; Lin, Jie; Wang, Yongjun; Shi, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effects of Yiqi Huayu recipe on TRPV4 expression in radicular neuralgia model induced by chronic constriction to the rat lumber nerve root. Healthy male SD rats were divided into 3 groups for radicular neuralgia (RN) model construction: the sham operation group, model groups (day 3, 7, 14 and 28), and medication groups (day 3, 7, 14 and 28). Von-Frey hairs test was performed to detect the 50% with drawal threshold (50% TPW) for rats of each group. The expression of TRPV4 in dorsal root ganglion was detected at both mRNA and protein level. Rats from all model groups displayed hyperalgesia with significantly reduced 50% TPW values compared with sham-operation group (P<0.01); Yiqi Huayu recipe medication groups showed higher 50% TPW than model group since 7 days post medication (P<0.01); the medication groups showed decreased TRPV4 expression than that of model groups (P<0.01). In conclusion, Yiqi Huayu recipe alleviates nerve root constriction induced radicular neuralgia by repressing TRPV4 expression in dorsal root ganglion. PMID:26770465

  10. Surgical treatment for total root avulsion type brachial plexus injuries by neurotization: A prospective comparison study between total and hemicontralateral C7 nerve root transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yuan-Kun; Tsai, Yi-Jung; Chang, Chih-Han; Su, Fong-Chin; Hsiao, Chih-Kun; Tan, Jacqueline Siau-Woon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We conducted a clinical study to evaluate the effects of neurotization, especially comparing the total contralateral C7 (CC7) root transfer to hemi-CC7 transfer, on total root avulsion brachial plexus injuries (BPI). Methods: Forty patients who received neurotization for BPI were enrolled in this prospective study. Group 1 (n = 20) received hemi-CC7 transfer for hand function, while group 2 (n = 20) received total-CC7 transfer. Additional neurotization included spinal accessory, phrenic, and intercostal nerve transfer for shoulder and elbow function. The results were evaluated with an average of 6 years follow-up. Results: Group 1 had fewer donor site complications (15%) than group 2 (45%); group 2 had significantly better hand M3 and M4 motor function (65%) than group 1 (30%; P = 0.02). There was no difference in sensory recovery. Significantly, better shoulder function was obtained by simultaneous neurotization on both suprascapular and axillary nerves. Conclusions: Total-CC7 transfer had better hand recovery but more donor complications than hemi-CC7. Neurotization on both supra-scapular and axillary nerves improved shoulder recovery. © 2013 The Authors. Microsurgery published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 34:91–101, 2014. PMID:23913440

  11. A case of nerve root heat injury induced by percutaneous laser disc decompression performed at an outside institution: technical case report.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Kobayashi S; Uchida K; Takeno K; Yayama T; Nakajima H; Nomura E; Hayakawa K; Meir A; Yonezawa T; Baba H

    2007-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: In recent years, percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) has become a routine surgical procedure because it can be performed under local anesthesia and is minimally invasive. However, there is a risk of nerve root and endplate injury owing to heat generated by laser irradiation during PLDD. We recently performed salvage surgery on a patient with heat injury to the L5 nerve root that developed after PLDD.CLINICAL PRESENTATION: One month before presenting to our hospital, the patient underwent two sessions of PLDD for lumbar vertebral disk herniation at another institution. The patient developed worsening sciatica, as well as bowel and urinary problems after the PLDD.INTERVENTION: We performed salvage surgery after PLDD. The intraoperative findings in the present case included carbon spots in the dura mater of the nerve root and a disc herniation strongly adherent to the nerve roots. These findings indicate that the area adjacent to the nerve roots was damaged by excessive heat during laser irradiation.CONCLUSION: When salvage surgery is performed after a PLDD procedure, disc and nerve root injuries owing to laser heat energy must be considered.

  12. Blood-nerve barrier: distribution of anionic sites on the endothelial plasma membrane and basal lamina of dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Bush, M S; Reid, A R; Allt, G

    1991-09-01

    Previous investigations of the blood-nerve barrier have correlated the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels, compared to those of nerve trunks, with the presence of fenestrations and open intercellular junctions. Recent studies have demonstrated reduced endothelial cell surface charge in blood vessels showing greater permeability. To determine the distribution of anionic sites on the plasma membranes and basal laminae of endothelial cells in dorsal root ganglia, cationic colloidal gold and cationic ferritin were used. Electron microscopy revealed the existence of endothelial microdomains with differing labelling densities. Labelling indicated that caveolar and fenestral diaphragms and basal laminae are highly anionic at physiological pH, luminal plasma membranes and endothelial processes are moderately charged and abluminal plasma membranes are weakly anionic. Tracers did not occur in caveolae or cytoplasmic vesicles. In vitro tracer experiments at pH values of 7.3, 5.0, 3.5 and 2.0 indicated that the anionic charge on the various endothelial domains was contributed by chemical groups with differing pKa values. In summary, the labelling of ganglionic and sciatic nerve vessels was similar except for the heavy labelling of diaphragms in a minority of endoneurial vessels in ganglia. This difference is likely to account in part for the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels. The results are discussed with regard to the blood-nerve and -brain barriers and vascular permeability in other tissues and a comparison made between the ultrastructure and anionic microdomains of epi-, peri- and endoneurial vessels of dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves. PMID:1960538

  13. Upregulation of EMMPRIN (OX47) in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to the Development of Mechanical Allodynia after Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Sun, Yanyuan; Ren, Yingna; Gao, Yandong; Tian, Li; Liu, Yang; Pu, Yanan; Gou, Xingchun; Chen, Yanke; Lu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are widely implicated in inflammation and tissue remodeling associated with various neurodegenerative diseases and play an important role in nociception and allodynia. Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) plays a key regulatory role for MMP activities. However, the role of EMMPRIN in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Western blotting, real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), and immunofluorescence were performed to determine the changes of messenger RNA and protein of EMMPRIN/OX47 and their cellular localization in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) after nerve injury. Paw withdrawal threshold test was examined to evaluate the pain behavior in spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model. The lentivirus containing OX47 shRNA was injected into the DRG one day before SNL. The expression level of both mRNA and protein of OX47 was markedly upregulated in ipsilateral DRG after SNL. OX47 was mainly expressed in the extracellular matrix of DRG. Administration of shRNA targeted against OX47 in vivo remarkably attenuated mechanical allodynia induced by SNL. In conclusion, peripheral nerve injury induced upregulation of OX47 in the extracellular matrix of DRG. RNA interference against OX47 significantly suppressed the expression of OX47 mRNA and the development of mechanical allodynia. The altered expression of OX47 may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain after nerve injury. PMID:26697232

  14. Upregulation of EMMPRIN (OX47) in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to the Development of Mechanical Allodynia after Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qun; Sun, Yanyuan; Ren, Yingna; Gao, Yandong; Tian, Li; Liu, Yang; Pu, Yanan; Gou, Xingchun; Chen, Yanke; Lu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are widely implicated in inflammation and tissue remodeling associated with various neurodegenerative diseases and play an important role in nociception and allodynia. Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) plays a key regulatory role for MMP activities. However, the role of EMMPRIN in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Western blotting, real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), and immunofluorescence were performed to determine the changes of messenger RNA and protein of EMMPRIN/OX47 and their cellular localization in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) after nerve injury. Paw withdrawal threshold test was examined to evaluate the pain behavior in spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model. The lentivirus containing OX47 shRNA was injected into the DRG one day before SNL. The expression level of both mRNA and protein of OX47 was markedly upregulated in ipsilateral DRG after SNL. OX47 was mainly expressed in the extracellular matrix of DRG. Administration of shRNA targeted against OX47 in vivo remarkably attenuated mechanical allodynia induced by SNL. In conclusion, peripheral nerve injury induced upregulation of OX47 in the extracellular matrix of DRG. RNA interference against OX47 significantly suppressed the expression of OX47 mRNA and the development of mechanical allodynia. The altered expression of OX47 may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain after nerve injury. PMID:26697232

  15. Attenuation and recovery of nerve growth factor receptor mRNA in dorsal root ganglion neurons following axotomy.

    PubMed

    Krekoski, C A; Parhad, I M; Clark, A W

    1996-01-01

    The actions of nerve growth factor (NGF) are mediated by two receptor proteins, trk and p75. Recent evidence indicates that NGF upregulates the expression of both trk and p75 in responsive neurons including rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Axotomy by disconnecting the neuron from its source of target-derived NGF is predicted to lead to the downregulation of trk and p75 expression. However, previous studies of the effects of axotomy on trk and p75 mRNA expression in rat DRG have yielded discrepant results. We report that following sciatic nerve crush, trk and p75 mRNA levels in L4-L6 DRG decrease to approximately 50% of control levels at 4-14 days, return to control levels by 30 days, and are increased by approximately 30% at 60 days. Similar changes are observed following nerve transection although mRNA levels are slower in returning to normal and do not exceed control levels at later timepoints. Thus, trk and p75 expression decline early following target disconnection and later recover irrespective of target reinnervation. These observations indicate that target derived NGF is required for the maintenance of NGF receptor expression in adult rat DRG neurons and that non-target derived factors can appropriate this function following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:8838569

  16. microRNA-222 Targeting PTEN Promotes Neurite Outgrowth from Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons following Sciatic Nerve Transection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongjun; Gong, Leilei; Tang, Xiaoyan; Yu, Bin; Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons spontaneously undergo neurite growth after nerve injury. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), as small, non-coding RNAs, negatively regulate gene expression in a variety of biological processes. The roles of miRNAs in the regulation of responses of DRG neurons to injury stimuli, however, are not fully understood. Here, microarray analysis was performed to profile the miRNAs in L4-L6 DRGs following rat sciatic nerve transection. The 26 known miRNAs were differentially expressed at 0, 1, 4, 7, 14 d post injury, and the potential targets of the miRNAs were involved in nerve regeneration, as analyzed by bioinformatics. Among the 26 miRNAs, microRNA-222 (miR-222) was our research focus because its increased expression promoted neurite outgrowth while it silencing by miR-222 inhibitor reduced neurite outgrowth. Knockdown experiments confirmed that phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), a major inhibitor of nerve regeneration, was a direct target of miR-222 in DRG neurons. In addition, we found that miR-222 might regulate the phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) through PTEN, and c-Jun activation might enhance the miR-222 expression. Collectively, our data suggest that miR-222 could regulate neurite outgrowth from DRG neurons by targeting PTEN. PMID:23028614

  17. Heterogeneous responses of dorsal root ganglion neurons in neuropathies induced by peripheral nerve trauma and the antiretroviral drug stavudine

    PubMed Central

    Boateng, EK; Novejarque, A; Pheby, T; Rice, ASC; Huang, W

    2015-01-01

    Background Heterogeneity is increasingly recognized in clinical presentation of neuropathic pain (NP), but less often recognized in animal models. Neurochemical dysregulation in rodent dorsal root ganglia (DRG) is associated with peripheral nerve trauma, but poorly studied in non-traumatic NP conditions. Methods This study aimed to investigate the temporal expressions of activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3), growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and galanin in traumatic and non-traumatic rat models of neuropathies associated with NP. Expressions of these markers were examined in the DRG at different time points following tibial nerve transection (TNT) injury and antiretroviral drug stavudine (d4T) administration using immunohistochemistry. The development of sensory gain following these insults was assessed by measuring limb withdrawal to a punctate mechanical stimulus. Results Both TNT-injured and d4T-treated rats developed hindpaw mechanical hypersensitivity. Robust expressions of ATF-3, GAP-43, NPY and galanin in both small- and large-sized L5 DRG neurons were observed in the DRG from TNT-injured rats. In contrast, d4T-treated rats did not exhibit any significant neurochemical changes in the DRG. Conclusions Taken together, the results suggest that ATF-3, GAP-43, NPY and galanin are likely indicators of nerve trauma-associated processes and not generic markers for NP. These experiments also demonstrate distinct expression patterns of neurochemical markers in the DRG and emphasize the mechanistic difference between nerve trauma and antiretroviral drug-associated NP. PMID:25070481

  18. Differential distribution of thyroid hormone receptor isoform in rat dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerve in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Glauser, L; Barakat Walter, I

    1997-03-01

    Using autoradiographic techniques carried out under precise conditions we previously demonstrated that both sensory neurons and peripheral glial cells in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or sciatic nerve, possess specific [125I]-labeled T3 binding sites. Thyroid hormone receptors (TR) include several isoforms (TR alpha(1), TR alpha(2), TR beta(1), TR beta(2...)) The present study demonstrates that while sensory neurons and peripheral glial cells both possess functional TR, they express a differential expression of TR isoforms. Using a panel of antisera to specific for the TR alpha-common (alpha(1) and alpha(2)), TR alpha-1 or TR beta-1 isoforms, we detected TRs isoform localization at the cellular level during DRG and sciatic nerve development and regeneration. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that during embryonic life, sensory neurons express TR alpha-common and TR beta-1 rather than TR alpha-1. The number of TR alpha-common and TR beta-1 positive neurons as well as the intensity of labeling increased during the first two postnatal weeks and remained more or less stable in adult life. TR alpha-1 immunoreactivity, which was undetectable in embryonic sensory neurons, became discreetly visible in neurons after birth. In developing DRG and sciatic nerves, Schwann cells exhibited TR alpha-common and TR alpha-1 rather than TR beta-1 immunolabeling. The appearance of TR alpha-common and alpha-1 isoform immunoreactivity in the sciatic nerve was restricted to a short period ranging from E17 up to two postnatal weeks. By comparing TR alpha-common and TR alpha-1 immunostaining we can deduce that Schwann cells primarily express TR alpha-1. Afterwards, in adult rat sciatic nerve TR alpha isoforms was no more detected. However transection of sciatic nerve caused a reexpression of TR alpha isoforms in degenerating nerve. The prevalence of TR alpha in Schwann cells in vivo was correlated with in vitro results. The differential expression of TR alpha and beta by sensory neurons and Schwann cells indicates that the feedback regulation of circulating thyroid hormone could occur by binding to either the alpha or beta TR isoforms. Moreover, the presence of multiple receptor isoforms in developing sensory neurons suggests that thyroid hormone uses multiple signaling pathways to regulate DRG and sciatic nerve development. PMID:9089473

  19. The influence of random element displacement on DOA estimates obtained with (Khatri-Rao-)root-MUSIC.

    PubMed

    Inghelbrecht, Veronique; Verhaevert, Jo; van Hecke, Tanja; Rogier, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Although a wide range of direction of arrival (DOA) estimation algorithms has been described for a diverse range of array configurations, no specific stochastic analysis framework has been established to assess the probability density function of the error on DOA estimates due to random errors in the array geometry. Therefore, we propose a stochastic collocation method that relies on a generalized polynomial chaos expansion to connect the statistical distribution of random position errors to the resulting distribution of the DOA estimates. We apply this technique to the conventional root-MUSIC and the Khatri-Rao-root-MUSIC methods. According to Monte-Carlo simulations, this novel approach yields a speedup by a factor of more than 100 in terms of CPU-time for a one-dimensional case and by a factor of 56 for a two-dimensional case. PMID:25393783

  20. The Influence of Random Element Displacement on DOA Estimates Obtained with (Khatri–Rao-)Root-MUSIC

    PubMed Central

    Inghelbrecht, Veronique; Verhaevert, Jo; van Hecke, Tanja; Rogier, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Although a wide range of direction of arrival (DOA) estimation algorithms has been described for a diverse range of array configurations, no specific stochastic analysis framework has been established to assess the probability density function of the error on DOA estimates due to random errors in the array geometry. Therefore, we propose a stochastic collocation method that relies on a generalized polynomial chaos expansion to connect the statistical distribution of random position errors to the resulting distribution of the DOA estimates. We apply this technique to the conventional root-MUSIC and the Khatri-Rao-root-MUSIC methods. According to Monte-Carlo simulations, this novel approach yields a speedup by a factor of more than 100 in terms of CPU-time for a one-dimensional case and by a factor of 56 for a two-dimensional case. PMID:25393783

  1. Intra-epidermal nerve fibres in human skin: back to the roots.

    PubMed

    Abels, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Regarding the existence and the role of intra-epidermal nerve fibres, the literature is ambiguous. However, performing a literature search, a landmark paper turned up that even many dermatologists seem to have forgotten, or may not even know at all. This paper is entitled 'The innervation of human epidermis' written by Arthur and Shelley (J Invest Dermatol, 32, 1959, 397). The full text is available via http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v32/n3/pdf/jid195969a.pdf. The authors present data on intra-epidermal nerves at 16 representative body areas. The existence of intra-epidermal nerve fibres is undisputable and does not only explain clinical symptoms but may even provide a promising target for drug development. PMID:24450967

  2. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Nuclear Size, Shape and Displacement in Clover Root Cap Statocytes from Space and a Clinostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.D.; Todd, P. W.; Staehelin, L. A.; Holton, Emily (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Under normal (l-g) conditions the statocytes of root caps have a characteristic polarity with the nucleus in tight association with the proximal cell wall; but, in altered gravity environments including microgravity (mu-g) and the clinostat (c-g) movement of the nucleus away from the proximal cell wall is not uncommon. To further understand the cause of gravity-dependent nuclear displacement in statocytes, three-dimensional cell reconstruction techniques were used to precisely measure the volumes, shapes, and positions of nuclei in white clover (Trifolium repens) flown in space and rotated on a clinostat. Seeds were germinated and grown for 72 hours aboard the Space Shuttle (STS-63) in the Fluid Processing Apparatus (BioServe Space Technologies, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder). Clinorotation experiments were performed on a two-axis clinostat (BioServe). Computer reconstruction of selected groups of statocytes were made from serial sections (0.5 microns thick) using the ROSS (Reconstruction Of Serial Sections) software package (Biocomputation Center, NASA Ames Research Center). Nuclei were significantly displaced from the tops of cells in mu-g (4.2 +/- 1.0 microns) and c-g (4.9 +/- 1.4 microns) when compared to l-g controls (3.4 +/- 0.8 gm); but, nuclear volume (113 +/- 36 cu microns, 127 +/- 32 cu microns and 125 +/- 28 cu microns for l-g, mu-g and c-g respectively) and the ratio of nuclear volume to cell volume (4.310.7%, 4.211.0% and 4.911.4% respectively) were not significantly dependent on gravity treatment (ANOVA; alpha = 0.05). Three-dimensional analysis of nuclear shape and proximity to the cell wall, however, showed that nuclei from l-g controls appeared ellipsoidal while those from space and the clinostat were more spherically shaped. This change in nuclear shape may be responsible for its displacement under altered gravity conditions. Since the cytoskeleton is known to affect nuclear polarity in root cap statocytes, those same cytoskeletal elements could also control nuclear shape. This alteration in nuclear shape and position in mu-g and c-g when compared to l-g may lead to functional differences in the gravity signaling systems of plants subjected to altered gravity environments.

  3. H-reflex amplitude asymmetry is an earlier sign of nerve root involvement than latency in patients with S1 radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Based on our clinical experience, the H-reflex amplitude asymmetry might be an earlier sign of nerve root involvement than latency in patients with S1 radiculopathy. However, no data to support this assumption are available. The purpose of this study was to review and report the electrophysiological changes in H-reflex amplitude and latency in patients with radiculopathy in order to determine if there is any evidence to support the assumption that H-reflex amplitude is an earlier sign of nerve root involvement than latency. Results Patients with radiculopathy showed significant amplitude asymmetry when compared with healthy controls. However, latency was not always significantly different between patients and healthy controls. These findings suggest nerve root axonal compromise that reduced reflex amplitude earlier than the latency parameter (demyelination) during the pathologic processes. Conclusion Contrary to current clinical thought, H-reflex amplitude asymmetry is an earlier sign/parameter of nerve root involvement in patients with radiculopathy compared with latency. PMID:21466665

  4. Dorsal root ganglion-derived Schwann cells combined with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan conduits for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Qu, Wei; Wu, Yuxuan; Ma, Hao; Jiang, Huajun

    2014-01-01

    Schwann cells, nerve regeneration promoters in peripheral nerve tissue engineering, can be used to repair both the peripheral and central nervous systems. However, isolation and purification of Schwann cells are complicated by contamination with fibroblasts. Current reported measures are mainly limited by either high cost or complicated procedures with low cell yields or purity. In this study, we collected dorsal root ganglia from neonatal rats from which we obtained highly purified Schwann cells using serum-free melanocyte culture medium. The purity of Schwann cells (> 95%) using our method was higher than that using standard medium containing fetal bovine serum. The obtained Schwann cells were implanted into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats. Results showed that axonal diameter and area were significantly increased and motor functions were obviously improved in the rat sciatic nerve tissue. Experimental findings suggest that serum-free melanocyte culture medium is conducive to purify Schwann cells and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan nerve conduits combined with Schwann cells contribute to restore sciatic nerve defects. PMID:25598778

  5. Treatment outcomes of intradiscal steroid injection/selective nerve root block for 161 patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keigo; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Machino, Masaaki; Inoue, Taro; Ouchida, Jun; Tomita, Keisuke; Kato, Fumihiko

    2015-02-01

    Patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) were treated with intradiscal injection of steroids (IDIS) and/or selective nerve root block (SNRB) at our hospital. We retrospectively report the outcomes of these nonsurgical treatments for CR. 161 patients who were followed up for >2months were enrolled in this study. Patients' clinical manifestations were classified as arm pain, arm numbness, neck and/or scapular pain, and arm paralysis. Improvement in each manifestation was classified as "disappeared," "improved," "poor," or "worsened." Responses of "disappeared" or "improved" manifestations suggested treatment effectiveness. Final clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Odom criteria. Changes in herniated disc size were evaluated by comparing the initial and final MRI scans. On the basis of these changes, the patients were divided into regression, no-change, or progression groups. We investigated the relationship between the Odom criteria and changes observed on MRI. Effectiveness rates were 89% for arm pain, 77% for arm numbness, 82% for neck and/or scapular pain, and 76% for arm paralysis. In total, 91 patients underwent repeated MRI. In 56 patients (62%), the size of the herniated disc decreased, but 31 patients (34%) exhibited no change in disc size. The regression group showed significantly better Odom criteria results than the no-change group. In conclusion, IDIS and SNRB for CR are not widely performed. However, other extremely effective therapies that can rapidly improve neuralgia should be considered before surgery. PMID:25797986

  6. TREATMENT OUTCOMES OF INTRADISCAL STEROID INJECTION/SELECTIVE NERVE ROOT BLOCK FOR 161 PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL RADICULOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    ITO, KEIGO; YUKAWA, YASUTSUGU; MACHINO, MASAAKI; INOUE, TARO; OUCHIDA, JUN; TOMITA, KEISUKE; KATO, FUMIHIKO

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) were treated with intradiscal injection of steroids (IDIS) and/or selective nerve root block (SNRB) at our hospital. We retrospectively report the outcomes of these nonsurgical treatments for CR. 161 patients who were followed up for >2months were enrolled in this study. Patients clinical manifestations were classified as arm pain, arm numbness, neck and/or scapular pain, and arm paralysis. Improvement in each manifestation was classified as "disappeared," "improved," "poor," or "worsened." Responses of "disappeared" or "improved" manifestations suggested treatment effectiveness. Final clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Odom criteria. Changes in herniated disc size were evaluated by comparing the initial and final MRI scans. On the basis of these changes, the patients were divided into regression, no-change, or progression groups. We investigated the relationship between the Odom criteria and changes observed on MRI. Effectiveness rates were 89% for arm pain, 77% for arm numbness, 82% for neck and/or scapular pain, and 76% for arm paralysis. In total, 91 patients underwent repeated MRI. In 56 patients (62%), the size of the herniated disc decreased, but 31 patients (34%) exhibited no change in disc size. The regression group showed significantly better Odom criteria results than the no-change group. In conclusion, IDIS and SNRB for CR are not widely performed. However, other extremely effective therapies that can rapidly improve neuralgia should be considered before surgery. PMID:25797986

  7. Successful operative management of an upper lumbar spinal canal stenosis resulting in multilevel lower nerve root radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Shearwood; Kim, Stefan S

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is a common disorder, usually characterized clinically by neurogenic claudication with or without lumbar/sacral radiculopathy corresponding to the level of stenosis. We present a case of lumbar stenosis manifesting as a multilevel radiculopathy inferior to the nerve roots at the level of the stenosis. A 55-year-old gentleman presented with bilateral lower extremity pain with neurogenic claudication in an L5/S1 distribution (posterior thigh, calf, into the foot) concomitant with dorsiflexion and plantarflexion weakness. Imaging revealed grade I spondylolisthesis of L3 on L4 with severe spinal canal stenosis at L3-L4, mild left L4-L5 disc herniation, no stenosis at L5-S1, and no instability. EMG revealed active and chronic L5 and S1 radiculopathy. The patient underwent bilateral L3-L4 hemilaminotomy with left L4-L5 microdiscectomy for treatment of his L3-L4 stenosis. Postoperatively, he exhibited significant improvement in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The L5-S1 level was not involved in the operative decompression. Patients with radiculopathy and normal imaging at the level corresponding to the radiculopathy should not be ruled out for operative intervention should they have imaging evidence of lumbar stenosis superior to the expected affected level. PMID:25552866

  8. Multi-scale simulations predict responses to non-invasive nerve root stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Hirata, Akimasa; Terao, Yasuo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Established biophysical neurone models have achieved limited success in reproducing electrophysiological responses to non-invasive stimulation of the human nervous system. This is related to our insufficient knowledge of the induced electric currents inside the human body. Despite the numerous research and clinical applications of non-invasive stimulation, it is still unclear which internal sites are actually affected by it. Approach. We performed multi-scale computer simulations that, by making use of advances in computing power and numerical algorithms, combine a microscopic model of electrical excitation of neurones with a macroscopic electromagnetic model of the realistic whole-body anatomy. Main results. The simulations yield responses consistent with those experimentally recorded following magnetic and electrical motor root stimulation in human subjects, and reproduce the observed amplitudes and latencies for a wide variety of stimulation parameters. Significance. Our findings demonstrate that modern computational techniques can produce detailed predictions about which and where neurones are activated, leading to improved understanding of the physics and basic mechanisms of non-invasive stimulation and enabling potential new applications that make use of improved targeting of stimulation.

  9. Characterization of Thoracic Motor and Sensory Neurons and Spinal Nerve Roots in Canine Degenerative Myelopathy, a Potential Disease Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Brandie R.; Coates, Joan R.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Shelton, G. Diane; Katz, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Canine Degenerative Myelopathy (DM) is a progressive adult-onset multisystem degenerative disease with many features in common with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). As with some forms of ALS, DM is associated with mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Clinical signs include general proprioceptive ataxia and spastic upper motor neuron paresis in pelvic limbs, which progress to flaccid tetraplegia and dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to characterize DM as a potential disease model for ALS. We previously reported that intercostal muscle atrophy develops in dogs with advanced stage DM. To determine if other components of the thoracic motor unit (MU) also demonstrated morphological changes consistent with dysfunction, histopathologic and morphometric analyses were conducted on thoracic spinal motor neurons (MN) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and in motor and sensory nerve root axons from DM-affected Boxers and Pembroke Welsh Corgis (PWCs). No alterations in MNs, or motor root axons were observed in either breed. However, advanced stage PWCs exhibited significant losses of sensory root axons, and numerous DRG sensory neurons displayed evidence of degeneration. These results indicate that intercostal muscle atrophy in DM is not preceded by physical loss of the motor neurons innervating these muscles, or of their axons. Axonal loss in thoracic sensory roots and sensory nerve death suggest sensory involvement may play an important role in DM disease progression. Further analysis of the mechanisms responsible for these morphological findings would aid in the development of therapeutic intervention for DM and some forms of ALS. PMID:24375814

  10. Selective decrease of small sensory neurons in lumbar dorsal root ganglia labeled with horseradish peroxidase after ND:YAG laser irradiation of the tibial nerve in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Wesselmann, U.; Lin, S.F.; Rymer, W.Z. )

    1991-02-01

    Recent electrophysiological evidence indicates that Q-switched Nd:YAG laser irradiation might have selective effects on neural impulse transmission in small slow conducting sensory nerve fibers as compared to large diameter afferents. In an attempt to clarify the ultimate fate of sensory neurons after laser application to their peripheral axons, we have used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a cell marker to retrogradely label sensory neurons innervating the distal hindlimb in the rat. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser light was applied to the tibial nerve at pulse energies of 70 or 80 mJ/pulse for 5 min in experimental rats. Seven days later HRP was applied to the left (laser-treated) and to the contralateral (untreated) tibial nerve proximal to the site of laser irradiation. In control animals the numbers of HRP-labeled dorsal root ganglion cells were not significantly different between the right and the left side. In contrast, after previous laser irradiation labeling was always less on the laser-treated side (2183 +/- 513 cells, mean +/- SEM) as compared to the untreated side (3937 +/- 225). Analysis of the dimensions of labeled cells suggested that the reduction of labeled cells on the laser-treated side was mainly due to a deficit in small sensory neurons. Since the conduction velocity of nerve fibers is related to the size of their somata, our histological data imply that laser light selectively affects retrograde transport mechanisms for HRP in slow conducting sensory nerve fibers.

  11. Electrical properties of rat dorsal root ganglion neurones with different peripheral nerve conduction velocities.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, A A; Lawson, S N

    1985-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of individual rat dorsal root ganglion neurones were studied and related to the peripheral axon conduction velocity and morphological cell type. Neurones were divided into four groups based on the conduction velocity of their peripheral axons (A alpha, 30-55 m/s; A beta, 14-30 m/s; A delta, 2.2-8 m/s and C less than 1.4 m/s). Electrophysiological parameters examined included membrane potential, action potential amplitude and duration, after-potential height and duration, input resistance and the occurrence of time-dependent rectification. The mean duration of the somatic action potentials was found to be characteristic for each of the conduction velocity groupings. However, there was considerable overlap between groups. The fast-conducting (A alpha) and slowly conducting (A delta) myelinated fibres had short-duration action potentials, within the ranges 0.49-1.35 and 0.5-1.7 ms at the base respectively. The A beta and C cells had somatic action potentials with durations in the ranges of 0.6-2.9 and 0.6-7.4 ms respectively. The longer action potential durations could be related to the presence of an inflexion on the repolarizing phase seen in a third of A beta neurones (called A beta I neurones) and in all C neurones. The action potential overshoot was larger in C neurones and A beta I neurones than in the other neurone groups. The mean duration of the after-hyperpolarization was several times greater in C neurones than in A neurones. A delta neurones displayed the shortest and greatest amplitude after-hyperpolarizations. Large, long-lasting after-hyperpolarizations were not limited to neurones displaying an inflexion. The electrophysiological properties of the soma membrane of A delta neurones closely resembled those of A alpha neurones, while in several respects those of C neurones resembled the A beta I neuronal properties. The input resistance was found to be much greater in C than in A cells, although there was no significant difference between specific membrane resistance values calculated for the different groups. A number of A cells exhibited time-dependent rectification. PMID:2987489

  12. Differential action potentials and firing patterns in injured and uninjured small dorsal root ganglion neurons after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Feng; Zhu, Chang Z; Thimmapaya, Rama; Choi, Won S; Honore, Prisca; Scott, Victoria E; Kroeger, Paul E; Sullivan, James P; Faltynek, Connie R; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Shieh, Char-Chang

    2004-05-29

    The profile of tetrodotoxin sensitive (TTX-S) and resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channels and their contribution to action potentials and firing patterns were studied in isolated small dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after L5/L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Total TTX-R Na(+) currents and Na(v) 1.8 mRNA were reduced in injured L5 DRG neurons 14 days after SNL. In contrast, TTX-R Na(+)currents and Na(v) 1.8 mRNA were upregulated in uninjured L4 DRG neurons after SNL. Voltage-dependent inactivation of TTX-R Na(+) channels in these neurons was shifted to hyperpolarized potentials by 4 mV. Two types of neurons were identified in injured L5 DRG neurons after SNL. Type I neurons (57%) had significantly lower threshold but exhibited normal resting membrane potential (RMP) and action potential amplitude. Type II neurons (43%) had significantly smaller action potential amplitude but retained similar RMP and threshold to those from sham rats. None of the injured neurons could generate repetitive firing. In the presence of TTX, only 26% of injured neurons could generate action potentials that had smaller amplitude, higher threshold, and higher rheobase compared with sham rats. In contrast, action potentials and firing patterns in uninjured L4 DRG neurons after SNL, in the presence or absence of TTX, were not affected. These results suggest that TTX-R Na(+) channels play important roles in regulating action potentials and firing patterns in small DRG neurons and that downregulation in injured neurons and upregulation in uninjured neurons confer differential roles in shaping electrogenesis, and perhaps pain transmission, in these neurons. PMID:15120592

  13. The Impact of Spinal Cord Nerve Roots and Denticulate Ligaments on Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Heidari Pahlavian, Soroush; Yiallourou, Theresia; Tubbs, R. Shane; Bunck, Alexander C.; Loth, Francis; Goodin, Mark; Raisee, Mehrdad; Martin, Bryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics in the spinal subarachnoid space (SSS) have been thought to play an important pathophysiological role in syringomyelia, Chiari I malformation (CM), and a role in intrathecal drug delivery. Yet, the impact that fine anatomical structures, including nerve roots and denticulate ligaments (NRDL), have on SSS CSF dynamics is not clear. In the present study we assessed the impact of NRDL on CSF dynamics in the cervical SSS. The 3D geometry of the cervical SSS was reconstructed based on manual segmentation of MRI images of a healthy volunteer and a patient with CM. Idealized NRDL were designed and added to each of the geometries based on in vivo measurments in the literature and confirmation by a neuroanatomist. CFD simulations were performed for the healthy and patient case with and without NRDL included. Our results showed that the NRDL had an important impact on CSF dynamics in terms of velocity field and flow patterns. However, pressure distribution was not altered greatly although the NRDL cases required a larger pressure gradient to maintain the same flow. Also, the NRDL did not alter CSF dynamics to a great degree in the SSS from the foramen magnum to the C1 level for the healthy subject and CM patient with mild tonsillar herniation (∼6 mm). Overall, the NRDL increased fluid mixing phenomena and resulted in a more complex flow field. Comparison of the streamlines of CSF flow revealed that the presence of NRDL lead to the formation of vortical structures and remarkably increased the local mixing of the CSF throughout the SSS. PMID:24710111

  14. Dorsal displacement of the facial nerve in acoustic neuroma surgery: clinical features and surgical outcomes of 21 consecutive dorsal pattern cases.

    PubMed

    Nejo, Takahide; Kohno, Michihiro; Nagata, Osamu; Sora, Shigeo; Sato, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    In acoustic neuroma surgery, the facial nerve (FN) course varies among patients, but a dorsal pattern is rarely observed. We retrospectively reviewed and classified 556 acoustic neuromas operated on via a lateral suboccipital retrosigmoid (LSO) approach into two groups: dorsal (group D) and non-dorsal (group ND). The clinical features and outcomes including functional preservation of the FN, the extent of tumor resection, and the retreatment rate were compared. Among 556 cases, 21 (3.8 %) patients with dorsal patterns were identified. No significant differences in clinical features or preoperative status were noted between groups D and ND. No significant differences in functional FN preservation were found between groups D and ND in the immediate postoperative period (90.5 and 83.0 %, respectively) or 1-year postoperatively (95.2 and 97.0 %, respectively). Compared with group ND, the extent of tumor resection was significantly less (p < 0.0001) and the retreatment rate was significantly higher in group D (hazard ratio, 33.6; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 11.7-96.1; p < 0.0001). In one dorsal pattern case, surgical resection was abandoned based on the intraoperative findings. Dorsal displacement of the FN was accurately predicted with preoperative imaging evaluations in just two cases. Functional preservation of the FN during acoustic neuroma surgery is achievable if the FN runs along the dorsal side of the tumor. However, a dorsal pattern, especially when the FN is broadened, is clearly associated with less complete tumor removal and a higher rate of retreatment than typical pattern cases. PMID:26621676

  15. Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons and Differentiated Adipose-derived Stem Cells: An In Vitro Co-culture Model to Study Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    de Luca, Alba C.; Faroni, Alessandro; Reid, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, located in the intervertebral foramina of the spinal column, can be used to create an in vitro system facilitating the study of nerve regeneration and myelination. The glial cells of the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells (SC), are key facilitators of these processes; it is therefore crucial that the interactions of these cellular components are studied together. Direct contact between DRG neurons and glial cells provides additional stimuli sensed by specific membrane receptors, further improving the neuronal response. SC release growth factors and proteins in the culture medium, which enhance neuron survival and stimulate neurite sprouting and extension. However, SC require long proliferation time to be used for tissue engineering applications and the sacrifice of an healthy nerve for their sourcing. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) differentiated into SC phenotype are a valid alternative to SC for the set-up of a co-culture model with DRG neurons to study nerve regeneration. The present work presents a detailed and reproducible step-by-step protocol to harvest both DRG neurons and ASC from adult rats; to differentiate ASC towards a SC phenotype; and combines the two cell types in a direct co-culture system to investigate the interplay between neurons and SC in the peripheral nervous system. This tool has great potential in the optimization of tissue-engineered constructs for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:25742570

  16. Monitoring of immune cell response to B cell depletion therapy and nerve root injury using SPIO enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorek, Daniel L.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is a robust platform for non-invasive, high-resolution anatomical imaging. However, MR imaging lacks the requisite sensitivity and contrast for imaging at the cellular level. This represents a clinical impediment to greater diagnostic accuracy. Recent advances have allowed for the in vivo visualization of populations and even of individual cells using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) MR contrast agents. These nanoparticles, commonly manifested as a core of a single iron oxide crystal or cluster of crystals coated in a biocompatible shell, function to shorten proton relaxation times. In MR imaging these constructs locally dephase protons, resulting in a decrease in signal (hypointensity) localized to the region of accumulation of SPIO. In the context of immune cell imaging, SPIO can provide insight into the cellular migration patterns, trafficking, temporal dynamics and progression of diseases and their related pathological states. Furthermore, by visualizing the presence and activity of immune cells, SPIO-enabled cellular imaging can help evaluate the efficacy of therapy in immune disorders. This thesis examines the production, modification and application of SPIO in a range of in vitro and in vivo immune-response-relevant cellular systems. The role of different nanoparticle characteristics including diameter, surface charge and concentration are investigated in the labeling of T cells in culture. Following optimization of SPIO loading conditions for lymphocytes, the effect these particles have on the activation of primary B cells are elucidated. B cells are tracked using a variety of modalities, with and without the application of B cell depleting therapy. This is to evaluate the efficacy of SPIO as in vivo marker for B cell distribution. Unmodified SPIO were applied to monitor macrophage infiltration in a transient nerve root compression model, with implications for neck pain diagnosis and treatment. Nanoparticle accumulation and MR hypointensity was correlated to the presence of activated macrophage at the site of injury. Taken together, the application of SPIO to study nanoparticle uptake in vitro and visualization of immune cells in vivo provide a basis for advanced study and diagnosis of diverse pathologies.

  17. Vasodilative effects of prostaglandin E1 derivate on arteries of nerve roots in a canine model of a chronically compressed cauda equina

    PubMed Central

    Shirasaka, Masayoshi; Takayama, Bunji; Sekiguchi, Miho; Konno, Shin-ichi; Kikuchi, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    Background Reduction of blood flow is important in the induction of neurogenic intermittent claudication (NIC) in lumbar spinal canal stenosis. PGE1 improves the mean walking distance in patients with NIC type cauda equina compression. PGE1 derivate might be effective in dilating blood vessels and improving blood flow in nerve roots with chronically compressed cauda equina. The aim of this study was to assess whether PGE1 derivate has vasodilatory effects on both arteries and veins in a canine model of chronic cauda equina compression. Methods Fourteen dogs were used in this study. A plastic balloon inflated to 10 mmHg was placed under the lamina of the 7th lumbar vertebra for 1 week. OP-1206-cyclodextrin clathrate (OP-1206-CD: prostaglandin E1 derivate) was administered orally. The blood vessels of the second or third sacral nerve root were identified using a specially designed surgical microscope equipped with a video camera. The diameter of the blood vessels was measured on video-recordings every 15 minutes until 90 minutes after the administration of the PGE1 derivate. Results We observed seven arteries and seven veins. The diameter and blood flow of the arteries was significantly increased compared with the veins at both 60 and 75 minutes after administration of the PGE1 derivate (p < 0.05). Blood flow velocity did not change over 90 minutes in either the arteries or veins. Discussion The PGE1 derivate improved blood flow in the arteries but did not induce blood stasis in the veins. Our results suggest that the PGE1 derivate might be a potential therapeutic agent, as it improved blood flow in the nerve roots in a canine model of chronic cauda equina compression. PMID:18394203

  18. Virus-mediated shRNA Knockdown of Nav1.3 in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Attenuates Nerve Injury-induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Samad, Omar A; Tan, Andrew M; Cheng, Xiaoyang; Foster, Edmund; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition that is often refractory to treatment with available therapies and thus an unmet medical need. We have previously shown that the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.3 is upregulated in peripheral and central nervous system (CNS) of rats following nerve injury, and that it contributes to nociceptive neuron hyperexcitability in neuropathic conditions. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of peripheral Nav1.3 knockdown at a specific segmental level, we constructed adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector expressing small hairpin RNA against rat Nav1.3 and injected it into lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of rats with spared nerve injury (SNI). Our data show that direct DRG injection provides a model that can be used for proof-of-principle studies in chronic pain with respect to peripheral delivery route of gene transfer constructs, high transduction efficiency, flexibility in terms of segmental localization, and limited behavioral effects of the surgical procedure. We show that knockdown of Nav1.3 in lumbar 4 (L4) DRG results in an attenuation of nerve injury-induced mechanical allodynia in the SNI model. Taken together, our studies support the contribution of peripheral Nav1.3 to pain in adult rats with neuropathic pain, validate Nav1.3 as a target, and provide validation for this approach of AAV-mediated peripheral gene therapy. PMID:22910296

  19. Neuronal calcium-binding proteins 1/2 localize to dorsal root ganglia and excitatory spinal neurons and are regulated by nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming-Dong; Tortoriello, Giuseppe; Hsueh, Brian; Tomer, Raju; Ye, Li; Mitsios, Nicholas; Borgius, Lotta; Grant, Gunnar; Kiehn, Ole; Watanabe, Masahiko; Uhlén, Mathias; Mulder, Jan; Deisseroth, Karl; Harkany, Tibor; Hökfelt, Tomas G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal calcium (Ca2+)-binding proteins 1 and 2 (NECAB1/2) are members of the phylogenetically conserved EF-hand Ca2+-binding protein superfamily. To date, NECABs have been explored only to a limited extent and, so far, not at all at the spinal level. Here, we describe the distribution, phenotype, and nerve injury-induced regulation of NECAB1/NECAB2 in mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and spinal cord. In DRGs, NECAB1/2 are expressed in around 70% of mainly small- and medium-sized neurons. Many colocalize with calcitonin gene-related peptide and isolectin B4, and thus represent nociceptors. NECAB1/2 neurons are much more abundant in DRGs than the Ca2+-binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, and secretagogin) studied to date. In the spinal cord, the NECAB1/2 distribution is mainly complementary. NECAB1 labels interneurons and a plexus of processes in superficial layers of the dorsal horn, commissural neurons in the intermediate area, and motor neurons in the ventral horn. Using CLARITY, a novel, bilaterally connected neuronal system with dendrites that embrace the dorsal columns like palisades is observed. NECAB2 is present in cell bodies and presynaptic boutons across the spinal cord. In the dorsal horn, most NECAB1/2 neurons are glutamatergic. Both NECAB1/2 are transported into dorsal roots and peripheral nerves. Peripheral nerve injury reduces NECAB2, but not NECAB1, expression in DRG neurons. Our study identifies NECAB1/2 as abundant Ca2+-binding proteins in pain-related DRG neurons and a variety of spinal systems, providing molecular markers for known and unknown neuron populations of mechanosensory and pain circuits in the spinal cord. PMID:24616509

  20. Neuronal expression of the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2 in rat dorsal root ganglia: modulation in the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Cachemaille, M; Laedermann, C J; Pertin, M; Abriel, H; Gosselin, R-D; Decosterd, I

    2012-12-27

    Neuronal hyperexcitability following peripheral nerve lesions may stem from altered activity of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), which gives rise to allodynia or hyperalgesia. In vitro, the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2 is a negative regulator of VGSC ?-subunits (Na(v)), in particular Na(v)1.7, a key actor in nociceptor excitability. We therefore studied Nedd4-2 in rat nociceptors, its co-expression with Na(v)1.7 and Na(v)1.8, and its regulation in pathology. Adult rats were submitted to the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain or injected with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), a model of inflammatory pain. L4 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were analyzed in sham-operated animals, seven days after SNI and 48 h after CFA with immunofluorescence and Western blot. We observed Nedd4-2 expression in almost 50% of DRG neurons, mostly small and medium-sized. A preponderant localization is found in the non-peptidergic sub-population. Additionally, 55.7 2.7% and 55.0 3.6% of Nedd4-2-positive cells are co-labeled with Na(v)1.7 and Na(v)1.8 respectively. SNI significantly decreases the proportion of Nedd4-2-positive neurons from 45.9 1.9% to 33.5 0.7% (p<0.01) and the total Nedd4-2 protein to 44% 0.13% of its basal level (p<0.01, n=4 animals in each group, mean SEM). In contrast, no change in Nedd4-2 was found after peripheral inflammation induced by CFA. These results indicate that Nedd4-2 is present in nociceptive neurons, is downregulated after peripheral nerve injury, and might therefore contribute to the dysregulation of Na(v)s involved in the hyperexcitability associated with peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:23022218

  1. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  2. In Vivo Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Dorsal Root Ganglia Is Mediated by Nerve Growth Factor-Triggered Akt Activation during Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Li-Ya; Yu, Sharon J.; Kay, Jarren C.; Xia, Chun-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in sensory hypersensitivity has been suggested; however the molecular mechanisms and signal transduction that regulate BDNF expression in primary afferent neurons during visceral inflammation are not clear. Here we used a rat model of cystitis and found that the mRNA and protein levels of BDNF were increased in the L6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in response to bladder inflammation. BDNF up-regulation in the L6 DRG was triggered by endogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) because neutralization of NGF with a specific NGF antibody reduced BDNF levels during cystitis. The neutralizing NGF antibody also subsequently reduced cystitis-induced up-regulation of the serine/threonine kinase Akt activity in L6 DRG. To examine whether the NGF-induced Akt activation led to BDNF up-regulation in DRG in cystitis, we found that in cystitis the phospho-Akt immunoreactivity was co-localized with BDNF in L6 DRG, and prevention of the endogenous Akt activity in the L6 DRG by inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) with a potent inhibitor LY294002 reversed cystitis-induced BDNF up-regulation. Further study showed that application of NGF to the nerve terminals of the ganglion-nerve two-compartmented preparation enhanced BDNF expression in the DRG neuronal soma; which was reduced by pre-treatment of the ganglia with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and wortmannin. These in vivo and in vitro experiments indicated that NGF played an important role in the activation of Akt and subsequent up-regulation of BDNF in the sensory neurons in visceral inflammation such as cystitis. PMID:24303055

  3. Validity of the vertical tube-shift method in determining the relationship between the mandibular third molar roots and the inferior alveolar nerve canal

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the validity of the vertical tube-shift method using intraoral periapical radiography (IOPAR) for determining the relationship between the mandibular third molar roots and the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) canal in comparison with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods Fifty impacted mandibular third molars were analyzed using the IOPAR vertical tube-shift method and CBCT. The relationship of the IAN canal to the impacted mandibular third molar was recorded as buccal, lingual or in line with the apex and was compared with CBCT findings. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the vertical tube-shift method in depicting the relationship (buccal/lingual/in line with the apex) of the IAN canal to the third molar root apex was calculated. Results The sensitivity and specificity PPV and NPV of the IOPAR vertical tube-shift technique was found to be highest for a lingual relationship (100%) followed by buccal (94.4%, 92.3%, 97.1%, and 85.7%) and in line with the apex relationship (88.9%, 95.0%, 80.0%, and 97.4%) of the IAN canal with the third molar root apex, respectively. A statistically significant association was observed between the IOPAR vertical tube-shift method and the CBCT with a P-value <0.01. Conclusion The vertical tube-shift method can be used as an effective diagnostic tool in assessing the relationship of the IAN canal to the third molar root apex with high sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV. PMID:25922817

  4. Expressions of miR-132, miR-134, and miR-485 in rat primary motor cortex during transhemispheric functional reorganization after contralateral seventh cervical spinal nerve root transfer following brachial plexus avulsion injuries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Hong; Li, Li-Jun; Sun, Gui-Xin; Wu, Zuo-Pei; Li, Ji-Feng; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of a contralateral healthy seventh cervical spinal nerve root (cC7) to the recipient nerve in the injured side is considered a promising procedure for restoration of the physiological functions of an injured hand after brachial plexus root avulsion injury (BPAI). Growing evidence shows that transhemispheric cortical reorganization plays an important role in the functional recovery of the injured arm after cC7 nerve transfer surgery. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the transhemispheric cortical reorganization after cC7 transfer remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated the expression of miR-132, miR-134, and miR-485 in the rat primary motor cortex after cC7 transfer following BPAI by quantitative PCR. The results demonstrated the dynamic alteration in the expression of miR-132, miR-134, and miR-485 in the primary motor cortex of rats after cC7 transfer following BPAI. It indicates that microRNAs are involved in the dynamic transhemispheric functional reorganization after cC7 root transfer following BPAI. Together, this study is the first to provide evidence for the involvement of microRNAs during dynamic transhemispheric functional reorganization after cC7 transfer following BPAI. The results are useful for understanding the mechanism underlying transhemispheric functional reorganization after contralateral seventh cervical spinal nerve root transfer following BPAI. PMID:26544683

  5. Control of leg-powered paraplegic cycling using stimulation of the lumbo-sacral anterior spinal nerve roots.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Tim A; de N Donaldson, Nick; Hatcher, Neil A C; Swain, Ian D; Wood, Duncan E

    2002-09-01

    We investigated leg-powered cycling in a recumbent tricycle for a paraplegic using functional electrical stimulation (FES) with the lumbo-sacral anterior root stimulator implant (LARSI). A female complete T9 paraplegic had a stimulator for the anterior L2 to S2 spinal roots (bilaterally) implanted in 1994. She was provided with equipment for daily FES cycling exercise at home. The cycling controller applies a pattern of stimulation in each of 16 crank angle phases. A 7-bit shaft encoder measures the crank angle with adequate precision. Each pattern was originally chosen to give the greatest propulsive force in that position when there was no motion. However, dynamically, some reduction in co-contraction is needed; also the patterns are applied with a preset advance time. Maximal power is obtained with an advance of 250 ms, which compensates for muscle response delay and accommodates changes in cadence (from about 25 to 85 rpm). With this system, she has cycled 1.2 km at a time on gently undulating road. We found that spinal root stimulation gives sufficient control over the muscles in the legs to produce a fluid cycling gait. We propose that root stimulation for leg cycling exercise may be a practicable and valuable function for paraplegics following spinal cord injury. PMID:12503780

  6. The diagnostic utility and cost-effectiveness of selective nerve root blocks in patients considered for lumbar decompression surgery: a systematic review and economic model.

