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Sample records for nervous system aspergillosis

  1. A Diagnostic Dilemma: Similarity of Neuroradiological Findings in Central Nervous System Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis and Aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jessica M; Borders, Heather; Kurt, Beth A

    2016-07-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in the context of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is not uncommon. Given the immunosuppressive nature of HLH therapy, infectious complications are also seen. We describe a 9-year-old male who developed acute neurological decline secondary to aspergillosis while undergoing HLH therapy. The significant overlap observed in CNS neuroimaging of HLH and aspergillosis and the subtleties that may help differentiate the two are discussed. The importance of obtaining tissue for definitive diagnosis is underscored. PMID:26970537

  2. Invasive central nervous system aspergillosis in a patient with Crohn's disease after treatment with infliximab and corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Emma-Lee; Dimou, James

    2016-08-01

    Aspergillus species are emerging as a significant cause of pneumonia mortality in immune compromised hosts, with haematological spread being a rare and life-threatening complication. The central nervous system (CNS) as a site for extrapulmonary spread is rarer still. We report a case of CNS disseminated aspergillosis in a patient treated with corticosteroids and infliximab, an immunomodulatory agent commonly used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, and review the available literature regarding this rare pathology. PMID:27050914

  3. Aspergillosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... during tuberculosis or other types of pneumonia. Aspergillus species can cause severe disease in children whose immune systems are weakened. The lungs are often involved, as are the sinuses and ear canals. This is a serious infection ( invasive aspergillosis) that often destroys the lungs and can ...

  4. ASPERGILLOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillosis is a disease, usually of the respiratory system, of chickens, turkeys, and less frequently ducklings, pigeons, canaries, geese, and many other wild and pet birds. In chickens and turkeys, the disease may be endemic on some farms; in wild birds, it appears to be sporadic, frequently aff...

  5. Antigenemia detected by radioimmunoassay in systemic aspergillosis

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, M.H.

    1980-06-01

    Because of difficulties in antemortem diagnosis of systemic aspergillosis, a radioimmunoassay to an Aspergillus fumigatus carbohydrate was developed and evaluated in patients with mycotic or bacterial infections. Antigenemia was detected in sera obtained antemortem from four of seven patients with systemic aspergillosis and in pleural fluid from an Aspergillus empyema but not in control sera or pleural fluid from 43 patients or 27 normal donors. When characterized with reference to onset of disease, antigenemia was an early sign of infection. This study shows the usefulness of the Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay for early, specific immunodiagnosis of systemic aspergillosis.

  6. Aspergillosis

    MedlinePlus

    Aspergillus infection ... Aspergillosis is caused by a fungus called Aspergillus . The fungus is often found growing on dead leaves, stored grain, compost piles, or in other decaying vegetation. It can also be found ...

  7. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating ... with breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as ...

  8. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  9. Antifungal activity of the local complement system in cerebral aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Rambach, Günter; Hagleitner, Magdalena; Mohsenipour, Iradj; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Maier, Hans; Würzner, Reinhard; Dierich, Manfred P; Speth, Cornelia

    2005-10-01

    Dissemination of aspergillosis into the central nervous system is associated with nearly 100% mortality. To study the reasons for the antifungal immune failure we analyzed the efficacy of cerebral complement to combat the fungus Aspergillus. Incubation of Aspergillus in non-inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed that complement levels were sufficient to obtain a deposition on the surface, but opsonization was much weaker than in serum. Consequently complement deposition from normal CSF on fungal surface stimulated a very low phagocytic activity of microglia, granulocytes, monocytes and macrophages compared to stimulation by conidia opsonized in serum. Similarly, opsonization of Aspergillus by CSF was not sufficient to induce an oxidative burst in infiltrating granulocytes, whereas conidia opsonized in serum induced a clear respiratory signal. Thus, granulocytes were capable of considerably reducing the viability of serum-opsonized Aspergillus conidia, but not of conidia opsonized in CSF. The limited efficacy of antifungal attack by cerebral complement can be partly compensated by enhanced synthesis, leading to elevated complement concentrations in CSF derived from a patient with cerebral aspergillosis. This inflammatory CSF was able to induce (i) a higher complement deposition on the Aspergillus surface than non-inflammatory CSF, (ii) an accumulation of complement activation products and (iii) an increase in phagocytic and killing activity of infiltrating granulocytes. However, levels and efficacy of the serum-derived complement were not reached. These data indicate that low local complement synthesis and activation may represent a central reason for the insufficient antifungal defense in the brain and the high mortality rate of cerebral aspergillosis. PMID:16027023

  10. Central nervous system

    MedlinePlus

    The central nervous system is composed of the brain and spinal cord. Your brain and spinal cord serve as the main "processing center" for your entire nervous system. They control all the workings of your body.

  11. Nervous System Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-12-01

    Nervous system involvement occurs in 10% to 15% of patients infected with the tick-borne spirochetes Borrelia burgdorferi, B afzelii, and B garinii. Peripheral nervous system involvement is common. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement, most commonly presenting with lymphocytic meningitis, causes modest cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis. Parenchymal CNS infection is rare. If the CNS is invaded, however, measuring local production of anti-B burgdorferi antibodies in the CSF provides a useful marker of infection. Most cases of neuroborreliosis can be cured with oral doxycycline; parenteral regimens should be reserved for patients with particularly severe disease. PMID:26593257

  12. The Nervous System Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbitt, Cynthia; Carpenter, Molly

    2006-01-01

    For many children, especially those with reading difficulties, a motor-kinesthetic learning activity may be an effective tool to teach complex concepts. With this in mind, the authors developed and tested a game designed to teach fourth- to sixth-grade children some basic principles of nervous system function by allowing the children themselves to…

  13. Central Nervous System Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahley, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ApoE on high-density lipoproteins is primarily responsible for lipid transport and cholesterol homeostasis in the central nervous system (CNS). Normally produced mostly by astrocytes, apoE is also produced under neuropathologic conditions by neurons. ApoE on high-density lipoproteins is critical in redistributing cholesterol and phospholipids for membrane repair and remodeling. The 3 main structural isoforms differ in their effectiveness. Unlike apoE2 and apoE3, apoE4 has markedly altered CNS metabolism, is associated with Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, and is expressed at lower levels in brain and cerebrospinal fluid. ApoE4-expressing cultured astrocytes and neurons have reduced cholesterol and phospholipid secretion, decreased lipid-binding capacity, and increased intracellular degradation. Two structural features are responsible for apoE4 dysfunction: domain interaction, in which arginine-61 interacts ionically with glutamic acid-255, and a less stable conformation than apoE3 and apoE2. Blocking domain interaction by gene targeting (replacing arginine-61 with threonine) or by small-molecule structure correctors increases CNS apoE4 levels and lipid-binding capacity and decreases intracellular degradation. Small molecules (drugs) that disrupt domain interaction, so-called structure correctors, could prevent the apoE4-associated neuropathology by blocking the formation of neurotoxic fragments. Understanding how to modulate CNS cholesterol transport and metabolism is providing important insights into CNS health and disease. PMID:27174096

  14. Nervous System Complexity Baffles Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jeffrey L.

    1982-01-01

    New research findings about how nerve cells transmit signals are forcing researchers to overhaul their simplistic ideas about the nervous system. Topics highlighted include the multiple role of peptides in the nervous system, receptor molecules, and molecules that form ion channels within membranes. (Author/JN)

  15. Brain and nervous system (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The nervous system controls the many complicated and interconnected functions of the body and mind. Motor, sensory cognitive and autonomic function are all coordinated and driven by the brain and nerves. As people age, ...

  16. Brain and nervous system (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The nervous system controls the many complicated and interconnected functions of the body and mind. Motor, sensory cognitive and autonomic function are all coordinated and driven by the brain and nerves. As people age, nerve ...

  17. [Vesalius and the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Van Laere, J

    1993-01-01

    Before we comment the subject of this lecture, we attract the reader's attention towards two remarks. We first want to point out that, although Vesalius is rightly considered as "the father of anatomy", in physiological matters--such as e.g. the physiology of the nervous system--he remained a faithful follower of Galen. A second preliminary remark explains why the books Vesalius devoted to the nervous system, namely the fourth and seventh books, as well as a part of the third book, don't belong to the best parts of the Fabrica, when we compare them with his Osteology and his Myology. We should not forget that some technical discoveries such as keeping brain-tissue in alcohol in order to harden it and colouring methods of Weigert, Marchi and Nissl, that made a refined macro- and microscopic examination of the nervous system possible, were only invented in the 19th century. The fourth book considers the peripheral nervous system. According to Vesalius, there are seven pairs of brain-nerves. His first pair corresponds to our Nervous opticus; his second pair concerns our Nervi oculomotorius, trochlearis and abducens; this third pair embraces a great part of our Nervus trigeminus; his fourth pair corresponds to our Nervus maxillaris; his fifth pair includes our Nervi facialis and acusticus; his sixth pair includes our Nervi vagus and accessorius; his seventh pair our Nervi hypoglossus and pharyngeus. Vesalius counts thirty pairs of spinal nerves. His description of the Plexus brachialis and the Plexus ischiadicus is closely related to the modern views in these matters. However, his teleologic views about them are remarkable, e.g. about the course of the Nervi recurrentes. The seventh book covers the brain. He successively and truly describes the cerebral membranes, the Ventriculi, the Cerebrum; his description relies on a series of horizontal slices. He also describes the brain-stem and the Cerebellum. Vesalius, who had doubts about the existence of the Plexus

  18. Paraneoplastic nervous system syndromes.

    PubMed

    Jaeckle, K A

    1996-05-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of the paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes has included further deliniation of the clinical syndromes and their treatment, attempts at standardization of the diagnostic nomenclature, investigations of pathogenetic mechanisms, and molecular characterization of the paraneoplastic antigens with implications as to their biologic relevance. Despite more than 30 years of investigation, the pathogenesis of these presumably autoimmune conditions remains unclear. Furthermore, no effective therapy has been identified for these conditions, with the possible exception of the opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndromes. Future investigations must focus on the disrupted genetic regulatory events involved in generation and propagation of the autoimmune response, antigen presentation and processing; target cell destruction, and consideration of alternative pathologic causes. Effective management strategies are most likely to develop from a better understanding of the disease pathogenesis, the development of animal model systems, and a creative look beyond the usual therapies employed in autoimmune conditions. PMID:8794147

  19. Novel central nervous system drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Jocelyn; Abdi, Nabiha; Lu, Xiaofan; Maheshwari, Oshin; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2014-05-01

    For decades, biomedical and pharmaceutical researchers have worked to devise new and more effective therapeutics to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system. The blood-brain barrier effectively protects the brain, but poses a profound challenge to drug delivery across this barrier. Many traditional drugs cannot cross the blood-brain barrier in appreciable concentrations, with less than 1% of most drugs reaching the central nervous system, leading to a lack of available treatments for many central nervous system diseases, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors. Due to the ineffective nature of most treatments for central nervous system disorders, the development of novel drug delivery systems is an area of great interest and active research. Multiple novel strategies show promise for effective central nervous system drug delivery, giving potential for more effective and safer therapies in the future. This review outlines several novel drug delivery techniques, including intranasal drug delivery, nanoparticles, drug modifications, convection-enhanced infusion, and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. It also assesses possible clinical applications, limitations, and examples of current clinical and preclinical research for each of these drug delivery approaches. Improved central nervous system drug delivery is extremely important and will allow for improved treatment of central nervous system diseases, causing improved therapies for those who are affected by central nervous system diseases. PMID:24325540

  20. Human nervous system function emulator.

    PubMed

    Frenger, P

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a modular, extensible, open-systems design for a multiprocessor network which emulates the major functions of the human nervous system. Interchangeable hardware/software components, a socketed software bus with plug-and-play capability and self diagnostics are included. The computer hardware is based on IEEE P996.1 bus cards. Its operating system utilizes IEEE 1275 standard software. Object oriented design techniques and programming are featured. A machine-independent high level script-based command language was created for this project. Neural anatomical structures which were emulated include the cortex, brainstem, cerebellum, spinal cord, autonomic and peripheral nervous systems. Motor, sensory, autoregulatory, and higher cognitive artificial intelligence, behavioral and emotional functions are provided. The author discusses how he has interfaced this emulator to machine vision, speech recognition/speech synthesis, an artificial neural network and a dexterous hand to form an android robotic platform. PMID:10834247

  1. Infections of the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Vevek; Tucci, Veronica; Galwankar, Sagar

    2012-01-01

    Glycemic control is an important aspect of patient care in the surgical Infections of the nervous system are among the most difficult infections in terms of the morbidity and mortality posed to patients, and thereby require urgent and accurate diagnosis. Although viral meningitides are more common, it is the bacterial meningitides that have the potential to cause a rapidly deteriorating condition that the physician should be familiar with. Viral encephalitis frequently accompanies viral meningitis, and can produce focal neurologic findings and cognitive difficulties that can mimic other neurologic disorders. Brain abscesses also have the potential to mimic and present like other neurologic disorders, and cause more focal deficits. Finally, other infectious diseases of the central nervous system, such as prion disease and cavernous sinus thrombosis, are explored in this review. PMID:22837896

  2. Invasive intracranial aspergillosis in an immunocompetent patient after dental extraction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bo; Wu, Xingtong; Zhou, Dong

    2011-02-01

    Invasive intracranial aspergillosis in immunocompetent patients remains a rarity. We report such a case in a male who developed symptoms after a dental extraction. Attention should be paid to atypical central nervous system symptoms after dental procedures; early diagnosis and management are of great importance to improve outcomes. PMID:21047191

  3. Aging changes in the nervous system

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/004023.htm Aging changes in the nervous system To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The brain and nervous system are your body's central control center. They control ...

  4. HIV Infection Seems to Affect Nervous System

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159344.html HIV Infection Seems to Affect Nervous System But symptoms tend to subside once antiretroviral drugs ... mild, it is clear that HIV affects the nervous system within days of infection," she said in a ...

  5. The Nervous System and Gastrointestinal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altaf, Muhammad A.; Sood, Manu R.

    2008-01-01

    The enteric nervous system is an integrative brain with collection of neurons in the gastrointestinal tract which is capable of functioning independently of the central nervous system (CNS). The enteric nervous system modulates motility, secretions, microcirculation, immune and inflammatory responses of the gastrointestinal tract. Dysphagia,…

  6. Invasive aspergillosis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac postoperative complication

    PubMed Central

    Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; Silva-Júnior, Heraldo Maia; de Souza-Motta, Cristina Maria; Milan, Eveline Pípolo; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus is a ubiquitous fungus which can cause a variety of clinical syndromes. This fungus has emerged as agent of systemic infections and has therefore gained considerable public health importance. This paper describes two cases of invasive aspergillosis caused by A. fumigatus in immuno-suppressed patients and underscores the importance of early identification of Aspergillus infection associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac postoperative complications. PMID:24031340

  7. Glucocorticoids and nervous system plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Madalena, Kathryn M.; Lerch, Jessica K.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptor (GC/GR) interactions alter numerous aspects of neuronal function. These consequences (e.g., anti-inflammatory vs. pro-inflammatory) can vary depending on the duration of GC exposure or central nervous system (CNS) injury model. In this review we discuss how GC/GR interactions impact neuronal recovery after a central or peripheral nerve injury and discuss how GC exposure duration can produce divergent CNS neuronal growth responses. Finally we consider how new findings on gender specific immune cell responses after a nerve injury could intersect with GC/GR interactions to impact pain processing. PMID:26981074

  8. Infections of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, A A

    1998-05-01

    Epidemiologic trends causing infections of the nervous system remain a significant source of morbidity and mortality one half-century after the introduction of penicillin. This article outlines common causes of bacterial meningitis, aseptic meningitis syndrome, encephalitis, abscess, spinal cord syndromes, and cranial and peripheral nerve problems. Recommendations for diagnostic evaluation and both empiric and definitive antimicrobial therapy are offered; controversial management issues are also discussed. The protean manifestations of varicella-zoster virus and Lyme diseases are outlined. In addition, special considerations in the immunocompromised host, including organ transplant recipients, cancer patients, and HIV-positive persons are explained, and antimicrobial therapy is discussed. PMID:9537969

  9. Lavender and the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Koulivand, Peir Hossein; Khaleghi Ghadiri, Maryam; Gorji, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Lavender is traditionally alleged to have a variety of therapeutic and curative properties, ranging from inducing relaxation to treating parasitic infections, burns, insect bites, and spasm. There is growing evidence suggesting that lavender oil may be an effective medicament in treatment of several neurological disorders. Several animal and human investigations suggest anxiolytic, mood stabilizer, sedative, analgesic, and anticonvulsive and neuroprotective properties for lavender. These studies raised the possibility of revival of lavender therapeutic efficacy in neurological disorders. In this paper, a survey on current experimental and clinical state of knowledge about the effect of lavender on the nervous system is given. PMID:23573142

  10. Systemic candidosis and concomitant aspergillosis and zygomycosis in two Amazon parakeets (Amazona aestiva).

    PubMed

    Carrasco, L; Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Jensen, H E

    1998-01-01

    Systemic candidosis and concomitant aspergillosis and zygomycosis were diagnosed immunohistochemically in two Amazon parakeets (Amazona aestiva). In the bird with systemic candidosis, subacute necrotic lesions were present in the lung and the gastrointestinal tract, whereas chronic giant cell-containing granulomas were located in the liver, heart, spleen and on the serosal lining of the small intestine. Although the lesions in the liver, heart and spleen most likely developed as a result of haematogenous spread, the granulomas on the serosal surface may have developed after a local transmural intestinal invasion. In the second bird, aspergillosis and zygomycosis were restricted to the lung, whereas some zygomycetes were found in the air sacs as well as in the heart and kidneys. In all organs the zygomycotic lesions were dominated by thrombosing vasculitis, supporting haematogenous dissemination. PMID:9861835

  11. Aquaporin Biology and Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Barbara, Buffoli

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the movement of water through cell membranes has been greatly advanced by the discovery of a family of water-specific, membrane-channel proteins: the Aquaporins (AQPs). These proteins are present in organisms at all levels of life, and their unique permeability characteristics and distribution in numerous tissues indicate diverse roles in the regulation of water homeostasis. Phenotype analysis of AQP knock-out mice has confirmed the predicted role of AQPs in osmotically driven transepithelial fluid transport, as occurs in the urinary concentrating mechanism and glandular fluid secretion. Regarding their expression in nervous system, there are evidences suggesting that AQPs are differentially expressed in the peripheral versus central nervous system and that channel-mediated water transport mechanisms may be involved in cerebrospinal fluid formation, neuronal signal transduction and information processing. Moreover, a number of recent studies have revealed the importance of mammalian AQPs in both physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms and have suggested that pharmacological modulation of AQP expression and activity may provide new tools for the treatment of variety of human disorders in which water and small solute transport may be involved. For all the AQPs, new contributions to physiological functions are likely to be discovered with ongoing work in this rapidly expanding field of research. PMID:21119880

  12. [Primary central nervous system vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Schuster, S; Magnus, T

    2015-12-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is a rare disorder. However, it is often considered in the differential diagnosis of vascular or inflammatory CNS diseases. Diagnosis is challenging, as specific biomarkers are lacking and the clinical presentation can be variable. A definitive diagnosis can only be established by biopsy of the inflammatory changes in the vascular wall. Alternatively, the diagnosis of PACNS can also be based on the synopsis of clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. Different subtypes of PACNS have been described in recent years, depending on the size of the affected vessels or histopathological patterns. Based on selective literature research in the database PubMed on the subject of CNS vasculitis, this article reviews the diagnostic characteristics and differential diagnosis of the condition. We suggest a diagnostic algorithm customized to the size of the affected vessels. Lastly, therapeutic options and the outcome of PACNS are briefly outlined. PMID:26589203

  13. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in a patient presenting with idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hayama, Manabu; Shime, Nobuaki; Mio, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old man presented to our emergency department with fever and dyspnoea. He required vigorous haemodynamic support and mechanical ventilation for hypotensive distributive shock with hypoalbuminaemia, haemoconcentration, rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure, consistent with idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome. Left lung consolidation and hypoxaemia were observed 6 days after admission. Sputum smear revealed the presence of acute angled branching hyphae, consistent with a diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Antifungal therapy was administered and mechanical ventilation discontinued on day 66. The patient recovered and was discharged from the hospital on day 185. PMID:24859554

  14. [Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, E

    2010-02-01

    Central nervous system infections and infestations by protozoa and helminths constitute a problem of increasing importance throughout all of central European and northern/western countries. This is partially due to the globalisation of our society, tourists and business people being more frequently exposed to parasitic infection/infestation in tropical countries than in moderate climate countries. On top of that, migrants may import chronic infestations and infections with parasitic pathogens, eventually also--sometimes exclusively--involving the nervous system. Knowledge of epidemiology, initial clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures as well as specific chemotherapeutic therapies and adjunctive therapeutic strategies is of utmost important in all of these infections and infestations of the nervous systems, be it by protozoa or helminths. This review lists, mainly in the form of tables, all possible infections and infestations of the nervous systems by protozoa and by helminths. Besides differentiating parasitic diseases of the nervous system seen in migrants, tourists etc., it is very important to have in mind that disease-related (e.g. HIV) or iatrogenic immunosuppression has led to the increased occurrence of a wide variety of parasitic infections and infestations of the nervous system (e. g. babesiosis, Chagas disease, Strongyloides stercoralis infestation, toxoplasmosis, etc.). PMID:20111855

  15. Degenerative disease affecting the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Eadie, M J

    1974-03-01

    The term "degenerative disease" is one which is rather widely used in relation to the nervous system and yet one which is rarely formally and carefully defined. The term appears to be applied to disorders of the nervous system which often occur in later life and which are of uncertain cause. In the Shorter Oxford Dictionary the word degeneration is defined as "a change of structure by which an organism, or an organ, assumes the form of a lower type". However this is not quite the sense in which the word is applied in human neuropathology, where it is conventional to restrict the use of the word to those organic disorders which are of uncertain or poorly understood cause and in which there is a deterioration or regression in the level of functioning of the nervous system. The concept of degenerative disorder is applied to other organs as well as to the brain, and as disease elsewhere in the body may affect the nervous system, it seems reasonable to include within the topic of degenerative disorder affecting the nervous system those conditions in which the nervous system is involved as a result of primary degenerations in other parts of the body. PMID:25026144

  16. Axonal Elongation into Peripheral Nervous System ``Bridges'' after Central Nervous System Injury in Adult Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Samuel; Aguayo, Albert J.

    1981-11-01

    The origin, termination, and length of axonal growth after focal central nervous system injury was examined in adult rats by means of a new experimental model. When peripheral nerve segments were used as ``bridges'' between the medulla and spinal cord, axons from neurons at both these levels grew approximately 30 millimeters. The regenerative potential of these central neurons seems to be expressed when the central nervous system glial environment is changed to that of the peripheral nervous system.

  17. The Injured Nervous System: A Darwinian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Zachary M.; Norman, Greg J.; DeVries, A. Courtney; Nelson, Randy J.

    2008-01-01

    Much of the permanent damage that occurs in response to nervous system damage (trauma, infection, ischemia, etc.) is mediated by endogenous secondary processes that can contribute to cell death and tissue damage (excitotoxicity, oxidative damage and inflammation). For humans to evolve mechanisms to minimize secondary pathophysiological events following CNS injuries, selection must occur for individuals who survive such insults. Two major factors limit the selection for beneficial responses to CNS insults: for many CNS disease states the principal risk factor is advanced, post-reproductive age and virtually all severe CNS traumas are fatal in the absence of modern medical intervention. An alternative hypothesis for the persistence of apparently maladaptive responses to CNS damage is that the secondary exacerbation of damage is the result of unavoidable evolutionary constraints. That is, the nervous system could not function under normal conditions if the mechanisms that caused secondary damage (e.g., excitotoxicity) in response to injury were decreased or eliminated. However, some vertebrate species normally inhabit environments (e.g. hypoxia in underground burrows) that could potentially damage their nervous systems. Yet, profound neuroprotective mechanisms have evolved in these animals indicating that natural selection can occur for traits that protect animals from nervous system damage. Many of the secondary processes and regeneration-inhibitory factors that exacerbate injuries likely persist because they have been adaptive over evolutionary time in the healthy nervous system. Therefore, it remains important that researchers consider the role of the processes in the healthy or developing nervous system to understand how they become dysregulated following injury. PMID:18602443

  18. Nosocomial invasive aspergillosis in a heart transplant patient acquired during a break in the HEPA air filtration system.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, P; Guinea, J; Peláez, T; Durán, C; Blanco, J L; Bouza, E

    2004-03-01

    We report a case of nosocomially acquired invasive aspergillosis (IA) in a low-risk heart transplant recipient due to a break in the air conditioning system. A high overload of Aspergillus spores in the intensive care unit room led this patient to acquire IA. Identical environmental and patient isolates allowed our hypothesis to be confirmed and a very precise incubation time to be estimated. PMID:15225229

  19. Illuminating viral infections in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    McGavern, Dorian B.; Kang, Silvia S.

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are a major cause of human disease. Although most viruses replicate in peripheral tissues, some have developed unique strategies to move into the nervous system, where they establish acute or persistent infections. Viral infections in the central nervous system (CNS) can alter homeostasis, induce neurological dysfunction and result in serious, potentially life-threatening inflammatory diseases. This Review focuses on the strategies used by neurotropic viruses to cross the barrier systems of the CNS and on how the immune system detects and responds to viral infections in the CNS. A special emphasis is placed on immune surveillance of persistent and latent viral infections and on recent insights gained from imaging both protective and pathogenic antiviral immune responses. PMID:21508982

  20. Gravitational Study of the Central Nervous System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A series of experiments conducted at 1G are discussed with reference to the role of calcium ions in information processing by the central nervous system. A technique is described which allows thin sections of a mammalian hippocampus to be isolated while maintaining neural activity. Two experiments carried out in hypergravic fields are also addressed; one investigating altered stimulation in the auditory system, the other determining temperature regulation responses in hypergravic fields.

  1. Maintaining Genome Stability in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Active maintenance of genome stability is a prerequisite for the development and function of the nervous system. The high replication index during neurogenesis and the long life of mature neurons highlight the need for efficient cellular programs to safeguard genetic fidelity. Multiple DNA damage response pathways ensure that replication stress and other types of DNA lesions such as oxidative damage do not impact neural homeostasis. Numerous human neurologic syndromes result from defective DNA damage signaling and compromised genome integrity. These syndromes can involve different neuropathology, which highlights the diverse maintenance roles required for genome stability in the nervous system. Understanding how DNA damage signaling pathways promote neural development and preserve homeostasis is essential for understanding fundamental brain function. PMID:24165679

  2. Imaging the fetal central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    De Keersmaecker, B.; Claus, F.; De Catte, L.

