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Sample records for nerve sheath decompression

  1. Pediatric and adult vision restoration after optic nerve sheath decompression for idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bersani, Thomas A; Meeker, Austin R; Sismanis, Dimitrios N; Carruth, Bryant P

    2016-06-01

    To compare presentations of idiopathic intracranial hypertension and efficacy of optic nerve sheath decompression between adult and pediatric patients, a retrospective cohort study was completed All idiopathic intracranial hypertension patients undergoing optic nerve sheath decompression by one surgeon between 1991 and 2012 were included. Pre-operative and post-operative visual fields, visual acuity, color vision, and optic nerve appearance were compared between adult and pediatric (<18 years) populations. Outcome measures included percentage of patients with complications or requiring subsequent interventions. Thirty-one adults (46 eyes) and eleven pediatric patients (18 eyes) underwent optic nerve sheath decompression for vision loss from idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Mean deviation on visual field, visual acuity, color vision, and optic nerve appearance significantly improved across all subjects. Pre-operative mean deviation was significantly worse in children compared to adults (p=0.043); there was no difference in mean deviation post-operatively (p=0.838). Significantly more pediatric eyes (6) presented with light perception only or no light perception than adult eyes (0) (p=0.001). Pre-operative color vision performance in children (19%) was significantly worse than in adults (46%) (p=0.026). Percentage of patients with complications or requiring subsequent interventions did not differ between groups. The consistent improvement after surgery and low rate of complications suggest optic nerve sheath decompression is safe and effective in managing vision loss due to adult and pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Given the advanced pre-operative visual deficits seen in children, one might consider a higher index of suspicion in diagnosing, and earlier surgical intervention in treating pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension. PMID:27163674

  2. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... canals). The optic nerve is the “nerve of vision” and extends from the brain, through your skull, and into your eye. A ... limited to, the following: loss of vision, double vision, inadequate ... leakage of brain fluid (CSF), meningitis, nasal bleeding, infection of the ...

  3. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor.

    PubMed

    James, Aaron W; Shurell, Elizabeth; Singh, Arun; Dry, Sarah M; Eilber, Fritz C

    2016-10-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is the sixth most common type of soft tissue sarcoma. Most MPNSTs arise in association with a peripheral nerve or preexisting neurofibroma. Neurofibromatosis type is the most important risk factor for MPNST. Tumor size and fludeoxyglucose F 18 avidity are among the most helpful parameters to distinguish MPNST from a benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The histopathologic diagnosis is predominantly a diagnosis of light microscopy. Immunohistochemical stains are most helpful to distinguish high-grade MPNST from its histologic mimics. Current surgical management of high-grade MPNST is similar to that of other high-grade soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:27591499

  4. Delayed facial nerve decompression for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Jong Ha; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete recovery of facial motor function continues to be long-term sequelae in some patients with Bell's palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of transmastoid facial nerve decompression after steroid and antiviral treatment in patients with late stage Bell's palsy. Twelve patients underwent surgical decompression for Bell's palsy 21-70 days after onset, whereas 22 patients were followed up after steroid and antiviral therapy without decompression. Surgical criteria included greater than 90 % degeneration on electroneuronography and no voluntary electromyography potentials. This study was a retrospective study of electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review between 2006 and 2013. Recovery from facial palsy was assessed using the House-Brackmann grading system. Final recovery rate did not differ significantly in the two groups; however, all patients in the decompression group recovered to at least House-Brackmann grade III at final follow-up. Although postoperative hearing threshold was increased in both groups, there was no significant between group difference in hearing threshold. Transmastoid decompression of the facial nerve in patients with severe late stage Bell's palsy at risk for a poor facial nerve outcome reduced severe complications of facial palsy with minimal morbidity. PMID:26319412

  5. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Adam D; Ki, Dong Hyuk; He, Shuning; Look, A Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are tumors derived from Schwann cells or Schwann cell precursors. Although rare overall, the incidence of MPNST has increased with improved clinical management of patients with the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor predisposition syndrome. Unfortunately, current treatment modalities for MPNST are limited, with no targeted therapies available and poor efficacy of conventional radiation and chemotherapeutic regimens. Many murine and zebrafish models of MPNST have been developed, which have helped to elucidate the genes and pathways that are dysregulated in MPNST tumorigenesis, including the p53, and the RB1, PI3K-Akt-mTOR, RAS-ERK and Wnt signaling pathways. Preclinical results have suggested that new therapies, including mTOR and ERK inhibitors, may synergize with conventional chemotherapy in human tumors. The discovery of new genome editing technologies, like CRISPR-cas9, and their successful application to the zebrafish model will enable rapid progress in the faithful modeling of MPNST molecular pathogenesis. The zebrafish model is especially suited for high throughput screening of new targeted therapeutics as well as drugs approved for other purposes, which may help to bring enhanced treatment modalities into human clinical trials for this devastating disease. PMID:27165368

  6. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome results in a loss of visual function and occurs in astronauts following long-duration spaceflight. Understanding the mechanisms that lead to the ocular changes involved in VIIP is of critical importance for space medicine research. Although the exact mechanisms of VIIP are not yet known, it is hypothesized that microgravity-induced increases in intracranial pressures (ICP) drive the remodeling of the optic nerve sheath, leading to compression of the optic nerve which in turn may reduce visual acuity. Some astronauts present with a kink in the optic nerve after return to earth, suggesting that tissue remodeling in response to ICP increases may be taking place. The goal of this work is to characterize the mechanical properties of the optic nerve sheath (dura mater) to better understand its biomechanical response to increased ICP.

  7. Massive exophytic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    PubMed

    Khorsand, Derek; Porrino, Jack; Flaherty, Erin; Bandhlish, Anshu; Davidson, Darin

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of a solitary neurofibroma involving the right posterior shoulder of a 69-year-old man with degeneration into a massive, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor measuring more than 3 times the average reported size. The radiographic, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomographic features are compared with the gross appearance and pathology. PMID:27257459

  8. Microsurgical Decompression for Peroneal Nerve Entrapment Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    MORIMOTO, Daijiro; ISU, Toyohiko; KIM, Kyongsong; SUGAWARA, Atsushi; YAMAZAKI, Kazuyoshi; CHIBA, Yasuhiro; IWAMOTO, Naotaka; ISOBE, Masanori; MORITA, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Peroneal nerve entrapment neuropathy (PNEN) is one cause of numbness and pain in the lateral lower thigh and instep, and of motor weakness of the extensors of the toes and ankle. We report a less invasive surgical procedure performed under local anesthesia to treat PNEN and our preliminary outcomes. We treated 22 patients (33 legs), 7 men and 15 women, whose average age was 66 years. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 40 months. All patients complained of pain or paresthesia of the lateral aspect of affected lower thigh and instep; all manifested a Tinel-like sign at the entrapment point. As all had undergone unsuccessful conservative treatment, we performed microsurgical decompression under local anesthesia. Of 19 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery (LSS), 9 suffered residual symptoms attributable to PNEN. While complete symptom abatement was obtained in the other 10 they later developed PNEN-induced new symptoms. Motor weakness of the extensors of the toes and ankle [manual muscle testing (MMT) 4/5] was observed preoperatively in 8 patients; it was relieved by microsurgical decompression. Based on self-assessments, all 22 patients were satisfied with the results of surgery. PNEN should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in patients with L5 neuropathy due to lumbar degenerative disease, and as a causative factor of residual symptoms after LSS. PNEN can be successfully addressed by less-invasive surgery performed under local anesthesia. PMID:26227056

  9. Microsurgical Decompression for Peroneal Nerve Entrapment Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Daijiro; Isu, Toyohiko; Kim, Kyongsong; Sugawara, Atsushi; Yamazaki, Kazuyoshi; Chiba, Yasuhiro; Iwamoto, Naotaka; Isobe, Masanori; Morita, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Peroneal nerve entrapment neuropathy (PNEN) is one cause of numbness and pain in the lateral lower thigh and instep, and of motor weakness of the extensors of the toes and ankle. We report a less invasive surgical procedure performed under local anesthesia to treat PNEN and our preliminary outcomes. We treated 22 patients (33 legs), 7 men and 15 women, whose average age was 66 years. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 40 months. All patients complained of pain or paresthesia of the lateral aspect of affected lower thigh and instep; all manifested a Tinel-like sign at the entrapment point. As all had undergone unsuccessful conservative treatment, we performed microsurgical decompression under local anesthesia. Of 19 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery (LSS), 9 suffered residual symptoms attributable to PNEN. While complete symptom abatement was obtained in the other 10 they later developed PNEN-induced new symptoms. Motor weakness of the extensors of the toes and ankle [manual muscle testing (MMT) 4/5] was observed preoperatively in 8 patients; it was relieved by microsurgical decompression. Based on self-assessments, all 22 patients were satisfied with the results of surgery. PNEN should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in patients with L5 neuropathy due to lumbar degenerative disease, and as a causative factor of residual symptoms after LSS. PNEN can be successfully addressed by less-invasive surgery performed under local anesthesia. PMID:26227056

  10. Nerve sheath myxoma: report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Amoolya; Narasimha, Apaparna; C, Vijaya; Vk, Sundeep

    2015-04-01

    Nerve sheath myxoma defined by Harkin and Reed is an uncommon benign neoplasm with nerve sheath like features. It has several cytological and histological differential diagnoses. One such lesion is neurothekeoma, which can be differentiated using immunohistochemistry. In most of the previous reports nerve sheath myxoma and neurothekeoma were considered synonymous and were often confused for one another. This case report separates the two using immunohistochemistry. Also, the cytological features of nerve sheath myxoma are not well documented in the past. This case report attempts to display the cyto-morphology of nerve sheath myxoma. We report a rare case of nerve sheath myxoma diagnosed on cytological features confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry in a 32-year-old lady who presented with an asymptomatic nodule over the left cervical area and discuss its cyto-histological mimics. PMID:26023558

  11. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  12. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Infraorbital Nerve.

    PubMed

    D'Addino, José Luis; Piccoletti, Laura; Pigni, María Mercedes; de Gordon, Maria José Rodriguez Arenas

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to report a large, rare, and ulcerative infiltrated skin lesion. Its diagnosis, therapeutic management, and progress are described. The patient is a 78-year-old white man, who presented with a 12-month ulcerative perforated lesion that had affected and infiltrated the skin, with easy bleeding. He had a history of hypertension, although controlled, was a 40-year smoker, had chronic atrial fibrillation, diabetes, and microangiopathy. During the consultation, the patient also presented with ocular obstruction due to an inability to open the eye. He mentioned having reduced vision. The computed tomography scan showed upper maxilla osteolysis without eye involvement. We underwent a radical resection in which upper maxilla and the anterior orbital margin were included. We used a Becker-type flap that allowed us to rebuild the cheek and to complete a modified neck dissection. Progress was favorable; the patient recovered ocular motility and his vision improved to 20/200. The final biopsy result was "malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, malignant schwannoma." Malignant schwannoma of the peripheral nerve is extremely rare. The total resection and reconstruction being completed in one surgery represented a challenge due to the difficulty in obtaining tissues in addition to the necessity of an oncological resection. PMID:27162577

  13. Arthroscopic Suprascapular Nerve Decompression: Transarticular and Subacromial Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; Chalmers, Peter N.; Yanke, Adam B.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2012-01-01

    Entrapment of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) is an increasingly recognized entity that can occur due to traction or compression-related etiology. Traction injuries of the SSN are unlikely to respond to surgical management and frequently improve with rest and avoidance of overhead activity. Compression injuries, on the other hand, frequently require surgical decompression for pain relief. SSN entrapment caused by compression at the suprascapular notch by the transverse scapular ligament gives rise to pain and atrophy of both the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles. However, compression at the spinoglenoid notch is more insidious because pain fibers may not be involved, causing isolated external rotation weakness. We present our preferred surgical technique for safe decompression of the SSN at the suprascapular and spinoglenoid notch using a subacromial and intra-articular approach, respectively. The key to ensuring efficient and uncomplicated decompression of the SSN relies on an intimate knowledge of the neurovascular anatomy and related landmarks. PMID:23766994

  14. White matter changes linked to visual recovery after nerve decompression

    PubMed Central

    Paul, David A.; Gaffin-Cahn, Elon; Hintz, Eric B.; Adeclat, Giscard J.; Zhu, Tong; Williams, Zoë R.; Vates, G. Edward; Mahon, Bradford Z.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the integrity of white matter tracts and cortical function in the human brain remains poorly understood. Here we use a model of reversible white matter injury, compression of the optic chiasm by tumors of the pituitary gland, to study the structural and functional changes that attend spontaneous recovery of cortical function and visual abilities after surgical tumor removal and subsequent decompression of the nerves. We show that compression of the optic chiasm leads to demyelination of the optic tracts, which reverses as quickly as 4 weeks after nerve decompression. Furthermore, variability across patients in the severity of demyelination in the optic tracts predicts visual ability and functional activity in early cortical visual areas, and pre-operative measurements of myelination in the optic tracts predicts the magnitude of visual recovery after surgery. These data indicate that rapid regeneration of myelin in the human brain is a significant component of the normalization of cortical activity, and ultimately the recovery of sensory and cognitive function, after nerve decompression. More generally, our findings demonstrate the utility of diffusion tensor imaging as an in vivo measure of myelination in the human brain. PMID:25504884

  15. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Chis, Octavian; Albu, Silviu

    2014-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) refers to spindle cell sarcomas arising from or separating in the direction of cells of the peripheral nerve sheath. The MPNST of the parotid gland is an extremely rare tumor, usually having a poor prognosis, and only a few cases been described in the literature. In this article, we report the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges related to a new case of MPNST of the parotid. Diagnosis was made based on clinical, imaging (computed tomography scan), histologic, and immunohistochemistry findings. Despite comprehensive treatment--complete surgical resection and radiotherapy--the tumor displayed a highly aggressive course. PMID:25153067

  16. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425

  17. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Mahesh, Nirujogi; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-06-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425

  18. Rationale, Science, and Economics of Surgical Nerve Decompression for Diabetic Neuropathy Foot Complications.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, David Scott

    2016-04-01

    Nerve decompression is effective and safe for dealing with the pain and numbness symptoms of the frequent nerve compression entrapments in diabetic symmetric peripheral neuropathy (DSPN). Evidence has accumulated of balance and stability improvements and protection against diabetic foot ulceration, recurrence and its complication cascade. Nerve decompression proffers significant benefit versus the large socioeconomic costs of DSPN complications. Advancing understanding of the mechanism of nerve compression and altered axonal activity in diabetes clarifies the basis of clinical benefit. Clinicians should seek out and recognize nerve entrapments and consider advising nerve decompression for relief of DSPN symptoms and prevention of complications. PMID:27013417

  19. Effect of optic nerve sheath fenestration for idiopathic intracranial hypertension on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Starks, Victoria; Gilliland, Grant; Vrcek, Ivan; Gilliland, Connor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether optic nerve sheath fenestration in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension was associated with improvement in visual field pattern deviation and optical coherence tomography retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.The records of 13 eyes of 11 patients who underwent optic nerve sheath fenestration were reviewed. The subjects were patients of a clinical practice in Dallas, Texas. Charts were reviewed for pre- and postoperative visual field pattern deviation (PD) and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL).PD and RNFL significantly improved after surgery. Average PD preoperatively was 8.51 DB and postoperatively was 4.80 DB (p = 0.0002). Average RNFL preoperatively was 113.63 and postoperatively was 102.70 (p = 0.01). The preoperative PD and RNFL did not correlate strongly.Our results demonstrate that PD and RNFL are improved after optic nerve sheath fenestration. The pre- and postoperative RNFL values were compared to the average RNFL value of healthy optic nerves obtained from the literature. Post-ONSF RNFL values were significantly closer to the normal value than preoperative. RNFL is an objective parameter for monitoring the optic nerve after optic nerve sheath fenestration. This study adds to the evidence that OCT RNFL may be an effective monitoring tool for patients with IIH and that it continues to be a useful parameter after ONSF. PMID:26928128

  20. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour: CT and MRI Findings.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Massimiliano; Di Poce, Isabelle; Ricci, Aurora; Di Trapano, Roberta; Costanzo, Elisa; Di Cello, Pierfrancesco; Pelle, Fabio; Izzo, Luciano; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) is extremely rare malignancy in the general population, occurring more frequently in patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). In the literature five cases of MPNST arising from the parapharyngeal space (PPS) in patients without neurofibromatosis have been reported. We report imaging techniques in a patient with MPNST in the PPS, who had neither a family history nor sign of NF1. Computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed for a correct therapeutic planning. CT and MRI findings were correlated with hystopathological diagnosis. PMID:23970990

  1. Cystic change in primary paediatric optic nerve sheath meningioma.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Daniel; Rajak, Saul; Patel, Sandy; Selva, Dinesh

    2016-08-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (PONSM) are rare in children. Cystic meningiomas are an uncommon subgroup of meningiomas. We report a case of paediatric PONSM managed using observation alone that underwent cystic change and radiological regression. A 5-year-old girl presented with visual impairment and proptosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a PONSM. The patient was left untreated and followed up with regular MR imaging. Repeat imaging at 16 years of age showed the tumour had started to develop cystic change. Repeat imaging at 21 years of age showed the tumour had decreased in size. PMID:27310300

  2. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma Masquerading as Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Alroughani, R.; Behbehani, R.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuritis is a common presentation of demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. It typically presents with acute painful monocular vision loss, whereas chronic optic neuropathy can be caused by compressive lesions along the anterior visual pathway, genetic, toxic, or nutritional causes. We report an unusual presentation mimicking optic neuritis, which was subsequently diagnosed as optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Misinterpretation of white matter lesions on MRI of brain and the failure to image the optic nerves at the time of acute loss of vision led to the misdiagnosis of optic neuritis in this case. A comprehensive accurate history and ordering the appropriate imaging modality remain paramount in diagnosing progressive visual deterioration. PMID:26904329

  3. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma Masquerading as Optic Neuritis.

    PubMed

    Alroughani, R; Behbehani, R

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuritis is a common presentation of demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. It typically presents with acute painful monocular vision loss, whereas chronic optic neuropathy can be caused by compressive lesions along the anterior visual pathway, genetic, toxic, or nutritional causes. We report an unusual presentation mimicking optic neuritis, which was subsequently diagnosed as optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Misinterpretation of white matter lesions on MRI of brain and the failure to image the optic nerves at the time of acute loss of vision led to the misdiagnosis of optic neuritis in this case. A comprehensive accurate history and ordering the appropriate imaging modality remain paramount in diagnosing progressive visual deterioration. PMID:26904329

  4. Composite pheochromocytoma with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Namekawa, Takeshi; Utsumi, Takanobu; Imamoto, Takashi; Kawamura, Koji; Oide, Takashi; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Nihei, Naoki; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Nakatani, Yukio; Ichikawa, Tomohiko

    2016-07-01

    Adrenal tumors with more than one cellular component are uncommon. Furthermore, an adrenal tumor composed of a pheochromocytoma and a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is extremely rare. A composite pheochromocytoma with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a 42-year-old man is reported here. After adequate preoperative control, left adrenalectomy was performed simultaneously with resection of the ipsilateral kidney for spontaneous rupture of the left adrenal tumor. Pathological findings demonstrated pheochromocytoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a ruptured adrenal tumor. To date, there have been only four reported cases of composite pheochromocytoma with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, so the present case is only the fifth case in the world. Despite the very poor prognosis of patients with pheochromocytoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors reported in the literature, the patient remains well without evidence of recurrence or new metastatic lesions at 36 months postoperatively. PMID:27338175

  5. Excellent response of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of retroperitoneum to radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan, Ali; Binesh, Fariba; Ghannadi, Fazlollah; Navabii, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours are high-grade sarcomas originating from Schwann cells or nerve sheath cells. Most of these tumours are associated with major nerves of the body wall and extremities. The lower extremity and the retroperitoneum are the most common sites. Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment, however, radiation therapy is usually used as an adjuvant treatment. In this paper we present a 57-year-old Iranian woman with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of retroperitoneum who was operated subtotally and then underwent radiation therapy which led to disappearance of all gross residual disease. PMID:23257269

  6. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour in a sow.

    PubMed

    Resende, Talita P; Pereira, Carlos E R; Vannucci, Fabio A; Araujo, Fernando S; dos Santos, José Lúcio; Cassali, Geovanni D; Damasceno, Karine A; Guedes, Roberto M C

    2015-01-01

    Nodular lung lesions in swine are frequently due to abscesses or granulomatous pneumonia. Although tumours are rarely reported in modern pig farming, they should be considered as a differential diagnosis when nodular lung lesions are found. A first-parity sow exhibiting respiratory signs was euthanized. Several whitish firm nodules, not encapsulated, ranging in diameter from 0.5 to 5 cm were present in all lung lobes. Microscopically, the nodules were composed of dense neoplastic cells, mainly in Antoni types A and B patterns, infiltrative and with development of emboli. All neoplastic cells stained positively by immunohistochemistry for vimentin and S-100 protein, with variable immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and stained negative for cytokeratin. Based on the gross, histological and immunohistochemical features, the tumor was diagnosed as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour. PMID:26407677

  7. Conventional and Functional MR Imaging of Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Demehri, S.; Belzberg, A.; Blakeley, J.; Fayad, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Differentiating benign from malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can be very challenging using conventional MR imaging. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that conventional and functional MR imaging can accurately diagnose malignancy in patients with indeterminate peripheral nerve sheath tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS This institutional review board–approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act–compliant study retrospectively reviewed 61 consecutive patients with 80 indeterminate peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Of these, 31 histologically proved peripheral nerve sheath tumors imaged with conventional (unenhanced T1, fluid-sensitive, contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences) and functional MR imaging (DWI/apparent diffusion coefficient mapping, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging) were included. Two observers independently assessed anatomic (size, morphology, signal) and functional (ADC values, early arterial enhancement by dynamic contrast-enhanced MR) features to determine interobserver agreement. The accuracy of MR imaging for differentiating malignant from benign was also determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis. RESULTS Of 31 peripheral nerve sheath tumors, there were 9 malignant (9%) and 22 benign ones (81%). With anatomic sequences, average tumor diameter (6.3 ± 1.8 versus 3.9 ± 2.3 mm, P = .009), ill-defined/infiltrative margins (77% versus 32%; P = .04), and the presence of peritumoral edema (66% versus 23%, P = .01) were different for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors. With functional sequences, minimum ADC (0.47 ± 0.32 × 10−3 mm2/s versus 1.08 ± 0.26 × 10−3 mm2/s; P [H11021] .0001) and the presence of early arterial enhancement (50% versus 11%; P = .03) were different for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors. The minimum ADC (area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.89; 95

  8. Sciatica due to malignant nerve sheath tumour of sciatic nerve in the thigh.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R R; Pawar, S J; Mahapatra, A K; Doctor, M; Musa, M M

    2001-06-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) is a rare malignant neoplasm arising from the supportive non-neural component of the peripheral nerves. An unusual case of pain and weakness of the foot and calf muscles due to a giant MPNST of the sciatic nerve in the posterior compartment of the thigh is presented. The patient was already investigated as a case of sciatica due to a lumbar disc disease with a negative magnetic resonance imaging and then unsuccessfully operated elsewhere twice, with a misdiagnosis of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Neurosurgical referral prompted a diagnostic magnetic resonance study of the thigh, revealing the lesion, which was completely excised microsurgically with total relief in the pain and partial improvement in the weakness and sensations in the sole of the foot. PMID:11447444

  9. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics and Permeability in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Best, Lauren; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  10. Biomechanics of the Optic Nerve Sheath in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. Ross; Raykin, Julia; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  11. Benign Nerve Sheath Myxoma in an Infant Misdiagnosed as Infantile Digital Fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Şule; Şişman, Servet; Kocaturk, Emek; Oguz Topal, Ilteris; Yıldırım, Selda

    2016-07-01

    Herein we present the case of a 16-month boy, clinically diagnosed with infantile digital fibromatosis, but 9 months after continued growth, the mass was excised and the histopathologic diagnosis was that of a benign nerve sheath myxoma. We present this case to emphasize that nerve sheath myxomas (also known as myxoid neurothekeoma) should be included in the differential diagnosis of dermal nodules in infants. PMID:27196676

  12. [Malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumours: Two case reports and complete review of the literature cases].

    PubMed

    Le Fèvre, C; Castelli, J; Perrin, C; Hénaux, P L; Noël, G

    2016-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours are extremely rare and can be associated with neurofibramatosis type 1. Their prognosis is poor and surgery remains the mainstay of therapy and should be the first line of treatment. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are second line treatment and their effectiveness remains to demonstrate. The diagnosis is clinical, radiological, histological and immunohistochemical. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours have a potential of local tumour recurrence very high and can metastasize. They often occur in extremity of the members but also rarely into brain. We report two cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour. The first was a 68-year-old woman who was admitted with progressive symptoms of headache and diplopia. A left frontotemporal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and was treated by surgery and irradiation. Ten months later, she presented a local recurrence and spine bone's metastases were treated by vertebroplasty and irradiation. The patient died 15 months after the diagnosis. The second case was a 47-year-old woman who was referred because headache and vomiting symptoms. A right frontal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and treated by surgery and irradiation. After that, the patient had three local recurrence operated and pulmonary and cranial bone's metastases. She was still alive after 20 months. We propose a literature review with 25 cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour identified, including the two current cases. PMID:26934901

  13. Analysis and Visualization of Nerve Vessel Contacts for Neurovascular Decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süßmuth, Jochen; Piazza, Alexander; Enders, Frank; Naraghi, Ramin; Greiner, Günther; Hastreiter, Peter

    Neurovascular compression syndromes are caused by a pathological contact between cranial nerves and vascular structures at the surface of the brainstem. Aiming at improved pre-operative analysis of the target structures, we propose calculating distance fields to provide quantitative information of the important nerve-vessel contacts. Furthermore, we suggest reconstructing polygonal models for the nerves and vessels. Color-coding with the respective distance information is used for enhanced visualization. Overall, our new strategy contributes to a significantly improved clinical understanding.

  14. Optical coherence tomography imaging of the optic nerve head pre optic and post optic nerve sheath fenestration.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Haziq Raees; Rajak, Saul; Heath, Dominic; Brittain, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder of unknown aetiology, and causes elevated intracranial pressures. This is often associated with papilloedema with subsequent degrees of optic atrophy if the intracranial pressures are not controlled in a timely manner. Optical coherence tomography imaging is widely recognised for its use in the monitoring of optic nerves in glaucoma, and this report is the first to describe its use to monitor the optic nerve head pre optic and post optic nerve sheath fenestration. PMID:26150609

  15. Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Spinal Accessory Nerve: A Unique Presentation of a Rare Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Omair A.; Reaves, Ann; Kralick, Francis A.; Brooks, Ari; Musial, Rachel E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), sarcomas originating from tissues of mesenchymal origin, are rare in patients without a history of neurofibromatosis. Case Report We report a case of an MPNST of the spinal accessory nerve, unassociated with neurofibromatosis, which metastasized to the brain. The tumor, originating in the intrasternomastoid segment of the spinal accessory nerve, was removed. Two years later, the patient presented with focal neurological deficits. Radiographic findings revealed a well-defined 2.2×2.2×2.2 cm, homogeneously enhancing mass in the left parieto-occipital region of the brain surrounded by significant vasogenic edema and mass effect, culminating in a 1-cm midline shift to the right. The mass was surgically removed. The patient had nearly complete recovery of vision, speech, and memory. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of an MPNST arising from an extracranial segment of the spinal accessory nerve and metastasizing to the brain. PMID:22523517

  16. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Frank; Doerr, Stefan; Wilhelm, Helmut; Becker, Gerd; Bamberg, Michael; Classen, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SFRT) in the treatment of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 109 patients (113 eyes) with primary (n = 37) or secondary (n = 76) ONSM were treated according to a prospective protocol with SFRT to a median dose of 54 Gy. All patients underwent radiographic, ophthalmologic, and endocrine analysis before and after SFRT. Radiographic response, visual control, and late side effects were endpoints of the analysis. Results: Median time to last clinical, radiographic, and ophthalmologic follow up was 30.2 months (n = 113), 42.7 months (n = 108), and 53.7 months (n = 91), respectively. Regression of the tumor was observed in 5 eyes and progression in 4 eyes, whereas 104 remained stable. Visual acuity improved in 12, deteriorated in 11, and remained stable in 68 eyes. Mean visual field defects reduced from 33.6% (n = 90) to 17.8% (n = 56) in ipsilateral and from 10% (n = 94) to 6.7% (n = 62) in contralateral eyes. Ocular motility improved in 23, remained stable in 65, and deteriorated in 3 eyes. Radiographic tumor control was 100% at 3 years and 98% at 5 years. Visual acuity was preserved in 94.8% after 3 years and in 90.9% after 5 years. Endocrine function was normal in 90.8% after 3 years and in 81.3% after 5 years. Conclusions: SFRT represents a highly effective treatment for ONSM. Interdisciplinary counseling of the patients is recommended. Because of the high rate of preservation of visual acuity we consider SFRT the standard approach for the treatment of ONSM. Prolonged observation is warranted to more accurately assess late visual impairment. Moderate de-escalation of the radiation dose might improve the preservation of visual acuity and pituitary gland function.

  17. Pathology in practice: Peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a Shubunkin goldfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs) have been detected in many fish species, including goldfish, several species of snapper, coho salmon, the bicolor damselfish, and rainbow smelt. They originate from neural crest cells and generally occur along the subcutaneous nerves. A viral etiology has bee...

  18. Effect of scuba-diving on optic nerve and sheath diameters

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Shams-Hosseini, Narges Sadat; Rezaali, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is not any data available about the effect of high bar pressure condition on intracranial pressure. In this study, the effect of diving on the optic nerve and sheath diameters as non-invasive markers of intracranial pressure has been investigated. Methods: Twenty professional male divers from twenty one volunteers were chosen for this cross-sectional study. Only one person who had a history of barotraumas was excluded. Each diver then completed a questionnaire on demographic data, medical and diving history. Nineteen other volunteers were selected to represent a control group. A 10-MHz linear ultrasonic probe was used to measure the optic nerve sheath diameters of both eyes in closed and supine position and its relationship with diving history of divers was determined. Results: It was found that divers have a higher mean optic nerve sheath diameter compared to the normal population as previously reported by other studies. The mean diameter of the left and right optic nerve sheaths were 6.4±0.7, 6.5±0.9 mm respectively and a significant relationship between optic nerve sheath diameter and diving history was found. Conclusion: Results showed that divers have a higher optic nerve diameter than the general population. However, our result cannot yet be considered as a marker of intracranial pressure in divers as it was conducted on an limited number of subjects and so a bigger study should be undertaken for this purpose. PMID:25664290

  19. Treatment of Peripheral Neuropathy in Leprosy: The Case for Nerve Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Eric L.; Rivadeneira, Andres F.; Jouvin, Renato Martinez

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Plastic surgery has a tradition of caring for patients with facial deformity and hand deformity related to leprosy. The approach, however, to the progressive deformity and disability related to chronic nerve compression is underappreciated in the world today. A cohort of patients with leprous neuropathy from an indigenous area of leprosy in Ecuador was evaluated for the presence of chronic peripheral nerve compression, and 12 patients were chosen for simultaneous upper and lower extremity, unilateral, nerve decompression at multiple levels along the course of each nerve. The results at 1 year of follow-up show that 6 patients improved into the excellent category and 4 patients improved into the good category for improved function. Based on the early results in this small cohort of patients with leprous neuropathy, an approach to peripheral nerve decompression, encompassing the concept of multiple crush at multiple levels of each nerve, seems to offer optimism to improve upper and lower extremity limb function. Long-term studies with quality-of-life outcomes would be welcome. PMID:27257567

  20. Treatment of Peripheral Neuropathy in Leprosy: The Case for Nerve Decompression.

    PubMed

    Wan, Eric L; Rivadeneira, Andres F; Jouvin, Renato Martinez; Dellon, A Lee

    2016-03-01

    Plastic surgery has a tradition of caring for patients with facial deformity and hand deformity related to leprosy. The approach, however, to the progressive deformity and disability related to chronic nerve compression is underappreciated in the world today. A cohort of patients with leprous neuropathy from an indigenous area of leprosy in Ecuador was evaluated for the presence of chronic peripheral nerve compression, and 12 patients were chosen for simultaneous upper and lower extremity, unilateral, nerve decompression at multiple levels along the course of each nerve. The results at 1 year of follow-up show that 6 patients improved into the excellent category and 4 patients improved into the good category for improved function. Based on the early results in this small cohort of patients with leprous neuropathy, an approach to peripheral nerve decompression, encompassing the concept of multiple crush at multiple levels of each nerve, seems to offer optimism to improve upper and lower extremity limb function. Long-term studies with quality-of-life outcomes would be welcome. PMID:27257567

  1. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor in Neurofibromatosis Type I : Unusual Presentation of Intraabdominal or Intrathoracic Mass

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Gwang; Sung, Woo Jin; Kim, Dong Hwan; Kim, Young Hwan; Lee, Kyu Bo

    2005-01-01

    A malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is an extremely rare soft tissue tumor in the general population. On the other hand, there is a higher incidence of MPNST in patients with neurofibromatosis type I (von Recklinghausen's disease). The common sites are the extremities, trunk, head and neck. However, an intraabdominal or intrathoracic manifestation is uncommon. This paper reports two patients, a 31 year-old woman with multiple neurofibromatosis presenting as an intraabdominal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and a 33 year-old woman with an intrathoracic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The patients were treated with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. However, one patient died as a result of disease progression 21 months after the diagnosis and the other patient is currently being treated with radiotherapy. PMID:15906964

  2. A Case of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Hypoglossal Nerve after Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tong; Juric-Sekhar, Gordana; Born, Donald; Sekhar, Laligam N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hypoglossal schwannomas are rare. Surgical resection has been the standard treatment modality. Radiosurgery has been increasingly used for treatment. Radiation-associated secondary malignancy/malignant transformation has not been documented in the literature for the treatment of nonvestibular schwannomas. Setting The patient was a 52-year-old man with an enlarging high cervical/skull base lesion 8.5 years after CyberKnife treatment of a presumed vagal schwannoma. A decision was made for surgical resection, and the tumor was found to originate from the hypoglossal nerve intraoperatively. Final pathology diagnosis was malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Results Patient had a gross total resection. Three months after resection, he received fractionated radiation of 50 Gy in 25 fractions and a boost gamma knife radiosurgery of 10 Gy to the 50% isodose surface. He remained tumor free on repeat magnetic resonance imaging 9 months after the resection. Conclusion Although extremely rare, radiation treatment of nonvestibular schwannomas can potentially cause malignant transformation. PMID:25083387

  3. In situ decompression of the ulnar nerve at the cubital tunnel.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Robert P; Zlotolow, Dan A

    2007-08-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome is a clinical entity that has been described for more than a century. Numerous conservative and surgical treatments have evolved to address this condition, but a consensus has yet to emerge regarding optimal treatment. Evidence suggests a limited but potentially valuable role for in situ decompression of the ulnar nerve at the cubital tunnel. Future research will undoubtedly clarify this role and contribute to the development of a standard treatment protocol. PMID:17765584

  4. Decompression of the Sciatic Nerve Entrapment Caused by Post-Inflammatory Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-ryeong; Jeun, Sin Soo; Lee, Sang-won

    2015-01-01

    A rare case of chronic pain of entrapment neuropathy of the sciatic nerve successfully relieved by surgical decompression is presented. A 71-year-old male suffered a chronic right buttock pain of duration of 7 years which radiating to the right distal leg and foot. His pain developed gradually over one year after underwenting drainage for the gluteal abscess seven years ago. A cramping buttock and intermittently radiating pain to his right foot on sitting, walking, and voiding did not respond to conventional treatment. An MRI suggested a post-inflammatory adhesion encroaching the proximal course of the sciatic nerve beneath the piriformis as it emerges from the sciatic notch. Upon exploration of the sciatic nerve, a fibrotic tendinous scar beneath the piriformis was found and released proximally to the sciatic notch. His chronic intractable pain was completely relieved within days after the decompression. However, thigh weakness and hypesthesia of the foot did not improve. This case suggest a need for of more prompt investigation and decompression of the chronic sciatic entrapment neuropathy which does not improve clinically or electrically over several months. PMID:25733994

  5. Biologic Basis of Nerve Decompression Surgery for Focal Entrapments in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sessions, John; Nickerson, D Scott

    2014-02-27

    The most recent (2011) National Diabetes Fact Sheet states the combined diagnosed and undiagnosed number of diabetes cases in the United States is approaching 25 million, and another 79 million are prediabetic. Of the diabetes patients, 60-70% suffer from mild to severe neuropathy. This combined loss of sensory and motor control in diabetic limbs is usually considered an irreversible, progressive process. Patients suffering from these losses are at a significantly higher risk for development of foot ulceration, frequently leading to infection and partial or major limb amputation. However, a review of focal nerve entrapment surgical decompression literature suggests that several diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN) symptoms and complications are potentially partially reversible or preventable. Decompression surgery represents a paradigm shift in treatment protocols because it both relieves pain and restores protective sensation, while providing significant protection against a cascade of serious foot complications. This review surveys current research regarding the biological basis for diabetic focal entrapment neuropathy. Metabolic dysfunction related to aldose reductase, oxidative stress, and advanced glycation end products are considered and correlated to peripheral nerve enlargement and entrapment. In addition, observational studies correlated to that biological basis are presented as well as surgical outcomes illustrating the effect of decompression on DSPN symptomatic relief, nerve function, and protection against complications. PMID:24876595

  6. Loss of H3K27 trimethylation distinguishes malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors from histologic mimics.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Fletcher, Christopher Dm; Hornick, Jason L

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is challenging, particularly in the sporadic setting. Inactivation of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), resulting from inactivating mutations of its constituents SUZ12 or EED1, has recently been identified in 70-90% of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Homozygous PRC2 inactivation results in loss of histone H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3). PRC2 inactivation promotes tumor progression and may render patients sensitive to epigenetic-based targeted therapies. H3K27me3 loss has not yet been validated as a diagnostic marker. We evaluated immunohistochemistry for H3K27me3 in 100 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (70 sporadic, 10 neurofibromatosis type 1-associated, 10 radiation-associated, 10 epithelioid) and 200 other spindle cell neoplasms representing potential mimics (20 each monophasic synovial sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, dedifferentiated liposarcoma, malignant solitary fibrous tumor, low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma, cellular schwannoma, spindle cell melanoma, unclassified postradiation sarcoma; 10 each atypical neurofibroma, spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, fibrosarcomatous dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans). In total, 51 (51%) malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, including 34 (49%) sporadic, 7 (70%) neurofibromatosis type 1-associated, and 10 (100%) radiation-associated, but no epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, were negative for H3K27me3. An additional 6 (6%) tumors showed heterogeneous H3K27me3 expression. Among the 90 sporadic, neurofibromatosis type 1-associated, and radiation-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, complete H3K27me3 loss was observed in 29% of low-grade, 59% of intermediate-grade, and 83% of high-grade tumors (low vs intermediate/high grade, P=0.0003). Among other tumor types, 4 (20%) unclassified postradiation sarcomas were negative for H3K27me3, whereas all other neoplasms were positive. Loss of H3K27me

  7. The coexistence of peripheral nerve sheath tumors and vitiligo: more than coincidence?

    PubMed

    Elsherif, Mohamed A; Spinner, Robert J; Miest, Rachel Y

    2016-01-01

    Neurocristopathies arise from abnormal migration, differentiation, or proliferation of neural crest derivatives, leading to diverse clinical and pathological features. They are classified into dysgenetic or neoplastic, and can affect single or multiple sites (simple versus complex). Examples include congenital melanocytic nevi, neuroblastoma, Hirshsprung's disease, Waardenburg's syndrome, neurofibromatosis (NF) 1 and multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2A and 2B. We report two cases of peripheral nerve sheath tumors associated with vitiligo and discuss the possible implicated embryologic, genetic and molecular mechanisms. To our knowledge, we also report the first case of de novo malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) associated with vitiligo. PMID:26607956

  8. Microvascular decompression of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery for intermediate nerve neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Humberto Kluge; Neville, Iuri Santana; de Andrade, Daniel Ciampi; Lepski, Guilherme Alves; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Duarte, Kleber Paiva

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intermediate nerve neuralgia (INN) is an extremely rare craniofacial pain disorder mainly caused by neurovascular compression. Case Description: We present the case of a 48-year-old female with a 20-month history of intractable paroxysmal INN on the right side. The patient described feeling paroxysmal pain in her auditory canal, pinna, deep in the jaw, and adjacent retromastoid area on the right side. She described the pain as being like a burning sensation. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the right posterior cerebellar artery crossing the cerebellopontine cistern in close contact with the right VII and VIII nerves. Surgical exploration via retromastoid craniotomy revealed vascular compression of the intermediate nerve by the posterior cerebellar artery. We therefore performed microvascular nerve decompression to relieve pain, and the patient remained pain-free at the 6-month follow-up visit. Conclusion: INN should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases with atypical facial neuralgia, and microvascular decompression is an effective treatment option that can provide optimal pain relief. PMID:25883844

  9. Changes in myelin sheath thickness and internode geometry in the rabbit phrenic nerve during growth.

    PubMed Central

    Friede, R L; Brzoska, J; Hartmann, U

    1985-01-01

    The rabbit phrenic nerve was studied at seven phases of growth from the newborn to the adult to determine the length of the nerve fibres, the length of the internodes, the fibre calibre, the geometric proportions of the internodes and the thickness of the myelin sheaths. The elongation of the internodes corresponded precisely to the elongation of the nerve, indicating a constant number of approximately 140 internodes per fibre, each internode elongating commensurate with body growth. Internode elongation was accompanied by increases in fibre calibre, but these parameters did not change in precise proportion. The internodes of thick fibres were relatively short for calibre, as defined by the length/diameter quotient. This trend of foreshortening changed during growth. Sheath thickness, defined by the quotient axon diameter/fibre diameter, was determined with a computer-assisted method. Fibres of young rabbits had relatively thin sheaths for axon calibre, compared with adult rabbits. The changes in sheath thickness corresponded to the changes in internode geometry. This was consistent with previous studies showing that elongation or foreshortening of an internode of a given calibre has a slight, but definite effect on the thickness of its myelin sheath. PMID:3870716

  10. Acute optic nerve sheath fenestration with the free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jin-Hui; Casagrande, Vivien A.; Joos, Karen M.; Shetlar, Debra J.; Robinson, Richard D.; Head, William S.; Mavity-Hudson, Julia A.; Nunnally, Amy H.

    1999-06-01

    Purpose: To determine if the free electron laser (FEL) energy can be delivered to a small space to perform optic nerve sheath fenestration with minimal acute nerve damage. Methods: A 530 mm hollow waveguide probe was designed. Optic nerve sheath fenestration (1.0 mm diameter) was performed in 8 rabbits using either the FEL (4 eyes, 6.45mm, 10 Hz, 2 mJ) or a knife (4 eyes). Within 2 hours following surgery, the animals were perfused with aldehyde fixative. The integrity of the optic nerve and glial response at the site of fenestration were evaluated on tissue selections with H&E, and antibodies to S100β or GFAP. Results: Surgery using the FEL probe was found to be technically superior to the knife. The glial reaction was limited to a zone adjacent to the fenestration and was similar in both the FEL and knife incisions. Conclusions: The FEL appears capable of efficiently performing an optic nerve sheath fenestration in a small space with minimal acute damage. Both the FEL and knife incisions result in a rapid glial response at the site of fenestration even when optic nerve integrity is not compromised.

  11. Decompression of the orbit and the optic nerve in different diseases.

    PubMed

    Stoll, W; Busse, H; Kroll, P

    1988-10-01

    During the past six years, visual loss in 60 patients was caused by infectious processes and mucoceles of the ethmoid region, benign paranasal tumours, endocrine ophthalmopathies, head trauma etc. Comparison of preoperative and postoperative visual function in 48 cases treated by decompression of the orbit and in 12 cases treated by decompression of the optic nerve demonstrated visual improvement of 68 percent on average. Surgically, we preferred the transethmoidal route and in some cases the lateral osteoplastic approach. With regard to the success of the surgical therapy, a correlation between the time of manifestation of the visual loss and the time of surgery was found. The results mainly depended on the underlying diseases. PMID:3198774

  12. Methylation-based classification of benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Röhrich, Manuel; Koelsche, Christian; Schrimpf, Daniel; Capper, David; Sahm, Felix; Kratz, Annekathrin; Reuss, Jana; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T W; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Becker, Albert; Weis, Joachim; Mawrin, Christian; Mittelbronn, Michel; Perry, Arie; Mautner, Victor-Felix; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Hartmann, Christian; Okuducu, Ali Fuat; Arp, Mirko; Seiz-Rosenhagen, Marcel; Hänggi, Daniel; Heim, Stefanie; Paulus, Werner; Schittenhelm, Jens; Ahmadi, Rezvan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Unterberg, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M; von Deimling, Andreas; Reuss, David E

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of peripheral nerve sheath tumors derive from the Schwann cell lineage and comprise diverse histological entities ranging from benign schwannomas and neurofibromas to high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST), each with several variants. There is increasing evidence for methylation profiling being able to delineate biologically relevant tumor groups even within the same cellular lineage. Therefore, we used DNA methylation arrays for methylome- and chromosomal profile-based characterization of 171 peripheral nerve sheath tumors. We analyzed 28 conventional high-grade MPNST, three malignant Triton tumors, six low-grade MPNST, four epithelioid MPNST, 33 neurofibromas (15 dermal, 8 intraneural, 10 plexiform), six atypical neurofibromas, 43 schwannomas (including 5 NF2 and 5 schwannomatosis associated cases), 11 cellular schwannomas, 10 melanotic schwannomas, 7 neurofibroma/schwannoma hybrid tumors, 10 nerve sheath myxomas and 10 ganglioneuromas. Schwannomas formed different epigenomic subgroups including a vestibular schwannoma subgroup. Cellular schwannomas were not distinct from conventional schwannomas. Nerve sheath myxomas and neurofibroma/schwannoma hybrid tumors were most similar to schwannomas. Dermal, intraneural and plexiform neurofibromas as well as ganglioneuromas all showed distinct methylation profiles. Atypical neurofibromas and low-grade MPNST were indistinguishable with a common methylation profile and frequent losses of CDKN2A. Epigenomic analysis finds two groups of conventional high-grade MPNST sharing a frequent loss of neurofibromin. The larger of the two groups shows an additional loss of trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3). The smaller one retains H3K27me3 and is found in spinal locations. Sporadic MPNST with retained neurofibromin expression did not form an epigenetic group and most cases could be reclassified as cellular schwannomas or soft tissue sarcomas. Widespread immunohistochemical loss

  13. Peripheral Nerve Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Assessment of Axon and Myelin Sheath Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Heckel, A.; Weiler, M.; Xia, A.; Ruetters, M.; Pham, M.; Bendszus, M.; Heiland, S.; Baeumer, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters as in-vivo biomarkers of axon and myelin sheath integrity of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. Methods MRI examinations at 3T including DTI were conducted on wrists in 30 healthy subjects. After manual segmentation of the median nerve quantitative analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) as well as axial, radial and mean diffusivity (AD, RD, and MD) was carried out. Pairwise Pearson correlations with electrophysiological parameters comprising sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) as markers of axon integrity, and distal motor latency (dml) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (sNCV) as markers of myelin sheath integrity were computed. The significance criterion was set at P=0.05, Bonferroni corrected for multiple comparisons. Results DTI parameters showed a distinct proximal-to-distal profile with FA, MD, and RD extrema coinciding in the center of the carpal tunnel. AD correlated with CMAP (r=0.50, p=0.04, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of myelin sheath integrity. RD correlated with sNCV (r=-0.53, p=0.02, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of axon integrity. FA correlated with dml (r=-0.63, p=0.002, Bonf. corr.) and sNCV (r=0.68, p=0.001, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of axon integrity. Conclusion AD reflects axon integrity, while RD (and FA) reflect myelin sheath integrity as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. DTI parameters consistently indicate a slight decrease of structural integrity in the carpal tunnel as a physiological site of median nerve entrapment. DTI is particularly sensitive, since these findings are observed in healthy participants. Our results encourage future studies to evaluate the potential of DTI in differentiating axon from myelin sheath injury in patients with manifest peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26114630

  14. Morphometric Analysis of Connective Tissue Sheaths of Sural Nerve in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kundalić, Braca; Ugrenović, Slađana; Jovanović, Ivan; Stefanović, Natalija; Petrović, Vladimir; Kundalić, Jasen; Stojanović, Vesna; Živković, Vladimir; Antić, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic neuropathy. It may be provoked by metabolic and/or vascular factors, and depending on duration of disease, various layers of nerve may be affected. Our aim was to investigate influence of diabetes on the epineurial, perineurial, and endoneurial connective tissue sheaths. The study included 15 samples of sural nerve divided into three groups: diabetic group, peripheral vascular disease group, and control group. After morphological analysis, morphometric parameters were determined for each case using ImageJ software. Compared to the control group, the diabetic cases had significantly higher perineurial index (P < 0.05) and endoneurial connective tissue percentage (P < 0.01). The diabetic group showed significantly higher epineurial area (P < 0.01), as well as percentage of endoneurial connective tissue (P < 0.01), in relation to the peripheral vascular disease group. It is obvious that hyperglycemia and ischemia present in diabetes lead to substantial changes in connective tissue sheaths of nerve, particularly in peri- and endoneurium. Perineurial thickening and significant endoneurial fibrosis may impair the balance of endoneurial homeostasis and regenerative ability of the nerve fibers. Future investigations should focus on studying the components of extracellular matrix of connective tissue sheaths in diabetic nerves. PMID:25147820

  15. Morphometric analysis of connective tissue sheaths of sural nerve in diabetic and nondiabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Kundalić, Braca; Ugrenović, Slađana; Jovanović, Ivan; Stefanović, Natalija; Petrović, Vladimir; Kundalić, Jasen; Stojanović, Vesna; Živković, Vladimir; Antić, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic neuropathy. It may be provoked by metabolic and/or vascular factors, and depending on duration of disease, various layers of nerve may be affected. Our aim was to investigate influence of diabetes on the epineurial, perineurial, and endoneurial connective tissue sheaths. The study included 15 samples of sural nerve divided into three groups: diabetic group, peripheral vascular disease group, and control group. After morphological analysis, morphometric parameters were determined for each case using ImageJ software. Compared to the control group, the diabetic cases had significantly higher perineurial index (P < 0.05) and endoneurial connective tissue percentage (P < 0.01). The diabetic group showed significantly higher epineurial area (P < 0.01), as well as percentage of endoneurial connective tissue (P < 0.01), in relation to the peripheral vascular disease group. It is obvious that hyperglycemia and ischemia present in diabetes lead to substantial changes in connective tissue sheaths of nerve, particularly in peri- and endoneurium. Perineurial thickening and significant endoneurial fibrosis may impair the balance of endoneurial homeostasis and regenerative ability of the nerve fibers. Future investigations should focus on studying the components of extracellular matrix of connective tissue sheaths in diabetic nerves. PMID:25147820

  16. Transethmoidal decompression of the optic nerve in the case of craniocerebral trauma.

    PubMed

    Kolenda, H; Schröder, M; Mühlendyck, H; Rama, B; Markakis, E

    1988-01-01

    Over a period of ten years, 39 patients who had suffered optic nerve compression after a craniocerebral trauma underwent transethmoidal decompression surgery. The operation was performed bilaterally on 5 patients. Fifty percent of patients involved suffered a blunt head or brain injury, the others brain compression or contusion. On the side of optic nerve compression, we found specific signs and symptoms of the compression such as negative or sluggish direct light reaction of the pupil, wounds on the lateral side of the eyebrow, bleeding from the nose, eyelid hematoma, skull fractures and intracranial hematomas. Since radiological and intraoperative findings were the same in only 67% of cases ophthalmological findings such as lack of direct pupil reaction occurring together with preserved consensual light reaction and progressive loss of vision after a traumatic incident are used as guideline for performing transethmoidal decompression of the optic nerve. Surgery produced restitution of visual function in about 10% more cases than conservative therapy reported in the literature. PMID:3217018

  17. Suprameatal extension of retrosigmoid approach for microvascular decompression of trigeminal nerve: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Holguin, Juan Carlos; Revuelta-Gutierrez, Rogelio; Monroy-Sosa, Alejandro; Almeida-Navarro, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Trigeminal neuralgia is produced in a significant number of cases by vascular compression at the level of cisternal segment of the nerve at the entry of the pons. It is common to find superior cerebellar artery (SCA) responsible for this compression. The retrosigmoid approach (RA), with asterional craniectomy, clearly exposes the cisternal portion of the trigeminal nerve (TN). Presentation of case We describe in this case report how vessels at the trigeminal pore level known as “Meckel’s segment” can compress the TN. This situation is unusual. One of the reasons why the compression of this Meckel’s segment level could be overlooked is a suprameatal tubercle (ST) prominence that would prevent trigeminal pore visualization through retrosigmoid approach. Discussion The suprameatal extension of this approach has been described for other purposes, especially in tumors invading Meckel’s cave resection. We could not find publications for the use of the resection of the suprameatal tubercle in the retrosigmoid approach for microvascular decompression of the trigeminal neuralgia. Conclusion Microvascular decompression of the TN is an effective treatment for trigeminal neuralgia, however in some cases, in which vascular compression is not evident when exploring the cerebellopontine angle, it is important to note that association of a prominent ST can hide a vascular compression of the nerve in this region. PMID:26298243

  18. Support of Nerve Conduction by Respiring Myelin Sheath: Role of Connexons.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Silvia; Bartolucci, Martina; Adriano, Enrico; Garbati, Patrizia; Ferrando, Sara; Ramoino, Paola; Calzia, Daniela; Morelli, Alessandro; Balestrino, Maurizio; Panfoli, Isabella

    2016-05-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that myelin conducts an extramitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, hypothesizing a novel supportive role for myelin in favor of the axon. We have also hypothesized that the ATP produced in myelin could be transferred thought gap junctions. In this work, by biochemical, immunohistochemical, and electrophysiological techniques, the existence of a connection among myelin to the axon was evaluated, to understand how ATP could be transferred from sheath to the axoplasm. Data confirm a functional expression of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated myelin. Moreover, WB and immunohistochemistry on optic nerve slices show that connexins 32 and 43 are present in myelin and colocalize with myelin basic protein. Interestingly, addition of carbenoxolone or oleamide, two gap junction blockers, causes a decrease in oxidative metabolism in purified myelin, but not in mitochondria. Similar effects were observed on conduction speed in hippocampal Schaffer collateral, in the presence of oleamide. Confocal analysis of optic nerve slices showed that lucifer yellow (that only passes through aqueous pores) signal was found in both the sheath layers and the axoplasma. In the presence of oleamide, but not with oleic acid, signal significantly decreased in the sheath and was lost inside the axon. This suggests the existence of a link among myelin and axons. These results, while supporting the idea that ATP aerobically synthesized in myelin sheath could be transferred to the axoplasm through gap junctions, shed new light on the function of the sheath. PMID:26033217

  19. Lectin histochemistry of normal and neoplastic peripheral nerve sheath. 1. Lectin binding pattern of normal peripheral nerve in man.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, K; Nakasu, S; Nioka, H; Handa, J

    1993-01-01

    The binding patterns of lectins to normal peripheral nerves were examined. Twelve biotinylated lectins were used in this study; Canavalia ensiformis (Con A), Pisum sativum (PSA), Lens culinaris (LCA), Ricinus communis 1 (RCA-1), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Glycine max (SBA), Sophora japonica (SJA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia 1 (BSL-1), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), succinylated WGA (s-WGA), Ulex europaeus 1 (UEA-1) and Helix pomatia (HPA). Cytoplasm of Schwann cells and perineurial cells was stained by Con A, PSA, LCA, s-WGA and WGA. PNA showed specific binding to perineurial cells, while after neuraminidase treatment stain with this lectin was demonstrated also in Schwann cells. Myelin sheaths were stained with fewer lectins. SBA and HPA with sialic acid removal rarely showed reactivity to the peripheral nerve structure in surgical specimens, in contrast to clear staining of Schwann cells, perineurial cells and myelin sheaths in autopsy specimens. The present study shows distinct lectin stainings of specific structures of the normal human peripheral nerves, and provides important basic information on the alterations of lectin binding patterns during pathological processes in the peripheral nerves. PMID:8310810

  20. Cellular neurothekeoma: case report and its (un) relation with nerve sheath myxoma.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Dechent, Cristián; Curi-Tuma, Maximiliano; Marín, Celeste; González, Sergio; Sandoval-Osses, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Neurothekeoma is an uncommon, benign neoplasm presenting in young adults, primarily on the head and neck. It was initially related to nerve sheath myxoma but with the advent of immunohistochemistry, new insights into its cellular differentiation and origin have emerged, unlinking Neurothekeoma and nerve sheath myxoma. Herein we describe a 19-year-old male who had had a frontal, flesh-colored, asymptomatic papule for 2 years. Histology showed a dermal fusocellular-spindle cell tumor, including an eosinophilic cytoplasm with mild cellular pleomorphism and moderately dense fibrous stroma. IHQ was positive for CD10 and negative for S100 and Claudin-1. These findings were compatible with cellular Neurothekeoma. The lesion was completely extirpated and at the 6-month follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and had experienced no recurrences. PMID:26312702

  1. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a cat with nodal and pulmonary metastases.