    PubMed Central

    Beynon, R; Hawkins, J; Laing, R; Higgins, N; Whiting, P; Jameson, C; Sterne, J A C; Vergara, P; Hollingworth, W

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Diagnostic selective nerve root block (SNRB) involves injection of local anaesthetic, sometimes in conjunction with corticosteroids, around spinal nerves. It is used to identify symptomatic nerve roots in patients with probable radicular pain that is not fully concordant with imaging findings. OBJECTIVES (1) Determine the diagnostic accuracy of SNRB in patients with low back and radiating pain in a lower limb; (2) evaluate whether or not accuracy varies by patient subgroups; (3) review injection-related adverse events; and (4) evaluate the cost-effectiveness of SNRB. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, Bioscience Information Service (BIOSIS), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) and grey literature databases were searched from inception to August 2011. Reference lists of included studies were screened. METHODS A systematic review (SR) of studies that assessed the accuracy of SNRB or adverse events in patients with low back pain and symptoms in a lower limb for the diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy. Study quality was assessed using the quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS)-2 checklist. We used random-effects meta-analysis to pool diagnostic accuracy data. Decision tree and Markov models were developed, combining SR results with information on the costs and outcomes of surgical and non-surgical care. Uncertainty was assessed using probabilistic and deterministic sensitivity analyses. RESULTS Five studies assessed diagnostic accuracy: three diagnostic cohort and two within-patient case-control studies. All were judged to be at high risk of bias and had high concerns regarding applicability. In individual studies, sensitivity ranged from 57% [95% confidence interval (CI) 43% to 70%] to 100% (95% CI 76% to 100%) and specificity from 9.5% (95% CI 1% to 30%) to 86% (95% CI 76% to 93%). The most reliable estimate was judged to come from two cohort studies that used post-surgery outcome as the reference standard; summary sensitivity and specificity were 93% (95% CI 86% to 97%) and 26% (95% CI 5% to 68%), respectively. No study provided sufficient detail to judge whether or not accuracy varied by patient subgroup. Seven studies assessed adverse events. There were no major or permanent complications; minor complications were reported in 0-6% of patients. The addition of SNRB to the diagnostic work-up was not cost-effective with an incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year of £1,576,007. Sensitivity analyses confirmed that SNRB was unlikely to be a cost-effective method for diagnosis and planning surgical therapy. LIMITATIONS We identified very few studies; all were at high risk of bias. The conduct and interpretation of SNRBs varied and there was no gold standard for diagnosis. Limited information about the impact of SNRB on subsequent care and the long-term costs and benefits of surgery increased uncertainty about cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS There were few studies that estimated the diagnostic accuracy of SNRB in patients with radiculopathy and all were limited by the difficulty of making a reference standard diagnosis. Summary estimates suggest that specificity is low, but results are based on a small number of studies at a high risk of bias. Based on current weak evidence, it is unlikely that SNRB is a cost-effective method for identifying the symptomatic nerve root prior to lumbar spine surgery. Future research should focus on randomised controlled trials to evaluate whether or not SNRB improves patient outcomes at acceptable cost. FUNDING The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme. PMID:23673151

  7. A diagnosis challenge-L4 nerve root compression as the initial presentation of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Alexianu, Marilena; Bastian, Alexandra; Sapira, Violeta; Her?ea, Cristina; Cojocaru, M

    2012-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 65-year-old woman who was admitted for paraparesis and paresthesias in the inferior limbs. The neurological examination revealed the difficulty in extension of the right foot and of the right toe, accompanied by paresthesias located in the anterolateral area of the right leg, dorsum and plantar area of the foot, the reduction of the right knee jerk, and of the ankle tendon jerk both sides. The vertebro-spinal MRI showed lumbar canal stenosis with L4 intraforaminal compression on the right, and L2-L3 on the left. CSF examination revealed mild increase in protein concentration. The morphological picture of the sural nerve biopsy was compatible with a chronic inflammatory neuropathy and severe muscular lesions of neurogenic origin were observed on right gastrocnemius muscle biopsy. The diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) was established. Solu-medrol (0.5 g/d)-5 days, then medrol (prednisolone) was done, followed by improving of the symptomatology. For the relapse of the disease intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG)-0.4 g/kg/d-5 days was the elective treatment. Six months later she presented a new relapse. IVIG were administered with the remission of the sensitive symptoms. A chronic treatment with medrol was recommended. The diagnosis of L4 disc herniation was obvious in the studied case, but the electroneurographic examination brought extra data for the associated diagnosis of CIDP whose onset was asymmetrical and initially paucisymptomatic. Neither the electroneurographic examination nor the CSF examination were total relevant for CIDP, imposing the sural nerve biopsy. The diagnosis of CIDP involves a team-work composed of neurologist, electroneurophysiologist and neuropathologist. PMID:23610977

  8. Upregulation of Chemokine CXCL12 in the Dorsal Root Ganglia and Spinal Cord Contributes to the Development and Maintenance of Neuropathic Pain Following Spared Nerve Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liying; Wang, Xinru; Li, Zhisong; Kong, Cunlong; Zhao, Yonghui; Qian, Jun-Liang; Kan, Quancheng; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Ji-Tian

    2016-02-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling is involved in chronic pain. However, few studies have systemically assessed its role in direct nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and the underlying mechanism. Here, we determined that spared nerve injury (SNI) increased the expression of CXCL12 and its cognate receptor CXCR4 in lumbar 5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and satellite glial cells. SNI also induced long-lasting upregulation of CXCL12 and CXCR4 in the ipsilateral L4-5 spinal cord dorsal horn, characterized by CXCL12 expression in neurons and microglia, and CXCR4 expression in neurons and astrocytes. Moreover, SNI-induced a sustained increase in TNF-? expression in the DRG and spinal cord. Intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of the TNF-? synthesis inhibitor thalidomidereduced the SNI-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and inhibited the expression of CXCL12 in the DRG and spinal cord. Intrathecal injection (i.t.) of the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, both 30min before and 7days after SNI, reduced the behavioral signs of allodynia. Rats given an i.t. or i.p. bolus of AMD3100 on day 8 of SNI exhibited attenuated abnormal pain behaviors. The neuropathic pain established following SNI was also impaired by i.t. administration of a CXCL12-neutralizing antibody. Moreover, repetitive i.t. AMD3100 administration prevented the activation of ERK in the spinal cord. The mechanical hypersensitivity induced in nave rats by i.t. CXCL12 was alleviated by pretreatment with the MEK inhibitor PD98059. Collectively, our results revealed that TNF-? might mediate the upregulation of CXCL12 in the DRG and spinal cord following SNI, and that CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling via ERK activation contributes to the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. PMID:26781879

  9. Extracellular Nm23H1 stimulates neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia neurons in vitro independently of nerve growth factor supplementation or its nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, K.T.; Seabright, R.; Logan, A.; Lilly, A.J.; Khanim, F.; Bunce, C.M.; Johnson, W.E.B.

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Extracellular Nm23H1 stimulates nerve growth. {yields} Extracellular Nm23H1 provides pathfinding cues to growth cones. {yields} The neurotrophic activity of Nm23H1 is independent of NDP kinase activity. {yields} The neurotrophic activity of Nm23H1 is independent of NGF. -- Abstract: The nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase, Nm23H1, is a highly expressed during neuronal development, whilst induced over-expression in neuronal cells results in increased neurite outgrowth. Extracellular Nm23H1 affects the survival, proliferation and differentiation of non-neuronal cells. Therefore, this study has examined whether extracellular Nm23H1 regulates nerve growth. We have immobilised recombinant Nm23H1 proteins to defined locations of culture plates, which were then seeded with explants of embryonic chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or dissociated adult rat DRG neurons. The substratum-bound extracellular Nm23H1 was stimulatory for neurite outgrowth from chick DRG explants in a concentration-dependent manner. On high concentrations of Nm23H1, chick DRG neurite outgrowth was extensive and effectively limited to the location of the Nm23H1, i.e. neuronal growth cones turned away from adjacent collagen-coated substrata. Nm23H1-coated substrata also significantly enhanced rat DRG neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth in comparison to collagen-coated substrata. These effects were independent of NGF supplementation. Recombinant Nm23H1 (H118F), which does not possess NDP kinase activity, exhibited the same activity as the wild-type protein. Hence, a novel neuro-stimulatory activity for extracellular Nm23H1 has been identified in vitro, which may function in developing neuronal systems.

  10. Effects of sciatic nerve transection on glucose uptake in the presence and absence of lactate in the frog dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rigon, F; Horst, A; Kucharski, L C; Silva, R S M; Faccioni-Heuser, M C; Partata, W A

    2014-08-01

    Frogs have been used as an alternative model to study pain mechanisms because the simplicity of their nervous tissue and the phylogenetic aspect of this question. One of these models is the sciatic nerve transection (SNT), which mimics the clinical symptoms of "phantom limb", a condition that arises in humans after amputation or transverse spinal lesions. In mammals, the SNT increases glucose metabolism in the central nervous system, and the lactate generated appears to serve as an energy source for nerve cells. An answerable question is whether there is elevated glucose uptake in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after peripheral axotomy. As glucose is the major energy substrate for frog nervous tissue, and these animals accumulate lactic acid under some conditions, bullfrogs Lithobates catesbeianus were used to demonstrate the effect of SNT on DRG and spinal cord 1-[14C] 2-deoxy-D-glucose (14C-2-DG) uptake in the presence and absence of lactate. We also investigated the effect of this condition on the formation of 14CO2 from 14C-glucose and 14C-L-lactate, and plasmatic glucose and lactate levels. The 3-O-[14C] methyl-D-glucose (14C-3-OMG) uptake was used to demonstrate the steady-state tissue/medium glucose distribution ratio under these conditions. Three days after SNT, 14C-2-DG uptake increased, but 14C-3-OMG uptake remained steady. The increase in 14C-2-DG uptake was lower when lactate was added to the incubation medium. No change was found in glucose and lactate oxidation after SNT, but lactate and glucose levels in the blood were reduced. Thus, our results showed that SNT increased the glucose metabolism in the frog DRG and spinal cord. The effect of lactate on this uptake suggests that glucose is used in glycolytic pathways after SNT. PMID:25627385

  11. Deficits in foot skin sensation are related to alterations in balance control in chronic low back patients experiencing clinical signs of lumbar nerve root impingement.

    PubMed

    Frost, Lydia R; Bijman, Marc; Strzalkowski, Nicholas D J; Bent, Leah R; Brown, Stephen H M

    2015-05-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) patients with radiculopathy, or sciatica, experience pain, tingling or numbness radiating down their leg due to compression of the lumbar nerve root. The resulting reduction in somatosensory information from the foot sole may contribute to deficits in standing balance control. This work was designed to investigate the relationship between foot skin sensitivity and standing balance control in chronic LBP patients with associated radiculopathy. Patients (n=9) and matched healthy controls (n=9) were recruited to the study, and were tested for balance control in both quiet standing as well as during rapid arm raise perturbation trials on a force plate. Foot skin sensitivity was tested bilaterally for vibratory threshold (3, 40 and 250 Hz) and touch (monofilament) threshold. Results demonstrate that patients had reduced sensitivity to 250 Hz vibration in their affected compared to unaffected foot (at the great toe and heel), as well as compared to controls (at the great toe), but there were no differences with lower frequency vibratory testing or with monofilament testing. While there were no significant between-group differences in balance measures, moderate statistically significant correlations between 250 Hz sensitivity and quiet standing balance parameters were uncovered. Thus, patients demonstrate reduced high-frequency vibratory sensitivity at the foot sole, and correlations with quiet standing balance measures indicate a connection between these foot skin sensitivity deficits and alterations in balance control. Clinically, this identifies high frequency vibration testing as an important measure of skin sensitivity in patients with radiculopathy. PMID:25887249

  12. The effect of botulinum neurotoxin A on sciatic nerve injury-induced neuroimmunological changes in rat dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Mika, J; Rojewska, E; Makuch, W; Korostynski, M; Luvisetto, S; Marinelli, S; Pavone, F; Przewlocka, B

    2011-02-23

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) acts by cleaving synaptosome-associated-protein-25 (SNAP-25) in nerve terminals to inhibit neuronal release and shows long-lasting antinociceptive action in neuropathic pain. However, its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. Our study aimed to characterize BoNT/A-induced neuroimmunological changes after chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. In the ipsilateral lumbar spinal cords of CCI-exposed rats, the mRNA of microglial marker (complement component 1q, C1q), astroglial marker (glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP), and prodynorphin were upregulated, as measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). No changes appeared in mRNA for proenkephalin, pronociceptin, or neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS1 and NOS2, respectively). In the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), an ipsilateral upregulation of prodynorphin, pronociceptin, C1q, GFAP, NOS1 and NOS2 mRNA and a downregulation of proenkephalin mRNA were observed. A single intraplantar BoNT/A (75 pg/paw) injection induced long-lasting antinociception in this model. BoNT/A diminished the injury-induced ipsilateral spinal upregulation of C1q mRNA. In the ipsilateral DRG a significant decrease of C1q-positive cell activation and of the upregulation of prodynorphin, pronociceptin and NOS1 mRNA was also observed following BoNT/A admistration. BoNT/A also diminished the injury-induced upregulation of SNAP-25 expression in both structures. We provide evidence that BoNT/A impedes injury-activated neuronal function in structures distant from the injection site, which is demonstrated by its influence on NOS1, prodynorphin and pronociceptin mRNA levels in the DRG. Moreover, the silence of microglia/macrophages after BoNT/A administration could be secondary to the inhibition of neuronal activity, but this decrease in neuroimmune interactions could be the key to the long-lasting BoNT/A effect on neuropathic pain. PMID:21111791

  13. Fluid structure interaction analysis reveals facial nerve palsy caused by vertebral-posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomoaki; Takao, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Takashi; Kambayashi, Yukinao; Watanabe, Mitsuyoshi; Shinohara, Sho; Fujiwara, Hidemoto; Nakazato, Shinji; Watanabe, Masato; Dahmani, Chiheb; Yamamoto, Makoto; Fujii, Yukihiko; Murayama, Yuichi

    2015-11-01

    Cranial nerve palsy caused by aneurysmal compression has not been fully evaluated. The main causes of symptoms are considered to be direct mechanical compression and aneurysm pulsations. Recent studies indicate that nerve dysfunction is mainly induced by pulsation rather than by direct compression, and successful cases of endovascular surgery have been reported. We describe a patient with an unruptured vertebral artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (VA-PICA) aneurysm compressing the facial nerve at the root exit zone (REZ). The patient presented with peripheral facial nerve palsy but not hemifacial spasm and was successfully treated by coil embolization. To investigate the mechanisms underlying peripheral facial nerve palsy, fluid structure interaction (FSI) analysis can approximate displacement and the magnitude of aneurysmal wall motion due to hemodynamic forces. In our case, maximum mesh displacement was observed at the aneurysmal wall attached to the facial nerve inside the pons rather than the REZ, which explains the clinical manifestation of facial nerve palsy in the absence of hemifacial spasm. This preliminary report demonstrates the utility of FSI analysis for investigating cranial nerve neuropathy. PMID:26453756

  14. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Hyaluronidase in the Selective Nerve Root Block of Radiculopathy: A Double Blind, Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sang-Bong; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Shin, Dong-Young

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Purpose To determine the ability of hyaluronidase to provide longer lasting pain relief and functional improvement in patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Overview of Literature Selective nerve root block (SNRB) is a good treatment option in lumbar radiculopathy. We studied the effectiveness of hyaluronidase when added to the traditional SNRB regimen. Methods A sample size of 126 patients per group was necessary. A sample of 252 patients who underwent an injection procedure with or without hyaluronidase due to radiculopathy was included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: the control (C) group and the hyaluronidase (H) group. After SNRB due to radiculopathy, the visual analog scale (VAS) was compared at 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks between the two groups, and the Oswestry disability index (ODI) was compared at 12 weeks between the two groups. Results Both groups seemed to have general improvement in VAS, but in C group, the VAS was higher than the H group 2 and 4 weeks after the surgery, and the difference in time-group change between 2 groups was statistically significant (p <0.05). ODI improved in both groups, and the difference in time-group change between 2 groups was not statistically significant (p >0.05). Conclusions The rebound pain (the re-occurrence of pain within 2-4 weeks after injection) that occurs within 2-4 weeks after the injection of the routine regimen can be reduced when hyaluronidase is added to the routine SNRB regimen. PMID:25705339

  15. Does magnetic stimulation of sacral nerve roots modify colonic motility? Results of a randomized double-blind sham-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Gallas, S; Gourcerol, G; Ducrott, P; Mosni, G; Menard, J-F; Michot, F; Leroi, A-M

    2009-04-01

    Although sacral nerve root stimulation (SNS) can result in a symptomatic improvement of faecal incontinence, the mechanism of action remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess whether short-term magnetic SNS can inhibit pharmacologically induced propulsive colonic contractions. Twelve healthy volunteers (median age: 43.5 years old) were studied on two separate occasions and randomized into either active (15 Hz, 100% output intensity for 5 s min(-1) for 30 min) or sham rapid rate lumbosacral magnetic stimulation (rLSMS). Colorectal motility was recorded with a manometric catheter located at the most proximal transducer in the left colon and the most distal, in the rectum. Colonic contractions were provoked by instilling Bisacodyl. The effects of rLSMS on colonic, sigmoid and rectal contractions were monitored and recorded after Bisacodyl instillation. The appearance of high-amplitude contractions propagated or not (HAC/HAPC) provoked by Bisacodyl instillation was significantly delayed during active compared to sham stimulation (P = 0.03). There was no difference in the characteristics of HAC/HAPC (i.e. frequency, amplitude, duration, velocity of propagation) or the motility index with active or sham stimulation. The perception of urgency tended to be decreased with rLSMS following Bisacodyl instillation. The catheter was expulsed within a median of 16.5 min (range 8-39) after Bisacodyl administration during active stimulation compared to 14 min (range 5-40) during sham stimulation (P = 0.03). This study suggests that rLSMS could delay the appearance of the first Bisacodyl-induced colonic contractions. PMID:19126187

  16. Effects of sciatic nerve transection on ultrastructure, NADPH-diaphorase reaction and serotonin-, tyrosine hydroxylase-, c-Fos-, glucose transporter 1- and 3-like immunoreactivities in frog dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Rigon, F; Rossato, D; Auler, V B; Dal Bosco, L; Faccioni-Heuser, M C; Partata, W A

    2013-06-01

    Frogs have been used as an alternative model to study pain mechanisms. Since we did not find any reports on the effects of sciatic nerve transection (SNT) on the ultrastructure and pattern of metabolic substances in frog dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells, in the present study, 18 adult male frogs (Rana catesbeiana) were divided into three experimental groups: naive (frogs not subjected to surgical manipulation), sham (frogs in which all surgical procedures to expose the sciatic nerve were used except transection of the nerve), and SNT (frogs in which the sciatic nerve was exposed and transected). After 3 days, the bilateral DRG of the sciatic nerve was collected and used for transmission electron microscopy. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect reactivity for glucose transporter (Glut) types 1 and 3, tyrosine hydroxylase, serotonin and c-Fos, as well as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-diaphorase). SNT induced more mitochondria with vacuolation in neurons, satellite glial cells (SGCs) with more cytoplasmic extensions emerging from cell bodies, as well as more ribosomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, intermediate filaments and mitochondria. c-Fos immunoreactivity was found in neuronal nuclei. More neurons and SGCs surrounded by tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactivity were found. No change occurred in serotonin- and Glut1- and Glut3-like immunoreactivity. NADPH-diaphorase occurred in more neurons and SGCs. No sign of SGC proliferation was observed. Since the changes of frog DRG in response to nerve injury are similar to those of mammals, frogs should be a valid experimental model for the study of the effects of SNT, a condition that still has many unanswered questions. PMID:23739744

  17. Effects of sciatic nerve transection on ultrastructure, NADPH-diaphorase reaction and serotonin-, tyrosine hydroxylase-, c-Fos-, glucose transporter 1- and 3-like immunoreactivities in frog dorsal root ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Rigon, F.; Rossato, D.; Auler, V.B.; Dal Bosco, L.; Faccioni-Heuser, M.C.; Partata, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Frogs have been used as an alternative model to study pain mechanisms. Since we did not find any reports on the effects of sciatic nerve transection (SNT) on the ultrastructure and pattern of metabolic substances in frog dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells, in the present study, 18 adult male frogs (Rana catesbeiana) were divided into three experimental groups: naive (frogs not subjected to surgical manipulation), sham (frogs in which all surgical procedures to expose the sciatic nerve were used except transection of the nerve), and SNT (frogs in which the sciatic nerve was exposed and transected). After 3 days, the bilateral DRG of the sciatic nerve was collected and used for transmission electron microscopy. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect reactivity for glucose transporter (Glut) types 1 and 3, tyrosine hydroxylase, serotonin and c-Fos, as well as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-diaphorase). SNT induced more mitochondria with vacuolation in neurons, satellite glial cells (SGCs) with more cytoplasmic extensions emerging from cell bodies, as well as more ribosomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, intermediate filaments and mitochondria. c-Fos immunoreactivity was found in neuronal nuclei. More neurons and SGCs surrounded by tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactivity were found. No change occurred in serotonin- and Glut1- and Glut3-like immunoreactivity. NADPH-diaphorase occurred in more neurons and SGCs. No sign of SGC proliferation was observed. Since the changes of frog DRG in response to nerve injury are similar to those of mammals, frogs should be a valid experimental model for the study of the effects of SNT, a condition that still has many unanswered questions. PMID:23739744

  18. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... myelin sheath covering the nerve) Inflammatory nerve conditions (neuropathies) Additional conditions under which the test may be performed: Alcoholic neuropathy Axillary nerve dysfunction Brachial plexopathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth ...

  19. Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord, roots and peripheral nerves: Basic principles and procedures for routine clinical and research application. An updated report from an I.F.C.N. Committee.

    PubMed

    Rossini, P M; Burke, D; Chen, R; Cohen, L G; Daskalakis, Z; Di Iorio, R; Di Lazzaro, V; Ferreri, F; Fitzgerald, P B; George, M S; Hallett, M; Lefaucheur, J P; Langguth, B; Matsumoto, H; Miniussi, C; Nitsche, M A; Pascual-Leone, A; Paulus, W; Rossi, S; Rothwell, J C; Siebner, H R; Ugawa, Y; Walsh, V; Ziemann, U

    2015-06-01

    These guidelines provide an up-date of previous IFCN report on "Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application" (Rossini et al., 1994). A new Committee, composed of international experts, some of whom were in the panel of the 1994 "Report", was selected to produce a current state-of-the-art review of non-invasive stimulation both for clinical application and research in neuroscience. Since 1994, the international scientific community has seen a rapid increase in non-invasive brain stimulation in studying cognition, brain-behavior relationship and pathophysiology of various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. New paradigms of stimulation and new techniques have been developed. Furthermore, a large number of studies and clinical trials have demonstrated potential therapeutic applications of non-invasive brain stimulation, especially for TMS. Recent guidelines can be found in the literature covering specific aspects of non-invasive brain stimulation, such as safety (Rossi et al., 2009), methodology (Groppa et al., 2012) and therapeutic applications (Lefaucheur et al., 2014). This up-dated review covers theoretical, physiological and practical aspects of non-invasive stimulation of brain, spinal cord, nerve roots and peripheral nerves in the light of more updated knowledge, and include some recent extensions and developments. PMID:25797650

  20. Reinnervation of Urethral and Anal Sphincters With Femoral Motor Nerve to Pudendal Nerve Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ruggieri, Michael R.; Braverman, Alan S.; Bernal, Raymond M.; Lamarre, Neil S.; Brown, Justin M.; Barbe, Mary F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Lower motor neuron damage to sacral roots or nerves can result in incontinence and a flaccid urinary bladder. We showed bladder reinnervation after transfer of coccygeal to sacral ventral roots, and genitofemoral nerves (L1, 2 origin) to pelvic nerves. This study assesses the feasibility of urethral and anal sphincter reinnervation using transfer of motor branches of the femoral nerve (L2–4 origin) to pudendal nerves (S1, 2 origin) that innervate the urethral and anal sphincters in a canine model. Methods Sacral ventral roots were selected by their ability to stimulate bladder, urethral sphincter, and anal sphincter contraction and transected. Bilaterally, branches of the femoral nerve, specifically, nervus saphenous pars muscularis [Evans HE. Miller’s anatomy of the dog. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders; 1993], were transferred and end-to-end anastomosed to transected pudendal nerve branches in the perineum, then enclosed in unipolar nerve cuff electrodes with leads to implanted RF micro-stimulators. Results Nerve stimulation induced increased anal and urethral sphincter pressures in five of six transferred nerves. Retrograde neurotracing from the bladder, urethral sphincter, and anal sphincter using fluorogold, fast blue, and fluororuby, demonstrated urethral and anal sphincter labeled neurons in L2–4 cord segments (but not S1–3) in nerve transfer canines, consistent with rein-nervation by the transferred femoral nerve motor branches. Controls had labeled neurons only in S1–3 segments. Postmortem DiI and DiO labeling confirmed axonal regrowth across the nerve repair site. Conclusions These results show spinal cord reinnervation of urethral and anal sphincter targets after sacral ventral root transection and femoral nerve transfer (NT) to the denervated pudendal nerve. These surgical procedures may allow patients to regain continence. PMID:21953679

  1. Nerve Blocks

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sometimes the needle has to be inserted fairly deep to reach the nerve causing your problem. This ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  2. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  3. Medial Plantar Nerve Entrapment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fibromatosis Medial and lateral plantar nerve entrapment is compression of nerve branches at the inner heel (the ... nerve or surgery to free the nerve from compression may help relieve pain. Foot Problems Overview of ...

  4. Lateral displacement and rotational displacement sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Duden, Thomas

    2014-04-22

    A position measuring sensor formed from opposing sets of capacitor plates measures both rotational displacement and lateral displacement from the changes in capacitances as overlapping areas of capacitors change. Capacitances are measured by a measuring circuit. The measured capacitances are provided to a calculating circuit that performs calculations to obtain angular and lateral displacement from the capacitances measured by the measuring circuit.

  5. Thermally drawn fibers as nerve guidance scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Koppes, Ryan A; Park, Seongjun; Hood, Tiffany; Jia, Xiaoting; Abdolrahim Poorheravi, Negin; Achyuta, Anilkumar Harapanahalli; Fink, Yoel; Anikeeva, Polina

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic neural scaffolds hold promise to eventually replace nerve autografts for tissue repair following peripheral nerve injury. Despite substantial evidence for the influence of scaffold geometry and dimensions on the rate of axonal growth, systematic evaluation of these parameters remains a challenge due to limitations in materials processing. We have employed fiber drawing to engineer a wide spectrum of polymer-based neural scaffolds with varied geometries and core sizes. Using isolated whole dorsal root ganglia as an invitro model system we have identified key features enhancing nerve growth within these fiber scaffolds. Our approach enabled straightforward integration of microscopic topography at the scale of nerve fascicles within the scaffold cores, which led to accelerated Schwann cell migration, as well as neurite growth and alignment. Our findings indicate that fiber drawing provides a scalable and versatile strategy for producing nerve guidance channels capable of controlling direction and accelerating the rate of axonal growth. PMID:26717246

  6. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  7. Lumbar nerve root: the enigmatic eponyms.

    PubMed

    Dyck, P

    1984-01-01

    Man's quest for recognition has not escaped the physician, whose contributions to medicine perpetuate his name in print. It is a final grasp for professional immortality, which for men like Imhotep and Hippocrates, has prevailed for millennia. This fervor was particularly evident in the latter 19th century, which created a flurry of eponyms, often two or more physicians publishing the same clinical observation. This article reviews the eponym epidemic as it relates to lumbar radiculopathy. PMID:6372123

  8. Visualization of nerve fibers and their relationship to peripheral nerve tumors by diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Cage, Tene A; Yuh, Esther L; Hou, Stephanie W; Birk, Harjus; Simon, Neil G; Noss, Roger; Rao, Anuradha; Chin, Cynthia T; Kliot, Michel

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT The majority of growing and/or symptomatic peripheral nerve tumors are schwannomas and neurofibromas. They are almost always benign and can usually be resected while minimizing motor and sensory deficits if approached with the proper expertise and techniques. Intraoperative electrophysiological stimulation and recording techniques allow the surgeon to map the surface of the tumor in an effort to identify and thus avoid damaging functioning nerve fibers. Recently, MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques have permitted the visualization of axons, because of their anisotropic properties, in peripheral nerves. The object of this study was to compare the distribution of nerve fibers as revealed by direct electrical stimulation with that seen on preoperative MR DTI. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with a peripheral nerve or nerve root tumor between March 2012 and January 2014. Diffusion tensor imaging and intraoperative data had been prospectively collected for patients with peripheral nerve tumors that were resected. Preoperative identification of the nerve fiber location in relation to the nerve tumor surface as seen on DTI studies was compared with the nerve fiber's intraoperative localization using electrophysiological stimulation and recordings. RESULTS In 23 patients eligible for study there was good correlation between nerve fiber location on DTI and its anatomical location seen intraoperatively. Diffusion tensor imaging demonstrated the relationship of nerve fibers relative to the tumor with 95.7% sensitivity, 66.7% specificity, 75% positive predictive value, and 93.8% negative predictive value. CONCLUSIONS Preoperative DTI techniques are useful in helping the peripheral nerve surgeon to both determine the risks involved in resecting a nerve tumor and plan the safest surgical approach. PMID:26323818

  9. Intermediate nerve neuralgia can be diagnosed and cured by microvascular decompression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yili; Song, Zhengfei; Wan, Yingfeng; Lin, Wei; Hu, Xingyue; Wang, Yirong; Imai, Hideaki

    2014-07-01

    Here, we present a case of a 55-year-old woman with a 10-year history of hemifacial spasm accompanied by 1-month ipsilateral paroxysmal otalgia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the presence of vessels around the facial nerve root. Surgical exploration via suboccipital retromastoid craniotomy showed converging compression of the facial nerve root and intermediate nerve from both sides by an anterior inferior cerebellar artery loop. The patient's hemifacial spasm and ipsilateral otalgia were completely relieved after microvascular decompression of the facial nerve root and intermediate nerve. Intraoperative findings and the postoperative result of this case confirmed that vascular compression of the intermediate nerve was the exclusive cause of paroxysmal otalgia. The presence of ipsilateral hemifacial spasm, combined with preoperative neuroimaging studies, contributed to the diagnosis of intermediate nerve neuralgia. Microvascular decompression should be considered for the management of patients with intermediate nerve neuralgia. PMID:25006894

  10. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePLUS

    Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how fast electrical signals move through a nerve. ... normal body temperature. Being too cold slows nerve conduction. Tell your doctor if you have a cardiac ...

  11. Composite nerve fibers in the hypogastric and pelvic splanchnic nerves: an immunohistochemical study using elderly cadavers.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyung Suk; Cho, Kwang Ho; Hieda, Keisuke; Kim, Ji Hyun; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shin-Ichi; Matsubara, Akio

    2015-06-01

    To determine the proportion of nerve fibers in the hypogastric nerve (HGN) and pelvic splanchnic nerve (PSN), small tissue strips of the HGN and PSN from 12 donated elderly cadavers were examined histologically. Immunohistochemistry for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was performed. More than 70% of fibers per bundle in the HGN were positive for TH at the level of the sacral promontory. In addition, NOS- (negative) and/or VIP+ (positive) fibers were observed in small areas of each nerve bundle, although the proportion of each was usually less than 10%. In the PSN near the third sacral nerve root, the proportion of nerve fibers positive for NOS and/or VIP (or TH) was below 30%. In both the HGN and PSN, the number of VIP+ fibers was usually greater than that of NOS+ fibers, with frequent co-localization of NOS and VIP. More fibers in both nerves were positive for TH than for these other markers. In contrast to pelvic plexus branches, there were no differences in the proportions of NOS+ and VIP+ fibers between nerve bundles in each of the tissue strips. Thus, target-dependent sorting of nerve fibers was not apparent in the HGN at the level of the sacral promontory or in the PSN near the third sacral nerve root. The NOS+ and/or VIP+ fibers in the HGN were most likely ascending postganglionic fibers to the colon, while those in the PSN root may be preganglionic fibers from Onuf's nucleus. PMID:26140222

  12. Composite nerve fibers in the hypogastric and pelvic splanchnic nerves: an immunohistochemical study using elderly cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyung Suk; Hieda, Keisuke; Kim, Ji Hyun; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shin-ichi; Matsubara, Akio

    2015-01-01

    To determine the proportion of nerve fibers in the hypogastric nerve (HGN) and pelvic splanchnic nerve (PSN), small tissue strips of the HGN and PSN from 12 donated elderly cadavers were examined histologically. Immunohistochemistry for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was performed. More than 70% of fibers per bundle in the HGN were positive for TH at the level of the sacral promontory. In addition, NOS- (negative) and/or VIP+ (positive) fibers were observed in small areas of each nerve bundle, although the proportion of each was usually less than 10%. In the PSN near the third sacral nerve root, the proportion of nerve fibers positive for NOS and/or VIP (or TH) was below 30%. In both the HGN and PSN, the number of VIP+ fibers was usually greater than that of NOS+ fibers, with frequent co-localization of NOS and VIP. More fibers in both nerves were positive for TH than for these other markers. In contrast to pelvic plexus branches, there were no differences in the proportions of NOS+ and VIP+ fibers between nerve bundles in each of the tissue strips. Thus, target-dependent sorting of nerve fibers was not apparent in the HGN at the level of the sacral promontory or in the PSN near the third sacral nerve root. The NOS+ and/or VIP+ fibers in the HGN were most likely ascending postganglionic fibers to the colon, while those in the PSN root may be preganglionic fibers from Onuf's nucleus. PMID:26140222

  13. Modeling root reinforcement using root-failure Weibull survival function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, M.; Giadrossich, F.; Cohen, D.

    2013-03-01

    Root networks contribute to slope stability through complicated interactions that include mechanical compression and tension. Due to the spatial heterogeneity of root distribution and the dynamic of root turnover, the quantification of root reinforcement on steep slope is challenging and consequently the calculation of slope stability as well. Although the considerable advances in root reinforcement modeling, some important aspect remain neglected. In this study we address in particular to the role of root strength variability on the mechanical behaviors of a root bundle. Many factors may contribute to the variability of root mechanical properties even considering a single class of diameter. This work presents a new approach for quantifying root reinforcement that considers the variability of mechanical properties of each root diameter class. Using the data of laboratory tensile tests and field pullout tests, we calibrate the parameters of the Weibull survival function to implement the variability of root strength in a numerical model for the calculation of root reinforcement (RBMw). The results show that, for both laboratory and field datasets, the parameters of the Weibull distribution may be considered constant with the exponent equal to 2 and the normalized failure displacement equal to 1. Moreover, the results show that the variability of root strength in each root diameter class has a major influence on the behavior of a root bundle with important implications when considering different approaches in slope stability calculation. Sensitivity analysis shows that the calibration of the tensile force and the elasticity of the roots are the most important equations, as well as the root distribution. The new model allows the characterization of root reinforcement in terms of maximum pullout force, stiffness, and energy. Moreover, it simplifies the implementation of root reinforcement in slope stability models. The realistic quantification of root reinforcement for tensile, shear and compression behavior allows the consideration of the stabilization effects of root networks on steep slopes and the influence that this has on the triggering of shallow landslides.

  14. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  15. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Felice, KJ. Focal neuropathies of the femoral, obturator, lateral femoral cutaneous and other nerves of the thigh and pelvis. In: Bromberg MB, Smith ...

  16. Aberrant Dual Origin of the Dorsal Scapular Nerve and Its Communication with Long Thoracic Nerve: An Unusual Variation of the Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Sarda, Rohit Kumar; Chhetri, Kalpana; Lama, Polly; Tamang, Binod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Pre and post-fixed variations at roots of the brachial plexus have been well documented, however little is known about the variations that exist in the branches which arise from the brachial plexus. In this paper, we describe about one such rare variation related to the dorsal scapular and the long thoracic nerve, which are the branches arising from the roots of the brachial plexus. The variation was found during routine dissection. The dorsal scapular nerve, which routinely arises from the fifth cervical nerve root (C5), was seen to receive contributions from C5 as well as sixth cervical nerve (C6), while the long thoracic nerve arose from C6 and seventh cervical nerves (C7) only. Furthermore along with variations in origin of the dorsal scapular and long thoracic nerves, the brachial plexus was seen to exist as a prefixed plexus receiving a contribution from C4 nerve root. An aberrant communicating branch between the dorsal scapular and long thoracic nerve was also identified. Knowledge about the course and anatomy of such variations can be vital for understanding the aetiology of various conditions such as winging of scapula, interscapular pain, administration of cervical nerve blocks, surgeries and for effective management of regions and muscles supplied by dorsal scapular and long thoracic nerve. PMID:26266108

  17. Effect of combination of nerve fragments with nerve growth factor in autologous epineurium small gap coaptation on peripheral nerve injury repair.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bo; Ma, Hua; Hu, He; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Zhi; Pang, Youming; Wang, Yongjun; Niu, Kecheng; Lin, Ligong

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effect of the combination of nerve fragments with nerve growth factor (NGF) on the repair of peripheral nerve injury through autologous epineurium small gap coaptation. A total of 150 male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-250g were divided into five groups randomly with 30 rats per group, including the following: a control group that was subjected to traditional end-to-end neuroanastomosis; an autologous epineurium small gap group that received autologous epineurium small gap coaptation suture; a nerve fragments group in which nerve fragments were added to the small gap; an NGF group in which NGF was added to the small gap; and an NGF combined with nerve fragments group in which both NGF and nerve fragments were added to the small gap. All groups were examined at 4, 6, and 8weeks after the operation, respectively; furthermore, electroneurophysiological detection and histological observation were performed at 8weeks. Autonomic activities and root ulcers recovered sooner in rats in the NGF combined with nerve fragments group than the other groups. Moreover, the numbers of regenerated nerve fibers were greater and nerve conduction velocity was faster in the NGF combined with nerve fragments group than the other groups. Therefore, the combination of NGF with nerve fragments plays a significant role in the repair of peripheral nerve injury through autologous epineurium small gap coaptation. Therefore, compared with the other four methods, the combination of nerve fragments with NGF on the repair of peripheral nerve injury through autologous epineurium small gap coaptation has a better effect. PMID:25599678

  18. High Displacement Actuator (HDA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Positioned beneath a fiber optic displacement sensor is the new High Displacement Actuator (HDA) developed by scientists at NASA Langley Research Center. The high displacement actuator significantly improves the state-of-the-art piezoelectric technology and provides inordinately large mechanical displacements. The HDA is also applicable to high performance sensor applications such as microphones, non-destructive testing, and vibration sensing. Test results on the high displacement actuators show displacements 50 times greater than device thickness and several orders of magnitude increase over state-of-the-art devices. The actuators can be used from DC to frequencies in excess of a megahertz and with displacement loads exceeding 10 Kg (25 lbs). The actuator can also produce displacements comparable to state-of-the-art devices with an order reduction in operating voltage. The high displacement actuators are reliable. They have been laboratory tested to beyond 400 million cycles without failure. The highly efficient electrically- insulated actuator can be operated in a vacuum, in liquids, and in the upper atmosphere. The HDA is versatile and rugged allowing for use in harsh environments for hundreds of commercial applications. In many device applications the high displacement actuator wafer itself can serve the function of several components, e.g. in simple pumps it take the place of piston, piston-rod and crank. The HDA is a packaged flexible laminate of pre-stressed polymeric materials and a piezoelectric ceramic that form a robust, low cost, user friendly device.

  19. Soil-root mechanical interactions within bundles of roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giadrossich, Filippo; Schwarz, Massimiliano; Preti, Federico; Or, Dani

    2010-05-01

    Root-soil mechanical interactions play an important role in strength and force redistribution in rooted soil. Recent advances in root reinforcement modeling implement detailed representation of root geometry and mechanical properties as well as root-soil mechanical interactions. Nevertheless, root-soil mechanical interactions are often considered at the single root scale ignoring interactions between neighboring roots and root bundles known to play important role in similar applications such as engineered composite material reinforcement. The objective was to quantify mechanical interactions among neighboring roots or roots network using pullout laboratory experiments and modeling. We focus on the on effects of such interactions on global pull out force of a bundle of roots via better understanding of transmission of radial stresses to soil matrix due to the friction at the interface soil-root. Additionally, we wish to predict how cumulative friction changes along a single root axis with and without branching points during the slipping out. Analytical models of fiber reinforced materials show the magnitude of bonded friction depends on three key parameters: bond modulus, maximal bond strength and difference between the Young moduli of fiber and Young moduli of matrix. Debonded friction is calculated assuming failure follows Coulomb failure that includes apparent cohesion, effective normal stress and residual root soil friction angle. We used a pullout device to measure displacement and force of individual roots and for the bundle of roots. Additionally, we monitored and detected activation of root-soil friction by six acoustic emission sensors placed on waveguide in contact with the soil matrix. Results from experiments with parallel and crossing roots demonstrated the importance of considering factors such as distance of root axis, branching points, crossing of roots and roots diameter for the behavior of bundle of roots and inclined roots during pullout. Acoustic emission measurements provided interesting insights into progressive activation of root-soil friction. These results enhance understanding of root reinforcement mechanism and enable more realistic implementation of root reinforcement modeling for stability calculation of vegetated slopes.

  20. Optogenetic control of nerve growth.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjun; Koppes, Ryan A; Froriep, Ulrich P; Jia, Xiaoting; Achyuta, Anil Kumar H; McLaughlin, Bryan L; Anikeeva, Polina

    2015-01-01

    Due to the limited regenerative ability of neural tissue, a diverse set of biochemical and biophysical cues for increasing nerve growth has been investigated, including neurotrophic factors, topography, and electrical stimulation. In this report, we explore optogenetic control of neurite growth as a cell-specific alternative to electrical stimulation. By investigating a broad range of optical stimulation parameters on dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) expressing channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2), we identified conditions that enhance neurite outgrowth by three-fold as compared to unstimulated or wild-type (WT) controls. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of ChR2 expressing DRGs induces directional outgrowth in WT DRGs co-cultured within a 10 mm vicinity of the optically sensitive ganglia. This observed enhancement and polarization of neurite growth was accompanied by an increased expression of neural growth and brain derived neurotrophic factors (NGF, BDNF). This work highlights the potential for implementing optogenetics to drive nerve growth in specific cell populations. PMID:25982506

  1. Precision displacement reference system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Dubois, Robert R.; Strother, Jerry D.

    2000-02-22

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  2. Nerve injuries about the elbow in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joshua D; Lintner, David M

    2014-09-01

    The athlete's elbow is a remarkable example of motion, strength, and durability. The stress placed on the elbow during sport, including the throwing motion, may lead to soft-tissue ligamentous and nerve injury. The thrower's elbow illustrates one example of possible nerve injury about the elbow in sport, related to chronic repetitive tensile and compressive stresses to the ulnar nerve associated with elbow flexion and valgus position. Besides the throwing athlete, nerve injury from high-energy direct-impact forces may also damage nerves around the elbow in contact sports. Detailed history and physical examination can often make the diagnosis of most upper extremity neuropathies. The clinician must be aware of the possibility of isolated or combined nerve injury as far proximal as the cervical nerve roots, through the brachial plexus, to the peripheral nerve terminal branches. Electrodiagnostic studies are occasionally beneficial for diagnosis with certain nerves. Nonoperative management is often successful in most elbow and upper extremity neuropathies. If conservative treatment fails, then surgical treatment should address all potentially offending structures. In the presence of medial laxity and concurrent ulnar neuritis, the medial ulnar collateral ligament warrants surgical treatment, in addition to transposition of the ulnar nerve. The morbidity of open surgical decompression of nerves in and around the elbow is potentially career threatening in the throwing athlete. This mandates an assessment of the adequacy of the nonsurgical treatment and a thorough preoperative discussion of the risks and benefits of surgery. PMID:25077754

  3. Licorice Root

    MedlinePLUS

    ... licorice root, licorice, liquorice, sweet root, gan zao (Chinese licorice) Latin Name: Glycyrrhiza glabra, Glycyrrhiza uralensis (Chinese licorice) Introduction This fact sheet provides basic information ...

  4. The facial nerve axotomy model.

    PubMed

    Moran, Linda B; Graeber, Manuel B

    2004-03-01

    Experimental models such as the facial nerve axotomy paradigm in rodents allow the systematic and detailed study of the response of neurones and their microenvironment to various types of challenges. Well-studied experimental examples include peripheral nerve trauma, the retrograde axonal transport of neurotoxins and locally enhanced inflammation following the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in combination with axotomy. These studies have led to novel insights into the regeneration programme of the motoneurone, the role of microglia and astrocytes in synaptic plasticity and the biology of glial cells. Importantly, many of the findings obtained have proven to be valid in other functional systems and even across species barriers. In particular, microglial expression of major histocompatibility complex molecules has been found to occur in response to various types of neuronal damage and is now regarded as a characteristic component of "glial inflammation". It is found in the context of numerous neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. The detachment of afferent axonal endings from the surface membrane of regenerating motoneurones and their subsequent displacement by microglia ("synaptic stripping") and long-lasting insulation by astrocytes have also been confirmed in humans. The medical implications of these findings are significant. Also, the facial nerve system of rats and mice has become the best studied and most widely used test system for the evaluation of neurotrophic factors. PMID:15003391

  5. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near ... surface of the body where it crosses the elbow, so prolonged pressure on the elbow or entrapment ...

  6. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  7. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this delicate surgery without any cuts to the face. In the following sections, we will review the indications, risks and benefits of endoscopic optic nerve decompression. Indications The reasons for optic nerve decompression usually ...

  8. Assessing nerves in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Garbino, José Antonio; Heise, Carlos Otto; Marques, Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy neuropathy is dependent on the patient's immune response and expresses itself as a focal or multifocal neuropathy with asymmetric involvement. Leprosy neuropathy evolves chronically but recurrently develops periods of exacerbation during type 1 or type 2 reactions, leading to acute neuropathy. Nerve enlargement leading to entrapment syndromes is also a common manifestation. Pain may be either of inflammatory or neuropathic origin. A thorough and detailed evaluation is mandatory for adequate patient follow-up, including nerve palpation, pain assessment, graded sensory mapping, muscle power testing, and autonomic evaluation. Nerve conduction studies are a sensitive tool for nerve dysfunction, including new lesions during reaction periods or development of entrapment syndromes. Nerve ultrasonography is also a very promising method for nerve evaluation in leprosy. The authors propose a composite nerve clinical score for nerve function assessment that can be useful for longitudinal evaluation. PMID:26773623

  9. Engineering Peripheral Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Laura; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.

    2013-01-01

    Current approaches for treating peripheral nerve injury have resulted in promising, yet insufficient functional recovery compared to the clinical standard of care, autologous nerve grafts. In order to design a construct that can match the regenerative potential of the autograft, all facets of nerve tissue must be incorporated in a combinatorial therapy. Engineered biomaterial scaffolds in the future will have to promote enhanced regeneration and appropriate reinnervation by targeting the highly sensitive response of regenerating nerves to their surrounding microenvironment. PMID:23790730

  10. Optic Nerve Pit

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  11. Advanced Triangulation Displacement Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poteet, Wade M.; Cauthen, Harold K.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced optoelectronic triangulation displacement sensors undergoing development. Highly miniaturized, more stable, more accurate, and relatively easy to use. Incorporate wideband electronic circuits suitable for real-time monitoring and control of displacements. Measurements expected to be accurate to within nanometers. In principle, sensors mass-produced at relatively low unit cost. Potential applications numerous. Possible industrial application in measuring runout of rotating shaft or other moving part during fabrication in "zero-defect" manufacturing system, in which measured runout automatically corrected.

  12. Internal displacement in Burma.

    PubMed

    Lanjouw, S; Mortimer, G; Bamforth, V

    2000-09-01

    The internal displacement of populations in Burma is not a new phenomenon. Displacement is caused by numerous factors. Not all of it is due to outright violence, but much is a consequence of misguided social and economic development initiatives. Efforts to consolidate the state by assimilating populations in government-controlled areas by military authorities on the one hand, while brokering cease-fires with non-state actors on the other, has uprooted civilian populations throughout the country. Very few areas in which internally displaced persons (IDPs) are found are not facing social turmoil within a climate of impunity. Humanitarian access to IDP populations remains extremely problematic. While relatively little information has been collected, assistance has been focused on targeting accessible groups. International concern within Burma has couched the problems of displacement within general development modalities, while international attention along its borders has sought to contain displacement. With the exception of several recent initiatives, few approaches have gone beyond assistance and engaged in the prevention or protection of the displaced. PMID:11026156

  13. The sea anemone Bunodosoma caissarum toxin BcIII modulates the sodium current kinetics of rat dorsal root ganglia neurons and is displaced in a voltage-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Salceda, Emilio; Lpez, Omar; Zaharenko, Andr J; Garateix, Anoland; Soto, Enrique

    2010-03-01

    Sea anemone toxins bind to site 3 of the sodium channels, which is partially formed by the extracellular linker connecting S3 and S4 segments of domain IV, slowing down the inactivation process. In this work we have characterized the actions of BcIII, a sea anemone polypeptide toxin isolated from Bunodosoma caissarum, on neuronal sodium currents using the patch clamp technique. Neurons of the dorsal root ganglia of Wistar rats (P5-9) in primary culture were used for this study (n=65). The main effects of BcIII were a concentration-dependent increase in the sodium current inactivation time course (IC(50)=2.8 microM) as well as an increase in the current peak amplitude. BcIII did not modify the voltage at which 50% of the channels are activated or inactivated, nor the reversal potential of sodium current. BcIII shows a voltage-dependent action. A progressive acceleration of sodium current fast inactivation with longer conditioning pulses was observed, which was steeper as more depolarizing were the prepulses. The same was observed for other two anemone toxins (CgNa, from Condylactis gigantea and ATX-II, from Anemonia viridis). These results suggest that the binding affinity of sea anemone toxins may be reduced in a voltage-dependent manner, as has been described for alpha-scorpion toxins. PMID:20015459

  14. The utility of three-dimensional optical projection tomography in nerve injection injury imaging.

    PubMed

    Cvetko, E; ?apek, M; Damjanovska, M; Reina, M A; Eren, I; Stopar-Pintari?, T

    2015-08-01

    The examination of nerve microarchitecture has hitherto been limited solely to two-dimensional imaging techniques. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of optical projection tomography to discern the nerve microarchitecture and injection injury in three dimensions. Five piglets were studied, whose median and lingual nerves were unilaterally injected post mortem with preset volumes of local anaesthetic, excised and subsequently made transparent with benzyl alcohol benzyl benzoate. Images were captured in three dimensions. The same contralateral nerves were used as controls. Using optical projection tomography, we observed differences between the internal organisation of the median and the lingual nerves, which potentially explain the variations in their susceptibility to injury. This was demonstrated in three dimensions as a disruption to the fascicles in the lingual nerve, and their displacement in the median nerve. This new technology offers potential for studying nerve microarchitecture topography and its tolerance to injection injury. PMID:25827062

  15. Optic Nerve Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Aijaz; Janecka, Ivo P.; Kapadia, Silloo; Johnson, Bruce L.; McVay, William

    1996-01-01

    The length of the optic nerves is a reflection of normal postnatal cranio-orbital development. Unilateral elongation of an optic nerve has been observed in two patients with orbital and skull base neoplasms. In the first case as compared to the patient's opposite, normal optic nerve, an elongated length of the involved optic nerve of 45 mm was present. The involved optic nerve in the second patient was 10 mm longer than the normal opposite optic nerve. The visual and extraocular function was preserved in the second patient. The first patient had only light perception in the affected eye. In this paper, the embryology, anatomy, and physiology of the optic nerve and its mechanisms of stretch and repair are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 13 PMID:17170975

  16. Chromo-fluorogenic BODIPY-complexes for selective detection of V-type nerve agent surrogates.

    PubMed

    Barba-Bon, Andrea; Costero, Ana Mara; Gil, Salvador; Sancenn, Flix; Martnez-Mez, Ramn

    2014-11-11

    Two new Eu(3+) and Au(3+) BODIPY-complexes capable of chromo-fluorogenically detecting micromolar concentrations of V-type nerve agent surrogates by a simple displacement assay are described. PMID:25233370

  17. ROOT WEEVILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous species of root weevil, Otiorhynchus spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), infest hop. The black vine weevil, O. sulcatus (F.), is the dominant species infesting hop followed by the strawberry root weevil, O. ovatus (L.), rough strawberry root weevil, O. rugosostriatus Goeze, and O. meridional...

  18. Water displacement mercury pump

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, Marshall G. (Woodside, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

  19. Optical displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Dustin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-08

    An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

  20. Water displacement mercury pump

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, M.G.

