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Sample records for nervous system effects

  1. Environmental effects on the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, G W

    1977-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is designed to respond to the environment and is peculiarly vulnerable to many of the influences found in the environment. Utilizing an anatomical classification (cortex, cerebellum, peripheral nerves) major toxins and stresses are reviewed with selections from recent references. Selective vulnerability of certain areas to particular toxins is apparent at all levels of the CNS, although the amount of damage produced by any noxious agent depends on the age and genetic substrate of the subject. It is apparent that the effects of certain well known and long respected environmental toxins such as lead, mercury, etc., deserve continued surveillance. In addition, the overwhelming impact on the CNS of social damages such as trauma, alcohol, and tobacco cannot be ignored by environmentalists. The effect of the hospital and therapeutic environment has become apparent in view of increased awareness of iatrogenic disorders. The need for particular laboratory tests, for example, examination of CSF and nerve conduction toxicity studies, is suggested. Epidemics such as the recent solvent neuropathies suggest a need for continued animal studies that are chronic, as well as acute evaluations when predicting the potential toxic effects of industrial compounds. PMID:202447

  2. Effects of snake venom polypeptides on central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Alexey; Utkin, Yuri

    2012-12-01

    The nervous system is a primary target for animal venoms as the impairment of its function results in the fast and efficient immobilization or death of a prey. There are numerous evidences about effects of crude snake venoms or isolated toxins on peripheral nervous system. However, the data on their interactions with the central nervous system (CNS) are not abundant, as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) impedes penetration of these compounds into brain. This updated review presents the data about interaction of snake venom polypeptides with CNS. Such data will be described according to three main modes of interactions: - Direct in vivo interaction of CNS with venom polypeptides either capable to penetrate BBB or injected into the brain. - In vitro interactions of cell or sub-cellular fractions of CNS with crude venoms or purified toxins. - Indirect effects of snake venoms or their components on functioning of CNS under different conditions. Although the venom components penetrating BBB are not numerous, they seem to be the most suitable candidates for the leads in drug design. The compounds with other modes of action are more abundant and better studied, but the lack of the data about their ability to penetrate BBB may substantially aggravate the potentials for their medical perspectives. Nevertheless, many such compounds are used for research of CNS in vitro. These investigations may give invaluable information for understanding the molecular basis of CNS diseases and thus lay the basis for targeted drug design. This aspect also will be outlined in the review. PMID:23270323

  3. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating ... with breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as ...

  4. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  5. The Adverse Effects of Air Pollution on the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Genc, Sermin; Zadeoglulari, Zeynep; Fuss, Stefan H.; Genc, Kursad

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution is a serious and common public health concern associated with growing morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the last decades, the adverse effects of air pollution on the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems have been well established in a series of major epidemiological and observational studies. In the recent past, air pollution has also been associated with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been demonstrated that various components of air pollution, such as nanosized particles, can easily translocate to the CNS where they can activate innate immune responses. Furthermore, systemic inflammation arising from the pulmonary or cardiovascular system can affect CNS health. Despite intense studies on the health effects of ambient air pollution, the underlying molecular mechanisms of susceptibility and disease remain largely elusive. However, emerging evidence suggests that air pollution-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, microglial activation, cerebrovascular dysfunction, and alterations in the blood-brain barrier contribute to CNS pathology. A better understanding of the mediators and mechanisms will enable the development of new strategies to protect individuals at risk and to reduce detrimental effects of air pollution on the nervous system and mental health. PMID:22523490

  6. Effect of Artificial Gravity: Central Nervous System Neurochemical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; D'Amelio, Fernando; Eng, Lawrence F.

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project was to assess chemical and morphological modifications occurring in muscle receptors and the central nervous system of animals subjected to altered gravity (2 x Earth gravity produced by centrifugation and simulated micro gravity produced by hindlimb suspension). The underlying hypothesis for the studies was that afferent (sensory) information sent to the central nervous system by muscle receptors would be changed in conditions of altered gravity and that these changes, in turn, would instigate a process of adaptation involving altered chemical activity of neurons and glial cells of the projection areas of the cerebral cortex that are related to inputs from those muscle receptors (e.g., cells in the limb projection areas). The central objective of this research was to expand understanding of how chronic exposure to altered gravity, through effects on the vestibular system, influences neuromuscular systems that control posture and gait. The project used an approach in which molecular changes in the neuromuscular system were related to the development of effective motor control by characterizing neurochemical changes in sensory and motor systems and relating those changes to motor behavior as animals adapted to altered gravity. Thus, the objective was to identify changes in central and peripheral neuromuscular mechanisms that are associated with the re-establishment of motor control which is disrupted by chronic exposure to altered gravity.

  7. Clinical implications of thyroid hormones effects on nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Carreón-Rodríguez, Alfonso; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid hormones have an important role throughout prenatal and postnatal nervous system development. They are involved in several processes such as neurogenesis, gliogenesis, myelination, synaptogenesis, etc., as shown in many cases of deficiency like congenital hypothyroidism or hypothyroxinemia. Those pathologies if untreated could lead to severe damages in cognitive, motor, neudoendocrine functions among other effects. Some could be reversed after adequate supplementation of thyroid hormones at birth, however there are other cellular processes highly sensitive to low levels of thyroid hormones and lasting a limited period of time during which if thyroid hormone action is lacking or deficient, the functional and structural damages would produce permanent defects. PMID:22523832

  8. The effect of octopamine on the locust stomatogastric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rand, David; Knebel, Daniel; Ayali, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Octopamine (OA) is a prominent neuromodulator of invertebrate nervous systems, influencing multiple physiological processes. Among its many roles in insects are the initiation and maintenance of various rhythmic behaviors. Here, the neuromodulatory effects of OA on the components of the locust stomatogastric nervous system were studied, and one putative source of OA modulation of the system was identified. Bath application of OA was found to abolish the endogenous rhythmic output of the fully isolated frontal ganglion (FG), while stimulating motor activity of the fully isolated hypocerebral ganglion (HG). OA also induced rhythmic movements in a foregut preparation with intact HG innervation. Complex dose-dependent effects of OA on interconnected FG-HG preparations were seen: 10(-5) M OA accelerated the rhythmic activity of both the HG and FG in a synchronized manner, while 10(-4) M OA decreased both rhythms. Intracellular stimulation of an identified octopaminergic dorsal unpaired median neuron in the subesophageal ganglion was found to exert a similar effect on the FG motor output as that of OA application. Our findings suggest a mechanism of regulation of insect gut patterns and feeding-related behavior during stress and times of high energy demand. PMID:22934040

  9. The effect of space radiation of the nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauger, Grant E.; Tobias, Cornelius A.; Yang, Tracy; Whitney, Monroe

    The long-term effects of irradiation by accelerated heavy ions on the structure and function of the nervous system have not been studied extensively. Although the adult brain is relatively resistant to low LET radiation, cellular studies indicate that individual heavy ions can produce serious membrane lesions and multiple chromatin breaks. Capillary hemorrhages may follow high LET particle irradiation of the developing brain as high RBE effects. Evidence has been accumulating that the glial system and blood-brain barrier (BBB) are relatively sensitive to injury by ionizing radiation. While DNA repair is active in neural systems, it may be assumed that a significant portion of this molecular process is misrepair. Since the expression of cell lethality usually requires cell division, and nerve cells have an extremely low rate of division, it is possible that some of the characteristic changes of premature aging may represent a delayed effect of chromatin misrepair in brain. Altered microcirculation, decreased local metabolism, entanglement and reduction in synaptic density, premature loss of neurons, myelin degeneration, and glial proliferation are late signs of such injuries. HZE particles are very efficient in producing carcinogenic cell transformation, reaching a peak for iron particles. The promotion of viral transformation is also efficient up to an energy transfer of approximately 300 keV/micron. The RBE for carcinogenesis in nerve tissues remains unknown. On the basis of available information concerning HZE particle flux in interplanetary space, only general estimates of the magnitude of the effects of long-term spaceflight on some nervous system parameters may be constructed.

  10. Central nervous system

    MedlinePlus

    The central nervous system is composed of the brain and spinal cord. Your brain and spinal cord serve as the main "processing center" for your entire nervous system. They control all the workings of your body.

  11. Protective effects and mechanisms of sirtuins in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Wang, Suping; Gan, Li; Vosler, Peter S.; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Silent information regulator two proteins (sirtuins or SIRTs) are a group of histone deacetylases whose activities are dependent on and regulated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). They suppress genome-wide transcription, yet upregulate a select set of proteins related to energy metabolism and pro-survival mechanisms, and therefore play a key role in the longevity effects elicited by calorie restriction. Recently, a neuroprotective effect of sirtuins has been reported for both acute and chronic neurological diseases. The focus of this review is to summarize the latest progress regarding the protective effects of sirtuins, with a focus on SIRT1. We first introduce the distribution of sirtuins in the brain and how their expression and activity are regulated. We then highlight their protective effects against common neurological disorders, such as cerebral ischemia, axonal injury, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and multiple sclerosis. Finally, we analyze the mechanisms underlying sirtuin-mediated neuroprotection, centering on their non-histone substrates such as DNA repair enzymes, protein kinases, transcription factors, and coactivators. Collectively, the information compiled here will serve as a comprehensive reference for the actions of sirtuins in the nervous system to date, and will hopefully help to design further experimental research and expand sirtuins as therapeutic targets in the future. PMID:21930182

  12. Effects of radiation on development, especially of the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, S.P.; D'Amato, C.J.

    1980-12-01

    Humans and other organisms are exposed to ionizing radiations from a variety of natural and man-made sources. Radiation may cause mutations and chromosome abnormalities, cell-killing, alterations and transformations in cell growth, and carcinogenetic changes. This paper considers principally the cell-killing and nonlethal cell alterations in developing laboratory mammals and humans, especially the nervous system, that follow irradiation and often lead to malformation and disturbed function, but at certain stages to restitution of the injury. Most of what researchers know about the mechanisms of these radiation effects in man is derived from animal experiments, especially with rats. The few observations in humans have corresponded closely to them. Researchers illustrate the cellular effects and malformative results with an example of cell-killing in the developing cortex of a human fetus exposed to therapeutic radiation in utero; a current timetable of the malformative and other effects of radiation on rats during development from which expectations of human effects might be extrapolated; examples of hydrocephalus produced in rats; low-dose alterations of nerve cells in rats; and a microcephalic Japanese boy exposed in utero to the atomic bomb at Hiroshima in 1945.

  13. The Nervous System Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbitt, Cynthia; Carpenter, Molly

    2006-01-01

    For many children, especially those with reading difficulties, a motor-kinesthetic learning activity may be an effective tool to teach complex concepts. With this in mind, the authors developed and tested a game designed to teach fourth- to sixth-grade children some basic principles of nervous system function by allowing the children themselves to…

  14. Effects of hyperthermia on the peripheral nervous system: a review.

    PubMed

    Haveman, J; Van Der Zee, J; Wondergem, J; Hoogeveen, J F; Hulshof, M C C M

    2004-06-01

    The present paper overviews the current knowledge about effects of hyperthermia at temperatures used in clinical oncology on the peripheral nervous system. From the experimental studies it may be concluded that the heat sensitivity of the nerve is determined by the sensitivity of the nerve vasculature. These studies show that in order to avoid induction of severe neuropathy, application of heat to the peripheral nerves should not be in excess of doses of 30 min at 44 degrees C or equivalent. Using modern equipment for application of loco-regional hyperthermia the incidence of even mild neurological complications is very low. In hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion (HILP) neurotoxicity is an often-mentioned side effect, this is in spite of the fact that in all studies a relatively mild hyperthermic temperature is used that, based on the experimental studies, should be well tolerated by the nerves and other normal tissues in the limbs. It seems that the neurotoxicity observed after HILP results from thermal enhancement of drug toxicity, very probably combined with effects of a high tourniquet pressure that is used to isolate the blood flow in the leg. Whole body hyperthermia (WBH), using anesthesia and appropriate monitoring to avoid cardiovascular stress is at present considered a safe procedure. Still in the recent past cases of neuropathy after treatment have been described. When chemotherapy, and notably cisplatin, is administered before or during hyperthermia there are several clinical and experimental observations that indicate a limited tolerance of the peripheral nervous tissue in such case. Also previous radiotherapy may limit the tolerance of nerves to hyperthermia, notably when radiation is applied with a large field size. Experimental studies show that combined treatment with radiation and heat leads to enhancement of effects of radiation (enhancement ratio approximately 1.5 at 60 min at 44 degrees C). A clear contraindication for the application of

  15. Central Nervous System Effects of Ginkgo Biloba, a Plant Extract.

    PubMed

    Itil, Turan M.; Eralp, Emin; Tsambis, Elias; Itil, Kurt Z.; Stein, Ulrich

    1996-01-01

    Extracts of Ginkgo biloba (EGb) are among the most prescribed drugs in France and Germany. EGb is claimed to be effective in peripheral arterial disorders and in "cerebral insufficiency." The mechanism of action is not yet well understood. Three of the ingredients of the extract have been isolated and found to be pharmacologically active, but which one alone or in combination is responsible for clinical effects is unknown. The recommended daily dose (3 x 40 mg extract) is based more on empirical data than on clinical dose-findings studies. However, despite these, according to double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials, EGb has therapeutic effects, at least, on the diagnostic entity of "cerebral insufficiency," which is used in Europe as synonymous with early dementia. To determine whether EGb has significant pharmacological effects on the human brain, a pharmacodynamic study was conducted using the Quantitative Pharmacoelectroencephalogram (QPEEG(R)) method. It was established that the pharmacological effects (based on a predetermined 7.5--13.0-Hz alpha frequency band in a computer-analyzed electroencephalogram = CEEG(R)) of EGb on the central nervous system (CNS) are significantly different than placebo, and the high and low doses could be discriminated from each other. The 120-mg, but particularly the 240-mg, single doses showed the most consistent CNS effects with an earlier onset (1 h) and longer duration (7 h). Furthermore, it was established that the electrophysiological effects of EGb in CNS are similar to those of well-known cognitive activators such as "nootropics" as well as tacrine, the only marketed "antidementia" drug currently available in the United States. PMID:11856998

  16. Alcoholism and its effects on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sukhes

    2013-08-01

    Alcohol abuse is a major health problem worldwide, resulting to extensive admissions in many general hospitals. The overall economic cost of alcohol abuse is enormous worldwide. As a small molecule, alcohol can easily cross membrane barriers and reach different parts of the body very quickly. Attainment of its equilibrium concentration in different cellular compartments depends on the respective water content. Alcohol can affect several parts of the brain, but, in general, contracts brain tissues, destroys brain cells, as well as depresses the central nervous system. Excessive drinking over a prolonged period of time can cause serious problems with cognition and memory. Alcohol interacts with the brain receptors, interfering with the communication between nerve cells, and suppressing excitatory nerve pathway activity. Neuro-cognitive deficits, neuronal injury, and neurodegeneration are well documented in alcoholics, yet the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The effect can be both direct and/ or indirect. In this review we highlighted the role of alcoholism on the CNS and its impact on human health. PMID:23713737

  17. Central nervous system effects of whole-body proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Tara Beth; Panda, Nirlipta; Hein, Amy M; Das, Shoshana L; Hurley, Sean D; Olschowka, John A; Williams, Jacqueline P; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2014-07-01

    Space missions beyond the protection of Earth's magnetosphere expose astronauts to an environment that contains ionizing proton radiation. The hazards that proton radiation pose to normal tissues, such as the central nervous system (CNS), are not fully understood, although it has been shown that proton radiation affects the neurogenic environment, killing neural precursors and altering behavior. To determine the time and dose-response characteristics of the CNS to whole-body proton irradiation, C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 1 GeV/n proton radiation at doses of 0-200 cGy and behavioral, physiological and immunohistochemical end points were analyzed over a range of time points (48 h-12 months) postirradiation. These experiments revealed that proton radiation exposure leads to: 1. an acute decrease in cell division within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, with significant differences detected at doses as low as 10 cGy; 2. a persistent effect on proliferation in the subgranular zone, at 1 month postirradiation; 3. a decrease in neurogenesis at doses as low as 50 cGy, at 3 months postirradiation; and 4. a decrease in hippocampal ICAM-1 immunoreactivity at doses as low as 10 cGy, at 1 month postirradiation. The data presented contribute to our understanding of biological responses to whole-body proton radiation and may help reduce uncertainty in the assessment of health risks to astronauts. These findings may also be relevant to clinical proton beam therapy. PMID:24937778

  18. The pleiotropic effects of erythropoietin in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Buemi, M; Cavallaro, E; Floccari, F; Sturiale, A; Aloisi, C; Trimarchi, M; Corica, F; Frisina, N

    2003-03-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is a hydrophobic sialoglycoproteic hormone produced by the kidney and responsible for the proliferation, maturation, and differentiation of the precursors of the erythroid cell line. Human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEpo) is used to treat different types of anemia, not only in uremic patients but also in newborns with anemia of prematurity, in patients with cancer-related anemia or myeloproliferative disease, thalassemias, bone marrow transplants, or those with chronic infectious diseases. The pleiotropic functions of Epo are well known. It has been shown that this hormone can modulate the inflammatory and immune response, has direct hemodynamic and vasoactive effects, could be considered a proangiogenic factor because of its interaction with vascular endothelial growth factor, and its ability to stimulate mitosis and motility of endothelial cells. The multifunctional role of Epo has further been confirmed by the discovery in the central nervous system of a specific Epo/Epo receptor (EpoR) system. Both Epo and EpoR are expressed by astrocytes and neurons and Epo is present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Therefore, novel functions of Epo, tissue-specific regulation, and the mechanisms of action have been investigated. In this review we have tried to summarize the current data on the role of Epo on brain function. We discuss the different sites of cerebral expression and mechanisms of regulation of Epo and its receptor and its role in the development and maturation of the brain. Second, we discuss the neurotrophic and neuroprotective function of Epo in different conditions of neuronal damage, such as hypoxia, cerebral ischemia, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, and the consequent possibility that rHuEpo therapy could soon be used in clinical practice to limit neuronal damage induced by these diseases. PMID:12638727

  19. The effects of Aconitum alkaloids on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ameri, A

    1998-10-01

    Preparations of Aconitum roots are employed in Chinese and Japanese medicine for analgesic, antirheumatic and neurological indications. The recent surge in use of phytomedicine derived from traditional Chinese medicine as well as increasing concerns about possible toxic effects of these compounds have inspired a great deal of research into the mechanisms by which certain Aconitum alkaloids may act on the central nervous system. The pharmacological effects of preparations of Aconitum roots are attributed to several diterpenoid alkaloids. The main alkaloid of these plants is aconitine, a highly toxic diterpenoid alkaloid which is known to suppress the inactivation of voltage-dependent Na+ channels by binding to neurotoxin binding site 2 of the alpha-subunit of the channel protein. In this article the pharmacology of several structurally related Aconitum alkaloids is highlighted and their therapeutic vs toxic potential is discussed. Neurochemical and neurophysiological studies will be reviewed with emphasis on the effects of the alkaloids in regions of the brain that have been implicated in pain transmission and generation of epileptic activity. Considering the chemical structure of the Aconitum alkaloids as well as their mechanism of action, a subdivision in three groups becomes obvious: the first group comprises such alkaloids which possess high toxicity due to two ester boundings at the diterpene skeleton. The members of this group activate voltage-dependent sodium channels already at resting potential and inhibit noradrenaline reuptake. Activation of sodium channels and in consequence excessive depolarization with final inexcitability and suppression of pain transmission account for their antinociceptive properties. The second group comprises less toxic monoesters which have been shown to possess strong antinociceptive, antiarrhythmic and antiepileptiform properties due to a blockade of the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Electrophysiological studies have

  20. Effects of lymphoma on the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, R A; Britton, T; Richards, M

    1994-01-01

    Peripheral nervous system abnormalities occur in 5% of patients with lymphoma and have a wide differential diagnosis. Herpes zoster is the commonest cause. Vinca alkaloids are the only drugs used in lymphoma which commonly cause neuropathy. Compression or infiltration of nerve roots by lymphoma is a rare presenting feature but becomes more common with advanced disease. Radiation plexopathy does not usually develop until at least 6 months after irradiation and can be difficult to distinguish from neoplastic infiltration. Either multifocal infiltration of nerves or lymphoma-associated vasculitis may present as a peripheral neuropathy. The incidence of Guillain-Barré (GBS) syndrome, and possibly chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, appears to be increased in association with lymphoma, especially Hodgkin's disease. Subacute sensory neuronopathy and subacute lower motor neuronopathy have both been reported as paraneoplastic syndromes associated with Hodgkin's disease. Treatment of the underlying lymphoma is only rarely followed by recovery of the associated neuropathy. PMID:7932460

  1. Nervous System Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-12-01

    Nervous system involvement occurs in 10% to 15% of patients infected with the tick-borne spirochetes Borrelia burgdorferi, B afzelii, and B garinii. Peripheral nervous system involvement is common. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement, most commonly presenting with lymphocytic meningitis, causes modest cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis. Parenchymal CNS infection is rare. If the CNS is invaded, however, measuring local production of anti-B burgdorferi antibodies in the CSF provides a useful marker of infection. Most cases of neuroborreliosis can be cured with oral doxycycline; parenteral regimens should be reserved for patients with particularly severe disease. PMID:26593257

  2. Central nervous system effects in acute thallium poisoning.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Tai; Huang, Chin-Chang; Kuo, Hung-Chou; Wang, Hsuan-Min; Shen, Wu-Shiun; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Chu, Nai-Shin

    2006-03-01

    We report the central nervous system manifestations, neuropsychological studies and brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings of two patients with acute thallium intoxication. Neurologically the patients suffered from confusion, disorientation, and hallucination in the acute stage, followed by anxiety, depression, lack of attention, and memory impairment, in addition to peripheral neuropathy. Neuropsychological tests revealed an impairment of memory function, including reversed digital span, memory registration, memory recall, memory recognition, similarity, proverb reasoning, and verbal fluency. High concentrations of thallium were found in the urine, blood, and drinking water of these two patients. Brain MRI showed lesions in the corpus striatum in one patient. During the follow-up periods, the clinical manifestations and neuropsychological studies showed a slowly progressive improvement, and a follow-up brain MRI 1.5 months later demonstrated a resolution of the lesions. We conclude that thallium intoxication might induce encephalopathy, and brain MRI studies demonstrated the acute-stage brain lesions in a severe intoxicated patient. In addition, neuropsychological tests also confirmed memory deficits, although the brain lesions in the corpus striatum might resolve. PMID:16337004

  3. The toxic effects of formaldehyde on the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Songur, Ahmet; Ozen, Oguz Aslan; Sarsilmaz, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is found in the polluted atmosphere of cities, domestic air (e.g., paint, insulating materials, chipboard and plywood, fabrics, furniture, paper), and cigarette smoke, etc.; therefore, everyone and particularly susceptible children may be exposed to FA. FA is also widely used in industrial and medical settings and as a sterilizing agent, disinfectant, and preservative. Therefore, employees may be highly exposed to it in there settings. Of particular concern to the authors are anatomists and medical students, who can be highly exposed to formaldehyde vapor during dissection sessions. Formaldehyde is toxic over a range of doses; chances of exposure and subsequent harmful effects are increased as (room) temperature increases, because of FA's volatility. Many studies have been conducted to evaluate the effects of FA during systemic and respiratory exposures in rats. This review compiles that literature and emphasizes the neurotoxic effects of FA on neuronal morphology, behavior, and biochemical parameters. The review includes the results of some of the authors' work related to FA neurotoxicity, and such neurotoxic effects from FA exposure were experimentally demonstrated. Moreover, the effectiveness of some antioxidants such as melatonin, fish omega-3, and CAPE was observed in the treatment of the harmful effects of FA. Despite the harmful effects from FA exposure, it is commonly used in Turkey and elsewhere in dissection laboratories. Consequently, all anatomists must know and understand the effects of this toxic agent on organisms and the environment, and take precautions to avoid unnecessary exposure. The reviewed studies have indicated that FA has neurotoxic characteristics and systemic toxic effects. It is hypothesized that inhalation of FA, during the early postnatal period, is linked to some neurological diseases that occur in adults. Although complete prevention is impossible for laboratory workers and members of industries utilizing FA

  4. Novel central nervous system drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Jocelyn; Abdi, Nabiha; Lu, Xiaofan; Maheshwari, Oshin; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2014-05-01

    For decades, biomedical and pharmaceutical researchers have worked to devise new and more effective therapeutics to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system. The blood-brain barrier effectively protects the brain, but poses a profound challenge to drug delivery across this barrier. Many traditional drugs cannot cross the blood-brain barrier in appreciable concentrations, with less than 1% of most drugs reaching the central nervous system, leading to a lack of available treatments for many central nervous system diseases, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors. Due to the ineffective nature of most treatments for central nervous system disorders, the development of novel drug delivery systems is an area of great interest and active research. Multiple novel strategies show promise for effective central nervous system drug delivery, giving potential for more effective and safer therapies in the future. This review outlines several novel drug delivery techniques, including intranasal drug delivery, nanoparticles, drug modifications, convection-enhanced infusion, and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. It also assesses possible clinical applications, limitations, and examples of current clinical and preclinical research for each of these drug delivery approaches. Improved central nervous system drug delivery is extremely important and will allow for improved treatment of central nervous system diseases, causing improved therapies for those who are affected by central nervous system diseases. PMID:24325540

  5. INTERACTION BETWEEN METHYL MERCURY AND RADIATION EFFECTS ON NERVOUS SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction between methyl mercury and ionizing radiation was investigated in a series of experiments using rats, hamsters, and squirrel monkeys to study the effects produced and possible mechanisms of action. Parameters evaluated included several measurements of behavior, br...

  6. Effects of Inhaled Rosemary Oil on Subjective Feelings and Activities of the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Sayorwan, Winai; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri; Piriyapunyporn, Teerut; Hongratanaworakit, Tapanee; Kotchabhakdi, Naiphinich; Siripornpanich, Vorasith

    2013-01-01

    Rosemary oil is one of the more famous essential oils widely used in aroma-therapy. However, the effects of rosemary oil on the human body, in particular the nervous system, have not been sufficiently studied. This study investigates the effects of the inhalation of rosemary oil on test subjects’ feelings, as well as its effects on various physiological parameters of the nervous system. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in the experiment. All subjects underwent autonomic nervous system (ANS) recording. This consisted of measurements of skin temperature; heart rate; respiratory rate; blood pressure; evaluations of the subjects’ mood states; and electroencephalography (EEG) recordings in the pre-, during treatment, and post-rosemary inhalation periods as compared with control conditions. Our results showed significant increases in blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate after rosemary oil inhalation. After the inhalation treatments, subjects were found to have become more active and stated that they felt “fresher”. The analysis of EEGs showed a reduction in the power of alpha1 (8–10.99 Hz) and alpha2 (11–12.99 Hz) waves. Moreover, an increment in the beta wave (13–30 Hz) power was observed in the anterior region of the brain. These results confirm the stimulatory effects of rosemary oil and provide supporting evidence that brain wave activity, autonomic nervous system activity, as well as mood states are all affected by the inhalation of the rosemary oil. PMID:23833718

  7. Central Nervous System Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahley, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ApoE on high-density lipoproteins is primarily responsible for lipid transport and cholesterol homeostasis in the central nervous system (CNS). Normally produced mostly by astrocytes, apoE is also produced under neuropathologic conditions by neurons. ApoE on high-density lipoproteins is critical in redistributing cholesterol and phospholipids for membrane repair and remodeling. The 3 main structural isoforms differ in their effectiveness. Unlike apoE2 and apoE3, apoE4 has markedly altered CNS metabolism, is associated with Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, and is expressed at lower levels in brain and cerebrospinal fluid. ApoE4-expressing cultured astrocytes and neurons have reduced cholesterol and phospholipid secretion, decreased lipid-binding capacity, and increased intracellular degradation. Two structural features are responsible for apoE4 dysfunction: domain interaction, in which arginine-61 interacts ionically with glutamic acid-255, and a less stable conformation than apoE3 and apoE2. Blocking domain interaction by gene targeting (replacing arginine-61 with threonine) or by small-molecule structure correctors increases CNS apoE4 levels and lipid-binding capacity and decreases intracellular degradation. Small molecules (drugs) that disrupt domain interaction, so-called structure correctors, could prevent the apoE4-associated neuropathology by blocking the formation of neurotoxic fragments. Understanding how to modulate CNS cholesterol transport and metabolism is providing important insights into CNS health and disease. PMID:27174096

  8. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Effects of Statins in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Amelia J.; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; Arora, Devinder S.; Grant, Gary D.; McDermott, Catherine M.; Perkins, Anthony V.; Davey, Andrew K.

    2014-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, commonly referred to as statins, are widely used in the treatment of dyslipidaemia, in addition to providing primary and secondary prevention against cardiovascular disease and stroke. Statins’ effects on the central nervous system (CNS), particularly on cognition and neurological disorders such as stroke and multiple sclerosis, have received increasing attention in recent years, both within the scientific community and in the media. Current understanding of statins’ effects is limited by a lack of mechanism-based studies, as well as the assumption that all statins have the same pharmacological effect in the central nervous system. This review aims to provide an updated discussion on the molecular mechanisms contributing to statins’ possible effects on cognitive function, neurodegenerative disease, and various neurological disorders such as stroke, epilepsy, depression and CNS cancers. Additionally, the pharmacokinetic differences between statins and how these may result in statin-specific neurological effects are also discussed. PMID:25391045

  9. Caffeine and the central nervous system: mechanisms of action, biochemical, metabolic and psychostimulant effects.

    PubMed

    Nehlig, A; Daval, J L; Debry, G

    1992-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed central-nervous-system stimulant. Three main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the central nervous system have been described. Mobilization of intracellular calcium and inhibition of specific phosphodiesterases only occur at high non-physiological concentrations of caffeine. The only likely mechanism of action of the methylxanthine is the antagonism at the level of adenosine receptors. Caffeine increases energy metabolism throughout the brain but decreases at the same time cerebral blood flow, inducing a relative brain hypoperfusion. Caffeine activates noradrenaline neurons and seems to affect the local release of dopamine. Many of the alerting effects of caffeine may be related to the action of the methylxanthine on serotonin neurons. The methylxanthine induces dose-response increases in locomotor activity in animals. Its psychostimulant action on man is, however, often subtle and not very easy to detect. The effects of caffeine on learning, memory, performance and coordination are rather related to the methylxanthine action on arousal, vigilance and fatigue. Caffeine exerts obvious effects on anxiety and sleep which vary according to individual sensitivity to the methylxanthine. However, children in general do not appear more sensitive to methylxanthine effects than adults. The central nervous system does not seem to develop a great tolerance to the effects of caffeine although dependence and withdrawal symptoms are reported. PMID:1356551

  10. Different methods for evaluating the effects of microwave radiation exposure on the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Altun, Gamze; Yahyazadeh, Ahmed; Kaplan, Arife Ahsen; Deniz, Omur Gulsum; Türkmen, Aysın Pinar; Önger, Mehmet Emin; Kaplan, Suleyman

    2016-09-01

    Microwave radiation (MWR) leads to hazardous effects on he central nervous system (CNS) for both human and animals. The widespread use of mobile phones has increased the risks of health problems in the CNS caused by radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields. To determine these effects various methodological approaches related to neuroscience such as stereology, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy have been used. These approaches examine the effects on cells exposed to MWR at the light microscopic and ultrastructural levels, and novel information is obtained. The main aim of this paper is to discuss possible side effects of MWR in the light of current literature with different methodological approaches. PMID:26686295

  11. [Advance in studies on pharmacological effect of salidroside on nervous system diseases].