    PubMed

    Buza, Elizabeth L; Menzies, Robert A; Goldschmidt, Michael H; Durham, Amy C

    2012-07-01

    Peripheral nerve sheath tumors in domestic cats are infrequently reported and are often locally invasive. An 11-year-old Domestic Shorthair cat was originally diagnosed with a right maxillary benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor at incisional biopsy. At necropsy, the neoplasm had features of malignancy including metastases to the regional lymph nodes and lung. Histologically, the neoplasm contained 2 distinct regions: spindle cells arranged in dense interwoven bundles with Antoni A areas and Verocay bodies and Antoni B regions with loosely arranged spindle cells separated by a mucinous matrix. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells in the primary mass and right mandibular lymph node were strongly positive for vimentin, S-100, and glial fibrillar acidic protein. The neoplastic cells within the lung were strongly positive for vimentin and weakly positive for S-100 and glial fibrillar acidic protein. PMID:22604770

  2. Lost in Translation: Ambiguity in Nerve Sheath Tumor Nomenclature and Its Resultant Treatment Effect

    PubMed Central

    Bernthal, Nicholas M.; Jones, Kevin B.; Monument, Michael J.; Liu, Ting; Viskochil, David; Randall, R. Lor

    2013-01-01

    There is much ambiguity surrounding the diagnosis of nerve sheath tumors, including atypical neurofibroma and low-grade MPNST, and yet, the distinction between these entities designates either benign or malignant behavior and thus carries presumed profound prognostic importance that often guides treatment. This study reviews the diagnostic criteria used to designate atypical neurofibroma from low-grade MPNSTs and reviews existing literature the natural history of each of these tumors to see if the distinction is, in fact, of importance. PMID:24216989

  3. Ethanol Ablation of a Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Presenting as a Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chin, Matthew; Chen, Chien-Lin; Chang, Kenneth; Lee, John; Samarasena, Jason

    2015-10-01

    Ethanol has historically been used as an ablative agent for a variety of lesions. One of the more common applications of this technique is celiac plexus neurolysis; however, recent reports have suggested a role for the endoscopic alcohol ablation of a variety of solid and cystic lesions. We report a novel case of endoscopic ethanol ablation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor presenting as a small bowel obstruction. PMID:26504873

  4. Growth-associated protein 43 in differentiating peripheral nerve sheath tumors from other non-neural spindle cell neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Shen; Chen, Pei-Ling; Lu, Dongsi; Lind, Anne C; Dehner, Louis P

    2014-02-01

    The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a relatively uncommon type of soft tissue sarcoma arising from a peripheral nerve or extraneural soft tissues and showing nerve sheath differentiation. The diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is one of the most challenging tasks in surgical pathology because of its uncommon type (5-10% soft tissue sarcomas), morphologic resemblance to other spindle cell neoplasms and lack of sensitive and specific immunohistochemical markers. The pathologic diagnosis is more straightforward in the clinical setting of neurofibromatosis-1, but problems are mainly centered on the non-neurofibromatosis-1 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. To date, S100 protein is the most widely applied marker in the case of a suspected malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, yet its suboptimal sensitivity and its expression in other spindle cell neoplasms, including spindle cell melanoma, clear-cell sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma and monophasic synovial sarcoma, add to the diagnostic conundrum. Growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43), a membrane-associated phosphoprotein expressed in neuronal growth cones and Schwann cell precursors during neural development and axonal regeneration, was applied to a set of nerve sheath and non-nerve sheath spindle cell neoplasms. The findings in this study indicate that GAP43 is expressed in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (n=18/21; 86%) and demonstrates a sensitivity superior to S100 protein (n=13/21; 62%). GAP43 is also positive in neurofibromas (n=17/18; 94%), schwannomas (n=11/12; 92%) and desmoplastic melanomas (n=7/10; 70%). In contrast, it is negative in the non-desmoplastic spindle cell melanomas (n=20/22; 91%). Of the other non-neural soft tissue sarcomas, GAP43 is non-reactive in most leiomyosarcomas (n=14/16; 88%) and clear-cell sarcomas (n=8/8), and only focally positive in monophasic synovial sarcomas (n=3/7; 43%). GAP43 is seemingly a highly sensitive marker for peripheral nerve

  5. Radial tunnel syndrome. A retrospective review of 30 decompressions of the radial nerve.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, T; Mobbs, P; Fortems, Y; Stanley, J K

    1995-08-01

    Radial tunnel syndrome results from compression of the radial nerve by the free edge of the supinator muscle or closely related structures in the vicinity of the elbow joint. Despite numerous reports on the surgical management of this disorder, it remains largely unrecognized and often neglected. The symptoms of radial tunnel syndrome can resemble those of tennis elbow, chronic wrist pain or tenosynovitis. Reliable objective criteria are not available to differentiate between these pathologies. These difficulties are discussed in relation to 29 patients who underwent 30 primary explorations and proximal decompressions of the radial nerve. Excellent or good results were obtained in 70%, fair results in 13% and poor results in 17% of patients. The results can be satisfactory despite the prolonged duration of symptoms. We believe that a diagnosis of radial tunnel syndrome should always be born in mind when dealing with patients with forearm and wrist pain that has not responded to more conventional treatment. Patients with occupations requiring repetitive manual tasks seem to be particularly at risk of developing radial tunnel syndrome and it is also interesting to note that 66% of patients with on-going medico-legal claims had successful outcomes following surgery. PMID:7594982

  6. Potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takuya; Andoh, Tooru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Hirose, Tkanori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Kawamoto, Teruya; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Satomi; Atagi, Shinji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are relatively rare neoplasms with poor prognosis. At present there is no effective treatment for MPNST other than surgical resection. Nonetheless, the anti-tumor effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was recently demonstrated in two patients with MPNST. Subsequently, tumor-bearing nude mice subcutaneously transplanted with a human MPNST cell line were injected with p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA) and subjected to BNCT. Pathological studies then revealed that the MPNST cells were selectively destroyed by BNCT. PMID:26278348

  7. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the orbit: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet D; Yildirim, Umran; Gundogdu, Cemal; Dursun, Osman; Uysal, Hasan H; Ozdikici, Mete

    2004-05-01

    A 68-year-old woman with progressive visual loss and exophthalmos in her right eye had been operated on for a mass in her right calf 3 years earlier. Imaging showed a huge mass invading the orbital structures and temporal pole. The presumptive diagnosis was a malignant orbital tumor. The tumor was resected totally and eroded tissues such as the lateral rectus muscle and dural compartments were repaired. The histological diagnosis was a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged 8 days after surgery. Two years later she died from a liver tumor. Few MPNSTs involving the orbit have been reported. PMID:16145592

  8. Optic Nerve Sheath Melanoma Presenting as a Central Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Barash, Alexander; Sibony, Patrick A; Stippa, Nigel A; Boyle, Nariman S; Davis, James E

    2016-03-01

    A 64-year-old woman, with a history of diabetes and melanoma, developed a central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) in her left eye. On exam, she had severe disc edema with retinal nerve fiber layer thickening, and anterior deformation of the peripapillary retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/Bruch membrane layer (ppRPE/BM) toward the vitreous on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) suggesting an optic nerve sheath (ONS) meningioma. Magnetic resonance imaging findings and ONS biopsy later confirmed a metastatic melanoma. This case demonstrates that the shape of the RPE/BM on SD-OCT may aid in the decision to consider imaging in patients with isolated CRVO. PMID:26535468

  9. Peripheral nerve sheath tumors arising in salivary glands: A clinicopathologic study.

    PubMed

    Guraya, Sahejmeet S; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Primary salivary gland peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST) are uncommon. This study is a retrospective, clinicopathologic review of 9 cases of PNST (5 neurofibromas, 3 schwannomas and 1 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST)) arising from the salivary glands, encountered between 1990 and 2015. All patients with neurofibromas were male (ages 1-62 years) and had a single parotid lesion of which 2 were diffuse, 2 plexiform and one mixed diffuse/plexiform. Four had a history of neurofibromatosis I. Four of 5 presented with symptoms related to mass effect including facial swelling, facial drooping, and dysphagia. All underwent de-bulking surgery and recurred due to continued growth. Of the 3 patients with schwannomas, 1 was male and 2 were female (ages 19, 44 and 56 years). One tumor each arose in the sublingual, submandibular, and parotid glands. Two of 3 presented with soreness and swelling local to the affected gland, especially while chewing. There was no recurrence of these tumors after resection. An MPNST in a male presented as a tender mass in the patient's left parotid; the tumor was resected. There was no evidence of tumor elsewhere in the body. The tumor did not recur in 12 years of follow-up. The most common tumor type in the current series was neurofibroma; most arose in the background of neurofibromatosis type I and all of which recurred after initial subtotal resection. Most PNST arose in the parotid gland. PMID:27402223

  10. [Malignant peripheral sheath nerve tumor: An exceptional mass of the anterior and middle mediastinum].

    PubMed

    Bacha, S; Chaouch, N; Ayadi, A; Zidi, A; Cheikhrouhou, S; Racil, H; Chabbou, A

    2015-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are rare nervous tumors usually located in the posterior mediastinum in the paravertebral gutters. We report the case of a non-smoking 62-year-old man who was admitted with a 4 months history of cough, hoarseness and shortness of breath. Physical examination noted a superior vena cava syndrome. CT scan of the chest revealed a right anterior and middle mediastinal mass compressing the superior vena cava, the ascending aorta, the right pulmonary artery, invading the superior root of the pulmonary vein and the right auricle. Flexible bronchoscopy showed extrinsic compression of the right main bronchus, the right upper lobe bronchus and intermedius bronchus. The patient underwent surgical biopsy of the mass by mediastinoscopy. Histological examination revealed a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The patient received a single cycle of chemotherapy (ifosfamid-adriamycin). Clinical course was marked by the fast worsening of the dyspnea and the general state. Patient died three weeks after the cure of the chemotherapy. This case is original by the exceptional clinical presentation of MPSNT with a superior vena cava syndrome and the very rare location of this tumor in the anterior and middle mediastinum. PMID:26190334

  11. Breast metastases from a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the kidney: An unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Koppisetty, Shalini; Alessio, Ricardo C.; Rajpurkar, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are extremely rare soft tissue sarcomas of ectomesenchymal origin. They are commonly seen in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1), but can also occur without a history of NF (isolated MPNST). MPNSTs are most commonly located on the extremities (brachial and sacral plexus), head and neck, and trunk regions and are rarely reported in genitourinary organs. These tumors are aggressive, with a high recurrence rate and distant metastases. MPNST involving the kidney is extremely rare, and review of the literature using PubMed from 2001 to 2014 revealed eight cases of MPNST involving the kidney (seven, primarily involving the kidney and one metastatic MPNST of the kidney). Herein, we describe a case of breast metastases from an MPNST of the kidney without a history of NF-1. The patient was initially diagnosed with a spindle cell neoplasm of the kidney with peripheral nerve sheath differentiation. Eventually, the patient developed a right breast mass that was diagnosed as metastatic MPNST. The patient refused any kind of treatment and died 6 months later in hospice care. PMID:27453670

  12. Results after simple decompression of the ulnar nerve in cubital tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Kristina; Lukschu, Sandra; Dunda, Sebastian E.; Krapohl, Björn Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome represents the second most common compression neuropathy of the upper limb. For more than four decades there has been a controversy about the best surgical treatment modality for cubital tunnel syndrome. In this study the results of 28 patients with simple ulnar nerve decompression are presented. Data analyses refers to clinical examination, personal interview, DASH-questionnaire, and electrophysiological measurements, which were assessed pre- and postoperatively. 28 patients (15 females, 13 males) were included in this study. The average age at time of surgery was 47.78 years (31.68–73.10 years). The period from onset of symptoms to surgery ranged from 2 to 24 months (mean 6 months). The mean follow-up was 2.11 years (0.91–4.16 years). Postoperatively there was a significant decrease in DASH score from 52.6 points to 13.3 points (p<0.001). Also the electrophysiological findings improved significantly: motor nerve conduction velocity increased from 36.0 m/s to 44.4 m/s (p=0.008) and the motor nerve action potential reached 5,470 mV compared to 3,665 mV preoperatively (p=0.018). A significant increase of grip strength from 59% (in comparison to the healthy hand) to 80% was observed (p=0.002). Pain was indicated by means of a visual analog scale from 0 to 100. Preoperatively the median level of pain was 29 and postoperatively it was 0 (p=0.001). The decrease of the two-point-discrimination of the three ulnar finger nerves was also highly significant (p<0.001) from 11.3 mm to 5.0 mm. Significant postoperative improvement was also observed in the clinical examination concerning muscle atrophy (p=0.002), clawing (p=0.008), paresthesia (p=0.004), the sign of Froment (p=0.004), the sign of Hoffmann-Tinel (p=0.021), and clumsiness (p=0.002). Overall nearly 90% of all patients were satisfied with the result of the operation. In 96.4% of all cases, surgery improved the symptoms and in one patient (3.6%) the success was noted as “poor” because

  13. [Teflon granuloma after microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve root in a patient with recurrent trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Rzaev, D A; Kulikova, E V; Moysak, G I; Voronina, E I; Ageeva, T A

    2016-01-01

    The use of a Teflon implant for Jannetta surgery in patients with trigeminal neuralgia is complicated in rare cases by the development of a Teflon granuloma and can cause recurrent facial pain. The article presents a clinical case of a Teflon granuloma developed after microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve root, describes the surgical findings and histological picture, and analyzes the literature, causes of granuloma development, and recommendations for treatment of these patients. PMID:27070261

  14. Squamous cell carcinoma and suspect peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a 10-year-old Paint horse

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    A round mass 4 cm in diameter was present on the proximal rostro-lateral border of the right pinna of a 10-year-old, gelded, Paint horse. A preliminary histopathological diagnosis of a potential squamous cell carcinoma and peripheral nerve sheath tumor was made, and the lesion was resected at the base of the lateral edge of the ear. PMID:20119546

  15. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the renal parenchyma presenting as a fast growing atypical renal cyst.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Simon; Doueik, Alexandre; Sabbagh, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNST) of the kidney are very rare, with only 3 cases reported in the English and French literature. However, we report the first case of fast growing atypical renal cyst where a magnetic resonance imaging was an interesting adjunct to the computed tomography scan in imaging this rare tumour. PMID:24069105

  16. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the third eyelid in a 3-year-old Rhodesian Ridgeback

    PubMed Central

    vom Hagen, Franziska; Romkes, Gwendolyna; Kershaw, Olivia; Eule, J Corinna

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A 3-year-old Rhodesian Ridgeback was presented with conjunctivitis, enlargement of the third eyelid and a dorsotemporal deviation of the right eye. A mass within the third eyelid was detected and excised. The histopathologic examination showed a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, which most likely is a neurofibrosarcoma based on immunohistochemistry. PMID:25678975

  17. EGFR-STAT3 signaling promotes formation of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianqiang; Patmore, Deanna M.; Jousma, Edwin; Eaves, David W.; Breving, Kimberly; Patel, Ami V.; Schwartz, Eric B.; Fuchs, James R.; Cripe, Timothy P.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Ratner, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) develop sporadically or in the context of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). EGFR overexpression has been implicated in MPNST formation, but its precise role and relevant signaling pathways remain unknown. We found that EGFR overexpression promotes mouse neurofibroma transformation to aggressive MPNST (GEM-PNST). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated phosphorylated STAT3 (Tyr705) in both human MPNST and mouse GEM-PNST. A specific JAK2/STAT3 inhibitor FLLL32 delayed MPNST formation in an MPNST xenograft nude mouse model. STAT3 knockdown by shRNA prevented MPNST formation in vivo. Finally, reducing EGFR activity strongly reduced pSTAT3 in vivo. Thus, an EGFR-STAT3 pathway is necessary for MPNST transformation and establishment of MPNST xenografts growth but not for tumor maintenance. Efficacy of the FLLL32 pharmacological inhibitor in delaying MPNST growth suggests that combination therapies targeting JAK/STAT3 might be useful therapeutics. PMID:23318430

  18. EGFR-STAT3 signaling promotes formation of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Patmore, D M; Jousma, E; Eaves, D W; Breving, K; Patel, A V; Schwartz, E B; Fuchs, J R; Cripe, T P; Stemmer-Rachamimov, A O; Ratner, N

    2014-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) develop sporadically or in the context of neurofibromatosis type 1. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression has been implicated in MPNST formation, but its precise role and relevant signaling pathways remain unknown. We found that EGFR overexpression promotes mouse neurofibroma transformation to aggressive MPNST (GEM-PNST). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated phosphorylated STAT3 (Tyr705) in both human MPNST and mouse GEM-PNST. A specific JAK2/STAT3 inhibitor FLLL32 delayed MPNST formation in an MPNST xenograft nude mouse model. STAT3 knockdown by shRNA prevented MPNST formation in vivo. Finally, reducing EGFR activity strongly reduced pSTAT3 in vivo. Thus, an EGFR-STAT3 pathway is necessary for MPNST transformation and establishment of MPNST xenografts growth but not for tumor maintenance. Efficacy of the FLLL32 pharmacological inhibitor in delaying MPNST growth suggests that combination therapies targeting JAK/STAT3 might be useful therapeutics. PMID:23318430

  19. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor presenting as orbito temporal lump: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Souvagya; Mishra, Sudhansu S.; Mishra, Sanjib; Das, Srikant

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare soft tissue sarcoma. The most common anatomical sites include the upper and lower extremities and trunk and less commonly the head and neck. To our knowledge, few patients with a cranial or facial MPNST have been reported. We report such a lesion in a 35-year-old woman who presented with left sided rapidly progressive proptosis and visual loss due to an orbital lump extending up to the temporal lobe. Cranial imaging showed a huge mass invading the orbital wall and temporal bone. The presumptive diagnosis was a malignant orbital tumor. Preoperative fine needle aspiration cytology of the orbital mass came to be neurofibroma. Near total resection of the tumor was done. Histopathology revealed MPNST which was subsequently confirmed on the basis of immunopositivity for S-100. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged 8 days after surgery with an advice to attend cancer institute for possible radiotherapy. PMID:27057226

  20. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) of mandible: solving the perplexity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shilpa; Pathak, Jigna; Dekate, Kamlesh; Mohanty, Neeta

    2015-01-01

    We present an extremely rare case of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) in a 30-year-old woman without associated neurofibromatosis 1. The patient presented with an 8 cm×4 cm lesion extending from 46 to the retro molar region involving the ramus of the right mandible associated with regional paraesthesia. Incisional biopsy revealed spindle cells with vesicular nuclei arranged in fascicles leading to a diagnosis of spindle cell lesion. Posterior segmental mandibulectomy was performed under general anaesthesia. On excisional biopsy, a definitive diagnosis of low-grade MPNST was established on the basis of immunohistochemistry. The patient was then lost to follow-up. PMID:25762575

  1. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter: Translating a Terrestrial Focused Technique into a Clinical Monitoring Tool for Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Sara; Foy, Millennia; Sargsyan, Ashot; Garcia, Kathleen; Wear, Mary L.; Bedi, Deepak; Ernst, Randy; Van Baalen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography is increasingly used to quickly measure optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) when increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is suspected. NASA Space and Clinical Operations Division has been using ground and on-orbit ultrasound since 2009 as a proxy for ICP in non-acute monitoring for space medicine purposes. In the terrestrial emergency room population, an ONSD greater than 0.59 cm is considered highly predictive of elevated intracranial pressure. However, this cut-off limit is not applicable to the spaceflight setting since over 50% of US Operating Segment (USOS) astronauts have an ONSD greater than 0.60 cm even before launch. Crew Surgeon clinical decision-making is complicated by the fact that many astronauts have history of previous spaceflights. Our data characterize the distribution of baseline ONSD in the astronaut corps, its longitudinal trends in long-duration spaceflight, and the predictive power of this measure related to increased ICP outcomes.

  2. Unusual brachial plexus lesion: Hematoma masquerading as a peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    PubMed Central

    Krisht, Khaled M.; Karsy, Michael; Shah, Lubdha M.; Schmidt, Meic H.; Dailey, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) of the brachial plexus have unique radiographic and clinical findings. Patients often present with progressive upper extremity paresthesias, weakness, and pain. On magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, lesions are isointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences, while also demonstrating marked enhancement on MR studies with gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid. On the basis of their characteristic MR imaging features and rapid clinical progression, two brachial plexus lesions proved to be organizing hematomas rather than MPNST. Methods: A 51-year-old male and a 31-year-old female were both assessed for persistent and worsened left-sided upper extremity pain, paresthesias, and weakness. In both cases, the MR imaging of the brachial plexus demonstrated an extraspinal enhancing lesion located within the left C7–T1 neuroforamina. Results: Although the clinical and radiographic MR features for these 2 patients were consistent with MPNSTs, both lesions proved to be benign organizing hematomas. Conclusions: These two case studies emphasize that brachial plexus hematomas may mimic MPNSTs on MR studies. Accurate diagnosis of these lesions is critical for determining the appropriate management options and treatment plans. Delaying the treatment of a highly aggressive nerve sheath tumor can have devastating consequences, whereas many hematomas resolve without surgery. Therefore, if the patient has stable findings on neurological examination and a history of trauma, surgical intervention may be delayed in favor of repeat MR imaging in 2–3 months to re-evaluate the size of the mass. PMID:26904368

  3. Cervical nerve root decompression by lateral approach as salvage operation after failed anterior transdiscal surgery: technical case report

    PubMed Central

    George, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Cervical nerve root compression caused by disco-osteophytic changes is classically operated by anterior transdiscal approach with disc replacement. If compression persists or recurs, reoperation via the same surgical route may be difficult, because of scar tissue and/or implants. An alternative approach may be necessary. We recommend the lateral cervical approach (retrojugular) as salvage operation in such cases. We report a patient with cervical nerve root compression operated by anterior transdiscal approach with plate and bone graft. As some compression persisted clinically and radiologically, the patient was re-operated via a lateral approach. The surgical access was free of scar tissue. The arthrodesis could be left intact and did not prevent effective nerve root decompression. The patient became asymptomatic. The lateral cervical approach (retrojugular) as reported here, is an excellent alternative pathway if reoperation after anterior transdiscal surgery with disc replacement becomes necessary. PMID:19449041

  4. Functional Expression of Electron Transport Chain and FoF1-ATP Synthase in Optic Nerve Myelin Sheath.

    PubMed

    Bartolucci, Martina; Ravera, Silvia; Garbarino, Greta; Ramoino, Paola; Ferrando, Sara; Calzia, Daniela; Candiani, Simona; Morelli, Alessandro; Panfoli, Isabella

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies reported evidence for aerobic ATP synthesis by myelin from both bovine brainstem and rat sciatic nerve. Considering that the optic nerve displays a high oxygen demand, here we evaluated the expression and activity of the five Respiratory Complexes in myelin purified from either bovine or murine optic nerves. Western blot analyses on isolated myelin confirmed the expression of ND4L (subunit of Complex I), COX IV (subunit of Complex IV) and β subunit of F1Fo-ATP synthase. Moreover, spectrophotometric and in-gel activity assays on isolated myelin, as well as histochemical activity assays on both bovine and murine transversal optic nerve sections showed that the respiratory Complexes are functional in myelin and are organized in a supercomplex. Expression of oxidative phosphorylation proteins was also evaluated on bovine optic nerve sections by confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Having excluded a mitochondrial contamination of isolated myelin and considering the results form in situ analyses, it is proposed that the oxidative phosphorylation machinery is truly resident in optic myelin sheath. Data may shed a new light on the unknown trophic role of myelin sheath. It may be energy supplier for the axon, explaining why in demyelinating diseases and neuropathies, myelin sheath loss is associated with axonal degeneration. PMID:26334391

  5. Medullary metastasis of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hagi, Tomohito; Nakamura, Tomoki; Yokoji, Ayumu; Matsumine, Akihiko; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a case of medullary metastasis without lung metastasis that occurred as a result of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). An 81-year-old woman presented with a MPNST in the left brachial plexus, arising from the cervical nerve root. The patient underwent carbon ion radiotherapy; however, tumor recurrence was identified in the left shoulder. Subsequently, the patient underwent wide excision. Three weeks subsequent to surgery, imbalance and dysarthria developed suddenly. Dysphagia emerged and left upper limb pain disappeared on the day after symptom development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that this was due to metastasis to the medulla. Five days subsequent to the onset of dysarthria, the patient succumbed due to respiratory failure. To the best of our knowledge, no previous cases of medullary metastasis arising from a MPNST in the absence of lung metastasis have been reported. MRI is a useful examination tool for the identification of brain metastases; however, the high cost of MRI as a routine examination must be considered due to the rarity of brain metastases. Therefore, methods to detect brain metastasis warrant further investigation.

  6. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the orbit: a clinicopathologic study of eight cases.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobiec, F A; Font, R L; Zimmerman, L E

    1985-01-01

    Eight adult patients with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the orbit are described. Only two of the patients were known to have von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis. The typical clinical history included the development of a mass in the superonasal quadrant of the orbit, which was palpable immediately beneath the skin of the lid. There was a definite tendency for the lesions to arise in, or grow along, the supraorbital nerve--including posteriorly through the superior orbital fissure to the Gasserian ganglion, and even as far posteriorly along the trigeminal rootlets to the pons. Delays in pathologic diagnosis, which beclouded the true nature of the process, led to multiple recurrences, eventuating in five known fatalities out of the eight patients. In addition to intracranial extension, pulmonary metastases and regional cervical metastases were encountered. Once recognized for their diagnostic value, the histopathologic patterns are highly distinctive: biphasic populations of spindled and epithelioid cells; sheets of epithelioid cells or clusters demarcated by delicate reticulin fibers or thicker collagenous trabeculae; malignant plexiform patterns; and neurotubular patterns. Pure spindle cell populations were encountered only in the two patients with von Recklinghausen's disease, and in each, either a pre-existent benign neurofibroma or a coexistent plexiform neurofibroma was found in the pathology specimens. The best management of this condition depends upon early clinical and pathological recognition, leading to radical surgery, which usually consists of orbital exenteration combined with intracranial extirpation of as much of the trigeminal nerve as possible. Postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy after radical surgery might also be advisable. Images FIGURE 16 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:3938581

  7. Canine cutaneous spindle cell tumours with features of peripheral nerve sheath tumours: a histopathological and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Gaitero, L; Añor, S; Fondevila, D; Pumarola, M

    2008-07-01

    In veterinary medicine, the term peripheral nerve sheath tumour is usually restricted to neoplasms that are closely associated with an identified nerve. Thirty-three cases of canine cutaneous tumours previously classified as spindle cell tumours with features resembling peripheral nerve sheath tumours were examined. Two histological patterns were identified: dense areas of spindle shaped cells resembling the Antoni A pattern and less cellular areas with more pleomorphic cells resembling the Antoni B pattern. Immunohistochemically, all tumours uniformly expressed vimentin and 15/33 (45.4%) had scattered and patchy expression of S-100. Laminin expression was found in 25/33 (75.7%) tumours and collagen IV labelling occurred in 14/33 (42.4%). Expression of protein gene product 9.5 was detected in 31/33 (93.9%) of tumours and neuron specific enolase labelling was present in 27/33 (81.8%). Glial fibrillary acidic protein was only expressed within the cytoplasm of some large multinucleated cells in one tumour. These findings suggest that any cutaneous tumour with one of the two histopathological patterns described above should be described as a cutaneous peripheral nerve sheath tumour and that expression of S-100, laminin and collagen IV may be used to define a schwannoma. PMID:18514218

  8. Diagnostic value of the optic nerve sheath diameter in pseudotumor cerebri.

    PubMed

    Bekerman, Inessa; Sigal, Tal; Kimiagar, Itzhak; Almer, Zina Evy; Vaiman, Michael

    2016-08-01

    If persistent severe headache remains the only complaint of a patient, then the diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) can be delayed because in such cases practitioners are hesitant to immediately apply invasive intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement. Our purpose was to apply the technique of measuring diameters of the optic nerve sheath (ONSD) as a diagnostic tool in cases of PTC. Our aim was to provide practitioners with an additional sign to speed up their decision making about implementation of the lumbar puncture. In a retrospective study, CT scan data of 35 consecutive adult patients with PTC were collected and analyzed. ONSD were measured at the point where the ophthalmic artery crosses the optic nerve (anatomical landmark). The correlation analysis was performed with sex, age, and neuro-ophthalmological findings. We found that the ONSD was enlarged in 94.3% of patients with PTC. The enlarged ONSD were 6.2±1.2mm for the right and 6.3±0.9mm for the left (cut-off value >5.5mm). The enlargement was bilateral, and no correlation with age or sex was found (p=0.67 and p=0.76, respectively). Presence of papilledema was detected in 91.4% of patients (32/35) presenting as a slightly less valuable diagnostic sign compared with ONSD. We conclude that in the majority of cases of PTC the ONSD is significantly enlarged, indicating elevated ICP even if CT scans are negative. Implementing this ONSD method as a diagnostic tool in cases of suspected PTC may help in early accurate diagnosis, avoiding misdiagnosis, and providing appropriate early treatment. PMID:27168453

  9. Visual Outcome and Tumor Control After Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Lessell, Simmons; Bussiere, Marc; Beaudette, Kevin; Rizzo, Joseph F.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumor that almost uniformly leads to visual dysfunction and even blindness without intervention. Because surgical extirpation carries a high risk of postoperative blindness, vision-sparing treatment strategies are desirable. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 25 patients (25 optic nerves) with ONSM, treated at a single institution with conformal fractionated radiotherapy by either stereotactic photon or proton radiation. Primary endpoints were local control and visual acuity. Results: The patients presented with symptoms of visual loss (21) or orbital pain (3) or were incidentally diagnosed by imaging (3). The mean age was 44 years, and 64% were female patients. The indication for treatment was the development or progression of symptoms. Of the patients, 13 were treated with photons, 9 were treated with protons, and 3 received a combination of photons and protons. The median dose delivered was 50.4 gray equivalents (range, 45-59.4 gray equivalents). Median follow-up after radiotherapy was 30 months (range, 3-168 months), with 3 patients lost to follow-up. At most recent follow-up, 21 of 22 patients (95%) had improved (14) or stable (7) visual acuity. One patient had worsened visual acuity after initial postirradiation improvement. Of the 22 patients, 20 (95%) had no radiographic progression. Three patients had evidence of asymptomatic, limited retinopathy on ophthalmologic examination, and one had recurrent ONSM 11 years after treatment. Conclusions: Highly conformal, fractionated radiation therapy for symptomatic primary ONSM provides tumor control and improvement in visual function in most cases, with minimal treatment-induced morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess the durability of tumor control and treatment-related late effects.

  10. Primary malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the lung in a young child without neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Muwakkit, Samar A; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; El Samra, Ahmad I; Khoury, Ruby; Akel, Samir R; Mroueh, Salman; Razzouk, Bassem; Abboud, Miguel R

    2006-10-15

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are uncommon in children and almost half of the cases occur in patients with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1). We report a child with a primary MPNST of the lung without NF1. MPNST of the lung has similar clinical and radiologic characteristics as pleuropulmonary blastoma. We suggest to include MPNST of the lung in the differential diagnosis of intrapulmonary masses in children. PMID:16544294

  11. Extending the Convergence of Canonical WNT Signaling and Classic Cancer Pathways for Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Karlyne M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are incurable tumors of the Schwann cell lineage that progress unpredictably from benign plexiform neurofibromas (PNFs). In this issue of Cancer Discovery Watson and colleagues (1) use an insertional mutagenesis screen combined with network analysis to identify the canonical Wnt signaling pathway as an important potential biomarker of tumor progression and target for combination therapy in MPNSTs. PMID:23749527

  12. Inhibition of Eyes Absent Homolog 4 expression induces malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor necrosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, S J; Lan, Z D; Hardiman, A; Wu, J; Kordich, J J; Patmore, D M; Hegde, R S; Cripe, T P; Cancelas, J A; Collins, M H; Ratner, N

    2010-01-21

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive sarcomas without effective therapeutics. Bioinformatics was used to identify potential therapeutic targets. Paired Box (PAX), Eyes Absent (EYA), Dachsund (DACH) and Sine Oculis (SIX) genes, which form a regulatory interactive network in Drosophila, were found to be dysregulated in human MPNST cell lines and solid tumors. We identified a decrease in DACH1 expression, and increases in the expressions of PAX6, EYA1, EYA2, EYA4, and SIX1-4 genes. Consistent with the observation that half of MPNSTs develop in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients, subsequent to NF1 mutation, we found that exogenous expression of the NF1-GTPase activating protein-related domain normalized DACH1 expression. EYA4 mRNA was elevated more than 100-fold as estimated by quantitative real-time PCR in most MPNST cell lines. In vitro, suppression of EYA4 expression using short hairpin RNA reduced cell adhesion and migration and caused cellular necrosis without affecting cell proliferation or apoptotic cell death. MPNST cells expressing shEYA4 either failed to form tumors in nude mice or formed very small tumors, with extensive necrosis but similar levels of proliferation and apoptosis as control cells. Our findings identify a role of EYA4 and possibly interacting SIX and DACH proteins in MPNSTs and suggest the EYA4 pathway as a rational therapeutic target. PMID:19901965

  13. Optic nerve sheath diameters in healthy adults measured by computer tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vaiman, Michael; Abuita, Rani; Bekerman, Inessa

    2015-01-01

    AIM To measure optic nerve sheath diameters (ONSD) in different locations by computer tomography (CT) and to recommend the best location for cases when ONSD is used for intracranial pressure monitoring. METHODS In a prospective cohort study, CT data of 300 healthy adults were analyzed (600 eyes). In all cases, the CT investigation was performed at the Emergency Department because of the various conditions that proved not to be connected with ophthalmological or neurological pathology. The ONSD were measured at 3 mm and 8 mm distance from the globe, and 3 mm from the anterior opening of the optic canal. The correlation analysis was performed with gender, age, and ethnic background. RESULTS The right/left ONSD are 4.94±1.51/5.17±1.34 mm at 3 mm, 4.35±0.76/4.45±0.62 mm at 8 mm from the globe, and 3.55±0.82/3.65±0.7 mm at 3 mm from the optic canal. No significant differences correlated with gender of the patients, their age, and ethnic background were found. CONCLUSION In healthy persons, the ONSD varies from 5.17±1.34 mm to 3.55±0.82 mm in different locations within the intraorbital space. The most stable results with lesser standard deviation can be obtained if it is measured 8-10 mm from the globe. PMID:26682181

  14. Trp53 Haploinsufficiency Modifies EGFR-Driven Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rahrmann, Eric P.; Moriarity, Branden S.; Otto, George M.; Watson, Adrienne L.; Choi, Kwangmin; Collins, Margaret H.; Wallace, Margaret; Webber, Beau R.; Forster, Colleen L.; Rizzardi, Anthony E.; Schmechel, Stephen C.; Ratner, Nancy; Largaespada, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are genetically diverse, aggressive sarcomas that occur sporadically or in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 syndrome. Reduced TP53 gene expression and amplification/overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene occur in MPNST formation. We focused on determining the cooperativity between reduced TP53 expression and EGFR overexpression for Schwann cell transformation in vitro (immortalized human Schwann cells) and MPNST formation in vivo (transgenic mice). Human gene copy number alteration data, microarray expression data, and TMA analysis indicate that TP53 haploinsufficiency and increased EGFR expression co-occur in human MPNST samples. Concurrent modulation of EGFR and TP53 expression in HSC1λ cells significantly increased proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in vitro. Transgenic mice heterozygous for a Trp53-null allele and overexpressing EGFR in Schwann cells had a significant increase in neurofibroma and grade 3 PNST (MPNST) formation compared with single transgenic controls. Histological analysis of tumors identified a significant increase in pAkt expression in grade 3 PNSTs compared with neurofibromas. Array comparative genome hybridization analysis of grade 3 PNSTs identified recurrent focal regions of chromosomal gains with significant enrichment in genes involved in extracellular signal–regulated kinase 5 signaling. Collectively, altered p53 expression cooperates with overexpression of EGFR in Schwann cells to enhance in vitro oncogenic properties and tumorigenesis and progression in vivo. PMID:24832557

  15. Chromosomal imbalances in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor detected by metaphase and microarray comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yasuko; Yoshida, Aki; Numoto, Kunihiko; Kunisada, Toshiyuki; Wai, Daniel; Ohata, Norihide; Takeda, Ken; Kawai, Akira; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2006-02-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly malignant tumors affecting adolescents and adults. There have been a few reports on chromosomal aberrations of MPNSTs; however, the tumor-specific alteration remains unknown. We characterized the genomic alterations in 8 MPNSTs and 8 schwannomas by metaphase comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In 5 of 8 MPNSTs, microarray CGH was added for more detailed analyses. Frequent gains were identified on 3q13-26, 5p13-14, and 12q11-23 and frequent losses were at 1p31, 10p, 11q24-qter, 16, and 17. Microarray CGH revealed frequent gains of EGFR, DAB2, MSH2, KCNK12, DDX15, CDK6, and LAMA3, and losses of CDH1, GLTSCR2, EGR1, CTSB, GATA3, and SULT2A1. These genes seem to be responsible for developing MPNSTs. The concordance rate between metaphase CGH and microarray CGH was 66%. Metaphase CGH was useful for identifying chromosomal alterations before applying microarray CGH. PMID:16391845

  16. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of kidney—A case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Badr

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are very rare soft-tissue tumors. These tumors originate from Schwann cells or pluripotent perineural cells of the neural crest. An isolated MPNST of the kidney is extremely rare and has been reported in only six cases to date. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 30-year-old female with an unremarkable past medical and surgical history presented with an enlarging, right-sided abdominal mass for the last 3 months. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed a large exophytic mass arising from the right kidney. A metastatic work-up was negative, so a right radical nephrectomy was performed. Histopathological and immunohistochemical studies confirmed the diagnosis of an MPNST. DISCUSSION MPNSTs are rare and aggressive soft-tissue sarcomas that are usually associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) but that also occur post-radiation and sporadically. These tumors are highly malignant neoplasms with a high recurrence rate and distant metastases. Complete surgical excision remains the mainstay of treatment due to the limited response of MPNSTs to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. CONCLUSION MPNSTs arising from the kidney are very rare. Complete surgical resection provides the only hope for cure. Postoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy are still controversial, although postoperative radiotherapy is currently recommended by an oncology consensus group. PMID:23995478

  17. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors in Children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Pourtsidis, Apostolos; Baka, Margarita; Bouhoutsou, Despina; Varvoutsi, Maria; Synodinou, Maria; Giamarelou, Panagiota; Kosmidis, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare in children and account for approximately 5–10% of all soft tissue sarcomas in adults. MPNSTs may occur independently but individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have a significantly increased risk. Our aim is to present patients with MPNST treated in our department. Cases and Results. In this report we present 4 cases of MPNSTs (3 females: 13, 12, and 13 years old and 1 male: 10 years old) arising in patients with NF1. All of them presented with an enlarging mass and pain at diagnosis. Tumor was located in the buttock, the spinal cord, the trunk, and the left leg proximal to the heel. Wide excision of the tumor and radiotherapy were applied to all and adjuvant chemotherapy was given to three of them after the disease was progressed. All four died 32, 18, 10, and 22 months after diagnosis with progressive disease locally and pulmonary metastases in two of them. Conclusions. In conclusion, MPNSTs arising in patients with NF1 are high grade sarcomas with short survival. Individuals with NF1 should be followed closely in order to identify early the development of MPNSTs. Aggressive surgery and complete excision significantly improves disease-free survival. The usefulness of radiation therapy in MPNSTs is not determined although all patients will receive radiation therapy at some stage of the disease. The role of chemotherapy is unclear. PMID:25317349

  18. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors in children with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Pourtsidis, Apostolos; Doganis, Dimitrios; Baka, Margarita; Bouhoutsou, Despina; Varvoutsi, Maria; Synodinou, Maria; Giamarelou, Panagiota; Kosmidis, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare in children and account for approximately 5-10% of all soft tissue sarcomas in adults. MPNSTs may occur independently but individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have a significantly increased risk. Our aim is to present patients with MPNST treated in our department. Cases and Results. In this report we present 4 cases of MPNSTs (3 females: 13, 12, and 13 years old and 1 male: 10 years old) arising in patients with NF1. All of them presented with an enlarging mass and pain at diagnosis. Tumor was located in the buttock, the spinal cord, the trunk, and the left leg proximal to the heel. Wide excision of the tumor and radiotherapy were applied to all and adjuvant chemotherapy was given to three of them after the disease was progressed. All four died 32, 18, 10, and 22 months after diagnosis with progressive disease locally and pulmonary metastases in two of them. Conclusions. In conclusion, MPNSTs arising in patients with NF1 are high grade sarcomas with short survival. Individuals with NF1 should be followed closely in order to identify early the development of MPNSTs. Aggressive surgery and complete excision significantly improves disease-free survival. The usefulness of radiation therapy in MPNSTs is not determined although all patients will receive radiation therapy at some stage of the disease. The role of chemotherapy is unclear. PMID:25317349

  19. Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase inhibition: A potential treatment of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    PubMed

    Kivlin, Christine M; Watson, Kelsey L; Al Sannaa, Ghadah A; Belousov, Roman; Ingram, Davis R; Huang, Kai-Lieh; May, Caitlin D; Bolshakov, Svetlana; Landers, Sharon M; Kalam, Azad Abul; Slopis, John M; McCutcheon, Ian E; Pollock, Raphael E; Lev, Dina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres, Keila E

    2016-01-01

    Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, first evaluated nearly a decade ago, are primarily used in malignancies with known defects in DNA repair genes, such as alterations in breast cancer, early onset 1/2 (BRCA1/2). While no specific mutations in BRCA1/2 have been reported in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), MPNST cells could be effectively targeted with a PARP inhibitor to drive cells to synthetic lethality due to their complex karyotype and high level of inherent genomic instability. In this study, we assessed the expression levels of PARP1 and PARP2 in MPNST patient tumor samples and correlated these findings with overall survival. We also determined the level of PARP activity in MPNST cell lines. In addition, we evaluated the efficacy of the PARP inhibitor AZD2281 (Olaparib) in MPNST cell lines. We observed decreased MPNST cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in vitro at doses similar to, or less than, the doses used in cell lines with established defective DNA repair genes. Furthermore, AZD2281 significantly reduced local growth of MPNST xenografts, decreased the development of macroscopic lung metastases, and increased survival of mice with metastatic disease. Our results suggest that AZD2281 could be an effective therapeutic option in MPNST and should be further investigated for its potential clinical use in this malignancy. PMID:26650448

  20. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor as a cause of chronic cardiac insufficiency in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chronic cardiac insufficiency was associated with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a cow. An eight-year-old cow developed a progressive condition (over a period of three months) characterized by an enhanced abdominal volume, reluctance to move, a positive jugular pulse, watery diarrhea and death. At necropsy, moderate subcutaneous edema and an enhanced hepatic lobular pattern were observed. A 23x20x11 cm firm, grayish-white mass adhered to and infiltrated the right atrium. Multiple firm, yellowish-white nodules of 0.5 to 12 cm in diameter were diffusely scattered in the epicardium and parietal pericardium. Histologically, the tumor was poorly circumscribed with foci of infiltration of the myocardium. The neoplastic cells had two major histologic patterns, Antoni types A and B. Within occasional foci, pleomorphic cells with an epithelioid appearance were present in addition to multinucleated cells with periodic acid Schiff (PAS)-positive cytoplasmic globules. Foci of cartilaginous and granular differentiations were interspersed among the neoplastic cells. Multiple vessels presented wall hyalinization and tumoral embolus. Large necrotic foci with mineralization and cholesterol clefts were also observed. Immunohistochemically, the tumor was positive for S100 protein, vimentin and neuron-specific enolase labeling. PMID:23369465

  1. Controversies: Optic nerve sheath fenestration versus shunt placement for the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Spitze, Arielle; Lam, Peter; Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Yalamanchili, Sushma; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) has been increasing in prevalence in the past decade, following the obesity epidemic. When medical treatment fails, surgical treatment options must be considered. However, controversy remains as to which surgical procedure is the preferred surgical option – optic nerve sheath fenestration (ONSF) or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting – for the long-term treatment of this syndrome. Purpose: To provide a clinical update of the pros and cons of ONSF versus shunt placement for the treatment of IIH. Design: This was a retrospective review of the current literature in the English language indexed in PubMed. Methods: The authors conducted a PubMed search using the following terms: Idiopathic IIH, pseudotumor cerebri, ONSF, CSF shunts, vetriculo-peritoneal shunting, and lumbo-peritoneal shunting. The authors included pertinent and significant original articles, review articles, and case reports, which revealed the new aspects and updates in these topics. Results: The treatment of IIH remains controversial and lacks randomized controlled clinical trial data. Treatment of IIH rests with the determination of the severity of IIH-related visual loss and headache. Conclusion: The decision for ONSF versus shunting is somewhat institution and surgeon dependent. ONSF is preferred for patients with visual symptoms whereas shunting is reserved for patients with headache. There are positive and negative aspects of both procedures, and a prospective, randomized, controlled trial is needed (currently underway). This article will hopefully be helpful in allowing the reader to make a more informed decision until that time. PMID:25449938

  2. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the lower labial mucosa: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    do Amaral, Thiago Lucena; Valiati, Renato; de Andrade, Bruno Augusto Benevenuto; Rumayor Piña, Alicia; Torres, Sandra Regina; Romañach, Mário José; Agostini, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is an uncommon soft tissue sarcoma with a predilection for the extremities and trunk of adults, rarely occurring in the oral cavity. To date, 10 cases of MPNSTs affecting the lower labial mucosa have been reported in the English language literature. We describe an additional case of MPNST in the lower labial mucosa of a 67-year-old male patient, who exhibited a painful swelling with a history of 4 months of evolution. Microscopic examination showed dense plexiform fascicles of spindle cells with wavy atypical nuclei. Mitotic figures and nuclear pleomorphism were evident. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor cells revealed positivity for S-100 protein, CD56, CD34, and neuron-specific enolase but was negative for neurofilament protein, glut-1, claudin-1, desmin, and smooth muscle actin. Ki-67 labeling was 20%. The final diagnosis was MPNST. The lesion was surgically removed with wide margins, with no signs of recurrence after 4 years of follow-up. PMID:26852824

  3. [Injury to the median nerve after minimally invasive decompression: discrepancy between the surgical report and actual course of surgery].

    PubMed

    Kernt, B; Neu, J

    2011-06-01

    A 72-year-old man suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome had undergone minimally invasive decompression by using a SafeGuard® Mini-Open Carpal Tunnel Release System. After the operation the patient presented with a paraesthesia in the median nerve distribution. Two months later an operative revision was performed in another hospital. A partial transection of the median nerve and an incomplete release was seen. The surgeon of the first operation stated that detailed informed consent including the risk of iatrogenic nerve injury had been obtained. Furthermore he referred to the operative report, which mentioned the accuracy of the procedure without any problems or complications during surgery. The Arbitration Board stated that the operative report could not exculpate the surgeon because the findings of the operative revision disagreed with the first operative report. The expert opinion declared that the lesion was a result of an inaccurate operative procedure as the surgeon was not able to demonstrate an anatomical variation of the median nerve. PMID:21604030

  4. Intracerebral malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a child with neurofibromatosis Type 1 and middle cerebral artery aneurysm treated with endovascular coil embolization.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael J; Cheshier, Samuel; Sharma, Sunjay; Armstrong, Derek; Hawkins, Cynthia; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T; Taylor, Michael D

    2011-10-01

    Among the neoplastic conditions that affect patients with neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) are malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), which typically arise from peripheral nerves of the limbs, trunk, and lumbar and brachial plexuses. Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for MPNST development, especially in susceptible patients such as those with NF1. Patients with NF1 are also at risk for intracranial aneurysms, which are increasingly being successfully managed with endovascular therapies. The authors describe the case of a 9-year-old, previously healthy girl who presented in extremis with a right frontal intracerebral hemorrhage resulting from a ruptured right middle cerebral artery (MCA) trifurcation aneurysm. Following urgent decompressive craniectomy, the patient underwent endovascular coil embolization of the MCA aneurysm without complication. Given her mother's history of NF1, the child underwent genetic testing, which disclosed signs positive for NF1. The patient recovered well, but follow-up MR imaging and MR angiography performed at 14 months demonstrated a large frontotemporal mass encasing the right MCA trifurcation. The patient underwent frontotemporal craniotomy and subtotal resection of the mass, which was histologically found to be an intracranial MPNST. The patient received chemotherapy and focal radiation therapy and remains alive at 6 months postresection. To the authors' knowledge, this represents the only known case of intracranial neoplasm arising in the region of an intracranial aneurysm repaired by endovascular coil embolization. While patients with NF1 represent a population with genetic susceptibility to radiation-induced tumors, the pathogenesis of intracerebral MPNSTs remains poorly understood. PMID:21961539

  5. Prognostic roles for fibroblast growth factor receptor family members in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fengju; Zheng, Hong; Chen, Kexin; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Jilong

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are rare, highly malignant, and poorly understood sarcomas. The often poor outcome of MPNST highlights the necessity of identifying prognostic predictors for this aggressive sarcoma. Here, we investigate the role of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family members in human MPNSTs. Results aCGH and bioinformatics analysis identified frequent amplification of the FGFR1 gene. FISH analysis revealed that 26.9% MPNST samples had amplification of FGFR1, with both focal and polysomy patterns observed. IHC identified that FGFR1 protein expression was positively correlated with FGFR1 gene amplification. High expression of FGFR1 protein was associated with better overall survival (OS) and was an independent prognostic predictor for OS of MPNST patients. Additionally, combined expression of FGFR1 and FGFR2 protein characterized a subtype of MPNST with better OS. FGFR4 protein was expressed 82.3% of MPNST samples, and was associated with poor disease-free survival. Materials and Methods We performed microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) profiling of two cohorts of primary MPNST tissue samples including 25 patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and 26 patients from Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to validate the gene amplification detected by aCGH analysis. Another cohort of 63 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded MPNST samples (including 52 samples for FISH assay) was obtained to explore FGFR1, 2, 3, and 4 protein expression by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. Conclusions Our integrated genomic and molecular studies provide evidence that FGFRs play different prognostic roles in MPNST. PMID:26993773

  6. Astounding recovery after resection of an intradural nerve sheath tumor in an adult male from Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    King, Paul; Khan, Saleen; Inamullah, Ovais

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord tumors can be classified as intramedullary, intradural extramedullary, or extradural. The differential diagnosis of spinal cord tumors includes meningiomas, astrocytomas, ependymomas, metastasis, nerve sheath tumors such as schwannomas or neurofibromas, and multiple sclerosis plaques. Radiology can provide clues to the type of tumor, but a pathology evaluation of a specimen is necessary to provide an accurate diagnosis. These tumors can cause a variety of neurological symptoms from spinal cord compression including pain, weakness, and paresthesia. They are treated by surgical resection, with a variety of outcomes possible depending on the severity of the preoperative symptoms, location and extent of the tumor, and efficacy of the surgery performed. Case Description: A 59-year-old male from Vietnam came to the Atlanta Medical Center for evaluation of severe ride sided hemiparesis and paresthesias. He first noticed alterations in his handwriting and quickly deteriorated to the point of being unable to walk or move his right arm. A cervical spinal mass was identified and analyzed on magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical resection was performed under a microscope in a joint operation between an orthopedic surgeon and neurosurgeon. A specimen of the tumor was sent to pathology for further evaluation. Conclusion: The mass was determined to be an intradural extramedullary schwannoma. The severity of the patient's symptoms and the location and size of the tumor made full recovery unlikely and postoperative quadriplegia a real possibility. The tumor was surgically resected, which led surprisingly, however, to a full and prompt resolution of the patient's symptoms. Less than 2 weeks after surgery, the patient was able to walk and had almost fully regained use of his hands. PMID:26425395

  7. HDAC8, A Potential Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNST)

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Gonzalo; Bill, Kate Lynn J.; Bid, Hemant Kumar; Braggio, Danielle; Constantino, Dylan; Prudner, Bethany; Zewdu, Abeba; Batte, Kara; Lev, Dina; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HDAC isoform-specific inhibitors may improve the therapeutic window while limiting toxicities. Developing inhibitors against class I isoforms poses difficulties as they share high homology among their catalytic sites; however, HDAC8 is structurally unique compared to other class I isoforms. HDAC8 inhibitors are novel compounds and have affinity for class I HDAC isoforms demonstrating anti-cancer effects; little is known about their activity in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). Recently, we demonstrated anti-MPNST efficacy of HDAC8i in human and murine-derived MPNST pre-clinical models; we now seek to consider the potential therapeutic inhibition of HDAC8 in MPNST. Methods Four Human MPNST cell lines, a murine-derived MPNST cell line, and two HDAC8 inhibitors (PCI-34051, PCI-48012; Pharmacyclics, Inc. Sunnyvale, CA) were studied. Proliferation was determined using MTS and clonogenic assays. Effects on cell cycle were determined via PI FACS analysis; effects on apoptosis were determined using Annexin V-PI FACS analysis and cleaved caspase 3 expression. In vivo growth effects of HDAC8i were evaluated using MPNST xenograft models. 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify potential HDAC8 deacetylation substrates. Results HDAC8i induced cell growth inhibition and marked S-phase cell cycle arrest in human and murine-derived MPNST cells. Relative to control, HDAC8i induced apoptosis in both human and murine-derived MPNST cells. HDAC8i exhibited significant effects on MPNST xenograft growth (p=0.001) and tumor weight (p=0.02). Four potential HDAC8 substrate targets were identified using a proteomic approach: PARK7, HMGB1, PGAM1, PRDX6. Conclusions MPNST is an aggressive sarcoma that is notoriously therapy-resistant, hence the urgent need for improved anti-MPNST therapies. HDAC8 inhibition may be useful for MPNST by improving efficacy while limiting toxicities as compared to pan-HDACis. PMID:26200462

  8. Correlation of measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter using ultrasound with magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shirodkar, Chetan G.; Munta, Kartik; Rao, S. Manimala; Mahesh, M. Uma

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Analysis to correlate the measurements of optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) obtained by using ultrasound to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in order to establish the accuracy of ocular sonography as a noninvasive modality for detecting raised intracranial pressure (ICP). Materials and Methods: A prospective, observational study was performed in 100 cases of adult meningoencephalitis patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit in whom MRI was performed for neurodiagnosis. ONSD was measured in such patients, 3 mm behind the globe in each eye. A mean binocular ONSD >4.6 mm in female and 4.8 mm in male was taken as cut-off values for diagnosing raised ICP. This was compared with ONSD measured on T2-weighted MRI image measured 3 mm behind the globe. The reading obtained from both the methods were compared with Bland–Altman analysis for correlation and the findings were tabulated. Results: The mean ONSD values measured with ultrasonography (USG) and MRI for female were 5.48 ± 0.43 mm and 5.68 ± 0.44 mm and for male were 5.40 ± 0.37 mm and 5.56 ± 0.38 mm, respectively. The mean age of the female and male was 53.90 ± 17.84 and 56.06 ± 15.67 years, respectively. On comparing ultrasound with MRI-derived ONSD values, we found acceptable agreement between both methods for measurements at a depth of 3 mm (r = 0.02, P < 0.001). Conclusion: In our study, we have found a good correlation between ocular USG and MRI of ONSD. The study has shown agreement with the fact that ocular sonography can be used as a noninvasive tool for detecting raised ICP with accuracy. PMID:26321806

  9. Visual outcomes following optic nerve sheath fenestration via the medial transconjunctival approach.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Neel S; Mahmoud, Ashraf M; Buzzacco, Dominic; Katz, Steven E

    2016-10-01

    This article determines the safety of optic nerve sheath fenestration (ONSF) for the treatment of patients with intracranial hypertension in the immediate 6-month post-operative period and its efficacy in reducing optic disk edema. Retrospective, non-comparative interventional case series. 207 eyes in 104 patients undergoing ONSF between the years 2005 and 2014. Papilledema grade based on modified Frisen scale and mean deviation of Humphrey visual field. 207 eyes of 104 patients (102 IIH, 2 IH due to dural sinus thrombosis) were included in the study. The patients were 96.1% female (N = 100) and 3.9% male (N = 4). The average patient age was 28.8 years (SD ± 9.5 years) and had a mean opening pressure of 39.85 cmH2O (SD ± 8.4 cmH2O). Mean follow-up period was 6.0 months (SD ± 5.9 months). Papilledema resolved in 76.1% of eyes at 1 week (N = 102 eyes), 75% of eyes at 1 month (N = 90 eyes), and 71% of eyes at 6 months (N = 94 eyes). Visual field comparison had a mean of the paired differences in MD at 1 week, 1 month, and 6 months of 1.59dB (P = 0.006), 2.53dB (P < 0.001), and 1.30dB (P = 0.016), respectively. ONSF is effective in reducing optic disk edema and does not cause vision loss in the 6-month post-operative period regardless of severity of IIH (as judged by elevation of opening pressure measured at pre-operative assessment). PMID:27541942

  10. Comparative methylome analysis of benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Feber, Andrew; Wilson, Gareth A; Zhang, Lu; Presneau, Nadege; Idowu, Bernadine; Down, Thomas A; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Noon, Luke A; Lloyd, Alison C; Stupka, Elia; Schiza, Vassia; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Schroth, Gary P; Flanagan, Adrienne; Beck, Stephan

    2011-04-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation (DNAm) was first linked to cancer over 25 yr ago. Since then, many studies have associated hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes and hypomethylation of oncogenes to the tumorigenic process. However, most of these studies have been limited to the analysis of promoters and CpG islands (CGIs). Recently, new technologies for whole-genome DNAm (methylome) analysis have been developed, enabling unbiased analysis of cancer methylomes. By using MeDIP-seq, we report a sequencing-based comparative methylome analysis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), benign neurofibromas, and normal Schwann cells. Analysis of these methylomes revealed a complex landscape of DNAm alterations. In contrast to what has been reported for other tumor types, no significant global hypomethylation was observed in MPNSTs using methylome analysis by MeDIP-seq. However, a highly significant (P < 10(-100)) directional difference in DNAm was found in satellite repeats, suggesting these repeats to be the main target for hypomethylation in MPNSTs. Comparative analysis of the MPNST and Schwann cell methylomes identified 101,466 cancer-associated differentially methylated regions (cDMRs). Analysis showed these cDMRs to be significantly enriched for two satellite repeat types (SATR1 and ARLα) and suggests an association between aberrant DNAm of these sequences and transition from healthy cells to malignant disease. Significant enrichment of hypermethylated cDMRs in CGI shores (P < 10(-60)), non-CGI-associated promoters (P < 10(-4)) and hypomethylated cDMRs in SINE repeats (P < 10(-100)) was also identified. Integration of DNAm and gene expression data showed that the expression pattern of genes associated with CGI shore cDMRs was able to discriminate between disease phenotypes. This study establishes MeDIP-seq as an effective method to analyze cancer methylomes. PMID:21324880

  11. Morphological spectrum of peripheral nerve sheath tumors: An insight into World Health Organization 2013 classification

    PubMed Central

    Chikkannaiah, Panduranga; Boovalli, Mythri M.; Nathiyal, Velusamy; Venkataramappa, Srinivasamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs) are neuroectodermal in origin. Now these tumors are classified under World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of soft tissue and bone 2013. Objective: To study the morphological spectrum of PNST and to study the secondary degenerative changes associated with it. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted from January 2010 to June 2015. The gross details of tumor and patient's demographic profiles were reviewed. The hematoxylin and eosin stained slides were reassessed and the lesions were categorized and classified as per the WHO 2013 classification. The tumors were also assessed for secondary degenerative changes. Results: Our study comprised 143 cases of PNST. Age of the patients ranged from 5 to 75 years. 21–30 years is the most common age of occurrence with head and neck being the most common site. The PNSTs observed in the present study were neurofibroma (NF) (61.5%), schwannoma (36%), malignant PNST (2%), and granular cell tumor (0.5%). Nearly 10% of NF fulfilled the criteria for neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1). Rare tumors such as plexiform schwannoma and granular cell tumor were also observed. Malignant tumors were larger in dimension than benign. Myxoid, cystic, and hyaline changes were commonly associated with benign tumors while necrosis, hemorrhage, and mitotic activity were seen with malignant tumors. Conclusion: This series highlights the pathological variants of PNST along with their morphological changes and NF1 association. It is essential to be familiar with all these variants of PNST for accurate diagnosis as they have varied biological behavior. PMID:27365950

  12. Optic nerve sheath diameter is not related to high altitude headache: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lawley, Justin Stevan; Oliver, Samuel James; Mullins, Paul; Morris, Daniel; Junglee, Naushad Ali; Jelleyman, Charlotte; Macdonald, Jamie Hugo

    2012-09-01

    The mechanism of high altitude headache (HAH) remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine experimentally whether optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD), as an indicator of intracranial pressure, is related to HAH. Following sea level measurements at 3 and 12 hours (SL), 23 subjects were passively transported to high altitude (3777 m, HA) via cable car. HAH, ONSD, arterial oxygen saturation (Spo(2)), and fluid balance were determined at 3, 12, 24, and 36 hours. After 12 hours exposure to HA, subjects were classified by visual analogue scale (VAS) as either HAH positive (HAH+) or HAH negative (HAH-). Acetazolamide (250 mg) or placebo was then randomly prescribed at 15, 20, and 28 hours. Outcome means were compared via analysis of variance, and relationships between variables were analyzed by longitudinal regression. Acetazolamide had no statistically significant effect on HAH (p=0.63) or ONSD (p=0.98), but produced a negative fluid balance (p<0.01) (and also increased Spo(2) in exploratory analyses). Spo(2) was lower in HAH+ than HAH- [85 (3)% versus 88 (2)%, p=0.03). Nevertheless, ONSD increased similarly in HAH+ and HAH- (interaction p=0.90). ONSD also remained significantly elevated above SL values for the entire HA period [SL, 5.2 (0.5) versus HA, 5.6 (0.5) mm, p<0.01], despite headache resolving with acclimatization [VAS: SL, 1/100 (3) mm versus HA 3 h, 9/100 (13); 12 h, 10/100 (14); 24 h, 8/100 (12); 36 h, 1/100 (4) mm, p<0.01]. Furthermore, HAH was significantly correlated with Spo(2) (β=-1.39, p<0.01) but not with ONSD (β=0.59, p=0.57). These data do not support that intracranial pressure is associated with the development or amelioration of mild HAH. Clinical trial registration NCT01288781. PMID:22994519

  13. Microvascular decompression of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery for intermediate nerve neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Younes, Walid M; Capelle, Hans-Holger; Krauss, Joachim K

    2010-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 63-year-old woman with a 5-year history of intractable paroxysmal 'atypical' otofacial pain. The patient's pain attacks were not typical for either trigeminal or vagoglossopharyngeal neuralgia. Surgical exploration via a suboccipital retromastoid craniotomy showed vascular compression of the nervus intermedius by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery and the patient's pain was successfully managed with microvascular decompression. PMID:20431332

  14. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal. PMID:27284515

  15. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a case of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: An unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    D’souza, Maria M; Jaimini, Abhinav; Kumar Dhali, Tapan; D'souza, Paschal; Saw, Sanjiv; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare tumors, with an estimated incidence of 0.1/100,000/year. They are regarded as a rare variety of soft-tissue sarcomas that derive from peripheral nerves or from cells associated with the nerve sheath. Until 50% of observed MPNSTs occur in patients with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1). The typical presenting signs and symptoms of a PNST are a palpable mass involving a peripheral nerve, loss of nerve function and/or pain. Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to detect 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in these tumors. Most of the PET studies have been reported in patients with NF1. We report a case of sporadic MPNST masquerading as infectious dermatoses, with an unusual PET/computed tomography presentation. PMID:24250026

  16. An intraosseous malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the lumbar spine without neurofibromatosis: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kayo; Yasuda, Taketoshi; Hori, Takeshi; Watanabe, Kenta; Kanamori, Masahiko; Kimura, Tomoatsu

    2014-06-01

    A malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is defined as any malignant tumor that develops or differentiates from cells in the peripheral nerve sheath. This tumor is commonly associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and previous radiotherapy treatment. Primary intraosseous MPNSTs are extremely rare and a case of the lumbar spine in a patient without NF1 is reported in the present study, with a review of the intraosseous MPNST literature. A 45-year-old female presented with a 1-month history of severe lower back pain and pain radiating to the left leg. A total en bloc spondylectomy of L4 was performed. The postoperative histopathological diagnosis was MPNST with deletion of NF1, confirmed by dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. The tumor recurred 1 month following the surgery. Although adjuvant chemotherapy was administered, the patient succumbed due to intramedullary dissemination and carcinomatous meningitis 8 months following the initial consultation. NF1 deletion by FISH analysis may be particularly useful in distinguishing MPNST from other high-grade malignancies with overlapping morphological features. PMID:24932270

  17. Fenestration in the myelin sheath of nerve fibers of the shrimp: a novel node of excitation for saltatory conduction.