    2011-01-01

    The low prevalence of fetal central nervous system anomalies results in a restricted level of exposure and limited experience for most of the obstetricians involved in prenatal ultrasound. Sonographic guidelines for screening the fetal brain in a systematic way will probably increase the detection rate and enhance a correct referral to a tertiary care center, offering the patient a multidisciplinary approach of the condition. This paper aims to elaborate on prenatal sonographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis and outcome of various central nervous system malformations. Detailed neurosonographic investigation has become available through high resolution vaginal ultrasound probes and the development of a variety of 3D ultrasound modalities e.g. ultrasound tomographic imaging. In addition, fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the detection of gyration and neurulation anomalies and disorders of the gray and white matter. PMID:24753859

  3. Regeneration in the nervous system with erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Globally, greater than 30 million individuals are afflicted with disorders of the nervous system accompanied by tens of thousands of new cases annually with limited, if any, treatment options. Erythropoietin (EPO) offers an exciting and novel therapeutic strategy to address both acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. EPO governs a number of critical protective and regenerative mechanisms that can impact apoptotic and autophagic programmed cell death pathways through protein kinase B (Akt), sirtuins, mammalian forkhead transcription factors, and wingless signaling. Translation of the cytoprotective pathways of EPO into clinically effective treatments for some neurodegenerative disorders has been promising, but additional work is necessary. In particular, development of new treatments with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents such as EPO brings several important challenges that involve detrimental vascular outcomes and tumorigenesis. Future work that can effectively and safely harness the complexity of the signaling pathways of EPO will be vital for the fruitful treatment of disorders of the nervous system. PMID:26549969

  4. Computed tomography of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Bentson, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to review the most pertinent articles published during the past year on the subject of computed tomography of the central nervous system. The chapter contains sections on pediatric computed tomography, and on the diagnostic use of CT in white matter disease, in infectious disease, for intracranial aneurysms, trauma, and intracranial tumors. Metrizamide flow studies and contrast enhancement are also examined. (KRM)

  5. Peripheral Nervous System Manifestations of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brizzi, Kate T.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious causes of peripheral nervous system (PNS) disease are underrecognized but potentially treatable. Heightened awareness educed by advanced understanding of the presentations and management of these infections can aid diagnosis and facilitate treatment. In this review, we discuss the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of common bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections that affect the PNS. We additionally detail PNS side effects of some frequently used antimicrobial agents. PMID:25360209

  6. Zygomycotic invasion of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tomoaki; Mineta, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Keigo; Ando, Masakatsu; Obata, Masahiko

    2010-06-01

    Zygomycosis is an opportunistic fungal infection that affects the central nervous system (CNS). In this report, we present three cases of zygomycosis with CNS involvement. In two patients zygomycosis developed after neurosurgery, and in the third patient zygomycosis developed after bone marrow transplantation for leukemia. All patients developed persistent fever and neurological deficits. They presented with progressive cerebral infarction accompanied by hemorrhage. Intraoperative findings and histopathological examinations revealed that zygomycotic hyphae caused mycotic aneurysm, vasculitis, and venous occlusion. PMID:20585927

  7. LGI proteins in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Linde; Aunin, Eerik; Meijer, Dies; Bermingham, John R

    2013-01-01

    The development and function of the vertebrate nervous system depend on specific interactions between different cell types. Two examples of such interactions are synaptic transmission and myelination. LGI1-4 (leucine-rich glioma inactivated proteins) play important roles in these processes. They are secreted proteins consisting of an LRR (leucine-rich repeat) domain and a so-called epilepsy-associated or EPTP (epitempin) domain. Both domains are thought to function in protein-protein interactions. The first LGI gene to be identified, LGI1, was found at a chromosomal translocation breakpoint in a glioma cell line. It was subsequently found mutated in ADLTE (autosomal dominant lateral temporal (lobe) epilepsy) also referred to as ADPEAF (autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features). LGI1 protein appears to act at synapses and antibodies against LGI1 may cause the autoimmune disorder limbic encephalitis. A similar function in synaptic remodelling has been suggested for LGI2, which is mutated in canine Benign Familial Juvenile Epilepsy. LGI4 is required for proliferation of glia in the peripheral nervous system and binds to a neuronal receptor, ADAM22, to foster ensheathment and myelination of axons by Schwann cells. Thus, LGI proteins play crucial roles in nervous system development and function and their study is highly important, both to understand their biological functions and for their therapeutic potential. Here, we review our current knowledge about this important family of proteins, and the progress made towards understanding their functions. PMID:23713523

  8. LGI proteins in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Kegel, Linde; Aunin, Eerik; Meijer, Dies; Bermingham, John R.

    2013-01-01

    The development and function of the vertebrate nervous system depend on specific interactions between different cell types. Two examples of such interactions are synaptic transmission and myelination. LGI1-4 (leucine-rich glioma inactivated proteins) play important roles in these processes. They are secreted proteins consisting of an LRR (leucine-rich repeat) domain and a so-called epilepsy-associated or EPTP (epitempin) domain. Both domains are thought to function in protein–protein interactions. The first LGI gene to be identified, LGI1, was found at a chromosomal translocation breakpoint in a glioma cell line. It was subsequently found mutated in ADLTE (autosomal dominant lateral temporal (lobe) epilepsy) also referred to as ADPEAF (autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features). LGI1 protein appears to act at synapses and antibodies against LGI1 may cause the autoimmune disorder limbic encephalitis. A similar function in synaptic remodelling has been suggested for LGI2, which is mutated in canine Benign Familial Juvenile Epilepsy. LGI4 is required for proliferation of glia in the peripheral nervous system and binds to a neuronal receptor, ADAM22, to foster ensheathment and myelination of axons by Schwann cells. Thus, LGI proteins play crucial roles in nervous system development and function and their study is highly important, both to understand their biological functions and for their therapeutic potential. Here, we review our current knowledge about this important family of proteins, and the progress made towards understanding their functions. PMID:23713523

  9. Stress, sex, and the enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Million, M; Larauche, M

    2016-09-01

    Made up of millions of enteric neurons and glial cells, the enteric nervous system (ENS) is in a key position to modulate the secretomotor function and visceral pain of the gastrointestinal tract. The early life developmental period, through which most of the ENS development occurs, is highly susceptible to microenvironmental perturbation. Over the past decade, accumulating evidence has shown the impact of stress and early life adversity (ELA) on host gastrointestinal pathophysiology. While most of the focus has been on alterations in brain structure and function, limited experimental work in rodents suggest that the enteric nervous system can also be directly affected, as shown by changes in the number, phenotype, and reactivity of enteric nerves. The work of Medland et al. in the current issue of this journal demonstrates that such alterations also occur in pigs, a larger mammalian species with high translational value to human. This work also highlights a sex-differential susceptibility of the ENS to the effect of ELA, which could contribute to the higher prevalence of GI disorders in women. In this mini-review, we will discuss the development and composition of the ENS and related gastrointestinal sensory motor and secretory functions. We will then focus on the influence of stress on the enteric nervous system, with a particular emphasis on neurodevelopmental changes. Finally, we will discuss the influence of sex on those parameters. PMID:27561694

  10. Comparative anatomy of the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Stefan

    2011-11-16

    This short review aims to point out the general anatomical features of the autonomic nervous systems of non-mammalian vertebrates. In addition it attempts to outline the similarities and also the increased complexity of the autonomic nervous patterns from fish to tetrapods. With the possible exception of the cyclostomes, perhaps the most striking feature of the vertebrate autonomic nervous system is the similarity between the vertebrate classes. An evolution of the complexity of the system can be seen, with the segmental ganglia of elasmobranchs incompletely connected longitudinally, while well developed paired sympathetic chains are present in teleosts and the tetrapods. In some groups the sympathetic chains may be reduced (dipnoans and caecilians), and have yet to be properly described in snakes. Cranial autonomic pathways are present in the oculomotor (III) and vagus (X) nerves of gnathostome fish and the tetrapods, and with the evolution of salivary and lachrymal glands in the tetrapods, also in the facial (VII) and glossopharyngeal (IX) nerves. PMID:20444653

  11. Classical Neurotransmitters and their Significance within the Nervous System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veca, A.; Dreisbach, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Describes some of the chemical compounds involved in the nervous system and their roles in transmitting nerve signals. Discusses acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, histamine, glycine, glutemate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid and their effects within the nervous system. (CW)

  12. NERVOUS-SYSTEM SPECIFIC PROTEINS AS BIOCHEMICAL INDICATORS OF NEUROTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent advances in neuroimmunology and protein purification methodology have led to the identification of nervous-system specific proteins. Their intimate relationship to the cellular and functional heterogeneity of the nervous system, makes these proteins ideal biochemical marke...

  13. What Are the Parts of the Nervous System?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Planning Scientific Resources Research A-Z Topics Neuroscience Overview Condition Information Parts of the nervous system ... functions does the nervous system control? Why study neuroscience? What are the areas of neuroscience? NICHD Research ...

  14. The BIRN Project: Imaging the Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    Ellisman, Mark

    2006-05-22

    The grand goal in neuroscience research is to understand how the interplay of structural, chemical and electrical signals in nervous tissue gives rise to behavior. Experimental advances of the past decades have given the individual neuroscientist an increasingly powerful arsenal for obtaining data, from the level of molecules to nervous systems. Scientists have begun the arduous and challenging process of adapting and assembling neuroscience data at all scales of resolution and across disciplines into computerized databases and other easily accessed sources. These databases will complement the vast structural and sequence databases created to catalogue, organize and analyze gene sequences and protein products. The general premise of the neuroscience goal is simple; namely that with 'complete' knowledge of the genome and protein structures accruing rapidly we next need to assemble an infrastructure that will facilitate acquisition of an understanding for how functional complexes operate in their cell and tissue contexts.

  15. The BIRN Project: Imaging the Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    Ellisman, Mark

    2006-05-22

    The grand goal in neuroscience research is to understand how the interplay of structural, chemical and electrical signals in nervous tissue gives rise to behavior. Experimental advances of the past decades have given the individual neuroscientist an increasingly powerful arsenal for obtaining data, from the level of molecules to nervous systems. Scientists have begun the arduous and challenging process of adapting and assembling neuroscience data at all scales of resolution and across disciplines into computerized databases and other easily accessed sources. These databases will complement the vast structural and sequence databases created to catalogue, organize and analyze gene sequences and protein products. The general premise of the neuroscience goal is simple; namely that with "complete" knowledge of the genome and protein structures accruing rapidly we next need to assemble an infrastructure that will facilitate acquisition of an understanding for how functional complexes operate in their cell and tissue contexts.

  16. Lysophosphatidic Acid signaling in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Yung, Yun C; Stoddard, Nicole C; Mirendil, Hope; Chun, Jerold

    2015-02-18

    The brain is composed of many lipids with varied forms that serve not only as structural components but also as essential signaling molecules. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an important bioactive lipid species that is part of the lysophospholipid (LP) family. LPA is primarily derived from membrane phospholipids and signals through six cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), LPA1-6. These receptors are expressed on most cell types within central and peripheral nervous tissues and have been functionally linked to many neural processes and pathways. This Review covers a current understanding of LPA signaling in the nervous system, with particular focus on the relevance of LPA to both physiological and diseased states. PMID:25695267

  17. Immunodiagnosis of aspergillosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, V P; Kumar, A

    1991-01-01

    Aspergillus species are ubiquitous fungi and have been implicated as the causative agents of a variety of lung disorders in humans. These disorders include allergic, saprophytic, and systemic manifestations. The allergic disorders mainly affect atopic persons, and invasive or systemic diseases affect immunosuppressed individuals. Immunodiagnosis can help the practitioner diagnose these diseases. Demonstration of circulating antibodies is a useful criterion, but the lack of dependable and standardized antigens is a limiting factor in the diagnosis of most Aspergillus-induced diseases. Despite this limitation, however, immunodiffusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays have been widely used for the detection of antibodies in the sera of patients with aspergillosis. Similarly, crude and semipurified antigens are being used to demonstrate skin hypersensitivity in patients, and several methods have been useful in the detection of antigenemia in patients with invasive aspergillosis. With a growing number of reports on the incidence of aspergillosis and an increase in the number of immunosuppressed individuals in the population, more rapid methods and more reliable reagents for immunodiagnosis are needed. With recent attempts at obtaining reliable reagents for through hybridoma technology and molecular biological techniques, substantial progress toward efficient immunodiagnosis may be achieved. PMID:1747861

  18. Neuroimaging in Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Vossough, Arastoo; Hajmomenian, Mehrdad; Assadsangabi, Reza; Mohan, Suyash

    2016-08-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare aggressive high-grade type of extranodal lymphoma. PCNSL can have a variable imaging appearance and can mimic other brain disorders such as encephalitis, demyelination, and stroke. In addition to PCNSL, the CNS can be secondarily involved by systemic lymphoma. Computed tomography and conventional MRI are the initial imaging modalities to evaluate these lesions. Recently, however, advanced MRI techniques are more often used in an effort to narrow the differential diagnosis and potentially inform diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. PMID:27443998

  19. Viral Diseases of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Phillip A.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2015-01-01

    Virus-induced diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) represent a significant burden to human health worldwide. The complexity of these diseases is influenced by the sheer number of different neurotropic viruses, the diverse routes of CNS entry, viral tropism, and the immune system. Using a combination of human pathological data and experimental animal models, we have begun to uncover many of the mechanisms that viruses use to enter the CNS and cause disease. This review highlights a selection of neurotropic viruses that infect the CNS and explores the means by which they induce neurological diseases such as meningitis, encephalitis, and myelitis. PMID:25681709

  20. Photoplethysmographic measurements from central nervous system tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. P.; Kyriacou, P. A.; Chang, S. H.; Maney, K.; George, K. J.; Langford, R. M.

    2007-10-01

    A new system for measuring the oxygen saturation of blood within tissue has been developed, for a number of potential patient monitoring applications. This proof of concept project aims to address the unmet need of real-time measurement of oxygen saturation in the central nervous system (CNS) for patients recovering from neurosurgery or trauma, by developing a fibre optic signal acquisition system for internal placement through small apertures. The development and testing of a two-wavelength optical fibre reflectance photoplethysmography (PPG) system is described together with measurements in rats and preliminary results from a clinical trial of the system in patients undergoing neurosurgery. It was found that good quality red and near-infrared PPG signals could be consistently obtained from the rat spinal cord (n=6) and human cerebral cortex (n=4) using the fibre optic probe. These findings justify further development and clinical evaluation of this fibre optic system.

  1. The central nervous system of ascidian larvae.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Clare

    2016-09-01

    Ascidians are marine invertebrate chordates. Their tadpole larvae contain a dorsal tubular nervous system, resulting from the rolling up of a neural plate. Along the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis, the central nervous system (CNS) is organized into a sensory vesicle, neck, trunk ganglion, and tail nerve cord and consists of approximately only 330 cells, of which around 100 are thought to be neurons. The organization of distinct neuronal cell types and neurotransmitter gene expression within the CNS has been described. The unique developmental mode of ascidians, with a small number of cells and a fixed cell division pattern, allows individual cells to be traced throughout development. This feature has led to the complete documentation of the cell lineages of certain cell types in the CNS. Thus, a step-by-step understanding of nervous system development from the initial stages of neural induction to the neurogenesis of individual neurons is a feasible goal. The genetic control of neural fate induction and early neural plate patterning are now well understood. The molecular mechanisms specifying the cholinergic neurons of the trunk ganglion as well as the pigment cells of the sensory organs are also well elucidated. In addition, studies have begun on the morphogenetic processes of neurulation. Remaining challenges include building an embryonic atlas integrating gene expression patterns, cell lineage, and neuronal cell types as well as developing the gene regulatory networks of cell fate specification and integrating them with the genetic control of morphogenesis. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:538-561. doi: 10.1002/wdev.239 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27328318

  2. Histoplasmosis of the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, V; Wilkins, P; Badve, S; Coppen, M; Lucas, S; Hay, R; Schon, F

    1992-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum infection of the central nervous system is extremely rare in the United Kingdom partly because the organism is not endemic. However, because the organism can remain quiescent in the lungs or the adrenal glands for over 40 years before dissemination, it increasingly needs to be considered in unexplained neurological disease particularly in people who lived in endemic areas as children. In this paper a rapidly progressive fatal myelopathy in an English man brought up in India was shown at necropsy to be due to histoplasmosis. The neurological features of this infection are reviewed. Images PMID:1640242

  3. Did the ctenophore nervous system evolve independently?

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph F

    2014-08-01

    Recent evidence supports the placement of ctenophores as the most distant relative to all other animals. This revised animal tree means that either the ancestor of all animals possessed neurons (and that sponges and placozoans apparently lost them) or that ctenophores developed them independently. Differentiating between these possibilities is important not only from a historical perspective, but also for the interpretation of a wide range of neurobiological results. In this short perspective paper, I review the evidence in support of each scenario and show that the relationship between the nervous system of ctenophores and other animals is an unsolved, yet tractable problem. PMID:24986234

  4. Physiology of the Autonomic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    This manuscript discusses the physiology of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The following topics are presented: regulation of activity; efferent pathways; sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions; neurotransmitters, their receptors and the termination of their activity; functions of the ANS; and the adrenal medullae. In addition, the application of this material to the practice of pharmacy is of special interest. Two case studies regarding insecticide poisoning and pheochromocytoma are included. The ANS and the accompanying case studies are discussed over 5 lectures and 2 recitation sections during a 2-semester course in Human Physiology. The students are in the first-professional year of the doctor of pharmacy program. PMID:17786266

  5. Microglia: Architects of the Developing Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Frost, Jeffrey L; Schafer, Dorothy P

    2016-08-01

    Microglia are resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS), representing 5-10% of total CNS cells. Recent findings reveal that microglia enter the embryonic brain, take up residence before the differentiation of other CNS cell types, and become critical regulators of CNS development. Here, we discuss exciting new work implicating microglia in a range of developmental processes, including regulation of cell number and spatial patterning of CNS cells, myelination, and formation and refinement of neural circuits. Furthermore, we review studies suggesting that these cellular functions result in the modulation of behavior, which has important implications for a variety of neurological disorders. PMID:27004698

  6. Vascularisation of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Tata, Mathew; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Fantin, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The developing central nervous system (CNS) is vascularised through the angiogenic invasion of blood vessels from a perineural vascular plexus, followed by continued sprouting and remodelling until a hierarchical vascular network is formed. Remarkably, vascularisation occurs without perturbing the intricate architecture of the neurogenic niches or the emerging neural networks. We discuss the mouse hindbrain, forebrain and retina as widely used models to study developmental angiogenesis in the mammalian CNS and provide an overview of key cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the vascularisation of these organs. PMID:26222953

  7. Catastrophic primary central nervous system vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Salvarani, Carlo; Brown, Robert D; Morris, Jonathan M; Huston, John; Hunder, Gene G

    2014-01-01

    Primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) is an uncommon condition that affects the brain and the spinal cord. It is heterogeneous in presenting characteristics and outcomes. We report a patient with a catastrophic rapidly progressive course refractory to intensive treatment with pulses of methylprednisolone and iv cyclophosphamide. The condition rapidly deteriorated and the patient died 6 weeks after presentation. Rapidly progressive PCNSV represents the worst end of the clinical spectrum of PCNSV. These patients are characterised by bilateral, multiple, large cerebral vessel lesions on angiograms and multiple bilateral cerebral infarctions. PMID:24854370

  8. Central Nervous System Complications of Oncologic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hoeffner, Ellen G

    2016-08-01

    Traditional and newer agents used to treat cancer can cause significant toxicity to the central nervous system. MRI of the brain and spine is the imaging modality of choice for patients with cancer who develop neurologic symptoms. It is important to be aware of the agents that can cause neurotoxicity and their associated imaging findings so that patients are properly diagnosed and treated. In some instances conventional MRI may not be able to differentiate posttreatment effects from disease progression. In these instances advanced imaging techniques may be helpful, although further research is still needed. PMID:27444003

  9. Mold Infections of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Matthew; Rosengart, Axel; Schuetz, Audrey N.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The recent outbreak of exserohilum rostratum meningitis linked to epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate has brought renewed attention to mold infections of the central nervous system (CNS).1 Although uncommon, these infections are often devastating and difficult to treat. This focused review of the epidemiologic aspects, clinical characteristics, and treatment of mold infections of the CNS covers a group of common pathogens: aspergillus, fusarium, and scedosporium species, molds in the order Mucorales, and dematiaceous molds. Infections caused by these pathogen groups have distinctive epidemiologic profiles, clinical manifestations, microbiologic characteristics, and therapeutic implications, all of which clinicians should understand. PMID:25006721

  10. [Sports injuries of the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Lang, C; Stefan, H

    1999-08-01

    Almost 1% of all Germans suffer sports injuries each year, almost 5% of all peripheral nerve lesions are due to sports. A review is given on various activities detailing the specific risks for traumata of the central and peripheral nervous system. Specifically these are volleyball, handball, basketball, American football, soccer, bowling, hockey, baseball, tennis, golf, javelin, fencing, wrestling, judo, boxing, running, jumping, dancing, mountain climbing, weight lifting, gymnastics, horse-back riding, swimming, rowing, skiing, skating, shooting, (motor) biking, car racing, flying, and sports for the disabled. The knowledge of typical traumata should enable the neurologist to rapidly and reliably recognize related lesions and to contribute to their prevention or improvement. PMID:10478302

  11. Nutritional stimulation of the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Luyer, Misha D P; Habes, Quirine; van Hak, Richard; Buurman, Wim

    2011-09-14

    Disturbance of the inflammatory response in the gut is important in several clinical diseases ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to postoperative ileus. Several feedback mechanisms exist that control the inflammatory cascade and avoid collateral damage. In the gastrointestinal tract, it is of particular importance to control the immune response to maintain the balance that allows dietary uptake and utilization of nutrients on one hand, while preventing invasion of bacteria and toxins on the other hand. The process of digestion and absorption of nutrients requires a relative hyporesponsiveness of the immune cells in the gut to luminal contents which is not yet fully understood. Recently, the autonomic nervous system has been identified as an important pathway to control local and systemic inflammation and gut barrier integrity. Activation of the pathway is possible via electrical or via pharmacological interventions, but is also achieved in a physiological manner by ingestion of dietary lipids. Administration of dietary lipids has been shown to be very effective in reducing the inflammatory cascade and maintaining intestinal barrier integrity in several experimental studies. This beneficial effect of nutrition on the inflammatory response and intestinal barrier integrity opens new therapeutic opportunities for treatment of certain gastrointestinal disorders. Furthermore, this neural feedback mechanism provides more insight in the relative hyporesponsiveness of the immune cells in the gut. Here, we will discuss the regulatory function of the autonomic nervous system on the inflammatory response and gut barrier function and the potential benefit in a clinical setting. PMID:22025873

  12. Nutritional stimulation of the autonomic nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Luyer, Misha DP; Habes, Quirine; van Hak, Richard; Buurman, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Disturbance of the inflammatory response in the gut is important in several clinical diseases ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to postoperative ileus. Several feedback mechanisms exist that control the inflammatory cascade and avoid collateral damage. In the gastrointestinal tract, it is of particular importance to control the immune response to maintain the balance that allows dietary uptake and utilization of nutrients on one hand, while preventing invasion of bacteria and toxins on the other hand. The process of digestion and absorption of nutrients requires a relative hyporesponsiveness of the immune cells in the gut to luminal contents which is not yet fully understood. Recently, the autonomic nervous system has been identified as an important pathway to control local and systemic inflammation and gut barrier integrity. Activation of the pathway is possible via electrical or via pharmacological interventions, but is also achieved in a physiological manner by ingestion of dietary lipids. Administration of dietary lipids has been shown to be very effective in reducing the inflammatory cascade and maintaining intestinal barrier integrity in several experimental studies. This beneficial effect of nutrition on the inflammatory response and intestinal barrier integrity opens new therapeutic opportunities for treatment of certain gastrointestinal disorders. Furthermore, this neural feedback mechanism provides more insight in the relative hyporesponsiveness of the immune cells in the gut. Here, we will discuss the regulatory function of the autonomic nervous system on the inflammatory response and gut barrier function and the potential benefit in a clinical setting. PMID:22025873

  13. The Plasmair Decontamination System Is Protective Against Invasive Aspergillosis in Neutropenic Patients.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gerlinger, Marie-Paule; Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Rigaudeau, Sophie; Lambert, Juliette; Eloy, Odile; Mignon, François; Farhat, Hassan; Castaigne, Sylvie; Merrer, Jacques; Rousselot, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a rare but severe infection caused by Aspergillus spp. that often develops in immunocompromised patients. Lethality remains high in this population. Therefore, preventive strategies are of key importance. The impact of a mobile air decontamination system (Plasmair, AirInSpace, Montigny-le-Bretonneux, France) on the incidence of IA in neutropenic patients was evaluated in this study. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study METHODS Patients with chemotherapy-induced neutropenia lasting 7 days or more were included over a 2-year period. Cases of IA were confirmed using the revised European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria. We took advantage of a partial installation of Plasmair systems in the hematology intensive care unit during this period to compare patients treated in Plasmair-equipped versus non-equipped rooms. Patients were assigned to Plasmair-equipped or non-equipped rooms depending only on bed availability. Differences in IA incidence in both groups were compared using Fisher's exact test, and a multivariate analysis was performed to take into account potential confounding factors. RESULTS Data from 156 evaluable patients were available. Both groups were homogenous in terms of age, gender, hematological diagnosis, duration of neutropenia, and prophylaxis. A total of 11 cases of probable IA were diagnosed: 10 in patients in non-equipped rooms and only 1 patient in a Plasmair-equipped room. The odds of developing IA were much lower for patients hospitalized in Plasmair-equipped rooms than for patients in non-equipped rooms (P=.02; odds ratio [OR] =0.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.00-0.84). CONCLUSION In this study, Plasmair demonstrated a major impact in reducing the incidence of IA in neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:845-851. PMID:27340735

  14. Central nervous system toxicity of metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaoli; Chen, Aijie; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Jianfeng; Shao, Longquan; Wei, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are increasingly used for the therapy, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease- or drug-induced mechanisms in the human biological system. In view of their small size, after certain modifications, NMs have the capacity to bypass or cross the blood–brain barrier. Nanotechnology is particularly advantageous in the field of neurology. Examples may include the utilization of nanoparticle (NP)-based drug carriers to readily cross the blood–brain barrier to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases, nanoscaffolds for axonal regeneration, nanoelectromechanical systems in neurological operations, and NPs in molecular imaging and CNS imaging. However, NPs can also be potentially hazardous to the CNS in terms of nano-neurotoxicity via several possible mechanisms, such as oxidative stress, autophagy, and lysosome dysfunction, and the activation of certain signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the dual effect of NMs on the CNS and the mechanisms involved. The limitations of the current research are also discussed. PMID:26170667

  15. Novel nervous system mechanisms in visceral pain.

    PubMed

    De Winter, B Y; Deiteren, A; De Man, J G

    2016-03-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is an important factor underlying abdominal pain in functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and can result from aberrant signaling from the gut to the brain or vice versa. Over the last two decades, research has identified several selective, intertwining pathways that underlie IBS-related visceral nociception, including specific receptors on afferent and efferent nerve fibers such as transient receptor potential channels (TRP) channels, opioid, and cannabinoid receptors. In this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility Gil et al. demonstrate that in an animal model with reduced descending inhibitory control, the sympathetic nervous system outflow is enhanced, contributing to visceral and somatic hypersensitivity. They also provide evidence that interfering with the activation of adrenergic receptors on sensory nerves can be an interesting new strategy to treat visceral pain in IBS. This mini-review places these findings in a broader perspective by providing an overview of promising novel mechanisms to alter the nervous control of visceral pain interfering with afferent or efferent neuronal signaling. PMID:26891060

  16. Central nervous system phenotypes in craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, Kristina; Marsh, Jeffrey L; Govier, Daniel; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2002-01-01

    Though reduction in the number of cranial elements through loss of a suture is a recognized trend in vertebrate evolution, the premature closure of cranial sutures in humans, craniosynostosis, is considered a pathological condition. Previous research on craniosynostosis has focused primarily on the skeletal phenotype, but the intimate relationship between the developing central nervous system (CNS) and skull is well documented. We investigate the morphology of the CNS in patients with isolated craniosynostosis through an analysis of cortical and subcortical features using 3-D magnetic resonance images (MRI). Results show that a distinct CNS phenotype can be defined for specific diagnostic categories. Many differences in CNS morphology observed in the patient samples may be anticipated based on skeletal morphology, but others are not reflected in the skull. We propose a developmental approach to determining the cause of premature suture fusion, which includes investigation of the craniofacial complex as a system, rather than study of isolated tissues. PMID:12171474

