Science.gov

Sample records for neural interface systems

  1. Bidirectional neural interface: Closed-loop feedback control for hybrid neural systems.

    PubMed

    Chou, Zane; Lim, Jeffrey; Brown, Sophie; Keller, Melissa; Bugbee, Joseph; Broccard, Frédéric D; Khraiche, Massoud L; Silva, Gabriel A; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2015-08-01

    Closed-loop neural prostheses enable bidirectional communication between the biological and artificial components of a hybrid system. However, a major challenge in this field is the limited understanding of how these components, the two separate neural networks, interact with each other. In this paper, we propose an in vitro model of a closed-loop system that allows for easy experimental testing and modification of both biological and artificial network parameters. The interface closes the system loop in real time by stimulating each network based on recorded activity of the other network, within preset parameters. As a proof of concept we demonstrate that the bidirectional interface is able to establish and control network properties, such as synchrony, in a hybrid system of two neural networks more significantly more effectively than the same system without the interface or with unidirectional alternatives. This success holds promise for the application of closed-loop systems in neural prostheses, brain-machine interfaces, and drug testing. PMID:26737158

  2. Implantable microscale neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Karen C

    2007-12-01

    Implantable neural microsystems provide an interface to the nervous system, giving cellular resolution to physiological processes unattainable today with non-invasive methods. Such implantable microelectrode arrays are being developed to simultaneously sample signals at many points in the tissue, providing insight into processes such as movement control, memory formation, and perception. These electrode arrays have been microfabricated on a variety of substrates, including silicon, using both surface and bulk micromachining techniques, and more recently, polymers. Current approaches to achieving a stable long-term tissue interface focus on engineering the surface properties of the implant, including coatings that discourage protein adsorption or release bioactive molecules. The implementation of a wireless interface requires consideration of the necessary data flow, amplification, signal processing, and packaging. In future, the realization of a fully implantable neural microsystem will contribute to both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as a neuroprosthetic interface to restore motor functions in paralyzed patients. PMID:17252207

  3. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  4. Optical Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Melissa R.; Cardin, Jessica A.; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Genetically encoded optical actuators and indicators have changed the landscape of neuroscience, enabling targetable control and readout of specific components of intact neural circuits in behaving animals. Here, we review the development of optical neural interfaces, focusing on hardware designed for optical control of neural activity, integrated optical control and electrical readout, and optical readout of population and single-cell neural activity in freely moving mammals. PMID:25014785

  5. A Neuromorphic Event-Based Neural Recording System for Smart Brain-Machine-Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Federico; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2015-10-01

    Neural recording systems are a central component of Brain-Machince Interfaces (BMIs). In most of these systems the emphasis is on faithful reproduction and transmission of the recorded signal to remote systems for further processing or data analysis. Here we follow an alternative approach: we propose a neural recording system that can be directly interfaced locally to neuromorphic spiking neural processing circuits for compressing the large amounts of data recorded, carrying out signal processing and neural computation to extract relevant information, and transmitting only the low-bandwidth outcome of the processing to remote computing or actuating modules. The fabricated system includes a low-noise amplifier, a delta-modulator analog-to-digital converter, and a low-power band-pass filter. The bio-amplifier has a programmable gain of 45-54 dB, with a Root Mean Squared (RMS) input-referred noise level of 2.1 μV, and consumes 90 μW . The band-pass filter and delta-modulator circuits include asynchronous handshaking interface logic compatible with event-based communication protocols. We describe the properties of the neural recording circuits, validating them with experimental measurements, and present system-level application examples, by interfacing these circuits to a reconfigurable neuromorphic processor comprising an array of spiking neurons with plastic and dynamic synapses. The pool of neurons within the neuromorphic processor was configured to implement a recurrent neural network, and to process the events generated by the neural recording system in order to carry out pattern recognition. PMID:26513801

  6. Miniaturized neural interfaces and implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Boretius, Tim; Ordonez, Juan; Hassler, Christina; Henle, Christian; Meier, Wolfgang; Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Schuettler, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Neural prostheses are technical systems that interface nerves to treat the symptoms of neurological diseases and to restore sensory of motor functions of the body. Success stories have been written with the cochlear implant to restore hearing, with spinal cord stimulators to treat chronic pain as well as urge incontinence, and with deep brain stimulators in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Highly complex neural implants for novel medical applications can be miniaturized either by means of precision mechanics technologies using known and established materials for electrodes, cables, and hermetic packages or by applying microsystems technologies. Examples for both approaches will be introduced and discussed. Electrode arrays for recording of electrocorticograms during presurgical epilepsy diagnosis have been manufactured using approved materials and a marking laser to achieve an integration density that is adequate in the context of brain machine interfaces, e.g. on the motor cortex. Microtechnologies have to be used for further miniaturization to develop polymer-based flexible and light weighted electrode arrays to interface the peripheral and central nervous system. Polyimide as substrate and insulation material will be discussed as well as several application examples for nerve interfaces like cuffs, filament like electrodes and large arrays for subdural implantation.

  7. Point-and-Click Cursor Control With an Intracortical Neural Interface System by Humans With Tetraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Phil; Simeral, John D.; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Donoghue, John P.; Friehs, Gerhard M.; Black, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a point-and-click intracortical neural interface system (NIS) that enables humans with tetraplegia to volitionally move a 2-D computer cursor in any desired direction on a computer screen, hold it still, and click on the area of interest. This direct brain–computer interface extracts both discrete (click) and continuous (cursor velocity) signals from a single small population of neurons in human motor cortex. A key component of this system is a multi-state probabilistic decoding algorithm that simultaneously decodes neural spiking activity of a small population of neurons and outputs either a click signal or the velocity of the cursor. The algorithm combines a linear classifier, which determines whether the user is intending to click or move the cursor, with a Kalman filter that translates the neural population activity into cursor velocity. We present a paradigm for training the multi-state decoding algorithm using neural activity observed during imagined actions. Two human participants with tetraplegia (paralysis of the four limbs) performed a closed-loop radial target acquisition task using the point-and-click NIS over multiple sessions. We quantified point-and-click performance using various human-computer interaction measurements for pointing devices. We found that participants could control the cursor motion and click on specified targets with a small error rate (<3% in one participant). This study suggests that signals from a small ensemble of motor cortical neurons (~40) can be used for natural point-and-click 2-D cursor control of a personal computer. PMID:21278024

  8. A wireless transmission neural interface system for unconstrained non-human primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Leon, Jose A.; Parajuli, Arun; Franklin, Robert; Sorenson, Michael; Felleman, Daniel J.; Hansen, Bryan J.; Hu, Ming; Dragoi, Valentin