    PubMed

    Hsu, K; Terakawa, S

    1996-07-01

    Giant nerve fibers of the shrimp family Penaeidae conduct impulses at the velocity highest among all animal species (approximately 210 m/s; highest in mammals = 120 m/s). We examined these giant and other small nerve fibers morphologically using a differential interference contrast microscope as well as an electron microscope, and found a very specialized form of excitable membrane that functions as a node for saltatory conduction of the impulse. This node appeared under the light microscope as a characteristic pattern of concentrically aligned rings in a very small spot of the myelin sheath. The diameter of the innermost ring of the node was about 5 microns, and the distance between these nodes was as long as 12 mm. Via an electron microscope, these nodes were characterized by a complete lack of the myelin sheath, forming a fenestration that has a tight junction with an axonal membrane. Voltage clamp measurements by a sucrose gap technique demonstrated that the axonal membrane at these fenestration nodes is exclusively excitable and that the large submyelinic space is a unique conductive pathway for loop currents for saltatory conduction through such fenestration nodes. PMID:8807532

  18. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the colon in a patient with von Recklinghausen's disease: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Marwah, Sanjay; Gurawalia, Jai Prakash; Sheoran, Kapil Dev; Marwah, Nisha; Gupta, Sumiti; Ranga, Hansraj

    2013-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) arising from the colon is an extremely rare clinical entity. We report one such case of an adult female with neurofibromatosis type I who presented with pain and a lump in her abdomen. A computed tomographic scan revealed a 10 × 8-cm mass in the splenic flexure of her colon that was compressing its lumen, but the results of a colonoscopy were normal. Segmental resection of the left colon was performed based on the clinical possibility of gastrointestinal stromal tumor. However, on histopathological examination and immunohistochemical staining, the final diagnosis came out to be MPNST. This case highlights that, although rare, the possibility of MPNST should be considered when dealing with extramucosal colonic wall tumors. PMID:26182132

  19. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter: Translating a Terrestrial Focused Technique Into a Clinical Monitoring Tool for Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Sara S.; Foy, Millennia; Sargsyan, Ashot; Garcia, Kathleen; Wear, Mary L.; Bedi, Deepak; Ernst, Randy; Van Baalen, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Emergency medicine physicians recently adopted the use of ultrasonography to quickly measure optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) as concomitant with increased intracranial pressure. NASA Space and Clinical Operations Division has been using ground and on-orbit ultrasound capabilities since 2009 to consider this anatomical measure as a proxy for intracranial pressure in the microgravity environment. In the terrestrial emergency room population, an ONSD greater than 0.59 cm is considered highly predictive of elevated intracranial pressure. However, this cut-off limit is not applicable to the spaceflight setting since over 50% of US Operating Segment (USOS) astronauts have an ONSD greater than 0.60 cm even before missions. Crew Surgeon clinical decision-making is complicated by the fact that many astronauts have history of previous spaceflights. Data will be presented characterizing the distribution of baseline ONSD in the astronaut corps, longitudinal trends in-flight, and the predictive power of this measure related to increased intracranial pressure outcomes.

  20. Imaging of the malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour with emphasis οn ultrasonography: correlation with MRI.

    PubMed

    Rafailidis, Vasileios; Kaziani, Theodora; Theocharides, Costas; Papanikolaou, Athanasios; Rafailidis, Dimitrios

    2014-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours affect 0.001 % of the population. The epithelioid subtype accounts for only 5 % of them. We herein present a patient with a palpable mass on the left calf, which was investigated by ultrasonography, ultrasonographically guided fine-needle biopsy and MRI. Ultrasonography estimated the size of the tumour and evaluated its echotexture. Doppler technique detected characteristic corkscrew-type blood vessel entering in the upper pole of the mass. T1-weighted, fat-suppression and gadolinium-enhanced MRI sequences confirmed ultrasonographic findings. In conclusion, although final diagnosis was established by biopsy, ultrasonography and MRI proved complementary in the characterization of the lesion and planning of surgery. PMID:25177396

  1. Constructing a statistical atlas of the radii of the optic nerve and cerebrospinal fluid sheath in young healthy adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Plassard, Andrew J.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Optic neuritis is a sudden inflammation of the optic nerve (ON) and is marked by pain on eye movement, and visual symptoms such as a decrease in visual acuity, color vision, contrast and visual field defects. The ON is closely linked with multiple sclerosis (MS) and patients have a 50% chance of developing MS within 15 years. Recent advances in multi-atlas segmentation methods have omitted volumetric assessment. In the past, measuring the size of the ON has been done by hand. We utilize a new method of automatically segmenting the ON to measure the radii of both the ON and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sheath to develop a normative distribution of healthy young adults. We examine this distribution for any trends and find that ON and CSF sheath radii do not vary between 20-35 years of age and between sexes. We evaluate how six patients suffering from optic neuropathy compare to this distribution of controls. We find that of these six patients, five of them qualitatively differ from the normative distribution which suggests this technique could be used in the future to distinguish between optic neuritis patients and healthy controls

  2. Endoscopic Excision of Supracondylar Humeral Spur for Decompression of the Median Nerve and Brachial Artery

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Gregory; Gupta, Prince; Phadnis, Joideep; Singhi, Prahalad K.

    2016-01-01

    The humeral supracondylar process and Struthers ligament comprise a relatively rare but well-known anatomic variant. They are usually asymptomatic but may produce clinical symptoms related to compression of the median nerve or brachial artery below the ligament. Previously, surgery has been performed with an open ligament release and supracondylar process excision. This article reports on the use of endoscopic findings and the method of ligament release and process excision. Endoscopy is a minimally invasive technique that provides excellent visualization and enables the surgeon to perform dissection with magnification and precision. It allows the surgeon to introduce open surgical techniques into the depths of the wound in a controlled manner. Because of the dead space created, there is a risk of hematoma formation. Many of the concepts used in open surgery are now being used for endoscopic surgery, and vice versa. The barriers and differences among endoscopic, arthroscopic, and open procedures are being broken down. We report another endoscopic technique, which is part of the ongoing evolution of musculoskeletal surgery. PMID:27073779

  3. Navigated Transtubular Extraforaminal Decompression of the L5 Nerve Root at the Lumbosacral Junction: Clinical Data, Radiographic Features, and Outcome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stavrinou, P; Härtl, R; Krischek, B; Kabbasch, C; Mpotsaris, A; Goldbrunner, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Extraforaminal decompression of the L5 nerve root remains a challenge due to anatomic constraints, severe level-degeneration, and variable anatomy. The purpose of this study is to introduce the use of navigation for transmuscular transtubular decompression at the L5/S1 level and report on radiological features and clinical outcome. Methods. Ten patients who underwent a navigation-assisted extraforaminal decompression of the L5 nerve root were retrospectively analyzed. Results. Six patients had an extraforaminal herniated disc and four had a foraminal stenosis. The distance between the L5 transverse process and the para-articular notch of the sacrum was 12.1 mm in patients with a herniated disc and 8.1 mm in those with a foraminal stenosis. One patient had an early recurrence and another developed dysesthesia that resolved after 3 months. There was a significant improvement from preoperative to postoperative NRS with the results being sustainable at follow-up. ODI was also significantly improved after surgery. According to the Macnab grading scale, excellent or good outcomes were obtained in 8 patients and fair ones in 2. Conclusions. The navigated transmuscular transtubular approach to the lumbosacral junction allows for optimal placement of the retractor and excellent orientation particularly for foraminal stenosis or in cases of complex anatomy. PMID:27127783

  4. Navigated Transtubular Extraforaminal Decompression of the L5 Nerve Root at the Lumbosacral Junction: Clinical Data, Radiographic Features, and Outcome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stavrinou, P.; Härtl, R.; Krischek, B.; Kabbasch, C.; Mpotsaris, A.; Goldbrunner, R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Extraforaminal decompression of the L5 nerve root remains a challenge due to anatomic constraints, severe level-degeneration, and variable anatomy. The purpose of this study is to introduce the use of navigation for transmuscular transtubular decompression at the L5/S1 level and report on radiological features and clinical outcome. Methods. Ten patients who underwent a navigation-assisted extraforaminal decompression of the L5 nerve root were retrospectively analyzed. Results. Six patients had an extraforaminal herniated disc and four had a foraminal stenosis. The distance between the L5 transverse process and the para-articular notch of the sacrum was 12.1 mm in patients with a herniated disc and 8.1 mm in those with a foraminal stenosis. One patient had an early recurrence and another developed dysesthesia that resolved after 3 months. There was a significant improvement from preoperative to postoperative NRS with the results being sustainable at follow-up. ODI was also significantly improved after surgery. According to the Macnab grading scale, excellent or good outcomes were obtained in 8 patients and fair ones in 2. Conclusions. The navigated transmuscular transtubular approach to the lumbosacral junction allows for optimal placement of the retractor and excellent orientation particularly for foraminal stenosis or in cases of complex anatomy. PMID:27127783

  5. Illustration of Cost Saving Implications of Lower Extremity Nerve Decompression to Prevent Recurrence of Diabetic Foot Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Timothy M.; Miller, John D.; Gruessner, Angelika C.; Nickerson, D. Scott

    2015-01-01

    The US diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) incidence is 3-4% of 22.3 million diagnosed diabetes cases plus 6.3 million undiagnosed, 858 000 cases total. Risk of recurrence after healing is 30% annually. Lower extremity multiple nerve decompression (ND) surgery reduces neuropathic DFU (nDFU) recurrence risk by >80%. Cost effectiveness of hypothetical ND implementation to minimize nDFU recurrence is compared to the current $6.171 billion annual nDFU expense. A literature review identified best estimates of annual incidence, recurrence risk, medical management expense, and noneconomic costs for DFU. Illustrative cost/benefit calculations were performed assuming widespread application of bilateral ND after wound healing to the nDFU problem, using Center for Medicare Services mean expense data of $1143/case for unilateral lower extremity ND. Calculations use conservative, evidence-based cost figures, which are contemporary (2012) or adjusted for inflation. Widespread adoption of ND after nDFU healing could reduce annual DFU occurrences by at least 21% in the third year and 24% by year 5, representing calculated cost savings of $1.296 billion (year 3) to $1.481 billion (year 5). This scenario proffers significant expense reduction and societal benefit, and represents a minimum 1.9× return on the investment cost for surgical treatment. Further large cost savings would require reductions in initial DFU incidence, which ND might achieve by selective application to advanced diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN). By minimizing the contribution of recurrences to yearly nDFU incidence, ND has potential to reduce by nearly $1 billion the annual cost of DFU treatment in the United States. PMID:26055081

  6. Illustration of Cost Saving Implications of Lower Extremity Nerve Decompression to Prevent Recurrence of Diabetic Foot Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Timothy M; Miller, John D; Gruessner, Angelika C; Nickerson, D Scott

    2015-07-01

    The US diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) incidence is 3-4% of 22.3 million diagnosed diabetes cases plus 6.3 million undiagnosed, 858 000 cases total. Risk of recurrence after healing is 30% annually. Lower extremity multiple nerve decompression (ND) surgery reduces neuropathic DFU (nDFU) recurrence risk by >80%. Cost effectiveness of hypothetical ND implementation to minimize nDFU recurrence is compared to the current $6.171 billion annual nDFU expense. A literature review identified best estimates of annual incidence, recurrence risk, medical management expense, and noneconomic costs for DFU. Illustrative cost/benefit calculations were performed assuming widespread application of bilateral ND after wound healing to the nDFU problem, using Center for Medicare Services mean expense data of $1143/case for unilateral lower extremity ND. Calculations use conservative, evidence-based cost figures, which are contemporary (2012) or adjusted for inflation. Widespread adoption of ND after nDFU healing could reduce annual DFU occurrences by at least 21% in the third year and 24% by year 5, representing calculated cost savings of $1.296 billion (year 3) to $1.481 billion (year 5). This scenario proffers significant expense reduction and societal benefit, and represents a minimum 1.9× return on the investment cost for surgical treatment. Further large cost savings would require reductions in initial DFU incidence, which ND might achieve by selective application to advanced diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN). By minimizing the contribution of recurrences to yearly nDFU incidence, ND has potential to reduce by nearly $1 billion the annual cost of DFU treatment in the United States. PMID:26055081

  7. Comprehensive establishment and characterization of orthoxenograft mouse models of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Castellsagué, Joan; Gel, Bernat; Fernández-Rodríguez, Juana; Llatjós, Roger; Blanco, Ignacio; Benavente, Yolanda; Pérez-Sidelnikova, Diana; García-del Muro, Javier; Viñals, Joan Maria; Vidal, August; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Terribas, Ernest; López-Doriga, Adriana; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S; Serra, Eduard; Villanueva, Alberto; Lázaro, Conxi

    2015-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are soft-tissue sarcomas that can arise either sporadically or in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). These aggressive malignancies confer poor survival, with no effective therapy available. We present the generation and characterization of five distinct MPNST orthoxenograft models for preclinical testing and personalized medicine. Four of the models are patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTX), two independent MPNSTs from the same NF1 patient and two from different sporadic patients. The fifth model is an orthoxenograft derived from an NF1-related MPNST cell line. All MPNST orthoxenografts were generated by tumor implantation, or cell line injection, next to the sciatic nerve of nude mice, and were perpetuated by 7–10 mouse-to-mouse passages. The models reliably recapitulate the histopathological properties of their parental primary tumors. They also mimic distal dissemination properties in mice. Human stroma was rapidly lost after MPNST engraftment and replaced by murine stroma, which facilitated genomic tumor characterization. Compatible with an origin in a catastrophic event and subsequent genome stabilization, MPNST contained highly altered genomes that remained remarkably stable in orthoxenograft establishment and along passages. Mutational frequency and type of somatic point mutations were highly variable among the different MPNSTs modeled, but very consistent when comparing primary tumors with matched orthoxenografts generated. Unsupervised cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) using an MPNST expression signature of ~1,000 genes grouped together all primary tumor–orthoxenograft pairs. Our work points to differences in the engraftment process of primary tumors compared with the engraftment of established cell lines. Following standardization and extensive characterization and validation, the orthoxenograft models were used for initial preclinical drug testing. Sorafenib (a

  8. Combinatorial Therapy with Tamoxifen And Trifluoperazine Effectively Inhibits Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth by Targeting Complementary Signaling Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Brosius, Stephanie N.; Turk, Amy N.; Byer, Stephanie J.; Longo, Jody Fromm; Kappes, John C.; Roth, Kevin A.; Carroll, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents effective against malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are urgently needed. We recently found that tamoxifen potently impedes xenograft growth. In vitro, tamoxifen inhibits MPNST proliferation and survival in an estrogen receptor-independent manner; these effects are phenocopied by the calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine. The present study was performed to establish the mechanism of action of tamoxifen in vivo and optimize its therapeutic effectiveness. To determine if tamoxifen has estrogen receptor-dependent effects in vivo, we grafted MPNST cells in castrated and ovariectomized mice; xenograft growth was unaffected by reductions in sex hormones. To establish whether tamoxifen and trifluoperazine additively or synergistically impede MPNST growth, mice xenografted with NF1-associated or sporadic MPNST cells were treated with tamoxifen, trifluoperazine, or both drugs for 30 days. Both monotherapies inhibited graft growth by 50%, whereas combinatorial treatment maximally reduced graft mass by 90% and enhanced decreases in proliferation and survival. Kinomic analyses showed that tamoxifen and trifluoperazine have both shared and distinct targets in MPNSTs. Additionally, trifluoperazine prevented tamoxifen-induced increases in serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1, a protein linked to tamoxifen resistance. These findings suggest that combinatorial therapy with tamoxifen and trifluoperazine is effective against MPNSTs because these agents target complementary pathways that are essential for MPNST pathogenesis. PMID:25289889

  9. Canine cutaneous peripheral nerve sheath tumours versus fibrosarcomas can be differentiated by neuroectodermal marker genes in their transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Klopfleisch, R; Meyer, A; Lenze, D; Hummel, M; Gruber, A D

    2013-02-01

    The diagnostic differentiation between canine fibrosarcomas and peripheral nerve sheath tumours (PNSTs) is based on histopathological phenotype. Histological differentiation of these tumours can, however, be challenging and there is a lack of immunohistochemical markers to prove their histogenic origin. To identify possible PNST markers and to further characterize their histogenic origin we compared histologically well-defined canine fibrosarcomas and PNSTs by cDNA microarray analysis. Forty-five annotated gene products were significantly differentially expressed between both tumour types. Seven of these gene products, known to be specifically expressed in neuroectodermal tissues, had higher expression levels in PNSTs: FMN2, KIF1B, GLI1, ROBO1, NMUR2, DOK4 and HMG20B. Conversely, eight genes associated with carcinogenesis had higher expression in fibrosarcomas: FHL2, PLAGL1, FNBP1L, BAG2, HK1, CSK and Cox5A. Comparison of the fibrosarcoma and PNST transcriptome therefore identified PNST phenotype-associated genes involved in neuroectodermal differentiation, which may be useful as diagnostic markers. Furthermore, the genes associated with the fibrosarcoma phenotype may serve as markers to differentiate fibrosarcomas from other tumour types. PMID:22818216

  10. Genomic and molecular aberrations in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and their roles in personalized target therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jilong; Du, Xiaoling

    2013-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are malignant tumors with a high rate of local recurrence and a significant tendency to metastasize. Its dismal outcome points to the urgent need to establish better therapeutic strategies for patients harboring MPNSTs. The investigations of genomic and molecular aberrations in MPNSTs which detect many chromosomal aberrations, pathway abnormalities, and specific molecular aberrant events would supply multiple potential therapy targets and contribute to achievement of personalized medicine. The involved genes in the significant gains aberrations include BIRC5, CCNE2, DAB2, DDX15, EGFR, DAB2, MSH2, CDK6, HGF, ITGB4, KCNK12, LAMA3, LOXL2, MET, and PDGFRA. The involved genes in the significant deletion aberrations include CDH1, GLTSCR2, EGR1, CTSB, GATA3, SULT2A1, GLTSCR2, HMMR/RHAMM, LICAM2, MMP13, p16/INK4a, RASSF2, NM-23H1, and TP53. These genetic aberrations involve in several important signaling pathways such as TFF, EGFR, ARF, IGF1R signaling pathways. The genomic and molecular aberrations of EGFR, IGF1R, SOX9, EYA4, TOP2A, ETV4, and BIRC5 exhibit great promise as personalized therapeutic targets for MPNST patients. PMID:23830351

  11. A retroperitoneal NF1-independent malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with elevated serum CA125: case report and discussion.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing; Meng, Xianze; Shi, Bian; Shi, Jun; Qin, Zhifeng; Wei, Pinkang

    2012-08-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are usually located in the trunk, extremities, head, or neck, and most occur with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1; von Recklinghausen's disease). No biomarkers have previously been found to be associated with their progression. Retroperitoneal NF1-independent MPNSTs are rare; they are considered to be less aggressive and to have better prognoses compared to NF1-related tumors. Currently, en bloc excision is the only consensus treatment approach. In a 27-year-old male with a giant retroperitoneal MPNST and no stigmata or family history of neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1), a remarkable elevation of serum CA125 was detected. The high-grade tumor displayed a striking progression: the primary lesion, 25 cm in diameter, recurred in its previous site as a 17-cm MPNST less than 50 days after total excision. Subsequent treatment with microwave ablation and huachansu, a traditional Chinese medication, proved ineffective, and the patient died within 3 months. Our case suggests that retroperitoneal MPNSTs can deteriorate rapidly even if NF1 independent, that aggressive treatment may not benefit large high-grade MPNSTs, and that novel and effective treatment is urgently needed. Our case also suggests the possibility of using serum tumor markers in the early detection and monitoring of MPNSTs. PMID:22528792

  12. Standard-Fractionated Radiotherapy for Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma: Visual Outcome Is Predicted by Mean Eye Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Abouaf, Lucie; Girard, Nicolas; Lefort, Thibaud; D'hombres, Anne; Tilikete, Caroline; Vighetto, Alain; Mornex, Francoise

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has shown its efficacy in controlling optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) tumor growth while allowing visual acuity to improve or stabilize. However, radiation-induced toxicity may ultimately jeopardize the functional benefit. The purpose of this study was to identify predictive factors of poor visual outcome in patients receiving radiotherapy for ONSM. Methods and Materials: We conducted an extensive analysis of 10 patients with ONSM with regard to clinical, radiologic, and dosimetric aspects. All patients were treated with conformal radiotherapy and subsequently underwent biannual neuroophthalmologic and imaging assessments. Pretreatment and posttreatment values of visual acuity and visual field were compared with Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: Visual acuity values significantly improved after radiotherapy. After a median follow-up time of 51 months, 6 patients had improved visual acuity, 4 patients had improved visual field, 1 patient was in stable condition, and 1 patient had deteriorated visual acuity and visual field. Tumor control rate was 100% at magnetic resonance imaging assessment. Visual acuity deterioration after radiotherapy was related to radiation-induced retinopathy in 2 patients and radiation-induced mature cataract in 1 patient. Study of radiotherapy parameters showed that the mean eye dose was significantly higher in those 3 patients who had deteriorated vision. Conclusions: Our study confirms that radiotherapy is efficient in treating ONSM. Long-term visual outcome may be compromised by radiation-induced side effects. Mean eye dose has to be considered as a limiting constraint in treatment planning.

  13. Intraoperative monitoring during decompression of the spinal cord and spinal nerves using transcranial motor-evoked potentials: The law of twenty percent.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Hirao, Jun; Oka, Hidehiro; Akimoto, Jiro; Takanashi, Junko; Yamada, Junichi

    2015-09-01

    Motor-evoked potential (MEP) monitoring was performed during 196 consecutive spinal (79 cervical and 117 lumbar) surgeries for the decompression of compressive spinal and spinal nerve diseases. MEP monitoring in spinal surgery has been considered sensitive to predict postoperative neurological recovery. In this series, transcranial stimulation consisted of trains of five pulses at a constant voltage (200-600 V). For the normalization of MEP, we recorded compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) after peripheral nerve stimulation, usually on the median nerve at the wrist 2 seconds before or after each transcranial stimulation of the motor area, for all operations. The sensitivity and specificity of MEP monitoring was 100% and 97.4%, respectively, or 96.9% with or without CMAP compensation (if the threshold of postoperative motor palsy was defined as 20% relative amplitude rate [RAR]). The mean RAR after CMAP normalization, of the most affected muscle in the patient group with excellent postoperative results (recovery rate of a Japan Orthopedic Association score of more than 50%) was significantly higher than that in the other groups (p=0.0224). All patients with an amplitude increase rate (AIR) with CMAP normalization of more than 20% achieved neurological recovery postoperatively. Our results suggest that if the RAR is more than 20%, postoperative motor palsy can be avoided in spinal surgery. If the AIR with normalization by CMAP after peripheral nerve stimulation is more than 20%, neurological recovery can be expected in spinal surgery. PMID:26142049

  14. Effect of acute high-intensity resistance exercise on optic nerve sheath diameter and ophthalmic artery blood flow pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Lefferts, W K; Hughes, W E; Heffernan, K S

    2015-12-01

    Exertional hypertension associated with acute high-intensity resistance exercise (RE) increases both intravascular and intracranial pressure (ICP), maintaining cerebrovascular transmural pressure. Carotid intravascular pressure pulsatility remains elevated after RE. Whether ICP also remains elevated after acute RE in an attempt to maintain the vessel wall transmural pressure is unknown. Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD), a valid proxy of ICP, was measured in 20 participants (6 female; 24 ± 4 yr, 24.2 ± 3.9 kg m(-)(2)) at rest (baseline), following a time-control condition, and following RE (5 sets, 5 repetition maximum bench press, 5 sets 10 repetition maximum biceps curls) using ultrasound. Additionally, intracranial hemodynamic pulsatility index (PI) was assessed in the ophthalmic artery (OA) by using Doppler. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was obtained from synthesized aortic pressure waveforms obtained via a brachial oscillometric cuff and carotid pulse pressure was measured by using applanation tonometry. Aortic PWV (5.2 ± 0.5-6.0 ± 0.7 m s(-1), P < 0.05) and carotid pulse pressure (45 ± 17-59 ± 19 mm Hg, P < 0.05) were significantly elevated post RE compared with baseline. There were no significant changes in ONSD (5.09 ± 0.7-5.09 ± 0.7 mm, P > 0.05) or OA flow PI (1.35 ± 0.2-1.38 ± 0.3, P > 0.05) following acute RE. In conclusion, during recovery from acute high-intensity RE, there are increases in aortic stiffness and extracranial pressure pulsatility in the absence of changes in ICP and flow pulsatility. These findings may have implications for alterations in cerebral transmural pressure and cerebral aneurysmal wall stress following RE. PMID:25739332

  15. Optic nerve sheath diameter on initial brain CT, raised intracranial pressure and mortality after severe TBI: an interesting link needing confirmation.

    PubMed

    Masquère, Pierre; Bonneville, Fabrice; Geeraerts, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) enlargement on initial computed tomography (CT) scan has been found to be associated with increased mortality after severe traumatic brain injury. This could offer the possibility to detect patients with raised intracranial pressure requiring urgent therapeutic interventions and/or invasive intracranial monitoring to guide the treatment. The method to measure ONSD using CT scan, however, needs further confirmation. Moreover, the link between ONSD enlargement on initial CT scan and raised intracranial pressure also needs to be confirmed by further studies. PMID:23751121

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of PET/CT-Guided Percutaneous Biopsies for Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brahmi, Mehdi; Combemale, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are one of the most frequent causes of death in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Early detection is crucial because complete surgical resection is the only curative treatment. It has been previously reported that an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) image with a T/L (Tumor/Liver) SUVmax ratio > 1.5 provides a high negative predictive value; however, it is not specific enough to make a NF1-related MPNST diagnosis. A formal proof of malignant transformation from a histological analysis is necessary before surgical excision because the procedure can cause mutilation. The objective of the present work was to investigate the effectiveness of and complications associated with PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsies for an NF1-related MPNST diagnosis. Methods PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsy procedures performed on 26 NF1 patients with a clinical suspicion of MPNST and a suspect lesion from a PET/CT scan (T/L SUVmax ratio > 1.5) were retrospectively evaluated. The localization of the suspected malignant site was determined using PET/CT. A stereotactic (ultrasonic and CT control) core biopsy technique was used with a local anesthesia. Results The first PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsies enabled a pathological diagnosis for all of the patients (no "inconclusive " results were obtained), and no secondary procedures were needed. Among the 26 patients, the histopathological results from the biopsy were malignant in 17 cases and benign (BPNST with atypical cells) in nine cases. No complications from the diagnostic procedure were observed. A surgical resection was performed in 18 patients (seven benign and 11 malignant biopsies), removing the fine needle biopsy scar. In addition, six locally advanced/metastatic MPNST were treated with chemo/radiotherapy, and two BPNST had no progression after a follow-up of 14 and 39 months, respectively. The PET

  17. [Results of 466 nerve decompressions in 123 leprosy patients during polychemotherapy with a minimum follow-up of one year. Value of preventive surgery in a leprosy control program].

    PubMed

    Ramarorazana, S; Di Schino, M; Rene, J P; Schwarz, L E

    1994-01-01

    The clinical expression of leprosy is primarily cutaneous but its serious neurologic manifestations are maiming. Mutilations mainly of limb ends are due to peripheric nerves compression and may appear before or during the clinical treatment of the illness. Their appearance which is not automatically related to multiple Hansen's bacilli, may be prevented surgically by nervous decompression. The authors report their experiences of 466 nervous decompressions of 123 patients (89 men and 34 women), among them, 14 were pauci-bacillary and 109 multi-bacillary. They conclude that very good results (complete recovery or improvement of sensitivity, disappearing of pain) have been obtained through simple and easy-to-learn surgeries. PMID:7575033

  18. Reappearance of Cranial Nerve Dysfunction Symptoms Caused by New Artery Compression More than 20 Years after Initially Successful Microvascular Decompression: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, Hiroto; KONDO, Akinori; SHIMANO, Hiroshi; YASUDA, Soichiro; MURAO, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Reappearance of symptoms of cranial nerve dysfunction is not uncommon after successful microvascular decompression (MVD). The purpose of this study was to report two quite unusual cases of recurrent and newly developed hemifacial spasm (HFS) caused by a new conflicting artery more than 20 years after the first successful surgery. In Case 1, the first MVD was performed for HFS caused by the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) when the patient was 38 years old. After 26 symptom-free years, HFS recurred on the same side of the face due to compression by the newly developed offending AICA. In Case 2, the patient was first operated on for trigeminal neuralgia by transposition of the AICA at 49 years old, but 20 symptom-free years after the first MVD, a new offending PICA compressed the facial nerve on the same side, causing HFS. These two patients underwent reoperation and gained satisfactory results postoperatively. Reappearance of symptoms related to compression of the root exit zone (REZ) by a new offending artery after such a long symptom-free interval since the first effective MVD is rare. Here, we describe two such unusual cases and discuss how to manage and prevent such reappearance of symptoms after a long time interval. PMID:26804190

  19. Reappearance of Cranial Nerve Dysfunction Symptoms Caused by New Artery Compression More than 20 Years after Initially Successful Microvascular Decompression: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroto; Kondo, Akinori; Shimano, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Soichiro; Murao, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Reappearance of symptoms of cranial nerve dysfunction is not uncommon after successful microvascular decompression (MVD). The purpose of this study was to report two quite unusual cases of recurrent and newly developed hemifacial spasm (HFS) caused by a new conflicting artery more than 20 years after the first successful surgery. In Case 1, the first MVD was performed for HFS caused by the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) when the patient was 38 years old. After 26 symptom-free years, HFS recurred on the same side of the face due to compression by the newly developed offending AICA. In Case 2, the patient was first operated on for trigeminal neuralgia by transposition of the AICA at 49 years old, but 20 symptom-free years after the first MVD, a new offending PICA compressed the facial nerve on the same side, causing HFS. These two patients underwent reoperation and gained satisfactory results postoperatively. Reappearance of symptoms related to compression of the root exit zone (REZ) by a new offending artery after such a long symptom-free interval since the first effective MVD is rare. Here, we describe two such unusual cases and discuss how to manage and prevent such reappearance of symptoms after a long time interval. PMID:26804190

  20. Triterpenoid saponin flaccidoside II from Anemone flaccida triggers apoptosis of NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors via the MAPK-HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Lin-Tao; Fang, Yin; Cao, Yan; Wu, Feng-Hua; Liu, E; Mo, Guo-Yan; Huang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive soft tissue neoplasms that are extremely rare and are frequently associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. MPNSTs are typically fatal, and there is no effective treatment so far. In our previous study, we showed that flaccidoside II, one of the triterpenoid saponins isolated from Anemone flaccida Fr. Schmidt, has antitumor potential by inducing apoptosis. In the present study, we found that flaccidoside II inhibits proliferation and facilitates apoptosis in MPNST cell lines ST88-14 and S462. Furthermore, this study provides a mechanism by which the downregulation of heme oxygenase-1 via extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways is involved in the apoptotic role of flaccidoside II. This study suggested the potential of flaccidoside II as a novel pharmacotherapeutic approach for MPNSTs. PMID:27103823

  1. Triterpenoid saponin flaccidoside II from Anemone flaccida triggers apoptosis of NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors via the MAPK-HO-1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lin-tao; Fang, Yin; Cao, Yan; Wu, Feng-hua; Liu, E; Mo, Guo-yan; Huang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive soft tissue neoplasms that are extremely rare and are frequently associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. MPNSTs are typically fatal, and there is no effective treatment so far. In our previous study, we showed that flaccidoside II, one of the triterpenoid saponins isolated from Anemone flaccida Fr. Schmidt, has antitumor potential by inducing apoptosis. In the present study, we found that flaccidoside II inhibits proliferation and facilitates apoptosis in MPNST cell lines ST88-14 and S462. Furthermore, this study provides a mechanism by which the downregulation of heme oxygenase-1 via extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways is involved in the apoptotic role of flaccidoside II. This study suggested the potential of flaccidoside II as a novel pharmacotherapeutic approach for MPNSTs. PMID:27103823

  2. Surgical Management of Solitary Nerve Sheath Tumors of the Cervical Spine: A Retrospective Case Analysis Based on Tumor Location and Extension

    PubMed Central

    ABE, Junya; TAKAMI, Toshihiro; NAITO, Kentaro; YAMAGATA, Toru; ARIMA, Hironori; OHATA, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Complete resection of spinal nerve sheath tumors (NSTs) does not always result in significant neurological deficit. The purpose of this retrospective case analysis was to discuss the optimal surgical strategy for spinal NST of the cervical spine. Twenty-four patients who underwent surgery for solitary cervical NST over the past decade were included in this retrospective study. Patients with neurofibromatosis or schwannomatosis were excluded. Seventeen of the 24 cases (70.8%) showed extradural dumbbell extension, most frequently at the C1 or C2 vertebral level. Neurological condition was assessed using the modified McCormick functional schema and sensory pain scale. Total removal of the tumor was achieved in 20 of 24 cases (83.3%). Staged surgery using combined anterior and posterior approaches was applied for 2 of 17 cases with extradural dumbbell extension. Tumor involvement with nerve root fibers critical for upper extremity function (C5–C8) was recognized in 6 of 24 cases (25.0%), with complete resection in all 6 cases. Final assessment of neurological function revealed satisfactory or acceptable recovery in all 6 patients. Spinal NSTs with extradural dumbbell extension are a common condition in the cervical spine. Complete removal of spinal NST of the cervical spine may carry a risk of permanent neurological deficit, but such sequelae appeared to be the exception in the present case analysis. A radical and safe surgical strategy, including staged surgery combining anterior and posterior approaches, should be tailored to the individual case. PMID:25367583

  3. Surgical management of solitary nerve sheath tumors of the cervical spine: a retrospective case analysis based on tumor location and extension.

    PubMed

    Abe, Junya; Takami, Toshihiro; Naito, Kentaro; Yamagata, Toru; Arima, Hironori; Ohata, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Complete resection of spinal nerve sheath tumors (NSTs) does not always result in significant neurological deficit. The purpose of this retrospective case analysis was to discuss the optimal surgical strategy for spinal NST of the cervical spine. Twenty-four patients who underwent surgery for solitary cervical NST over the past decade were included in this retrospective study. Patients with neurofibromatosis or schwannomatosis were excluded. Seventeen of the 24 cases (70.8%) showed extradural dumbbell extension, most frequently at the C1 or C2 vertebral level. Neurological condition was assessed using the modified McCormick functional schema and sensory pain scale. Total removal of the tumor was achieved in 20 of 24 cases (83.3%). Staged surgery using combined anterior and posterior approaches was applied for 2 of 17 cases with extradural dumbbell extension. Tumor involvement with nerve root fibers critical for upper extremity function (C5-C8) was recognized in 6 of 24 cases (25.0%), with complete resection in all 6 cases. Final assessment of neurological function revealed satisfactory or acceptable recovery in all 6 patients. Spinal NSTs with extradural dumbbell extension are a common condition in the cervical spine. Complete removal of spinal NST of the cervical spine may carry a risk of permanent neurological deficit, but such sequelae appeared to be the exception in the present case analysis. A radical and safe surgical strategy, including staged surgery combining anterior and posterior approaches, should be tailored to the individual case. PMID:25367583

  4. Spatially- and temporally-controlled postnatal p53 knockdown cooperates with embryonic Schwann cell precursor Nf1 gene loss to promote malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor formation

    PubMed Central

    Hirbe, Angela C.; Dahiya, Sonika; Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Verma, Inder M.; Clapp, D. Wade; Gutmann, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive sarcomas that arise sporadically or in association with the Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) cancer predisposition syndrome. In individuals with NF1, MPNSTs are hypothesized to arise from Nf1-deficient Schwann cell precursor cells following the somatic acquisition of secondary cooperating genetic mutations (e.g., p53 loss). To model this sequential genetic cooperativity, we coupled somatic lentivirus-mediated p53 knockdown in the adult right sciatic nerve with embryonic Schwann cell precursor Nf1 gene inactivation in two different Nf1 conditional knockout mouse strains. Using this approach, ∼60% of mice with Periostin-Cre-mediated Nf1 gene inactivation (Periostin-Cre; Nf1flox/flox mice) developed tumors classified as low-grade MPNSTs following p53 knockdown (mean, 6 months). Similarly, ∼70% of Nf1+/− mice with GFAP-Cre-mediated Nf1 gene inactivation (GFAP-Cre; Nf1flox/null mice) developed low-grade MPNSTs following p53 knockdown (mean, 3 months). In addition, wild-type and Nf1+/− mice with GFAP-Cre-mediated Nf1 loss develop MPNSTs following somatic p53 knockout with different latencies, suggesting potential influences of Nf1+/− stromal cells in MPNST pathogenesis. Collectively, this new MPNST model system permits the analysis of somatically-acquired events as well as tumor microenvironment signals that potentially cooperate with Nf1 loss in the development and progression of this deadly malignancy. PMID:26859681

  5. Compression neuropathy of the common peroneal nerve secondary to a ganglion cyst.

    PubMed

    Yazid Bajuri, M; Tan, B C; Das, S; Hassan, S; Subanesh, S

    2011-01-01

    There are various causes of the common peroneal nerve palsy. However, common peroneal nerve palsy caused by ganglia are uncommon. We hereby present a case of a 55-year-old man with a 1 week history of foot drop and swelling in the region of the right leg. Physical examination and nerve conduction study studies confirmed a diagnosis of common peroneal nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a lobulated, elongated cystic-appearing mass anterior to the head of fibula. Surgical decompression of the nerve with removal of the mass was performed. Surgical pathology reports confirmed the diagnosis of a ganglion cyst. Findings on physical examination, nerve conduction study and MRI results of this interesting case are being discussed. We wish to highlight that even a tumour which is benign and within the nerve sheath can cause compression. PMID:22262327

  6. Decompression illness.

    PubMed

    Vann, Richard D; Butler, Frank K; Mitchell, Simon J; Moon, Richard E

    2011-01-01

    Decompression illness is caused by intravascular or extravascular bubbles that are formed as a result of reduction in environmental pressure (decompression). The term covers both arterial gas embolism, in which alveolar gas or venous gas emboli (via cardiac shunts or via pulmonary vessels) are introduced into the arterial circulation, and decompression sickness, which is caused by in-situ bubble formation from dissolved inert gas. Both syndromes can occur in divers, compressed air workers, aviators, and astronauts, but arterial gas embolism also arises from iatrogenic causes unrelated to decompression. Risk of decompression illness is affected by immersion, exercise, and heat or cold. Manifestations range from itching and minor pain to neurological symptoms, cardiac collapse, and death. First-aid treatment is 100% oxygen and definitive treatment is recompression to increased pressure, breathing 100% oxygen. Adjunctive treatment, including fluid administration and prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism in paralysed patients, is also recommended. Treatment is, in most cases, effective although residual deficits can remain in serious cases, even after several recompressions. PMID:21215883

  7. Lectin histochemistry of normal and neoplastic peripheral nerve sheath. 2. Lectin binding patterns of schwannoma and neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, K; Nakasu, S; Nioka, H; Handa, J

    1993-01-01

    Lectin binding patterns of 31 schwannomas and 6 neurofibromas were examined using 12 lectins, and the results were compared with those of normal peripheral nerves. Tumors obtained from 10 cases of neurofibromatosis and 4 recurrent schwannomas were included. Changes of glycoconjugates were observed in association with a neoplastic transformation of Schwann cells; Arachis hypogaea (PNA) staining after neuraminidase treatment seen in normal Schwann cells was reduced in schwannoma of Antoni type A, and bindings with Glycine max (SBA) and Helix pomatia (HPA) after sialic acid removal, which were not seen in normal Schwann cells, appeared in schwannoma cells. Intensities of staining of tumor cells with each lectin were higher in Antoni type B than those in Antoni type A. No differences in lectin binding patterns were observed between schwannomas in patients with neurofibromatosis or recurrent schwannomas and ordinary, primary schwannomas in patients without stigmata of neurofibromatosis. Lectin binding patterns of Schwann cells and perineurial cells in neurofibroma were almost similar to those in normal peripheral nerves with an exception of faint stain of Schwann cells with HPA after neuraminidase pretreatment. This result suggests differences in extent of differentiation between schwannoma cells and neoplastic Schwann cells in neurofibroma. Specific PNA binding to perineurial cells in neurofibroma indicates the significance of this lectin as a marker of these cells. PMID:8310811

  8. Fractionated Conformal Radiotherapy for Management of Optic Nerve Sheath Meningiomas: Long-Term Outcomes of Tumor Control and Visual Function at a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Metellus, Philippe; Kapoor, Sumit; Kharkar, Siddharth; Batra, Sachin; Jackson, Juan F.; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Miller, Neil R.; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To provide the long-term outcomes of patients treated with fractionated conformal radiotherapy (FCRT) for presumed optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSMs). Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2002, 9 patients with a presumed ONSM were treated with FCRT at our institution. The indications for FCRT were significant visual dysfunction at presentation, progression of visual dysfunction during a period of observation, tumor growth documented by sequential imaging, or a combination of these findings. In 2 patients, FCRT was performed as adjuvant therapy, and in 7, it was the initial and primary treatment. Results: Of the 9 patients, 6 were women and 3 were men, with a mean age of 47 years. All 9 patients had evidence of optic nerve dysfunction in the affected eye, characterized by reduced visual acuity, a visual field defect, and a relative afferent pupillary defect. In addition, 2 patients had proptosis and 1 had diplopia. The mean follow-up period was 98 {+-} 31.7 months (median, 90; range, 61-151). After FCRT, the visual function improved in the 7 patients who had undergone FCRT as the primary treatment. However, 2 patients who were blind in their affected eye at FCRT remained blind. In 4 of the 7 patients with improvement, the improvement was documented within 1-3 months after FCRT. The tumor control rate was 100%. Proptosis and diplopia also regressed in 100% of patients. At 2 years after FCRT, 1 patient had developed radiation retinopathy. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that FCRT is a safe and effective treatment of ONSMs, affording satisfactory long-term tumor control, good functional outcome, and low treatment morbidity. FCRT should be considered the treatment of choice for patients with presumed ONSMs for whom the treatment has been deemed appropriate.

  9. [Decompression sickness].

    PubMed

    Sipinen, Seppo

    2010-01-01

    Decompression sickness will develop, when excess concentrations of nitrogen or helium from the respiratory gas have dissolved into the body. The dissolved gases are removed from the body with exhalation. If the level of dissolved gases exceeds their natural rate of removal, bubbles are formed in the circulation and tissues as the pressure surrounding the diver decreases. The bubbles will cause decompression sickness typically manifested as skin symptoms, musculoskeletal pains and disturbances of the central nervous system. The only known and effective treatment is recompression and inhalation of pure oxygen. PMID:20486494

  10. Wilms’ Tumor Gene 1 (WT1) Silencing Inhibits Proliferation of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor sNF96.2 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Rosalba; Cardile, Venera; Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Parenti, Carmela; Venuti, Assunta; Bertuccio, Maria Paola; Furno, Debora Lo; Magro, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Wilms’ tumor gene 1 (WT1) plays complex roles in tumorigenesis, acting as tumor suppressor gene or an oncogene depending on the cellular context. WT1 expression has been variably reported in both benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) by means of immunohistochemistry. The aim of the present study was to characterize its potential pathogenetic role in these relatively uncommon malignant tumors. Firstly, immunohistochemical analyses in MPNST sNF96.2 cell line showed strong WT1 staining in nuclear and perinuclear areas of neoplastic cells. Thus, we investigated the effects of silencing WT1 by RNA interference. Through Western Blot analysis and proliferation assay we found that WT1 knockdown leads to the reduction of cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner. siWT1 inhibited proliferation of sNF96.2 cell lines likely by influencing cell cycle progression through a decrease in the protein levels of cyclin D1 and inhibition of Akt phosphorylation compared to the control cells. These results indicate that WT1 knockdown attenuates the biological behavior of MPNST cells by decreasing Akt activity, demonstrating that WT1 is involved in the development and progression of MPNSTs. Thus, WT1 is suggested to serve as a potential therapeutic target for MPNSTs. PMID:25474318

  11. Whole-exome sequencing of breast cancer, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and neurofibroma from a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    McPherson, John Richard; Ong, Choon-Kiat; Ng, Cedric Chuan-Young; Rajasegaran, Vikneswari; Heng, Hong-Lee; Yu, Willie Shun-Shing; Tan, Benita Kiat-Tee; Madhukumar, Preetha; Teo, Melissa Ching-Ching; Ngeow, Joanne; Thike, Aye-Aye; Rozen, Steven George; Tan, Puay-Hoon; Lee, Ann Siew-Gek; Teh, Bin-Tean; Yap, Yoon-Sim

    2015-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder characterized by the development of multiple neurofibromas, cafe-au-lait spots, and Lisch nodules. Individuals with NF1 are at increased risk of developing various tumors, such as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST), pheochromocytoma, leukemia, glioma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and breast cancer. Here, we describe the exome sequencing of breast cancer, MPNST, and neurofibroma from a patient with NF1. We identified a germline mutation in the NF1 gene which resulted in conversion of leucine to proline at amino acid position 847. In addition, we showed independent somatic NF1 mutations in all the three tumors (frameshift insertion in breast cancer (p.A985fs), missense mutation in MPNST (p.G23R), and inframe deletion in dermal neurofibroma (p.L1876del-Inf)), indicating that a second hit in NF1 resulting in the loss of function could be important for tumor formation. Each tumor had a distinct genomic profile with mutually exclusive mutations in different genes. Copy number analysis revealed multiple copy number alterations in the breast cancer and the MPNST, but not the benign neurofibroma. Germline loss of chromosome 6q22.33, which harbors two potential tumor suppressor genes, PTPRK and LAMA2, was also identified; this may increase tumor predisposition further. In the background of NF1 syndrome, although second-hit NF1 mutation is critical in tumorigenesis, different additional mutations are required to drive the formation of different tumors. PMID:26432421

  12. Induction of apoptosis in Neurofibromatosis Type 1 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cell lines by a combination of novel farnesyl transferase inhibitors and lovastatin

    PubMed Central

    Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Fouad, Farid; LaLonde, Daniel T.; Kleinman, Miriam D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Reiners, John J.; Borch, Richard F.; Mattingly, Raymond R.

    2013-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder that is driven by the loss of neurofibromin (Nf) protein function. Nf contains a Ras GTPase activating domain (Ras-GAP), which directly regulates Ras signaling. Numerous clinical manifestations are associated with the loss of Nf and increased Ras activity. Ras proteins must be prenylated in order to traffic and functionally localize with target membranes. Hence, Ras is a potential therapeutic target for treating NF1. We have tested the efficacy of two novel farnesyl transferase inhibitors (FTI), 1 and 2, alone or in combination with lovastatin, on two NF1 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPSNT) cell lines, NF90-8 and ST88-14. Single treatments of 1, 2, or lovastatin had no effect on MPNST cell proliferation. However, low micromolar combinations of 1 or 2 with lovastatin (FTI/lovastatin) reduced Ras prenylation in both MPNST cell lines. Further, this FTI/lovastatin combination treatment reduced cell proliferation and induced an apoptotic response as shown by morphological analysis, pro-caspase-3/-7 activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and accumulation of cells with sub G1 DNA content. Little to no detectable toxicity was observed in normal rat Schwann cells following FTI/lovastatin combination treatment. These data support the hypothesis that combination FTI plus lovastatin therapy may be a potential treatment for NF1 MPNSTs. PMID:18367665

  13. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Invasion Requires Aberrantly Expressed Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) Receptors and is Variably Enhanced by Multiple EGF Family Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Byer, Stephanie J.; Brossier, Nicole M.; Peavler, Lafe T.; Eckert, Jenell M.; Watkins, Stacey; Roth, Kevin A.; Carroll, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression promotes the pathogenesis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), the most common malignancy associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, but the mechanisms by which EGFR expression promotes MPNST pathogenesis are poorly understood. We hypothesized that inappropriately expressed EGFRs promote MPNST invasion and found that these kinases are concentrated in MPNST invadopodia in vitro. EGFR knockdown inhibited the migration of unstimulated MPNST cells in vitro and exogenous EGF further enhanced MPNST migration in a substrate-specific manner, promoting migration on laminin and, to a lesser extent, collagen. Thus, in this setting, EGF acts as a chemotactic factor. We also found that the 7 known EGFR ligands (EGF, betacellulin, epiregulin, heparin-binding EGF, transforming growth factor α [TGFα], amphiregulin, and epigen) variably enhanced MPNST migration in a concentration-dependent manner, with TGFα being particularly potent. With the exception of epigen, these factors similarly promoted the migration of non-neoplastic Schwann cells. Although transcripts encoding all 7 EGFR ligands were detected in human MPNST cells and tumor tissues, only TGFα was consistently overexpressed and was found to colocalize with EGFR in situ. These data indicate that constitutive EGFR activation, potentially driven by autocrine or paracrine TGFα signaling, promotes the aggressive invasive behavior characteristic of MPNSTs. PMID:23399900

  14. Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Assessment of Whole-Body Metabolic Tumor Burden Using F-18-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Salamon, Johannes; Papp, László; Tóth, Zoltán; Laqmani, Azien; Apostolova, Ivayla; Adam, Gerhard; Mautner, Victor F.; Derlin, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the metabolically active whole-body tumor volume (WB-MTV) on F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18-FDG PET/CT) in individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) using a three-dimensional (3D) segmentation and computerized volumetry technique, and to compare PET WB-MTV between patients with benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs). Patients and Methods Thirty-six NF1 patients (18 patients with malignant PNSTs and 18 age- and sex-matched controls with benign PNSTs) were examined by F-18-FDG PET/CT. WB-MTV, whole-body total lesion glycolysis (WB-TLG) and a set of semi-quantitative imaging-based parameters were analyzed both on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis. Results On a per-lesion basis, malignant PNSTs demonstrated both a significantly higher MTV and TLG than benign PNSTs (p < 0.0001). On a per-patient basis, WB-MTV and WB-TLG were significantly higher in patients with malignant PNSTs compared to patients with benign PNSTs (p < 0.001). ROC analysis showed that MTV and TLG could be used to differentiate between benign and malignant tumors. Conclusions WB-MTV and WB-TLG may identify malignant change and may have the potential to provide a basis for investigating molecular biomarkers that correlate with metabolically active disease manifestations. Further evaluation will determine the potential clinical impact of these PET-based parameters in NF1. PMID:26625155

  15. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Is a Challenging Diagnosis: A Systematic Pathology Review, Immunohistochemistry, and Molecular Analysis in 160 Patients From the French Sarcoma Group Database.

    PubMed

    Le Guellec, Sophie; Decouvelaere, Anne-Valérie; Filleron, Thomas; Valo, Isabelle; Charon-Barra, Céline; Robin, Yves-Marie; Terrier, Philippe; Chevreau, Christine; Coindre, Jean-Michel

    2016-07-01

    An accurate histopathologic diagnosis is essential for an adequate treatment of soft tissue sarcomas. The diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) can be complex, particularly outside the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) context. MPNST is a rare malignancy, and due to the lack of specific histologic criteria, several differential diagnoses must be considered. A total of 350 patients diagnosed with MPNST (from 1990 to 2013) were retrieved from the French sarcoma network (RRePS) and the Conticabase (Connective Tissue Cancer Network database). Tumor samples were available for 160 cases (45.2%). Pathology review, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and molecular analysis (when dealing with a monomorphic sarcoma) were systematically performed. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were evaluated to identify prognostic factors for the definitive primary MPNST (n=106) cohort. Twenty-nine tumors (18.1%) initially diagnosed as MPNST were reclassified on the basis of histologic review, IHC, and molecular analysis. Patients with NF1 disease comprised 64% of the remaining cohort. The 5-year overall survival for patients from the entire cohort was 47%, 34.8% for NF1 patients, and 68.5% for patients without NF1 disease, making NF1 syndrome an independent poor prognostic factor of survival. Positive margins and lack of radiation therapy were independent predictors of local recurrence. The Fédération Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer tumor grade was an independent prognostic indicator of metastasis. Given the therapeutic implications of a misdiagnosis, the systematic pathology review, IHC, and molecular analysis (when dealing with monomorphic sarcoma) strategy allowed reclassification of 20% of cases, mainly the sporadic MPNSTs. PMID:27158754

  16. Sec6/8 regulates Bcl-2 and Mcl-1, but not Bcl-xl, in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kikuchi, Noriaki; Goto, Kaoru; Iino, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Sec6 and Sec8, which are components of the exocyst complex, has been concerned with various roles independent of its role in secretion, such as cell migration, invadopodia formation, cytokinesis, glucose uptake, and neural development. Given the vital roles of the exocyst complex in cellular and developmental processes, the disruption of its function may be closely related to various diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and neuronal disorders. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) have high malignant potential and poor prognosis because of aggressive progression and metastasis. To date, no chemotherapeutic agents have been validated for MPNSTs treatment because how MPNSTs are resistant to chemotherapeutic agents remains unknown. This study demonstrates that combination of doxorubicin and sorafenib induces apoptosis in MPNST cells through downregulation of B cell lymphoma protein 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-related protein long form of Bcl-x (Bcl-xl), and myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1). Moreover, both Sec6 and Sec8 levels decreased after treatment with doxorubicin and sorafenib and were found to be associated with Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 expressions, but not Bcl-xl. Although Sec8 was found to be involved in the regulation of both Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 at the mRNA level, Sec6 regulated Bcl-2 at the mRNA level and the binding affinity of F-box and WD repeat domain containing 7 and Mcl-1, thereby controlling Mcl-1 at the protein level. Bcl-2 or Mcl-1 mRNA suppression by Sec6 or Sec8 depletion resulted in significant changes in nuclear factor-kappa B, cAMP response element, and p53 transcriptional activity. These results suggest that Sec6 and Sec8 are therapeutic target molecules in MPNST. PMID:26892009

  17. Endoscopic and Microscopic Microvascular Decompression.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Matthew; Lee, John Y K

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of the endoscope into the neurosurgeon's armamentarium has revolutionized ventral and anterior skull-base surgery and, more recently, has been used in the surgical treatment of cerebellopontine angle (CPA) pathology. The utilization of the endoscope in microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia and other associated cranial nerve hyperactivity syndromes allows for unparalleled panoramic views and illumination of the neurovascular structures within the CPA and identification of vessel-nerve contact traditionally unseen using the microscope. In this article, the technical advantages and challenges of using the endoscope for MVD, operative technique, and patient outcomes of endoscopic MVD are discussed. PMID:27324997

  18. Loss of H3K27 tri-methylation is a diagnostic marker for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and an indicator for an inferior survival.