  17. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and bilateral fungal balls terminating in disseminated aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, C J; Craig, S; Bardana, E J

    1980-02-01

    A unique case of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis associated with bilateral apical aspergillomas terminating in disseminated aspergillosis is presented. Postulated mechanisms of this combination are discussed with respect to the patient's clinical findings. The contribution of systemic and aerosolized corticosteroids are considered major contributing factors to dissemination of disease. PMID:7351446

  18. Subcortical cytoskeleton periodicity throughout the nervous system.

    PubMed

    D'Este, Elisa; Kamin, Dirk; Velte, Caroline; Göttfert, Fabian; Simons, Mikael; Hell, Stefan W

    2016-01-01

    Superresolution fluorescence microscopy recently revealed a ~190 nm periodic cytoskeleton lattice consisting of actin, spectrin, and other proteins underneath the membrane of cultured hippocampal neurons. Whether the periodic cytoskeleton lattice is a structural feature of all neurons and how it is modified when axons are ensheathed by myelin forming glial cells is not known. Here, STED nanoscopy is used to demonstrate that this structure is a commonplace of virtually all neuron types in vitro. To check how the subcortical meshwork is modified during myelination, we studied sciatic nerve fibers from adult mice. Periodicity of both actin and spectrin was uncovered at the internodes, indicating no substantial differences between unmyelinated and myelinated axons. Remarkably, the actin/spectrin pattern was also detected in glial cells such as cultured oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Altogether our work shows that the periodic subcortical cytoskeletal meshwork is a fundamental characteristic of cells in the nervous system and is not a distinctive feature of neurons, as previously thought. PMID:26947559

  19. Emerging infections of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Jennifer; McArthur, Justin

    2013-12-01

    Emerging infections affecting the central nervous system often present as encephalitis and can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis requires not only careful history taking, but also the application of newly developed diagnostic tests. These diseases frequently occur in outbreaks stemming from viruses that have mutated from an animal host and gained the ability to infect humans. With globalization, this can translate to the rapid emergence of infectious clusters or the establishment of endemicity in previously naïve locations. Since these infections are often vector borne and effective treatments are almost uniformly lacking, prevention is at least as important as prompt diagnosis and institution of supportive care. In this review, we focus on some of the recent literature addressing emerging and resurging viral encephalitides in the United States and around the world-specifically, West Nile virus, dengue, polio, and cycloviruses. We also discuss new, or "emerging," techniques for the precise and rapid diagnosis of encephalitides. PMID:24136412

  20. Advances in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Lauren B; Mohile, Nimish A

    2015-12-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is limited to the CNS. Although novel imaging techniques aid in discriminating lymphoma from other brain tumors, definitive diagnosis requires brain biopsy, vitreoretinal biopsy, or cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Survival rates in clinical studies have improved over the past 20 years due to the addition of high-dose methotrexate-based chemotherapy regimens to whole-brain radiotherapy. Long-term survival, however, is complicated by clinically devastating delayed neurotoxicity. Newer regimens are attempting to reduce or eliminate radiotherapy from first-line treatment with chemotherapy dose intensification. Significant advances have also been made in the fields of pathobiology and treatment, with more targeted treatments on the horizon. The rarity of the disease makes conducting of prospective clinical trials challenging, requiring collaborative efforts between institutions. This review highlights recent advances in the biology, detection, and treatment of PCNSL in immunocompetent patients. PMID:26475775

  1. The autonomic nervous system and renal physiology

    PubMed Central

    D’Elia, John A; Weinrauch, Larry A

    2013-01-01

    Research in resistant hypertension has again focused on autonomic nervous system denervation – 50 years after it had been stopped due to postural hypotension and availability of newer drugs. These (ganglionic blockers) drugs have all been similarly stopped, due to postural hypotension and yet newer antihypertensive agents. Recent demonstration of the feasibility of limited regional transcatheter sympathetic denervation has excited clinicians due to potential therapeutic implications. Standard use of ambulatory blood pressure recording equipment may alter our understanding of the diagnosis, potential treatment strategies, and health care outcomes – when faced with patients whose office blood pressure remains in the hypertensive range – while under treatment with three antihypertensive drugs at the highest tolerable doses, plus a diuretic. We review herein clinical relationships between autonomic function, resistant hypertension, current treatment strategies, and reflect upon the possibility of changes in our approach to resistant hypertension. PMID:24039445

  2. Varicella Zoster Virus in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria; Cohrs, Randall; Mahalingam, Ravi; Baird, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a ubiquitous, exclusively human alphaherpesvirus. Primary infection usually results in varicella (chickenpox), after which VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. As VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity declines in elderly and immunocompromised individuals, VZV reactivates and causes herpes zoster (shingles), frequently complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV reactivation also produces multiple serious neurological and ocular diseases, such as cranial nerve palsies, meningoencephalitis, myelopathy, and VZV vasculopathy, including giant cell arteritis, with or without associated rash. Herein, we review the clinical, laboratory, imaging, and pathological features of neurological complications of VZV reactivation as well as diagnostic tests to verify VZV infection of the nervous system. Updates on the physical state of VZV DNA and viral gene expression in latently infected ganglia, neuronal, and primate models to study varicella pathogenesis and immunity are presented along with innovations in the immunization of elderly individuals to prevent VZV reactivation. PMID:26918131

  3. VIIP: Central Nervous System (CNS) Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vera, Jerry; Mulugeta, Lealem; Nelson, Emily; Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross; Myers, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Current long-duration missions to the International Space Station and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit expose astronauts to increased risk of Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. It has been hypothesized that the headward shift of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood in microgravity may cause significant elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP), which in turn may then induce VIIP syndrome through interaction with various biomechanical pathways. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm this hypothesis. In this light, we are developing lumped-parameter models of fluid transport in the central nervous system (CNS) as a means to simulate the influence of microgravity on ICP. The CNS models will also be used in concert with the lumped parameter and finite element models of the eye described in the related IWS works submitted by Nelson et al., Feola et al. and Ethier et al.

  4. Antihypertensive drugs and the sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Del Colle, Sara; Morello, Fulvio; Rabbia, Franco; Milan, Alberto; Naso, Diego; Puglisi, Elisabetta; Mulatero, Paolo; Veglio, Franco

    2007-11-01

    Hypertension has been associated with several modifications in the function and regulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Although it is unclear whether this dysfunction is primary or secondary to the development of hypertension, these alterations are considered to play an important role in the evolution, maintenance, and development of hypertension and its target organ damage. Several pharmacological antihypertensive classes are currently available. The main drugs that have been clearly shown to affect SNS function are beta-blockers, alpha-blockers, and centrally acting drugs. On the contrary, the effects of ACE inhibitors (ACE-Is), AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs), and diuretics on SNS function remain controversial. These properties are pharmacologically and pathophysiologically relevant and should be considered in the choice of antihypertensive treatments and combination therapies in order to achieve, beyond optimal blood pressure control, a normalization of SNS physiology and the most effective prevention of target organ damage. PMID:18030057

  5. [Histopathology of central nervous system cavernomas].

    PubMed

    Mosnier, J-F; Brunon, J; Nuti, C

    2007-06-01

    Central nervous system cavernomas are vascular malformations, which occur in two circumstances: sporadic forms and familial autosomal dominant forms. The lesion consists of enlarged, closely packed vessels without interposition of brain parenchyma, surrounded by hemosiderin and gliosis, calcified in few cases. In 80% of sporadic forms the lesion is unique, multiple lesions are rare (median: 4). In familial forms the lesions are always multiple. Cavernomas are often associated with other vascular malformations, especially with venous developmental anomalies. The size of cavernomas is variable from 1 mm to several centimeters. About 70% of cases are supratentorial and 30% in the posterior fossa, particularly in the brain stem. Macroscopic and histopathological findings are typical and the diagnostic is generally easy. PMID:17498756

  6. Scaffolds for central nervous system tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Spector, Myron; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2012-03-01

    Traumatic injuries to the brain and spinal cord of the central nervous system (CNS) lead to severe and permanent neurological deficits and to date there is no universally accepted treatment. Owing to the profound impact, extensive studies have been carried out aiming at reducing inflammatory responses and overcoming the inhibitory environment in the CNS after injury so as to enhance regeneration. Artificial scaffolds may provide a suitable environment for axonal regeneration and functional recovery, and are of particular importance in cases in which the injury has resulted in a cavitary defect. In this review we discuss development of scaffolds for CNS tissue engineering, focusing on mechanism of CNS injuries, various biomaterials that have been used in studies, and current strategies for designing and fabricating scaffolds.

  7. Environmentally related disorders of the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.L.; Feldman, R.G.; French, J.G. )

    1990-03-01

    Specific physical and chemical agents found in the workplace and in the general environment are responsible for characteristic pathologic processes within the nervous system. It has been shown that many neurotoxic agents produce a dose-related spectrum of impairment ranging from mild slowing of nerve conducting velocity or prolongation in reaction time to neuropathy and frank encephalopathy. Clinical manifestations are determined by the agent involved, by the dose of exposure, the vulnerability of the cellular target, the ability of the organism to metabolize and excrete the agent, and the ability to repair damage. An occupational history, including evaluation of evidence of specific agents and job history, is a critical component in the clinical management of individuals with suspect neurotoxic disease. Environmentally-induced disorders can be prevented by appropriate environmental controls. Prevention of neurotoxic disease is a complex process requiring continuous involvement of public health agencies and strong scientific research.

  8. Gangliosides of the Vertebrate Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Schnaar, Ronald L

    2016-08-14

    Gangliosides, sialylated glycosphingolipids, found on all vertebrate cells and tissues, are major molecular determinants on the surfaces of vertebrate nerve cells. Composed of a sialylated glycan attached to a ceramide lipid, the same four structures-GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b-represent the vast majority (>90%) of gangliosides in the brains of all mammals and birds. Primarily found on the outer surface of the plasma membrane with their glycans facing outward, gangliosides associate laterally with each other, sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and select proteins in lipid rafts-the dynamic functional subdomains of the plasma membrane. The functions of gangliosides in the human nervous system are revealed by congenital mutations in ganglioside biosynthetic genes. Mutations in ST3GAL5, which codes for an enzyme early in brain ganglioside biosynthesis, result in an early-onset seizure disorder with profound motor and cognitive decay, whereas mutations in B4GALNT1, a gene encoding a later step, result in hereditary spastic paraplegia accompanied by intellectual deficits. The molecular functions of brain gangliosides include regulation of receptors in the same membrane via lateral (cis) associations and regulation of cell-cell recognition by trans interaction with ganglioside binding proteins on apposing cells. Gangliosides also affect the aggregation of Aβ (Alzheimer's disease) and α-synuclein (Parkinson's Disease). As analytical, biochemical, and genetic tools advance, research on gangliosides promises to reveal mechanisms of molecular control related to nerve and glial cell differentiation, neuronal excitability, axon outgrowth after nervous system injury, and protein folding in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27261254

  9. Myelin synthesis in the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Garbay, B; Heape, A M; Sargueil, F; Cassagne, C

    2000-06-01

    By imposing saltatory conduction on the nervous impulse, the principal role of the myelin sheath is to allow the faster propagation of action potentials along the axons which it surrounds. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) myelin is formed by the differentiation of the plasma membrane of Schwann cells. One of the biochemical characteristics that distinguishes myelin from other biological membranes is its high lipid-to-protein ratio. All the major lipid classes are represented in the myelin membrane, while several myelin-specific proteins have been identified. During development, the presence of axons is required for the initiation of myelination, but the nature of the axonal signal is still unknown. The only certainties are that this signal is synthesized by axons whose diameter is greater than 0.7 microm, and that the signal(s) include(s) a diffusible molecule. Morphological studies have provided us with information concerning the timing of myelination, the mechanism by which immature Schwann cells differentiate into a myelinating phenotype and lay down the myelin sheath around the axon, and the accumulation and the structure of the myelin membrane. The last 20 years have seen the identification and the cDNA and gene cloning of the major PNS myelin proteins, which signalled the beginning of the knock-out decade: transgenic null-mutant mice have been created for almost every protein gene. The study of these animals shows that the formation of myelin is considerably less sensitive to molecular alterations than the maintenance of myelin. During the same period, important data has been gathered concerning the synthesis and function of lipids in PNS myelin, although this field has received relatively little attention compared with that of their protein counterparts. PMID:10727776

  10. [Combination therapy for invasive aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Camps, Isabel

    2011-03-01

    The frequency of invasive fungal infections, and specifically invasive aspergillosis, has increased in the last few decades. Despite the development of new antifungal agents, these infections are associated with high mortality, ranging from 40% to 80%, depending on the patient and the localization of the infection. To reduce these figures, several therapeutic strategies have been proposed, including combination therapy. Most of the available data on the efficacy of these combinations are from experimental models, in vitro data and retrospective observational studies or studies with a small number of patients that have included both patients in first-line treatment and those receiving rescue therapy; in addition there are many patients with possible forms of aspergillosis and few with demonstrated or probable forms. To date, there is no evidence that combination therapy has significantly higher efficacy than monotherapy; however, combination therapy could be indicated in severe forms of aspergillosis, or forms with central nervous involvement or extensive pulmonary involvement with respiratory insufficiency, etc. Among the combinations, the association of an echinocandin--the group that includes micafungin--with voriconazole or liposomal amphotericin B seems to show synergy. These combinations are those most extensively studied in clinical trials and therefore, although the grade of evidence is low, are recommended by the various scientific societies. PMID:21420576

  11. Prenatal diagnosis of central nervous system abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Angtuaco, E E; Angtuaco, T L; Angtuaco, E J

    1994-01-01

    Fetal anomalies have been the subject of innumerable publications both in the prenatal and neonatal literature. This has significantly increased in the last 10 years, mainly because of the advent of high-resolution ultrasound equipment and improvement of scanning techniques. In addition, guidelines issued by professional organizations involved in prenatal diagnosis have encouraged a more universal approach to the imaging and documentation of prenatal findings. The fetal central nervous system is the most frequently investigated organ system, mainly because of its easy accessibility and prominence even in the early stages of embryologic development. The biparietal diameter was the first fetal measurement to be widely used in determining gestational age. As investigators gained more experience, the appearance of ultrasound images achieved the resolution that allows direct comparisons with gross specimens and more recent sophisticated techniques of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Now endovaginal ultrasound can document early first trimester development and compare it to known embryologic landmarks. Interest in demonstrating the ultrasound counterpart of central nervous system structures in the early stages of development has resulted in a plethora of articles proving the unique ability of ultrasound in imaging the developing fetus. In view of all these developments, the beginning ultrasound specialist is faced with the challenge and responsibility not only of being familiar with the literature but also of the mastery of scanning techniques that allow accurate prenatal diagnosis. It is therefore helpful to review key developmental milestones in embryologic life and correlate them with the corresponding prenatal ultrasound appearance. In addition, the changing appearance of the developing fetus has created a need for a systematic approach in the evaluation of structures so routine protocols can be established. This has been the subject of other

  12. [Diagnostic imaging of central nervous system vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Hajime; Yamada, Kei

    2015-03-01

    Vasculitis involving the central nervous system presents with infarction and hemorrhage, which are often nonspecific findings. Laboratory examinations are essential for diagnosis of vasculitis in addition to comprehensive and systematic review of the clinical course. Although most findings tend to be nonspecific, enhancement and thickening of the vascular wall indicate vasculitis. Visualization of the vascular wall requires selection of the appropriate imaging modality and mode of image acquisition. Contrast-enhanced CT, MRI, and FDG-PET are useful for visualizing large vessel vasculitis, while CT, MRI, and angiography are effective for medium vessel vasculitis. The use of ultrasound is limited to evaluating vessels on the body surface. Although relatively thick vessels can be demonstrated by angiography, complete survey of small vessels is difficult. Here, we summarize the characteristics of each imaging modality and imaging findings of typical vasculitides-Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis, ANCA-associated vasculitis, Behçet's disease, primary angiitis of the CNS, and vasculitis associated with systemic disease. Differential diagnoses are also shown, including infective endocarditis, tuberculous meningitis, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. PMID:25846439

  13. Central nervous system stimulants and sport practice

    PubMed Central

    Avois, L; Robinson, N; Saudan, C; Baume, N; Mangin, P; Saugy, M

    2006-01-01

    Background and objectives Central nervous system (CNS) stimulants may be used to reduce tiredness and increase alertness, competitiveness, and aggression. They are more likely to be used in competition but may be used during training to increase the intensity of the training session. There are several potential dangers involving their misuse in contact sports. This paper reviews the three main CNS stimulants, ephedrine, amfetamine, and cocaine, in relation to misuse in sport. Methods Description of the pharmacology, actions, and side effects of amfetamine, cocaine, and ephedrine. Results CNS stimulants have psychotropic effects that may be perceived to be ergogenic. Some are prescription drugs, such as Ephedra alkaloids, and there are issues regarding their appropriate therapeutic use. Recently attention has been given to their widespread use by athletes, despite the lack of evidence regarding any ergogenic or real performance benefit, and their potentially serious side effects. Recreational drugs, some of which are illegal (cocaine, amfetamines), are commonly used by athletes and cause potential ergolytic effects. Overall, these drugs are important for their frequent use and mention in anti‐doping laboratories statistics and the media, and their potentially serious adverse effects. Conclusions Doping with CNS stimulants is a real public health problem and all sports authorities should participate in its prevention. Dissemination of information is essential to prevent doping in sport and to provide alternatives. Adequate training and education in this domain should be introduced. PMID:16799095

  14. Time Perception Mechanisms at Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Rhailana; Ribeiro, Jéssica; Gupta, Daya S; Machado, Dionis; Lopes-Júnior, Fernando; Magalhães, Francisco; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Rocha, Kaline; Marinho, Victor; Lima, Gildário; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Orsini, Marco; Pessoa, Bruno; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Teixeira, Silmar

    2016-04-01

    The five senses have specific ways to receive environmental information and lead to central nervous system. The perception of time is the sum of stimuli associated with cognitive processes and environmental changes. Thus, the perception of time requires a complex neural mechanism and may be changed by emotional state, level of attention, memory and diseases. Despite this knowledge, the neural mechanisms of time perception are not yet fully understood. The objective is to relate the mechanisms involved the neurofunctional aspects, theories, executive functions and pathologies that contribute the understanding of temporal perception. Articles form 1980 to 2015 were searched by using the key themes: neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, theories, time cells, memory, schizophrenia, depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and Parkinson's disease combined with the term perception of time. We evaluated 158 articles within the inclusion criteria for the purpose of the study. We conclude that research about the holdings of the frontal cortex, parietal, basal ganglia, cerebellum and hippocampus have provided advances in the understanding of the regions related to the perception of time. In neurological and psychiatric disorders, the understanding of time depends on the severity of the diseases and the type of tasks. PMID:27127597

  15. Time Perception Mechanisms at Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Rhailana; Ribeiro, Jéssica; Gupta, Daya S.; Machado, Dionis; Lopes-Júnior, Fernando; Magalhães, Francisco; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Rocha, Kaline; Marinho, Victor; Lima, Gildário; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Orsini, Marco; Pessoa, Bruno; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Teixeira, Silmar

    2016-01-01

    The five senses have specific ways to receive environmental information and lead to central nervous system. The perception of time is the sum of stimuli associated with cognitive processes and environmental changes. Thus, the perception of time requires a complex neural mechanism and may be changed by emotional state, level of attention, memory and diseases. Despite this knowledge, the neural mechanisms of time perception are not yet fully understood. The objective is to relate the mechanisms involved the neurofunctional aspects, theories, executive functions and pathologies that contribute the understanding of temporal perception. Articles form 1980 to 2015 were searched by using the key themes: neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, theories, time cells, memory, schizophrenia, depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and Parkinson’s disease combined with the term perception of time. We evaluated 158 articles within the inclusion criteria for the purpose of the study. We conclude that research about the holdings of the frontal cortex, parietal, basal ganglia, cerebellum and hippocampus have provided advances in the understanding of the regions related to the perception of time. In neurological and psychiatric disorders, the understanding of time depends on the severity of the diseases and the type of tasks. PMID:27127597

  16. Environmental effects on the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, G W

    1977-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is designed to respond to the environment and is peculiarly vulnerable to many of the influences found in the environment. Utilizing an anatomical classification (cortex, cerebellum, peripheral nerves) major toxins and stresses are reviewed with selections from recent references. Selective vulnerability of certain areas to particular toxins is apparent at all levels of the CNS, although the amount of damage produced by any noxious agent depends on the age and genetic substrate of the subject. It is apparent that the effects of certain well known and long respected environmental toxins such as lead, mercury, etc., deserve continued surveillance. In addition, the overwhelming impact on the CNS of social damages such as trauma, alcohol, and tobacco cannot be ignored by environmentalists. The effect of the hospital and therapeutic environment has become apparent in view of increased awareness of iatrogenic disorders. The need for particular laboratory tests, for example, examination of CSF and nerve conduction toxicity studies, is suggested. Epidemics such as the recent solvent neuropathies suggest a need for continued animal studies that are chronic, as well as acute evaluations when predicting the potential toxic effects of industrial compounds. PMID:202447

  17. Central Nervous System Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boulware, David R.; Marais, Suzaan; Scriven, James; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (CNS-IRIS) develops in 9 %–47 % of persons with HIV infection and a CNS opportunistic infection who start antiretroviral therapy and is associated with a mortality rate of 13 %–75 %. These rates vary according to the causative pathogen. Common CNS-IRIS events occur in relation to Cryptococcus, tuberculosis (TB), and JC virus, but several other mycobacteria, fungi, and viruses have been associated with IRIS. IRIS symptoms often mimic the original infection, and diagnosis necessitates consideration of treatment failure, microbial resistance, and an additional neurological infection. These diagnostic challenges often delay IRIS diagnosis and treatment. Corticosteroids have been used to treat CNS-IRIS, with variable responses; the best supportive evidence exists for the treatment of TB-IRIS. Pathogenic mechanisms vary: Cryptococcal IRIS is characterized by a paucity of cerebrospinal inflammation prior to antiretroviral therapy, whereas higher levels of inflammatory markers at baseline predispose to TB meningitis IRIS. This review focuses on advances in the understanding of CNS-IRIS over the past 2 years. PMID:24173584

  18. Plants and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Carlini, E A

    2003-06-01

    This review article draws the attention to the many species of plants possessing activity on the central nervous system (CNS). In fact, they cover the whole spectrum of central activity such as psychoanaleptic, psycholeptic and psychodysleptic effects, and several of these plants are currently used in therapeutics to treat human ailments. Among the psychoanaleptic (stimulant) plants, those utilized by human beings to reduce body weight [Ephedra spp. (Ma Huang), Paullinia spp. (guaraná), Catha edulis Forssk. (khat)] and plants used to improve general health conditions (plant adaptogens) were scrutinized. Many species of hallucinogenic (psychodysleptic) plants are used by humans throughout the world to achieve states of mind distortions; among those, a few have been used for therapeutic purposes, such as Cannabis sativa L., Tabernanthe iboga Baill. and the mixture of Psychotria viridis Ruiz and Pav. and Banisteriopsis caapi (Spruce ex Griseb.) C.V. Morton. Plants showing central psycholeptic activities, such as analgesic or anxiolytic actions (Passiflora incarnata L., Valeriana spp. and Piper methysticum G. Forst.), were also analysed.Finally, the use of crude or semipurified extracts of such plants instead of the active substances seemingly responsible for their therapeutic effect is discussed. PMID:12895668

  19. Subcortical cytoskeleton periodicity throughout the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    D’Este, Elisa; Kamin, Dirk; Velte, Caroline; Göttfert, Fabian; Simons, Mikael; Hell, Stefan W.