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Zhu, Da-hui

    2012-09-01

    Salidroside is an extract from Rhodiola crenulata as well as one of major active constituents. In studies of recent years, salidroside showed multiple effects in protecting nerves, scavenging free radicals, regulating central nervous system neurotransmitter, increasing the ability to promote nerve repair and modulating of apoptosis-related gene expression. Hence, it is expected to be applied in treating degenerative nerve diseases and brain ischemic diseases. This essay summarizes studies on pharmacological effects of salidroside on nerve system diseases, providing reference for further studies, development and application of R. crenulata. PMID:23236741

  12. Effects of Petroleum Ether Extract of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius Tuber on Central Nervous System in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Das, S. S.; Sen, Malini; Dey, Y. N.; De, S.; Ghosh, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    The central nervous system activity of the petroleum ether extract of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius tuber was examined in mice, fed normal as well as healthy conditions. The petroleum ether extract of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius tuber at the doses of 100, 300 and 1000 mg/kg showed significant central nervous system activity in mice. PMID:20376218

  13. Nervous System Complexity Baffles Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jeffrey L.

    1982-01-01

    New research findings about how nerve cells transmit signals are forcing researchers to overhaul their simplistic ideas about the nervous system. Topics highlighted include the multiple role of peptides in the nervous system, receptor molecules, and molecules that form ion channels within membranes. (Author/JN)

  14. The effects of Crocus sativus (saffron) and its constituents on nervous system: A review

    PubMed Central

    Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Rezaee, Ramin; M. Tsatsakis, Aristidis

    2015-01-01

    Saffron or Crocus sativus L. (C. sativus) has been widely used as a medicinal plant to promote human health, especially in Asia. The main components of saffron are crocin, picrocrocin and safranal. The median lethal doses (LD50) of C. sativus are 200 mg/ml and 20.7 g/kg in vitro and in animal studies, respectively. Saffron has been suggested to be effective in the treatment of a wide range of disorders including coronary artery diseases, hypertension, stomach disorders, dysmenorrhea and learning and memory impairments. In addition, different studies have indicated that saffron has anti-inflammatory, anti-atherosclerotic, antigenotoxic and cytotoxic activities. Antitussive effects of stigmas and petals of C. sativus and its components, safranal and crocin have also been demonstrated. The anticonvulsant and anti-Alzheimer properties of saffron extract were shown in human and animal studies. The efficacy of C. sativus in the treatment of mild to moderate depression was also reported in clinical trial. Administration of C. sativus and its constituents increased glutamate and dopamine levels in the brain in a dose-dependent manner. It also interacts with the opioid system to reduce withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, in the present article, the effects of C. sativus and its constituents on the nervous system and the possible underlying mechanisms are reviewed. Our literature review showed that C. sativus and its components can be considered as promising agents in the treatment of nervous system disorders. PMID:26468457

  15. The effects of Crocus sativus (saffron) and its constituents on nervous system: A review.

    PubMed

    Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Rezaee, Ramin; M Tsatsakis, Aristidis

    2015-01-01

    Saffron or Crocus sativus L. (C. sativus) has been widely used as a medicinal plant to promote human health, especially in Asia. The main components of saffron are crocin, picrocrocin and safranal. The median lethal doses (LD50) of C. sativus are 200 mg/ml and 20.7 g/kg in vitro and in animal studies, respectively. Saffron has been suggested to be effective in the treatment of a wide range of disorders including coronary artery diseases, hypertension, stomach disorders, dysmenorrhea and learning and memory impairments. In addition, different studies have indicated that saffron has anti-inflammatory, anti-atherosclerotic, antigenotoxic and cytotoxic activities. Antitussive effects of stigmas and petals of C. sativus and its components, safranal and crocin have also been demonstrated. The anticonvulsant and anti-Alzheimer properties of saffron extract were shown in human and animal studies. The efficacy of C. sativus in the treatment of mild to moderate depression was also reported in clinical trial. Administration of C. sativus and its constituents increased glutamate and dopamine levels in the brain in a dose-dependent manner. It also interacts with the opioid system to reduce withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, in the present article, the effects of C. sativus and its constituents on the nervous system and the possible underlying mechanisms are reviewed. Our literature review showed that C. sativus and its components can be considered as promising agents in the treatment of nervous system disorders. PMID:26468457

  16. Lavender and the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Koulivand, Peir Hossein; Khaleghi Ghadiri, Maryam; Gorji, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Lavender is traditionally alleged to have a variety of therapeutic and curative properties, ranging from inducing relaxation to treating parasitic infections, burns, insect bites, and spasm. There is growing evidence suggesting that lavender oil may be an effective medicament in treatment of several neurological disorders. Several animal and human investigations suggest anxiolytic, mood stabilizer, sedative, analgesic, and anticonvulsive and neuroprotective properties for lavender. These studies raised the possibility of revival of lavender therapeutic efficacy in neurological disorders. In this paper, a survey on current experimental and clinical state of knowledge about the effect of lavender on the nervous system is given. PMID:23573142

  17. Pharmacokinetics and central nervous system effects of the novel dopamine D2 receptor antagonist JNJ-37822681.

    PubMed

    te Beek, Erik T; Moerland, Matthijs; de Boer, Peter; van Nueten, Luc; de Kam, Marieke L; Burggraaf, Jacobus; Cohen, Adam F; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2012-08-01

    Using the rate of dissociation from the D(2) receptor as a means to screen novel compounds for antipsychotic drug candidates, the centrally acting and fast-dissociating selective dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist JNJ-37822681 was developed. In a blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized first-in-human study, JNJ-37822681 was administered orally to 27 healthy male volunteers at doses of 0.5, 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20 mg. Safety, pharmacokinetics and central nervous system effects were evaluated by measuring prolactin levels, eye movements, adaptive tracking, visual analogue scales, body sway, finger tapping and electroencephalography. JNJ-37822681 was well tolerated and somnolence was the most frequently reported adverse effect. Peak plasma concentrations increased more than proportional to dose, but increases in the area under curve (AUC) were dose-proportional. Prolactin elevations started at doses of 5 mg, whereas small decreases in adaptive tracking were demonstrated at 10 mg doses. At higher doses, JNJ-37822681 caused a small decrease in saccadic peak velocity, smooth pursuit, alertness, finger tapping and electroencephalography activity, and an increase in body sway. This effect profile is likely to be the result of the selectivity of JNJ-37822681 for the D(2) receptor, leading to strong D(2) receptor-mediated elevations in serum prolactin, but fewer effects on more complex central nervous system functions, which are likely to involve multiple neurotransmitters. PMID:21890591

  18. Effects on the nervous system among welders exposed to aluminium and manganese.

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, B; Iregren, A; Frech, W; Hagman, M; Johansson, L; Tesarz, M; Wennberg, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--The purpose was to study the effects on the nervous system in welders exposed to aluminium and manganese. METHODS--The investigation included questionnaires on symptoms, psychological methods (simple reaction time, finger tapping speed and endurance, digit span, vocabulary, tracking, symbol digit, cylinders, olfactory threshold, Luria-Nebraska motor scale), neurophysiological methods (electroencephalography, event related auditory evoked potential (P-300), brainstem auditory evoked potential, and diadochokinesometry) and assessments of blood and urine concentrations of metals (aluminium, lead, and manganese). RESULTS--The welders exposed to aluminium (n = 38) reported more symptoms from the central nervous system than the control group (n = 39). They also had a decreased motor function in five tests. The effect was dose related in two of these five tests. The median exposure of aluminium welders was 7065 hours and they had about seven times higher concentrations of aluminium in urine than the controls. The welders exposed to manganese (n = 12) had a decreased motor function in five tests. An increased latency of event related auditory evoked potential was also found in this group. The median manganese exposure was 270 hours. These welders did not have higher concentrations of manganese in blood than the controls. CONCLUSIONS--The neurotoxic effects found in the groups of welders exposed to aluminium and manganese are probably caused by the aluminium and manganese exposure, respectively. These effects indicate a need for improvements in the work environments of these welders. PMID:8563855

  19. Functional Observational Battery Testing for Nervous System Effects of Drugs and Other Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Screening for behavioral toxicity, or neurotoxicity, has become standard practice in preclinical safety pharmacology and toxicology. Behavior represents the integrated sum of activities mediated by the nervous system. Current screening batteries, such as the functional observat...

  20. Nervous system effects of dissolved and nanoparticulate cadmium in rats in subacute exposure.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Edina; Oszlánczi, Gábor; Máté, Zsuzsanna; Szabó, Andrea; Kozma, Gábor; Sápi, András; Kónya, Zoltán; Paulik, Edit; Nagymajtényi, László; Papp, András

    2011-07-01

    Cadmium, a toxic heavy metal with various applications in technology, can affect people both by environmental (foodborne) and occupational (inhalation) exposure and can cause nervous system damage. To model this, rats were subacutely treated either with CdCl(2) solution per os (3.0 mg kg(-1) b.w.) or nanoparticulate CdO(2) (particle size ca 65 nm) by intratracheal instillation (0.04 mg kg(-1) b.w.) alone or in sequential combination. Nervous system effects were observed at different levels of function (open field behavior, cortical electrical activity, nerve action potential) and some general toxicological indicators were also measured. Three weeks of oral plus one week of intratracheal exposure caused significant reduction of body weight gain and open field motility. Lengthening of latency of sensory evoked potentials, observed in all treated rats, was also the most significant in the group receiving oral plus intratracheal treatment. Conduction velocity of the tail nerve was likewise decreased in all treated groups. Several of the effects pointed to a potentiating interaction between the two forms of Cd. Modeling environmental and occupational Cd exposure by oral and intratracheal application in rats was feasible, with results suggesting serious negative health effects in humans suffering such a combined exposure. PMID:21351111

  1. Effect of Hinoki and Meniki Essential Oils on Human Autonomic Nervous System Activity and Mood States.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Jung; Kumar, K J Senthil; Chen, Yu-Ting; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Chien, Shih-Chang; Chang, Shang-Tzen; Chu, Fang-Hua; Wang, Sheng-Yang

    2015-07-01

    Meniki (Chamecyparis formosensis) and Hinoki (C. obtusa) are precious conifers with excellent wood properties and distinctive fragrances that make these species popular in Taiwan for construction, interiors and furniture. In the present study, the compositions of essential oils prepared from Meniki and Hinoki were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Thirty-six compounds were identified from the wood essential oil of Meniki, including Δ-cadinene, γ-cadinene, Δ-cadinol, α-muurolene, calamenene, linalyl acetate and myrtenol; 29 compounds were identified from Hinoki, including α-terpineol, α-pinene, Δ-cadinene, borneol, terpinolene, and limonene. Next, we examined the effect of Meniki and Hinoki essential oils on human autonomic nervous system activity. Sixteen healthy adults received Meniki or Hinoki by inhalation for 5 min, and the physiological and psychological effects were examined. After inhaling Meniki essential oil, participant's systolic blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were decreased, and diastolic blood pressure increased. In addition, sympathetic nervous activity (SNS) was significantly decreased, and parasympathetic activity (PSNS) was significantly increased. On the other hand, after inhaling Hinoki essential oil, systolic blood pressure, heart rate and PSNS were decreased, whereas SNA was increased. Indeed, both Meniki and Hinoki essential oils increased heart rate variability (HRV) in tested adults. Furthermore, in the Profile of Mood States (POMS) test, both Meniki and Hinoki wood essential oils stimulated a pleasant mood status. Our results strongly suggest that Meniki and Hinoki essential oils could be suitable agents for the development of regulators of sympathetic nervous system dysfunctions. PMID:26411036

  2. Hazard effects of nanoparticles in central nervous system: Searching for biocompatible nanomaterials for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Leite, Paulo Emílio Corrêa; Pereira, Mariana Rodrigues; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured materials are widely used in many applications of industry and biomedical fields. Nanoparticles emerges as potential pharmacological carriers that can be applied in the regenerative medicine, diagnosis and drug delivery. Different types of nanoparticles exhibit ability to cross the brain blood barrier (BBB) and accumulate in several brain areas. Then, efforts have been done to develop safer nanocarrier systems to treat disorders of central nervous system (CNS). However, several in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that nanoparticles of different materials exhibit a wide range of neurotoxic effects inducing neuroinflammation and cognitive impairment. For this reason, polymeric nanoparticles arise as a promisor alternative due to their biocompatible and biodegradable properties. After an overview of CNS location and neurotoxic effects of translocated nanoparticles, this review addresses the use of polymeric nanoparticles to the treatment of neuroinfectious diseases, as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and meningitis. PMID:26116398

  3. Brain and nervous system (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The nervous system controls the many complicated and interconnected functions of the body and mind. Motor, sensory cognitive and autonomic function are all coordinated and driven by the brain and nerves. As people age, ...

  4. Brain and nervous system (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The nervous system controls the many complicated and interconnected functions of the body and mind. Motor, sensory cognitive and autonomic function are all coordinated and driven by the brain and nerves. As people age, nerve ...

  5. Paraneoplastic nervous system syndromes.

    PubMed

    Jaeckle, K A

    1996-05-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of the paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes has included further deliniation of the clinical syndromes and their treatment, attempts at standardization of the diagnostic nomenclature, investigations of pathogenetic mechanisms, and molecular characterization of the paraneoplastic antigens with implications as to their biologic relevance. Despite more than 30 years of investigation, the pathogenesis of these presumably autoimmune conditions remains unclear. Furthermore, no effective therapy has been identified for these conditions, with the possible exception of the opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndromes. Future investigations must focus on the disrupted genetic regulatory events involved in generation and propagation of the autoimmune response, antigen presentation and processing; target cell destruction, and consideration of alternative pathologic causes. Effective management strategies are most likely to develop from a better understanding of the disease pathogenesis, the development of animal model systems, and a creative look beyond the usual therapies employed in autoimmune conditions. PMID:8794147

  6. Effect of experimental hyperinsulinemia on sympathetic nervous system activity in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Since insulin acutely stimulates the sympathetic nervous system, a role for sympathetic overactivity has been hypothesized to underlie the association between chronic hyperinsulinemia and hypertension. To assess the effect of sustained hyperinsulinemia on sympathetic function, (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine (NE) turnover was measured in rats injected with insulin for 14d. NE turnover in insulin-treated animals given free access to lab chow and a 10% sucrose solution was compared with that obtained in rats fed chow alone or chow plus sucrose. Sucrose ingestion increased NE turnover in heart, brown adipose tissue, and liver, but exogenous insulin did not augment turnover beyond that seen in animals given sucrose alone. This study, therefore, provides no evidence that chronic hyperinsulinemia, sufficient to induce peripheral insulin resistance, stimulates sympathetic activity more than that produced by chronic sucrose ingestion.

  7. Neuritogenesis: A model for space radiation effects on the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, M. E.; Broglio, T. M.; Worgul, B. V.; Benton, E. V.

    1994-10-01

    Pivotal to the astronauts' functional integrity and survival during long space flights are the strategies to deal with space radiations. The majority of the cellular studies in this area emphasize simple endpoints such as growth related events which, although useful to understand the nature of primary cell injury, have poor predictive value for extrapolation to more complex tissues such as the central nervous system (CNS). In order to assess the radiation damage on neural cell populations, we developed an in vitro model in which neuronal differentiation, neurite extension, and synaptogenesis occur under controlled conditions. The model exploits chick embryo neural explants to study the effects of radiations on neuritogenesis. In addition, neurobiological problems associated with long-term space flights are discussed.

  8. Neuritogenesis: A model for space radiation effects on the central nervous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, M. E.; Broglio, T. M.; Worgul, B. V.; Benton, E. V.

    1994-01-01

    Pivotal to the astronauts' functional integrity and survival during long space flights are the strategies to deal with space radiations. The majority of the cellular studies in this area emphasize simple endpoints such as growth related events which, although useful to understand the nature of primary cell injury, have poor predictive value for extrapolation to more complex tissues such as the central nervous system (CNS). In order to assess the radiation damage on neural cell populations, we developed an in vitro model in which neuronal differentiation, neurite extension, and synaptogenesis occur under controlled conditions. The model exploits chick embryo neural explants to study the effects of radiations on neuritogenesis. In addition, neurobiological problems associated with long-term space flights are discussed.

  9. Effect of regional myocardial ischemia on sympathetic nervous system as assessed by fluorine-18-metaraminol

    SciTech Connect

    Schwaiger, M.; Guibourg, H.; Rosenspire, K.; McClanahan, T.; Gallagher, K.; Hutchins, G.; Wieland, D.M. )

    1990-08-01

    With the introduction of radiolabeled catecholamine analogues, the noninvasive evaluation of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system has become possible. This study evaluated the effect of regional ischemia on myocardial retention of the new norepinephrine analogue 6-({sup 18}F) fluorometaraminol (FMR) in the open chest dog model. Six dogs were injected intravenously with FMR following 30-min occlusion of the left anterior descending artery. Six sham animals served as control group. Regional myocardial blood flow as determined by microspheres decreased 87% during ischemia (p less than 0.01), but was not significantly different from control myocardium following reperfusion. Regional myocardial 18F activity as determined postmortem was significantly reduced in reperfused myocardium (-34%), which paralleled an 18% reduction of tissue norepinephrine concentration. Thus, short time periods of coronary occlusion affect neuronal function indicating the sensitivity of the sympathetic nerve terminals to ischemia. FMR provides a new tracer approach for the characterization of neuronal integrity in postischemic myocardium.

  10. Effects of low-dose prenatal irradiation on the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Scientists are in general agreement about the effects of prenatal irradiation, including those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Differing concepts and research approaches have resulted in some uncertainties about some quantitative relationships, underlying interpretations, and conclusions. Examples of uncertainties include the existence of a threshold, the quantitative relationships between prenatal radiation doses and resulting physical and functional lesions, and processes by which lesions originate and develop. A workshop was convened in which scientists with varying backgrounds and viewpoints discussed these relationships and explored ways in which various disciplines could coordinate concepts and methodologies to suggest research directions for resolving uncertainties. This Workshop Report summarizes, in an extended fashion, salient features of the presentations on the current status of our knowledge about the radiobiology and neuroscience of prenatal irradiation and the relationships between them.

  11. Functional biomarkers for the acute effects of alcohol on the central nervous system in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Zoethout, Remco W M; Delgado, Wilson L; Ippel, Annelies E; Dahan, Albert; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) effects of acute alcohol administration have been frequently assessed. Such studies often use a wide range of methods to study each of these effects. Unfortunately, the sensitivity of these tests has not completely been ascertained. A literature search was performed to recognize the most useful tests (or biomarkers) for identifying the acute CNS effects of alcohol in healthy volunteers. All tests were grouped in clusters and functional domains. Afterwards, the effect of alcohol administration on these tests was scored as improvement, impairment or as no effect. Furthermore, dose–response relationships were established. A total number of 218 studies, describing 342 different tests (or test variants) were evaluated. Alcohol affected a wide range of CNS domains. Divided attention, focused attention, visuo-motor control and scales of feeling high and of subjective drug effects were identified as the most sensitive functional biomarkers for the acute CNS effects of alcohol. The large number of CNS tests that are used to determine the effects of alcohol interferes with the identification of the most sensitive ones and of drug–response relationships. Our results may be helpful in selecting rational biomarkers for studies investigating the acute CNS effects of alcohol or for future alcohol- interaction studies. PMID:21284693

  12. The effects of ozone exposure and associated injury mechanisms on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lazcano, Juan Carlos; González-Guevara, Edith; del Carmen Rubio, María; Franco-Pérez, Javier; Custodio, Verónica; Hernández-Cerón, Miguel; Livera, Carlos; Paz, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is a component of photochemical smog, which is a major air pollutant and demonstrates properties that are harmful to health because of the toxic properties that are inherent to its powerful oxidizing capabilities. Environmental O3 exposure is associated with many symptoms related to respiratory disorders, which include loss of lung function, exacerbation of asthma, airway damage, and lung inflammation. The effects of O3 are not restricted to the respiratory system or function - adverse effects within the central nervous system (CNS) such as decreased cognitive response, decrease in motor activity, headaches, disturbances in the sleep-wake cycle, neuronal dysfunctions, cell degeneration, and neurochemical alterations have also been described; furthermore, it has also been proposed that O3 could have epigenetic effects. O3 exposure induces the reactive chemical species in the lungs, but the short half-life of these chemical species has led some authors to attribute the injurious mechanisms observed within the lungs to inflammatory processes. However, the damage to the CNS induced by O3 exposure is not well understood. In this review, the basic mechanisms of inflammation and activation of the immune system by O3 exposure are described and the potential mechanisms of damage, which include neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, and the signs and symptoms of disturbances within the CNS caused by environmental O3 exposure are discussed. PMID:23585211

  13. [Cannabis: Effects in the Central Nervous System. Therapeutic, societal and legal consequences].

    PubMed

    Rivera-Olmos, Víctor Manuel; Parra-Bernal, Marisela C

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of marijuana extracted from Cannabis sativa and indica plants involves an important cultural impact in Mexico. Their psychological stimulatory effect is widely recognized; their biochemical and molecular components interact with CB1 and CB2 (endocannabinoid system) receptors in various central nervous system structures (CNS) and immune cells. The psychoactive element Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) can be reproduced synthetically. Systematic reviews show evidence of therapeutic effectiveness of therapeutic marijuana only for certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis (spasticity, spasms and pain), despite attempts for its widespread use, including refractory childhood epilepsy. Evidence indicates significant adverse effects of smoked marijuana on the structure, functioning and brain connectivity. Cannabis exposure during pregnancy affects fetal brain development, potentially leading to later behavioral problems in children. Neuropsychological tests and advanced imaging techniques show involvement in the learning process in adolescents with substance use. Also, marijuana increases the cognitive impairment in patients with multiple sclerosis. Social and ethical consequences to legally free marijuana for recreational use may be deleterious transcendentally. The medicinal or psychoactive cannabinol no addictive effect requires controlled proven efficacy and safety before regulatory approval studies. PMID:27428345

  14. Classical Neurotransmitters and their Significance within the Nervous System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veca, A.; Dreisbach, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Describes some of the chemical compounds involved in the nervous system and their roles in transmitting nerve signals. Discusses acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, histamine, glycine, glutemate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid and their effects within the nervous system. (CW)

  15. [Effect of nociceptin on histamine and serotonin release in the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Gyenge, Melinda; Hantos, Mónika; Laufer, Rudolf; Tekes, Korniléa

    2006-01-01

    Role in pain sensation of both nociceptin (NC), the bioactive heptadecapeptide sequence of preproorphaninFQ and of histamine has been widely evidenced in the central nervous system (CNS). In the current series of experiments effect of intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered NC (5.5 nmol/rat) on histamine and serotonin levels in blood plasma, CSF and brain areas (hypothalamus and hippocampus) was studies and compared to the effect of the mast cell degranulator Compound 48/80(100microg/kg, i.c.v.) and the neuroactive peptide Substance P (50nmol/rat, i.c.v.). It was found that all the three compounds increased the histamine level in the CNS, however their activity concerning the mast cell-, and neuronal histamine release is different. NC could release histamine from both the mast cells and the neurons and it decreased CNS serotonin levels. Substance P was found the most potent in increasing CNS histamine levels. Compound 48/80 treatment resulted in elevated histamine levels both in the CNS and blood plasma. It is concluded that the histamine releasing effects of i.c.v. administered NC and SP are limited to the CNS, but in the effect of Compound 48/80 its blood-brain barrier impairing activity is also involved. Data also demonstrate that NC has significant effect on both the histaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmission in the CNS. PMID:17094659

  16. Effects of Fumaric Acids on Cuprizone Induced Central Nervous System De- and Remyelination in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Moharregh-Khiabani, Darius; Blank, Alexander; Skripuletz, Thomas; Miller, Elvira; Kotsiari, Alexandra; Gudi, Viktoria; Stangel, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background Fumaric acid esters (FAE) are a group of compounds which are currently under investigation as an oral treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. One of the suggested modes of action is the potential of FAE to exert a neuroprotective effect. Methodology/Principal Findings We have investigated the impact of monomethylfumarate (MMF) and dimethylfumaric acid (DMF) on de- and remyelination using the toxic cuprizone model where the blood-brain-barrier remains intact and only scattered T-cells and peripheral macrophages are found in the central nervous system (CNS), thus excluding the influence of immunomodulatory effects on peripheral immune cells. FAE showed marginally accelerated remyelination in the corpus callosum compared to controls. However, we found no differences for demyelination and glial reactions in vivo and no cytoprotective effect on oligodendroglial cells in vitro. In contrast, DMF had a significant inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced nitric oxide burst in microglia and induced apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Conclusions These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of action of fumaric acids. Our data suggest that fumarates have no or only little direct protective effects on oligodendrocytes in this toxic model and may act rather indirectly via the modulation of immune cells. PMID:20668697

  17. Differential effects of opiates on the incorporation of [14C] thiamine in the central nervous system of the rat.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Vadlamani, N L; Pontani, R B

    1977-03-15

    Opiate agonist (morphine), pure antagonist (naloxone), mixed agonist-antagonist (nalorphine) and analgesically inactive enantiomorph (dextrorphan) produced differential stereoselective effects on the incorporation of [14C] thiamine in the central nervous system of the rats. The possible role of thiamine in opiate effects and its implications are discussed. PMID:858372

  18. Evaluation of the acute cardiac and central nervous system effects of the fluorocarbon trifluoromethane in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, C.A.; Goldberg, D.A.; Ewing, J.R.; Butt, S.S.; Gayner, J.; Fagan, S.C.

    1994-12-31

    The gaseous fluorocarbon trifluoromethane has recently been investigated for its potential as an in vivo gaseous indicator for nuclear magnetic resonance studies of brain perfusion. Trifluoromethane may also have significant value as a replacement for chlorofluorocarbon fire retardants. Because of possible species-specific cardiotoxic and anesthetic properties, the toxicological evaluation of trifluoromethane in primates (Papio anubis) is necessary prior to its evaluation in humans. We report the acute cardiac and central nervous system effects of trifluoromethane in eight anesthetized baboons. A dose-response effect was established for respiratory rate, electroencephalogram, and cardiac sinus rate, which exhibited a stepwise decrease from 10% trifluoromethane. No spontaneous arrhythmias were noted, and arterial blood pressure remained unchanged at any inspired level. Intravenous epinephrine infusions (1 {mu}g/kg) induced transient cardiac arrhythmia in 1 animal only at 70% FC-23 (v/v) trifluoromethane. Trifluoromethane appears to induce mild dose-related physiological changes at inspired levels of 30% or more, indicative of an anesthetic effect. These data suggest that trifluoromethane may be safe to use in humans, without significant adverse acute effects, at an inspired level of 30%. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation and levodopa on the autonomic nervous system in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Janne; Remien, Piet; Guballa, Christoph; Binder, Andreas; Binder, Sabine; Schattschneider, Jörn; Herzog, Jan; Volkmann, Jens; Deuschl, Günther; Wasner, Gunnar; Baron, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Dysfunctions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Regarding motor disability, deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment option in long lasting PD. The aims of this study were to examine whether STN stimulation has an influence on functions of the ANS and to compare these effects to those induced by levodopa. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) during rest and orthostatic conditions, HR variability (HRV) and breathing‐induced cutaneous sympathetic vasoconstriction (CVC) were tested in 14 PD patients treated with STN stimulation during “ON” and “OFF” condition of the stimulator. The effects of a single dose of levodopa on ANS were tested in 15 PD patients without DBS. STN stimulation had no influence on cardiovascular ANS functions, whereas CVC was significantly increased. In contrast, levodopa significantly lowered BP and HR at rest and enhanced orthostatic hypotension. Further, HRV, skin perfusion and temperature increased after administration of levodopa. Our results suggest that in contrast to levodopa, STN stimulation has only minor effects on autonomic functions. Since less pharmacotherapy is needed after STN stimulation, reduced levodopa intake results in relative improvement of autonomic function in deep brain stimulated PD patients. PMID:17371906

  20. Effects of Low-Level Blast Exposure on the Nervous System: Is There Really a Controversy?

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Gregory A.; Stone, James R.; Ahlers, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    High-pressure blast waves can cause extensive CNS injury in human beings. However, in combat settings, such as Iraq and Afghanistan, lower level exposures associated with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or subclinical exposure have been much more common. Yet controversy exists concerning what traits can be attributed to low-level blast, in large part due to the difficulty of distinguishing blast-related mTBI from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We describe how TBI is defined in human beings and the problems posed in using current definitions to recognize blast-related mTBI. We next consider the problem of applying definitions of human mTBI to animal models, in particular that TBI severity in human beings is defined in relation to alteration of consciousness at the time of injury, which typically cannot be assessed in animals. However, based on outcome assessments, a condition of “low-level” blast exposure can be defined in animals that likely approximates human mTBI or subclinical exposure. We review blast injury modeling in animals noting that inconsistencies in experimental approach have contributed to uncertainty over the effects of low-level blast. Yet, animal studies show that low-level blast pressure waves are transmitted to the brain. In brain, low-level blast exposures cause behavioral, biochemical, pathological, and physiological effects on the nervous system including the induction of PTSD-related behavioral traits in the absence of a psychological stressor. We review the relationship of blast exposure to chronic neurodegenerative diseases noting the paradoxical lowering of Abeta by blast, which along with other observations suggest that blast-related TBI is pathophysiologically distinct from non-blast TBI. Human neuroimaging studies show that blast-related mTBI is associated with a variety of chronic effects that are unlikely to be explained by co-morbid PTSD. We conclude that abundant evidence supports low-level blast as having long

  1. Facilitation of breathing by leptin effects in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bassi, M; Furuya, W I; Zoccal, D B; Menani, J V; Colombari, D S A; Mulkey, D K; Colombari, E

    2016-03-15

    With the global epidemic of obesity, breathing disorders associated with excess body weight have markedly increased. Respiratory dysfunctions caused by obesity were originally attributed to mechanical factors; however, recent studies have suggested a pathophysiological component that involves the central nervous system (CNS) and hormones such as leptin produced by adipocytes as well as other cells. Leptin is suggested to stimulate breathing and leptin deficiency causes an impairment of the chemoreflex, which can be reverted by leptin therapy. This facilitation of the chemoreflex may depend on the action of leptin in the hindbrain areas involved in the respiratory control such as the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), a site that receives chemosensory afferents, and the ventral surface of the medulla that includes the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a central chemosensitive area, and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Although the mechanisms and pathways activated by leptin to facilitate breathing are still not completely clear, evidence suggests that the facilitatory effects of leptin on breathing require the brain melanocortin system, including the POMC-MC4R pathway, a mechanism also activated by leptin to modulate blood pressure. The results of all the studies that have investigated the effect of leptin on breathing suggest that disruption of leptin signalling as caused by obesity-induced reduction of central leptin function (leptin resistance) is a relevant mechanism that may contribute to respiratory dysfunctions associated with obesity. PMID:26095748

  2. Effects of Betel chewing on the central and autonomic nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Chu, N S

    2001-01-01

    Betel chewing has been claimed to produce a sense of well-being, euphoria, heightened alertness, sweating, salivation, a hot sensation in the body and increased capacity to work. Betel chewing also leads to habituation, addiction and withdrawal. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain poorly understood. Arecoline, the major alkaloid of Areca nut, has been extensively studied, and several effects of betel chewing are thought to be related to the actions of this parasympathomimetic constituent. However, betel chewing may produce complex reactions and interactions. In the presence of lime, arecoline and guvacoline in Areca nut are hydrolyzed into arecaidine and guvacine, respectively, which are strong inhibitors of GABA uptake. Piper betle flower or leaf contains aromatic phenolic compounds which have been found to stimulate the release of catecholamines in vitro. Thus, betel chewing may affect parasympathetic, GABAnergic and sympathetic functions. Betel chewing produces an increase in heart rate, blood pressure, sweating and body temperature. In addition, EEG shows widespread cortical desynchronization indicating a state of arousal. In autonomic function tests, both the sympathetic skin response and RR interval variation are affected. Betel chewing also increases plasma concentrations of norepinephrine and epinephrine. These results suggest that betel chewing mainly affects the central and autonomic nervous systems. Future studies should investigate both the acute and chronic effects of betel chewing. Such studies may further elucidate the psychoactive mechanisms responsible for the undiminished popularity of betel chewing since antiquity. PMID:11385294

  3. FTY720 (fingolimod) in Multiple Sclerosis: therapeutic effects in the immune and the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Volker

    2009-01-01

    FTY720 (fingolimod) is a first-in-class sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulator that was highly effective in Phase II clinical trials for Multiple Sclerosis (MS). FTY720 is phosphorylated in vivo by sphingosine kinase-2 to form the active moiety FTY720-phosphate that binds to four of the five G protein-coupled S1P receptor subtypes. Studies using conditional S1P1 receptor-deficient and sphingosine kinase-deficient mice showed that the egress of lymphocytes from lymph nodes requires signalling of lymphocytic S1P1 receptors by the endogenous ligand S1P. The S1P mimetic FTY720-phosphate causes internalization and degradation of cell membrane-expressed S1P1, thereby antagonizing S1P action at the receptor. In models of human MS and demyelinating polyneuropathies, functional antagonism of lymphocytic S1P1 slows S1P-driven egress of lymphocytes from lymph nodes, thereby reducing the numbers of autoaggressive TH17 cells that recirculate via lymph and blood to the central nervous system and the sciatic/ischiatic nerves. Based on its lipophilic nature, FTY720 crosses the blood–brain barrier, and ongoing experiments suggest that the drug also down-modulates S1P1 in neural cells/astrocytes to reduce astrogliosis, a phenomenon associated with neurodegeneration in MS. This may help restore gap-junctional communication of astrocytes with neurons and cells of the blood–brain barrier. Additional effects may result from (down-) modulation of S1P3 in astrocytes and of S1P1 and S1P5 in oligodendrocytes. In conclusion, FTY720 may act through immune-based and central mechanisms to reduce inflammation and support structural restoration of the central nervous system parenchyma. Beyond the autoimmune indications, very recent studies suggest that short-term, low-dose administration of FTY720 could help treat chronic (viral) infections. Differential effects of the drug on the trafficking of naïve, central memory and effector memory T cell subsets are discussed. PMID:19814729

  4. [Effects of radio- and microwaves emitted by wireless communication devices on the functions of the nervous system selected elements].

    PubMed

    Politański, Piotr; Bortkiewicz, Alicja; Zmyślony, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Nervous system is the most "electric" system in the human body. The research of the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of different frequencies on its functioning have been carried out for years. This paper presents the results of the scientific literature review on the EMF influence on the functioning of the human nervous system with a particular emphasis on the recent studies of the modern wireless communication and data transmission systems. In the majority of the analyzed areas the published research results do not show EMF effects on the nervous system, except for the influence of GSM telephony signal on resting EEG and EEG during patients' sleep and the influence of radiofrequency EMF on the cardiovascular regulation. In other analyzed areas (EMF impact on sleep, the evoked potentials and cognitive processes), there are no consistent results supporting any influence of electromagnetic fields. Neurophysiological studies of the effect of radio- and microwaves on the brain functions in humans are still considered inconclusive. This is among others due to, different exposure conditions, a large number of variables tested, deficiencies in repeatability of research and statistical uncertainties. However, methodological guidelines are already available giving a chance of unifying research that definitely needs to be continued in order to identify biophysical mechanisms of interaction between EMFs and the nervous system. One of the EMF research aspects, on which more and more attention is paid, are inter-individual differences. Med Pr 2016;67(3):411-421. PMID:27364114

  5. [Vesalius and the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Van Laere, J

    1993-01-01

    Before we comment the subject of this lecture, we attract the reader's attention towards two remarks. We first want to point out that, although Vesalius is rightly considered as "the father of anatomy", in physiological matters--such as e.g. the physiology of the nervous system--he remained a faithful follower of Galen. A second preliminary remark explains why the books Vesalius devoted to the nervous system, namely the fourth and seventh books, as well as a part of the third book, don't belong to the best parts of the Fabrica, when we compare them with his Osteology and his Myology. We should not forget that some technical discoveries such as keeping brain-tissue in alcohol in order to harden it and colouring methods of Weigert, Marchi and Nissl, that made a refined macro- and microscopic examination of the nervous system possible, were only invented in the 19th century. The fourth book considers the peripheral nervous system. According to Vesalius, there are seven pairs of brain-nerves. His first pair corresponds to our Nervous opticus; his second pair concerns our Nervi oculomotorius, trochlearis and abducens; this third pair embraces a great part of our Nervus trigeminus; his fourth pair corresponds to our Nervus maxillaris; his fifth pair includes our Nervi facialis and acusticus; his sixth pair includes our Nervi vagus and accessorius; his seventh pair our Nervi hypoglossus and pharyngeus. Vesalius counts thirty pairs of spinal nerves. His description of the Plexus brachialis and the Plexus ischiadicus is closely related to the modern views in these matters. However, his teleologic views about them are remarkable, e.g. about the course of the Nervi recurrentes. The seventh book covers the brain. He successively and truly describes the cerebral membranes, the Ventriculi, the Cerebrum; his description relies on a series of horizontal slices. He also describes the brain-stem and the Cerebellum. Vesalius, who had doubts about the existence of the Plexus

  6. Effect of Muslim Prayer (Salat) on α Electroencephalography and Its Relationship with Autonomic Nervous System Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doufesh, Hazem; Ismail, Noor Azina; Wan Ahmad, Wan Azman

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: This study investigated the effect of Muslim prayer (salat) on the α relative power (RPα) of electroencephalography (EEG) and autonomic nervous activity and the relationship between them by using spectral analysis of EEG and heart rate variability (HRV). Methods: Thirty healthy Muslim men participated in the study. Their electrocardiograms and EEGs were continuously recorded before, during, and after salat practice with a computer-based data acquisition system (MP150, BIOPAC Systems Inc., Camino Goleta, California). Power spectral analysis was conducted to extract the RPα and HRV components. Results: During salat, a significant increase (p<.05) was observed in the mean RPα in the occipital and parietal regions and in the normalized unit of high-frequency (nuHF) power of HRV (as a parasympathetic index). Meanwhile, the normalized unit of low-frequency (nuLF) power and LF/HF of HRV (as sympathetic indices) decreased according to HRV analyses. RPα showed a significant positive correlation in the occipital and parietal electrodes with nuHF and significant negative correlations with nuLF and LF/HF. Conclusions: During salat, parasympathetic activity increased and sympathetic activity decreased. Therefore, regular salat practices may help promote relaxation, minimize anxiety, and reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:24827587

  7. Neuropsychological assessment for detecting adverse effects of volatile organic compounds on the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Bolla, K.I. )

    1991-11-01

    Because there are no direct biological markers for the substances implicated in indoor air exposure, it is impossible to directly measure if an individual or group of individuals has been exposed to a potentially neurotoxic substance in the workplace. Behavioral changes may be the earliest and only manifestation of central nervous system (CNS) effects and are often too subtle to be revealed by routine physical or neurological examination. Neuropsychological techniques are sensitive to subtle behavioral/cognitive changes that can results from exposure to neurotoxins. These techniques consist of oral and written tests that are administered by a trained examiner on a on-to-one basis. In general, a wide variety of cognitive domains are evaluated. The typical battery generally includes assessing orientation, attention, intelligence, language, visual memory, verbal memory, perception, visuoconstruction, simple motor speed, psychomotor speed, and mood. As with most assessment techniques, the neuropsychological methods have limitations. One major drawback is the availability of appropriate norms that are used to compare the results of a specific individual. Although neuropsychological tests are sensitive to the presence of CNS involvement, they are not specific. Patterns of performance seen with specific instances of neurotoxic exposure may also be seen with a number of other diseases of the CNS such as dementia, cerebrovascular disease, hydrocephalus, or normal aging. Some of the more sensitive neuropsychological tests are presented. Interpretations of test performance as they relate to toxic effects on the CNS are discussed.