    PubMed

    Cleven, Arjen H G; Sannaa, Ghadah A Al; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge; Ingram, Davis R; van de Rijn, Matt; Rubin, Brian P; de Vries, Maurits W; Watson, Kelsey L; Torres, Kelia E; Wang, Wei-Lien; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Lazar, Alexander J; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2016-06-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive sarcomas that can show overlapping features with benign neurofibromas as well as high-grade sarcomas. Additional diagnostic markers are needed to aid in this often challenging differential diagnosis. Recently mutations in two critical components of the polycomb repressor 2 (PRC2) complex, SUZ12 and EED, were reported to occur specifically in MPNSTs while such mutations are absent in neurofibromas, both in the setting of neurofibromatosis (NF) and sporadic cases. Furthermore, both SUZ12 and EED mutations in MPNSTs were associated with loss of H3K27 tri-methylation, a downstream target of PRC2. Therefore, we tested whether H3K27me3 immunohistochemistry is useful as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for MPNSTs. We performed H3K27me3 immunohistochemistry in 162 primary MPNSTs, 97 neurofibromas and 341 other tumors using tissue microarray. We observed loss of H3K27me3 in 34% (55/162) of all MPNSTs while expression was retained in all neurofibromas including atypical (n=8) and plexiform subtypes (n=24). Within other tumors we detected loss of H3K27me3 in only 7% (24/341). Surprisingly, 60% (9/15) of synovial sarcomas and 38% (3/8) of fibrosarcomatous dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) showed loss of H3K27 trimethylation. Only 1 out of 44 schwannomas showed loss of H3K27me3 and all 4 perineuriomas showed intact H3K27me3. Furthermore, MPNSTs with loss of H3K27 tri-methylation showed inferior survival compared with MPNSTs with intact H3K27 tri-methylation, which was validated in two independent cohorts. Our results indicate that H3K27me3 immunohistochemistry is useful as a diagnostic marker, in which loss of H3K27me3 favors MPNST above neurofibroma. However, H3K27me3 immunohistochemistry is not suitable to distinguish MPNST from its morphological mimicker synovial sarcoma or fibrosarcomatous DFSP. Since loss of H3K27 tri-methylation was related to poorer survival in MPNST, chromatin modification mediated

  19. Loss of H3K27 tri-methylation is a diagnostic marker for Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors and an indicator for an inferior survival

    PubMed Central

    Cleven, Arjen H.G.; Al Sannaa, Ghadah A.; Bruijn, Inge Briaire-de; Ingram, Davis R.; van de Rijn, Matt; Rubin, Brian P.; de Vries, Maurits; Watson, Kelsey; Torres, Keila E.; Wang, Wei-Lien; van Duinen, Sjoerd; Hogendoorn, Pancras C. W.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Bovée, Judith V.M.G.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive sarcomas that can show overlapping features with benign neurofibromas as well as high-grade sarcomas. Additional diagnostic markers are needed to aid in this often challenging differential diagnosis. Recently mutations in two critical components of the polycomb repressor 2 (PRC2) complex, SUZ12 and EED, were reported to occur specifically in MPNSTs while such mutations are absent in neurofibromas, both in the setting of neurofibromatosis (NF) and sporadic cases. Furthermore, both SUZ12 and EED mutations in MPNSTs were associated with loss of H3K27 tri-methylation, a downstream target of PRC2. Therefore we tested whether H3K27me3 immunohistochemistry is useful as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for MPNSTs. We performed H3K27me3 immunohistochemistry in 162 primary MPNSTs, 97 neurofibromas and 341 other tumors using tissue microarray. We observed loss of H3K27me3 in 34% (55/162) of all MPNSTs while expression was retained in all neurofibromas including atypical (n=8) and plexiform subtypes (n=24). Within other tumors we detected loss of H3K27me3 in only 7% (24/341). Surprisingly, 60% (9/15) of synovial sarcomas and 38% (3/8) of fibrosarcomatous dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) showed loss of H3K27 trimethylation. Only 1 out of 44 schwannomas showed loss of H3K27me3 and all 4 perineuriomas showed intact H3K27me3. Furthermore, MPNSTs with loss of H3K27 tri-methylation showed inferior survival compared to MPNSTs with intact H3K27 tri-methylation, which was validated in two independent cohorts. Our results indicate that H3K27me3 immunohistochemistry is useful as a diagnostic marker in which loss of H3K27me3 favours MPNST above neurofibroma. However H3K27me3 immunohistochemistry is not suitable to distinguish MPNST from its morphological mimicker synovial sarcoma or fibrosarcomatous DFSP. Since loss of H3K27 tri-methylation was related to poorer survival in MPNST, chromatin modification mediated by

  20. Giant malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with cauda equina syndrome and subarachnoid hemorrhage: Complications in a case of type 1 neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Tushar B; Singh, Maneesh Kumar; Lalla, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF1), which mainly involves ectodermal tissue arising from the neural crest, can increase the risk of developing malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), soft tissue sarcomas and subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 who developed soft tissue sarcoma, MPNST, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 22-year-old male reported right focal seizures consequence to severe headache. He had a weakness in both legs, could walk only with the support of a stick for the last 3 months and suffered from constipation and intermittent urinary retention for the past 1 week. The patient had a history of swelling in the back of left thigh for which surgical resection was done 6 months back. Cutaneous examination revealed multiple nodules of varying sizes all over the body, along with many café-au-lait spots and Lisch nodule in iris. Patient had weakness in bilateral hip abduction, extension, knee flexion, extension and ankle dorsiflexion and plantiflexion. Bilateral ankle reflexes were absent while other deep tendon reflexes were sub-optimal. A noncontrast computed tomography brain indicated subarachnoid hemorrhage in left perisylvian region. Ultrasound of left thigh showed a hypoechoic solid lesion in the posterior aspect of left thigh in muscle plane. Histopathology of the lesion following resection showed features suggestive of a low-grade pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma. Histology of cutaneous nodules was consistent with neurofibroma. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine demonstrated a tumor arising from cauda equina. Histopathological examination of the tumor suggested high-grade MPNST. Unfortunately, the patient's MPNST was inoperable, and he received palliative radiotherapy for local control of the disease. The care of a patient with neurofibromatosis requires a comprehensive multisystem evaluation. MPNST occurs in 8-13% patients with neurofibromatosis. Early diagnosis and surgical resection are key

  1. Percutaneous laser disc decompression.

    PubMed

    Choy, D S

    1995-06-01

    Herniated disc disease has an incidence of 1.7% in the U.S. Heretofore, open operative procedures were the rule for this condition when conservative measures were ineffective. Choy and Ascher introduced this new technique in February 1986 using a Nd:YAG laser introduced into the disc through an optical fiber in a needle. Percutaneous laser disc decompression is based on the principle that in an enclosed hydraulic space, such as an intact disc, a small reduction in volume is associated with a disproportionate fall in pressure. In the disc, this partial vacuum causes the herniated portion to move away from the nerve root back toward the center of the disc. This technique has been taught worldwide and is being performed in most of Europe, Japan, the United States, and Korea. In this special issue devoted to percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD), we will set forth the basic science of PLDD, patient selection, use of the holmium:YAG, and the Nd:YAG lasers, operative technique, and results. PMID:10150634

  2. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... surface of the body where it crosses the elbow. The damage destroys the nerve covering ( myelin sheath) ... be caused by: Long-term pressure on the elbow An elbow fracture or dislocation Temporary pain and ...

  3. Gravitoelectromagnetic sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goutam, H. P.; Karmakar, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we propose a gravito-electro-magnetic sheath (GEMS) model to explore the equilibrium properties of the solar plasma system. It describes the solar interior plasma (SIP) on the bounded scale and the solar wind plasma (SWP) on the unbounded scale from the viewpoint of plasma-based theory. This differs from the previously reported gravito-electrostatic sheath (GES) model employed to precisely define the solar surface boundary (SSB) on the fact that the present investigation incorporates variable temperature, magnetic field and collisional processes on the solar plasma flow dynamics. We show that the included parameters play important roles in the solar plasma dynamics. We demonstrate that the SSB location shifts outward as a result of the magnetic field by 14 % in comparison with that predicted by the GES model. As a consequence of the interaction of the plasma with magnetic field, the width of the sheath broadens by 25 % in comparison with the GES model predicted value. This physically means that the magnetic field decreases the distribution of the tiny (inertialess) electrons relative to the massive (inertial) ions, which in turn increases the confining wall potential value resulting in the increased width. Besides, the sonic point moves inward by 8 % as a result of collisions in the SIP that leads to rapid acceleration. Here, collisional dynamics plays an important role in the conversion process of the electron thermal energy into the bulk plasma flow energy. An interesting feature of continuous and smooth transition of the electric current density from the SIP to the SWP (with finite positive divergence on both the scales) through the SSB under inhomogeneous temperature distribution is also reported. Finally, the analyses may be applied to understand the realistic equilibrium dynamics of stellar plasmas never addressed before within the earlier GES framework like establishment of current-field correlation, properties of the slow solar wind and its

  4. Pre-Operative Image-based Segmentation of the Cranial Nerves and Blood Vessels in Microvascular Decompression: Can we Prevent Unnecessary Explorations?

    PubMed Central

    Dolati, P; Golby, A; Eichberg, D; Abolfotoh, M; Dunn, IF; Mukundan, S; Hulou, MM; Al-Mefty, O

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to validate the accuracy of image-based pre-operative segmentation using the gold standard endoscopic and microscopic findings for localization and pre-operative diagnosis of the offensive vessel. Patients and Methods Fourteen TN and 6 HS cases were randomly selected. All patients had 3T MRI, which included thin-sectioned 3D space T2, 3D Time of Flight and MPRAGE Sequences. Imaging sequences were loaded in BrainLab iPlanNet and fused. Individual segmentation of the affected cranial nerves and the compressing vascular structure was performed by a neurosurgeon, and the results were compared with the microscopic and endoscopic findings by two blinded neurosurgeons. For each case, at least three neurovascular landmarks were targeted. Each segmented neurovascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe over each target, and errors of localization were measured in mm. Results All patients underwent retro-sigmoid craniotomy and MVD using both microscope and endoscope. Based on image segmentation, the compressing vessel was identified in all cases except one, which was also negative intraoperatively. Perfect correspondence was found between image-based segmentation and endoscopic and microscopic images and videos (Dice coefficient of 1). Measurement accuracy was 0.45+/-0.21 mm (mean +/-SD). Conclusion Image-based segmentation is a promising method for pre-operative identification and localization of offending blood vessels causing HFS and TN. Using this method may prevent some unnecessary explorations on especially atypical cases with no vascular contacts. However, negative pre-operative image segmentation may not preclude one from exploration in classic cases of TN or HFS. A multicenter study with larger number of cases is recommended. PMID:26476700

  5. Surgical decompression for notalgia paresthetica: a case report.

    PubMed

    Williams, Eric H; Rosson, Gedge D; Elsamanoudi, Ibrahim; Dellon, A Lee

    2010-01-01

    Notalgia paresthetica is a rare nerve compression. From the Greek word noton, meaning "back," and algia, meaning "pain," "notalgia paresthetica" implies that symptoms of burning pain, itching, and/or numbness in the localized region between the spinous processes of T2 through T6 and the medial border of the scapula constitute a nerve compression syndrome. The compressed nerve is the dorsal branch of the spinal nerve. It is compressed by the paraspinous muscles and fascia against the transverse process of these spinal segments. This is the first report of symptomatic relief by decompression of this nerve. PMID:19790177

  6. Successful surgical treatment of an intraneural ganglion of the common peroneal nerve.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Garret L; Lipschultz, Todd M

    2015-04-01

    Intraneural ganglion cysts of peripheral nerves occurring within the epineural sheath are rare, and their mechanism of formation and treatment options are debated. We present a case of a 41-year-old man who presented with a complaint of lateral-sided left knee pain with numbness on the lateral side of the foot who was diagnosed with an intraneural ganglion of the common peroneal nerve (CPN). He was treated initially with common peroneal epineural decompression only to have symptoms recur 6 weeks postoperatively. The patient was subsequently treated utilizing the suggestions of the "unified articular theory," which proposes a small recurrent articular branch of the CPN as the source of cyst fluid. This branch was surgically detached, leading to complete alleviation of his symptoms. When the patient was reevaluated 2 years postoperatively, his preoperative symptoms had resolved, and a follow-up magnetic resonance image showed resolution of the enlargement of the CPN. PMID:25844595

  7. Intraneural ganglion cyst on the external popliteal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Rendon, Diego; Pescador, David; Cano, Carlos; Blanco, Juan

    2014-01-01

    There are many causes for the paralysis of the external sciatic popliteal nerve , such as the intraneural ganglion cyst. In this case, we evaluate a 52-year-old woman with no relevant personal record, who was admitted with paresis of the right foot of 4 months of evolution associated with alterations in the sensitivity that rose up to the posterolateral region of the leg. The diagnosis was based on MR and cyst decompression and disconnection of the articular branch. Given the low incidence of these lesions, their origin is still subject to controversy. The most widely accepted theory is the unifying articular theory described by Spinner in the year 2003. Intraneural ganglion cysts must be included in the differential diagnosis of progressive paralysis of the sciatic nerve, lesions of the nerve root at L5 and nerve sheath tumours that start at the lateral compartment of the knee. The treatment of a fibular intraneural ganglion cyst must be surgical and the operation must be performed as soon as possible. PMID:24891476

  8. Decompressive craniectomy: technical note.

    PubMed

    Quinn, T M; Taylor, J J; Magarik, J A; Vought, E; Kindy, M S; Ellegala, D B

    2011-04-01

    Decompressive craniectomy is a neurosurgical technique in which a portion of the skull is removed to reduce intracranial pressure. The rationale for this procedure is based on the Monro-Kellie Doctrine; expanding the physical space confining edematous brain tissue after traumatic brain injury will reduce intracranial pressure. There is significant debate over the efficacy of decompressive craniectomy despite its sound rationale and historical significance. Considerable variation in the employment of decompressive craniectomy, particularly for secondary brain injury, explains the inconsistent results and mixed opinions of this potentially valuable technique. One way to address these concerns is to establish a consistent methodology for performing decompressive craniectomies. The purpose of this paper is to begin accomplishing this goal and to emphasize the critical points of the hemicraniectomy and bicoronal (Kjellberg type) craniectomy. PMID:20637010

  9. [Decompression of deep divers].

    PubMed

    Gardette, B

    1989-08-01

    For industrial saturation dives over 50 m, Heliox (He-O2) is now used routinely as respiratory gas mix. The decompression after such dives has been investigated thoroughly as well on the animal (minipig, monkeys) as on humans. Results show that for a given ascending speed, the number of bubbles detectable by the Doppler method in the bloodstream rises according to the maximal depth. The incidence of decompression accidents follows the same trend. This finding prompted us to adopt since 1979 slower decompression speeds. Moreover we modified the ascension profile, using henceforth a linear decompression in maintaining a constant speed for a given partial oxygen pressure. For our research program Hydra, we replaced in part Helium by Hydrogen in the respiratory gas mix. We were thus able to do the first hydrogen saturation decompression between 450 and 200 meters, during our Hydra V (1985) experiment. During our following diving research program Hydra VI (1986), 8 divers were decompressed under Hydreliox (H2-He-O2) mix from 500 to 300 m by eliminating hydrogen by chemical means. We used for this purpose a dehydrogenation apparatus developed by our engineering team. These decompressions took place without any difficulty and only a low number of bubbles detected. It is therefore possible to use decompression speeds for hydrogen and helium which are very similar. A confirmatory experiment on mice, where we exposed them to a 2000 m depth dive under Hydreliox (H2-He-O2), gave good results. This gives us the possibility, to perform gas exchange studies on small animals and to extrapolate the results to humans. PMID:2799362

  10. APPARATUS FOR SHEATHING RODS

    DOEpatents

    Ford, W.K.; Wyatt, M.; Plail, S.

    1961-08-01

    An arrangement is described for sealing a solid body of nuclear fuel, such as a uranium metal rod, into a closelyfitting thin metallic sheath with an internal atmosphere of inert gas. The sheathing process consists of subjecting the sheath, loaded with the nuclear fuel body, to the sequential operations of evacuation, gas-filling, drawing (to entrap inert gas and secure close contact between sheath and body), and sealing. (AEC)

  11. Communication through plasma sheaths

    SciTech Connect

    Korotkevich, A. O.; Newell, A. C.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2007-10-15

    We wish to transmit messages to and from a hypersonic vehicle around which a plasma sheath has formed. For long distance transmission, the signal carrying these messages must be necessarily low frequency, typically 2 GHz, to which the plasma sheath is opaque. The idea is to use the plasma properties to make the plasma sheath appear transparent.

  12. Surgical decompression in lower-extremity diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rader, Andrew J

    2005-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can be a devastating complication of diabetes mellitus. This article describes surgical decompression as a means of restoring sensation and relieving painful neuropathy symptoms. A prospective study was performed involving patients diagnosed as having type 1 or type 2 diabetes with lower-extremity peripheral neuropathy. The neuropathy diagnosis was confirmed using quantitative sensory testing. Visual analog scales were used for subjective assessment before and after surgery. Treatment consisted of external and as-needed internal neurolysis of the common peroneal, deep peroneal, tibial, medial plantar, lateral plantar, and calcaneal nerves. Subjective pain perception and objective sensibility were significantly improved in most patients who underwent the described decompression. Surgical decompression of multiple peripheral nerves in the lower extremities is a valid and effective method of providing symptomatic relief of neuropathy pain and restoring sensation. PMID:16166461

  13. [Ganglia of peripheral nerves].

    PubMed

    Tatagiba, M; Penkert, G; Samii, M

    1993-01-01

    The authors present two different types of ganglion affecting the peripheral nerves: extraneural and intraneural ganglion. Compression of peripheral nerves by articular ganglions is well known. The surgical management involves the complete removal of the lesion with preservation of most nerve fascicles. Intraneural ganglion is an uncommon lesion which affects the nerve diffusely. The nerve fascicles are usually intimately involved between the cysts, making complete removal of all cysts impossible. There is no agreement about the best surgical management to be applied in these cases. Two possibilities are available: opening of the epineural sheath lengthwise and pressing out the lesion; or resection of the affected part of the nerve and performing a nerve reconstruction. While in case of extraneural ganglion the postoperative clinical evolution is very favourable, only long follow up studies will reveal in case of intraneural ganglion the best surgical approach. PMID:8128785

  14. Cutaneous decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Tasios, Konstantinos; Sidiras, Georgios Gr; Kalentzos, Vasileios; Pyrpasopoulou, Athina

    2014-03-01

    A probable case of decompression illness with associated cutis marmorata is presented, which regressed over a few hours with oxygen breathing and after intravenous methylprednisolone and fluid resuscitation without recompression. He was eventually transferred for hyperbaric treatment some 10 hours post dive. Cutaneous decompression illness is not associated with high mortality per se, but prompt and accurate recognition is warranted, as it may represent a prodromal feature of potentially life-threatening complications. However, in this case, as differential diagnosis, an allergic reaction remains possible. PMID:24687485

  15. Decompression–Avulsion of the Auriculotemporal Nerve for Treatment of Migraines and Chronic Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Sanniec, Kyle; Borsting, Emily; Amirlak, Bardia

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Surgical decompression of peripheral branches of the trigeminal and occipital nerves has been shown to alleviate migraine symptoms. Site II surgery involves decompression of the zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve by the technique developed by Guyuron. Failure of site II surgery may occur secondary to an inability to recognize a second temporal trigger: site V, the auriculotemporal nerve. A direct approach for site V has been used with no clear description in the literature. Herein, we describe a safe and efficient method for auriculotemporal nerve decompression during the Guyuron endoscopic approach. Close attention to all temporal sites is necessary to avoid potential failure of migraine decompression surgery. PMID:27200240

  16. RF Sheath Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2007-11-01

    RF sheath formation on the antennas and walls in ICRF-heated experiments can reduce the heating efficiency, limit the coupled power, and cause damage to plasma-facing structures. The sheaths are driven by a slow wave component of the rf field due to a mismatch between the magnetic field and the boundary (antenna or wall). Quantitative modeling of the highly nonlinear sheaths may now be feasible for the first time in massively-parallel-processing (MPP) codes developed in the RF SciDAC project. Recently, a new approach to sheath modeling was proposed,ootnotetextD.A. D'Ippolito and J.R. Myra, Phys. Plasmas 13, 102508 (2006). in which the sheath physics is incorporated into the RF wave computation by using a modified boundary condition (BC) on the RF fields in both wave propagation and antenna codes. Here, we illustrate the use of the sheath BC for near-field sheaths by a model calculation that includes electromagnetic effects and a simple antenna coupling model. Properties of the model (such as the role of sheath-plasma waves) and implications for antenna codes such as TOPICAootnotetextV. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion 46, S476 (2006). will be discussed.

  17. Plasma-Sheath Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Karl-Ulrich

    2012-10-01

    In typical gas discharges a quasineutral plasma is shielded from a negativ absorbing wall by a thin positive sheath that is nearly planar and collision-free. The subdivision of ``plasma'' and ``sheath'' was introduced by Langmuir and is based on a small ratio of the electron Debye lenghth λD to the dominant competing characteristic plasma length l. Depending on the special conditions, l may represent, e.g., the plasma extension, the ionization length, the ion mean free path, the ion gyro radius, or a geometric length. Strictly speaking, this subdivion is possible only in the asymptotic limit λD/l->0. The asymptotic analysis results in singularities at the ``sheath edge'' closely related to the ``Bohm criterion.'' Due to these singularities a direct smooth matching of the separate plasma and sheath soltions is not possible. To obtain a consistent smooth transition, the singular sheath edge must be bridged by an additinal narrow ``intermediate'' model zone accounting both for plasma processes (e.g., collisions) and for the first build up of space charge. Due to this complexity and to different interpretations of the ``classical'' papers by Langmuir and Bohm, the asymptotic plasma-sheath concept and the definition of the sheath edge were questioned and resulted in controversies during the last two decades. We discuss attempts to re-define the sheath edge, to account for finite values of λD/l in the Bohm criterion, and demonstrate the consistent matching of plasma and sheath. The investigations of the plasma-sheath transition discussed so far are based on a simplified fluid analysis that cannot account for the essential inhomogeneity of the boundary layer and for the dominant role of slow ions in space charge formation. Therefore we give special emphasis to the kinetic theory of the plasma-sheath transition. Unfortunately this approach results in an additional mathematical difficulty caused by ions with zero velocity. We discuss attempts to avoid this singularity by

  18. Validation of diving decompression tables.

    PubMed

    Kłos, Ryszard; Nishi, Ron; Olszański, Roman

    2002-01-01

    Research on the validation of decompression tables is one of the common subject areas of the co-operation undertaken between the Defence and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine, Toronto, Canada, and The Naval Academy of Gdynia, Poland. For several years now, a systematic survey of diving technologies has been conducted among the target projects financed by the Polish State Committee for Scientific Research and the Polish Navy. Among the most important problems discussed have been various aspects of decompression safety. The present paper shows a study to standardise and unify validation procedures for decompression in the Polish Navy. PMID:12608591

  19. Microvascular decompression for intractable singultus.

    PubMed

    Saito, Atsushi; Hatayama, Toru; Kon, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Taigen; Sasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    Intractable singultus due to cerebrovascular disease is very rare. We report a case of intractable singultus that improved after microvascular decompression and present a literature review. The patient was a 58-year-old man with a 30-year history of persistent singultus. Its frequency and duration gradually increased and it was resistant to multiple medical treatments. Microvascular decompression to relieve pressure on the anterolateral surface of the lower medulla oblongata from the vertebral artery resulted in the resolution of singultus. Patients with intractable idiopathic singultus who fail to respond to medical therapy need to be considered for the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases and microvascular decompression. PMID:27335312

  20. Delayed Sciatic Nerve Injury Resulting From Myositis Ossificans Traumatica.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhe; Wilson, Thomas J; Jacobson, Jon A; Hollon, Todd C; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2016-05-01

    A motorcyclist sustained multiple-system trauma, including a left buttock hematoma requiring decompression and evacuation. Presentation for severe hip pain and lower extremity weakness was delayed. Imaging revealed myositis ossificans traumatica compressing the sciatic nerve in the buttock. The patient underwent sciatic nerve decompression with resection of heterotopic calcification, resulting in improvement in pain and left lower extremity function. This case illustrates the contrast in differential diagnosis of peripheral nerve injury immediately posttrauma and that occurring in a slow, delayed fashion posttrauma. Myositis ossificans may be an underrecognized complication of trauma but should be considered in cases of delayed peripheral nerve injury after trauma. PMID:26548968

  1. A neurogenic tumor containing a low-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) component with loss of p16 expression and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A/p16: a case report showing progression from a neurofibroma to a high-grade MPNST.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Koda, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Development of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) is a stepwise process that involves the alteration of many cell cycle regulators and the double inactivation of the NF1 gene. Inactivation of the TP53 gene and deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene are known to play an important role in the process. Herein, we present a 19-year-old man with a familial history of neurofibromatosis type 1, in whom the tumor arose from the intercostal nerve and showed 3 components: a neurofibroma, a low-grade MPNST, and a high-grade MPNST. Loss of p16 expression and homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene were observed in both the low-grade and the high-grade MPNST. In contrast to low-grade MPNSTs, high-grade MPNSTs generally tend to lose expression of p16 and harbor homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene. Loss of p16 expression and homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene in low-grade MPNST in our case might be related to its progression to high-grade MPNST. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study correlating the p16 expression status and CDKN2A/p16 gene alteration in low-grade MPNSTs. PMID:26191206

  2. Sheath energy transmission in a collisional plasma with collisionless sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xian-Zhu Guo, Zehua

    2015-10-15

    Sheath energy transmission governs the plasma energy exhaust onto a material surface. The ion channel is dominated by convection, but the electron channel has a significant thermal conduction component, which is dominated by the Knudsen layer effect in the presence of an absorbing wall. First-principle kinetic simulations reveal a robustly supersonic sheath entry flow. The ion sheath energy transmission and the sheath potential are accurately predicted by a sheath model of truncated bi-Maxwellian electron distribution. The electron energy transmission is further enhanced by a parallel heat flux of the perpendicular degrees of freedom.

  3. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xing-long; Wang, Pei; Sun, Bo; Liu, Shi-bo; Gao, Yun-feng; He, Xin-ze; Yu, Chang-yu

    2015-01-01

    Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery. PMID:26692866

  4. Two Portal Percutaneous Endoscopic Decompression for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Dilokhuttakarn, Thitinut

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose To report the outcomes of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis treated with percutaneous endoscopic decompression, focusing on the results of clinical evaluations. Overview of Literature There are no studies about two portal percutaneous endoscopic decompression in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods Medical and surgical complications were examined and clinical results were analyzed for 30 patients who consecutively underwent two portal percutaneous endoscopic decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis were reviewed. The operations were performed by unilateral laminotomy for bilateral decompression. Results All patients displayed clinical improvement when were evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS) score of pain, Oswestry disability index (ODI) and Macnab criteria. The improvement of VAS and ODI was 8.3±0.7 to 2.3±2.6 and 65.2±13.7 to 24.0±15.5, respectively (both p<0.05). Complications were the same as for open decompression. The most common complication was transient nerve root paresthesia. Conclusions Surgical decompression with two portal percutaneous endoscopic decompression has initial benefits, but long-term studies should pay more attention to the risks of postoperative instability and restenosis as well as the need for re-operation. Further investigations with long-term results are thus required. PMID:27114776

  5. Radial tunnel syndrome caused by ganglion cyst: treatment by arthroscopic cyst decompression.

    PubMed

    Mileti, Joseph; Largacha, Mauricio; O'Driscoll, Shawn W

    2004-05-01

    Compressive neuropathies of the radial nerve at the elbow can lead to one of 2 clinical entities. Posterior interosseous syndrome is primarily a motor deficiency of the posterior interosseous nerve, and radial tunnel syndrome presents as pain along the radial tunnel and extensor muscle mass. The radial nerve can be compressed at a number of sites around the elbow. In addition, numerous mass lesions reported in the literature can cause compressive neuropathy of the radial nerve at the elbow. Standard surgical management for persistent radial tunnel syndrome that is refractory to nonsurgical treatment is open decompression of the radial nerve. Cysts occurring in other joints are commonly treated arthroscopically. Supraglenoid cysts of the shoulder, meniscal cysts in the knee, and dorsal wrist ganglia are routinely treated with arthroscopic decompression or excision with management of the underlying etiology of the cyst. We present a case of radial tunnel syndrome caused by a ganglion cyst of the proximal radioulnar joint that was treated using arthroscopic excision of the cyst and decompression of the radial nerve. PMID:15122155

  6. Chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor microspheres repair facial nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huawei; Wen, Weisheng; Hu, Min; Bi, Wenting; Chen, Lijie; Liu, Sanxia; Chen, Peng; Tan, Xinying

    2013-01-01

    Microspheres containing nerve growth factor for sustained release were prepared by a compound method, and implanted into chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm defects on the right buccal branches of the facial nerve in rabbits. In addition, chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor or normal saline, as well as autologous nerve, were used as controls. At 90 days post-surgery, the muscular atrophy on the right upper lip was more evident in the nerve growth factor and normal sa-line groups than in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups. physiological analysis revealed that the nerve conduction velocity and amplitude were significantly higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. Moreover, histological observation illustrated that the di-ameter, number, alignment and myelin sheath thickness of myelinated nerves derived from rabbits were higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. These findings indicate that chitosan nerve conduits bined with microspheres for sustained release of nerve growth factor can significantly improve facial nerve defect repair in rabbits. PMID:25206635

  7. Chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor microspheres repair facial nerve defects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huawei; Wen, Weisheng; Hu, Min; Bi, Wenting; Chen, Lijie; Liu, Sanxia; Chen, Peng; Tan, Xinying

    2013-11-25

    Microspheres containing nerve growth factor for sustained release were prepared by a compound method, and implanted into chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm defects on the right buccal branches of the facial nerve in rabbits. In addition, chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor or normal saline, as well as autologous nerve, were used as controls. At 90 days post-surgery, the muscular atrophy on the right upper lip was more evident in the nerve growth factor and normal sa-line groups than in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups. physiological analysis revealed that the nerve conduction velocity and amplitude were significantly higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. Moreover, histological observation illustrated that the di-ameter, number, alignment and myelin sheath thickness of myelinated nerves derived from rabbits were higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. These findings indicate that chitosan nerve conduits bined with microspheres for sustained release of nerve growth factor can significantly improve facial nerve defect repair in rabbits. PMID:25206635

  8. Decompressive craniectomy in neurocritical care.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Wei; Li, Jin-Ping; Song, Ying-Lun; Tan, Ke; Wang, Yu; Li, Tao; Guo, Peng; Li, Xiong; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Qi-Huang

    2016-05-01

    Recently, several randomized controlled trials (RCT) investigating the effectiveness of decompressive craniectomy in the context of neurocritical illnesses have been completed. Thus, a meta-analysis to update the current evidence regarding the effects of decompressive craniectomy is necessary. We searched PUBMED, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Other sources, including internet-based clinical trial registries and grey literature, were also searched. After searching the literature, two investigators independently performed literature screening, assessing the quality of the included trials and extracting the data. The outcome measures included the composite outcome of death or dependence and the risk of death. Ten RCT were included: seven RCT were on malignant middle cerebral artery infarction (MCAI) and three were on severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Decompressive craniectomy significantly reduced the risk of death for patients suffering malignant MCAI (risk ratio [RR] 0.46, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.36-0.59, P<0.00001) in comparison with no reduction in the risk of death for patients with severe TBI (RR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.48-1.42, P=0.49). However, there was no significant difference in the composite risk of death or dependence at the final follow-up between the decompressive craniectomy group and the conservative treatment group for either malignant MCAI or severe TBI. The present meta-analysis indicates that decompressive craniectomy can significantly reduce the risk of death for patients with malignant MCAI, although no evidence demonstrates that decompressive craniectomy is associated with a reduced risk of death or dependence for TBI patients. PMID:26879572

  9. Recognising and managing decompression illness.

    PubMed

    Caton-Richards, Michelle

    2013-11-01

    Seen primarily in scuba divers who have breathed compressed air, decompression illness is a rare but potentially fatal condition. Prompt recognition and treatment of the illness, and urgent referral of patients to hyperbaric chambers, can mean the difference between full recovery and paralysis or death. This article describes decompression illness and how to recognise it, and discusses the treatment that patients require for the best chance of recovery with no adverse effects. It also includes a case study of a patient who developed this condition after a dive. PMID:24219686

  10. Analytic Model of Antenna Sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2008-11-01

    RF sheaths are generated on ICRF antennas whenever the launched fast wave also drives a slow wave, e.g. when the magnetic field is tilted (not perpendicular to the current straps). A new approach to sheath modeling was recently proposed in which the RF waves are computed using a modified boundary condition at the sheath surface to describe the plasma-sheath coupling. Here, we illustrate the use of the sheath BC for antenna sheaths by a model electromagnetic perturbation calculation, treating the B field tilt as a small parameter. Analytic expressions are obtained for the sheath voltage and the rf electric field parallel to B in both sheath and plasma regions, including the Child-Langmuir (self-consistency) constraint. It is shown that the plasma corrections to the sheath voltage (which screen the rf field) can be important. The simple vacuum-field sheath-voltage estimate is obtained as a limiting case. Implications for antenna codes such as TOPICA will be discussed. D.A. D'Ippolito and J.R. Myra, Phys. Plasmas 13, 102508 (2006). V. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion 46, S476 (2006).

  11. A Start Toward Micronucleus-Based Decompression Models; Altitude Decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Liew, H. D.; Conkin, Johnny

    2007-01-01

    Do gaseous micronuclei trigger the formation of bubbles in decompression sickness (DCS)? Most previous instructions for DCS prevention have been oriented toward supersaturated gas in tissue. We are developing a mathematical model that is oriented toward the expected behavior of micronuclei. The issue is simplified in altitude decompressions because the aviator or astronaut is exposed only to decompression, whereas in diving there is a compression before the decompression. The model deals with four variables: duration of breathing of 100% oxygen before going to altitude (O2 prebreathing), altitude of the exposure, exposure duration, and rate of ascent. Assumptions: a) there is a population of micronuclei of various sizes having a range of characteristics, b) micronuclei are stable until they grow to a certain critical nucleation radius, c) it takes time for gas to diffuse in or out of micronuclei, and d) all other variables being equal, growth of micronuclei upon decompression is more rapid at high altitude because of the rarified gas in the micronuclei. To estimate parameters, we use a dataset of 4,756 men in altitude chambers exposed to various combinations of the model s variables. The model predicts occurrence of DCS symptoms quite well. It is notable that both the altitude chamber data and the model show little effect of O2 prebreathing until it lasts more than 60 minutes; this is in contrast to a conventional idea that the benefit of prebreathing is directly due to exponential washout of tissue nitrogen. The delay in response to O2 prebreathing can be interpreted as time required for outward diffusion of nitrogen; when the micronuclei become small enough, they are disabled, either by crushing or because they cannot expand to a critical nucleation size when the subject ascends to altitude.

  12. Ischiofemoral Space Decompression Through Posterolateral Approach: Cutting Block Technique

    PubMed Central

    Howse, Elizabeth A.; Mannava, Sandeep; Tamam, Cüneyt; Martin, Hal D.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Stubbs, Allston J.

    2014-01-01

    Ischiofemoral space impingement has become an increasingly recognized extracapsular cause of atypical hip, deep gluteal, and groin pain that can be treated endoscopically. We present a minimally invasive posterolateral technique that preserves the attachment of the iliopsoas tendon and quadratus femoris insertion while decompressing the ischiofemoral space by resecting the lesser trochanter. Furthermore, we present tips to perform this technique in a manner that minimizes the potential for damage to the sciatic nerve. This technique also allows the surgeon to treat concurrent hip pathology arthroscopically. PMID:25685670

  13. COMPUTERIZED EXPERT SYSTEM FOR EVALUATION OF AUTOMATED VISUAL FIELDS FROM THE ISCHEMIC OPTIC NEUROPATHY DECOMPRESSION TRIAL: METHODS, BASELINE FIELDS, AND SIX-MONTH LONGITUDINAL FOLLOW-UP

    PubMed Central

    Feldon, Steven E

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To validate a computerized expert system evaluating visual fields in a prospective clinical trial, the Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Decompression Trial (IONDT). To identify the pattern and within-pattern severity of field defects for study eyes at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Design Humphrey visual field (HVF) change was used as the outcome measure for a prospective, randomized, multi-center trial to test the null hypothesis that optic nerve sheath decompression was ineffective in treating nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and to ascertain the natural history of the disease. Methods An expert panel established criteria for the type and severity of visual field defects. Using these criteria, a rule-based computerized expert system interpreted HVF from baseline and 6-month visits for patients randomized to surgery or careful follow-up and for patients who were not randomized. Results A computerized expert system was devised and validated. The system was then used to analyze HVFs. The pattern of defects found at baseline for patients randomized to surgery did not differ from that of patients randomized to careful follow-up. The most common pattern of defect was a superior and inferior arcuate with central scotoma for randomized eyes (19.2%) and a superior and inferior arcuate for nonrandomized eyes (30.6%). Field patterns at 6 months and baseline were not different. For randomized study eyes, the superior altitudinal defects improved (P = .03), as did the inferior altitudinal defects (P = .01). For nonrandomized study eyes, only the inferior altitudinal defects improved (P = .02). No treatment effect was noted. Conclusions A novel rule-based expert system successfully interpreted visual field defects at baseline of eyes enrolled in the IONDT. PMID:15747764

  14. Immediate versus delayed primary nerve repair in the rabbit sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Piskin, Ahmet; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zühal; Çitlak, Atilla; Sezgin, Hicabi; Yazιcι, Ozgür; Kaplan, Süleyman

    2013-12-25

    It is well known that peripheral nerve injury should be treated immediately in the clinic, but in some instances, repair can be delayed. This study investigated the effects of immediate versus delayed (3 days after injury) neurorrhaphy on repair of transected sciatic nerve in New Zealand rabbits using stereological, histomorphological and biomechanical methods. At 8 weeks after immediate and delayed neurorrhaphy, axon number and area in the sciatic nerve, myelin sheath and epineurium thickness, Schwann cell morphology, and the mechanical property of nerve fibers did not differ obviously. These results indicate that delayed neurorrhaphy do not produce any deleterious effect on sciatic nerve repair. PMID:25206663

  15. Nerve conduction and electromyography studies.

    PubMed

    Kane, N M; Oware, A

    2012-07-01

    Nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyography (EMG), often shortened to 'EMGs', are a useful adjunct to clinical examination of the peripheral nervous system and striated skeletal muscle. NCS provide an efficient and rapid method of quantifying nerve conduction velocity (CV) and the amplitude of both sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) and compound motor action potentials (cMAPs). The CV reflects speed of propagation of action potentials, by saltatory conduction, along large myelinated axons in a peripheral nerve. The amplitude of SNAPs is in part determined by the number of axons in a sensory nerve, whilst amplitude of cMAPs reflects integrated function of the motor axons, neuromuscular junction and striated muscle. Repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) can identify defects of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) transmission, pre- or post-synaptic. Needle EMG examination can detect myopathic changes in muscle and signs of denervation. Combinations of these procedures can establish if motor and/or sensory nerve cell bodies or peripheral nerves are damaged (e.g. motor neuronopathy, sensory ganglionopathy or neuropathy), and also indicate if the primary target is the axon or the myelin sheath (i.e. axonal or demyelinating neuropathies). The distribution of nerve damage can be determined as either generalised, multifocal (mononeuropathy multiplex) or focal. The latter often due to compression at the common entrapment sites (such as the carpal tunnel, Guyon's canal, cubital tunnel, radial groove, fibular head and tarsal tunnel, to name but a few of the reported hundred or so 'entrapment neuropathies'). PMID:22614870

  16. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sheath. (a) Identification. A glans sheath device is a sheath which covers only the glans penis or part... the entire shaft of the penis. It is indicated only for the prevention of pregnancy and not for...

  17. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... sheath. (a) Identification. A glans sheath device is a sheath which covers only the glans penis or part... the entire shaft of the penis. It is indicated only for the prevention of pregnancy and not for...

  18. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sheath. (a) Identification. A glans sheath device is a sheath which covers only the glans penis or part... the entire shaft of the penis. It is indicated only for the prevention of pregnancy and not for...

  19. Orthostatic mesodiencephalic dysfunction after decompressive craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Bijlenga, Philippe; Zumofen, Daniel; Yilmaz, Hasan; Creisson, Eric; de Tribolet, Nicolas

    2007-04-01

    An extreme syndrome of the trephined after decompressive craniectomy is reported here. The most extensive clinical syndrome observed was established over 4 weeks and consisted of bradypsychia, dysartria, and limb rigidity with equine varus feet predominating on the right. The syndrome was aggravated when the patient was sitting with the sequential appearance over minutes of a typical parkinsonian levodopa-resistant tremor starting on the right side, extending to all four limbs, followed by diplopia resulting from a left abducens nerve palsy followed by a left-sided mydriasis. All signs recovered within 1-2 h after horizontalisation. It was correlated with an orthostatic progressive sinking of the skin flap, MRI and CT scan mesodiencephalic distortion without evidence of parenchymal lesion. Brain stem auditory evoked potential wave III latency increases were observed on the right side on verticalisation of the patient. EEG exploration excluded any epileptic activity. Symptoms were fully recovered within 2 days after cranioplasty was performed. The cranioplasty had to be removed twice due to infection. Bradypsychia, speech fluency, limb rigidity and tremor reappeared within a week after removal of the prosthesis. While waiting for sterilisation of the operative site, the symptoms were successfully prevented by a custom-made transparent suction-cup helmet before completion of cranioplasty. PMID:17119005

  20. Challenging diagnosis of peripillous sheaths.

    PubMed

    Gnarra, Maria; Saraceni, Pierluigi; Rossi, Alfredo; Murabit, Amera; Caradonna, Emanuela; Fania, Luca; Feliciani, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Peripillous sheaths, or hair casts, are asymptomatic, white, cylindrical concretions that encircle the hair without adhering to it. They are infrequently documented in the literature, are often misdiagnosed, and generate avoidable apprehension and expense for parents and caregivers. Dermoscopy is the standard for a rapid, noninvasive, cost-effective diagnosis. We describe a case of peripillous sheaths presenting in a boy. PMID:24846654

  1. Radiation therapy for primary optic nerve meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.L.; Vuksanovic, M.M.; Yates, B.M.; Bienfang, D.C.

    1981-06-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningiomas, formerly thought to be rare, have been encountered with surprising frequency since the widespread use of computed tomography. Early diagnosis led to an enthusiastic surgical approach to these lesions, but this has been tempered by the realization that even in the best of hands, blindness followed such surgery with distressing frequency. Optic nerve sheath meningiomas may be divided into primary, secondary, and multiple meningioma groups. Five patients with primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas treated with irradiation therapy are presented in this report. Improvement in visual acuity, stabilization to increase in the visual field, and decrease in size to total regression of optociliary veins, have been documented following irradiation therapy of the posterior orbital and intracanalicular portions of the optic nerve in some of these cases. Although each patient must be carefully individualized, there is no question that visual palliation can be achieved in some cases of optic nerve sheath meningioma. Further investigation of this therapeutic modality in selected cases in advised.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerves and chiasm

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Herfkins, R.; Gager, W.E.; Meyer, G.A.; Koehler, P.R.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) of the optic nerves and chiasm was compared with computed tomography (CT) in 4 healthy volunteers, 4 patients without orbital or chiasmal abnormalities, and 4 patients with tumor (anterior clinoid meningioma in 2, optic nerve glioma in 1, and optic nerve sheath meningioma in 1). MR was found to be effective in demonstrating the optic nerves and related structures, particularly the intracanalicular portion of the nerve which is difficult to see with CT. Best results were achieved with partial saturation recovery (SR) images. As axial views cannot always distinguish the ethmoid sinus tissue from the optic nerve, it may be necessary to employ both axial and coronal images.

  3. Sonography of Common Peripheral Nerve Disorders With Clinical Correlation.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jon A; Wilson, Thomas J; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2016-04-01

    Sonography is now considered an effective method to evaluate peripheral nerves. Low cost, high resolution, the ability to image an entire limb in a short time, and dynamic assessment are several of the positive attributes of sonography. This article will review the normal appearance of peripheral nerves as shown with sonography. In addition, the most common applications for sonography of the peripheral nerves will be reviewed, which include entrapment neuropathies, intraneural ganglion cyst, nerve trauma, and peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Clinical information related to nerve disorders is also included, as it provides valuable information that can be obtained during sonographic examinations, increasing diagnostic accuracy. PMID:26931790

  4. Spaceflight Decompression Sickness Contingency Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervay, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the Decompression Sickness (DCS) Contingency Plan for manned spaceflight is shown. The topics include: 1) Approach; 2) DCS Contingency Plan Overview; 3) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Cuff Classifications; 4) On-orbit Treatment Philosophy; 5) Long Form Malfunction Procedure (MAL); 6) Medical Checklist; 7) Flight Rules; 8) Crew Training; 9) Flight Surgeon / Biomedical Engineer (BME) Training; and 10) DCS Emergency Landing Site.

  5. Cardiopulmonary Changes with Moderate Decompression in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R.; Little, T.; Doursout, M.-F.; Butler, B. D.; Chelly, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were compressed to 616 kPa for 120 min then decompressed at 38 kPa/min to assess the cardiovascular and pulmonary responses to moderate decompression stress. In one series of experiments the rats were chronically instrumented with Doppler ultrasonic probes for simultaneous measurement of blood pressure, cardiac output, heart rate, left and right ventricular wall thickening fraction, and venous bubble detection. Data were collected at base-line, throughout the compression/decompression protocol, and for 120 min post decompression. In a second series of experiments the pulmonary responses to the decompression protocol were evaluated in non-instrumented rats. Analyses included blood gases, pleural and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein and hemoglobin concentration, pulmonary edema, BAL and lung tissue phospholipids, lung compliance, and cell counts. Venous bubbles were directly observed in 90% of the rats where immediate post-decompression autopsy was performed and in 37% using implanted Doppler monitors. Cardiac output, stroke volume, and right ventricular wall thickening fractions were significantly decreased post decompression, whereas systemic vascular resistance was increased suggesting a decrease in venous return. BAL Hb and total protein levels were increased 0 and 60 min post decompression, pleural and plasma levels were unchanged. BAL white blood cells and neutrophil percentages were increased 0 and 60 min post decompression and pulmonary edema was detected. Venous bubbles produced with moderate decompression profiles give detectable cardiovascular and pulmonary responses in the rat.

  6. Bilateral superficial peroneal nerve entrapment secondary to anorexia nervosa: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of severe weight loss secondary to anorexia nervosa causing bilateral superficial peroneal nerve entrapment in a young female patient who was treated successfully by bilateral surgical decompression. PMID:18439309

  7. [Severe decompression sickness in divers].

    PubMed

    Beuster, W; van Laak, U

    1999-01-01

    The term "decompression illness (DCI)" is a disorder which arises from the presence of ectopic gas bubbles following decompression. Scuba diving poses the risk of two typically clinical syndromes: decompression sickness (DCS) and arterial gas embolism (AGE). DCS results from the formation of gas bubbles in the tissues of the body and in the blood due to rapid reduction of the environmental pressure. AGE is caused by pulmonary overinflation if the breathing gas cannot be exhaled adequately during the ascent. Although the pathophysiological mechanisms of these two disorders are quite different, both of them lead to the same result: inert gas bubbles that may cause impairment of vital functions due to hypoxia. Recognizing the signs and symptoms of DCI is the first step of the therapy. The emergency treatment contains: basic life support, advanced life support--if necessary, horizontal positioning of the victim, administration of 100% normobaric oxygen via face mask or endotracheal tube, rehydration, rapid transportation to the nearest emergency department/hyperbaric facility for definitive treatment in order to prevent serious neurological sequelae. PMID:11315407

  8. [First therapy of decompression injuries].

    PubMed

    Castan, Jan; Wirtz, Sebastian; Moecke, Heinzpeter; Schmidbauer, Willi; Ahlers, Olaf; Kerner, Thoralf

    2010-02-01

    The diving accident is a rare incident for an emergency physician which requires special physical and patho-physiological knowledge. With increasing recreational activities and the fascination of diving also for older persons diving accidents are expected to occur more often. There can be several reasons for diving accidents such as the ignorance of the physics of diving, a trauma under water as well as internistical illnesses like heart attach, stroke or hypoglycaemia. The therapy of the underlying illness should not be left aside while dealing with the patient. The careful rescue and the immobilisation are most important for the initial therapy. The patient should receive oxygen, if possible via a demand valve, until a hyperbaric chamber is reached. There is no specific medical therapy for decompression illness. It is very important that a pre-information is sent to the closest hyperbaric chamber as soon as possible since often the chamber needs some time to be properly prepared for usage. In order to receive information regarding the depth where the diving incident occured, the duration of the diving trip and the decompression stops, it is important to secure the diving computer of the victim for the hyperbaric chamber. Also outside diving, decompression illness can occur, for example working in a tunnel under hyperbaric conditions. These accidents have to be treated according to the same guidelines. PMID:20155636

  9. Neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring: II. Facial nerve function.

    PubMed

    Niparko, J K; Kileny, P R; Kemink, J L; Lee, H M; Graham, M D

    1989-01-01

    Intraoperative facial nerve monitoring provides a potentially useful adjunct to recent surgical advances in neurotology and neurosurgery. These measures further aid the surgeon in preserving facial nerve function by enhancing visual identification with electrical monitoring of mechanically evoked facial muscle activation. Facial nerve monitoring in neurotologic surgery may achieve the following goals: (1) early recognition of surgical trauma to the facial nerve, with immediate feedback made available to the surgeon through monitoring of mechanical activation; (2) assistance in distinguishing the facial nerve from regional cranial nerves and from adjacent soft tissue and tumor with selective electrical stimulation; (3) facilitation of tumor excision by electrical mapping of portions of tumor that are remote from the facial nerve; (4) confirmation of nerve stimulability at the completion of surgery; and (5) identification of the site and degree of neural dysfunction in patients undergoing nerve exploration for suspected facial nerve neoplasm or undergoing decompression in acute facial palsy. This paper provides an overview of intraoperative facial nerve monitoring principles and methodology and reports a recent clinical investigation that demonstrates the utility of facial nerve monitoring in translabyrinthine acoustic neuroma surgery. PMID:2655465

  10. Pinched Nerve

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Pinched Nerve Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Pinched Nerve? The term "pinched nerve" is a colloquial term ...

  11. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy may be done to help diagnose: Axon degeneration (destruction of the axon portion of the nerve cell) Damage to the ... Demyelination Inflammation of the nerve Leprosy Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis

  12. Sheaths: A Comparison of Magnetospheric, ICME, and Heliospheric Sheaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Richardson, J. D.; Liu, W.

    2007-01-01

    When a supersonic flow encounters an obstacles, shocks form to divert the flow around the obstacle. The region between the shock and the obstacle is the sheath, where the supersonic flow is compressed, heated, decelerated, and deflected. Supersonic flows, obstacles, and thus sheaths are observed on many scales throughout the Universe. We compare three examples seen in the heliosphere, illustrating the interaction of the solar wind with obstacles of three very different scales lengths. Magnetosheaths form behind planetary bow shocks on scales ranging from tens to 100 planetary radii. ICME sheath form behind shocks driven by solar disturbances on scale lengths of a few to tens of AU. The heliosheath forms behind the termination shock due to the obstacle presented by the interstellar medium on scale lengths of tens to a hundred AU. Despite this range in scales some common features have been observed. Magnetic holes, possibly due to mirror mode waves, have been observed in all three of these sheaths. Plasma depletion layers are observed in planetary and ICME sheaths. Other features observed in some sheaths are wave activity (ion cyclotron, plasma), energetic particles, transmission of Alfven waves/shocks, tangential discontinuities turbulence behind quasi-parallel shocks, standing slow mode waves, and reconnection on the obstacle boundary. We compare these sheath regions, discussing similarities and differences and how these may relate to the scale lengths of these regions.

  13. Nerve Regeneration in the Peripheral Nervous System versus the Central Nervous System and the Relevance to Speech and Hearing after Nerve Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Tessa; Gordon, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells normally form myelin sheaths around axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and support nerve regeneration after nerve injury. In contrast, nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is not supported by the myelinating cells known as oligodendrocytes. We have found that: 1) low frequency electrical stimulation can be…

  14. SLAP repair with arthroscopic decompression of spinoglenoid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Hashiguchi, Hiroshi; Iwashita, Satoshi; Ohkubo, Atsushi; Takai, Shinro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A spinoglenoid cyst with suprascapular nerve disorders is highly associated with superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP) lesion. Conservative or surgical treatment is applied to relieve pain and neurological symptoms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes of patients treated by arthroscopic surgery for SLAP lesion with a spinoglenoid cyst. Methods: The subjects of this study were six patients with SLAP lesion with a spinoglenoid cyst who underwent arthroscopic surgery. There was one female and five males with a mean age of 48.5 years. SLAP lesion was found in all the patients at arthroscopy. A small tear of the rotator cuff was found in the two patients. The SLAP lesion was repaired using suture anchors, and the rotator cuff tears were repaired by suture-bridge fixation. The spinoglenoid cyst was decompressed through the torn labrum in three patients, and through the released superior to posterior portion of the capsule in the other three patients. Results: All patients showed excellent improvement in pain and muscle strength at the final follow-up examination. The mean Constant score was improved from 60.5 points preoperatively to 97.2 points postoperatively. The mean visual analog scale (VAS) score decreased from 4.5 on the day of the surgery to 2.5 within one week postoperatively. Postoperative MRI showed disappearance or reduction of the spinoglenoid cyst in four and two patients, respectively. There were no complications from the surgical intervention and in the postoperative period. Discussion: The patients treated by decompression through the released capsule obtained pain relief at an early period after the surgery. Arthroscopic treatment for a spinoglenoid cyst can provide a satisfactory clinical outcome. Arthroscopic decompression of a spinoglenoid cyst through the released capsule is recommended for a safe and reliable procedure for patients with suprascapular nerve disorders. PMID:27163090

  15. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  16. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-07-15

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  17. Recurrent Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor After Effective Decompression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Li, Wei; Han, Fangkai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Yang, Xudong

    2016-07-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) has potential aggressive and infiltrative behavior. Decompression has been widely preferred for large KCOTs due to safety and lower recurrence rates. However, KCOT is still likely to recur even after effective decompression. Here, we present a rare and interesting case of recurrent KCOT after effective decompression with adjunctive enucleation. Redecompression was then performed again, and the effect was still satisfactory on long-term follow-up. PMID:27391520

  18. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, John R.

    1987-12-01

    a method for manufacturing a magnet cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely positioned thereon, is accurately positioned at a precise location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator.

  19. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, J.R.

    1987-05-15

    A method for manufacturing a magnetic cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible substrate sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator. 1 fig.

  20. Ultrasound-guided surgical treatment for ulnar nerve entrapment: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Poujade, T; Hanouz, N; Lecoq, B; Hulet, C; Collon, S

    2014-09-01

    Several open and endoscopic techniques for the surgical treatment of ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow (cubital tunnel syndrome) have been described that provide decompression with or without anterior transposition. Based on our experience with US-guided decompression for carpal tunnel syndrome in our department, we developed a similar surgical technique for the decompression of the ulnar nerve at the elbow. Using sixteen cadaver upper limbs, we performed decompression of all the structures possibly responsible for ulnar nerve compression at the elbow. The structures involved were Struthers' arcade, the cubital tunnel retinaculum, Osborne's fascia and Amadio-Beckenbaugh's arcade. The procedure was followed by anatomical dissection to confirm complete sectioning of the compressive structures, absence of iatrogenic vascular or nervous injuries and absence of nerve dislocation or instability. There were no remaining compressive structures after the release procedure. There was no iatrogenic damage to the nerves and no nerve dislocation was observed during elbow flexion or extension. In 3.4% cases, a thin superficial layer of one or more of the identified structures remained but these did not appear to compress the nerve based on US imaging. Using ultrasonographic visualization of the nerve and compressive structures is easy. Each procedure can be tailored according to the nerve compression sites. Our cadaveric study shows the feasibility of an US-guided percutaneous surgical release for ulnar nerve entrapment. PMID:24981578

  1. Graphics processing unit-assisted lossless decompression

    DOEpatents

    Loughry, Thomas A.

    2016-04-12

    Systems and methods for decompressing compressed data that has been compressed by way of a lossless compression algorithm are described herein. In a general embodiment, a graphics processing unit (GPU) is programmed to receive compressed data packets and decompress such packets in parallel. The compressed data packets are compressed representations of an image, and the lossless compression algorithm is a Rice compression algorithm.

  2. Repair of peripheral nerve with vein wrapping*

    PubMed Central

    LEUZZI, S.; ARMENIO, A.; LEONE, L.; DE SANTIS, V.; DI TURI, A.; ANNOSCIA, P.; BUFANO, L.; PASCONE, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The post–traumatic neuro-anastomosis must be protected from the surrounding environment. This barrier must be biologically inert, biodegradable, not compressing but protecting the nerve. Formation of painful neuroma is one of the major issues with neuro-anastomosis; currently there is no consensus on post-repair neuroma prevention. Aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of neuroanastomosis performed with venous sheath to reduce painful neuromas formation, improve the electrical conductivity of the repaired nerve, and reduce the discrepancies of the sectioned nerve stumps. Patients and methods From a trauma population of 320 patients treated in a single centre between January 2008 and December 2011, twenty-six patients were identified as having an injury to at least one of the peripheral nerves of the arm and enrolled in the study. Patients were divided into two groups. In the group A (16 patients) the end-to-end nerve suture was wrapped in a vein sheath and compared with the group B (10 patients) in which a simple end-to-end neurorrhaphy was performed. The venous segment used to cover the nerve micro-suture was harvested from the superficial veins of the forearm. The parameters analyzed were: functional recovery of motor nerves, sensitivity and pain. Results Average follow-up was 14 months (range: 12–24 months). The group A showed a more rapid motor and sensory recovery and a reduction of the painful symptoms compared to the control group (B). Conclusions The Authors demonstrated that, in their experience, the venous sheath provides a valid solution to avoid the dispersion of the nerve fibres, to prevent adherent scars and painful neuromas formation. Moreover it can compensate the different size of two nerve stumps, allowing, thereby, a more rapid functional and sensitive recovery without expensive devices. PMID:24841688

  3. Xenon Blocks Neuronal Injury Associated with Decompression.

    PubMed

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; David, Hélène N; Vallée, Nicolas; Meckler, Cedric; Demaistre, Sebastien; Lambrechts, Kate; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Abraini, Jacques H

    2015-01-01

    Despite state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment, about 30% of patients suffering neurologic decompression sickness (DCS) exhibit incomplete recovery. Since the mechanisms of neurologic DCS involve ischemic processes which result in excitotoxicity, it is likely that HBO in combination with an anti-excitotoxic treatment would improve the outcome in patients being treated for DCS. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of the noble gas xenon in an ex vivo model of neurologic DCS. Xenon has been shown to provide neuroprotection in multiple models of acute ischemic insults. Fast decompression compared to slow decompression induced an increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a well-known marker of sub-lethal cell injury. Post-decompression administration of xenon blocked the increase in LDH release induced by fast decompression. These data suggest that xenon could be an efficient additional treatment to HBO for the treatment of neurologic DCS. PMID:26469983

  4. Xenon Blocks Neuronal Injury Associated with Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; David, Hélène N.; Vallée, Nicolas; Meckler, Cedric; Demaistre, Sebastien; Lambrechts, Kate; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Abraini, Jacques H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment, about 30% of patients suffering neurologic decompression sickness (DCS) exhibit incomplete recovery. Since the mechanisms of neurologic DCS involve ischemic processes which result in excitotoxicity, it is likely that HBO in combination with an anti-excitotoxic treatment would improve the outcome in patients being treated for DCS. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of the noble gas xenon in an ex vivo model of neurologic DCS. Xenon has been shown to provide neuroprotection in multiple models of acute ischemic insults. Fast decompression compared to slow decompression induced an increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a well-known marker of sub-lethal cell injury. Post-decompression administration of xenon blocked the increase in LDH release induced by fast decompression. These data suggest that xenon could be an efficient additional treatment to HBO for the treatment of neurologic DCS. PMID:26469983

  5. Surgery for ganglia of the flexor tendon sheath

    PubMed Central

    Finsen, Vilhjalmur; Håberg, Øyvind; Borchgrevink, Grethe Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    There are very few reports in the literature on the results of surgery for ganglia of the flexor tendon sheaths of the digits. We reviewed 24 patients operated for flexor tendon sheath ganglia 8 (3–11) years previously. Two operations were for recurrences and one of these recurred again. There was one permanent digital nerve injury and one patient complained of cold sensibility. VAS (0=best; 100=worst) for mean general complaints from the hand was remembered as 51 before surgery and was 5 at review. Mean pain at review was reported as VAS 4 and general satisfaction with the operation as VAS 3. All stated that they would have consented to surgery if they had known the outcome in advance. We conclude that the results of surgery are good, although complications do occur. PMID:23705064

  6. Modeling Sheaths in DC Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott

    2014-10-01

    Textbook presentations on sheaths are often limited to a discussion of Bohm's criterion because more detailed analysis results in equations that can be solved only by numerical methods. There are both fluid and kinetic models for sheaths that can be solved by packaged numerical integration routines in a mathematical spreadsheet such as Mathematica, Matlab, or Mathcad. The potential profiles and the currents for sheaths at boundaries usually have monotonic profiles that are easily modeled using a Boltzmann distribution for electrons and for ions using the fluid momentum equation and the continuity equation with a source term describing plasma production. Additional ion species and bi-Maxwellian electron distributions are easily included. Virtual cathodes may form above emissive surfaces which divide the distribution function of emitted electrons into a passing population and a reflected population that can be modeled only by a kinetic approach. For sheaths at inserted objects such as probes and dust particles, it is customary to prescribe the plasma characteristics at infinity, to ignore creation of new plasma by ionization, and to solve for the radial variation of the density near the object and for the current collected by the object. A kinetic model is required for sheaths at inserted objects because the distribution function must be divided into passing particles and collected particles.