    2016-01-01

    Superresolution fluorescence microscopy recently revealed a ~190 nm periodic cytoskeleton lattice consisting of actin, spectrin, and other proteins underneath the membrane of cultured hippocampal neurons. Whether the periodic cytoskeleton lattice is a structural feature of all neurons and how it is modified when axons are ensheathed by myelin forming glial cells is not known. Here, STED nanoscopy is used to demonstrate that this structure is a commonplace of virtually all neuron types in vitro. To check how the subcortical meshwork is modified during myelination, we studied sciatic nerve fibers from adult mice. Periodicity of both actin and spectrin was uncovered at the internodes, indicating no substantial differences between unmyelinated and myelinated axons. Remarkably, the actin/spectrin pattern was also detected in glial cells such as cultured oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Altogether our work shows that the periodic subcortical cytoskeletal meshwork is a fundamental characteristic of cells in the nervous system and is not a distinctive feature of neurons, as previously thought. PMID:26947559

  20. In vivo peripheral nervous system insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Caleb W.; Ryals, Janelle M.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in peripheral nervous system (PNS) insulin support may contribute to diabetic neuropathy (DN); yet, PNS insulin signaling is not fully defined. Here, we investigated in vivo insulin signaling in the PNS and compared the insulin-responsiveness to that of muscle, liver, and adipose. Nondiabetic mice were administered increasing doses of insulin to define a dose response relationship between insulin and Akt activation in the DRG and sciatic nerve. Resulting EC50 doses were used to characterize the PNS insulin signaling time course and make comparisons between insulin signaling in the PNS and other peripheral tissues (i.e., muscle, liver, adipose). The results demonstrate that the PNS is responsive to insulin and that differences in insulin signaling pathway activation exist between PNS compartments. At a therapeutically relevant dose, Akt was activated in the muscle, liver, and adipose at 30 minutes, correlating with the changes in blood glucose levels. Interestingly, the sciatic nerve showed a similar signaling profile as insulin-sensitive tissues, however there was not a comparable activation in the DRG or spinal cord. These results present new evidence regarding PNS insulin signaling pathways in vivo and provide a baseline for studies investigating the contribution of disrupted PNS insulin signaling to DN pathogenesis. PMID:24028189

  1. Diabetes and the enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharan, B; Srinivasan, S

    2007-12-01

    Diabetes is associated with several changes in gastrointestinal (GI) motility and associated symptoms such as nausea, bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhoea and constipation. The pathogenesis of altered GI functions in diabetes is multifactorial and the role of the enteric nervous system (ENS) in this respect has gained significant importance. In this review, we summarize the research carried out on diabetes-related changes in the ENS. Changes in the inhibitory and excitatory enteric neurons are described highlighting the role of loss of inhibitory neurons in early diabetic enteric neuropathy. The functional consequences of these neuronal changes result in altered gastric emptying, diarrhoea or constipation. Diabetes can also affect GI motility through changes in intestinal smooth muscle or alterations in extrinsic neuronal control. Hyperglycaemia and oxidative stress play an important role in the pathophysiology of these ENS changes. Antioxidants to prevent or treat diabetic GI motility problems have therapeutic potential. Recent research on the nerve-immune interactions demonstrates inflammation-associated neurodegeneration which can lead to motility related problems in diabetes. PMID:17971027

  2. Early animal evolution and the origins of nervous systems

    PubMed Central

    Budd, Graham E.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of early nervous systems is hazardous because we lack good criteria for determining homology between the systems of distant taxa; the timing of the evolutionary events is contested, and thus the relevant ecological and geological settings for them are also unclear. Here I argue that no simple approach will resolve the first issue, but that it remains likely that animals evolved relatively late, and that their nervous systems thus arose during the late Ediacaran, in a context provided by the changing planktonic and benthic environments of the time. The early trace fossil provides the most concrete evidence for early behavioural diversification, but it cannot simply be translated into increasing nervous system complexity: behavioural complexity does not map on a one-to-one basis onto nervous system complexity, both because of possible limitations to behaviour caused by the environment and because we know that even organisms without nervous systems are capable of relatively complex behaviour. PMID:26554037

  3. Early animal evolution and the origins of nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Budd, Graham E

    2015-12-19

    Understanding the evolution of early nervous systems is hazardous because we lack good criteria for determining homology between the systems of distant taxa; the timing of the evolutionary events is contested, and thus the relevant ecological and geological settings for them are also unclear. Here I argue that no simple approach will resolve the first issue, but that it remains likely that animals evolved relatively late, and that their nervous systems thus arose during the late Ediacaran, in a context provided by the changing planktonic and benthic environments of the time. The early trace fossil provides the most concrete evidence for early behavioural diversification, but it cannot simply be translated into increasing nervous system complexity: behavioural complexity does not map on a one-to-one basis onto nervous system complexity, both because of possible limitations to behaviour caused by the environment and because we know that even organisms without nervous systems are capable of relatively complex behaviour. PMID:26554037

  4. Melatonin Metabolism in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    The metabolism of melatonin in the central nervous system is of interest for several reasons. Melatonin enters the brain either via the pineal recess or by uptake from the blood. It has been assumed to be also formed in some brain areas. Neuroprotection by melatonin has been demonstrated in numerous model systems, and various attempts have been undertaken to counteract neurodegeneration by melatonin treatment. Several concurrent pathways lead to different products. Cytochrome P450 subforms have been demonstrated in the brain. They either demethylate melatonin to N-acetylserotonin, or produce 6-hydroxymelatonin, which is mostly sulfated already in the CNS. Melatonin is deacetylated, at least in pineal gland and retina, to 5-methoxytryptamine. N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine is formed by pyrrole-ring cleavage, by myeloperoxidase, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and various non-enzymatic oxidants. Its product, N1-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine, is of interest as a scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial modulator, downregulator of cyclooxygenase-2, inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, neuronal and inducible NO synthases. Contrary to other nitrosated aromates, the nitrosated kynuramine metabolite, 3-acetamidomethyl-6-methoxycinnolinone, does not re-donate NO. Various other products are formed from melatonin and its metabolites by interaction with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The relative contribution of the various pathways to melatonin catabolism seems to be influenced by microglia activation, oxidative stress and brain levels of melatonin, which may be strongly changed in experiments on neuroprotection. Many of the melatonin metabolites, which may appear in elevated concentrations after melatonin administration, possess biological or pharmacological properties, including N-acetylserotonin, 5-methoxytryptamine and some of its derivatives, and especially the 5-methoxylated kynuramines. PMID:21358968

  5. Carbon monoxide and the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Raub, J A; Benignus, V A

    2002-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, tasteless, odorless, and non-irritating gas formed when carbon in fuel is not burned completely. It enters the bloodstream through the lungs and attaches to hemoglobin (Hb), the body's oxygen carrier, forming carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and thereby reducing oxygen (O(2)) delivery to the body's organs and tissues. High COHb concentrations are poisonous. Central nervous system (CNS) effects in individuals suffering acute CO poisoning cover a wide range, depending on severity of exposure: headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, disorientation, confusion, collapse, and coma. At lower concentrations, CNS effects include reduction in visual perception, manual dexterity, learning, driving performance, and attention level. Earlier work is frequently cited to justify the statement that CO exposure sufficient to produce COHb levels of ca. 5% would be sufficient to produce visual sensitivity reduction and various neurobehavioral performance deficits. In a recent literature re-evaluation, however, the best estimate was that [COHb] would have to rise to 15-20% before a 10% reduction in any behavioral or visual measurement could be observed. This conclusion was based on (1) critical review of the literature on behavioral and sensory effects, (2) review and interpretation of the physiological effects of COHb on the CNS, (3) extrapolation from the effects of hypoxic hypoxia to the effects of CO hypoxia, and (4) extrapolation from rat behavioral effects of CO to humans. Also covered in this review article are effects of chronic CO exposure, the discovery of neuroglobin, a summary of the relatively new role for endogenous CO in neurotransmission and vascular homeostasis, groups which might be especially sensitive to CO, and recommendations on further research. The interested reader is directed to other published reviews of the literature on CO and historically seminal references that form our understanding of this ubiquitous gas. PMID

  6. Mechanosensitivity in the enteric nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuoli-Weber, Gemma; Schemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) autonomously controls gut muscle activity. Mechanosensitive enteric neurons (MEN) initiate reflex activity by responding to mechanical deformation of the gastrointestinal wall. MEN throughout the gut primarily respond to compression or stretch rather than to shear force. Some MEN are multimodal as they respond to compression and stretch. Depending on the region up to 60% of the entire ENS population responds to mechanical stress. MEN fire action potentials after mechanical stimulation of processes or soma although they are more sensitive to process deformation. There are at least two populations of MEN based on their sensitivity to different modalities of mechanical stress and on their firing pattern. (1) Rapidly, slowly and ultra-slowly adapting neurons which encode compressive forces. (2) Ultra-slowly adapting stretch-sensitive neurons encoding tensile forces. Rapid adaptation of firing is typically observed after compressive force while slow adaptation or ongoing spike discharge occurs often during tensile stress (stretch). All MEN have some common properties: they receive synaptic input, are low fidelity mechanoreceptors and are multifunctional in that some serve interneuronal others even motor functions. Consequently, MEN possess processes with mechanosensitive as well as efferent functions. This raises the intriguing hypothesis that MEN sense and control muscle activity at the same time as servo-feedback loop. The mechanosensitive channel(s) or receptor(s) expressed by the different MEN populations are unknown. Future concepts have to incorporate compressive and tensile-sensitive MEN into neural circuits that controls muscle activity. They may interact to control various forms of a particular motor pattern or regulate different motor patterns independently from each other. PMID:26528136

  7. Radiation response of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, T.E.; Kun, L.E.; Stephens, L.C.

    1995-03-30

    This report reviews the anatomical, pathophysiological, and clinical aspects of radiation injury to the central nervous system (CNS). Despite the lack of pathoGyomonic characteristics for CNS radiation lesions, demyelination and malacia are consistently the dominant morphological features of radiation myelopathy. In addition, cerebral atrophy is commonly observed in patients with neurological deficits related to chemotherapy and radiation, and neurocognitive deficits are associated with diffuse white matter changes. Clinical and experimental dose-response information have been evaluated and summarized into specific recommendations for the spinal cord and brain. The common spinal cord dose limit of 45 Gn in 22 to 25 fractions is conservative and can be relaxed if respecting this limit materially reduces the probability of tumor control. It is suggested that the 5% incidence of radiation myelopathy probably lies between 57 and 61 Gy to the spinal cord in the absence of dose modifying chemotherapy. A clinically detectable length effect for the spinal cord has not been observed. The effects of chemotherapy and altered fractionation are also discussed. Brain necrosis in adults is rarely noted below 60 Gy in conventional fractionation, with imaging and clinical changes being observed generally only above 50 Gy. However, neurocognitive effects are observed at lower doses, especially in children. A more pronounced volume effect is believed to exist in the brain than in the spinal cord. Tumor progression may be hard to distinguish from radiation and chemotherapy effects. Diffuse white matter injury can be attributed to radiation and associated with neurological deficits, but leukoencephalopathy is rarely observed in the absence of chemotherapy. Subjective, objective, management, and analytic (SOMA) parameters related to radiation spinal cord and brain injury have been developed and presented on ordinal scales. 140 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Is There Anything "Autonomous" in the Nervous System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasia-Filho, Alberto A.

    2006-01-01

    The terms "autonomous" or "vegetative" are currently used to identify one part of the nervous system composed of sympathetic, parasympathetic, and gastrointestinal divisions. However, the concepts that are under the literal meaning of these words can lead to misconceptions about the actual nervous organization. Some clear-cut examples indicate…

  9. General Information about Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... System Embryonal Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors Go ... in patients with a high-risk tumor. The information from tests and procedures done to detect (find) ...

  10. Animal-microbe interactions and the evolution of nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Eisthen, Heather L; Theis, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    Animals ubiquitously interact with environmental and symbiotic microbes, and the effects of these interactions on animal physiology are currently the subject of intense interest. Nevertheless, the influence of microbes on nervous system evolution has been largely ignored. We illustrate here how taking microbes into account might enrich our ideas about the evolution of nervous systems. For example, microbes are involved in animals' communicative, defensive, predatory and dispersal behaviours, and have likely influenced the evolution of chemo- and photosensory systems. In addition, we speculate that the need to regulate interactions with microbes at the epithelial surface may have contributed to the evolutionary internalization of the nervous system. PMID:26598731

  11. The Human Sympathetic Nervous System Response to Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, Andrew C.; Diedrich, Andre; Paranjape, Sachin Y.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, Rose Marie; Lane, Lynda D.; Shiavi, Richard; Robertson, David

    2003-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is an important part of the autonomic (or automatic) nervous system. When an individual stands up, the sympathetic nervous system speeds the heart and constricts blood vessels to prevent a drop in blood pressure. A significant number of astronauts experience a drop in blood pressure when standing for prolonged periods after they return from spaceflight. Difficulty maintaining blood pressure with standing is also a daily problem for many patients. Indirect evidence available before the Neurolab mission suggested the problem in astronauts while in space might be due partially to reduced sympathetic nervous system activity. The purpose of this experiment was to identify whether sympathetic activity was reduced during spaceflight. Sympathetic nervous system activity can be determined in part by measuring heart rate, nerve activity going to blood vessels, and the release of the hormone norepinephrine into the blood. Norepinephrine is a neurotransmitter discharged from active sympathetic nerve terminals, so its rate of release can serve as a marker of sympathetic nervous system action. In addition to standard cardiovascular measurements (heart rate, blood pressure), we determined sympathetic nerve activity as well as norepinephrine release and clearance on four crewmembers on the Neurolab mission. Contrary to our expectation, the results demonstrated that the astronauts had mildly elevated resting sympathetic nervous system activity in space. Sympathetic nervous system responses to stresses that simulated the cardiovascular effects of standing (lower body negative pressure) were brisk both during and after spaceflight. We concluded that, in the astronauts tested, the activity and response of the sympathetic nervous system to cardiovascular stresses appeared intact and mildly elevated both during and after spaceflight. These changes returned to normal within a few days.

  12. Orbital Aspergillosis: Voriconazole – The New Standard Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Ohlstein, Derek H.; Hooten, Claudia; Perez, Javier; Clark, Charles L.; Samy, Hazem

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim To describe a case of invasive orbital aspergillosis and evaluate treatments and outcomes. Methods A case report and review of orbital aspergillosis treatment with voriconazole in the English language literature. Conclusion Amphotericin B with debridement is the current standard of care for orbital aspergillosis; however, its prognosis is unfavorable. When compared to amphotericin B, voriconazole demonstrates a survival benefit, has less systemic toxicity, and is better tolerated by patients. While a prospective trial comparing amphotericin B to voriconazole in orbital aspergillosis is not feasible, there is evidence to support the use of voriconazole as primary therapy. PMID:22611368

  13. Evolution of eumetazoan nervous systems: insights from cnidarians

    PubMed Central

    Kelava, Iva; Rentzsch, Fabian; Technau, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, the sister group to bilaterians, have a simple diffuse nervous system. This morphological simplicity and their phylogenetic position make them a crucial group in the study of the evolution of the nervous system. The development of their nervous systems is of particular interest, as by uncovering the genetic programme that underlies it, and comparing it with the bilaterian developmental programme, it is possible to make assumptions about the genes and processes involved in the development of ancestral nervous systems. Recent advances in sequencing methods, genetic interference techniques and transgenic technology have enabled us to get a first glimpse into the molecular network underlying the development of a cnidarian nervous system—in particular the nervous system of the anthozoan Nematostella vectensis. It appears that much of the genetic network of the nervous system development is partly conserved between cnidarians and bilaterians, with Wnt and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling, and Sox genes playing a crucial part in the differentiation of neurons. However, cnidarians possess some specific characteristics, and further studies are necessary to elucidate the full regulatory network. The work on cnidarian neurogenesis further accentuates the need to study non-model organisms in order to gain insights into processes that shaped present-day lineages during the course of evolution. PMID:26554048

  14. Strategies for Enhanced Drug Delivery to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Dwibhashyam, V. S. N. M.; Nagappa, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    Treating central nervous system diseases is very challenging because of the presence of a variety of formidable obstacles that impede drug delivery. Physiological barriers like the blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier as well as various efflux transporter proteins make the entry of drugs into the central nervous system very difficult. The present review provides a brief account of the blood brain barrier, the P-glycoprotein efflux and various strategies for enhancing drug delivery to the central nervous system. PMID:20046703

  15. Cryptococcosis of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, V. E.; Sutherland, J. M.; Tyrer, J. H.

    1970-01-01

    (1) A survey of cryptococcal infections of the nervous system in Queensland, Australia, revealed the nine year prevalence rate for the Australian aboriginal to be some 17 times greater than that of the white population. Uncommon in the first decade of life, the disease was developed by 79% of 29 patients between 20 and 59 years, males being affected twice as commonly as females. (2) Cryptococcosis appears to be more common in Australia than in the United Kingdom, and in Queensland the nine year incidence of neurological cryptococcosis was 4·7 per 100,000 in the tropical north compared with 1·8 per 100,000 in the southern parts of the State. Because of this, and since 20 of the 29 patients were regarded as having outdoor occupations, it is suggested that a high environmental exposure to the fungus may be associated with an animal reservoir and with dry, dusty conditions. It is also possible that geographical and occupational factors rather than racial predisposition account for the high incidence of the disease in the Australian aborigine. However, individual resistance and susceptibility are probably also important factors, since the clinical disease appears to be positively correlated with certain other diseases, or with steroid therapy, which would impair the immune responses of the body. (3) Headache is the outstanding symptom of neurological cryptococcosis and fever or evidence of meningeal reaction, though often present, may be absent. An awareness of the possibility of neurological cryptococcosis in the differential diagnosis of various intracranial disorders should lead to identification of the encapsulated C. neoformans in the cerebrospinal fluid. Although in eight of 26 patients the lumbar cerebrospinal fluid was sterile on repeated examination, in five cases C. neoformans was found on direct examination of cerebrospinal fluid obtained by ventricular puncture. The remaining three died before further investigations could be performed. (4) Before the

  16. The eye and visual nervous system: anatomy, physiology and toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    McCaa, C S

    1982-01-01

    The eyes are at risk to environmental injury by direct exposure to airborne pollutants, to splash injury from chemicals and to exposure via the circulatory system to numerous drugs and bloodborne toxins. In addition, drugs or toxins can destroy vision by damaging the visual nervous system. This review describes the anatomy and physiology of the eye and visual nervous system and includes a discussion of some of the more common toxins affecting vision in man. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. PMID:7084144

  17. Review: Glial lineages and myelination in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    COMPSTON, ALASTAIR; ZAJICEK, JOHN; SUSSMAN, JON; WEBB, ANNA; HALL, GILLIAN; MUIR, DAVID; SHAW, CHRISTOPHER; WOOD, ANDREW; SCOLDING, NEIL

    1997-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes, derived from stem cell precursors which arise in subventricular zones of the developing central nervous system, have as their specialist role the synthesis and maintenance of myelin. Astrocytes contribute to the cellular architecture of the central nervous system and act as a source of growth factors and cytokines; microglia are bone-marrow derived macrophages which function as primary immunocompetent cells in the central nervous system. Myelination depends on the establishment of stable relationships between each differentiated oligodendrocyte and short segments of several neighbouring axons. There is growing evidence, especially from studies of glial cell implantation, that oligodendrocyte precursors persist in the adult nervous system and provide a limited capacity for the restoration of structure and function in myelinated pathways damaged by injury or disease. PMID:9061442

  18. Complex Homology and the Evolution of Nervous Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Hillis, David M.; Zakon, Harold H.; Hofmann, Hans A.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the complex evolution of animal nervous systems and discuss the ramifications of this complexity for inferring the nature of early animals. Although reconstructing the origins of nervous systems remains a central challenge in biology, and the phenotypic complexity of early animals remains controversial, a compelling picture is emerging. We now know that the nervous system and other key animal innovations contain a large degree of homoplasy, at least on the molecular level. Conflicting hypotheses about early nervous system evolution are due primarily to differences in the interpretation of this homoplasy. We highlight the need for explicit discussion of assumptions and discuss the limitations of current approaches for inferring ancient phenotypic states. PMID:26746806

  19. Improving and Accelerating Drug Development for Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pankevich, Diana E.; Altevogt, Bruce M.; Dunlop, John; Gage, Fred H.; Hyman, Steve E.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the neurosciences have placed the field in the position where it is poised to significantly reduce the burden of nervous system disorders. However, drug discovery, development and translation for nervous system disorders still pose many unique challenges. The key scientific challenges can be summarized as follows: mechanisms of disease, target identification and validation, predictive models, biomarkers for patient stratification and as endpoints for clinical trials, clear regulatory pathways, reliability and reproducibility of published data, and data sharing and collaboration. To accelerate nervous system drug development the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders has hosted a series of public workshops that brought together representatives of industry, government (including both research funding and regulatory agencies), academia, and patient groups to discuss these challenges and offer potential strategies to improve the translational neuroscience. PMID:25442933

  20. Nervous system in the fibrillar theory of Giorgio Baglivi.

    PubMed

    Zurak, N

    2000-01-01

    The drafts, epistles, headwords, and conceptual basis known as the fibrillar theory of Giorgio Baglivi, published in his book entitled De fibra motrice et morbosa, were analyzed in an attempt to re-evaluate Baglivi's contribution, generally considered quite modest, to the development of scientific thought on the nervous system functions. The analysis revealed Baglivi's identification of the reflex organization, vegetative nervous system function, and neural aspect of the vasomotor function to be surprisingly valuable. I believe that the lucidity and genuine contemporariness of Baglivi's standpoints arise the question of the historical precedence in the discovery of these functions (it is usually attributed to F.X. Bichat for vegetative nervous system, and to Claude Bernard for vasomotor nerves). In the light of these facts, the need of an expert revision of the history of discovering nervous system functions is suggested. PMID:11624709

  1. Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Nervous System Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neurological Disorders and Stroke American Diabetes Association JDRF Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Español Prevent diabetes problems: Keep your nervous system healthy Page Content ...

  2. Source characterization of nervous system active pharmaceutical ingredients in healthcare wastewaters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nervous system active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including anti-depressants and opioids, are important clinically administered pharmaceuticals within healthcare facilities. Concentrations and mass loadings of ten nervous system APIs and three nervous system API metaboli...

  3. Introduction to 'Origin and evolution of the nervous system'.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hirth, Frank

    2015-12-19

    In 1665, Robert Hooke demonstrated in Micrographia the power of the microscope and comparative observations, one of which revealed similarities between the arthropod and vertebrate eyes. Utilizing comparative observations, Saint-Hilaire in 1822 was the first to propose that the ventral nervous system of arthropods corresponds to the dorsal nervous system of vertebrates. Since then, studies on the origin and evolution of the nervous system have become inseparable from studies about Metazoan origins and the origins of organ systems. The advent of genome sequence data and, in turn, phylogenomics and phylogenetics have refined cladistics and expanded our understanding of Metazoan phylogeny. However, the origin and evolution of the nervous system is still obscure and many questions and problems remain. A recurrent problem is whether and to what extent sequence data provide reliable guidance for comparisons across phyla. Are genetic data congruent with the geological fossil records? How can we reconcile evolved character loss with phylogenomic records? And how informative are genetic data in relation to the specification of nervous system morphologies? These provide some of the background and context for a Royal Society meeting to discuss new data and concepts that might achieve insights into the origin and evolution of brains and nervous systems. PMID:26554035

  4. Central nervous system adaptation to exercise training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Lois Anne

    Exercise training causes physiological changes in skeletal muscle that results in enhanced performance in humans and animals. Despite numerous studies on exercise effects on skeletal muscle, relatively little is known about adaptive changes in the central nervous system. This study investigated whether spinal pathways that mediate locomotor activity undergo functional adaptation after 28 days of exercise training. Ventral horn spinal cord expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a trophic factor at the neuromuscular junction, choline acetyltransferase (Chat), the synthetic enzyme for acetylcholine, vesicular acetylcholine transporter (Vacht), a transporter of ACh into synaptic vesicles and calcineurin (CaN), a protein phosphatase that phosphorylates ion channels and exocytosis machinery were measured to determine if changes in expression occurred in response to physical activity. Expression of these proteins was determined by western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Comparisons between sedentary controls and animals that underwent either endurance training or resistance training were made. Control rats received no exercise other than normal cage activity. Endurance-trained rats were exercised 6 days/wk at 31m/min on a treadmill (8% incline) for 100 minutes. Resistance-trained rats supported their weight plus an additional load (70--80% body weight) on a 60° incline (3 x 3 min, 5 days/wk). CGRP expression was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). CGRP expression in the spinal dorsal and ventral horn of exercise-trained animals was not significantly different than controls. Chat expression measured by Western blot and IHC was not significantly different between runners and controls but expression in resistance-trained animals assayed by IHC was significantly less than controls and runners. Vacht and CaN immunoreactivity in motor neurons of endurance-trained rats was significantly elevated relative to control and resistance-trained animals. Ventral

  5. Holothurian Nervous System Diversity Revealed by Neuroanatomical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A.; Lázaro-Peña, María I.; Vázquez-Figueroa, Lionel D.; Díaz-Balzac, Roberto J.; García-Arrarás, José E.

    2016-01-01

    The Echinodermata comprise an interesting branch in the phylogenetic tree of deuterostomes. Their radial symmetry which is reflected in their nervous system anatomy makes them a target of interest in the study of nervous system evolution. Until recently, the study of the echinoderm nervous system has been hindered by a shortage of neuronal markers. However, in recent years several markers of neuronal and fiber subpopulations have been described. These have been used to identify subpopulations of neurons and fibers, but an integrative study of the anatomical relationship of these subpopulations is wanting. We have now used eight commercial antibodies, together with three antibodies produced by our group to provide a comprehensive and integrated description and new details of the echinoderm neuroanatomy using the holothurian Holothuria glaberrima (Selenka, 1867) as our model system. Immunoreactivity of the markers used showed: (1) specific labeling patterns by markers in the radial nerve cords, which suggest the presence of specific nerve tracts in holothurians. (2) Nerves directly innervate most muscle fibers in the longitudinal muscles. (3) Similar to other deuterostomes (mainly vertebrates), their enteric nervous system is composed of a large and diverse repertoire of neurons and fiber phenotypes. Our results provide a first blueprint of the anatomical organization of cells and fibers that form the holothurian neural circuitry, and highlight the fact that the echinoderm nervous system shows unexpected diversity in cell and fiber types and their distribution in both central and peripheral nervous components. PMID:26987052

  6. Holothurian Nervous System Diversity Revealed by Neuroanatomical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A; Lázaro-Peña, María I; Vázquez-Figueroa, Lionel D; Díaz-Balzac, Roberto J; García-Arrarás, José E

    2016-01-01

    The Echinodermata comprise an interesting branch in the phylogenetic tree of deuterostomes. Their radial symmetry which is reflected in their nervous system anatomy makes them a target of interest in the study of nervous system evolution. Until recently, the study of the echinoderm nervous system has been hindered by a shortage of neuronal markers. However, in recent years several markers of neuronal and fiber subpopulations have been described. These have been used to identify subpopulations of neurons and fibers, but an integrative study of the anatomical relationship of these subpopulations is wanting. We have now used eight commercial antibodies, together with three antibodies produced by our group to provide a comprehensive and integrated description and new details of the echinoderm neuroanatomy using the holothurian Holothuria glaberrima (Selenka, 1867) as our model system. Immunoreactivity of the markers used showed: (1) specific labeling patterns by markers in the radial nerve cords, which suggest the presence of specific nerve tracts in holothurians. (2) Nerves directly innervate most muscle fibers in the longitudinal muscles. (3) Similar to other deuterostomes (mainly vertebrates), their enteric nervous system is composed of a large and diverse repertoire of neurons and fiber phenotypes. Our results provide a first blueprint of the anatomical organization of cells and fibers that form the holothurian neural circuitry, and highlight the fact that the echinoderm nervous system shows unexpected diversity in cell and fiber types and their distribution in both central and peripheral nervous components. PMID:26987052

  7. Role of the nervous system in cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    LI, SHA; SUN, YANLAI; GAO, DONGWEI

    2013-01-01

    The notion that tumors lack innervation was proposed several years ago. However, nerve fibers are irregulatedly found in some tumor tissues. Their terminals interaction with cancer cells are considered to be neuro-neoplastic synapses. Moreover, neural-related factors, which are important players in the development and activity of the nervous system, have been found in cancer cells. Thus, they establish a direct connection between the nervous system and tumor cells. They modulate the process of metastasis, including degradation of base membranes, cancer cell invasion, migration, extravasation and colonization. Peripheral nerve invasion provides another pathway for the spread of cancer cells when blood and lymphatic metastases are absent, which is based on the interactions between the microenvironments of nerve fibers and tumor cells. The nervous system also modulates angiogenesis, the tumor microenvironment, bone marrow, immune functions and inflammatory pathways to influence metastases. Denervation of the tumor has been reported to enhance cancer metastasis. Stress, social isolation and other emotional factors may increase distant metastasis through releasing hormones from the brain, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and autonomic nervous system. Disruption of circadian rhythms will also promote cancer metastasis through direct and indirect actions of the nervous system. Therefore, the nervous system plays an important role in cancer metastasis. PMID:23599747

  8. Global research priorities for infections that affect the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    John, Chandy C.; Carabin, Hélène; Montano, Silvia M.; Bangirana, Paul; Zunt, Joseph R.; Peterson, Phillip K.

    2015-01-01

    Infections that cause significant nervous system morbidity globally include viral (for example, HIV, rabies, Japanese encephalitis virus, herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus and chikungunya virus), bacterial (for example, tuberculosis, syphilis, bacterial meningitis and sepsis), fungal (for example, cryptococcal meningitis) and parasitic (for example, malaria, neurocysticercosis, neuroschistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths) infections. The neurological, cognitive, behavioural or mental health problems caused by the infections probably affect millions of children and adults in low- and middle-income countries. However, precise estimates of morbidity are lacking for most infections, and there is limited information on the pathogenesis of nervous system injury in these infections. Key research priorities for infection-related nervous system morbidity include accurate estimates of disease burden; point-of-care assays for infection diagnosis; improved tools for the assessment of neurological, cognitive and mental health impairment; vaccines and other interventions for preventing infections; improved understanding of the pathogenesis of nervous system disease in these infections; more effective methods to treat and prevent nervous system sequelae; operations research to implement known effective interventions; and improved methods of rehabilitation. Research in these areas, accompanied by efforts to implement promising technologies and therapies, could substantially decrease the morbidity and mortality of infections affecting the nervous system in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:26580325

  9. Global research priorities for infections that affect the nervous system.

    PubMed

    John, Chandy C; Carabin, Hélène; Montano, Silvia M; Bangirana, Paul; Zunt, Joseph R; Peterson, Phillip K

    2015-11-19

    Infections that cause significant nervous system morbidity globally include viral (for example, HIV, rabies, Japanese encephalitis virus, herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus and chikungunya virus), bacterial (for example, tuberculosis, syphilis, bacterial meningitis and sepsis), fungal (for example, cryptococcal meningitis) and parasitic (for example, malaria, neurocysticercosis, neuroschistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths) infections. The neurological, cognitive, behavioural or mental health problems caused by the infections probably affect millions of children and adults in low- and middle-income countries. However, precise estimates of morbidity are lacking for most infections, and there is limited information on the pathogenesis of nervous system injury in these infections. Key research priorities for infection-related nervous system morbidity include accurate estimates of disease burden; point-of-care assays for infection diagnosis; improved tools for the assessment of neurological, cognitive and mental health impairment; vaccines and other interventions for preventing infections; improved understanding of the pathogenesis of nervous system disease in these infections; more effective methods to treat and prevent nervous system sequelae; operations research to implement known effective interventions; and improved methods of rehabilitation. Research in these areas, accompanied by efforts to implement promising technologies and therapies, could substantially decrease the morbidity and mortality of infections affecting the nervous system in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:26580325

  10. Management of granulomatous cerebral aspergillosis in immunocompetent adult patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Ellenbogen, Jonathan Richard; Waqar, Mueez; Cooke, Richard P D; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis, is an infrequent, opportunistic infection of the central nervous system that accounts for 5-10% of all intracranial fungal pathology. It is uncommon in immunocompetent patients and has a significant disease burden, with high morbidity and mortality, even with appropriate treatment. Basic principles of abscess management should be employed, including aspiration and targeted anti-fungal therapy for 12-18 months. However, reported outcomes with a purely minimally invasive approach are poor and there should be a low threshold for surgical excision, especially in resource poor settings and in patients with deteriorating neurology harbouring sizeable masses. Evidence favouring gross total excision over subtotal resection is lacking, however. It is notable that these recommendations are largely based on retrospective case series and isolated case reports. There is a need therefore for international collaboration to evaluate management strategies for immunocompetent patients with cerebral aspergillosis. PMID:26853515

  11. Reactions of the nervous system to magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kholodov, Y. A.

    1974-01-01

    This magnetobiological survey considers sensory, nervous, stress and genetic effects of magnetic fields on man and animals. It is shown that the nervous system plays an important role in the reactions of the organism to magnetic fields; the final biological effect is a function of the strength of the magnetic fields, the gradient, direction of the lines of force, duration and location of the action, and the functional status of the organism.