  8. Insights Into Effects of Ellagic Acid on the Nervous System: A Mini Review.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Touqeer; Setzer, William N; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Braidy, Nady; Sobarzo-Sanchez, Eduardo; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest that disease-related neurodegeneration seems to be a multifactorial process that involves different cytotoxic pathways converging in cell death. Neuropathological evidence indicates that neuroinflammation, excitotoxicity, redox-active metals, increased reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, abnormalities in the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, impairments in endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms, mitochondrial dysfunction, as well as a reduction in the expression of trophic factors in neuronal tissues might play a role in the pathobiology of disease. In addition, increased expression of proapoptotic proteins, which leads to neuronal cell death, plays an important role in the onset and progression of neurodegeneration. With respect to the inefficacy of single-target drugs for the treatment of numerous neurodegenerative disorders, much attention has been paid to natural products with pluripharmacological properties as well as negligible adverse effects. Ellagic acid is known as an important natural phenolic antioxidant, that is widely found in different fruits and vegetables. Recent studies have shown that ellagic acid may invoke a spectrum of cell signaling pathways to attenuate or slow down the development of neurodegenerative disorders. Ellagic acid possesses potent neuroprotective effects through its free radical scavenging properties, iron chelation, activation of different cell signaling pathways, and mitigation of mitochondrial dysfunction. The aim of this review is to critically summarize and analyze the available literature regarding the neuroprotective effects of ellagic acid with emphasis on its molecular mechanisms of action. In addition, we also discuss the biosynthesis, sources, bioavailability, and metabolism, of ellagic acid to provide as accurately as possible the much needed information for assessment of the overall protective effects of this compound in the central nervous system. PMID:26806345

  9. Human nervous system function emulator.

    PubMed

    Frenger, P

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a modular, extensible, open-systems design for a multiprocessor network which emulates the major functions of the human nervous system. Interchangeable hardware/software components, a socketed software bus with plug-and-play capability and self diagnostics are included. The computer hardware is based on IEEE P996.1 bus cards. Its operating system utilizes IEEE 1275 standard software. Object oriented design techniques and programming are featured. A machine-independent high level script-based command language was created for this project. Neural anatomical structures which were emulated include the cortex, brainstem, cerebellum, spinal cord, autonomic and peripheral nervous systems. Motor, sensory, autoregulatory, and higher cognitive artificial intelligence, behavioral and emotional functions are provided. The author discusses how he has interfaced this emulator to machine vision, speech recognition/speech synthesis, an artificial neural network and a dexterous hand to form an android robotic platform. PMID:10834247

  10. The effect of chronic stress on prenatal development of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Giordana, L N; Bozzo, A A; Cots, D S; Monedero Cobeta, I; Rolando, A; Borghi, D; Diaz, T; Gauna, H F; Romanini, M C

    2015-02-01

    The survival of developing embryos depends on the control and maintenance of homeostasis. Stress caused by chronic immobilization during pregnancy in rats may alter the normal development of the nervous system and increase susceptibility to psychiatric disorders. We investigated the effects of chronic stress on cell proliferation in the forebrains of embryos at 12 days of gestation, and in the hippocampus, dentate gyrus and cortex in embryos at 17 and 21 days of gestation. We examined serial sections of the embryonic brains of control and stressed rats at days 12, 17 and 21 of gestation. Brain sections were immunolabeled with anti-PCNA and stereological analysis was performed on 540 images. The results showed no statistical differences on days 12 and 17 of gestation in the proliferation area of the structures studied, whereas on day 21 of gestation, proliferation decreased in the cortex and dentate gyrus of embryos of the stressed group. These changes were related to decreased prolactin and increased corticosterone concentrations in the plasma. PMID:25420890

  11. Evidence Report: Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Simonsen, Lisa; Huff, Janice L.

    2016-01-01

    Possible acute and late risks to the central nervous system (CNS) from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are concerns for human exploration of space. Acute CNS risks may include: altered cognitive function, reduced motor function, and behavioral changes, all of which may affect performance and human health. Late CNS risks may include neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia and premature aging. Although detrimental CNS changes are observed in humans treated with high-dose radiation (e.g., gamma rays and 9 protons) for cancer and are supported by experimental evidence showing neurocognitive and behavioral effects in animal models, the significance of these results on the morbidity to astronauts has not been elucidated. There is a lack of human epidemiology data on which to base CNS risk estimates; therefore, risk projection based on scaling to human data, as done for cancer risk, is not possible for CNS risks. Research specific to the spaceflight environment using animal and cell models must be compiled to quantify the magnitude of CNS changes in order to estimate this risk and to establish validity of the current permissible exposure limits (PELs). In addition, the impact of radiation exposure in combination with individual sensitivity or other space flight factors, as well as assessment of the need for biological/pharmaceutical countermeasures, will be considered after further definition of CNS risk occurs.

  12. [Gender and the effects of steroid hormones in the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Brandt, N; Vierk, R; Fester, L; Zhou, L; Imholz, P; Rune, G M

    2014-09-01

    Degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, the incidence and prevalence of which vary between men and women, often manifest in the hippocampus. Neurosteroids are hormones that are synthesized in the CNS, and it is here that they exert their influence. Estrogen and testosterone are examples of neurosteroid hormones. In the hippocampus, an area of the brain closely associated with learning and memory, the local synthesis of estrogen in females, but not in males, is essential for the plasticity and stability of the synapses. The inhibition of estrogen synthesis in the female hippocampus causes a reduction in long-term potentiation (LTP), an electrophysiological parameter of learning and memory, thus resulting in a significant loss of synapses. In light of this, the fact that estrogen has been attributed with many neuroprotective functions in degenerative diseases of the CNS suggests that therapeutic concepts involving the use of estrogen are possibly only effective in women, but not in men. These findings similarly provide a basis for explaining the gender dimorphism that has been found in certain degenerative illnesses of the CNS. PMID:25091372

  13. Effect of mental fatigue on the central nervous system: an electroencephalography study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fatigue can be classified as mental and physical depending on its cause, and each type of fatigue has a multi-factorial nature. We examined the effect of mental fatigue on the central nervous system using electroencephalography (EEG) in eighteen healthy male volunteers. Methods After enrollment, subjects were randomly assigned to two groups in a single-blinded, crossover fashion to perform two types of mental fatigue-inducing experiments. Each experiment consisted of four 30-min fatigue-inducing 0- or 2-back test sessions and two evaluation sessions performed just before and after the fatigue-inducing sessions. During the evaluation session, the participants were assessed using EEG. Eleven electrodes were attached to the head skin, from positions F3, Fz, F4, C3, Cz, C4, P3, Pz, P4, O1, and O2. Results In the 2-back test, the beta power density on the Pz electrode and the alpha power densities on the P3 and O2 electrodes were decreased, and the theta power density on the Cz electrode was increased after the fatigue-inducing mental task sessions. In the 0-back test, no electrodes were altered after the fatigue-inducing sessions. Conclusions Different types of mental fatigue produced different kinds of alterations of the spontaneous EEG variables. Our findings provide new perspectives on the neural mechanisms underlying mental fatigue. PMID:22954020

  14. Effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing central nervous system: possible involvement of thyroid hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Li, G. H.; Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Sulkowski, G. M.; Koibuchi, N.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing brain and specifically explored the possibility that these effects are mediated by altered thyroid status. Thirty-four timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to continuous centrifugation at 1.5 G (HG) from gestational Day 11 until one of three key developmental points: postnatal Day (P) 6, P15, or P21 (10 pups/dam: 5 males/5 females). During the 32-day centrifugation, stationary controls (SC, n = 25 dams) were housed in the same room as HG animals. Neonatal body, forebrain, and cerebellum mass and neonatal and maternal thyroid status were assessed at each time point. The body mass of centrifuged neonates was comparatively lower at each time point. The mass of the forebrain and the mass of the cerebellum were maximally reduced in hypergravity-exposed neonates at P6 by 15.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Analysis of neonatal plasma suggested a transient hypothyroid status, as indicated by increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level (38.6%) at P6, while maternal plasma TSH levels were maximally elevated at P15 (38.9%). Neither neonatal nor maternal plasma TH levels were altered, suggesting a moderate hypothyroid condition. Thus, continuous exposure of the developing rats to hypergravity during the embryonic and neonatal periods has a highly significant effect on the developing forebrain and cerebellum and neonatal thyroid status (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). These data are consistent with the hypothesized role of the thyroid hormone in mediating the effect of hypergravity in the developing central nervous system and begin to define the role of TH in the overall response of the developing organism to altered gravity.

  15. Neuroprotective effects of Nigella sativa extracts during germination on central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Hayatul; Ahmad, Iffat Zareen; Salman, Mohammad Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nigella sativa Linn. which has many acclaimed medicinal properties is an indigenous herbaceous plant and belongs to the Ranunculaceae family, which grows in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea, Pakistan and India. Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effects of N. sativa seed extracts of different germination phases on the central nervous system (CNS) responses in experimental animals. Materials and Methods: Anxiolytic, locomotor activity of extracts (1 g/kg of body weight) was evaluated in both stressed and unstressed animal models and antiepileptic effect was evaluated by maximal electroshock seizure model keeping diazepam (20 mg/kg) as a positive control. Antidepressant effect was evaluated by forced swim test and tail suspension test keeping imipramine (15 mg/kg) as a positive control. Results: All tested extracts of N. sativa during different phases of germination (especially 5th day germination phase) showed significant (P < 0.001) anxiolytic effect in comparison to control. Diazepam reduced locomotor activity in control (unstressed) rats but did not show affect in stressed rats while N. sativa extracts from germination phases significantly (P < 0.001) reduced locomotor activity in unstressed as well as stressed animals. All the extracts of N. sativa from different germination phases exhibited significant (P < 0.001) reduction in various phases of epileptic seizure on comparison with the reference standard (diazepam). During antidepressant test, N. sativa extracts exhibited a slight reduction in the immobility of rats. Conclusion: During germination, especially in 5th day germination extract, N. sativa showed significant CNS depressant activity as compared to whole seeds that possibly may be due higher content of secondary metabolites produced during germination. PMID:26109765

  16. Central nervous system effects of meclizine and dimenhydrinate: evidence of acute tolerance to antihistamines.

    PubMed

    Manning, C; Scandale, L; Manning, E J; Gengo, F M

    1992-11-01

    Relative daytime drowsiness and performance impairment produced by meclizine and dimenhydrinate was assessed in 24 healthy male volunteers. Subjects received either dimenhydrinate, 100 mg, at 8:00 AM, 12:00 PM, and 4:00 PM; meclizine, 50 mg, at 8:00 AM, with placebo at 12:00 PM and 4:00 PM; or placebo at all three times in this randomized, double-blind, three-way crossover study. Impairment of mental performance was assessed by choice reaction time testing and digit symbol substitution scores. Drowsiness was self-assessed on the Stanford Sleepiness Scale and on a visual analog scale. Both antihistamines produced changes in digit symbol substitution, recognition time, and subjective assessments of sleepiness different from placebo. Expressed as change from baseline, the greatest reductions in digit symbol substitution scores after dimenhydrinate occurred 3 hours after the first dose (6.6 +/- 7) and were not different from the greatest measured change after meclizine (5.8 +/- 8), which occurred 9 hours after the dose was administered. Similar results were obtained with the other psychometric test scores. Self-rated sleepiness after dimenhydrinate was greatest 1 hour after the first dose, and was significantly greater than the largest degree of sleepiness after meclizine, which occurred at 7 hours after the dose. The effects of the first dose of dimenhydrinate on psychometric test scores were compared with the magnitude of the effects produced by subsequent doses. The magnitude of effect of the first dose of dimenhydrinate was significantly greater than the magnitude of effect produced by subsequent doses. The data suggest the possibility that acute tolerance to central nervous system impairment develops with multiple doses of dimenhydrinate. PMID:1474173

  17. Use of pupil size to determine the effect of electromagnetic acupuncture on activation level of the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Byeong; Choi, Woo-Hyuk; Liu, Wen-Xue; Lee, Na-Ra; Shin, Tae-Min; Lee, Yong-Heum

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic fields are widely considered as a method of treatment to increase the therapeutic effect when applied to acupoints. Hence, this study proposes a new method which creates significant stimulation of acupoints by using weak magnetic fields. We conducted this experiment in order to confirm the effect on the activation level of the autonomic nervous system by measuring pupil sizes in cases of stimulation by using manual acupuncture and electromagnetic acupuncture (EMA) at BL15. We selected 30 Hz of biphasic wave form with 570.1 Gauss. To confirm the biopotential by the magnetic flux density occurring in EMA that affected the activation of the autonomic nervous system, we observed the biopotential induced at the upper and the mid left and right trapezius. We observed a significant decrease in pupil size only in the EMA group (p < 0.05), thus confirming that EMA decreased the pupil size through activation of the parasympathetic nerve in the autonomic nervous system. Moreover, we confirmed that the amplitude of the biopotential which was caused by 570.1 Gauss was higher than ±20 μA. Thus, we can conclude that EMA treatment successfully activates the parasympathetic nerve in the autonomic nervous system by inducing a biotransformation by the induced biopotential. PMID:24929456

  18. Evaluation of the effects of mediastinal radiation therapy on autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hoca, Ayse; Yildiz, Metin; Ozyigit, Gokhan

    2012-12-01

    In this prospective study, the effects of mediastinal radiation therapy (RT) on autonomic nervous system (ANS) were investigated by heart rate variability (HRV) analysis that is accepted as a non-invasive indicator of ANS. Study was performed with the eligible patients had a histopathologically confirmed diagnosis of malignant disease with no known congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, hypertension, valvular cardiac disease or arrhythmia history. Electrocardiograms of 14 voluntary patients were recorded for duration of 5 min just before and after irradiation for the first and the 15th fractions. ANS-related HRV analysis parameters were calculated as which were recommended by Task Force of ESC/NASPE (Circulation 93:1043-1065, 1996). HRV parameters that belong to pre- and post-RT treatment of patients were compared statistically. We found that there is not effect of single-dose radiation on HRV parameter. The mean RRI (782.29 ± 115.65-738.93 ± 111.01, P < 0.014) and HF power of HRVs PSD (156.94 ± 229.37-60.71 ± 77.99, P < 0.045) decreased, and LF/HF ratio (1.38 ± 0.79-2.03 ± 1.25, P < 0.039) increased significantly with 28-Gy external radiation dose. As the effect of cumulative dose was investigated on HRV parameters, the above changes were continued to increase with 30-Gy external radiation dose. We found that mediastinal RT involving heart directly in the radiation field decreased vagal and sympathetic ANS activities, and autonomic balance shifted toward sympathetic dominance. PMID:22528518

  19. Infections of the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Vevek; Tucci, Veronica; Galwankar, Sagar

    2012-01-01

    Glycemic control is an important aspect of patient care in the surgical Infections of the nervous system are among the most difficult infections in terms of the morbidity and mortality posed to patients, and thereby require urgent and accurate diagnosis. Although viral meningitides are more common, it is the bacterial meningitides that have the potential to cause a rapidly deteriorating condition that the physician should be familiar with. Viral encephalitis frequently accompanies viral meningitis, and can produce focal neurologic findings and cognitive difficulties that can mimic other neurologic disorders. Brain abscesses also have the potential to mimic and present like other neurologic disorders, and cause more focal deficits. Finally, other infectious diseases of the central nervous system, such as prion disease and cavernous sinus thrombosis, are explored in this review. PMID:22837896

  20. Effects of gender and game type on autonomic nervous system physiological parameters in long-hour online game players.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tung-Cheng

    2013-11-01

    Online game playing may induce physiological effects. However, the physical mechanisms that cause these effects remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the physiological effects of long-hour online gaming from an autonomic nervous system (ANS) perspective. Heart rate variability (HRV), a valid and noninvasive electrocardiographic method widely used to investigate ANS balance, was used to measure physiological effect parameters. This study used a five-time, repeated measures, mixed factorial design. Results found that playing violent games causes significantly higher sympathetic activity and diastolic blood pressure than playing nonviolent games. Long-hour online game playing resulted in the gradual dominance of the parasympathetic nervous system due to physical exhaustion. Gaming workload was found to modulate the gender effects, with males registering significantly higher sympathetic activity and females significantly higher parasympathetic activity in the higher gaming workload group. PMID:23992474

  1. Neuropsychological assessment for detecting adverse effects of volatile organic compounds on the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Bolla, K I

    1991-01-01

    Because there are no direct biological markers for the substances implicated in indoor air exposure, it is impossible to directly measure if an individual or group of individuals has been exposed to a potentially neurotoxic substance in the workplace. Behavioral changes may be the earliest and only manifestation of central nervous system (CNS) effects and are often too subtle to be revealed by routine physical or neurological examination. Neuropsychological techniques are sensitive to subtle behavioral/cognitive changes that can result from exposure to neurotoxins. These techniques consist of oral and written tests that are administered by a trained examiner on a one-to-one basis. In general, a wide variety of cognitive domains are evaluated. The typical battery generally includes assessing orientation, attention, intelligence, language, visual memory, verbal memory, perception, visuoconstruction, simple motor speed, psychomotor speed, and mood. As with most assessment techniques, the neuropsychological methods have limitations. One major drawback is the availability of appropriate norms that are used to compare the results of a specific individual. Because these tasks are greatly affected by age, intelligence, and in some instances sex, the availability of appropriate norms is mandatory to determine if the CNS has been effected. Although neuropsychological tests are sensitive to the presence of CNS involvement, they are not specific. Patterns of performance seen with specific instances of neurotoxic exposure may also be seen with a number of other diseases of the CNS such as dementia, cerebrovascular disease, hydrocephalus, or normal aging. In addition, neuropsychiatric symptoms such as anxiety and/or depression are often manifested as cognitive difficulties that will mimic the cognitive dysfunction seen with toxicity of the CNS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1821386

  2. Effects of adenosine metabolism in astrocytes on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-liang; Zhang, Ya-nan; Wang, Zhong-zhuang; Xu, Wei-gang; Li, Run-ping; Zhang, Jun-dong

    2016-03-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is widely used in military operations, especially underwater missions. However, prolonged and continuous inhalation of HBO can cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT), which greatly limits HBO's application. The regulation of astrocytes to the metabolism of adenosine is involved in epilepsy. In our study, we aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on the metabolism of adenosine in the brain. Furthermore, we aimed to confirm the possible mechanism underlying adenosine's mediation of the CNS-OT. Firstly, anesthetized rats exposed to 5 atm absolute HBO for 80 min. The concentrations of extracellular adenosine, ATP, ADP, and AMP were detected. Secondly, free-moving rats were exposed to HBO at the same pressure for 20 min, and the activities of 5'-nucleotidase and ADK in brain tissues were measured. For the mechanism studies, we observed the effects of a series of different doses of drugs related to adenosine metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed HBO exposure could increase adenosine content by inhibiting ADK activity and improving 5'-nucleotidase activity. And adenosine metabolism during HBO exposure may be a protective response against HBO-induced CNS-OT. Moreover, the improvement of adenosine concentration, activation of adenosine A1R, or suppression of ADK and adenosine A2AR, which are involved in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. This is the first study to demonstrate HBO exposure regulated adenosine metabolism in the brain. Adenosine metabolism and adenosine receptors are related to HBO-induced CNS-OT development. These results will provide new potential targets for the termination or the attenuation of CNS-OT. PMID:26806404

  3. Aging changes in the nervous system

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/004023.htm Aging changes in the nervous system To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The brain and nervous system are your body's central control center. They control ...

  4. HIV Infection Seems to Affect Nervous System

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159344.html HIV Infection Seems to Affect Nervous System But symptoms tend to subside once antiretroviral drugs ... mild, it is clear that HIV affects the nervous system within days of infection," she said in a ...

  5. Effects of rat cytomegalovirus on the nervous system of the early rat embryo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuning; Guan, YingJun; Li, Fengjie; Li, Xutong; Wang, Xiaowen; Guan, Zhiyu; Sheng, Kai; Yu, Li; Liu, Zhijun

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the impact of rat cytomegalovirus (RCMV) infection on the development of the nervous system in rat embryos, and to evaluate the involvement of Wnt signaling pathway key molecules and the downstream gene neurogenin 1 (Ngn1) in RCMV infected neural stem cells (NSCs). Infection and control groups were established, each containing 20 pregnant Wistar rats. Rats in the infection group were inoculated with RCMV by intraperitoneal injection on the first day of pregnancy. Rat E20 embryos were taken to evaluate the teratogenic rate. NSCs were isolated from E13 embryos, and maintained in vitro. We found: 1) Poor fetal development was found in the infection group with low survival and high malformation rates. 2) The proliferation and differentiation of NSCs were affected. In the infection group, NSCs proliferated more slowly and had a lower neurosphere formation rate than the control. The differentiation ratio from NSCs to neurons and glial cells was significantly different from that of the control, showed by immunofluorescence staining. 3) Ngn1 mRNA expression and the nuclear β-catenin protein level were significantly lower than the control on day 2 when NSCs differentiated. 4) The Morris water maze test was performed on 4-week pups, and the infected rats were found worse in learning and memory ability. In a summary, RCMV infection caused abnormalities in the rat embryonic nervous system, significantly inhibited NSC proliferation and differentiation, and inhibited the expression of key molecules in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway so as to affect NSCs differentiation. This may be an important mechanism by which RCMV causes embryonic nervous system abnormalities. PMID:22899431

  6. The Nervous System and Gastrointestinal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altaf, Muhammad A.; Sood, Manu R.

    2008-01-01

    The enteric nervous system is an integrative brain with collection of neurons in the gastrointestinal tract which is capable of functioning independently of the central nervous system (CNS). The enteric nervous system modulates motility, secretions, microcirculation, immune and inflammatory responses of the gastrointestinal tract. Dysphagia,…

  7. Effect of the sympathetic nervous system co-transmitters ATP and norepinephrine on thermoregulatory response to cooling

    PubMed Central

    Kozyreva, Tamara V; Meyta, Ekaterina S; Khramova, Galina M

    2015-01-01

    The existence of co-transmitters of the sympathetic nervous system norepinephrine (NE) and ATP implies variations in the neuromodulator mechanisms of physiological processes. The role of ATP, as a transmitter of the peripheral part of sympathetic nervous system in the formation of thermoregulatory response is not clear. Whether ATP modulates any parameters of thermoregulatory response to cold; if yes, whether co-transmitters of sympathetic nervous system ATP and NE differently modulate thermoregulatory response and on which parameters of cold-defense response the influence of ATP is more pronounced. Experiments were carried out on rats. ATP (10−6), NE (10−3), and their mixture introduced iontophoretically into skin. Their effects on thermoregulatory parameters (temperature parameters, total oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide release, muscle activity, respiratory coefficient) were studied in thermoneutral conditions (without cold load) and under the cooling. In thermoneutral conditions both ATP and NE enhance total metabolism through increase in metabolic rate of lipids, NE effect being more expressed. It was shown that ATP and NE influence predominantly on the different components of the metabolic response to cold. ATP affects to the greatest extent on cold muscular thermogenesis by increasing shivering almost twofold and lowering its initiation temperature thresholds, whereas NE mainly promotes increase in non-shivering thermogenesis. When introducing the mixture of these biological substances the effect of NE is more expressed and the ATP effect is weakened. The obtained results allow to suggest that in vivo the NE effects can be more expressed when the sympathetic nervous system is stimulated by cold. Thus, NE and ATP being co-transmitters and predominantly acting on the different processes of cold thermogenesis (ATP on shivering and NE on non-shivering) may organize the certain sequence of cold defense responses.

  8. Effect of a botanical composition, UP446, on respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous systems in beagle dogs and rats.

    PubMed

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young Chul; Jia, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Extensive safety evaluation of UP446, a botanical composition comprised of standardized extracts from roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and heartwoods of Acacia catechu, has been reported previously. Here we carried out additional studies to assess the effect of UP446 on respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous (CNS) systems. A Functional observational battery (FOB) and whole body plethysmography system in rats and implanted telemetry in dogs were utilized to evaluate the potential CNS, respiratory and cardiovascular toxicity, respectively. UP446 was administered orally at dose levels of 800, 2000 and 5000 mg/kg to SpragueDawley rats and at 4 ascending dose levels (0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) to beagle dogs. No abnormal effects were observed on the cage side, open field, hand held, and sensori-motor observations suggestive of toxicity in respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous (CNS) systems. Rectal temperatures were comparable for each treatment groups. Similarly, respiratory rate, tidal volume and minute volume were unaffected by any of the treatment groups. No UP446 related changes were observed on blood pressure, heart rate and electrocardiogram in beagle dogs at dose levels of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg. Some minor incidental, non-dose correlated changes were observed in the FOB assessment. These data suggest that UP446 has minimal or no pharmaco-toxicological effect on the respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous systems. PMID:27012374

  9. NASA Models of Space Radiation Induced Cancer, Circulatory Disease, and Central Nervous System Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori J.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2013-01-01

    The risks of late effects from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are potentially a limitation to long-term space travel. The late effects of highest concern have significant lethality including cancer, effects to the central nervous system (CNS), and circulatory diseases (CD). For cancer and CD the use of age and gender specific models with uncertainty assessments based on human epidemiology data for low LET radiation combined with relative biological effectiveness factors (RBEs) and dose- and dose-rate reduction effectiveness factors (DDREF) to extrapolate these results to space radiation exposures is considered the current "state-of-the-art". The revised NASA Space Risk Model (NSRM-2014) is based on recent radio-epidemiology data for cancer and CD, however a key feature of the NSRM-2014 is the formulation of particle fluence and track structure based radiation quality factors for solid cancer and leukemia risk estimates, which are distinct from the ICRP quality factors, and shown to lead to smaller uncertainties in risk estimates. Many persons exposed to radiation on earth as well as astronauts are life-time never-smokers, which is estimated to significantly modify radiation cancer and CD risk estimates. A key feature of the NASA radiation protection model is the classification of radiation workers by smoking history in setting dose limits. Possible qualitative differences between GCR and low LET radiation increase uncertainties and are not included in previous risk estimates. Two important qualitative differences are emerging from research studies. The first is the increased lethality of tumors observed in animal models compared to low LET radiation or background tumors. The second are Non- Targeted Effects (NTE), which include bystander effects and genomic instability, which has been observed in cell and animal models of cancer risks. NTE's could lead to significant changes in RBE and DDREF estimates for GCR particles, and the potential

  10. Enhancement of the white matter following prophylactic therapy of the central nervous system for leukemia: radiation effects and methotrexate leukoencephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Shalen, P.R.; Ostrow, P.T.; Glass, P.J.

    1981-08-01

    The authors report a case of fatal necrotizing leukoencephalopathy following prophylactic therapy of the central nervous system for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The clinical, CT, and neuropathological findings are described. The CT scan demonstrated symmetrical white-matter enhancement. Histological analysis was consistent with the effects of irradiation and methotrexate. The differential diagnosis of the clinical and CT findings is discussed. Brain biopsy is the diagnostic procedure of choice.

  11. Glucocorticoids and nervous system plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Madalena, Kathryn M.; Lerch, Jessica K.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptor (GC/GR) interactions alter numerous aspects of neuronal function. These consequences (e.g., anti-inflammatory vs. pro-inflammatory) can vary depending on the duration of GC exposure or central nervous system (CNS) injury model. In this review we discuss how GC/GR interactions impact neuronal recovery after a central or peripheral nerve injury and discuss how GC exposure duration can produce divergent CNS neuronal growth responses. Finally we consider how new findings on gender specific immune cell responses after a nerve injury could intersect with GC/GR interactions to impact pain processing. PMID:26981074

  12. Infections of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, A A

    1998-05-01

    Epidemiologic trends causing infections of the nervous system remain a significant source of morbidity and mortality one half-century after the introduction of penicillin. This article outlines common causes of bacterial meningitis, aseptic meningitis syndrome, encephalitis, abscess, spinal cord syndromes, and cranial and peripheral nerve problems. Recommendations for diagnostic evaluation and both empiric and definitive antimicrobial therapy are offered; controversial management issues are also discussed. The protean manifestations of varicella-zoster virus and Lyme diseases are outlined. In addition, special considerations in the immunocompromised host, including organ transplant recipients, cancer patients, and HIV-positive persons are explained, and antimicrobial therapy is discussed. PMID:9537969

  13. Effect of 100 Hz electroacupuncture on salivary immunoglobulin A and the autonomic nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Hideaki, Waki; Tatsuya, Hisajima; Shogo, Miyazaki; Naruto, Yoshida; Hideaki, Tamai; Yoichi, Minakawa; Yoshihiro, Okuma; Kazuo, Uebaba; Hidenori, Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Background A previous study has reported that low-frequency (LF) electroacupuncture (EA) influences salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) and the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The ANS is known to control the secretion volume of sIgA; however, the effect of high-frequency (HF) EA on salivary sIgA has not been determined. We investigated whether HF EA affects salivary sIgA levels and the ANS. Method Sixteen healthy subjects were randomly classified into two groups: a control group and an EA group. After a 5 min rest, subjects in the EA group received EA at 100 Hz bilaterally at LI4 and LI11 for 15 min before resting for a further 40 min post-stimulation. Subjects in the control group rested for a total of 60 min. Measurements of the ANS and sIgA levels in both groups were made before, immediately after, 20 min after, and 40 min after rest or 15 min EA treatment. HF and LF components of heart rate variability were analysed as markers of ANS function. LF/HF ratio and HF were taken as indices of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity, respectively. Salivary protein concentrations and sIgA levels were determined by Bradford protein assay and ELISA, respectively. Results LF/HF ratio was significantly increased immediately after EA. HF was significantly increased at 20 min after EA and sIgA level was significantly increased at 40 min after EA. In addition, HF and salivary sIgA level were positively correlated with each another. Conclusions HF EA exerted sequential positive effects on sympathetic nerve activity, parasympathetic nerve activity, and salivary sIgA level (immediately and after 20 and 40 min, respectively). HF EA may increase salivary sIgA levels by influencing parasympathetic nerve activity. PMID:26449884

  14. Gene-Chemical Interactions in the Developing Mammalian Nervous System: Effects on Proliferation, Neurogenesis and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Donald A.; Opanashuk, Lisa; Zharkovsky, Aleksander; Weiss, Bernie

    2010-01-01

    The orderly formation of the nervous system requires a multitude of complex, integrated and simultaneously occurring processes. Neural progenitor cells expand through proliferation, commit to different cell fates, exit the cell cycle, generate different neuronal and glial cell types, and new neurons migrate to specified areas and establish synaptic connections. Gestational and perinatal exposure to environmental toxicants, pharmacological agents and drugs of abuse produce immediate, persistent or late-onset alterations in behavioral, cognitive, sensory and/or motor functions. These alterations reflect the disruption of the underlying processes of CNS formation and development. To determine the neurotoxic mechanisms that underlie these deficits it is necessary to analyze and dissect the complex molecular processes that occur during the proliferation, neurogenesis and differentiation of cells. This symposium will provide a framework for understanding the orchestrated events of neurogenesis, the coordination of proliferation and cell fate specification by selected genes, and the effects of well-known neurotoxicants on neurogenesis in the retina, hippocampus and cerebellum. These three tissues share common developmental profiles, mediate diverse neuronal activities and function, and thus provide important substrates for analysis. This paper summarizes four invited talks that were presented at the 12th International Neurotoxicology Association meeting held in Jerusalem, Israel during the summer of 2009. Donald A. Fox described the structural and functional alterations following low-level gestational lead exposure in children and rodents that produced a supernormal electroretinogram and selective increases in neurogenesis and cell proliferation of late-born retinal neurons (rod photoreceptors and bipolar cells), but not Müller glia cells, in mice. Lisa Opanashuk discussed how dioxin [TCDD] binding to the arylhydrocarbon receptor [AhR], a transcription factor that

  15. Factors Predicting the Effects of Hybrid Assistive Limb Robot Suit during the Acute Phase of Central Nervous System Injury

    PubMed Central

    CHIHARA, Hideo; TAKAGI, Yasushi; NISHINO, Kazunari; YOSHIDA, Kazumichi; ARAKAWA, Yoshiki; KIKUCHI, Takayuki; TAKENOBU, Yohei; MIYAMOTO, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    To improve the activities of daily living of patients with injury to the central nervous system, physical therapy starting from the acute phase of the injury is important. Recently, the efficacy of physical therapy using a hybrid assistive limb (HAL) robot suit was reported. However, individual differences exist in the effects of HAL. We investigated factors predicting the effects of HAL in 15 patients at our institution with central nervous system injury, primarily due to stroke, who underwent training using HAL during the acute phase. Patients were classified as either “with HAL suitability” or “without HAL suitability” based on scores from 10-m walking speed, gait, satisfaction, and pain. In both groups, Brunnstrom stage before HAL intervention, Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA), stroke impairment assessment set (SIAS), and functional independence measure (FIM) were evaluated. Although motor function items did not differ significantly, FIM cognitive function items (P = 0.036), visuospatial perception items on SIAS (P = 0.0277), and pain items on SIAS (P = 0.0122) differed significantly between groups. These results indicated that training using HAL does not involve pain in patients with central nervous system injury during the acute phase, and exhibits positive effects in patients without pain and with high communication ability and visuospatial perception function. When conducting HAL intervention, incorporating functional assessment scores (FIM and SIAS), including peripheral items, may be useful to predict the suitability of HAL. PMID:26538291

  16. Systemic effects of low-power laser irradiation on the peripheral and central nervous system, cutaneous wounds, and burns

    SciTech Connect

    Rochkind, S.; Rousso, M.; Nissan, M.; Villarreal, M.; Barr-Nea, L.; Rees, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we direct attention to the systemic effect of low-power helium-neon (HeNe) laser irradiation on the recovery of the injured peripheral and central nervous system, as well as healing of cutaneous wounds and burns. Laser irradiation on only the right side in bilaterally inflicted cutaneous wounds enhanced recovery in both sides compared to the nonirradiated control group (P less than .01). Similar results were obtained in bilateral burns: irradiating one of the burned sites also caused accelerated healing in the nonirradiated site (P less than .01). However, in the nonirradiated control group, all rats suffered advanced necrosis of the feet and bilateral gangrene. Low-power HeNe laser irradiation applied to a crushed injured sciatic nerve in the right leg in a bilaterally inflicted crush injury, significantly increased the compound action potential in the left nonirradiated leg as well. The statistical analysis shows a highly significant difference between the laser-treated group and the control nonirradiated group (P less than .001). Finally, the systemic effect was found in the spinal cord segments corresponding to the crushed sciatic nerves. The bilateral retrograde degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord expected after the bilateral crush injury of the peripheral nerves was greatly reduced in the laser treated group. The systemic effects reported here are relevant in terms of the clinical application of low-power laser irradiation as well as for basic research into the possible mechanisms involved.