  7. Sciatic nerve enlargement in the Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meirer, Romed; Huemer, Georg M; Shafighi, Maziar; Kamelger, Florian S; Hussl, Heribert; Piza-Katzer, Hildegunde

    2005-06-01

    The case of a 35-year-old woman with Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome (KTWS) showing clinical symptoms of a peroneal nerve lesion is presented. An immense nerve enlargement along most of the sciatic, peroneal and tibial nerve was found to be due to a lipoma arising from the epi- and perineurium. Treatment consisted of extensive microsurgical neurolysis and excision of the tumor resulting in decompression of the affected nerves. Although rare, a perineural lipoma should be kept in mind in patients with KTWS showing neurological abnormalities. PMID:15897045

  8. Ulnar Nerve Compression in Guyon's Canal by Ganglion Cyst.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kyung-Woo; Kim, Min-Su; Chang, Chul-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Ho

    2011-02-01

    Compression of the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal can result from repeated blunt trauma, fracture of the hamate's hook, and arterial thrombosis or aneurysm. In addition, conditions such as ganglia, rheumatoid arthritis and ulnar artery disease can rapidly compress the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal. A ganglion cyst can acutely protrude or grow, which also might compress the ulnar nerve. So, clinicians should consider a ganglion cyst in Guyon's canal as a possible underlying cause of ulnar nerve compression in patients with a sudden decrease in hand strength. We believe that early decompression with removal of the ganglion is very important to promote complete recovery. PMID:21519507

  9. Ulnar Nerve Compression in Guyon's Canal by Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kyung-Woo; Kim, Min-Su; Chang, Chul-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Compression of the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal can result from repeated blunt trauma, fracture of the hamate's hook, and arterial thrombosis or aneurysm. In addition, conditions such as ganglia, rheumatoid arthritis and ulnar artery disease can rapidly compress the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal. A ganglion cyst can acutely protrude or grow, which also might compress the ulnar nerve. So, clinicians should consider a ganglion cyst in Guyon's canal as a possible underlying cause of ulnar nerve compression in patients with a sudden decrease in hand strength. We believe that early decompression with removal of the ganglion is very important to promote complete recovery. PMID:21519507

  10. libpolycomp: Compression/decompression library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasi, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Libpolycomp compresses and decompresses one-dimensional streams of numbers by means of several algorithms. It is well-suited for time-ordered data acquired by astronomical instruments or simulations. One of the algorithms, called "polynomial compression", combines two widely-used ideas (namely, polynomial approximation and filtering of Fourier series) to achieve substantial compression ratios for datasets characterized by smoothness and lack of noise. Notable examples are the ephemerides of astronomical objects and the pointing information of astronomical telescopes. Other algorithms implemented in this C library are well known and already widely used, e.g., RLE, quantization, deflate (via libz) and Burrows-Wheeler transform (via libbzip2). Libpolycomp can compress the timelines acquired by the Planck/LFI instrument with an overall compression ratio of ~9, while other widely known programs (gzip, bzip2) reach compression ratios less than 1.5.

  11. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Update Date 6/1/2015 ...

  12. Nerve conduction

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the spinal cord to muscles and sensory receptors. A peripheral nerve is composed of nerve bundles (fascicles) ... two neurons, it must first be converted to a chemical signal, which then crosses a space of ...

  13. A comparative study of acellular nerve xenografts and allografts in repairing rat facial nerve defects.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haitao; Xiao, Hongxi; Liu, Huawei; Niu, Yu; Yan, Rongzeng; Hu, Min

    2015-10-01

    Acellular nerves are composed of a basal lamina tube, which retains sufficient bioactivity to promote axon regeneration, thereby repairing peripheral nerve gaps. However, the clinical application of acellular allografts has been restricted due to its limited availability. To investigate whether xenografts, a substitute to allograft acellular nerves in abundant supply, could efficiently promote nerve regeneration, rabbit and rat acellular nerve grafts were used to reconstruct 1 cm defects in Wistar rat facial nerves. Autologous peroneal nerve grafts served as a positive control group. A total of 12 weeks following the surgical procedure, the axon number, myelinated axon number, myelin sheath thickness, and nerve conduction velocity of the rabbit and rat‑derived acellular nerve grafts were similar, whereas the fiber diameter of the rabbit‑derived acellular xenografts decreased, as compared with those of rat‑derived acellular allografts. Autografts exerted superior effects on nerve regeneration; however, no significant difference was observed between the axon number in the autograft group, as compared with the two acellular groups. These results suggested that autografts perform better than acellular nerve grafts, and chemically extracted acellular allografts and xenografts have similar effects on the regeneration of short facial nerve defects. PMID:26239906

  14. A simple model of radial nerve injury in the rhesus monkey to evaluate peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Huang, Xijun; Fu, Guo; Gu, Liqiang; Liu, Xiaolin; Wang, Honggang; Hu, Jun; Yi, Jianhua; Niu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Qingtang

    2014-05-15

    Current research on bone marrow stem cell transplantation and autologous or xenogenic nerve transplantation for peripheral nerve regeneration has mainly focused on the repair of peripheral nerve defects in rodents. In this study, we established a standardized experimental model of radial nerve defects in primates and evaluated the effect of repair on peripheral nerve injury. We repaired 2.5-cm lesions in the radial nerve of rhesus monkeys by transplantation of autografts, acellular allografts, or acellular allografts seeded with autologous bone marrow stem cells. Five months after surgery, regenerated nerve tissue was assessed for function, electrophysiology, and histomorphometry. Postoperative functional recovery was evaluated by the wrist-extension test. Compared with the simple autografts, the acellular allografts and allografts seeded with bone marrow stem cells facilitated remarkable recovery of the wrist-extension functions in the rhesus monkeys. This functional improvement was coupled with radial nerve distal axon growth, a higher percentage of neuron survival, increased nerve fiber density and diameter, increased myelin sheath thickness, and increased nerve conduction velocities and peak amplitudes of compound motor action potentials. Furthermore, the quality of nerve regeneration in the bone marrow stem cells-laden allografts group was comparable to that achieved with autografts. The wrist-extension test is a simple behavioral method for objective quantification of peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:25206757

  15. Percutaneous laser disc decompression: an update--Spring 1992.

    PubMed

    Choy, D S; Michelsen, J; Getrajdman, G; Diwan, S

    1992-06-01

    Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) is being performed in multiple centers in the United States, Germany, Austria, France, and Switzerland with the Nd:YAG having the longest follow up at more than 75 months. The experience with this procedure, in both humans and animals, carried out over the past decade is presented along with a detailed discussion of the surgical procedure. Conditions that favor such surgery and contraindications to the procedure are also presented. There are a number of important advantages to PLDD that make it a procedure that merits continued investigation. Because PLDD is relatively noninvasive, it can be repeated. Because there is no cutting, there is no perispinal scar formation, with possible future pain secondary to entrapment of nerves by scar. Because of its effectiveness for treatment, the laser, in this application, should prove to be an important addition to the spinal surgeon's armamentarium. PMID:10147861

  16. Is carpal tunnel decompression warranted for HNPP?

    PubMed

    Earle, Nicholas; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2013-12-01

    The role of carpal tunnel decompression surgery for patients that have hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) is currently unknown. Since recovery from carpal tunnel compression is often associated with remyelination or nodal reconstruction rather than axonal regeneration, it is uncertain whether the PMP22 deletion associated with HNPP interrupts myelin or nodal reconstitution. We describe two patients with genetically confirmed HNPP and symptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome that had clinical and electrophysiological improvement after surgical decompression. The findings indicate a capacity for conduction repair in HNPP. They also suggest a need for further investigation and discussion around whether to offer carpal tunnel decompression to symptomatic HNPP patients. PMID:24171697

  17. Delayed diagnosed posterior interosseous nerve palsy due to intramuscular myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Kursumovic, A; Mattiassich, G; Rath, S

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of posterior interosseous nerve palsy after bowel surgery associated with intramuscular myxoma of the supinator muscle. The initial symptoms of swelling of the forearm made it difficult to distinguish the condition from extravasations after intravenous cannulation. The diagnosis was finally established with nerve conduction studies and MRI 3 months after symptom onset. The patient underwent surgery for removal of the tumour and decompression of the posterior interosseous nerve. The histological examination identified the tumour as intramuscular myxoma and the patient made a full recovery with no recurrence of the lesion until present. Every swelling on the forearm causing neurological disorders is tumour suspected and should be examined clinically as well as electrophysically and radiographically. Early surgery and nerve decompression should follow immediately after the diagnosis. In case of intramuscular myxoma, good recovery of function after surgery with low recurrence risk may be expected. PMID:23576649

  18. Cascaded target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Wang, X. F.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Yu, Y. H.; Yi, L. Q.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, T. J.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2013-11-15

    A cascaded target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) scheme is proposed to simultaneously increase energy and improve energy spread of a laser-produced mono-energetic proton beam. An optimum condition that uses the maximum sheath field to accelerate the center of the proton beam is theoretically found and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An initial 10 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 21 MeV with energy spread decreased from 5% to 2% under the optimum condition during the process of the cascaded TNSA. The scheme opens a way to scale proton energy lineally with laser energy.

  19. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  20. Evidence Report: Risk of Decompression Sickness (DCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Norcross, Jason R.; Wessel, James H., III; Klein, Jill S.; Dervay, Joseph P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Given that tissue inert gas partial pressure is often greater than ambient pressure during phases of a mission, primarily during extravehicular activity (EVA), there is a possibility of decompression sickness (DCS).

  1. Revision surgery for Chiari malformation decompression.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Catherine A; Fried, Arno H

    2003-09-15

    Chiari malformations comprise four different hindbrain anomalies originally described by Hans Chiari, a professor of pathology at the German University in Prague. There are four basic Chiari malformations. The reasons for revision of Chiari malformation decompression may be for conservative or inadequate initial decompression or the development of postoperative complications. Another reason involves cases of both hindbrain herniation and syringomyelia in patients who have undergone adequate posterior fossa decompression without resolution of symptoms, signs, or radiological appearance of their syrinx cavity. Additionally, symptom recurrence has been reported in association with various types of dural grafts. Reoperation or revision surgery for patients with Chiari malformations is common and may not be due to technical error or inadequate decompression. The types of revision surgeries, their indications, and initial presentations will be reviewed. PMID:15347221

  2. Orbital decompression in thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Fichter, N; Guthoff, R F; Schittkowski, M P

    2012-01-01

    Though enlargement of the bony orbit by orbital decompression surgery has been known for about a century, surgical techniques vary all around the world mostly depending on the patient's clinical presentation but also on the institutional habits or the surgeon's skills. Ideally every surgical intervention should be tailored to the patient's specific needs. Therefore the aim of this paper is to review outcomes, hints, trends, and perspectives in orbital decompression surgery in thyroid eye disease regarding different surgical techniques. PMID:24558591

  3. Orbital Decompression in Thyroid Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fichter, N.; Guthoff, R. F.; Schittkowski, M. P.

    2012-01-01

    Though enlargement of the bony orbit by orbital decompression surgery has been known for about a century, surgical techniques vary all around the world mostly depending on the patient's clinical presentation but also on the institutional habits or the surgeon's skills. Ideally every surgical intervention should be tailored to the patient's specific needs. Therefore the aim of this paper is to review outcomes, hints, trends, and perspectives in orbital decompression surgery in thyroid eye disease regarding different surgical techniques. PMID:24558591

  4. Magnetic resonance neurography of peripheral nerve tumors and tumorlike conditions.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, Shivani; Chhabra, Avneesh; Blakely, Jaishri

    2014-02-01

    Peripheral nerve enlargement may be seen in multiple conditions including hereditary or inflammatory neuropathies, sporadic or syndromic peripheral nerve sheath tumors, perineurioma, posttraumatic neuroma, and intraneural ganglion. Malignancies such as neurolymphoma, intraneural metastases, or sarcomas may also affect the peripheral nervous system and result in nerve enlargement. The imaging appearance and differentiating factors become especially relevant in the setting of tumor syndromes such as neurofibromatosis type 1, neurofibromatosis type 2, and schwannomatosis. This article reviews the typical magnetic resonance neurography imaging appearances of neurogenic as well as nonneurogenic neoplasms and tumorlike lesions of peripheral nerves, with emphasis on distinguishing factors. PMID:24210319

  5. Use of psychological decompression in military operational environments.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jamie G H Hacker; Earnshaw, N Mark; Greenberg, Neil; Eldridge, Rod; Fear, Nicola T; French, Claire; Deahl, Martin P; Wessely, Simon

    2008-06-01

    This article reviews the use of psychological decompression as applied to troops returning from active service in operational theaters. Definitions of the term are considered and a brief history is given. Current policies and practices are described and the question of mandatory decompression is considered. Finally, the evidence base for the efficacy of decompression is examined and some conclusions are drawn. This article highlights variations in the definition and practice of decompression and its use. Although there is, as yet, no evidence that decompression works, there is also no evidence to the contrary. Given the lack of knowledge as to the balance of risks and benefits of decompression and the absence of any definitive evidence that decompression is associated with improved mental health outcomes or that lack of decompression is associated with the reverse, it is argued that the use of decompression should remain a matter for discretion. PMID:18595415

  6. Trauma-induced schwannoma of the recurrent laryngeal nerve after thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, William P; Brody, Robert M; LiVolsi, Virginia A; Wang, Amber R; Mirza, Natasha A

    2016-06-01

    Laryngeal schwannomas are rare, benign tumors, most often arising from the superior laryngeal nerve. We describe a case of a 68-year-old female with a laryngeal schwannoma of the recurrent laryngeal nerve after traumatic injury. We postulate that trauma to the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroidectomy or thyroplasty incited growth of a nerve sheath tumor. This is the first reported case of a trauma-induced schwannoma of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and second case of a recurrent laryngeal nerve schwannoma. Although rare, this case demonstrates that these tumors should be considered during workup of vocal cord paresis after surgery or failed thyroplasty. Laryngoscope, 126:1408-1410, 2016. PMID:26421595

  7. A new biophysical decompression model for estimating the risk of articular bends during and after decompression.

    PubMed

    Hugon, J; Rostain, J-C; Gardette, B

    2011-08-21

    The biophysical models that intend to predict the risk of decompression sickness after a change of pressure are not numerous. Few approaches focus in particular on joints as target tissues, with the aim to describe properly the mechanisms inducing pain. Nevertheless, for this type of decompression incidents, called articular bends, no model proved to fit the empirical results for a broad range of exposures and decompression procedures. We present here an original biophysical decompression model for describing the occurrence of articular bends. A target joint is broken down into two parts that exchange inert gases with the blood by perfusion and with each other by diffusion over distances of a few millimetres. This diffusion pathway allows the slow amplification of microbubbles growing during and after decompression, consistent with the possible delayed occurrence of bends. The diffusion coefficients introduced into this model are larger than those introduced into most modern decompression models. Their value remains physical (#10(-9)m(2)/s). Inert gas exchanges and the formation, amplification and resorption of microbubbles during and after decompression were simulated. We used a critical gas volume criterion for predicting the occurrence of bends. A risk database extracted from COMEX experience and other published studies were used for the correlation of model parameters not known a priori. We considered a large range of exposure, and the commonly used inert gases nitrogen and helium. This correlation phase identified the worst biophysical conformations most likely to lead to the formation, in tissues such as tendons, of a large number of microbubbles recruited from pre-existing gas nuclei during decompression. The risk of bends occurrence was found to be linked to the total separated gas volume generated during and after decompression. A clamping phenomenon occurs soon after the start of decompression, greatly slowing the gas exchanges controlled especially by

  8. Silver-sheathed multifilament wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. T.; Goretta, K. C.; Shi, D.; Lanagan, M. T.; Poeppel, R. B.

    1991-01-01

    The process for manufacturing Ag-sheathed multifilament superconducting wires was investigated. Bi2Sr(1.7)CaCu2O(x), Pb-doped Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O(x), or YBa2Cu3O(x) powders were packed into Ag tubes and swaged into long wires. Pieces were cut from each wire, packed into a second Ag tube and swaged or rolled into multifilament wires. Each wire was then sintered to produce a superconductor. Processing considerations included the sheath workability, effects of compacting and residual stresses, and heat treatment schedules. The superconducting properties of the Bi-based wires were superior to those of the YBa2Cu3O(x) wires at 4.2 K, but not at 77 K.

  9. [Emergency treatment in decompression accidents in shipyards].

    PubMed

    Comet, M

    1989-08-01

    The Comex company has underwater workplaces scattered over the whole world, which are therefore very often far away from a medical center equipped for the treatment of decompression sickness. However, the subsequent evolution of such an event depends mainly on how fast the first aid is given to the patient. Therefore, the scientific and medical departments of our company developed a medical handbook to be used by chiefs of working platforms. The text which has to be easily understandable, mentions: a cursory description of the clinical signs of the different decompression accidents the measures which have to be taken in each case, depending on: the moment of the emergency: after or during decompression, the presence of an insufficient decompression, or a "blow-up". The handbook contains several recompression tables, first aid treatment recommendations and drugs. It has to be stressed that these procedures are only emergency steps. They should be performed before the patient can be transferred to a medical center with expertise in the treatment of decompression accidents. PMID:2799360

  10. [Decompression illness: minor symptoms, major consequences].

    PubMed

    Gho, J M I H Ing Han; Kramer, Irene Fleur; van Hulst, Rob A; Kramer, William L M

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, diving is being performed ever more frequently; it is thus important to take diving injuries into consideration in patients presenting with even minor complaints after diving. Every dive is risky and could result in decompression illness, barotrauma and/or death. We report on two cases of decompression illness: a 30-year old man, an occupational diver, and a 46-year old man, an experienced diver, who were both clinically suspected of having decompression illness and were treated with hyperbaric oxygen in a recompression chamber. Both were eventually symptom-free after several treatments. Decompression illness is caused by a reduction in ambient pressure, which results in intra- or extravascular bubbles. Symptoms vary and are dependent on the site affected: from minor pain to neurological symptoms and death. If patients are suspected of having diving injuries, we recommend contacting a centre specialised in diving and hyperbaric medicine. Recompression in a hyperbaric chamber is the definitive treatment for decompression illness and should be performed as soon as possible. PMID:22951132

  11. Combined endoscopic and subciliary orbital decompression for thyroid-related compressive optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Graham, S M; Carter, K D

    1997-09-01

    Compressive optic neuropathy is a feared, although unusual, complication of thyroid-related orbitopathy. A variety of surgical approaches have been described to achieve orbital decompression and alleviate the hallmark apical orbital crowding of this condition. We describe a subciliary anterior orbitotomy approach to the floor combined with an endoscopic medial wall resection. The anterior orbitotomy allows removal of the bones of the orbital floor both medial and lateral to the canal of the infraorbital nerve. The anterior orbital floor is retained for globe support. This combined approach retains the low morbidity of the endoscopic operation while achieving increased apical medial orbital wall and orbital floor decompression. We describe two illustrative cases where this approach produced a dramatic improvement in visual function. The surgical refinements associated with this combined approach offer technical advantages over other operations in the treatment of thyroid-related compressive optic neuropathy. PMID:9403938

  12. Modeling of dynamic bipolar plasma sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, J. M.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Ottinger, P. F.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior of a one-dimensional plasma sheath is described in regimes where the sheath is not in equilibrium because it carries current densities that are either time dependent, or larger than the bipolar Child-Langmuir level determined from the injected ion flux. Earlier models of dynamic bipolar sheaths assumed that ions and electrons evolve in a series of quasiequilibria. In addition, sheath growth was described by the equation Zen0ẋs=‖ ji‖-Zen0u0, where ẋs is the velocity of the sheath edge, ji is the ion current density, n0u0 is the injected ion flux density, and Ze is the ion charge. In this paper, a generalization of the bipolar electron-to-ion current density ratio formula is derived to study regimes where ions are not in equilibrium. A generalization of the above sheath growth equation is also developed, which is consistent with the ion continuity equation and which reveals new physics of sheath behavior associated with the emitted electrons and their evolution. Based on these findings, two new models of dynamic bipolar sheaths are developed. Larger sheath sizes and potentials than those of earlier models are found. In certain regimes, explosive sheath growth is predicted.

  13. Current neurosurgical management of glossopharyngeal neuralgia and technical nuances for microvascular decompression surgery.

    PubMed

    Rey-Dios, Roberto; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2013-03-01

    Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GPN) is an uncommon facial pain syndrome often misdiagnosed as trigeminal neuralgia. The rarity of this condition and its overlap with other cranial nerve hyperactivity syndromes often leads to a significant delay in diagnosis. The surgical procedures with the highest rates of pain relief for GPN are rhizotomy and microvascular decompression (MVD) of cranial nerves IX and X. Neurovascular conflict at the level of the root exit zone of these cranial nerves is believed to be the cause of this pain syndrome in most cases. Vagus nerve rhizotomy is usually reserved for cases in which vascular conflict is not evident. A review of the literature reveals that although the addition of cranial nerve X rhizotomy may improve the chances of long-term pain control, this maneuver also increases the risk of permanent dysphagia and vocal cord paralysis. The risks of this procedure have to be carefully weighed against its benefits. Based on the authors' experience, careful patient selection with a thorough exploratory operation most often leads to identification of the site of vascular conflict, obviating the need for cranial nerve X rhizotomy. PMID:23451790

  14. [A case of orbital apex syndrome due to aspergillus infection that avoided loss of visual acuity by optic canal decompression].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenji; Shirata, Akiko; Sato, Taku; Kishida, Yugo; Saito, Kiyoshi; Yamane, Kiyomi

    2016-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of left orbital pain, headache, diplopia and left-sided ptosis, which she had suffered for two months. On examination, the patient had loss of visual acuity, left-sided ptosis, lateral gaze disturbance, and was diagnosed as having left orbital apex syndrome. An abnormal signal to the left orbital cone was detected on MRI. Serum β-D-glucan was increased, and serum Aspergillus antigen and antibody were both positive. Although antifungal drugs (voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B) were administered, the symptoms deteriorated. The patient then underwent optic nerve decompression surgery and was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone, which gradually improved the patient's symptoms, Aspergillus hyphae were confirmed by pathological examination. To obtain good prognosis for patients with orbital apex syndrome associated with Aspergillus infection, optic nerve decompression surgery should be considered. PMID:26616482

  15. Schwannoma of the Median Nerve: Diagnosis Sometimes Delayed

    PubMed Central

    Boufettal, Monsef; Azouz, Mohamed; Rhanim, Abdelkarim; Abouzahir, Mohamed; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Bardouni, Ahmed El; Berrada, Mohamed S; Yaacoubi, Moradh El

    2014-01-01

    Schwannoma is a tumor that develops from nerve sheath. The authors report an unusual case of schwannoma of the median nerve (MN) that remained asymptomatic for four years. The diagnosis was based on MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and histopathological examination. Surgical removal is usually curative. The asymptomatic character of the tumor and its slow evolution remain an essential factor in diagnosis delays. This tumor has a good prognosis with a low recurrence rate and potential for malignant transformation. PMID:25125990

  16. Proton hopping: a proposed mechanism for myelinated axon nerve impulses.

    PubMed

    Kier, Lemont B; Tombes, Robert M

    2013-04-01

    Myelinated axon nerve impulses travel 100 times more rapidly than impulses in non-myelinated axons. Increased speed is currently believed to be due to 'hopping' or 'saltatory propagation' along the axon, but the mechanism by which impulses flow has never been adequately explained. We have used modeling approaches to simulate a role for proton hopping in the space between the plasma membrane and myelin sheath as the mechanism of nerve action-potential flow. PMID:23576345

  17. Acute kidney injury due to decompression illness.

    PubMed

    Viecelli, Andrea; Jamboti, Jagadish; Waring, Andrew; Banham, Neil; Ferrari, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    Decompression illness is a rare but serious complication of diving caused by intravascular or extravascular gas bubble formation. We report the first case of acute kidney injury in a 27-year-old diver following three rapid ascents. He presented with transient neurological symptoms and abdominal pain followed by rapidly progressive acute kidney injury (creatinine peak 1210 µmol/L) due to arterial air emboli. He received supportive care and 100% oxygen followed by hyperbaric therapy and recovered fully. Arterial air emboli caused by rapid decompression can affect multiple organs including the kidneys. Early transfer to a hyperbaric unit is important as complications may present delayed. PMID:25852912

  18. Hypobaric decompression prebreathe requirements and breathing environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    To reduce incidence of decompression sickness (DCS), prebreathing 100 percent oxygen to denitrogenate is required prior to hypobaric decompressions from a sea level pressure breathing environment to pressures lower than 350 mm Hg (20,000 ft; 6.8 psia). The tissue ratio (TR) of such exposures equals or exceeds 1.7; TR being the tissue nitrogen pressure prior to decompression divided by the total pressure after decompression (((0.781)(14.697))/6.758). Designing pressure suits capable of greater pressure differentials, lower TR's, and procedures which limit the potential for DCS occurrence would enhance operational efficiency. The current 10.2 psia stage decompression prior to extravehicular activity (EVA) from the Shuttle in the 100 percent oxygen, 4.3 psia suit, results in a TR of 1.65 and has proven to be relatively free of DCS. Our recent study of zero-prebreathe decompressions to 6.8 psia breathing 100 percent oxygen (TR = 1.66) also resulted in no DCS (N = 10). The level of severe, Spencer Grades 3 or 4, venous gas emboli (VGE) increased from 0 percent at 9.5 psia to 40 percent at 6.8 psia yielding a Probit curve of VGE risk for the 51 male subjects who participated in these recent studies. Earlier, analogous decompressions using a 50 percent oxygen, 50 percent nitrogen breathing mixture resulted in one case of DCS and significantly higher levels of severe VGE, e.g., at 7.8 psia, the mixed gas breathing environment resulted in a 56 percent incidence of severe VGE versus 10 percent with use of 100 percent oxygen. The report of this study recommended use of 100 percent oxygen during zero-prebreathe exposure to 6.8 psia if such a suit could be developed. For future, long-term missions, we suggest study of the effects of decompression over several days to a breathing environment of 150 mmHg O2 and approximately 52 mmHg He as a means of eliminating DCS and VGE hazards during subsequent excursions. Once physiologically adapted to a 4 psia vehicle, base, or space

  19. Acute kidney injury due to decompression illness

    PubMed Central

    Viecelli, Andrea; Jamboti, Jagadish; Waring, Andrew; Banham, Neil; Ferrari, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Decompression illness is a rare but serious complication of diving caused by intravascular or extravascular gas bubble formation. We report the first case of acute kidney injury in a 27-year-old diver following three rapid ascents. He presented with transient neurological symptoms and abdominal pain followed by rapidly progressive acute kidney injury (creatinine peak 1210 µmol/L) due to arterial air emboli. He received supportive care and 100% oxygen followed by hyperbaric therapy and recovered fully. Arterial air emboli caused by rapid decompression can affect multiple organs including the kidneys. Early transfer to a hyperbaric unit is important as complications may present delayed. PMID:25852912

  20. Evidence Report: Risk of Decompression Sickness (DCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Norcross, Jason R.; Wessel, James H. III; Abercromby, Andrew F. J.; Klein, Jill S.; Dervay, Joseph P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The Risk of Decompression Sickness (DCS) is identified by the NASA Human Research Program (HRP) as a recognized risk to human health and performance in space, as defined in the HRP Program Requirements Document (PRD). This Evidence Report provides a summary of the evidence that has been used to identify and characterize this risk. Given that tissue inert gas partial pressure is often greater than ambient pressure during phases of a mission, primarily during extravehicular activity (EVA), there is a possibility that decompression sickness may occur.

  1. The onset and rate of myelination in six peripheral and autonomic nerves of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, K; Friede, R L

    1988-01-01

    A light and electron microscopic study was carried out of the numbers of myelinated fibres in 6 nerves of the rat for 7 age groups from birth to 73 weeks. The hypoglossal nerve and the mandibular branch of the facial nerve had short and early myelination periods, essentially complete by the second week. The glossopharyngeal nerve and the sympathetic rami communicantes myelinated late and over a protracted period. Myelination of the rami communicantes continued up to 20 weeks, followed by a marked loss of fibres in the 73 week animals. Intercostal and saphenous nerves had intermediary patterns. There was evidence of subpopulations myelinating at different times. Measurements of myelin sheath thickness showed variations of relative sheath thickness with age, between nerves and for subpopulations of nerves. Late myelination corresponded to relatively thin myelin sheaths. Statistical two-stage-density cluster analysis by computer was used for analysing complex fibre populations. The developmental changes of three subpopulations of the intercostal nerve are documented. Nerves also differed in their rates of axon growth. The increment in axon calibre was small and late for sympathetic fibres. Intercostal and facial nerve fibres had rapid axon growth with different growth rates for subpopulations. PMID:3248966

  2. Nerve injuries about the elbow in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joshua D; Lintner, David M

    2014-09-01

    The athlete's elbow is a remarkable example of motion, strength, and durability. The stress placed on the elbow during sport, including the throwing motion, may lead to soft-tissue ligamentous and nerve injury. The thrower's elbow illustrates one example of possible nerve injury about the elbow in sport, related to chronic repetitive tensile and compressive stresses to the ulnar nerve associated with elbow flexion and valgus position. Besides the throwing athlete, nerve injury from high-energy direct-impact forces may also damage nerves around the elbow in contact sports. Detailed history and physical examination can often make the diagnosis of most upper extremity neuropathies. The clinician must be aware of the possibility of isolated or combined nerve injury as far proximal as the cervical nerve roots, through the brachial plexus, to the peripheral nerve terminal branches. Electrodiagnostic studies are occasionally beneficial for diagnosis with certain nerves. Nonoperative management is often successful in most elbow and upper extremity neuropathies. If conservative treatment fails, then surgical treatment should address all potentially offending structures. In the presence of medial laxity and concurrent ulnar neuritis, the medial ulnar collateral ligament warrants surgical treatment, in addition to transposition of the ulnar nerve. The morbidity of open surgical decompression of nerves in and around the elbow is potentially career threatening in the throwing athlete. This mandates an assessment of the adequacy of the nonsurgical treatment and a thorough preoperative discussion of the risks and benefits of surgery. PMID:25077754

  3. Multiple locations of nerve compression: an unusual cause of persistent lower limb paresthesia.

    PubMed

    Ang, Chia-Liang; Foo, Leon Siang Shen

    2014-01-01

    A paucity of appreciation exists that the "double crush" phenomenon can account for persistent leg symptoms even after spinal neural decompression surgery. We present an unusual case of multiple locations of nerve compression causing persistent lower limb paresthesia in a 40-year old male patient. The patient's lower limb paresthesia was persistent after an initial spinal surgery to treat spinal lateral recess stenosis thought to be responsible for the symptoms. It was later discovered that he had peroneal muscle herniations that had caused superficial peroneal nerve entrapments at 2 separate locations. The patient obtained much symptomatic relief after decompression of the peripheral nerve. The "double crush" phenomenon and multiple levels of nerve compression should be considered when evaluating lower limb neurogenic symptoms, especially after spinal nerve root surgery. PMID:25128915

  4. Gold ink coating of thermocouple sheaths

    DOEpatents

    Ruhl, H. Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for applying a gold ink coating to a thermocouple sheath which includes the steps of electropolishing and oxidizing the surface of the thermocouple sheath, then dipping the sheath into liquid gold ink, and finally heat curing the coating. The gold coating applied in this manner is highly reflective and does not degrade when used for an extended period of time in an environment having a temperature over 1000.degree. F. Depending on the application, a portion of the gold coating covering the tip of the thermocouple sheath is removed by abrasion.

  5. Ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist.

    PubMed

    Earp, Brandon E; Floyd, W Emerson; Louie, Dexter; Koris, Mark; Protomastro, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Presentation of ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist varies based on differential anatomy and the site or sites of compression. Therefore, an understanding of the anatomy of the Guyon canal is essential for diagnosis in patients presenting with motor and/or sensory deficits in the hand. The etiologies of ulnar nerve compression include soft-tissue tumors; repetitive or acute trauma; the presence of anomalous muscles and fibrous bands; arthritic, synovial, endocrine, and metabolic conditions; and iatrogenic injury. In addition to a thorough history and physical examination, which includes motor, sensory, and vascular assessments, imaging and electrodiagnostic studies facilitate the diagnosis of ulnar nerve lesions at the wrist. Nonsurgical management is appropriate for a distal compression lesion caused by repetitive activity, but surgical decompression is indicated if symptoms persist or worsen over 2 to 4 months. PMID:25344595

  6. Pre-differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in combination with a microstructured nerve guide supports peripheral nerve regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve model.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Arne Hendrik; van Neerven, Sabien Geraldine Antonia; Scheffel, Juliane; Tank, Julian; Altinova, Haktan; Seidensticker, Katrin; Deumens, Ronald; Tolba, Rene; Weis, Joachim; Brook, Gary Anthony; Pallua, Norbert; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Many bioartificial nerve guides have been investigated pre-clinically for their nerve regeneration-supporting function, often in comparison to autologous nerve transplantation, which is still regarded as the current clinical gold standard. Enrichment of these scaffolds with cells intended to support axonal regeneration has been explored as a strategy to boost axonal regeneration across these nerve guides Ansselin et al. (1998). In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were implanted with a cell-seeded microstructured collagen nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Under the influence of seeded, pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells, axons regenerated well into the Perimaix nerve guide. Myelination-related parameters, like myelin sheath thickness, benefitted from an additional seeding with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. Furthermore, both the number of retrogradely labelled sensory neurons and the axon density within the implant were elevated in the cell-seeded scaffold group with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. However, a pre-differentiation had no influence on functional recovery. An additional cell seeding of the Perimaix nerve guide with mesenchymal stromal cells led to an extent of functional recovery, independent of the differentiation status, similar to autologous nerve transplantation. These findings encourage further investigations on pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells as a cellular support for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26296589

  7. L-carnitine alleviates sciatic nerve crush injury in rats: functional and electron microscopy assessments

    PubMed Central

    Avsar, Ümmü Zeynep; Avsar, Umit; Aydin, Ali; Yayla, Muhammed; Ozturkkaragoz, Berna; Un, Harun; Saritemur, Murat; Mercantepe, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. It is hypothesized that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats. Rat sciatic nerve was crush injured by a forceps and exhibited degenerative changes. After intragastric administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg L-carnitine for 30 days, axon area, myelin sheath area, axon diameter, myelin sheath diameter, and numerical density of the myelinated axons of injured sciatic nerve were similar to normal, and the function of injured sciatic nerve also improved significantly. These findings suggest that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on sciatic nerve crush injury in rats. PMID:25206754

  8. INDIRECT ARTHROSCOPIC DECOMPRESSION OF SPINOGLENOID CYST WITH SUPRASCAPULAR NEUROPATHY: REPORT OF TWO CASES AND LITERATURE REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi; Fernandes, Rui José

    2015-01-01

    Suprascapular nerve compression is rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with shoulder pain and external rotation deficit. Spinoglenoidal cysts may cause compression, and posterosuperior glenoid labrum lesions are the most likely hypothesis to explain their appearance. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography define the diagnosis. Indirect arthroscopic decompression of the cyst and repair of the glenoid labrum enable complete neurological recovery. The authors report two cases of isolated paralysis of the infraspinatus muscle caused by compression due to spinoglenoidal cysts that were treated by means of arthroscopy, and present the pre and postoperative assessments. PMID:27022558

  9. A novel sling technique for microvascular decompression of a rare anomalous vertebral artery causing cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Adesh; Chandela, Sid; Langer, David; Sen, Chandranath

    2013-09-01

    Cervical radiculopathy secondary to compression from congenital anomalous vertebral arteries (VAs) is a known entity. Patients present with a variety of symptoms ranging from upper-extremity numbness to true occipital neuralgia. Treatment options for extracranial tortuous VAs include conservative management or some form of surgical microvascular decompression (MVD). The authors report on a patient with a congenital anomalous VA loop causing cervical nerve root compression. Successful MVD was conducted with relief of the patient's symptoms. A novel sling technique was used for mobilization of the VA. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first MVD described utilizing this technique. PMID:23991815

  10. Microsurgical endonasal decompression in dysthyroid orbitopathy.

    PubMed

    May, A; Fries, U; Reimold, I; Weber, A

    1999-01-01

    Diagnosis of thyroid eye disease can be established by its history, signs, symptoms, clinical and laboratory findings of an autoimmune thyroid disease. Therapy for this disease is limited to a few options, which should be administered depending on its stage and inflammatory activity. When medication and radiation therapy fail indications for decompression are: loss of visual acuity or visual field defects, increasing strabism and severe keratopathy due to eyelid retraction. Numerous surgical decompression techniques have been described in endocrine orbitopathy. We have adopted endonasal microsurgery, because this technique gives the freedom to work bimanually, ensures a stereomicoscopic view of the intranasal landmarks of orbital walls and allows simultaneous decompression of the medial and inferior orbital wall as well as a good relief of pressure at the orbital apex. Decompressions were performed on 27 orbits in 17 patients, via the endonasal microsurgical, 3 via external approach. The microscopic approach was entirely comparable with regard to reduction of proptosis with a mean improvement of 4.1 mm against a mean of 4.7 mm by external approach and a mean 0.2 of better visual acuity in both procedures. The microsurgical technique is considered superior to an external approach avoiding external scars, neural pains and reportedly less diplopia. Also, trauma to the nalolacrimal and nasofrontal ducts are avoided. The healing phase and the hospitalization time is shorter. PMID:10687942

  11. Long arm decompression osteotomy for hallux limitus.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Stephen C; Frank, Ryan P

    2005-04-01

    This article presents a new osteotomy for stage I or II hallux limitus. The long arm decompression osteotomy can be used to shorten and plantarflex the first metatarsal. The indications, surgical technique, advantages, and disadvantages are described in detail. PMID:15833423

  12. [Vascular compression syndromes of the cranial nerves].

    PubMed

    Kuncz, Adám; Vörös, Erika; Barzó, Pál

    2011-01-30

    The blood vessels which are running nearby the cranial nerves and the brainstem can be elongated; curves and loops of the vessels may develop mostly due to the degenerative alterations of ageing and these vessels can compress the surrounding neural elements. The authors report a review of vascular compression syndromes based on the literature and their own experience. The typical clinical symptoms of the syndromes subserving the proper diagnosis, the pathomechanism, the significance of imaging especially the magnetic resonance angiography, the experience with the surgical technique of microvascular decompression which is the only causal treatment of the syndromes are discussed. In cases of non-responsible medical treatment the microvascular decompression should be the eligible treatment in certain syndromes (trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm) for it is a highly effective and low risk method. PMID:21428033

  13. A 2-year follow-up survey of 523 cases with peripheral nerve injuries caused by the earthquake in Wenchuan, China

    PubMed Central

    He, Chun-qing; Zhang, Li-hai; Liu, Xian-fei; Tang, Pei-fu

    2015-01-01

    We performed a 2-year follow-up survey of 523 patients with peripheral nerve injuries caused by the earthquake in Wenchuan, Sichuan Province, China. Nerve injuries were classified into three types: type I injuries were nerve transection injuries, type II injuries were nerve compression injuries, and type III injuries displayed no direct neurological dysfunction due to trauma. In this study, 31 patients had type I injuries involving 41 nerves, 419 had type II injuries involving 823 nerves, and 73 had type III injuries involving 150 nerves. Twenty-two patients had open transection nerve injury. The restoration of peripheral nerve function after different treatments was evaluated. Surgical decompression favorably affected nerve recovery. Physiotherapy was effective for type I and type II nerve injuries, but not substantially for type III nerve injury. Pharmacotherapy had little effect on type II or type III nerve injuries. Targeted decompression surgery and physiotherapy contributed to the effective treatment of nerve transection and compression injuries. The Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center score for nerve injury severity declined with increasing duration of being trapped. In the first year after treatment, the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center score for grades 3 to 5 nerve injury increased by 28.2% to 81.8%. If scores were still poor (0 or 1) after a 1-year period of treatment, further treatment was not effective. PMID:25883624

  14. A wakeboarding injury presented as acute carpal syndrome and median nerve contusion after wrist strangulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We present a case of combined median nerve contusion with immediate loss of sensation after the strangulation with a wakeboarding rope and prolonged referral to our department 72 hours after the injury accompanied by an acute carpal tunnel syndrome with immediate relief of numbness of a significant proportion of the median nerve following surgical decompression. Case presentation The palmar branch of the median nerve was surrounded by a significant haematoma in addition to the strangulation damage caused by its more superficial location in contrast to the median nerve. Conclusion In case of acute median neuropathy, urgent surgical intervention with exploration, decompression of both, the median nerve and the superficial branch of the median nerve, accompanied by compartment measurements of the forearm should be performed to regain or re-establish neurological integrity. PMID:19178709

  15. Pictorial essay: Role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression

    PubMed Central

    Botchu, Rajesh; Khan, Aman; Jeyapalan, Kanagaratnam

    2012-01-01

    USG has been used for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Scarring and incomplete decompression are the main causes for persistence or recurrence of symptoms. We performed a retrospective study to assess the role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression. Of 422 USG studies of the wrist performed at our center over the last 5 years, 14 were for failed carpal tunnel decompression. Scarring was noted in three patients, incomplete decompression in two patients, synovitis in one patient, and an anomalous muscle belly in one patient. No abnormality was detected in seven patients. We present a pictorial review of USG findings in failed carpal tunnel decompression. PMID:22623813

  16. Placement of Teflon Sponges in Microvascular Decompression Procedure for Treatment of Hemifacial Spasm.

    PubMed

    Nan-Xiang, Xiong; Lv-An, Chen; Zhi-Jun, Chen; Hong-Yang, Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Background Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is generally treated by microvascular decompression (MVD). Inadequate separation of vessel and nerve or adhesive inflammation surrounding the nerve root may cause recurrence. Objective To explore a method to reduce the incidence of adhesions and to ensure sufficient separation of the offending vessel and nerve during MVD. Methods Fifty-one patients diagnosed with HFS were studied. During the MVD procedure, Teflon sponges were placed between the offending vessels and medulla oblongata to push compressing vessels away from the facial nerve without contacting the nerve. Results Our method of placement of the Teflon sponge effectively shifts the compressing artery and ensures that both the Teflon sponge and offending vessels do not contact the root exit zone. This method also ensures that the Teflon sponge is fixed in place. Conclusion The technique described for the treatment of HFS provides an effective, safe, and durable resolution to patient symptoms that minimizes surgical complications and may be useful in treating HFS. PMID:25798798

  17. Theory and simulation of plasma sheath waves

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.Q.; DiPeso, G.; Vahedi, V.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1992-12-15

    Sheath waves have been investigated analytically and with particle simulation for an unmagnetized two dimensional plasma slab with periodic boundary conditions in y and conducting walls at x = 0, L{sub x}. Analytically treating the sheath as a vacuum layer, the sheath wave bears a resemblance to plasma vacuum surface waves. The simulations are in agreement with the theory for both bulk Bohm Grow waves and edge sheath waves, with some unanswered questions. Some waves that were expected did not show up, at least, where we thought they should be. Hence, improvements were made in the initialization (a better quiet start), in the diagnostics (especially the spectra in frequency), and in the excitation (ability to pulse). It has become clear that this problem, seeking both sheath (or surface) and body waves in a bounded system, needs far more attention, in analysis (non-uniform density included) and in simulation, especially in diagnostics. Hence, this report is to be treated as a start on the problem. The problem is not dropped, as the understanding of such waves (in 2d and 3d) is very important, for both basic sheath understanding and for applications, such as plasma control via excitation of sheath or pre-sheath waves.

  18. SHEATH BLIGHT RESISTANCE IN SOUTHERN RICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight is a serious fungal disease problem in southern US rice production, making it necessary for rice farmers to diligently use fungicides for its control. There are no long grain rice varieties adapted to commercial production in the southern US that have adequate resistance to sheath bli...

  19. Endothelial dysfunction correlates with decompression bubbles in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongxin; Ning, Xiaowei; Buzzacott, Peter; Xu, Weigang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have documented that decompression led to endothelial dysfunction with controversial results. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between endothelial dysfunction, bubble formation and decompression rate. Rats were subjected to simulated air dives with one of four decompression rates: one slow and three rapid. Bubble formation was detected ultrasonically following decompression for two hours, before measurement of endothelial related indices. Bubbles were found in only rapid-decompressed rats and the amount correlated with decompression rate with significant variability. Serum levels of ET-1, 6-keto-PGF1α, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MDA, lung Wet/Dry weight ratio and histological score increased, serum NO decreased following rapid decompression. Endothelial-dependent vasodilatation to Ach was reduced in pulmonary artery rings among rapid-decompressed rats. Near all the above changes correlated significantly with bubble amounts. The results suggest that bubbles may be the causative agent of decompression-induced endothelial damage and bubble amount is of clinical significance in assessing decompression stress. Furthermore, serum levels of ET-1 and MDA may serve as sensitive biomarkers with the capacity to indicate endothelial dysfunction and decompression stress following dives. PMID:27615160

  20. Nerve damage related to implant dentistry: incidence, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Gary; Carpentieri, Joseph R; Cavallaro, John

    2015-10-01

    Proper patient selection and treatment planning with respect to dental implant placement can preclude nerve injuries. Nevertheless, procedures associated with implant insertion can inadvertently result in damage to branches of the trigeminal nerve. Nerve damage may be transient or permanent; this finding will depend on the cause and extent of the injury. Nerve wounding may result in anesthesia, paresthesia, or dysesthesia. The type of therapy to ameliorate the condition will be dictated by clinical and radiographic assessments. Treatment may include monitoring altered sensations to see if they subside, pharmacotherapy, implant removal, reverse-torquing an implant to decompress a nerve, combinations of the previous therapies, and/or referral to a microsurgeon for nerve repair. Patients manifesting altered sensations due to various injuries require different therapies. Transection of a nerve dictates immediate referral to a microsurgeon for evaluation. If a nerve is compressed by an implant or adjacent bone, the implant should be reverse-torqued away from the nerve or removed. When an implant is not close to a nerve, but the patient is symptomatic, the patient can be monitored and treated pharmacologically as long as symptoms improve or the implant can be removed. There are diverse opinions in the literature concerning how long an injured patient should be monitored before being referred to a microsurgeon. PMID:26448148

  1. Microvascular decompression for elderly patients with trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Rao, Prashanth J; Dexter, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) has been demonstrated to be an excellent surgical treatment approach in younger patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN). However, it is not clear whether there are additional morbidity and mortality risks for MVD in the elderly population. We performed a systematic literature review using six electronic databases for studies that compared outcomes for MVD for TN in elderly (cut-off ⩾60, 65, 70years) versus younger populations. Outcomes examined included success rate, deaths, strokes, thromboembolism, meningitis, cranial nerve deficits and cerebrospinal fluid leaks. There were 1524 patients in the elderly cohort and 3488 patients in the younger cohort. There was no significant difference in success rates in elderly versus younger patients (87.5% versus 84.8%; P=0.47). However, recurrence rates were lower in the elderly (11.9% versus 15.6%; P=0.03). The number of deaths in the elderly cohort was higher (0.9% versus 0.1%; P=0.003). Rates of stroke (2.5% versus 1%) and thromboembolism (1.1% versus 0%) were also higher for elderly TN patients. No differences were found for rates of meningitis, cranial nerve deficits or cerebrospinal fluid leak. MVD remains an effective and reasonable strategy in the elderly population. There is evidence to suggest that rates of complications such as death, stroke, and thromboembolism may be significantly higher in the elderly population. The presented results may be useful in the decision-making process for MVD in elderly patients with TN. PMID:26944213

  2. Surgical techniques of anterior decompression and fusion for spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Bohlman, H H; Eismont, F J

    1981-01-01

    Many patients who have static or only slowly improving neurologic deficits and significant compression of the spinal cord and nerve roots can benefit from anterior decompression. The improvement ranges from partial root recovery to very dramatic improvement in upper as well as lower extremities in the patient with quadriparesis. Intrinsic damage or contusion of the spinal cord cannot be reversed by decompression. Patients with motor sparing preoperatively attain a better functional improvement than those patients who have only slight distal sensory function initially. The same can be said of patients with spinal cord injuries treated with surgery, but we believe the ultimate degree of functional recovery of incomplete cord injuries is greater following anterior than posterior decompression when the operation is indicated. An early accurate diagnosis must be made concerning whether a patient has a complete or an incomplete spinal cord injury. The mechanical compressive lesion must be well documented by myelography, laminography, or CAT scan. The patient should not be neurologically harmed by a posterior laminectomy approach to anterior pathology which additionally removes all posterior stability. An anterior compressive block is best removed through an anterior approach. PMID:7471590

  3. Flexor Tendon Sheath Ganglions: Results of Surgical Excision

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Edwin E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to review the clinical features and determine the results following surgical excision of a flexor tendon sheath ganglion. A retrospective analysis of 24 consecutive patients (25 ganglions) who underwent excision of a painful flexor tendon sheath ganglion by the same surgeon was performed. The patient’s medical and operative records were reviewed. Each patient was invited to return for an evaluation, which consisted of a clinical interview, completion of a questionnaire, and physical examination. Those patients that were unable to return underwent a detailed telephone interview. Sixteen patients returned for a clinical evaluation, while eight patients underwent a telephone interview. There were 15 women and nine men, with an average age of 43 years (range, 21–68 years). The dominant hand was involved in 15 patients. The long finger was most commonly involved (11 cases). The ganglion arose from the A1 pulley in 13 cases, between the A1 and A2 pulleys in three cases, and from the A2 pulley in nine cases. At an average follow-up of 18.5 months (range, 5–38 months), all of the patients were satisfied with their final result. No patient developed a recurrence and all returned to their previous functional level. There were two minor complications that resolved uneventfully; one patient experienced mild incisional tenderness, while an additional patient experienced transient digital nerve paresthesias. We conclude that surgical excision is a simple, safe, and effective method for treating a painful ganglion of the digital flexor tendon sheath. PMID:18780066

  4. Ambulation Increases Decompression Sickness in Altitude Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION - Exercise accelerates inert gas elimination during oxygen breathing prior to decompression (prebreathe), but may also promote bubble formation and increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The timing, pattern and intensity of exercise are likely critical to the net effect. The NASA Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) combined oxygen prebreathe and exercise preceding a 4.3 psi exposure in non-ambulatory subjects (a microgravity analog) to produce two protocols now used by astronauts preparing for extravehicular activity (CEVIS and ISLE). Additional work is required to investigate whether exercise normal to 1 G environments increases the risk of DCS over microgravity simulation. METHODS - The CEVIS protocol was replicated with one exception. Our subjects completed controlled ambulation (walking in place with fixed cadence and step height) during both preflight and at 4.3 psi instead of remaining non-ambulatory throughout. Decompression stress was graded with aural Doppler (Spencer 0-IV scale). Two-dimensional echocardiographic imaging was used to look for left heart gas emboli (the presence of which prompted test termination). Venous blood was collected at three points to correlate Doppler measures of decompression stress with microparticle (cell fragment) accumulation. Fisher Exact Tests compared test and control groups. Trial suspension would occur when DCS risk >15% or grade IV venous gas emboli (VGE) risk >20% (at 70% confidence). RESULTS - Eleven person-trials were completed (9 male, 2 female) when DCS prompted suspension. DCS was greater than in CEVIS trials (3/11 [27%] vs. 0/45 [0%], respectively, p=0.03). Statistical significance was not reached for peak grade IV VGE (2/11 [18%] vs. 3/45 [7%], p=0.149) or cumulative grade IV VGE observations per subject-trial (8/128 [6%] vs. 26/630 [4%], p=0.151). Microparticle data were collected for 5/11 trials (3 with DCS outcomes), with widely varying patterns that could not be resolved statistically

  5. Suprascapular Nerve: Is It Important in Cuff Pathology?

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lewis L.; Freehill, Michael T.; Yannopoulos, Paul; Warner, Jon J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Suprascapular nerve and rotator cuff function are intimately connected. The incidence of suprascapular neuropathy has been increasing due to improved understanding of the disease entity and detection methods. The nerve dysfunction often results from a traction injury or compression, and a common cause is increased tension on the nerve from retracted rotator cuff tears. Suprascapular neuropathy should be considered as a diagnosis if patients exhibit posterosuperior shoulder pain, atrophy or weakness of supraspinatus and infraspinatus without rotator cuff tear, or massive rotator cuff with retraction. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography studies are indicated to evaluate the rotator cuff and function of the nerve. Fluoroscopically guided injections to the suprascapular notch can also be considered as a diagnostic option. Nonoperative treatment of suprascapular neuropathy can be successful, but in the recent decade there is increasing evidence espousing the success of surgical treatment, in particular arthroscopic suprascapular nerve decompression. There is often reliable improvement in shoulder pain, but muscle atrophy recovery is less predictable. More clinical data are needed to determine the role of rotator cuff repair and nerve decompression in the same setting. PMID:23193484

  6. Percutaneous laser disc decompression: a 17-year experience.

    PubMed

    Choy, Daniel S J

    2004-10-01

    In this review, we analyze our effort to demonstrate the effectiveness of a new approach to the treatment of herniated disc disease using Nd:YAG laser energy introduced into a herniated disc under fluoroscopic control and local anesthesia. 2400 PLDD procedures (combined number of decompressions in cervical, thoracic, and lumbar discs were performed in the past 18(1/2) years in 1275 patients. The overall success rate according to the MacNab criteria was 89%. The complication rate (only infectious disciitis) was 0.4%; all 10 patients with complications were cured with appropriate antibiotics. The recurrence rate was 5%, and usually due to reinjury. There were no deaths, and no cases of nerve or cord damage. PLDD is a safe and effective outpatient procedure for the treatment of herniated disc disease with the advantages of relative non-invasiveness, usually immediate relief of back and sciatic pain, early return to work (generally 5-6 days), and a low complication and recurrence rate. It can also be repeated if necessary as many as five times. PMID:15671713

  7. Pathology: whales, sonar and decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Claude A; Thalmann, Edward D

    2004-04-15

    We do not yet know why whales occasionally strand after sonar has been deployed nearby, but such information is important for both naval undersea activities and the protection of marine mammals. Jepson et al. suggest that a peculiar gas-forming disease afflicting some stranded cetaceans could be a type of decompression sickness (DCS) resulting from exposure to mid-range sonar. However, neither decompression theory nor observation support the existence of a naturally occurring DCS in whales that is characterized by encapsulated, gas-filled cavities in the liver. Although gas-bubble formation may be aggravated by acoustic energy, more rigorous investigation is needed before sonar can be firmly linked to bubble formation in whales. PMID:15085881

  8. Optic nerve atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Optic nerve atrophy is damage to the optic nerve. The optic nerve carries images of what the eye sees to ... problem most often affects older adults. The optic nerve can also be damaged by shock, toxins, radiation, ...

  9. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  10. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  11. Space Flight Decompression Sickness Contingency Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervay, Joseph; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Ross, Charles E.; Hamilton, Douglas; Homick, Jerry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The purpose was to develop an enhanced plan to diagnose, treat, and manage decompression sickness (DCS) during extravehicular activity (EVA). This plan is merited by the high frequency of upcoming EVAs necessary to construct and maintain the International Space Station (ISS). The upcoming ISS era will demand a significant increase in EVA. The DCS Risk and Contingency Plan provided a new and improved approach to DCS reporting, treatment, management, and training.

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage after Thoracic Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pan-Pan; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Yu, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to review cerebrospinal fluid leakage (CSFL) after thoracic decompression and describe its regular and special features. Data Sources: Literature cited in this review was retrieved from PubMed and Medline and was primarily published during the last 10 years. “Cerebrospinal fluid”, “leakage”, “dural tears”, and “thoracic decompression” were the indexed terms. Relevant citations in the retrieved articles were also screened to include more data. Study Selection: All retrieved literature was scrutinized, and four categories were recorded: incidence and risk factors, complications, treatment modalities, and prognosis. Results: CSFL is much more frequent after thoracic decompression than after cervical and lumbar spinal surgeries. Its occurrence is related to many clinical factors, especially the presence of ossified ligaments and the adhesion of the dural sac. While its impact on the late neurological recovery is currently controversial, CSFL increases the risk of other perioperative complications, such as low intracranial pressure symptoms, infection, and vascular events. The combined use of primary repairs during the operation and conservative treatment postoperatively is generally effective for most CSFL cases, whereas lumbar drains and reoperations should be implemented as rescue options for refractory cases only. Conclusions: CSFL after thoracic decompression has not been specifically investigated, so the present study provides a systematic and comprehensive review of the issue. CSFL is a multi-factor-related complication, and pathological factors play a decisive role. The importance of CSFL is in its impact on the increased risk of other complications during the postoperative period. Methods to prevent these complications are in need. In addition, though the required treatment resources are not special for CSFL after thoracic decompression, most CSFL cases are conservatively curable, and surgeons should be

  13. Unusual stability of the Methanospirillum hungatei sheath.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, T J; Stewart, M; Doyle, R J; Sprott, G D

    1985-01-01

    The proteinaceous sheath of Methanospirillum hungatei was isolated by lysing cells in 50 mM dithiothreitol, separating the sheath from other cellular material by discontinuous sucrose density centrifugation, and removing the "cell spacers" with dilute NaOH. The isolated sheath material consisted of hollow tubes which had a highly ordered surface array. The stability of the sheath to treatment with denaturants and to enzymatic digestion was examined by a turbidimetric assay in conjunction with electron microscopy and optical or electron diffraction. The sheath was resistant to a range of proteases and also was not digested by peptidoglycan-degrading enzymes, a lipase, a cellulase, a glucosidase, or Rhozyme (a mixture of galactosidases, acetylglucosaminidase, acetylgalactosaminidase, fucosidase, and mannosidases). In addition to being unaffected by common salts, thiol-reducing agents, and EDTA, the layer was resistant to powerful denaturants such as 6 M urea, 6 M guanidinium hydrochloride, 10 M LiSCN, cyanogen bromide, sodium periodate, and 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate. Strong bases, boiling 3 N HCl, and performic acid did attack the sheath; in these cases, the array was systematically disassembled in a progressive manner, which was followed by electron microscopy. The layer was slightly modified by N-bromosuccinimide in urea, but the array remained intact. The stability of the sheath was remarkable, not only as compared to other bacterial surface arrays, but also as compared to proteins generally, and possibly indicated the presence of covalent cross-links between protein subunits. Images PMID:3988711

  14. Disposable sheath that facilitates endoscopic Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Short, Michael; Tai, Isabella T.; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-02-01

    In vivo endoscopic Raman spectroscopy of human tissue using a fiber optic probe has been previously demonstrated. However, there remain several technical challenges, such as a robust control over the laser radiation dose and measurement repeatability during endoscopy. A decrease in the signal to noise was also observed due to aging of Raman probe after repeated cycles of harsh reprocessing procedures. To address these issues, we designed and tested a disposable, biocompatible, and sterile sheath for use with a fiber optic endoscopic Raman probe. The sheath effectively controls contamination of Raman probes between procedures, greatly reduces turnaround time, and slows down the aging of the Raman probes. A small optical window fitted at the sheath cap maintained the measurement distance between Raman probe end and tissue surface. To ensure that the sheath caused a minimal amount of fluorescence and Raman interference, the optical properties of materials for the sheath, optical window, and bonding agent were studied. The easy-to-use sheath can be manufactured at a moderate cost. The sheath strictly enforced a maximum permissible exposure standard of the tissue by the laser and reduced the spectral variability by 1.5 to 8.5 times within the spectral measurement range.

  15. Optical properties of nonextensive inhomogeneous plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, A.; Esfandiari-Kalejahi, A.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of electromagnetic wave through an inhomogeneous magnetized nonextensive plasma sheath is numerically examined for a realistic density profile of a reentry problem around a hypersonic vehicle. The effect of nonextensivity and inhomogeneity on radio wave communication is studied parametrically. Variation of reflection and transmission coefficients, total attenuation, and total phase shift over the plasma sheath with respect to the strength of applied magnetic field are derived and compared for different values of q-nonextensive parameter. The obtained results for inhomogeneous plasma sheath are compared with previously obtained results of authors for homogeneous plasma sheath. The comparison shows that radio communication in the inhomogeneous plasma sheath is more advantageous than that in the homogeneous case. The transmission coefficient of a plasma sheath with superthermal electrons ( /1 3 < q < 1 ) has larger value compared to that with q > 1. Moreover, for ω c e > ω , the minimum value of total attenuation corresponds to the range /1 3 < q < 1 . An interesting result is that nonextensivity effect on wave propagation in plasma sheath depends on the strength of the ambient magnetic field. The effect of nonextensivity on attenuation coefficient is found to be negligible for ω c e < ω while it is significant for ω c e > ω .