  12. Symptoms of Aspergillosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov . Fungal Diseases Types of Fungal Diseases Aspergillosis Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment Healthcare Professionals Statistics More Resources Blastomycosis Definition Symptoms Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment & Outcomes ...

  13. Systemic biomarkers of inflammation and haemostasis in patients with chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate mediators of inflammation and haemostasis in patients with chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA), a locally, destructive process of the lung due to invasion by Aspergillus species. Methods Measurements of selected biomarkers in 10 patients with CNPA and 19 healthy, matched controls were performed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and multiplex methodology. The gene expressions of relevant biomarkers were analyzed with real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Results Increased concentrations of circulating mediators of inflammation interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, RANTES, TNF-α, ICAM-1 and mediators involved in endothelial activation and thrombosis (vWF, TF and PAI-1) were observed in patients with CNPA. The concentration of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was increased both in plasma and in PBMC in the patient population. The gene expression of CD40L was decreased in PBMC from the patient group, accompanied by decreased concentrations of soluble (s) CD40L in the circulation. Conclusions The proinflammatory response against Aspergillus may be counteracted by reduced CD40L and sCD40L, as well as increased IL-10, which may compromise the immune response against Aspergillus in patients with CNPA. PMID:22731696

  14. Structural and functional features of central nervous system lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Louveau, Antoine; Smirnov, Igor; Keyes, Timothy J; Eccles, Jacob D; Rouhani, Sherin J; Peske, J David; Derecki, Noel C; Castle, David; Mandell, James W; Lee, Kevin S; Harris, Tajie H; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-07-16

    One of the characteristics of the central nervous system is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage system. Although it is now accepted that the central nervous system undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the central nervous system remain poorly understood. In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the central nervous system. The discovery of the central nervous system lymphatic system may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and sheds new light on the aetiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune system dysfunction. PMID:26030524

  15. Designing and implementing nervous system simulations on LEGO robots.

    PubMed

    Blustein, Daniel; Rosenthal, Nikolai; Ayers, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to use the commercially available LEGO Mindstorms NXT robotics platform to test systems level neuroscience hypotheses. The first step of the method is to develop a nervous system simulation of specific reflexive behaviors of an appropriate model organism; here we use the American Lobster. Exteroceptive reflexes mediated by decussating (crossing) neural connections can explain an animal's taxis towards or away from a stimulus as described by Braitenberg and are particularly well suited for investigation using the NXT platform.(1) The nervous system simulation is programmed using LabVIEW software on the LEGO Mindstorms platform. Once the nervous system is tuned properly, behavioral experiments are run on the robot and on the animal under identical environmental conditions. By controlling the sensory milieu experienced by the specimens, differences in behavioral outputs can be observed. These differences may point to specific deficiencies in the nervous system model and serve to inform the iteration of the model for the particular behavior under study. This method allows for the experimental manipulation of electronic nervous systems and serves as a way to explore neuroscience hypotheses specifically regarding the neurophysiological basis of simple innate reflexive behaviors. The LEGO Mindstorms NXT kit provides an affordable and efficient platform on which to test preliminary biomimetic robot control schemes. The approach is also well suited for the high school classroom to serve as the foundation for a hands-on inquiry-based biorobotics curriculum. PMID:23728477

  16. Systemic delivery to central nervous system by engineered PLGA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiang; Wang, Long; Deng, Gang; Liu, Junhui; Chen, Qianxue; Chen, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    Neurological disorders are an important global public health problem, but pharmaceutical treatments are limited due to drug access to the central nervous system being restricted by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most promising drug and gene delivery systems for crossing the BBB. While these systems offer great promise, PLGA NPs also have some intrinsic drawbacks and require further engineering for clinical and research applications. Multiple strategies have been developed for using PLGA NPs to deliver compounds across the BBB. We classify these strategies into three categories according to the adaptations made to the PLGA NPs (1) to facilitate travel from the injection site (pre-transcytosis strategies); (2) to enhance passage across the brain endothelial cells (BBB transcytosis strategies) and (3) to achieve targeting of the impaired nervous system cells (post-transcytosis strategies). PLGA NPs modified according to these three strategies are denoted first, second, and third generation NPs, respectively. We believe that fusing these three strategies to engineer multifunctional PLGA NPs is the only way to achieve translational applications. PMID:27158367

  17. Systemic delivery to central nervous system by engineered PLGA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiang; Wang, Long; Deng, Gang; Liu, Junhui; Chen, Qianxue; Chen, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    Neurological disorders are an important global public health problem, but pharmaceutical treatments are limited due to drug access to the central nervous system being restricted by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most promising drug and gene delivery systems for crossing the BBB. While these systems offer great promise, PLGA NPs also have some intrinsic drawbacks and require further engineering for clinical and research applications. Multiple strategies have been developed for using PLGA NPs to deliver compounds across the BBB. We classify these strategies into three categories according to the adaptations made to the PLGA NPs (1) to facilitate travel from the injection site (pre-transcytosis strategies); (2) to enhance passage across the brain endothelial cells (BBB transcytosis strategies) and (3) to achieve targeting of the impaired nervous system cells (post-transcytosis strategies). PLGA NPs modified according to these three strategies are denoted first, second, and third generation NPs, respectively. We believe that fusing these three strategies to engineer multifunctional PLGA NPs is the only way to achieve translational applications. PMID:27158367

  18. Monophyletic Origin of the Metazoan Nervous System: Characterizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Russell; Beckenbach, Andrew

    In the absence of additional cases to be studied, our understanding of the likelihood of intelligent life evolving elsewhere in the universe must be framed within the context of the evolution of intelligence on this planet. Towards this end a valid model of the evolution of animal life, and in particular of the nervous system, is key. Models which describe the development of complexity within the nervous system can be positively misleading if they are not grounded in an accurate model of the true relationships of the animal phyla. If fact the evolution of animal life at its earliest stages, from protists to the sponges, Cnidaria, and Ctenophora and onward to the bilateral animal phyla is poorly characterized. Recently numerous phylogenies of the early animal radiation have been published based upon DNA sequence data, with conflicting and poorly supported results. A polyphyletic origin for the animal nervous system has been implied by the results of several studies, which would lead to the conclusion that some characteristics of the nervous systems of higher and lower animals could be convergent. We show that an equally parsimonious interpretation of the molecular sequence data published thus far is that it reflects rapid speciation events early in animal evolution among the classical ``diploblast'' phyla, as well as accelerated DNA sequence divergence among the higher animals. This could be interpreted as support for a classical phylogeny of the animal kingdom, and thus of a strictly monophyletic origin for the nervous system.

  19. Evolution of flatworm central nervous systems: Insights from polyclads.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Sigmer Y; Carolina Bonilla, E; Marcela Bolaños, D; Carbayo, Fernando; Litvaitis, Marian K; Brown, Federico D

    2015-01-01

    The nervous systems of flatworms have diversified extensively as a consequence of the broad range of adaptations in the group. Here we examined the central nervous system (CNS) of 12 species of polyclad flatworms belonging to 11 different families by morphological and histological studies. These comparisons revealed that the overall organization and architecture of polyclad central nervous systems can be classified into three categories (I, II, and III) based on the presence of globuli cell masses -ganglion cells of granular appearance-, the cross-sectional shape of the main nerve cords, and the tissue type surrounding the nerve cords. In addition, four different cell types were identified in polyclad brains based on location and size. We also characterize the serotonergic and FMRFamidergic nervous systems in the cotylean Boninia divae by immunocytochemistry. Although both neurotransmitters were broadly expressed, expression of serotonin was particularly strong in the sucker, whereas FMRFamide was particularly strong in the pharynx. Finally, we test some of the major hypothesized trends during the evolution of the CNS in the phylum by a character state reconstruction based on current understanding of the nervous system across different species of Platyhelminthes and on up-to-date molecular phylogenies. PMID:26500427

  20. Evolution of flatworm central nervous systems: Insights from polyclads

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, Sigmer Y.; Carolina Bonilla, E.; Marcela Bolaños, D.; Carbayo, Fernando; Litvaitis, Marian K.; Brown, Federico D.

    2015-01-01

    The nervous systems of flatworms have diversified extensively as a consequence of the broad range of adaptations in the group. Here we examined the central nervous system (CNS) of 12 species of polyclad flatworms belonging to 11 different families by morphological and histological studies. These comparisons revealed that the overall organization and architecture of polyclad central nervous systems can be classified into three categories (I, II, and III) based on the presence of globuli cell masses -ganglion cells of granular appearance-, the cross-sectional shape of the main nerve cords, and the tissue type surrounding the nerve cords. In addition, four different cell types were identified in polyclad brains based on location and size. We also characterize the serotonergic and FMRFamidergic nervous systems in the cotylean Boninia divae by immunocytochemistry. Although both neurotransmitters were broadly expressed, expression of serotonin was particularly strong in the sucker, whereas FMRFamide was particularly strong in the pharynx. Finally, we test some of the major hypothesized trends during the evolution of the CNS in the phylum by a character state reconstruction based on current understanding of the nervous system across different species of Platyhelminthes and on up-to-date molecular phylogenies. PMID:26500427

  1. 3D printed nervous system on a chip.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Blake N; Lancaster, Karen Z; Hogue, Ian B; Meng, Fanben; Kong, Yong Lin; Enquist, Lynn W; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-04-21

    Bioinspired organ-level in vitro platforms are emerging as effective technologies for fundamental research, drug discovery, and personalized healthcare. In particular, models for nervous system research are especially important, due to the complexity of neurological phenomena and challenges associated with developing targeted treatment of neurological disorders. Here we introduce an additive manufacturing-based approach in the form of a bioinspired, customizable 3D printed nervous system on a chip (3DNSC) for the study of viral infection in the nervous system. Micro-extrusion 3D printing strategies enabled the assembly of biomimetic scaffold components (microchannels and compartmented chambers) for the alignment of axonal networks and spatial organization of cellular components. Physiologically relevant studies of nervous system infection using the multiscale biomimetic device demonstrated the functionality of the in vitro platform. We found that Schwann cells participate in axon-to-cell viral spread but appear refractory to infection, exhibiting a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.4 genomes per cell. These results suggest that 3D printing is a valuable approach for the prototyping of a customized model nervous system on a chip technology. PMID:26669842

  2. Guidance Receptors in the Nervous and Cardiovascular Systems.

    PubMed

    Rubina, K A; Tkachuk, V A

    2015-10-01

    Blood vessels and nervous fibers grow in parallel, for they express similar receptors for chemokine substances. Recently, much attention is being given to studying guidance receptors and their ligands besides the growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines necessary to form structures in the nervous and vascular systems. Such guidance molecules determine trajectory for growing axons and vessels. Guidance molecules include Ephrins and their receptors, Neuropilins and Plexins as receptors for Semaphorins, Robos as receptors for Slit-proteins, and UNC5B receptors binding Netrins. Apart from these receptors and their ligands, urokinase and its receptor (uPAR) and T-cadherin are also classified as guidance molecules. The urokinase system mediates local proteolysis at the leading edge of cells, thereby providing directed migration. T-cadherin is a repellent molecule that regulates the direction of growing axons and blood vessels. Guidance receptors also play an important role in the diseases of the nervous and cardiovascular systems. PMID:26567567

  3. Signals that initiate myelination in the developing mammalian nervous system.

    PubMed

    Colello, R J; Pott, U

    1997-08-01

    The myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system is essential for the establishment of saltatory conduction. In the absence or destruction of the myelin sheath, as seen in demyelinating diseases, impulse conduction is impeded resulting in severe sensory and motor deficits. Axon myelination is the culmination of a sequence of events that begins with the differentiation of glial cells and proceeds to the transcription and translation of myelin genes, the elaboration of a myelin sheath, and the recognition and ensheathment of axons. This review examines the regulatory mechanisms for each of these steps and compares and contrasts the role of the axon in initiating myelination in the central and peripheral nervous system. PMID:9396006

  4. Hepatic nervous system and neurobiology of the liver.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kendal Jay; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon

    2013-04-01

    The liver has a nervous system containing both afferent and efferent neurons that are involved in a number of processes. The afferent arm includes the sensation of lipids, glucose, and metabolites (after eating and drinking) and triggers the nervous system to make appropriate physiological changes. The efferent arm is essential for metabolic regulation, modulation of fibrosis and biliary function and the control of a number of other processes. Experimental models have helped us to establish how: (i) the liver is innervated by the autonomic nervous system; and (ii) the cell types that are involved in these processes. Thus, the liver acts as both a sensor and effector that is influenced by neurological signals and ablation. Understanding these processes hold significant implications in disease processes such as diabetes and obesity, which are influenced by appetite and hormonal signals. PMID:23720325

  5. Differential responses of components of the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S

    2013-01-01

    This chapter conveys several concepts and points of view about the scientific and medical significance of differential alterations in activities of components of the autonomic nervous system in stress and disease. The use of terms such as "the autonomic nervous system," "autonomic failure," "dysautonomia," and "autonomic dysfunction" imply the existence of a single entity; however, the autonomic nervous system has functionally and neurochemically distinctive components, which are reflected in differential responses to stressors and differential involvement in pathophysiologic states. One can conceptualize the autonomic nervous system as having at least five components: the sympathetic noradrenergic system, the sympathetic cholinergic system, the parasympathetic cholinergic system, the sympathetic adrenergic system, and the enteric nervous system. Evidence has accumulated for differential noradrenergic vs. adrenergic responses in various situations. The largest sympathetic adrenergic system responses are seen when the organism encounters stressors that pose a global or metabolic threat. Sympathetic noradrenergic system activation dominates the responses to orthostasis, moderate exercise, and exposure to cold, whereas sympathetic adrenergic system activation dominates those to glucoprivation and emotional distress. There seems to be at least as good a justification for the concept of coordinated adrenocortical-adrenomedullary responses as for coordinated adrenomedullary-sympathoneural responses in stress. Fainting reactions involve differential adrenomedullary hormonal vs. sympathetic noradrenergic activation. Parkinson disease entails relatively selective dysfunction of the sympathetic noradrenergic system, with prominent loss of noradrenergic nerves in the heart, yet normal adrenomedullary function. Allostatic load links stress with degenerative diseases, and Parkinson disease may be a disease of the elderly because of allostatic load. PMID:24095112

  6. Inflammation and cutaneous nervous system involvement in hypertrophic scarring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-hua; Yang, Heng-lian; Xiao, Hu; Wang, Yi-bing; Wang, De-chang; Huo, Ran

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to use a mouse model of hypertrophic scarring by mechanical loading on the dorsum of mice to determine whether the nervous system of the skin and inflammation participates in hypertrophic scarring. Results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that inflammation contributed to the formation of a hypertrophic scar and increased the nerve density in scar tissue.Western blot assay verified that interleukin-13 expression was increased in scar tissue. These findings suggest that inflammation and the cutaneous nervous system play a role in hypertrophic scar formation. PMID:26692869

  7. Role of Neuroactive Steroids in the Peripheral Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo; Giatti, Silvia; Pesaresi, Marzia; Calabrese, Donato; Mitro, Nico; Caruso, Donatella; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Several reviews have so far pointed out on the relevant physiological and pharmacological role exerted by neuroactive steroids in the central nervous system. In the present review we summarize observations indicating that synthesis and metabolism of neuroactive steroids also occur in the peripheral nerves. Interestingly, peripheral nervous system is also a target of their action. Indeed, as here reported neuroactive steroids are physiological regulators of peripheral nerve functions and they may also represent interesting therapeutic tools for different types of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:22654839

  8. Central Nervous System Cancers, Version 2.2014

    PubMed Central

    Nabors, Louis Burt; Portnow, Jana; Ammirati, Mario; Brem, Henry; Brown, Paul; Butowski, Nicholas; Chamberlain, Marc C.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Fenstermaker, Robert A.; Friedman, Allan; Gilbert, Mark R.; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona; Hesser, Deneen; Holdhoff, Matthias; Junck, Larry; Lawson, Ronald; Loeffler, Jay S.; Moots, Paul L.; Mrugala, Maciej M.; Newton, Herbert B.; Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Recht, Lawrence; Shonka, Nicole; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Sills, Allen K.; Swinnen, Lode J.; Tran, David; Tran, Nam; Vrionis, Frank D.; Wen, Patrick Yung; McMillian, Nicole R.; Ho, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Central Nervous System Cancers provide multidisciplinary recommendations for the clinical management of patients with cancers of the central nervous system. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight recent updates regarding the management of metastatic brain tumors using radiation therapy. Use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is no longer limited to patients with 3 or fewer lesions, because data suggest that total disease burden, rather than number of lesions, is predictive of survival benefits associated with the technique. SRS is increasingly becoming an integral part of management of patients with controlled, low-volume brain metastases. PMID:25361798

  9. Brain-computer interface after nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Burns, Alexis; Adeli, Hojjat; Buford, John A

    2014-12-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) has proven to be a useful tool for providing alternative communication and mobility to patients suffering from nervous system injury. BCI has been and will continue to be implemented into rehabilitation practices for more interactive and speedy neurological recovery. The most exciting BCI technology is evolving to provide therapeutic benefits by inducing cortical reorganization via neuronal plasticity. This article presents a state-of-the-art review of BCI technology used after nervous system injuries, specifically: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, and disorders of consciousness. Also presented is transcending, innovative research involving new treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:25193343

  10. Regulation of gene expression in the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Giuffrida Stella, A.M.; Perez-Polo, J.R.; deVellis, J.

    1990-01-01

    This book offers an up-to-date account of the latest research findings concerned with the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression in neuronal and glial cells under different conditions. The book explores the cellular and neurobiological aspects of important phenomena of the nervous system and its role in health, disease and injury. Contributions form prominent scientists in the field address a variety of specific topics concerned with gene expression in the nervous system - from growth, hormonal and trophic factors to neural tissue reactions in injury or aging.

  11. Central nervous system manifestations of Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection.

    PubMed

    Martins, Yuri C; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Kazacos, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Over 20 species of Angiostrongylus have been described from around the world, but only Angiostrongylus cantonensis has been confirmed to cause central nervous system disease in humans. A neurotropic parasite that matures in the pulmonary arteries of rats, A. cantonensis is the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis in southern Asia and the Pacific and Caribbean islands. The parasite can also cause encephalitis/encephalomyelitis and rarely ocular angiostrongyliasis. The present paper reviews the life cycle, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, prevention and prognosis of A. cantonesis infection. Emphasis is given on the spectrum of central nervous system manifestations and disease pathogenesis. PMID:25312338

  12. Central nervous system manifestations of Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Yuri C.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Kazacos, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Over 20 species of Angiostrongylus have been described from around the world, but only Angiostrongylus cantonensis has been confirmed to cause central nervous system disease in humans. A neurotropic parasite that matures in the pulmonary arteries of rats, A. cantonensis is the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis in southern Asia and the Pacific and Caribbean islands. The parasite can also cause encephalitis/encephalomyelitis and rarely ocular angiostrongyliasis. The present paper reviews the life cycle, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, prevention and prognosis of A. cantonesis infection. Emphasis is given on the spectrum of central nervous system manifestations and disease pathogenesis. PMID:25312338

  13. Sympathetic nervous system regulation of the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Green, Paige A.; Sood, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral autonomic nervous system (ANS) is known to regulate gene expression in primary tumours and their surrounding microenvironment. Activation of the sympathetic division of the ANS in particular modulates gene expression programs that promote metastasis of solid tumours by stimulating macrophage infiltration, inflammation, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and tumour invasion, and by inhibiting cellular immune responses and programmed cell death. Haematological cancers are modulated by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) regulation of stem cell biology and hematopoietic differentiation programs. In addition to identifying a molecular basis for physiologic stress effects on cancer, these findings have also identified new pharmacologic strategies to inhibit cancer progression in vivo. PMID:26299593

  14. Infectious diseases of the nervous system: pathogenesis and worldwide impact.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, Ben

    2008-11-01

    The 2008 Infectious Diseases of the Nervous System: Pathogenesis and World Impact conference was held at the Pasteur Institute of Paris, and was the first worldwide conference on neuroinfections. While viral encephalitis and bacterial meningitis are being actively studied in the developed world, much less attention is paid to the often fatal nervous system infections caused by neurotropic viruses, parasites and mycobacteria that represent important health problems in tropical regions. This meeting fostered worldwide interactions between scientists and stimulated the exchange of the latest research results on these neglected neurotropic pathogens. PMID:18988120

  15. Invasive aspergillosis in near drowning nonneutropenic patient

    PubMed Central

    Munta, Kartik; Gopal, Palepu B. N.; Vigg, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis in immunosuppressed people has been well documented, but to diagnose and treat in an immunocompetent individual after near drowning, it requires early suspicion and proper empirical treatment. We report a case diagnosed to have invasive aspergillosis with systemic dissemination of the infection to the brain, gluteal muscles, and kidneys after a fall in a chemical tank of a paper manufacturing company. He was ventilated for acute respiratory distress syndrome and managed with antibiotics and vasopressors. Due to nonresolving pneumonia and positive serum galactomannan, trans-tracheal biopsy was performed which confirmed invasive aspergillosis and was treated with antifungals. With the availability of galactomannan assay and better radiological investigative modalities, occurrence of such invasive fungal infections in cases of drowning patients should be considered early in such patients and treated with appropriate antifungals. PMID:26816451

  16. Modelling of pathologies of the nervous system by the example of computational and electronic models of elementary nervous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shumilov, V. N. Syryamkin, V. I. Syryamkin, M. V.

    2015-11-17

    The paper puts forward principles of action of devices operating similarly to the nervous system and the brain of biological systems. We propose an alternative method of studying diseases of the nervous system, which may significantly influence prevention, medical treatment, or at least retardation of development of these diseases. This alternative is to use computational and electronic models of the nervous system. Within this approach, we represent the brain in the form of a huge electrical circuit composed of active units, namely, neuron-like units and connections between them. As a result, we created computational and electronic models of elementary nervous systems, which are based on the principles of functioning of biological nervous systems that we have put forward. Our models demonstrate reactions to external stimuli and their change similarly to the behavior of simplest biological organisms. The models possess the ability of self-training and retraining in real time without human intervention and switching operation/training modes. In our models, training and memorization take place constantly under the influence of stimuli on the organism. Training is without any interruption and switching operation modes. Training and formation of new reflexes occur by means of formation of new connections between excited neurons, between which formation of connections is physically possible. Connections are formed without external influence. They are formed under the influence of local causes. Connections are formed between outputs and inputs of two neurons, when the difference between output and input potentials of excited neurons exceeds a value sufficient to form a new connection. On these grounds, we suggest that the proposed principles truly reflect mechanisms of functioning of biological nervous systems and the brain. In order to confirm the correspondence of the proposed principles to biological nature, we carry out experiments for the study of processes of

  17. Modelling of pathologies of the nervous system by the example of computational and electronic models of elementary nervous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilov, V. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Syryamkin, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    The paper puts forward principles of action of devices operating similarly to the nervous system and the brain of biological systems. We propose an alternative method of studying diseases of the nervous system, which may significantly influence prevention, medical treatment, or at least retardation of development of these diseases. This alternative is to use computational and electronic models of the nervous system. Within this approach, we represent the brain in the form of a huge electrical circuit composed of active units, namely, neuron-like units and connections between them. As a result, we created computational and electronic models of elementary nervous systems, which are based on the principles of functioning of biological nervous systems that we have put forward. Our models demonstrate reactions to external stimuli and their change similarly to the behavior of simplest biological organisms. The models possess the ability of self-training and retraining in real time without human intervention and switching operation/training modes. In our models, training and memorization take place constantly under the influence of stimuli on the organism. Training is without any interruption and switching operation modes. Training and formation of new reflexes occur by means of formation of new connections between excited neurons, between which formation of connections is physically possible. Connections are formed without external influence. They are formed under the influence of local causes. Connections are formed between outputs and inputs of two neurons, when the difference between output and input potentials of excited neurons exceeds a value sufficient to form a new connection. On these grounds, we suggest that the proposed principles truly reflect mechanisms of functioning of biological nervous systems and the brain. In order to confirm the correspondence of the proposed principles to biological nature, we carry out experiments for the study of processes of

  18. THERMAL INFLUENCES ON NERVOUS SYSTEM FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of cooling and warming on neural function are reviewed. he literature is presented progressively from the subcellular through the cellular level to the neural systems level. emporal measures relevant to membrane activity, action potentials, synaptic transmission and e...

  19. Sympathetic nervous system and inflammation: a conceptual view.

    PubMed

    Jänig, Wilfrid

    2014-05-01

    The peripheral sympathetic nervous system is organized into function-specific pathways that transmit the activity from the central nervous system to its target tissues. The transmission of the impulse activity in the sympathetic ganglia and to the effector tissues is target cell specific and guarantees that the centrally generated command is faithfully transmitted. This is the neurobiological basis of autonomic regulations in which the sympathetic nervous system is involved. Each sympathetic pathway is connected to distinct central circuits in the spinal cord, lower and upper brain stem and hypothalamus. In addition to its conventional functions, the sympathetic nervous system is involved in protection of body tissues against challenges arising from the environment as well as from within the body. This function includes the modulation of inflammation, nociceptors and above all the immune system. Primary and secondary lymphoid organs are innervated by sympathetic postganglionic neurons and processes in the immune tissue are modulated by activity in these sympathetic neurons via adrenoceptors in the membranes of the immune cells (see Bellinger and Lorton, 2014). Are the primary and secondary lymphoid organs innervated by a functionally specific sympathetic pathway that is responsible for the modulation of the functioning of the immune tissue by the brain? Or is this modulation of immune functions a general function of the sympathetic nervous system independent of its specific functions? Which central circuits are involved in the neural regulation of the immune system in the context of neural regulation of body protection? What is the function of the sympatho-adrenal system, involving epinephrine, in the modulation of immune functions? PMID:24525016

  20. Neural Circuit Recording from an Intact Cockroach Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Titlow, Josh S.; Majeed, Zana R.; Hartman, H. Bernard; Burns, Ellen; Cooper, Robin L.