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Studying the brain in large animal models in a restrained laboratory rig severely limits our capacity to examine brain circuits in experimental and clinical applications. Approach. To overcome these limitations, we developed a high-fidelity 96-channel wireless system to record extracellular spikes and local field potentials from the neocortex. A removable, external case of the wireless device is attached to a titanium pedestal placed in the animal skull. Broadband neural signals are amplified, multiplexed, and continuously transmitted as TCP/IP data at a sustained rate of 24 Mbps. A Xilinx Spartan 6 FPGA assembles the digital signals into serial data frames for transmission at 20 kHz though an 802.11n wireless data link on a frequency-shift key-modulated signal at 5.7-5.8 GHz to a receiver up to 10 m away. The system is powered by two CR123A, 3 V batteries for 2 h of operation. Main results. We implanted a multi-electrode array in visual area V4 of one anesthetized monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) of a freely moving monkey (Macaca mulatta). The implanted recording arrays were electrically stable and delivered broadband neural data over a year of testing. For the first time, we compared dlPFC neuronal responses to the same set of stimuli (food reward) in restrained and freely moving conditions. Although we did not find differences in neuronal responses as a function of reward type in the restrained and unrestrained conditions, there were significant differences in correlated activity. This demonstrates that measuring neural responses in freely moving animals can capture phenomena that are absent in the traditional head-fixed paradigm. Significance. We implemented a wireless neural interface for multi-electrode recordings in freely moving non-human primates, which can potentially move systems neuroscience to a new direction by allowing one to record neural signals while animals interact with their environment.

  9. Intra-day signal instabilities affect decoding performance in an intracortical neural interface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perge, János A.; Homer, Mark L.; Malik, Wasim Q.; Cash, Sydney; Eskandar, Emad; Friehs, Gerhard; Donoghue, John P.; Hochberg, Leigh R.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Motor neural interface systems (NIS) aim to convert neural signals into motor prosthetic or assistive device control, allowing people with paralysis to regain movement or control over their immediate environment. Effector or prosthetic control can degrade if the relationship between recorded neural signals and intended motor behavior changes. Therefore, characterizing both biological and technological sources of signal variability is important for a reliable NIS. Approach. To address the frequency and causes of neural signal variability in a spike-based NIS, we analyzed within-day fluctuations in spiking activity and action potential amplitude recorded with silicon microelectrode arrays implanted in the motor cortex of three people with tetraplegia (BrainGate pilot clinical trial, IDE). Main results. 84% of the recorded units showed a statistically significant change in apparent firing rate (3.8 ± 8.71 Hz or 49% of the mean rate) across several-minute epochs of tasks performed on a single session, and 74% of the units showed a significant change in spike amplitude (3.7 ± 6.5 µV or 5.5% of mean spike amplitude). 40% of the recording sessions showed a significant correlation in the occurrence of amplitude changes across electrodes, suggesting array micro-movement. Despite the relatively frequent amplitude changes, only 15% of the observed within-day rate changes originated from recording artifacts such as spike amplitude change or electrical noise, while 85% of the rate changes most likely emerged from physiological mechanisms. Computer simulations confirmed that systematic rate changes of individual neurons could produce a directional ‘bias’ in the decoded neural cursor movements. Instability in apparent neuronal spike rates indeed yielded a directional bias in 56% of all performance assessments in participant cursor control (n = 2 participants, 108 and 20 assessments over two years), resulting in suboptimal performance in these sessions

  10. EDITORIAL: Focus on the neural interface Focus on the neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.

    2009-10-01

    The possibility of an effective connection between neural tissue and computers has inspired scientists and engineers to develop new ways of controlling and obtaining information from the nervous system. These applications range from `brain hacking' to neural control of artificial limbs with brain signals. Notwithstanding the significant advances in neural prosthetics in the last few decades and the success of some stimulation devices such as cochlear prosthesis, neurotechnology remains below its potential for restoring neural function in patients with nervous system disorders. One of the reasons for this limited impact can be found at the neural interface and close attention to the integration between electrodes and tissue should improve the possibility of successful outcomes. The neural interfaces research community consists of investigators working in areas such as deep brain stimulation, functional neuromuscular/electrical stimulation, auditory prostheses, cortical prostheses, neuromodulation, microelectrode array technology, brain-computer/machine interfaces. Following the success of previous neuroprostheses and neural interfaces workshops, funding (from NIH) was obtained to establish a biennial conference in the area of neural interfaces. The first Neural Interfaces Conference took place in Cleveland, OH in 2008 and several topics from this conference have been selected for publication in this special section of the Journal of Neural Engineering. Three `perspectives' review the areas of neural regeneration (Corredor and Goldberg), cochlear implants (O'Leary et al) and neural prostheses (Anderson). Seven articles focus on various aspects of neural interfacing. One of the most popular of these areas is the field of brain-computer interfaces. Fraser et al, report on a method to generate robust control with simple signal processing algorithms of signals obtained with electrodes implanted in the brain. One problem with implanted electrode arrays, however, is that

  11. Analysis of neural activity in human motor cortex -- Towards brain machine interface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secundo, Lavi

    , the correlation of ECoG activity to kinematic parameters of arm movement is context-dependent, an important constraint to consider in future development of BMI systems. The third chapter delves into a fundamental organizational principle of the primate motor system---cortical control of contralateral limb movements. However, ipsilateral motor areas also appear to play a role in the control of ipsilateral limb movements. Several studies in monkeys have shown that individual neurons in ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1) may represent, on average, the direction of movements of the ipsilateral arm. Given the increasing body of evidence demonstrating that neural ensembles can reliably represent information with a high temporal resolution, here we characterize the distributed neural representation of ipsilateral upper limb kinematics in both monkey and man. In two macaque monkeys trained to perform center-out reaching movements, we found that the ensemble spiking activity in M1 could continuously represent ipsilateral limb position. We also recorded cortical field potentials from three human subjects and also consistently found evidence of a neural representation for ipsilateral movement parameters. Together, our results demonstrate the presence of a high-fidelity neural representation for ipsilateral movement and illustrates that it can be successfully incorporated into a brain-machine interface.

  12. An integrated interface for peripheral neural system recording and stimulation: system design, electrical tests and in-vivo results.

    PubMed

    Carboni, Caterina; Bisoni, Lorenzo; Carta, Nicola; Puddu, Roberto; Raspopovic, Stanisa; Navarro, Xavier; Raffo, Luigi; Barbaro, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The prototype of an electronic bi-directional interface between the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) and a neuro-controlled hand prosthesis is presented. The system is composed of 2 integrated circuits: a standard CMOS device for neural recording and a HVCMOS device for neural stimulation. The integrated circuits have been realized in 2 different 0.35μ m CMOS processes available from ams. The complete system incorporates 8 channels each including the analog front-end, the A/D conversion, based on a sigma delta architecture and a programmable stimulation module implemented as a 5-bit current DAC; two voltage boosters supply the output stimulation stage with a programmable voltage scalable up to 17V. Successful in-vivo experiments with rats having a TIME electrode implanted in the sciatic nerve were carried out, showing the capability of recording neural signals in the tens of microvolts, with a global noise of 7μ V r m s , and to selectively elicit the tibial and plantar muscles using different active sites of the electrode. PMID:27007860