    1984-04-20

    A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

  1. GLP-1 signals via ERK in peripheral nerve and prevents nerve dysfunction in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Jolivalt, C.G.; Fineman, M.; Deacon, C.F.; Carr, R.D.; Calcutt, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that induces glucose-dependent insulin secretion and may have neurotrophic properties. Our aim was to identify the presence and activity of GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) in peripheral nerve and to assess the impact of GLP-1R agonists on diabetes-induced nerve disorders. Materials and methods Tissues were collected from streptozotocin-diabetic rats. GLP-1R function was assessed by incubating tissues from normal and diabetic rats with GLP-1R agonists and antagonists and measuring induction of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by western blot. Streptozotocin-diabetic mice were also treated with the GLP-1R agonist exenatide for 8 weeks to assess the impact of GLP-1R signaling on peripheral nerve function and structure. Results GLP-1R protein was detected in rat dorsal root ganglia and the neurons and Schwann cells of the sciatic nerve. Protein levels were not affect by streptozotocin-induced diabetes. GLP-1R agonists did not signal via ERK1/2 in sciatic nerve of normal rats. However, GLP-1R agonists significantly increased pERK1/2 levels in sciatic nerves from diabetic rats, indicating that GLP-1Rs are functional in this tissue. Exenatide treatment did not affect blood sugar, insulin levels or paw thermal response latencies in either control or diabetic mice. However, the reductions of motor nerve conduction velocity and paw intraepidermal fibre density seen in diabetic mice were attenuated by exenatide treatment. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the peripheral nerve of diabetic rodents exhibits functional GLP-1R and suggest that GLP-1R-mediated ERK-signaling in sciatic nerve of diabetic rodents may protect large motor fibre function and small C fibre structure by a mechanism independent of glycaemic control. PMID:21635674

  2. Olmesartan medoxomil ameliorates sciatic nerve regeneration in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroaki; Domon, Yuki; Inoue, Tatsuya; Arakawa, Naohisa; Yokoyama, Tomihisa

    2009-10-28

    To evaluate the effect of angiotensin II type1 receptor blocker on nerve regeneration delay in diabetic rats, nerve regeneration was monitored by a pinch test on the crushed sciatic nerves of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Nerve regeneration was significantly delayed in diabetic rats and was partly ameliorated by treatment with olmesartan medoxomil (3 mg/kg/day, orally). In the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia, the mRNA level of insulin-like growth factor-1 and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was downregulated, whereas the mRNA level of neurotrophin-3 and CNTF receptor was upregulated. Olmesartan medoxomil significantly enhanced the CNTF expression. These results showed that angiotensin II type1 receptor blocker treatment is effective on nerve regeneration delay in diabetic animals and may provide an effective therapy for clinical diabetic neuropathy. PMID:19786922

  3. Root Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Claire; Nielsen, Erik; Ketelaarc, Tijs; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair specification in Arabidopsis is determined by position-dependent signaling and molecular feedback loops causing differential accumulation of a WD-bHLH-Myb transcriptional complex. The initiation of root hairs is dependent on the RHD6 bHLH gene family and auxin to define the site of outgrowth. Root hair elongation relies on polarized cell expansion at the growing tip, which involves multiple integrated processes including cell secretion, endomembrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and cell wall modifications. The study of root hair biology in Arabidopsis has provided a model cell type for insights into many aspects of plant development and cell biology. PMID:24982600

  4. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nervesthe cranial nerveslead directly from the brain to various parts of the head, neck, and trunk. Some of the cranial nerves are ... cranial nerves emerge from the underside of the brain, pass through ... to parts of the head, neck, and trunk. The nerves are named and numbered, ...

  5. Peripheral nerve regeneration and neurotrophic factors

    PubMed Central

    TERENGHI, GIORGIO

    1999-01-01

    The role of neurotrophic factors in the maintenance and survival of peripheral neuronal cells has been the subject of numerous studies. Administration of exogenous neurotrophic factors after nerve injury has been shown to mimic the effect of target organ-derived trophic factors on neuronal cells. After axotomy and during peripheral nerve regeneration, the neurotrophins NGF, NT-3 and BDNF show a well defined and selective beneficial effect on the survival and phenotypic expression of primary sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia and of motoneurons in spinal cord. Other neurotrophic factors such as CNTF, GDNF and LIF also exert a variety of actions on neuronal cells, which appear to overlap and complement those of the neurotrophins. In addition, there is an indirect contribution of GGF to nerve regeneration. GGF is produced by neurons and stimulates proliferation of Schwann cells, underlining the close interaction between neuronal and glial cells during peripheral nerve regeneration. Different possibilities have been investigated for the delivery of growth factors to the injured neurons, in search of a suitable system for clinical applications. The studies reviewed in this article show the therapeutic potential of neurotrophic factors for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury and for neuropathies. PMID:10227662

  6. Optical stimulation of peripheral nerves in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jonathon D.

    This dissertation documents the emergence and validation of a new clinical tool that bridges the fields of biomedical optics and neuroscience. The research herein describes an innovative method for direct neurostimulation with pulsed infrared laser light. Safety and effectiveness of this technique are first demonstrated through functional stimulation of the rat sciatic nerve in vivo. The Holmium:YAG laser (lambda = 2.12 mum) is shown to operate at an optimal wavelength for peripheral nerve stimulation with advantages over standard electrical neural stimulation; including contact-free stimulation, high spatial selectivity, and lack of a stimulation artifact. The underlying biophysical mechanism responsible for transient optical nerve stimulation appears to be a small, absorption driven thermal gradient sustained at the axonal layer of nerve. Results explicitly prove that low frequency optical stimulation can reliably stimulate without resulting in tissue thermal damage. Based on the positive results from animal studies, these optimal laser parameters were utilized to move this research into the clinic with a combined safety and efficacy study in human subjects undergoing selective dorsal rhizotomy. The clinical Holmium:YAG laser was used to effectively stimulate human dorsal spinal roots and elicit functional muscle responses recorded during surgery without evidence of nerve damage. Overall these results predict that this technology can be a valuable clinical tool in various neurosurgical applications.

  7. [Investigating peripheral nerve injuries: what's new in 2013?].

    PubMed

    Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonographic (US) investigations have recently became prominent tools for the investigation of peripheral nerve injuries. MRI is the most valuable for the study of proximal nervous structures, i.e. roots and plexi, whereas US is better suited for the investigation of distal nerves, including entrapment syndromes. However, as nerve conduction studies and electromyographic studies still have a better sensitivity and specificity than MRI and US, they remain the gold standard for the evaluation of the peripheral nervous system. PMID:25459117

  8. [Sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma].

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Benjamin; Poussange, Nicolas; Le Collen, Philippe; Fabre, Thierry; Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sbastien

    2015-12-01

    Intraneural perineurioma is a benign tumor developed from the perineurium and responsible for localized nerve hypertrophy. This uncommon tumor is characterized by a proliferation of perineural cells with a "pseudo-onion bulb" pattern. We report a sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma in a 39-year-old patient. PMID:26586011

  9. Axillary nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... muscle of the shoulder may show signs of muscle atrophy . Tests that may be used to check axillary nerve dysfunction include: EMG and nerve conduction tests, will be ... the injury or symptoms start MRI or x-rays of the shoulder

  10. Imaging the hypoglossal nerve.

    PubMed

    Alves, Pedro

    2010-05-01

    The hypoglossal nerve is a pure motor nerve. It provides motor control to the intrinsic and extrinsic tongue muscles thus being essential for normal tongue movement and coordination. In order to design a useful imaging approach and a working differential diagnosis in cases of hypoglossal nerve damage one has to have a good knowledge of the normal anatomy of the nerve trunk and its main branches. A successful imaging evaluation to hypoglossal diseases always requires high resolution studies due to the small size of the structures being studied. MRI is the preferred modality to directly visualize the nerve, while CT is superior in displaying the bony anatomy of the neurovascular foramina of the skull base. Also, while CT is only able to detect nerve pathology by indirect signs, such as bony expansion of the hypoglossal canal, MRI is able to visualize directly the causative pathological process as in the case of small tumors, or infectious/inflammatory processes affecting the nerve. The easiest way to approach the study of the hypoglossal nerve is to divide it in its main segments: intra-axial, cisternal, skull base and extracranial segment, tailoring the imaging technique to each anatomical area while bearing in mind the main disease entities affecting each segment. PMID:20347541

  11. Root reinforcement of soils under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, M.; Rist, A.; Cohen, D.; Giadrossich, F.; Egorov, P.; Bttner, D.; Stolz, M.; Thormann, J.-J.

    2015-10-01

    It is well recognized that roots reinforce soils and that the distribution of roots within vegetated hillslopes strongly influences the spatial distribution of soil strength. Previous studies have focussed on the contribution of root reinforcement under conditions of tension or shear. However, no systematic investigation into the contribution of root reinforcement to soils experiencing compression, such as the passive Earth forces at the toe of a landslide, is found in the literature. An empirical-analytical model (CoRoS) for the quantification of root reinforcement in soils under compression is presented and tested against experimental data. The CoRoS model describes the force-displacement behavior of compressed, rooted soils and can be used to provide a framework for improving slope stability calculations. Laboratory results showed that the presence of 10 roots with diameters ranging from 6 to 28 mm in a rectangular soil profile 0.72 m by 0.25 m increased the compressive strength of the soil by about 40% (2.5 kN) at a displacement of 0.05 m, while the apparent stiffness of the rooted soil was 38% higher than for root-free soil. The CoRoS model yields good agreement with experimentally determined values of maximum reinforcement force and compression force as a function of displacement. These results indicate that root reinforcement under compression has a major influence on the mechanical behavior of soil and that the force-displacement behavior of roots should be included in analysis of the compressive regimes that commonly are present in the toe of landslides.

  12. Peripheral nerve stimulation: definition.

    PubMed

    Abejn, David; Prez-Cajaraville, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been a tremendous evolution in the field of neurostimulation, both from the technological point of view and from development of the new and different indications. In some areas, such as peripheral nerve stimulation, there has been a boom in recent years due to the variations in the surgical technique and the improved results documented by in multiple published papers. All this makes imperative the need to classify and define the different types of stimulation that are used today. The confusion arises when attempting to describe peripheral nerve stimulation and subcutaneous stimulation. Peripheral nerve stimulation, in its pure definition, involves implanting a lead on a nerve, with the aim to produce paresthesia along the entire trajectory of the stimulated nerve. PMID:21422790

  13. RTV 21 Displacements

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-02-04

    A seal is needed for the cover of the Nitrogen Test Vessel in order to prevent leakage of the N{sub 2} gas. This seal is to be molded out of RTV 21. In this experiment, the Modulus of Elasticity of the RTV was sought after, and the displacements of the RTV due to various stresses were measured to see if they were large enough to provide a tight seal between the vessel and its cover.

  14. Tunable beam displacer

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar-Serrano, Luis José; Valencia, Alejandra; Torres, Juan P.

    2015-03-15

    We report the implementation of a tunable beam displacer, composed of a polarizing beam splitter (PBS) and two mirrors, that divides an initially polarized beam into two parallel beams whose separation can be continuously tuned. The two output beams are linearly polarized with either vertical or horizontal polarization and no optical path difference is introduced between them. The wavelength dependence of the device as well as the maximum separation between the beams achievable is limited mainly by the PBS characteristics.

  15. Preoperative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for localizing superficial nerve paths.

    PubMed

    Natori, Yuhei; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ayato

    2015-12-01

    During surgery, peripheral nerves are often seen to follow unpredictable paths because of previous surgeries and/or compression caused by a tumor. Iatrogenic nerve injury is a serious complication that must be avoided, and preoperative evaluation of nerve paths is important for preventing it. In this study, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was used for an in-depth analysis of peripheral nerve paths. This study included 27 patients who underwent the TENS procedure to evaluate the peripheral nerve path (17 males and 10 females; mean age: 59.9 years, range: 18-83 years) of each patient preoperatively. An electrode pen coupled to an electrical nerve stimulator was used for superficial nerve mapping. The TENS procedure was performed on patients' major peripheral nerves that passed close to the surgical field of tumor resection or trauma surgery, and intraoperative damage to those nerves was apprehensive. The paths of the target nerve were detected in most patients preoperatively. The nerve paths of 26 patients were precisely under the markings drawn preoperatively. The nerve path of one patient substantially differed from the preoperative markings with numbness at the surgical region. During surgery, the nerve paths could be accurately mapped preoperatively using the TENS procedure as confirmed by direct visualization of the nerve. This stimulation device is easy to use and offers highly accurate mapping of nerves for surgical planning without major complications. The authors conclude that TENS is a useful tool for noninvasive nerve localization and makes tumor resection a safe and smooth procedure. PMID:26420473

  16. Miniaturised optical displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gindele, Frank; Gaul, Frank; Kraus, Silvio; Sigloch, Susanne; Teubner, Ulrich

    2004-09-01

    The primary object presented in this contribution is the miniaturization of a displacement sensor system with the potential for high accuracy measurements and for cost-effective production in polymers. The measurement of linear displacements can be performed by different methods e.g. magnetoresistive, potentiometric, electromagnetic or inductive encoder systems. For movements in the millimeter range and above the most precise systems are based on optical methods. The displacement measurement of our sensor system uses the intensity modulation of two amplitude gratings, moving relative to each other and illuminated by a LED. To increase the system resolution and the signal quality the grating/detector combination is divided into four areas which are phase shifted to each other. The grating period is 25 ?m with a geometrical accuracy below 1 ?m. The amplitude gratings have been processed on a glass substrate lithographically. Applying electro-discharge machining a miniaturised optical bench for the passive alignment of the optical and the opto-electronic components has been realised. The sensor has an overall size of 6x4x3 mm3 and is designed for the future replication in one single polymer part. In combination with an electronic interpolation the sensor will be capable for a sub-micrometer accuracy.

  17. Variable displacement vane pump

    SciTech Connect

    Tschantz, J.S.; Bisson, B.J.

    1997-12-31

    What has been developed under this program is a pumping system which can vary the amount of fuel delivered according to engine needs, thereby reducing the temperature rise of the fuel to very low levels. This permits the elimination of the air/oil coolers and conserves the vital airflow through the fan. The variable displacement vane pump (VDVP) also permits a substantial simplification of the control system with the elimination of complex metering valves, offering a significant reduction in fuel system cost. This program was initiated to develop a technology that embodied the ruggedness of the gear pump with the efficiency and metering versatility of the variable displacement vane pump. Thick metal vanes emulate the teeth on pumping gears while the simple, elegant swing cam feature provides the variable displacement capability without the unwieldy multiple cam segments found in other concepts. The result is a pumping architecture which is rugged, light in weight and extremely versatile, having demonstrated superb heat management and controllability in extensive bench and engine testing. This paper will report the results that the pumps have achieved to date both in terms of durability and efficiency.

  18. [Facial nerve paralysis and mandibular fracture].

    PubMed

    Salonna, I; Fanizzi, P; Quaranta, A

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe three cases of peripheral facial nerve paralysis in patients with a mandibular fracture. In two cases, in which the onset of palsy was uncertain, the facial nerve injury was contralateral to the fractured side. Topodiagnostic tests showed neural damage at the third intrapetrosal portion and at the genicular ganglion. In one of the two patients tomography revealed a fracture line through the anterio-superior wall of the external auditory canal homolateral to the facial palsy. In the third subject palsy set in immediately after the trauma and was ipsilateral to the mandibular fracture; the facial lesion was localized at the genicular ganglion. In the first two cases, functional recovery was spontaneous (40 and 0 days after the trauma respectively). In the third subject, the nerve was decompressed surgically with a complete functional recovery two months later. The functional and clinical findings of these three cases show that a contralateral facial palsy secondary to a mandibular fracture resolves spontaneously while the traumatic displacement of the mandibular condyle may determine a temporal bone fracture sometimes followed by a lesion in the intratemporal portion of the facial nerve. An event such as the latter may delay functional recovery and thus warrant surgery such as in cases of Bell's palsy. PMID:1298156

  19. Pullout tests of root analogs and natural root bundles in soil: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, M.; Cohen, D.; Or, D.

    2011-06-01

    Root-soil mechanical interactions are key to soil stability on steep hillslopes. Motivated by new advances and applications of the Root Bundle Model (RBM), we conducted a series of experiments in the laboratory and in the field to study the mechanical response of pulled roots. We systematically quantified the influence of different factors such as root geometry and configuration, soil type, and soil water content considering individual roots and root bundles. We developed a novel pullout apparatus for strain-controlled field and laboratory tests of up to 13 parallel roots measured individually and as a bundle. Results highlight the importance of root tortuosity and root branching points for prediction of individual root pullout behavior. Results also confirm the critical role of root diameter distribution for realistic prediction of global pullout behavior of a root bundle. Friction between root and soil matrix varied with soil type and water content and affected the force-displacement behavior. Friction in sand varied from 1 to 17 kPa, with low values obtained in wet sand at a confining pressure of 2 kPa and high values obtained in dry sand with 4.5 kPa confining pressure. In a silty soil matrix, friction ranged between 3 kPa under wet and low confining pressure (2 kPa) and 6 kPa in dry and higher confining pressure (4.5 kPa). Displacement at maximum pullout force increased with increasing root diameter and with tortuosity. Laboratory experiments were used to calibrate the RBM that was later validated using six field measurements with natural root bundles of Norway spruce (Picea abies L.). These tests demonstrate the progressive nature of root bundle failure under strain-controlled pullout force and provide new insights regarding force-displacement behavior of root reinforcement, highlighting the importance of considering displacement in slope stability models. Results show that the magnitude of maximum root pullout forces (1-5 kPa) are important for slope stability. The force-displacement relations characterized in this study are fundamental inputs for quantifying the resistive force redistribution on vegetated slopes and may provide explanation for abrupt loss of strength during landslide initiation and deformation.

  20. Reappraisal of nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Millesi, H

    1981-04-01

    In every case of acute injury involving the nerve, the surgeon must decide whether a primary repair of an elective early secondary repair is the treatment of choice. In a clean-cut nerve without defect, immediate primary repair, using trunk-to-trunk coaptation with epineurial sutures, offers an optimal solution. In the periphery of the median and the ulnar nerves, in which motor and sensory fascicles are already separated, fascicular dissection is performed, and coaptation of fascicle groups should be done. In medical centers with excellent facilities, such nerve repair will give good results even in very severe lesions. This repair can be performed also as a delayed primary procedure. If there is a nerve defect, a primary grafting procedure must be considered. We do not recommend this as a routine procedure because the nerve grafts might be lost if a complication occurs. The decision to perform a planned early secondary repair is an equally good alternative, especially in cases of a nerve defect, severe concomitant injuries, or both. In case of a combined nerve and tendon lesion in the carpal tunnel, the nerve repair can be performed at a later procedure without exposing the repaired flexor tendons, thus avoiding adhesion between tendons and nerves. If a decision is made in favor of an early secondary repair, the two stumps can be approximated by stitches to prevent retraction, if this can be achieved without tension. Approximation under tension in case of a larger defect would damage the two stumps and create an even larger defect. Marking the nerve ends by sutures is not necessary because exploration with always start in normal tissue, exposing the nerves from the proximal or the distal segments. Early secondary repair is performed during the third week, or later if this is demanded by local conditions. When indicated, plastic surgical procedures can eliminate constricting scars and provide an optimal soft tissue environment. After exploration and preparation of the two stumps, the surgeon must decide whether direct suturing or a nerve graft is indicated. If after very limited mobilization and slight flexion the nerve stumps cannot be coapted easily, a nerve graft should be used. The quality of motor recovery decreases steadily after a 6 month delay of repair. Late secondary repairs or reoperation of failure of primary repair should be performed within this time limit, although this does not mean that motor recovery cannot occur after a longer time interval. Useful motor recovery was achieved in certain cases after 18 months or more. Obviously the results might have been better if the time interval had been shorter. If a patient is seen with a nerve lesion after a long time interval, nerve repair is still indicated if sensibility is the main functional objective. In other long-standing cases, the nerve repair is combined with tendon transfer or capsulorrhaphy. After a particularly long time interval or in old patients, only palliative surgery is indicated. PMID:7233326

  1. Anterior interosseous nerve syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bumer, Philipp; Meinck, Hans-Michael; Schiefer, Johannes; Weiler, Markus; Bendszus, Martin; Kele, Henrich

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine lesion sites and spatial lesion patterns in spontaneous anterior interosseous nerve syndrome (AINS) with high-resolution magnetic resonance neurography (MRN). Methods: In 20 patients with AINS and 20 age- and sex-matched controls, MRN of median nerve fascicles was performed at 3T with large longitudinal anatomical coverage (upper arm/elbow/forearm): 135 contiguous axial slices (T2-weighted: echo time/repetition time 52/7,020 ms, time of acquisition: 15 minutes 48 seconds, in-plane resolution: 0.25 0.25 mm). Lesion classification was performed by visual inspection and by quantitative analysis of normalized T2 signal after segmentation of median nerve voxels. Results: In all patients and no controls, T2 lesions of individual fascicles were observed within upper arm median nerve trunk and strictly followed a somatotopic/internal topography: affected were those motor fascicles that will form the anterior interosseous nerve further distally while other fascicles were spared. Predominant lesion focus was at a mean distance of 14.6 5.4 cm proximal to the humeroradial joint. Discriminative power of quantitative T2 signal analysis and of qualitative lesion rating was high, with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity (p < 0.0001). Fascicular T2 lesion patterns were rated as multifocal (n = 17), monofocal (n = 2), or indeterminate (n = 1) by 2 independent observers with strong agreement (kappa = 0.83). Conclusion: It has been difficult to prove the existence of fascicular/partial nerve lesions in spontaneous neuropathies using clinical and electrophysiologic findings. With MRN, fascicular lesions with strict somatotopic organization were observed in upper arm median nerve trunks of patients with AINS. Our data strongly support that AINS in the majority of cases is not a surgically treatable entrapment neuropathy but a multifocal mononeuropathy selectively involving, within the main trunk of the median nerve, the motor fascicles that continue distally to form the anterior interosseous nerve. PMID:24415574

  2. Sensitivity of the "Root Bundle Model" to root mechanical properties and root distribution: Implication for shallow landslide stability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Massimiliano; Giadrossich, Filippo; Cohen, Denis

    2015-04-01

    Root reinforcement is recognized as an important factor for shallow landslides stability. Due to the complexity of root reinforcement mechanisms and the heterogeneity of the root-soil system, the estimation of parameters used in root reinforcement models is difficult, time consuming, and often highly uncertain. For practical applications, it is necessary to focus on the estimation of the most relevant parameters. The objective of the present contribution is to review the state of the art in the development of root reinforcement models and to discuss the sensitivity of the "Root Bundle Model" (RBM) when considering the variability of root mechanical properties and the heterogeneity of root distributions. The RBM is a strain-step loading fiber bundle model extended to include the mechanical and geometrical properties of roots. The model allows the calculation of the force-displacement behavior of a root bundle. In view of new results of field pullout tests performed on coarse roots of spruce (Picea abies) and considering a consistent dataset of root distribution of alpine tree species, we quantify the sensitivity of the RBM and the uncertainty associated with the most important input parameters. Preliminary results show that the extrapolation of force-diameter values from incomplete datasets (i.e., when only small roots are tested and values for coarse roots are extrapolated) may result in considerable errors. In particular, in the case of distributions with root diameters larger than 5 mm, root reinforcement tends to be dominated by coarse roots and their mechanical properties need to be quantified. In addition to the results of the model sensitivity, we present a possible best-practice method for the quantification of root reinforcement in view of its application to slope stability calculations and implementations in numerical models.

  3. Suprascapular nerve entrapment.

    PubMed

    Cor, L; Azuelos, A; Alexandre, A

    2005-01-01

    It is important to be aware of neuropathy involving the suprascapular nerve. While direct trauma to the suprascapular nerve is the usual cause (direct blow to the base of the neck or posterior shoulder, shoulder dislocation or fracture), the problem may result from overuse injuries (such as repetitive tennis serving or spiking of a volley ball), excessive horizontal adduction, weight lifting, backpacking or no apparent reason. These last three years we have operated 8 cases of suprascapular nerve neurolysis at the level of suprascapular incision, and section of the transverse scapular ligament through the back supraspinal approach. PMID:15830964

  4. Displacement cascades in polyatomic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, D.M.; Coulter, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Using a continuous-slowing-down, random amorphous material model, we have studied displacement cascades in a number of diatomic materials. This paper reviews a number of previous results that elucidate the effects of atomic mass, recoil energy, displacement energy, capture energy and material stoichiometry on the numbers of displacements in a cascade. The displacement cascade reveals a complex structure that is dependent on the type of irradiation and the material properties. Conclusions related to damage analysis for fusion reactors are given.

  5. Cauda equina repair in the rat: part 1. Stimulus-evoked EMG for identifying spinal nerves innervating intrinsic tail muscles.

    PubMed

    Blaskiewicz, Don J; Smirnov, Igor; Cisu, Tudor; DeRuisseau, Lara R; Stelzner, Dennis J; Calancie, Blair

    2009-08-01

    Cauda equina injuries may produce severe leg and pelvic floor dysfunction, for which no effective treatments exist. We are developing a rat cauda equina injury model to allow nerve root identification and surgical repair. One possible difficulty in implementing any repair strategy after trauma in humans involves the correct identification of proximal and distal ends of nerve roots separated by the injury. Two series of studies were carried out. In Series 1, we electrically stimulated segmental contributors to the dorsal and ventral caudales nerves in order to characterize the recruitment patterns of muscles controlling rat tail movements. In Series 2, we attempted to identify individual nerve roots forming the cauda equina by both level of origin and function (i.e., dorsal or ventral), based solely upon the recruitment patterns in response to electrical stimulation. For Series 1 studies, electrical stimulation of the segmental contributors showed that all nerve roots-from the sixth lumbar to the first coccygeal-contributed to recruitment of muscles found at the base of the tail. Intrinsic tail muscles lying more distally in the tail showed a more root-specific pattern of innervation. For Series 2, the rate of successful identification of an unknown nerve root as being ventral was very high (>95%), and only somewhat lower (approximately 80%) for dorsal roots. Correctly identifying the level of origin of that root was more difficult, but for ventral roots this rate still exceeded 90%. Using the rat cauda equina model, we have shown that stimulus-evoked EMG can be used to identify ventral nerve roots innervating tail muscles with a high degree of accuracy. These findings support the feasibility of using this conceptual approach for identifying and repairing damaged human cauda equina nerve roots based on stimulus-evoked recruitment of muscles in the leg and pelvic floor. PMID:19203211

  6. Roots and Root Function: Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of current issues related to water management, ecohydrology, and climate change are giving impetus to new research aimed at understanding roots and their functioning. Current areas of research include: use of advanced imaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging to observe roots...

  7. Synthesis of finite displacements and displacements in continental margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speed, R. C.; Elison, M. W.; Heck, F. R.; Russo, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    The scope of the project is the analysis of displacement-rate fields in the transitional regions between cratonal and oceanic lithospheres over Phanerozoic time (last 700 ma). Associated goals are an improved understanding of range of widths of major displacement zones; the partition of displacement gradients and rotations with position and depth in such zones; the temporal characteristics of such zones-the steadiness, episodicity, and duration of uniform versus nonunifrom fields; and the mechanisms and controls of the establishment and kinematics of displacement zones. The objective is to provide a context of time-averaged kinematics of displacement zones. The initial phase is divided topically among the methodology of measurement and reduction of displacements in the lithosphere and the preliminary analysis from geologic and other data of actual displacement histories from the Cordillera, Appalachians, and southern North America.

  8. Modeling root reinforcement using a root-failure Weibull survival function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, M.; Giadrossich, F.; Cohen, D.

    2013-11-01

    Root networks contribute to slope stability through complex interactions with soil that include mechanical compression and tension. Due to the spatial heterogeneity of root distribution and the dynamics of root turnover, the quantification of root reinforcement on steep slopes is challenging and consequently the calculation of slope stability also. Although considerable progress has been made, some important aspects of root mechanics remain neglected. In this study we address specifically the role of root-strength variability on the mechanical behavior of a root bundle. Many factors contribute to the variability of root mechanical properties even within a single class of diameter. This work presents a new approach for quantifying root reinforcement that considers the variability of mechanical properties of each root diameter class. Using the data of laboratory tensile tests and field pullout tests, we calibrate the parameters of the Weibull survival function to implement the variability of root strength in a numerical model for the calculation of root reinforcement (RBMw). The results show that, for both laboratory and field data sets, the parameters of the Weibull distribution may be considered constant with the exponent equal to 2 and the normalized failure displacement equal to 1. Moreover, the results show that the variability of root strength in each root diameter class has a major influence on the behavior of a root bundle with important implications when considering different approaches in slope stability calculation. Sensitivity analysis shows that the calibration of the equations of the tensile force, the elasticity of the roots, and the root distribution are the most important steps. The new model allows the characterization of root reinforcement in terms of maximum pullout force, stiffness, and energy. Moreover, it simplifies the implementation of root reinforcement in slope stability models. The realistic quantification of root reinforcement for tensile, shear and compression behavior allows for the consideration of the stabilization effects of root networks on steep slopes and the influence that this has on the triggering of shallow landslides.

  9. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  10. Tibial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and successfully treated. Some people may have a partial or complete loss of movement or sensation. Nerve ... mild to severe) Movement loss in the toes (partial or complete) Repeated or unnoticed injury to the ...

  11. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  12. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  13. [Optic nerve disc drusen].

    PubMed

    Samoil?, O; C?lug?ru, D; C?lug?ru, M; Emese, Kaucsar

    2006-01-01

    Optic nerve head drusen represents a frequent condition, with unknown pathogenesis, mostly asymptomatic. Here, we present a patient with visual impairment, who has reacted well to anti-inflammatory and vasodilator treatment. PMID:16927754

  14. [Nerve injuries and posttraumatic therapy].

    PubMed

    Radtke, C; Vogt, P M

    2014-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are a common clinical problem and can represent a major challenge, especially after trauma. In order to achieve optimal therapy, an early and adequate diagnosis with subsequent therapy is critical for functional preservation and restoration. Especially after complete severance of a peripheral nerve, the surgical techniques for nerve coaptation are an important prerequisite for peripheral nerve regeneration. The importance and necessity of adequate nerve coaptation and nerve transplantation are presented in detail. In addition, the types of primary and secondary nerve reconstruction procedures are described as well as the optimal time point of nerve repair. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the possibilities for diagnosis and intervention after nerve injury, additionally including an algorithm for surgical intervention. Furthermore, possible pitfalls and factors for improving the functional outcome are presented to optimize results with trauma-related nerve injury. PMID:24903504

  15. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion-extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating median nerve dysfunction in CTS patients. PMID:26764488

  16. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion–extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating median nerve dysfunction in CTS patients. PMID:26764488

  17. Schwannoma of Extraocular Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Niazi, Wasim; Boggan, James E.

    1994-01-01

    An unusual case of schwannoma arising from the third cranial nerve in a thirteen year old male is reported. The patient presented with paresis of the right oculomotor nerve and ipsilateral hemiparesis. The clinical features of this case are discussed and the pertinent medical literature reviewed. ImagesFigure 1p220-bFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17171175

  18. A novel chondroitin sulfate hydrogel for nerve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conovaloff, Aaron William

    Brachial plexus injuries affect numerous patients every year, with very debilitating results. The majority of these cases are very severe, and involve damage to the nerve roots. To date, repair strategies for these injuries address only gross tissue damage, but do not supply cells with adequate regeneration signals. As a result, functional recovery is often severely lacking. Therefore, a chondroitin sulfate hydrogel that delivers neurotrophic signals to damaged neurons is proposed as a scaffold to support nerve root regeneration. Capillary electrophoresis studies revealed that chondroitin sulfate can physically bind with a variety of neurotrophic factors, and cultures of chick dorsal root ganglia demonstrated robust neurite outgrowth in chondroitin sulfate hydrogels. Outgrowth in chondroitin sulfate gels was greater than that observed in control gels of hyaluronic acid. Furthermore, the chondroitin sulfate hydrogel's binding activity with nerve growth factor could be enhanced by incorporation of a synthetic bioactive peptide, as revealed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. This enhanced binding was observed only in chondroitin sulfate gels, and not in hyaluronic acid control gels. This enhanced binding activity resulted in enhanced dorsal root ganglion neurite outgrowth in chondroitin sulfate gels. Finally, the growth of regenerating dorsal root ganglia in these gels was imaged using label-free coherent anti-Stokes scattering microscopy. This technique generated detailed, high-quality images of live dorsal root ganglion neurites, which were comparable to fixed, F-actin-stained samples. Taken together, these results demonstrate the viability of this chondroitin sulfate hydrogel to serve as an effective implantable scaffold to aid in nerve root regeneration.

  19. Laryngeal nerve "anastomoses".

    PubMed

    Naidu, L; Lazarus, L; Partab, P; Satyapal, K S

    2014-02-01

    Laryngeal nerves have been observed to communicate with each other and forma variety of patterns. These communications have been studied extensively and have been of particular interest as it may provide an additional form of innervation to the intrinsic laryngeal muscles. Variations noted in incidence may help explain the variable position of the vocal folds after vocal fold paralysis. This study aimed to examine the incidence of various neural communications and to determine their contribution to the innervation of the larynx. Fifty adult cadaveric en-bloc laryngeal specimens were studied. Three different types of communications were observed between internal and recurrent laryngeal nerves viz. (1) Galen's anastomosis (81%):in 13%, it was observed to supply the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle; (2) thyroarytenoid communication (9%): this was observed to supply the thyroarytenoid muscle in 2% of specimens and (3) arytenoid plexus (28%): in 6%, it supplied a branch to the transverse arytenoid muscle. The only communication between the external and recurrent laryngeal nerves was the communicating nerve (25%). In one left hemi-larynx, the internal laryngeal nerve formed a communication with the external laryngeal nerve, via a thyroid foramen. The neural communications that exist in the larynx have been thought to play a role in laryngeal innervation. The results of this study have shown varying incidences in neural communications. Contributions from these communications have also been noted to various intrinsic laryngeal muscles which may be a possible factor responsible for the variable position of the vocal folds in certain cases of vocal fold paralysis. PMID:24590520

  20. Optic nerve aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lisi; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    We report a 55-year-old woman with optic nerve Aspergillosis. Aspergillus is an ubiquitous airborne saprophytic fungus. Inhaled Aspergillus conidia are normally eliminated in the immunocompetent host by innate immune mechanisms; however, in immunosuppressed patients, they can cause disease. The woman had a past medical history of hypertension and migraines. She presented 1 year prior to death with a new onset headache behind the left eye and later developed blurred vision and scotoma. A left temporal artery biopsy was negative for giant cell arteritis. One month prior to the current admission, she had an MRI showing optic nerve thickening with no other findings. Because of the visual loss and a positive antinuclear antibody test, she was given a trial of high dose steroids and while it significantly improved her headache, her vision did not improve. At autopsy, the left optic nerve at the level of the cavernous sinus and extending into the optic chiasm was enlarged in diameter and there was a 1.3 cm firm nodule surrounding the left optic nerve. Histologically, an abscess surrounded and involved the left optic nerve. Acute angle branching, angioinvasive fungal hyphae were identified on Grocott's methenamine silver stained sections, consistent with Aspergillus spp. No gross or microscopic evidence of systemic vasculitis or infection was identified in the body. The literature on optic nerve Aspergillosis is reviewed. PMID:25861888

  1. Adapting to variable prismatic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Robert B.; Cohen, Malcolm M.

    1989-01-01

    In each of two studies, subjects were exposed to a continuously changing prismatic displacement with a mean value of 19 prism diopters (variable displacement) and to a fixed 19-diopter displacement (fixed displacement). In Experiment 1, significant adaptation (post-pre shifts in hand-eye coordination) was found for fixed, but not for variable, displacement. Experiment 2 demonstrated that adaptation was obtained for variable displacement, but it was very fragile and is lost if the measures of adaptation are preceded by even a very brief exposure of the hand to normal or near-normal vision. Contrary to the results of some previous studies, an increase in within-S dispersion was not found of target pointing responses as a result of exposure to variable displacement.

  2. Bladder emptying by intermittent electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, Joseph W.; Wenzel, Brian J.; Gustafson, Kenneth J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2006-03-01

    Persons with a suprasacral spinal cord injury cannot empty their bladder voluntarily. Bladder emptying can be restored by intermittent electrical stimulation of the sacral nerve roots (SR) to cause bladder contraction. However, this therapy requires sensory nerve transection to prevent dyssynergic contraction of the external urethral sphincter (EUS). Stimulation of the compound pudendal nerve trunk (PN) activates spinal micturition circuitry, leading to a reflex bladder contraction without a reflex EUS contraction. The present study determined if PN stimulation could produce bladder emptying without nerve transection in cats anesthetized with ?-chloralose. With all nerves intact, intermittent PN stimulation emptied the bladder (64 14% of initial volume, n = 37 across six cats) more effectively than either distention-evoked micturition (40 19%, p < 0.001, n = 27 across six cats) or bilateral intermittent SR stimulation (25 23%, p < 0.005, n = 4 across two cats). After bilateral transection of the nerves innervating the urethral sphincter, intermittent SR stimulation voided 79 17% (n = 12 across three cats), comparable to clinical results obtained with SR stimulation. Voiding via intermittent PN stimulation did not increase after neurotomy (p > 0.10), indicating that PN stimulation was not limited by bladder-sphincter dyssynergia. Intermittent PN stimulation holds promise for restoring bladder emptying following spinal injury without requiring nerve transection.

  3. Histopathological effects of radiosurgery on a human trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Al-Otaibi, Faisal; Alhindi, Hindi; Alhebshi, Adnan; Albloushi, Monirah; Baeesa, Saleh; Hodaie, Mojgan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radiosurgery is a well-established treatment modality for medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. The exact mechanism of pain relief after radiosurgery is not clearly understood. Histopathology examination of the trigeminal nerve in humans after radiosurgery is rarely performed and has produced controversial results. Case Description: We report on a 45-year-old female who received radiosurgery treatment for trigeminal neuralgia by Cyberknife. A 6-mm portion of the cisternal segment of trigeminal nerve received a dose of 60 Gy. The clinical benefit started 10 days after therapy and continued for 8 months prior to a recurrence of her previous symptoms associated with mild background pain. She underwent microvascular decompression and partial sensory root sectioning. Atrophied trigeminal nerve rootlets were grossly noted intraoperatively under surgical microscope associated with changes in trigeminal nerve color to gray. A biopsy from the inferolateral surface of the nerve proximal to the midcisternal segment showed histological changes in the form of fibrosis and axonal degeneration. Conclusion: This case study supports the evidence of histological damage of the trigeminal nerve fibers after radiosurgery therapy. Whether or not the presence and degree of nerve damage correlate with the degree of clinical benefit and side effects are not revealed by this study and need to be explored in future studies. PMID:24605252

  4. Variable displacement blower

    DOEpatents

    Bookout, Charles C.; Stotts, Robert E.; Waring, Douglass R.; Folsom, Lawrence R.

    1986-01-01

    A blower having a stationary casing for rotatably supporting a rotor assembly having a series of open ended chambers arranged to close against the surrounding walls of the casing. Pistons are slidably mounted within each chamber with the center of rotation of the pistons being offset in regard to the center of rotation of the rotor assembly whereby the pistons reciprocate in the chambers as the rotor assembly turns. As inlet port communicates with the rotor assembly to deliver a working substance into the chamber as the pistons approach a top dead center position in the chamber while an outlet port also communicates with the rotor to exhaust the working substance as the pistons approach a bottom dead center position. The displacement of the blower is varied by adjusting the amount of eccentricity between the center of rotation of the pistons and the center of rotation of the rotor assembly.

  5. Strategies for displacing oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Vikram; Gupta, Raghubir

    2015-03-01

    Oil currently holds a monopoly on transportation fuels. Until recently biofuels were seen as the means to break this stranglehold. They will still have a part to play, but the lead role has been handed to natural gas, almost solely due to the increased availability of shale gas. The spread between oil and gas prices, unprecedented in its scale and duration, will cause a secular shift away from oil as a raw material. In the transport fuel sector, natural gas will gain traction first in the displacement of diesel fuel. Substantial innovation is occurring in the methods of producing liquid fuel from shale gas at the well site, in particular in the development of small scale distributed processes. In some cases, the financing of such small-scale plants may require new business models.

  6. Reducing the risk of nerve injury during Bernese periacetabular osteotomy: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Kalhor, M; Gharehdaghi, J; Schoeniger, R; Ganz, R

    2015-05-01

    The modified Smith-Petersen and Kocher-Langenbeck approaches were used to expose the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh and the femoral, obturator and sciatic nerves in order to study the risk of injury to these structures during the dissection, osteotomy, and acetabular reorientation stages of a Bernese peri-acetabular osteotomy. Injury of the lateral cutaneous nerve of thigh was less likely to occur if an osteotomy of the anterior superior iliac spine had been carried out before exposing the hip. The obturator nerve was likely to be injured during unprotected osteotomy of the pubis if the far cortex was penetrated by > 5 mm. This could be avoided by inclining the osteotome 45 medially and performing the osteotomy at least 2 cm medial to the iliopectineal eminence. The sciatic nerve could be injured during the first and last stages of the osteotomy if the osteotome perforated the lateral cortex of ischium and the ilio-ischial junction by > 10 mm. The femoral nerve could be stretched or entrapped during osteotomy of the pubis if there was significant rotational or linear displacement of the acetabulum. Anterior or medial displacement of < 2 cm and lateral tilt (retroversion) of < 30 were safe margins. The combination of retroversion and anterior displacement could increase tension on the nerve. Strict observation of anatomical details, proper handling of the osteotomes and careful manipulation of the acetabular fragment reduce the neurological complications of Bernese peri-acetabular osteotomy. PMID:25922457

  7. Communications Between the Facial Nerve and the Vestibulocochlear Nerve, the Glossopharyngeal Nerve, and the Cervical Plexus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Song, Ju Sung; Yang, Su Cheol

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this review is to elucidate the communications between the facial nerves or facial nerve and neighboring nerves: the vestibulocochlear nerve, the glossopharyngeal nerve, and the cervical plexus.In a PubMed search, 832 articles were searched using the terms "facial nerve and communication." Sixty-two abstracts were read and 16 full-text articles were reviewed. Among them, 8 articles were analyzed.The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve was the highest (82.3%) and the frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the glossopharyngeal nerve was the lowest (20%). The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the cervical plexus was 65.2 43.5%. The frequency of communication between the cervical branch and the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was 24.7 1.7%.Surgeons should be aware of the nerve communications, which are important during clinical examinations and surgical procedures of the facial nerves such as those communications involved in facial reconstructive surgery, neck dissection, and various nerve transfer procedures. PMID:26413963

  8. Displacement parameter inversion for a novel electromagnetic underground displacement sensor.

    PubMed

    Shentu, Nanying; Li, Qing; Li, Xiong; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Jiang, Guoqing; Qiu, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    Underground displacement monitoring is an effective method to explore deep into rock and soil masses for execution of subsurface displacement measurements. It is not only an important means of geological hazards prediction and forecasting, but also a forefront, hot and sophisticated subject in current geological disaster monitoring. In previous research, the authors had designed a novel electromagnetic underground horizontal displacement sensor (called the H-type sensor) by combining basic electromagnetic induction principles with modern sensing techniques and established a mutual voltage measurement theoretical model called the Equation-based Equivalent Loop Approach (EELA). Based on that work, this paper presents an underground displacement inversion approach named "EELA forward modeling-approximate inversion method". Combining the EELA forward simulation approach with the approximate optimization inversion theory, it can deduce the underground horizontal displacement through parameter inversion of the H-type sensor. Comprehensive and comparative studies have been conducted between the experimentally measured and theoretically inversed values of horizontal displacement under counterpart conditions. The results show when the measured horizontal displacements are in the 0-100 mm range, the horizontal displacement inversion discrepancy is generally tested to be less than 3 mm under varied tilt angles and initial axial distances conditions, which indicates that our proposed parameter inversion method can predict underground horizontal displacement measurements effectively and robustly for the H-type sensor and the technique is applicable for practical geo-engineering applications. PMID:24858960

  9. Displacement Parameter Inversion for a Novel Electromagnetic Underground Displacement Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Nanying; Li, Qing; Li, Xiong; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Jiang, Guoqing; Qiu, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    Underground displacement monitoring is an effective method to explore deep into rock and soil masses for execution of subsurface displacement measurements. It is not only an important means of geological hazards prediction and forecasting, but also a forefront, hot and sophisticated subject in current geological disaster monitoring. In previous research, the authors had designed a novel electromagnetic underground horizontal displacement sensor (called the H-type sensor) by combining basic electromagnetic induction principles with modern sensing techniques and established a mutual voltage measurement theoretical model called the Equation-based Equivalent Loop Approach (EELA). Based on that work, this paper presents an underground displacement inversion approach named “EELA forward modeling-approximate inversion method”. Combining the EELA forward simulation approach with the approximate optimization inversion theory, it can deduce the underground horizontal displacement through parameter inversion of the H-type sensor. Comprehensive and comparative studies have been conducted between the experimentally measured and theoretically inversed values of horizontal displacement under counterpart conditions. The results show when the measured horizontal displacements are in the 0–100 mm range, the horizontal displacement inversion discrepancy is generally tested to be less than 3 mm under varied tilt angles and initial axial distances conditions, which indicates that our proposed parameter inversion method can predict underground horizontal displacement measurements effectively and robustly for the H-type sensor and the technique is applicable for practical geo-engineering applications. PMID:24858960

  10. Mirror-image pain after nerve reconstruction in rats is related to enhanced density of epidermal peptidergic nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Kambiz, S; Brakkee, E M; Duraku, L S; Hovius, S E R; Ruigrok, T J H; Walbeehm, E T

    2015-05-01

    Mirror-image pain is a phenomenon in which unprovoked pain is detected on the uninjured contralateral side after unilateral nerve injury. Although it has been implicated that enhanced production of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the contralateral dorsal root ganglion is important in the development of mirror-image pain, it is not known if this is related to enhanced expression of nociceptive fibers in the contralateral skin. Mechanical and thermal sensitivity in the contralateral hind paw was measured at four different time points (5, 10, 20 and 30weeks) after transection and immediate end-to-end reconstruction of the sciatic nerve in rats. These findings were compared to the density of epidermal (peptidergic and non-peptidergic) nerve fibers on the contralateral hind paw. Mechanical hypersensitivity of the contralateral hind paw was observed at 10weeks PO, a time point in which both subgroups of epidermal nerve fibers reached control values. Thermal hypersensitivity was observed with simultaneous increase in the density of epidermal peptidergic nerve fibers of the contralateral hind paw at 20weeks PO. Both thermal sensitivity and the density of epidermal nerve fibers returned to control values 30weeks PO. We conclude that changes in skin innervation and sensitivity are present on the uninjured corresponding side in a transient pain model. Therefore, the contralateral side cannot serve as control. Moreover, the current study confirms the involvement of the peripheral nervous system in the development of mirror-image pain. PMID:25749190

  11. Peripheral Nerve Repair in Rats Using Composite Hydrogel-Filled Aligned Nanofiber Conduits with Incorporated Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jenny; Limburg, Sonja; Joshi, Sunil K.; Landman, Rebeccah; Park, Michelle; Zhang, Qia; Kim, Hubert T.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of peripheral nerve defects with current synthetic, tubular nerve conduits generally shows inferior recovery when compared with using nerve autografts, the current gold standard. We tested the ability of composite collagen and hyaluronan hydrogels, with and without the nerve growth factor (NGF), to stimulate neurite extension on a promising aligned, nanofiber poly-L-lactide-co-caprolactone (PLCL) scaffold. In vitro, the hydrogels significantly increased neurite extension from dorsal root ganglia explants. Consistent with these results, the addition of hydrogels as luminal fillers within aligned, nanofiber tubular PLCL conduits led to improved sensory function compared to autograft repair in a critical-size defect in the sciatic nerve in a rat model. Sensory recovery was assessed 3 and 12 weeks after repair using a withdrawal assay from thermal stimulation. The addition of hydrogel did not enhance recovery of motor function in the rat model. The NGF led to dose-dependent improvements in neurite out-growth in vitro, but did not have a significant effect in vivo. In summary, composite collagen/hyaluronan hydrogels enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth in vitro and sensory recovery in vivo. The use of such hydrogels as luminal fillers for tubular nerve conduits may therefore be useful in assisting restoration of protective sensation following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23659607

  12. Measuring vulnerability to disaster displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Susan A.; Khazai, Bijan; Power, Christopher; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2015-04-01

    Large scale disasters can cause devastating impacts in terms of population displacement. Between 2008 and 2013, on average 27 million people were displaced annually by disasters (Yonetani 2014). After large events such as hurricane Katrina or the Port-au-Prince earthquake, images of inadequate public shelter and concerns about large scale and often inequitable migration have been broadcast around the world. Population displacement can often be one of the most devastating and visible impacts of a natural disaster. Despite the importance of population displacement in disaster events, measures to understand the socio-economic vulnerability of a community often use broad metrics to estimate the total socio-economic risk of an event rather than focusing on the specific impacts that a community faces in a disaster. Population displacement is complex and multi-causal with the physical impact of a disaster interacting with vulnerability arising from the response, environmental issues (e.g., weather), cultural concerns (e.g., expectations of adequate shelter), and many individual factors (e.g., mobility, risk perception). In addition to the complexity of the causes, population displacement is difficult to measure because of the wide variety of different terms and definitions and its multi-dimensional nature. When we speak of severe population displacement, we may refer to a large number of displaced people, an extended length of displacement or associated difficulties such as poor shelter quality, risk of violence and crime in shelter communities, discrimination in aid, a lack of access to employment or other difficulties that can be associated with large scale population displacement. We have completed a thorough review of the literature on disaster population displacement. Research has been conducted on historic events to understand the types of negative impacts associated with population displacement and also the vulnerability of different groups to these impacts. We aggregate these ideas into a framework of disaster displacement vulnerability that distinguishes between three main aspects of disaster displacement. Disaster displacement can be considered in terms of the number of displaced people and the length of that displacement. However, the literature emphasizes that the severity of disaster displacement can not be measured completely in quantitative terms. Thus, we include a measure representing people who are trapped and unable to leave their homes due to mobility, resources or for other reasons. Finally the third main aspect considers the difficulties that are associated with displacement and reflects the difference between the experiences of those who are displaced into safe and supportive environments as compared to those whose only alternate shelter is dangerous and inadequate for their needs. Finally, we apply the framework to demonstrate a methodology to estimate vulnerability to disaster displacement. Using data from the Global Earthquake Model (GEM) Social and Economic Vulnerability sub-National Database, we generate an index to measure the vulnerability of Japanese prefectures to the dimensions of displacement included in the framework. References Yonitani, M. (2014). Global Estimates 2014: People displaced by disasters. http://www.internal-displacement.org/publications/2014/global-estimates-2014-people-displaced-by-disasters/

  13. Correlation Analysis of Histomorphometry and Motor Neurography in the Median Nerve Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Theodora; Werdin, Frank; Gruessinger, Hannes; Sinis, Nektarios; Schiefer, Jennifer Lynn; Jaminet, Patrick; Geuna, Stefano; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Standard methods to evaluate the functional regeneration after injury of the rat median nerve are insufficient to identify any further differences of axonal nerve regeneration after restitution of motor recovery is completed. An important complementary method for assessing such differences is a histomorphometric analysis of the distal to lesion nerve fibers. Recently, an electrophysiological method has been proposed as a sensitive method to examine the quality of axonal nerve regeneration. Methods: A linear regression analysis has been performed to correlate histomorphometric and neurographic data originating from 31 rats subjected to neurotmesis and immediate reconstruction of their right median nerve. Results: A significant linear correlation between the velocity of neuromuscular conduction and the total number of nerve fibers (P = .037) as well as between the amplitude of compound muscle action potential and the total number of nerve fibers (P = .026) has been identified. Interestingly, a significant correlation between the velocity of neuromuscular conduction and the square root of the cross-sectional area of the nerve could be found (P = .008). This corresponds to a linear correlation between the velocity of neuromuscular conduction and the radius of the nerve. Conclusion: These results contribute in a better interpretation of morphological predictors of nerve regeneration and verify the previously described electrophysiological assessment in the median nerve rat model as a valid method. PMID:24904711

  14. Injection nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kakati, Arindhom; Bhat, Dhananjaya; Devi, Bhagavathula Indira; Shukla, Dhaval

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical profile and outcome of surgery for injection nerve palsies. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients with INP who were treated at our institute during May 2000 to May 2009. Clinical, electroneuromyography (ENMG), and operative findings were noted. Intraoperative nerve action potential monitoring was not used in any case. Outcome of patients who were followed was reviewed. Results: INP comprised 92 (11%) of 837 nerve injury patients. Seventy one patients were children less than 16 years. The nerves involved were sciatic in 80 patients, radial in 8, and others in four. Fifty seven patients had power, grade 0/5. ENMG studies revealed absent compound muscle action potential in 64 and absent sensory nerve action potential in 67 patients. Thirty nine (42.3%) of 92 patients underwent surgery. The mean duration since injury in these patients was 5.2 months (3 months to 11 months). All underwent neurolysis. Only 18 patients who underwent surgery had a follow up of more than 3 months. Ten (55.5%) patients had good or fair outcome after surgery. Except for grade of motor deficit prior to surgery, none of the variables were found to significantly affect the outcome. Conclusion: The outcome of INP is generally good and many patients recover spontaneously. The outcome of surgery is dependent on preoperative motor power. PMID:23546341

  15. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the inferior calcaneal nerve (Baxter nerve).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rong; Frederick-Dyer, Katherine; Ferguson, N Lynn; Lewis, James; Fu, Yitong

    2012-09-01

    Fibrolipomatous hamartoma (FLH) is a rare, benign lesion of the peripheral nerves most frequently involving the median nerve and its digital branches (80 %). Pathognomonic MR features of FLH such as coaxial-cable-like appearance on axial planes and a spaghetti-like appearance on coronal planes have been described by Marom and Helms, obviating the need for diagnostic biopsy. We present a case of fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the inferior calcaneal nerve (Baxter nerve) with associated subcutaneous fat proliferation. PMID:22526881

  16. Comparative morphological remarks on the origin of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, T; Kanno, Y; Kaneshige

    1976-01-01

    The origin and course of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve were observed macroscopically in 38 Japanese adult cadavers which were dissected in the University of Hokkaido, Faculty of Medicine during the years 1971/72 and the results obtained were compared with those from some other mammals (rat, rabbit, dog and cat) and a number of bibliographical findings on the other animals. On the basis of the archetype of the pudendal plexus, the site of origin of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve was divided into seven portions as follows: the sciatic nerve or inferior gluteal nerve (I) and its originating roots (RI), the bigeminal nerve (B) and its originating roots (RB), the part of junction of I and B (CIB), the pudendal nerve (P) and its originating roots (RP). According to the arising mode, the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve was calssified into seven types: Type A (the sciatic nerve type); the nerve arises from I and RI (horse, rat, bird, frog and salamander). Type B (the sciatic transitional type); the nerve arises from I, RI, CIB, RB and B (MAN AND MONKEY). Type C (the bigeminal nerve type); the nerve arises from CIB, RB and B (gorilla, chimpanzee, orangutan, cat and sphenodon). Type D (the pudendal transitional type); the nerve arises from CIB, RB, B, RP and P (dog). Type E (the pudendal nerve type); the nerve arises from RP and P (pig, cattle and rabbit). Type F (the mixed type); a mixture of A to E types. These various patterns in the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve may be explained by the comparative anatomical explanation on the limb medial rotation given in Braus' text-book of Anatomy (Bd. I, S. 273). From these descriptions it is reasonable to presume that the main trunk of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve of the tetrapod below the Aves arises from the sciatic nerve and is analogous to the gluteal branches of mammals, with its main stem still retained in the pudendal nerve. If the cutaneous area supplied by the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve expands to the lateral border of the buttock in company with the lower limb medial rotation, the part between this area and that supplied by the pudendal nerve is enlarged. At first, these expanded areas are probably supplied by the branches of the pudendal nerve, which gradually become independent to become the main stem of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve in mammals. This nerve seems, therefore, to be primarily a division of the pedendal nerve, and so in man has various types of arising patterns, A to E, in accordance with the scheme in the phylogeny. Those hypothetical changes are observed in the human sacral plexus, from which the cutaneous nerve arises with a fan-shaped overlapping. PMID:1275304

  17. Root hairs aid soil penetration by anchoring the root surface to pore walls

    PubMed Central

    Bengough, A. Glyn; Loades, Kenneth; McKenzie, Blair M.