  16. Magma chamber paradox: decompression upon replenishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papale, Paolo; Longo, Antonella; Montagna, Chiara Paola

    2013-04-01

    The invasion of active magma chambers by fresh magma of deeper provenance is invariably assumed to cause chamber pressurization. Pressure increase thus stands as an intuitive consequence of magma chamber replenishment. However, new numerical simulations demonstrate that pressure evolution is highly non-linear, and that decompression dominates when large density contrasts exist between injected and resident magmas. This apparent paradox originates from the compressible nature of volatile-rich magma and the dynamics of convection associated with injections of buoyant magma. While decompression can dominate in a shallow chamber, pressure increase develops in the connected deep regions of magma provenance. These results contradict classical views adopted to interpret observations at active as well as fossil magma chambers, and demonstrate that a simple reliance on intuition is insufficient: what may be perceived as a paradox - magma chamber decompression upon replenishment - is instead likely, and rooted in the complex physics that governs the multiphase, multi-component dynamics of magma transport in geometrically composite, spatially extended magmatic systems.

  17. Recreational technical diving part 2: decompression from deep technical dives.

    PubMed

    Doolette, David J; Mitchell, Simon J

    2013-06-01

    Technical divers perform deep, mixed-gas 'bounce' dives, which are inherently inefficient because even a short duration at the target depth results in lengthy decompression. Technical divers use decompression schedules generated from modified versions of decompression algorithms originally developed for other types of diving. Many modifications ostensibly produce shorter and/or safer decompression, but have generally been driven by anecdote. Scientific evidence relevant to many of these modifications exists, but is often difficult to locate. This review assembles and examines scientific evidence relevant to technical diving decompression practice. There is a widespread belief that bubble algorithms, which redistribute decompression in favour of deeper decompression stops, are more efficient than traditional, shallow-stop, gas-content algorithms, but recent laboratory data support the opposite view. It seems unlikely that switches from helium- to nitrogen-based breathing gases during ascent will accelerate decompression from typical technical bounce dives. However, there is evidence for a higher prevalence of neurological decompression sickness (DCS) after dives conducted breathing only helium-oxygen than those with nitrogen-oxygen. There is also weak evidence suggesting less neurological DCS occurs if helium-oxygen breathing gas is switched to air during decompression than if no switch is made. On the other hand, helium-to-nitrogen breathing gas switches are implicated in the development of inner-ear DCS arising during decompression. Inner-ear DCS is difficult to predict, but strategies to minimize the risk include adequate initial decompression, delaying helium-to-nitrogen switches until relatively shallow, and the use of the maximum safe fraction of inspired oxygen during decompression. PMID:23813463

  18. Theory of the electron sheath and presheath

    SciTech Connect

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2015-12-30

    Here, electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in particle-in-cell(PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions (Te >> Ti), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under common plasma conditions, the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma than an analogous ion presheath. PIC simulations reveal that the ion density in the electron presheath is determined by a flow around the electron sheath and that this flow is due to 2D aspects of the sheath geometry. Simulations also indicate the presence of ion acoustic instabilities excited by the differential flow between electrons and ions in the presheath, which result in sheath edge fluctuations. The 1D model and time averaged PIC simulations are compared and it is shown that the model provides a good description of the electron sheath and presheath.

  19. Theory of the electron sheath and presheath

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2015-12-30

    Here, electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in particle-in-cell(PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperaturemore » plasma conditions (Te >> Ti), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under common plasma conditions, the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma than an analogous ion presheath. PIC simulations reveal that the ion density in the electron presheath is determined by a flow around the electron sheath and that this flow is due to 2D aspects of the sheath geometry. Simulations also indicate the presence of ion acoustic instabilities excited by the differential flow between electrons and ions in the presheath, which result in sheath edge fluctuations. The 1D model and time averaged PIC simulations are compared and it is shown that the model provides a good description of the electron sheath and presheath.« less

  20. Theory of the electron sheath and presheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2015-12-01

    Electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions ( Te≫Ti ), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under common plasma conditions, the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma than an analogous ion presheath. PIC simulations reveal that the ion density in the electron presheath is determined by a flow around the electron sheath and that this flow is due to 2D aspects of the sheath geometry. Simulations also indicate the presence of ion acoustic instabilities excited by the differential flow between electrons and ions in the presheath, which result in sheath edge fluctuations. The 1D model and time averaged PIC simulations are compared and it is shown that the model provides a good description of the electron sheath and presheath.

  1. Electrical stimulation accelerates nerve regeneration and functional recovery in delayed peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinghui; Zhang, Yongguang; Lu, Lei; Hu, Xueyu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2013-12-01

    The present study aims to investigate the potential of brief electrical stimulation (ES; 3 V, 20 Hz, 20 min) in improving functional recovery in delayed nerve injury repair (DNIR). The sciatic nerve of Sprague Dawley rats was transected, and the repair of nerve injury was delayed for different time durations (2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks). Brief depolarizing ES was applied to the proximal nerve stump when the transected nerve stumps were bridged with a hollow nerve conduit (5 mm in length) after delayed periods. We found that the diameter and number of regenerated axons, the thickness of myelin sheath, as well as the number of Fluoro-Gold retrograde-labeled motoneurons and sensory neurons were significantly increased by ES, suggesting that brief ES to proximal nerve stumps is capable of promoting nerve regeneration in DNIR with different delayed durations, with the longest duration of 24 weeks. In addition, the amplitude of compound muscle action potential (gastrocnemius muscle) and nerve conduction velocity were also enhanced, and gastrocnemius muscle atrophy was partially reversed by brief ES, indicating that brief ES to proximal nerve stump was able to improve functional recovery in DNIR. Furthermore, brief ES was capable of increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the spinal cord in DNIR, suggesting that BDNF-mediated neurotrophin signaling might be one of the contributing factors to the beneficial effect of brief ES on DNIR. In conclusion, the present findings indicate the potential of using brief ES as a useful method to improve functional recovery for delayed repair of peripheral nerve lesions. PMID:24118464

  2. Effects of electron emission on sheath potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, Ansel; Khrabrov, Alexander; Kaganovich, Igor; Schamis, Hanna

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the potential profile of a sheath under the influence of surface electron emission. The plasma and sheath profiles are simulated using the Large Scale Plasma (LSP) particle-in-cell code. Using one dimensional models we corroborate the analytical relationship between sheath potential and plasma electron and emitted electron temperatures derived earlier. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4-5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  4. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, K.R.

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4 to 5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  5. Malignant granular cell tumor of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve: report of a case with cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Tommaso, Luca; Magrini, Elisabetta; Consales, Alessandro; Poppi, Massimo; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Dorji, Tsering; Benedetti, Giovanni; Baccarini, Paola

    2002-12-01

    Malignant granular cell tumors (MGCTs) are rare neoplasms of uncertain histogenesis. We report a case of MGCT involving a peripheral nerve with peritoneal and omental dissemination in which cytogenetic findings are available. Our results show that MGCTs share some cytogenetic abnormalities with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), supporting the hypothesis that they may represent histogenetically related lesions. PMID:12514794

  6. Ganglioglioma arising from olfactory sheath: A rare site of an uncommon tumor.

    PubMed

    Singla, Navneet; Gupta, Kirti; Kapoor, Ankur

    2016-06-01

    Gangliogliomas are rare slow growing tumors with a mixed population of dysplastic ganglion cells and glial components, reported at variable sites within the central nervous system, including the frontal, parietal and occipital lobes, the striatum, cerebellum, pituitary and pineal glands as well as the spinal cord. Rarely gangliogliomas have been reported arising within the cranial nerves, including the optic and trigeminal nerve. We present the first patient, to our knowledge, where such a tumor originated from the olfactory sheath. Migration defects leading to entrapment of sensory neurons during development is believed to be responsible for the pathogenesis of these lesions. The extent of surgical extirpation and histopathological anaplasia are important prognosticators. While gangliogliomas are rare tumors, it is crucial to consider them in the differential diagnosis of non-enhancing, poorly localized lesions along the cranial nerves. PMID:26874814

  7. Infraorbital nerve transpositioning into orbital floor: a modified technique to minimize nerve injury following zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kotrashetti, Sharadindu Mahadevappa; Kale, Tejraj Pundalik; Bhandage, Supriya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Transpositioning of the inferior alveolar nerve to prevent injury in lower jaw has been advocated for orthognathic, pre-prosthetic and for implant placement procedures. However, the concept of infra-orbital nerve repositioning in cases of mid-face fractures remains unexplored. The infraorbital nerve may be involved in trauma to the zygomatic complex which often results in sensory disturbance of the area innervated by it. Ten patients with infraorbital nerve entrapment were treated in similar way at our maxillofacial surgery centre. Materials and Methods In this article we are reporting three cases of zygomatico-maxillary complex fracture in which intra-operative repositioning of infra-orbital nerve into the orbital floor was done. This was done to release the nerve from fractured segments and to reduce the postoperative neural complications, to gain better access to fracture site and ease in plate fixation. This procedure also decompresses the nerve which releases it off the soft tissue entrapment caused due to trauma and the organized clot at the fractured site. Results There was no evidence of sensory disturbance during their three month follow-up in any of the patient. Conclusion Infraorbital nerve transposition is very effective in preventing paresthesia in patients which fracture line involving the infraorbital nerve. PMID:25922818

  8. Sacral radiculopathy due to cement leakage from percutaneous sacroplasty, successfully treated with surgical decompression.

    PubMed

    Barber, Sean M; Livingston, Andrew D; Cech, David A

    2013-05-01

    Percutaneous sacroplasty is a procedure adapted from vertebroplasty, which is designed to ameliorate the painful morbidity associated with sacral insufficiency fractures without the invasiveness of open surgery. Early estimates of efficacy, according to several case reports and small series, appear promising, but the procedure is not without risk. Several cases of radiculopathy due to nerve root compression by extravasated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) have been reported. The authors present a case of radiculopathy caused by cement leakage from sacroplasty, treated with surgical decompression of the compromised nerve root. The patient presented with left S-1 radiculopathy and was found on CT to have a left S-1 nerve root completely encased in PMMA over a portion of its length. The patient underwent sacral laminectomy with the removal of PMMA and experienced pain relief and the return of function postoperatively. Surgical removal of PMMA extravasated during sacroplasty is feasible and should be considered when nerve root compression or canal stenosis causes pain or neurological deficit refractory to conservative therapy. PMID:23521686

  9. Facilitation of facial nerve regeneration using chitosan-β-glycerophosphate-nerve growth factor hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Chao, Xiuhua; Xu, Lei; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Li, Xiaofei; Mao, YanYan; Shang, Haiqiong; Fan, Zhaomin; Wang, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion C/GP hydrogel was demonstrated to be an ideal drug delivery vehicle and scaffold in the vein conduit. Combined use autologous vein and NGF continuously delivered by C/GP-NGF hydrogel can improve the recovery of facial nerve defects. Objective This study investigated the effects of chitosan-β-glycerophosphate-nerve growth factor (C/GP-NGF) hydrogel combined with autologous vein conduit on the recovery of damaged facial nerve in a rat model. Methods A 5 mm gap in the buccal branch of a rat facial nerve was reconstructed with an autologous vein. Next, C/GP-NGF hydrogel was injected into the vein conduit. In negative control groups, NGF solution or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was injected into the vein conduits, respectively. Autologous implantation was used as a positive control group. Vibrissae movement, electrophysiological assessment, and morphological analysis of regenerated nerves were performed to assess nerve regeneration. Results NGF continuously released from C/GP-NGF hydrogel in vitro. The recovery rate of vibrissae movement and the compound muscle action potentials of regenerated facial nerve in the C/GP-NGF group were similar to those in the Auto group, and significantly better than those in the NGF group. Furthermore, larger regenerated axons and thicker myelin sheaths were obtained in the C/GP-NGF group than those in the NGF group. PMID:26881479

  10. Rectus sheath hematoma: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Kapan, Selin; Turhan, Ahmet N; Alis, Halil; Kalayci, Mustafa U; Hatipoglu, Sinan; Yigitbas, Hakan; Aygun, Ersan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is an accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear. It could occur spontaneously or after trauma. They are usually located infraumblically and often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, inflammatory diseases or tumours of the abdomen. Case presentation We reported three cases of rectus sheath hematoma presenting with a mass in the abdomen and diagnosed by computerized tomography. The patients recovered uneventfully after bed rest, intravenous fluid replacement, blood transfusion and analgesic treatment. Conclusion Rectus sheath hematoma is a rarely seen pathology often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen that may lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Computerized tomography must be chosen for definitive diagnosis since ultrasonography is subject to error due to misinterpretation of the images. Main therapy is conservative management. PMID:18221529

  11. Compression neuropathy of the peroneal nerve secondary to a ganglion cyst.

    PubMed

    Greer-Bayramoglu, Rebecca J; Nimigan, André S; Gan, Bing Siang

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies caused by ganglion cysts are rare, particularly in the lower extremities. The case of a 45-year-old man with a two-month history of foot drop and swelling in the region of the right fibular head is presented. Physical examination and electromyogram studies verified a peroneal nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lobulated, multilocular, cystic-appearing mass extending around the fibular neck. Surgical decompression of the nerve with removal of the mass and careful articular branch ligation was performed. Surgical pathology reports confirmed the diagnosis of a ganglion cyst. The patient regained full function within four months of the decompression. Pertinent findings on physical examination are discussed, as well as electromyogram and magnetic resonance imaging results. If symptoms persist, early surgical decompression (between the third and fourth months) is recommended. PMID:19721802

  12. Compression neuropathy of the peroneal nerve secondary to a ganglion cyst

    PubMed Central

    Greer-Bayramoglu, Rebecca J; Nimigan, André S; Gan, Bing Siang

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies caused by ganglion cysts are rare, particularly in the lower extremities. The case of a 45-year-old man with a two-month history of foot drop and swelling in the region of the right fibular head is presented. Physical examination and electromyogram studies verified a peroneal nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lobulated, multilocular, cystic-appearing mass extending around the fibular neck. Surgical decompression of the nerve with removal of the mass and careful articular branch ligation was performed. Surgical pathology reports confirmed the diagnosis of a ganglion cyst. The patient regained full function within four months of the decompression. Pertinent findings on physical examination are discussed, as well as electromyogram and magnetic resonance imaging results. If symptoms persist, early surgical decompression (between the third and fourth months) is recommended. PMID:19721802

  13. Sheath rot of rice in Iran.

    PubMed

    Naeimi, S; Okhovvat, S M; Hedjaroude, G A; Khosravi, V

    2003-01-01

    Sheath rot of rice occurs in most rice-growing regions of the world. It usually causes yield losses from 20 to 85%. Sheath rot was reported from Iran in 1993. Year after year, the number of diseased plants increased in the Northern Iran. In summer of 2001, these symptoms were observed in most fields: lesions occur on the upper leaf sheaths, especially the flag leaf sheath. As the disease progresses, lesions enlarge and coalesce and may cover most of the leaf sheath. Panicle may fail to completely or at all. Brown or partially brown not filled or partially filled grain is also associated with infection of the panicle. A whitish powdery growth may be found inside affected sheaths. Infected plants were collected and trasferred to laboratory. Small pieces of diseased tissues were washed under tap water for one hour. Then tissues were placed on WA and incubated at 25 degrees C. These isolates were purified and identified as: Sarocladium oryzae, Fusarium udum, F. semitectum, F. avenaceum, F. flocciferum, F. graminearum, Bipolaris oryzae, Alternaria padwickii, Rhizoctonia solani, Paecilomyces sp., Nigrospora sp. and Trichoderma sp. This is the first report of F. udum in Iran. Also this is the first report that rice is the host for F. semitectum, F. avenaceum and F. flocciferum in Iran. Pathogenicity tests were conducted in glass house. Following species were found to be associated with sheath rot of rice: S. oryzae, F. graminearum, F. udum, F. avenaceum, B. oryzae, A. padwickii. This is the first report in the world that F. udum and A. padwickii are the causal agents of the sheath rot on rice plants. PMID:15151303

  14. Tolerance of the carotid-sheath contents to brachytherapy: an experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Werber, J.L.; Sood, B.; Alfieri, A.; McCormick, S.A.; Vikram, B. )

    1991-06-01

    Tumor invasion of the carotid artery is a potential indication for brachytherapy, which delivers a high dose of irradiation to residual tumor while limiting the dose to adjacent healthy tissues. The tolerance of carotid-sheath contents to varying doses of brachytherapy, however, has not been clearly established. In order to evaluate brachytherapy effects on carotid-sheath contents, after-loading catheters were implanted bilaterally in 3 groups of 6 rabbits each (18 rabbits). Iridium 192 brachytherapy doses of either 5000 cGy (rad), 9000 cGy, or 13,000 cGy were delivered unilaterally, with the contralateral neck serving as a nonirradiated control in each animal. There were no carotid ruptures and wound healing was normal. Two animals from each group were killed at 6, 20, and 48 weeks. Even at the highest dose (13,000 cGy), nerve conduction studies performed on the vagus nerve prior to sacrifice revealed no increased latency, histologic changes were minimal, and carotid arteries were patent. These observations suggest that the carotid-sheath contents in healthy rabbits could tolerate high doses (up to 13,000 cGy) of low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy without complications.

  15. Theory of the Electron Sheath and Presheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott; Yee, Benjamin; Hopkins, Matthew; Barnat, Edward

    2015-09-01

    Electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the velocity distribution function (VDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that electron sheaths are not so simple. Motivated by VDFs observed in recent Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations, we develop a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions, an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient allows the generation of large flows compared to those that would be generated by the electric field alone. It is due to this pressure gradient that the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma (nominally by a factor of √{mi /me }) than an analogous ion presheath. Results of the model are compared with PIC simulations. This work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science at the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94SL85000 and by the Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program under Contract Number DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  16. Multidimensional Plasma Sheaths over Electrically Inhomogeneous Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Demetre

    2004-09-01

    Multidimensional plasma sheaths are encountered in a number of applications including plasma immersion ion implantation, extraction of ions (or plasma) through grids, MEMS fabrication, neutral beam sources, and plasma in contact with internal reactor parts (e.g., wafer chuck edge). The sheath may be multidimensional when: (a) plasma is in contact with surface topography, and the size of the topographical features is comparable to or larger than the plasma sheath thickness, or (b) the surface is flat but inhomogeneous, i.e., a conducting surface next to an insulating surface. In either case, the flux, energy and angular distributions of energetic species incident on the substrate are of primary importance. These quantities depend critically on the shape of the meniscus (plasma-sheath boundary) formed over the surface. A two-dimensional fluid/Monte Carlo simulation model was developed to study multidimensional sheaths. The radio frequency (RF) sheath potential evolution, and ion density and flux profiles over the surface were predicted with a self-consistent fluid simulation. The trajectories of ions and energetic neutrals (resulting by ion neutralization on surfaces or charge exchange collisions in the gas phase) were then followed with a Monte Carlo simulation. Ion flow and energy and angular distributions of ions bombarding a flat but electrically inhomogeneous surface will be reported in detail. Ion flow over trenches and holes will also be reported. Work supported by the NSF, Sandia National Laboratories and NIST.

  17. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Phillippi, R.M.

    1991-12-03

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device. 4 figures.

  18. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Phillippi, R. Michael

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device.

  19. How to Patch Active Plasma and Collisionless Sheath: Practical Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-08-22

    Most plasmas have a very thin sheath compared with the plasma dimension. This necessitates separate calculations of the plasma and sheath. The Bohm criterion provides the boundary condition for calculation of plasma profiles. To calculate sheath properties, a value of electric field at the plasma-sheath interface has to be specified in addition to the Bohm criterion. The value of the boundary electric field and robust procedure to approximately patch plasma and collisionless sheath with a very good accuracy are reported.

  20. Nodes of Ranvier and myelin sheath dimensions along exceptionally thin myelinated vertebrate PNS axons.

    PubMed

    Tuisku, F; Hildebrand, C

    1992-11-01

    The trigeminal alveolar branch in the lower jaw of the cichlid Tilapia mariae was examined by light and electron microscopy on single and serial sections, and by light microscopy on teased fibre preparations. The principal purpose was to find out if the exceptionally thin myelinated axons (d < 1 micron) present in this nerve possess true nodes of Ranvier, and to determine the dimensions of their myelin sheaths. This necessitated analysis of the whole size range of myelinated fibres, with respect to nodal and internodal morphology. The results show that the exceptionally thin myelinated fibres exhibit primitive nodal regions, with patches of axolemmal undercoating, and few Schwann cell processes in the node gap. This contrasts with the more complex nodal organization seen in larger trigeminal alveolar branch fibres. For the whole population of myelinated fibres the number of myelin lamellae increases rectilinearly with axon diameter, and sheath length increases with fibre diameter according to a logarithmic expression. The myelin sheaths of the exceptionally thin trigeminal alveolar branch fibres are composed of 10-20 lamellae, and extend 35-50 microns along the axon. These results show that the structural complexity of nodal regions in the trigeminal alveolar branch decreases with decreasing fibre size, that the exceptionally thin myelinated trigeminal alveolar branch fibres possess primitive nodes and that they have very short myelin sheaths. Our crude theoretical calculations suggest that these fibres might be capable of saltatory conduction. PMID:1279131

  1. Spatial domain entertainment audio decompression/compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. K.; Tam, Ka Him K.

    2014-02-01

    The ARM7 NEON processor with 128bit SIMD hardware accelerator requires a peak performance of 13.99 Mega Cycles per Second for MP3 stereo entertainment quality decoding. For similar compression bit rate, OGG and AAC is preferred over MP3. The Patent Cooperation Treaty Application dated 28/August/2012 describes an audio decompression scheme producing a sequence of interleaving "min to Max" and "Max to min" rising and falling segments. The number of interior audio samples bound by "min to Max" or "Max to min" can be {0|1|…|N} audio samples. The magnitudes of samples, including the bounding min and Max, are distributed as normalized constants within the 0 and 1 of the bounding magnitudes. The decompressed audio is then a "sequence of static segments" on a frame by frame basis. Some of these frames needed to be post processed to elevate high frequency. The post processing is compression efficiency neutral and the additional decoding complexity is only a small fraction of the overall decoding complexity without the need of extra hardware. Compression efficiency can be speculated as very high as source audio had been decimated and converted to a set of data with only "segment length and corresponding segment magnitude" attributes. The PCT describes how these two attributes are efficiently coded by the PCT innovative coding scheme. The PCT decoding efficiency is obviously very high and decoding latency is basically zero. Both hardware requirement and run time is at least an order of magnitude better than MP3 variants. The side benefit is ultra low power consumption on mobile device. The acid test on how such a simplistic waveform representation can indeed reproduce authentic decompressed quality is benchmarked versus OGG(aoTuv Beta 6.03) by three pair of stereo audio frames and one broadcast like voice audio frame with each frame consisting 2,028 samples at 44,100KHz sampling frequency.

  2. Clinical and Radiological Comparison between Ipsilateral and Contralateral Side Canal Decompression Using an Unilateral Laminotomy Approach

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woong Bae; Lee, Sang Won; Sung, Jae Hoon; Yang, Seung Ho; Kim, IL Sub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical and radiological outcome of both sides using the unilateral approach. Methods Unilateral laminotomy was performed to achieve bilateral decompression. Thirty-nine patients who underwent this procedure were analyzed prospectively using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the visual analog scale (VAS) pain score to evaluate symptoms in both legs, and the radiological morphometric index to calculate the anteriorposterior diameter and midcanal width. The incidence of complications from this approach was then evaluated. Results The mean follow-up time was 12.2 months. The mean ODI was 48.4 preoperatively and 14.2 postoperatively. The mean dural sac widening of the ipsilateral side (187.0%) was significantly larger (p<0.01) than that of the the contralateral side (145.6%). The VAS improvement ratio ([preoperative VAS score-postoperative VAS score]/[preoperative VAS score]×100) for the pain in each leg was 75.4%(ipsilateral side) and 73.7%(contralateral side). While the VAS improvement ratio for pain in each side was significantly reduced, the difference in the VAS ratio between sides was statistically insignificant (p=0.64). There were 2 cases (5.1%) of dural tearing during the procedure, 1 case (2.6%) of transient paresthesia of nerve roots, and 2 cases (5.1%) of transient paresthesia of the contralateral nerve root. The transient paresthesias of nerve roots never lasted more than 2 weeks. Conclusion This technique allows for significant decompression of the contralateral canal and excellent clinical outcomes without troublesome complications. Although ipsilateral the dural sac widening was significantly larger than contralateral side, the difference in the clinical outcome between sides was statistically insignificant. PMID:27437011

  3. Analytic gain in probabilistic decompression sickness models.

    PubMed

    Howle, Laurens E

    2013-11-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a disease known to be related to inert gas bubble formation originating from gases dissolved in body tissues. Probabilistic DCS models, which employ survival and hazard functions, are optimized by fitting model parameters to experimental dive data. In the work reported here, I develop methods to find the survival function gain parameter analytically, thus removing it from the fitting process. I show that the number of iterations required for model optimization is significantly reduced. The analytic gain method substantially improves the condition number of the Hessian matrix which reduces the model confidence intervals by more than an order of magnitude. PMID:24209920

  4. Radiological considerations: percutaneous laser disc decompression.

    PubMed

    Botsford, J A

    1993-10-01

    Diagnostic radiology is an integral part of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). All physicians involved in PLDD patient selection and treatment must be familiar with the imaging techniques unique to this procedure to ensure a successful outcome. The following review is based on the cumulative experience gained in performing over 150 PLDD procedures. It discusses the function of diagnostic radiology in all facets of PLDD including patient selection, intraoperative imaging, postoperative evaluation, and analysis of complications. Fundamental radiologic concepts that apply to PLDD are explained and protocols suggested to optimize results and avoid complications. PMID:10146513

  5. Endoscopic Foraminal Decompression for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome under local Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Satishchandra

    2014-01-01

    Background The most common causes of failed back surgery are residual or recurrent herniation, foraminal fibrosis and foraminal stenosis that is ignored, untreated, or undertreated. Residual back ache may also be from facetal causes or denervation and scarring of the paraspinal muscles.1–6 The original surgeon may advise his patient that nothing more can be done on the basis of his opinion that the nerve was visually decompressed by the original surgery, supported by improved post-op imaging and follow-up studies such as EMG and conduction velocity studies. Post-op imaging or electrophysiological assessment may be inadequate to explain all the reasons for residual or recurrent symptoms. Treatment of Failed back surgery by repeat traditional open revision surgery usually incorporates more extensive decompression causing increased instability and back pain, therefore necessitating fusion. The authors, having limited their practice to endoscopic MIS surgery over the last 15-20 years, report on their experience gained during that period to relieve pain by endoscopically visualizing and treating unrecognized causative patho-anatomy in FBSS.7 Methods Thirty consecutive patients with FBSS presenting with back and leg pain that had supporting imaging diagnosis of lateral stenosis and /or residual / recurrent disc herniation, or whose pain complaint was supported by relief from diagnostic and therapeutic injections (Figure 1), were offered percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy and foraminoplasty over a repeat open procedure. Each patient sought consultation following a transient successful, partially successful or unsuccessful open translaminar surgical treatment for disc herniation or spinal stenosis. Endoscopic foraminoplasty was also performed to either decompress the bony foramen for foraminal stenosis, or foraminoplasty to allow for endoscopic visual examination of the affected traversing and exiting nerve roots in the axilla, also known as the

  6. Surgical treatment of painful lesions of the inferior alveolar nerve.

    PubMed

    Biglioli, Federico; Allevi, Fabiana; Lozza, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Nerve-related complications are being reported with increasing frequency following oral and dental surgery, and typically involve the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). We assess herein the etiology of neuropathic pain related to IAN injuries, and describe the various surgical treatment techniques available. Between 2007 and 2013, 19 patients were referred to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy) with pain in the area supplied by the IAN, which developed following endodontic treatment, oral surgery and maxillofacial surgery. All patients underwent IAN surgery by several different microsurgical procedures. Most of the patients affected by pain before surgery experienced complete or partial amelioration of symptoms. All patients receiving sural nerve grafts were pain-free 12 months after surgery. In five patients the operation was unsuccessful. In 78.94% of cases, a significant increase in nerve function was observed. Pain following IAN surgical damage may be addressed by microsurgery; nerve substitution with a sural nerve interpositional graft appears to represent the most efficacious procedure. Scar releasing, nerve decompression and nerve substitution using vein grafts are less effective. Removal of endodontic material extravasated into the mandibular canal is mandatory and effective in patients experiencing severe pain. Surgery should be performed within 12 months postoperatively, ideally during the first few weeks after symptoms onset. PMID:26315275

  7. Sciatic nerve repair using adhesive bonding and a modified conduit

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangdang; Cai, Hongfei; Hao, Yongyu; Sun, Geng; Song, Yaoyao; Chen, Wen

    2014-01-01

    When repairing nerves with adhesives, most researchers place glue directly on the nerve stumps, but this method does not fix the nerve ends well and allows glue to easily invade the nerve ends. In this study, we established a rat model of completely transected sciatic nerve injury and repaired it using a modified 1 cm-length conduit with inner diameter of 1.5 mm. Each end of the cylindrical conduit contains a short linear channel, while the enclosed central tube protects the nerve ends well. Nerves were repaired with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate and suture, which complement the function of the modified conduit. The results demonstrated that for the same conduit, the average operation time using the adhesive method was much shorter than with the suture method. No significant differences were found between the two groups in sciatic function index, motor evoked potential latency, motor evoked potential amplitude, muscular recovery rate, number of medullated nerve fibers, axon diameter, or medullary sheath thickness. Thus, the adhesive method for repairing nerves using a modified conduit is feasible and effective, and reduces the operation time while providing an equivalent repair effect. PMID:25206861

  8. Evaluation of quality of life in patients with Graves´ ophthalmopathy, before and after orbital decompression.

    PubMed

    Iacobæus, Lykke; Sahlin, Sven

    2016-06-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is a potentially sight threatening orbital disease that can have a large negative impact on the quality of life of the patient. Studies on long-term effects of GO on the quality of life are few. The aim of this study is to evaluate the health-related quality of life in patients with GO, before and after orbital decompression surgery. This is a prospective, longitudinal, interventional study in which patients who had orbital decompression were given the Graves´ ophthalmopathy quality of life questionnaire (GO-QOL) before and after surgery. The GO-QOL is a disease specific instrument to measure health-related quality of life. The answers are transformed into scores from 0-100 on 2 subscales. Higher score indicates better health. An additional patient satisfaction questionnaire was also given post-surgery. A significant, long-term, improvement in quality of life after orbital decompression was noted (p < 0.001, paired t-test). 50 patients were included and follow-up time was 5.3 ± 1.2 years (mean ± SD). The QOL-scores increased 28 ± 35 and 26 ± 31 points, respectively, on the two subscales, "visual functioning" and "appearance" (mean ± SD). The patient satisfaction questionnaire showed that 88% of the patients would recommend orbital decompression to a fellow patient. Persistent disturbing oscillopsia was seen in 2% and persistent disturbing infraorbital nerve hypoesthesia in 8% of the patients. Orbital decompression surgery has a positive effect on quality of life for patients with severe GO. The GO-QOL questionnaire showed significant improvement in QOL-scores even many years after surgery. PMID:27159575

  9. Low-Level Laser-Accelerated Peripheral Nerve Regeneration within a Reinforced Nerve Conduit across a Large Gap of the Transected Sciatic Nerve in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Yang, Yi-Chin; Huang, Tsung-Bin; Chan, Shiuh-Chuan; Liu, Bai-Shuan

    2013-01-01

    This study proposed a novel combination of neural regeneration techniques for the repair of damaged peripheral nerves. A biodegradable nerve conduit containing genipin-cross-linked gelatin was annexed using beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramic particles (genipin-gelatin-TCP, GGT) to bridge the transection of a 15 mm sciatic nerve in rats. Two trigger points were irradiated transcutaneously using 660 nm of gallium-aluminum arsenide phosphide (GaAlAsP) via laser diodes for 2 min daily over 10 consecutive days. Walking track analysis showed a significant improvement in sciatic functional index (SFI) (P < 0.01) and pronounced improvement in the toe spreading ability of rats undergoing laser stimulation. Electrophysiological measurements (peak amplitude and area) illustrated by compound muscle action potential (CMAP) curves demonstrated that laser stimulation significantly improved nerve function and reduced muscular atrophy. Histomorphometric assessments revealed that laser stimulation accelerated nerve regeneration over a larger area of neural tissue, resulting in axons of greater diameter and myelin sheaths of greater thickness than that observed in rats treated with nerve conduits alone. Motor function, electrophysiological reactions, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessments all demonstrate that the proposed therapy accelerated the repair of transected peripheral nerves bridged using a GGT nerve conduit. PMID:23737818

  10. [Traumatic nerve damage: causes, approaches and prognosis].

    PubMed

    Müller-Vahl, H

    2015-02-01

    Whereas minor injuries to peripheral nerves merely lead to a circumscribed damage of the myelin sheath which is completely healed within 3 months, penetrating injuries lead to degeneration of the distal axonal fragment (Waller degeneration) and simultaneously to time-dependent alterations in the effector organs, in the perikarya in the medulla and spinal ganglia as well as in the brain. Animal experimental studies and also findings in humans confirm that the conditions for regeneration of nerve fibers are most favorable in the first days and weeks following injury. Therefore, for optimal therapy it should be clarified as early as possible whether there is a chance for reinnervation using exclusively conservative therapy or whether an operative reconstruction is necessary due to the severity of structural damage. Imaging investigation procedures, such as neurosonography and magnetic resonance (MR) neurography can provide decisive information on this aspect. As a rule, the decision on the indications for a nerve operation should be made within the first 3 months. Even with optimal therapy the healing process of severe neural injuries is often unsatisfactory. For some years novel procedures for improvement of nerve regeneration have been tested in animal experiments which involve totally different points in the healing process. It is hoped that with these approaches procedures for improvement in the treatment of nerve injuries in humans can be developed in the near future. PMID:25627807

  11. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats.

    PubMed

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body's H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. PMID:26853722

  12. Submarine tower escape decompression sickness risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Loveman, G A M; Seddon, E M; Thacker, J C; Stansfield, M R; Jurd, K M

    2014-01-01

    Actions to enhance survival in a distressed submarine (DISSUB) scenario may be guided in part by knowledge of the likely risk of decompression sickness (DCS) should the crew attempt tower escape. A mathematical model for DCS risk estimation has been calibrated against DCS outcome data from 3,738 exposures of either men or goats to raised pressure. Body mass was used to scale DCS risk. The calibration data included more than 1,000 actual or simulated submarine escape exposures and no exposures with substantial staged decompression. Cases of pulmonary barotrauma were removed from the calibration data. The calibrated model was used to estimate the likelihood of DCS occurrence following submarine escape from the United Kingdom Royal Navy tower escape system. Where internal DISSUB pressure remains at - 0.1 MPa, escape from DISSUB depths < 200 meters is estimated to have DCS risk < 6%. Saturation at raised DISSUB pressure markedly increases risk, with > 60% DCS risk predicted for a 200-meter escape from saturation at 0.21 MPa. Using the calibrated model to predict DCS for direct ascent from saturation gives similar risk estimates to other published models. PMID:25109085

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment for decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Moon, R E

    2014-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a clinical syndrome occurring usually within 24 hours of a reduction in ambient pressure. DCS occurs most commonly in divers ascending from a minimum depth of 20 feet (6 meters) of sea water, but can also occur during rapid decompression from sea level to altitude (typically > 17,000 feet / 5,200 meters). Manifestations are one or more of the following: most commonly, joint pain, hypesthesia, generalized fatigue or rash; less common but more serious, motor weakness, ataxia, pulmonary edema, shock and death. The cause of DCS is in situ bubble formation in tissues, causing mechanical disruption of tissue, occlusion of blood flow, platelet activation, endothelial dysfunction and capillary leakage. High inspired concentration of oxygen (O2) is recommended as first aid for all cases and can be definitive treatment for most altitude DCS. For most other cases, hyperbaric oxygen is recommended,most commonly 100% O2 breathing at 2.82 atmospheres absolute (U.S.Navy Treatment Table 6 or equivalent). Additional treatments (generally no more than one to two) are used for residual manifestations until clinical stability; some severe cases may require more treatments. Isotonic, glucose-free fluids are recommended for prevention and treatment of hypovolemia. An evidence-based review of adjunctive therapies is presented. PMID:24851553

  14. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body’s H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. PMID:26853722

  15. A New Measure of Decompression Sickness in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiong; Lambrechts, Kate; Mansourati, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    In this study we assessed the reliability of a tilting-board grip score as a measure of decompression sickness in rats. In experiments using a hyperbaric compression/decompression protocol, rats were observed for signs of decompression sickness and their grip strength measured on a tilting particle board hinged to a metal frame. Angles at which rats lost grip were converted to gravitational vectors. Decreased mean grip scores following decompression were fitted to a logistic regression model with strain, age, and weight. Decrease in grip score was significantly associated with observed decompression sickness (P = 0.0036). The log odds ratio for decompression sickness = 1.40 (decrease in grip score). In rats with no decrease in mean grip score there was a 50% probability of decompression sickness (pDCS). This increased steadily with decreases in mean grip score. A decrease of 0.3 had a 60% pDCS, a decrease of 0.6 had a 70% pDCS, and a decrease of 2.1 had a 95% pDCS. The tilting board grip score is a reliable measure of the probability of decompression sickness. PMID:24963469

  16. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart S of... - Decompression Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rate not greater than 5 pounds per minute. Further reduction in pressure will take place during stage 2... minute. Decompression Table No. 1 indicates in the body of the table the total decompression time in... rate of 5 pounds per minute. Elapsed time stage 1: 16/5 3 Stage 2 (final stage): Reduce pressure at...

  17. Cardiovascular Pressures with Venous Gas Embolism and Decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, B. D.; Robinson, R.; Sutton, T.; Kemper, G. B.

    1995-01-01

    Venous gas embolism (VGE) is reported with decompression to a decreased ambient pressure. With severe decompression, or in cases where an intracardiac septal defect (patent foramen ovale) exists, the venous bubbles can become arterialized and cause neurological decompression illness. Incidence rates of patent foramen ovale in the general population range from 25-34% and yet aviators, astronauts, and deepsea divers who have decompression-induced venous bubbles do not demonstrate neurological symptoms at these high rates. This apparent disparity may be attributable to the normal pressure gradient across the atria of the heart that must be reversed for there to be flow potency. We evaluated the effects of: venous gas embolism (0.025, 0.05 and 0.15 ml/ kg min for 180 min.) hyperbaric decompression; and hypobaric decompression on the pressure gradient across the left and right atria in anesthetized dogs with intact atrial septa. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was used as a measure of left atrial pressure. In a total of 92 experimental evaluations in 22 dogs, there were no reported reversals in the mean pressure gradient across the atria; a total of 3 transient reversals occurred during the peak pressure gradient changes. The reasons that decompression-induced venous bubbles do not consistently cause serious symptoms of decompression illness may be that the amount of venous gas does not always cause sufficient pressure reversal across a patent foramen ovale to cause arterialization of the venous bubbles.

  18. Crystallization kinetics in magmas during decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Burton, Mike; Carroll, Michael R.

    2016-04-01

    Many variables play a role during magma crystallization at depth or in a volcanic conduit, and through experimentally derived constraints we can better understand pre- and syn-eruptive magma crystallization behavior. The thermodynamic properties of magmas have been extensively investigated as a function of T, P, fO2 and magma composition [1], and this allows estimation of the stability of equilibrium phases and physical parameters (e.g., density, viscosity). However, many natural igneous rocks contain geochemical, mineralogical and textural evidence of disequilibrium, suggesting that magmas frequently follow non-equilibrium, time-dependent pathways that are recorded in the geochemical and petrographic characteristics of the rocks. There are currently no suitable theoretical models capable of calculating nucleation and growth rates in disequilibrium conditions without experimental constraints. The aim of this contribution is provide quantitative data on growth and nucleation rates of feldspar crystals in silicate melts obtained through decompression experiments, in order to determine the magma evolution in pre- and sin-eruptive conditions. Decompression is one of the main processes that induce the crystallization of feldspar during the magma ascent in the volcanic conduit. Decompression experiments have been carried out on trachytic and basaltic melts to investigate crystallization kinetics of feldspar as a function of the effect of the degassing, undercooling and time on nucleation and crystal growth process [2; 3]. Furthermore, feldspar is the main crystals phase present in magmas, and its abundance can strongly vary with small changes in pressure, temperature and water content in the melt, implying appreciable variations in the textures and in the crystallization kinetics. Crystallization kinetics of trachytic melts show that long experiment durations involve more nucleation events of alkali feldspar than short experiment durations [2]. This is an important

  19. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. Material/Methods After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. Conclusions The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  20. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Pawel; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. MATERIAL AND METHODS After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. CONCLUSIONS The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  1. Low-level laser irradiation improves functional recovery and nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve crush rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm(2) and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm(2). Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm(2) had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm(2). Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm(2). Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm(2) and 8 J/cm(2)) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury. PMID:25119457

  2. Swimming Exercise in the Acute or Late Phase after Sciatic Nerve Crush Accelerates Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Teodori, Rosana Macher; Betini, Joice; de Oliveira, Larissa Salgado; Sobral, Luciane Lobato; Takeda, Sibele Yoko Mattozo; Montebelo, Maria Imaculada de Lima

    2011-01-01

    There is no consensus about the best time to start exercise after peripheral nerve injury. We evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the sciatic nerves of rats that began to swim immediately after crush nerve injury (CS1), those that began to swim 14 days after injury (CS14), injured rats not submitted to swimming (C), and uninjured rats submitted to swimming (S). After 30 days the number of axons in CS1 and CS14 was lower than in C (P < 0.01). The diameter of axons and nerve fibers was larger in CS1 (P < 0.01) and CS14 (P < 0.05) than in C, and myelin sheath thickness was lower in all crushed groups (P < 0.05). There was no functional difference between CS1 and CS14 (P > 0.05). Swimming exercise applied during the acute or late phase of nerve injury accelerated nerve regeneration and synaptic elimination after axonotmesis, suggesting that exercise may be initiated immediately after injury. PMID:21876821

  3. Sheaths: More complicated than you think

    SciTech Connect

    Hershkowitz, Noah

    2005-05-15

    Sheaths in low temperature collisionless and weakly collisional plasmas are often viewed as simple examples of nonlinear physics. How well do we understand them? Closer examination indicates that they are far from simple. Moreover, many predicted sheath properties have not been experimentally verified and even the appropriate 'Bohm velocity' for often encountered two-ion species plasma is unknown. In addition, a variety of sheathlike structures, e.g., double layers, can exist, and many two- and three-dimensional sheath effects have not been considered. Experimental studies of sheaths and presheaths in weakly collisional plasmas are described. A key diagnostic is emissive probes operated in the 'limit of zero emission'. Emissive probes provide a sensitive diagnostic of plasma potential with a resolution approaching 0.1 V and a spatial resolution of 0.1 cm. Combined with planar Langmuir probes and laser-induced fluorescence, they have been used to investigate a wide variety of sheath, presheath, and sheathlike structures. Our experiments have provided some answers but have also raised more questions.

  4. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how fast electrical signals move through a nerve. ... normal body temperature. Being too cold slows nerve conduction. Tell your doctor if you have a cardiac ...

  5. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  6. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ulnar nerve originates from the brachial plexus and travels down arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where ...

  7. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... hot or cold When the nerves that control digestion are affected, you may have trouble digesting food. ... harder to control. Damage to nerves that control digestion almost always occurs in people with severe nerve ...

  8. Successful Reconstruction of Nerve Defects Using Distraction Neurogenesis with a New Experimental Device

    PubMed Central

    Yousef, Mohamed Abdelhamid Ali; Dionigi, Paolo; Marconi, Stefania; Calligaro, Alberto; Cornaglia, Antonia Icaro; Alfonsi, Enrico; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Repair of peripheral nerve injuries is an intensive area of challenge and research in modern reconstructive microsurgery. Intensive research is being carried out to develop effective alternatives to the standard nerve autografting, avoiding its drawbacks. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a newly designed mechanical device for the reconstruction of the sciatic nerve in rats in comparison to nerve autografting and to assess the pain during the period of distraction neurogenesis. Methods: Fourteen Sprague Dawley rats were used and randomly assigned into 2 groups with 7 rats in each group; group A (Nerve Autografting group) in which a 10-mm segment of the sciatic nerve was resected and rotated 180 degrees, then primary end-to-end neurorrhaphy was performed in the reverse direction; group B (Nerve Lengthening group) in which the mechanical device was inserted after surgical resection of 10 mm of the sciatic nerve, then secondary end-to-end neurorrhaphy was performed after completing the nerve lengthening. Thirteen weeks later, assessment of the functional sciatic nerve recovery using static sciatic index (SSI) was performed. Furthermore, fourteen weeks after the nerve resection, assessment of the nerve regeneration with electrophysiological study and histological analysis were performed. Also, gastrocnemius wet weight was measured. For pain assessment in group B, Rat Grimace Scale (RGS) score was used. Results: Significantly better functional recovery rate (using the SSI) was reported in the nerve lengthening group in comparison to autografting group. Also, a statistically significant higher nerve conduction velocity was detected in the nerve lengthening group. On histological analysis of the distal nerve section at 3 mm distal to the nerve repair site, significant myelin sheath thickness was detected in the nerve lengthening group. Discussion: Distraction neurogenesis with the new experimental device is a reliable therapeutic

  9. Polarization force-induced changes in the dust sheath formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayout, Saliha; Bentabet, Karima; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-09-15

    The modifications arising in the dusty plasma sheath structure due to the presence of polarization forces acting on the dust grains are investigated. The corresponding appropriate Bohm criterion for sheath formation is obtained. It is found that the critical Mach number, beyond which the dusty plasma electrostatic sheath sets in, decreases whenever the polarization effects become important. In addition, when the polarization force dominates over the electrical one, the dust plasma sheath cannot set in. This happens whenever the dust grain size exceeds a critical threshold. Moreover, the sheath electrostatic potential-gradient becomes abruptly steep, and the sheath thickness becomes broader as the polarization force effects strengthen.

  10. Management of traumatic optic neuropathy--a study of 23 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Mauriello, J. A.; DeLuca, J.; Krieger, A.; Schulder, M.; Frohman, L.

    1992-01-01

    Twenty three patients with traumatic optic neuropathy were managed by medical and surgical treatment as follows. High dose intravenous steroids were initiated in all patients. If visions did not improve significantly after 24 to 48 hours decompression of an optic nerve sheath haematoma by medial orbitotomy and neurosurgical decompression of the optic canal were considered based on computed tomographic scan findings. Nine of 16 patients who received steroids only showed significant improvement. One of three showed improvement on optic nerve decompression after steroid failure; three or four showed improvement on optic nerve decompression after steroid failure; three or four showed improvement with combined optic nerve sheath decompression by the medial orbitotomy and decompression of the optic canal by frontal craniotomy. A lucid interval of vision after injury and an enlarged optic nerve sheath were associated with an improved prognosis. Five of the 23 patients had a lucid interval and all five had a final improved vision, while only five of 18 patients without a lucid interval improved. Similarly seven of the nine with an enlarged optic nerve sheath showed improvement while only three of 10 patients (three bilateral cases) who presented with no light perception improved with medical and surgical treatment. While a prospective controlled study of the management of traumatic optic neuropathy is necessary this preliminary study suggests that treatment of traumatic optic nerve sheath haematoma by optic nerve sheath decompression should be considered in selected patients. Images PMID:1622947

  11. Ambulation Increases Decompression Sickness in Spacewalk Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Conkin, J.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal activity has the potential to both improve and compromise decompression safety. Exercise enhances inert gas elimination during oxygen breathing prior to decompression (prebreathe), but it may also promote bubble nuclei formation (nucleation), which can lead to gas phase separation and bubble growth and increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The timing, pattern and intensity of musculoskeletal activity and the level of tissue supersaturation may be critical to the net effect. Understanding the relationships is important to evaluate exercise prebreathe protocols and quantify decompression risk in gravity and microgravity environments. Data gathered during NASA's Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) studies combined oxygen prebreathe and exercise followed by low pressure (4.3 psi; altitude equivalent of 30,300 ft [9,235 m]) microgravity simulation to produce two protocols used by astronauts preparing for extravehicular activity. Both the Phase II/CEVIS (cycle ergometer vibration isolation system) and ISLE (in-suit light exercise) trials eliminated ambulation to more closely simulate the microgravity environment. The CEVIS results (35 male, 10 female) serve as control data for this NASA/Duke study to investigate the influence of ambulation exercise on bubble formation and the subsequent risk of DCS. METHODS Four experiments will replicate the CEVIS exercise-enhanced oxygen prebreathe protocol, each with a different exception. The first of these is currently underway. Experiment 1 - Subjects complete controlled ambulation (walking in place with fixed cadence and step height) during both preflight and at 4.3 psi instead of remaining nonambulatory throughout. Experiment 2 - Subjects remain non-ambulatory during the preflight period and ambulatory at 4.3 psi. Experiment 3 - Subjects ambulate during the preflight period and remain non-ambulatory at 4.3 psi. Experiment 4 - The order of heavy and light exercise employed in the CEVIS protocol is

  12. Predetermined embryonic glial cells form the distinct glial sheaths of the Drosophila peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    von Hilchen, Christian M.; Bustos, Álvaro E.; Giangrande, Angela; Technau, Gerhard M.; Altenhein, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    One of the numerous functions of glial cells in Drosophila is the ensheathment of neurons to isolate them from the potassium-rich haemolymph, thereby establishing the blood-brain barrier. Peripheral nerves of flies are surrounded by three distinct glial cell types. Although all embryonic peripheral glia (ePG) have been identified on a single-cell level, their contribution to the three glial sheaths is not known. We used the Flybow system to label and identify each individual ePG in the living embryo and followed them into third instar larva. We demonstrate that all ePG persist until the end of larval development and some even to adulthood. We uncover the origin of all three glial sheaths and describe the larval differentiation of each peripheral glial cell in detail. Interestingly, just one ePG (ePG2) exhibits mitotic activity during larval stages, giving rise to up to 30 glial cells along a single peripheral nerve tract forming the outermost perineurial layer. The unique mitotic ability of ePG2 and the layer affiliation of additional cells were confirmed by in vivo ablation experiments and layer-specific block of cell cycle progression. The number of cells generated by this glial progenitor and hence the control of perineurial hyperplasia correlate with the length of the abdominal nerves. By contrast, the wrapping and subperineurial glia layers show enormous hypertrophy in response to larval growth. This characterisation of the embryonic origin and development of each glial sheath will facilitate functional studies, as they can now be addressed distinctively and genetically manipulated in the embryo. PMID:23903191

  13. Accuracy of the Unified Sheath Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Merle E.

    1997-10-01

    The Unified Sheath Model ( M. E. Riley, Sandia Labs Tech Reports SAND95-0775 UC-401 (May, 1995) and SAND96-1948 UC-401 (August, 1996)) is designed to bridge the intermediate region of ion response between the high frequency Lieberman model and the low frequency Metze, Ernie, and Oskam model. In order to make a quantitative check of the effective ion response time (inverse ion plasma radian frequency at the presheath boundary), I have compared the semi-analytic Unified Model predictions to time- and space-dependent numerical solutions of the ion fluid equations in an rf-biased plasma sheath. In so doing, one is testing the most crucial of the physical approximations made in the model. The comparisons are good and lend confidence to use of the sheath model in the simulation of rf-biased plasmas in processing applications.

  14. Cleaning and decompression of inferior alveolar canal to treat dysesthesia and paresthesia following endodontic treatment of a third molar.

    PubMed

    Scala, Rudy; Cucchi, Alessandro; Cappellina, Luca; Ghensi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic overfilling involving the mandibular canal may cause an injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). We report a case of disabling dysesthesia and paresthesia of a 70-year-old man after endodontic treatment of his mandibular left third molar that caused leakage of root canal filling material into the mandibular canal. After radiographic evaluation, extraction of the third molar and distal osteotomy, a surgical exploration was performed and followed by removal of the material and decompression of the IAN. The patient reported an improvement in sensation and immediate disappearance of dysesthesia already from the first postoperative day. PMID:25099006

  15. Microvascular decompression for glossopharyngeal neuralgia using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring: Technical case report

    PubMed Central

    Motoyama, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Takatani, Tsunenori; Park, Hun-Soo; Kotani, Yukiko; Tanaka, Yoshitaka; Gurung, Pritam; Park, Young-Soo; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GN) is a rare functional disorder representing around 1% of cases of trigeminal neuralgia. Lancinating throat and ear pain while swallowing are the typical manifestations, and are initially treated using anticonvulsants such as carbamazepine. Medically refractory GN is treated surgically. Microvascular decompression (MVD) is reportedly effective against GN, superseding rhizotomy and tractotomy. Methods: We encountered three patients with medically refractory GN who underwent MVD using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM). The offending vessels were the posterior inferior cerebellar arteries, which were confirmed intraoperatively via a transcondylar fossa approach to be affecting the root exit zones of the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves. As IONM, facial motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) and brainstem auditory-evoked potentials were monitored during microsurgery in all three patients. Pharyngeal and vagal MEPs were added for two patients to avoid postoperative dysphagia. Results: GN disappeared immediately after surgery with complete preservation of hearing acuity and facial nerve function. Transient mild swallowing disturbance was observed in 1 patient without pharyngeal or vagal MEPs, whereas the remaining two patients with pharyngeal and vagal MEPs demonstrated no postoperative dysphagia. Conclusion: Although control of severe pain is expected in surgical intervention for GN, lower cranial nerves are easily damaged because of their fragility, even in MVD. IONM including pharyngeal and vagal MEPs appears very useful for avoiding postoperative sequelae during MVD for GN. PMID:26862458

  16. Posterior-Only Circumferential Decompression and Reconstruction in the Surgical Management of Lumbar Vertebral Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z; Caridi, John; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The purpose of this report is to discuss the surgical management of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and present a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with instrumentation using an expandable titanium cage and without segmental nerve root sacrifice as an option in the treatment of this disease process. Methods We report a 42-year-old man who presented with 3 days of low back pain and chills who rapidly decompensated with severe sepsis following admission. Magnetic resonance imaging of his lumbosacral spine revealed intramuscular abscesses of the left paraspinal musculature and iliopsoas with SEA and L4 vertebral body involvement. The patient failed maximal medical treatment, which necessitated surgical treatment as a last resort for infectious source control. He underwent a previously undescribed procedure in the setting of SEA: a single-stage, posterior-only approach for circumferential decompression and reconstruction of the L4 vertebral body with posterior segmental instrumented fixation. Results After the surgery, the patient's condition gradually improved; however, he suffered a wound dehiscence necessitating a surgical exploration and deep wound debridement. Six months after the surgery, the patient underwent a revision surgery for adjacent-level pseudarthrosis. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and off narcotic pain medication and had returned to full activity. Conclusion This patient is the first reported case of lumbar osteomyelitis with SEA treated surgically with a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with posterior instrumentation. Although this approach is more technically challenging, it presents another viable option for the treatment of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis that may reduce the morbidity associated with an anterior approach. PMID:26835214

  17. [Development of Researches on Acupuncture Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Injury].

    PubMed

    Tao, Xing; Ma, Tie-ming

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical disease. Acupuncture therapy has been demonstrated to be effective in improving nerve injury in clinical practice, but its underlying mechanisms in prompting tissue repair basically remain unknown. In the present paper, the authors reviewed some descriptions of traditional Chinese medicine on peripheral nerve injury and treatment, and recent development of researches on acupuncture treatment of it in both clinical practice and animal studies. Clinical trials demonstrated that acupuncture treatment can relieve nerve injury induced pain, ameliorate both sensory and motor functions. Experimental studies showed that acupuncture stimulation may promote nerve repair by reducing desquamation of medullary sheath of nerve fibers, inhibiting apoptosis of nerve cells, and up-regulating expression of myelin basic protein, Slit-1 protein and gene, etc. In addition, acupuncture intervention may also improve the microenvironment of neural regeneration including increase of the proliferation and differentiation of Schwann cells and release of various types of neurotrophic factors. However, its mechanisms underlying accelerating rehabilitation of peripheral nerve injury need being researched further. PMID:27141630

  18. Threshold altitude resulting in decompression sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. V.; Waligora, James M.; Calkins, Dick S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of case reports, hypobaric chamber training data, and experimental evidence indicated that the threshold for incidence of altitude decompression sickness (DCS) was influenced by various factors such as prior denitrogenation, exercise or rest, and period of exposure, in addition to individual susceptibility. Fitting these data with appropriate statistical models makes it possible to examine the influence of various factors on the threshold for DCS. This approach was illustrated by logistic regression analysis on the incidence of DCS below 9144 m. Estimations using these regressions showed that, under a noprebreathe, 6-h exposure, simulated EVA profile, the threshold for symptoms occurred at approximately 3353 m; while under a noprebreathe, 2-h exposure profile with knee-bends exercise, the threshold occurred at 7925 m.

  19. [Percutaneous laser disk decompression. Experience since 1989].

    PubMed

    Siebert, W E; Berendsen, B T; Tollgaard, J

    1996-02-01

    Since 1987/1988 percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) has been used clinically for treatment of intervertebral disc prolapses. Credible prospective investigations that have been conducted since 1989 with large patient collectives are now available for analysis of their medium-term results and comparison with other minimally invasive procedures. Our follow-up examination of the first 180 patients treated with PLDD from 1989 to 1993 shows a success rate of 72.8%, similar to that with other percutaneous techniques (automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy, percutaneous lumbar discectomy, chemonucleolysis). To guarantee success, the spinal surgeon must have command of the correct technique and also use the appropriate instruments. Good results with the PLDD procedure can be procured when contraindications and indications for patient selection are strictly observed. Overall, our 5 year results seem encouraging. PMID:8622845

  20. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Quigley, A F; Bulluss, K J; Kyratzis, I L B; Gilmore, K; Mysore, T; Schirmer, K S U; Kennedy, E L; O'Shea, M; Truong, Y B; Edwards, S L; Peeters, G; Herwig, P; Razal, J M; Campbell, T E; Lowes, K N; Higgins, M J; Moulton, S E; Murphy, M A; Cook, M J; Clark, G M; Wallace, G G; Kapsa, R M I

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  1. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  2. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound and the etiology of neurologic decompression sickness during altitude decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, W. T.; Powell, M. R.; Kumar, K. Vasantha; Waligora, J.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of gas bubbles in the arterial circulation can occur from iatrogenic mishaps, cardiopulmonary bypass devices, or following decompression, e.g., in deep-sea or SCUBA diving or in astronauts during extravehicular activities (EVA). We have examined the pathophysiology of neurological decompression sickness in human subjects who developed a large number of small gas bubbles in the right side of the heart as a result of hypobaric exposures. In one case, gas bubbles were detected in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the subject developed neurological symptoms; a 'resting' patent foramen ovalae (PFO) was found upon saline contrast echocardiography. A PFO was also detected in another individual who developed Spencer Grade 4 precordial Doppler ultrasound bubbles, but no evidence was seen of arterialization of bubbles upon insonation of either the MCA or common carotid artery. The reason for this difference in the behavior of intracardiac bubbles in these two individuals is not known. To date, we have not found evidence of right-to-left shunting of bubbles through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubbles present following decompression is examined and compared with the number arising from saline contrast injection. The estimates are comparable.