  13. Regenerative Electrode Interfaces for Neural Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Cort H; Zoratti, Marissa J; Langhals, Nicholas B; Purcell, Erin K

    2016-04-01

    Neural prostheses are electrode arrays implanted in the nervous system that record or stimulate electrical activity in neurons. Rapid growth in the use of neural prostheses in research and clinical applications has occurred in recent years, but instability and poor patency in the tissue-electrode interface undermines the longevity and performance of these devices. The application of tissue engineering strategies to the device interface is a promising approach to improve connectivity and communication between implanted electrodes and local neurons, and several research groups have developed new and innovative modifications to neural prostheses with the goal of seamless device-tissue integration. These approaches can be broadly categorized based on the strategy used to maintain and regenerate neurons at the device interface: (1) redesign of the prosthesis architecture to include finer-scale geometries and/or provide topographical cues to guide regenerating neural outgrowth, (2) incorporation of material coatings and bioactive molecules on the prosthesis to improve neuronal growth, viability, and adhesion, and (3) inclusion of cellular grafts to replenish the local neuron population or provide a target site for reinnervation (biohybrid devices). In addition to stabilizing the contact between neurons and electrodes, the potential to selectively interface specific subpopulations of neurons with individual electrode sites is a key advantage of regenerative interfaces. In this study, we review the development of regenerative interfaces for applications in both the peripheral and central nervous system. Current and future development of regenerative interfaces has the potential to improve the stability and selectivity of neural prostheses, improving the patency and resolution of information transfer between neurons and implanted electrodes. PMID:26421660

  14. Controlling selective stimulations below a spinal cord hemisection using brain recordings with a neural interface system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetsos, Fivos; Sanchez-Jimenez, Abel; Torets, Carlos; Largo, Carla; Micera, Silvestro

    2011-08-01

    In this work we address the use of realtime cortical recordings for the generation of coherent, reliable and robust motor activity in spinal-lesioned animals through selective intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS). The spinal cord of adult rats was hemisectioned and groups of multielectrodes were implanted in both the central nervous system (CNS) and the spinal cord below the lesion level to establish a neural system interface (NSI). To test the reliability of this new NSI connection, highly repeatable neural responses recorded from the CNS were used as a pattern generator of an open-loop control strategy for selective ISMS of the spinal motoneurons. Our experimental procedure avoided the spontaneous non-controlled and non-repeatable neural activity that could have generated spurious ISMS and the consequent undesired muscle contractions. Combinations of complex CNS patterns generated precisely coordinated, reliable and robust motor actions.

  15. Evolvable Neural Software System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  16. Assistive technology and robotic control using motor cortex ensemble-based neural interface systems in humans with tetraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, John P; Nurmikko, Arto; Black, Michael; Hochberg, Leigh R

    2007-01-01

    This review describes the rationale, early stage development, and initial human application of neural interface systems (NISs) for humans with paralysis. NISs are emerging medical devices designed to allow persons with paralysis to operate assistive technologies or to reanimate muscles based upon a command signal that is obtained directly from the brain. Such systems require the development of sensors to detect brain signals, decoders to transform neural activity signals into a useful command, and an interface for the user. We review initial pilot trial results of an NIS that is based on an intracortical microelectrode sensor that derives control signals from the motor cortex. We review recent findings showing, first, that neurons engaged by movement intentions persist in motor cortex years after injury or disease to the motor system, and second, that signals derived from motor cortex can be used by persons with paralysis to operate a range of devices. We suggest that, with further development, this form of NIS holds promise as a useful new neurotechnology for those with limited motor function or communication. We also discuss the additional potential for neural sensors to be used in the diagnosis and management of various neurological conditions and as a new way to learn about human brain function. PMID:17272345

  17. Micro- and Nanotechnologies for Optical Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Pisanello, Ferruccio; Sileo, Leonardo; De Vittorio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    In last decade, the possibility to optically interface with the mammalian brain in vivo has allowed unprecedented investigation of functional connectivity of neural circuitry. Together with new genetic and molecular techniques to optically trigger and monitor neural activity, a new generation of optical neural interfaces is being developed, mainly thanks to the exploitation of both bottom-up and top-down nanofabrication approaches. This review highlights the role of nanotechnologies for optical neural interfaces, with particular emphasis on new devices and methodologies for optogenetic control of neural activity and unconventional methods for detection and triggering of action potentials using optically-active colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:27013939

  18. A Review of Organic and Inorganic Biomaterials for Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Pouria; Yang, Guang; Kim, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have generated wide interest in applying nanomaterials for neural prostheses. An ideal neural interface should create seamless integration into the nervous system and performs reliably for long periods of time. As a result, many nanoscale materials not originally developed for neural interfaces become attractive candidates to detect neural signals and stimulate neurons. In this comprehensive review, an overview of state-of-the-art microelectrode technologies provided first, with focus on the material properties of these microdevices. The advancements in electro active nanomaterials are then reviewed, including conducting polymers, carbon nanotubes, graphene, silicon nanowires, and hybrid organic-inorganic nanomaterials, for neural recording, stimulation, and growth. Finally, technical and scientific challenges are discussed regarding biocompatibility, mechanical mismatch, and electrical properties faced by these nanomaterials for the development of long-lasting functional neural interfaces. PMID:24677434

  19. NeuralWISP: A Wirelessly Powered Neural Interface With 1-m Range.

    PubMed

    Yeager, D J; Holleman, J; Prasad, R; Smith, J R; Otis, B P

    2009-12-01

    We present the NeuralWISP, a wireless neural interface operating from far-field radio-frequency RF energy. The NeuralWISP is compatible with commercial RF identification readers and operates at a range up to 1 m. It includes a custom low-noise, low-power amplifier integrated circuit for processing the neural signal and an analog spike detection circuit for reducing digital computational requirements and communications bandwidth. Our system monitors the neural signal and periodically transmits the spike density in a user-programmable time window. The entire system draws an average 20 muA from the harvested 1.8-V supply. PMID:23853285

  20. Intelligent Tutoring Systems: Formalization as Automata and Interface Design Using Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curilem, S. Gloria; Barbosa, Andrea R.; de Azevedo, Fernando M.

    2007-01-01

    This article proposes a mathematical model of Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS), based on observations of the behaviour of these systems. One of the most important problems of pedagogical software is to establish a common language between the knowledge areas involved in their development, basically pedagogical, computing and domain areas. A…

  1. Flexible neural interfaces with integrated stiffening shank

    DOEpatents

    Tooker, Angela C.; Felix, Sarah H.; Pannu, Satinderpall S.; Shah, Kedar G.; Sheth, Heeral; Tolosa, Vanessa

    2016-07-26

    A neural interface includes a first dielectric material having at least one first opening for a first electrical conducting material, a first electrical conducting material in the first opening, and at least one first interconnection trace electrical conducting material connected to the first electrical conducting material. A stiffening shank material is located adjacent the first dielectric material, the first electrical conducting material, and the first interconnection trace electrical conducting material.