    2016-01-01

    The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip during soil penetration was examined. Experiments using a hairless maize mutant (Zea mays: rth3–3) and its wild-type counterpart measured the anchorage force between the primary root of maize and the soil to determine whether root hairs enabled seedling roots in artificial biopores to penetrate sandy loam soil (dry bulk density 1.0–1.5g cm−3). Time-lapse imaging was used to analyse root and seedling displacements in soil adjacent to a transparent Perspex interface. Peak anchorage forces were up to five times greater (2.5N cf. 0.5N) for wild-type roots than for hairless mutants in 1.2g cm−3 soil. Root hair anchorage enabled better soil penetration for 1.0 or 1.2g cm−3 soil, but there was no significant advantage of root hairs in the densest soil (1.5g cm−3). The anchorage force was insufficient to allow root penetration of the denser soil, probably because of less root hair penetration into pore walls and, consequently, poorer adhesion between the root hairs and the pore walls. Hairless seedlings took 33h to anchor themselves compared with 16h for wild-type roots in 1.2g cm−3 soil. Caryopses were often pushed several millimetres out of the soil before the roots became anchored and hairless roots often never became anchored securely.The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip may be important in loose seed beds above more compact soil layers and may also assist root tips to emerge from biopores and penetrate the bulk soil. PMID:26798027

  18. Root hairs aid soil penetration by anchoring the root surface to pore walls.

    PubMed

    Bengough, A Glyn; Loades, Kenneth; McKenzie, Blair M

    2016-02-01

    The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip during soil penetration was examined. Experiments using a hairless maize mutant (Zea mays: rth3-3) and its wild-type counterpart measured the anchorage force between the primary root of maize and the soil to determine whether root hairs enabled seedling roots in artificial biopores to penetrate sandy loam soil (dry bulk density 1.0-1.5g cm(-3)). Time-lapse imaging was used to analyse root and seedling displacements in soil adjacent to a transparent Perspex interface. Peak anchorage forces were up to five times greater (2.5N cf. 0.5N) for wild-type roots than for hairless mutants in 1.2g cm(-3) soil. Root hair anchorage enabled better soil penetration for 1.0 or 1.2g cm(-3) soil, but there was no significant advantage of root hairs in the densest soil (1.5g cm(-3)). The anchorage force was insufficient to allow root penetration of the denser soil, probably because of less root hair penetration into pore walls and, consequently, poorer adhesion between the root hairs and the pore walls. Hairless seedlings took 33h to anchor themselves compared with 16h for wild-type roots in 1.2g cm(-3) soil. Caryopses were often pushed several millimetres out of the soil before the roots became anchored and hairless roots often never became anchored securely.The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip may be important in loose seed beds above more compact soil layers and may also assist root tips to emerge from biopores and penetrate the bulk soil. PMID:26798027

  19. Root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, P. H.

    1995-01-01

    When a plant root is reoriented within the gravity field, it responds by initiating a curvature which eventually results in vertical growth. Gravity sensing occurs primarily in the root tip. It may involve amyloplast sedimentation in the columella cells of the root cap, or the detection of forces exerted by the mass of the protoplast on opposite sides of its cell wall. Gravisensing activates a signal transduction cascade which results in the asymmetric redistribution of auxin and apoplastic Ca2+ across the root tip, with accumulation at the bottom side. The resulting lateral asymmetry in Ca2+ and auxin concentration is probably transmitted to the elongation zone where differential cellular elongation occurs until the tip resumes vertical growth. The Cholodny-Went theory proposes that gravity-induced auxin redistribution across a gravistimulated plant organ is responsible for the gravitropic response. However, recent data indicate that the gravity-induced reorientation is more complex, involving both auxin gradient-dependent and auxin gradient-independent events.

  20. Automated Root Tracking with "Root System Analyzer"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Jin, Meina; Ockert, Charlotte; Bol, Roland; Leitner, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Crucial factors for plant development are water and nutrient availability in soils. Thus, root architecture is a main aspect of plant productivity and needs to be accurately considered when describing root processes. Images of root architecture contain a huge amount of information, and image analysis helps to recover parameters describing certain root architectural and morphological traits. The majority of imaging systems for root systems are designed for two-dimensional images, such as RootReader2, GiA Roots, SmartRoot, EZ-Rhizo, and Growscreen, but most of them are semi-automated and involve mouse-clicks in each root by the user. "Root System Analyzer" is a new, fully automated approach for recovering root architectural parameters from two-dimensional images of root systems. Individual roots can still be corrected manually in a user interface if required. The algorithm starts with a sequence of segmented two-dimensional images showing the dynamic development of a root system. For each image, morphological operators are used for skeletonization. Based on this, a graph representation of the root system is created. A dynamic root architecture model helps to determine which edges of the graph belong to an individual root. The algorithm elongates each root at the root tip and simulates growth confined within the already existing graph representation. The increment of root elongation is calculated assuming constant growth. For each root, the algorithm finds all possible paths and elongates the root in the direction of the optimal path. In this way, each edge of the graph is assigned to one or more coherent roots. Image sequences of root systems are handled in such a way that the previous image is used as a starting point for the current image. The algorithm is implemented in a set of Matlab m-files. Output of Root System Analyzer is a data structure that includes for each root an identification number, the branching order, the time of emergence, the parent identification number, the distance between branching point to the parent root base, the root length, the root radius and the nodes that belong to each individual root path. This information is relevant for the analysis of dynamic root system development as well as the parameterisation of root architecture models. Here, we show results of Root System Analyzer applied to analyse the root systems of wheat plants grown in rhizotrons. Different treatments with respect to soil moisture and apatite concentrations were used to test the effects of those conditions on root system development. Photographs of the root systems were taken at high spatial and temporal resolution and root systems are automatically tracked.

  1. Optic nerve hypoplasia in children.

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, S. M.; Dutton, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is characterised by a diminished number of optic nerve fibres in the optic nerve(s) and until recently was thought to be rare. It may be associated with a wide range of other congenital abnormalities. Its pathology, clinical features, and the conditions associated with it are reviewed. Neuroendocrine disorders should be actively sought in any infant or child with bilateral ONH. Early recognition of the disorder may in some cases be life saving. Images PMID:2191713

  2. Displacement, Substitution, Sublimation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Sigmund Freund worked with the mechanisms of displacement, substitution, and sublimation. These mechanisms have many similarities and have been studied diagnostically and therapeutically. Displacement and substitution seem to fit in well with phobias, hysterias, somatiyations, prejudices, and scapegoating. Phobias, prejudices, and scapegoating

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Re, Michela; Blanco, Javier; Gmez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2016-03-01

    Superficial nerves can be visualized through ultrasonography in the cattle and facilitate local anesthetic disposition around nerve structures. Expected advantages include a higher successful rate of nerve block improving the degree and duration of the block. Among others, conduction nerves of clinical interest in cattle include the paravertebral nerves, nerves of the epidural space, the brachial plexus, and the sciatic and femoral nerves, and nerves of the head. PMID:26922116

  4. Lewis acid-assisted detection of nerve agents in water.

    PubMed

    Butala, Rahul R; Creasy, William R; Fry, Roderick A; McKee, Michael L; Atwood, David A

    2015-06-01

    The five-coordinate compound, Salen((t)Bu)Al(Ac), prepared in situ from Salen((t)Bu)AlBr and NH4Ac, forms Lewis acid-base adducts in aqueous solution with the G-type nerve agents, Sarin and Soman, and the VX hydrolysis product, ethylmethylphosphonate (EMPA). The resulting compounds, [Salen((t)Bu)Al(NA)](+)[Ac] (-) (with NA = Sarin, Soman, and EMPA) are sufficiently stable to be identified by ESI-MS. Molecular ion peaks were detected for every compound with little or no fragmentation. The distinctive MS signatures for the [Salen((t)Bu)Al(NA)](+) compounds provide a new technique for identifying nerve agents from aqueous solution. The energetics of the displacement of Ac(-) by the nerve agents to form [Salen((t)Bu)Al(NA)](+)[Ac](-) were determined computationally. PMID:25820753

  5. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate

  6. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... full recovery. In some cases, there may be partial or complete loss of movement or sensation. Nerve ... Deformity of the hand Partial or complete loss of sensation in the hand or fingers Partial or complete loss of wrist or hand movement Recurrent ...

  7. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... full recovery. In some cases, there may be partial or complete loss of movement or sensation. Nerve ... Deformity of the hand (rare) Partial or complete loss of hand movement Partial or complete loss of sensation in the fingers Recurrent or unnoticed injury to the ...

  8. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePLUS

    ... problems that may develop: Bladder or kidney infection Diabetes foot ulcers Nerve damage that hides the symptoms of ... and a heart attack Loss of a toe, foot, or leg through amputation, usually because of a bone infection that does not heal

  9. AN IN VITRO MODEL OF ADULT MAMMALIAN NERVE REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Alka; Li, Zhaobo; Aspalter, Manuela; Feiner, Jeffrey; Hoke, Ahmet; Zhou, Chunhua; ODaly, Andres; Abdullah, Madeel; Rohde, Charles; Brushart, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    The role of pathway-derived growth factors in the support of peripheral axon regeneration remains elusive. Few appropriate knock-out mice are available, and gene silencing techniques are rarely 100% effective. To overcome these difficulties, we have developed an in vitro organotypic co-culture system that accurately models peripheral nerve repair in the adult mammal. Spinal cord sections from P4 mice that express YFP in their neurons are used to innervate segments of P4 peripheral nerve. This reconstructed ventral root is then transected and joined to a nerve graft. Growth of axons across the nerve repair and into the graft can be imaged repeatedly with fluorescence microscopy to define regeneration speed, and parent neurons can be labeled in retrograde fashion to identify contributing neurons. Nerve graft harvested from adult mice remains viable in culture by both morphologic and functional criteria. Motoneurons are supported with GDNF for the first week in culture, after which they survive axotomy, and are thus functionally adult. This platform can be modified by using motoneurons from any genetically modified mouse that can be bred to express XFP, by harvesting nerve graft from any source, or by treating the culture systemically with antibodies, growth factors, or pathway inhibitors. The regeneration environment is controlled to a degree not possible in vivo, and the use of experimental animals is reduced substantially. The flexibility and control offered by this technique should thus make it a useful tool for the study of regeneration biology. PMID:19464291

  10. Rare variations in the formation of median nerve--embryological basis and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, N; Vishwakarma, N; Kumar, G P; Guha, R; Dattal, A K; Sunitha, P

    2009-12-01

    During routine dissection in the Department of Anatomy, CMS, Nepal, anomalous median nerves with regard to their formation were found in three different adult male cadavers. In one cadaver, there was variation in the formation of the median nerve and its relation with the axillary artery. Another cadaver revealed the formation of the median nerve by three roots, while in the third one, the median nerve was found to be formed by four roots. However, in each of the three cadavers the distribution of the anomalous median nerve was normal in arm, forearm and palm. The arterial pattern in the arm (axillary and brachial arteries) was also found to be normal. In each case the opposite upper limb was also meticulously dissected to exclude bilateral abnormality. However, in each case the anomaly was unilateral. Photographs of the abnormalities were taken for proper documentation. The variations related to the formation of median nerve by more than two roots are relatively uncommon as compared to the other types of varations of median nerve. Some embryological explanations are available to explain these variations. Finally, knowledge of these variations is important particularly to the surgeons for carrying out surgical procedures in axilla and arm. PMID:20635613

  11. Connecting localized DNA strand displacement reactions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Ismael Mullor; Arbona, Jean-Michel; Lad, Amitkumar; Mendoza, Oscar; Aim, Jean-Pierre; Elezgaray, Juan

    2015-08-14

    Logic circuits based on DNA strand displacement reactions have been shown to be versatile enough to compute the square root of four-bit numbers. The implementation of these circuits as a set of bulk reactions faces difficulties which include leaky reactions and intrinsically slow, diffusion-limited reaction rates. In this paper, we consider simple examples of these circuits when they are attached to platforms (DNA origamis). As expected, constraining distances between DNA strands leads to faster reaction rates. However, it also induces side-effects that are not detectable in the solution-phase version of this circuitry. Appropriate design of the system, including protection and asymmetry between input and fuel strands, leads to a reproducible behaviour, at least one order of magnitude faster than the one observed under bulk conditions. PMID:26168352

  12. Segmental thoracic lipomatosis of nerve with nerve territory overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Mark A; Amrami, Kimberly K; Howe, B Matthew; Spinner, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    Lipomatosis of nerve (LN), or fibrolipomatous hamartoma, is a rare condition of fibrofatty enlargement of the peripheral nerves. It is associated with bony and soft tissue overgrowth in approximately one-third to two-thirds of cases. It most commonly affects the median nerve at the carpal tunnel or digital nerves in the hands and feet. The authors describe a patient with previously diagnosed hemihypertrophy of the trunk who had a history of large thoracic lipomas resected during infancy, a thoracic hump due to adipose proliferation within the thoracic paraspinal musculature, and scoliotic deformity. She had fatty infiltration in the thoracic spinal nerves on MRI, identical to findings pathognomonic of LN at better-known sites. Enlargement of the transverse processes at those levels and thickened ribs were also found. This case appears to be directly analogous to other instances of LN with overgrowth, except that this case involved axial nerves rather than the typical appendicular nerves. PMID:24506247

  13. Measurements of the Obersteiner-Redlich zone of the vagus nerve and their possible clinical applications.

    PubMed

    S?oniewski, P; Korejwo, G; Zieli?ski, P; Mory?, J; Krzyzanowski, M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of our study was to describe anatomical variability of the root entry zone (REZ), also called the Obersteiner-Redlich zone, that represents the "junction zone" of glia and Schwann sheath of the cranial nerves. This zone has some clinical implications. The pulsatile compression of REZ by a vessel may produce clinical symptoms, such us trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm, glossopharyngeal neuralgia torticollis spasmodicus or even symptoms of essential hypertension when a vascular cross compression of REZ of a left vagus nerve is present. The vessel--cranial nerve contact in the skull base cysterns may be visualized in radiologic examinations, most accurately in magnetic resonance imaging. Because, we cannot distinguish the REZ from the rest of the vagus nerve in radiologic examinations we decided to measure the length of its REZ. The microanatomical study of the length of REZ zone of the vagus nerve was performed on 21 nerves taken from 17 human brain stems (12 men, 5 women, 14 left, 7 right), fixed with 8% buffered formalin solution. Paraffin embedded tissue was cut into 10-micron-thick sections parallel to the nerve longitudinal axis and stained with hematoxilin & eosin. Each of the nerves showed the presence of a zone of oligodendrocyte myelination, mean length 2 +/- 0.3 mm. In 17 nerves the transitional zone formed a cone-like process, in 4 nerves was shaped irregularly. The length of REZ (oligodendrocyte myelination plus "glial dome") had the mean length 3.5 +/- 0.9 mm. PMID:10504781

  14. Connecting localized DNA strand displacement reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullor Ruiz, Ismael; Arbona, Jean-Michel; Lad, Amitkumar; Mendoza, Oscar; Aim, Jean-Pierre; Elezgaray, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Logic circuits based on DNA strand displacement reactions have been shown to be versatile enough to compute the square root of four-bit numbers. The implementation of these circuits as a set of bulk reactions faces difficulties which include leaky reactions and intrinsically slow, diffusion-limited reaction rates. In this paper, we consider simple examples of these circuits when they are attached to platforms (DNA origamis). As expected, constraining distances between DNA strands leads to faster reaction rates. However, it also induces side-effects that are not detectable in the solution-phase version of this circuitry. Appropriate design of the system, including protection and asymmetry between input and fuel strands, leads to a reproducible behaviour, at least one order of magnitude faster than the one observed under bulk conditions.Logic circuits based on DNA strand displacement reactions have been shown to be versatile enough to compute the square root of four-bit numbers. The implementation of these circuits as a set of bulk reactions faces difficulties which include leaky reactions and intrinsically slow, diffusion-limited reaction rates. In this paper, we consider simple examples of these circuits when they are attached to platforms (DNA origamis). As expected, constraining distances between DNA strands leads to faster reaction rates. However, it also induces side-effects that are not detectable in the solution-phase version of this circuitry. Appropriate design of the system, including protection and asymmetry between input and fuel strands, leads to a reproducible behaviour, at least one order of magnitude faster than the one observed under bulk conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR02434J

  15. Volume displacement of scleral buckles.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J T; Michels, R G

    1985-12-01

    Indentation of the eye wall by a scleral buckle displaces volume from the vitreous cavity. We developed a mathematical formula to calculate the volume displacement caused by a scleral buckle and verified the accuracy of this mathematical model by performing scleral buckles in 21 cadaver eyes and three eyes undergoing retinal reattachment surgery. A single 5-mm radial sponge of moderate height displaces about 0.2 mL of fluid and a circumferential 2.5-mm-wide band of moderate height displaces about 0.5 mL of fluid. Larger circumferential tires of 7- to 10-mm width displace 1.1 to 1.8 mL of fluid, depending on the height and configuration of the scleral buckle. A 7- to 10-mm-wide circumferential scleral buckle with a buckle height of 4 mm may displace up to 45% of the volume of the vitreous cavity. This volume displacement should be considered when injecting expansile gases or pharmacologic agents into the vitreous cavity. PMID:4074171

  16. Regenerative rotary displacer Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Isshiki, Naotsugu; Watanabe, Hiroichi; Raggi, L.; Isshiki, Seita; Hirata, Koichi

    1996-12-31

    A few rotary displacer Stirling engines in which the displacer has one gas pocket space at one side and rotates in a main enclosed cylinder, which is heated from one side and cooled from opposite side without any regenerator, have been studied for some time by the authors. The authors tried to improve this engine by equipping it with a regenerator, because without a regenerator, pressure oscillation and efficiency are too small. Here, several types of regenerative rotary displacer piston Stirling engines are proposed. One is the contra-rotating tandem two disc type displacer engine using axial heat conduction through side walls or by heat pipes and another is a single disc type with circulating fluid regenerator or heat pipes. Stirling engines of this new rotary displacer type are thought to attain high speed. Here, experimental results of the original rotary displacer Stirling engine without a regenerator, and one contra-rotating tandem displacer engine with side wall regenerator by axial heat conduction are reported accompanied with a discussion of the results.

  17. A Case of Hemifacial Spasm Caused by an Artery Passing Through the Facial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Shim, Yu Shik; Park, Hyeonseon

    2015-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by unilateral facial nerve dysfunction. The usual cause involves vascular compression of the seventh cranial nerve, but compression by an artery passing through the facial nerve is very unusual. A 20-year-old man presented with left facial spasm that had persisted for 4 years. Compression of the left facial nerve root exit zone by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) was revealed on magnetic resonance angiography. During microvascular decompression surgery, penetration of the distal portion of the facial nerve root exit zone by the AICA was observed. At the penetrating site, the artery was found to have compressed the facial nerve and to be immobilized. The penetrated seventh cranial nerve was longitudinally split about 2 mm. The compressing artery was moved away from the penetrating site and the decompression was secured by inserting Teflon at the operative site. Although the facial spasm disappeared in the immediate postoperative period, the patient continued to show moderate facial weakness. At postoperative 12 months, the facial weakness had improved to a mild degree. Prior to performing microvascular decompression of HFS, surgeons should be aware of a possibility for rare complex anatomy, such as compression by an artery passing through the facial nerve, which cannot be observed by modern imaging techniques. PMID:25810866

  18. A case of hemifacial spasm caused by an artery passing through the facial nerve.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Shim, Yu Shik; Park, Hyeonseon; Kim, Eun-Young

    2015-03-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by unilateral facial nerve dysfunction. The usual cause involves vascular compression of the seventh cranial nerve, but compression by an artery passing through the facial nerve is very unusual. A 20-year-old man presented with left facial spasm that had persisted for 4 years. Compression of the left facial nerve root exit zone by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) was revealed on magnetic resonance angiography. During microvascular decompression surgery, penetration of the distal portion of the facial nerve root exit zone by the AICA was observed. At the penetrating site, the artery was found to have compressed the facial nerve and to be immobilized. The penetrated seventh cranial nerve was longitudinally split about 2 mm. The compressing artery was moved away from the penetrating site and the decompression was secured by inserting Teflon at the operative site. Although the facial spasm disappeared in the immediate postoperative period, the patient continued to show moderate facial weakness. At postoperative 12 months, the facial weakness had improved to a mild degree. Prior to performing microvascular decompression of HFS, surgeons should be aware of a possibility for rare complex anatomy, such as compression by an artery passing through the facial nerve, which cannot be observed by modern imaging techniques. PMID:25810866

  19. Borehole optical lateral displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, R.E.

    1998-10-20

    There is provided by this invention an optical displacement sensor that utilizes a reflective target connected to a surface to be monitored to reflect light from a light source such that the reflected light is received by a photoelectric transducer. The electric signal from the photoelectric transducer is then imputed into electronic circuitry to generate an electronic image of the target. The target`s image is monitored to determine the quantity and direction of any lateral displacement in the target`s image which represents lateral displacement in the surface being monitored. 4 figs.

  20. Variable spatial magnetic field influences peripheral nerves regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Suszy?ski, Krzysztof; Marcol, Wies?aw; Szajkowski, Sebastian; Pietrucha-Dutczak, Marita; Cie?lar, Grzegorz; Siero?, Aleksander; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2014-09-01

    Generator of spatial magnetic field is one of most recent achievements among the magnetostimulators. This apparatus allows to obtain the rotating magnetic field. This new method may be more effective than other widely used techniques of magnetostimulation and magnetotherapy. We investigated the influence of alternating, spatial magnetic field on the regeneration of the crushed rat sciatic nerves. Functional and morphological evaluations were used. After crush injury of the right sciatic nerve, Wistar C rats (n?=?80) were randomly divided into four groups (control and three experimental). The experimental groups (A, B, C) were exposed (20?min/day, 5?d/week, 4 weeks) to alternating spatial magnetic field of three different intensities. Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) and tensometric assessments were performed every week after nerve crush. Forty-eight hours before the sacrificing of animals, DiI (1,1'-di-octadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyloindocarbocyanine perchlorate) was applied 5?mm distally to the crush site. Collected nerves and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were subjected to histological and immunohistochemical staining. The survival rate of DRG neurons was estimated. Regrowth and myelination of the nerves was examined. The results of SFI and tensometric assessment showed improvement in all experimental groups as compared to control, with best outcome observed in group C, exposed to the strongest magnetic field. In addition, DRG survival rate and nerve regeneration intensity were significantly higher in the C group. Above results indicate that strong spatial alternating magnetic field exerts positive effect on peripheral nerve regeneration and its application could be taken under consideration in the therapy of injured peripheral nerves. PMID:23781984

  1. A Smartphone-Based Automatic Diagnosis System for Facial Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Seok; Kim, So Young; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy induces a weakness or loss of facial expression through damage of the facial nerve. A quantitative and reliable assessment system for facial nerve palsy is required for both patients and clinicians. In this study, we propose a rapid and portable smartphone-based automatic diagnosis system that discriminates facial nerve palsy from normal subjects. Facial landmarks are localized and tracked by an incremental parallel cascade of the linear regression method. An asymmetry index is computed using the displacement ratio between the left and right side of the forehead and mouth regions during three motions: resting, raising eye-brow and smiling. To classify facial nerve palsy, we used Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Support Vector Machine (SVM), and Leave-one-out Cross Validation (LOOCV) with 36 subjects. The classification accuracy rate was 88.9%. PMID:26506352

  2. Displacement sensing system and method

    DOEpatents

    VunKannon, Jr., Robert S

    2006-08-08

    A displacement sensing system and method addresses demanding requirements for high precision sensing of displacement of a shaft, for use typically in a linear electro-dynamic machine, having low failure rates over multi-year unattended operation in hostile environments. Applications include outer space travel by spacecraft having high-temperature, sealed environments without opportunity for servicing over many years of operation. The displacement sensing system uses a three coil sensor configuration, including a reference and sense coils, to provide a pair of ratio-metric signals, which are inputted into a synchronous comparison circuit, which is synchronously processed for a resultant displacement determination. The pair of ratio-metric signals are similarly affected by environmental conditions so that the comparison circuit is able to subtract or nullify environmental conditions that would otherwise cause changes in accuracy to occur.

  3. Polyimidazoles Via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments show variety of polyimidazoles prepared by aromatic nucleophilic displacement, from reactions of bisphenol imidazoles with activated difluoro compounds. Polyimidazoles have good mechanical properties making them suitable for use as films, moldings, and adhesives.

  4. Deficiency in monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) in mice delays regeneration of peripheral nerves following sciatic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Brett M; Tsingalia, Akivaga; Vidensky, Svetlana; Lee, Youngjin; Jin, Lin; Farah, Mohamed H; Lengacher, Sylvain; Magistretti, Pierre J; Pellerin, Luc; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration following injury occurs spontaneously, but many of the processes require metabolic energy. The mechanism of energy supply to axons has not previously been determined. In the central nervous system, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), expressed in oligodendroglia, is critical for supplying lactate or other energy metabolites to axons. In the current study, MCT1 is shown to localize within the peripheral nervous system to perineurial cells, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and Schwann cells by MCT1 immunofluorescence in wild-type mice and tdTomato fluorescence in MCT1 BAC reporter mice. To investigate whether MCT1 is necessary for peripheral nerve regeneration, sciatic nerves of MCT1 heterozygous null mice are crushed and peripheral nerve regeneration was quantified electrophysiologically and anatomically. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) recovery is delayed from a median of 21 days in wild-type mice to greater than 38 days in MCT1 heterozygote null mice. In fact, half of the MCT1 heterozygote null mice have no recovery of CMAP at 42 days, while all of the wild-type mice recovered. In addition, muscle fibers remain 40% more atrophic and neuromuscular junctions 40% more denervated at 42 days post-crush in the MCT1 heterozygote null mice than wild-type mice. The delay in nerve regeneration is not only in motor axons, as the number of regenerated axons in the sural sensory nerve of MCT1 heterozygote null mice at 4 weeks and tibial mixed sensory and motor nerve at 3 weeks is also significantly reduced compared to wild-type mice. This delay in regeneration may be partly due to failed Schwann cell function, as there is reduced early phagocytosis of myelin debris and remyelination of axon segments. These data for the first time demonstrate that MCT1 is critical for regeneration of both sensory and motor axons in mice following sciatic nerve crush. PMID:25447940

  5. Endogenous neurotrophin-3 promotes neuronal sprouting from dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu-yang; Gu, Pei-yuan; Chen, Shi-wen; Gao, Wen-wei; Tian, Heng-li; Lu, Xiang-he; Zheng, Wei-ming; Zhuge, Qi-chuan; Hu, Wei-xing

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of endogenous neurotrophin-3 in nerve terminal sprouting 2 months after spinal cord dorsal root rhizotomy. The left L15 and L7S2 dorsal root ganglia in adult cats were exposed and removed, preserving the L6 dorsal root ganglia. Neurotrophin-3 was mainly expressed in large neurons in the dorsal root ganglia and in some neurons in spinal lamina II. Two months after rhizotomy, the number of neurotrophin-3-positive neurons in the spared dorsal root ganglia and the density of neurite sprouts emerging from these ganglia were increased. Intraperitoneal injection of an antibody against neurotrophin-3 decreased the density of neurite sprouts. These findings suggest that endogenous neurotrophin-3 is involved in spinal cord plasticity and regeneration, and that it promotes axonal sprouting from the dorsal root ganglia after spinal cord dorsal root rhizotomy. PMID:26807126

  6. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patients history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  7. Histochemical discrimination of fibers in regenerating rat infraorbital nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilke, R. A.; Riley, D. A.; Sanger, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    In rat dorsal root ganglia, histochemical staining of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) yields a reciprocal pattern of activity: Sensory processes are CA positive and CE negative, whereas motor processes are CA negative and CE positive. In rat infraorbital nerve (a sensory peripheral nerve), we saw extensive CA staining of nearly 100% of the myelinated axons. Although CE reactivity in myelinated axons was extremely rare, we did observe CE staining of unmyelinated autonomic fibers. Four weeks after transection of infraorbital nerves, CA-stained longitudinal sections of the proximal stump demonstrated 3 distinct morphological zones. A fraction of the viable axons retained CA activity to within 2 mm of the distal extent of the stump, and the stain is capable of resolving growth sprouts being regenerated from these fibers. Staining of unmyelinated autonomic fibers in serial sections shows that CE activity was not retained as far distally as is the CA sensory staining.

  8. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment].

    PubMed

    Fansa, H; Schneider, W

    2003-03-01

    Isolated compression of the suprascapular nerve is a rare entity, that is seldom considered in differential diagnosis of shoulder pain. Usually atrophy of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles is present, resulting in weakened abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. Mostly the patients do not note the paresis, but complain about a dull and burning pain over the dorsal shoulder region. In a proximal lesion (at level of the superior transverse scapular ligament) electromyography reveals changes in both muscles, while in a distal lesion (spinoglenoidal notch) only the infraspinatus shows a pathology. From 1996 to 2001 we diagnosed an isolated suprascapular entrapment in nine patients. Seven patients were operated: The ligament was removed and the nerve was neurolysed. The average age was 36 years. All patients showed pathological findings in electrophysiological and clinical examination. Five patients had an atrophy of both scapula muscles, two showed only infraspinatus muscle atrophy (one with a ganglion in the distal course of the nerve). Six patients were followed up. All showed an improvement. Pain disappeared and all patients were able to return to work and sport activities. Electrophysiological examination one year after operation revealed normal nerve conduction velocity. The number of motor units, however, showed a reduction by half compared to the healthy side. Lesions without history of trauma are usually caused by repetitive motion or posture. Weight lifting, volley ball and tennis promote the entrapment. Rarely a lesion (either idiopathic or due to external compression) is described for patients who underwent surgery. Patients with a ganglion or a defined cause of compression should be operated, patients who present without a distinct reason for compression should firstly be treated conservatively. Physiotherapy, antiphlogistic medication and avoiding of the pain triggering motion can improve the symptoms. However, if muscle atrophy is evident, an operation is indicated from our experience. PMID:12874724

  9. Cranial Nerve II

    PubMed Central

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    This article contains a brief review of the anatomy of the visual system, a survey of diseases of the retina, optic nerve and lesions of the optic chiasm, and other visual field defects of special interest to the psychiatrist. It also includes a presentation of the corticothalamic mechanisms, differential diagnosis, and various manifestations of visual illusions, and simple and complex visual hallucinations, as well as the differential diagnoses of these various visual phenomena. PMID:19855858

  10. Cranial Nerve II: Vision.

    PubMed

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2009-09-01

    This article contains a brief review of the anatomy of the visual system, a survey of diseases of the retina, optic nerve and lesions of the optic chiasm, and other visual field defects of special interest to the psychiatrist. It also includes a presentation of the corticothalamic mechanisms, differential diagnosis, and various manifestations of visual illusions, and simple and complex visual hallucinations, as well as the differential diagnoses of these various visual phenomena. PMID:19855858

  11. Epidermal nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Engelstad, JaNean K.; Taylor, Sean W.; Witt, Lawrence V.; Hoebing, Belinda J.; Herrmann, David N.; Klein, Christopher J.; Johnson, David M.; Davies, Jenny L.; Carter, Rickey E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Our first objective was to explore the value of estimating 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of epidermal nerve fibers (ENFs)/mm for number of sections to be evaluated and for confidently judging normality or abnormality. Our second objective was to introduce a new continuous measure combining nerve conduction and ENFs/mm. Methods: The 95% CI studies were performed on 1, 12, 13 - - - 110 serial skip sections of 3-mm punch biopsies of leg and thigh of 67 healthy subjects and 23 patients with diabetes mellitus. Results: Variability of differences of ENFs/mm counts (and 95% CIs) from evaluation of 1, 12, 13 - - - 19 compared with 110 serial skip sections decreased progressively without a break point with increasing numbers of sections evaluated. Estimating 95% CIs as sections are evaluated can be used to judge how many sections are needed for adequate evaluation, i.e., only a few when counts and 95% CIs are well within the range of normality or abnormality and more when values are borderline. Also provided is a methodology to combine results of nerve conduction and ENFs/mm as continuous measures of normality or abnormality. Conclusion: Estimating 95% CIs of ENFs/mm is useful to judge how many sections should be evaluated to confidently declare counts to be normal or abnormal. Also introduced is a continuous measure of both large-fiber (nerve conduction) and small-fiber (ENFs/mm) normal structures/functions spanning the range of normality and abnormality for use in therapeutic trials. PMID:23100396

  12. Optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B S; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-05-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  13. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B. S.; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  14. Nerve grafting in the repair of complicated peripheral nerve trauma.

    PubMed

    Walton, R; Finseth, F

    1977-10-01

    Peripheral nerve trauma has been a challenge to surgeons, with significant advances in the surgery of repair occurring in major wars. The standard method of treatment involving wide mobilization and end-to-end suture to close traumatic gaps in peripheral nerves has not produced consistently acceptable results, particularly with large gaps. However, with the recent development of microsurgical techniques and instrumentation, the method of interfascicular nerve grafting has been applied to selected patients with trauma problems of the peripheral nerve, by resecting and autogenous nerve grafting at staggered levels to distribute scar formation, followed by plaster immobilization for 3 weeks. Ten patients are reported, with motor nerve recovery ranging from M2 to M4 and sensory recovery, S2-S4 (See Table I), based on Seddon's classification (11). PMID:909120

  15. Nfic regulates tooth root patterning and growth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tak-Heun; Bae, Cheol-Hyeon; Yang, Siqin; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Molecular interactions between epithelium and mesenchyme are important for root formation. Nuclear factor I-C (Nfic) has been identified as a key regulator of root formation. However, the mechanisms of root formation and their interactions between Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) and mesenchyme remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of Nfic in root patterning and growth during molar root development. The molars of Nfic knockout mice exhibited an enlarged pulp chamber and apical displacement of the pulpal floor, characteristic features of taurodontism, due to delayed furcation formation. In developing molar roots of mutant mice at P14, BrdU positive cells decreased in the apical mesenchyme of the elongation region whereas those cells increased in the dental papilla of the furcation region. Whereas cytokeratin 14 and laminin were localized in HERS cells of mutant molars, Smoothened (Smo) and Gli1 were downregulated in preodontoblasts. In contrast, cytokeratin 14 and Smo were localized in the cells of the furcation region of mutant molars. These results indicate that Nfic regulates cell proliferation in the dental mesenchyme and affects the fate of HERS cells in a site-specific manner. From the results, it is suggested that Nfic is required for root patterning and growth during root morphogenesis. PMID:26417478

  16. Nfic regulates tooth root patterning and growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tak-Heun; Bae, Cheol-Hyeon; Yang, Siqin; Park, Joo-Cheol; Cho, Eui-Sic

    2015-09-01

    Molecular interactions between epithelium and mesenchyme are important for root formation. Nuclear factor I-C (Nfic) has been identified as a key regulator of root formation. However, the mechanisms of root formation and their interactions between Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) and mesenchyme remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of Nfic in root patterning and growth during molar root development. The molars of Nfic knockout mice exhibited an enlarged pulp chamber and apical displacement of the pulpal floor, characteristic features of taurodontism, due to delayed furcation formation. In developing molar roots of mutant mice at P14, BrdU positive cells decreased in the apical mesenchyme of the elongation region whereas those cells increased in the dental papilla of the furcation region. Whereas cytokeratin 14 and laminin were localized in HERS cells of mutant molars, Smoothened (Smo) and Gli1 were downregulated in preodontoblasts. In contrast, cytokeratin 14 and Smo were localized in the cells of the furcation region of mutant molars. These results indicate that Nfic regulates cell proliferation in the dental mesenchyme and affects the fate of HERS cells in a site-specific manner. From the results, it is suggested that Nfic is required for root patterning and growth during root morphogenesis. PMID:26417478

  17. An analytical fiber bundle model for pullout mechanics of root bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D.; Schwarz, M.; Or, D.

    2011-09-01

    Roots in soil contribute to the mechanical stability of slopes. Estimation of root reinforcement is challenging because roots form complex biological networks whose geometrical and mechanical characteristics are difficult to characterize. Here we describe an analytical model that builds on simple root descriptors to estimate root reinforcement. Root bundles are modeled as bundles of heterogeneous fibers pulled along their long axes neglecting root-soil friction. Analytical expressions for the pullout force as a function of displacement are derived. The maximum pullout force and corresponding critical displacement are either derived analytically or computed numerically. Key model inputs are a root diameter distribution (uniform, Weibull, or lognormal) and three empirical power law relations describing tensile strength, elastic modulus, and length of roots as functions of root diameter. When a root bundle with root tips anchored in the soil matrix is pulled by a rigid plate, a unique parameter, ?, that depends only on the exponents of the power law relations, dictates the order in which roots of different diameters break. If ? < 1, small roots break first; if ? > 1, large roots break first. When ? = 1, all fibers break simultaneously, and the maximum tensile force is simply the roots' mean force times the number of roots in the bundle. Based on measurements of root geometry and mechanical properties, the value of ? is less than 1, usually ranging between 0 and 0.7. Thus, small roots always fail first. The model shows how geometrical and mechanical characteristics of roots and root diameter distribution affect the pullout force, its maximum and corresponding displacement. Comparing bundles of roots that have similar mean diameters, a bundle with a narrow variance in root diameter will result in a larger maximum force and a smaller displacement at maximum force than a bundle with a wide diameter distribution. Increasing the mean root diameter of a bundle without changing the distribution's shape increases both the maximum force and corresponding displacement. Estimates of the maximum pullout forces for bundles of 100 roots with identical diameter distribution for different species range from less than 1 kN for barley (Hordeum vulgare) to almost 16 kN for pistachio (Pistacia lentiscus). The model explains why a commonly used assumption that all roots break simultaneously overpredicts the maximum pullout force by a factor of about 1.6-2. This ratio may exceed 3 for diameter distributions that have a large number of small roots like the exponential distribution.

  18. Temporary Mental Nerve Paresthesia Originating from Periapical Infection

    PubMed Central

    Genc Sen, Ozgur; Kaplan, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Many systemic and local factors can cause paresthesia, and it is rarely caused by infections of dental origin. This report presents a case of mental nerve paresthesia caused by endodontic infection of a mandibular left second premolar. Resolution of the paresthesia began two weeks after conventional root canal treatment associated with antibiotic therapy and was completed in eight weeks. One year follow-up radiograph indicated complete healing of the radiolucent periapical lesion. The tooth was asymptomatic and functional. PMID:26345692

  19. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Through Hydrogel-Enriched Chitosan Conduits Containing Engineered Schwann Cells for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Cora; Wrobel, Sandra; Raimondo, Stefania; Rochkind, Shimon; Heimann, Claudia; Shahar, Abraham; Ziv-Polat, Ofra; Geuna, Stefano; Grothe, Claudia; Haastert-Talini, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Critical length nerve defects in the rat sciatic nerve model were reconstructed with chitosan nerve guides filled with Schwann cells (SCs) containing hydrogel. The transplanted SCs were naive or had been genetically modified to overexpress neurotrophic factors, thus providing a cellular neurotrophic factor delivery system. Prior to the assessment in vivo, in vitro studies evaluating the properties of engineered SCs overexpressing glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2(18kDa)) demonstrated their neurite outgrowth inductive bioactivity for sympathetic PC-12 cells as well as for dissociated dorsal root ganglion cell drop cultures. SCs within NVR-hydrogel, which is mainly composed of hyaluronic acid and laminin, were delivered into the lumen of chitosan hollow conduits with a 5% degree of acetylation. The viability and neurotrophic factor production by engineered SCs within NVR-Gel inside the chitosan nerve guides was further demonstrated in vitro. In vivo we studied the outcome of peripheral nerve regeneration after reconstruction of 15-mm nerve gaps with either chitosan/NVR-Gel/SCs composite nerve guides or autologous nerve grafts (ANGs). While ANGs did guarantee for functional sensory and motor regeneration in 100% of the animals, delivery of NVR-Gel into the chitosan nerve guides obviously impaired sufficient axonal outgrowth. This obstacle was overcome to a remarkable extent when the NVR-Gel was enriched with FGF-2(18kDa) overexpressing SCs. PMID:25876520

  20. Methods of peripheral nerve tissue preparation for second harmonic generation imaging of collagen fibers.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Surabhi; Huq, Rumana; Hausman, Michael R

    2014-03-15

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of the peripheral nerve using multi-photon microscopy is a novel technique with little documentation. It affords the significant possibility of non-destructive imaging of internal nerve anatomy. The nature of nerve tissue, especially its size and viscoelastic properties, present special challenges for microscopy. While nerves are under an innate in situ strain, they retract once dissected, thus distorting microscopic structure. The challenge is to preserve the nerve in its natural strain range to obtain images that most truly reveal its structure. This study examined backscattered SHG images of rat median nerve prepared by several different methods to compare image quality and content. Nerve segments were fixed under strained (constant load or length) and unstrained conditions and imaged as whole nerve as well as plastic (methyl methacrylate) and paraffin embedded sections. These were tested for optimal excitation wavelength, quantitative image contrast, and overall quality. Root mean squared (RMS) contrast proved to be a reliable measure of the level of image contrast perceived by eye. We concluded that images obtained from tissue sections (plastic and paraffin) provided the most accurate and revealing SHG images of peripheral nerve structure. Removing the embedding material prior to imaging significantly improved image quality. Optimal excitation wavelengths were consistent regardless of the preparation method. PMID:23962836

  1. Nerve Agent Toxicity and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Holstege, Christopher P; Dobmeier, Stephen G

    2005-03-01

    The clinical syndrome of nerve agent toxicity varies widely, ranging from the classic cholinergic syndrome to flaccid paralysis and status epilepticus. All nerve agents are capable of producing marked neuropathology. Seizure control is strongly associated with protection against acute lethality and brain pathology. The mainstays of therapy of nerve agent poisoned patients are atropine, pralidoxime, and benzodiazepines. Fosphenytoin provides little therapeutic anticonvulsant effectiveness for nerve agent-induced status epilepticus. Tachycardia is not a contraindication to treatment with atropine in nerve agent toxicity. Atropine should be administered to alleviate respiratory distress, symptomatic bradycardia, and as an adjunct to benzodiazepines and pralidoxime to alleviate seizure activity. In significant nerve agent toxicity, a continuous pralidoxime infusion may be considered. PMID:15676112

  2. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  3. Mutations affecting nerve attachment of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Shioi, G; Shoji, M; Nakamura, M; Ishihara, T; Katsura, I; Fujisawa, H; Takagi, S

    2001-01-01

    Using a pan-neuronal GFP marker, a morphological screen was performed to detect Caenorhabditis elegans larval lethal mutants with severely disorganized major nerve cords. We recovered and characterized 21 mutants that displayed displacement or detachment of the ventral nerve cord from the body wall (Ven: ventral cord abnormal). Six mutations defined three novel genetic loci: ven-1, ven-2, and ven-3. Fifteen mutations proved to be alleles of previously identified muscle attachment/positioning genes, mup-4, mua-1, mua-5, and mua-6. All the mutants also displayed muscle attachment/positioning defects characteristic of mua/mup mutants. The pan-neuronal GFP marker also revealed that mutants of other mua/mup loci, such as mup-1, mup-2, and mua-2, exhibited the Ven defect. The hypodermis, the excretory canal, and the gonad were morphologically abnormal in some of the mutants. The pleiotropic nature of the defects indicates that ven and mua/mup genes are required generally for the maintenance of attachment of tissues to the body wall in C. elegans. PMID:11290717

  4. Job Displacement Among Single Mothers:

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Jennie E.; Thomas, Juli Simon

    2015-01-01

    Given the recent era of economic upheaval, studying the effects of job displacement has seldom been so timely and consequential. Despite a large literature associating displacement with worker well-being, relatively few studies focus on the effects of parental displacement on child well-being, and fewer still focus on implications for children of single parent households. Moreover, notwithstanding a large literature on the relationship between single motherhood and children’s outcomes, research on intergenerational effects of involuntary employment separations among single mothers is limited. Using 30 years of nationally representative panel data and propensity score matching methods, we find significant negative effects of job displacement among single mothers on children’s educational attainment and social-psychological well-being in young adulthood. Effects are concentrated among older children and children whose mothers had a low likelihood of displacement, suggesting an important role for social stigma and relative deprivation in the effects of socioeconomic shocks on child well-being. PMID:25032267

  5. Using the nerve stimulator for peripheral or plexus nerve blocks.

    PubMed

    Urmey, W F

    2006-06-01

    Conventional methodology for nerve location utilizes anatomical landmarks followed by invasive exploration with a needle to a suitable endpoint. An appropriate endpoint can be either anatomical in nature (e.g. transaterial technique) or functional (paresthesia or motor response to electrical stimulation). Ability to electrically stimulate a peripheral nerve or plexus depends upon many variables, including; 1) conductive area at the electrode, 2) electrical impedance, 3) electrode-to-nerve distance, 4) current flow (amperage), and 5) pulse duration. Electrode conductive area follows the equation R = rhoL/A, where R = electrical resistance, p = tissue resistivity, L = electrode-to-nerve distance, and A = electrode conductive area. Therefore resistance varies to the inverse of the electrode's conductive area. Tissue electrical impedance varies as a function of the tissue composition. In general, tissues with higher lipid content have higher impedances. Modern electrical nerve stimulators are designed to keep current constant, in spite of varying impedance. The electrode-to-nerve distance has the most influence on the ability to elicit a motor response to electrical stimulation. This is governed by Coulomb's law: E = K(Q/r2) where E = required stimulating charge, K= constant, Q = minimal required stimulating current, and r = electrode-to-nerve distance. Therefore, ability to stimulate the nerve at low amperage (e.g. < 0.5 mA), indicates an extremely close position to the nerve. Similarly, increasing current flow (amperage) increases the ability to stimulate the nerve at a distance. Increasing pulse duration increases the flow of electrons during a current pulse at any given amperage. Therefore, reducing pulse duration to very short times (e.g. 0.1 or 0.05 ms) diminishes current dispersion, requiring the needle tip to be extremely close to the nerve to elicit a motor response. The above parameters can be varied optimally to enhance successful nerve location and subsequent blockade. Unlike imaging modalities such as ultrasonography, electrical nerve stimulation depends upon nerve conduction. Similarly, percutaneous electrode guidance (PEG) makes use of the above variables to allow prelocation of the nerve by transcutaneous stimulation. PMID:16682917

  6. Neurotrophin releasing single and multiple lumen nerve conduits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; De Laporte, Laura; Rives, Christopher B.; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Lin, Wei-Chun; Shull, Kenneth R.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies for nerve repair employ polymer conduits termed guidance channels and bridges to promote regeneration for peripheral nerve injury and spinal cord injury, respectively. An approach for fabrication of nerve conduits with single and multiple lumens capable of controlled release of neurotrophic factors was developed. These conduits were fabricated from a mixture of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) microspheres and porogen (NaCl) that was loaded into a mold and processed by gas foaming. The porosity and mechanical properties of the constructs were regulated by the ratio of porogen to polymer microsphere. The neurotrophin, nerve growth factor (NGF), was incorporated into the conduit by either mixing the protein with microspheres or encapsulating the protein within microspheres prior to gas foaming. A sustained release was observed for at least 42 days, with the release rate controlled by method of incorporation and polymer molecular weight. Released NGF retained its bioactivity, as demonstrated by its ability to stimulate neurite outgrowth from primary dorsal root ganglion (DRG). In vivo results indicate that conduits retain their original architecture, and allow for cellular infiltration into the channels. Polymer conduits with controllable lumen diameters and protein release may enhance nerve regeneration by guiding and stimulating neurite outgrowth. PMID:15911044

  7. Biosynthesis and transport of gangliosides in peripheral nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, A.J.; Tipnis, U.R.; Hofteig, J.H.; Warner, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    Radiolabelled glucosamine was injected into L-7 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of rabbits. At several different times after injection DRG, lumbosacral trunks (LST) and sciatic nerves (SN) were removed and gangliosides extracted. Two and 3 weeks after injection the amounts of radioactivity in the ganglioside fractions of LST and SN were significantly higher than at days 1 and 2. The TCA soluble radioactivity decreased dramatically over the same time period. Colchicine prevented the appearance of radiolabelled lipid in LST and SN. From these experiments the authors conclude that some ganglioside is synthesized in the neuronal cell bodies of DRG and transported in the axons of the sciatic nerve. In another experiment the sciatic nerve was transected and ends separated to prevent regeneration. There was no difference in the amount of radiolabelled ganglioside that was isolated from DRG or LST of transected nerves compared with control nerves. The behavior of several potential acid soluble contaminants was studied in several steps used to isolate gangliosides. Of those studied only CMP-NeuAc could cause significant contamination of the final ganglioside preparation.