  17. Aquaporin Biology and Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Barbara, Buffoli

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the movement of water through cell membranes has been greatly advanced by the discovery of a family of water-specific, membrane-channel proteins: the Aquaporins (AQPs). These proteins are present in organisms at all levels of life, and their unique permeability characteristics and distribution in numerous tissues indicate diverse roles in the regulation of water homeostasis. Phenotype analysis of AQP knock-out mice has confirmed the predicted role of AQPs in osmotically driven transepithelial fluid transport, as occurs in the urinary concentrating mechanism and glandular fluid secretion. Regarding their expression in nervous system, there are evidences suggesting that AQPs are differentially expressed in the peripheral versus central nervous system and that channel-mediated water transport mechanisms may be involved in cerebrospinal fluid formation, neuronal signal transduction and information processing. Moreover, a number of recent studies have revealed the importance of mammalian AQPs in both physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms and have suggested that pharmacological modulation of AQP expression and activity may provide new tools for the treatment of variety of human disorders in which water and small solute transport may be involved. For all the AQPs, new contributions to physiological functions are likely to be discovered with ongoing work in this rapidly expanding field of research. PMID:21119880

  18. The effects of constrained left versus right monocular viewing on the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Burtis, D Brandon; Heilman, Kenneth M; Mo, Jue; Wang, Chao; Lewis, Gregory F; Davilla, Maria I; Ding, Mingzhou; Porges, Stephen W; Williamson, John B

    2014-07-01

    Asymmetrical activation of right and left hemispheres differentially influences the autonomic nervous system. Additionally, each hemisphere primarily receives retinocollicular projections from the contralateral eye. To learn if asymmetrical hemispheric activation induced by monocular viewing would influence relative pupillary size and respiratory hippus variability (RHV), a measure of parasympathetic activity, healthy participants had their left, right or neither eye patched. Pupillary sizes were then recorded with infrared pupillography. Pupillary dilation was significantly greater with left than right eye viewing. RHV, however, was not different between eye viewing conditions. These differences in pupil dilatation may have been caused by relatively greater activation of the right hemispheric-mediated sympathetic activity induced by left monocular viewing or relatively greater deactivation of the left hemispheric-mediated parasympathetic activity induced by right eye patching. The absence of an asymmetry in RHV, however, suggests that hemispheric asymmetry of sympathetic activation was primarily responsible for this ocular asymmetry of pupil dilation. PMID:24878321

  19. The Effects of Constrained Left versus Right Monocular Viewing on the Autonomic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Burtis, D. Brandon; Heilman, Kenneth M.; Mo, Jue; Wang, Chao; Lewis, Gregory F.; Davilla, Maria I.; Ding, Mingzhou; Porges, Stephen W.; Williamson, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetrical activation of right and left hemispheres differentially influences the autonomic nervous system. Additionally, each hemisphere primarily receives retinocollicular projections from the contralateral eye. To learn if asymmetrical hemispheric activation induced by monocular viewing would influence relative pupillary size and respiratory hippus variability (RHV), a measure of parasympathetic activity, healthy participants had their left, right or neither eye patched. Pupillary sizes were then recorded with infrared pupillography. Pupillary dilation was significantly greater with left than right eye viewing. RHV, however, was not different between eye viewing conditions. These differences in pupil dilatation may have been caused by relatively greater activation of the right hemispheric-mediated sympathetic activity induced by left monocular viewing or relatively greater deactivation of the left hemispheric-mediated parasympathetic activity induced by right eye patching. The absence of an asymmetry in RHV, however, suggests that hemispheric asymmetry of sympathetic activation was primarily responsible for this ocular asymmetry of pupil dilation. PMID:24878321

  20. Effect of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia on the central nervous system: evidence from experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Jensen, V F H; Bøgh, I B; Lykkesfeldt, J

    2014-03-01

    Insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (IIH) is a major acute complication in type 1 as well as in type 2 diabetes, particularly during intensive insulin therapy. The brain plays a central role in the counter-regulatory response by eliciting parasympathetic and sympathetic hormone responses to restore normoglycaemia. Brain glucose concentrations, being approximately 15-20% of the blood glucose concentration in humans, are rigorously maintained during hypoglycaemia through adaptions such as increased cerebral glucose transport, decreased cerebral glucose utilisation and, possibly, by using central nervous system glycogen as a glucose reserve. However, during sustained hypoglycaemia, the brain cannot maintain a sufficient glucose influx and, as the cerebral hypoglycaemia becomes severe, electroencephalogram changes, oxidative stress and regional neuronal death ensues. With particular focus on evidence from experimental studies on nondiabetic IIH, this review outlines the central mechanisms behind the counter-regulatory response to IIH, as well as cerebral adaption to avoid sequelae of cerebral neuroglycopaenia, including seizures and coma. PMID:24428753

  1. [Primary central nervous system vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Schuster, S; Magnus, T

    2015-12-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is a rare disorder. However, it is often considered in the differential diagnosis of vascular or inflammatory CNS diseases. Diagnosis is challenging, as specific biomarkers are lacking and the clinical presentation can be variable. A definitive diagnosis can only be established by biopsy of the inflammatory changes in the vascular wall. Alternatively, the diagnosis of PACNS can also be based on the synopsis of clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. Different subtypes of PACNS have been described in recent years, depending on the size of the affected vessels or histopathological patterns. Based on selective literature research in the database PubMed on the subject of CNS vasculitis, this article reviews the diagnostic characteristics and differential diagnosis of the condition. We suggest a diagnostic algorithm customized to the size of the affected vessels. Lastly, therapeutic options and the outcome of PACNS are briefly outlined. PMID:26589203

  2. Regeneration in the nervous system with erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Globally, greater than 30 million individuals are afflicted with disorders of the nervous system accompanied by tens of thousands of new cases annually with limited, if any, treatment options. Erythropoietin (EPO) offers an exciting and novel therapeutic strategy to address both acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. EPO governs a number of critical protective and regenerative mechanisms that can impact apoptotic and autophagic programmed cell death pathways through protein kinase B (Akt), sirtuins, mammalian forkhead transcription factors, and wingless signaling. Translation of the cytoprotective pathways of EPO into clinically effective treatments for some neurodegenerative disorders has been promising, but additional work is necessary. In particular, development of new treatments with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents such as EPO brings several important challenges that involve detrimental vascular outcomes and tumorigenesis. Future work that can effectively and safely harness the complexity of the signaling pathways of EPO will be vital for the fruitful treatment of disorders of the nervous system. PMID:26549969

  3. Peripheral Nervous System Manifestations of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brizzi, Kate T.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious causes of peripheral nervous system (PNS) disease are underrecognized but potentially treatable. Heightened awareness educed by advanced understanding of the presentations and management of these infections can aid diagnosis and facilitate treatment. In this review, we discuss the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of common bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections that affect the PNS. We additionally detail PNS side effects of some frequently used antimicrobial agents. PMID:25360209

  4. Selective and antigen-dependent effects of myelin degeneration on central nervous system inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aboul-Enein, Fahmy; Bauer, Jan; Klein, Matthias; Schubart, Anna; Flügel, Alexander; Ritter, Thomas; Kawakami, Naoto; Siedler, Frank; Linington, Christopher; Wekerle, Hartmut; Lassmann, Hans; Bradl, Monika

    2004-12-01

    Damage to myelin sheath or oligodendrocytes may precede or even provoke inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS), but the extent to which these degenerative changes affect inflammation remains largely undefined. To study these processes in more detail, we used CNS antigen-specific T cells in the presence or absence of anti-myelin antibodies to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in transgenic Lewis rats with low-grade subclinical myelin degeneration and associated microglia cell activation, and in wild-type Lewis rats with an intact CNS. We found that myelin degeneration affects the localization of inflammatory lesions, the numbers of T cells recruited to these lesions, and the severity of the resulting clinical disease. In addition, myelin degeneration and associated microglia cell activation jointly enhance the susceptibility of the CNS to the action of anti-myelin antibodies. Our data show that even subtle alterations of myelin and oligodendrocytes may massively amplify the extent of demyelination and tissue damage, involving different immune effector mechanisms. A similar causal relationship might also operate in human patients with multiple sclerosis, where T cell-mediated inflammation and antibody-mediated demyelination have been documented, and where genetic factors might determine the susceptibility of the target tissue for immune-mediated injury. PMID:15624765

  5. Bendiocarb effect on liver and central nervous system in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Petrovova, Eva; Sedmera, David; Lesnik, Frantisek; Luptakova, Lenka

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate toxicity of bendiocarb (2, 3-isopropyledene-dioxyphenyl methylcarbamate) to organs of chicken embryo. The toxic action of bendiocarb was observed on liver and central nervous system (CNS). Bendiocarb was administered to chicken embryos at embryonic day (ED) 3 in a dose 500 microg/egg and 10 ED (800 microg/egg). The observations showed no macroscopic or microscopic changes in the liver and CNS with either dose or day of incubation when the bendiocarb was administered. The liver and CNS were also investigated for caspase activity in relation to application of bendiocarb and no differences in the number of cells with caspase immunopositivity were observed in comparison with the control. The results obtained indicate that bendiocarb administered in the respective doses showed no toxicity to investigated organs. Furthermore, both at the early (3 ED) and the later (10 ED) stages of development no increase in numbers of apoptotic cells in chicken embryos was observed. PMID:19365755

  6. Effects of diving and oxygen on autonomic nervous system and cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Winklewski, Pawel J; Kot, Jacek; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Nuckowska, Magdalena K; Tkachenko, Yurii

    2013-09-01

    Recreational scuba diving is a popular leisure activity with the number of divers reaching several millions worldwide. Scuba diving represents a huge challenge for integrative physiology. In mammalian evolution, physiological reflexes developed to deal with lack of oxygen, rather than with an excess, which makes adaptations to scuba diving more difficult to describe and understand than those associated with breath-hold diving. The underwater environment significantly limits the use of equipment to register the organism's functions, so, in most instances, scientific theories are built on experiments that model real diving to some extent, like hyperbaric exposures, dive reflexes or water immersion. The aim of this review is to summarise the current knowledge related to the influence exerted by physiological conditions specific to diving on the autonomic nervous system and cerebral blood flow. The main factors regulating cerebral blood flow during scuba diving are discussed as follows: 1) increased oxygen partial pressure; 2) immersion-related trigemino-cardiac reflexes and 3) exposure to cold, exercise and stress. Also discussed are the potential mechanisms associated with immersion pulmonary oedema. PMID:24122190

  7. Delayed Effects of Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Germ Cell Tumor Patients With Central Nervous System Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Danielle M. Einhorn, Lawrence H.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Central nervous system (CNS) metastases are uncommon in patients with germ cell tumors, with an incidence of 2-3%. CNS metastases have been managed with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and concomitant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Our previous study did not observe serious CNS toxicity (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 1991;22:17-22). We now report on 5 patients who developed delayed significant CNS toxicity. Patients and Methods: We observed 5 patients with delayed CNS toxicity. The initial diagnosis was between 1981 and 2003. All patients had poor-risk disease according to the International Germ Cell Consensus Collaborative Group criteria. Of the 5 patients, 3 had CNS metastases at diagnosis and 2 developed relapses with CNS metastases. These 5 patients underwent WBRT to 4,000-5,000 cGy in 18-28 fractions concurrently with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Results: All 5 patients developed delayed symptoms consistent with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The symptoms included seizures, hemiparesis, cranial neuropathy, headaches, blindness, dementia, and ataxia. The median time from WBRT to CNS symptoms was 72 months (range, 9-228). Head imaging revealed multiple abnormalities consistent with gliosis and diffuse cerebral atrophy. Of the 5 patients, 3 had progressive and 2 stable symptoms. Treatment with surgery and/or steroids had modest benefit. The progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy resulted in significant debility in all 5 patients, resulting in death (3 patients), loss of work, steroid-induced morbidity, and recurrent hospitalizations. Conclusion: Whole brain radiotherapy is not innocuous in young patients with germ cell tumors and can cause late CNS toxicity.

  8. [Effects of inorganic lead exposure on the autonomic nervous system and on the variability of heart rate among workers at a battery plant].

    PubMed

    Muzi, G; Murgia, N; Dell'Omo, M; Fiordi, T; Sposini, F; Argentino, A; Apostoli, P; Abbritti, G

    2005-01-01

    Inorganic Lead can cause a toxic effect on Central Nervous System, Peripheral Nervous System and Autonomic Nervous System (ANS). A damage of the ANS can determine an heart rate variability (HRV) reduction. In this study 43 battery workers exposed to inorganic lead with mean PbB = 31.63 microg/dl (DS 14.77 microg/dl) and 35 not exposed subjects underwent to an evaluation of heart rate variability by specific tests. Heart rate variability in the exposed group was, for some tests (lying to standing, lying to standing-standing to lying) reduced compared with not exposed subjects and for other tests (Valsalva manouvre, lying to standing-standing to lying) correlated with PbB and Zinc Protoporphyrin (ZPP), but not with BMI, age and smoking habits. This study, like others conducted on similar populations, suggest an effect of occupational inorganic lead exposure on Autonomic Nervous System and heart rate variability PMID:15915655

  9. Autonomic nervous system-mediated effects of galanin-like peptide on lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hirako, Satoshi; Wada, Nobuhiro; Kageyama, Haruaki; Takenoya, Fumiko; Izumida, Yoshihiko; Kim, Hyounju; Iizuka, Yuzuru; Matsumoto, Akiyo; Okabe, Mai; Kimura, Ai; Suzuki, Mamiko; Yamanaka, Satoru; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Galanin-like peptide (GALP) is a neuropeptide involved in the regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism in mammals. While a weight loss effect of GALP has been reported, its effects on lipid metabolism have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine if GALP regulates lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissue via an action on the sympathetic nervous system. The respiratory exchange ratio of mice administered GALP intracerebroventricularly was lower than that of saline-treated animals, and fatty acid oxidation-related gene mRNA levels were increased in the liver. Even though the respiratory exchange ratio was reduced by GALP, this change was not significant when mice were treated with the sympatholytic drug, guanethidine. Lipolysis-related gene mRNA levels were increased in the adipose tissue of GALP-treated mice compared with saline-treated animals. These results show that GALP stimulates fatty acid β-oxidation in liver and lipolysis in adipose tissue, and suggest that the anti-obesity effect of GALP may be due to anorexigenic actions and improvement of lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues via the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:26892462

  10. Autonomic nervous system-mediated effects of galanin-like peptide on lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Hirako, Satoshi; Wada, Nobuhiro; Kageyama, Haruaki; Takenoya, Fumiko; Izumida, Yoshihiko; Kim, Hyounju; Iizuka, Yuzuru; Matsumoto, Akiyo; Okabe, Mai; Kimura, Ai; Suzuki, Mamiko; Yamanaka, Satoru; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Galanin-like peptide (GALP) is a neuropeptide involved in the regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism in mammals. While a weight loss effect of GALP has been reported, its effects on lipid metabolism have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine if GALP regulates lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissue via an action on the sympathetic nervous system. The respiratory exchange ratio of mice administered GALP intracerebroventricularly was lower than that of saline-treated animals, and fatty acid oxidation-related gene mRNA levels were increased in the liver. Even though the respiratory exchange ratio was reduced by GALP, this change was not significant when mice were treated with the sympatholytic drug, guanethidine. Lipolysis-related gene mRNA levels were increased in the adipose tissue of GALP-treated mice compared with saline-treated animals. These results show that GALP stimulates fatty acid β-oxidation in liver and lipolysis in adipose tissue, and suggest that the anti-obesity effect of GALP may be due to anorexigenic actions and improvement of lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues via the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:26892462

  11. Stress, sex, and the enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Million, M; Larauche, M

    2016-09-01

    Made up of millions of enteric neurons and glial cells, the enteric nervous system (ENS) is in a key position to modulate the secretomotor function and visceral pain of the gastrointestinal tract. The early life developmental period, through which most of the ENS development occurs, is highly susceptible to microenvironmental perturbation. Over the past decade, accumulating evidence has shown the impact of stress and early life adversity (ELA) on host gastrointestinal pathophysiology. While most of the focus has been on alterations in brain structure and function, limited experimental work in rodents suggest that the enteric nervous system can also be directly affected, as shown by changes in the number, phenotype, and reactivity of enteric nerves. The work of Medland et al. in the current issue of this journal demonstrates that such alterations also occur in pigs, a larger mammalian species with high translational value to human. This work also highlights a sex-differential susceptibility of the ENS to the effect of ELA, which could contribute to the higher prevalence of GI disorders in women. In this mini-review, we will discuss the development and composition of the ENS and related gastrointestinal sensory motor and secretory functions. We will then focus on the influence of stress on the enteric nervous system, with a particular emphasis on neurodevelopmental changes. Finally, we will discuss the influence of sex on those parameters. PMID:27561694

  12. Effects of sarin on the nervous system of subway workers seven years after the Tokyo subway sarin attack.

    PubMed

    Miyaki, Koichi; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Maekawa, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Yasutaka; Asukai, Nozomu; Yoshimura, Kimio; Etoh, Norihito; Matsumoto, Yukio; Kikuchi, Yuriko; Kumagai, Nami; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2005-07-01

    This study was designed to assess the after effects of sarin exposure on the nervous system in victims of the Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, which occurred on 20 March, 1995. We performed a similar study 3 yr after the disaster. This time, we newly enrolled 36 staff of the Teito Rapid Transit Authority (Tokyo Eidan subway) to assess the 7 yr after effects on the nervous system, and merged previous data including unpublished data to enhance statistical power. New subjects consisted of 23 male exposed subjects and 13 referent subjects matched for age and working types. Neurobehavioral tests for psychomotor function and memory, stabilometry, and Benton visual retention test were performed. As reported previously, the exposed group performed significantly less well in the psychomotor function test (tapping) than the referent group (117.8 +/- 1.2 vs. 105.6 +/- 1.2 msec). Using merged data, this phenomenon was also observed in a dose-dependent manner and the exposed group performed significantly less well in the backward digit span test (4.47 +/- 1.17 vs. 5.11 +/- 1.65 digits). These results indicate that chronic decline of psychomotor function and memory function still exist 7 yr after the sarin exposure. PMID:16096354

  13. An animal model to study toxicity of central nervous system therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Effects on behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenix, P.J.; Kernan, W.J.; Tassinari, M.S.; Schunior, A.; Waber, D.P.; Howes, A.; Tarbell, N.J. )

    1990-10-15

    Central nervous system prophylactic therapy used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia can reduce intelligence quotient scores and impair memory and attention in children. Cranial irradiation, intrathecal methotrexate, and steroids are commonly utilized in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy. How they induce neurotoxicity is unknown. This study employs an animal model to explore the induction of neurotoxicity. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 17 and 18 days of age were administered 18 mg/kg prednisolone, 2 mg/kg methotrexate, and 1000 cGy cranial irradiation. Another 18-day-old group was administered 1000 cGy cranial irradiation but no drugs. Matching controls received saline and/or a sham exposure to radiation. All animals at 6 weeks and 4 months of age were tested for alterations in spontaneous behavior. A computer pattern recognition system automatically recorded and classified individual behavioral acts displayed during exploration of a novel environment. Measures of behavioral initiations, total time, and time structure were used to compare treated and control animals. A permanent sex-specific change in the time structure of behavior was induced by the prednisolone, methotrexate, and radiation treatment but not by radiation alone. Unlike hyperactivity, the effect consisted of abnormal clustering and dispersion of acts in a pattern indicative of disrupted development of sexually dimorphic behavior. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an animal model delineating the agent/agents responsible for the neurotoxicity of central nervous system prophylactic therapy.

  14. Central Nervous System Complications of Oncologic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hoeffner, Ellen G

    2016-08-01

    Traditional and newer agents used to treat cancer can cause significant toxicity to the central nervous system. MRI of the brain and spine is the imaging modality of choice for patients with cancer who develop neurologic symptoms. It is important to be aware of the agents that can cause neurotoxicity and their associated imaging findings so that patients are properly diagnosed and treated. In some instances conventional MRI may not be able to differentiate posttreatment effects from disease progression. In these instances advanced imaging techniques may be helpful, although further research is still needed. PMID:27444003

  15. Fampridine-PR (prolonged released 4-aminopyridine) is not effective in patients with inflammatory demyelination of the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Leussink, Verena-Isabell; Stettner, Mark; Warnke, Clemens; Hartung, Hans-Peter

    2016-06-01

    Fampridine-PR is a voltage-gated potassium channel inhibitor potentially improving nerve conduction in demyelinated axons. Based on its established clinical efficacy in patients with demyelination in the central nervous system, we assessed if fampridine-PR is also effective in patients with inflammatory demyelination of the peripheral nerve. In this small open-label study, 10 patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) were treated with fampridine-PR 10 mg BID for 28 days and assessed clinically as well as by nerve conduction studies. In this study, Fampridine-PR failed to improve CIDP based on clinical measures and nerve conduction studies. Our findings suggest that Fampridine-PR appears to be ineffective in demyelinating polyneuropathies. These observations may indicate a more complex mode of action beyond improving action potential conduction in demyelinated axons. PMID:26968589

  16. Adverse effects of cigarette and noncigarette smoke exposure on the autonomic nervous system: mechanisms and implications for cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Middlekauff, Holly R; Park, Jeanie; Moheimani, Roya S

    2014-10-21

    This review summarizes the detrimental effects of cigarette and noncigarette emission exposure on autonomic function, with particular emphasis on the mechanisms of acute and chronic modulation of the sympathetic nervous system. We propose that the nicotine and fine particulate matter in tobacco smoke lead to increased sympathetic nerve activity, which becomes persistent via a positive feedback loop between sympathetic nerve activity and reactive oxidative species. Furthermore, we propose that baroreflex suppression of sympathetic activation is attenuated in habitual smokers; that is, the baroreflex plays a permissive role, allowing sympathoexcitation to occur without restraint in the setting of increased pressor response. This model is also applicable to other nontobacco cigarette emission exposures (e.g., marijuana, waterpipes [hookahs], electronic cigarettes, and even air pollution). Fortunately, emerging data suggest that baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic function may be restored after smoking cessation, providing further evidence in support of the health benefits of smoking cessation. PMID:25323263

  17. Nutritional stimulation of the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Luyer, Misha D P; Habes, Quirine; van Hak, Richard; Buurman, Wim

    2011-09-14

    Disturbance of the inflammatory response in the gut is important in several clinical diseases ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to postoperative ileus. Several feedback mechanisms exist that control the inflammatory cascade and avoid collateral damage. In the gastrointestinal tract, it is of particular importance to control the immune response to maintain the balance that allows dietary uptake and utilization of nutrients on one hand, while preventing invasion of bacteria and toxins on the other hand. The process of digestion and absorption of nutrients requires a relative hyporesponsiveness of the immune cells in the gut to luminal contents which is not yet fully understood. Recently, the autonomic nervous system has been identified as an important pathway to control local and systemic inflammation and gut barrier integrity. Activation of the pathway is possible via electrical or via pharmacological interventions, but is also achieved in a physiological manner by ingestion of dietary lipids. Administration of dietary lipids has been shown to be very effective in reducing the inflammatory cascade and maintaining intestinal barrier integrity in several experimental studies. This beneficial effect of nutrition on the inflammatory response and intestinal barrier integrity opens new therapeutic opportunities for treatment of certain gastrointestinal disorders. Furthermore, this neural feedback mechanism provides more insight in the relative hyporesponsiveness of the immune cells in the gut. Here, we will discuss the regulatory function of the autonomic nervous system on the inflammatory response and gut barrier function and the potential benefit in a clinical setting. PMID:22025873

  18. Nutritional stimulation of the autonomic nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Luyer, Misha DP; Habes, Quirine; van Hak, Richard; Buurman, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Disturbance of the inflammatory response in the gut is important in several clinical diseases ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to postoperative ileus. Several feedback mechanisms exist that control the inflammatory cascade and avoid collateral damage. In the gastrointestinal tract, it is of particular importance to control the immune response to maintain the balance that allows dietary uptake and utilization of nutrients on one hand, while preventing invasion of bacteria and toxins on the other hand. The process of digestion and absorption of nutrients requires a relative hyporesponsiveness of the immune cells in the gut to luminal contents which is not yet fully understood. Recently, the autonomic nervous system has been identified as an important pathway to control local and systemic inflammation and gut barrier integrity. Activation of the pathway is possible via electrical or via pharmacological interventions, but is also achieved in a physiological manner by ingestion of dietary lipids. Administration of dietary lipids has been shown to be very effective in reducing the inflammatory cascade and maintaining intestinal barrier integrity in several experimental studies. This beneficial effect of nutrition on the inflammatory response and intestinal barrier integrity opens new therapeutic opportunities for treatment of certain gastrointestinal disorders. Furthermore, this neural feedback mechanism provides more insight in the relative hyporesponsiveness of the immune cells in the gut. Here, we will discuss the regulatory function of the autonomic nervous system on the inflammatory response and gut barrier function and the potential benefit in a clinical setting. PMID:22025873

  19. Measurement of the effect of Isha Yoga on cardiac autonomic nervous system using short-term heart rate variability

    PubMed Central

    Muralikrishnan, Krishnan; Balakrishnan, Bhavani; Balasubramanian, Kabali; Visnegarawla, Fehmida

    2012-01-01

    Background: Beneficial effects of Yoga have been postulated to be due to modulation of the autonomic nervous system. Objective: To assess the effect of Isha Yoga practices on cardiovascular autonomic nervous system through short-term heart rate variability (HRV). Design of the Study: Short-term HRV of long-term regular healthy 14 (12 males and 2 females) Isha Yoga practitioners was compared with that of age- and gender-matched 14 (12 males and 2 females) non-Yoga practitioners. Methods and Materials: ECG Lead II and respiratory movements were recorded in both groups using Polyrite during supine rest for 5 min and controlled deep breathing for 1 minute. Frequency domain analysis [RR interval is the mean of distance between subsequent R wave peaks in ECG], low frequency (LF) power, high frequency (HF) power, LF normalized units (nu), HF nu, LF/HF ratio] and time domain analysis [Standard Deviation of normal to normal interval (SDNN), square of mean squared difference of successive normal to normal intervals (RMSSD), normal to normal intervals which are differing by 50 ms (NN50), and percentage of NN50 (pNN50)] of HRV variables were analyzed for supine rest. Time domain analysis was recorded for deep breathing. Results: Results showed statistically significant differences between Isha Yoga practitioners and controls in both frequency and time domain analyses of HRV indices, with no difference in resting heart rate between the groups. Conclusions: Practitioners of Isha Yoga showed well-balanced beneficial activity of vagal efferents, an overall increased HRV, and sympathovagal balance, compared to non-Yoga practitioners during supine rest and deep breathing. PMID:22707866

  20. Animal-microbe interactions and the evolution of nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Eisthen, Heather L; Theis, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    Animals ubiquitously interact with environmental and symbiotic microbes, and the effects of these interactions on animal physiology are currently the subject of intense interest. Nevertheless, the influence of microbes on nervous system evolution has been largely ignored. We illustrate here how taking microbes into account might enrich our ideas about the evolution of nervous systems. For example, microbes are involved in animals' communicative, defensive, predatory and dispersal behaviours, and have likely influenced the evolution of chemo- and photosensory systems. In addition, we speculate that the need to regulate interactions with microbes at the epithelial surface may have contributed to the evolutionary internalization of the nervous system. PMID:26598731

  1. Central nervous system effects of haloperidol on THC in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Liem-Moolenaar, Marieke; te Beek, Erik T; de Kam, Marieke L; Franson, Kari L; Kahn, René S; Hijman, Ron; Touw, Daan; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the hypothesis that haloperidol would lead to an amelioration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-induced 'psychotomimetic' effects was investigated. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, partial three-way crossover ascending dose study the effects of THC, haloperidol and their combination were investigated in 35 healthy, male mild cannabis users, measuring Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Visual Analogue Scales for alertness, mood, calmness and psychedelic effects, saccadic and smooth pursuit eye measurements, electroencephalography, Body Sway, Stroop test, Visual and Verbal Learning Task, hormone levels and pharmacokinetics. Compared with placebo, THC significantly decreased smooth pursuit, Visual Analogue Scales alertness, Stroop test performance, immediate and delayed word recall and prolactin concentrations, and significantly increased positive and general Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale score, Visual Analogue Scales feeling high, Body Sway and electroencephalography alpha. Haloperidol reversed the THC-induced positive Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale increase to levels observed with haloperidol alone, but not THC-induced 'high' feelings. Compared with placebo, haloperidol significantly decreased saccadic peak velocity, smooth pursuit, Visual Analogue Scales mood and immediate and delayed word recall and significantly increased Body Sway, electroencephalography theta and prolactin levels. THC-induced increases in positive Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale but not in Visual Analogue Scales feeling high were reversed by haloperidol. This indicates that psychotic-like effects induced by THC are mediated by dopaminergic systems, but that other systems are involved in 'feeling high'. Additionally, the clear reductions of psychotic-like symptoms by a clinically relevant dose of haloperidol suggest that THC administration may be a useful pharmacological cannabinoid model for psychotic effects in healthy volunteers. PMID:20142302

  2. [Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, E

    2010-02-01

    Central nervous system infections and infestations by protozoa and helminths constitute a problem of increasing importance throughout all of central European and northern/western countries. This is partially due to the globalisation of our society, tourists and business people being more frequently exposed to parasitic infection/infestation in tropical countries than in moderate climate countries. On top of that, migrants may import chronic infestations and infections with parasitic pathogens, eventually also--sometimes exclusively--involving the nervous system. Knowledge of epidemiology, initial clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures as well as specific chemotherapeutic therapies and adjunctive therapeutic strategies is of utmost important in all of these infections and infestations of the nervous systems, be it by protozoa or helminths. This review lists, mainly in the form of tables, all possible infections and infestations of the nervous systems by protozoa and by helminths. Besides differentiating parasitic diseases of the nervous system seen in migrants, tourists etc., it is very important to have in mind that disease-related (e.g. HIV) or iatrogenic immunosuppression has led to the increased occurrence of a wide variety of parasitic infections and infestations of the nervous system (e. g. babesiosis, Chagas disease, Strongyloides stercoralis infestation, toxoplasmosis, etc.). PMID:20111855

  3. Degenerative disease affecting the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Eadie, M J

    1974-03-01

    The term "degenerative disease" is one which is rather widely used in relation to the nervous system and yet one which is rarely formally and carefully defined. The term appears to be applied to disorders of the nervous system which often occur in later life and which are of uncertain cause. In the Shorter Oxford Dictionary the word degeneration is defined as "a change of structure by which an organism, or an organ, assumes the form of a lower type". However this is not quite the sense in which the word is applied in human neuropathology, where it is conventional to restrict the use of the word to those organic disorders which are of uncertain or poorly understood cause and in which there is a deterioration or regression in the level of functioning of the nervous system. The concept of degenerative disorder is applied to other organs as well as to the brain, and as disease elsewhere in the body may affect the nervous system, it seems reasonable to include within the topic of degenerative disorder affecting the nervous system those conditions in which the nervous system is involved as a result of primary degenerations in other parts of the body. PMID:25026144

  4. Axonal Elongation into Peripheral Nervous System ``Bridges'' after Central Nervous System Injury in Adult Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Samuel; Aguayo, Albert J.

    1981-11-01

    The origin, termination, and length of axonal growth after focal central nervous system injury was examined in adult rats by means of a new experimental model. When peripheral nerve segments were used as ``bridges'' between the medulla and spinal cord, axons from neurons at both these levels grew approximately 30 millimeters. The regenerative potential of these central neurons seems to be expressed when the central nervous system glial environment is changed to that of the peripheral nervous system.