  2. Feasibility study for future implantable neural-silicon interface devices.

    PubMed

    Al-Armaghany, Allann; Yu, Bo; Mak, Terrence; Tong, Kin-Fai; Sun, Yihe

    2011-01-01

    The emerging neural-silicon interface devices bridge nerve systems with artificial systems and play a key role in neuro-prostheses and neuro-rehabilitation applications. Integrating neural signal collection, processing and transmission on a single device will make clinical applications more practical and feasible. This paper focuses on the wireless antenna part and real-time neural signal analysis part of implantable brain-machine interface (BMI) devices. We propose to use millimeter-wave for wireless connections between different areas of a brain. Various antenna, including microstrip patch, monopole antenna and substrate integrated waveguide antenna are considered for the intra-cortical proximity communication. A Hebbian eigenfilter based method is proposed for multi-channel neuronal spike sorting. Folding and parallel design techniques are employed to explore various structures and make a trade-off between area and power consumption. Field programmable logic arrays (FPGAs) are used to evaluate various structures. PMID:22254974

  3. Time to address the problems at the neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.; Ghovanloo, Maysam; Krames, Elliot

    2014-04-01

    Neural engineers have made significant, if not remarkable, progress in interfacing with the nervous system in the last ten years. In particular, neuromodulation of the brain has generated significant therapeutic benefits [1-5]. EEG electrodes can be used to communicate with patients with locked-in syndrome [6]. In the central nervous system (CNS), electrode arrays placed directly over or within the cortex can record neural signals related to the intent of the subject or patient [7, 8]. A similar technology has allowed paralyzed patients to control an otherwise normal skeletal system with brain signals [9, 10]. This technology has significant potential to restore function in these and other patients with neural disorders such as stroke [11]. Although there are several multichannel arrays described in the literature, the workhorse for these cortical interfaces has been the Utah array [12]. This 100-channel electrode array has been used in most studies on animals and humans since the 1990s and is commercially available. This array and other similar microelectrode arrays can record neural signals with high quality (high signal-to-noise ratio), but these signals fade and disappear after a few months and therefore the current technology is not reliable for extended periods of time. Therefore, despite these major advances in communicating with the brain, clinical translation cannot be implemented. The reasons for this failure are not known but clearly involve the interface between the electrode and the neural tissue. The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) as well as other federal funding agencies such as the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health have provided significant financial support to investigate this problem without much success. A recent funding program from DARPA was designed to establish the failure modes in order to generate a reliable neural interface technology and again was unsuccessful at producing a robust

  4. Shaping the Dynamics of a Bidirectional Neural Interface

    PubMed Central

    Vato, Alessandro; Semprini, Marianna; Maggiolini, Emma; Szymanski, Francois D.; Fadiga, Luciano; Panzeri, Stefano; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.

    2012-01-01

    Progress in decoding neural signals has enabled the development of interfaces that translate cortical brain activities into commands for operating robotic arms and other devices. The electrical stimulation of sensory areas provides a means to create artificial sensory information about the state of a device. Taken together, neural activity recording and microstimulation techniques allow us to embed a portion of the central nervous system within a closed-loop system, whose behavior emerges from the combined dynamical properties of its neural and artificial components. In this study we asked if it is possible to concurrently regulate this bidirectional brain-machine interaction so as to shape a desired dynamical behavior of the combined system. To this end, we followed a well-known biological pathway. In vertebrates, the communications between brain and limb mechanics are mediated by the spinal cord, which combines brain instructions with sensory information and organizes coordinated patterns of muscle forces driving the limbs along dynamically stable trajectories. We report the creation and testing of the first neural interface that emulates this sensory-motor interaction. The interface organizes a bidirectional communication between sensory and motor areas of the brain of anaesthetized rats and an external dynamical object with programmable properties. The system includes (a) a motor interface decoding signals from a motor cortical area, and (b) a sensory interface encoding the state of the external object into electrical stimuli to a somatosensory area. The interactions between brain activities and the state of the external object generate a family of trajectories converging upon a selected equilibrium point from arbitrary starting locations. Thus, the bidirectional interface establishes the possibility to specify not only a particular movement trajectory but an entire family of motions, which includes the prescribed reactions to unexpected perturbations. PMID

  5. A TinyOS-based wireless neural interface.

    PubMed

    Farshchi, Shahin; Mody, Istvan; Judy, Jack W

    2004-01-01

    The overlay of a neural interface upon a TinyOS-based sensing and communication platform is described. The system amplifies, digitally encodes, and transmits two EEG channels of neural signals from an un-tethered subject to a remote gateway, which routes the signals to a client PC. This work demonstrates the viability of the TinyOS-based sensor technology as a foundation for chronic remote biological monitoring applications, and thus provides an opportunity to create a system that can leverage from the frequent networking and communications advancements being made by the global TinyOS-development community. PMID:17271263

  6. Encapsulation of an integrated neural interface device with Parylene C.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jui-Mei; Rieth, Loren; Normann, Richard A; Tathireddy, Prashant; Solzbacher, Florian

    2009-01-01

    Electronic neural interfaces have been developed to restore function to the nervous system for patients with neural disorders. A conformal and chronically stable dielectric encapsulation is required to protect the neural interface device from the harsh physiological environment and localize the active electrode tips. Chemical vapor deposited Parylene-C films were studied as a potential implantable dielectric encapsulation material using impedance spectroscopy and leakage current measurements. Both tests were performed in 37 degrees C saline solution, and showed that the films provided an electrically insulating encapsulation for more than one year. Isotropic and anisotropic oxygen plasma etching processes were compared for removing the Parylene-C insulation to expose the active electrode tips. Also, the relationship between tip exposure and electrode impedance was determined. The conformity and the uniformity of the Parylene-C coating were assessed using optical microscopy, and small thickness variations on the complex 3-D electrode arrays were observed. Parylene C was found to provide encapsulation and electrical insulation required for such neural interface devices for more than one year. Also, oxygen plasma etching was found to be an effective method to etch and pattern Parylene-C films. PMID:19224715

  7. Time to address the problems at the neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.; Ghovanloo, Maysam; Krames, Elliot

    2014-04-01

    Neural engineers have made significant, if not remarkable, progress in interfacing with the nervous system in the last ten years. In particular, neuromodulation of the brain has generated significant therapeutic benefits [1-5]. EEG electrodes can be used to communicate with patients with locked-in syndrome [6]. In the central nervous system (CNS), electrode arrays placed directly over or within the cortex can record neural signals related to the intent of the subject or patient [7, 8]. A similar technology has allowed paralyzed patients to control an otherwise normal skeletal system with brain signals [9, 10]. This technology has significant potential to restore function in these and other patients with neural disorders such as stroke [11]. Although there are several multichannel arrays described in the literature, the workhorse for these cortical interfaces has been the Utah array [12]. This 100-channel electrode array has been used in most studies on animals and humans since the 1990s and is commercially available. This array and other similar microelectrode arrays can record neural signals with high quality (high signal-to-noise ratio), but these signals fade and disappear after a few months and therefore the current technology is not reliable for extended periods of time. Therefore, despite these major advances in communicating with the brain, clinical translation cannot be implemented. The reasons for this failure are not known but clearly involve the interface between the electrode and the neural tissue. The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) as well as other federal funding agencies such as the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health have provided significant financial support to investigate this problem without much success. A recent funding program from DARPA was designed to establish the failure modes in order to generate a reliable neural interface technology and again was unsuccessful at producing a robust