  8. Facial nerve neuromas: radiologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Latack, J T; Gabrielsen, T O; Knake, J E; Kemink, J L; Graham, M D; Gebarski, S S; Yang, P J

    1983-12-01

    Eight patients who had facial nerve neuromas were examined, and the radiographic findings are reported. Thin section tomography, high resolution computed tomography, posterior fossa computed tomography, and cerebellopontine angle cisternography using Pantopaque (iophendylate) demonstrated bone erosions and soft tissue masses conforming to the course of the facial nerve. The lesions generally exhibited either a proximal or a distal pattern of nerve involvement. Radiologic imaging frequently permits a correct preoperative diagnosis and accurate definition of the extent of facial nerve neuromas, assessments that are important for proper patient management. PMID:6606188

  9. Nerve-pulse interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

  10. In vivo nerve-macrophage interactions following peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Allison; Wolman, Marc A.; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Granato, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, the peripheral nervous system has retained its regenerative capacity, enabling severed axons to reconnect with their original synaptic targets. While it is well documented that a favorable environment is critical for nerve regeneration, the complex cellular interactions between injured nerves with cells in their environment, as well as the functional significance of these interactions, have not been determined in vivo and in real time. Here we provide the first minute-by-minute account of cellular interactions between laser transected motor nerves and macrophages in live intact zebrafish. We show that macrophages arrive at the lesion site long before axon fragmentation, much earlier than previously thought. Moreover, we find that axon fragmentation triggers macrophage invasion into the nerve to engulf axonal debris, and that delaying nerve fragmentation in a Wlds model does not alter macrophage recruitment but induces a previously unknown nerve scanning behavior, suggesting that macrophage recruitment and subsequent nerve invasion are controlled by separate mechanisms. Finally, we demonstrate that macrophage recruitment, thought to be dependent on Schwann cell derived signals, occurs independently of Schwann cells. Thus, live cell imaging defines novel cellular and functional interactions between injured nerves and immune cells. PMID:22423110

  11. Magnetic nerve stimulation without interlinkage between nerve and magnetic flux

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, S.; Harada, K.; Ji, C.; Oomura, Y.

    1984-09-01

    A new method of magnetic stimulation of nerves is proposed. Nerves are located on a core aperture outside the core which is implanted in the body. Nerves can be stimulated by the secondary currents which flow in the body fluids around the core when the magnetic flux in the core is changed. One of the advantages in this method is to be able to avoid the interlinkage between the core and nerves. The equivalent resistance of tissues around the core is calculated, and current density for nerve excitation is estimated. The validity of the new method is demonstrated by experiments using frog nerve-muscle preparations. The results show that the nerve can be excited by a change of magnetic flux which generates an EMF of 0.8-volts peak amplitude and 0.8-ms duration in a monitor wire. The current density in the vicinity of the core aperture for nerve excitation is 3.2 mA/cm/sup 2/.

  12. Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in Human Cervical and Thoracic Vagus Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Atsuko; Green, Hunter R.; Lee, Thomas D.; Hong, LongSheng; Tan, Jian; Vinters, Harry V.; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Fishbein, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vagus nerve stimulation therapy (VNS) has been used for chronic heart failure (CHF), and is believed to improve imbalance of autonomic control by increasing parasympathetic activity. Although it is known that there is neural communication between the VN and the cervical sympathetic trunk, there are few data regarding the quantity and/or distribution of the sympathetic components within the VN. Objective To examine the sympathetic component within human VN and correlate these with the presence of cardiac and neurologic diseases. Methods We performed immunohistochemistry on 31 human cervical and thoracic VNs (total 104 VNs) from autopsies and we reviewed the patients records. We correlated the quantity of sympathetic nerve fibers within the VNs with cardiovascular and neurologic disease states. Results All 104 VNs contain TH positive (sympathetic) nerve fibers; the mean TH positive areas were 5.47% in right cervical, 3.97% in left cervical, 5.11% in right thoracic, and 4.20% in left thoracic VN. The distribution of TH positive nerve fibers varied from case to case: central, peripheral, or scattered throughout nerve bundles. No statistically significant differences in nerve morphology were seen between diseases in which VNS is considered effective (depression and CHF), and other cardiovascular diseases, or neurodegenerative disease. Conclusion Human VNs contain sympathetic nerve fibers. The sympathetic component within the VN could play a role in physiologic effects reported with VNS. The recognition of sympathetic nerve fibers in the VNs may lead to better understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of VNS. PMID:24768897

  13. Rotor component displacement measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Mercer, Gary D.; Li, Ming C.; Baum, Charles R.

    2003-05-27

    A measuring system for measuring axial displacement of a tube relative to an axially stationary component in a rotating rotor assembly includes at least one displacement sensor adapted to be located normal to a longitudinal axis of the tube; an insulated cable system adapted for passage through the rotor assembly; a rotatable proximitor module located axially beyond the rotor assembly to which the cables are connected; and a telemetry system operatively connected to the proximitor module for sampling signals from the proximitor module and forwarding data to a ground station.

  14. Particle displacement tracking for PIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1990-01-01

    A new Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) data acquisition and analysis system, which is an order of magnitude faster than any previously proposed system has been constructed and tested. The new Particle Displacement Tracing (PDT) system is an all electronic technique employing a video camera and a large memory buffer frame-grabber board. Using a simple encoding scheme, a time sequence of single exposure images are time coded into a single image and then processed to track particle displacements and determine velocity vectors. Application of the PDT technique to a counter-rotating vortex flow produced over 1100 velocity vectors in 110 seconds when processed on an 80386 PC.

  15. Nerve Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the body. A nerve is like a telephone cable wrapped in insulation. An outer layer of tissue ... nerve, just like the insulation surrounding a telephone cable (see Figure 1). A nerve contains millions of ...

  16. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,

  17. Nerve welding by Ar+ laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dong-Ji; Li, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Ai-Hua; Deng, Zue-Xing; Xu, Gue-Xiang

    1998-11-01

    The comparative study of sciatic nerve microepincutral anastomoses with Ar+ laser and conventional suture techniques was made on rats. Total tests included electrophysiological and histopathological studies. The result of the experiment showed that nerve welding with laser is better than conventional suture techniques.

  18. Blade Displacement Predictions for the Full-Scale UH-60A Airloads Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bledron, Robert T.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    An unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver for unstructured grids is loosely coupled to a rotorcraft comprehensive code and used to simulate two different test conditions from a wind-tunnel test of a full-scale UH-60A rotor. Performance data and sectional airloads from the simulation are compared with corresponding tunnel data to assess the level of fidelity of the aerodynamic aspects of the simulation. The focus then turns to a comparison of the blade displacements, both rigid (blade root) and elastic. Comparisons of computed root motions are made with data from three independent measurement systems. Finally, comparisons are made between computed elastic bending and elastic twist, and the corresponding measurements obtained from a photogrammetry system. Overall the correlation between computed and measured displacements was good, especially for the root pitch and lag motions and the elastic bending deformation. The correlation of root lead-lag motion and elastic twist deformation was less favorable.

  19. Patterns of slow transport in sensory nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Stromska, D.P.; Ochs, S.

    1981-09-01

    An examination of the pattern of outflow of radioactivity in sciatic nerves was made at times from 1 to 82 days in the rat and up to 132 days in the cat after injecting the L5 and L7 dorsal root ganglia, respectively, with 3H-leucine. Slow waves moving at a rate of 1-2 mm/day were looked for on the basis of their reported presence in the motor fibers of the rat. A consistent pattern of slow waves was not seen in the cat or rat sensory fibers of the sciatic nerves nor was evidence of a slow wave found in the cat dorsal columns. Irregularities in the pattern of outflow which at times appeared as waves did so in an irregular fashion, a pattern inconsistent with a steady progression of slow waves in the fibers. The decrease of radioactivity appearing first near the ganglia helps create the impression of a wave along with irregular decreases in the overall levels of radio-activity with time. The results were explained on the basis of the unitary hypothesis. The labeled components are considered to be moved down the fiber by the fast transport mechanism, those components dropping off locally in the fibers early on, constituting the slow wave. As those components turn over locally in the various organelles of fiber and are further redistributed, they may at times give rise to what appears as waves.

  20. Retraining Displaced Workers. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaLonde, Robert; Sullivan, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Robert LaLonde of the University of Chicago and Daniel Sullivan of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago suggest that retraining through our nation's community colleges is a way to reduce the skills gaps of at least some of these displaced workers and increase their reemployment earnings. Although workers may still experience significant earnings

  1. Knowledge Integration and Displaced Volume.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Marcia C.; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2000-01-01

    Contrasts spontaneous and reflective knowledge integration instruction delivered using a computer learning environment to enhance understanding of displaced volume. Distinguishes the impact of instruction on students who believed scientific phenomena are governed by principles (cohesive beliefs) versus students who believed that science is a

  2. DISPLACEMENT BASED SEISMIC DESIGN METHODS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOFMAYER,C.MILLER,C.WANG,Y.COSTELLO,J.

    2003-07-15

    A research effort was undertaken to determine the need for any changes to USNRC's seismic regulatory practice to reflect the move, in the earthquake engineering community, toward using expected displacement rather than force (or stress) as the basis for assessing design adequacy. The research explored the extent to which displacement based seismic design methods, such as given in FEMA 273, could be useful for reviewing nuclear power stations. Two structures common to nuclear power plants were chosen to compare the results of the analysis models used. The first structure is a four-story frame structure with shear walls providing the primary lateral load system, referred herein as the shear wall model. The second structure is the turbine building of the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant. The models were analyzed using both displacement based (pushover) analysis and nonlinear dynamic analysis. In addition, for the shear wall model an elastic analysis with ductility factors applied was also performed. The objectives of the work were to compare the results between the analyses, and to develop insights regarding the work that would be needed before the displacement based analysis methodology could be considered applicable to facilities licensed by the NRC. A summary of the research results, which were published in NUREGICR-6719 in July 2001, is presented in this paper.

  3. Clinical observations on sensory effects of trigeminal dorsal root section1

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Adolfo; Guitart, Jos Ma.

    1971-01-01

    Further clinical and operative support is presented for Dandy's discovery in 1929 of the presence of accessory sensory fibres of the fifth cranial nerve, running a separate course from the main sensory root at its exit from the pons. The advantages are stressed of Dandy's subcerebellar approach in selected cases for sparing those fibres as well as the motor root. Images PMID:5571312

  4. Noncontact subnanometer measurement of transient surface displacement during action potential propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkin, Taner; Dave, Digant P.; Rylander, H. Grady, III; Milner, Thomas E.

    2005-04-01

    We have demonstrated non-contact, sub-nanometer optical measurement of neural surface displacement associated with action potential propagation without applying exogenous chemicals or reflection coatings. Signals recorded from crayfish leg nerve using a phase-sensitive optical low coherence reflectometer show that transient neural surface displacement due to action potential propagation is approximately 1 nm in amplitude and 1 ms in duration. Measured optical signals are coincident with electrical action potential arrival to the optical measurement site. Recent experiments indicate signals with similar amplitude and duration are observed in response to repetitive fast stimulation (200 stimuli/s).

  5. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  6. Peripheral nerve lengthening as a regenerative strategy

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Kenneth M.; Brown, Justin M.; Shah, Sameer B.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic function, incurring substantial financial costs and diminished quality of life. For large nerve gaps, proximal lesions, or chronic nerve injury, the prognosis for recovery is particularly poor, even with autografts, the current gold standard for treating small to moderate nerve gaps. In vivo elongation of intact proximal stumps towards the injured distal stumps of severed peripheral nerves may offer a promising new strategy to treat nerve injury. This review describes several nerve lengthening strategies, including a novel internal fixator device that enables rapid and distal reconnection of proximal and distal nerve stumps. PMID:25317163

  7. Adipose derived stem cells and nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Faroni, Alessandro; Smith, Richard JP; Reid, Adam J

    2014-01-01

    Injuries to peripheral nerves are common and cause life-changing problems for patients alongside high social and health care costs for society. Current clinical treatment of peripheral nerve injuries predominantly relies on sacrificing a section of nerve from elsewhere in the body to provide a graft at the injury site. Much work has been done to develop a bioengineered nerve graft, precluding sacrifice of a functional nerve. Stem cells are prime candidates as accelerators of regeneration in these nerve grafts. This review examines the potential of adipose-derived stem cells to improve nerve repair assisted by bioengineered nerve grafts. PMID:25221589

  8. Peripheral nerve blocks for distal extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Offierski, Chris

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral nerve block is well suited for distal extremity surgery. Blocking the nerves at the distal extremity is easily done. It does not require ultrasound or stimulators to identify the nerve. Blocking nerves in the distal extremity is safe with low risk of toxicity. The effect of the nerve block is limited to the distribution of the nerve. The distal nerves in the lower extremity are sensory branches of the sciatic nerve. This provides a sensory block only. This has the advantage of allowing the patient to actively contract tendons in the foot and ambulate more quickly after surgery. PMID:24093651

  9. True navigation in migrating gulls requires intact olfactory nerves.

    PubMed

    Wikelski, Martin; Arriero, Elena; Gagliardo, Anna; Holland, Richard A; Huttunen, Markku J; Juvaste, Risto; Mueller, Inge; Tertitski, Grigori; Thorup, Kasper; Wild, Martin; Alanko, Markku; Bairlein, Franz; Cherenkov, Alexander; Cameron, Alison; Flatz, Reinhard; Hannila, Juhani; Hppop, Ommo; Kangasniemi, Markku; Kranstauber, Bart; Penttinen, Maija-Liisa; Safi, Kamran; Semashko, Vladimir; Schmid, Heidi; Wistbacka, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    During migratory journeys, birds may become displaced from their normal migratory route. Experimental evidence has shown that adult birds can correct for such displacements and return to their goal. However, the nature of the cues used by migratory birds to perform long distance navigation is still debated. In this experiment we subjected adult lesser black-backed gulls migrating from their Finnish/Russian breeding grounds (from >60N) to Africa (to?nerve section kept a clear directional preference (southerly) but were unable to compensate for the displacement, while intact birds and gulls with the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve sectioned oriented towards their population-specific migratory corridor. Thus, air-borne olfactory information seems to be important for migrating gulls to navigate successfully in some circumstances. PMID:26597351

  10. True navigation in migrating gulls requires intact olfactory nerves

    PubMed Central

    Wikelski, Martin; Arriero, Elena; Gagliardo, Anna; Holland, Richard A.; Huttunen, Markku J.; Juvaste, Risto; Mueller, Inge; Tertitski, Grigori; Thorup, Kasper; Wild, Martin; Alanko, Markku; Bairlein, Franz; Cherenkov, Alexander; Cameron, Alison; Flatz, Reinhard; Hannila, Juhani; Hüppop, Ommo; Kangasniemi, Markku; Kranstauber, Bart; Penttinen, Maija-Liisa; Safi, Kamran; Semashko, Vladimir; Schmid, Heidi; Wistbacka, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    During migratory journeys, birds may become displaced from their normal migratory route. Experimental evidence has shown that adult birds can correct for such displacements and return to their goal. However, the nature of the cues used by migratory birds to perform long distance navigation is still debated. In this experiment we subjected adult lesser black-backed gulls migrating from their Finnish/Russian breeding grounds (from >60°N) to Africa (to < 5°N) to sensory manipulation, to determine the sensory systems required for navigation. We translocated birds westward (1080 km) or eastward (885 km) to simulate natural navigational challenges. When translocated westwards and outside their migratory corridor birds with olfactory nerve section kept a clear directional preference (southerly) but were unable to compensate for the displacement, while intact birds and gulls with the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve sectioned oriented towards their population-specific migratory corridor. Thus, air-borne olfactory information seems to be important for migrating gulls to navigate successfully in some circumstances. PMID:26597351

  11. Degree of distal trigeminal nerve atrophy predicts outcome after microvascular decompression for Type 1a trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yifei; Sweet, Jennifer; Munyon, Charles; Miller, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Trigeminal neuralgia is often associated with nerve atrophy, in addition to vascular compression. The authors evaluated whether cross-sectional areas of different portions of the trigeminal nerve on preoperative imaging could be used to predict outcome after microvascular decompression (MVD). METHODS A total of 26 consecutive patients with unilateral Type 1a trigeminal neuralgia underwent high-resolution fast-field echo MRI of the cerebellopontine angle followed by MVD. Preoperative images were reconstructed and reviewed by 2 examiners blinded to the side of symptoms and clinical outcome. For each nerve, a computerized automatic segmentation algorithm was used to calculate the coronal cross-sectional area at the proximal nerve near the root entry zone and the distal nerve at the exit from the porus trigeminus. Findings were correlated with outcome at 12 months. RESULTS After MVD, 17 patients were pain free and not taking medications compared with 9 with residual pain. Across all cases, the coronal cross-sectional area of the symptomatic trigeminal nerve was significantly smaller than the asymptomatic side in the proximal part of the nerve, which was correlated with degree of compression at surgery. Atrophy of the distal trigeminal nerve was more pronounced in patients who had residual pain than in those with excellent outcome. Among the 7 patients who had greater than 20% loss of nerve volume in the distal nerve, only 2 were pain free and not taking medications at long-term follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Trigeminal neuralgia is associated with atrophy of the root entry zone of the affected nerve compared with the asymptomatic side, but volume loss in different segments of the nerve has very different prognostic implications. Proximal atrophy is associated with vascular compression and correlates with improved outcome following MVD. However, distal atrophy is associated with a significantly worse outcome after MVD. PMID:26186027

  12. Restorative effect and mechanism of mecobalamin on sciatic nerve crush injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lin; Qian, Minquan; Shi, Keqin; Chen, Gang; Gu, Yanglin; Du, Wei; Zhu, Guoxing

    2014-01-01

    Mecobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 containing a central metal element (cobalt), is one of the most important mediators of nervous system function. In the clinic, it is often used to accelerate recovery of peripheral nerves, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we performed sciatic nerve crush injury in mice, followed by daily intraperitoneal administration of mecobalamin (65 ?g/kg or 130 ?g/kg) or saline (negative control). Walking track analysis, histomorphological examination, and quantitative real-time PCR showed that mecobalamin significantly improved functional recovery of the sciatic nerve, thickened the myelin sheath in myelinated nerve fibers, and increased the cross-sectional area of target muscle cells. Furthermore, mecobalamin upregulated mRNA expression of growth associated protein 43 in nerve tissue ipsilateral to the injury, and of neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor) in the L46 dorsal root ganglia. Our findings indicate that the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of mecobalamin after sciatic nerve injury involves the upregulation of multiple neurotrophic factor genes. PMID:25598780

  13. Nerve injury induces the expression of syndecan-1 heparan sulfate proteoglycan in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Murakami, K; Tanaka, T; Bando, Y; Yoshida, S

    2015-08-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) have important functions in development of the central nervous system; however, their functions in nerve injury are not yet fully understood. We previously reported the expression of syndecan-1, a type of HSPG, in cranial motor neurons after nerve injury, suggesting the importance of syndecan-1 in the pathology of motor nerve injury. In this study, we examined the expression of syndecan-1, a type of HSPG, in primary sensory neurons after nerve injury in mice. Sciatic nerve axotomy strongly induced the expression of syndecan-1 in a subpopulation of injured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which were small in size and had CGRP- or isolectin B4-positive fibers. Syndecan-1 was also distributed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord ipsilateral to the axotomy, and located on the membrane of axons in lamina II of the dorsal horn. Not only sciatic nerve axotomy, infraorbital nerve axotomy also induced the expression of syndecan-1 in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Moreover, syndecan-1 knockdown in cultured DRG neurons induced a shorter neurite extension. These results suggest that syndecan-1 expression in injured primary sensory neurons may have functional roles in nerve regeneration and synaptic plasticity, resulting in the development of neuropathic pain. PMID:26002314

  14. Some Considerations on Horizontal Displacement and Horizontal Displacement Coefficient B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajduś, Krzysztof; Tajduś, Antoni

    2015-12-01

    Mining-induced deformations of the ground surface and within the rock mass may pose danger not only for surface constructions but also for underground objects (e.g., tunnels, underground storages, garages), diverse types of pipelines, electric cables, etc. For a proper evaluation of hazard for surface and underground objects, such parameters as horizontal displacement and horizontal deformations, especially their maximum values, are of crucial importance. The paper is an attempt at a critical review of hitherto accomplished studies and state of the art of predicting horizontal displacement u, in particular the coefficient B, whose value allows determination of the value of maximum displacement if the value of maximum slope is known, or the value of maximum deformation if the value of maximum trough slope is recognized. Since the geodesic observations of fully developed subsidence troughs suggest that the value of the coefficient depends on the depth H, radius of main influences range r and properties of overburden rock, in particular the occurrence of sub-eras Paleogene and Neogene layers (old name: Quaternary and Tertiary) with low strength parameters, therefore a formula is provided in the present paper allowing for the estimation of the influence of those factors on the value of coefficient B.

  15. Orientated Guidance of Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Using Conduits with a Microtube Array Sheet (MTAS).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueming; Wang, Wenjin; Wo, Yan; Gui, Ting; Zhu, Hao; Mo, Xiumei; Chen, Chien-Chung; Li, Qingfeng; Ding, Wenlong

    2015-04-29

    Material surface topography has been shown to affect the biological behavior of cells in vitro; however, the in vivo effect on peripheral nerve regeneration has not been explored. Here, we studied the potential of a microtube array sheet (MTAS) with a unique longitudinal surface topography to promote peripheral nerve regeneration efficiency, both in vivo and in vitro. Schwann cells, spinal cord motor neurons, and dorsal root ganglion neurons were seeded on the MTAS to study the effect of the construct on the biological properties and behaviors of neural cells. The MTAS guided the oriented migration of Schwann cells without affecting other critical biological properties, such as proliferation and neurotrophin expression. In addition, the MTAS guided the directed extension of neurites from both types of neurons. Next, we tested the capability of the MTAS to facilitate peripheral nerve regeneration by bridging a 10 mm sciatic nerve defect in rats with a nerve conduit equipped with an MTAS lining. The MTAS significantly promoted peripheral nerve regeneration, as suggested by the greater fiber caliber in the midconduit and the greater abundance of fibers in nerve segment distal to the conduit. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis suggested the orientated guidance of nerve regeneration by the MTAS, as indicated by the smaller eccentricity of the nerve fibers and the concordant arrangement of the collagen fiber in both the fibers and the matrix in the MTAS group. Our results collectively suggest that the conduits with the MTAS developed in this study have significant potential for facilitating peripheral nerve regeneration by modifying critical biological behaviors and guiding orientated nerve growth. PMID:25853547

  16. Axonal morphological changes following impulse activity in mouse peripheral nerve in vivo: the return pathway for sodium ions

    PubMed Central

    Trigo, Diogo; Smith, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Myelinated axons can conduct sustained trains of impulses at high frequency, but this involves substantial ion movements that must be reversed to restore homeostasis. Little attention has been paid to the potential osmotic consequences of the ion movements or to the pathway taken by sodium ions returning to their original endoneurial location, given that the axolemmal Na+–K+-ATPase extrudes these ions into the periaxonal space beneath the myelin rather than into the endoneurium. Serial confocal imaging of fluorescent axons conducting at sustained physiological frequencies in vivo has revealed surprising morphological changes that may illuminate these problems. Saphenous nerves and spinal roots of anaesthetized transgenic mice expressing axoplasmic yellow fluorescent protein were stimulated electrically or pharmacologically (veratridine). Within 2 h, the axon herniated on one or both sides of the nodal membrane, displacing the paranodal myelin and widening the nodal gap. The herniated axoplasm became directed back towards the internode, forming a ‘cap’ up to 30 μm long. Concurrently, the fluid in the expanded periaxonal space accumulated into droplets that appeared to travel to the paranode, where they escaped. No such alterations occurred in axons treated with sodium channel or Na+–K+-ATPase inhibitors. Remarkably, impulse conduction continued throughout, and all these changes reversed spontaneously over hours or days. The morphological changes were verified ultrastructurally, and occurred in virtually all myelinated axons. The findings appear to reveal an overlooked part of the physiological repertoire of nerve fibres, and here they are interpreted in terms of osmotic changes that may illuminate the pathway by which sodium ions return to the endoneurial space after they have entered the axon during impulse conduction. PMID:25524071

  17. Crustal Displacements Due to Continental Water Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanDam, T.; Wahr, J.; Milly, P. C. D.; Shmakin, A. B.; Blewitt, G.; Lavallee, D.; Larson, K. M.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of long-wavelength (> 100 km), seasonal variability in continental water storage on vertical crustal motions are assessed. The modeled vertical displacements (delta-r(sub M)) have root-mean-square (RMS) values for 1994-1998 as large as 8 mm with ranges up to 30 mm, and are predominantly annual in character. Regional strains are on the order of 20 nanostrain for tilt and 5 nanostrain for horizontal deformation. We compare delta-r(sub M) with observed Global Positioning System (GPS) heights (delta-r(sub O)) (which include adjustments to remove estimated effects of atmospheric pressure and annual tidal and non-tidal ocean loading) for 147 globally distributed sites. When the delta-r(sub O) time series are adjusted by delta-r(sub M), their variances are reduced, on average, by an amount equal to the variance of the delta-r(sub M). Of the delta-r(sub O) time series exhibiting a strong annual signal, more than half are found to have an annual harmonic that is in phase and of comparable amplitude with the annual harmonic in the delta-r(sub M). The delta-r(sub M) time series exhibit long-period variations that could be mistaken for secular tectonic trends or post-glacial rebound when observed over a time span of a few years.

  18. Polybenzimidazole via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Di(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole monomers were prepared from phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate and aromatic bis(o-diamine)s. These monomers were used in the synthesis of soluble polybenzimidazoles. The reaction involved the aromatic nucleophilic displacement of various di(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds in the presence of an alkali metal base. These polymers exhibited lower glass transition temperatures, improved solubility, and better compression moldability over their commercial counterparts.

  19. Diffusion tensor imaging of lumbar spinal nerve in subjects with degenerative lumbar disorders.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Eguchi, Yawara; Inoue, Gen; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Orita, Sumihisa; Kamoda, Hiroto; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Go; Inage, Kazuhide; Saino, Takeshi; Sato, Hirotaka; Ando, Hiroki; Kojima, Masatoshi; Okumura, Kenichiro; Masuda, Yoshitada; Watanabe, Atsuya; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    Recently several authors have reported that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) might provide a new understanding of sciatica. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical feasibility of DTI for the evaluation of lumbar spinal nerve of patients with sciatica associated with lumbar degenerative disorders. Thirty-four patients (25men, mean age63. 3years) with degenerated lumbar disease, 14 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis with foraminal stenosis, 12 with lumbar spinal stenosis without foraminal stenosis, five with lumbar disc herniation, two with discogenic low back pain, and one with spondylolysis who underwent 3.0T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and surgical treatment were included in the present study. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was calculated from an FA map, and tractography was investigated. In asymptomatic nerves, tractography showed all L3-S1 spinal nerve roots clearly. Abnormalities of tractography were classified into three types by shape; "Disrupted", "Narrowing", and "Tapering". More abnormalities of tractography were found in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis, and especially in patients with foraminal stenosis. The disrupted type was the most common. The mean FA of entrapped symptomatic nerves was less than seen on the intact side. This study demonstrates that tractography shows abnormal findings for nerve roots in lumbar spinal degeneration and that FA decreases in symptomatic roots. DTI may offer not only morphological evaluation, but also quantitative evaluation. We believe that DTI can be used as a tool for the diagnosis of lumbar spinal degenerative disease. PMID:25979227

  20. Pulmonary adenocarcinoma metastasis to a dorsal root ganglion: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The dorsal root ganglion is a rare manifestation of metastatic spread. We report what we believe to be the first case of metastasis of a pulmonary adenocarcinoma to the lumbar dorsal root ganglion. Only four descriptions for different primary tumors spreading to the dorsal root ganglion have been described in the literature so far. Case presentation A 70-year-old Caucasian woman with a four-month history of left-sided lumbar radiculopathy was admitted to our department under the assumption of a herniated lumbar disc. Her past medical history included a pulmonary adenocarcinoma and invasive ductal breast cancer. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging revealed a space-occupying mass in her left neuroforamen L3-L4 with compression of her L3 nerve root. Neurinoma was taken into account as a differential diagnosis, although not considered typical. Surgery revealed a metastasis of pulmonary adenocarcinoma to her dorsal root ganglion. Conclusions Dorsal root ganglion metastases seem to be extremely rare and can mimic primary local nerve sheath tumors. Therefore, they usually present as incidental findings. Resection should be performed strictly under intraoperative monitoring as tumor spread between the nerve fibers is commonly observed. Metastases should be taken into account in spinal nerve tumors involving the dorsal root ganglion, especially in patients harboring known malignant diseases. The low incidence means that no clear treatment advice can be given. Resection is possible under intraoperative monitoring and relieves neurological symptoms. PMID:23972227

  1. Rapid identification of spinal ventral and dorsal roots using a quartz crystal microbalance☆

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Tao; Que, Jun; Kong, Dechao; Xie, Hao; Wang, Daode; Shi, Kun; Cao, Xiaojian; Li, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The fast and accurate identification of nerve tracts is critical for successful nerve anastomosis. Taking advantage of differences in acetylcholinesterase content between the spinal ventral and dorsal roots, we developed a novel quartz crystal microbalance method to distinguish between these nerves based on acetylcholinesterase antibody reactivity. The acetylcholinesterase antibody was immobilized on the electrode surface of a quartz crystal microbalance and reacted with the acetylcholinesterase in sample solution. The formed antigen and antibody complexes added to the mass of the electrode inducing a change in frequency of the electrode. The spinal ventral and dorsal roots were distinguished by the change in frequency. The ventral and dorsal roots were cut into 1 to 2-mm long segments and then soaked in 250 μL PBS. Acetylcholinesterase antibody was immobilized on the quartz crystal microbalance gold electrode surface. The results revealed that in 10 minutes, both spinal ventral and dorsal roots induced a frequency change; however, the frequency change induced by the ventral roots was notably higher than that induced by the dorsal roots. No change was induced by bovine serum albumin or PBS. These results clearly demonstrate that a quartz crystal microbalance sensor can be used as a rapid, highly sensitive and accurate detection tool for the quick identification of spinal nerve roots intraoperatively. PMID:25206714

  2. Silk-tropoelastin protein films for nerve guidance

    PubMed Central

    White, James D.; Wang, Siran; Weiss, Anthony S.; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration may be enhanced through the use of biodegradable thin film biomaterials as highly tuned inner nerve conduit liners. Dorsal root ganglion neuron and Schwann cell responses were studied on protein films comprised of silk fibroin blended with recombinant human tropoelastin protein. Tropoelastin significantly improved neurite extension and enhanced Schwann cell process length and cell area, while the silk provided a robust biomaterial template. Silk-tropoelastin blends afforded a 2.4 fold increase in neurite extension, when compared to silk films coated with poly-d-lysine. When patterned by drying on grooved polydimethylsiloxane (3.5 µm groove width, 0.5 µm groove depth), these protein blends induced both neurite and Schwann cell process alignment. Neurons were functional as assessed using patch-clamping, and displayed action potentials similar to those cultured on poly(lysine)-coated glass. Taken together, silk-tropoelastin films offer useful biomaterial interfacial platforms for nerve cell control which can be considered for neurite guidance, disease models for neuropathies, and surgical peripheral nerve repairs. PMID:25481743

  3. Silk-tropoelastin protein films for nerve guidance.

    PubMed

    White, James D; Wang, Siran; Weiss, Anthony S; Kaplan, David L

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration may be enhanced through the use of biodegradable thin film biomaterials as highly tuned inner nerve conduit liners. Dorsal root ganglion neuron and Schwann cell responses were studied on protein films comprising silk fibroin blended with recombinant human tropoelastin protein. Tropoelastin significantly improved neurite extension and enhanced Schwann cell process length and cell area, while the silk provided a robust biomaterial template. Silk-tropoelastin blends afforded a 2.4-fold increase in neurite extension, when compared to silk films coated with poly-d-lysine. When patterned by drying on grooved polydimethylsiloxane (3.5 ?m groove width, 0.5 ?m groove depth), these protein blends induced both neurite and Schwann cell process alignment. Neurons were functional as assessed using patch-clamping, and displayed action potentials similar to those cultured on poly(lysine)-coated glass. Taken together, silk-tropoelastin films offer useful biomaterial interfacial platforms for nerve cell control, which can be considered for neurite guidance, disease models for neuropathies and surgical peripheral nerve repairs. PMID:25481743

  4. Spatial pattern of nerve fiber abnormality indicative of pathologic mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Dyck, P. J.; Karnes, J.; O'Brien, P.; Nukada, H.; Lais, A.; Low, P.

    1984-01-01

    Estimates of the number, density, and size distribution of myelinated fibers at selected levels of roots, spinal tracts, and sampled levels of peripheral nerves may be used in the detection and characterization of alterations of motor, sensory, and autonomic neurons and their axons with development, aging and disease. Use of imaging techniques, now available, increases the reliability, versatility, and speed of such analysis. In this study, the authors evaluated the spatial pattern of fibers in sampled frames and contour areas of transverse sections of nerve fascicles, utilizing, the coefficient of variation and index of dispersion (ID), the latter extensively employed by plant ecologists. The ID was used for recognization of increased, normal, or decreased variability of density within fascicles, between fascicles, and between nerves in health and in various experimental neuropathies. In addition, various morphometric measurements were made in transverse sections at defined levels along the hind limb nerves of rats in acute and chronic ischemia, after rhizotomy and in galactose neuropathy. These stereomorphometric studies, emphasizing the number, size, shape, and spatial pattern of fibers, revealed differences among experimental neuropathies and may be found to be helpful in the characterization and prediction of pathologic mechanisms in neuropathies of unknown cause. Specifically, these approaches could be used for study of whether fiber loss in human diabetic neuropathy is multifocal and determination of the levels of such losses. PMID:6333825

  5. Morphological features of nerves in skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Wendelschafer-Crabb, G; Kennedy, W R; Walk, D

    2006-03-15

    Skin biopsy is an effective test for diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. The most commonly reported indication of abnormality in a skin biopsy is reduction of epidermal nerve density. Morphological changes of epidermal nerves and the underlying subepidermal nerve plexus provide added evidence for the presence of neuropathy. We determined the prevalence of epidermal axon swellings, dermal axon swellings, and a unique type of epidermal nerve that we call a crawler, in a group of normal subjects, diabetic subjects, and patients with idiopathic small fiber neuropathy. Other morphologic features examined include thinning of the subepidermal nerve plexus, sprouts at nerve terminals, encapsulated endings, and immunoreactive basal cells. PMID:16448669

  6. Octopamine release at two points along lobster nerve trunks.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P D; Kravitz, E A; Talamo, B R

    1976-01-01

    Nerve cells in the proximal regions of second thoracic roots in lobsters have been injected with the fluorescent dye Procion Yellow. Examination of the roots reveals an elaborate array of cell branches in a superficial layer of the root in the vicinity of the cell bodies. Large varicosities, up to 10 mum in diameter, are seen lined up along fine nerve branches. 2. In these same regions, electron microscopic examination shows the presence of large profiles filled with 0-1-0-2 mum dense cored granules, and having the appearance of nerve endings. These profiles probably correspond to the varicosities seen in the Procion Yellow injections. The dense cored granules within the endings have a crystalline substructure. All the endings are found within 7 mum of the surface of the root and no obvious physiological target tissue exists in their surroundings. Endings have not been traced directly to root cell bodies.However, granules of similar dimensions to those seen in endings are found in cell bodies, axon-hillock regions and numerous axonal profiles in the superficial root regions near cell bodies. The morphological studies suggest that the root neurones have the typical appearance of neurosecretory cells. 3. Octopamine pools in cell body regions of second thoracic roots can be isotopically labelled by incubation with either [3H]tyramine or [3H]-tyrosine. After labelling, pulsing with 100 mM potassium causes an increase in the rate of release of radioactive material. Upon return to normal media background rates of release are re-established. The enhanced efflux has the following properties: (a) repeated pulses of potassium release less radio-active material each time; (b) a prolonged potassium pulse produces first a peak of release, then a decline to a plateau, and the plateau level of release is maintained for the duration of the potassium pulse; (c) release is dependent on the presence of calcium ions in the bathing fluid and 40 mM cobalt prevents release; (d) release is selective for octopamine. With tyrosine as a precursor compound, as much radioactive tyrosine as octopamine is found in tissues after incubation, yet pulsing with potassium causes an enhanced efflux only of octopamine from preparations. 4. Release of octopamine also can be demonstrated from pericardial organs near the ends of lateral branches of the roots and the properties of the release are identical to those seen with cell body regions. 5. Physiological studies, in which root cells are antidromically activated while recording from cell bodies, suggest that the distal endings of at least some of the root cells are at the pericardial organs. 6. The results suggest that root cell neurones are neurosecretory cells capable of releasing octopamine at two points: one near cell bodies, the other at the pericardial organs near the distal ends of the roots... Images Plate 1 A B C PMID:792418

  7. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePLUS

    ... supply (as occurs in diabetes), drugs, and toxins. Did You Know... Some cranial nerve disorders interfere with ... depends on the cause. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  8. Ion Channels in Nerve Membranes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenstein, Gerald

    1976-01-01

    Discusses research that indicates that nerve membranes, which play a key role in the conduction of impulses, are traversed by protein channels with ion pathways opened and closed by the membrane electric field. (Author/MLH)

  9. Diabetes and nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... damage the nerves and cause a complication called neuropathy. This generally begins as loss of sensation in the toes, and possibly fingers. Eventually, the neuropathy can move up the person's legs or arms.

  10. Neuromodulation of the Suprascapular Nerve.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Erkan; van Eijk, Tess; Henssen, Dylan; Arnts, Inge; Steegers, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intractable shoulder pain (CISP) is defined as shoulder pain which is present for longer than 6 months and does not respond to standard treatments like medication, physical therapy, rehabilitation, selective nerve blocks and local infiltrations, or orthopedic procedures. The etiology of CISP may be very diverse, varying from many orthopedic conditions to non-orthopedic conditions. The fact that the suprascapular nerve is one of the most important nerves supplying the shoulder region makes this nerve an interesting target in treating patients suffering shoulder pain. Invasive treatment options are peripheral nerve blocks, temporary electrical stimulation, and neurostimulation. To our best knowledge, thus far there are only a few reports describing the technique of permanent neurostimulation of the suprascapular nerve. In this article we present a patient suffering shoulder pain after she underwent surgery for cervical stenosis. After a step by step treatment protocol was done, we finally offered her trial stimulation of the suprascapular nerve. A single quad lead was implanted via a posterior approach under fluoroscopic and ultrasound guidance. Two weeks after successful stimulation, we implanted a permanent neuromodulation system. Permanent neurostimulation of the suprascapular nerve and its end branches may be a new interesting target in treating patients suffering shoulder pain due to various etiologies. In our patient the follow-up period is 9 months with an excellent result in pain relief, we observed no complications thus far, especially no dislocation or breakage of the lead. In this report, literature on this subject is reviewed, and our technique is well documented with additional anatomical illustrations. PMID:26752491

  11. Peripheral nerve injuries treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruijun; Liu, Zhigang; Pan, Yuemei; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Zhixin; Lu, Laijin

    2014-04-01

    Patients with peripheral nerve injuries, especially severe injury, often face poor nerve regeneration and incompletely functional recovery, even after surgical nerve repair. Current researches have extensively focused on the new approaches for the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. This review summarizes treatments of peripheral nerve injures, from conventional suturing method, to conduit coaptation with stem cell and growth factor, and review the developments of research and clinical application of these therapies. PMID:24037713

  12. Optic Nerve Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Paul; Kokemüller, Horst; Tavassol, Frank; Lindhorst, Daniel; Lemound, Juliana; Essig, Harald; Rücker, Martin; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius

    2013-01-01

    Orbital and anterior skull base surgery is generally performed close to the prechiasmatic visual pathway, and clear strategies for detecting and handling visual pathway damage are essential. To overcome the common problem of a missed clinical examination because of an uncooperative or unresponsive patient, flash visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms should be used. These electrophysiologic examination techniques can provide evidence of intact, pathologic, or absent conductivity of the visual pathway when clinical assessment is not feasible. Visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms are thus essential diagnostic procedures not only for primary diagnosis but also for intraoperative evaluation. A decision for or against treatment of a visual pathway injury has to be made as fast as possible due to the enormous importance of the time elapsed with such injuries; this can be achieved additionally using multislice spiral computed tomography. The first-line conservative treatment of choice for such injuries is megadose methylprednisolone therapy. Surgery is used to decompress the orbital compartment by exposure of the intracanalicular part of the optic nerve in the case of optic canal compression. Modern craniomaxillofacial surgery requires detailed consideration of the diagnosis and treatment of traumatic visual pathway damage with the ultimate goal of preserving visual acuity. PMID:24436741

  13. Comparison of hemihypoglossal-facial nerve transposition with a cross-facial nerve graft and muscle transplant for the rehabilitation of facial paralysis using the facial clima method.

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Vila, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    To compare quantitatively the results obtained after hemihypoglossal nerve transposition and microvascular gracilis transfer associated with a cross facial nerve graft (CFNG) for reanimation of a paralysed face, 66 patients underwent hemihypoglossal transposition (n = 25) or microvascular gracilis transfer and CFNG (n = 41). The commissural displacement (CD) and commissural contraction velocity (CCV) in the two groups were compared using the system known as Facial clima. There was no inter-group variability between the groups (p > 0.10) in either variable. However, intra-group variability was detected between the affected and healthy side in the transposition group (p = 0.036 and p = 0.017, respectively). The transfer group had greater symmetry in displacement of the commissure (CD) and commissural contraction velocity (CCV) than the transposition group and patients were more satisfied. However, the transposition group had correct symmetry at rest but more asymmetry of CCV and CD when smiling. PMID:22455573

  14. Gravitropic curvature of maize roots is not preceded by rootcap asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, F. D.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Blair, A.

    1990-01-01

    We tested whether the first response to gravistimulation is an asymmetry in the root tip that results from differential growth of the rootcap itself. The displacement of markers on the rootcap surface of maize (Zea mays L. cv. Merit) roots was quantified from videotaped images using customized software. The method was sensitive enough to detect marker displacements down to 15 microns and root curvature as early as 8 min after gravistimulation. No differential growth of the upper and lower sides of the cap occurred before or during root curvature. Fewer than a third of all gravistimulated roots developed an asymmetrical outline of the root tip after curvature had started, and this asymmetry did not occur in the rootcap itself. Our data support the view that the regions of gravitropic sensing and curvature are spatially separate during all phases of gravitropism in maize roots.

  15. Retrieving three-dimensional displacement fields of mining areas from a single InSAR pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi Wei; Yang, Ze Fa; Zhu, Jian Jun; Hu, Jun; Wang, Yun Jia; Li, Pei Xian; Chen, Guo Liang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for retrieving three-dimensional (3-D) displacement fields of mining areas from a single interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) pair. This method fully exploits the mechanism of mining subsidence, specifically the proportional relationship between the horizontal displacement and horizontal gradient of vertical displacements caused by underground mining. This method overcomes the limitations of conventional InSAR techniques that can only measure one-dimensional (1-D) deformation of mining area along the radar line-of-sight direction. The proposed method is first validated with simulated 3-D displacement fields, which are obtained by the FLAC software. The root mean square errors of the 3-D displacements retrieved by the proposed method are 13.7, 27.6 and 3.6 mm for the West-East, North-South, and Up-Down components, respectively. We then apply the proposed method to estimate the 3-D displacements of the Qianyingzi and the Xuzhou coal mines in China, respectively, each along with two Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array Type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar images. Results show that the estimated 3-D displacement is highly consistent with that of the field surveying. This demonstrates that the proposed method is an effective approach for retrieving 3-D mining displacement fields and will play an important role in mining-related hazard prevention and environment assessment under limited InSAR acquisitions.

  16. Displaced Children: The Psychological Implications.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Paramjit T; Fayyad, John A

    2015-10-01

    Millions of people across the world have been displaced or live in exile and/or as refugees largely as a consequence of wars, acts of terrorism, and catastrophic natural disasters. There are serious psychological consequences as a result of these extremely difficult life circumstances. Adults often can express their needs and have them be heard, whereas children are unable to do so. The children may be provided food, shelter, and clothing and have their medical needs attended to, but their emotional and psychological needs go unrecognized and unmet, with dire and monumental long-term consequences. PMID:26346385

  17. Displacement current and surface flashover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.; Caporaso, G. J.; Blackfield, D.; Chen, Y.-J.

    2007-09-01

    High-voltage vacuum insulator failure is generally due to surface flashover rather than insulator bulk breakdown. Vacuum surface flashover is widely believed to be initiated by a secondary electron emission avalanche along the vacuum-insulator interface. This process requires a physical mechanism to cause secondary electrons emitted from the insulator surface to return to that surface. Here, it is shown that when an insulator is subjected to a fast high-voltage pulse, the magnetic field due to displacement current through the insulator can provide this mechanism. This indicates the importance of the voltage pulse shape, especially the rise time, in the flashover initiation process.

  18. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine displacement. 205.153 Section... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a) Engine displacement must be calculated using nominal engine values and rounded to the nearest whole cubic...

  19. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine displacement. 205.153 Section... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a) Engine displacement must be calculated using nominal engine values and rounded to the nearest whole cubic...

  20. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine displacement. 205.153 Section... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a) Engine displacement must be calculated using nominal engine values and rounded to the nearest whole cubic...

  1. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Engine displacement. 205.153 Section... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a) Engine displacement must be calculated using nominal engine values and rounded to the nearest whole cubic...

  2. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Engine displacement. 205.153 Section... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a) Engine displacement must be calculated using nominal engine values and rounded to the nearest whole cubic...

  3. The case for character displacement in plants

    PubMed Central

    Beans, Carolyn M

    2014-01-01

    The evidence for character displacement as a widespread response to competition is now building. This progress is largely the result of the establishment of rigorous criteria for demonstrating character displacement in the animal literature. There are, however, relatively few well-supported examples of character displacement in plants. This review explores the potential for character displacement in plants by addressing the following questions: (1) Why aren't examples of character displacement in plants more common? (2) What are the requirements for character displacement to occur and how do plant populations meet those requirements? (3) What are the criteria for testing the pattern and process of character displacement and what methods can and have been used to address these criteria in the plant literature? (4) What are some additional approaches for studying character displacement in plants? While more research is needed, the few plant systems in which character displacement hypotheses have been rigorously tested suggest that character displacement may play a role in shaping plant communities. Plants are especially amenable to character displacement studies because of the experimental ease with which they can be used in common gardens, selection analyses, and breeding designs. A deeper investigation of character displacement in plants is critical for a more complete understanding of the ecological and evolutionary processes that permit the coexistence of plant species. PMID:24683467

  4. Displacement Compensation of Temperature Probe Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Christopher S.; Hubert, James A.; Barber, Patrick G.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of temperature data from a probe in a vertical Bridgman furnace growing germanium crystals revealed a displacement of the temperature profile due to conduction error. A theoretical analysis shows that the displacement compensation is independent of local temperature gradient. A displacement compensation value should become a standard characteristic of temperature probes used for temperature profile measurements.

  5. Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations.

    PubMed

    Murayama, M; Sasaki, K; Shibahara, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury by determining degrees of nerve disturbance using the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Crush and partial and complete nerve amputation injuries were applied to the IAN of rabbits, then SNAPs and histomorphometric observations were recorded at 1, 5, and 10 weeks. For crush injury, most nerves were smaller in diameter at 5 weeks than at 1 week, however after 10 weeks, extensive nerve regeneration was observed. The SNAP showed a decrease in SCV at weeks 1 and 5, followed by an increase at week 10. For partial nerve amputation, small to medium-sized nerve fibres were observed at weeks 1 and 5, then larger nerves were seen at week 10. Minimal changes in SCV were observed at weeks 1 and 5, however SCV increased at week 10. For complete nerve amputation, nerve fibres were sparse at week 1, but gradual nerve regeneration was observed at weeks 5 and 10. SNAPs were detectable from week 10, however the SCV was extremely low. This study showed SCV to be an effective factor in the evaluation of nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:26433750

  6. From nerve net to nerve ring, nerve cord and brain - evolution of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Detlev; Tosches, Maria Antonietta; Marlow, Heather

    2015-12-17

    The puzzle of how complex nervous systems emerged remains unsolved. Comparative studies of neurodevelopment in cnidarians and bilaterians suggest that this process began with distinct integration centres that evolved on opposite ends of an initial nerve net. The 'apical nervous system' controlled general body physiology, and the 'blastoporal nervous system' coordinated feeding movements and locomotion. We propose that expansion, integration and fusion of these centres gave rise to the bilaterian nerve cord and brain. PMID:26675821

  7. Gravisensing in flax roots - results from STS-107

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Scherp, P.; Ma, Z.

    The goal of the experiment "magnetophoretic induction of curvature in roots" (MICRO) on STS-107 was the induction of curvature in roots by high-gradient magnetic fields (HGMF) in microgravity. The scientific objectives included investigating the growth/curvature pattern in response to a HGMF, the determination of amyloplasts as gravisensing/curvature-inducing structures, and a study of the effects of HGMF and microgravity on the plant cytoskeleton. Flax seeds were germinated in orbit in specially designed seed cassettes. The seeds were oriented so that the emerging roots grew away from the cassette. The magnetic system consisted of ferro-magnetic wedges, magnetized by permanent NdFeB magnets (coercivity > 32k Oe). The HGMF that results from the transition from the high magnetic field density at the wedge tips to air repels diamagnetic amyloplasts. As a result of the previously demonstrated internal displacement of the amyloplasts, the roots were expected to curve as if gravistimulated. Despite successful germination (>90%), the growth rate of the seedlings was significantly lower than comparable controls. Despite the slower growth rate, root curvature was enhanced and initiated earlier than in ground controls. The results indicate that microgravity-grown roots exhibit higher sensitivity for the HGMF than ground controls. The enhanced sensitivity of root curvature in microgravity suggests that the root gravisensing system responds to the displacement of amyloplasts. In the absence of gravity, the higher sensitivity might result from intracellular motion, which in microgravity is likely to be stronger than on the ground.

  8. Purines and sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    P2X and P2Y nucleotide receptors are described on sensory neurons and their peripheral and central terminals in dorsal root, nodose, trigeminal, petrosal, retinal and enteric ganglia. Peripheral terminals are activated by ATP released from local cells by mechanical deformation, hypoxia or various local agents in the carotid body, lung, gut, bladder, inner ear, eye, nasal organ, taste buds, skin, muscle and joints mediating reflex responses and nociception. Purinergic receptors on fibres in the dorsal spinal cord and brain stem are involved in reflex control of visceral and cardiovascular activity, as well as relaying nociceptive impulses to pain centres. Purinergic mechanisms are enhanced in inflammatory conditions and may be involved in migraine, pain, diseases of the special senses, bladder and gut, and the possibility that they are also implicated in arthritis, respiratory disorders and some central nervous system disorders is discussed. Finally, the development and evolution of purinergic sensory mechanisms are considered. PMID:19655112

  9. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, J.

    1995-05-30

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically. 29 figs.

  10. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, John (M.I.T. P.O. Box 397301, Cambridge, MA 02139)

    1999-01-01

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically.

  11. Displacement Based Multilevel Structural Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszezanski-Sobieski, J.; Striz, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    In the complex environment of true multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO), efficiency is one of the most desirable attributes of any approach. In the present research, a new and highly efficient methodology for the MDO subset of structural optimization is proposed and detailed, i.e., for the weight minimization of a given structure under size, strength, and displacement constraints. Specifically, finite element based multilevel optimization of structures is performed. In the system level optimization, the design variables are the coefficients of assumed polynomially based global displacement functions, and the load unbalance resulting from the solution of the global stiffness equations is minimized. In the subsystems level optimizations, the weight of each element is minimized under the action of stress constraints, with the cross sectional dimensions as design variables. The approach is expected to prove very efficient since the design task is broken down into a large number of small and efficient subtasks, each with a small number of variables, which are amenable to parallel computing.

  12. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, J.

    1999-04-06

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically. 23 figs.

  13. Genetics of bovine abomasal displacement.

    PubMed

    Zerbin, Ina; Lehner, Stefanie; Distl, Ottmar

    2015-04-01

    Displacement of the abomasum (DA) is a common inherited condition in Holstein cows. This article reviews the genetics of DA including risk factors, genetic parameters and molecular genetic results. Breeds other than Holsteins affected by DA include Guernseys, Jerseys, Brown Swiss, Ayrshires and Simmental-Red Holsteins. In most DA cases, left displacements of the abomasum (LDA) are seen. Lactation incidence rates are higher for DA in first lactation Holsteins compared to later lactations. For Holstein cows, heritability estimates for DA are between 0.03 and 0.53. Genetic correlation estimates among DA and milk production traits range from positive to negative. Genome-wide significant genomic regions associated with LDA are located on bovine chromosomes (BTA) 1, 3, 11, 20 and 23. Motilin-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms on BTA23 exhibit a functional relationship with LDA. Pathways for deposition of calcium, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and synaptic transmission are significantly related to LDA in Holsteins. Deciphering the DA-associated genomic regions and genes may be an important step in the quest to understand the underlying disease-causing mechanisms and in unravelling mutations with a causal relationship to DA. PMID:25840863

  14. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, John (M.I.T. Branch P.O. Box 301, Cambridge, MA 02139)

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically.