    2013-01-01

    The cockroach ventral nerve cord preparation is a tractable system for neuroethology experiments, neural network modeling, and testing the physiological effects of insecticides. This article describes the scope of cockroach sensory modalities that can be used to assay how an insect nervous system responds to environmental perturbations. Emphasis here is on the escape behavior mediated by cerci to giant fiber transmission in Periplaneta americana. This in situ preparation requires only moderate dissecting skill and electrophysiological expertise to generate reproducible recordings of neuronal activity. Peptides or other chemical reagents can then be applied directly to the nervous system in solution with the physiological saline. Insecticides could also be administered prior to dissection and the escape circuit can serve as a proxy for the excitable state of the central nervous system. In this context the assays described herein would also be useful to researchers interested in limb regeneration and the evolution of nervous system development for which P. americana is an established model organism. PMID:24300738

  1. Radiation Damage to the Nervous System: a delayed therapeutic hazard

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.A.; Kagan, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    This volume represents a good overview of an important issue - late effects of radiation on the nervous system, a topic of interest to everybody who deals with neurooncologic problems. The book is well edited and includes almost all relevant subjects ranging from diagnostic and dosimetric considerations to treatment of radiation brain necrosis.

  2. THE SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM ALTERATIONS IN HUMAN HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Guido; Mark, Allyn; Esler, Murray

    2015-01-01

    A number of articles have dealt with the importance and mechanisms of the sympathetic nervous system alterations in experimental animal models of hypertension. This review addresses the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology and therapy of human hypertension. We first discuss the strengths and limitations of various techniques for assessing the sympathetic nervous system in humans, with a focus on heart rate, plasma norepinephrine, microneurographic recording of sympathetic nerve traffic, and measurements of radiolabeled norepinephrine spillover. We then examine the evidence supporting the importance of neuroadrenergic factors as “promoters” and “amplifiers” of human hypertension. We expand on the role of the sympathetic nervous system in two increasingly common forms of secondary hypertension, namely hypertension associated with obesity and with renal disease. With this background, we examine interventions of sympathetic deactivation as a mode of antihypertensive treatment. Particular emphasis is given to the background and results of recent therapeutic approaches based on carotid baroreceptor stimulation and radiofrequency ablation of the renal nerves. PMID:25767284

  3. The sympathetic nervous system alterations in human hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Guido; Mark, Allyn; Esler, Murray

    2015-03-13

    Several articles have dealt with the importance and mechanisms of the sympathetic nervous system alterations in experimental animal models of hypertension. This review addresses the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology and therapy of human hypertension. We first discuss the strengths and limitations of various techniques for assessing the sympathetic nervous system in humans, with a focus on heart rate, plasma norepinephrine, microneurographic recording of sympathetic nerve traffic, and measurements of radiolabeled norepinephrine spillover. We then examine the evidence supporting the importance of neuroadrenergic factors as promoters and amplifiers of human hypertension. We expand on the role of the sympathetic nervous system in 2 increasingly common forms of secondary hypertension, namely hypertension associated with obesity and with renal disease. With this background, we examine interventions of sympathetic deactivation as a mode of antihypertensive treatment. Particular emphasis is given to the background and results of recent therapeutic approaches based on carotid baroreceptor stimulation and radiofrequency ablation of the renal nerves. PMID:25767284

  4. The Role of Central Nervous System Plasticity in Tinnitus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, James C.

    2007-01-01

    Tinnitus is a vexing disorder of hearing characterized by sound sensations originating in the head without any external stimulation. The specific etiology of these sensations is uncertain but frequently associated with hearing loss. The "neurophysiogical" model of tinnitus has enhanced appreciation of central nervous system (CNS) contributions.…

  5. School Reentry for Children with Acquired Central Nervous Systems Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Joan; Porter, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Onset of acquired central nervous system (CNS) injury during the normal developmental process of childhood can have impact on cognitive, behavioral, and motor function. This alteration of function often necessitates special education programming, modifications, and accommodations in the education setting for successful school reentry. Special…

  6. Homology and Convergence in Vertebrate and Invertebrate Nervous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeman, David

    Each year the meeting of the American Neuroscience Society attracts over 20,000 members, reflecting the explosion of interest in this field that has occurred over the past few decades. Researchers from many disciplines are focusing their skills on the investigation of every aspect of nervous systems, and neuroscience now encompasses the entire range of endeavour from the study of the single molecules that make up neural membranes to the non-invasive observation of neural function in animals behaving in their natural environments. Advances over the past three decades in our understanding of nervous systems are impressive and come from a multifaceted approach to the study of both vertebrate and invertebrate animals. An almost unexpected by-product of the parallel investigation of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems that is explored in this article is the emergent view of an intricate web of evolutionary homology and convergence exhibited in the structure and function of the nervous systems of these two large, paraphyletic groups of animals.

  7. The Nervous System, Science (Experimental): 5363.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Alan; And Others

    This unit of instruction was designed as an intensive in-depth study of the nervous impulse, neurons, brain, spinal cord, and sensory organs. Also included is a study of the endocrine system in its role of maintaining homeostasis. The booklet lists the relevant state-adopted texts and states the performance objectives for the unit. It provides an…

  8. The nervous and the immune systems: conspicuous physiological analogies.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Julio

    2015-02-01

    From all biological constituents of complex organisms, two are highly sophisticated: the nervous and the immune systems. Interestingly, their goals and processes appear to be distant from each other; however, their physiological mechanisms keep notorious similarities. Both construct intelligence, learn from experience, and keep memory. Their precise responses to innumerable stimuli are delicately modulated, and the exposure of the individual to thousands of potential challenges integrates their functionality; they use a large part of their constituents not in excitatory activities but in the maintenance of inhibitory mechanisms to keep silent vast intrinsic potentialities. The nervous and immune systems are integrated by a basic cell lineage (neurons and lymphocytes, respectively) but each embodies countless cell subgroups with different and specialized deeds which, in contrast with cells from other organs, labyrinthine molecular arrangements conduct to "one cell, one function". Also, nervous and immune actions confer identity that differentiates every individual from countless others in the same species. Both systems regulate and potentiate their responses aided by countless biological resources of variable intensity: hormones, peptides, cytokines, pro-inflammatory molecules, etc. How the immune and the nervous systems buildup memory, learning capability, and exquisite control of excitatory/inhibitory mechanisms constitute major intellectual challenges for contemporary research. PMID:25398574

  9. Brain Facts: A Primer on the Brain and Nervous System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Joseph, Ed.

    This booklet describes only a glimpse of what is known about the nervous system, brain disorders, and the exciting avenues of research that promise new therapies for many of the most devastating neurological and psychiatric diseases. The neuron, brain development, sensation and perception, learning and memory, movement, advances and challenges in…

  10. Parasitic Central Nervous System Infections in Immunocompromised Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Melanie; Zunt, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Immunosuppression due to therapy after transplantation or associated with HIV infection increases susceptibility to various central nervous system (CNS) infections. This article discusses how immunosuppression modifies the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of selected parasitic CNS infections, with a focus on toxoplasmosis, Chagas disease, neurocysticercosis, schistosomiasis, and strongyloidiasis. PMID:15824993

  11. Central nervous system blastomycosis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Gaunt, M. Casey; Taylor, Susan M.; Kerr, Moira E.

    2009-01-01

    An adult golden retriever was presented for progressive neurologic dysfunction. Clinical examination suggested brainstem disease. Blastomycosis was diagnosed based on fine-needle aspiration cytology of a normal sized lymph node and a positive blastomycosis urine antigen test. Systemic blastomycosis with neurologic involvement was confirmed at necropsy. PMID:19949557

  12. The Nervous Systems of Basally Branching Nemertea (Palaeonemertea)

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Patrick; Loesel, Rudi; Bartolomaeus, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a lot of studies have been published dealing with the anatomy of the nervous system in different spiralian species. The only nemertean species investigated in this context probably shows derived characters and thus the conditions found there are not useful in inferring the relationship between nemerteans and other spiralian taxa. Ingroup relationships within Nemertea are still unclear, but there is some agreement that the palaeonemerteans form a basal, paraphyletic grade. Thus, palaeonemertean species are likely the most informative when comparing with other invertebrate groups. We therefore analyzed the nervous system of several palaeonemertean species by combining histology and immunostaining. 3D reconstructions based on the aligned slices were performed to get an overall impression of the central nervous system, and immunohistochemistry was chosen to reveal fine structures and to be able to compare the data with recently published results. The insights presented here permit a first attempt to reconstruct the primary organization of the nemertean nervous system. This comparative analysis allows substantiating homology hypotheses for nerves of the peripheral nervous system. This study also provides evidence that the nemertean brain primarily consists of two lobes connected by a strong ventral commissure and one to several dorsal commissures. During nemertean evolution, the brain underwent continuous compartmentalization into a pair of dorsal and ventral lobes interconnected by commissures and lateral tracts. Given that this conclusion can be corroborated by cladistic analyses, nemerteans should share a common ancestor with spiralians that primarily have a simple brain consisting of paired medullary, frontally commissurized and reinforced cords. Such an organization resembles the situation found in presumably basally branching annelids or mollusks. PMID:23785478

  13. The nervous systems of basally branching nemertea (palaeonemertea).

    PubMed

    Beckers, Patrick; Loesel, Rudi; Bartolomaeus, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a lot of studies have been published dealing with the anatomy of the nervous system in different spiralian species. The only nemertean species investigated in this context probably shows derived characters and thus the conditions found there are not useful in inferring the relationship between nemerteans and other spiralian taxa. Ingroup relationships within Nemertea are still unclear, but there is some agreement that the palaeonemerteans form a basal, paraphyletic grade. Thus, palaeonemertean species are likely the most informative when comparing with other invertebrate groups. We therefore analyzed the nervous system of several palaeonemertean species by combining histology and immunostaining. 3D reconstructions based on the aligned slices were performed to get an overall impression of the central nervous system, and immunohistochemistry was chosen to reveal fine structures and to be able to compare the data with recently published results. The insights presented here permit a first attempt to reconstruct the primary organization of the nemertean nervous system. This comparative analysis allows substantiating homology hypotheses for nerves of the peripheral nervous system. This study also provides evidence that the nemertean brain primarily consists of two lobes connected by a strong ventral commissure and one to several dorsal commissures. During nemertean evolution, the brain underwent continuous compartmentalization into a pair of dorsal and ventral lobes interconnected by commissures and lateral tracts. Given that this conclusion can be corroborated by cladistic analyses, nemerteans should share a common ancestor with spiralians that primarily have a simple brain consisting of paired medullary, frontally commissurized and reinforced cords. Such an organization resembles the situation found in presumably basally branching annelids or mollusks. PMID:23785478

  14. Itch signaling in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Jeffry, Joseph; Kim, Seungil; Chen, Zhou-Feng

    2011-08-01

    Itch is a major somatic sensation, along with pain, temperature, and touch, detected and relayed by the somatosensory system. Itch can be an acute sensation, associated with mosquito bite, or a chronic condition, like atopic dermatitis (29, 59). The origins of the stimulus can be localized in the periphery or systemic, and associated with organ failure or cancer. Itch is also a perception originating in the brain. Itch is broadly characterized as either histamine-dependent (histaminergic) or histamine-independent (nonhistaminergic), both of which are relayed by subsets of C fibers and by the second-order neurons expressing gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and spinothalamic track (STT) neurons in the spinal cord of rodents. Historically, itch research has been primarily limited to clinical and psychophysical studies and to histamine-mediated mechanisms. In contrast, little is known about the signaling mechanisms underlying nonhistaminergic itch, despite the fact that the majority of chronic itch are mediated by nonhistaminergic mechanisms. During the past few years, important progress has been made in understanding the molecular signaling of itch, largely due to the introduction of mouse genetics. In this review, we examine some of the molecular mechanisms underlying itch sensation with an emphasis on recent studies in rodents. PMID:21841076

  15. Itch Signaling in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Jeffry, Joseph; Kim, Seungil; Chen, Zhou-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Itch is a major somatic sensation, along with pain, temperature and touch, detected and relayed by the somatosensory system. Itch can be an acute sensation, associated with mosquito bite, or a chronic condition, like atopic dermatitis (29, 59). The origins of the stimulus can be localized in the periphery or systemic, and associated with organ failure or cancer. Itch is also a perception originating in the brain. Itch is broadly characterized as either histamine-dependent (histaminergic) or histamine-independent (nonhistaminergic), both of which are relayed by subsets of C-fibers, and by the second-order neurons expressing gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and spinothalamic track (STT) neurons in the spinal cord of rodents. Historically, itch research has been primarily limited to clinical and psychophysical studies, and to histamine-mediated mechanisms. In contrast, little is known about signaling mechanisms underlying nonhistaminergic itch, despite the fact that the majority of chronic itch are mediated by nonhistaminergic mechanisms. During the past few years, important progress has been made in understanding of molecular signaling of itch, largely due to the introduction of mouse genetics. In this review, we examine some of molecular mechanisms underlying itch sensation with an emphasis on recent studies in rodents. PMID:21841076

  16. Heterotopic ossification after central nervous system trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M. P.; Torres, S. J.; Mehta, S.; Ahn, J.

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) is a disorder of aberrant bone formation affecting one in five patients sustaining a spinal cord injury or traumatic brain injury. Ectopic bone forms around joints in characteristic patterns, causing pain and limiting movement especially around the hip and elbow. Clinical sequelae of neurogenic heterotopic ossification include urinary tract infection, pressure injuries, pneumonia and poor hygiene, making early diagnosis and treatment clinically compelling. However, diagnosis remains difficult with more investigation needed. Our pathophysiological understanding stems from mechanisms of basic bone formation enhanced by evidence of systemic influences from circulating humor factors and perhaps neurological ones. This increasing understanding guides our implementation of current prophylaxis and treatment including the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, bisphosphonates, radiation therapy and surgery and, importantly, should direct future, more effective ones. PMID:23610702

  17. Temporal Encoding in a Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Aldworth, Zane N.; Dimitrov, Alexander G.; Cummins, Graham I.; Gedeon, Tomáš; Miller, John P.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the extent to which temporal encoding may be implemented by single neurons in the cercal sensory system of the house cricket Acheta domesticus. We found that these neurons exhibit a greater-than-expected coding capacity, due in part to an increased precision in brief patterns of action potentials. We developed linear and non-linear models for decoding the activity of these neurons. We found that the stimuli associated with short-interval patterns of spikes (ISIs of 8 ms or less) could be predicted better by second-order models as compared to linear models. Finally, we characterized the difference between these linear and second-order models in a low-dimensional subspace, and showed that modification of the linear models along only a few dimensions improved their predictive power to parity with the second order models. Together these results show that single neurons are capable of using temporal patterns of spikes as fundamental symbols in their neural code, and that they communicate specific stimulus distributions to subsequent neural structures. PMID:21573206

  18. Pathology of the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fernandez; Marchese; Palma; Lauretti; Procaccini; Pallini

    1999-01-26

    In this review, the first four papers deal with an important chapter in peripheral nerve surgery: cranial nerve reconstruction after injury occurring during skull base surgery. The last paper discusses the problem of peripheral nerves affected by a ganglion cyst. Damage to a cranial nerve is no longer considered to be an absolutely irreparable event. The first two studies are related to facial nerve management during the surgical treatment of vestibular schwannomas. The most common mechanisms responsible for facial nerve injury during tumor removal and the technical means to avoid them are cited. The importance of intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring to save the facial nerve is stressed. A comparison between microsurgery and radiosurgery results in the conclusion that for vestibular schwannomas, the first choice of treatment is microsurgery. These two large and exceptional series show that by using a refined technique it is possible to obtain both total tumor removal and preservation of the facial nerve in most of the vestibular schwannomas. In the minority of patients in whom the facial nerve is severed, there are several therapeutic options to re-establish facial nerve function. After facial nerve reconstruction, performed immediately during the same tumor operation, a satisfactory reinnervation was obtained in 74% of the cases. After facial nerve reanimation, using as donor nerve the hypoglossus and performed 1 week after the tumor operation, a satisfactory reinnervation was obtained in 96% of the cases. The other two papers deal with the intraoperative transection of the trochlear and abducens nerve during surgery for skull base tumors. These two cranial nerves, owing to their simply organized motor nerve system (they are purely motor nerves and supply one muscle each), show quite a good expectation of functional recovery. The behavior of ganglion cysts involving peripheral nerves is the topic of the last paper reviewed. These cysts are benign lesions

  19. Molecular clocks and the early evolution of metazoan nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Wray, Gregory A

    2015-12-19

    The timing of early animal evolution remains poorly resolved, yet remains critical for understanding nervous system evolution. Methods for estimating divergence times from sequence data have improved considerably, providing a more refined understanding of key divergences. The best molecular estimates point to the origin of metazoans and bilaterians tens to hundreds of millions of years earlier than their first appearances in the fossil record. Both the molecular and fossil records are compatible, however, with the possibility of tiny, unskeletonized, low energy budget animals during the Proterozoic that had planktonic, benthic, or meiofaunal lifestyles. Such animals would likely have had relatively simple nervous systems equipped primarily to detect food, avoid inhospitable environments and locate mates. The appearance of the first macropredators during the Cambrian would have changed the selective landscape dramatically, likely driving the evolution of complex sense organs, sophisticated sensory processing systems, and diverse effector systems involved in capturing prey and avoiding predation. PMID:26554040

  20. Molecular mechanisms regulating myelination in the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jorge A; Lebrun-Julien, Frédéric; Suter, Ueli

    2012-02-01

    Glial cells and neurons are engaged in a continuous and highly regulated bidirectional dialog. A remarkable example is the control of myelination. Oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) and Schwann cells (SCs) in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) wrap their plasma membranes around axons to organize myelinated nerve fibers that allow rapid saltatory conduction. The functionality of this system is critical, as revealed by numerous neurological diseases that result from deregulation of the system, including multiple sclerosis and peripheral neuropathies. In this review we focus on PNS myelination and present a conceptual framework that integrates crucial signaling mechanisms with basic SC biology. We will highlight signaling hubs and overarching molecular mechanisms, including genetic, epigenetic, and post-translational controls, which together regulate the interplay between SCs and axons, extracellular signals, and the transcriptional network. PMID:22192173

  1. Quest for the basic plan of nervous system circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Larry W.

    2007-01-01

    The basic plan of nervous system organization has been investigated since classical antiquity. The first model centered on pneumas pumped from sensory nerves through the ventricular system and out motor nerves to muscles. It was popular well into the seventeenth century and diverted attention from the organization of brain parenchyma itself. Willis focused on gray matter production and white matter conduction of pneumas in 1664, and by the late nineteenth century a clear cellular model of nervous system organization based on sensory, motor, and association neuron classes transmitting nerve impulses was elaborated by Cajal and his contemporaries. Today, revolutionary advances in experimental pathway tracing methods, molecular genetics, and computer science inspire systems neuroscience. Seven minimal requirements are outlined for knowledge management systems capable of describing, analyzing, and modeling the basic plan of nervous system circuitry in general, and the plan evolved for vertebrates, for mammals, and ultimately for humans in particular. The goal remains a relatively simple, easy to understand model analogous to the one Harvey elaborated in 1628 for circulation in the cardiovascular system. As Cajal wrote in 1909, “To extend our understanding of neural function to the most complex human physiological and psychological activities, it is essential that we first generate a clear and accurate view of the structure of the relevant centers, and of the human brain itself, so that the basic plan—the overview—can be grasped in the blink of an eye.” PMID:17267046

  2. [VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS AND DISEASES OF CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM VESSELS].

    PubMed

    Kazanova, A S; Lavrov, V F; Zverev, V V

    2015-01-01

    Systemized data on epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, diagnostics and therapy of VZV-vasculopathy--a disease, occurring due to damage of arteries of the central nervous system by Varicella Zoster virus, are presented in the review. A special attention in the paper is given to the effect of vaccine prophylaxis of chicken pox and herpes zoster on the frequency of development and course of VZV-vasculopathy. PMID:26259280

  3. Functional structure and dynamics of the human nervous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The status of an effort to define the directions needed to take in extending pilot models is reported. These models are needed to perform closed-loop (man-in-the-loop) feedback flight control system designs and to develop cockpit display requirements. The approach taken is to develop a hypothetical working model of the human nervous system by reviewing the current literature in neurology and psychology and to develop a computer model of this hypothetical working model.

  4. Regulation of sympathetic nervous system function after cardiovascular deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasser, E. M.; Moffitt, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans subjected to prolonged periods of bed rest or microgravity undergo deconditioning of the cardiovascular system, characterized by resting tachycardia, reduced exercise capability, and a predisposition for orthostatic intolerance. These changes in cardiovascular function are likely due to a combination of factors, including changes in control of body fluid balance or cardiac alterations resulting in inadequate maintenance of stroke volume, altered arterial or venous vascular function, reduced activation of cardiovascular hormones, and diminished autonomic reflex function. There is evidence indicating a role for each of these mechanisms. Diminished reflex activation of the sympathetic nervous system and subsequent vasoconstriction appear to play an important role. Studies utilizing the hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rat, an animal model of deconditioning, evaluated the potential role of altered arterial baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system. These studies indicate that HU results in blunted baroreflex-mediated activation of both renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in response to a hypotensive stimulus. HU rats are less able to maintain arterial pressure during hemorrhage, suggesting that diminished ability to increase sympathetic activity has functional consequences for the animal. Reflex control of vasopressin secretion appears to be enhanced following HU. Blunted baroreflex-mediated sympathoexcitation appears to involve altered central nervous system function. Baroreceptor afferent activity in response to changes in arterial pressure is unaltered in HU rats. However, increases in efferent sympathetic nerve activity for a given decrease in afferent input are blunted after HU. This altered central nervous system processing of baroreceptor inputs appears to involve an effect at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Specifically, it appears that tonic GABAA-mediated inhibition of the RVLM is enhanced after HU. Augmented inhibition apparently

  5. Introduction to 'Homology and convergence in nervous system evolution'.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hirth, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The origin of brains and central nervous systems (CNSs) is thought to have occurred before the Palaeozoic era 540 Ma. Yet in the absence of tangible evidence, there has been continued debate whether today's brains and nervous systems derive from one ancestral origin or whether similarities among them are due to convergent evolution. With the advent of molecular developmental genetics and genomics, it has become clear that homology is a concept that applies not only to morphologies, but also to genes, developmental processes, as well as to behaviours. Comparative studies in phyla ranging from annelids and arthropods to mammals are providing evidence that corresponding developmental genetic mechanisms act not only in dorso-ventral and anterior-posterior axis specification but also in segmentation, neurogenesis, axogenesis and eye/photoreceptor cell formation that appear to be conserved throughout the animal kingdom. These data are supported by recent studies which identified Mid-Cambrian fossils with preserved soft body parts that present segmental arrangements in brains typical of modern arthropods, and similarly organized brain centres and circuits across phyla that may reflect genealogical correspondence and control similar behavioural manifestations. Moreover, congruence between genetic and geological fossil records support the notion that by the 'Cambrian explosion' arthropods and chordates shared similarities in brain and nervous system organization. However, these similarities are strikingly absent in several sister- and outgroups of arthropods and chordates which raises several questions, foremost among them: what kind of natural laws and mechanisms underlie the convergent evolution of such similarities? And, vice versa: what are the selection pressures and genetic mechanisms underlying the possible loss or reduction of brains and CNSs in multiple lineages during the course of evolution? These questions were addressed at a Royal Society meeting to discuss

  6. Mesoscopic organization reveals the constraints governing Caenorhabditis elegans nervous system.

    PubMed

    Pan, Raj Kumar; Chatterjee, Nivedita; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2010-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in biology is to understand how activity at the cellular level of neurons, as a result of their mutual interactions, leads to the observed behavior of an organism responding to a variety of environmental stimuli. Investigating the intermediate or mesoscopic level of organization in the nervous system is a vital step towards understanding how the integration of micro-level dynamics results in macro-level functioning. The coordination of many different co-occurring processes at this level underlies the command and control of overall network activity. In this paper, we have considered the somatic nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, for which the entire neuronal connectivity diagram is known. We focus on the organization of the system into modules, i.e., neuronal groups having relatively higher connection density compared to that of the overall network. We show that this mesoscopic feature cannot be explained exclusively in terms of considerations such as, optimizing for resource constraints (viz., total wiring cost) and communication efficiency (i.e., network path length). Even including information about the genetic relatedness of the cells cannot account for the observed modular structure. Comparison with other complex networks designed for efficient transport (of signals or resources) implies that neuronal networks form a distinct class. This suggests that the principal function of the network, viz., processing of sensory information resulting in appropriate motor response, may be playing a vital role in determining the connection topology. Using modular spectral analysis we make explicit the intimate relation between function and structure in the nervous system. This is further brought out by identifying functionally critical neurons purely on the basis of patterns of intra- and inter-modular connections. Our study reveals how the design of the nervous system reflects several constraints, including its key

  7. The nervous system of Xenacoelomorpha: a genomic perspective.

    PubMed

    Perea-Atienza, Elena; Gavilán, Brenda; Chiodin, Marta; Abril, Josep F; Hoff, Katharina J; Poustka, Albert J; Martinez, Pedro

    2015-02-15

    Xenacoelomorpha is, most probably, a monophyletic group that includes three clades: Acoela, Nemertodermatida and Xenoturbellida. The group still has contentious phylogenetic affinities; though most authors place it as the sister group of the remaining bilaterians, some would include it as a fourth phylum within the Deuterostomia. Over the past few years, our group, along with others, has undertaken a systematic study of the microscopic anatomy of these worms; our main aim is to understand the structure and development of the nervous system. This research plan has been aided by the use of molecular/developmental tools, the most important of which has been the sequencing of the complete genomes and transcriptomes of different members of the three clades. The data obtained has been used to analyse the evolutionary history of gene families and to study their expression patterns during development, in both space and time. A major focus of our research is the origin of 'cephalized' (centralized) nervous systems. How complex brains are assembled from simpler neuronal arrays has been a matter of intense debate for at least 100 years. We are now tackling this issue using Xenacoelomorpha models. These represent an ideal system for this work because the members of the three clades have nervous systems with different degrees of cephalization; from the relatively simple sub-epithelial net of Xenoturbella to the compact brain of acoels. How this process of 'progressive' cephalization is reflected in the genomes or transcriptomes of these three groups of animals is the subject of this paper. PMID:25696825

  8. Neurotropic Enterovirus Infections in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsing-I; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses are a group of positive-sense single stranded viruses that belong to the Picornaviridae family. Most enteroviruses infect humans from the gastrointestinal tract and cause mild symptoms. However, several enteroviruses can invade the central nervous system (CNS) and result in various neurological symptoms that are correlated to mortality associated with enteroviral infections. In recent years, large outbreaks of enteroviruses occurred worldwide. Therefore, these neurotropic enteroviruses have been deemed as re-emerging pathogens. Although these viruses are becoming large threats to public health, our understanding of these viruses, especially for non-polio enteroviruses, is limited. In this article, we review recent advances in the trafficking of these pathogens from the peripheral to the central nervous system, compare their cell tropism, and discuss the effects of viral infections in their host neuronal cells. PMID:26610549

  9. [The role of metalloprotease in pathogenesis of nervous system diseases].