  5. Distinct or shared actions of peptide family isoforms: II. Multiple pyrokinins exert similar effects in the lobster stomatogastric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Patsy S; Kurland, Sienna C; Qu, Xuan; Parker, Brett O; Sreekrishnan, Anirudh; Kwiatkowski, Molly A; Williams, Alex H; Ysasi, Alexandra B; Christie, Andrew E

    2015-09-01

    Many neuropeptides are members of peptide families, with multiple structurally similar isoforms frequently found even within a single species. This raises the question of whether the individual peptides serve common or distinct functions. In the accompanying paper, we found high isoform specificity in the responses of the lobster (Homarus americanus) cardiac neuromuscular system to members of the pyrokinin peptide family: only one of five crustacean isoforms showed any bioactivity in the cardiac system. Because previous studies in other species had found little isoform specificity in pyrokinin actions, we examined the effects of the same five crustacean pyrokinins on the lobster stomatogastric nervous system (STNS). In contrast to our findings in the cardiac system, the effects of the five pyrokinin isoforms on the STNS were indistinguishable: they all activated or enhanced the gastric mill motor pattern, but did not alter the pyloric pattern. These results, in combination with those from the cardiac ganglion, suggest that members of a peptide family in the same species can be both isoform specific and highly promiscuous in their modulatory capacity. The mechanisms that underlie these differences in specificity have not yet been elucidated; one possible explanation, which has yet to be tested, is the presence and differential distribution of multiple receptors for members of this peptide family. PMID:26206359

  6. Distinct or shared actions of peptide family isoforms: II. Multiple pyrokinins exert similar effects in the lobster stomatogastric nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Patsy S.; Kurland, Sienna C.; Qu, Xuan; Parker, Brett O.; Sreekrishnan, Anirudh; Kwiatkowski, Molly A.; Williams, Alex H.; Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Christie, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many neuropeptides are members of peptide families, with multiple structurally similar isoforms frequently found even within a single species. This raises the question of whether the individual peptides serve common or distinct functions. In the accompanying paper, we found high isoform specificity in the responses of the lobster (Homarus americanus) cardiac neuromuscular system to members of the pyrokinin peptide family: only one of five crustacean isoforms showed any bioactivity in the cardiac system. Because previous studies in other species had found little isoform specificity in pyrokinin actions, we examined the effects of the same five crustacean pyrokinins on the lobster stomatogastric nervous system (STNS). In contrast to our findings in the cardiac system, the effects of the five pyrokinin isoforms on the STNS were indistinguishable: they all activated or enhanced the gastric mill motor pattern, but did not alter the pyloric pattern. These results, in combination with those from the cardiac ganglion, suggest that members of a peptide family in the same species can be both isoform specific and highly promiscuous in their modulatory capacity. The mechanisms that underlie these differences in specificity have not yet been elucidated; one possible explanation, which has yet to be tested, is the presence and differential distribution of multiple receptors for members of this peptide family. PMID:26206359

  7. [Pharmacological studies of guanabenz. Effects on the peripheral nervous and other organ systems].

    PubMed

    Ohata, K; Murata, T; Sakamoto, H; Kohno, S; Hojo, M; Yoshida, Y; Nagasaka, Y; Akimoto, Y; Shimada, A; Teramoto, N; Tatsumi, H

    1983-01-01

    General pharmacological properties of guanabenz (GUB), a new anti-hypertensive agent, were studied in comparison with those of clonidine (CLD) and guanethidine (GUD). Intravenous or peroral administration of GUB caused a contraction of the nictitating membrane in cats and mydriasis in mice, while it produced an inhibitions of the gastrointestinal motility in dogs; the motility of isolated rabbit ileum; and chacol transport, salivation and gastric acid secretion in rats. GUB had no or slight inhibitory actions on contractile responses induced by peripheral sympathetic or parasympathetic nerve stimulation in various organs; however, it had antagonistic actions against the norepinephrine-induced contraction of isolated guinea-pig vas deferens. The contractile responses to epinephrine and tyramine in the nictitating membrane and to sympathetic nerve stimulation in isolated guinea-pig vas deferens were potentiated by GUB. GUB specifically antagonized the serotonin-induced contraction of the isolated rat fundus strip and nonspecifically inhibited acetylcholine, histamine or Ba2+-induced contractions of isolated guinea-pig ileum at higher concentrations. GUB exhibited local anesthetic actions and diuretic effects, but had no particular actions on neuromuscular transmission, isolated rat uterus, guinea-pig tracheal muscle and the hematic system. These effects of GUB were found to be almost identical with but less potent than those of CLD. The effects of GUD were basically different from GUB. PMID:6852682

  8. Building a scientific framework for studying hormonal effects on behavior and on the development of the sexually dimorphic nervous system

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been increasing concern that low-dose exposure to hormonally active chemicals disrupts sexual differentiation of the brain and peripheral nervous system. There also has been active drug development research on the therapeutic potential of hormone therapy on behaviors. T...

  9. A Comparison of the Anorexic Effects of Chicken, Porcine, Human and Bovine Insulin on the Central Nervous System of Chicks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the present study was to determine if some naturally-occurring substitutions of amino acid residues of insulin could act differentially within the central nervous system (CNS) of neonatal chicks to control ingestive behavior. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of chicken insuli...

  10. Central nervous system toxicity of metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaoli; Chen, Aijie; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Jianfeng; Shao, Longquan; Wei, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are increasingly used for the therapy, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease- or drug-induced mechanisms in the human biological system. In view of their small size, after certain modifications, NMs have the capacity to bypass or cross the blood–brain barrier. Nanotechnology is particularly advantageous in the field of neurology. Examples may include the utilization of nanoparticle (NP)-based drug carriers to readily cross the blood–brain barrier to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases, nanoscaffolds for axonal regeneration, nanoelectromechanical systems in neurological operations, and NPs in molecular imaging and CNS imaging. However, NPs can also be potentially hazardous to the CNS in terms of nano-neurotoxicity via several possible mechanisms, such as oxidative stress, autophagy, and lysosome dysfunction, and the activation of certain signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the dual effect of NMs on the CNS and the mechanisms involved. The limitations of the current research are also discussed. PMID:26170667

  11. Effect of Forest Walking on Autonomic Nervous System Activity in Middle-Aged Hypertensive Individuals: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chorong; Ikei, Harumi; Kobayashi, Maiko; Miura, Takashi; Taue, Masao; Kagawa, Takahide; Li, Qing; Kumeda, Shigeyoshi; Imai, Michiko; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    There has been increasing attention on the therapeutic effects of the forest environment. However, evidence-based research that clarifies the physiological effects of the forest environment on hypertensive individuals is lacking. This study provides scientific evidence suggesting that a brief forest walk affects autonomic nervous system activity in middle-aged hypertensive individuals. Twenty participants (58.0 ± 10.6 years) were instructed to walk predetermined courses in forest and urban environments (as control). Course length (17-min walk), walking speed, and energy expenditure were equal between the forest and urban environments to clarify the effects of each environment. Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate were used to quantify physiological responses. The modified semantic differential method and Profile of Mood States were used to determine psychological responses. The natural logarithm of the high-frequency component of HRV was significantly higher and heart rate was significantly lower when participants walked in the forest than when they walked in the urban environment. The questionnaire results indicated that, compared with the urban environment, walking in the forest increased “comfortable”, “relaxed”, “natural” and “vigorous” feelings and decreased “tension-anxiety,” “depression,” “anxiety-hostility,” “fatigue” and “confusion”. A brief walk in the forest elicited physiological and psychological relaxation effects on middle-aged hypertensive individuals. PMID:25739004

  12. Neuroimaging and Neuromonitoring Effects of Electro and Manual Acupuncture on the Central Nervous System: A Literature Review and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Scheffold, Brigitte Elisabeth; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Litscher, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the different effects of manual and electroacupuncture on the central nervous system in studies with different neuroimaging interventions. The Database PubMed was searched from 1/1/2000 to 1/6/2014 with restriction to human studies in English language. Data collection for functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) studies was restricted to the period from 1/1/2010 to 1/6/2014 due to a recently published review which included all published randomized and nonrandomized controlled clinical studies as well as observational studies with control groups, no blinding required. Only studies comparing manual or electroacupuncture with sham acupuncture were eligible. All participants were healthy adult men and women. A majority of 25 studies compared manual versus sham, a minority of 7 trials compared electro versus sham and only 1 study compared electro versus manual acupuncture. In 29 out of 33 studies verum acupuncture results were found to present either more or different modulation effects on neurological components measured by neuroimaging and neuromonitoring methods than sham acupuncture. Only four studies reported no effects of verum in comparison to sham acupuncture. Evaluation of the very heterogeneous results shows evidence that verum acupuncture elicits more modulation effects on neurological components than sham acupuncture. PMID:26339269

  13. [Role of hormonal and seasonal factors in the effect of vitamin E on cholinesterase activity in the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Teplyĭ, D L; Savich, V F

    1975-01-01

    Tests were set up on 73 Citellus fulvus to study the influence exerted by different doses of vitamin E (4 and 8 mg) introduced per os on the activity of the total cholinesterase in various divisions of the central nervous system and also the part played by the hormonal and seasonal factors in this effect. Each test series lasted 30 days (in spring, summer and autumn). The cholinesterase activity was determined after Vensen and Segonzak (1968). The results of the experiments revealed some characteristic trends in the change of the cholinesterase activity occurring under the effect of vitamin E that depended upon a number of factors, such as: the dose of tocopherol, the sex of the animal, time of the year, the brain division under study and the seasonal dynamics of the initial activity. It is shown that in the brain sectors where a material difference existed in the cholinesterase activity between the control males and females it vanished under the effect of tocopherol. On the other hand, in the brain sectors where no such difference existed, it appeared under the effect of tocopherol. The regular character of changes in the cholinesterase activity of the brain and spinal cord produced by different doses of vitamin E suggest the possibility of the brain cholinesterase activity disorders to a play a part in the development of neuro-muscular pathology in cases of the E vitamin deficiency. PMID:1210181

  14. Neuroimaging and Neuromonitoring Effects of Electro and Manual Acupuncture on the Central Nervous System: A Literature Review and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Scheffold, Brigitte Elisabeth; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Litscher, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the different effects of manual and electroacupuncture on the central nervous system in studies with different neuroimaging interventions. The Database PubMed was searched from 1/1/2000 to 1/6/2014 with restriction to human studies in English language. Data collection for functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) studies was restricted to the period from 1/1/2010 to 1/6/2014 due to a recently published review which included all published randomized and nonrandomized controlled clinical studies as well as observational studies with control groups, no blinding required. Only studies comparing manual or electroacupuncture with sham acupuncture were eligible. All participants were healthy adult men and women. A majority of 25 studies compared manual versus sham, a minority of 7 trials compared electro versus sham and only 1 study compared electro versus manual acupuncture. In 29 out of 33 studies verum acupuncture results were found to present either more or different modulation effects on neurological components measured by neuroimaging and neuromonitoring methods than sham acupuncture. Only four studies reported no effects of verum in comparison to sham acupuncture. Evaluation of the very heterogeneous results shows evidence that verum acupuncture elicits more modulation effects on neurological components than sham acupuncture. PMID:26339269

  15. The Human Sympathetic Nervous System Response to Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, Andrew C.; Diedrich, Andre; Paranjape, Sachin Y.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, Rose Marie; Lane, Lynda D.; Shiavi, Richard; Robertson, David

    2003-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is an important part of the autonomic (or automatic) nervous system. When an individual stands up, the sympathetic nervous system speeds the heart and constricts blood vessels to prevent a drop in blood pressure. A significant number of astronauts experience a drop in blood pressure when standing for prolonged periods after they return from spaceflight. Difficulty maintaining blood pressure with standing is also a daily problem for many patients. Indirect evidence available before the Neurolab mission suggested the problem in astronauts while in space might be due partially to reduced sympathetic nervous system activity. The purpose of this experiment was to identify whether sympathetic activity was reduced during spaceflight. Sympathetic nervous system activity can be determined in part by measuring heart rate, nerve activity going to blood vessels, and the release of the hormone norepinephrine into the blood. Norepinephrine is a neurotransmitter discharged from active sympathetic nerve terminals, so its rate of release can serve as a marker of sympathetic nervous system action. In addition to standard cardiovascular measurements (heart rate, blood pressure), we determined sympathetic nerve activity as well as norepinephrine release and clearance on four crewmembers on the Neurolab mission. Contrary to our expectation, the results demonstrated that the astronauts had mildly elevated resting sympathetic nervous system activity in space. Sympathetic nervous system responses to stresses that simulated the cardiovascular effects of standing (lower body negative pressure) were brisk both during and after spaceflight. We concluded that, in the astronauts tested, the activity and response of the sympathetic nervous system to cardiovascular stresses appeared intact and mildly elevated both during and after spaceflight. These changes returned to normal within a few days.

  16. Pharmacological effects of primaquine ureas and semicarbazides on the central nervous system in mice and antimalarial activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kedzierska, Ewa; Orzelska, Jolanta; Perković, Ivana; Knežević, Danijel; Fidecka, Sylwia; Kaiser, Marcel; Zorc, Branka

    2016-02-01

    New primaquine (PQ) urea and semicarbazide derivatives 1-4 were screened for the first time for central nervous system (CNS) and antimalarial activity. Behavioural tests were performed on mice. In vitro cytotoxicity on L-6 cells and activity against erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum was determined. Compound 4 inhibited 'head-twitch' responses and decreased body temperature of mice, which suggests some involvement of the serotonergic system. Compound 4 protected mice against clonic seizures and was superior in the antimalarial test. A hybrid of two PQ urea 2 showed a strong antimalarial activity, confirming the previous findings of the high activity of bis(8-aminoquinolines) and other bisantimalarial drugs. All the compounds decreased the locomotor activity of mice, what suggests their weak depressive effects on the CNS, while PQ derivatives 1 and 2 increased amphetamine-induced hyperactivity. None of the compounds impaired coordination, what suggests a lack of their neurotoxicity. All the tested compounds presented an antinociceptive activity in the 'writhing' test. Compounds 3 and 4 were active in nociceptive tests, and those effects were reversed by naloxone. Compound 4 could be a useful lead compound in the development of CNS active agents and antimalarials, whereas compound 3 may be considered as the most promising lead for new antinociceptive agents. PMID:26501210

  17. Antihypertensive drugs and the sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Del Colle, Sara; Morello, Fulvio; Rabbia, Franco; Milan, Alberto; Naso, Diego; Puglisi, Elisabetta; Mulatero, Paolo; Veglio, Franco

    2007-11-01

    Hypertension has been associated with several modifications in the function and regulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Although it is unclear whether this dysfunction is primary or secondary to the development of hypertension, these alterations are considered to play an important role in the evolution, maintenance, and development of hypertension and its target organ damage. Several pharmacological antihypertensive classes are currently available. The main drugs that have been clearly shown to affect SNS function are beta-blockers, alpha-blockers, and centrally acting drugs. On the contrary, the effects of ACE inhibitors (ACE-Is), AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs), and diuretics on SNS function remain controversial. These properties are pharmacologically and pathophysiologically relevant and should be considered in the choice of antihypertensive treatments and combination therapies in order to achieve, beyond optimal blood pressure control, a normalization of SNS physiology and the most effective prevention of target organ damage. PMID:18030057

  18. Sex-specific effects of intranasal oxytocin on autonomic nervous system and emotional responses to couple conflict

    PubMed Central

    Nater, Urs M.; Schaer, Marcel; La Marca, Roberto; Bodenmann, Guy; Ehlert, Ulrike; Heinrichs, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Unhappy couple relationships are associated with impaired individual health, an effect thought to be mediated through ongoing couple conflicts. Little is known, however, about the underlying mechanisms regulating psychobiological stress, and particularly autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity, during negative couple interaction. In this study, we tested the effects of the neuropeptide oxytocin on ANS reactivity during couple conflict in a standardized laboratory paradigm. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 47 heterosexual couples (total n = 94) received oxytocin or placebo intranasally prior to instructed couple conflict. Participants’ behavior was videotaped and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), a measure of sympathetic activity, and emotional arousal were repeatedly measured during the experiment. Oxytocin significantly reduced sAA during couple conflict in women, whereas men showed increases in sAA levels (sex × group interaction: B = −49.36, t = −2.68, P = 0.009). In men, these increases were related to augmented emotional arousal (r = 0.286, P = 0.028) and more positive behavior (r = 0.291, P = 0.026), whereas there was no such association in women. Our results imply sex-specific effects of oxytocin on sympathetic activity, to negative couple interaction, with the neuropeptide reducing sAA responses and emotional arousal in women while increasing them in men. PMID:22842905

  19. Reactions of the nervous system to magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kholodov, Y. A.

    1974-01-01

    This magnetobiological survey considers sensory, nervous, stress and genetic effects of magnetic fields on man and animals. It is shown that the nervous system plays an important role in the reactions of the organism to magnetic fields; the final biological effect is a function of the strength of the magnetic fields, the gradient, direction of the lines of force, duration and location of the action, and the functional status of the organism.

  20. Effects of methylmercuric chloride of low concentration on the rat nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, K.; Maehara, N.; Ohno, H.; Ueno, N.; Kohyama, A.; Satoh, T.; Shimoda, A.; Kishi, R.

    1987-06-01

    In an earlier study the authors reported the effects of 20 ..mu..g/g of MeHg on the rat. After 2-week exposure to 20 ..mu..g/g MeHg, effects on behavior, pathological changes of brain and prolongation of EEP (early potential of evoked potential) latency were observed. So, in this experiment, they planned to expose rats to lower concentrations of MeHg. They therefore investigated the effects of MeHg exposure at a low concentration on behavioral indices, neurological signs, the circadian rhythm of behaviors, EEP, and pathology of the visual cortex and the sciatic nerve in rats.

  1. The effect of quinidine, a strong P-glycoprotein inhibitor, on the pharmacokinetics and central nervous system distribution of naloxegol.

    PubMed

    Bui, Khanh; She, Fahua; Zhou, Diansong; Butler, Kathleen; Al-Huniti, Nidal; Sostek, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Naloxegol is a PEGylated, oral, peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonist approved in the United States for treatment of opioid-induced constipation in patients with noncancer pain. Naloxegol is metabolized by CYP3A, and its properties as a substrate for the P-glycoprotein (PGP) transporter limit its central nervous system (CNS) permeability. This double-blind, randomized, 2-part, crossover study in healthy volunteers evaluated the effect of quinidine (600 mg PO), a CYP3A/PGP transporter inhibitor, on the pharmacokinetics and CNS distribution of naloxegol (25 mg PO). In addition, the effects of quinidine on morphine (5 mg/70 kg IV)-induced miosis and exposure to naloxegol were assessed. Coadministration of quinidine and naloxegol increased naloxegol's AUC 1.4-fold and Cmax 2.5-fold but did not antagonize morphine-induced miosis, suggesting that PGP inhibition does not increase the CNS penetration of naloxegol. Naloxegol pharmacokinetics was unaltered by coadministration of morphine and either quinidine or placebo; conversely, pharmacokinetics of morphine and its metabolites (in the presence of quinidine) were unaltered by coadministration of naloxegol. Naloxegol was safe and well tolerated, alone or in combination with quinidine, morphine, or both. The observed increase in exposure to naloxegol in the presence of quinidine is primarily attributed to quinidine's properties as a weak CYP3A inhibitor. PMID:26248047

  2. [The effect of thiamine deficiency on the actions of drugs affecting the central nervous system in rats (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Onodera, K; Sakurada, S; Ando, R; Takahashi, N; Tadano, T; Kisara, K; Ogura, Y

    1980-03-01

    Male Wistar rats, 35-days-old, maintained on a thiamine deficient diet for 30 days showed marked growth inhibition and a heart rate less than 70% of that of control rats. We examined the effect of thiamine deficiency on the action of drugs effecting the central nervous system at this period. In thiamine deficient rats treated with chloral hydrate 200 mg/kg, ketamine 100 mg/kg sodium pentobarbital 50 mg/kg, and hexobarbital 100 mg/kg, the sleeping time increased. Pretreatment with 15 mg/kg of the metabolic enzymes inhibitor, SKF-525A, 30 min prior to the hexobarbital administration resulted in prolongation of sleeping time in all groups. The thiamine deficient rats slept almost 3.5 times longer than did the control group. Pretreatment with 100 mg/kg of the metabolic enzyme inducer, sodium phenobarbital, 48 hours prior to hexobarbital treatment resulted in decreased sleeping time in all groups, as compared with only hexobarbital treatment. In the thiamine deficient rats the catalepsy and ptosis induced by the i.p. administration of tetrabenazine 50 mg/kg was reduced even when the control and pair-fed groups responded to this drug at the drug peak time. The spontaneous neuronal activity of lateral hypothalamus was most sensitive to the administration of 5-hydroxytryptophan in thiamine deficient rats. PMID:6967442

  3. Glutamate metabolism of astrocytes during hyperbaric oxygen exposure and its effects on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Liang; Li, Dan; Wang, Zhong-Zhuang; Xu, Wei-Gang; Li, Run-Ping; Zhang, Jun-Dong

    2016-01-20

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) has been used widely in many underwater missions and clinical work. However, exposure to extremely high oxygen pressure may cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT). The regulation of astrocyte glutamate metabolism is closely related to epilepsy. This study aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on glutamate metabolism in astrocytes and confirm the role of glutamate metabolism in CNS-OT. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 5 atmosphere absolute HBO for 80 min and microdialysis samples of brain interstitial fluid were continuously collected. Extracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations were also detected. Freely moving rats were exposed to HBO of the same pressure for 20 min and glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in brain tissues was measured. Finally, we observed the effects of different doses of drugs related to glutamate metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed that HBO exposure significantly increased glutamate content, whereas glutamine content was significantly reduced. Moreover, HBO exposure significantly reduced GS activity. Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) selective antagonist ceftriaxone prolonged CNS-OT latency, whereas GLT-1 selective inhibitor dihydrokainate shortened CNS-OT latency. In summary, HBO exposure improved glutamate concentration and reduced glutamine concentration by inhibition of GS activity. GLT-1 activation also participated in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. Our research will provide a potential new target to terminate or attenuate CNS-OT. PMID:26619231

  4. The Injured Nervous System: A Darwinian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Zachary M.; Norman, Greg J.; DeVries, A. Courtney; Nelson, Randy J.

    2008-01-01

    Much of the permanent damage that occurs in response to nervous system damage (trauma, infection, ischemia, etc.) is mediated by endogenous secondary processes that can contribute to cell death and tissue damage (excitotoxicity, oxidative damage and inflammation). For humans to evolve mechanisms to minimize secondary pathophysiological events following CNS injuries, selection must occur for individuals who survive such insults. Two major factors limit the selection for beneficial responses to CNS insults: for many CNS disease states the principal risk factor is advanced, post-reproductive age and virtually all severe CNS traumas are fatal in the absence of modern medical intervention. An alternative hypothesis for the persistence of apparently maladaptive responses to CNS damage is that the secondary exacerbation of damage is the result of unavoidable evolutionary constraints. That is, the nervous system could not function under normal conditions if the mechanisms that caused secondary damage (e.g., excitotoxicity) in response to injury were decreased or eliminated. However, some vertebrate species normally inhabit environments (e.g. hypoxia in underground burrows) that could potentially damage their nervous systems. Yet, profound neuroprotective mechanisms have evolved in these animals indicating that natural selection can occur for traits that protect animals from nervous system damage. Many of the secondary processes and regeneration-inhibitory factors that exacerbate injuries likely persist because they have been adaptive over evolutionary time in the healthy nervous system. Therefore, it remains important that researchers consider the role of the processes in the healthy or developing nervous system to understand how they become dysregulated following injury. PMID:18602443

  5. Emerging infections of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Jennifer; McArthur, Justin

    2013-12-01

    Emerging infections affecting the central nervous system often present as encephalitis and can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis requires not only careful history taking, but also the application of newly developed diagnostic tests. These diseases frequently occur in outbreaks stemming from viruses that have mutated from an animal host and gained the ability to infect humans. With globalization, this can translate to the rapid emergence of infectious clusters or the establishment of endemicity in previously naïve locations. Since these infections are often vector borne and effective treatments are almost uniformly lacking, prevention is at least as important as prompt diagnosis and institution of supportive care. In this review, we focus on some of the recent literature addressing emerging and resurging viral encephalitides in the United States and around the world-specifically, West Nile virus, dengue, polio, and cycloviruses. We also discuss new, or "emerging," techniques for the precise and rapid diagnosis of encephalitides. PMID:24136412

  6. EFFECTS OF TRIMETHYLTIN ON DOPAMINERGIC AND SEROTONERGIC FUNCTION IN THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of trimethyltin (TMT) administration on regional concentrations of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and their metabolites were determined. Acute administration of 3 or 7 mg/kg TMT (as the chloride) to adult male Long-Evans rats caused alterations in both dopaminergic ...

  7. Global research priorities for infections that affect the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    John, Chandy C.; Carabin, Hélène; Montano, Silvia M.; Bangirana, Paul; Zunt, Joseph R.; Peterson, Phillip K.

    2015-01-01

    Infections that cause significant nervous system morbidity globally include viral (for example, HIV, rabies, Japanese encephalitis virus, herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus and chikungunya virus), bacterial (for example, tuberculosis, syphilis, bacterial meningitis and sepsis), fungal (for example, cryptococcal meningitis) and parasitic (for example, malaria, neurocysticercosis, neuroschistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths) infections. The neurological, cognitive, behavioural or mental health problems caused by the infections probably affect millions of children and adults in low- and middle-income countries. However, precise estimates of morbidity are lacking for most infections, and there is limited information on the pathogenesis of nervous system injury in these infections. Key research priorities for infection-related nervous system morbidity include accurate estimates of disease burden; point-of-care assays for infection diagnosis; improved tools for the assessment of neurological, cognitive and mental health impairment; vaccines and other interventions for preventing infections; improved understanding of the pathogenesis of nervous system disease in these infections; more effective methods to treat and prevent nervous system sequelae; operations research to implement known effective interventions; and improved methods of rehabilitation. Research in these areas, accompanied by efforts to implement promising technologies and therapies, could substantially decrease the morbidity and mortality of infections affecting the nervous system in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:26580325

  8. Global research priorities for infections that affect the nervous system.

    PubMed

    John, Chandy C; Carabin, Hélène; Montano, Silvia M; Bangirana, Paul; Zunt, Joseph R; Peterson, Phillip K

    2015-11-19

    Infections that cause significant nervous system morbidity globally include viral (for example, HIV, rabies, Japanese encephalitis virus, herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus and chikungunya virus), bacterial (for example, tuberculosis, syphilis, bacterial meningitis and sepsis), fungal (for example, cryptococcal meningitis) and parasitic (for example, malaria, neurocysticercosis, neuroschistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths) infections. The neurological, cognitive, behavioural or mental health problems caused by the infections probably affect millions of children and adults in low- and middle-income countries. However, precise estimates of morbidity are lacking for most infections, and there is limited information on the pathogenesis of nervous system injury in these infections. Key research priorities for infection-related nervous system morbidity include accurate estimates of disease burden; point-of-care assays for infection diagnosis; improved tools for the assessment of neurological, cognitive and mental health impairment; vaccines and other interventions for preventing infections; improved understanding of the pathogenesis of nervous system disease in these infections; more effective methods to treat and prevent nervous system sequelae; operations research to implement known effective interventions; and improved methods of rehabilitation. Research in these areas, accompanied by efforts to implement promising technologies and therapies, could substantially decrease the morbidity and mortality of infections affecting the nervous system in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:26580325

  9. Central nervous system effects of prenatal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: sensing the signal through the noise

    PubMed Central

    Gur, Tamar L.; Kim, Deborah R.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Women are increasingly prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy, with potential implications for neurodevelopment. Whether prenatal SSRI exposure has an effect on neurodevelopment and behavior in the offspring is an important area of investigation. Objectives The aim of this paper was to review the existing preclinical and clinical literature of prenatal SSRI exposure on serotonin-related behaviors and markers in the offspring. The goal is to determine if there is a signal in the literature that could guide clinical care and/or inform research. Results Preclinical studies (n = 4) showed SSRI exposure during development enhanced depression-like behavior. Half of rodent studies examining anxiety-like behavior (n = 13) noted adverse effects with SSRI exposure. A majority of studies of social behavior (n = 4) noted a decrease in sociability in SSRI exposed offspring. Human studies (n = 4) examining anxiety in the offspring showed no adverse effects of prenatal SSRI exposure. The outcome of one study suggested that children with autism were more likely to have a mother who was prescribed an SSRI during pregnancy. Conclusions Preclinical findings in rodents exposed to SSRIs during development point to an increase in depression- and anxiety-like behavior and alteration in social behaviors in the offspring, though both the methods used and the findings were not uniform. These data are not robust enough to discourage use of SSRIs during human pregnancy, particularly given the known adverse effects of maternal mental illness on pregnancy outcomes and infant neurodevelopment. Future research should focus on consistent animal models and prospective human studies with larger samples. PMID:23681158

  10. Riboflavin transport in the central nervous system. Characterization and effects of drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, R

    1980-01-01

    The relationship of riboflavin transport to the transport of other substances including drugs in rabbit choroid plexus, the anatomical locus of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and brain cells were studied in vivo and in vitro. In vitro, the ability of rabbit choroid plexus to transport riboflavin from the medium (cerebrospinal fluid surface) through the choroid plexus epithelial cells into the extracellular and vascular spaces of the choroid plexus was documented using fluorescence microscopy. These studies provided further evidence that riboflavin is transported from cerebrospinal fluid to blood via the choroid plexus. The transport of [14C]riboflavin by the isolated choroid plexus was inhibited by thiol agents, ouabain, theophylline, various flavins (lumiflavin and lumichrome > sugar containing flavins), and cyclic organic acids including penicillin and fluorescein. Riboflavin inhibited [14C]penicillin transport competitively and the inhibition constant (K1) for riboflavin equaled the concentration of riboflavin at which the saturable transport system for riboflavin is 50% saturated (KT). These and other data suggest that riboflavin, penicillin, and possibly fluorescein are transported by the same transport system in choroid plexus. In vivo, the intra-ventricular injection or riboflavin and [14C]penicillin inhibited [14C]penicillin transport from cerebrospinal fluid. In vitro, various flavins (riboflavin > other sugar-containing flavins > lumiflavin > lumichrome) inhibited [14C]riboflavin accumulation by brain slices. These studies support the notions that: (a) riboflavin accumulation by choroid plexus (active transport) is quite different from that in brain cells (facilitated diffusion and intracellular trapping), and (b) therapeutically important cyclic organic acids (e.g., penicillin) are transported fom cerebrospinal fluid by the riboflavin transport system in choroid plexus. Images PMID:7419721

  11. Late effects of 2.2 GeV protons on the central nervous system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lippincott, S. W.; Calvo, W.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of late pathological effects of high-energy (2.2 GeV) protons on the brain of rabbits, in a postirradiation period of up to 16 months following exposure at fluxes of 30, 100, and 1000 billion protons per sq cm. At the latter two irradiation-intensity levels, the kinds of brain lesions inflicted include large venous dilatation, thickening of vessel walls with deposit of amorphous PAS positive substance, thrombosis, perivascular infiltration of leukocytes and macrophages, mobilization of microglia cells, gliosis, demyelinization, and multiple small pseudocyst formation.

  12. Serotonin release from the neuronal cell body and its long-lasting effects on the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    De-Miguel, Francisco F.; Leon-Pinzon, Carolina; Noguez, Paula; Mendez, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin, a modulator of multiple functions in the nervous system, is released predominantly extrasynaptically from neuronal cell bodies, axons and dendrites. This paper describes how serotonin is released from cell bodies of Retzius neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) of the leech, and how it affects neighbouring glia and neurons. The large Retzius neurons contain serotonin packed in electrodense vesicles. Electrical stimulation with 10 impulses at 1 Hz fails to evoke exocytosis from the cell body, but the same number of impulses at 20 Hz promotes exocytosis via a multistep process. Calcium entry into the neuron triggers calcium-induced calcium release, which activates the transport of vesicle clusters to the plasma membrane. Exocytosis occurs there for several minutes. Serotonin that has been released activates autoreceptors that induce an inositol trisphosphate-dependent calcium increase, which produces further exocytosis. This positive feedback loop subsides when the last vesicles in the cluster fuse and calcium returns to basal levels. Serotonin released from the cell body is taken up by glia and released elsewhere in the CNS. Synchronous bursts of neuronal electrical activity appear minutes later and continue for hours. In this way, a brief train of impulses is translated into a long-term modulation in the nervous system. PMID:26009775

  13. Destructive Effects of Prenatal WIN 55212-2 Exposure on Central Nervous System of Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Mohammad; Divsalar, Kouros; Janahmadi, Mahyar

    2012-01-01

    Background Cannabinoid, particularly hashish and WIN 55212-2 (WIN), consumption during embryonic period may affect fetal growth, and the development of motor functioning, memory and cognitive functions. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effects of WIN 55212-2 during embryonic period on behavioral responses, as well as tissue and memory changes among neonatal rats. Methods WIN treated groups subcutaneously received daily doses of 0.5 or 1 mg/kg WIN suspended in 1% Tween-80-saline (1 ml/kg) from days 5 to 20 of pregnancy. The vehicle group received 1% Tween-80-saline from days 5 to 20 of pregnancy. Three, five and seven weeks after birth, the effects of maternal WIN consumption on infants' body weight, mortality, histological changes, motor functioning, and memory function were assessed. Findings Prenatal WIN consumption was associated with atrophy of cerebellum cortex in granular and Purkinje cells layers. WIN treatment of pregnant rats produced a significant decrease in the rearing frequency of the offspring, but significantly increased the grooming frequency at 22, 36 and 50 days of age. During the acquisition trials, approach latencies were not significantly different between all groups of rats (50 days old). When the trial was repeated 24 hours and seven days later (retention trial), the avoidance latencies of the WIN-exposed group were significantly shorter than those of the control and vehicle animals. The mortality percent was increased significantly and litter size was decreased significantly in WIN (1 mg/kg) treated rats compared to the control, vehicle and WIN (0.5 mg/kg) treatment groups. Conclusion These findings suggested that prenatal exposure to WIN probably induces long-term alterations in histological, motor functioning, and learning and memory parameters. PMID:24494131

  14. Effects of maternal lead exposure on central nervous system maturation in postnatal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Pups from female rats exposed to 40-to-80 mg of lead per liter in their drinking water (low-lead group) and 160-to-320 mg of lead per liter water (high-lead group) were examined at 1 to 18 days of age. Maximal electroshock seizure (MES) patterns were determined and, upon recovery, whole blood, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and cerebral cortex samples were collected. Approximately one-half of the pups was used to determine the cerebral cortical extracellular water space (ECS). The other half was used to determine whole blood lead concentrations, plasma electrolytes (Na/sup +/, K/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/), CSF electrolytes, and cerebral cortical lead content, electrolytes, total water spaces, protein content, DNA content, carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity, and sodium- potassium-activated adenosinetriphosphatase (Na/sup +//K/sup +/-ATPase) activity. Neither the low- nor the high-lead groups had significant changes in body weight, body length, hematocrit or cerebral wet weight at any age studied. Whole blood and cerebral cortical lead contents were increased, dose-dependently, at each day of age. Hyperexcitability as measured by MES was observed in lead-exposed pups at 6, 9 and 12 days of age. These observations demonstrate that prenatal and postnatal exposure to lead causes increased susceptibility to MES and alterations in normal developmental patterns of the cerebral cortex. Such alterations appear to result from the greater vulnerability of the glial population to the adverse effects of lead than are neutrons. Thus, effects on the glia can account for the electrolyte imbalances, cellular edema and hyperexcitability resulting from exposure to lead.