  15. [Positioning Injuries to Peripheral Nerves during Laparoscopic Colon and Rectum Surgery].

    PubMed

    Ellebrecht, D B; Wolken, H; Ellebrecht, C T; Bruch, H-P; Kleemann, M

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic colon and rectum operations expose peripheral nerves to risk due to extreme patient positions needed to achieve gravity displacement during the surgical procedures. The general incidence of position-caused nerve injuries in surgery is not well known and is estimated to be about 0.5?% in the literature. There are no current data concerning laparoscopic operations. This study assesses the incidence and outcome of surgery-associated neurological symptoms after laparoscopic colon and rectum surgical procedures. We analysed the number of position-caused nerve injuries and their outcome from 1992-2010 in a prospectively managed data base. Risk factors like age, BMI, procedure duration and abduction of the upper extremities were analysed. There were 19 (0.7?%) position-caused nerve injuries among 2698 laparoscopic operations on the colon and rectum. The incidence of surgery-associated neurological symptoms was 1.08?% after laparoscopic rectum and 0.54?% after laparoscopic colon surgical procedures. Both operation time (267 vs. 185 minutes) and BMI (27.93 vs. 25.79?kg/m(2)) were revealed as risk factors for position-caused nerve injuries. Adduction of the upper extremities reduced the incidence of positioning nerve injuries from 0.23?% to 0.1?%. Postoperative neurological symptoms were in most cases reversible (89.47?%). The incidence of postoperative nerve injuries since 2007 is low after laparoscopic rectum and colon operations and is mostly completely reversible. Both procedure duration and BMI are probable risk factors for surgery-associated nerve injuries. Adduction of the upper extremities provides an opportunity to reduce position-caused nerve injuries. PMID:23824613

  16. Chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor microspheres repair facial nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huawei; Wen, Weisheng; Hu, Min; Bi, Wenting; Chen, Lijie; Liu, Sanxia; Chen, Peng; Tan, Xinying

    2013-01-01

    Microspheres containing nerve growth factor for sustained release were prepared by a compound method, and implanted into chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm defects on the right buccal branches of the facial nerve in rabbits. In addition, chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor or normal saline, as well as autologous nerve, were used as controls. At 90 days post-surgery, the muscular atrophy on the right upper lip was more evident in the nerve growth factor and normal sa-line groups than in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups. physiological analysis revealed that the nerve conduction velocity and amplitude were significantly higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. Moreover, histological observation illustrated that the di-ameter, number, alignment and myelin sheath thickness of myelinated nerves derived from rabbits were higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. These findings indicate that chitosan nerve conduits bined with microspheres for sustained release of nerve growth factor can significantly improve facial nerve defect repair in rabbits. PMID:25206635

  17. A Theoretical Model to Predict Both Horizontal Displacement and Vertical Displacement for Electromagnetic Induction-Based Deep Displacement Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Nanying; Zhang, Hongjian; Li, Qing; Zhou, Hongliang; Tong, Renyuan; Li, Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Deep displacement observation is one basic means of landslide dynamic study and early warning monitoring and a key part of engineering geological investigation. In our previous work, we proposed a novel electromagnetic induction-based deep displacement sensor (I-type) to predict deep horizontal displacement and a theoretical model called equation-based equivalent loop approach (EELA) to describe its sensing characters. However in many landslide and related geological engineering cases, both horizontal displacement and vertical displacement vary apparently and dynamically so both may require monitoring. In this study, a II-type deep displacement sensor is designed by revising our I-type sensor to simultaneously monitor the deep horizontal displacement and vertical displacement variations at different depths within a sliding mass. Meanwhile, a new theoretical modeling called the numerical integration-based equivalent loop approach (NIELA) has been proposed to quantitatively depict II-type sensors’ mutual inductance properties with respect to predicted horizontal displacements and vertical displacements. After detailed examinations and comparative studies between measured mutual inductance voltage, NIELA-based mutual inductance and EELA-based mutual inductance, NIELA has verified to be an effective and quite accurate analytic model for characterization of II-type sensors. The NIELA model is widely applicable for II-type sensors’ monitoring on all kinds of landslides and other related geohazards with satisfactory estimation accuracy and calculation efficiency. PMID:22368467

  18. Blockade of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 promotes regeneration after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Fei; Zhang, Hong; Qi, Chao; Gao, Mei-ling; Wang, Hong; Li, Xia-qing

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) provides the sensation of pain (nociception). However, it remains unknown whether TRPV1 is activated after peripheral nerve injury, or whether activation of TRPV1 affects neural regeneration. In the present study, we established rat models of unilateral sciatic nerve crush injury, with or without pretreatment with AMG517 (300 mg/kg), a TRPV1 antagonist, injected subcutaneously into the ipsilateral paw 60 minutes before injury. At 1 and 2 weeks after injury, we performed immunofluorescence staining of the sciatic nerve at the center of injury, at 0.3 cm proximal and distal to the injury site, and in the dorsal root ganglia. Our results showed that Wallerian degeneration occurred distal to the injury site, and neurite outgrowth and Schwann cell regeneration occurred proximal to the injury. The number of regenerating myelinated and unmyelinated nerve clusters was greater in the AMG517-pretreated rats than in the vehicle-treated group, most notably 2 weeks after injury. TRPV1 expression in the injured sciatic nerve and ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia was markedly greater than on the contralateral side. Pretreatment with AMG517 blocked this effect. These data indicate that TRPV1 is activated or overexpressed after sciatic nerve crush injury, and that blockade of TRPV1 may accelerate regeneration of the injured sciatic nerve. PMID:26487864

  19. Neuropathic Pain: Sensory Nerve Injury or Motor Nerve Injury?

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-Guo; Pang, Rui-Ping; Zhou, Li-Jun; Wei, Xu-Hong; Zang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury often induces chronic neuropathic pain. Peripheral nerve is consisted of sensory fibers and motor fibers, it is questioned injury to which type of fibers is responsible for generation of neuropathic pain? Because neuropathic pain is sensory disorder, it is generally believed that the disease should be induced by injury to sensory fibers. In recent years, however, emergent evidence shows that motor fiber injury but not sensory fiber injury is necessary and sufficient for induction of neuropathic pain. Motor fiber injury leads to neuropathic pain by upregulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in pain pathway. PMID:26900063

  20. Facial-hypoglossal nerve anastomosis using laser nerve welding.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Sun Goo; Kim, Dae Joong

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study is to compare laser nerve welding to microsurgical suturing of hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis (HFA), and a result of immediate to delayed repair, and to evaluate the effect of laser nerve welding on HFA for reanimation of facial palsy. The first group of five rats underwent immediate HFA by microsurgical suturing and the second group of five rats by CO2 laser welding. The third group of five rats underwent delayed HFA by microsurgical suturing, and the fourth group of five rats by laser nerve welding. The fifth group of five rats served as controls, with intact hypoglossal and facial nerve. In all rats of the four different treatment groups, cholera toxin B subunit (CTb) was injected in the epineurium distal to the anastomosis site on the postoperative 6th week and in the normal hypoglossal nerve in the five rats of the control group. Neurons labeled CTb of hypoglossal nuclei were positive immunohistochemically, and the numbers were counted. In the immediate HFA groups, CTb-positive neurons were 751 +/- 247 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 888 +/- 60 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). There was no significant difference (P = 0.117). In the delayed HFA groups, CTb-positive neurons were 749 +/- 54 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 590 +/- 169 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). The difference was not significant (P = 0.116). There was no significant difference between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the laser welding group (P = 0.600), but there was significance between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the microsurgical suturing group (P = 0.009). Injected CTb in intact hypoglossal neurons (n = 5) were labeled 1,003 +/- 52. No dehiscence in the laser welding site of nerve anastomosis was seen at the time of re-exploration for injection of CTb in all 10 rats. This study shows that the regeneration of anastomosed hypoglossal-facial nerve was affected similarly by laser welding and microsurgical suturing, and more effective, especially in delayed repair. PMID:16877915

  1. Access to the Mandibular Angle Using a Sagittal Split to Address Pathologic Displacement of a Mandibular Third Molar.

    PubMed

    Kontaxis, Katrina L; Steinbacher, Derek M

    2015-12-01

    Access to the mandibular angle for removal of pathology poses a unique challenge to surgeons. Intraoral approaches result in considerable bone removal and potential damage to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). Extraoral approaches are associated with a cutaneous scar and the potential for facial nerve damage. This report describes the case of a 53-year-old man with a deeply impacted third molar associated with a cystic lesion that was treated by enucleation using an intraoral sagittal split osteotomy. This approach allowed for complete access and visualization of the cyst and displaced third molar and protection of the IAN with minimal surgical morbidity. PMID:26408844

  2. Increase of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and lysosomes in rat DRG neurons and their transportation to the central nerve terminal in dorsal horn after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Jung, J; Uesugi, N; Jeong, N Y; Park, B S; Konishi, H; Kiyama, H

    2016-01-28

    In the spinal dorsal horn (DH), nerve injury activates microglia and induces neuropathic pain. Several studies clarified an involvement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the microglial activation. However, the origin of ATP together with the release mechanism is unclear. Recent in vitro study revealed that an ATP marker, quinacrine, in lysosomes was released from neurite terminal of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to extracellular space via lysosomal exocytosis. Here, we demonstrate a possibility that the lysosomal ingredient including ATP released from DRG neurons by lysosomal-exocytosis is an additional source of the glial activation in DH after nerve injury. After rat L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL), mRNA for transcription factor EB (TFEB), a transcription factor controlling lysosomal activation and exocytosis, was induced in the DRG. Simultaneously both lysosomal protein, LAMP1- and vesicular nuclear transporter (VNUT)-positive vesicles were increased in L5 DRG neurons and ipsilateral DH. The quinacrine staining in DH was increased and co-localized with LAMP1 immunoreactivity after nerve injury. In DH, LAMP1-positive vesicles were also co-localized with a peripheral nerve marker, Isolectin B4 (IB4) lectin. Injection of the adenovirus encoding mCherry-LAMP1 into DRG showed that mCherry-positive lysosomes are transported to the central nerve terminal in DH. These findings suggest that activation of lysosome synthesis including ATP packaging in DRG, the central transportation of the lysosome, and subsequent its exocytosis from the central nerve terminal of DRG neurons in response to nerve injury could be a partial mechanism for activation of microglia in DH. This lysosome-mediated microglia activation mechanism may provide another clue to control nociception and pain. PMID:26601776

  3. Displaced electrode process for welding

    DOEpatents

    Heichel, L.J.

    1975-08-26

    A method is described for the butt-welding of a relatively heavy mass to a relatively small mass such as a thin-wall tube. In butt-welding heat is normally applied at the joint between the two pieces which are butt-welded together. The application of heat at the joint results in overheating the tube which causes thinning of the tube walls and porosity in the tube material. This is eliminated by displacing the welding electrode away from the seam toward the heavier mass so that heat is applied to the heavy mass and not at the butt seam. Examples of the parameters used in welding fuel rods are given. The cladding and end plugs were made of Zircalloy. The electrode used was of 2 percent thoriated tungsten. (auth)

  4. Polybenzimidazoles Via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergerrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Novel molecular weight controlled and endcapped polybenzimidazoles (PBI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenylbenzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The PBI are endcapped with mono(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazoles. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. Mono(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazoles are synthesized by reacting phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with aromatic (o-diamine)s in diphenylsulfone. Molecular weight controlled and endcapped PBI of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  5. Polybenzimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel molecular weight controlled and endcapped polybenzimidazoles (PBI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl benzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The PBI are endcapped with mono(hydroxyphenyl) benzimidazoles. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. Mono(hydroxyphenyl) benzimidazoles are synthesizedby reacting phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with aromatic (o-diamine)s in diphenylsulfone. Molecular weight controlled and endcapped PBI of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  6. Polyimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Polyimidazoles (PI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethyl acetamide, sulfolane, N-methylpyrrolidinone, dimethylsulfoxide, or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers are prepared by reacting an aromatic aldehyde with a dimethoxybenzil or by reacting an aromatic dialdehyde with a methoxybenzil in the presence of ammonium acetate. The di(methoxyphenyl) imidazole is subsequently treated with aqueous hydrobromic acid to give the di(hydroxphenyl) imidazole monomer. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight PI of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides and dinitro compounds.

  7. Polyimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimidazoles (Pl) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethylacetamide, sulfolane, N-methylpyrroldinone, dimethylsulfoxide, or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperature under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomers are prepared by reacting an aromatic aldehyde with a dimethoxybenzil or by reacting an aromatic dialdehyde with a methoxybenzil in the presence of ammonium acetate. The di(methoxyphenyl)imidazole is subsequently treated with aqueous hydrobromic acid to give the di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomer. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight Pl of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides and dinitro compounds.

  8. Displaceable Gear Torque Controlled Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a displaceable gear to limit torque transfer to a fastener at a precisely controlled torque limit. A biasing assembly biases a first gear into engagement with a second gear for torque transfer between the first and second gear. The biasing assembly includes a pressurized cylinder controlled at a constant pressure that corresponds to a torque limit. A calibrated gage and valve is used to set the desired torque limit. One or more coiled output linkages connect the first gear with the fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. The torque limit is adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  9. Variable delivery, fixed displacement pump

    SciTech Connect

    Sommars, Mark F.

    2001-01-01

    A variable delivery, fixed displacement pump comprises a plurality of pistons reciprocated within corresponding cylinders in a cylinder block. The pistons are reciprocated by rotation of a fixed angle swash plate connected to the pistons. The pistons and cylinders cooperate to define a plurality of fluid compression chambers each have a delivery outlet. A vent port is provided from each fluid compression chamber to vent fluid therefrom during at least a portion of the reciprocal stroke of the piston. Each piston and cylinder combination cooperates to close the associated vent port during another portion of the reciprocal stroke so that fluid is then pumped through the associated delivery outlet. The delivery rate of the pump is varied by adjusting the axial position of the swash plate relative to the cylinder block, which varies the duration of the piston stroke during which the vent port is closed.

  10. Amyloplast Distribution Directs a Root Gravitropic Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth

    Immobile higher plants are oriented in the gravitational field due to gravitropim that is a physiological growth reaction and consists of three phases: reception of a gravitational signal by statocytes, its transduction to the elongation zone, and finally the organ bending. As it is known, roots are characterized with positive gravitropism, i. e. they grow in the direction of a gravitational vector, stems - with negative gravitropism, i. e. they grow in the direction opposite to a gravitational vector. According to the Nemecs and Haberlandts starch-statolith hypothesis, amyloplasts in diameter of 1.5 - 3 ? in average, which appear to act as gravity sensors and fulfill a statolythic function in the specialized graviperceptive cells - statocytes, sediment in the direction of a gravitational vector in the distal part of a cell, while a nucleus is in the proximal one. There are reasonable data that confirm the amyloplasts-statoliths participation in gravity perception: 1) correlation between the statoliths localization and the site of gravity sensing, 2) significant redistribution (sedimentation) of amyloplasts in statocytes under gravistimulation in comparison with other cell organelles, 3) root decreased ability to react on gravity under starch removal from amyloplasts, 4) starchless Arabidopsis thaliana mutants are agravitropic, 5) amyloplasts-statoliths do not sediment in the absence of the gravitational vector and are in different parts or more concentrated in the center of statocytes. Plant tropisms have been intensively studied for many decades and continue to be investigated. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which plants do so is still not clearly explained and many questions on gravisensing and graviresponse remain unanswered. Even accepted hypotheses are now being questioned and recent data are critically evaluated. Although the available data show the Ca2+ and cytoskeleton participation in graviperception and signal transduction, the clear evidence with regard to the participation of calcium ions and cytoskeletal elements in these processes is therefore substantial but still circumstantial and requires new experimental data. Using a new model - weak combined magnetic fields (CMFs), which elicit a variety of responses in plants, growth rate and fresh weight, seed germination, Ca2+ concentration, membrane permeability, with a frequency resonance to cyclotron frequency of calcium ions, we firstly showed that a root positive gravitropic reaction changes on a negative one. In this case, the paradoxical displacement of amylopasts-statoliths to the upper longitudinal cell wall of statocytes occurred in the direction opposite to a gravitational vector. Displacement of amyloplasts, which contain the abundance of free Ca2+ in the stroma, was accompanied with Ca2+ redistribution in the same direction in the cytosol and increasing around amyloplasts in comparison with the state magnetic field. In the elongation zone, calcium ions accumulated in the upper site of a gravistimulated root unlike a positive gravitropic reaction, and a root is bending in the same direction in which amyloplasts are displacing. It seems that a root gravitropic reaction, if it began, occurs by an usual physiological way resulting in root bending with an opposite sign. It is of a special interest that a root is bending to the same direction with displacing of amyloplasts: in positive gravitropism - downwards, in negative gravitropism - upwards. Peculiarities of calcium ion redistribution in statocytes under gravistimulation in such combined magnetic field are a new additional evidence of a Ca2+ ion significant role in gravitropism. Thus, our data support the starch-statolith hypothesis but also pose the question as to which forces displace amyloplasts against the gravity vector? We hope that these data will stimulate new research to better understand the mechanisms of plant graviperception and graviresponse. Gravistimulation of a root in the CMF with the frequency resonance to the cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ ions is an effective model for future research of the mechanism of plant gravitropism, including a Ca2+ role in plant physiological growth reactions.

  11. The Root Pressure Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Describes experiments demonstrating that root pressure in plants is probably controlled by a circadian rhythm (biological clock). Root pressure phenomenon plays significant part in water transport in contradiction with prevalent belief. (PS)

  12. [Paraganglioma of the vagus nerve].

    PubMed

    Torres-Carranza, E; Infante-Cosso, P; Garca-Perla, A; Belmonte, R; Menndez, J; Gutirrez-Prez, J L

    2006-06-01

    Paragangliomas of the vagus nerve are uncommon vascular benign neoplasms of neuroectodermic origin. Initial clinical manifestation is usually as an asymptomatic cervical mass, although sometimes may cause lower cranial nerve palsies. These paragangliomas seldom associate to high levels of circulating catecholamines. Diagnosis is based on the clinics aided by imaging, where CT and MRI play an important role. Angiography is not only diagnostic, but it also allows preoperative embolization of the mass. Most accepted treatment is surgical removal, even though some paragangliomas are suitable for radiation therapy in very specific patients. In this paper we describe a new case of paraganglioma of the vagus nerve in a cervical location, with hypertensive episodes and high catecholamine-levels. The authors review the literature describing the clinical presentation, the diagnosis and the treatment of this rare lesion. PMID:16855784

  13. Embryonic anastomosis between hypoglossal nerves.

    PubMed

    Rodrguez-Vzquez, J F; Mrida-Velasco, J R; Verdugo-Lpez, S; Sanz-Casado, J V; Jimnez-Collado, J

    2009-12-01

    This article presents two cases of anastomosis of hypoglossal nerves in the suprahyoid region in human embryos of CR length 10.75 and 17.5 mm. This variation was studied in two human specimens at this stage of development and compared with the normal arrangement of the hypoglossal nerves in embryos at the same stage. The anastomotic branches were of similar caliber to the main trunks. In both cases the anastomosis was located dorsal to the origin of the geniohyoid muscles and caudal to the genioglossus muscles, lying transversally over the cranial face of the body of the hyoid bone anlage. The anastomosis formed a suprahyoid nerve chiasm on the midline in the embryo of 10.75 mm CR length. PMID:19330282

  14. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  15. Magnetic stimulation of curved nerves.

    PubMed

    Rotem, A; Moses, E

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic stimulation of nerves is attracting increased attention recently, as it has been found to be useful in therapy of neural disorders in humans. In an effort to explain the mechanisms of magnetic stimulation, we focus in this paper on the dependence of magnetic stimulation on neuronal morphology and in particular on the importance of curvature of axonal bundles. Using the theory of passive membrane dynamics, we predict the threshold power (the minimum stimulation power required to initiate an action potential) of specific axonal morphologies. In the experimental section, we show that magnetic stimulation of the frog sciatic nerve follows our theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the voltage length constant of the nerve can be measured based on these results alone. PMID:16532767

  16. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  17. Phylogenetic dichotomy of nerve glycosphingolipids.

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, N; Stoskopf, M; Hendricks, F; Kishimoto, Y

    1985-01-01

    Galactocerebrosides and sulfatides are major characteristic components of vertebrate myelin. In contrast, glucocerebroside is the major glycosphingolipid of shrimp nerve. In this study, the concentrations of these glycosphingolipids in the nervous systems of animals from several evolutionary branches were determined by use of high-performance liquid chromatography. In nerves of protostome animals only glucose-containing glycosphingolipids were detected, whereas glycosphingolipids from deuterostomes contained predominantly galactose. Neither the glycolipids containing alpha-hydroxy fatty acids nor sulfate esters of the glycolipids, both of which always accompany galactocerebrosides in deuterostome myelin, were present in protostome nerves. This correlation suggests an evolutionary trend from gluco- to galactocerebrosides, which corresponds with changes in the nervous system from loosely structured membrane-enwrapped axons to multilamellar highly structured myelin. PMID:3863128

  18. Reinforcement of Tree Root and Non-frame Method in Slope Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoto, I.; Quang, N. Minh

    2009-04-01

    A root fiber can nail a slipping soil mass into the bedrock and thus can increase slope stability. The reinforcement of root fibers is considered as the resultant of tension and shear reinforces occurred in the cross section of root at slip surface. The shear force and bending moment of a deformed root directly prevent against the displacement of unstable soil mass while the tension force increase the friction force between unstable soil and bed rock. Longer displacement of slope causes larger deformation and thus causes larger reinforcement of tree root. In other side, larger root reinforcement results in more slope stability. The reinforcement of tree root and displacement of slipping soil mass depending on each other is the reinforcement mechanism of tree root in a landslide. The mechanism of tree root reinforcement is considered in developing a new soil nail method named Non-frame. By conducting a number of experiments of soil nail stabilizing slope, the alteration process of root reinforcement was performed in various conditions of rainfall and earthquake.

  19. Impulse magnetic stimulation facilitates synaptic regeneration in rats following sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhivolupov, Sergey A; Odinak, Miroslav M; Rashidov, Nariman A; Onischenko, Ludmila S; Samartsev, Igor N; Jurin, Anton A

    2012-06-15

    The current studies describing magnetic stimulation for treatment of nervous system diseases mainly focus on transcranial magnetic stimulation and rarely focus on spinal cord magnetic stimulation. Spinal cord magnetic stimulation has been confirmed to promote neural plasticity after injuries of spinal cord, brain and peripheral nerve. To evaluate the effects of impulse magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord on peripheral nerve regneration, we compressed a 3 mm segment located in the middle third of the hip using a sterilized artery forceps to induce ischemia. Then, all animals underwent impulse magnetic stimulation of the lumbar portion of spinal crod and spinal nerve roots daily for 1 month. Electron microscopy results showed that in and below the injuryed segment, the inflammation and demyelination of neural tissue were alleviated, apoptotic cells were reduced, and injured Schwann cells and myelin fibers were repaired. These findings suggest that high-frequency impulse magnetic stimulation of spinal cord and corresponding spinal nerve roots promotes synaptic regeneration following sciatic nerve injury. PMID:25657659

  20. Impulse magnetic stimulation facilitates synaptic regeneration in rats following sciatic nerve injury?

    PubMed Central

    Zhivolupov, Sergey A.; Odinak, Miroslav M.; Rashidov, Nariman A.; Onischenko, Ludmila S.; Samartsev, Igor N.; Jurin, Anton A.

    2012-01-01

    The current studies describing magnetic stimulation for treatment of nervous system diseases mainly focus on transcranial magnetic stimulation and rarely focus on spinal cord magnetic stimulation. Spinal cord magnetic stimulation has been confirmed to promote neural plasticity after injuries of spinal cord, brain and peripheral nerve. To evaluate the effects of impulse magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord on peripheral nerve regneration, we compressed a 3 mm segment located in the middle third of the hip using a sterilized artery forceps to induce ischemia. Then, all animals underwent impulse magnetic stimulation of the lumbar portion of spinal crod and spinal nerve roots daily for 1 month. Electron microscopy results showed that in and below the injuryed segment, the inflammation and demyelination of neural tissue were alleviated, apoptotic cells were reduced, and injured Schwann cells and myelin fibers were repaired. These findings suggest that high-frequency impulse magnetic stimulation of spinal cord and corresponding spinal nerve roots promotes synaptic regeneration following sciatic nerve injury. PMID:25657659

  1. The site of impulse generation in transcranial magnetic stimulation of the facial nerve.

    PubMed

    Rimpilinen, I; Pyykk, I; Blomstedt, G; Kuurne, T; Karma, P

    1993-05-01

    The facial nerve can be stimulated in its intracranial course through transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We studied the site of impulse generation produced by TMS by comparing the latencies of the muscle evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited with TMS and intracranial electrical stimulation (IES) of the facial nerve during neurosurgical posterior fossa procedures. In a series of 25 patients, the mean latency of the TMS elicited MEPs, recorded in the orbicularis oris muscle, was 5.0 ms (SD 0.58). Also IES of the distal part of the facial nerve in the internal acoustic meatus showed a mean latency of 5.0 ms (SD 0.68). Proximal IES in the root entry zone of the facial nerve, and intermediate IES between root entry zone and meatus, produced MEPs with significantly longer latencies compared to TMS and distal IES (p < 0.05). The findings suggest that the TMS induced facial nerve activation, leading to a MEP response, takes place within the internal acoustic meatus. PMID:8517138

  2. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration by Secretomes of Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth.

    PubMed

    Sugimura-Wakayama, Yukiko; Katagiri, Wataru; Osugi, Masashi; Kawai, Takamasa; Ogata, Kenichi; Sakaguchi, Kohei; Hibi, Hideharu

    2015-11-15

    Peripheral nerve regeneration across nerve gaps is often suboptimal, with poor functional recovery. Stem cell transplantation-based regenerative therapy is a promising approach for axon regeneration and functional recovery of peripheral nerve injury; however, the mechanisms remain controversial and unclear. Recent studies suggest that transplanted stem cells promote tissue regeneration through a paracrine mechanism. We investigated the effects of conditioned media derived from stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED-CM) on peripheral nerve regeneration. In vitro, SHED-CM-treated Schwann cells exhibited significantly increased proliferation, migration, and the expression of neuron-, extracellular matrix (ECM)-, and angiogenesis-related genes. SHED-CM stimulated neuritogenesis of dorsal root ganglia and increased cell viability. Similarly, SHED-CM enhanced tube formation in an angiogenesis assay. In vivo, a 10-mm rat sciatic nerve gap model was bridged by silicon conduits containing SHED-CM or serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. Light and electron microscopy confirmed that the number of myelinated axons and axon-to-fiber ratio (G-ratio) were significantly higher in the SHED-CM group at 12 weeks after nerve transection surgery. The sciatic functional index (SFI) and gastrocnemius (target muscle) wet weight ratio demonstrated functional recovery. Increased compound muscle action potentials and increased SFI in the SHED-CM group suggested sciatic nerve reinnervation of the target muscle and improved functional recovery. We also observed reduced muscle atrophy in the SHED-CM group. Thus, SHEDs may secrete various trophic factors that enhance peripheral nerve regeneration through multiple mechanisms. SHED-CM may therefore provide a novel therapy that creates a more desirable extracellular microenvironment for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26154068

  3. Neuromodulation of the suprascapular nerve.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Foad; Reddy, Chandan G

    2014-01-01

    The shoulder joint is an enarthrodial or ball-and-socket joint. A complex network of anatomic structures endows the human shoulder with tremendous mobility, greater than any other joint in the body. Many pathologies can been found in those patients with chronic shoulder pain. The painful limitation of shoulder motion affects hand and arm motion as well; therefore, it significantly influences work performance and everyday activities as well as the quality of life. Therefore, the treatment of patients with chronic shoulder pain has major social and health economic implications. In this article we present a patient with a complex history of shoulder pathology including 7 surgeries that left the patient with chronic debilitating shoulder pain. She was suffering from chronic pain and limited mobility of the shoulder joint due to adhesive shoulder capsulitis. She was treated with a multimodality approach with the goals of increasing shoulder range of motion and decreasing her pain. This did not provide significant improvement. The suprascapular nerve supplies motor and sensory innervation to the shoulder, and can be easily accessible in the supraspinatus fossa. A suprascapular nerve block dramatically decreased her pain. This clinical observation along with confirmatory nerve block play an important role during the decision-making process for a trial period of electrical neuromodulation. She was followed for 3 months after the permanent implantation of a suprascapular nerve stimulator. Her pain and shoulder range of motion in all planes improved dramatically. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) of the suprascapular nerve, in addition to multimodality pain management, is one approach to the difficult task of treating adhesive capsulitis with accompanying pain and the inability to move the shoulder. We conducted a literature review on PubMed and found no case describing a similar patient to our knowledge. PMID:25415792

  4. WHY ROOTING FAILS.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2007-07-30

    I explore the origins of the unphysical predictions from rooted staggered fermion algorithms. Before rooting, the exact chiral symmetry of staggered fermions is a flavored symmetry among the four 'tastes.' The rooting procedure averages over tastes of different chiralities. This averaging forbids the appearance of the correct 't Hooft vertex for the target theory.

  5. The origin of the auriculotemporal nerve and its relationship to the middle meningeal artery.

    PubMed

    Dias, George J; Koh, Joshua M C; Cornwall, Jon

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the auriculotemporal nerve (ATN) and middle meningeal artery (MMA) in the infratemporal fossa is necessary for assisting concise medical diagnosis and intervention. Current textbook descriptions describe a relationship between these structures that is not reported in previous studies. In addition, no previous studies have reported on symmetry or ethnicity affecting the relationship between these structures. This study aims to provide information on the relationship between the ATN and the meningeal artery in a specific ethnic group to further our understanding of normal morphology in this region. The infratemporal fossae of 19 Caucasian cadaveric heads were dissected bilaterally and the relationship between the ATN and MMA scrutinised. Twenty-five samples were included for analysis, including 6 bilateral (12 sides, 8 female) and 13 unilateral (9 female) specimens. Nerve root contributions to the ATN from the mandibular and inferior alveolar nerve included 8 specimens with 1 root, 12 with 2, 5 with 3, and 1 with 4. Three of six bilaterally dissected specimens had asymmetrical numbers of nerve roots. Two specimens were found with a 'button hole' arrangement of the ATN; these did not enclose the MMA. Variation was found both between and within specimens in relation to the relationship between the ATN and MMA. None of the specimens examined demonstrated a morphology that was consistent with common anatomical texts. Findings suggest modern texts require revision in order to accurately describe the relationship between these structures. PMID:24973088

  6. Rooting Gene Trees without Outgroups: EP Rooting

    PubMed Central

    Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Little, Roderick J. A.; Lake, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Gene sequences are routinely used to determine the topologies of unrooted phylogenetic trees, but many of the most important questions in evolution require knowing both the topologies and the roots of trees. However, general algorithms for calculating rooted trees from gene and genomic sequences in the absence of gene paralogs are few. Using the principles of evolutionary parsimony (EP) (Lake JA. 1987a. A rate-independent technique for analysis of nucleic acid sequences: evolutionary parsimony. Mol Biol Evol. 4:167–181) and its extensions (Cavender, J. 1989. Mechanized derivation of linear invariants. Mol Biol Evol. 6:301–316; Nguyen T, Speed TP. 1992. A derivation of all linear invariants for a nonbalanced transversion model. J Mol Evol. 35:60–76), we explicitly enumerate all linear invariants that solely contain rooting information and derive algorithms for rooting gene trees directly from gene and genomic sequences. These new EP linear rooting invariants allow one to determine rooted trees, even in the complete absence of outgroups and gene paralogs. EP rooting invariants are explicitly derived for three taxon trees, and rules for their extension to four or more taxa are provided. The method is demonstrated using 18S ribosomal DNA to illustrate how the new animal phylogeny (Aguinaldo AMA et al. 1997. Evidence for a clade of nematodes, arthropods, and other moulting animals. Nature 387:489–493; Lake JA. 1990. Origin of the metazoa. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 87:763–766) may be rooted directly from sequences, even when they are short and paralogs are unavailable. These results are consistent with the current root (Philippe H et al. 2011. Acoelomorph flatworms are deuterostomes related to Xenoturbella. Nature 470:255–260). PMID:22593551

  7. Rooting gene trees without outgroups: EP rooting.

    PubMed

    Sinsheimer, Janet S; Little, Roderick J A; Lake, James A

    2012-01-01

    Gene sequences are routinely used to determine the topologies of unrooted phylogenetic trees, but many of the most important questions in evolution require knowing both the topologies and the roots of trees. However, general algorithms for calculating rooted trees from gene and genomic sequences in the absence of gene paralogs are few. Using the principles of evolutionary parsimony (EP) (Lake JA. 1987a. A rate-independent technique for analysis of nucleic acid sequences: evolutionary parsimony. Mol Biol Evol. 4:167-181) and its extensions (Cavender, J. 1989. Mechanized derivation of linear invariants. Mol Biol Evol. 6:301-316; Nguyen T, Speed TP. 1992. A derivation of all linear invariants for a nonbalanced transversion model. J Mol Evol. 35:60-76), we explicitly enumerate all linear invariants that solely contain rooting information and derive algorithms for rooting gene trees directly from gene and genomic sequences. These new EP linear rooting invariants allow one to determine rooted trees, even in the complete absence of outgroups and gene paralogs. EP rooting invariants are explicitly derived for three taxon trees, and rules for their extension to four or more taxa are provided. The method is demonstrated using 18S ribosomal DNA to illustrate how the new animal phylogeny (Aguinaldo AMA et al. 1997. Evidence for a clade of nematodes, arthropods, and other moulting animals. Nature 387:489-493; Lake JA. 1990. Origin of the metazoa. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 87:763-766) may be rooted directly from sequences, even when they are short and paralogs are unavailable. These results are consistent with the current root (Philippe H et al. 2011. Acoelomorph flatworms are deuterostomes related to Xenoturbella. Nature 470:255-260). PMID:22593551

  8. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  9. Peripheral nerve disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klein, Autumn

    2013-06-01

    Neuropathies during pregnancy and the postpartum period are common and are usually due to compression around pregnancy and childbirth. The most common peripheral neuropathies are Bell's palsy, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and lower extremity neuropathies. Although most neuropathies are usually reversible, associated disabilities or morbidities can limit functioning and require therapy. Nerve conduction study tests and imaging should only be considered if symptoms are unusual or prolonged. Some neuropathies may be associated with preeclampsia or an inherent underlying neuropathy that increases the risk of nerve injury. All neuropathies in pregnancy should be followed as some may be persistent and require follow-up. PMID:23563878

  10. Validity of Ski Skating Center-of-Mass Displacement Measured by a Single Inertial Measurement Unit.

    PubMed

    Myklebust, Håvard; Gløersen, Øyvind; Hallén, Jostein

    2015-12-01

    In regard to simplifying motion analysis and estimating center of mass (COM) in ski skating, this study addressed 3 main questions concerning the use of inertial measurement units (IMU): (1) How accurately can a single IMU estimate displacement of os sacrum (S1) on a person during ski skating? (2) Does incorporating gyroscope and accelerometer data increase accuracy and precision? (3) Moreover, how accurately does S1 determine COM displacement? Six world-class skiers roller-ski skated on a treadmill using 2 different subtechniques. An IMU including accelerometers alone (IMU-A) or in combination with gyroscopes (IMU-G) were mounted on the S1. A reflective marker at S1, and COM calculated from 3D full-body optical analysis, were used to provide reference values. IMU-A provided an accurate and precise estimate of vertical S1 displacement, but IMU-G was required to attain accuracy and precision of < 8 mm (root-mean-squared error and range of displacement deviation) in all directions and with both subtechniques. Further, arm and torso movements affected COM, but not the S1. Hence, S1 displacement was valid for estimating sideways COM displacement, but the systematic amplitude and timing difference between S1 and COM displacement in the anteroposterior and vertical directions inhibits exact calculation of energy fluctuations. PMID:26155813

  11. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement by Michael Rubin, MDCM NOTE: This is the ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  12. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement By Michael Rubin, MDCM NOTE: This is the ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  13. Therapies for Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    AAN Summary of Evidence-based Guideline for PATIENTS and THEIR FAMILIES THERAPIES FOR TREATING DIABETIC NERVE PAIN This fact sheet is provided to help you understand which therapies help diabetic nerve pain. This condition is also known as ...

  14. Modelling Toehold-Mediated RNA Strand Displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-03-01

    We study the thermodynamics and kinetics of an RNA toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction with a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Strand displacement, during which a single strand displaces a different strand previously bound to a complementary substrate strand, is an essential mechanism in active nucleic acid nanotechnology and has also been hypothesized to occur in vivo. We study the rate of displacement reactions as a function of the length of the toehold and temperature and make two experimentally testable predictions: that the displacement is faster if the toehold is placed at the 5' end of the substrate and that the displacement slows down with increasing temperature for longer toeholds.

  15. Modelling Toehold-Mediated RNA Strand Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P.K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics and kinetics of an RNA toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction with a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Strand displacement, during which a single strand displaces a different strand previously bound to a complementary substrate strand, is an essential mechanism in active nucleic acid nanotechnology and has also been hypothesized to occur in vivo. We study the rate of displacement reactions as a function of the length of the toehold and temperature and make two experimentally testable predictions: that the displacement is faster if the toehold is placed at the 5′ end of the substrate; and that the displacement slows down with increasing temperature for longer toeholds. PMID:25762335

  16. Presynaptic inhibition of soleus Ia afferents does not vary with center of pressure displacements during upright standing.

    PubMed

    Johannsson, J; Duchateau, J; Baudry, S

    2015-07-01

    The present work was designed to investigate the presynaptic modulation of soleus Ia afferents with the position and the direction of the displacement of the center of pressure (CoP) during unperturbed upright standing and exaggerated CoP displacements in young adults. Hoffmann (H) reflex was evoked in the soleus by stimulating the tibial nerve at the knee level. Modulation of Ia presynaptic inhibition was assessed by conditioning the H reflex with fibular nerve (D1 inhibition) and femoral nerve (heteronymous facilitation) stimulation. Leg muscle activity was assessed by electromyography (EMG). The results indicate that in unperturbed standing and exaggerated CoP displacements, the H-reflex amplitude was greater during forward than backward CoP direction (p<0.05). However, the amplitude of the conditioned H reflex (expressed relative to unconditioned H reflex) did not vary with CoP displacement, regardless of the experimental condition. The soleus EMG was greater during forward than backward CoP direction and during anterior than posterior position in both experimental conditions (p<0.05). The modulation of the unconditioned H reflex with CoP direction was positively associated with the corresponding changes in soleus EMG (r(2)>0.34). The tibialis anterior EMG did not change during unperturbed standing, but was greater for backward than forward CoP direction during exaggerated CoP displacements. In this experimental condition, soleus EMG was negatively associated with tibialis anterior EMG (r(2)=0.81). These results indicate that Ia presynaptic inhibition is not modulated with CoP direction and position, but rather suggest that CoP displacements induced changes in excitability of the soleus motor neuron pool. PMID:25869621

  17. Effect of pulsed infrared lasers on neural conduction and axoplasmic transport in sensory nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesselmann, Ursula; Rymer, William Z.; Lin, Shien-Fong

    1990-06-01

    Over the past ten years there has been an increasing interest in the use of lasers for neurosurgical and neurological procedures. Novel recent applications range from neurosurgical procedures such as dorsal root entry zone lesions made with argon and carbon dioxide microsurgical lasers to pain relief by low power laser irradiation of the appropriate painful nerve or affected region1 '2 However, despite the widespread clinical applications of laser light, very little is known about the photobiological interactions between laser light and nervous tissue. The present studies were designed to evaluate the effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser light on neural impulse conduction and axoplasmic transport in sensory nerves in rats and cats. Our data indicate that Q-switched Nd:YAG laser irradiation can induce a preferential impairment of (1) the synaptic effects of small afferent fibers on dorsal horn cells in the spinal cord and of (2) small slow conducting sensory nerve fibers in dorsal roots and peripheral nerves. These results imply that laser light might have selective effects on impulse conduction in slow conducting sensory nerve fibers. In agreement with our elecirophysiological observations recent histological data from our laboratory show, that axonal transport of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase is selectively impaired in small sensory nerve fibers. In summary these data indicate, that Q-switched Nd:YAG laser irradiation can selectively impair neural conduction and axoplasmic transport in small sensory nerve fibers as compared to fast conducting fibers. A selective influence of laser irradiation on slow conducting fibers could have important clinical applications, especially for the treatment of chronic pain.

  18. Light-induced effects on Brownian displacements

    PubMed Central

    Bhalerao, Anish S.; Pollack, Gerald H.

    2011-01-01

    Earlier work on particles in aqueous solution indicated that particle hydration could be expanded by incident light. To assess the effects of expanded hydration we measured Brownian displacements of microspheres exposed to light of varying intensities and wavelengths. Displacements were consistently diminished in an intensity-dependent and wavelength-dependent fashion, and center-to-center distances between microspheres were shifted to higher values. We conclude that suspended microspheres are surrounded by hydration zones substantial enough to impact Brownian displacements. PMID:21287689

  19. Displacement speeds in turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Marcus S.; Shepherd, Ian G.; Bell, J.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    The theory of turbulent premixed flames is based on acharacterization of the flame as a discontinuous surface propagatingthrough the fluid. The displacement speed, defined as the local speed ofthe flame front normal to itself, relative to the unburned fluid,provides one characterization of the burning velocity. In this paper, weintroduce a geometric approach to computing displacement speed anddiscuss the efficacy of the displacement speed for characterizing aturbulent flame.

  20. Patterned substrates and methods for nerve regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Heath, Carole; Shanks, Howard; Miller, Cheryl A.; Jeftinija, Srdija

    2004-01-13

    Micropatterned substrates and methods for fabrication of artificial nerve regeneration conduits and methods for regenerating nerves are provided. Guidance compounds or cells are seeded in grooves formed on the patterned substrate. The substrates may also be provided with electrodes to provide electrical guidance cues to the regenerating nerve. The micropatterned substrates give physical, chemical, cellular and/or electrical guidance cues to promote nerve regeneration at the cellular level.

  1. Axon-schwann cell interaction in the squid nerve fibre

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Jorge

    1972-01-01

    The electrical properties of Schwann cells and the effects of neuronal impulses on their membrane potential have been studied in the giant nerve fibre of the squid. 1. The behaviour of the Schwann cell membrane to current injection into the cell was ohmic. No impulse-like responses were observed with displacements of 35 mV in the membrane potential. The resistance of the Schwann cell membrane was found to be approximately 103 ? cm2. 2. A long-lasting hyperpolarization is observed in the Schwann cells following the conduction of impulse trains by the axon. Whereas the propagation of a single impulse had little effect, prolonged stimulation of the fibre at 250 impulses/sec was followed by a hyperpolarization of the Schwann cell that gradually declined over a period of several minutes. 3. The prolonged effects of nerve impulse trains on the Schwann cell were similar to those produced by depolarizing current pulses applied to the axon by the voltage-clamp technique. Thus, a series of depolarizing pulses in the axon was followed by a long-lasting hyperpolarization of the Schwann cells. In contrast, the application of a series of hyperpolarizing 100 mV pulses at a frequency of 1/sec had no apparent effects. 4. Changes in the external potassium concentration did not reproduce the long-lasting effects of nerve excitation. 5. The hyperpolarizing effects of impulse trains were abolished by the incubation of the nerve fibre in a sea-water solution containing trypsin. 6. These findings are discussed in relation to the possible mechanisms that might be responsible for the long-lasting hyperpolarizations of the Schwann cells. PMID:5074387

  2. An imaging study of the facial nerve canal in congenital aural atresia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shouqin; Han, Demin; Wang, Zhenchang; Li, Jie; Qian, Yanni; Ren, Yuanyuan; Dong, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a prospective study to investigate the abnormalities of the facial nerve canal in patients with congenital aural atresia by computed tomography (CT). Our study population was made up of 99 patients--68 males and 31 females, aged 6 to 22 years (mean: 13.5)--who had unilateral congenital aural atresia without any inner ear malformations. We compared our findings in these patients with those in 50 controls-33 males and 17 females, aged 5 to 22 years (mean: 15.0)-who had normal ears. We classified the congenital aural atresia patients into three groups (A, B, and C) according to their Jahrsdoerfer grading scale score (?8; 6 or 7; and ?5, respectively). The course of the facial nerve canal in both the controls and the study patients was determined by temporal bone CT with multiplanar reconstruction. The distances from different parts of the facial nerve canal to surrounding structures were also measured. The course of the facial nerve canal in the normal ears did not vary much, and there were no statistically significant differences according to head side and sex. In groups B and C, the tympanic segment, mastoid segment, and angle of the second genu of the facial nerve canal were all significantly smaller than those of the controls (p < 0.01 in all cases). Statistically, the tympanic segment of the facial nerve canal in patients with congenital aural atresia was downwardly displaced. The mastoid segment of the facial nerve canal in these patients was more anterior than that of the controls. We conclude that congenital aural atresia is often accompanied by abnormalities of the facial nerve canal, especially in the tympanic segment, the mastoid segment, and the second genu. We found that the lower the Jahrsdoerfer score was, the shorter the tympanic segment was and the more forward the mastoid segment was. PMID:26535838

  3. Design, fabrication and evaluation of a conforming circumpolar peripheral nerve cuff electrode for acute experimental use

    PubMed Central

    Foldes, Emily L.; Ackermann, D. Michael; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L.; Bhadra, Narendra

    2011-01-01

    Nerve cuff electrodes are a principle tool of basic and applied electro-neurophysiology studies and are championed for their ability to achieve good nerve recruitment with low thresholds. We describe the design and method of fabrication for a novel circumpolar peripheral nerve electrode for acute experimental use. This cylindrical cuff-style electrode provides approximately 270 degrees of radial electrode contact with a nerve for each of an arbitrary number of contacts, has a profile that allows for simple placement and removal in an acute nerve preparation, and is designed for adjustment of the cylindrical diameter to ensure a close fit on the nerve. For each electrode, the electrical contacts were cut from 25 µm platinum foil as an array so as to maintain their positions relative to each other within the cuff. Lead wires were welded to each intended contact. The structure was then molded in silicone elastomer, after which the individual contacts were electrically isolated. The final electrode was curved into a cylindrical shape with an inner diameter corresponding to that of the intended target nerve. The positions of these contacts were well maintained during the molding and shaping process and failure rates during fabrication due to contact displacements were very low. Established electrochemical measurements were made on one electrode to confirm expected behavior for a platinum electrode and to measure the electrode impedance to applied voltages at different frequencies. These electrodes have been successfully used for nerve stimulation, recording, and conduction block in a number of different acute animal experiments by several investigators. PMID:21187115

  4. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  5. The nerve supply of the lumbar intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Edgar, M A

    2007-09-01

    The anatomical studies, basic to our understanding of lumbar spine innervation through the sinu-vertebral nerves, are reviewed. Research in the 1980s suggested that pain sensation was conducted in part via the sympathetic system. These sensory pathways have now been clarified using sophisticated experimental and histochemical techniques confirming a dual pattern. One route enters the adjacent dorsal root segmentally, whereas the other supply is non-segmental ascending through the paravertebral sympathetic chain with re-entry through the thoracolumbar white rami communicantes. Sensory nerve endings in the degenerative lumbar disc penetrate deep into the disrupted nucleus pulposus, insensitive in the normal lumbar spine. Complex as well as free nerve endings would appear to contribute to pain transmission. The nature and mechanism of discogenic pain is still speculative but there is growing evidence to support a 'visceral pain' hypothesis, unique in the muscloskeletal system. This mechanism is open to 'peripheral sensitisation' and possibly 'central sensitisation' as a potential cause of chronic back pain. PMID:17905946

  6. Polybenzoxazole via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Polybenzoxazoles (PBO) are heterocyclic macromolecules which were first synthesized in a two-step process by the initial formation of aromatic diacid chlorides with bis(o-aminophenol)s through solution condensation of aromatic diacid chlorides with bis(o-aminophenol)s followed by thermal cyclodehydration. Since then several methods were utilized in their synthesis. The most common synthetic method for PBO involves a polycondensation of bis(o-aminophenol)s with aromatic diacid diphenyl esters. Another preparative route involves the solution polycondensation of the hydrochloride salts of bis(o-amino phenol)s with aromatic diacids in polyphosphoric acid. Another synthetic method involves the initial formation of poly(o-hydroxy amide)s from silylated bis(o-aminophenol)s with aromatic diacid chlorides followed by thermal cyclodehydration to PBO. A recent preparative route involves the reaction of aromatic bisphenols with bis(fluorophenyl) benzoxazoles by the displacement reaction to form PBO. The novelty of the present invention is that high molecular weight PBO of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  7. Results of ulnar nerve neurotization to biceps brachii muscle in brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Marcelo Rosa De; Rabelo, Neylor Teofilo Arajo; Silveira, Clvis Castanho; Petersen, Pedro Arajo; Paula, Emygdio Jos Leomil De; Mattar, Rames

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the factors influencing the results of ulnar nerve neurotization at the motor branch of the brachii biceps muscle, aiming at the restoration of elbow flexion in patients with brachial plexus injury. METHODS: 19 patients, with 18 men and 1 woman, mean age 28.7 years. Eight patients had injury to roots C5-C6 and 11, to roots C5-C6-C7. The average time interval between injury and surgery was 7.5 months. Four patients had cervical fractures associated with brachial plexus injury. The postoperative follow-up was 15.7 months. RESULTS: Eight patients recovered elbow flexion strength MRC grade 4; two, MRC grade 3 and nine, MRC <3. There was no impairment of the previous ulnar nerve function. CONCLUSION: The surgical results of ulnar nerve neurotization at the motor branch of brachii biceps muscle are dependent on the interval between brachial plexus injury and surgical treatment, the presence of associated fractures of the cervical spine and occipital condyle, residual function of the C8-T1 roots after the injury and the involvement of the C7 root. Signs of reinnervation manifested up to 3 months after surgery showed better results in the long term. Level of Evidence: IV, Case Series. PMID:24453624

  8. The primary projections of the lateral-line nerves of the Florida gar, Lepisosteus platyrhincus.

    PubMed

    Song, J K; Northcutt, R G

    1991-01-01

    Gars, like most other ray-finned fishes, possess lines of superficial and canal neuromasts that form highly ordered spatial arrays on the head and trunk. These neuromasts are innervated by three pairs of cranial nerves: anterior, middle and posterior lateral-line nerves. Application of horseradish peroxidase to the roots of these nerves indicates that the afferent fibers of each nerve terminate throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the ipsilateral octavolateralis column, composed of medial and caudal octavolateralis nuclei, as well as rostrally in the eminentia granularis of the cerebellum. The afferents of each nerve terminate within different regions of these nuclei, thus preserving a rostrocaudal somatotopy of the peripheral receptors. The individual rami of these nerves innervate peripheral receptors in a dorsoventral sequence; however, application of horseradish peroxidase to these rami indicates an almost total overlap of the terminal fields of adjacent rami and, thus, little or no preservation of dorsoventral somatotopy of the peripheral receptors. Similarly, the terminal fields of fibers that innervate canal and superficial neuromasts overlap extensively, and there is no evidence for separate maps of canal and superficial neuromasts. Furthermore, the position of the terminal fields of superficial neuromasts is not consistent with a hypothesis that these receptors may have evolved into electroreceptors in some teleosts. However, these experiments do indicate that superficial neuromasts, like canal neuromasts, are innervated by efferent fibers of rostral and caudal efferent nuclei, but there is no evidence of a diencephalic efferent nucleus as occurs in teleosts. PMID:2029608

  9. Distribution of TRPV1- and TRPV2-immunoreactive afferent nerve endings in rat trachea.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshio; Sato, Yoshikazu; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2007-12-01

    Nociception in the trachea is important for respiratory modulation. We investigated the distribution, neurochemical characteristics, and origin of nerve endings with immunoreactivity for candidate sensor channels, TRPV1 and TRPV2, in rat trachea. In the epithelial layer, the intraepithelial nerve endings and dense subepithelial network of nerve fibers were immunoreactive for TRPV1. In contrast, TRPV2 immunoreactivity was observed mainly in nerve fibers of the tracheal submucosal layer and in several intrinsic ganglion cells in the peritracheal plexus. Double immunostaining revealed that some TRPV1-immunoreactive nerve fibers were also immunoreactive for substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide, but neither neuropeptide colocalized with TRPV2. Injection of the retrograde tracer, fast blue, into the tracheal wall near the thoracic inlet demonstrated labeled neurons in the jugular, nodose, and dorsal root ganglia at segmental levels of C2-C8. In the jugular and nodose ganglia, 59.3% (70/118) and 10.7% (17/159), respectively, of fast blue-labeled neurons were immunoreactive for TRPV1, compared to 8.8% (8/91) and 2.6% (5/191) for TRPV2-immunoreactive. Our results indicate that TRPV1-immunoreactive nerve endings are important for tracheal nociception, and the different expression patterns of TRPV1 and TRPV2 with neuropeptides may reflect different subpopulations of sensory neurons. PMID:17979952

  10. Autoradiographic location of sensory nerve endings in dentin of monkey teeth

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, M.R.; Dong, W.K.