    PubMed

    Mirowska, D; Członkowska, A

    2001-01-01

    Matrix Metalloproteases (MMPs) comprise a big family of proteolytic enzymes secreted into extracellular matrix and involved in remodelling of many tissues. The MMPs' activity is regulated on many levels. It is also determined by specific inhibitors known as tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases (TIMPs). Several studies revealed that MMPs have a role not only in physiological processes but also in pathophysiology of nervous system diseases, such as multiplex sclerosis, Guillan-Barré syndrome and strokes. Concerning demyelination MMPs are responsible for degradation of myelin components and facilitation of immune cells migration into inflammatory sites by degrading vascular basement membrane. We still investigate substances with positive clinical effect on the nervous system diseases due to MMPs inactivation. PMID:11464705

  10. Central nervous system infection in the pediatric population

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Rabi Narayan; Kumar, Raj; Mahapatra, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    Infection of the central nervous system is a life-threatening condition in the pediatric population. Almost all agents can cause infection within the central nervous system and the extent of infection ranges from diffuse involvement of the meninges, brain, or the spinal cord to localized involvement presenting as a space-occupying lesion. Modern imaging techniques define the anatomic region infected, the evolution of the disease, and help in better management of these patients. Acute bacterial meningitis remains a major cause of mortality and long-term neurological disability. Fortunately, the incidence of infection after clean craniotomy is < 5%, but it leads to significant morbidity as well as fiscal loss. The most significant causative factor in postcraniotomy infections is postoperative CSF leak. Cerebral abscess related to organic congenital heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population. The administration of prophylactic antibiotics is indicated for contaminated and clean-contaminated wounds. PMID:21887170

  11. Oxidation of ion channels in the aging nervous system.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rahul; Sesti, Federico

    2016-05-15

    Ion channels are integral membrane proteins that allow passive diffusion of ions across membranes. In neurons and in other excitable cells, the harmonious coordination between the numerous types of ion channels shape and propagate electrical signals. Increased accumulation of reactive oxidative species (ROS), and subsequent oxidation of proteins, including ion channels, is a hallmark feature of aging and may contribute to cell failure as a result. In this review we discuss the effects of ROS on three major types of ion channels of the central nervous system, namely the potassium (K(+)), calcium (Ca(2+)) and sodium (Na(+)) channels. We examine two general mechanisms through which ROS affect ion channels: via direct oxidation of specific residues and via indirect interference of pathways that regulate the channels. The overall status of the present studies indicates that the interaction of ion channels with ROS is multimodal and pervasive in the central nervous system and likely constitutes a general mechanism of aging susceptibility. PMID:26947620

  12. Nanoneuromedicines for Degenerative, Inflammatory, and Infectious Nervous System Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gendelman, Howard E.; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Bronich, Tatiana; Ghaisas, Shivani; Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Liu, Xinming; McMillan, JoEllyn; Mosley, R. Lee; Narasimhan, Balaji; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in nanoneuromedicine has grown rapidly due to the immediate need for improved biomarkers and therapies for psychiatric, developmental, traumatic, inflammatory, infectious and degenerative nervous system disorders. These, in whole or in part, are a significant societal burden due to growth in numbers of affected people and in disease severity. Lost productivity of the patient and his or her caregiver, and the emotional and financial burden cannot be overstated. The need for improved health care, treatment and diagnostics are immediate. A means to such an end is nanotechnology. Indeed, recent developments of health-care enabling nanotechnologies and nanomedicines range from biomarker discovery including neuroimaging to therapeutic applications for degenerative, inflammatory and infectious disorders of the nervous system. This review focuses on the current and future potential of the field to positively affect clinical outcomes. PMID:25645958

  13. Fiber optic in vivo imaging in the mammalian nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Amit D; Jung, Juergen C; Flusberg, Benjamin A; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    The compact size, mechanical flexibility, and growing functionality of optical fiber and fiber optic devices are enabling several new modalities for imaging the mammalian nervous system in vivo. Fluorescence microendoscopy is a minimally invasive fiber modality that provides cellular resolution in deep brain areas. Diffuse optical tomography is a non-invasive modality that uses assemblies of fiber optic emitters and detectors on the cranium for volumetric imaging of brain activation. Optical coherence tomography is a sensitive interferometric imaging technique that can be implemented in a variety of fiber based formats and that might allow intrinsic optical detection of brain activity at a high resolution. Miniaturized fiber optic microscopy permits cellular level imaging in the brains of behaving animals. Together, these modalities will enable new uses of imaging in the intact nervous system for both research and clinical applications. PMID:15464896

  14. Regulation of cadherin expression in nervous system development

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Alicia F; Prasad, Maneeshi S; Thuringer, Amanda Henke; Manzerra, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for classical cadherin expression during development of the vertebrate nervous system. The complexity of the spatial and temporal expression patterns is linked to morphogenic and functional roles in the developing nervous system. While the regulatory networks controlling cadherin expression are not well understood, it is likely that the multiple signaling pathways active in the development of particular domains also regulate the specific cadherins expressed at that time and location. With the growing understanding of the broader roles of cadherins in cell–cell adhesion and non-adhesion processes, it is important to understand both the upstream regulation of cadherin expression and the downstream effects of specific cadherins within their cellular context. PMID:24526207

  15. Measurement of autophagy flux in the nervous system in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, K; Valenzuela, V; Matus, S; Nassif, M; Oñate, M; Fuentealba, Y; Encina, G; Irrazabal, T; Parsons, G; Court, F A; Schneider, B L; Armentano, D; Hetz, C

    2013-01-01

    Accurate methods to measure autophagic activity in vivo in neurons are not available, and most of the studies are based on correlative and static measurements of autophagy markers, leading to conflicting interpretations. Autophagy is an essential homeostatic process involved in the degradation of diverse cellular components including organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy impairment is emerging as a relevant factor driving neurodegeneration in many diseases. Moreover, strategies to modulate autophagy have been shown to provide protection against neurodegeneration. Here we describe a novel and simple strategy to express an autophagy flux reporter in the nervous system of adult animals by the intraventricular delivery of adeno-associated viruses (AAV) into newborn mice. Using this approach we efficiently expressed a monomeric tandem mCherry-GFP-LC3 construct in neurons of the peripheral and central nervous system, allowing the measurement of autophagy activity in pharmacological and disease settings. PMID:24232093

  16. [Molecular physiology of glycine receptors in nervous system of vertebrates].

    PubMed

    2014-03-01

    Glycine receptor is the anion-selective channel, providing fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system of vertebrates. Together with the nicotinic acetylcholine, GABA and serotonin (5-HT3R) receptors, it belongs to the superfamily of pentameric cys-loop receptors. It has been cloned one beta and four alpha subunits of glycine receptor, which are specifically distributed in different areas of the nervous system. Due to their specific molecular properties and distribution, different subunits ensure important physiological functions: from control of motor activity and regulation of neuronal differentiation to sensory information processing and modulation of pain sensitivity. In this review we briefly describe main functions of these transmembrane proteins, their distribution and molecular architecture. Special attention is paid to recent studies on the molecular physiology of these receptors, as well as on presenting of molecular domains responsible for their modulation and dysfunction. PMID:25508361

  17. [Molecular physiology of glycine receptors in nervous system of vertebrates].

    PubMed

    Maleeva, G V; Brezhestovskiĭ, P D

    2014-03-01

    Glycine receptor is the anion-selective channel, providing fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system of vertebrates. Together with the nicotinic acetylcholine, GABA and serotonin (5-HT3R) receptors, it belongs to the superfamily of pentameric cys-loop receptors. It has been cloned one beta and four alpha subunits of glycine receptor, which are specifically distributed in different areas of the nervous system. Due to their specific molecular properties and distribution, different subunits ensure important physiological functions: from control of motor activity and regulation of neuronal differentiation to sensory information processing and modulation of pain sensitivity. In this review we briefly describe main functions of these transmembrane proteins, their distribution and molecular architecture. Special attention is paid to recent studies on the molecular physiology of these receptors, as well as on presenting of molecular domains responsible for their modulation and dysfunction. PMID:25464730

  18. Eph-ephrin signaling in nervous system development

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Karina S.; Miko, Ilona J.

    2016-01-01

    Ephrins and Eph receptors enable contact-mediated interactions between cells at every stage of nervous system development. In spite of their broad binding affinities, Eph proteins facilitate specificity in neuronal migration and axon targeting. This review focuses on recent studies that demonstrate how these proteins interact with each other, and with other signaling pathways, to guide specificity in a diverse set of developmental processes. PMID:27092247

  19. N-glycosylation in Regulation of the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Hilary; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Protein N-glycosylation can influence the nervous system in a variety of ways by affecting functions of glycoproteins involved in nervous system development and physiology. The importance of N-glycans for different aspects of neural development has been well documented. For example, some N-linked carbohydrate structures were found to play key roles in neural cell adhesion and axonal targeting during development. At the same time, the involvement of glycosylation in the regulation of neural physiology remains less understood. Recent studies have implicated N-glycosylation in the regulation of neural transmission, revealing novel roles of glycans in synaptic processes and the control of neural excitability. N-Glycans were found to markedly affect the function of several types of synaptic proteins involved in key steps of synaptic transmission, including neurotransmitter release, reception and uptake. Glycosylation also regulates a number of channel proteins, such as TRP channels that control responses to environmental stimuli and voltage-gated ion channels, the principal determinants of neuronal excitability. Sialylated carbohydrate structures play a particularly prominent part in the modulation of voltage gated ion channels. Sialic acids appear to affect channel functions via several mechanisms, including charge interactions, as well as other interactions that probably engage steric effects and interactions with other molecules. Experiments also indicated that some structural features of glycans can be particularly important for their function. Since glycan structures can vary significantly between different cell types and depends on the metabolic state of the cell, it is important to analyze glycan functions using in vivo approaches. While the complexity of the nervous system and intricacies of glycosylation pathways can create serious obstacles for in vivo experiments in vertebrates, recent studies have indicated that more simple and experimentally

  20. The central nervous system in childhood chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gipson, Debbie S; Duquette, Peter J; Icard, Phil F; Hooper, Stephen R

    2007-10-01

    Neurodevelopmental deficits in pediatric and adult survivors of childhood onset chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been documented for many years. This paper reviews the available literature on central nervous system involvement incurred in childhood CKD. The studies reviewed include recent work in neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and neuropsychology, along with commentary on school functioning and long-term outcomes. The paper concludes with suggestions for monitoring the neurodevelopmental status and pursuing appropriate early interventions for children with CKD. PMID:17072652

  1. The role of leptin in central nervous system diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Mei; Yan, Hai-Jing; Guo, Yi-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is a peptide hormone produced by adipose tissue and acts in brain centers to control critical physiological functions. Leptin receptors are especially abundant in the hypothalamus and trigger specific neuronal subpopulations, and activate several intracellular signaling events, including the JAK/STAT, MAPK, PI3K, and mTOR pathway. Although most studies focus on its role in energy intake and expenditure, leptin also plays a critical role in many central nervous system diseases. PMID:26885866

  2. Plasticity and neural stem cells in the enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Van Ginneken, Chris; Copray, Sjef

    2009-12-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is a highly organized part of the autonomic nervous system, which innervates the whole gastrointestinal tract by several interconnected neuronal networks. The ENS changes during development and keeps throughout its lifespan a significant capacity to adapt to microenvironmental influences, be it in inflammatory bowel diseases or changing dietary habits. The presence of neural stem cells in the pre-, postnatal, and adult gut might be one of the prerequisites to adapt to changing conditions. During the last decade, the ENS has increasingly come into the focus of clinical neural stem cell research, forming a considerable pool of neural crest derived stem cells, which could be used for cell therapy of dysganglionosis, that is, diseases based on the deficient or insufficient colonization of the gut by neural crest derived stem cells; in addition, the ENS could be an easily accessible neural stem cell source for cell replacement therapies for neurodegenerative disorders or traumatic lesions of the central nervous system. PMID:19943347

  3. [American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) and the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Spina-Franca, A

    1988-01-01

    Ten to twelve million people irregularly distributed mainly through extensive rural areas of Latin America are afflicted by American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease). Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent, and it is naturally transmitted to humans by hematophagous hemiptera of Triatominae sub-family. These hemiptera feed by biting and usually defecate in the area near the puncture wound. Mucous membranes of breaks in the continuity of skin serve as passage ways for the parasite present in the excrement of the bug. Acute and chronic forms of American trypanosomiasis occur. Nervous system involvement in the acute form may give rise to meningoencephalitis. Central and/or peripheral signs of nervous system involvement can occur in the chronic form. Neuronal depopulation due to cell destruction by direct parasitism during the acute stage of the disease is the main pathogenetic way pointed out to explain chronic forms of nervous system involvement. Chronic Chagas cardiopathy usually produces mural thrombi. Fragments of thrombus situated in the left ventricle may become detached and migrate with the bloodstream to cause embolic phenomena in distant vessels--as in brain vessels--thus causing embolic cerebrovascular insults. Data on clinical and experimental studies are critically analysed. PMID:3143493

  4. FoxO proteins in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Acute as well as chronic disorders of the nervous system lead to significant morbidity and mortality for millions of individuals globally. Given the ability to govern stem cell proliferation and differentiated cell survival, mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the forkhead box class O (FoxO) are increasingly being identified as potential targets for disorders of the nervous system, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and auditory neuronal disease. FoxO proteins are present throughout the body, but they are selectively expressed in the nervous system and have diverse biological functions. The forkhead O class transcription factors interface with an array of signal transduction pathways that include protein kinase B (Akt), serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase (SgK), IκB kinase (IKK), silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (S. cerevisiae) (SIRT1), growth factors, and Wnt signaling that can determine the activity and integrity of FoxO proteins. Ultimately, there exists a complex interplay between FoxO proteins and their signal transduction pathways that can significantly impact programmed cell death pathways of apoptosis and autophagy as well as the development of clinical strategies for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26171319

  5. Herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system in immunocompromised patients

    PubMed Central

    Strank, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    Human herpesviruses may cause infections of the central nervous system during primary infection or following reactivation from a latent state. Especially in immunosuppressed patients the infection can take a life-threatening course, and therefore early diagnosis of herpesvirus-associated neurological diseases should have high priority. Clinical presentation in these patients is usually without typical features, making diagnosis even more challenging. Therefore general broad testing for different herpesviruses in cerebrospinal fluid samples is highly recommended. In addition, determination of the virus DNA level in the cerebrospinal fluid by quantitative assays seems to be of high importance to determine prognosis. Moreover, it might help to differentiate between specific virus-associated disease and unspecific presence of virus in the cerebrospinal fluid, especially in immunocompromised patients. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of cerebrospinal fluid has revolutionized the diagnosis of nervous system viral infections, particularly those caused by human herpesviruses. This review summarizes the role human herpesviruses play in central nervous system infections in immunocompromised patients, with a focus on the clinical manifestation of encephalitis. PMID:22973424

  6. Centralization of the deuterostome nervous system predates chordates.

    PubMed

    Nomaksteinsky, Marc; Röttinger, Eric; Dufour, Héloïse D; Chettouh, Zoubida; Lowe, Chris J; Martindale, Mark Q; Brunet, Jean-François

    2009-08-11

    The origin of the chordate central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. One theory is that a CNS was present in the first bilaterian and that it gave rise to both the ventral cord of protostomes and the dorsal cord of deuterostomes. Another theory proposes that the chordate CNS arose by a dramatic process of dorsalization and internalization from a diffuse nerve net coextensive with the skin of the animal, such as enteropneust worms (Hemichordata, Ambulacraria) are supposed to have. We show here that juvenile and adult enteropneust worms in fact have a bona fide CNS, i.e., dense agglomerations of neurons associated with a neuropil, forming two cords, ventral and dorsal. The latter is internalized in the collar as a chordate-like neural tube. Contrary to previous assumptions, the greater part of the adult enteropneust skin is nonneural, although elements of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are found there. We use molecular markers to show that several neuronal types are anatomically segregated in the CNS and PNS. These neuroanatomical features, whatever their homologies with the chordate CNS, imply that nervous system centralization predates the evolutionary separation of chordate and hemichordate lineages. PMID:19559615

  7. FoxO Proteins in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Acute as well as chronic disorders of the nervous system lead to significant morbidity and mortality for millions of individuals globally. Given the ability to govern stem cell proliferation and differentiated cell survival, mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the forkhead box class O (FoxO) are increasingly being identified as potential targets for disorders of the nervous system, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and auditory neuronal disease. FoxO proteins are present throughout the body, but they are selectively expressed in the nervous system and have diverse biological functions. The forkhead O class transcription factors interface with an array of signal transduction pathways that include protein kinase B (Akt), serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase (SgK), IκB kinase (IKK), silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (S. cerevisiae) (SIRT1), growth factors, and Wnt signaling that can determine the activity and integrity of FoxO proteins. Ultimately, there exists a complex interplay between FoxO proteins and their signal transduction pathways that can significantly impact programmed cell death pathways of apoptosis and autophagy as well as the development of clinical strategies for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26171319

  8. Effects of snake venom polypeptides on central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Alexey; Utkin, Yuri

    2012-12-01

    The nervous system is a primary target for animal venoms as the impairment of its function results in the fast and efficient immobilization or death of a prey. There are numerous evidences about effects of crude snake venoms or isolated toxins on peripheral nervous system. However, the data on their interactions with the central nervous system (CNS) are not abundant, as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) impedes penetration of these compounds into brain. This updated review presents the data about interaction of snake venom polypeptides with CNS. Such data will be described according to three main modes of interactions: - Direct in vivo interaction of CNS with venom polypeptides either capable to penetrate BBB or injected into the brain. - In vitro interactions of cell or sub-cellular fractions of CNS with crude venoms or purified toxins. - Indirect effects of snake venoms or their components on functioning of CNS under different conditions. Although the venom components penetrating BBB are not numerous, they seem to be the most suitable candidates for the leads in drug design. The compounds with other modes of action are more abundant and better studied, but the lack of the data about their ability to penetrate BBB may substantially aggravate the potentials for their medical perspectives. Nevertheless, many such compounds are used for research of CNS in vitro. These investigations may give invaluable information for understanding the molecular basis of CNS diseases and thus lay the basis for targeted drug design. This aspect also will be outlined in the review. PMID:23270323

  9. Gangliosides in the Nervous System: Biosynthesis and Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Robert K.; Ariga, Toshio; Yanagisawa, Makoto; Zeng, Guichao

    Gangliosides, abundant in the nervous system, are known to play crucial modulatory roles in cellular recognition, interaction, adhesion, and signal transduction, particularly during early developmental stages. The expression of gangliosides in the nervous system is developmentally regulated and is closely related to the differentiation state of the cell. Ganglioside biosynthesis occurs in intracellular organelles, from which gangliosides are transported to the plasma membrane. During brain development, the ganglioside composition of the nervous system undergoes remarkable changes and is strictly regulated by the activities of glycosyltransferases, which can occur at different levels of control, including glycosyltransferase gene transcription and posttranslational modification. Genes for glycosyltransferase involved in ganglioside biosynthesis have been cloned and classified into families of glycosyltransferases based on their amino acid sequence similarities. The donor and acceptor substrate specificities are determined by enzymatic analysis of the glycosyltransferase gene products. Cell-type specific regulation of these genes has also been studied. Gangliosides are degraded by lysosomal exoglycosidases. The action of these enzymes occurs frequently in cooperation with activator proteins. Several human diseases are caused by defects of degradative enzymes, resulting in massive accumulation of certain glycolipids, including gangliosides in the lysosomal compartment and other organelles in the brain and visceral organs. Some of the representative lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) caused by the accumulation of lipids in late endosomes and lysosomes will be discussed.

  10. What Health-Related Functions Are Regulated by the Nervous System?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Planning Scientific Resources Research A-Z Topics Neuroscience Overview Condition Information Parts of the nervous system ... functions does the nervous system control? Why study neuroscience? What are the areas of neuroscience? NICHD Research ...

  11. Fourier domain OCT imaging of American cockroach nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyszkowska, Joanna; Gorczynska, Iwona; Ruminski, Daniel; Karnowski, Karol; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Stankiewicz, Maria; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    In this pilot study we demonstrate results of structural Fourier domain OCT imaging of the nervous system of Periplaneta americana L. (American cockroach). The purpose of this research is to develop an OCT apparatus enabling structural imaging of insect neural system. Secondary purpose of the presented research is to develop methods of the sample preparation and handling during the OCT imaging experiments. We have performed imaging in the abdominal nerve cord excised from the American cockroach. For this purpose we have developed a Fourier domain / spectral OCT system operating at 820 nm wavelength range.

  12. A thermodynamic model of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Recordati, Giorgio

    2003-01-31

    In light of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics by I. Prigogine, the autonomic nervous system as a whole may be viewed as a dissipative structure progressively assembled in the course of evolution, plastically and rhythmically interfaced between forebrain, internal and external environments, to regulate energy, matter and information exchanges. In the present paper, this hypothesis is further pursued to verify whether the two main divisions of the autonomic nervous system, the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems, may support different types of exchange with the external environment. Previous data from hypothalamic stimulation experiments, studies of locus coeruleus function and available data on behavioral functional organization indicate that (1) tight engagement with the external environment, (2) high level of energy mobilization and utilization and (3) information mainly related to exteroceptive sensory stimulation characterize a behavioral prevalence of sympathoadrenal activation. On the other hand, (1) disengagement from the external environment, (2) low levels of internal energy and (3) dominance of proprioceptive information characterize a behavioral prevalence of vagal tone. Behavioral matter exchanges such as feeding, drinking, micturition and defecation are equally absent at the extreme of sympathoadrenal and vagally driven behaviors. The autonomic nervous system as a whole is genetically determined, but the sympathoadrenal system has been mainly designed to organize the visceral apparatus for an action to be performed by the biological system in the external environment and to deal with the novelty of task and of the environment, while the functional role of the parasympathetic is to prepare the visceral apparatus for an action to be performed by the biological system on itself, for recovery and self-protection (homeostasis), and is reinforced by repetition of phylo- and ontogenetically determined patterns. The available clinical data further support

  13. Invasive aspergillosis presenting as swelling of the buccal mucosa in an immunocompetent individual.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Praveen; Nagarjuna, Muralidhara; Shetty, Samarth; Kumar, Pradeep; Bhat, Venkatraman; Salins, Paul C

    2015-02-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous in nature but have low virulence and cause disease usually when the host defenses are compromised. Fungal infections of the central nervous system are rare and are usually seen in immunocompromised patients. However, in recent years, there has been an increase in the number of central nervous system fungal infections in immunocompetent individuals. Intracranial fungal granulomas are rare space-occupying lesions. Among these, Aspergillus granuloma is the most common. Craniocerebral involvement by aspergillosis usually occurs via the hematogenous route or through contiguous spread from the paranasal sinuses. Predominant symptoms associated with cranial fungal granuloma include headache, vomiting, proptosis, and visual disturbances. Common signs include papilledema, cranial neuropathy, hemiparesis, and meningismus. We present a case of invasive Aspergillus granuloma in an immunocompetent individual, who presented with a palpable mass in the buccal mucosa following removal of an impacted mandibular third molar but with no other characteristic signs and symptoms of invasive fungal granuloma. To our knowledge, there is no documentation of aspergillosis presenting as a swelling in the buccal mucosa. Unexplained swellings in the buccal mucosa should be viewed with a high degree of suspicion and investigated thoroughly at the earliest. PMID:25487984

  14. [Pseudotumoral allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Otero González, I; Montero Martínez, C; Blanco Aparicio, M; Valiño López, P; Verea Hernando, H

    2000-06-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) develops as the result of a hypersensitivity reaction to fungi of the genus Aspergillus. Clinical and radiological presentation can be atypical, requiring a high degree of suspicion on the part of the physician who treats such patients. We report the cases of two patients with APBA in whom the form of presentation--with few asthma symptoms, images showing lobar atelectasia and hilar adenopathy--led to an initial suspicion of lung cancer. PMID:10932345

  15. Inhaled voriconazole for prevention of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Tolman, Justin A; Wiederhold, Nathan P; McConville, Jason T; Najvar, Laura K; Bocanegra, Rosie; Peters, Jay I; Coalson, Jacqueline J; Graybill, John R; Patterson, Thomas F; Williams, Robert O

    2009-06-01

    Targeted airway delivery of antifungals as prophylaxis against invasive aspergillosis may lead to high lung drug concentrations while avoiding toxicities associated with systemically administered agents. We evaluated the effectiveness of aerosolizing the intravenous formulation of voriconazole as prophylaxis against invasive pulmonary aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus in an established murine model. Inhaled voriconazole significantly improved survival and limited the extent of invasive disease, as assessed by histopathology, compared to control and amphotericin B treatments. PMID:19289523

  16. 75 FR 75681 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs... and circulation) of the central nervous system. The BBB is an area consisting of specialized...

  17. Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Latgé, Jean-Paul

    1999-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is one of the most ubiquitous of the airborne saprophytic fungi. Humans and animals constantly inhale numerous conidia of this fungus. The conidia are normally eliminated in the immunocompetent host by innate immune mechanisms, and aspergilloma and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, uncommon clinical syndromes, are the only infections observed in such hosts. Thus, A. fumigatus was considered for years to be a weak pathogen. With increases in the number of immunosuppressed patients, however, there has been a dramatic increase in severe and usually fatal invasive aspergillosis, now the most common mold infection worldwide. In this review, the focus is on the biology of A. fumigatus and the diseases it causes. Included are discussions of (i) genomic and molecular characterization of the organism, (ii) clinical and laboratory methods available for the diagnosis of aspergillosis in immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts, (iii) identification of host and fungal factors that play a role in the establishment of the fungus in vivo, and (iv) problems associated with antifungal therapy. PMID:10194462

  18. Gemella morbillorum: an underestimated aetiology of central nervous system infection?

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Paolo; Rassu, Mario; Branscombe, Michele; Sefton, Armine; Pellizzer, Giampietro

    2009-12-01

    A case is reported of cerebellar abscess and diffuse cerebritis due to Gemella morbillorum. The clinical course was 'biphasic', developing with an acute meningeal infection followed shortly afterwards by suppuration in the cerebellar and cerebral parenchyma; this pattern seemed to suggest a latent survival of the aetiological agent, probably within the central nervous system (CNS), despite systemic antibiotic therapy. Based upon a review of cases so far described, infections of the CNS caused by G. morbillorum appear to be an emerging reality. PMID:19713361

  19. Role of the autonomic nervous system in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Magnon, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Convergence of multiple stromal cell types is required to develop a tumorigenic niche that nurtures the initial development of cancer and its dissemination. Although the immune and vascular systems have been shown to have strong influences on cancer, a growing body of evidence points to a role of the nervous system in promoting cancer development. This review discusses past and current research that shows the intriguing role of autonomic nerves, aided by neurotrophic growth factors and axon cues, in creating a favorable environment for the promotion of tumor formation and metastasis.

  20. School reentry for children with acquired central nervous systems injuries.

    PubMed

    Carney, Joan; Porter, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Onset of acquired central nervous system (CNS) injury during the normal developmental process of childhood can have impact on cognitive, behavioral, and motor function. This alteration of function often necessitates special education programming, modifications, and accommodations in the education setting for successful school reentry. Special education is not necessarily a special classroom, but an individualized set of educational needs, determined by a multidisciplinary school team, to promote educational success. The purpose of this article is to inform those pediatricians and pediatric allied health professionals treating children with CNS injury of the systems in place to support successful school reentry and their role in contributing to developing an appropriate educational plan. PMID:19489086

  1. Effect of Artificial Gravity: Central Nervous System Neurochemical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; D'Amelio, Fernando; Eng, Lawrence F.