  15. The Effect of Lavender Aromatherapy on Autonomic Nervous System in Midlife Women with Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Li-Wei; Cheng, Su Li; Liu, Chi Feng

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effects of 12 weeks of lavender aromatherapy on self-reported sleep and heart rate variability (HRV) in the midlife women with insomnia. Sixty-seven women aged 45–55 years, with a CPSQI (Chinese version of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) greater than 5, were recruited from communities in Taiwan. The experimental group (n = 34) received lavender inhalation, 20 min each time, twice per week, for 12 weeks, with a total of 24 times. The control group (n = 33) received health education program for sleep hygiene with no intervention. The study of HRV was analyzed by time- and frequency-domain methods. Significant decrease in mean heart rate (HR) and increases in SDNN (standard deviation of the normal-to-normal (NN) intervals), RMSDD (square root of the mean squared differences of successive NN intervals), and HF (high frequency) of spectral powers analysis after lavender inhalation were observed in the 4th and 12th weeks of aromatherapy. The total CPSQI score of study subjects was significantly decreased in the experimental group (P < 0.001), while no significant difference was observed across the same time period (P = 0.776) in the control group. Resting HR and HRV measurements at baseline 1 month and 3 months after allocation showed no significant difference between the experimental and control groups. The study demonstrated that lavender inhalation may have a persistent short-term effect on HRV with an increase in parasympathetic modulation. Women receiving aromatherapy experienced a significant improvement in sleep quality after intervention. However, lavender aromatherapy does not appear to confer benefit on HRV in the long-term followup. PMID:21869900

  16. Central Nervous System Effects of Iso-6-spectaline Isolated from Senna Spectabilis var. Excelsa (Schrad) in Mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fo; Silva, Mgv; Cerqueira, Gs; Sabino, Eb; Almeida, Aac; Costa, Jp; Freitas, Rm

    2011-07-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) depressant and anticonvulsant activities of iso-6-spectaline (SPEC) were investigated in animal models. The SPEC from Senna spectabilis var. excelsa (Schrad) (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ kg) injected by oral route (p.o.) in mice caused a significant decrease in the motor activity up to 30 days after the administration and in the dose of 1.0 mg/kg significantly reduced the remaining time on the Rota-rod apparatus. Additionally, SPEC (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg, p.o.) was also capable of promoting increase of latency for development of convulsions induced by pentylenetetrazole. This SPEC was also capable of promoting an increase of latency for development of convulsions induced by picrotoxin at highest dose. In the same way, the anticonvulsant effect of SPEC was affected by pretreatment with flumazenil, a selective antagonist of the benzodiazepine site of the GABA(A) receptor. These results suggest possible CNS depressant and anticonvulsant activities in mice that needs further investigation. PMID:21897664

  17. Negative emotionality and cortisol during adolescent pregnancy and its effects on infant health and autonomic nervous system reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ponirakis, A; Susman, E J; Stifter, C A

    1998-09-01

    This research examined the relations among maternal emotionality, biology, and infant outcome and autonomic nervous system reactivity (cardiac vagal tone). The sample consisted of 27 pregnant adolescents and their 3-week-old infants. Measures of anxiety, depression, anger, and saliva cortisol were obtained from the adolescents both pre- and postnatally. Infant outcome measures consisted of gestational age at delivery, birth weight, number of risk factors at birth and at 24 hr, Apgar score at 1 and 5 min, abnormalities on newborn physical exam, number of resuscitation measures used on the infant, and cardiac vagal tone. Significant relations were found among the adolescent's emotionality, infant physical outcomes, and cardiac vagal tone. Higher concentrations of adolescent cortisol were associated with lower infant Apgar scores and an increased need for resuscitation measures performed on the infant. The positive association between negative emotions and better infant outcomes also was found and may reflect the sensitivity of the adolescents to their feelings and needs during pregnancy. Social support during pregnancy mediated the effects of maternal negative emotionality and infant cardiac vagal tone. PMID:9742411

  18. Delayed effects of neutron irradiation on central nervous system microvasculature in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, J.H.; McGregor, J.M.; Clendenon, N.R.; Gordon, W.A.; Yates, A.J.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Barth, R.F.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Pathologic examination of a series of 14 patients with malignant gliomas treated with BNCT showed well demarcated zones of radiation damage characterized by coagulation necrosis. Beam attenuation was correlated with edema, loss of parenchymal elements, demyelination, leukocytosis, and peripheral gliosis. Vascular disturbances consisted of endothelial swelling, medial and adventitial proliferation, fibrin impregnation, frequent thrombosis, and perivascular inflammation. Radiation changes appeared to be acute and delayed. The outcome of the patients in this series was not significantly different from the natural course of the disease, even though two of the patients had no residual tumor detected at the time of autopsy. The intensity of the vascular changes raised a suspicion that boron may have sequestered in vessel walls, resulting in selectively high doses of radiation to these structures (Asbury et al., 1972), or that there may have been high blood concentrations of boron at the time of treatment. The potential limiting effects of a vascular ischemic reaction in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) prompted the following study to investigate the delayed response of microvascular structures in a rat model currently being used for pre-clinical investigations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Effects of different forms of central nervous system prophylaxis on neuropsychologic function in childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, J.H.; Glidewell, O.J.; Sibley, R.F.; Holland, J.C.; Tull, R.; Berman, A.; Brecher, M.L.; Harris, M.; Glicksman, A.S.; Forman, E.

    1984-12-01

    A comparison of the late effects on intellectual and neuropsychologic function of three different CNS prophylaxis regimens was conducted in 104 patients treated for childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Of the children studied, 33 were randomized to treatment with intrathecal (IT) methotrexate alone, 36 to IT methotrexate plus 2,400 rad cranial irradiation, and 35 to IT methotrexate plus intravenous intermediate dose methotrexate. All patients were in their first (complete) continuous remission, were a minimum of one year post-CNS prophylaxis and had no evidence of CNS disease at the time of evaluation. In contrast to the other two treatment groups, children whose CNS prophylaxis included cranial irradiation attained significantly lower mean Full Scale IQs, performed more poorly on the Wide Range Achievement Test, a measure of school abilities, and exhibited a greater number of difficulties on a variety of other neuropsychologic measures. The poorer performance of the irradiated group was independent of sex of the patient, time since treatment and age at diagnosis. These data suggest that the addition of 2,400 rad cranial irradiation to CNS prophylaxis in ALL puts these children at greater risk for mild global loss in intellectual and neuropsychologic ability.

  20. Investigation of radiofrequency/microwave effects upon the central nervous system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, W.W.

    1980-06-26

    A study to determine the effect of pulsed electromagnetic energy upon brain calcium behavior was undertaken. An innovative approach for loading the cerebral tissues with radiocalcium was introduced. Intraventricular injections through the skull placed Ca-45 solution directly into the right lateral ventricle. Two hours later, companion frontal lobe samples were placed in separate glass breakers containing physiologic solution for a 20-min exposure to pulsed electromagnetic energy. An efflux value was calculated for each sample. A second experimental procedure involved whole-body irradiation of the animals two hours following the intraventricular injections. Animals were then irradiated with pulsed electromagnetic energy at a power density of 10 mW/cm squared, a pulse repetition frequency of 16 Hz, and carrier frequency of 2.45 GHz. Following exposure, frontal lobe and parieto-occipital tissue samples were taken and analysed for radioactivity. Statistical treatment of the first sets of experiments failed to reveal any perturbation in calcium efflux behavior. Data from the second set are still being evaluated.

  1. Effects of different "relaxing" music styles on the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Diez, Joaquín; Domé, María Natalia; Delvenne, Andrea Alvarez; Braidot, Nestor; Cardinali, Daniel P; Vigo, Daniel Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects on heart rate variability (HRV) of exposure to different styles of "relaxing" music. Autonomic responses to musical stimuli were correlated with subjective preferences regarding the relaxing properties of each music style. Linear and nonlinear HRV analysis was conducted in 25 healthy subjects exposed to silence or to classical, new age or romantic melodies in a random fashion. At the end of the study, subjects were asked to choose the melody that they would use to relax. The low-to-high-frequency ratio was significantly higher when subjects were exposed to "new age" music when compared with silence (3.4 ± 0.3 vs. 2.6 ± 0.3, respectively, P < 0.02), while no differences were found with "classical" or "romantic" melodies (2.1 ± 0.4 and 2.2 ± 0.3). These results were related to a reduction in the high frequency component with "new age" compared to silence (17.4 ± 1.9 vs. 23.1 ± 1.1, respectively P < 0.004). Significant differences across melodies were also found for nonlinear HRV indexes. Subjects' preferences did not correlate with autonomic responses to melodies. The results suggest that "new age" music induced a shift in HRV from higher to lower frequencies, independently on the music preference of the listener. PMID:25209037

  2. Effect of repetitive SCUBA diving on humoral markers of endothelial and central nervous system integrity.

    PubMed

    Bilopavlovic, Nada; Marinovic, Jasna; Ljubkovic, Marko; Obad, Ante; Zanchi, Jaksa; Pollock, Neal W; Denoble, Petar; Dujic, Zeljko

    2013-07-01

    During SCUBA diving decompression, there is a significant gas bubble production in systemic veins, with rather frequent bubble crossover to arterial side even in asymptomatic divers. The aim of the current study was to investigate potential changes in humoral markers of endothelial and brain damage (endothelin-1, neuron-specific enolase and S-100β) after repetitive SCUBA diving with concomitant assessment of venous gas bubble production and subsequent arterialization. Sixteen male divers performed four open-water no-decompression dives to 18 msw (meters of sea water) lasting 49 min in consecutive days during which they performed moderate-level exercise. Before and after dives 1 and 4 blood was drawn, and bubble production and potential arterialization were echocardiographically evaluated. In addition, a control dive to 5 msw was performed with same duration, water temperature and exercise load. SCUBA diving to 18 msw caused significant bubble production with arterializations in six divers after dive 1 and in four divers after dive 4. Blood levels of endothelin-1 and neuron-specific enolase did not change after diving, but levels of S-100β were significantly elevated after both dives to 18 msw and a control dive. Creatine kinase activity following a control dive was also significantly increased. Although serum S-100β levels were increased after diving, concomitant increase of creatine kinase during control, almost bubble-free, dive suggests the extracranial release of S-100β, most likely from skeletal muscles. Therefore, despite the significant bubble production and sporadic arterialization after open-water dives to 18 msw, the current study found no signs of damage to neurons or the blood-brain barrier. PMID:23400567

  3. Results of a United States and Soviet Union joint project on nervous system effects of microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.L.; McRee, D.I.; Peterson, N.J.; Tilson, H.A.; Shandala, M.G.; Rudnev, M.I.; Varetskii, V.V.; Navakatikyan, M.I. )

    1989-05-01

    During the course of a formal program of cooperation between the United States and the Soviet Union concerning the biological effects of physical factors in the environment, it was concluded that duplicate projects should be initiated with the general goal of determining the most sensitive and valid test procedures for evaluating the effects of microwave radiation on the central nervous system. This report details an initial step in this direction. Male rats of the Fischer 344 strain were exposed or sham exposed to 10 mW/cm2 continuous wave microwave radiation at 2.45 GHz for a period of 7 hr. Animals were subjected to behavioral, biochemical, or electrophysiological measurements during and/or immediately after exposure. Behavioral tests used were passive avoidance and activity in an open field. Biochemical measurements were ATPase (Na+, K+; Mg2+, Ca2+) and K+ alkaline phosphatase activities. Electrophysiological measurements consisted of EEG frequency analysis. Neither group observed a significant effect of microwave irradiation on open field activity. Both groups observed changes in variability of the data obtained using the passive avoidance procedure, but not in the same parameters. The U.S. group, but not the USSR group, found significantly less Na+,K+-ATPase activity in the microwave-exposed animals compared to the sham exposed animals. Both groups found incidences of statistically significant effects in the power spectral analysis of EEG frequency, but not at the same frequency. The failure of both groups to substantiate the results of the other reinforces our contention that such duplicate projects are important and necessary.

  4. Results of a United States and Soviet Union joint project on nervous system effects of microwave radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, C L; McRee, D I; Peterson, N J; Tilson, H A; Shandala, M G; Rudnev, M I; Varetskii, V V; Navakatikyan, M I

    1989-01-01

    During the course of a formal program of cooperation between the United States and the Soviet Union concerning the biological effects of physical factors in the environment, it was concluded that duplicate projects should be initiated with the general goal of determining the most sensitive and valid test procedures for evaluating the effects of microwave radiation on the central nervous system. This report details an initial step in this direction. Male rats of the Fischer 344 strain were exposed or sham exposed to 10 mW/cm2 continuous wave microwave radiation at 2.45 GHz for a period of 7 hr. Animals were subjected to behavioral, biochemical, or electrophysiological measurements during and/or immediately after exposure. Behavioral tests used were passive avoidance and activity in an open field. Biochemical measurements were ATPase (Na+, K+; Mg2+, Ca2+) and K+ alkaline phosphatase activities. Electrophysiological measurements consisted of EEG frequency analysis. Neither group observed a significant effect of microwave irradiation on open field activity. Both groups observed changes in variability of the data obtained using the passive avoidance procedure, but not in the same parameters. The U.S. group, but not the USSR group, found significantly less Na+,K+-ATPase activity in the microwave-exposed animals compared to the sham exposed animals. Both groups found incidences of statistically significant effects in the power spectral analysis of EEG frequency, but not at the same frequency. The failure of both groups to substantiate the results of the other reinforces our contention that such duplicate projects are important and necessary. Images FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:2527152

  5. The effect of a single session of whole-body vibration training in recreationally active men on the excitability of the central and peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Chmielewska, Daria; Piecha, Magdalena; Błaszczak, Edward; Król, Piotr; Smykla, Agnieszka; Juras, Grzegorz

    2014-06-28

    Vibration training has become a popular method used in professional sports and recreation. In this study, we examined the effect of whole-body vibration training on the central nervous system and muscle excitability in a group of 28 active men. Subjects were assigned randomly to one of two experimental groups with different variables of vibrations. The chronaximetry method was used to evaluate the effect of a single session of whole-body vibration training on the excitability of the rectus femoris and brachioradialis muscles. The examination of the fusing and flickering frequencies of the light stimulus was performed. An increase in the excitability of the quadriceps femoris muscle due to low intensity vibrations (20 Hz frequency, 2 mm amplitude) was noted, and a return to the initial values was observed 30 min after the application of vibration. High intensity vibrations (60 Hz frequency, 4 mm amplitude) caused elongations of the chronaxy time; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Neither a low intensity vibration amplitude of 2 mm (frequency of 20 Hz) nor a high intensity vibration amplitude of 4 mm (frequency of 60 Hz) caused a change in the excitability of the central nervous system, as revealed by the average frequency of the fusing and flickering of the light stimulus. A single session of high intensity whole-body vibration did not significantly decrease the excitability of the peripheral nervous system while the central nervous system did not seem to be affected. PMID:25114735

  6. Central nervous system stimulants and sport practice

    PubMed Central

    Avois, L; Robinson, N; Saudan, C; Baume, N; Mangin, P; Saugy, M

    2006-01-01

    Background and objectives Central nervous system (CNS) stimulants may be used to reduce tiredness and increase alertness, competitiveness, and aggression. They are more likely to be used in competition but may be used during training to increase the intensity of the training session. There are several potential dangers involving their misuse in contact sports. This paper reviews the three main CNS stimulants, ephedrine, amfetamine, and cocaine, in relation to misuse in sport. Methods Description of the pharmacology, actions, and side effects of amfetamine, cocaine, and ephedrine. Results CNS stimulants have psychotropic effects that may be perceived to be ergogenic. Some are prescription drugs, such as Ephedra alkaloids, and there are issues regarding their appropriate therapeutic use. Recently attention has been given to their widespread use by athletes, despite the lack of evidence regarding any ergogenic or real performance benefit, and their potentially serious side effects. Recreational drugs, some of which are illegal (cocaine, amfetamines), are commonly used by athletes and cause potential ergolytic effects. Overall, these drugs are important for their frequent use and mention in anti‐doping laboratories statistics and the media, and their potentially serious adverse effects. Conclusions Doping with CNS stimulants is a real public health problem and all sports authorities should participate in its prevention. Dissemination of information is essential to prevent doping in sport and to provide alternatives. Adequate training and education in this domain should be introduced. PMID:16799095

  7. Illuminating viral infections in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    McGavern, Dorian B.; Kang, Silvia S.

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are a major cause of human disease. Although most viruses replicate in peripheral tissues, some have developed unique strategies to move into the nervous system, where they establish acute or persistent infections. Viral infections in the central nervous system (CNS) can alter homeostasis, induce neurological dysfunction and result in serious, potentially life-threatening inflammatory diseases. This Review focuses on the strategies used by neurotropic viruses to cross the barrier systems of the CNS and on how the immune system detects and responds to viral infections in the CNS. A special emphasis is placed on immune surveillance of persistent and latent viral infections and on recent insights gained from imaging both protective and pathogenic antiviral immune responses. PMID:21508982

  8. Gravitational Study of the Central Nervous System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A series of experiments conducted at 1G are discussed with reference to the role of calcium ions in information processing by the central nervous system. A technique is described which allows thin sections of a mammalian hippocampus to be isolated while maintaining neural activity. Two experiments carried out in hypergravic fields are also addressed; one investigating altered stimulation in the auditory system, the other determining temperature regulation responses in hypergravic fields.

  9. [Effect of cerebrum compositum preparation on functional state of the central nervous system in elderly patients with ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, S M; Lukach, O I

    2004-01-01

    The article presents the results obtained after having treated patients with ischemic stroke during a rehabilitation period with cerebrum compositum. It has been also studied its influence on psychoemotional condition, bioelectrical activity of brain and cerebral hemodynamics. The results of the conducted trial prove cerebrum compositum remedy to have a harmonious influence on bioelectrical activity of brain and cerebral hemodynamics as well as it improves psychological state, alleviates anxiety and enhances initiative and physical activity of the treated patients. Positive complex influence on functional state of central nervous system of the medication ensure us to recommend cerebrum compositum during rehabilitation of patients having stroke positive anamnesis. PMID:15605833

  10. Carbon monoxide and the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Raub, J A; Benignus, V A

    2002-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, tasteless, odorless, and non-irritating gas formed when carbon in fuel is not burned completely. It enters the bloodstream through the lungs and attaches to hemoglobin (Hb), the body's oxygen carrier, forming carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and thereby reducing oxygen (O(2)) delivery to the body's organs and tissues. High COHb concentrations are poisonous. Central nervous system (CNS) effects in individuals suffering acute CO poisoning cover a wide range, depending on severity of exposure: headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, disorientation, confusion, collapse, and coma. At lower concentrations, CNS effects include reduction in visual perception, manual dexterity, learning, driving performance, and attention level. Earlier work is frequently cited to justify the statement that CO exposure sufficient to produce COHb levels of ca. 5% would be sufficient to produce visual sensitivity reduction and various neurobehavioral performance deficits. In a recent literature re-evaluation, however, the best estimate was that [COHb] would have to rise to 15-20% before a 10% reduction in any behavioral or visual measurement could be observed. This conclusion was based on (1) critical review of the literature on behavioral and sensory effects, (2) review and interpretation of the physiological effects of COHb on the CNS, (3) extrapolation from the effects of hypoxic hypoxia to the effects of CO hypoxia, and (4) extrapolation from rat behavioral effects of CO to humans. Also covered in this review article are effects of chronic CO exposure, the discovery of neuroglobin, a summary of the relatively new role for endogenous CO in neurotransmission and vascular homeostasis, groups which might be especially sensitive to CO, and recommendations on further research. The interested reader is directed to other published reviews of the literature on CO and historically seminal references that form our understanding of this ubiquitous gas. PMID

  11. [Diagnostic imaging of central nervous system vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Hajime; Yamada, Kei

    2015-03-01

    Vasculitis involving the central nervous system presents with infarction and hemorrhage, which are often nonspecific findings. Laboratory examinations are essential for diagnosis of vasculitis in addition to comprehensive and systematic review of the clinical course. Although most findings tend to be nonspecific, enhancement and thickening of the vascular wall indicate vasculitis. Visualization of the vascular wall requires selection of the appropriate imaging modality and mode of image acquisition. Contrast-enhanced CT, MRI, and FDG-PET are useful for visualizing large vessel vasculitis, while CT, MRI, and angiography are effective for medium vessel vasculitis. The use of ultrasound is limited to evaluating vessels on the body surface. Although relatively thick vessels can be demonstrated by angiography, complete survey of small vessels is difficult. Here, we summarize the characteristics of each imaging modality and imaging findings of typical vasculitides-Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis, ANCA-associated vasculitis, Behçet's disease, primary angiitis of the CNS, and vasculitis associated with systemic disease. Differential diagnoses are also shown, including infective endocarditis, tuberculous meningitis, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. PMID:25846439

  12. The effects of the glycine reuptake inhibitor R213129 on the central nervous system and on scopolamine-induced impairments in psychomotor and cognitive function in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Liem-Moolenaar, M; Zoethout, R W M; de Boer, P; Schmidt, M; de Kam, M L; Cohen, A F; Franson, K L; van Gerven, J M A

    2010-11-01

    In this study the effects of R213129, a selective glycine transporter 1 inhibitor, on central nervous system function were investigated in healthy males in the absence and presence of scopolamine. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, 4-period crossover ascending dose study evaluating the following endpoints: body sway, saccadic and smooth pursuit eye movements, pupillometry, electroencephalography, visual analogue scales for alertness, mood, calmness and psychedelic effects, adaptive tracking, finger tapping, Visual and Verbal Learning Task, Stroop test, hormone levels and pharmacokinetics. R213129 dose levels were selected based on exposure levels that blocked the GlyT1 sites >50% in preclinical experiments. Forty-three of the 45 included subjects completed the study. Scopolamine significantly affected almost every central nervous system parameter measured in this study. R213129 alone compared with placebo did not elicit pharmacodynamic changes. R213129 had some small effects on scopolamine-induced central nervous system impairments. Scopolamine-induced finger tapping impairment was further enhanced by 3 mg R213129 with 2.0 taps/10 seconds (95% CI -4.0, -0.1), electroencephalography alpha power was increased by 10 mg R213129 with respectively 12.9% (0.7, 26.6%), scopolamine-induced impairment of the Stroop test was partly reversed by 10 mg R213129 with 59 milliseconds (-110, -7). Scopolamine produced robust and consistent effects in psychomotor and cognitive function in healthy volunteers. The most logical reason for the lack of R213129 effects seems to be that the central nervous system concentrations were too low. The effects of higher doses in healthy volunteers and the clinical efficacy in patients remain to be established. PMID:20142308

  13. Plants and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Carlini, E A

    2003-06-01

    This review article draws the attention to the many species of plants possessing activity on the central nervous system (CNS). In fact, they cover the whole spectrum of central activity such as psychoanaleptic, psycholeptic and psychodysleptic effects, and several of these plants are currently used in therapeutics to treat human ailments. Among the psychoanaleptic (stimulant) plants, those utilized by human beings to reduce body weight [Ephedra spp. (Ma Huang), Paullinia spp. (guaraná), Catha edulis Forssk. (khat)] and plants used to improve general health conditions (plant adaptogens) were scrutinized. Many species of hallucinogenic (psychodysleptic) plants are used by humans throughout the world to achieve states of mind distortions; among those, a few have been used for therapeutic purposes, such as Cannabis sativa L., Tabernanthe iboga Baill. and the mixture of Psychotria viridis Ruiz and Pav. and Banisteriopsis caapi (Spruce ex Griseb.) C.V. Morton. Plants showing central psycholeptic activities, such as analgesic or anxiolytic actions (Passiflora incarnata L., Valeriana spp. and Piper methysticum G. Forst.), were also analysed.Finally, the use of crude or semipurified extracts of such plants instead of the active substances seemingly responsible for their therapeutic effect is discussed. PMID:12895668

  14. Effect of amygdala kindling on the central nervous system effects of tiagabine: EEG effects versus brain GABA levels

    PubMed Central

    Cleton, A; Altorf, B A; Voskuyl, R A; Danhof, M

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the influence of amygdala kindling on the pharmacodynamics of tiagabine in vivo, using quantitative EEG parameters and extracellular GABA concentrations as pharmacodynamic endpoints. In integrated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) studies the time course of these effects was determined in conjunction with plasma concentrations following intravenous administration of 10 mg kg−1. An ‘effect compartment' model was used to derive individual concentration–effect relationships. Tiagabine produced an increase in the amplitude of the 11.5–30 Hz frequency band of the EEG. The relationship between concentration and EEG effect was non-linear and described by the Hill equation. In kindled rats the EC50 was reduced to 291 ng ml−1 from the original value of 521 ng ml−1 in controls. The values of all other parameters were unchanged. In kindled rats the baseline extracellular GABA concentration was increased to 1.58 μM from 0.74 μM in controls. The relationships between tiagabine concentration and extracellular GABA concentration were again non-linear and described by the Hill equation. No differences were observed between kindled rats and controls. In the synaptoneurosmal preparation in vitro no changes in the functioning of the GABA transporter were observed. It is concluded that unlike the situation with midazolam, there is no resistance to the EEG effect of tiagabine in the kindling model of experimental epilepsy. The observed shift in the concentration–EEG effect relationship to lower concentrations can presumably be explained by the increase in the baseline GABA levels. PMID:10882388

  15. Effects of TRP channel agonist ingestion on metabolism and autonomic nervous system in a randomized clinical trial of healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Michlig, Stéphanie; Merlini, Jenny Meylan; Beaumont, Maurice; Ledda, Mirko; Tavenard, Aude; Mukherjee, Rajat; Camacho, Susana; le Coutre, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Various lines of published evidence have already demonstrated the impact of TRPV1 agonists on energetic metabolism through the stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). This study presents a trial investigating if stimulation of the two related sensory receptors TRPA1 and TRPM8 could also stimulate the SNS and impact the energetic metabolism of healthy subjects. The trial was designed to be double-blinded, randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled with healthy subjects and the impact on the energetic metabolism and the autonomic nervous system (ANS) of cinnamaldehyde, capsaicin and a cooling flavor was measured during the 90 min after ingestion. Energy expenditure and substrate oxidation were measured by indirect calorimetry. An exploratory method to measure ANS activity was by facial thermography and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability using ECG was also used. Following cinnamaldehyde ingestion, energy expenditure was increased as compared to placebo. Furthermore, postprandial fat oxidation was maintained higher compared to placebo after cinnamaldehyde and capsaicin ingestion. Similar peripheral thermoregulation was observed after capsaicin and cinnamaldehyde ingestion. Unlike capsaicin, the dose of cinnamaldehyde was not judged to be sensorially ‘too intense’ by participants suggesting that Cinnamaldehyde would be a more tolerable solution to improve thermogenesis via spicy ingredients as compared to capsaicin. PMID:26883089

  16. Effects of TRP channel agonist ingestion on metabolism and autonomic nervous system in a randomized clinical trial of healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Michlig, Stéphanie; Merlini, Jenny Meylan; Beaumont, Maurice; Ledda, Mirko; Tavenard, Aude; Mukherjee, Rajat; Camacho, Susana; le Coutre, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Various lines of published evidence have already demonstrated the impact of TRPV1 agonists on energetic metabolism through the stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). This study presents a trial investigating if stimulation of the two related sensory receptors TRPA1 and TRPM8 could also stimulate the SNS and impact the energetic metabolism of healthy subjects. The trial was designed to be double-blinded, randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled with healthy subjects and the impact on the energetic metabolism and the autonomic nervous system (ANS) of cinnamaldehyde, capsaicin and a cooling flavor was measured during the 90 min after ingestion. Energy expenditure and substrate oxidation were measured by indirect calorimetry. An exploratory method to measure ANS activity was by facial thermography and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability using ECG was also used. Following cinnamaldehyde ingestion, energy expenditure was increased as compared to placebo. Furthermore, postprandial fat oxidation was maintained higher compared to placebo after cinnamaldehyde and capsaicin ingestion. Similar peripheral thermoregulation was observed after capsaicin and cinnamaldehyde ingestion. Unlike capsaicin, the dose of cinnamaldehyde was not judged to be sensorially 'too intense' by participants suggesting that Cinnamaldehyde would be a more tolerable solution to improve thermogenesis via spicy ingredients as compared to capsaicin. PMID:26883089

  17. Maintaining Genome Stability in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Active maintenance of genome stability is a prerequisite for the development and function of the nervous system. The high replication index during neurogenesis and the long life of mature neurons highlight the need for efficient cellular programs to safeguard genetic fidelity. Multiple DNA damage response pathways ensure that replication stress and other types of DNA lesions such as oxidative damage do not impact neural homeostasis. Numerous human neurologic syndromes result from defective DNA damage signaling and compromised genome integrity. These syndromes can involve different neuropathology, which highlights the diverse maintenance roles required for genome stability in the nervous system. Understanding how DNA damage signaling pathways promote neural development and preserve homeostasis is essential for understanding fundamental brain function. PMID:24165679

  18. Imaging the fetal central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    De Keersmaecker, B.; Claus, F.; De Catte, L.

    2011-01-01

    The low prevalence of fetal central nervous system anomalies results in a restricted level of exposure and limited experience for most of the obstetricians involved in prenatal ultrasound. Sonographic guidelines for screening the fetal brain in a systematic way will probably increase the detection rate and enhance a correct referral to a tertiary care center, offering the patient a multidisciplinary approach of the condition. This paper aims to elaborate on prenatal sonographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis and outcome of various central nervous system malformations. Detailed neurosonographic investigation has become available through high resolution vaginal ultrasound probes and the development of a variety of 3D ultrasound modalities e.g. ultrasound tomographic imaging. In addition, fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the detection of gyration and neurulation anomalies and disorders of the gray and white matter. PMID:24753859

  19. Computed tomography of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Bentson, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to review the most pertinent articles published during the past year on the subject of computed tomography of the central nervous system. The chapter contains sections on pediatric computed tomography, and on the diagnostic use of CT in white matter disease, in infectious disease, for intracranial aneurysms, trauma, and intracranial tumors. Metrizamide flow studies and contrast enhancement are also examined. (KRM)

  20. Zygomycotic invasion of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tomoaki; Mineta, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Keigo; Ando, Masakatsu; Obata, Masahiko

    2010-06-01

    Zygomycosis is an opportunistic fungal infection that affects the central nervous system (CNS). In this report, we present three cases of zygomycosis with CNS involvement. In two patients zygomycosis developed after neurosurgery, and in the third patient zygomycosis developed after bone marrow transplantation for leukemia. All patients developed persistent fever and neurological deficits. They presented with progressive cerebral infarction accompanied by hemorrhage. Intraoperative findings and histopathological examinations revealed that zygomycotic hyphae caused mycotic aneurysm, vasculitis, and venous occlusion. PMID:20585927

  1. LGI proteins in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Linde; Aunin, Eerik; Meijer, Dies; Bermingham, John R

    2013-01-01

    The development and function of the vertebrate nervous system depend on specific interactions between different cell types. Two examples of such interactions are synaptic transmission and myelination. LGI1-4 (leucine-rich glioma inactivated proteins) play important roles in these processes. They are secreted proteins consisting of an LRR (leucine-rich repeat) domain and a so-called epilepsy-associated or EPTP (epitempin) domain. Both domains are thought to function in protein-protein interactions. The first LGI gene to be identified, LGI1, was found at a chromosomal translocation breakpoint in a glioma cell line. It was subsequently found mutated in ADLTE (autosomal dominant lateral temporal (lobe) epilepsy) also referred to as ADPEAF (autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features). LGI1 protein appears to act at synapses and antibodies against LGI1 may cause the autoimmune disorder limbic encephalitis. A similar function in synaptic remodelling has been suggested for LGI2, which is mutated in canine Benign Familial Juvenile Epilepsy. LGI4 is required for proliferation of glia in the peripheral nervous system and binds to a neuronal receptor, ADAM22, to foster ensheathment and myelination of axons by Schwann cells. Thus, LGI proteins play crucial roles in nervous system development and function and their study is highly important, both to understand their biological functions and for their therapeutic potential. Here, we review our current knowledge about this important family of proteins, and the progress made towards understanding their functions. PMID:23713523

  2. LGI proteins in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Kegel, Linde; Aunin, Eerik; Meijer, Dies; Bermingham, John R.