    1983-04-01

    We have used the autoradiographic method to locate trigeminal nerve endings in monkey teeth. The nerve endings were labeled in two adult female Macaca fascicularis by 20 hours of axonal transport of radioactive protein (/sup 3/H-L-proline). We found a few labeled axons in contralateral mandibular central incisors and one mandibular canine. In ipsilateral teeth, numerous myelinated and unmyelinated axons were labeled; they formed a few terminal branches in the roots but primarily branched in the crown to form the peripheral plexus of Raschkow and to terminate as free endings in the odontoblast layer, predentin, and as far as 120 micrometers into dentinal tubules. Electron microscopic autoradiography showed that the radioactive axonally transported protein was confined to sensory axons and endings; odontoblasts and dentin matrix were not significantly labeled. Labeled free nerve endings were closely apposed to odontoblasts in dentin but did not form distinctive junctions with them. Nerve endings were most numerous in the regular tubular dentin of the crown adjacent to the tip of the pulp horn, occurring in at least half of the dentinal tubules there. Our results show tha dentinal sensory nerve endings in primate teeth can be profuse, sparse, or absent depending on the location and structure of dentin and its adjacent pulp. When dentin was innervated, the tubules were straight and contained odontoblast processes, the predentin was wide, the odontoblast cell bodies were relatively columnar, and there was an adjacent cell-free zone and pulpal nerve plexus.

  11. Dilation of the oropharynx via selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingtao; Sahin, Mesut; Durand, Dominique M

    2005-12-01

    The functional effects of selective hypoglossal nerve (HG) stimulation with a multi-contact peripheral nerve electrode were assessed using images of the upper airways and the tongue in anesthetized beagles. A biphasic pulse train of 50 Hz frequency and 2 s duration was applied through each one of the tripolar contact sets of the nerve electrode while the pharyngeal images were acquired into a computer. The stimulation current was limited to 20% above the activation threshold for maximum selectivity. The images showed that various contact sets could generate several different activation patterns of the tongue muscles resulting in medial and/or lateral dilation and closing of the airways at the tongue root. Some of these patterns translated into an increase in the oropharyngeal size while others did not have any effect. The pharyngeal sizes were not statistically different during stimulation either between the two different positions of the head (30 degrees and 60 degrees), or when the lateral contacts were compared with the medial ones. The contacts that had the least effect generated an average of 53 +/- 15% pharyngeal dilation relative to the best contacts, indicating that the results are marginally sensitive to the contact position around the HG nerve trunk. These results suggest that selective HG nerve stimulation can be a useful technique to produce multiple tongue activation patterns that can dilate the pharynx. This may in turn increase the size of the patient population who can benefit from HG nerve stimulation as a treatment method for obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:16317230

  12. Hemi-hypoglossal nerve transfer for obstetric brachial plexus palsy: report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Al-Thunyan, Abdullah; Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; Al-Meshal, Obaid; Al-Husainan, Hanan; Al-Assaf, Assaf

    2015-03-01

    Use of the entire hypoglossal nerve for nerve transfer in obstetric palsy is not recommended because of major donor nerve morbidity in terms of feeding and speech problems. We used a hemi-hypoglossal nerve transfer for biceps reinnervation in obstetric palsy in 3 infants with multiple root avulsions. Two of the 3 infants recovered normal or near-normal elbow flexion. There was no donor nerve morbidity in terms of feeding. Speech was assessed at age 20 to 27 months and was appropriate for age, which indicates that early speech development (speech intelligibility and articulation) were not affected. However, phonological development (expected to develop by age 3 y) and full consonant development (expected to be complete by age 5 y) could not be assessed because all children were younger than age 3 years at final follow-up. Our results confirm the relative safety of using a hemi-hypoglossal nerve transfer in infants. The transfer deserves study in a larger series and with longer follow-up, particularly regarding speech development. PMID:25617219

  13. Carbon-nanotube-interfaced glass fiber scaffold for regeneration of transected sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hong-Sun; Hwang, Ji-Young; Kim, Min Soo; Lee, Ja-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Wan; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Shin, Ueon Sang; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won; Hyun, Jung Keun

    2015-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with their unique and unprecedented properties, have become very popular for the repair of tissues, particularly for those requiring electrical stimuli. Whilst most reports have demonstrated in vitro neural cell responses of the CNTs, few studies have been performed on the in vivo efficacy of CNT-interfaced biomaterials in the repair and regeneration of neural tissues. Thus, we report here for the first time the in vivo functions of CNT-interfaced nerve conduits in the regeneration of transected rat sciatic nerve. Aminated CNTs were chemically tethered onto the surface of aligned phosphate glass microfibers (PGFs) and CNT-interfaced PGFs (CNT-PGFs) were successfully placed into three-dimensional poly(L/D-lactic acid) (PLDLA) tubes. An in vitro study confirmed that neurites of dorsal root ganglion outgrew actively along the aligned CNT-PGFs and that the CNT interfacing significantly increased the maximal neurite length. Sixteen weeks after implantation of a CNT-PGF nerve conduit into the 10 mm gap of a transected rat sciatic nerve, the number of regenerating axons crossing the scaffold, the cross-sectional area of the re-innervated muscles and the electrophysiological findings were all significantly improved by the interfacing with CNTs. This first in vivo effect of using a CNT-interfaced scaffold in the regeneration process of a transected rat sciatic nerve strongly supports the potential use of CNT-interfaced PGFs at the interface between the nerve conduit and peripheral neural tissues. PMID:25463487

  14. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  15. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  16. The nerve gap. Theory and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Millesi, H

    1986-11-01

    In peripheral nerve surgery, the term "gap" means the distance between the two stumps of a transected peripheral nerve without further specification. The factors that contribute to the formation of a gap are analyzed in this paper. It becomes clear that the gap formed by a true nerve defect has a different meaning than a gap formed by elastic retraction. The final length of a particular nerve gap in an extremity is decisively influenced by the joint position. Therefore, the question arises regarding how a nerve adapts to the length difference during limb motion, which can be estimated for the median nerve during flexion and extension of the elbow joint with approximately 10 cm in an adult patient. Three mechanisms play an important role: true elongation of the length of the nerve in the relaxed state against elastic forces; movement of the nerve trunk in the longitudinal direction; and increase and decrease of the tissue relaxation at the level of the nerve trunk (relaxed course) and the nerve fibers (change in the undulated course). The efficiency of this mechanism partially depends on the ability of the nerve to move against the surrounding tissue. This ability is provided by the loose connective tissue around the nerve (adventitia, conjunctiva nervorum, perineurium). Only if this movement is possible, traction forces to elongate the nerve are distributed over the whole length of the nerve and are kept minimal for each particular segment. Adhesions of the nerve trunk at the site of repair prevent an equal distribution of forces and cause an unfavorable rise of traction forces at certain segments, according to the anatomic site. True elongation of the nerve, therefore, has only a limited application in overcoming a gap. Alternatives are rerouting, limb-shortening, and nerve-grafting. Today, the most reliable technique is the use of autologous cutaneous nerve segments as free nerve grafts. Advantages and disadvantages of "vascularized" nerve grafts are discussed. The use of neuromatous neurotization to overcome a gap is still in an experimental state. PMID:3539948

  17. Nerve agents: implications for anesthesia providers.

    PubMed

    Hrobak, Paula Kay

    2008-04-01

    Anesthesia providers may be called to treat injuries from chemical weapons or spills, for which prompt treatment is vital. It is therefore important to understand the mechanism of action of nerve agents and the resultant pathophysiology and to be able to quickly recognize the signs and symptoms of nerve agent exposure. This review article addresses the different types of nerve agents that are currently being manufactured as well as the symptomatic and definitive treatment of the patient who presents with acute nerve agent toxicity. This article also reviews the physiology of the neuromuscular junction and the autonomic nervous system receptors that nerve agent toxicity affects. PMID:18478812

  18. Atrophy of the brachialis muscle after a displaced clavicle fracture in an Ironman triathlete: case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Clavicle fractures are frequent injuries in athletes and midshaft clavicle fractures in particular are well-known injuries in Ironman triathletes. In 2000, Auzou et al. described the mechanism leading to an isolated truncular paralysis of the musculocutaneous nerve after a shoulder trauma. It is well-known that nerve palsies can lead to an atrophy of the associated muscle if they persist for months or even longer. In this case report we describe a new case of an Ironman triathlete suffering from a persistent isolated atrophy of the brachialis muscle. The atrophy occurred following a displaced midshaft clavicle fracture acquiring while falling off his bike after hitting a duck during a competition. PMID:21961883

  19. Video Games, Adolescents, and the Displacement Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Carla Christine

    2012-01-01

    The displacement effect (the idea that time spent in one activity displaces time spent in other activities) was examined within the lens of adolescents' video game use and their time spent reading, doing homework, in physically active sports and activities, in creative play, and with parents and friends. Data were drawn from the Panel Study

  20. Displaced Homemakers: Vo-Tech Workshop Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, Wanda Jo

    Written for displaced homemaker programs in vocational-technical schools, this curriculum contains material designed so that instructors can prepare student manuals appropriate to almost any educational support situation for displaced homemakers. An overview provides information on special needs groups, curriculum use, and resources and sample

  1. BLOCK DISPLACEMENT METHOD FIELD DEMONSTRATION AND SPECIFICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Block Displacement technique has been developed as a remedial action method for isolating large tracks of ground contaminated by hazardous waste. The technique places a low permeability barrier around and under a large block of contaminated earth. The Block Displacement proce...

  2. Displacement measurement based on TWAIN interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Zhongsheng; Wang, Xuanze; Zhong, Yuning; Lv, Qinghua

    2008-12-01

    The standard of technology without an interesting name (TWAIN) was introduced and a displacement measurement method was presented. Based on the theories of image capture and image measurement, a displacement measurement system was developed and subpixel and centroid technique were used to improve the measurement precision. The Experiment results show that the proposed method has low cost and high precision.

  3. Cranial nerves XIII and XIV: nerves in the shadows

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Zanier, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for over a century that these cranial nerves exist, and that they are not typographical errors nor a sensational event reported in the medical literature. A number of scientific articles on anatomy highlight how textbooks on descriptive anatomy do not always consider variables such as differences related to the geographical areas where people live, and these differences do exist. This is an important concept not only for surgeons, but also for all medical professionals who use manual techniques when treating their patients, ie, osteopaths, chiropractors, physiotherapists, and other manual therapists. This paper highlights the latest developments regarding these cranial nerves, offering at the same time some ideas for further reflection when looking at clinical scenarios that appear to bear little relationship to each other. Inclusion of these concepts in everyday anamnesis is encouraged. PMID:23516138

  4. Designing ideal conduits for peripheral nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    de Ruiter, Godard C. W.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.; Spinner, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Nerve tubes, guides, or conduits are a promising alternative for autologous nerve graft repair. The first biodegradable empty single lumen or hollow nerve tubes are currently available for clinical use and are being used mostly in the repair of small-diameter nerves with nerve defects of < 3 cm. These nerve tubes are made of different biomaterials using various fabrication techniques. As a result these tubes also differ in physical properties. In addition, several modifications to the common hollow nerve tube (for example, the addition of Schwann cells, growth factors, and internal frameworks) are being investigated that may increase the gap that can be bridged. This combination of chemical, physical, and biological factors has made the design of a nerve conduit into a complex process that demands close collaboration of bioengineers, neuroscientists, and peripheral nerve surgeons. In this article the authors discuss the different steps that are involved in the process of the design of an ideal nerve conduit for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:19435445

  5. Leptin-sensitive sensory nerves innervate white fat.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Keegan T; Schwartz, Gary J; Nguyen, Ngoc Ly T; Mendez, Jennifer M; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J

    2013-06-15

    Leptin, the primary white adipose tissue (WAT) adipokine, is thought to convey lipid reserve information to the brain via the circulation. Because WAT responds to environmental/internal signals in a fat pad-specific (FPS) manner, systemic signals such as leptin would fail to communicate such distinctive information. Saturation of brain leptin transport systems also would fail to convey increased lipid levels beyond that point. WAT possesses sensory innervation exemplified by proven sensory-associated peptides in nerves within the tissue and by viral sensory nerve-specific transneuronal tract tracer, H129 strain of herpes simplex virus 1 labeling of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) pseudounipolar neurons, spinal cord and central sensory circuits. Leptin as a paracrine factor activating WAT sensory innervation could supply the brain with FPS information. Therefore, we tested for and found the presence of the long form of the leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) on DRG pseudounipolar neurons immunohistochemically labeled after injections of Fluorogold, a retrograde tract tracer, into inguinal WAT (IWAT). Intra-IWAT leptin injections (300 ng) significantly elevated IWAT nerve spike rate within 5 min and persisted for at least 30 min. Intra-IWAT leptin injections also induced significant c-Fos immunoreactivity (ir), indicating neural activation across DRG pseudounipolar sensory neurons labeled with Fluorogold IWAT injections. Intraperitoneal leptin injection did not increase c-Fos-ir in DRG or the arcuate nucleus, nor did it increase arcuate signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation-ir. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that endogenous leptin secreted from white adipocytes functions as a paracrine factor to activate spinal sensory nerves innervating the tissue. PMID:23612999

  6. Amniotic membrane covering for facial nerve repair☆

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Murat; Tuncel, Arzu; Sheidaei, Shahrouz; Şenol, Mehmet Güney; Karabulut, Murat Hakan; Deveci, Ildem; Karaman, Nihan

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic membranes have been widely used in ophthalmology and skin injury repair because of their anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we measured therapeutic efficacy and determined if amniotic membranes could be used for facial nerve repair. The facial nerves of eight rats were dissected and end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Amniotic membranes were covered on the anastomosis sites in four rats. Electromyography results showed that, at the end of the 3rd and 8th weeks after amniotic membrane covering, the latency values of the facial nerves covered by amniotic membranes were significantly shortened and the amplitude values were significantly increased. Compared with simple facial nerve anastomosis, after histopathological examination, facial nerve anastomosed with amniotic membrane showed better continuity, milder inflammatory reactions, and more satisfactory nerve conduction. These findings suggest that amniotic membrane covering has great potential in facial nerve repair. PMID:25206390

  7. Root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed. We performed a Medline search for English-language papers published untill July 2010. The keywords used were ‘root canal irrigants’ and ‘endodontic irrigants.’ The reference lists of each article were manually checked for additional articles of relevance. PMID:21217955

  8. Using a 2D displacement sensor to derive 3D displacement information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soares, Schubert F. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A 2D displacement sensor is used to measure displacement in three dimensions. For example, the sensor can be used in conjunction with a pulse-modulated or frequency-modulated laser beam to measure displacement caused by deformation of an antenna on which the sensor is mounted.

  9. Assesing tree-root & soil interaction using pull-out test apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, J.; Corcoran, M. K.; Kala, R.; Leavell, D.

    2011-12-01

    Knowing in situ root strength provides a better understanding of the responses of tree root systems against external loads. Root pullout devices are used to record these strengths and can be expressed in two ways: pullout force, which is a direct output from the load cell (measured in pounds) or pullout stress, which is the pullout force divided by root cross section area (measured in pounds per square in.). Pullout tests show not only the possible tensile strength of a tree root, but also the interaction between the tree root and the surrounding geological materials. After discussion with engineers from the University of Nottingham-Trent, the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) constructed a root pullout apparatus with some modifications. These modifications included using a T-System configuration at the base of an aluminum frame instead of a diagonal rod and varying the size of the clamp placed around the tested root. The T-System is placed in front of the root perpendicular to the root path. In the ERDC pullout device, the root was pulled directly without a lever system. A string pot was used to measure displacement when the root was pulled. The device is capable of pulling tree roots with a diameter of up to 2.5 in. and a maximum load of 5000 lbs. Using this device, ERDC conducted field operations in Portland, Oregon; Burlington, Washington; and Albuquerque, New Mexico, on Oregon ash, alder, maple, and cedar trees. In general, pullout tests were conducted approximately 60 deg around the tree selected for the tests. The location of a test depended on the availability of a root near the ground surface. A backhoe was used to remove soil around the tree to locate roots. Before the root was secured in a clamp, root diameter was measured and recorded, and the root was photographed. The tree species, dip angle and dip direction of the root, root location with respect to the tree, tree location, dates, weather, and soil type were also recorded. When the test begins the load cell and displacement transducers immediately started recording the measurements, and the measurements are stored on a laptop computer. The hydraulic pump controls the rate of loading for a relatively slow pulling displacement rate of 0.08 in./sec. Failure occurred when the root breaks or was pulled out of the soil. Maximum forces and root failure location were noted, as well as any additional observations during and after the test. In the ERDC tests, root diameters (root with bark) ranged between 0.7 and 2.33 in., the pullout force was between 86 and 3513 lb, and the pullout stress was between 56 and 2645 psi. ERDC recorded three different types of tree-root failures: pure root tensile failure, bonding between root and soil failure, and a combination of the two. In tensile failure, a root breaks abruptly and the force versus displacement curve usually shows a steep slope, and there is no residual strength. In a bonding failure, the force versus displacement curve shows a gentler slope, and there is residual strength. A combined failure mode may also occur. For pullout tests conducted for the ERDC research, the combined mode failure was the most prevalent failure mechanism.

  10. Tensile forces and failure characteristics of individual and bundles of roots embedded in soil - experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Massimiliano; Cohen, Dedis; Or, Dani

    2010-05-01

    The quantification of soil root reinforcement is relevant for many aspects of hillslope stability and forest management. The abundance and distribution of roots in upper soil layers determines slope stability and is considered a mitigating factor reducing shallow landslide hazard. Motivated by advances in modeling approaches that account for soil-root mechanical interactions at single root and bundle of roots of different geometries (the root bundle model - RBM), we set up a series of root pull out experiments in the laboratory and in the field to study the mechanical behavior of pulled roots. We focused on the role of displacement and root failure mechanisms in determining global tensile strength and failure dynamics in a root bundle. Strain controlled pull out tests of up to 13 roots in parallel each with its own force measurements provided insights into the detailed soil-root and bundle interactions . The results enabled systematic evaluation of factors such as root tortuosity and branching patterns for the prediction of single root pull out behavior, and demonstrated the importance of root diameter distribution for realistic prediction of global pullout behavior of a root bundle. Analyses of root-soil interface friction shows that force-displacement behavior varies for different combinations of soil types and water content. The maximal pull out interfacial friction ranges between 1 for wet sand (under 2 kPa confining pressure) and 17 kPa for dry sand (under 4.5 kPa confining pressure). These experiments were instrumental for calibration of the RBM which was later validated with six field experiments on natural root bundles of spruce (Picea abies L.). The tests demonstrated the progressive nature of failure of a bundle of roots under strain controlled conditions (such as formation of tension crack on a vegetated hillslope), and provide important insights regarding stress-strain behavior of natural root reinforcement.

  11. Acute transfer of superficial radial nerve to the medial nerve: case report.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Lorenzo, Andres; Sfteland, Madiha Bhatti; Audolfsson, Thorir

    2012-11-01

    Distal nerve transfers have proven to be an important addition to the armamentarium for reconstruction of peripheral nerve injuries. As new nerve transfer procedures are developed, the indications for their uses continue to broaden. We report a case of a 77-year-old male who had a 9-cm-long gap of the median nerve after experiencing an avulsion injury to his right forearm. This was successfully treated by transferring superficial radial nerve to the median nerve at the carpal tunnel level, thus restoring thumb, index, and first web sensation. Our report emphasizes that nerve transfers in the emergency setting may be the treatment of first choice in cases where conventional nerve grafting is known to result in poorer outcomes such as in long nerve gaps or in the elderly patient population. PMID:23044754

  12. Two cases of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve: routine nerve exploration in total thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Say?m, Nazmi Ya?ar; Gl, Fethi

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury is one of the main complications of thyroidectomy. Since variability in the course of the nerve increases the risk of injury, routine nerve exploration is recommended. In this report, we present two cases of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve found during total thyroidectomy performed for benign pathologies. Total thyroidectomy was performed on two female patients (52 and 54 years old) with a diagnosis of multi-nodular goiter in our clinics. Nerve exploration was performed routinely and non-recurrent laryngeal nerve was noted in both patients. Patients were discharged on the first postoperative day without any complications. Recurrent laryngeal nerve exploration does not increase the risk of nerve injury and ensures safety in case of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve presence, despite its rarity. PMID:25931840

  13. Two cases of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve: routine nerve exploration in total thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Say?m, Nazmi Ya?ar; Gl, Fethi

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury is one of the main complications of thyroidectomy. Since variability in the course of the nerve increases the risk of injury, routine nerve exploration is recommended. In this report, we present two cases of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve found during total thyroidectomy performed for benign pathologies. Total thyroidectomy was performed on two female patients (52 and 54 years old) with a diagnosis of multi-nodular goiter in our clinics. Nerve exploration was performed routinely and non-recurrent laryngeal nerve was noted in both patients. Patients were discharged on the first postoperative day without any complications. Recurrent laryngeal nerve exploration does not increase the risk of nerve injury and ensures safety in case of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve presence, despite its rarity. PMID:25931840

  14. Identifying motor and sensory myelinated axons in rabbit peripheral nerves by histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Sanger, James R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Yousif, N. John; Bain, James L. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) histochemical staining of rabbit spinal nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia demonstrated that among the reactive myeliated axons, with minor exceptions, sensory axons were CA positive and CE negative whereas motor axons were CA negative and CE positive. The high specificity was achieved by adjusting reaction conditions to stain subpopulations of myelinated axons selectively while leaving 50 percent or so unstained. Fixation with glutaraldehyde appeared necessary for achieving selectivity. Following sciatic nerve transection, the reciprocal staining pattern persisted in damaged axons and their regenerating processes which formed neuromas within the proximal nerve stump. Within the neuromas, CA-stained sensory processes were elaborated earlier and in greater numbers than CE-stained regenerating motor processes. The present results indicate that histochemical axon typing can be exploited to reveal heterogeneous responses of motor and sensory axons to injury.

  15. Vascularized Nerve Grafts and Vascularized Fascia for Upper Extremity Nerve Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kostopoulos, Vasileios K.

    2009-01-01

    Since 1976, experimental and clinical studies have suggested the superiority of vascularized nerve grafts. In this study, a 27-year experience of the senior author is presented regarding vascularized nerve grafts and fascia for complex upper extremity nerve reconstruction. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts is presented. Since 1981, 21 vascularized nerve grafts, other than vascularized ulnar nerve, were used for reconstruction of nerve injuries in the upper extremity. Indications were prolonged denervation time, failure of the previously used conventional nerve grafts, and excessive scar in the recipient site. Injury was in the hand/wrist area (n = 5), in the forearm (n = 4), in the elbow (n = 2), in the arm (n = 4), or in the plexus (n = 6). Vascularized sural (n = 9), saphenous (n = 8), superficial radial (n = 3), and peroneal (superficial and deep) nerves were used. The mean follow-up was 31.4 months. Vascularized nerve grafts for upper extremity injuries provided good to excellent sensory return in severely scarred upper extremities in patients in whom conventional nerve grafts had failed. They have also provided relief of causalgia after painful neuroma resection and motor function recovery in selective cases even for above the elbow injuries. Small diameter vascularized nerve grafts should be considered for bridging long nerve gaps in regions of excessive scar or for reconstructions where conventional nerve grafts have failed. PMID:19381727

  16. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xing-long; Wang, Pei; Sun, Bo; Liu, Shi-bo; Gao, Yun-feng; He, Xin-ze; Yu, Chang-yu

    2015-01-01

    Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery. PMID:26692866

  17. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-yuan; Wang, Zhong-chao; Wang, Pin; Lan, Yu-yan; Tu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypoglossal nerve crush injury and gave intraperitoneal injections of exogenous nerve growth factor to rats for 14 days. p38MAPK activity in the damaged neurons was increased following hypoglossal nerve crush injury; exogenous nerve growth factor inhibited this increase in acitivity and increased the survival rate of motor neurons within the hypoglossal nucleus. Under transmission electron microscopy, we found that the injection of nerve growth factor contributed to the restoration of the morphology of hypoglossal nerve after crush injury. Our experimental findings indicate that exogenous nerve growth factor can protect damaged neurons and promote hypoglossal nerve regeneration following hypoglossal nerve crush injury. PMID:26889186

  18. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. Results: In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. Conclusions: The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh. PMID:26550216

  19. Reconstruction of peripheral nerves using acellular nerve grafts with implanted cultured Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, Onno; Fansa, Hisham; Schicht, Christoph; Wolf, Gerald; Schneider, Wolfgang; Keilhoff, Gerburg

    2002-01-01

    The bridging of nerve gaps is still one of the major problems in peripheral nerve surgery. The present experiment describes our attempt to engineer different biologic nerve grafts in a rat sciatic nerve model: cultured isogenic Schwann cells were implanted into 2-cm autologous acellular nerve grafts or autologous predegenerated nerve grafts. Autologous nerve grafts and predegenerated or acellular nerve grafts without implanted Schwann cells served as controls. The regenerated nerves were assessed histologically and morphometrically after 6 weeks. Predegenerated grafts showed results superior in regard to axon count and histologic appearance in comparison to standard grafts and acellular grafts. The acellular nerve grafts showed the worst histologic picture, but axon counts were in the range of standard grafts. The implantation of Schwann cells did not yield significant improvements in any group. In conclusion, the status of activation of Schwann cells and the stadium of Wallerian degeneration in a nerve graft might be key factors for regeneration, rather than total number of Schwann cells. Predegenerated nerve grafts are therefore superior to standard grafts in the rat model. Acellular grafts are able to bridge nerve gaps of up to 2 cm in the rat model, but even the addition of cultivated Schwann cells did not lead to results as good as in the group with autologous nerve grafts. PMID:12404350

  20. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xing-Long; Wang, Pei; Sun, Bo; Liu, Shi-Bo; Gao, Yun-Feng; He, Xin-Ze; Yu, Chang-Yu

    2015-10-01

    Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery. PMID:26692866

  1. Nerve guides manufactured from photocurable polymers to aid peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Pateman, Christopher J; Harding, Adam J; Glen, Adam; Taylor, Caroline S; Christmas, Claire R; Robinson, Peter P; Rimmer, Steve; Boissonade, Fiona M; Claeyssens, Frederik; Haycock, John W

    2015-05-01

    The peripheral nervous system has a limited innate capacity for self-repair following injury, and surgical intervention is often required. For injuries greater than a few millimeters autografting is standard practice although it is associated with donor site morbidity and is limited in its availability. Because of this, nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) can be viewed as an advantageous alternative, but currently have limited efficacy for short and large injury gaps in comparison to autograft. Current commercially available NGC designs rely on existing regulatory approved materials and traditional production methods, limiting improvement of their design. The aim of this study was to establish a novel method for NGC manufacture using a custom built laser-based microstereolithography (?SL) setup that incorporated a 405 nm laser source to produce 3D constructs with ? 50 ?m resolution from a photocurable poly(ethylene glycol) resin. These were evaluated by SEM, in vitro neuronal, Schwann and dorsal root ganglion culture and in vivo using a thy-1-YFP-H mouse common fibular nerve injury model. NGCs with dimensions of 1 mm internal diameter 5 mm length with a wall thickness of 250 ?m were fabricated and capable of supporting re-innervation across a 3 mm injury gap after 21 days, with results close to that of an autograft control. The study provides a technology platform for the rapid microfabrication of biocompatible materials, a novel method for in vivo evaluation, and a benchmark for future development in more advanced NGC designs, biodegradable and larger device sizes, and longer-term implantation studies. PMID:25725557

  2. Rehabilitation of peripheral nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Frykman, G K; Waylett, J

    1981-04-01

    Rehabilitation of the patient with a peripheral nerve injury requires knowledge, understanding, and cooperation between the patient, the physician, and the therapist. Careful documentation of the patient's status prior to beginning rehabilitation and periodic follow-up assessments are of utmost importance. We have presented a detailed scheme for initial and follow-up evaluation. Prevention of unnecessary stiffness, swelling, and contractures is emphasized. Education of the patient to prevent the individual from doing further damage to the anesthetic area is important. Proper splinting techniques, from the postoperative splint and cast to splints that prevent deformities as well as overcome established contractures and improve function, will aid in the patient's recovery. Desensitization is an important aspect of sensory recovery, and sensory reeducation will aid in recovery of sensibility. Early tendon transfers are found to be particularly advantageous for high radial and median nerve palsies to gain functional recovery earlier and to allow the patient to become brace-free sooner. PMID:7243244

  3. Signal propagation in nerve fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayko, Yuriy N.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the problem of signal propagation in nerve fiber is considered. Ohm losses and heat processes were taken into account. These permit to combine the two stages (metabolic and non-metabolic) of propagation and Na + and K + ions transmission through cell membrane due propagation. Electrodynamics of nerve fiber with losses is described by telegraph equations. Heat processes in fiber are described by an equation of entropy transfer. Ion motion at metabolic stage against the electro-chemical potential is described by negative conductance, responsible for the escape flow. The running- wave-type solutions of these equations are studied. An integral and an explicit solution of the given system are obtained. The solution represented by a series of quasi-harmonic pulses is investigated numerically. This proves the applicability of telegraph equation to the problem considered. Different types of solitary waves corresponding to various types of conductivity are also investigated.

  4. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  5. Morphology and Nanomechanics of Sensory Neurons Growth Cones following Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Vivien; Végh, Attila-Gergely; Lucas, Olivier; Cloitre, Thierry; Scamps, Frédérique; Gergely, Csilla

    2013-01-01

    A prior peripheral nerve injury in vivo, promotes a rapid elongated mode of sensory neurons neurite regrowth in vitro. This in vitro model of conditioned axotomy allows analysis of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to an improved neurite re-growth. Our differential interference contrast microscopy and immunocytochemistry results show that conditioned axotomy, induced by sciatic nerve injury, did not increase somatic size of adult lumbar sensory neurons from mice dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons but promoted the appearance of larger neurites and growth cones. Using atomic force microscopy on live neurons, we investigated whether membrane mechanical properties of growth cones of axotomized neurons were modified following sciatic nerve injury. Our data revealed that neurons having a regenerative growth were characterized by softer growth cones, compared to control neurons. The increase of the growth cone membrane elasticity suggests a modification in the ratio and the inner framework of the main structural proteins. PMID:23418549

  6. Inferior alveolar nerve damage because of overextended endodontic material: a problem of sealer cement biocompatibility?

    PubMed

    Escoda-Francoli, Jaume; Canalda-Sahli, Carles; Soler, Albert; Figueiredo, Rui; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2007-12-01

    Damage to the inferior alveolar nerve is a relatively infrequent complication in dental practice. When root canal treatment of a lower molar or premolar surpasses and/or overextends beyond the apical foramen and invades the periapical zone, the foreign material introduced within such a sensitive anatomical space may mechanically or even chemically affect the inferior alveolar nerve. We describe a case of endodontic treatment of a permanent right lower first molar in which the sealer cement overextended in large amounts and damaged the right inferior alveolar nerve. The condition reverted a few months after the surgical removal of the material. Evaluation of the removed material, using powder x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy with coupled dispersive energy spectroscopy, showed it to consist of calcium tungstate (scheelite [CaWO4]) and zirconium oxide (baddeleyite [ZrO2]), which were chemical components of the sealer cement. PMID:18037065

  7. Changes induced by peripheral nerve injury in the morphology and nanomechanics of sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzina, Ouafa; Szabo, Vivien; Lucas, Olivier; Saab, Marie-belle; Cloitre, Thierry; Scamps, Frdrique; Gergely, Csilla; Martin, Marta

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injury in vivo promotes a regenerative growth in vitro characterized by an improved neurite regrowth. Knowledge of the conditioning injury effects on both morphology and mechanical properties of live sensory neurons could be instrumental to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to this regenerative growth. In the present study, we use differential interference contrast microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show that conditioned axotomy, induced by sciatic nerve injury, does not increase somatic size of sensory neurons from adult mice lumbar dorsal root ganglia but promotes the appearance of longer and larger neurites and growth cones. AFM on live neurons is also employed to investigate changes in morphology and membrane mechanical properties of somas of conditioned neurons following sciatic nerve injury. Mechanical analysis of the soma allows distinguishing neurons having a regenerative growth from control ones, although they show similar shapes and sizes.

  8. Development and Evolution of Character Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Pfennig, David W.; Pfennig, Karin S.

    2012-01-01

    Character displacement occurs when competition for either resources or successful reproduction imposes divergent selection on interacting species, causing divergence in traits associated with resource use or reproduction. Here, we describe how character displacement can be mediated either by genetically canalized changes (i.e., changes that reflect allelic or genotype frequency changes) or by phenotypic plasticity. We also discuss how these two mechanisms influence the tempo of character displacement. Specifically, we suggest that, under some conditions, character displacement mediated by phenotypic plasticity might occur more rapidly than that mediated by genetically canalized changes. Finally, we describe how these two mechanisms may act together and determine character displacements mode, such that it proceeds through an initial phase in which trait divergence is environmentally induced to a later phase in which divergence becomes genetically canalized. This plasticity-first hypothesis predicts that character displacement should be generally mediated by ancestral plasticity and that it will arise similarly in multiple, independently evolving populations. We conclude by highlighting future directions for research that would test these predictions. PMID:22257002

  9. Clinical and neurobiological advances in promoting regeneration of the ventral root avulsion lesion.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Ruben; Tannemaat, Martijn R; De Winter, Fred; Malessy, Martijn J A; Verhaagen, Joost

    2016-02-01

    Root avulsions due to traction to the brachial plexus causes complete and permanent loss of function. Until fairly recent, such lesions were considered impossible to repair. Here we review clinical repair strategies and current progress in experimental ventral root avulsion lesions. The current gold standard in patients with a root avulsion is nerve transfer, whereas reimplantation of the avulsed root into the spinal cord has been performed in a limited number of cases. These neurosurgical repair strategies have significant benefit for the patient but functional recovery remains incomplete. Developing new ways to improve the functional outcome of neurosurgical repair is therefore essential. In the laboratory, the molecular and cellular changes following ventral root avulsion and the efficacy of intervention strategies have been studied at the level of spinal motoneurons, the ventral spinal root and peripheral nerve, and the skeletal muscle. We present an overview of cell-based pharmacological and neurotrophic factor treatment approaches that have been applied in combination with surgical reimplantation. These interventions all demonstrate neuroprotective effects on avulsed motoneurons, often accompanied with various degrees of axonal regeneration. However, effects on survival are usually transient and robust axon regeneration over long distances has as yet not been achieved. Key future areas of research include finding ways to further extend the post-lesion survival period of motoneurons, the identification of neuron-intrinsic factors which can promote persistent and long-distance axon regeneration, and finally prolonging the pro-regenerative state of Schwann cells in the distal nerve. PMID:26415525

  10. Mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Scollard, David M; Truman, Richard W; Ebenezer, Gigi J

    2015-01-01

    All patients with leprosy have some degree of nerve involvement. Perineural inflammation is the histopathologic hallmark of leprosy, and this localization may reflect a vascular route of entry of Mycobacterium leprae into nerves. Once inside nerves, M. leprae are ingested by Schwann cells, with a wide array of consequences. Axonal atrophy may occur early in this process; ultimately, affected nerves undergo segmental demyelination. Knowledge of the mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy has been greatly limited by the minimal opportunities to study affected nerves in man. The nine-banded armadillo provides the only animal model of the pathogenesis of M. leprae infection. New tools available for this model enable the study and correlation of events occurring in epidermal nerve fibers, dermal nerves, and nerve trunks, including neurophysiologic parameters, bacterial load, and changes in gene transcription in both neural and inflammatory cells. The armadillo model is likely to enhance understanding of the mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy and offers a means of testing proposed interventions. PMID:25432810

  11. Optimum displacement estimates using mean field annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelqader, Ikhlas M.; Rajala, Sarah A.; Bilbro, Griff L.; Snyder, Wesley E.

    1993-06-01

    In this paper a new algorithm to estimate dense displacement fields from a sequence of images is developed. The algorithm is based on modeling the displacement fields as Markov Random fields. The Markov Random fields-Gibbs equivalence is then used to convert the problem into one of finding an appropriate energy function that describes the motion and any constraints imposed on it. Mean field annealing, a technique which finds global minima in nonconvex optimization problems, is used to minimize the energy function, and solve for the optimum displacement fields. The algorithm results in accurate estimates even for scenes with noise or discontinuities.

  12. PDT - PARTICLE DISPLACEMENT TRACKING SOFTWARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is a quantitative velocity measurement technique for measuring instantaneous planar cross sections of a flow field. The technique offers very high precision (1%) directionally resolved velocity vector estimates, but its use has been limited by high equipment costs and complexity of operation. Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) is an all-electronic PIV data acquisition and reduction procedure which is simple, fast, and easily implemented. The procedure uses a low power, continuous wave laser and a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) camera to electronically record the particle images. A frame grabber board in a PC is used for data acquisition and reduction processing. PDT eliminates the need for photographic processing, system costs are moderately low, and reduced data are available within seconds of acquisition. The technique results in velocity estimate accuracies on the order of 5%. The software is fully menu-driven from the acquisition to the reduction and analysis of the data. Options are available to acquire a single image or 5- or 25-field series of images separated in time by multiples of 1/60 second. The user may process each image, specifying its boundaries to remove unwanted glare from the periphery and adjusting its background level to clearly resolve the particle images. Data reduction routines determine the particle image centroids and create time history files. PDT then identifies the velocity vectors which describe the particle movement in the flow field. Graphical data analysis routines are included which allow the user to graph the time history files and display the velocity vector maps, interpolated velocity vector grids, iso-velocity vector contours, and flow streamlines. The PDT data processing software is written in FORTRAN 77 and the data acquisition routine is written in C-Language for 80386-based IBM PC compatibles running MS-DOS v3.0 or higher. Machine requirements include 4 MB RAM (3 MB Extended), a single or multiple frequency RGB monitor (EGA or better), a math co-processor, and a pointing device. The printers supported by the graphical analysis routines are the HP Laserjet+, Series II, and Series III with at least 1.5 MB memory. The data acquisition routines require the EPIX 4-MEG video board and optional 12.5MHz oscillator, and associated EPIX software. Data can be acquired from any CCD or RS-170 compatible video camera with pixel resolution of 600hX400v or better. PDT is distributed on one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. Due to the use of required proprietary software, executable code is not provided on the distribution media. Compiling the source code requires the Microsoft C v5.1 compiler, Microsoft QuickC v2.0, the Microsoft Mouse Library, EPIX Image Processing Libraries, the Microway NDP-Fortran-386 v2.1 compiler, and the Media Cybernetics HALO Professional Graphics Kernal System. Due to the complexities of the machine requirements, COSMIC strongly recommends the purchase and review of the documentation prior to the purchase of the program. The source code, and sample input and output files are provided in PKZIP format; the PKUNZIP utility is included. PDT was developed in 1990. All trade names used are the property of their respective corporate owners.

  13. Irrational Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misiurewicz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    If students are presented the standard proof of irrationality of [square root]2, can they generalize it to a proof of the irrationality of "[square root]p", "p" a prime if, instead of considering divisibility by "p", they cling to the notions of even and odd used in the standard proof?

  14. Root-knot nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne species) can reduce crop yields worldwide, methods for their identification are often difficult to implement. This review summarizes the diagnostic morphological and molecular features for distinguishing the ten major previously described root-knot nematode ...

  15. The Roots of Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Yetta M.

    This review of research with children aged two to six on their reading, writing, and oral language development speaks of five roots of a tree of literate life that require nourishment in the soil of a written language environment. The roots discussed are the development of print awareness in situational contexts, the development of print awareness

  16. Pythium Root Rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pythium root rot is a disease that is found in agricultural and nursery soils throughout the United States and Canada. It is caused by several Pythium species, and the symptoms are typified by leaf or needle chlorosis, stunting, root rot, and plant death. The disease is favored by wet soils, overc...

  17. An ecohydrological framework for grass displacement by woody plants in savannas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kailiang; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    During the past several decades, woody plants have been encroaching into grasslands around the world. This transition in plant dominance is often explained as a state shift in bistable ecosystem dynamics induced by fire-vegetation feedbacks. These feedbacks occur when woody plants are able to displace grasses because of their better access to soil water and light. On the other hand, grasses can displace woody plants because of their ability to increase fire frequency and of the higher susceptibility of woody plants to fire-induced mortality. In this study, we present an ecohydrological framework to investigate the displacement of grasses by woody plants. Considering the effect of lateral root spread and of soil water and light limitations, we found that woody plant encroachment can substantially suppress grass production even without the presence of grazers. Bistable dynamics emerge as a result of the grass-fire feedback for a wide range of rainfall conditions, fire susceptibility, and woody plant growth rates.

  18. Root Nutrient Foraging1

    PubMed Central

    Giehl, Ricardo F.H.; von Wirn, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    During a plant's lifecycle, the availability of nutrients in the soil is mostly heterogeneous in space and time. Plants are able to adapt to nutrient shortage or localized nutrient availability by altering their root system architecture to efficiently explore soil zones containing the limited nutrient. It has been shown that the deficiency of different nutrients induces root architectural and morphological changes that are, at least to some extent, nutrient specific. Here, we highlight what is known about the importance of individual root system components for nutrient acquisition and how developmental and physiological responses can be coupled to increase nutrient foraging by roots. In addition, we review prominent molecular mechanisms involved in altering the root system in response to local nutrient availability or to the plant's nutritional status. PMID:25082891

  19. Cranial nerve VI palsy after dural-arachnoid puncture.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Jennifer E; Scavone, Barbara M

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we provide a literature review of cranial nerve (CN) VI injury after dural-arachnoid puncture. CN VI injury is rare and ranges in severity from diplopia to complete lateral rectus palsy with deviated gaze. The proposed mechanism of injury is cerebrospinal fluid leakage causing intracranial hypotension and downward displacement of the brainstem. This results in traction on CN VI leading to stretch and neural demyelination. Symptoms may present 1 day to 3 weeks after dural-arachnoid puncture and typically are associated with a postdural puncture (spinal) headache. Resolution of symptoms may take weeks to months. Use of small-gauge, noncutting spinal needles may decrease the risk of intracranial hypotension and subsequent CN VI injury. When ocular symptoms are present, early administration of an epidural blood patch may decrease morbidity or prevent progression of ocular symptoms. PMID:25695579

  20. Polymeric biomaterials for nerve regeneration: fabrication and implantation of a biodegradable nerve guide.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Wesley N; Bliley, Jacqueline M; Marra, Kacey G

    2014-01-01

    Optimizing the quantity, quality, and speed of axon regeneration is important in maximizing functional outcomes following peripheral nerve injury. When severed, injured nerves must be able to regenerate and reconnect to the structures they previously controlled within 12-18 months before sensation and motion are permanently lost. Nerve sprouts from the proximal stump will spontaneously migrate toward the distal stump in the event of a nerve transection. However, surgical intervention remains necessary to repair transection injuries. Regeneration becomes particularly troublesome with large gaps, where autologous nerve grafts or nerve guides are used to repair transected nerves. Nerve conduits function as therapeutic adjuncts, guiding axonal regeneration across gap defects. Despite the availability of several FDA-approved nerve conduits, functional outcomes following their use remain less than optimal. Much work has been focused on developing nerve conduits to improve peripheral nerve repair outcomes. This chapter describes fabrication of a poly(caprolactone) nerve guide and demonstrates its use in a rat sciatic nerve model. PMID:24838964

  1. Use of retinal nerve fiber layer birefringence as an addition to absorption in retinal scanning for biometric purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agopov, Mikael; Gramatikov, Boris I.; Wu, Yi-Kai; Irsch, Kristina; Guyton, David L.

    2008-03-01

    We built a device sensitive to the birefringence of the retinal nerve fiber layer for biometric purposes. A circle of 20 diameter on the retina was scanned around the optic disk with a spot of light from a 785 nm laser diode. The nonbirefringent blood vessels indenting or displacing the retinal nerve fiber layer were seen as blips in the measured birefringence-derived signal. For comparison, the reflection-absorption signature of the blood vessel pattern in the scanned circle was also measured. The birefringence-derived signal proved to add useful information to the reflectance-absorption signature for retinal biometric scanning.

  2. Controlled Field and Laboratory Experiments to Investigate soil-root Interactions and Streambank Stability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollen, N. L.; Simon, A.

    2002-12-01

    Riparian vegetation has a number of mechanical and hydrologic effects on streambank stability, some of which are positive and some of which are negative. The mechanical reinforcement provided by root networks is one of the most important stabilizing factors, as roots are strong in tension but weak in compression and conversely soil is strong in compression but weak in tension. A soil that contains roots therefore has increased shear strength due to the production of a reinforced matrix, which is stronger than the soil or roots separately (Thorne, 1990). Quantification and understanding of the way the soil and roots interact individually and as a complete matrix is important if we are to predict the reinforcing effects of different types of riparian vegetation in streambank stabilizing schemes. Previous estimates of the contribution of root networks to soil strength have been attained either by using equations that sum root tensile and the soil shear strengths (eg. Wu et al., 1979), or by carrying out shear tests of root-permeated soils. However, neither of these methods alone allows a full investigation and understanding of the interactions that take place between the soil and the roots as a soil is sheared. These interactions are complex, and the simple addition of root tensile and soil shear strengths may therefore lead to overestimation of the increased strength provided to the soil by the roots, as the rate of mobilization of stress in the roots may not be the same as that of the soil (Waldron and Dakessian, 1981; Pollen et al., 2002). This paper describes a series of experiments that were carried out to test the material properties of roots, and soil samples from a streambank along Goodwin Creek, N. Mississippi. Results from field experiments carried out to measure root-tensile strengths, and stress-displacement characteristics of roots, were compared with laboratory shear tests of soil samples from Goodwin Creek. It was shown that the roots of different species took up strain at different rates, and that these rates differed considerably from that of the Goodwin Creek soil sample. For example, the mean displacement of Eastern Sycamore roots before breaking was 3.57cm, whereas the displacement of the soil sample at peak strength was just 0.68cm, suggesting that the critical factor in root reinforcement of soil matrices may in fact be the rate of mobilization of tension in the roots, rather than their ultimate tensile strength. Isolation and testing of the roots and soil separately, in the field and the laboratory, allowed the formulation of two hypotheses to explain the way in which roots and soil interact during shearing: As the soil shears, either the roots reinforce the soil after the peak soil strength has been overcome, until the ultimate tensile strength of the roots is reached, or the roots only reinforce the soil until the peak soil strength has been reached, beyond which point the entire root-soil matrix fails. These hypotheses were then tested by running a series of laboratory-shear tests of root-permeated and non-root-permeated soils. The results of these studies were used in the ARS-Bank Stability Model (ver. 2.0) to simulate the increase in factor of safety of streambanks due to root reinforcement. The calculations suggest that overestimation of increased soil shear strength from the root network using the sum of root tensile and soil shear strengths, may be as high as 78% for Eastern Sycamore roots which uptake strain slowly, but only 10% for Sandbar Willow roots, which take up tension more quickly.

  3. Imunoreactivity of zinc transporter 7 (ZNT7) in mouse dorsal root ganglia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the present study, we showed for the first time the localization of ZNT7 immunoreactivity in the mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) by means of immunohistochemistry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Our results revealed that ZNT7 immunoreactivity was abundantly expressed in the nerve cells of...