  8. A 1microW 85nV/ radicalHz pseudo open-loop preamplifier with programmable band-pass filter for neural interface system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sun-Il; Yoon, Euisik

    2009-01-01

    We report an energy efficient pseudo open-loop amplifier with programmable band-pass filter developed for neural interface systems. The proposed amplifier consumes 400nA at 2.5V power supply. The measured thermal noise level is 85nV/ radicalHz and input-referred noise is 1.69microV(rms) from 0.3Hz to 1 kHz. The amplifier has a noise efficiency factor of 2.43, the lowest in the differential topologies reported up to date to our knowledge. By programming the switched-capacitor frequency and bias current, we could control the bandwidth of the preamplifier from 138 mHz to 2.2 kHz to meet various application requirements. The entire preamplifier including band-pass filters has been realized in a small area of 0.043mm(2) using a 0.25microm CMOS technology. PMID:19964762

  9. Elastomeric and soft conducting microwires for implantable neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kolarcik, Christi L; Luebben, Silvia D; Sapp, Shawn A; Hanner, Jenna; Snyder, Noah; Kozai, Takashi D Y; Chang, Emily; Nabity, James A; Nabity, Shawn T; Lagenaur, Carl F; Cui, X Tracy

    2015-06-28

    Current designs for microelectrodes used for interfacing with the nervous system elicit a characteristic inflammatory response that leads to scar tissue encapsulation, electrical insulation of the electrode from the tissue and ultimately failure. Traditionally, relatively stiff materials like tungsten and silicon are employed which have mechanical properties several orders of magnitude different from neural tissue. This mechanical mismatch is thought to be a major cause of chronic inflammation and degeneration around the device. In an effort to minimize the disparity between neural interface devices and the brain, novel soft electrodes consisting of elastomers and intrinsically conducting polymers were fabricated. The physical, mechanical and electrochemical properties of these materials were extensively characterized to identify the formulations with the optimal combination of parameters including Young's modulus, elongation at break, ultimate tensile strength, conductivity, impedance and surface charge injection. Our final electrode has a Young's modulus of 974 kPa which is five orders of magnitude lower than tungsten and significantly lower than other polymer-based neural electrode materials. In vitro cell culture experiments demonstrated the favorable interaction between these soft materials and neurons, astrocytes and microglia, with higher neuronal attachment and a two-fold reduction in inflammatory microglia attachment on soft devices compared to stiff controls. Surface immobilization of neuronal adhesion proteins on these microwires further improved the cellular response. Finally, in vivo electrophysiology demonstrated the functionality of the elastomeric electrodes in recording single unit activity in the rodent visual cortex. The results presented provide initial evidence in support of the use of soft materials in neural interface applications. PMID:25993261

  10. Elastomeric and soft conducting microwires for implantable neural interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kolarcik, Christi L.; Luebben, Silvia D.; Sapp, Shawn A.; Hanner, Jenna; Snyder, Noah; Kozai, Takashi D.Y.; Chang, Emily; Nabity, James A.; Nabity, Shawn T.; Lagenaur, Carl F.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Current designs for microelectrodes used for interfacing with the nervous system elicit a characteristic inflammatory response that leads to scar tissue encapsulation, electrical insulation of the electrode from the tissue and ultimately failure. Traditionally, relatively stiff materials like tungsten and silicon are employed which have mechanical properties several orders of magnitude different from neural tissue. This mechanical mismatch is thought to be a major cause of chronic inflammation and degeneration around the device. In an effort to minimize the disparity between neural interface devices and the brain, novel soft electrodes consisting of elastomers and intrinsically conducting polymers were fabricated. The physical, mechanical and electrochemical properties of these materials were extensively characterized to identify the formulations with the optimal combination of parameters including Young’s modulus, elongation at break, ultimate tensile strength, conductivity, impedance and surface charge injection. Our final electrode has a Young’s modulus of 974 kPa which is five orders of magnitude lower than tungsten and significantly lower than other polymer-based neural electrode materials. In vitro cell culture experiments demonstrated the favorable interaction between these soft materials and neurons, astrocytes and microglia, with higher neuronal attachment and a two-fold reduction in inflammatory microglia attachment on soft devices compared to stiff controls. Surface immobilization of neuronal adhesion proteins on these microwires further improved the cellular response. Finally, in vivo electrophysiology demonstrated the functionality of the elastomeric electrodes in recording single unit activity in the rodent visual cortex. The results presented provide initial evidence in support of the use of soft materials in neural interface applications. PMID:25993261

  11. Neural interfaces for upper-limb prosthesis control: opportunities to improve long-term reliability.

    PubMed

    Judy, Jack W

    2012-03-01

    Building on a long history of innovation in neural-recording interfaces, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has launched a program to address the key challenges related to transitioning advanced neuroprosthesis technology to clinical use for amputated service members. The goal of the Reliable Neural Technology (RE-NET) Program is to develop new technology to extract information from the nervous system at a scale and rate needed to reliably control modern robotic prostheses over the lifetime of the amputee. The RE-NET program currently encompasses three separate efforts: histology for interface stability over time (HIST), reliable peripheral interfaces (RPIs), and reliable central nervous system (CNS) interfaces (RCIs). PMID:22481748

  12. Functional recordings from awake, behaving rodents through a microchannel based regenerative neural interface

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Russell K.; Choi, Yoonsu; Bellamkonda, Ravi; English, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neural interface technologies could provide controlling connections between the nervous system and external technologies, such as limb prosthetics. The recording of efferent, motor potentials is a critical requirement for a peripheral neural interface, as these signals represent the user-generated neural output intended to drive external devices. Our objective was to evaluate structural and functional neural regeneration through a microchannel neural interface and to characterize potentials recorded from electrodes placed within the microchannels in awake and behaving animals. Approach Female rats were implanted with muscle EMG electrodes and, following unilateral sciatic nerve transection, the cut nerve was repaired either across a microchannel neural interface or with end-to-end surgical repair. During a 13-week recovery period, direct muscle responses to nerve stimulation proximal to the transection were monitored weekly. In two rats repaired with the neural interface, four wire electrodes were embedded in the microchannels and recordings were obtained within microchannels during proximal stimulation experiments and treadmill locomotion. Main results In these proof-of-principle experiments, we found that axons from cut nerves were capable of functional reinnervation of distal muscle targets, whether regenerating through a microchannel device or after direct end-to-end repair. Discrete stimulation-evoked and volitional potentials were recorded within interface microchannels in a small group of awake and behaving animals and their firing patterns correlated directly with intramuscular recordings during locomotion. Of 38 potentials extracted, 19 were identified as motor axons reinnervating tibialis anterior or soleus muscles using spike triggered averaging. Significance These results are evidence for motor axon regeneration through microchannels and are the first report of in vivo recordings from regenerated motor axons within microchannels in a small