    2013-01-01

    The development and function of the vertebrate nervous system depend on specific interactions between different cell types. Two examples of such interactions are synaptic transmission and myelination. LGI1-4 (leucine-rich glioma inactivated proteins) play important roles in these processes. They are secreted proteins consisting of an LRR (leucine-rich repeat) domain and a so-called epilepsy-associated or EPTP (epitempin) domain. Both domains are thought to function in protein–protein interactions. The first LGI gene to be identified, LGI1, was found at a chromosomal translocation breakpoint in a glioma cell line. It was subsequently found mutated in ADLTE (autosomal dominant lateral temporal (lobe) epilepsy) also referred to as ADPEAF (autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features). LGI1 protein appears to act at synapses and antibodies against LGI1 may cause the autoimmune disorder limbic encephalitis. A similar function in synaptic remodelling has been suggested for LGI2, which is mutated in canine Benign Familial Juvenile Epilepsy. LGI4 is required for proliferation of glia in the peripheral nervous system and binds to a neuronal receptor, ADAM22, to foster ensheathment and myelination of axons by Schwann cells. Thus, LGI proteins play crucial roles in nervous system development and function and their study is highly important, both to understand their biological functions and for their therapeutic potential. Here, we review our current knowledge about this important family of proteins, and the progress made towards understanding their functions. PMID:23713523

  3. Comparative anatomy of the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Stefan

    2011-11-16

    This short review aims to point out the general anatomical features of the autonomic nervous systems of non-mammalian vertebrates. In addition it attempts to outline the similarities and also the increased complexity of the autonomic nervous patterns from fish to tetrapods. With the possible exception of the cyclostomes, perhaps the most striking feature of the vertebrate autonomic nervous system is the similarity between the vertebrate classes. An evolution of the complexity of the system can be seen, with the segmental ganglia of elasmobranchs incompletely connected longitudinally, while well developed paired sympathetic chains are present in teleosts and the tetrapods. In some groups the sympathetic chains may be reduced (dipnoans and caecilians), and have yet to be properly described in snakes. Cranial autonomic pathways are present in the oculomotor (III) and vagus (X) nerves of gnathostome fish and the tetrapods, and with the evolution of salivary and lachrymal glands in the tetrapods, also in the facial (VII) and glossopharyngeal (IX) nerves. PMID:20444653

  4. Radiation response of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, T.E.; Kun, L.E.; Stephens, L.C.

    1995-03-30

    This report reviews the anatomical, pathophysiological, and clinical aspects of radiation injury to the central nervous system (CNS). Despite the lack of pathoGyomonic characteristics for CNS radiation lesions, demyelination and malacia are consistently the dominant morphological features of radiation myelopathy. In addition, cerebral atrophy is commonly observed in patients with neurological deficits related to chemotherapy and radiation, and neurocognitive deficits are associated with diffuse white matter changes. Clinical and experimental dose-response information have been evaluated and summarized into specific recommendations for the spinal cord and brain. The common spinal cord dose limit of 45 Gn in 22 to 25 fractions is conservative and can be relaxed if respecting this limit materially reduces the probability of tumor control. It is suggested that the 5% incidence of radiation myelopathy probably lies between 57 and 61 Gy to the spinal cord in the absence of dose modifying chemotherapy. A clinically detectable length effect for the spinal cord has not been observed. The effects of chemotherapy and altered fractionation are also discussed. Brain necrosis in adults is rarely noted below 60 Gy in conventional fractionation, with imaging and clinical changes being observed generally only above 50 Gy. However, neurocognitive effects are observed at lower doses, especially in children. A more pronounced volume effect is believed to exist in the brain than in the spinal cord. Tumor progression may be hard to distinguish from radiation and chemotherapy effects. Diffuse white matter injury can be attributed to radiation and associated with neurological deficits, but leukoencephalopathy is rarely observed in the absence of chemotherapy. Subjective, objective, management, and analytic (SOMA) parameters related to radiation spinal cord and brain injury have been developed and presented on ordinal scales. 140 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Assessment of the Effects of Combination Therapy with Ciprofloxacin and Fenbufen on the Central Nervous Systems of Healthy Volunteers by Quantitative Electroencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, F.; Ashton, C. H.; Marsh, V. R.; Cox, J.

    1998-01-01

    The potential effects of concurrent administration of fenbufen and ciprofloxacin on central nervous system activity in healthy young subjects were investigated by electroencephalography (EEG). Visual analog scales (VAS) were used to assess subjective measures of concentration, vigilance, tension, and irritability. When ciprofloxacin was administered in combination with fenbufen, none of the EEG parameters or VAS ratings measured were significantly different from those measured when the drugs were administered alone. PMID:9593161

  6. 3D printed nervous system on a chip.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Blake N; Lancaster, Karen Z; Hogue, Ian B; Meng, Fanben; Kong, Yong Lin; Enquist, Lynn W; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-04-21

    Bioinspired organ-level in vitro platforms are emerging as effective technologies for fundamental research, drug discovery, and personalized healthcare. In particular, models for nervous system research are especially important, due to the complexity of neurological phenomena and challenges associated with developing targeted treatment of neurological disorders. Here we introduce an additive manufacturing-based approach in the form of a bioinspired, customizable 3D printed nervous system on a chip (3DNSC) for the study of viral infection in the nervous system. Micro-extrusion 3D printing strategies enabled the assembly of biomimetic scaffold components (microchannels and compartmented chambers) for the alignment of axonal networks and spatial organization of cellular components. Physiologically relevant studies of nervous system infection using the multiscale biomimetic device demonstrated the functionality of the in vitro platform. We found that Schwann cells participate in axon-to-cell viral spread but appear refractory to infection, exhibiting a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.4 genomes per cell. These results suggest that 3D printing is a valuable approach for the prototyping of a customized model nervous system on a chip technology. PMID:26669842

  7. NERVOUS-SYSTEM SPECIFIC PROTEINS AS BIOCHEMICAL INDICATORS OF NEUROTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent advances in neuroimmunology and protein purification methodology have led to the identification of nervous-system specific proteins. Their intimate relationship to the cellular and functional heterogeneity of the nervous system, makes these proteins ideal biochemical marke...

  8. What Are the Parts of the Nervous System?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Planning Scientific Resources Research A-Z Topics Neuroscience Overview Condition Information Parts of the nervous system ... functions does the nervous system control? Why study neuroscience? What are the areas of neuroscience? NICHD Research ...

  9. The BIRN Project: Imaging the Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    Ellisman, Mark

    2006-05-22

    The grand goal in neuroscience research is to understand how the interplay of structural, chemical and electrical signals in nervous tissue gives rise to behavior. Experimental advances of the past decades have given the individual neuroscientist an increasingly powerful arsenal for obtaining data, from the level of molecules to nervous systems. Scientists have begun the arduous and challenging process of adapting and assembling neuroscience data at all scales of resolution and across disciplines into computerized databases and other easily accessed sources. These databases will complement the vast structural and sequence databases created to catalogue, organize and analyze gene sequences and protein products. The general premise of the neuroscience goal is simple; namely that with 'complete' knowledge of the genome and protein structures accruing rapidly we next need to assemble an infrastructure that will facilitate acquisition of an understanding for how functional complexes operate in their cell and tissue contexts.

  10. The BIRN Project: Imaging the Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    Ellisman, Mark

    2006-05-22

    The grand goal in neuroscience research is to understand how the interplay of structural, chemical and electrical signals in nervous tissue gives rise to behavior. Experimental advances of the past decades have given the individual neuroscientist an increasingly powerful arsenal for obtaining data, from the level of molecules to nervous systems. Scientists have begun the arduous and challenging process of adapting and assembling neuroscience data at all scales of resolution and across disciplines into computerized databases and other easily accessed sources. These databases will complement the vast structural and sequence databases created to catalogue, organize and analyze gene sequences and protein products. The general premise of the neuroscience goal is simple; namely that with "complete" knowledge of the genome and protein structures accruing rapidly we next need to assemble an infrastructure that will facilitate acquisition of an understanding for how functional complexes operate in their cell and tissue contexts.

  11. Lysophosphatidic Acid signaling in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Yung, Yun C; Stoddard, Nicole C; Mirendil, Hope; Chun, Jerold

    2015-02-18

    The brain is composed of many lipids with varied forms that serve not only as structural components but also as essential signaling molecules. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an important bioactive lipid species that is part of the lysophospholipid (LP) family. LPA is primarily derived from membrane phospholipids and signals through six cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), LPA1-6. These receptors are expressed on most cell types within central and peripheral nervous tissues and have been functionally linked to many neural processes and pathways. This Review covers a current understanding of LPA signaling in the nervous system, with particular focus on the relevance of LPA to both physiological and diseased states. PMID:25695267

  12. Sympathetic nervous system regulation of the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Green, Paige A.; Sood, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral autonomic nervous system (ANS) is known to regulate gene expression in primary tumours and their surrounding microenvironment. Activation of the sympathetic division of the ANS in particular modulates gene expression programs that promote metastasis of solid tumours by stimulating macrophage infiltration, inflammation, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and tumour invasion, and by inhibiting cellular immune responses and programmed cell death. Haematological cancers are modulated by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) regulation of stem cell biology and hematopoietic differentiation programs. In addition to identifying a molecular basis for physiologic stress effects on cancer, these findings have also identified new pharmacologic strategies to inhibit cancer progression in vivo. PMID:26299593

  13. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and the central nervous system: distribution effects and possible relationship to neurological and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Wahlestedt, C; Ekman, R; Widerlöv, E

    1989-01-01

    1. NPY is a 36 amino acid tyrosine-rich peptide. It is one of the most abundant and widely distributed neuropeptides known today within the central nervous system with particularly high concentrations in the hypothalamus and in several limbic regions. 2. NPY seems to coexist with other on neurotransmitters like somatostatin, galanin, GABA and the catecholamines noradrenaline and adrenaline in discrete brain regions. 3. NPY binding sites are widely distributed in the brain. However they do not always overlap with the distribution of NPY-like immunoreactivity. 4. NPY is suggested to be involved in a large number of neuroendocrine functions, stress responses, circadian rhythms, central autonomic functions, eating and drinking behaviour, and sexual and motor behaviour. 5. Psychotropic drugs and neurotoxins can alter the NPY concentrations in discrete brain regions. 6. It is possible that NPY is related to various neurological and psychiatric illnesses, like Huntington's chorea, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, eating disorders, and major depressive illness. PMID:2664885

  14. Neuroimaging in Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Vossough, Arastoo; Hajmomenian, Mehrdad; Assadsangabi, Reza; Mohan, Suyash

    2016-08-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare aggressive high-grade type of extranodal lymphoma. PCNSL can have a variable imaging appearance and can mimic other brain disorders such as encephalitis, demyelination, and stroke. In addition to PCNSL, the CNS can be secondarily involved by systemic lymphoma. Computed tomography and conventional MRI are the initial imaging modalities to evaluate these lesions. Recently, however, advanced MRI techniques are more often used in an effort to narrow the differential diagnosis and potentially inform diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. PMID:27443998

  15. Viral Diseases of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Phillip A.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2015-01-01

    Virus-induced diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) represent a significant burden to human health worldwide. The complexity of these diseases is influenced by the sheer number of different neurotropic viruses, the diverse routes of CNS entry, viral tropism, and the immune system. Using a combination of human pathological data and experimental animal models, we have begun to uncover many of the mechanisms that viruses use to enter the CNS and cause disease. This review highlights a selection of neurotropic viruses that infect the CNS and explores the means by which they induce neurological diseases such as meningitis, encephalitis, and myelitis. PMID:25681709

  16. Radiation Damage to the Nervous System: a delayed therapeutic hazard

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.A.; Kagan, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    This volume represents a good overview of an important issue - late effects of radiation on the nervous system, a topic of interest to everybody who deals with neurooncologic problems. The book is well edited and includes almost all relevant subjects ranging from diagnostic and dosimetric considerations to treatment of radiation brain necrosis.

  17. Photoplethysmographic measurements from central nervous system tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. P.; Kyriacou, P. A.; Chang, S. H.; Maney, K.; George, K. J.; Langford, R. M.

    2007-10-01

    A new system for measuring the oxygen saturation of blood within tissue has been developed, for a number of potential patient monitoring applications. This proof of concept project aims to address the unmet need of real-time measurement of oxygen saturation in the central nervous system (CNS) for patients recovering from neurosurgery or trauma, by developing a fibre optic signal acquisition system for internal placement through small apertures. The development and testing of a two-wavelength optical fibre reflectance photoplethysmography (PPG) system is described together with measurements in rats and preliminary results from a clinical trial of the system in patients undergoing neurosurgery. It was found that good quality red and near-infrared PPG signals could be consistently obtained from the rat spinal cord (n=6) and human cerebral cortex (n=4) using the fibre optic probe. These findings justify further development and clinical evaluation of this fibre optic system.

  18. The central nervous system of ascidian larvae.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Clare

    2016-09-01

    Ascidians are marine invertebrate chordates. Their tadpole larvae contain a dorsal tubular nervous system, resulting from the rolling up of a neural plate. Along the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis, the central nervous system (CNS) is organized into a sensory vesicle, neck, trunk ganglion, and tail nerve cord and consists of approximately only 330 cells, of which around 100 are thought to be neurons. The organization of distinct neuronal cell types and neurotransmitter gene expression within the CNS has been described. The unique developmental mode of ascidians, with a small number of cells and a fixed cell division pattern, allows individual cells to be traced throughout development. This feature has led to the complete documentation of the cell lineages of certain cell types in the CNS. Thus, a step-by-step understanding of nervous system development from the initial stages of neural induction to the neurogenesis of individual neurons is a feasible goal. The genetic control of neural fate induction and early neural plate patterning are now well understood. The molecular mechanisms specifying the cholinergic neurons of the trunk ganglion as well as the pigment cells of the sensory organs are also well elucidated. In addition, studies have begun on the morphogenetic processes of neurulation. Remaining challenges include building an embryonic atlas integrating gene expression patterns, cell lineage, and neuronal cell types as well as developing the gene regulatory networks of cell fate specification and integrating them with the genetic control of morphogenesis. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:538-561. doi: 10.1002/wdev.239 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27328318

  19. Histoplasmosis of the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, V; Wilkins, P; Badve, S; Coppen, M; Lucas, S; Hay, R; Schon, F

    1992-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum infection of the central nervous system is extremely rare in the United Kingdom partly because the organism is not endemic. However, because the organism can remain quiescent in the lungs or the adrenal glands for over 40 years before dissemination, it increasingly needs to be considered in unexplained neurological disease particularly in people who lived in endemic areas as children. In this paper a rapidly progressive fatal myelopathy in an English man brought up in India was shown at necropsy to be due to histoplasmosis. The neurological features of this infection are reviewed. Images PMID:1640242

  20. Did the ctenophore nervous system evolve independently?

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph F

    2014-08-01

    Recent evidence supports the placement of ctenophores as the most distant relative to all other animals. This revised animal tree means that either the ancestor of all animals possessed neurons (and that sponges and placozoans apparently lost them) or that ctenophores developed them independently. Differentiating between these possibilities is important not only from a historical perspective, but also for the interpretation of a wide range of neurobiological results. In this short perspective paper, I review the evidence in support of each scenario and show that the relationship between the nervous system of ctenophores and other animals is an unsolved, yet tractable problem. PMID:24986234

  1. Physiology of the Autonomic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    This manuscript discusses the physiology of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The following topics are presented: regulation of activity; efferent pathways; sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions; neurotransmitters, their receptors and the termination of their activity; functions of the ANS; and the adrenal medullae. In addition, the application of this material to the practice of pharmacy is of special interest. Two case studies regarding insecticide poisoning and pheochromocytoma are included. The ANS and the accompanying case studies are discussed over 5 lectures and 2 recitation sections during a 2-semester course in Human Physiology. The students are in the first-professional year of the doctor of pharmacy program. PMID:17786266

  2. Microglia: Architects of the Developing Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Frost, Jeffrey L; Schafer, Dorothy P

    2016-08-01

    Microglia are resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS), representing 5-10% of total CNS cells. Recent findings reveal that microglia enter the embryonic brain, take up residence before the differentiation of other CNS cell types, and become critical regulators of CNS development. Here, we discuss exciting new work implicating microglia in a range of developmental processes, including regulation of cell number and spatial patterning of CNS cells, myelination, and formation and refinement of neural circuits. Furthermore, we review studies suggesting that these cellular functions result in the modulation of behavior, which has important implications for a variety of neurological disorders. PMID:27004698

  3. Vascularisation of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Tata, Mathew; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Fantin, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The developing central nervous system (CNS) is vascularised through the angiogenic invasion of blood vessels from a perineural vascular plexus, followed by continued sprouting and remodelling until a hierarchical vascular network is formed. Remarkably, vascularisation occurs without perturbing the intricate architecture of the neurogenic niches or the emerging neural networks. We discuss the mouse hindbrain, forebrain and retina as widely used models to study developmental angiogenesis in the mammalian CNS and provide an overview of key cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the vascularisation of these organs. PMID:26222953

  4. Catastrophic primary central nervous system vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Salvarani, Carlo; Brown, Robert D; Morris, Jonathan M; Huston, John; Hunder, Gene G

    2014-01-01

    Primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) is an uncommon condition that affects the brain and the spinal cord. It is heterogeneous in presenting characteristics and outcomes. We report a patient with a catastrophic rapidly progressive course refractory to intensive treatment with pulses of methylprednisolone and iv cyclophosphamide. The condition rapidly deteriorated and the patient died 6 weeks after presentation. Rapidly progressive PCNSV represents the worst end of the clinical spectrum of PCNSV. These patients are characterised by bilateral, multiple, large cerebral vessel lesions on angiograms and multiple bilateral cerebral infarctions. PMID:24854370

  5. Mold Infections of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Matthew; Rosengart, Axel; Schuetz, Audrey N.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The recent outbreak of exserohilum rostratum meningitis linked to epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate has brought renewed attention to mold infections of the central nervous system (CNS).1 Although uncommon, these infections are often devastating and difficult to treat. This focused review of the epidemiologic aspects, clinical characteristics, and treatment of mold infections of the CNS covers a group of common pathogens: aspergillus, fusarium, and scedosporium species, molds in the order Mucorales, and dematiaceous molds. Infections caused by these pathogen groups have distinctive epidemiologic profiles, clinical manifestations, microbiologic characteristics, and therapeutic implications, all of which clinicians should understand. PMID:25006721

  6. [Sports injuries of the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Lang, C; Stefan, H

    1999-08-01

    Almost 1% of all Germans suffer sports injuries each year, almost 5% of all peripheral nerve lesions are due to sports. A review is given on various activities detailing the specific risks for traumata of the central and peripheral nervous system. Specifically these are volleyball, handball, basketball, American football, soccer, bowling, hockey, baseball, tennis, golf, javelin, fencing, wrestling, judo, boxing, running, jumping, dancing, mountain climbing, weight lifting, gymnastics, horse-back riding, swimming, rowing, skiing, skating, shooting, (motor) biking, car racing, flying, and sports for the disabled. The knowledge of typical traumata should enable the neurologist to rapidly and reliably recognize related lesions and to contribute to their prevention or improvement. PMID:10478302

  7. Central nervous system penetration-effectiveness rank does not reliably predict neurocognitive impairment in HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Libertone, Raffaella; Lorenzini, Patrizia; Balestra, Pietro; Pinnetti, Carmela; Ricottini, Martina; Maddalena Plazzi, Maria; Menichetti, Samanta; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Nicastri, Emanuele; Bellagamba, Rita; Ammassari, Adriana; Antinori, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Central nervous system (CNS) penetration-effectiveness (CPE) rank was proposed in 2008 as an estimate of penetration of ARV regimen into the CNS, and validated as predictor of CSF HIV-1 replication. Results on predictive role of CPE on neurocognitive and clinical outcome were conflicting. Materials and Methods Retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of neurocognitive profile in HIV-infected cART-treated patients. All patients underwent neuropsychological (NP) assessment by standardized battery of 14 tests on 5 different domains. People were classified as having NCI if they scored >1 standard deviation (SD) below the normal mean in at least two tests, or >2 SD below in one test. Linear and logistic regression analyses were fitted using as outcome Npz8 and impaired/not impaired respectively. Results A total of 660 HIV-infected cART-treated individuals from 2009 to 2014, contributing a total of 1003 tests (mean age 49 (IQR 43–56), male 82%; median current CD4 586/mm3; 18% HCV infected; HIV-RNA <40 cp/mL in 84%). Current ARV regimen was 2NRTIs+1NNRTI 50.3%, 2NRTI+1PI/r in 32.6%, NRTI sparing in 11.1%. Mean CPE of current regimens was 6.6 (95% CI 6.5–6.7). As per test multivariable analysis, higher CPE values were associated to poor NP tasks (Beta=−0,09; 95% CI −0,14 −0,03; p=0.002 at multivariable linear regression). The association between higher CPE and increased NCI risk was confirmed at multivariable logistic regression, with a 1.24-fold risk of NCI occurrence for each point increase of CPE of current regimen at the time of NP testing (see Table 1). In a sensitivity analysis performed only on patients at the first NP test, the association between higher CPE and poor NP tasks and enhanced NCI risk was only marginally confirmed (Beta=−0,05; [−0,12–0,02]; p=0,19; OR 1,13 [0,95–1,34]; p=0.17). Older age, longer time from HIV diagnosis, current CD4 count <350 cell/mm3 and lower education level were all associated to an increased risk of

  8. Neural Circuit Recording from an Intact Cockroach Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Titlow, Josh S.; Majeed, Zana R.; Hartman, H. Bernard; Burns, Ellen; Cooper, Robin L.

    2013-01-01

    The cockroach ventral nerve cord preparation is a tractable system for neuroethology experiments, neural network modeling, and testing the physiological effects of insecticides. This article describes the scope of cockroach sensory modalities that can be used to assay how an insect nervous system responds to environmental perturbations. Emphasis here is on the escape behavior mediated by cerci to giant fiber transmission in Periplaneta americana. This in situ preparation requires only moderate dissecting skill and electrophysiological expertise to generate reproducible recordings of neuronal activity. Peptides or other chemical reagents can then be applied directly to the nervous system in solution with the physiological saline. Insecticides could also be administered prior to dissection and the escape circuit can serve as a proxy for the excitable state of the central nervous system. In this context the assays described herein would also be useful to researchers interested in limb regeneration and the evolution of nervous system development for which P. americana is an established model organism. PMID:24300738

  9. Novel nervous system mechanisms in visceral pain.

    PubMed

    De Winter, B Y; Deiteren, A; De Man, J G

    2016-03-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is an important factor underlying abdominal pain in functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and can result from aberrant signaling from the gut to the brain or vice versa. Over the last two decades, research has identified several selective, intertwining pathways that underlie IBS-related visceral nociception, including specific receptors on afferent and efferent nerve fibers such as transient receptor potential channels (TRP) channels, opioid, and cannabinoid receptors. In this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility Gil et al. demonstrate that in an animal model with reduced descending inhibitory control, the sympathetic nervous system outflow is enhanced, contributing to visceral and somatic hypersensitivity. They also provide evidence that interfering with the activation of adrenergic receptors on sensory nerves can be an interesting new strategy to treat visceral pain in IBS. This mini-review places these findings in a broader perspective by providing an overview of promising novel mechanisms to alter the nervous control of visceral pain interfering with afferent or efferent neuronal signaling. PMID:26891060

  10. Central nervous system phenotypes in craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, Kristina; Marsh, Jeffrey L; Govier, Daniel; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2002-01-01

    Though reduction in the number of cranial elements through loss of a suture is a recognized trend in vertebrate evolution, the premature closure of cranial sutures in humans, craniosynostosis, is considered a pathological condition. Previous research on craniosynostosis has focused primarily on the skeletal phenotype, but the intimate relationship between the developing central nervous system (CNS) and skull is well documented. We investigate the morphology of the CNS in patients with isolated craniosynostosis through an analysis of cortical and subcortical features using 3-D magnetic resonance images (MRI). Results show that a distinct CNS phenotype can be defined for specific diagnostic categories. Many differences in CNS morphology observed in the patient samples may be anticipated based on skeletal morphology, but others are not reflected in the skull. We propose a developmental approach to determining the cause of premature suture fusion, which includes investigation of the craniofacial complex as a system, rather than study of isolated tissues. PMID:12171474

  11. [VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS AND DISEASES OF CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM VESSELS].

    PubMed

    Kazanova, A S; Lavrov, V F; Zverev, V V

    2015-01-01

    Systemized data on epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, diagnostics and therapy of VZV-vasculopathy--a disease, occurring due to damage of arteries of the central nervous system by Varicella Zoster virus, are presented in the review. A special attention in the paper is given to the effect of vaccine prophylaxis of chicken pox and herpes zoster on the frequency of development and course of VZV-vasculopathy. PMID:26259280

  12. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Pain Threshold of Laboring Rats and the Expression of Norepinephrine Transporter and α2 Adrenergic Receptor in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shike; Feng, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Meili; Wang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    To observe the effects of electroacupuncture on pain threshold of laboring rats and the expression of norepinephrine transporter and α2 adrenergic receptor in the central nervous system to determine the mechanism of the analgesic effect of labor. 120 pregnant rats were divided into 6 groups: a control group, 4 electroacupuncture groups, and a meperidine group. After interventions, the warm water tail-flick test was used to observe pain threshold. NE levels in serum, NET, and α2AR mRNA and protein expression levels in the central nervous system were measured. No difference in pain threshold was observed between the 6 groups before intervention. After intervention, increased pain thresholds were observed in all groups except the control group with a higher threshold seen in the electroacupuncture groups. Serum NE levels decreased in the electroacupuncture and MP groups. Increases in NET and α2AR expression in the cerebral cortex and decreases in enlarged segments of the spinal cord were seen. Acupuncture increases uptake of NE via cerebral NET and decreases its uptake by spinal NET. The levels of α2AR are also increased and decreased, respectively, in both tissues. This results in a decrease in systemic NE levels and may be the mechanism for its analgesic effects. PMID:27547232

  13. Cryptococcosis of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, V. E.; Sutherland, J. M.; Tyrer, J. H.

    1970-01-01

    (1) A survey of cryptococcal infections of the nervous system in Queensland, Australia, revealed the nine year prevalence rate for the Australian aboriginal to be some 17 times greater than that of the white population. Uncommon in the first decade of life, the disease was developed by 79% of 29 patients between 20 and 59 years, males being affected twice as commonly as females. (2) Cryptococcosis appears to be more common in Australia than in the United Kingdom, and in Queensland the nine year incidence of neurological cryptococcosis was 4·7 per 100,000 in the tropical north compared with 1·8 per 100,000 in the southern parts of the State. Because of this, and since 20 of the 29 patients were regarded as having outdoor occupations, it is suggested that a high environmental exposure to the fungus may be associated with an animal reservoir and with dry, dusty conditions. It is also possible that geographical and occupational factors rather than racial predisposition account for the high incidence of the disease in the Australian aborigine. However, individual resistance and susceptibility are probably also important factors, since the clinical disease appears to be positively correlated with certain other diseases, or with steroid therapy, which would impair the immune responses of the body. (3) Headache is the outstanding symptom of neurological cryptococcosis and fever or evidence of meningeal reaction, though often present, may be absent. An awareness of the possibility of neurological cryptococcosis in the differential diagnosis of various intracranial disorders should lead to identification of the encapsulated C. neoformans in the cerebrospinal fluid. Although in eight of 26 patients the lumbar cerebrospinal fluid was sterile on repeated examination, in five cases C. neoformans was found on direct examination of cerebrospinal fluid obtained by ventricular puncture. The remaining three died before further investigations could be performed. (4) Before the

  14. Distribution of carnosine-like peptides in the nervous system of developing and adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and embryonic effects of chronic carnosine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Azher, Seema; Margolis, Frank L.; Patel, Kamakshi; Mousa, Ahmad; Majid, Arshad

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine-like peptides (carnosine-LP) are a family of histidine derivatives that are present in the nervous system of various species and that exhibit antioxidant, anti-matrix-metalloproteinase, anti-excitotoxic, and free-radical scavenging properties. They are also neuroprotective in animal models of cerebral ischemia. Although the function of carnosine-LP is largely unknown, the hypothesis has been advanced that they play a role in the developing nervous system. Since the zebrafish is an excellent vertebrate model for studying development and disease, we have examined the distribution pattern of carnosine-LP in the adult and developing zebrafish. In the adult, immunoreactivity for carnosine-LP is specifically concentrated in sensory neurons and non-sensory cells of the olfactory epithelium, the olfactory nerve, and the olfactory bulb. Robust staining has also been observed in the retinal outer nuclear layer and the corneal epithelium. Developmental studies have revealed immunostaining for carnosine-LP as early as 18 h, 24 h, and 7 days post-fertilization in, respectively, the olfactory, corneal, and retinal primordia. These data suggest that carnosine-LP are involved in olfactory and visual function. We have also investigated the effects of chronic (7 days) exposure to carnosine on embryonic development and show that 0.01 μM to 10 mM concentrations of carnosine do not elicit significant deleterious effects. Conversely, treatment with 100 mM carnosine results in developmental delay and compromised larval survival. These results indicate that, at lower concentrations, exogenously administered carnosine can be used to explore the role of carnosine in development and developmental disorders of the nervous system. PMID:19440736

  15. Differential effects of methylmercury, thiols, and vitamins on galactosidases of nervous and non-nervous tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayalakshmi, K.; Bapu, C.; Sood, P.P.

    1992-07-01

    A rational pharmacological attack on heavy metal poisoning has only been possible with the advent of non-toxic binding of chelating agents. In the recent past, a number of chelators have been used to detoxicate the mercury content from the body. When all the well known chelators were subjected for their therapeutic capacities in the central nervous system, most of the findings were discouraging. In a recent study we have demonstrated the superiority of vitamins over thiol compounds in methylmercury mobilization, which otherwise has been considered difficult and often an impossible task for clinicians as well as toxicologists. Biochemical lesions are considered to be the most primary effects of methylmercury toxication, and lysosomes are the critical cellular organelles which are easily ruptured and release enzymes. In the present study, the biochemical analyses of two lysosomal enzymes (alpha and beta-galactosidases) in various nervous and non-nervous tissues of mice during methylmercury toxication as well as detoxication with vitamins and thiols have been studied in the light of previous investigation related to methylmercury mobilization with these agents. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Subcortical cytoskeleton periodicity throughout the nervous system.

    PubMed

    D'Este, Elisa; Kamin, Dirk; Velte, Caroline; Göttfert, Fabian; Simons, Mikael; Hell, Stefan W

    2016-01-01

    Superresolution fluorescence microscopy recently revealed a ~190 nm periodic cytoskeleton lattice consisting of actin, spectrin, and other proteins underneath the membrane of cultured hippocampal neurons. Whether the periodic cytoskeleton lattice is a structural feature of all neurons and how it is modified when axons are ensheathed by myelin forming glial cells is not known. Here, STED nanoscopy is used to demonstrate that this structure is a commonplace of virtually all neuron types in vitro. To check how the subcortical meshwork is modified during myelination, we studied sciatic nerve fibers from adult mice. Periodicity of both actin and spectrin was uncovered at the internodes, indicating no substantial differences between unmyelinated and myelinated axons. Remarkably, the actin/spectrin pattern was also detected in glial cells such as cultured oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Altogether our work shows that the periodic subcortical cytoskeletal meshwork is a fundamental characteristic of cells in the nervous system and is not a distinctive feature of neurons, as previously thought. PMID:26947559

  17. Advances in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Lauren B; Mohile, Nimish A

    2015-12-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is limited to the CNS. Although novel imaging techniques aid in discriminating lymphoma from other brain tumors, definitive diagnosis requires brain biopsy, vitreoretinal biopsy, or cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Survival rates in clinical studies have improved over the past 20 years due to the addition of high-dose methotrexate-based chemotherapy regimens to whole-brain radiotherapy. Long-term survival, however, is complicated by clinically devastating delayed neurotoxicity. Newer regimens are attempting to reduce or eliminate radiotherapy from first-line treatment with chemotherapy dose intensification. Significant advances have also been made in the fields of pathobiology and treatment, with more targeted treatments on the horizon. The rarity of the disease makes conducting of prospective clinical trials challenging, requiring collaborative efforts between institutions. This review highlights recent advances in the biology, detection, and treatment of PCNSL in immunocompetent patients. PMID:26475775

  18. The autonomic nervous system and renal physiology

    PubMed Central

    D’Elia, John A; Weinrauch, Larry A

    2013-01-01

    Research in resistant hypertension has again focused on autonomic nervous system denervation – 50 years after it had been stopped due to postural hypotension and availability of newer drugs. These (ganglionic blockers) drugs have all been similarly stopped, due to postural hypotension and yet newer antihypertensive agents. Recent demonstration of the feasibility of limited regional transcatheter sympathetic denervation has excited clinicians due to potential therapeutic implications. Standard use of ambulatory blood pressure recording equipment may alter our understanding of the diagnosis, potential treatment strategies, and health care outcomes – when faced with patients whose office blood pressure remains in the hypertensive range – while under treatment with three antihypertensive drugs at the highest tolerable doses, plus a diuretic. We review herein clinical relationships between autonomic function, resistant hypertension, current treatment strategies, and reflect upon the possibility of changes in our approach to resistant hypertension. PMID:24039445

  19. Varicella Zoster Virus in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria; Cohrs, Randall; Mahalingam, Ravi; Baird, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a ubiquitous, exclusively human alphaherpesvirus. Primary infection usually results in varicella (chickenpox), after which VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. As VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity declines in elderly and immunocompromised individuals, VZV reactivates and causes herpes zoster (shingles), frequently complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV reactivation also produces multiple serious neurological and ocular diseases, such as cranial nerve palsies, meningoencephalitis, myelopathy, and VZV vasculopathy, including giant cell arteritis, with or without associated rash. Herein, we review the clinical, laboratory, imaging, and pathological features of neurological complications of VZV reactivation as well as diagnostic tests to verify VZV infection of the nervous system. Updates on the physical state of VZV DNA and viral gene expression in latently infected ganglia, neuronal, and primate models to study varicella pathogenesis and immunity are presented along with innovations in the immunization of elderly individuals to prevent VZV reactivation. PMID:26918131

  20. VIIP: Central Nervous System (CNS) Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vera, Jerry; Mulugeta, Lealem; Nelson, Emily; Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross; Myers, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Current long-duration missions to the International Space Station and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit expose astronauts to increased risk of Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. It has been hypothesized that the headward shift of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood in microgravity may cause significant elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP), which in turn may then induce VIIP syndrome through interaction with various biomechanical pathways. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm this hypothesis. In this light, we are developing lumped-parameter models of fluid transport in the central nervous system (CNS) as a means to simulate the influence of microgravity on ICP. The CNS models will also be used in concert with the lumped parameter and finite element models of the eye described in the related IWS works submitted by Nelson et al., Feola et al. and Ethier et al.

  1. [Histopathology of central nervous system cavernomas].

    PubMed

    Mosnier, J-F; Brunon, J; Nuti, C

    2007-06-01

    Central nervous system cavernomas are vascular malformations, which occur in two circumstances: sporadic forms and familial autosomal dominant forms. The lesion consists of enlarged, closely packed vessels without interposition of brain parenchyma, surrounded by hemosiderin and gliosis, calcified in few cases. In 80% of sporadic forms the lesion is unique, multiple lesions are rare (median: 4). In familial forms the lesions are always multiple. Cavernomas are often associated with other vascular malformations, especially with venous developmental anomalies. The size of cavernomas is variable from 1 mm to several centimeters. About 70% of cases are supratentorial and 30% in the posterior fossa, particularly in the brain stem. Macroscopic and histopathological findings are typical and the diagnostic is generally easy. PMID:17498756

  2. Scaffolds for central nervous system tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Spector, Myron; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2012-03-01

    Traumatic injuries to the brain and spinal cord of the central nervous system (CNS) lead to severe and permanent neurological deficits and to date there is no universally accepted treatment. Owing to the profound impact, extensive studies have been carried out aiming at reducing inflammatory responses and overcoming the inhibitory environment in the CNS after injury so as to enhance regeneration. Artificial scaffolds may provide a suitable environment for axonal regeneration and functional recovery, and are of particular importance in cases in which the injury has resulted in a cavitary defect. In this review we discuss development of scaffolds for CNS tissue engineering, focusing on mechanism of CNS injuries, various biomaterials that have been used in studies, and current strategies for designing and fabricating scaffolds.