  3. Histopathological effects of radiosurgery on a human trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Al-Otaibi, Faisal; Alhindi, Hindi; Alhebshi, Adnan; Albloushi, Monirah; Baeesa, Saleh; Hodaie, Mojgan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radiosurgery is a well-established treatment modality for medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. The exact mechanism of pain relief after radiosurgery is not clearly understood. Histopathology examination of the trigeminal nerve in humans after radiosurgery is rarely performed and has produced controversial results. Case Description: We report on a 45-year-old female who received radiosurgery treatment for trigeminal neuralgia by Cyberknife. A 6-mm portion of the cisternal segment of trigeminal nerve received a dose of 60 Gy. The clinical benefit started 10 days after therapy and continued for 8 months prior to a recurrence of her previous symptoms associated with mild background pain. She underwent microvascular decompression and partial sensory root sectioning. Atrophied trigeminal nerve rootlets were grossly noted intraoperatively under surgical microscope associated with changes in trigeminal nerve color to gray. A biopsy from the inferolateral surface of the nerve proximal to the midcisternal segment showed histological changes in the form of fibrosis and axonal degeneration. Conclusion: This case study supports the evidence of histological damage of the trigeminal nerve fibers after radiosurgery therapy. Whether or not the presence and degree of nerve damage correlate with the degree of clinical benefit and side effects are not revealed by this study and need to be explored in future studies. PMID:24605252

  4. Decompressive cervical laminectomy and lateral mass screw-rod arthrodesis. Surgical analysis and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study evaluates the outcome and complications of decompressive cervical Laminectomy and lateral mass screw fixation in 110 cases treated for variable cervical spine pathologies that included; degenerative disease, trauma, neoplasms, metabolic-inflammatory disorders and congenital anomalies. Methods A retrospective review of total 785 lateral mass screws were placed in patients ages 16-68 years (40 females and 70 males). All cases were performed with a polyaxial screw-rod construct and screws were placed by using Anderson-Sekhon trajectory. Most patients had 12-14-mm length and 3.5 mm diameter screws placed for subaxial and 28-30 for C1 lateral mass. Screw location was assessed by post operative plain x-ray and computed tomography can (CT), besides that; the facet joint, nerve root foramen and foramen transversarium violation were also appraised. Results No patients experienced neural or vascular injury as a result of screw position. Only one patient needed screw repositioning. Six patients experienced superficial wound infection. Fifteen patients had pain around the shoulder of C5 distribution that subsided over the time. No patients developed screw pullouts or symptomatic adjacent segment disease within the period of follow up. Conclusion decompressive cervical spine laminectomy and Lateral mass screw stabilization is a technique that can be used for a variety of cervical spine pathologies with safety and efficiency. PMID:21595968

  5. 56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE SOUTHWEST REAR VENTILATION PASSAGE. (SHEATHING HELP CONTROL HUMIDITY AND DECREASE DANGER OF MAETAL STRIKING STONE AND SPARKING.) - Fort Monroe, Fortress, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  6. Far-Infrared Therapy Promotes Nerve Repair following End-to-End Neurorrhaphy in Rat Models of Sciatic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tai-Yuan; Yang, Yi-Chin; Sha, Ya-Na; Chou, Jiun-Rou

    2015-01-01

    This study employed a rat model of sciatic nerve injury to investigate the effects of postoperative low-power far-infrared (FIR) radiation therapy on nerve repair following end-to-end neurorrhaphy. The rat models were divided into the following 3 groups: (1) nerve injury without FIR biostimulation (NI/sham group); (2) nerve injury with FIR biostimulation (NI/FIR group); and (3) noninjured controls (normal group). Walking-track analysis results showed that the NI/FIR group exhibited significantly higher sciatic functional indices at 8 weeks after surgery (P < 0.05) compared with the NI/sham group. The decreased expression of CD4 and CD8 in the NI/FIR group indicated that FIR irradiation modulated the inflammatory process during recovery. Compared with the NI/sham group, the NI/FIR group exhibited a significant reduction in muscle atrophy (P < 0.05). Furthermore, histomorphometric assessment indicated that the nerves regenerated more rapidly in the NI/FIR group than in the NI/sham group; furthermore, the NI/FIR group regenerated neural tissue over a larger area, as well as nerve fibers of greater diameter and with thicker myelin sheaths. Functional recovery, inflammatory response, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessment all indicated that FIR radiation therapy can accelerate nerve repair following end-to-end neurorrhaphy of the sciatic nerve. PMID:25722734

  7. Ocular bubble formation as a method of assessing decompression stress.

    PubMed

    Mekjavić, I B; Campbell, D G; Jaki, P; Dovsak, P A

    1998-01-01

    Tear film bubble formation and ultrasound reflectivity of the lens-vitreous humor compartments were monitored following simulated dives in a hyperbaric chamber. the sensitivity of these methods in determining decompression stress was compared with the results of precordial Doppler ultrasound. In addition, the utility of these diagnostic techniques in testing decompression dive profiles was evaluated. Eleven divers completed two series of chamber dives according to the decompression schedule of the Professional Association of Diving Instructors. The first dive series comprised dives to 70 feet of seawater (fsw) for 15, 29, and 40 min. The second series comprised maximum duration no-stop decompression dives to 40 fsw for 140 min, 70 fsw for 40 min, 90 fsw for 25 min, and 120 fsw for 13 min. Before and immediately after each dive, the following measurements were obtained from each subject: eye surface tear film bubble counts with a slit-lamp microscope, lens and vitreous humor reflectivity using A- and B-mode ophthalmic ultrasonic scan, and precordial Doppler ultrasonic detection of venous gas bubbles. Tear film bubble assessment and ocular scanning ultrasound were observed to be more sensitive in detecting decompression stress than the conventional Doppler ultrasonic surveillance of the precordial region. In contrast to precordial Doppler ultrasonic surveillance, which failed to detect any significant changes in circulating bubbles, tear film bubble formation displayed a dose-response relationship with increasing duration of the 70-fsw dives. Reflectivity changes of the lens-vitreous humor interface were not significant until the no-stop decompression limit was reached. In addition, for each of the no-stop decompression limit dives, increases in the average tear film bubble formation and lens-vitreous humor interface reflectivity were similar. Ocular bubble observations may provide a practical and objective ocular bubble index for analyzing existing decompression

  8. Vertebral artery anomaly causing C2 suboccipital neuralgia, relieved by neurovascular decompression.

    PubMed

    Trimble, Christopher; Reeves, Alexa; Pare, Laura; Tsai, Fong

    2013-07-01

    We report imaging and surgical findings of a symptomatic 40-year-old male with an anomalous left vertebral artery. MR, CT myelography, angiography, and intraoperative photos demonstrate the vertebral artery entering the thecal sac at the C1-C2 intervertebral foramen and compressing the dorsal C2 nerve rootlets against the cord. Open microvascular decompression alleviated the patient's long-standing suboccipital and posterior cervical neck pain. An embryologic review of the vertebral and lateral spinal artery systems reveals possible developmental explanations for this variant. Intradural course of the vertebral artery at C2 is one of the few symptomatic developmental vertebral artery anomalies. Recognition of this condition is important because surgical intervention can alleviate associated neck pain. PMID:21682793

  9. Clinical applications of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar foraminal nerve root entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Ohtori, Seiji; Yamashita, Masaomi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Munetaka; Orita, Sumihisa; Kamoda, Hiroto; Arai, Gen; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Masuda, Yoshitada; Ochi, Shigehiro; Kikawa, Takashi; Takaso, Masashi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Toyone, Tomoaki; Suzuki, Takane; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can provide valuable structural information about tissues that may be useful for clinical applications in evaluating lumbar foraminal nerve root entrapment. Our purpose was to visualize the lumbar nerve root and to analyze its morphology, and to measure its apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in healthy volunteers and patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis using 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging. Fourteen patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis and 14 healthy volunteers were studied. Regions of interest were placed at the fourth and fifth lumbar root at dorsal root ganglia and distal spinal nerves (at L4 and L5) and the first sacral root and distal spinal nerve (S1) on DWI to quantify mean ADC values. The anatomic parameters of the spinal nerve roots can also be determined by neurography. In patients, mean ADC values were significantly higher in entrapped roots and distal spinal nerve than in intact ones. Neurography also showed abnormalities such as nerve indentation, swelling and running transversely in their course through the foramen. In all patients, leg pain was ameliorated after selective decompression (n = 9) or nerve block (n = 5). We demonstrated the first use of DWI and neurography of human lumbar nerves to visualize and quantitatively evaluate lumbar nerve entrapment with foraminal stenosis. We believe that DWI is a potential tool for diagnosis of lumbar nerve entrapment. PMID:20632042

  10. Sheath fold morphology in simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, Jacqueline E.; Dabrowski, Marcin; Galland, Olivier; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2013-08-01

    Sheath folds are highly non-cylindrical structures often associated with shear zones. We investigate the formation of sheath folds around a weak inclusion acting as a slip surface in simple shear by means of an analytical model. We present results for different slip surface orientations and shapes. Cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction through the sheath fold display closed contours, so called eye-structures. The aspect ratio of the outermost closed contour is strongly dependent on the initial slip surface configuration. The center of the eye-structure is subject to change in height with respect to the upper edge of the outermost closed contour for different cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction. This results in a large variability in layer thickness across the sheath fold length, questioning the usefulness of eye-structures as shear sense indicators. The location of the center of the eye structure is largely invariant to the initial configurations of the slip surface as well as to strain. The values of the aspect ratios of the closed contours within the eye-pattern are dependent on the strain and the cross-section location. The ratio (R') of the aspect ratios of the outermost closed contour (Ryz) and the innermost closed contour (Ry'z') shows values above and below 1. R' shows dependence on the slip surface shape and orientation but not on the number of involved contours. Using R' measurements to deduce the bulk strain type may be erroneous.

  11. Radio-frequency sheath-plasma interactions with magnetic field tangency points along the sheath surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2013-08-15

    Computer simulations of radio-frequency (RF) waves propagating across a two-dimensional (2D) magnetic field into a conducting boundary are described. The boundary condition for the RF fields at the metal surface leads to the formation of an RF sheath, which has previously been studied in one-dimensional models. In this 2D study, it is found that rapid variation of conditions along the sheath surface promote coupling of the incident RF branch (either fast or slow wave) to a short-scale-length sheath-plasma wave (SPW). The SPW propagates along the sheath surface in a particular direction dictated by the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the surface, and the wave energy in the SPW accumulates near places where the background magnetic field is tangent to the surface.

  12. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  17. Microvascular decompression as a surgical management for trigeminal neuralgia: long-term follow-up and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kabatas, Serdar; Karasu, Aykut; Civelek, Erdinc; Sabanci, Akin P; Hepgul, Kemal T; Teng, Yang D

    2009-01-01

    This retrospective study summarizes our experience based on treating 62 patients with trigeminal neuralgia treated with microvascular decompression. All patients had typical trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, with 24 of them (38%) having failed to benefit from other previous treatment paradigms. We excluded subjects with atypical and/or secondary forms of trigeminal neuralgia. Follow-up duration ranged from 5 months to 10 years 6 months, with recurrence being identified in three patients (4.8%).We found that the superior cerebellar artery is the leading offending vessel in our cases (33.9%; 21 patients). Interestingly, seven patients (11.3%) underwent an early reoperation 12-48 h later after the first operation was deemed ineffective. This subgroup recovered satisfactorily following isolation of the pathogenic vessels. Overall, no mortality was observed in our patients, and the only permanent morbidity outcome was a case of facial nerve palsy (1.6%). We conclude that microvascular decompression and its reapplicaiton for patients who showed no pain relief immediately after the first decompression are safe and effective treatments for trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:18820959

  18. Decompression for management of keratocystic odontogenic tumor in the mandible.

    PubMed

    Morais de Melo, Willian; Pereira-Santos, Darklilson; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Hochuli-Vieira, Eduardo

    2012-11-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a benign intraosseous neoplasm of odontogenic origin with high recurrence rate. To date, various conservative or aggressive management strategies have been suggested as a method of treatment. Decompression is a conservative method that has been used in the treatment of large odontogenic cysts. The present paper reports a case of KCOT located in the mandible and discusses the importance of its management using conservative methods. The authors present a case of a 38-year-old patient with a KCOT located in the right mandibular angle and ascending ramus, which was treated by decompression followed by enucleation and curettage. The lesion did not recur during a follow-up period of 3 years after surgery. Preserving important structures of the bone and soft tissue decompression is a method with low morbidity. In addition, according to the literature, decompression has a success rate at least as high as the one of most aggressive treatments. PMID:23172507

  19. Minimally invasive lumbar decompression-the surgical learning curve.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choll W

    2016-08-01

    Commentary On: Ahn J, Iqbal A, Manning BT, Leblang S, Bohl DD, Mayo BC, et al. Minimally invasive lumbar decompression-the surgical learning curve. Spine J 2016:16:909-16. (in this issue). PMID:27545398

  20. [Theoretical analysis of recompression-based therapies of decompression illness].

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, V P; Sokolov, G M; Komarevtsev, V N

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical analysis is concerned with the benefits of oxygen, air and nitrogen-helium-oxygen recompression schedules used to treat decompression illness in divers. Mathematical modeling of tissue bubbles dynamics during diving shows that one-hour oxygen recompression to 200 kPa does not diminish essentially the size of bubble enclosed in a layer that reduces tenfold the intensity of gas diffusion from bubbles. However, these bubbles dissolve fully in all the body tissues equally after 2-hr. air compression to 800 kPa and ensuing 2-d decompression by the Russian navy tables, and 1.5-hr. N-He-O2 compression to this pressure followed by 5-day decompression. The overriding advantage of the gas mixture recompression is that it obviates the narcotic action of nitrogen at the peak of chamber pressure and does not create dangerous tissue supersaturation and conditions for emergence of large bubbles at the end of decompression. PMID:21970044

  1. Paradoxical Herniation following Decompressive Craniectomy in the Subacute Setting

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Decompressive craniectomy is reserved for extreme cases of intracranial hypertension. An uncommon complication known as paradoxical herniation has been documented within weeks to months following surgery. Here we present a unique case within days of surgery. Since standard medical treatment for intracranial hypertension will exacerbate paradoxical herniation, any abrupt neurological changes following decompressive craniectomy should be carefully investigated. Immediate treatment for paradoxical herniation is placement of the patient in the supine position with adequate hydration. Cranioplasty is the ultimate treatment option. PMID:27446619

  2. Paradoxical Herniation following Decompressive Craniectomy in the Subacute Setting.

    PubMed

    Michael, Alex P; Espinosa, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Decompressive craniectomy is reserved for extreme cases of intracranial hypertension. An uncommon complication known as paradoxical herniation has been documented within weeks to months following surgery. Here we present a unique case within days of surgery. Since standard medical treatment for intracranial hypertension will exacerbate paradoxical herniation, any abrupt neurological changes following decompressive craniectomy should be carefully investigated. Immediate treatment for paradoxical herniation is placement of the patient in the supine position with adequate hydration. Cranioplasty is the ultimate treatment option. PMID:27446619

  3. Patterns and Variations in Microvascular Decompression for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    TODA, Hiroki; GOTO, Masanori; IWASAKI, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) is a highly effective surgical treatment for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Although there is little prospective clinical evidence, accumulated observational studies have demonstrated the benefits of MVD for refractory TN. In the current surgical practice of MVD for TN, there have been recognized patterns and variations in surgical anatomy and various decompression techniques. Here we provide a stepwise description of surgical procedures and relevant anatomical characteristics, as well as procedural options. PMID:25925756

  4. Effects of plasma sheath on solar power satellite array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. W.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of the plasma sheath and equilibrium voltage distribution of a high-power solar array governs various kinds of plasma-interaction phenomena and array losses. Sheath effects of a linearly-connected array are investigated for GEO. Although the array may be large, the thin-sheath-limit analysis may be invalid, necessitating numerical methods. Three-dimensional computer calculations show that potential barriers and over-lapping sheaths can occur, i.e., structures not predictable under the thin-sheath-limit analysis, but nevertheless controlling the distribution of plasma currents impacting on the array.

  5. Limb immobilization alters functional electrophysiological parameters of sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Alves, J S M; Leal-Cardoso, J H; Santos-Júnior, F F U; Carlos, P S; Silva, R C; Lucci, C M; Báo, S N; Ceccatto, V M; Barbosa, R

    2013-08-01

    Immobilization, used in clinical practice to treat traumatologic problems, causes changes in muscle, but it is not known whether changes also occur in nerves. We investigated the effects of immobilization on excitability and compound action potential (CAP) and the ultrastructure of the rat sciatic nerve. Fourteen days after immobilization of the right leg of adult male Wistar rats (n=34), animals were killed and the right sciatic nerve was dissected and mounted in a moist chamber. Nerves were stimulated at a baseline frequency of 0.2 Hz and tested for 2 min at 20, 50, and 100 Hz. Immobilization altered nerve excitability. Rheobase and chronaxy changed from 3.13 ± 0.05 V and 52.31 ± 1.95 µs (control group, n=13) to 2.84 ± 0.06 V and 59.71 ± 2.79 µs (immobilized group, n=15), respectively. Immobilization altered the amplitude of CAP waves and decreased the conduction velocity of the first CAP wave (from 93.63 ± 7.49 to 79.14 ± 5.59 m/s) but not of the second wave. Transmission electron microscopy showed fragmentation of the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerve of immobilized limbs and degeneration of the axon. In conclusion, we demonstrated that long-lasting leg immobilization can induce alterations in nerve function. PMID:23969978

  6. Limb immobilization alters functional electrophysiological parameters of sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Alves, J.S.M.; Leal-Cardoso, J.H.; Santos-Júnior, F.F.U.; Carlos, P.S.; Silva, R.C.; Lucci, C.M.; Báo, S.N.; Ceccatto, V.M.; Barbosa, R.

    2013-01-01

    Immobilization, used in clinical practice to treat traumatologic problems, causes changes in muscle, but it is not known whether changes also occur in nerves. We investigated the effects of immobilization on excitability and compound action potential (CAP) and the ultrastructure of the rat sciatic nerve. Fourteen days after immobilization of the right leg of adult male Wistar rats (n=34), animals were killed and the right sciatic nerve was dissected and mounted in a moist chamber. Nerves were stimulated at a baseline frequency of 0.2 Hz and tested for 2 min at 20, 50, and 100 Hz. Immobilization altered nerve excitability. Rheobase and chronaxy changed from 3.13±0.05 V and 52.31±1.95 µs (control group, n=13) to 2.84±0.06 V and 59.71±2.79 µs (immobilized group, n=15), respectively. Immobilization altered the amplitude of CAP waves and decreased the conduction velocity of the first CAP wave (from 93.63±7.49 to 79.14±5.59 m/s) but not of the second wave. Transmission electron microscopy showed fragmentation of the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerve of immobilized limbs and degeneration of the axon. In conclusion, we demonstrated that long-lasting leg immobilization can induce alterations in nerve function. PMID:23969978

  7. Are human peripheral nerves sensitive to X-ray imaging?

    PubMed

    Scopel, Jonas Francisco; de Souza Queiroz, Luciano; O'Dowd, Francis Pierce; Júnior, Marcondes Cavalcante França; Nucci, Anamarli; Hönnicke, Marcelo Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques play an important role in assessing the exact location, cause, and extent of a nerve lesion, thus allowing clinicians to diagnose and manage more effectively a variety of pathological conditions, such as entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries, and space-occupying lesions. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are becoming useful methods for this purpose, but they still lack spatial resolution. In this regard, recent phase contrast x-ray imaging experiments of peripheral nerve allowed the visualization of each nerve fiber surrounded by its myelin sheath as clearly as optical microscopy. In the present study, we attempted to produce high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of a human sciatic nerve by using synchrotron radiation propagation-based imaging. The images showed high contrast and high spatial resolution, allowing clear identification of each fascicle structure and surrounding connective tissue. The outstanding result is the detection of such structures by phase contrast x-ray tomography of a thick human sciatic nerve section. This may further enable the identification of diverse pathological patterns, such as Wallerian degeneration, hypertrophic neuropathy, inflammatory infiltration, leprosy neuropathy and amyloid deposits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful phase contrast x-ray imaging experiment of a human peripheral nerve sample. Our long-term goal is to develop peripheral nerve imaging methods that could supersede biopsy procedures. PMID:25757086

  8. Are Human Peripheral Nerves Sensitive to X-Ray Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Scopel, Jonas Francisco; de Souza Queiroz, Luciano; O’Dowd, Francis Pierce; Júnior, Marcondes Cavalcante França; Nucci, Anamarli; Hönnicke, Marcelo Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques play an important role in assessing the exact location, cause, and extent of a nerve lesion, thus allowing clinicians to diagnose and manage more effectively a variety of pathological conditions, such as entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries, and space-occupying lesions. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are becoming useful methods for this purpose, but they still lack spatial resolution. In this regard, recent phase contrast x-ray imaging experiments of peripheral nerve allowed the visualization of each nerve fiber surrounded by its myelin sheath as clearly as optical microscopy. In the present study, we attempted to produce high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of a human sciatic nerve by using synchrotron radiation propagation-based imaging. The images showed high contrast and high spatial resolution, allowing clear identification of each fascicle structure and surrounding connective tissue. The outstanding result is the detection of such structures by phase contrast x-ray tomography of a thick human sciatic nerve section. This may further enable the identification of diverse pathological patterns, such as Wallerian degeneration, hypertrophic neuropathy, inflammatory infiltration, leprosy neuropathy and amyloid deposits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful phase contrast x-ray imaging experiment of a human peripheral nerve sample. Our long-term goal is to develop peripheral nerve imaging methods that could supersede biopsy procedures. PMID:25757086

  9. Decompression sickness in breath-hold divers: a review.

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, Frederic; Fahlman, Andreas; Gardette, Bernard; Kohshi, Kiyotaka

    2009-12-01

    Although it has been generally assumed that the risk of decompression sickness is virtually zero during a single breath-hold dive in humans, repeated dives may result in a cumulative increase in the tissue and blood nitrogen tension. Many species of marine mammals perform extensive foraging bouts with deep and long dives interspersed by a short surface interval, and some human divers regularly perform repeated dives to 30-40 m or a single dive to more than 200 m, all of which may result in nitrogen concentrations that elicit symptoms of decompression sickness. Neurological problems have been reported in humans after single or repeated dives and recent necropsy reports in stranded marine mammals were suggestive of decompression sickness-like symptoms. Modelling attempts have suggested that marine mammals may live permanently with elevated nitrogen concentrations and may be at risk when altering their dive behaviour. In humans, non-pathogenic bubbles have been recorded and symptoms of decompression sickness have been reported after repeated dives to modest depths. The mechanisms implicated in these accidents indicate that repeated breath-hold dives with short surface intervals are factors that predispose to decompression sickness. During deep diving, the effect of pulmonary shunts and/or lung collapse may play a major role in reducing the incidence of decompression sickness in humans and marine mammals. PMID:19967580

  10. Surgical options in ICH including decompressive craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patrick; Gregson, Barbara A; Vindlacheruvu, Raghu R; Mendelow, A David

    2007-10-15

    Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 15 to 20% of strokes. The condition carries a higher morbidity and mortality than occlusive stroke. Despite considerable research effort, no therapeutic modality either medical or surgical has emerged with clear evidence of benefit other than in rare aneurysmal cases. Intracerebral haemorrhages can be divided into those that arise from pre-existing macroscopic vascular lesions - so called "ictohaemorrhagic lesions", and those that do not; the latter being the commoner. Most of the research that has been done on the benefits of surgery has been in this latter group. Trial data available to date precludes a major benefit from surgical evacuation in a large proportion of cases however there are hypotheses of benefit still under investigation, specifically superficial lobar ICH treated by open surgical evacuation, deeper ICH treated with minimally invasive surgical techniques, and decompressive craniectomy. When an ICH arises from an ictohaemorrhagic lesion, therapy has two goals: to treat the effects of the acute haemorrhage and to prevent a recurrence. Three modalities are available for treating lesions to prevent recurrence: stereotactic radiosurgery, endovascular embolisation, and open surgical resection. As with ICH without an underlying lesion there is no evidence to support surgical removal of the haemorrhage in most cases. An important exception is ICHs arising from intracranial aneurysms where there is good evidence to support evacuation of the haematoma as well as repair of the aneurysm. PMID:17543995

  11. Arthroscopic Decompression for a Giant Meniscal Cyst.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    The authors report the case of a giant medial meniscal cyst in an osteoarthritic knee of an 82-year-old woman that was successfully treated with only arthroscopic cyst decompression. The patient noticed a painful mass on the medial side of the right knee that had been gradually growing for 5 years. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an encapsulated large medial cystic mass measuring 80×65×40 mm that was adjacent to the medial meniscus. An accompanying horizontal tear was also detected in the middle and posterior segments of the meniscus. The medial meniscus was resected up to the capsular attachment to create bidirectional flow between the joint and the cyst with arthroscopic surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging performed 14 months postoperatively showed that the cyst had completely disappeared, and no recurrence was observed during a 2-year follow-up period. An excellent result could be obtained by performing limited meniscectomy to create a channel leading to the meniscal cyst, even though the cyst was large. Among previously reported cases of meniscal cysts, this case is the largest to be treated arthroscopically without open excision. PMID:26726987

  12. Effective Decompression of JPEG Document Images.

    PubMed

    Pham, The-Anh; Delalandre, Mathieu

    2016-08-01

    This paper concentrates on developing an effective approach for decompressing JPEG document images. Our main goal is targeted to time-critical applications, especially to those situated on mobile network infrastructures. To this aim, the proposed approach is designed to work either in the transform domain or image spatial plane. Specifically, the image blocks are first classified into smooth blocks (e.g., background and uniform regions) and non-smooth blocks (e.g., text, graphics, and line-drawings). Next, the smooth blocks are fully decoded in the transform domain by minimizing the total block boundary variation, which is very efficient to compute. For decoding non-smooth blocks, a novel text model is presented that accounts for the specifics of document content. In addition, an efficient optimization algorithm is introduced to reconstruct the non-smooth blocks. The proposed approach has been validated by extensive experiments, demonstrating a significant improvement of visual quality, assuming that document images have been encoded at low bit rates and thus are subject to severe distortion. PMID:27295665

  13. Use of ultrasound in altitude decompression modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Robert M.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    A model that predicts the probability of developing decompression sickness (DCS) with various denitrogenation schedules is being developed by the Armstrong Laboratory, using human data from previous exposures. It was noted that refinements are needed to improve the accuracy and scope of the model. A commercially developed ultrasonic echo imaging system is being used in this model development. Using this technique, bubbles images from a subject at altitude can be seen in the gall bladder, hepatic veins, vena cava, and chambers of the heart. As judged by their motion and appearance in the vena cava, venous bubbles near the heart range in size from 30 to 300 M. The larger bubbles skim along the top, whereas the smaller ones appear as faint images near the bottom of the vessel. Images from growing bubbles in a model altitude chamber indicate that they grow rapidly, going from 20 to 100 M in 3 sec near 30,000 ft altitude. Information such as this is valuable in verifying those aspects of the DCS model dealing with bubble size, their growth rate, and their site of origin.

  14. Male urinary incontinence and the urinary sheath.

    PubMed

    Smart, Clare

    This article addresses the assessment and management of male incontinence with a specific focus on the use of the male external catheter (MEC) or urinary sheath. Education and expertise when dealing with a man with urinary incontinence, as well as a tactful and sensitive attitude towards this embarrassing problem, are essential for a successful outcome. The urinary sheath is often perceived by nurses and patients as a difficult product to master and is prone to failure owing to incorrect fitting and management. With correct usage it can make a great difference to a patient's quality of life and avoid problems often associated with urinary catheters and pads such as urinary infection and skin excoriation. Detailed assessment of the patient as well as his suitability for the MEC is essential for a successful outcome. PMID:24820510

  15. Anode sheath contributions in plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, John F.

    1994-03-01

    Contributions of the anode to Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance are considered. High energy losses at this electrode, surface erosion, and sheath/ionization effects must be controlled in designs of practical interest. Current constriction or spotting at the anode, evolving into localized surface damage and considerable throat erosion, is shown to be related to the electron temperature's T(sub e) rise above the gas temperature T(sub o). An elementary one-dimensional description of a collisional sheath which highlights the role of T(sub e) is presented. Computations to model the one-dimensional sheath are attempted using a set of five coupled first-order, nonlinear differential equations describing the electric field, as well as the species current and number densities. For a large temperature nonequilibrium (i.e., T(sub e) greater than T(sub o)), the one-dimensional approach fails to give reasonable answers and a multidimensional description is deemed necessary. Thus, anode spotting may be precipitated by the elevation of T sub e among other factors. A review of transpiration cooling as a means of recouping some anode power is included. Active anode cooling via transpiration cooling would result in (1) quenching T(sub e), (2) adding 'hot' propellant to exhaust, and (3) reducing the local electron Hall parameter.

  16. Dynamic Heating and Decompression Experiments on Dacite and Rhyolite Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.; Waters, L.; Grocke, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral reaction rims, zoned crystals, and myriad growth or dissolution textures provide evidence for changes in magma pressure, temperature, or composition. Quantifying the magnitudes, timescales and length scales of those variations is a fundamental challenge of volcanology and igneous petrology; experiments provide quantitative insights into how magmas react to changes in pressure and temperature that can be used to address that challenge. We use single-step and dynamic experiments conducted in cold seal pressure vessels to study the responses of dacite and rhyolite magmas to heating and decompression events. During single-step decompression (or heating) experiments, conditions are changed nearly instantaneously from the initial to final state in one step, or several smaller steps, whereas "dynamic experiments" have continuous variation in pressure and/or temperature. These two types of experiments yield useful and complementary information describing crystal nucleation, growth, and reaction rates in response to changing (as opposed to steady state) conditions. Here we discuss isothermal decompression experiments that show substantial path-dependence for runs with equivalent time-averaged decompression rates as slow as 0.27 MPa/h for >500 h. Continuous decompression experiments often contain fewer but larger plagioclase crystals than are present in single-step runs, and those new crystals often show complex growth textures. Our results suggest that even slow changes in storage conditions can disrupt melt structure and greatly retard nucleation provided the changes are steady. We hypothesize that if the decompression path remains steady and continuous (absent a stall on and/or rapid decompression), the magma can remain in a growth-dominated regime even though it is far from equilibrium.

  17. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Myra, James R.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describe the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle, θ assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numericallymore » to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.« less

  18. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, James R.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describe the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle, θ assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.

  19. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-06-15

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describes the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle θ, assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath, and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general, the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.

  20. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describes the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle θ, assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath, and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general, the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.

  1. Decompression alone versus decompression with limited fusion for treatment of degenerative lumbar scoliosis in the elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Daubs, Michael D.; Lenke, Lawrence G.; Bridwell, Keith H.; Cheh, Gene; Kim, Yongjung J.; Stobbs, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Retrospective cohort study. Objective: To analyze the surgical results of a group of patients older than 65 years treated for mild degenerative lumbar scoliosis (<30°) with stenosis, treated with decompression alone or decompression and limited fusion. Methods: We evaluated 55 patients, all older than 65 years from our prospectively collected database with mild degenerative scoliosis (<30°) and stenosis who underwent surgery. Laminectomy alone was performed in 16 patients, and laminectomy and limited fusion in 39 patients. Mean follow-up was 4.6 years in the decompression group and 5.0 years in the fusion group. Clinical results were graded by patients' self-reported satisfaction and length of symptom-free period to recurrence. Results: In the decompression alone group, 6 (37%) of 16 patients developed recurrent stenosis at the previously decompressed level and five developed recurrence within 6 months postoperatively versus the decompression and fusion group where 3 (8%) of 39 (P = .0476) developed symptomatic stenosis supra adjacent to the fusion. Of 16 patients in the decompression alone group, 12 (75%) had recurrence of symptoms by the 5-year follow-up period versus only 14 (36%) patients in the decompression and fusion group (P = .016). Adjacent segment degenerative changes were common in the fusion group, but only 7% developed symptomatic stenosis. Conclusions: Decompression with limited fusion prevents early return of stenotic symptoms compared with decompression alone in the setting of mild degenerative scoliosis (<30°) and symptomatic stenosis in patients 65 years and older. Final class of evidence–prognosis Study design  RCT  Cohort •  Case control  Case series Methods  Concealed allocation (RCT)  Intention to treat (RCT)  Blinded/independent evaluation of primary outcome  F/U ≥ 85% •  Adequate sample size  Control for confounding Overall class of evidence III The definiton of the different classes of

  2. Delayed Recompression for Decompression Sickness: Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hadanny, Amir; Fishlev, Gregori; Bechor, Yair; Bergan, Jacob; Friedman, Mony; Maliar, Amit; Efrati, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Most cases of decompression sickness (DCS) occur soon after surfacing, with 98% within 24 hours. Recompression using hyperbaric chamber should be administrated as soon as feasible in order to decrease bubble size and avoid further tissue injury. Unfortunately, there may be a significant time delay from surfacing to recompression. The time beyond which hyperbaric treatment is non effective is unclear. The aims of the study were first to evaluate the effect of delayed hyperbaric treatment, initiated more than 48h after surfacing for DCS and second, to evaluate the different treatment protocols. Methods From January 2000 to February 2014, 76 divers had delayed hyperbaric treatment (≥48h) for DCS in the Sagol center for Hyperbaric medicine and Research, Assaf-Harofeh Medical Center, Israel. Data were collected from their medical records and compared to data of 128 patients treated earlier than 48h after surfacing at the same hyperbaric institute. Results There was no significant difference, as to any of the baseline characteristics, between the delayed and early treatment groups. With respect to treatment results, at the delayed treatment divers, complete recovery was achieved in 76% of the divers, partial recovery in 17.1% and no improvement in 6.6%. Similar results were achieved when treatment started early, where 78% of the divers had complete recovery, 15.6% partial recovery and 6.2% no recovery. Delayed hyperbaric treatment using US Navy Table 6 protocol trended toward a better clinical outcome yet not statistically significant (OR=2.786, CI95%[0.896-8.66], p=0.07) compared to standard hyperbaric oxygen therapy of 90 minutes at 2 ATA, irrespective of the symptoms severity at presentation. Conclusions Late recompression for DCS, 48 hours or more after surfacing, has clinical value and when applied can achieve complete recovery in 76% of the divers. It seems that the preferred hyperbaric treatment protocol should be based on US Navy Table 6. PMID

  3. Decompression sickness following breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Schipke, J D; Gams, E; Kallweit, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Despite convincing evidence of a relationship between breath-hold diving and decompression sickness (DCS), the causal connection is only slowly being accepted. Only the more recent textbooks have acknowledged the risks of repetitive breath-hold diving. We compare four groups of breath-hold divers: (1) Japanese and Korean amas and other divers from the Pacific area, (2) instructors at naval training facilities, (3) spear fishers, and (4) free-dive athletes. While the number of amas is likely decreasing, and Scandinavian Navy training facilities recorded only a few accidents, the number of spear fishers suffering accidents is on the rise, in particular during championships or using scooters. Finally, national and international associations (e.g., International Association of Free Drives [IAFD] or Association Internationale pour Le Developpment De L'Apnee [AIDA]) promote free-diving championships including deep diving categories such as constant weight, variable weight, and no limit. A number of free-diving athletes, training for or participating in competitions, are increasingly accident prone as the world record is presently set at a depth of 171 m. This review presents data found after searching Medline and ISI Web of Science and using appropriate Internet search engines (e.g., Google). We report some 90 cases in which DCS occurred after repetitive breath-hold dives. Even today, the risk of suffering from DCS after repetitive breath-hold diving is often not acknowledged. We strongly suggest that breath-hold divers and their advisors and physicians be made aware of the possibility of DCS and of the appropriate therapeutic measures to be taken when DCS is suspected. Because the risk of suffering from DCS increases depending on depth, bottom time, rate of ascent, and duration of surface intervals, some approaches to assess the risks are presented. Regrettably, none of these approaches is widely accepted. We propose therefore the development of easily manageable

  4. Alpha-lipoic acid loaded in chitosan conduit enhances sciatic nerve regeneration in rat

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Saeed; Heshmatian, Behnam; Amini, Keyvan; Raisi, Abbas; Azimzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the effect of topical administration of alpha-lipoic acid into chitosan conduit on peripheral nerve regeneration using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Materials and Methods: Forty five Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups randomly. A 10-mm gap of sciatic nerve was bridged with a chitosan conduit following surgical preparation and anesthesia. In treatment group, the conduit was filled with 30 µl alpha-lipoic acid (10 mg/kg/bw).It was filled with 30 µl phosphate buffered saline solution in control group. In Sham group sciatic nerve was just exposed. Results: The recovery of nerve function was faster in treatment group than in control, at 4 and 8 weeks after surgery (P-value<0.05). Conduction velocity was better in treatment group than in control group at 4 and 12 weeks (P-value<0.05). Recovery index was higher in treatment group than the control group, 8 weeks after surgery (P-value <0.05). Greater nerve fiber diameter, axon diameter, and myelin sheath thickness were observed in treatment group compared to control group at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery (P-value<0.05). The immunoreactivity of regenerated axons and myelin sheath in treatment group were far more similar to sham group. Conclusion: Alpha-lipoic acid when loaded in a chitosan conduit could improve transected sciatic nerve regeneration in rat. PMID:25945234

  5. A rare localization of neurothekeomas of radial nerve: A case report.

    PubMed

    Di Sante, L; Camerota, F; Celletti, C; Ioppolo, F; Santilli, V; David, E

    2015-01-01

    Neurothekeoma is a very rare benign connective tissue tumour that presumably derived from nerve sheath cells. We described the case of a rare localization of neurothekeoma in the upper limb with a strange presentation. A 49 years-old woman presented to the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Division of the Umberto I Hospital referring an intensive pain associated to paresthesias at the left forearm lasting from six months. The patient had a history of epicondylitis confirmed with an elbow RMN showing an increased thickness of the tendon insertions on the epicondiloidea region of the elbow. Rehabilitative and physical therapy has been done without symptoms remission. An ultrasound evaluation showed an oval formation well circumscribed in the context of the radial nerve. It was easy to demonstrate the relevance of the radial nerve, following it from the arch of Frohse until the humeral sulcus of the radial nerve. A MRI that showed a mass, mildly hypointense on T1- weighted sequences and hyperintense on T2-weighted images, with nonhomogeneous enhancement post-contrast, attributable to expansionary pathology of the radial nerve. A biopsy was done and the lesion was described as a benign tumor of nerve sheath, i.e., a Neurothekeoma of the radial nerve. Patients was surgically treated, the tumor has been removed and she referred the resolution of symptomatology. PMID:26794820

  6. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near ... surface of the body where it crosses the elbow, so prolonged pressure on the elbow or entrapment ...

  7. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  8. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  9. Tibial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... a loss of movement or sensation in the foot from damage to the tibial nerve. ... Tibial nerve dysfunction is an unusual form of peripheral ... the calf and foot muscles. A problem in function with a single ...

  10. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how ...

  11. Assessing nerves in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Garbino, José Antonio; Heise, Carlos Otto; Marques, Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy neuropathy is dependent on the patient's immune response and expresses itself as a focal or multifocal neuropathy with asymmetric involvement. Leprosy neuropathy evolves chronically but recurrently develops periods of exacerbation during type 1 or type 2 reactions, leading to acute neuropathy. Nerve enlargement leading to entrapment syndromes is also a common manifestation. Pain may be either of inflammatory or neuropathic origin. A thorough and detailed evaluation is mandatory for adequate patient follow-up, including nerve palpation, pain assessment, graded sensory mapping, muscle power testing, and autonomic evaluation. Nerve conduction studies are a sensitive tool for nerve dysfunction, including new lesions during reaction periods or development of entrapment syndromes. Nerve ultrasonography is also a very promising method for nerve evaluation in leprosy. The authors propose a composite nerve clinical score for nerve function assessment that can be useful for longitudinal evaluation. PMID:26773623

  12. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  13. Radial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... nerve leads to problems with movement in the arm and wrist and with sensation in the back of the arm or hand. ... to the radial nerve, which travels down the arm and controls movement of the triceps muscle at ...

  14. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  15. Chronic Posttraumatic Dislocation of Radial Head With Ulnar Nerve Entrapment in a Child: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jiangyu; Wang, Wei; Yu, Shiyang; Yan, Hede; Zhan, Yulin; Fan, Cunyi

    2016-06-01

    We present an unusual case of chronic posttraumatic anteromedial dislocation of radial head with direct ulnar nerve entrapment in a child. Ulnar nerve decompression, open reduction of the radial head, and annular ligament reconstruction using a palmaris longus tendon graft were performed, and a satisfactory functional outcome was achieved at the 15-month follow-up. Through a review of literature, we conclude that early diagnosis and management for radial head dislocation are recommended to avoid nerve symptoms. Besides, open reduction and annular ligament reconstruction with a palmaris longus tendon graft would be an alternative surgery during chronic phase. PMID:27171922

  16. Postherniotomy dysejaculation: successful treatment with mesh removal and nerve transection.

    PubMed

    Aasvang, E K; Kehlet, H

    2008-12-01

    Dysejaculation following groin hernia repair can occur in about 1-2% of patients, resulting in impairment of sexual function. We report a case of chronic postherniotomy dysejaculation treated with transection of the ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerves and decompression of vas deferens that was embedded and twisted in shrunken mesh and scar tissue. At three months follow-up, there was reduced overall pain and no dysejaculation, and quantitative sensory testing showed reversal of sensory abnormalities, except for sensory loss, compared with preoperative values. PMID:18437287

  17. Laryngeal nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Laryngeal nerve damage is injury to one or both of the nerves that are attached to the voice box. ... Injury to the laryngeal nerves is uncommon. When it does occur, it can be from: A complication of neck or chest surgery (especially thyroid, lung, ...

  18. Influence of decompression sickness on vasomotion of isolated rat vessels.

    PubMed

    Mazur, A; Lambrechts, K; Buzzacott, P; Wang, Q; Belhomme, M; Theron, M; Mansourati, J; Guerrero, F

    2014-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that endothelial function is impaired following a dive even without decompression sickness. During this study we determined the effect of decompression sickness on endothelium-dependent and independent vasoreactivity. For this purpose twenty-seven male Sprague-Dawley rats were submitted to a simulated dive up to 1,000 kPa absolute pressure and divided into 3 groups: safe diving without decompression sickness or dives provoking mild or severe sickness. A fourth control group remained at atmospheric pressure. Endothelium-dependent and independent vasomotion was assessed ex vivo by measuring isometric tension in rings of abdominal aorta and mesenteric arteries. Dose-response curves were obtained with phenylephrine, acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside. Acetylcholine-induced relaxation was measured in the presence of L-NAME, indometacin or both of them at once.Contraction was significantly decreased after each protocol compared with the control rats. Additionally, the response in animals from the severe group was significantly different from that of the safe and mild groups. Dose response curves for acetylcholine alone and in the presence of inhibitors remained unchanged. We did not observe differences in endothelium-dependent vasodilation after diving or in the presence of decompression sickness. Contractile response to phenylephrine was progressively impaired with increased decompression stress. These results may indicate smooth muscle injury. PMID:24258471

  19. Decompression sickness during construction of the Great Belt Tunnel, Denmark.

    PubMed

    Andersen, H L

    2002-01-01

    Thirteen cases of decompression sickness (DCS) occurred during the construction of the 8-km long railway tunnel under the Great Belt in Denmark between January 1992 and February 1996. 320 compressed air workers were subjected to 9018 pressure exposures in four tunnel boring machines. Overall DCS incidence was 0.14%. Working pressures ranged between 0.25 bar (1.25 atm abs or 126.3 kPa) and 2.95 bar (3.91 atm abs or 396.3 kPa) and working times ranged between 2 minutes and 339 minutes. During the first 1798 pressure exposures 7 DCS cases occurred using French air decompression tables from 1974. The following 7220 exposures were then decompressed in accordance with the newly issued French air decompression tables of 1992. After changing schedules 6 DCS cases occurred and DCS incidence was reduced to 0.08%. Two of the first seven DCS cases had permanent residual symptoms after recompression treatment. All DCS cases, except one, occurred among the 30% of exposures that imposed the greatest decompression stress. DCS incidence among these exposures was 0.42%. PMID:12670120

  20. Paranodal dysmyelination in peripheral nerves of Trembler mice.

    PubMed

    Rosenbluth, Jack; Bobrowski-Khoury, Natasha

    2014-04-01

    Subtle defects in paranodes of myelinated nerve fibers can cause significant physiological malfunction. We have investigated myelinated fibers in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) of the Trembler mouse, a model of CMT-1A neuropathy, for evidence of such defects. Ultrastructural analysis shows that the "transverse bands," which attach the myelin sheath to the axon at the paranodal axoglial junction, are grossly diminished in number in Trembler nerve fibers. Although paranodes often appear to be greatly elongated, it is only a short region immediately adjacent to the node of Ranvier that displays transverse bands. Where transverse bands are missing, the junctional gap widens, thus reducing resistance to short circuiting of nodal action currents during saltatory conduction and increasing the likelihood that axonal K(+) channels under the myelin sheath will be activated. In addition, we find evidence that structural domains in Trembler axons are incompletely differentiated, consistent with diminution in nodal Na channel density, which could further compromise conduction. Deficiency of transverse bands may also increase susceptibility to disruption of the paranodal junction and retraction of the myelin sheath. We conclude that Trembler PNS myelinated fibers display subtle defects in paranodal and nodal regions that could contribute significantly to conduction defects and increased risk of myelin detachment. PMID:24446165

  1. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the median nerve: A cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a three-year-old child: A case report and comprehensive literature review

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Jenna-Lynn; Classen, Dale; Bruce, Garth; Kanthan, Rani

    2014-01-01

    A three-year-old boy was investigated for inexplicable incessant crying. On examination, his left wrist was mildly swollen (three to four months) and sensitive. Exploration and carpal tunnel decompression of the left wrist with incisional biopsy was performed for the presence of a fusiform swelling intimately associated with the median nerve. Histopathology revealed the presence of enlarged nerve bundles admixed with mature fat cells and diffuse fibroblastic proliferation. Three months later, he underwent urgent contralateral carpal tunnel decompression for a similar presentation. The final diagnosis was bilateral fibrolipomatous hamartoma (FLH) of the median nerves causing acute bilateral compression neuropathy. FLH of the median nerve is an extremely unusual cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a young child presenting with ‘incessant crying’. A comprehensive review of FLH including epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, imaging, pathology, treatment and prognosis is discussed. PMID:25332651

  2. Simulations of plasma sheaths using continuum kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Hakim, Ammar

    2015-11-01

    Understanding plasma sheath physics is important for the performance of devices such as Hall thrusters due to the effect of energetic particles on electrode erosion. Plasma sheath physics is studied using kinetic and multi-fluid models with relevance to secondary electron emissions and plasma-surface interactions. Continuum kinetic models are developed to directly solve the Vlasov-Poisson equation using the discontinuous Galerkin method for each of the ion and electron species. A steady-state sheath is simulated by including a simple model for a neutral fluid. Multi-fluid simulations for the plasma sheath are also performed using the discontinuous Galerkin method to solve a complete set of fluid equations for each of the ion and electron species. The kinetic plasma sheath is compared to a multi-fluid plasma sheath. Supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  3. Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications.

  4. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging of nerves with a clinical ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Jean Martial; West, Simeon; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate and efficient identification of nerves is of great importance during many ultrasound-guided clinical procedures, including nerve blocks and prostate biopsies. It can be challenging to visualise nerves with conventional ultrasound imaging, however. One of the challenges is that nerves can have very similar appearances to nearby structures such as tendons. Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of near-infrared optical spectroscopy for differentiating nerves and adjacent tissues, as this modality can be sensitive to optical absorption of lipids that are present in intra- and extra-neural adipose tissue and in the myelin sheaths. These studies were limited to point measurements, however. In this pilot study, a custom photoacoustic system with a clinical ultrasound imaging probe was used to acquire multi-spectral photoacoustic images of nerves and tendons from swine ex vivo, across the wavelength range of 1100 to 1300 nm. Photoacoustic images were processed and overlaid in colour onto co-registered conventional ultrasound images that were acquired with the same imaging probe. A pronounced optical absorption peak centred at 1210 nm was observed in the photoacoustic signals obtained from nerves, and it was absent in those obtained from tendons. This absorption peak, which is consistent with the presence of lipids, provides a novel image contrast mechanism to significantly enhance the visualization of nerves. In particular, image contrast for nerves was up to 5.5 times greater with photoacoustic imaging (0.82 +/- 0.15) than with conventional ultrasound imaging (0.148 +/- 0.002), with a maximum contrast of 0.95 +/- 0.02 obtained in photoacoustic mode. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of photoacoustic imaging to improve clinical outcomes in ultrasound-guided interventions in regional anaesthesia and interventional oncology.

  5. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuates peripheral nerve degeneration in rat sciatic nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Maghrebi, May; Alshammari, Ahmad; George, Preethi

    2013-02-01

    Recently, we have shown that green tea (GT) consumption improves both reflexes and sensation in unilateral chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve. Considering the substantial neuroprotective properties of GT polyphenols, we sought to investigate whether (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) could protect the sciatic nerve and improve functional impairments induced by a crushing injury. We also examined whether neuronal cell apoptosis induced by the crushing injury is affected by EGCG treatment. Histological examination of sciatic nerves from EGCG-treated (50mg/kg; i.p.) showed that axonotmized rats had a remarkable axonal and myelin regeneration with significant decrease in the number of myelinated axonal fibers compared to vehicle-treated crush group. Similarly, ultrastructural evaluation of EGCG-treated nerves displayed normal unmyelinated and myelinated axons with regular myelin sheath thickness and normalized appearance of Schmidt-Lantermann clefts. Extracellular matrix displayed normal collagen fibers appearance with distinctively organized distribution similar to sham animals. Analysis of foot position and extensor postural thrust test showed a progressive and faster recovery in the EGCG-treated group compared to vehicle-treated animals. EGCG-treated rats showed significant increase in paw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical stimulation compared to vehicle-treated crush group. EGCG treatment also restored the mRNA expression of Bax, Bcl-2 and survivin but not that of p53 to sham levels on days 3 and 7 post-injury. Our results demonstrate that EGCG treatment enhanced functional recovery, advanced morphological nerve rescue and accelerated nerve regeneration following crush injury partly due to the down regulation of apoptosis related genes. PMID:23313191

  6. Experimental Research on Differentiation-Inducing Growth of Nerve Lateral Bud by HUC-MSCs Chitosan Composite Conduit.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qiang; Zhang, Xuepu; Wu, Yuexin

    2015-11-01

    This study is intended to explore the role of human umbilical-cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HUC-MSCs) in nerve end-to-side anastomosis, as well as in the induction and promotion of growth of nerve lateral bud. The chitosan nerve conduit was prepared based on the biological characteristics of chitosan, and the nerve conduit was filled with HUC-MSCs, and was used to bridge the nerve end-to-side anastomotic stoma. The experimental animals were randomly assigned into three groups (10 in each group), and the nerve end-to-side anastomosis was conducted: (1) group A (control group): traditional tibial nerve-common peroneal nerve end-to-side anastomosis; (2) group B (experimental group 1): tibial nerve-common peroneal nerve end-to-side anastomotic stoma bridged with chitosan nerve conduit; (3) group C (experimental group 2): tibial nerve-common peroneal nerve end-to-side anastomotic stoma bridged by chitosan nerve conduit filled with HUC-MSCs. General morphological observation, nerve electrophysiology, and anti-S-100 immunohistochemistry were performed. All experimental animals survived, and no infections were found at operative incisions. The nerve continuity was in good condition through visual observation when sampling, which is mild adhesion to the surrounding tissue and easy to be separated. 12 W HUC-MSCs chitosan composite nerve conduits were degraded completely after operation. Electrophysiological test showed that the nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in group C was significantly higher than that in group A or group B (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences between NCVs of group A and group B. Toluidine blue staining and transmission electron microscope showed that the number of the medullated fibers and the myelin sheath thickness in group C were larger than those in group A or B. There were no significant differences between the numbers of the medullated fibers and between the myelin sheath thicknesses of groups A and B. By means of anti-S-100

  7. Kinetic model for the collisionless sheath of a collisional plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2016-08-01

    Collisional plasmas typically have mean-free-path still much greater than the Debye length, so the sheath is mostly collisionless. Once the plasma density, temperature, and flow are specified at the sheath entrance, the profile variation of electron and ion density, temperature, flow speed, and conductive heat fluxes inside the sheath is set by collisionless dynamics, and can be predicted by an analytical kinetic model distribution. These predictions are contrasted here with direct kinetic simulations, showing good agreement.

  8. [Polychromatic method of simultaneously demonstrating all the structural components of a peripheral nerve].

    PubMed

    Dolishniĭ, N V; Mel'man, E P

    1978-02-01

    To study neuro-vessel relations in the nerve conductive system, a combined method revealing myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers and blood vessels was suggested. The method includes the following stages of material treatment: injection of the nerve blood vessels with chloroform emulsion of Paris blue (5--10 g of the dye in 100 g of the solvant); the straightened nerves about 5 mm long are fixed in 12% neutral formalin; etching in the solution of chromium solts; embedding in paraffin and preparation of thin sections (3--5 mcm); staining after Masson's method applied for collagen fiber staining) in the author's modification and mounting in balsam. In the preparations, the axons of the nerve fibers are seen blue--purple, myelin sheaths--light red, connective tissue elements--violet and blood vessels are seen as dark blue rings. PMID:77154

  9. Bridging peripheral nerves using a deacetyl chitin conduit combined with short-term electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongli; Li, Xin; Zuo, Songjie; Xin, Jie; Zhang, Peixun

    2014-05-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that deacetyl chitin conduit nerve bridging or electrical stimulation can effectively promote the regeneration of the injured peripheral nerve. We hypothesized that the combination of these two approaches could result in enhanced regeneration. Rats with right sciatic nerve injury were subjected to deacetyl chitin conduit bridging combined with electrical stimulation (0.1 ms, 3 V, 20 Hz, for 1 hour). At 6 and 12 weeks after treatment, nerve conduction velocity, myelinated axon number, fiber diameter, axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin sheath in the stimulation group were better than in the non-stimulation group. The results indicate that deacetyl chitin conduit bridging combined with temporary electrical stimulation can promote peripheral nerve repair. PMID:25206762

  10. Methylprednisolone microsphere sustained-release membrane inhibits scar formation at the site of peripheral nerve lesion.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Li, Teng; Cao, Xiang-Chang; Luo, De-Qing; Lian, Ke-Jian

    2016-05-01

    Corticosteroids are widely used for the treatment of acute central nervous system injury. However, their bioactivity is limited by their short half-life. Sustained release of glucocorticoids can prolong their efficacy and inhibit scar formation at the site of nerve injury. In the present study, we wrapped the anastomotic ends of the rat sciatic nerve with a methylprednisolone sustained-release membrane. Compared with methylprednisone alone or methylprednisone microspheres, the methylprednisolone microsphere sustained-release membrane reduced tissue adhesion and inhibited scar tissue formation at the site of anastomosis. It also increased sciatic nerve function index and the thickness of the myelin sheath. Our findings show that the methylprednisolone microsphere sustained-release membrane effectively inhibits scar formation at the site of anastomosis of the peripheral nerve, thereby promoting nerve regeneration. PMID:27335571

  11. Methylprednisolone microsphere sustained-release membrane inhibits scar formation at the site of peripheral nerve lesion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Li, Teng; Cao, Xiang-chang; Luo, De-qing; Lian, Ke-jian

    2016-01-01

    Corticosteroids are widely used for the treatment of acute central nervous system injury. However, their bioactivity is limited by their short half-life. Sustained release of glucocorticoids can prolong their efficacy and inhibit scar formation at the site of nerve injury. In the present study, we wrapped the anastomotic ends of the rat sciatic nerve with a methylprednisolone sustained-release membrane. Compared with methylprednisone alone or methylprednisone microspheres, the methylprednisolone microsphere sustained-release membrane reduced tissue adhesion and inhibited scar tissue formation at the site of anastomosis. It also increased sciatic nerve function index and the thickness of the myelin sheath. Our findings show that the methylprednisolone microsphere sustained-release membrane effectively inhibits scar formation at the site of anastomosis of the peripheral nerve, thereby promoting nerve regeneration. PMID:27335571

  12. High Median Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Jonathan; Ugwu-Oju, Obinna

    2016-08-01

    The median nerve serves a crucial role in extrinsic and intrinsic motor and sensory function to the radial half of the hand. High median nerve injuries, defined as injuries proximal to the anterior interosseous nerve origin, therefore typically result in significant functional loss prompting aggressive surgical management. Even with appropriate recognition and contemporary nerve reconstruction, however, motor and sensory recovery may be inadequate. With isolated persistent high median nerve palsies, a variety of available tendon transfers can improve key motor functions and salvage acceptable use of the hand. PMID:27387077

  13. High-altitude decompression illness: case report and discussion

    PubMed Central

    Allan, G. Michael; Kenny, David

    2003-01-01

    DECOMPRESSION ILLNESS (DCI) CAN OCCUR in a variety of contexts, including scuba diving and flight in nonpressurized aircraft. It is characterized by joint pain, neurologic injury, and respiratory or constitutional symptoms. To prepare flight crews for accidental decompression events, the Canadian Armed Forces regularly conducts controlled and supervised depressurization exercises in specialized chambers. We present the cases of 3 Canadian Armed Forces personnel who successfully completed such decompression exercises but experienced DCI after they took a 3-hour commercial flight 6 hours after the completion of training. All 3 patients were treated in a hyperbaric oxygen chamber. The pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of DCI and the travel implications for military personnel who have undergone such training exercises are discussed. Although DCI is relatively uncommon, physicians may see it and should be aware of its presentation and treatment. PMID:14557320

  14. The Risks of Scuba Diving: A Focus on Decompression Illness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Decompression Illness includes both Decompression Sickness (DCS) and Pulmonary Overinflation Syndrome (POIS), subsets of diving-related injury related to scuba diving. DCS is a condition in which gas bubbles that form while diving do not have adequate time to be resorbed or “off-gassed,” resulting in entrapment in specific regions of the body. POIS is due to an overly rapid ascent to the surface resulting in the rupture of alveoli and subsequent extravasation of air bubbles into tissue planes or even the cerebral circulation. Divers must always be cognizant of dive time and depth, and be trained in the management of decompression. A slow and controlled ascent, plus proper control of buoyancy can reduce the dangerous consequences of pulmonary barotrauma. The incidence of adverse effects can be diminished with safe practices, allowing for the full enjoyment of this adventurous aquatic sport. PMID:25478296

  15. Decompression sickness in simulated Apollo-Soyuz space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, J. P.; Robertson, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Apollo-Soyuz docking module atmospheres were evaluated for incidence of decompression sickness in men simulating passage from the Russian spacecraft atmosphere, to the U.S. spacecraft atmosphere, and then to the American space suit pressure. Following 8 hr of 'shirtsleeve' exposure to 31:69::O2:N2 gas breathing mixture, at 10 psia, subjects were 'denitrogenated' for either 30 or 60 min with 100% O2 prior to decompression directly to 3.7 psia suit equivalent while performing exercise at fixed intervals. Five of 21 subjects experienced symptoms of decompression sickness after 60 min of denitrogenation compared to 6 among 20 subjects after 30 min of denitrogenation. A condition of Grade I bends was reported after 60 min of denitrogenation, and 3 of these 5 subjects noted the disappearance of all symptoms of bends at 3.7 psia. After 30 min of denitrogenation, 2 out of 6 subjects developed Grade II bends at 3.7 psia.

  16. A computerized databank of decompression sickness incidence in altitude chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Bedahl, Sharon R.; Van Liew, Hugh D.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a hypobaric decompression sickness databank (HDSD) for use with personal computers. The databank consolidates some of the decompression sickness (DCS) information that has accumulated from altitude chamber tests from 1942 to the present. The information was transcribed to a data collection form, screened for accuracy and duplication, and then added to the databank through a computer keyboard. The databank consists of two files; 63 fields contain details of the test conditions in the altitude chamber, the outcome of the test in terms of DCS and venous gas emboli, the physical characteristics of the group of subjects who underwent the test, and the denitrogenation procedures prior to decompression. The HDSD currently contains 378 records that represent 130,012 altitude exposures from 80 sources: scientific journal articles, government and contractor reports, and chapters from books.