  4. Colonosphincteric electromyographic responses to sacral root stimulation: evidence for a somatosympathetic reflex.

    PubMed

    Vitton, V; Abysique, A; Gaigé, S; Leroi, A-M; Bouvier, M

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of selectively stimulating the afferent fibres running in the dorsal sacral roots (S1, S2, S3) and the somatic (radial and sciatic) nerves on colonic and internal anal sphincter (IAS) electromyographic (EMG) activity in anaesthetized cats to try to understand how sacral nerve stimulation can improve fecal continence in human. Electrically stimulating the afferent fibres present in the sacral dorsal roots and somatic nerves inhibited the colonic spike potential frequency (n = 97) and increased the slow variations in the sphincteric membrane potential (n = 76). These effects were found to have disappeared after administering an alpha-noradrenergic receptor blocker (n = 64) or sectioning the sympathetic efferent fibres innervating these organs (n = 69) suggesting the involvement of the sympathetic system in the effects observed. Moreover, no significant differences were observed between the effects of sacral dorsal root vs somatic nerve stimulation on colonic and sphincteric EMG activity. In conclusion, the data obtained here show that neurostimulation applied to the sacral spinal roots may improve fecal continence by inhibiting colonic activity and enhancing IAS activity via a somatosympathetic reflex. PMID:18034793

  5. Giant adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney

    PubMed Central

    Chodisetti, Subbarao; Boddepalli, Yogesh; Kota, Malakondareddy

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cysts are rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal cysts. We present a case of a huge adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney anteriorly toward the left side in a young female. PMID:26941503

  6. Giant adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney.

    PubMed

    Chodisetti, Subbarao; Boddepalli, Yogesh; Kota, Malakondareddy

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cysts are rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal cysts. We present a case of a huge adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney anteriorly toward the left side in a young female. PMID:26941503

  7. Seismic transducer measures small horizontal displacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, T. L.

    1965-01-01

    Pendular seismic transducer mounted on base plate measures small horizontal displacements of structures subjected to vibration where no fixed reference point is available. Enclosure of transducer in transparent plastic case prevents air currents from disturbing the pendulum balance.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies. PMID:26752822

  9. Sciatic Nerve Injury Associated with Acetabular Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Helfet, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Sciatic nerve injuries associated with acetabular fractures may be a result of the initial trauma or injury at the time of surgical reconstruction. Patients may present with a broad range of symptoms ranging from radiculopathy to foot drop. There are several posttraumatic, perioperative, and postoperative causes for sciatic nerve palsy including fracturedislocation of the hip joint, excessive tension or inappropriate placement of retractors, instrument- or implant-related complications, heterotopic ossification, hematoma, and scarring. Natural history studies suggest that nerve recovery depends on several factors. Prevention requires attention to intraoperative limb positioning, retractor placement, and instrumentation. Somatosensory evoked potentials and spontaneous electromyography may help minimize iatrogenic nerve injury. Heterotopic ossification prophylaxis can help reduce delayed sciatic nerve entrapment. Reports on sciatic nerve decompression are not uniformly consistent but appear to have better outcomes for sensory than motor neuropathy. PMID:19089496

  10. Spontaneous intraneural hematoma of the sural nerve.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Shawn S; McLawhorn, Alexander S; Mintz, Douglas N; DiCarlo, Edward F; Weiland, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    Symptomatic intraneural hemorrhage occurs rarely. It presents with pain and/or weakness in the distribution following the anatomic innervation pattern of the involved nerve. When a purely sensory nerve is affected, the symptoms can be subtle. We present a previously healthy 36-year-old female who developed an atraumatic, spontaneous intraneural hematoma of her sural nerve. Sural dysfunction was elicited from the patient's history and physical examination. The diagnosis was confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging, and surgical decompression provided successful resolution of her preoperative symptoms. To our knowledge, this entity has not been reported previously. Our case highlights the importance of having a high index of suspicion for nerve injury or compression in patients whose complaints follow a typical peripheral nerve distribution. Prior studies have shown that the formation of intraneural hematoma and associated compression of nerve fibers result in axonal degeneration, and surgical decompression decreases axonal degeneration and aids functional recovery. PMID:25311865

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies. PMID:26752822

  12. Two applications of end-to-side nerve neurorrhaphy in severe upper-extremity nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Fuat; Peker, Fatih; Celiköz, Bahattin

    2004-01-01

    End-to-side and side-to-side techniques (what we call alternative nerve repair techniques) have been investigated in detail in both experimental and clinical studies. There have not been any large series, but only some case reports describing either successful or disappointing functional results in the recent literature. Two cases presented here were of two extreme examples of nerve injuries that had no chance for direct repair; alternative choices were performed. One was a side-to-side neurorrhaphy between the ulnar and median nerves, and the other was an end-to-side nerve repair of the median and radial nerves to the ulnar nerve. Both patients regained their diminished protective sensation and returned to their occupations. Based on these results and our review of the current literature, we consider alternative nerve repair techniques to be reasonable, prudent, and scientific choices for the treatment of some challenging nerve injury cases. PMID:15378581

  13. Optic nerve sheath fenestration in cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Milman, Tatyana; Mirani, Neena; Turbin, Roger E

    2008-09-01

    A patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) developed crytpococcal meningitis, complicated by papilledema and severe progressive visual loss despite medical therapy. Bilateral optic sheath fenestration resulted in significant improvement in vision and resolution of papilledema. Histopathologic evaluation of the optic nerve sheath demonstrated numerous cryptococci. Optic nerve sheath fenestration may be an effective treatment method when high intracranial pressure is contributing to visual loss, even in the presence of involvement of the optic nerve sheath by the fungus. PMID:19668765

  14. Optic nerve sheath fenestration in cryptococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Milman, Tatyana; Mirani, Neena; Turbin, Roger E

    2008-01-01

    A patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) developed crytpococcal meningitis, complicated by papilledema and severe progressive visual loss despite medical therapy. Bilateral optic sheath fenestration resulted in significant improvement in vision and resolution of papilledema. Histopathologic evaluation of the optic nerve sheath demonstrated numerous cryptococci. Optic nerve sheath fenestration may be an effective treatment method when high intracranial pressure is contributing to visual loss, even in the presence of involvement of the optic nerve sheath by the fungus. PMID:19668765

  15. Nerve physiology: mechanisms of injury and recovery.

    PubMed

    Menorca, Ron M G; Fussell, Theron S; Elfar, John C

    2013-08-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are common conditions, with broad-ranging groups of symptoms depending on the severity and nerves involved. Although much knowledge exists on the mechanisms of injury and regeneration, reliable treatments that ensure full functional recovery are scarce. This review aims to summarize various ways these injuries are classified in light of decades of research on peripheral nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:23895713

  16. Staphylococcus aureus infection of the optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Osmanovic, Senad; Al-Heeti, Omar M; Lin, Amy Y; Zivin, Sean P; Justo, Julie Ann; Mayer, Stockton M; Aakalu, Vinay K; Moss, Heather E; Patel, Mahesh C

    2015-03-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented with painful vision loss in the right eye followed by ophthalmoplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated optic nerve sheath enlargement and enhancement. Biopsy of the optic nerve sheath revealed purulent and necrotic material that was positive for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. The patient underwent enucleation of the right eye and was treated with systemic antibiotics with clinical stabilization. Imaging, pathological and treatment aspects of optic nerve sheath abscess are discussed. PMID:25383588

  17. An inconvenient truth: treatment of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, M; Green, C; Kelly, I P

    2012-06-01

    The need for emergent management of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures is being questioned in the literature. Open reduction rates of up to 46% have been reported in the non-emergent management of these injuries. At our institution these fractures are managed as operative emergencies by senior personnel. To examine the ongoing need for this policy we reviewed our results. All patients managed over a five year period with Gartland type IIB or III paeditric supracondylar humeral fractures were identified and a comprehensive chart and radiographic review undertaken. The mean time from injury to fracture reduction and stabilization was 6.6h. Consultants performed or supervised 90% of cases. Open reduction was necessary in 5% of cases. Complications included a perioperative nerve injury rate of 6% and a superficial pin site infection rate of 3%. This study suggests that, despite the challenge to trauma on-call rostering, the emergency management of these injuries is advantageous to patients in units of our size. Based on the data presented here we continue our practice of emergent management. We suggest that units of a similar size to our own would show a benefit from an analogous policy albeit an inconvenient truth. PMID:22525415

  18. Displacement chromatography applied to trace component analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, R.; Katti, A.M.; Guiochon, G. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN )

    1990-12-01

    Displacement chromatography has been used primarily for the isolation of relatively large quantities of materials in preparative scale separations. The authors show that it also offers advantages for the enrichment of trace components. During displacement development, significant compression of the trace component bands occurs. This enrichment is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The theoretical model is based on the solution of the mass balance equations for nonlinear chromatography, assuming competitive Langmuir isotherms. The system studied experimentally consisted of parts-per-million levels of {beta}-naphthylamine and an impurity of the naphthylamine as the sample and diethyl phthalate as the displacer. The band profiles of the trace components were monitored by fluorescence detection while the displacer was monitored by UV absorbance. Wavelengths were chosen such that the profiles of the sample and the displacer could be monitored independently. Trace enrichment by band compression was achieved by increasing the displacer concentration. Experimental results show very narrow bands at enhanced concentrations as compared to the relatively broad Gaussian-shaped profiles observed in linear elution chromatography. The experimental results are in agreement with theoretical predictions of peak shape.

  19. Mandibular first molar with single root and single root canal

    PubMed Central

    Munavalli, Anil; Kambale, Sharnappa; Ramesh, Sachhi; Ajgaonkar, Nishant

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular molars demonstrate considerable anatomic complexities and abnormalities with respect to number of roots and root canals. Clinicians should be aware that there is a possibility of the existence of a fewer number of roots and root canals than the normal root canal anatomy. Mandibular first molar with a single root and single canal was diagnosed with the aid of dental operating microscope and multiple angled radiographs. This case report presents a rare case of successful endodontic management of mandibular first molar with a single root and root canal. PMID:26180424

  20. Effects of medium flow on axon growth with or without nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Junichi; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Goto, Makiko; Nagayama, Masaharu; Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-09-11

    Axon growth is a crucial process in regeneration of damaged nerves. On the other hand, elongation of nerve fibers in the epidermis has been observed in skin of atopic dermatitis patients. Thus, regulation of nerve fiber extension might be an effective strategy to accelerate nerve regeneration and/or to reduce itching in pruritus dermatosis. We previously demonstrated that neurons and epidermal keratinocytes similarly contain multiple receptors that are activated by various environmental factors, and in particular, keratinocytes are influenced by shear stress. Thus, in the present study, we evaluated the effects of micro-flow of the medium on axon growth in the presence or absence of nerve growth factor (NGF), using cultured dorsal-root-ganglion (DRG) cells. The apparatus, AXIS, consists of two chambers connected by a set of microgrooves, through which signaling molecules and axons, but not living cells, can pass. When DRG cells were present in chamber 1, NGF was present in chamber 2, and micro-flow was directed from chamber 1 to chamber 2, axon growth was significantly increased compared with other conditions. Acceleration of axon growth in the direction of the micro-flow was also observed in the absence of NGF. These results suggest that local micro-flow might significantly influence axon growth. PMID:26212442

  1. Upregulation of FGF-2 in reactive spinal cord astrocytes following unilateral lumbar spinal nerve ligation.

    PubMed

    Madiai, Francesca; Hussain, Syed-Rehan A; Goettl, Virginia M; Burry, Richard W; Stephens, Robert L; Hackshaw, Kevin V

    2003-02-01

    Spinal nerve ligation results in dramatic changes in spinal cord primary C-afferent fibers, which include atrophy with an accompanied decrease in calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP). These changes parallel the activation of astrocytes, which have been implicated in the ensuing neuropathic pain states. As part of an effort to elucidate the role of the downstream effectors of astrocyte reactivity in the context of allodynia, the expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) was examined following tight ligation of L5 and L6 spinal nerves. FGF-2 is a pleiotropic cytokine that is synthesized and secreted by neurons and astrocytes. FGF-2 immunoreactivity was increased in ipsilateral dorsal horn reactive astrocytes at 1 and 3 weeks following nerve ligation. Semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of laser-captured dorsal spinal cord sections revealed an increase in FGF-2 mRNA in the dorsal horn ipsilateral to nerve injury compared to contralateral and SHAM. Furthermore, an increase in FGF-2 mRNA in ispilateral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was seen by in situ hybridization. These results demonstrate that, in response to ligation-induced injury of sensory neurons, FGF-2 is upregulated in both DRG neurons and in spinal cord astrocytes, suggesting neurotrophic functions of this growth factor following peripheral nerve lesion and possibly in astrocyte-related maintenance of pain states. PMID:12541147

  2. Dynamic expression of transcription factor Brn3b during mouse cranial nerve development.

    PubMed

    Sajgo, Szilard; Ali, Seid; Popescu, Octavian; Badea, Tudor Constantin

    2016-04-01

    During development, transcription factor combinatorial codes define a large variety of morphologically and physiologically distinct neurons. Such a combinatorial code has been proposed for the differentiation of projection neurons of the somatic and visceral components of cranial nerves. It is possible that individual neuronal cell types are not specified by unique transcription factors but rather emerge through the intersection of their expression domains. Brn3a, Brn3b, and Brn3c, in combination with each other and/or transcription factors of other families, can define subgroups of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), spiral and vestibular ganglia, inner ear and vestibular hair cell neurons in the vestibuloacoustic system, and groups of somatosensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia. The present study investigates the expression and potential role of the Brn3b transcription factor in cranial nerves and associated nuclei of the brainstem. We report the dynamic expression of Brn3b in the somatosensory component of cranial nerves II, V, VII, and VIII and visceromotor nuclei of nerves VII, IX, and X as well as other brainstem nuclei during different stages of development into adult stage. We find that genetically identified Brn3b(KO) RGC axons show correct but delayed pathfinding during the early stages of embryonic development. However, loss of Brn3b does not affect the anatomy of the other cranial nerves normally expressing this transcription factor. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1033-1061, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26356988

  3. Expression and regulation of redoxins at nociceptive signaling sites after sciatic nerve injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Valek, Lucie; Kanngießer, Maike; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    Injury of the sciatic nerve results in regulations of pro- and anti-oxidative enzymes at sites of nociceptive signaling including the injured nerve, dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), dorsal horn of the spinal cord, thalamus and somatosensory cortex (Valek et al., 2015) [1]. The present DiB paper shows immunohistochemistry of redoxins including peroxiredoxins (Prdx1–6), glutaredoxins (Glrx1, 2, 3, 5), thioredoxins (Txn1, 2) and thioredoxin reductases (Txnrd1, 2) in the DRGs, spinal cord and sciatic nerve and thalamus in naïve mice and 7 days after Spared sciatic Nerve Injury (SNI) in control mice (Hif1α-flfl) and in mice with a specific deletion of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (SNS-HIF1α−/−) in DRG neurons. The sciatic nerves were immunostained for the respective redoxins and counterstained with hematoxylin. The redoxin immunoreactivity was quantified with ImageJ. For the DRGs and spinal cord the data show the quantitative assessment of the intensity of redoxin immunoreactivity transformed to rainbow pseudocolors. In addition, some redoxin examples of the ipsi and contralateral dorsal and ventral horns of the lumbar spinal cord and some redoxin examples of the thalamus are presented. PMID:26693520

  4. Nicotine facilitates reinnervation of phenol-injured perivascular adrenergic nerves in the rat mesenteric resistance artery.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Shingo; Fujiwara, Hidetoshi; Hagimori, Kenta; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Yokomizo, Ayako; Takayama, Fusako; Tangsucharit, Panot; Ono, Nobufumi; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2015-02-01

    Nicotine has been shown to have neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions in the central nervous system. To elucidate the peripheral neurotrophic effects of nicotine, we determined whether nicotine affected the reinnervation of mesenteric perivascular nerves following a topical phenol treatment. A topical phenol treatment was applied to the superior mesenteric artery proximal to the abdominal aorta in Wistar rats. We examined the immunohistochemistry of the distal small arteries 7 days after the treatment. The topical phenol treatment markedly reduced the density of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-LI and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-LI fibers in these arteries. The administration of nicotine at a dose of 3 mg/kg/day (1.5 mg/kg/injection, twice a day), but not once a day or its continuous infusion using a mini-pump significantly increased the density of TH-LI nerves without affecting CGRP-LI nerves. A pretreatment with nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists hexamethonium, mecamylamine, and methyllycaconitine, but not dextrometorphan, canceled the TH-LI nerve reinnervation induced by nicotine. Nicotine significantly increased NGF levels in the superior cervical ganglia (SCG) and mesenteric arteries, but not in the dorsal root ganglia, and also up-regulated the expression of NGF receptors (TrkA) in the SCG, which were canceled by hexamethonium. These results suggested that nicotine exhibited neurotrophic effects that facilitated the reinnervation of adrenergic TH-LI nerves by activating ?7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and NGF in the SCG. PMID:25514605

  5. Interest of Electrostimulation of Peripheral Motor Nerves during Percutaneous Thermal Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia Garnon, Julien Ramamurthy, Nitin Buy, Xavier Gangi, Afshin

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: We present our experience of utilizing peripheral nerve electrostimulation as a complementary monitoring technique during percutaneous thermal ablation procedures; and we highlight its utility and feasibility in the prevention of iatrogenic neurologic thermal injury. Methods: Peripheral motor nerve electrostimulation was performed in 12 patients undergoing percutaneous image-guided thermal ablations of spinal/pelvic lesions in close proximity to the spinal cord and nerve roots. Electrostimulation was used in addition to existing insulation (active warming/cooling with hydrodissection, passive insulation with CO{sub 2} insufflation) and temperature monitoring (thermocouples) techniques. Impending neurologic deficit was defined as a visual reduction of muscle response or need for a stronger electric current to evoke muscle contraction, compared with baseline. Results: Significant reduction of the muscle response to electrostimulation was observed in three patients during the ablation, necessitating temporary interruption, followed by injection of warm/cool saline. This resulted in complete recovery of the muscle response in two cases, while for the third patient the response did not improve and the procedure was terminated. No patient experienced postoperative motor deficit. Conclusion: Peripheral motor nerve electrostimulation is a simple, easily accessible technique allowing early detection of impending neurologic injury during percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation. It complements existing monitoring techniques and provides a functional assessment along the whole length of the nerve.

  6. Root hydrotropism: an update.

    PubMed

    Cassab, Gladys I; Eapen, Delfeena; Campos, Mara Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    While water shortage remains the single-most important factor influencing world agriculture, there are very few studies on how plants grow in response to water potential, i.e., hydrotropism. Terrestrial plant roots dwell in the soil, and their ability to grow and explore underground requires many sensors for stimuli such as gravity, humidity gradients, light, mechanical stimulations, temperature, and oxygen. To date, extremely limited information is available on the components of such sensors; however, all of these stimuli are sensed in the root cap. Directional growth of roots is controlled by gravity, which is fixed in direction and intensity. However, other environmental factors, such as water potential gradients, which fluctuate in time, space, direction, and intensity, can act as a signal for modifying the direction of root growth accordingly. Hydrotropism may help roots to obtain water from the soil and at the same time may participate in the establishment of the root system. Current genetic analysis of hydrotropism in Arabidopsis has offered new players, mainly AHR1, NHR1, MIZ1, and MIZ2, which seem to modulate how root caps sense and choose to respond hydrotropically as opposed to other tropic responses. Here we review the mechanism(s) by which these genes and the plant hormones abscisic acid and cytokinins coordinate hydrotropism to counteract the tropic responses to gravitational field, light or touch stimuli. The biological consequence of hydrotropism is also discussed in relation to water stress avoidance. PMID:23258371

  7. Interventional nerve visualization via the intrinsic anisotropic optical properties of the nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Kenneth W.; Meijerink, Andries; Chin, Patrick T. K.

    2015-07-01

    We present an optical concept to visualize nerves during surgical interventions. The concept relies on the anisotropic optical properties of the nerves which allows for specific switching of the optical reflection by the nervous tissue. Using a low magnification polarized imaging system we are able to visualize the on and off switching of the optical reflection of the nervous tissue, enabling a non-invasive nerve specific real-time nerve visualization during surgery.

  8. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb

    PubMed Central

    Sudo?-Szopi?ska, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the elevator technique. All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the Journal of Ultrasonography.

  9. Ventral nerve cord in Phoronopsis harmeri larvae.

    PubMed

    Temereva, Elena N

    2012-01-15

    The nervous system organization is considered a phylogenetically important character among metazoans. The phylum Phoronida is included in a supraphyletic taxon known as Lophotrochozoa. Many lophotrochozoans possess a metameric ventral nerve cord as adults or larvae. Phoronids do not exhibit external metamery either as larvae or as adults. The current study describes the ventral nerve cord in the young larva of Phoronopsis harmeri. This structure is apparent both in the serotonergic and FMRF-amidergic nervous system in young larvae. The ventral nerve cord extends from the mouth to the tentacular ridge. Both serotonergic and FMRF-amidergic components consist of two ventrolateral nerves, each with several unipolar neurons. The ventrolateral nerves connect to each other by means of thin repetitive transversal nerves ("commissures"). The abundance of neurons and nerves in the epidermis of the oral field of actinotrocha larva likely reflects the importance of this area in collection of food particles. The ventral nerve cords of the actinotrocha and the metatrochophore differ in their positions with respect to ciliated bands: the cord is located between the preoral and postoral ciliated bands in the actinotrocha but between the postoral ciliated band and telotroch in the metatrochophore. The presence of the ventral nerve cord, which contains repetitive elements (neurons and "commissures"), in the early development of P. harmeri may recapitulate some stages of nervous system development during phoronid phylogeny. The larval nervous system does not contain nervous centers under the tentacular ridge that can correlate with the catastrophic metamorphosis and unique body plan of phoronids. PMID:21898789

  10. Raman microspectroscopy for visualization of peripheral nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Koizumi, Noriaki; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2013-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery is essential for improving quality of life of patients. To preserve peripheral nerves, detection of ne peripheral nerves that cannot be identi ed by human eye or under white light imaging is necessary. In this study, we sought to provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerve tissues against adjacent tissues that employs spontaneous Raman microspectroscopy. A line-illumination confocal Raman microscope was used for the experiment. A laser operating at the wavelength of 532 nm was used as an excitation laser light. We obtained Raman spectra of peripheral nerve, brous connective tissue, skeletal muscle, blood vessel, and adipose tissue of Wistar rats, and extracted speci c spectral features of peripheral nerves and adjacent tissues. By applying multivariate image analysis, peripheral nerves were clearly detected against adjacent tissues without any preprocessing neither xation nor staining. These results suggest the potential of the Raman spectroscopic observation for noninvasive and label-free nerve detection, and we expect this method could be a key technique for nerve-sparing surgery.

  11. Peripheral nerve injuries in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, J H; Nadler, S F; Krivickas, L S

    1997-12-01

    Peripheral nerves are susceptible to injury in the athlete because of the excessive physiological demands that are made on both the neurological structures and the soft tissues that protect them. The common mechanisms of injury are compression, traction, ischaemia and laceration. Seddon's original classification system for nerve injuries based on neurophysiological changes is the most widely used. Grade 1 nerve injury is a neuropraxic condition, grade 2 is axonal degeneration and grade 3 is nerve transection. Peripheral nerve injuries are more common in the upper extremities than the lower extremities, tend to be sport specific, and often have a biomechanical component. While the more acute and catastrophic neurological injuries are usually obvious, many remain subclinical and are not recognised before neurological damage is permanent. Early detection allows initiation of a proper rehabilitation programme and modification of biomechanics before the nerve injury becomes irreversible. Recognition of nerve injuries requires an understanding of peripheral neuroanatomy, knowledge of common sites of nerve injury and an awareness of the types of peripheral nerve injuries that are common and unique to each sport. The electrodiagnostic exam, usually referred to as the 'EMG', consists of nerve conduction studies and the needle electrode examination. It is used to determine the site and degree of neurological injury and to predict outcome. It should be performed by a neurologist or physiatrist (physician specialising in physical medicine and rehabilitation), trained and skilled in this procedure. Timing is essential if the study is to provide maximal information. Findings such as decreased recruitment after injury and conduction block at the site of injury may be apparent immediately after injury but other findings such as abnormal spontaneous activity may take several weeks to develop. The electrodiagnostic test assists with both diagnosis of the injury and in predicting outcome. Proximal nerve injuries have a poorer prognosis for neurological recovery. The most common peripheral nerve injury in the athlete is the burner syndrome. Though primarily a football injury, burners have been reported in wrestling, hockey, basketball and weight-lifting as a result of acute head, neck and/or shoulder trauma. Most burners are self-limiting, but they occasionally produce permanent neurological deficits. The axillary nerve is commonly injured with shoulder dislocations but is also susceptible to injury by direct compression. The sciatic and common peroneal nerves can be injured by trauma. The suprascapular, musculocutaneous, ulnar, median and tibial nerves are susceptible to entrapment. The long thoracic and femoral nerves can be injured by severe traction. PMID:9421863

  12. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Ay, Ilknur; Lopes de Morais, Andreia; Qin, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Sadeghian, Homa; Oka, Fumiaki; Simon, Bruce; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation has recently been reported to improve symptoms of migraine. Cortical spreading depression is the electrophysiological event underlying migraine aura and is a trigger for headache. We tested whether vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression to explain its antimigraine effect. Unilateral vagus nerve stimulation was delivered either noninvasively through the skin or directly by electrodes placed around the nerve. Systemic physiology was monitored throughout the study. Both noninvasive transcutaneous and invasive direct vagus nerve stimulations significantly suppressed spreading depression susceptibility in the occipital cortex in rats. The electrical stimulation threshold to evoke a spreading depression was elevated by more than 2-fold, the frequency of spreading depressions during continuous topical 1 M KCl was reduced by ∼40%, and propagation speed of spreading depression was reduced by ∼15%. This effect developed within 30 minutes after vagus nerve stimulation and persisted for more than 3 hours. Noninvasive transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation was as efficacious as direct invasive vagus nerve stimulation, and the efficacy did not differ between the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Our findings provide a potential mechanism by which vagus nerve stimulation may be efficacious in migraine and suggest that susceptibility to spreading depression is a suitable platform to optimize its efficacy. PMID:26645547

  13. Tissue engineered constructs for peripheral nerve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P. J.; Wood, M. D.; Moore, A. M.; Mackinnon, S. E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Tissue engineering has been defined as “an interdisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering and life sciences toward the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, or improve tissue function or a whole organ”. Traumatic peripheral nerve injury resulting in significant tissue loss at the zone of injury necessitates the need for a bridge or scaffold for regenerating axons from the proximal stump to reach the distal stump. Methods A review of the literature was used to provide information on the components necessary for the development of a tissue engineered peripheral nerve substitute. Then, a comprehensive review of the literature is presented composed of the studies devoted to this goal. Results Extensive research has been directed toward the development of a tissue engineered peripheral nerve substitute to act as a bridge for regenerating axons from the proximal nerve stump seeking the distal nerve. Ideally this nerve substitute would consist of a scaffold component that mimics the extracellular matrix of the peripheral nerve and a cellular component that serves to stimulate and support regenerating peripheral nerve axons. Conclusions The field of tissue engineering should consider its challenge to not only meet the autograft “gold standard” but also to understand what drives and inhibits nerve regeneration in order to surpass the results of an autograft. PMID:24385980

  14. NERVE AS MODEL TEMPERATURE END ORGAN

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, C. G.; Granit, Ragnar

    1946-01-01

    Rapid local cooling of mammalian nerve sets up a discharge which is preceded by a local temperature potential, the cooled region being electronegative relative to a normal portion of the nerve. Heating the nerve locally above its normal temperature similarly makes the heated region electronegative relative to a region at normal temperature, and again a discharge is set up from the heated region. These local temperature potentials, set up by the nerve itself, are held to serve as "generator potentials" and the mechanism found is regarded as the prototype for temperature end organs. PMID:19873460

  15. Effect of microstructure and notch root radius on fracture toughness of an aluminum metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent results on the effects of matrix aging condition (matrix temper) and notch root radius on the measured fracture toughness of a SiC particulate reinforced aluminum alloy are reviewed. Stress intensity factors at catastrophic fracture were obtained for both underaged and overaged composites reveal. The linear relation found between apparent fracture toughness and the square root of the notch root radius implies a linear dependence of the crack opening displacement on the notch root radius. The results suggest a strain controlled fracture process, and indicate that there are differences in the fracture micromechanisms of the two aging conditions.

  16. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways

  17. Axillary Nerve Reconstruction: Anterior-Posterior Exposure With Sural Nerve Cable Graft Pull-Through Technique.

    PubMed

    Baltzer, Heather L; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2015-12-01

    Deltoid paralysis after axillary nerve injury results in limitations in shoulder function and stability. In the setting of an isolated axillary nerve injury with no clinical or electromyographic evidence of recovery that is within 6 to 9 months postinjury, the authors' preferred technique to reinnervate the deltoid is to reconstruct the axillary nerve with sural nerve grafting. Intraoperative neuromuscular electrophysiology is critical to determine the continuity of the axillary nerve before proceeding with reconstruction. The majority of the time, both an anterior and posterior incision and dissection of the axillary nerve is required to adequately delineate the zone of injury. This also ensures that both proximally and distally, uninjured axillary nerve is present before graft inset and also facilitates the ability to perform a meticulous microsurgical inset of the nerve graft posteriorly. The nerve graft must be pulled through from posterior to anterior to span the zone of injury and reconstruct the axillary nerve. Careful infraclavicular brachial plexus dissection is necessary to prevent further injury to components of the brachial plexus in the setting of a scarred bed. Patients will require postoperative therapy to prevent limitations in shoulder range of motion secondary to postoperative stiffness. This paper presents a detailed surgical technique for axillary nerve reconstruction by an anterior-posterior approach with a pull-through technique of a sural nerve cable graft. PMID:26524659

  18. Comparison of Nerve Excitability Testing, Nerve Conduction Velocity, and Behavioral Observations for Acrylamide Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nerve excitability (NE) testing is a sensitive method to test for peripheral neurotoxicity in humans,and may be more sensitive than compound nerve action potential (CNAP) or nerve conduction velocity (NCV).We used acrylamide to compare the NE and CNAP/NCV methods. Behavioral test...

  19. One-stage human acellular nerve allograft reconstruction for digital nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-yuan; Hu, Hao-liang; Fei, Jian-rong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Tian-bing; Zhang, Pei-xun; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Human acellular nerve allografts have a wide range of donor origin and can effectively avoid nerve injury in the donor area. Very little is known about one-stage reconstruction of digital nerve defects. The present study observed the feasibility and effectiveness of human acellular nerve allograft in the reconstruction of < 5-cm digital nerve defects within 6 hours after injury. A total of 15 cases of nerve injury, combined with nerve defects in 18 digits from the Department of Emergency were enrolled in this study. After debridement, digital nerves were reconstructed using human acellular nerve allografts. The patients were followed up for 624 months after reconstruction. Mackinnon-Dellon static two-point discrimination results showed excellent and good rates of 89%. Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test demonstrated that light touch was normal, with an obvious improvement rate of 78%. These findings confirmed that human acellular nerve allograft for one-stage reconstruction of digital nerve defect after hand injury is feasible, which provides a novel trend for peripheral nerve reconstruction. PMID:25788927

  20. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  1. Comparison of the Lumbosacral Plexus Nerves Formation in Pampas Fox (Pseudalopex gymnocercus) and Crab-Eating Fox (Cerdocyon thous) in Relationship to Plexus Model in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Lorenzão, Caio José; Zimpel, Aline Veiga; Novakoski, Eduardo; da Silva, Aline Alves; Martinez-Pereira, Malcon Andrei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the spinal nerves that constitute the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) were dissected in two species of South American wild canids (pampas fox-Pseudalopex gymnocercus, and crab-eating fox-Cerdocyon thous). The nerves origin and distribution in the pelvic limb were examined and compared with the LSP model of the dog described in the literature. The LSP was formed by whole ventral branches of L5 at L7 and S1, and a contribution of a one branch from S2, divided in three trunks. The trunk formed by union from L5-6 and S1 was divided into the cranial (cutaneus femoris lateralis nerve) medial (femoralis nerve) and lateral branches (obturatorius nerve). At the caudal part of the plexus, a thick branch, the ischiadicus plexus, was formed by contributions from L6-7 and S1-2. This root gives rise to the nerve branches which was disseminated to the pelvic limb (nerves gluteus cranial and gluteus caudal, cutaneus femoris caudalis and ischiadicus). The ischiadicus nerve was divided into fibularis communis and tibialis nerves. The tibialis nerve emits the cutaneus surae caudalis. The fibularis communis emits the cutaneus surae lateralis, fibularis superficialis and fibularis profundus. The pudendus nerve arises from S2 with contributions of one branch L7-S1 and one ramus of the cutaneus femoris lateralis. Still, one branch of S2 joins with S3 to form the rectales caudales nerve. These data provides an important anatomical knowledge of a two canid species of South American fauna, besides providing the effective surgical and clinical care of these animals. Anat Rec, 299:361-369, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26692361

  2. Macrodystrophia lipomatosa involving multiple nerves.

    PubMed

    Rohilla, Seema; Jain, Nitin; Sharma, Rambaksh; Dhaulakhandi, Dhara B

    2012-03-01

    Macrodystrophia lipomatosa (MDL), a rare congenital disorder, is considered by some to be a localized form of Proteus syndrome. The implication of the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) gene in both strengthens this belief. We present a case who had MDL in multiple nerve territories--all on the same side of the body--with hypertrophy of mainly fibroadipose tissue throughout their distribution, thus pointing to a form of localized hemihypertrophy; both hemihypertrophy and lipomatous tumors are components of Proteus syndrome. PMID:21948052

  3. Economic strategies of plant absorptive roots vary with root diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. L.; Wang, J. J.; Kardol, P.; Wu, H. F.; Zeng, H.; Deng, X. B.; Deng, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots typically vary along a dominant ecological axis, the root economics spectrum, depicting a tradeoff between resource acquisition and conservation. For absorptive roots, which are mainly responsible for resource acquisition, we hypothesized that root economic strategies differ with increasing root diameter. To test this hypothesis, we used seven plant species (a fern, a conifer, and five angiosperms from south China) for which we separated absorptive roots into two categories: thin roots (thickness of root cortex plus epidermis < 247 µm) and thick roots. For each category, we analyzed a range of root traits related to resource acquisition and conservation, including root tissue density, different carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) fractions (i.e., extractive, acid-soluble, and acid-insoluble fractions) as well as root anatomical traits. The results showed significant relationships among root traits indicating an acquisition-conservation tradeoff for thin absorptive roots while no such trait relationships were found for thick absorptive roots. Similar results were found when reanalyzing data of a previous study including 96 plant species. The contrasting economic strategies between thin and thick absorptive roots, as revealed here, may provide a new perspective on our understanding of the root economics spectrum.

  4. Autonomous dynamic displacement estimation from data fusion of acceleration and intermittent displacement measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junhee; Kim, Kiyoung; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Addressing the importance of displacement measurement of structural responses in the field of structural health monitoring, this paper presents an autonomous algorithm for dynamic displacement estimation from acceleration integration fused with displacement data intermittently measured. The presented acceleration integration algorithm of multi-rate Kalman filtering distinguishes itself from the past study in the literature by explicitly considering acceleration measurement bias. Furthermore, the algorithm is formulated by unique state definition of integration errors and error dynamics system modeling. To showcase performance of the algorithm, a series of laboratory dynamic experiments for measuring structural responses of acceleration and displacement are conducted. Improved results are demonstrated through comparison between the proposed and past study.

  5. Biomechanical properties of the sciatic nerve following repair: effects of topical application of hyaluronic acid or tacrolimus

    PubMed Central

    Mekaj, Agon Y; Morina, Arsim A; Lajqi, Shpetim; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Kelmendi, Fatos M; Duci, Shkelzen B

    2015-01-01

    Recovery following nerve repair can be evaluated based on electrophysiological and morphological assessments of biomechanical properties. This study compared the effects of topical hyaluronic acid (HA), tacrolimus (FK-506) or saline administration on the biomechanical properties of the sciatic nerve at 12 weeks after nerve repair. Materials and Methods: Eighteen male European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) (weight from 2.5 to 3 kg) were randomly assigned to one of the following experimental groups (six animals per group): Saline, HA, or FK-506. The non-transected left leg was used as a control group (eighteen sciatic nerves). Biomechanical assays were performed and statistically analyzed. Results: The average maximal load, elastic limit load, maximal stress, and elastic limit strain of the control group were significantly different (P<0.001) from those of all three experimental groups. Moreover, the other examined parameters (i.e., maximal displacement, elastic limit stress, and maximal strain) were significantly different between the control group and all three experimental groups (P<0.0001). However, no significant differences in any of the biomechanical parameters were observed between the experimental groups (P>0.05). At 12 weeks after nerve repair, Saline, HA, and FK-506 groups displayed average maximal stress values that were 72.6%, 77.38%, and 73.8% of those in the control group (100%), respectively. Conclusion: The biomechanical properties of the HA and FK-506 groups were similar to those of the saline group at 12 weeks after nerve repair. PMID:26884934

  6. The binding of tetrodotoxin to nerve membranes

    PubMed Central

    Keynes, R. D.; Ritchie, J. M.; Rojas, E.

    1971-01-01

    1. The% reduction in size of the externally recorded action potential produced by concentrations of tetrodotoxin (TTX) in the range 6-300 nM was determined for the small non-myelinated fibres of the rabbit cervical vagus nerve and of the walking leg nerves of crab and lobster. The concentration of TTX for 50% reduction was around 80 nM for rabbit vagus and 14 nM for crab nerve. 2. Bio-assay procedures were devised to measure the amount of TTX taken up by a nerve when it was exposed to a very small volume of a solution whose TTX content was just great enough to produce 100% block of conduction. The extracellular space of each nerve was determined with [14C]sugar so that an allowance could be made for extracellular dilution. 3. The TTX binding by rabbit, crab and lobster nerve was respectively 0064, 0053 and 0036 p-mole/mg wet weight of nerve. 4. The binding of saxitoxin was measured in rabbit vagus nerve, and found to be much the same as that of TTX. 5. Control experiments on rabbit sciatic nerve, where the area of excitable membrane was much smaller, showed that there was relatively little unspecific binding of TTX. 6. In view of the evidence presented here and elsewhere that the blocking of sodium conductance by TTX involves the attachment of only one TTX molecule at each sodium site, and that unspecific binding of TTX does not cause serious errors, these results suggest that in 1 ?m2 of nerve membrane the number of sodium sites is 75 for rabbit, 49 for crab, and 36 for lobster nerve. PMID:5575342

  7. Roots in plant ecology.

    PubMed

    Cody, M L

    1986-09-01

    In 1727 the pioneer vegetation scientist Stephen Hales realized that I much that was of importance to his subject material took place below on ground. A good deal of descriptive work on plant roots and root systems was done in the subsequent two centuries; in crop plants especially, the gross morphology of root systems was well known by the early 20th century. These descriptive studies were extended to natural grasslands by Weaver and his associates and to deserts by Cannon by the second decade of this century, but since that time the study of subterranean growth form appears to have lapsed, as a recent review by Kummerow indicates. Nevertheless, growth form is an important aspect of plant ecology, and subterranean growth form is especially relevant to the study of vegetation in and areas (which is the main subject of this commentary). Moreover, there is a real need for more research to be directed towards understanding plant root systems in general. PMID:21227785

  8. Calcium Signaling in Intact Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Gemes, Geza; Rigaud, Marcel; Koopmeiners, Andrew S.; Poroli, Mark J.; Zoga, Vasiliki; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ca2+ is the dominant second messenger in primary sensory neurons. In addition, disrupted Ca2+ signaling is a prominent feature in pain models involving peripheral nerve injury. Standard cytoplasmic Ca2+ recording techniques use high K+ or field stimulation and dissociated neurons. To compare findings in intact dorsal root ganglia, we used a method of simultaneous electrophysiologic and microfluorimetric recording. Methods Dissociated neurons were loaded by bath-applied Fura-2-AM and subjected to field stimulation. Alternatively, we adapted a technique in which neuronal somata of intact ganglia were loaded with Fura-2 through an intracellular microelectrode that provided simultaneous membrane potential recording during activation by action potentials (APs) conducted from attached dorsal roots. Results Field stimulation at levels necessary to activate neurons generated bath pH changes through electrolysis and failed to predictably drive neurons with AP trains. In the intact ganglion technique, single APs produced measurable Ca2+ transients that were fourfold larger in presumed nociceptive C-type neurons than in nonnociceptive A?-type neurons. Unitary Ca2+ transients summated during AP trains, forming transients with amplitudes that were highly dependent on stimulation frequency. Each neuron was tuned to a preferred frequency at which transient amplitude was maximal. Transients predominantly exhibited monoexponential recovery and had sustained plateaus during recovery only with trains of more than 100 APs. Nerve injury decreased Ca2+ transients in C-type neurons, but increased transients in A?-type neurons. Conclusions Refined observation of Ca2+ signaling is possible through natural activation by conducted APs in undissociated sensory neurons and reveals features distinct to neuronal types and injury state. PMID:20526180

  9. Gadofluorine M-enhanced magnetic resonance nerve imaging: comparison between acute inflammatory and chronic degenerative demyelination in rats.

    PubMed

    Wessig, Carsten; Jestaedt, Leonie; Sereda, Michael W; Bendszus, Martin; Stoll, Guido

    2008-03-01

    Nerve imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an emerging tool for the diagnostic work-up of patients with PNS disorders. We have recently shown that the experimental MR contrast agent gadofluorine M (Gf, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin) accumulates in nerves undergoing Wallerian degeneration and in areas of acute focal demyelination allowing in-vivo assessment of nerve pathology. The exact pathomechanism underlying Gf accumulation in peripheral nerve disorders is unknown so far. In the present study we compared nerve signal alterations on T2-w and Gf-enhanced T1-w MRI in two different models of acute inflammatory and chronic degenerative demyelination: experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) induced by immunization with PNS myelin and experimental Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease in rats overexpressing the myelin protein PMP22. During the acute stage of inflammation and demyelination, strong Gf enhancement on T1-w MRI was seen in nerve roots and peripheral nerves in EAN, which resolved with completed remyelination. Similarly, Gf accumulation was seen in CMT rats during early stages with active demyelination at 6 weeks while at chronic stages (9 months) Gf enhancement decreased despite numerous demyelinated axons and onion bulb formation. At all disease stages no signal alterations were seen on T2-w MRI. In conclusion, our data show that the novel MR contrast agent Gf, but not Gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA, facilitates detection of ongoing demyelination by MR neurography independent from the underlying pathology. It appears that the extent of Gf enhancement depends on the acuity of demyelination and is probably related to a transient disturbance of the blood-nerve barrier. Clinical development of Gf may help to further improve the sensitivity of nerve lesion assessment by MRI in patients with peripheral neuropathies. PMID:18061168

  10. Carbon dioxide laser-assisted nerve repair: effect of solder and suture material on nerve regeneration in rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Menovsky, Tomas; Beek, Johan F

    2003-01-01

    In order to further improve and explore the role of lasers for nerve reconstruction, this study was designed to investigate regeneration of sharply transected peripheral nerves repaired with a CO(2) milliwatt laser in combination with three different suture materials and a bovine albumin protein solder as an adjunct to the welding process. Unilateral sciatic nerve repair was performed in 44 rats. In the laser group, nerves were gently apposed, and two stay sutures (10-0 nylon, 10-0 polyglycolic acid, or 25 microm stainless steel) were placed epi/perineurially. Thereafter, the repair site was fused at 100 mW with pulses of 1.0 s. In the subgroup of laser-assisted nerve repair (LANR), albumen was used as a soldering agent to further reinforce the repair site. The control group consisted of nerves repaired by conventional microsurgical suture repair (CMSR), using 4-6 10-0 nylon sutures. Evaluation was performed at 1 and 6 weeks after surgery, and included qualitative and semiquantitative light microscopy. LANR performed with a protein solder results in a good early peripheral nerve regeneration, with an optimal alignment of nerve fibers and minimal connective tissue proliferation at the repair site. All three suture materials produced a foreign body reaction; the least severe was with polyglycolic acid sutures. CMSR resulted in more pronounced foreign-body granulomas at the repair site, with more connective-tissue proliferation and axonal misalignment. Furthermore, axonal regeneration in the distal nerve segment was better in the laser groups. Based on these results, CO(2) laser-assisted nerve repair with soldering in combination with absorbable sutures has the potential of allowing healing to occur with the least foreign-body reaction at the repair site. Further experiments using this combination are in progress. PMID:12740882

  11. Conflict induced internal displacement in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sonal; Sharma, Sharan Prakash; Mills, Edward; Poudel, Krishna C; Jimba, Masamine

    2007-01-01

    Nepal has witnessed a humanitarian crisis since the Maoist conflict began ten years ago. The plight of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Nepal has received little international attention despite being rated one of the worst displacement scenarios in the world. An estimated 200,000 people have been displaced as a result of the conflict, with the far-western districts of Nepal being the worst affected. Internal displacement has stretched the carrying capacity of several cities with adverse physical and mental health consequences for the displaced. Vulnerable women and children have been the worst affected. The government has adopted a discriminatory approach and failed to fulfil its obligations towards IDPs. Non-governmental organisations and international agencies have provided inadequate services to IDPs in their programmes. Tackling the issues of IDPs requires co-operation between government and development agencies: acknowledging the burden of the problem of IDPs, adequate registration and needs assessment, along with health and nutritional surveys, and development of short-term emergency relief packages and long-term programmes for their assistance. PMID:17542185

  12. Polymorphism in Genes That Influence Sperm Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Prout, T.; Clark, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    Paternity of offspring of multiply inseminated females is in many organisms highly skewed, with an advantage generally going to the male that most recently mated. Variation in sperm competitive ability can result in strong natural selection, and one expects that a gene that offers an advantage in sperm displacement would, all else being equal, be rapidly fixed, leaving low equilibrium levels of variability in sperm competition. However, empirical studies have demonstrated genetic variation in sperm displacement, begging the question of how this variation can be maintained. Here we develop a population genetic model to find conditions that maintain polymorphism in alleles that influence sperm displacement. We consider a one-locus model in which allelic variants have pleiotropic effects on fecundity and mating ability in addition to sperm displacement. This model can admit more than one stable polymorphism, and we find conditions for protected polymorphism. Induced overdominance is not necessary for stable polymorphism. These results have direct bearing on the observed variation in the ability of resident sperm to defend against displacement. PMID:8878703

  13. Ultra-Sensitive Magnetoresistive Displacement Sensing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivas, John D. (Inventor); Lairson, Bruce M. (Inventor); Ramesham, Rajeshuni (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An ultrasensitive displacement sensing device for use in accelerometers, pressure gauges, temperature transducers, and the like, comprises a sputter deposited, multilayer, magnetoresistive field sensor with a variable electrical resistance based on an imposed magnetic field. The device detects displacement by sensing changes in the local magnetic field about the magnetoresistive field sensor caused by the displacement of a hard magnetic film on a movable microstructure. The microstructure, which may be a cantilever, membrane, bridge, or other microelement, moves under the influence of an acceleration a known displacement predicted by the configuration and materials selected, and the resulting change in the electrical resistance of the MR sensor can be used to calculate the displacement. Using a micromachining approach, very thin silicon and silicon nitride membranes are fabricated in one preferred embodiment by means of anisotropic etching of silicon wafers. Other approaches include reactive ion etching of silicon on insulator (SOI), or Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of silicon nitride films over silicon substrates. The device is found to be improved with the use of giant magnetoresistive elements to detect changes in the local magnetic field.

  14. Enhanced regeneration and functional recovery after spinal root avulsion by manipulation of the proteoglycan receptor PTP?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng; Wong, Connie; Li, Wen; Ruven, Carolin; He, Liumin; Wu, Xiaoli; Lang, Bradley T.; Silver, Jerry; Wu, Wutian

    2015-01-01

    Following root avulsion, spinal nerves are physically disconnected from the spinal cord. Severe motoneuron death and inefficient axon regeneration often result in devastating motor dysfunction. Newly formed axons need to extend through inhibitory scar tissue at the CNS-PNS transitional zone before entering into a pro-regenerative peripheral nerve trajectory. CSPGs are dominant suppressors in scar tissue and exert inhibition via neuronal receptors including PTP?. Previously, a small peptide memetic of the PTP? wedge region named ISP (Intracellular Sigma Peptide) was generated, and its capabilities to target PTP? and relieve CSPG inhibition were validated. Here, we demonstrate that after ventral root avulsion and immediate re-implantation, modulation of PTP? by systemic delivery of ISP remarkably enhanced regeneration. ISP treatment reduced motoneuron death, increased the number of axons regenerating across scar tissue, rebuilt healthy neuromuscular junctions and enhanced motor functional recovery. Our study shows that modulation of PTP? is a potential therapeutic strategy for root avulsion. PMID:26464223

  15. Redoxins in peripheral neurons after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Valek, Lucie; Kanngieer, Maike; Hussler, Annett; Agarwal, Nitin; Lillig, Christopher Horst; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral nerve injury causes redox stress in injured neurons by upregulations of pro-oxidative enzymes, but most neurons survive suggesting an activation of endogenous defense against the imbalance. As potential candidates we assessed thioredoxin-fold proteins, called redoxins, which maintain redox homeostasis by reduction of hydrogen peroxide or protein dithiol-disulfide exchange. Using a histologic approach, we show that the peroxiredoxins (Prdx1-6), the glutaredoxins (Glrx1, 2, 3 and 5), thioredoxin (Txn1 and 2) and their reductases (Txnrd1 and 2) are expressed in neurons, glial and/or vascular cells of the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and in the spinal cord. They show distinct cellular and subcellular locations in agreement with the GO terms for "cellular component". The expression and localization of Glrx, Txn and Txnrd proteins was not affected by sciatic nerve injury but peroxiredoxins were upregulated in the DRGs, Prdx1 and Prdx6 mainly in non-neuronal cells and Prdx4 and Prdx5 in DRG neurons, the latter associated with an increase of respective mRNAs and protein accumulation in peripheral and/or central fibers. The upregulation of Prdx4 and Prdx5 in DRG neurons was reduced in mice with a cre-loxP mediated deficiency of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1?) in these neurons. The results identify Prdx4 and Prdx5 as endogenous HIF1?-dependent, transcriptionally regulated defenders of nerve injury evoked redox stress that may be important for neuronal survival and regeneration. PMID:26456799

  16. Effectively Axonal-supercharged Interpositional Jump-Graft with an Artificial Nerve Conduit for Rat Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Yamato, Masayuki; Miyata, Mariko; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve. However, for using the technique, an autologous nerve, which should contain the great auricular and sural nerves, must be obtained. Depending on the donor site, unavoidable issues such as nerve disorders and postoperative scarring may appear. To reduce the issues, in this study, the authors developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit and investigated the efficacy of an IPJG with an artificial nerve conduit in a rat facial nerve paresis model. Methods: A ligature clip was used to crush the facial nerve trunk, thereby creating a partial facial nerve paresis model. An artificial nerve conduit was then prepared with a 10-mm-long silicone tube containing 10 μL type I collagen and used to create an IPJG between the facial nerve trunk and the hypoglossal nerve (the silicone tube group). Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve. Results: Retrograde tracer test confirmed a double innervation by the facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei. In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed. Conclusion: In this study, the authors successfully developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit, and revealed that an IPJG in the conduit was effective in the rat facial nerve paresis model. PMID:26180717

  17. A Safe Lab on Nerve Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment involving pineapples and gelatin that allows students to investigate the conditions that typically render an enzyme functionless, similar to the effect of nerve gasses. Discusses the materials, procedures, and results, drawing analogies to the effects of a nerve gas. (CW)

  18. Stem cell salvage of injured peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Grimoldi, Nadia; Colleoni, Federica; Tiberio, Francesca; Vetrano, Ignazio G; Cappellari, Alberto; Costa, Antonella; Belicchi, Marzia; Razini, Paola; Giordano, Rosaria; Spagnoli, Diego; Pluderi, Mauro; Gatti, Stefano; Morbin, Michela; Gaini, Sergio M; Rebulla, Paolo; Bresolin, Nereo; Torrente, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed a collagen tube filled with autologous skin-derived stem cells (SDSCs) for bridging long rat sciatic nerve gaps. Here we present a case report describing a compassionate use of this graft for repairing the polyinjured motor and sensory nerves of the upper arms of a patient. Preclinical assessment was performed with collagen/SDSC implantation in rats after sectioning the sciatic nerve. For the patient, during the 3-year follow-up period, functional recovery of injured median and ulnar nerves was assessed by pinch gauge test and static two-point discrimination and touch test with monofilaments, along with electrophysiological and MRI examinations. Preclinical experiments in rats revealed rescue of sciatic nerve and no side effects of patient-derived SDSC transplantation (30 and 180 days of treatment). In the patient treatment, motor and sensory functions of the median nerve demonstrated ongoing recovery postimplantation during the follow-up period. The results indicate that the collagen/SDSC artificial nerve graft could be used for surgical repair of larger defects in major lesions of peripheral nerves, increasing patient quality of life by saving the upper arms from amputation. PMID:24268028

  19. Paclitaxel alters sensory nerve biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Bober, Brian G; Shah, Sameer B

    2015-10-15

    Paclitaxel is an effective chemotherapeutic that, despite its common use, frequently causes debilitating peripheral sensory neuropathy. Paclitaxel binds to and stabilizes microtubules, and through unknown mechanisms, causes abnormal microtubule aggregation. Given that microtubules contribute to the mechanical properties of cells, we tested the hypothesis that paclitaxel treatment would alter the stiffness of sensory nerves. Rat sural nerves were excised and soaked in Ringer's solution with or without paclitaxel. Nerves were secured between a force transducer and actuator, and linearly strained. Stress-strain curves were generated, from which elastic moduli were calculated. Paclitaxel treated nerves exhibited significantly higher moduli in both linear and transition regions of the curve. A composite-tissue model was then generated to estimate the stiffness increase in the cellular fraction of the nerve following paclitaxel treatment. This model was supported experimentally by data on mechanical properties of sural nerves stripped of their epineurium, and area fractions of the cellular and connective tissue components of the rat sural nerve, calculated from immunohistochemical images. Model results revealed that the cellular components of the nerve must stiffen 12x to 115x, depending on the initial axonal modulus assumed, in order to achieve the observed tissue level mechanical changes. Consistent with such an increase, electron microscopy showed increased microtubule aggregation and cytoskeletal packing, suggestive of a more cross-linked cytoskeleton. Overall, our data suggests that paclitaxel treatment induces increased microtubule bundling in axons, which leads to alterations in tissue-level mechanical properties. PMID:26321364

  20. A silk sericin/silicone nerve guidance conduit promotes regeneration of a transected sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongjian; Yang, Wen; Chen, Jianghai; Zhang, Jinxiang; Lu, Xiaochen; Zhao, Xiaobo; Huang, Kun; Li, Huili; Chang, Panpan; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2015-10-28

    Peripheral nerve gap defects lead to significant loss of sensory or motor function. Tissue engineering has become an important alternative to nerve repair. Sericin, a major component of silk, is a natural protein whose value in tissue engineering has just begun to be explored. Here, the first time use of sericin in vivo is reported as a long-term implant for peripheral nerve regeneration. A sericin nerve guidance conduit is designed and fabricated. This conduit is highly porous with mechanical strength matching peripheral nerve tissue. It supports Schwann cell proliferation and is capable of up-regulating the transcription of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in Schwann cells. The sericin conduit wrapped with a silicone conduit (sericin/silicone double conduits) is used for bridging repair of a 5 mm gap in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. The sericin/silicone double conduits achieve functional recovery comparable to that of autologous nerve grafting as evidenced by drastically improved nerve function and morphology. Importantly, this improvement is mainly attributed to the sericin conduit as the silicone conduit alone only produces marginal functional recovery. This sericin/silicone-double-conduit strategy offers an efficient and valuable alternative to autologous nerve grafting for repairing damaged peripheral nerve. PMID:26332703