  13. Functional recordings from awake, behaving rodents through a microchannel based regenerative neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, Russell K.; Choi, Yoonsu; Bellamkonda, Ravi; English, Arthur

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Neural interface technologies could provide controlling connections between the nervous system and external technologies, such as limb prosthetics. The recording of efferent, motor potentials is a critical requirement for a peripheral neural interface, as these signals represent the user-generated neural output intended to drive external devices. Our objective was to evaluate structural and functional neural regeneration through a microchannel neural interface and to characterize potentials recorded from electrodes placed within the microchannels in awake and behaving animals. Approach. Female rats were implanted with muscle EMG electrodes and, following unilateral sciatic nerve transection, the cut nerve was repaired either across a microchannel neural interface or with end-to-end surgical repair. During a 13 week recovery period, direct muscle responses to nerve stimulation proximal to the transection were monitored weekly. In two rats repaired with the neural interface, four wire electrodes were embedded in the microchannels and recordings were obtained within microchannels during proximal stimulation experiments and treadmill locomotion. Main results. In these proof-of-principle experiments, we found that axons from cut nerves were capable of functional reinnervation of distal muscle targets, whether regenerating through a microchannel device or after direct end-to-end repair. Discrete stimulation-evoked and volitional potentials were recorded within interface microchannels in a small group of awake and behaving animals and their firing patterns correlated directly with intramuscular recordings during locomotion. Of 38 potentials extracted, 19 were identified as motor axons reinnervating tibialis anterior or soleus muscles using spike triggered averaging. Significance. These results are evidence for motor axon regeneration through microchannels and are the first report of in vivo recordings from regenerated motor axons within microchannels in a small

  14. Braided Multi-Electrode Probes (BMEPs) for Neural Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Gyo

    Although clinical use of invasive neural interfaces is very limited, due to safety and reliability concerns, the potential benefits of their use in brain machine interfaces (BMIs) seem promising and so they have been widely used in the research field. Microelectrodes as invasive neural interfaces are the core tool to record neural activities and their failure is a critical issue for BMI systems. Possible sources of this failure are neural tissue motions and their interactions with stiff electrode arrays or probes fixed to the skull. To overcome these tissue motion problems, we have developed novel braided multi-electrode probes (BMEPs). By interweaving ultra-fine wires into a tubular braid structure, we obtained a highly flexible multi-electrode probe. In this thesis we described BMEP designs and how to fabricate BMEPs, and explore experiments to show the advantages of BMEPs through a mechanical compliance comparison and a chronic immunohistological comparison with single 50microm nichrome wires used as a reference electrode type. Results from the mechanical compliance test showed that the bodies of BMEPs have 4 to 21 times higher compliance than the single 50microm wire and the tethers of BMEPs were 6 to 96 times higher compliance, depending on combinations of the wire size (9.6microm or 12.7microm), the wire numbers (12 or 24), and the length of tether (3, 5 or 10 mm). Results from the immunohistological comparison showed that both BMEPs and 50microm wires anchored to the skull caused stronger tissue reactions than unanchored BMEPs and 50microm wires, and 50microm wires caused stronger tissue reactions than BMEPs. In in-vivo tests with BMEPs, we succeeded in chronic recordings from the spinal cord of freely jumping frogs and in acute recordings from the spinal cord of decerebrate rats during air stepping which was evoked by mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) stimulation. This technology may provide a stable and reliable neural interface to spinal cord

  15. Electro-optical Neural Platform Integrated with Nanoplasmonic Inhibition Interface.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sangjin; Kim, Raeyoung; Park, Ji-Ho; Nam, Yoonkey

    2016-04-26

    Engineering of neural interfaces with nanomaterials for remote manipulation facilitates the development of platforms for the study and treatment of brain disorders, yet extending their capability to inhibiting the electrical activities of unmodified neurons has been difficult. Here we report the development of an electro-optical neural platform integrated with gold nanorods for simultaneous electrical excitation and readout, and photothermal inhibition of neural activities. A monolayer of gold nanorods was placed at the electrode-neuron interfaces of a microelectrode array for photothermal stimulation of neural activities. This nanoplasmonic interface interacted well with neurons and metal electrodes without affecting the biological and electrical properties. We demonstrated that spontaneous firing of neurons and their signal propagation along the neurites evoked by electrical stimulation were optically inhibited on this neural platform. We believe that our platform could be an alternative to the optogenetic approach and may ultimately be applied to prosthetic devices based on optical neuromodulation. PMID:26960013

  16. Conjugated Polymer Actuators for Articulating Neural Probes and Electrode Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshvar, Eugene Dariush

    This thesis investigated the potential use of polypyrrole (PPy) doped with dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS) to controllably articulate (bend or guide) flexible neural probes and electrodes. PPy(DBS) actuation performance was characterized in the ionic mixture and temperature found in the brain. Nearly all the ions in aCSF were exchanged into the PPy---the cations Na +, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, as well as the anion PO43-; Cl- was not present. Nevertheless, deflections in aCSF were comparable to those in NaDBS and they were monotonic with oxidation level: strain increased upon reduction, with no reversal of motion despite the mixture of ionic charges and valences being exchanged. Actuation depended on temperature. Upon warming, the cyclic voltammograms showed additional peaks and an increase of 70% in the consumed charge. Actuation strain was monotonic under these conditions, demonstrating that conducting polymer actuators can indeed be used for neural interface and neural probe applications. In addition, a novel microelectro-mechanical system (MEMS) was developed to measure previously disregarded residual stress in a bilayer actuator. Residual stresses are a major concern for MEMS devices as that they can dramatically influence their yield and functionality. This device introduced a new technique to measure micro-scaled actuation forces that may be useful for characterization of other MEMS actuators. Finally, a functional movable parylene-based neural electrode prototype was developed. Employing PPy(DBS) actuators, electrode projections were successfully controlled to either remain flat or actuate out-of-plane and into a brain phantom during insertion. An electrode projection 800 microm long and 50 microm wide was able to deflect almost 800 microm away from the probe substrate. Applications that do not require insertion into tissue may also benefit from the electrode projections described here. Implantable neural interface devices are a critical component to a broad class of

  17. Conductive porous scaffolds as potential neural interface materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth L.; Cicotte, Kirsten N.; Buerger, Stephen P.; Reece, Gregory; Dirk, Shawn M.; Lin, Patrick P.