  17. Bubble formation in crabs induced by limb motions after decompression.

    PubMed

    McDonough, P M; Hemmingsen, E A

    1984-07-01

    In vivo bubble formation was studied in the megalopal stage of the crab Pachygrapsus crassipes. The animals were equilibrated with elevated argon, nitrogen, or helium pressures then rapidly decompressed to atmospheric pressure. Voluntary motions induced bubble nucleation in leg joints after exposures to as low as 2 atm nitrogen (gauge pressure). Delays of several minutes sometimes passed between decompression and bubble formation. Mechanically stimulating the animals to move their legs increased this bubble formation, whereas immobilizing the legs before gas equilibration prevented it, even in animals decompressed from 150 atm nitrogen. We conclude that preformed nuclei are not responsible for bubbles developing in the legs of this animal. Instead, tribonucleation of bubbles apparently occurs as a result of limb motions at relatively low gas supersaturations. PMID:6469773

  18. The risks of scuba diving: a focus on Decompression Illness.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    Decompression Illness includes both Decompression Sickness (DCS) and Pulmonary Overinflation Syndrome (POIS), subsets of diving-related injury related to scuba diving. DCS is a condition in which gas bubbles that form while diving do not have adequate time to be resorbed or "off-gassed," resulting in entrapment in specific regions of the body. POIS is due to an overly rapid ascent to the surface resulting in the rupture of alveoli and subsequent extravasation of air bubbles into tissue planes or even the cerebral circulation. Divers must always be cognizant of dive time and depth, and be trained in the management of decompression. A slow and controlled ascent, plus proper control of buoyancy can reduce the dangerous consequences of pulmonary barotrauma. The incidence of adverse effects can be diminished with safe practices, allowing for the full enjoyment of this adventurous aquatic sport. PMID:25478296

  19. A critical review of physiological bubble formation in hyperbaric decompression.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Virginie; Eckersley, Robert J; Balestra, Costantino; Karapantsios, Thodoris D; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2013-05-01

    Bubbles are known to form in the body after scuba dives, even those done well within the decompression model limits. These can sometimes trigger decompression sickness and the dive protocols should therefore aim to limit bubble formation and growth from hyperbaric decompression. Understanding these processes physiologically has been a challenge for decades and there are a number of questions still unanswered. The physics and historical background of this field of study is presented and the latest studies and current developments reviewed. Heterogeneous nucleation is shown to remain the prime candidate for bubble formation in this context. The two main theories to account for micronuclei stability are then to consider hydrophobicity of surfaces or tissue elasticity, both of which could also explain some physiological observations. Finally the modeling relevance of the bubble formation process is discussed, together with that of bubble growth as well as multiple bubble behavior. PMID:23523006

  20. Detached tip of a transseptal sheath during left atrial ablation.

    PubMed

    El-Damaty, Ahmed; Love, Michael; Parkash, Ratika

    2012-02-15

    Left atrial ablation has become more commonplace with the advent of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation. A number of transseptal sheaths have been produced to enhance safe and efficient catheter manipulation in the left atrium (LA) for these procedures. Some of the sheaths have been subject to recall due to partial or complete detachment of its radiopaque tip. We report a case of a 46 year-old female diagnosed with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy that presented with atypical left atrial flutter. During electrophysiologic study, a Swartz braided SL1 (SL-1) transseptal sheath was used to introduce the ablation catheter to the left atrium. During left atrial mapping, the radiopaque tip of the sheath detached from the rest of the sheath and was seen floating in the LA. After exchanging the SL-1 sheath with a deflectable sheath, the detached segment was retrieved out of the LA and eventually out of the vascular system using an angioplasty balloon advanced over a wire and inflated distal to the lumen of the detached tip. The root cause of this malfunction was found to be lack of a secondary bonding process that these sheaths generally undergo during the manufacturing process. We describe the case of a left atrial ablation procedure where a novel percutaneous method was able to successfully retrieve the detached tip of a transseptal sheath from the vascular system, thereby avoiding a potential catastrophic complication or thoracotomy. This method may be useful in other cases where similar circumstances may present. PMID:22162088

  1. Atypic geniculate neuralgia: atypic anatomic correlation of cranial nerve roots and AICA.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Füsun Demirçivi; Duransoy, Yusuf Kurtuluş; Camlar, Mahmut

    2009-08-01

    Geniculate neuralgia is a rare cause of craniofacial pains. The anterior inferior cerebellar artery is the offending vessel which compress nervus intermedius in the patients with typical geniculate neuralgia. We report a patient whose pain was atypical for either geniculate neuralgia and trigeminal neuralgia. At operation the anterior inferior cerebellar artery was coursing with the nerves and was separated. After the decompression the pain resolved immediately. PMID:19404569

  2. Decompression to altitude: assumptions, experimental evidence, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Foster, Philip P; Butler, Bruce D

    2009-02-01

    Although differences exist, hypobaric and hyperbaric exposures share common physiological, biochemical, and clinical features, and their comparison may provide further insight into the mechanisms of decompression stress. Although altitude decompression illness (DCI) has been experienced by high-altitude Air Force pilots and is common in ground-based experiments simulating decompression profiles of extravehicular activities (EVAs) or astronauts' space walks, no case has been reported during actual EVAs in the non-weight-bearing microgravity environment of orbital space missions. We are uncertain whether gravity influences decompression outcomes via nitrogen tissue washout or via alterations related to skeletal muscle activity. However, robust experimental evidence demonstrated the role of skeletal muscle exercise, activities, and/or movement in bubble formation and DCI occurrence. Dualism of effects of exercise, positive or negative, on bubble formation and DCI is a striking feature in hypobaric exposure. Therefore, the discussion and the structure of this review are centered on those highlighted unresolved topics about the relationship between muscle activity, decompression, and microgravity. This article also provides, in the context of altitude decompression, an overview of the role of denitrogenation, metabolic gases, gas micronuclei, stabilization of bubbles, biochemical pathways activated by bubbles, nitric oxide, oxygen, anthropometric or physiological variables, Doppler-detectable bubbles, and potential arterialization of bubbles. These findings and uncertainties will produce further physiological challenges to solve in order to line up for the programmed human return to the Moon, the preparation for human exploration of Mars, and the EVAs implementation in a non-zero gravity environment. PMID:19074573

  3. Rarefaction solitons initiated by sheath instability

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry

    2015-09-15

    The instability of the cathode sheath initiated by the cold energetic electron beam is studied by the one-dimensional fluid model. Numerical simulations show the generation of travelling rarefaction solitons at the cathode. It is obtained that the parameters of these solitons strongly depend on the parameters of electron beam. The “stretched” variables are derived using the small-amplitude analysis. These variables are used in order to obtain the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the propagation of the rarefaction solitons through the plasma with cold energetic electron beam.

  4. Controversies in ureteroscopy: Wire, basket, and sheath

    PubMed Central

    Rizkala, Emad R; Monga, Manoj

    2013-01-01

    In the last one to two decades, flexible ureteroscopy has rapidly expanded its role in the treatment of urologic stone disease. With the frequent and expanded use of flexible ureteroscopy, other ancillary instruments were developed in order to ease and facilitate this technique, such as ureteral access sheaths (UAS) and a variety of wires and baskets. These developments, along with improved surgeon ureteroscopic competence, have often brought into question the need to implement the “traditional technique” of flexible ureteroscopy. In this review, we discuss a brief history of flexible ureteroscopy, its expanded indications, and the controversy surrounding the use of UAS, wires, and baskets. PMID:24082447

  5. Target normal sheath acceleration sheath fields for arbitrary electron energy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Holger

    2012-08-15

    Relativistic electrons, generated by ultraintense laser pulses, travel through the target and form a space charge sheath at the rear surface which can be used to accelerate ions to high energies. If the laser pulse duration is comparable or shorter than the time needed for the electrons to travel through the target, the electrons will not have the chance to form an equilibrium distribution but must be described by a non-equilibrium distribution. We present a kinetic theory of the rear sheath for arbitrary electron distribution function f(E), where E is the electron energy, and evaluate it for different shapes of f(E). We find that the far field is mainly determined by the high energy tail of the distribution, a steep decay of f(E) for high energies results in a small electric field and vice versa. The model is extended to account for electrons escaping the sheath region thereby allowing a finite potential drop over the sheath. The consequences of the model for the acceleration of ions are discussed.

  6. Improvement of long-term blindness caused by compression from inner-third sphenoid wing meningioma after optic canal decompression: An extremely rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Ryota; Takahashi, Satoshi; Horikoshi, Tomo; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been no previous case report of a patient whose visual acuity improved after long-term blindness caused by tumor invasion into the optic canal. Case Description: A 65-year-old Asian woman presented with a 6-month history of blindness caused by a meningioma located on the inner third of the sphenoid ridge. An operation was performed to prevent further tumor invasion into the cavernous sinus and contralateral optic nerve. During surgery, optic canal decompression was performed using an epidural approach. Subtotal removal of the tumor was achieved. Two days after the surgery, her left visual acuity recovered from blindness. Conclusion: Normally, long-term blindness caused by optic nerve compression by a brain tumor is regarded as irreversible, and even a surgical excision of the optic nerve is performed in some cases. However, because we experienced a case in which the patient recovered from long-term blindness after optic canal decompression, we believe that this surgical procedure should definitely be considered as an option. PMID:27413579

  7. Assessment of nerve morphology in nerve activation during electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Tames, Jose; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-10-01

    The distance between nerve and stimulation electrode is fundamental for nerve activation in Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation (TES). However, it is not clear the need to have an approximate representation of the morphology of peripheral nerves in simulation models and its influence in the nerve activation. In this work, depth and curvature of a nerve are investigated around the middle thigh. As preliminary result, the curvature of the nerve helps to reduce the simulation amplitude necessary for nerve activation from far field stimulation.

  8. The 1990 Hypobaric Decompression Sickness Workshop: Summary and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilmanis, Andrew A.; Stegmann, Barbara J.; Scoggins, Terrell E.

    1992-01-01

    Decompression sickness resulting from exposure to the hypobaric environment was reviewed and discussed at a three day workshop in Oct. 1990. This milestone meeting, attended by over 50 participants representing the Dept. of Defense, NASA, ESA, and academia, updated the current understanding of altitude decompression sickness (DCS). Both research and operational aspects of this illness were addressed through presentations on the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of DCS, its incidence in aviation and space operations, and existing and proposed measures for DCS prevention. Specific areas requiring further research were also identified. A summary is presented for the material given at the workshop.

  9. Decompression surgery for spinal metastases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bakar, Dara; Tanenbaum, Joseph E; Phan, Kevin; Alentado, Vincent J; Steinmetz, Michael P; Benzel, Edward C; Mroz, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature on reported outcomes following decompression surgery for spinal metastases. METHODS The authors conducted MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science database searches for studies reporting clinical outcomes and complications associated with decompression surgery for metastatic spinal tumors. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included. After meeting inclusion criteria, articles were categorized based on the following reported outcomes: survival, ambulation, surgical technique, neurological function, primary tumor histology, and miscellaneous outcomes. RESULTS Of the 4148 articles retrieved from databases, 36 met inclusion criteria. Of those included, 8 were prospective studies and 28 were retrospective studies. The year of publication ranged from 1992 to 2015. Study size ranged from 21 to 711 patients. Three studies found that good preoperative Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS ≥ 80%) was a significant predictor of survival. No study reported a significant effect of time-to-surgery following the onset of spinal cord compression symptoms on survival. Three studies reported improvement in neurological function following surgery. The most commonly cited complication was wound infection or dehiscence (22 studies). Eight studies reported that preoperative ambulatory or preoperative motor status was a significant predictor of postoperative ambulatory status. A wide variety of surgical techniques were reported: posterior decompression and stabilization, posterior decompression without stabilization, and posterior decompression with total or subtotal tumor resection. Although a wide range of functional scales were used to assess neurological outcomes, four studies used the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale to assess neurological function. Four studies reported the effects of radiation therapy and local disease control for spinal metastases. Two studies reported that

  10. Non-equilibrium and unsteady fluid degassing during slow decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Julia E.; Manga, Michael; Cashman, Katharine V.

    Decompression experiments were performed on corn syrup-water solutions in order to investigate the effect of viscosity on processes of vesiculation and degassing at low to moderate degrees of volatile supersaturation. Repeat experiments demonstrated similar long term vesiculation behavior at moderate decompression rates despite highly variable initial nucleation styles. Results suggest that magmas may not necessarily achieve chemical equilibrium by vapor exsolution and may require viscosity-dependent critical supersaturations in order to vesiculate. Vesiculation also increased the ambient pressure and decreased supersaturations, resulting in unsteady degassing.

  11. Decompression experiments identify kinetic controls on explosive silicic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.T.; Sisson, T.W.; Hankins, W.B.

    2004-01-01

    Eruption intensity is largely controlled by decompression-induced release of water-rich gas dissolved in magma. It is not simply the amount of gas that dictates how forcefully magma is propelled upwards during an eruption, but also the rate of degassing, which is partly a function of the supersaturation pressure (??Pcritical) triggering gas bubble nucleation. High temperature and pressure decompression experiments using rhyolite and dacite melt reveal compositionally-dependent differences in the ??Pcritical of degassing that may explain why rhyolites have fueled some of the most explosive eruptions on record.

  12. Superficial peroneal nerve paresis in a dancer caused by a midfoot ganglion: case report.

    PubMed

    Martin, Darrell; Dowling, Jamie; Rowan, Fiachra; Casey, Mary; O'Grady, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Ganglion cysts are common benign masses, usually occurring in the hands and feet. This report describes the case of a young female Irish dancer who presented with paresthesia of her foot due to a ganglion in near proximity to the superficial peroneal nerve. Midfoot ganglia in young girls engaged in Irish dance can limit their ability to participate. This pathology requires further epidemiological studies to investigate its prevalence. In the event of failed conservative management, surgical intervention to excise the cyst and decompress the nerve is an effective treatment to facilitate return to dancing. PMID:26045399

  13. Eruptive dynamics during magma decompression: a laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Cimarelli, C.; Scheu, B.; Wadsworth, F.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of eruptive styles characterizes the activity of a given volcano. Indeed, eruptive styles can range from effusive phenomena to explosive eruptions, with related implications for hazard management. Rapid changes in eruptive style can occur during an ongoing eruption. These changes are, amongst other, related to variations in the magma ascent rate, a key parameter affecting the eruptive style. Ascent rate is in turn dependent on several factors such as the pressure in the magma chamber, the physical properties of the magma and the rate at which these properties change. According to the high number of involved parameters, laboratory decompression experiments are the best way to achieve quantitative information on the interplay of each of those factors and the related impact on the eruption style, i.e. by analyzing the flow and deformation behavior of the transparent volatile-bearing analogue fluid. We carried out decompression experiments following different decompression paths and using silicone oil as an analogue for the melt, with which we can simulate a range of melt viscosity values. For a set of experiments we added rigid particles to simulate the presence of crystals in the magma. The pure liquid or suspension was mounted into a transparent autoclave and pressurized to different final pressures. Then the sample was saturated with argon for a fixed amount of time. The decompression path consists of a slow decompression from the initial pressure to the atmospheric condition. Alternatively, samples were decompressed almost instantaneously, after established steps of slow decompression. The decompression path was monitored with pressure transducers and a high-speed video camera. Image analysis of the videos gives quantitative information on the bubble distribution with respect to depth in the liquid, pressure and time of nucleation and on their characteristics and behavior during the ongoing magma ascent. Furthermore, we also monitored the evolution of

  14. CNS Myelin Sheath Lengths Are an Intrinsic Property of Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bechler, Marie E.; Byrne, Lauren; ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Summary Since Río-Hortega’s description of oligodendrocyte morphologies nearly a century ago, many studies have observed myelin sheath-length diversity between CNS regions [1–3]. Myelin sheath length directly impacts axonal conduction velocity by influencing the spacing between nodes of Ranvier. Such differences likely affect neural signal coordination and synchronization [4]. What accounts for regional differences in myelin sheath lengths is unknown; are myelin sheath lengths determined solely by axons or do intrinsic properties of different oligodendrocyte precursor cell populations affect length? The prevailing view is that axons provide molecular cues necessary for oligodendrocyte myelination and appropriate sheath lengths. This view is based upon the observation that axon diameters correlate with myelin sheath length [1, 5, 6], as well as reports that PNS axonal neuregulin-1 type III regulates the initiation and properties of Schwann cell myelin sheaths [7, 8]. However, in the CNS, no such instructive molecules have been shown to be required, and increasing in vitro evidence supports an oligodendrocyte-driven, neuron-independent ability to differentiate and form initial sheaths [9–12]. We test this alternative signal-independent hypothesis—that variation in internode lengths reflects regional oligodendrocyte-intrinsic properties. Using microfibers, we find that oligodendrocytes have a remarkable ability to self-regulate the formation of compact, multilamellar myelin and generate sheaths of physiological length. Our results show that oligodendrocytes respond to fiber diameters and that spinal cord oligodendrocytes generate longer sheaths than cortical oligodendrocytes on fibers, co-cultures, and explants, revealing that oligodendrocytes have regional identity and generate different sheath lengths that mirror internodes in vivo. PMID:26320951

  15. Transforming growth factor-β3 promotes facial nerve injury repair in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YANMEI; ZHAO, XINXIANG; HUOJIA, MUHTER; XU, HUI; ZHUANG, YOUMEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 on the regeneration of facial nerves in rabbits. A total of 20 adult rabbits were randomly divided into three equal groups: Normal control (n=10), surgical control (n=10) and TGF-β3 treatment (n=10). The total number and diameter of the regenerated nerve fibers was significantly increased in the TGF-β3 treatment group, as compared with in the surgical control group (P<0.01). Furthermore, in the TGF-β3 treatment group, the epineurial repair of the facial nerves was intact and the nerve fibers, which were arranged in neat rows, were morphologically intact with visible myelin swelling. However, in the surgical control group, the epineurial repair was incomplete, as demonstrated by: Atrophic nerve fibers, partially disappeared axons and myelin of uneven thickness with fuzzy borders. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the regenerated fibers in the TGF-β3 treatment group were predominantly myelinated, with clear-layered myelin sheath structures and axoplasms rich in organelles. Although typical layered myelin sheath structures were observed in the surgical control group, the myelin sheaths of the myelinated nerve fibers were poorly developed and few organelles were detected in the axoplasms. Neuro-electrophysiological examination demonstrated that, as compared with the surgical control group, the latency period of the action potentials in the TGF-β3 treatment group were shorter, whereas the stimulus amplitudes of the action potentials were significantly increased (P<0.01). The results of the present study suggest that TGF-β3 may improve the regeneration of facial nerves following trauma or injury. PMID:26997982

  16. Reproducibility in Nerve Morphometry: Comparison between Methods and among Observers

    PubMed Central

    Bilego Neto, Antônio Paulo da Costa; Silveira, Fernando Braga Cassiano; Rodrigues da Silva, Greice Anne; Sanada, Luciana Sayuri; Fazan, Valéria Paula Sassoli

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the reproducibility of a semiautomated method (computerized with manual intervention) for nerve morphometry (counting and measuring myelinated fibers) between three observers with different levels of expertise and experience with the method. Comparisons between automatic (fully computerized) and semiautomated morphometric methods performed by the same computer software using the same nerve images were also performed. Sural nerves of normal adult rats were used. Automatic and semiautomated morphometry of the myelinated fibers were made through the computer software KS-400. Semiautomated morphometry was conducted by three independent observers on the same images, using the semiautomated method. Automatic morphometry overestimated the myelin sheath area, thus overestimating the myelinated fiber size and underestimating the axon size. Fiber distributions overestimation was of 0.5 μm. For the semiautomated morphometry, no differences were found between observers for myelinated fiber and axon size distributions. Overestimation of the myelin sheath size of normal fibers by the fully automatic method might have an impact when morphometry is used for diagnostic purposes. We suggest that not only semiautomated morphometry results can be compared between different centers in clinical trials but it can also be performed by more than one investigator in one single experiment, being a reliable and reproducible method. PMID:23841086

  17. Ancient Schwannoma of superficial peroneal nerve presenting as intermittent leg pain: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Germano; Nomi, Thaís; Marques, Raquel; Leiria, João; Silva, Carmen; Periquito, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Schwannomas are benign, encapsulated, slow-growing and usually solitary tumors originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath. Schwannomas of the superficial peroneal nerves are very rare, and therefore scarcely documented in the literature. The authors report a case of a diagnosed superficial fibular nerve sheath tumor with an unreported clinical presentation. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 52-year-old Caucasian female arrived to our Orthopedics Department complaining of pain and numbness of the lateral aspect of her left leg. These symptoms were present for a year and were more evident at the end of the day, or after a long time in the orthostatic position. No evidence of other medical illnesses was found. There was no record of prior traumatic events related to that limb. Diagnosis of a benign peripheral nerve tumor was achieved and the patient was treated by surgical excision of the lesion. DISCUSSION The intermittent symptomatology presentation on this case suggest a mechanical compression etiology, allied to classical pain and paresthesia often exhibited by this kind of the tumor. An intracompartimental pressure elevation could explain why the symptoms disclosed an episodic pattern, due to a constricted, inclosed nerve. CONCLUSION We describe a rare case of a patient with an unusual superficial peroneal nerve Schwannoma clinical presentation. Literature on this topic is scarce and, therefore, this case report intends to add further data about this kind of lesion. PMID:25506844

  18. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 197 - Air No-Decompression Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air No-Decompression Limits A Appendix A to Part 197... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Pt. 197, App. A Appendix A to Part 197—Air No-Decompression Limits The following table gives the depth versus bottom time limits for single, no-decompression, air dives...

  19. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 197 - Air No-Decompression Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air No-Decompression Limits A Appendix A to Part 197... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Pt. 197, App. A Appendix A to Part 197—Air No-Decompression Limits The following table gives the depth versus bottom time limits for single, no-decompression, air dives...

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen pre-breathe modifies the outcome of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Butler, B D; Little, T; Cogan, V; Powell, M

    2006-01-01

    Deep sea divers, aviators and astronauts are at risk of decompression sickness when the ambient pressure reductions exceed a critical threshold. Venous bubbles associated with decompression sickness have the potential to react with the vascular membrane and adjacent blood products, eliciting an inflammatory cascade. Preventive measures usually involve careful decompression procedures to avoid or reduce bubble formation. De-nitrogenation with 100% oxygen pre-breathing as a preventive measure has been well established at least in altitude decompression exposures. The objective of this study was to determine the physiological and biochemical effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen Pre-breathe (HBOP) upon decompression from a hyperbaric exposure. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of eight groups. Two experimental groups received HBOP at 1 and 18 hours prior to decompression, as compared with ground level oxygen or non-treated groups that still experienced decompression stress, and the associated non-decompressed controls. The results showed decreased extravascular lung water (pulmonary edema), bronchoalveolar lavage and pleural protein and arterial, broncho-alveolar lavage, and urine leukotriene E4 (LKE4) levels in both the 1Hr and 18Hr HBOP decompressed rats compared to non-oxygenated decompressed rats, as well as a decreased overall expression of signs of decompression sickness. This study indicates that HBOP-treated rats exhibit fewer signs and complications of decompression sickness compared with non-treated or ground level oxygen treated rats. PMID:17274310

  1. An inside-out vein graft filled with platelet-rich plasma for repair of a short sciatic nerve defect in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Yeong; Jeon, Woo Joo; Kim, Dong Hwee; Rhyu, Im Joo; Kim, Young Hwan; Youn, Inchan; Park, Jong Woong

    2014-07-15

    Platelet-rich plasma containing various growth factors can promote nerve regeneration. An inside-out vein graft can substitute nerve autograft to repair short nerve defects. It is hypothesized that an inside-out vein graft filled with platelet-rich plasma shows better effects in the repair of short sciatic nerve defects. In this study, an inside-out vein autograft filled with platelet-rich plasma was used to bridge a 10 mm-long sciatic nerve defect in rats. The sciatic nerve function of rats with an inside-out vein autograft filled with platelet-rich plasma was better improved than that of rats with a simple inside-out vein autograft. At 6 and 8 weeks, the sciatic nerve function of rats with an inside-out vein autograft filled with platelet-rich plasma was better than that of rats undergoing nerve autografting. Compared with the sciatic nerve repaired with a simple inside-out vein autograft, the number of myelinated axons was higher, axon diameter and myelin sheath were greater in the sciatic nerve repaired with an inside-out vein autograft filled with platelet-rich plasma and they were similar to those in the sciatic nerve repaired with nerve autograft. These findings suggest that an inside-out vein graft filled with platelet-rich plasma can substitute nerve autograft to repair short sciatic nerve defects. PMID:25221591

  2. Sheath structure transition controlled by secondary electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, I. V.; Langendorf, S. J.; Walker, M. L. R.; Keidar, M.

    2015-04-01

    In particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC MCC) simulations and in an experiment we study sheath formation over an emissive floating Al2O3 plate in a direct current discharge plasma at argon gas pressure 10-4 Torr. The discharge glow is maintained by the beam electrons emitted from a negatively biased hot cathode. We observe three types of sheaths near the floating emissive plate and the transition between them is driven by changing the negative bias. The Debye sheath appears at lower voltages, when secondary electron emission is negligible. With increasing applied voltage, secondary electron emission switches on and a first transition to a new sheath type, beam electron emission (BEE), takes place. For the first time we find this specific regime of sheath operation near the floating emissive surface. In this regime, the potential drop over the plate sheath is about four times larger than the temperature of plasma electrons. The virtual cathode appears near the emissive plate and its modification helps to maintain the BEE regime within some voltage range. Further increase of the applied voltage U initiates the second smooth transition to the plasma electron emission sheath regime and the ratio Δφs/Te tends to unity with increasing U. The oscillatory behavior of the emissive sheath is analyzed in PIC MCC simulations. A plasmoid of slow electrons is formed near the plate and transported to the bulk plasma periodically with a frequency of about 25 kHz.

  3. Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abe Fetterman, Yevgeny Raitses, and Michael Keidar

    2008-04-08

    The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

  4. INCORPORATING FOREIGN SHEATH BLIGHT RESISTANCE GENES INTO US RICE GEMPLASM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight disease, caused by the Rhizoctonia solani fungus, has been the most economically significant rice disease throughout Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas since the early 1970s. While diseases such as blast and straighthead can also devastate yield, sheath blight disease occurs more consiste...

  5. Generalized Analytical Model for the Radio-Frequency Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    An analytical model for the planar radio frequency (RF) sheath in capacitive discharges is developed based on the applied RF voltage as the boundary condition. The model applies to all kind of waveforms for the applied RF voltage, includes both sheaths in a discharge of arbitrary symmetry, and allows for an arbitrary degree of ion collisionallity in the sheaths (charge-exchange collisions). Further, effects of the finite floating potential during sheath collapse are included. The model can even be extended to electronegative plasmas with low bulk conductivity. The individual sheath voltages, the self-bias, and the RF floating potentials are explicitly calculated by a voltage balance equation using a cubic-charge voltage relation for the sheaths. In particular, the RF-phase as a function of the sheath voltage is determined. This is an input for a single second order non-linear integro-differential equation which is governing the ion flow velocity in the sheath. Fast numerical integration is straight forward and in many cases approximate analytical solutions can be obtained. Based on the solution for the ion flow velocity, densities, electric fields, currents, and charge-voltage relations are calculated. Further, the Child-Langmuir laws for the collisionless as well as the highly collisional case are derived. Very good agreement between model and experiments is obtained.

  6. A Log Logistic Survival Model Applied to Hypobaric Decompression Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny

    2001-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a complex, multivariable problem. A mathematical description or model of the likelihood of DCS requires a large amount of quality research data, ideas on how to define a decompression dose using physical and physiological variables, and an appropriate analytical approach. It also requires a high-performance computer with specialized software. I have used published DCS data to develop my decompression doses, which are variants of equilibrium expressions for evolved gas plus other explanatory variables. My analytical approach is survival analysis, where the time of DCS occurrence is modeled. My conclusions can be applied to simple hypobaric decompressions - ascents lasting from 5 to 30 minutes - and, after minutes to hours, to denitrogenation (prebreathing). They are also applicable to long or short exposures, and can be used whether the sufferer of DCS is at rest or exercising at altitude. Ultimately I would like my models to be applied to astronauts to reduce the risk of DCS during spacewalks, as well as to future spaceflight crews on the Moon and Mars.

  7. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.332 PVHO—Decompression chambers... minimum pressure capability of— (1) 6 ATA, when used for diving to 300 fsw; or (2) The maximum depth of the dive, when used for diving operations deeper than 300 fsw, unless a closed bell meeting...

  8. Does temperature increase or decrease in adiabatic decompression of magma?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilinc, A. I.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Khan, T.

    2011-12-01

    We have modeled adiabatic decompression of an andesitic and a basaltic magma as an isentropic process using the Melts algorithm. Our modeling shows that during adiabatic decompression temperature of andesitic magma increases but temperature of basaltic magma decreases. In an isentropic process entropy is constant so change of temperature with pressure can be written as dT/dP=T (dV/dT)/Cp where T (dV/dT)/Cp is generally positive. If delta P is negative so is delta T. In general, in the absence of phase change, we expect the temperature to decrease with adiabatic decompression. The effect of crystallization is to turn a more entropic phase (liquid) into a less entropic phase (solid), which must be compensated by raising the temperature. If during adiabatic decompression there is small amount or no crystallization, T (dV/dT)/Cp effect which lowers the temperature overwhelms the small amount of crystallization, which raises the temperature, and overall system temperature decreases.

  9. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... minimum pressure capability of— (1) 6 ATA, when used for diving to 300 fsw; or (2) The maximum depth of the dive, when used for diving operations deeper than 300 fsw, unless a closed bell meeting the... minute to 60 fsw and at least 1 ATA per minute thereafter; (j) Have a decompression rate of 1 ATA...

  10. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... minimum pressure capability of— (1) 6 ATA, when used for diving to 300 fsw; or (2) The maximum depth of the dive, when used for diving operations deeper than 300 fsw, unless a closed bell meeting the... minute to 60 fsw and at least 1 ATA per minute thereafter; (j) Have a decompression rate of 1 ATA...

  11. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... minimum pressure capability of— (1) 6 ATA, when used for diving to 300 fsw; or (2) The maximum depth of the dive, when used for diving operations deeper than 300 fsw, unless a closed bell meeting the... minute to 60 fsw and at least 1 ATA per minute thereafter; (j) Have a decompression rate of 1 ATA...

  12. Pediatric traumatic brain injuries treated with decompressive craniectomy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Neil; West, Michael; Wurster, Joanie; Tillman, Cassie

    2013-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs in an estimated 80% of all pediatric trauma patients and is the leading cause of death and disability in the pediatric population. Decompressive craniectomy is a procedure used to decrease intracranial pressure by allowing the brain room to swell and therefore increase cerebral perfusion to the brain. Methods: This is a retrospective study done at St. Mary's Medical Center/Palm Beach Children's Hospital encompassing a 3 year 7 month period. All the pediatric patients who sustained a TBI and who were treated with a decompressive craniectomy were included. The patients’ outcomes were monitored and scored according to the Rancho Los Amigos Score at the time of discharge from the hospital and 6 months postdischarge. Results: A total of 379 pediatric patients with a diagnosis of TBI were admitted during this time. All these patients were treated according to the severity of their injury. A total of 49 pediatric patients required neurosurgical intervention and 7 of these patients met the criteria for a decompressive craniectomy. All seven patients returned home with favorable outcomes. Conclusion: This study supports the current literature that decompressive craniectomy is no longer an intervention used as a last resort but an effective first line treatment to be considered. PMID:24232244

  13. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements of § 197.330(a) (3), (4), and (5) is used; (i) Have a minimum pressurization rate of 2 ATA per minute to 60 fsw and at least 1 ATA per minute thereafter; (j) Have a decompression rate of 1 ATA per... capability to supply breathing mixtures at the maximum rate required by each occupant doing heavy work;...

  14. Ventral Decompression in Chiari Malformation, Basilar Invagination, and Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ridder, Thomas; Anderson, Richard C E; Hankinson, Todd C

    2015-10-01

    Ventral brainstem compression is an uncommon clinical diagnosis seen by pediatric neurosurgeons and associated with Chiari malformation, type I. Presenting clinical symptoms often include headaches, lower cranial neuropathies, myelopathy, central sleep apnea, ataxia, and nystagmus. When ventral decompression is required, both open and endoscopic transoral/transnasal approaches are highly effective. PMID:26408067

  15. Decompressive Craniectomy and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is the largest cause of death in young patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Decompressive craniectomy is part of the second level measures for the management of increased intracranial pressure refractory to medical management as moderate hypothermia and barbiturate coma. The literature lack of concepts is their indications. We present a review on the state of the art. PMID:27162826

  16. Percutaneous laser disc decompression with the holmium: YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Casper, G D; Hartman, V L; Mullins, L L

    1995-06-01

    This article discusses the evolution of the percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) method using a holmium:YAG laser. Advantages of using this wavelength and several techniques for its use in PLDD are reviewed. The article also discusses the current devices and delivery systems available for this application. PMID:10150646

  17. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart S of... - Decompression Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Decompression Tables A Appendix A to Subpart S of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Underground Construction, Caissons, Cofferdams and Compressed Air Pt....

  18. The Furcal Nerve Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked) is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets) and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to the lumbosacral trunk. It is most commonly found at L4 level and is the most common cause of atypical presentation of radiculopathy/sciatica. Very little is published about the furcal nerve and many are unaware of its existence. This article summarizes all the existing evidence about furcal nerve in English literature in an attempt to create awareness and offer insight about this unique entity to fellow colleagues/professionals involved in spine care. PMID:25317309

  19. Sciatic nerve injection injury.

    PubMed

    Jung Kim, Hyun; Hyun Park, Sang

    2014-06-11

    Nerve injury is a common complication following intramuscular injection and the sciatic nerve is the most frequently affected nerve, especially in children, the elderly and underweight patients. The neurological presentation may range from minor transient pain to severe sensory disturbance and motor loss with poor recovery. Management of nerve injection injury includes drug treatment of pain, physiotherapy, use of assistive devices and surgical exploration. Early recognition of nerve injection injury and appropriate management are crucial in order to reduce neurological deficit and to maximize recovery. Sciatic nerve injection injury is a preventable event. Total avoidance of intramuscular injection is recommended if other administration routes can be used. If the injection has to be administered into the gluteal muscle, the ventrogluteal region (gluteal triangle) has a more favourable safety profile than the dorsogluteal region (the upper outer quadrant of the buttock). PMID:24920643

  20. Accelerating axonal growth promotes motor recovery after peripheral nerve injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chi Him Eddie; Omura, Takao; Cobos, Enrique J.; Latrémolière, Alban; Ghasemlou, Nader; Brenner, Gary J.; van Veen, Ed; Barrett, Lee; Sawada, Tomokazu; Gao, Fuying; Coppola, Giovanni; Gertler, Frank; Costigan, Michael; Geschwind, Dan; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2011-01-01

    Although peripheral nerves can regenerate after injury, proximal nerve injury in humans results in minimal restoration of motor function. One possible explanation for this is that injury-induced axonal growth is too slow. Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is a regeneration-associated protein that accelerates axonal growth in vitro. Here, we have shown that it can also do this in mice after peripheral nerve injury. While rapid motor and sensory recovery occurred in mice after a sciatic nerve crush injury, there was little return of motor function after sciatic nerve transection, because of the delay in motor axons reaching their target. This was not due to a failure of axonal growth, because injured motor axons eventually fully re-extended into muscles and sensory function returned; rather, it resulted from a lack of motor end plate reinnervation. Tg mice expressing high levels of Hsp27 demonstrated enhanced restoration of motor function after nerve transection/resuture by enabling motor synapse reinnervation, but only within 5 weeks of injury. In humans with peripheral nerve injuries, shorter wait times to decompression surgery led to improved functional recovery, and, while a return of sensation occurred in all patients, motor recovery was limited. Thus, absence of motor recovery after nerve damage may result from a failure of synapse reformation after prolonged denervation rather than a failure of axonal growth. PMID:21965333

  1. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-yue; Zhang, Ze-peng; Mo, Zhou-yun; Chen, Shi-jie; Xiang, Si-yu; Zhang, Qing-shan; Xue, Min

    2015-01-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury. PMID:26604912

  2. Quality of paper boards from arecanut leaf sheath.

    PubMed

    Raghupathy, R; Viswanathan, R; Devadas, C T

    2002-03-01

    A study was carried on utilizing arecanut leaf sheath for making paper boards. Paper boards were made with various combinations of arecanut leaf sheath with waste paper, 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 3:1, 2:1, control (100% areca leaf sheath) and the qualities of these paper boards were tested as per the Bureau of Indian Standards (IS: 1060 (part-I)-1966). The paper boards made with more arecanut sheath materials had more resistance to water absorption. The addition of paper increased the substance weight of the paper boards. The 2:1 and 3:1 combinations of arecanut leaf sheath and waste paper had best tear strength, tensile strength, bursting strength and water resistance with minimum substance weight. PMID:11848383

  3. An Everting Ureteral Access Sheath: Concepts and In Vitro Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keith L.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2007-04-01

    Ureteral access sheaths have been a recent innovation in facilitating ureteral stone surgery. Once properly placed, access sheaths allow the movement of ureteroscopes and other instruments through the ureter with minimal injury to the urothelium. However, there are shortcomings of the current device designs. Initial sheath placement requires significant force, and shear stress can injure the ureter. In addition, inadvertent advancement of the outer sheath without the inner introducer stylet can tear and avulse the ureter. A novel eversion design incorporating a lubricous film provides marked improvement over current access sheaths. In bench top and animal models, the eversion shealths require less force during advancement, cause less injury to the urothelial tissue, and have a lower potential of introducing extraneous materials (e.g., microbes) into a simulated urinary tract. While, the everting design provides important advantages over traditional non-everting designs, further preclinical and clinical trials are required.

  4. Gas insulated transmission line having low inductance intercalated sheath

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1978-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line including an outer sheath, an inner conductor disposed within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas between the inner conductor and the outer sheath. The outer sheath comprises an insulating tube having first and second ends, and having interior and exterior surfaces. A first electrically conducting foil is secured to the interior surface of the insulating tube, is spirally wound from one tube end to the second tube end, and has a plurality of overlapping turns. A second electrically conducting foil is secured to the exterior surface of the insulating tube, and is spirally wound in the opposite direction from the first electrically conducting foil. By winding the foils in opposite directions, the inductances within the intercalated sheath will cancel each other out.

  5. The usefulness of ICG video angiography in the surgical treatment of superior cluneal nerve entrapment neuropathy: technical note.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyongsong; Isu, Toyohiko; Chiba, Yasuhiro; Morimoto, Daijiro; Ohtsubo, Seiji; Kusano, Mitsuo; Kobayashi, Shiro; Morita, Akio

    2013-11-01

    Superior cluneal nerve (SCN) entrapment neuropathy is a known cause of low back pain. Although surgical release at the entrapment point of the osteofibrous orifice is effective, intraoperative identification of the thin SCN in thick fat tissue and confirmation of sufficient decompression are difficult. Intraoperative indocyanine green video angiography (ICG-VA) is simple, clearly demonstrates the vascular flow dynamics, and provides real-time information on vascular patency and flow. The peripheral nerve is supplied from epineurial vessels around the nerve (vasa nervorum), and the authors now present the first ICG-VA documentation of the technique and usefulness of peripheral nerve neurolysis surgery to treat SCN entrapment neuropathy in 16 locally anesthetized patients. Clinical outcomes were assessed with the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire before surgery and at the latest follow-up after surgery. Indocyanine green video angiography was useful for identifying the SCN in fat tissue. It showed that the SCN penetrated and was entrapped by the thoracolumbar fascia through the orifice just before crossing over the iliac crest in all patients. The SCN was decompressed by dissection of the fascia from the orifice. Indocyanine green video angiography visualized the SCN and its termination at the entrapment point. After sufficient decompression, the SCN was clearly visualized on ICG-VA images. Low back pain improved significantly, from a preoperative Roland-Morris Questionnaire score of 13.8 to a postoperative score of 1.3 at the last follow-up visit (p < 0.05). The authors suggest that ICG-VA is useful for the inspection of peripheral nerves such as the SCN and helps to identify the SCN and to confirm sufficient decompression at surgery for SCN entrapment. PMID:24053371

  6. Role of Inflammatory Reponse in Experimental Decompression Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, B. D.; Little, T.

    1999-01-01

    Decompression to altitude can result in gas bubble formation both in tissues and in the systemic veins. The venous gas emboli (VGE) are often monitored during decompression exposures to assess risk for decompression sickness (DCS). Astronauts are at risk for DCS during extravehicular activities (EVA), where decompression occurs from the Space Shuttle or Space Station atmospheric pressure of 14.7 pounds per square inch (PSI) to that of the space suit pressure of 4.3 PSI. DCS symptoms include diffuse pain, especially around joints, inflammation and edema. Pathophysiological effects include interstitial inflammatory responses and recurring injury to the vascular endothelium. Such responses can result in vasoconstriction and associated hemodynamic changes.The granulocyte cell activation and chemotaxin release results in the formation of vasoactive and microvascular permeability altering mediators, especially from the lungs which are the principal target organ for the venous bubbles, and from activated cells (neutrophils, platelets, macrophages). Such mediators include free arachidonic acid and the byproducts of its metabolism via the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways (see figure). The cyclooxygenase pathway results in formation of prostacyclin and other prostaglandins and thromboxanes that cause vasoconstriction, bronchoconstriction and platelet aggregation. Leukotrienes produced by the alternate pathway cause pulmonary and bronchial smooth muscle contraction and edema. Substances directly affecting vascular tone such as nitric oxide may also play a role in the respose to DCS. We are studying the role and consequent effects of the release inflammatory bioactive mediators as a result of DCS and VGE. More recent efforts are focused on identifying the effects of the body's circadian rhythm on these physiological consequences to decompression stress. al

  7. Cervical Cord Decompression Using Extended Anterior Cervical Foraminotomy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Duk; Lee, Cheol-Young; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Chul-Ku; Kim, Jong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Objective At present, gold-standard technique of cervical cord decompression is surgical decompression and fusion. But, many complications related cervical fusion have been reported. We adopted an extended anterior cervical foraminotomy (EACF) technique to decompress the anterolateral portion of cervical cord and report clinical results and effectiveness of this procedure. Methods Fifty-three patients were operated consecutively using EACF from 2008 to 2013. All of them were operated by a single surgeon via the unilateral approach. Twenty-two patients who exhibited radicular and/or myelopathic symptoms were enrolled in this study. All of them showed cervical cord compression in their preoperative magnetic resonance scan images. Results In surgical outcomes, 14 patients (64%) were classified as excellent and six (27%), as good. The mean difference of cervical cord anterior-posterior diameter after surgery was 0.92 mm (p<0.01) and transverse area was 9.77 mm2 (p<0.01). The dynamic radiological study showed that the average post-operative translation (retrolisthesis) was 0.36 mm and the disc height loss at the operated level was 0.81 mm. The change in the Cobb angle decreased to 3.46, and showed slight kyphosis. The average vertebral body resection rate was 11.47%. No procedure-related complications occurred. Only one patient who had two-level decompression needed anterior fusion at one level as a secondary surgery due to postoperative instability. Conclusions Cervical cord decompression was successfully performed using EACF technique. This procedure will be an alternative surgical option for treating cord compressing lesions. Long-term follow-up and a further study in larger series will be needed. PMID:25328648

  8. Paradoxical Herniation After Unilateral Decompressive Craniectomy Predicts Better Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqiang; Guo, Jingfang; Wu, Jin; Peng, Guoyi; Huang, Mindong; Cai, Chuwei; Yang, Yingming; Wang, Shousen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Paradoxical herniation (PH) is a life-threatening emergency after decompressive craniectomy. In the current study, we examined patient survival in patients who developed PH after decompressive craniectomy versus those who did not. Risk factors for, and management of, PH were also analyzed. This retrospective analysis included 429 consecutive patients receiving decompressive craniectomy during a period from January 2007 to December 2012. Mortality rate and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) were compared between those who developed PH (n = 13) versus those who did not (n = 416). A stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out to examine the risk factors for PH. The overall mortality in the entire sample was 22.8%, with a median follow-up of 6 months. Oddly enough, all 13 patients who developed PH survived beyond 6 months. Glasgow Coma Scale did not differ between the 2 groups upon admission, but GOS was significantly higher in subjects who developed PH. Both the disease type and coma degree were comparable between the 13 PH patients and the remaining 416 patients. In all PH episodes, patients responded to emergency treatments that included intravenous hydration, cerebral spinal fluid drainage discontinuation, and Trendelenburg position. A regression analysis indicated the following independent risk factors for PH: external ventriculostomy, lumbar puncture, and continuous external lumbar drainage. The rate of PH is approximately 3% after decompressive craniectomy. The most intriguing findings of the current study were the 0% mortality in those who developed PH versus 23.6% mortality in those who did not develop PH and significant difference of GOS score at 6-month follow-up between the 2 groups, suggesting that PH after decompressive craniectomy should be managed aggressively. The risk factors for PH include external ventriculostomy, ventriculoperitoneal shunt, lumbar puncture, and continuous external lumbar drainage. PMID:26945365

  9. Similarities and distinctions of CIR and Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Yuri; Lodkina, Irina; Nikolaeva, Nadezhda; Yermolaev, Michael

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of OMNI data and our catalog of large scale solar wind (SW) streams during 1976-2000 [Yermolaev et al., 2009] we study the average temporal profiles for two types of compressed regions: CIR (corotating interaction region - compressed region before High Speed Stream (HSS)) and Sheath (compressed region before fast Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), including Magnetic Cloud (MC) and Ejecta). As have been shown by Nikolaeva et al, [2015], the efficiency of magnetic storm generation is ~50% higher for Sheath and CIR than for ICME (MC and Ejecta), i.e. reaction magnetosphere depends on type of driver. To take into account the different durations of SW types, we use the double superposed epoch analysis (DSEA) method: rescaling the duration of the interval for all types in such a manner that, respectively, beginning and end for all intervals of selected type coincide [Yermolaev et al., 2010; 2015]. Obtained data allows us to suggest that the formation of all types of compression regions has the same physical mechanism irrespective of piston (HSS or ICME) type and differences are connected with geometry and full jumps of speed in edges of compression regions. If making the natural assumption that the gradient of speed is directed approximately on normal to the piston, CIR has the largest angle between the gradient of speed and the direction of average SW speed, and ICME - the smallest angle. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, projects 13-02-00158, 16-02-00125 and by Program of Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences. References: Nikolaeva, N. S. , Yu. I. Yermolaev, and I. G. Lodkina (2015), Modeling of the Corrected Dst* Index Temporal Profile on the Main Phase of the Magnetic Storms Generated by Different Types of Solar Wind, Cosmic Research, Vol. 53, No. 2, pp. 119-127. Yermolaev, Yu. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2009), Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Research

  10. Endoscopic Facial Nerve Surgery.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Daniele; Soloperto, Davide; Rubini, Alessia; Nogueira, João Flávio; Badr-El-Dine, Mohamed; Presutti, Livio

    2016-10-01

    Tympanic facial nerve segment surgery has been traditionally performed using microscopic approaches, but currently, exclusive endoscopic approaches have been performed for traumatic, neoplastic, or inflammatory diseases, specially located at the geniculate ganglion, greater petrosal nerve, and second tract of the facial nerve, until the second genu. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve can be reached and visualized using an exclusive transcanal endoscopic approach, even in poorly accessible regions such as the second genu and geniculate ganglion, avoiding mastoidectomy, bony demolition, and meningeal or cerebral lobe tractions, with low complication rates using a minimally invasive surgical route. PMID:27468633

  11. Space charge sheath in plasma-neutral gas interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataramani, N.; Mattoo, S. K.

    1986-04-01

    A space charge sheath is found to be formed whenever a high-velocity magnetized plasma stream penetrates a gas cloud. The sheath is always located at the head of the plasma stream, and its thickness is very small compared to the length of the plasma stream. Soon after the sheath is formed it quickly slows down to the Alfven critical velocity. The plasma behind the sheath continues to move at higher velocity until the whole plasma stream is retarded to the critical velocity. In the interaction at gas density of about 10 to the 19th/cu cm, the sheaths are observed to be accompanied by a single loop of current with current density of about 10,000 A/sq m. Maximum potential in the sheath ranges between 50 and 200 V. Presently available models for the sheath may explain the initiation of the sheath formation. Physical processes like heating of the electrons and ionization of the gas cloud which come into play at a later stage of the interaction are not included in these models. These processes considerably alter the potential structure in the sheath region. A schematic model of the observed sheath is presented. Experiments reveal a threshold value of the magnetic field for plasma retardation to occur. This seems to correspond to the threshold condition for excitation of the modified two-stream instability, which can lead to the electron heating. The observed currents are found sufficient to account for the plasma retardation at a gas density of about 10 to the 17th/cu m.

  12. Bladder outlet reconstruction: fate of the silicone sheath.

    PubMed

    Kropp, B P; Rink, R C; Adams, M C; Keating, M A; Mitchell, M E

    1993-08-01

    The placement of a 1.5 cm. wide silicone sheath around a newly constructed urethra/bladder neck to ensure maintenance of repair length and to facilitate future placement of a sphincter cuff was reported by our institution in 1985. We present our long-term followup and new recommendations for use of the silicone sheath. A total of 15 silicone sheaths was placed between March 1981 and July 1984. Of the sheaths 14 were placed at the time of urinary reconstruction around the Young-Dees-Leadbetter bladder neck repair and 1 was placed after erosion of an artificial urinary sphincter cuff. Of the 15 sheaths 10 have eroded into the urethra and 4 sheaths remain in situ. Another sheath was replaced 2 years after its original insertion with an artificial urinary sphincter cuff. Mean time to erosion was 48.2 months, with a range of 2 to 108 months. Long-term followup of 10 patients revealed that 4 ultimately required ligation of the bladder neck and construction of continent stoma after erosion, 1 is dry after placement of a bulbar artificial urinary sphincter, 2 remain dry after removal of the eroded sheath alone, 2 required bladder neck revision to achieve continence after erosion and the most recent patient remains diverted with a suprapubic tube. All 4 patients with sheaths still remaining are dry without evidence of erosion (mean duration 116 months). These long-term results using a silicone wrap around a newly constructed bladder neck reveal an unacceptably high rate of erosion. Therefore, we no longer recommend or support the use of the silicone sheath in the manner we have described for bladder neck reconstruction. PMID:8326628

  13. The importance of nerve microenvironment for schwannoma development.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Alexander; Büttner, Robert; Hagel, Christian; Baader, Stephan L; Kluwe, Lan; Salamon, Johannes; Mautner, Victor-Felix; Mindos, Thomas; Parkinson, David B; Gehlhausen, Jeffrey R; Clapp, D Wade; Morrison, Helen

    2016-08-01

    Schwannomas are predominantly benign nerve sheath neoplasms caused by Nf2 gene inactivation. Presently, treatment options are mainly limited to surgical tumor resection due to the lack of effective pharmacological drugs. Although the mechanistic understanding of Nf2 gene function has advanced, it has so far been primarily restricted to Schwann cell-intrinsic events. Extracellular cues determining Schwann cell behavior with regard to schwannoma development remain unknown. Here we show pro-tumourigenic microenvironmental effects on Schwann cells where an altered axonal microenvironment in cooperation with injury signals contribute to a persistent regenerative Schwann cell response promoting schwannoma development. Specifically in genetically engineered mice following crush injuries on sciatic nerves, we found macroscopic nerve swellings in mice with homozygous nf2 gene deletion in Schwann cells and in animals with heterozygous nf2 knockout in both Schwann cells and axons. However, patient-mimicking schwannomas could only be provoked in animals with combined heterozygous nf2 knockout in Schwann cells and axons. We identified a severe re-myelination defect and sustained macrophage presence in the tumor tissue as major abnormalities. Strikingly, treatment of tumor-developing mice after nerve crush injury with medium-dose aspirin significantly decreased schwannoma progression in this disease model. Our results suggest a multifactorial concept for schwannoma formation-emphasizing axonal factors and mechanical nerve irritation as predilection site for schwannoma development. Furthermore, we provide evidence supporting the potential efficacy of anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of schwannomas. PMID:27236462

  14. [Research Progress in Seeding Cells of Peripheral Nerve].

    PubMed

    Shi, Gengqiang; Hu, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Seeding cells play an important role in the peripheral nerve damage repair. Seeding cells studied conse- quently in peripheral nerve are Schwann cells, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells. Schwann cells, the first seeding cells, are various unique glial cells in the peripheral nervous system, which can form the myelin sheath for insulation and package of the neuron projecting axons in the peripheral nervous system so that the conduction velocity of the nerve signal was accelerated. It can be proved that Schwann cells played an important role in the maintenance of peripheral nerve function and in the regeneration process after peripheral nerve injury. The second, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are the various mesenchymal stem cells mainly exist in the systemic connective tissues and organs. These functional stem cells are often studied at present, and it has been found that they have exuberant proliferation and differentiation potentials. Neural stem cells, mentioned the third in sequence, are the kind of pluripotent cells with multi-directional differentiation, which could conduct the self-renewal function, and generate and differentiate neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes through asymmetric cell division. These three types of seed cells are discussed in this paper. PMID:26211274

  15. Organic core-sheath nanowire artificial synapses with femtojoule energy consumption.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Min, Sung-Yong; Hwang, Hyunsang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-06-01

    Emulation of biological synapses is an important step toward construction of large-scale brain-inspired electronics. Despite remarkable progress in emulating synaptic functions, current synaptic devices still consume energy that is orders of magnitude greater than do biological synapses (~10 fJ per synaptic event). Reduction of energy consumption of artificial synapses remains a difficult challenge. We report organic nanowire (ONW) synaptic transistors (STs) that emulate the important working principles of a biological synapse. The ONWs emulate the morphology of nerve fibers. With a core-sheath-structured ONW active channel and a well-confined 300-nm channel length obtained using ONW lithography, ~1.23 fJ per synaptic event for individual ONW was attained, which rivals that of biological synapses. The ONW STs provide a significant step toward realizing low-energy-consuming artificial intelligent electronics and open new approaches to assembling soft neuromorphic systems with nanometer feature size. PMID:27386556

  16. A Case of Malignant Peripheral Sheath Tumor Arising from Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min Ju; Kang, Hoon; Kim, Hyung Ok

    2008-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a term encompassing tumors previously diagnosed as malignant schwannoma, malignant neurilemmoma, neurogenic sarcoma, and neurofibrosarcoma The occurrence rate of MPNST in neurofibromatosis type 1 patients is known to be about 4.6%. Tumors occurring in this particular group have a worse prognosis in that they occur at an earlier age, are more centrally located, tend to be of a larger size and show more metastases and recurrences. We present a typical case of MPNST in a 36-year-old man with NF type 1, which occurred on the left buttock. A PET-CT showed findings of possible inguinal lymph node metastasis and a lymph node biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. The patient was treated with wide surgical resection and is undergoing adjuvant radiation therapy. PMID:27303156

  17. Efficient bridging of 20 mm rat sciatic nerve lesions with a longitudinally micro-structured collagen scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, A; Boecker, A; Tank, J; Altinova, H; Deumens, R; Dabhi, C; Tolba, R; Weis, J; Brook, G A; Pallua, N; van Neerven, S G A

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of biomaterial nerve guides has been developed that await direct comparative testing with the 'gold-standard' autologous nerve graft in functional repair of peripheral nerve defects. In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were bridged with either a collagen-based micro-structured nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Axons regenerated well into the Perimaix scaffold and, the majority of these axons grew across the 20 mm defect into the distal nerve segment. In fact, both the total axon number and the number of retrogradely traced somatosensory and motor neurons extending their axons across the implant was similar between Perimaix and autologous nerve graft groups. Implantation of Schwann cell-seeded Perimaix scaffolds provided only a beneficial effect on myelination within the scaffold. Functional recovery supported by the implanted, non-seeded Perimaix scaffold was as good as that observed after the autologous nerve graft, despite the presence of thinner myelin sheaths in the Perimaix implanted nerves. These findings support the potential of the Perimaix collagen scaffold as a future off-the-shelf device for clinical applications in selected cases of traumatic peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26496383

  18. Comparison of clinical outcomes in decompression and fusion versus decompression only in patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Syed K; Alentado, Vincent J; Lee, Bryan S; Mroz, Thomas E; Benzel, Edward C; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is a pathological calcification or ossification of the PLL, predominantly occurring in the cervical spine. Although surgery is often necessary for patients with symptomatic neurological deterioration, there remains controversy with regard to the optimal surgical treatment. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, the authors identified differences in complications and outcomes after anterior or posterior decompression and fusion versus after decompression alone for the treatment of cervical myelopathy due to OPLL. METHODS A MEDLINE, SCOPUS, and Web of Science search was performed for studies reporting complications and outcomes after decompression and fusion or after decompression alone for patients with OPLL. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate effect summary mean values, 95% CIs, Q statistics, and I(2) values. Forest plots were constructed for each analysis group. RESULTS Of the 2630 retrieved articles, 32 met the inclusion criteria. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of excellent and good outcomes and of fair and poor outcomes between the decompression and fusion and the decompression-only cohorts. However, the decompression and fusion cohort had a statistically significantly higher recovery rate (63.2% vs 53.9%; p < 0.0001), a higher final Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (14.0 vs 13.5; p < 0.0001), and a lower incidence of OPLL progression (< 1% vs 6.3%; p < 0.0001) compared with the decompression-only cohort. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of complications between the 2 cohorts. CONCLUSIONS This study represents the only comprehensive review of outcomes and complications after decompression and fusion or after decompression alone for OPLL across a heterogeneous group of surgeons and patients. Based on these results, decompression and fusion is a superior surgical technique compared with posterior

  19. CNS myelin sheath is stochastically built by homotypic fusion of myelin membranes within the bounds of an oligodendrocyte process.

    PubMed

    Szuchet, Sara; Nielsen, Lauren L; Domowicz, Miriam S; Austin, Jotham R; Arvanitis, Dimitrios L

    2015-04-01

    Myelin - the multilayer membrane that envelops axons - is a facilitator of rapid nerve conduction. Oligodendrocytes form CNS myelin; the prevailing hypothesis being that they do it by extending a process that circumnavigates the axon. It is pertinent to ask how myelin is built because oligodendrocyte plasma membrane and myelin are compositionally different. To this end, we examined oligodendrocyte cultures and embryonic avian optic nerves by electron microscopy, immuno-electron microscopy and three-dimensional electron tomography. The results support three novel concepts. Myelin membranes are synthesized as tubules and packaged into "myelinophore organelles" in the oligodendrocyte perikaryon. Myelin membranes are matured in and transported by myelinophore organelles within an oligodendrocyte process. The myelin sheath is generated by myelin membrane fusion inside an oligodendrocyte process. These findings abrogate the dogma of myelin resulting from a wrapping motion of an oligodendrocyte process and open up new avenues in the quest for understanding myelination in health and disease. PMID:25682762

  20. Identification of a Gene Essential for Sheathed Structure Formation in Sphaerotilus natans, a Filamentous Sheathed Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshihiko; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2002-01-01

    Sphaerotilus natans, a filamentous bacterium that causes bulking in activated sludge processes, can assume two distinct morphologies, depending on the substrate concentration for growth; in substrate-rich media it grows as single rod-shaped cells, whereas in substrate-limited media it grows as filaments. To identify genes responsible for sheath formation, we carried out transposon Tn5 mutagenesis. Of the approximately 20,000 mutants obtained, 7 did not form sheathed structures. Sequencing of the Tn5-flanking regions showed that five of the seven Tn5 insertions converged at the same open reading frame, designated sthA. The deduced amino acids encoded by sthA were found to be homologous to glycosyltransferase, which is known to be involved in linking sugars to lipid carriers during bacterial exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Disruption of the gene of the wild-type strain by inserting a kanamycin resistance gene cassette also resulted in sheathless growth under either type of nutrient condition. These findings indicate that sthA is a crucial component responsible for sheath formation. PMID:11772646