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project was to assess chemical and morphological modifications occurring in muscle receptors and the central nervous system of animals subjected to altered gravity (2 x Earth gravity produced by centrifugation and simulated micro gravity produced by hindlimb suspension). The underlying hypothesis for the studies was that afferent (sensory) information sent to the central nervous system by muscle receptors would be changed in conditions of altered gravity and that these changes, in turn, would instigate a process of adaptation involving altered chemical activity of neurons and glial cells of the projection areas of the cerebral cortex that are related to inputs from those muscle receptors (e.g., cells in the limb projection areas). The central objective of this research was to expand understanding of how chronic exposure to altered gravity, through effects on the vestibular system, influences neuromuscular systems that control posture and gait. The project used an approach in which molecular changes in the neuromuscular system were related to the development of effective motor control by characterizing neurochemical changes in sensory and motor systems and relating those changes to motor behavior as animals adapted to altered gravity. Thus, the objective was to identify changes in central and peripheral neuromuscular mechanisms that are associated with the re-establishment of motor control which is disrupted by chronic exposure to altered gravity.

  2. Regulation of autonomic nervous system in space and magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Petrov, V. M.; Chernikova, A. G.

    Variations in the earth's magnetic field and magnetic storms are known to be a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disorders. The main ``targets'' for geomagnetic perturbations are the central nervous system and the neural regulation of vascular tone and heart rate variability. This paper presents the data about effect of geomagnetic fluctuations on human body in space. As a method for research the analysis of heart rate variability was used, which allows evaluating the state of the sympathetic and parasympathetic parts of the autonomic nervous system, vasomotor center and subcortical neural centers activity. Heart rate variability data were analyzed for 30 cosmonauts at the 2-nd day of space flight on transport spaceship Soyuz (32nd orbit). There were formed three groups of cosmonauts: without magnetic storm (n=9), on a day with magnetic storm (n=12) and 1-2 days after magnetic storm (n=9). The present study was the first to demonstrate a specific impact of geomagnetic perturbations on the system of autonomic circulatory control in cosmonauts during space flight. The increasing of highest nervous centers activity was shown for group with magnetic storms, which was more significant on 1-2 days after magnetic storm. The use of discriminate analysis allowed to classify indicated three groups with 88 % precision. Canonical variables are suggested to be used as criterions for evaluation of specific and non-specific components of cardiovascular reactions to geomagnetic perturbations. The applied aspect of the findings from the present study should be emphasized. They show, in particular, the need to supplement the medical monitoring of cosmonauts with predictions of probable geomagnetic perturbations in view of the prevention of unfavorable states appearances if the adverse reactions to geomagnetic perturbations are added to the tension experienced by regulatory systems during various stresses situations (such as work in the open space).

  3. The Adverse Effects of Air Pollution on the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Genc, Sermin; Zadeoglulari, Zeynep; Fuss, Stefan H.; Genc, Kursad

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution is a serious and common public health concern associated with growing morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the last decades, the adverse effects of air pollution on the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems have been well established in a series of major epidemiological and observational studies. In the recent past, air pollution has also been associated with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been demonstrated that various components of air pollution, such as nanosized particles, can easily translocate to the CNS where they can activate innate immune responses. Furthermore, systemic inflammation arising from the pulmonary or cardiovascular system can affect CNS health. Despite intense studies on the health effects of ambient air pollution, the underlying molecular mechanisms of susceptibility and disease remain largely elusive. However, emerging evidence suggests that air pollution-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, microglial activation, cerebrovascular dysfunction, and alterations in the blood-brain barrier contribute to CNS pathology. A better understanding of the mediators and mechanisms will enable the development of new strategies to protect individuals at risk and to reduce detrimental effects of air pollution on the nervous system and mental health. PMID:22523490

  4. Enteric nervous system development: migration, differentiation, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Jonathan I.

    2013-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) provides the intrinsic innervation of the bowel and is the most neurochemically diverse branch of the peripheral nervous system, consisting of two layers of ganglia and fibers encircling the gastrointestinal tract. The ENS is vital for life and is capable of autonomous regulation of motility and secretion. Developmental studies in model organisms and genetic studies of the most common congenital disease of the ENS, Hirschsprung disease, have provided a detailed understanding of ENS development. The ENS originates in the neural crest, mostly from the vagal levels of the neuraxis, which invades, proliferates, and migrates within the intestinal wall until the entire bowel is colonized with enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCDCs). After initial migration, the ENS develops further by responding to guidance factors and morphogens that pattern the bowel concentrically, differentiating into glia and neuronal subtypes and wiring together to form a functional nervous system. Molecules controlling this process, including glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and its receptor RET, endothelin (ET)-3 and its receptor endothelin receptor type B, and transcription factors such as SOX10 and PHOX2B, are required for ENS development in humans. Important areas of active investigation include mechanisms that guide ENCDC migration, the role and signals downstream of endothelin receptor type B, and control of differentiation, neurochemical coding, and axonal targeting. Recent work also focuses on disease treatment by exploring the natural role of ENS stem cells and investigating potential therapeutic uses. Disease prevention may also be possible by modifying the fetal microenvironment to reduce the penetrance of Hirschsprung disease-causing mutations. PMID:23639815

  5. Applications of Nanotechnology to the Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumling, James P., II

    Nanotechnology and nanomaterials, in general, have become prominent areas of academic research. The ability to engineer at the nano scale is critical to the advancement of the physical and medical sciences. In the realm of physical sciences, the applications are clear: smaller circuitry, more powerful computers, higher resolution intruments. However, the potential impact in the fields of biology and medicine are perhaps even grander. The implementation of novel nanodevices is of paramount importance to the advancement of drug delivery, molecular detection, and cellular manipulation. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the development of nanotechnology for applications in neuroscience. The nervous system provides unique challenges and opportunities for nanoscale research. This thesis discusses some background in nanotechnological applications to the central nervous system and details: (1) The development of a novel calcium nanosenser for use in neurons and astrocytes. We implemented the calcium responsive component of Dr. Roger Tsien's Cameleon sensor, a calmodulin-M13 fusion, in the first quantum dot-based calcium sensor. (2) The exploration of cell-penetrating peptides as a delivery mechanism for nanoparticles to cells of the nervous system. We investigated the application of polyarginine sequences to rat primary cortical astrocytes in order to assess their efficacy in a terminally differentiated neural cell line. (3) The development of a cheap, biocompatible alternative to quantum dots for nanosensor and imaging applications. We utilized a positively charged co-matrix to promote the encapsulation of free sulforhodamine B in silica nanoparticles, a departure from conventional reactive dye coupling to silica matrices. While other methods have been invoked to trap dye not directly coupled to silica, they rely on positively charged dyes that typically have a low quantum yield and are not extensively tested biologically, or they implement reactive dyes bound

  6. Zeb2: A multifunctional regulator of nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Shane V; Sullivan, Aideen M; O'Keeffe, Gerard W

    2015-09-01

    Zinc finger E-box binding homeobox (Zeb) 2 is a transcription factor, identified due its ability to bind Smad proteins, and consists of multiple functional domains which interact with a variety of transcriptional co-effectors. The complex nature of the Zeb2, both at its genetic and protein levels, underlie its multifunctional properties, with Zeb2 capable of acting individually or as part of a transcriptional complex to repress, and occasionally activate, target gene expression. This review introduces Zeb2 as an essential regulator of nervous system development. Zeb2 is expressed in the nervous system throughout its development, indicating its importance in neurogenic and gliogenic processes. Indeed, mutation of Zeb2 has dramatic neurological consequences both in animal models, and in humans with Mowat-Wilson syndrome, which results from heterozygous ZEB2 mutations. The mechanisms by which Zeb2 regulates the induction of the neuroectoderm (CNS primordium) and the neural crest (PNS primordium) are reviewed herein. We then describe how Zeb2 acts to direct the formation, delamination, migration and specification of neural crest cells. Zeb2 regulation of the development of a number of cerebral regions, including the neocortex and hippocampus, are then described. The diverse molecular mechanisms mediating Zeb2-directed development of various neuronal and glial populations are reviewed. The role of Zeb2 in spinal cord and enteric nervous system development is outlined, while its essential function in CNS myelination is also described. Finally, this review discusses how the neurodevelopmental defects of Zeb2 mutant mice delineate the developmental dysfunctions underpinning the multiple neurological defects observed in Mowat-Wilson syndrome patients. PMID:26193487

  7. Invasive aspergillosis complicating Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T J; Mendelsohn, G

    1981-08-01

    Patients with Cushing's syndrome are susceptible to opportunistic infections. Invasive fungal infections in patients with Cushing's syndrome caused by endogenous glucocorticoid excess rarely are reported, and aspergillosis occurring in this setting, to our knowledge, has not been described. Two patients with Cushing's syndrome and notably elevated levels of circulating cortisol had invasive aspergillosis develop. A patient with endogenous hypercortisolism caused by adrenal cortical carcinoma suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage from rupture of an Aspergillus mycotic aneurysm. The other patient, who had an adrenocorticotrophic hormone-producing prostatic carcinoma, had pulmonary and disseminated aspergillosis develop. Exogenous corticosteroids are known clinically and experimentally to facilitate disseminated aspergillosis. Endogenous hypercortisolism also may bae an important factor predisposing to invasive aspergillosis. PMID:7259386

  8. Nonviral Gene Therapy of the Nervous System: Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xue-Feng; Fan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation has been widely used to efficiently transfer foreign genes into the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), and thus plays an important role in gene therapeutic studies on some brain disorders. A lot of work concerning electroporation is focused on gene transfer into rodent brains. This technique involves an injection of nucleic acids into the brain ventricle or specific area and then applying appropriate electrical field to the injected area. Here, we briefly introduced the advantages and the basic procedures of gene transfer into the rodent brain using electroporation. Better understanding of electroporation in rodent brain may further facilitate gene therapeutic studies on brain disorders. PMID:26611596

  9. West Nile Virus Infection in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Evandro R.; Luo, Huanle; Wang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a neurotropic single-stranded flavivirus has been the leading cause of arboviral encephalitis worldwide.  Up to 50% of WNV convalescent patients in the United States were reported to have long-term neurological sequelae.  Neither antiviral drugs nor vaccines are available for humans.  Animal models have been used to investigate WNV pathogenesis and host immune response in humans.  In this review, we will discuss recent findings from studies in animal models of WNV infection, and provide new insights on WNV pathogenesis and WNV-induced host immunity in the central nervous system. PMID:26918172

  10. Herpesvirus Transport to the Nervous System and Back Again

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, and pseudorabies virus are neurotropic pathogens of the Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily of the Herpesviridae. These viruses efficiently invade the peripheral nervous system and establish lifelong latency in neurons resident in peripheral ganglia. Primary and recurrent infections cycle virus particles between neurons and the peripheral tissues they innervate. This remarkable cycle of infection is the topic of this review. In addition, some of the distinguishing hallmarks of the infections caused by these viruses are evaluated in terms of their underlying similarities. PMID:22726218

  11. [Metastasis tumors of the central nervous system: molecular biology].

    PubMed

    Bello, M Josefa; González-Gómez, P; Rey, J A

    2004-12-01

    Metastases in the nervous system represent an important and growing problem in the clinical practice, being the cause of a great mortality in the developed countries. This article reviews the few data available on the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of these tumours, leading to oncogene activation, inactivation of tumour suppressor genes, not only by the classical mechanisms, but also by the tumour cell epigenetic balance alteration. We conclude that all this knowledge will lead in the future to a better diagnosis, treatment and clinic evolution of these patients. PMID:15632995

  12. Septins in the glial cells of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Patzig, Julia; Dworschak, Michelle S; Martens, Ann-Kristin; Werner, Hauke B

    2014-02-01

    The capacity of cytoskeletal septins to mediate diverse cellular processes is related to their ability to assemble as distinct heterooligomers and higher order structures. However, in many cell types the functional relevance of septins is not well understood. This minireview provides a brief overview of our current knowledge about septins in the non-neuronal cells of the vertebrate nervous system, collectively termed 'glial cells', i.e., astrocytes, microglia, oligodendrocytes, and Schwann cells. The dysregulation of septins observed in various models of myelin pathology is discussed with respect to implications for hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA) caused by mutations of the human SEPT9-gene. PMID:24047595

  13. Clinical implications of thyroid hormones effects on nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Carreón-Rodríguez, Alfonso; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid hormones have an important role throughout prenatal and postnatal nervous system development. They are involved in several processes such as neurogenesis, gliogenesis, myelination, synaptogenesis, etc., as shown in many cases of deficiency like congenital hypothyroidism or hypothyroxinemia. Those pathologies if untreated could lead to severe damages in cognitive, motor, neudoendocrine functions among other effects. Some could be reversed after adequate supplementation of thyroid hormones at birth, however there are other cellular processes highly sensitive to low levels of thyroid hormones and lasting a limited period of time during which if thyroid hormone action is lacking or deficient, the functional and structural damages would produce permanent defects. PMID:22523832

  14. [Molecular Approaches for the Diagnosis of Central Nervous System Infections].

    PubMed

    Ohkusu, Kiyofumi

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, molecular microbiology techniques have proven to be a useful supplement to conventional assays not only in identification of strains from culture, but also in direct detection of pathogens from clinical specimens. This review explores the application of molecular diagnostic techniques for infectious diseases in certain clinical contexts. It aims to assess how these molecular techniques can be integrated to enhance diagnostic capabilities for infectious diseases of the central nervous system. Finally, it emphasizes the need for close collaboration between physicians and clinical microbiologists when considering molecular diagnostics from unusual specimens/cases, because assays must be customized according to the clinical settings. PMID:26160810

  15. Near misdiagnosis of glioblastoma as primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Shrestha, Rajesh; Shonka, Nicole; Bociek, R Gregory

    2014-08-01

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma, most frequently a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, is a rare aggressive lymphoma confined to the CNS, thus requiring differentiation from other brain malignancies such as glioblastoma. Although stereotactic biopsy can confirm the diagnosis, this is invasive, not always feasible and can be inconclusive after steroid use. Hence, cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast and cerebrospinal fluid analysis are frequently used to make a prompt diagnosis. We report a case of a woman with two brain masses who presented unique diagnostic challenge. PMID:24883157

  16. Near Misdiagnosis of Glioblastoma as Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Shrestha, Rajesh; Shonka, Nicole; Bociek, R. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma, most frequently a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, is a rare aggressive lymphoma confined to the CNS, thus requiring differentiation from other brain malignancies such as glioblastoma. Although stereotactic biopsy can confirm the diagnosis, this is invasive, not always feasible and can be inconclusive after steroid use. Hence, cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast and cerebrospinal fluid analysis are frequently used to make a prompt diagnosis. We report a case of a woman with two brain masses who presented unique diagnostic challenge. PMID:24883157

  17. Extracellular vesicles round off communication in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Budnik, Vivian; Ruiz-Cañada, Catalina; Wendler, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Functional neural competence and integrity require interactive exchanges among sensory and motor neurons, interneurons and glial cells. Recent studies have attributed some of the tasks needed for these exchanges to extracellular vesicles (such as exosomes and microvesicles), which are most prominently involved in shuttling reciprocal signals between myelinating glia and neurons, thus promoting neuronal survival, the immune response mediated by microglia, and synapse assembly and plasticity. Such vesicles have also been identified as important factors in the spread of neurodegenerative disorders and brain cancer. These extracellular vesicle functions add a previously unrecognized level of complexity to transcellular interactions within the nervous system. PMID:26891626

  18. Neuroactive steroids and the peripheral nervous system: An update.

    PubMed

    Giatti, Silvia; Romano, Simone; Pesaresi, Marzia; Cermenati, Gaia; Mitro, Nico; Caruso, Donatella; Tetel, Marc J; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Melcangi, Roberto C

    2015-11-01

    In the present review we summarize observations to date supporting the concept that neuroactive steroids are synthesized in the peripheral nervous system, regulate the physiology of peripheral nerves and exert notable neuroprotective actions. Indeed, neuroactive steroids have been recently proposed as therapies for different types of peripheral neuropathy, like for instance those occurring during aging, chemotherapy, physical injury and diabetes. Moreover, pharmacological tools able to increase the synthesis of neuroactive steroids might represent new interesting therapeutic strategy to be applied in case of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25824325

  19. Fulminant Demyelinating Diseases of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Carolyn J; Cree, Bruce A

    2015-12-01

    Fulminant demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system include acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, the related acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis, multiple sclerosis variants, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, and idiopathic transverse myelitis. These syndromes are often managed with similar acute treatments including high-dose corticosteroids and plasmapheresis; however, long-term management varies. Although the prognosis of fulminant demyelinating disease was historically poor, outcomes today may be improved due to earlier diagnosis, rapid implementation of anti-inflammatory therapies such as high-dose corticosteroids and plasmapheresis, and improved supportive care. PMID:26595866

  20. Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans in the Nervous System: Inhibitors to Repair

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, Justin R.; Conta Steencken, Amanda; Osterhout, Donna J.

    2014-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are widely expressed in the normal central nervous system, serving as guidance cues during development and modulating synaptic connections in the adult. With injury or disease, an increase in CSPG expression is commonly observed close to lesioned areas. However, these CSPG deposits form a substantial barrier to regeneration and are largely responsible for the inability to repair damage in the brain and spinal cord. This review discusses the role of CSPGs as inhibitors, the role of inflammation in stimulating CSPG expression near site of injury, and therapeutic strategies for overcoming the inhibitory effects of CSPGs and creating an environment conducive to nerve regeneration. PMID:25309928

  1. Neuroplasticity. Key to recovery after central nervous system injury.

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, B H

    1993-01-01

    After an injury to the central nervous system, physical and cognitive impairments and disabilities often abate. These gains may be partly mediated by mechanisms that allow reorganizing of the structure and function within gray and white matter. The potential to enhance neurologic recovery by manipulating the brain and spinal cord must now be considered in clinical practice. Today's rehabilitation routines may not encourage maximum recovery. Indeed, some commonly used physical and pharmacologic methods could inhibit the restoration of motor activities such as walking. On the other hand, therapies that use our expanding knowledge of neuroplasticity could lead to better results for patients. PMID:8351906

  2. Electricity in the treatment of nervous system disease.

    PubMed

    Fodstad, H; Hariz, M

    2007-01-01

    Electricity has been used in medicine for almost two millenniums beginning with electrical chocks from the torpedo fish and ending with the implantation of neuromodulators and neuroprostheses. These implantable stimulators aim to improve functional independence and quality of life in various groups of disabled people. New indications for neuromodulation are still evolving and the field is rapidly advancing. Thanks to modern science and computer technology, electrotherapy has reached a degree of sophistication where it can be applied relatively safely and effectively in a variety of nervous system diseases, including pain, movement disorders, epilepsy, Tourette syndrome, psychiatric disease, addiction, coma, urinary incontinence, impotence, infertility, respiratory paralysis, tinnitus and blindness. PMID:17691352

  3. [When prions use the systems of communication between the immune system and the peripheral nervous system].

    PubMed

    Dorban, Gauthier; Antoine, Nadine; Defaweux, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Prion disease pathogenesis has been largely studied since the inter-species transmissibility of the infectious protein (PrPSc), the oral uptake as natural route of infection and the exceptional implication in a problem of public health were highlighted. Two sequential preclinical stages are observed before the development of irreversible and fatal lesions in the central nervous system: the lymphoinvasion and the neuroinvasion. The first is characterized by the accumulation of PrPSc within lymphoid tissues and the second by PrPSc scattering the peripheral nervous system towards the central nervous system. The mechanisms involved in the communication between the immune and the peripheral nervous system are still debated. Recent studies even suggest that neuroinvasion can occur through the hematogenous route, independently of the peripheral nervous system. This review analyses (i) the role of immune cells, implicated in prion pathogenesis: dendritic cells as PrPSc vehicle, follicular dendritic cells as PrPSc accumulator and nerve fibres as PrPSc driver and (ii) the respective relations they maintain with peripheral nerve fibres to migrate to the brain. PMID:20619163

  4. The effect of octopamine on the locust stomatogastric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rand, David; Knebel, Daniel; Ayali, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Octopamine (OA) is a prominent neuromodulator of invertebrate nervous systems, influencing multiple physiological processes. Among its many roles in insects are the initiation and maintenance of various rhythmic behaviors. Here, the neuromodulatory effects of OA on the components of the locust stomatogastric nervous system were studied, and one putative source of OA modulation of the system was identified. Bath application of OA was found to abolish the endogenous rhythmic output of the fully isolated frontal ganglion (FG), while stimulating motor activity of the fully isolated hypocerebral ganglion (HG). OA also induced rhythmic movements in a foregut preparation with intact HG innervation. Complex dose-dependent effects of OA on interconnected FG-HG preparations were seen: 10(-5) M OA accelerated the rhythmic activity of both the HG and FG in a synchronized manner, while 10(-4) M OA decreased both rhythms. Intracellular stimulation of an identified octopaminergic dorsal unpaired median neuron in the subesophageal ganglion was found to exert a similar effect on the FG motor output as that of OA application. Our findings suggest a mechanism of regulation of insect gut patterns and feeding-related behavior during stress and times of high energy demand. PMID:22934040

  5. Autophagy in the central nervous system: implications for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Xilouri, Maria; Stefanis, Leonidas

    2010-12-01

    The autophagy-lysosomal pathway is a major proteolytic pathway that in mammalian systems mainly comprises of macroautophagy and chaperone-mediated autophagy. The former is relatively non-selective and involves bulk degradation of proteins and organelles, whereas the latter is selective for certain cytosolic proteins. These autophagy pathways are important in development, differentiation, cellular remodeling and survival during nutrient starvation. Autophagy is crucial for neuronal homeostasis and acts as a local housekeeping process, since neurons are post-mitotic cells and require effective protein degradation to prevent accumulation of toxic aggregates. A growing body of evidence now suggests that dysfunction of autophagy causes accumulation of abnormal proteins and/or damaged organelles. Such accumulation has been linked to synaptic dysfunction, cellular stress and neuronal death. Abnormal autophagy may be involved in the pathology of both chronic nervous system disorders, such as proteinopathies (Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's disease) and acute brain injuries. Although autophagy is generally beneficial, its aberrant activation may also exert a detrimental role in neurological diseases depending on the environment and the insult, leading to autophagic neuronal death. In this review we summarize the current knowledge regarding the role of autophagy-lysosomal pathway in the central nervous system and discuss the implication of autophagy dysregulation in human neurological diseases and animal models. PMID:20942791

  6. CXCL12 Signaling in the Development of the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Mithal, Divakar S.; Banisadr, Ghazal; Miller, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are small, secreted proteins that have been shown to be important regulators of leukocyte trafficking and inflammation. All the known effects of chemokines are transduced by action at a family of G protein coupled receptors. Two of these receptors, CCR5 and CXCR4, are also known to be the major cellular receptors for HIV-1. Consideration of the evolution of the chemokine family has demonstrated that the chemokine Stromal cell Derived Factor-1 or SDF1 (CXCL12) and its receptor CXCR4 are the most ancient members of the family and existed in animals prior to the development of a sophisticated immune system. Thus, it appears that the original function of chemokine signaling was in the regulation of stem cell trafficking and development. CXCR4 signaling is important in the development of many tissues including the nervous system. Here we discuss the manner in which CXCR4 signaling can regulate the development of different structures in the central and peripheral nervous systems and the different strategies employed to achieve these effects. PMID:22270883

  7. Gut Commensalism, Cytokines, and Central Nervous System Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Kasper, Lloyd H.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing support for the importance of risk factors such as genetic makeup, obesity, smoking, vitamin D insufficiency, and antibiotic exposure contributing to the development of autoimmune diseases, including human multiple sclerosis (MS). Perhaps the greatest environmental risk factor associated with the development of immune-mediated conditions is the gut microbiome. Microbial and helminthic agents are active participants in shaping the immune systems of their hosts. This concept is continually reinforced by studies in the burgeoning area of commensal-mediated immunomodulation. The clinical importance of these findings for MS is suggested by both their participation in disease and, perhaps of greater clinical importance, attenuation of disease severity. Observations made in murine models of central nervous system demyelinating disease and a limited number of small studies in human MS suggest that immune homeostasis within the gut microbiome may be of paramount importance in maintaining a disease-free state. This review describes three immunological factors associated with the gut microbiome that are central to cytokine network activities in MS pathogenesis: T helper cell polarization, T regulatory cell function, and B cell activity. Comparisons are drawn between the regulatory mechanisms attributed to first-line therapies and those described in commensal-mediated amelioration of central nervous system demyelination. PMID:25084177

  8. Ion Channels as Drug Targets in Central Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Waszkielewicz, A.M; Gunia, A; Szkaradek, N; Słoczyńska, K; Krupińska, S; Marona, H

    2013-01-01

    Ion channel targeted drugs have always been related with either the central nervous system (CNS), the peripheral nervous system, or the cardiovascular system. Within the CNS, basic indications of drugs are: sleep disorders, anxiety, epilepsy, pain, etc. However, traditional channel blockers have multiple adverse events, mainly due to low specificity of mechanism of action. Lately, novel ion channel subtypes have been discovered, which gives premises to drug discovery process led towards specific channel subtypes. An example is Na+ channels, whose subtypes 1.3 and 1.7-1.9 are responsible for pain, and 1.1 and 1.2 – for epilepsy. Moreover, new drug candidates have been recognized. This review is focusing on ion channels subtypes, which play a significant role in current drug discovery and development process. The knowledge on channel subtypes has developed rapidly, giving new nomenclatures of ion channels. For example, Ca2+ channels are not any more divided to T, L, N, P/Q, and R, but they are described as Cav1.1-Cav3.3, with even newer nomenclature α1A-α1I and α1S. Moreover, new channels such as P2X1-P2X7, as well as TRPA1-TRPV1 have been discovered, giving premises for new types of analgesic drugs. PMID:23409712

  9. Central- and autonomic nervous system coupling in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Steffen; Bolz, Mathias; Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Voss, Andreas

    2016-05-13

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction has been well described in schizophrenia (SZ), a severe mental disorder. Nevertheless, the coupling between the ANS and central brain activity has been not addressed until now in SZ. The interactions between the central nervous system (CNS) and ANS need to be considered as a feedback-feed-forward system that supports flexible and adaptive responses to specific demands. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, this study investigates central-autonomic couplings (CAC) studying heart rate, blood pressure and electroencephalogram in paranoid schizophrenic patients, comparing them with age-gender-matched healthy subjects (CO). The emphasis is to determine how these couplings are composed by the different regulatory aspects of the CNS-ANS. We found that CAC were bidirectional, and that the causal influence of central activity towards systolic blood pressure was more strongly pronounced than such causal influence towards heart rate in paranoid schizophrenic patients when compared with CO. In paranoid schizophrenic patients, the central activity was a much stronger variable, being more random and having fewer rhythmic oscillatory components. This study provides a more in-depth understanding of the interplay of neuronal and autonomic regulatory processes in SZ and most likely greater insights into the complex relationship between psychotic stages and autonomic activity. PMID:27044986

  10. Gut commensalism, cytokines, and central nervous system demyelination.

    PubMed

    Telesford, Kiel; Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Kasper, Lloyd H

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing support for the importance of risk factors such as genetic makeup, obesity, smoking, vitamin D insufficiency, and antibiotic exposure contributing to the development of autoimmune diseases, including human multiple sclerosis (MS). Perhaps the greatest environmental risk factor associated with the development of immune-mediated conditions is the gut microbiome. Microbial and helminthic agents are active participants in shaping the immune systems of their hosts. This concept is continually reinforced by studies in the burgeoning area of commensal-mediated immunomodulation. The clinical importance of these findings for MS is suggested by both their participation in disease and, perhaps of greater clinical importance, attenuation of disease severity. Observations made in murine models of central nervous system demyelinating disease and a limited number of small studies in human MS suggest that immune homeostasis within the gut microbiome may be of paramount importance in maintaining a disease-free state. This review describes three immunological factors associated with the gut microbiome that are central to cytokine network activities in MS pathogenesis: T helper cell polarization, T regulatory cell function, and B cell activity. Comparisons are drawn between the regulatory mechanisms attributed to first-line therapies and those described in commensal-mediated amelioration of central nervous system demyelination. PMID:25084177