    2011-11-01

    Our overall intent is to develop improved prosthetic devices with the use of nerve interfaces through which transected nerves may grow, such that small groups of nerve fibers come into close contact with electrode sites, each of which is connected to electronics external to the interface. These interfaces must be physically structured to allow nerve fibers to grow through them, either by being porous or by including specific channels for the axons. They must be mechanically compatible with nerves such that they promote growth and do not harm the nervous system, and biocompatible to promote nerve fiber growth and to allow close integration with biological tissue. They must exhibit selective and structured conductivity to allow the connection of electrode sites with external circuitry, and electrical properties must be tuned to enable the transmission of neural signals. Finally, the interfaces must be capable of being physically connected to external circuitry, e.g. through attached wires. We have utilized electrospinning as a tool to create conductive, porous networks of non-woven biocompatible fibers in order to meet the materials requirements for the neural interface. The biocompatible fibers were based on the known biocompatible material poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) as well as a newer biomaterial developed in our laboratories, poly(butylene fumarate) (PBF). Both of the polymers cannot be electrospun using conventional electrospinning techniques due to their low glass transition temperatures, so in situ crosslinking methodologies were developed to facilitate micro- and nano-fiber formation during electrospinning. The conductivity of the electrospun fiber mats was controlled by controlling the loading with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Fabrication, electrical and materials characterization will be discussed along with initial in vivo experimental results.

  18. Neural machine interfaces for controlling multifunctional powered upper-limb prostheses.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Kengo; Weir, Richard F; Kuiken, Todd A

    2007-01-01

    This article investigates various neural machine interfaces for voluntary control of externally powered upper-limb prostheses. Epidemiology of upper limb amputation, as well as prescription and follow-up studies of externally powered upper-limb prostheses are discussed. The use of electromyographic interfaces and peripheral nerve interfaces for prosthetic control, as well as brain machine interfaces suitable for prosthetic control, are examined in detail along with available clinical results. In addition, studies on interfaces using muscle acoustic and mechanical properties and the problem of interfacing sensory information to the nervous system are discussed. PMID:17187470

  19. A CMOS Neural Interface for a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, Kristin N.; Kalayjian, Zaven K.; Tejada, Francisco; Chiang, Bryce; Rahman, Mehdi A.; Fridman, Gene Y.; Dai, Chenkai; Pouliquen, Philippe O.; Georgiou, Julio; Della Santina, Charles C.; Andreou, Andreas G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-voltage CMOS neural-interface chip for a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) that measures head motion and modulates vestibular nerve activity to restore vision- and posture-stabilizing reflexes. This application specific integrated circuit neural interface (ASIC-NI) chip was designed to work with a commercially available microcontroller, which controls the ASIC-NI via a fast parallel interface to deliver biphasic stimulation pulses with 9-bit programmable current amplitude via 16 stimulation channels. The chip was fabricated in the ONSemi C5 0.5 micron, high-voltage CMOS process and can accommodate compliance voltages up to 12 V, stimulating vestibular nerve branches using biphasic current pulses up to 1.45 ± 0.06 mA with durations as short as 10 µs/phase. The ASIC-NI includes a dedicated digital-to-analog converter for each channel, enabling it to perform complex multipolar stimulation. The ASIC-NI replaces discrete components that cover nearly half of the 2nd generation MVP (MVP2) printed circuit board, reducing the MVP system size by 48% and power consumption by 17%. Physiological tests of the ASIC-based MVP system (MVP2A) in a rhesus monkey produced reflexive eye movement responses to prosthetic stimulation similar to those observed when using the MVP2. Sinusoidal modulation of stimulus pulse rate from 68–130 pulses per second at frequencies from 0.1 to 5 Hz elicited appropriately-directed slow phase eye velocities ranging in amplitude from 1.9–16.7°/s for the MVP2 and 2.0–14.2°/s for the MVP2A. The eye velocities evoked by MVP2 and MVP2A showed no significant difference (t-test, p = 0.034), suggesting that the MVP2A achieves performance at least as good as the larger MVP2. PMID:25974945

  20. A CMOS Neural Interface for a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Hageman, Kristin N; Kalayjian, Zaven K; Tejada, Francisco; Chiang, Bryce; Rahman, Mehdi A; Fridman, Gene Y; Dai, Chenkai; Pouliquen, Philippe O; Georgiou, Julio; Della Santina, Charles C; Andreou, Andreas G

    2016-04-01

    We present a high-voltage CMOS neural-interface chip for a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) that measures head motion and modulates vestibular nerve activity to restore vision- and posture-stabilizing reflexes. This application specific integrated circuit neural interface (ASIC-NI) chip was designed to work with a commercially available microcontroller, which controls the ASIC-NI via a fast parallel interface to deliver biphasic stimulation pulses with 9-bit programmable current amplitude via 16 stimulation channels. The chip was fabricated in the ONSemi C5 0.5 micron, high-voltage CMOS process and can accommodate compliance voltages up to 12 V, stimulating vestibular nerve branches using biphasic current pulses up to 1.45±0.06 mA with durations as short as 10 μs/phase. The ASIC-NI includes a dedicated digital-to-analog converter for each channel, enabling it to perform complex multipolar stimulation. The ASIC-NI replaces discrete components that cover nearly half of the 2nd generation MVP (MVP2) printed circuit board, reducing the MVP system size by 48% and power consumption by 17%. Physiological tests of the ASIC-based MVP system (MVP2A) in a rhesus monkey produced reflexive eye movement responses to prosthetic stimulation similar to those observed when using the MVP2. Sinusoidal modulation of stimulus pulse rate from 68-130 pulses per second at frequencies from 0.1 to 5 Hz elicited appropriately-directed slow phase eye velocities ranging in amplitude from 1.9-16.7 °/s for the MVP2 and 2.0-14.2 °/s for the MVP2A. The eye velocities evoked by MVP2 and MVP2A showed no significant difference ( t-test, p=0.34), suggesting that the MVP2A achieves performance at least as good as the larger MVP2. PMID:25974945

  1. Electronic dura mater for long-term multimodal neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minev, Ivan R.; Musienko, Pavel; Hirsch, Arthur; Barraud, Quentin; Wenger, Nikolaus; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Gandar, Jérôme; Capogrosso, Marco; Milekovic, Tomislav; Asboth, Léonie; Torres, Rafael Fajardo; Vachicouras, Nicolas; Liu, Qihan; Pavlova, Natalia; Duis, Simone; Larmagnac, Alexandre; Vörös, Janos; Micera, Silvestro; Suo, Zhigang; Courtine, Grégoire; Lacour, Stéphanie P.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical mismatch between soft neural tissues and stiff neural implants hinders the long-term performance of implantable neuroprostheses. Here, we designed and fabricated soft neural implants with the shape and elasticity of dura mater, the protective membrane of the brain and spinal cord. The electronic dura mater, which we call e-dura, embeds interconnects, electrodes, and chemotrodes that sustain millions of mechanical stretch cycles, electrical stimulation pulses, and chemical injections. These integrated modalities enable multiple neuroprosthetic applications. The soft implants extracted cortical states in freely behaving animals for brain-machine interface and delivered electrochemical spinal neuromodulation that restored locomotion after paralyzing spinal cord injury.