  3. Environmentally related disorders of the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.L.; Feldman, R.G.; French, J.G. )

    1990-03-01

    Specific physical and chemical agents found in the workplace and in the general environment are responsible for characteristic pathologic processes within the nervous system. It has been shown that many neurotoxic agents produce a dose-related spectrum of impairment ranging from mild slowing of nerve conducting velocity or prolongation in reaction time to neuropathy and frank encephalopathy. Clinical manifestations are determined by the agent involved, by the dose of exposure, the vulnerability of the cellular target, the ability of the organism to metabolize and excrete the agent, and the ability to repair damage. An occupational history, including evaluation of evidence of specific agents and job history, is a critical component in the clinical management of individuals with suspect neurotoxic disease. Environmentally-induced disorders can be prevented by appropriate environmental controls. Prevention of neurotoxic disease is a complex process requiring continuous involvement of public health agencies and strong scientific research.

  4. Gangliosides of the Vertebrate Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Schnaar, Ronald L

    2016-08-14

    Gangliosides, sialylated glycosphingolipids, found on all vertebrate cells and tissues, are major molecular determinants on the surfaces of vertebrate nerve cells. Composed of a sialylated glycan attached to a ceramide lipid, the same four structures-GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b-represent the vast majority (>90%) of gangliosides in the brains of all mammals and birds. Primarily found on the outer surface of the plasma membrane with their glycans facing outward, gangliosides associate laterally with each other, sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and select proteins in lipid rafts-the dynamic functional subdomains of the plasma membrane. The functions of gangliosides in the human nervous system are revealed by congenital mutations in ganglioside biosynthetic genes. Mutations in ST3GAL5, which codes for an enzyme early in brain ganglioside biosynthesis, result in an early-onset seizure disorder with profound motor and cognitive decay, whereas mutations in B4GALNT1, a gene encoding a later step, result in hereditary spastic paraplegia accompanied by intellectual deficits. The molecular functions of brain gangliosides include regulation of receptors in the same membrane via lateral (cis) associations and regulation of cell-cell recognition by trans interaction with ganglioside binding proteins on apposing cells. Gangliosides also affect the aggregation of Aβ (Alzheimer's disease) and α-synuclein (Parkinson's Disease). As analytical, biochemical, and genetic tools advance, research on gangliosides promises to reveal mechanisms of molecular control related to nerve and glial cell differentiation, neuronal excitability, axon outgrowth after nervous system injury, and protein folding in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27261254

  5. Differential effects of interleukin-17 receptor signaling on innate and adaptive immunity during central nervous system bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Vidlak, Debbie; Kielian, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    Although IL-17A (commonly referred to as IL-17) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune disease, its role during CNS bacterial infections remains unclear. To evaluate the broader impact of IL-17 family members in the context of CNS infection, we utilized IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) knockout (KO) mice that lack the ability to respond to IL-17, IL-17F and IL-17E (IL-25). In this article, we demonstrate that IL-17R signaling regulates bacterial clearance as well as natural killer T (NKT) cell and gamma-delta (γδ) T cell infiltrates during Staphylococcus aureus-induced brain abscess formation. Specifically, when compared with wild-type (WT) animals, IL-17R KO mice exhibited elevated bacterial burdens at days 7 and 14 following S. aureus infection. Additionally, IL-17R KO animals displayed elevated neutrophil chemokine production, revealing the ability to compensate for the lack of IL-17R activity. Despite these differences, innate immune cell recruitment into brain abscesses was similar in IL-17R KO and WT mice, whereas IL-17R signaling exerted a greater influence on adaptive immune cell recruitment. In particular, γδ T cell influx was increased in IL-17R KO mice at day 7 post-infection. In addition, NK1.1high infiltrates were absent in brain abscesses of IL-17R KO animals and, surprisingly, were rarely detected in the livers of uninfected IL-17R KO mice. Although IL-17 is a key regulator of neutrophils in other infection models, our data implicate an important role for IL-17R signaling in regulating adaptive immunity during CNS bacterial infection. PMID:22704602

  6. Evaluation of the Effects of the Aqueous Extract of Vitex doniana Root-Bark on the Peripheral and Central Nervous System of Laboratory Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulrahman, F. I.; Onyeyili, P. A.; Sandabe, U. K.; Ogugbuaja, V. O.

    Aim of this study to investigate the effects of aqueous extract of Vitrex doniana on the peripheral and central nervous systems and possibility to use it as folk medicine. The aqueous extract of Vitex doniana was soxhlet extracted with distilled water and concentrated in vacuo to give a yield of 8.5% w/w. The LD50 following intraperitoneal administration was estimated to be 980 mg kgG1. The aqueous extract of Vitex doniana from the study produced substantial depressant effects on both the peripheral and central nervous system. The aqueous extract induced sleep on its own at dose of 400 mg kgG1 and potentiated sodium thiopental sleeping time in a dose dependant manner. It also showed significant (p< 0.05) muscle relaxant activities and produced analgesia and weal anesthetic effect. The extract was able to confer 80% protection to rats treated with convulsive dose of PTZ, while it conferred 100% protection to rats treated with convulsion dose of strychnine.

  7. Myelin synthesis in the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Garbay, B; Heape, A M; Sargueil, F; Cassagne, C

    2000-06-01

    By imposing saltatory conduction on the nervous impulse, the principal role of the myelin sheath is to allow the faster propagation of action potentials along the axons which it surrounds. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) myelin is formed by the differentiation of the plasma membrane of Schwann cells. One of the biochemical characteristics that distinguishes myelin from other biological membranes is its high lipid-to-protein ratio. All the major lipid classes are represented in the myelin membrane, while several myelin-specific proteins have been identified. During development, the presence of axons is required for the initiation of myelination, but the nature of the axonal signal is still unknown. The only certainties are that this signal is synthesized by axons whose diameter is greater than 0.7 microm, and that the signal(s) include(s) a diffusible molecule. Morphological studies have provided us with information concerning the timing of myelination, the mechanism by which immature Schwann cells differentiate into a myelinating phenotype and lay down the myelin sheath around the axon, and the accumulation and the structure of the myelin membrane. The last 20 years have seen the identification and the cDNA and gene cloning of the major PNS myelin proteins, which signalled the beginning of the knock-out decade: transgenic null-mutant mice have been created for almost every protein gene. The study of these animals shows that the formation of myelin is considerably less sensitive to molecular alterations than the maintenance of myelin. During the same period, important data has been gathered concerning the synthesis and function of lipids in PNS myelin, although this field has received relatively little attention compared with that of their protein counterparts. PMID:10727776

  8. Experimental study of the mechanism and indices of harmful effects of certain chemical substances on the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Bokina, A. I.; Merkur'yeva, R. V.; Eksler, N. D.; Oleynik, A. A.; Pinigina, I. I.

    1979-01-01

    The task of the second stage of Soviet-American cooperation on the problem of environmental health science was to explain the question of the comparative sensitivity of methods used in both countries, as well as the indices of harmful effects for the same toxic substance (carbon disulfide), with the purpose of determining the most informative methods of assessing the influence of atmospheric pollutants on organisms. The application of neurophysiological research methods (recording total electrical activity of the cortex and cortical structures of the brain, studying amplitude-time characteristics of averaged evoked potentials of the optical cortex, investigating sensory and convulsive thresholds) has made it possible to explain the neurophysiological basis of the effect of carbon disulfide on the central nervous system—the perturbation of cortical inhibition processes and the increase of excitation in amygdalate structures, both of which play an important role in the fixation process of temporary connection. The compilation of data from neurophysiological and neurochemical investigations show that neurophysiological changes are associated primarily with a decrease in enzymic breakdown of free neuraminic acid. The study of the average evoked potentials in humans during exposure to carbon disulfide concentrations of 0.09 mg/m3 revealed a tendency to decrease the short latent amplitude components and increase the long latent amplitude components of the averaged evoked potentials. The study of operant behavior in rats revealed a characteristic change in the instrumental alimentary reactions under long-term (3 months) exposure of carbon disulfide to a concentration of 16 mg/m3. In this manner, the following were developed in experiments with animals and research on humans: indices of the harmful effects of neurotropic toxic substances, a change in operant behavior, a decrease in the amplitude of total electrical activity, a change in time-amplitude parameters of

  9. Simvastatin Hydroxy Acid Fails to Attain Sufficient Central Nervous System Tumor Exposure to Achieve a Cytotoxic Effect: Results of a Preclinical Cerebral Microdialysis Study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogesh T; Jacus, Megan O; Davis, Abigail D; Boulos, Nidal; Turner, David C; Vuppala, Pradeep K; Freeman, Burgess B; Gilbertson, Richard J; Stewart, Clinton F

    2016-04-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors were potent hits against a mouse ependymoma cell line, but their effectiveness against central nervous system tumors will depend on their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and attain a sufficient exposure at the tumor. Among 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors that had activity in vitro, we prioritized simvastatin (SV) as the lead compound for preclinical pharmacokinetic studies based on its potential for central nervous system penetration as determined from in silico models. Furthermore, we performed systemic plasma disposition and cerebral microdialysis studies of SV (100 mg/kg, p.o.) in a murine model of ependymoma to characterize plasma and tumor extracellular fluid (tECF) pharmacokinetic properties. The murine dosage of SV (100 mg/kg, p.o.) was equivalent to the maximum tolerated dose in patients (7.5 mg/kg, p.o.) based on equivalent plasma exposure of simvastatin acid (SVA) between the two species. SV is rapidly metabolized in murine plasma with 15 times lower exposure compared with human plasma. SVA exposure in tECF was <33.8 ± 11.9 µg/l per hour, whereas the tumor to plasma partition coefficient of SVA was <0.084 ± 0.008. Compared with in vitro washout IC50 values, we did not achieve sufficient exposure of SVA in tECF to suggest tumor growth inhibition; therefore, SV was not carried forward in subsequent preclinical efficacy studies. PMID:26802130

  10. [Effect of artificial mountain climate on the functional state of higher regions of the central nervous system in man].

    PubMed

    Berezovskiĭ, V A; Levashov, M I

    2009-01-01

    The study included 97 patients with vegetative vascular dystonia and chronic non-specific pulmonary diseases exposed to artificial high-altitude climate in an Orotron climatic chamber during 2 weeks. Atmospheric conditions maintained in the chamber had the following parameters: partial pressure of oxygen--147-160 gPa, relative humidity--60-70%, air temperature--16-18 degrees C, light aeroion content--up to 6000 cub.cm. It was shown that the exposure to artificial mountain climatic conditions enhanced functional mobility of nervous processes and decreased the length of the sensorimotor reactions of the patients. Individual differences in the change of parameters being measured depended on the degree of initial functional flexibility of nervous processes. PMID:19517597

  11. Regulation of sympathetic nervous system function after cardiovascular deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasser, E. M.; Moffitt, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans subjected to prolonged periods of bed rest or microgravity undergo deconditioning of the cardiovascular system, characterized by resting tachycardia, reduced exercise capability, and a predisposition for orthostatic intolerance. These changes in cardiovascular function are likely due to a combination of factors, including changes in control of body fluid balance or cardiac alterations resulting in inadequate maintenance of stroke volume, altered arterial or venous vascular function, reduced activation of cardiovascular hormones, and diminished autonomic reflex function. There is evidence indicating a role for each of these mechanisms. Diminished reflex activation of the sympathetic nervous system and subsequent vasoconstriction appear to play an important role. Studies utilizing the hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rat, an animal model of deconditioning, evaluated the potential role of altered arterial baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system. These studies indicate that HU results in blunted baroreflex-mediated activation of both renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in response to a hypotensive stimulus. HU rats are less able to maintain arterial pressure during hemorrhage, suggesting that diminished ability to increase sympathetic activity has functional consequences for the animal. Reflex control of vasopressin secretion appears to be enhanced following HU. Blunted baroreflex-mediated sympathoexcitation appears to involve altered central nervous system function. Baroreceptor afferent activity in response to changes in arterial pressure is unaltered in HU rats. However, increases in efferent sympathetic nerve activity for a given decrease in afferent input are blunted after HU. This altered central nervous system processing of baroreceptor inputs appears to involve an effect at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Specifically, it appears that tonic GABAA-mediated inhibition of the RVLM is enhanced after HU. Augmented inhibition apparently

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of central nervous system abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Angtuaco, E E; Angtuaco, T L; Angtuaco, E J

    1994-01-01

    Fetal anomalies have been the subject of innumerable publications both in the prenatal and neonatal literature. This has significantly increased in the last 10 years, mainly because of the advent of high-resolution ultrasound equipment and improvement of scanning techniques. In addition, guidelines issued by professional organizations involved in prenatal diagnosis have encouraged a more universal approach to the imaging and documentation of prenatal findings. The fetal central nervous system is the most frequently investigated organ system, mainly because of its easy accessibility and prominence even in the early stages of embryologic development. The biparietal diameter was the first fetal measurement to be widely used in determining gestational age. As investigators gained more experience, the appearance of ultrasound images achieved the resolution that allows direct comparisons with gross specimens and more recent sophisticated techniques of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Now endovaginal ultrasound can document early first trimester development and compare it to known embryologic landmarks. Interest in demonstrating the ultrasound counterpart of central nervous system structures in the early stages of development has resulted in a plethora of articles proving the unique ability of ultrasound in imaging the developing fetus. In view of all these developments, the beginning ultrasound specialist is faced with the challenge and responsibility not only of being familiar with the literature but also of the mastery of scanning techniques that allow accurate prenatal diagnosis. It is therefore helpful to review key developmental milestones in embryologic life and correlate them with the corresponding prenatal ultrasound appearance. In addition, the changing appearance of the developing fetus has created a need for a systematic approach in the evaluation of structures so routine protocols can be established. This has been the subject of other

  13. Neurotropic Enterovirus Infections in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsing-I; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses are a group of positive-sense single stranded viruses that belong to the Picornaviridae family. Most enteroviruses infect humans from the gastrointestinal tract and cause mild symptoms. However, several enteroviruses can invade the central nervous system (CNS) and result in various neurological symptoms that are correlated to mortality associated with enteroviral infections. In recent years, large outbreaks of enteroviruses occurred worldwide. Therefore, these neurotropic enteroviruses have been deemed as re-emerging pathogens. Although these viruses are becoming large threats to public health, our understanding of these viruses, especially for non-polio enteroviruses, is limited. In this article, we review recent advances in the trafficking of these pathogens from the peripheral to the central nervous system, compare their cell tropism, and discuss the effects of viral infections in their host neuronal cells. PMID:26610549

  14. [The role of metalloprotease in pathogenesis of nervous system diseases].

    PubMed

    Mirowska, D; Członkowska, A

    2001-01-01

    Matrix Metalloproteases (MMPs) comprise a big family of proteolytic enzymes secreted into extracellular matrix and involved in remodelling of many tissues. The MMPs' activity is regulated on many levels. It is also determined by specific inhibitors known as tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases (TIMPs). Several studies revealed that MMPs have a role not only in physiological processes but also in pathophysiology of nervous system diseases, such as multiplex sclerosis, Guillan-Barré syndrome and strokes. Concerning demyelination MMPs are responsible for degradation of myelin components and facilitation of immune cells migration into inflammatory sites by degrading vascular basement membrane. We still investigate substances with positive clinical effect on the nervous system diseases due to MMPs inactivation. PMID:11464705

  15. Oxidation of ion channels in the aging nervous system.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rahul; Sesti, Federico

    2016-05-15

    Ion channels are integral membrane proteins that allow passive diffusion of ions across membranes. In neurons and in other excitable cells, the harmonious coordination between the numerous types of ion channels shape and propagate electrical signals. Increased accumulation of reactive oxidative species (ROS), and subsequent oxidation of proteins, including ion channels, is a hallmark feature of aging and may contribute to cell failure as a result. In this review we discuss the effects of ROS on three major types of ion channels of the central nervous system, namely the potassium (K(+)), calcium (Ca(2+)) and sodium (Na(+)) channels. We examine two general mechanisms through which ROS affect ion channels: via direct oxidation of specific residues and via indirect interference of pathways that regulate the channels. The overall status of the present studies indicates that the interaction of ion channels with ROS is multimodal and pervasive in the central nervous system and likely constitutes a general mechanism of aging susceptibility. PMID:26947620

  16. Regulation of cadherin expression in nervous system development

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Alicia F; Prasad, Maneeshi S; Thuringer, Amanda Henke; Manzerra, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for classical cadherin expression during development of the vertebrate nervous system. The complexity of the spatial and temporal expression patterns is linked to morphogenic and functional roles in the developing nervous system. While the regulatory networks controlling cadherin expression are not well understood, it is likely that the multiple signaling pathways active in the development of particular domains also regulate the specific cadherins expressed at that time and location. With the growing understanding of the broader roles of cadherins in cell–cell adhesion and non-adhesion processes, it is important to understand both the upstream regulation of cadherin expression and the downstream effects of specific cadherins within their cellular context. PMID:24526207

  17. Central nervous system adaptation to exercise training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Lois Anne

    Exercise training causes physiological changes in skeletal muscle that results in enhanced performance in humans and animals. Despite numerous studies on exercise effects on skeletal muscle, relatively little is known about adaptive changes in the central nervous system. This study investigated whether spinal pathways that mediate locomotor activity undergo functional adaptation after 28 days of exercise training. Ventral horn spinal cord expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a trophic factor at the neuromuscular junction, choline acetyltransferase (Chat), the synthetic enzyme for acetylcholine, vesicular acetylcholine transporter (Vacht), a transporter of ACh into synaptic vesicles and calcineurin (CaN), a protein phosphatase that phosphorylates ion channels and exocytosis machinery were measured to determine if changes in expression occurred in response to physical activity. Expression of these proteins was determined by western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Comparisons between sedentary controls and animals that underwent either endurance training or resistance training were made. Control rats received no exercise other than normal cage activity. Endurance-trained rats were exercised 6 days/wk at 31m/min on a treadmill (8% incline) for 100 minutes. Resistance-trained rats supported their weight plus an additional load (70--80% body weight) on a 60° incline (3 x 3 min, 5 days/wk). CGRP expression was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). CGRP expression in the spinal dorsal and ventral horn of exercise-trained animals was not significantly different than controls. Chat expression measured by Western blot and IHC was not significantly different between runners and controls but expression in resistance-trained animals assayed by IHC was significantly less than controls and runners. Vacht and CaN immunoreactivity in motor neurons of endurance-trained rats was significantly elevated relative to control and resistance-trained animals. Ventral

  18. Time Perception Mechanisms at Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Rhailana; Ribeiro, Jéssica; Gupta, Daya S; Machado, Dionis; Lopes-Júnior, Fernando; Magalhães, Francisco; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Rocha, Kaline; Marinho, Victor; Lima, Gildário; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Orsini, Marco; Pessoa, Bruno; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Teixeira, Silmar

    2016-04-01

    The five senses have specific ways to receive environmental information and lead to central nervous system. The perception of time is the sum of stimuli associated with cognitive processes and environmental changes. Thus, the perception of time requires a complex neural mechanism and may be changed by emotional state, level of attention, memory and diseases. Despite this knowledge, the neural mechanisms of time perception are not yet fully understood. The objective is to relate the mechanisms involved the neurofunctional aspects, theories, executive functions and pathologies that contribute the understanding of temporal perception. Articles form 1980 to 2015 were searched by using the key themes: neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, theories, time cells, memory, schizophrenia, depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and Parkinson's disease combined with the term perception of time. We evaluated 158 articles within the inclusion criteria for the purpose of the study. We conclude that research about the holdings of the frontal cortex, parietal, basal ganglia, cerebellum and hippocampus have provided advances in the understanding of the regions related to the perception of time. In neurological and psychiatric disorders, the understanding of time depends on the severity of the diseases and the type of tasks. PMID:27127597

  19. Time Perception Mechanisms at Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Rhailana; Ribeiro, Jéssica; Gupta, Daya S.; Machado, Dionis; Lopes-Júnior, Fernando; Magalhães, Francisco; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Rocha, Kaline; Marinho, Victor; Lima, Gildário; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Orsini, Marco; Pessoa, Bruno; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Teixeira, Silmar

    2016-01-01

    The five senses have specific ways to receive environmental information and lead to central nervous system. The perception of time is the sum of stimuli associated with cognitive processes and environmental changes. Thus, the perception of time requires a complex neural mechanism and may be changed by emotional state, level of attention, memory and diseases. Despite this knowledge, the neural mechanisms of time perception are not yet fully understood. The objective is to relate the mechanisms involved the neurofunctional aspects, theories, executive functions and pathologies that contribute the understanding of temporal perception. Articles form 1980 to 2015 were searched by using the key themes: neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, theories, time cells, memory, schizophrenia, depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and Parkinson’s disease combined with the term perception of time. We evaluated 158 articles within the inclusion criteria for the purpose of the study. We conclude that research about the holdings of the frontal cortex, parietal, basal ganglia, cerebellum and hippocampus have provided advances in the understanding of the regions related to the perception of time. In neurological and psychiatric disorders, the understanding of time depends on the severity of the diseases and the type of tasks. PMID:27127597

  20. Central Nervous System Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boulware, David R.; Marais, Suzaan; Scriven, James; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (CNS-IRIS) develops in 9 %–47 % of persons with HIV infection and a CNS opportunistic infection who start antiretroviral therapy and is associated with a mortality rate of 13 %–75 %. These rates vary according to the causative pathogen. Common CNS-IRIS events occur in relation to Cryptococcus, tuberculosis (TB), and JC virus, but several other mycobacteria, fungi, and viruses have been associated with IRIS. IRIS symptoms often mimic the original infection, and diagnosis necessitates consideration of treatment failure, microbial resistance, and an additional neurological infection. These diagnostic challenges often delay IRIS diagnosis and treatment. Corticosteroids have been used to treat CNS-IRIS, with variable responses; the best supportive evidence exists for the treatment of TB-IRIS. Pathogenic mechanisms vary: Cryptococcal IRIS is characterized by a paucity of cerebrospinal inflammation prior to antiretroviral therapy, whereas higher levels of inflammatory markers at baseline predispose to TB meningitis IRIS. This review focuses on advances in the understanding of CNS-IRIS over the past 2 years. PMID:24173584

  1. Subcortical cytoskeleton periodicity throughout the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    D’Este, Elisa; Kamin, Dirk; Velte, Caroline; Göttfert, Fabian; Simons, Mikael; Hell, Stefan W.

    2016-01-01

    Superresolution fluorescence microscopy recently revealed a ~190 nm periodic cytoskeleton lattice consisting of actin, spectrin, and other proteins underneath the membrane of cultured hippocampal neurons. Whether the periodic cytoskeleton lattice is a structural feature of all neurons and how it is modified when axons are ensheathed by myelin forming glial cells is not known. Here, STED nanoscopy is used to demonstrate that this structure is a commonplace of virtually all neuron types in vitro. To check how the subcortical meshwork is modified during myelination, we studied sciatic nerve fibers from adult mice. Periodicity of both actin and spectrin was uncovered at the internodes, indicating no substantial differences between unmyelinated and myelinated axons. Remarkably, the actin/spectrin pattern was also detected in glial cells such as cultured oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Altogether our work shows that the periodic subcortical cytoskeletal meshwork is a fundamental characteristic of cells in the nervous system and is not a distinctive feature of neurons, as previously thought. PMID:26947559

  2. In vivo peripheral nervous system insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Caleb W.; Ryals, Janelle M.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in peripheral nervous system (PNS) insulin support may contribute to diabetic neuropathy (DN); yet, PNS insulin signaling is not fully defined. Here, we investigated in vivo insulin signaling in the PNS and compared the insulin-responsiveness to that of muscle, liver, and adipose. Nondiabetic mice were administered increasing doses of insulin to define a dose response relationship between insulin and Akt activation in the DRG and sciatic nerve. Resulting EC50 doses were used to characterize the PNS insulin signaling time course and make comparisons between insulin signaling in the PNS and other peripheral tissues (i.e., muscle, liver, adipose). The results demonstrate that the PNS is responsive to insulin and that differences in insulin signaling pathway activation exist between PNS compartments. At a therapeutically relevant dose, Akt was activated in the muscle, liver, and adipose at 30 minutes, correlating with the changes in blood glucose levels. Interestingly, the sciatic nerve showed a similar signaling profile as insulin-sensitive tissues, however there was not a comparable activation in the DRG or spinal cord. These results present new evidence regarding PNS insulin signaling pathways in vivo and provide a baseline for studies investigating the contribution of disrupted PNS insulin signaling to DN pathogenesis. PMID:24028189

  3. Diabetes and the enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharan, B; Srinivasan, S

    2007-12-01

    Diabetes is associated with several changes in gastrointestinal (GI) motility and associated symptoms such as nausea, bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhoea and constipation. The pathogenesis of altered GI functions in diabetes is multifactorial and the role of the enteric nervous system (ENS) in this respect has gained significant importance. In this review, we summarize the research carried out on diabetes-related changes in the ENS. Changes in the inhibitory and excitatory enteric neurons are described highlighting the role of loss of inhibitory neurons in early diabetic enteric neuropathy. The functional consequences of these neuronal changes result in altered gastric emptying, diarrhoea or constipation. Diabetes can also affect GI motility through changes in intestinal smooth muscle or alterations in extrinsic neuronal control. Hyperglycaemia and oxidative stress play an important role in the pathophysiology of these ENS changes. Antioxidants to prevent or treat diabetic GI motility problems have therapeutic potential. Recent research on the nerve-immune interactions demonstrates inflammation-associated neurodegeneration which can lead to motility related problems in diabetes. PMID:17971027

  4. Early animal evolution and the origins of nervous systems

    PubMed Central

    Budd, Graham E.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of early nervous systems is hazardous because we lack good criteria for determining homology between the systems of distant taxa; the timing of the evolutionary events is contested, and thus the relevant ecological and geological settings for them are also unclear. Here I argue that no simple approach will resolve the first issue, but that it remains likely that animals evolved relatively late, and that their nervous systems thus arose during the late Ediacaran, in a context provided by the changing planktonic and benthic environments of the time. The early trace fossil provides the most concrete evidence for early behavioural diversification, but it cannot simply be translated into increasing nervous system complexity: behavioural complexity does not map on a one-to-one basis onto nervous system complexity, both because of possible limitations to behaviour caused by the environment and because we know that even organisms without nervous systems are capable of relatively complex behaviour. PMID:26554037

  5. Early animal evolution and the origins of nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Budd, Graham E

    2015-12-19

    Understanding the evolution of early nervous systems is hazardous because we lack good criteria for determining homology between the systems of distant taxa; the timing of the evolutionary events is contested, and thus the relevant ecological and geological settings for them are also unclear. Here I argue that no simple approach will resolve the first issue, but that it remains likely that animals evolved relatively late, and that their nervous systems thus arose during the late Ediacaran, in a context provided by the changing planktonic and benthic environments of the time. The early trace fossil provides the most concrete evidence for early behavioural diversification, but it cannot simply be translated into increasing nervous system complexity: behavioural complexity does not map on a one-to-one basis onto nervous system complexity, both because of possible limitations to behaviour caused by the environment and because we know that even organisms without nervous systems are capable of relatively complex behaviour. PMID:26554037

  6. Activation of Latent Human Immunodeficiency Virus by the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Panobinostat: A Pilot Study to Assess Effects on the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Thomas A.; Tolstrup, Martin; Møller, Holger Jon; Brinkmann, Christel R.; Olesen, Rikke; Erikstrup, Christian; Laursen, Alex L.; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S.

    2015-01-01

    In a substudy of a clinical trial, we assessed whether activation of latent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by the histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat had detrimental effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Adults infected with HIV received oral panobinostat 20 mg 3 times per week every other week for 8 weeks. In cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), we assayed panobinostat concentration, HIV RNA, and the level of neuroinflammatory or degenerative biomarkers in 11 individuals before and during study therapy. Neither panobinostat nor HIV RNA was detected in CSF. In addition, there was no change from baseline in CSF biomarkers. Thus, panobinostat administration was not associated with CNS adverse effects as assessed by CSF biomarkers. PMID:26034779

  7. N-glycosylation in Regulation of the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Hilary; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Protein N-glycosylation can influence the nervous system in a variety of ways by affecting functions of glycoproteins involved in nervous system development and physiology. The importance of N-glycans for different aspects of neural development has been well documented. For example, some N-linked carbohydrate structures were found to play key roles in neural cell adhesion and axonal targeting during development. At the same time, the involvement of glycosylation in the regulation of neural physiology remains less understood. Recent studies have implicated N-glycosylation in the regulation of neural transmission, revealing novel roles of glycans in synaptic processes and the control of neural excitability. N-Glycans were found to markedly affect the function of several types of synaptic proteins involved in key steps of synaptic transmission, including neurotransmitter release, reception and uptake. Glycosylation also regulates a number of channel proteins, such as TRP channels that control responses to environmental stimuli and voltage-gated ion channels, the principal determinants of neuronal excitability. Sialylated carbohydrate structures play a particularly prominent part in the modulation of voltage gated ion channels. Sialic acids appear to affect channel functions via several mechanisms, including charge interactions, as well as other interactions that probably engage steric effects and interactions with other molecules. Experiments also indicated that some structural features of glycans can be particularly important for their function. Since glycan structures can vary significantly between different cell types and depends on the metabolic state of the cell, it is important to analyze glycan functions using in vivo approaches. While the complexity of the nervous system and intricacies of glycosylation pathways can create serious obstacles for in vivo experiments in vertebrates, recent studies have indicated that more simple and experimentally

  8. The Biphasic Effects of Moderate Alcohol Consumption with a Meal on Ambiance-Induced Mood and Autonomic Nervous System Balance: A Randomized Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schrieks, Ilse C.; Stafleu, Annette; Kallen, Victor L.; Grootjen, Marc; Witkamp, Renger F.; Hendriks, Henk F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The pre-drinking mood state has been indicated to be an important factor in the mood effects of alcohol. However, for moderate alcohol consumption there are no controlled studies showing this association. Also, the mood effects of consuming alcohol combined with food are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of moderate alcohol combined with a meal on ambiance-induced mood states. Furthermore effects on autonomic nervous system activity were measured to explore physiological mechanisms that may be involved in changes of mood state. Methods In a crossover design 28 women (age 18–45 y, BMI 18.5–27 kg/m2) were randomly allocated to 4 conditions in which they received 3 glasses of sparkling white wine (30 g alcohol) or alcohol-free sparkling white wine while having dinner in a room with either a pleasant or unpleasant created ambiance. Subjects filled out questionnaires (B-BAES, POMS and postprandial wellness questionnaire) at different times. Skin conductance and heart rate variability were measured continuously. Results Moderate alcohol consumption increased happiness scores in the unpleasant, but not in the pleasant ambiance. Alcohol consumption increased happiness and stimulation feelings within 1 hour and increased sedative feelings and sleepiness for 2.5 hour. Skin conductance was increased after alcohol within 1 hour and was related to happiness and stimulation scores. Heart rate variability was decreased after alcohol for 2 hours and was related to mental alertness. Conclusion Mood inductions and autonomic nervous system parameters may be useful to evaluate mood changes by nutritional interventions. Moderate alcohol consumption elevates happiness scores in an unpleasant ambiance. However, drinking alcohol during a pleasant mood results in an equally positive mood state. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01426022. PMID:24465955

  9. Melatonin Metabolism in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    The metabolism of melatonin in the central nervous system is of interest for several reasons. Melatonin enters the brain either via the pineal recess or by uptake from the blood. It has been assumed to be also formed in some brain areas. Neuroprotection by melatonin has been demonstrated in numerous model systems, and various attempts have been undertaken to counteract neurodegeneration by melatonin treatment. Several concurrent pathways lead to different products. Cytochrome P450 subforms have been demonstrated in the brain. They either demethylate melatonin to N-acetylserotonin, or produce 6-hydroxymelatonin, which is mostly sulfated already in the CNS. Melatonin is deacetylated, at least in pineal gland and retina, to 5-methoxytryptamine. N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine is formed by pyrrole-ring cleavage, by myeloperoxidase, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and various non-enzymatic oxidants. Its product, N1-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine, is of interest as a scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial modulator, downregulator of cyclooxygenase-2, inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, neuronal and inducible NO synthases. Contrary to other nitrosated aromates, the nitrosated kynuramine metabolite, 3-acetamidomethyl-6-methoxycinnolinone, does not re-donate NO. Various other products are formed from melatonin and its metabolites by interaction with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The relative contribution of the various pathways to melatonin catabolism seems to be influenced by microglia activation, oxidative stress and brain levels of melatonin, which may be strongly changed in experiments on neuroprotection. Many of the melatonin metabolites, which may appear in elevated concentrations after melatonin administration, possess biological or pharmacological properties, including N-acetylserotonin, 5-methoxytryptamine and some of its derivatives, and especially the 5-methoxylated kynuramines. PMID:21358968

  10. Evaluation of the effects of plant-derived essential oils on central nervous system function using discrete shuttle-type conditioned avoidance response in mice.

    PubMed

    Umezu, Toyoshi

    2012-06-01

    Although plant-derived essential oils (EOs) have been used to treat various mental disorders, their central nervous system (CNS) acting effects have not been clarified. The present study compared the effects of 20 kinds of EOs with the effects of already-known CNS acting drugs to examine whether the EOs exhibited CNS stimulant-like effects, CNS depressant-like effects, or neither. All agents were tested using a discrete shuttle-type conditioned avoidance task in mice. Essential oils of peppermint and chamomile exhibited CNS stimulant-like effects; that is, they increased the response rate (number of shuttlings/min) of the avoidance response. Linden also increased the response rate, however, the effect was not dose-dependent. In contrast, EOs of orange, grapefruit, and cypress exhibited CNS depressant-like effects; that is, they decreased the response rate of the avoidance response. Essential oils of eucalyptus and rose decreased the avoidance rate (number of avoidance responses/number of avoidance trials) without affecting the response rate, indicating that they may exhibit some CNS acting effects. Essential oils of 12 other plants, including juniper, patchouli, geranium, jasmine, clary sage, neroli, lavender, lemon, ylang-ylang, niaouli, vetivert and frankincense had no effect on the avoidance response in mice. PMID:22086772