  2. The emergent neural modeling system.

    PubMed

    Aisa, Brad; Mingus, Brian; O'Reilly, Randy

    2008-10-01

    Emergent (http://grey.colorado.edu/emergent) is a powerful tool for the simulation of biologically plausible, complex neural systems that was released in August 2007. Inheriting decades of research and experience in network algorithms and modeling principles from its predecessors, PDP++ and PDP, Emergent has been redesigned as an efficient workspace for academic research and an engaging, easy-to-navigate environment for students. The system provides a modern and intuitive interface for programming and visualization centered around hierarchical, tree-based navigation and drag-and-drop reorganization. Emergent contains familiar, high-level simulation constructs such as Layers and Projections, a wide variety of algorithms, general-purpose data handling and analysis facilities and an integrated virtual environment for developing closed-loop cognitive agents. For students, the traditional role of a textbook has been enhanced by wikis embedded in every project that serve to explain, document, and help newcomers engage the interface and step through models using familiar hyperlinks. For advanced users, the software is easily extensible in all respects via runtime plugins, has a powerful shell with an integrated debugger, and a scripting language that is fully symmetric with the interface. Emergent strikes a balance between detailed, computationally expensive spiking neuron models and abstract, Bayesian or symbolic systems. This middle level of detail allows for the rapid development and successful execution of complex cognitive models while maintaining biological plausibility. PMID:18684591

  3. Living electrodes: tissue engineering the neural interface.

    PubMed

    Green, Rylie A; Lim, Khoon S; Henderson, William C; Hassarati, Rachelle T; Martens, Penny J; Lovell, Nigel H; Poole-Warren, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    Soft, cell integrated electrode coatings are proposed to address the problem of scar tissue encapsulation of stimulating neuroprosthetics. The aim of these studies was to prove the concept and feasibility of integrating a cell loaded hydrogel with existing electrode coating technologies. Layered conductive hydrogel constructs are embedded with neural cells and shown to both support cell growth and maintain electro activity. The safe charge injection limit of these electrodes was 8 times higher than conventional platinum (Pt) electrodes and the stiffness was four orders of magnitude lower than Pt. Future studies will determine the biological cues required to support stem cell differentiation from the electrode surface. PMID:24111345

  4. Early Interfaced Neural Activity from Chronic Amputated Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Garde, Kshitija; Keefer, Edward; Botterman, Barry; Galvan, Pedro; Romero, Mario I.

    2009-01-01

    Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non-restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8 days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3 months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative multi-electrode arrays of open design allow early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. PMID:19506704

  5. Three-Dimensional Flexible Electronics Enabled by Shape Memory Polymer Substrates for Responsive Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Taylor; Simon, Dustin; Hearon, Keith; Liu, Clive; Shah, Sagar; Reeder, Jonathan; Khodaparast, Navid; Kilgard, Michael P.; Maitland, Duncan J.; Rennaker, Robert L.; Voit, Walter E.

    2014-01-01

    Planar electronics processing methods have enabled neural interfaces to become more precise and deliver more information. However, this processing paradigm is inherently 2D and rigid. The resulting mechanical and geometrical mismatch at the biotic–abiotic interface can elicit an immune response that prevents effective stimulation. In this work, a thiol–ene/acrylate shape memory polymer is utilized to create 3D softening substrates for stimulation electrodes. This substrate system is shown to soften in vivo from more than 600 to 6 MPa. A nerve cuff electrode that coils around the vagus nerve in a rat and that drives neural activity is demonstrated. PMID:25530708

  6. Progress towards biocompatible intracortical microelectrodes for neural interfacing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorfi, Mehdi; Skousen, John L.; Weder, Christoph; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-02-01

    To ensure long-term consistent neural recordings, next-generation intracortical microelectrodes are being developed with an increased emphasis on reducing the neuro-inflammatory response. The increased emphasis stems from the improved understanding of the multifaceted role that inflammation may play in disrupting both biologic and abiologic components of the overall neural interface circuit. To combat neuro-inflammation and improve recording quality, the field is actively progressing from traditional inorganic materials towards approaches that either minimizes the microelectrode footprint or that incorporate compliant materials, bioactive molecules, conducting polymers or nanomaterials. However, the immune-privileged cortical tissue introduces an added complexity compared to other biomedical applications that remains to be fully understood. This review provides a comprehensive reflection on the current understanding of the key failure modes that may impact intracortical microelectrode performance. In addition, a detailed overview of the current status of various materials-based approaches that have gained interest for neural interfacing applications is presented, and key challenges that remain to be overcome are discussed. Finally, we present our vision on the future directions of materials-based treatments to improve intracortical microelectrodes for neural interfacing.

  7. Progress Towards Biocompatible Intracortical Microelectrodes for Neural Interfacing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jorfi, Mehdi; Skousen, John L.; Weder, Christoph; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    To ensure long-term consistent neural recordings, next-generation intracortical microelectrodes are being developed with an increased emphasis on reducing the neuro-inflammatory response. The increased emphasis stems from the improved understanding of the multifaceted role that inflammation may play in disrupting both biologic and abiologic components of the overall neural interface circuit. To combat neuro-inflammation and improve recording quality, the field is actively progressing from traditional inorganic materials towards approaches that either minimizes the microelectrode footprint or that incorporate compliant materials, bioactive molecules, conducting polymers or nanomaterials. However, the immune-privileged cortical tissue introduces an added complexity compared to other biomedical applications that remains to be fully understood. This review provides a comprehensive reflection on the current understanding of the key failure modes that may impact intracortical microelectrode performance. In addition, a detailed overview of the current status of various materials-based approaches that have gained interest for neural interfacing applications is presented, and key challenges that remain to be overcome are discussed. Finally, we present our vision on the future directions of materials-based treatments to improve intracortical microelectrodes for neural interfacing. PMID:25460808

  8. Neural Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen

    2003-01-01

    The Neural Flight Control System (NFCS) was developed to address the need for control systems that can be produced and tested at lower cost, easily adapted to prototype vehicles and for flight systems that can accommodate damaged control surfaces or changes to aircraft stability and control characteristics resulting from failures or accidents. NFCS utilizes on a neural network-based flight control algorithm which automatically compensates for a broad spectrum of unanticipated damage or failures of an aircraft in flight. Pilot stick and rudder pedal inputs are fed into a reference model which produces pitch, roll and yaw rate commands. The reference model frequencies and gains can be set to provide handling quality characteristics suitable for the aircraft of interest. The rate commands are used in conjunction with estimates of the aircraft s stability and control (S&C) derivatives by a simplified Dynamic Inverse controller to produce virtual elevator, aileron and rudder commands. These virtual surface deflection commands are optimally distributed across the aircraft s available control surfaces using linear programming theory. Sensor data is compared with the reference model rate commands to produce an error signal. A Proportional/Integral (PI) error controller "winds up" on the error signal and adds an augmented command to the reference model output with the effect of zeroing the error signal. In order to provide more consistent handling qualities for the pilot, neural networks learn the behavior of the error controller and add in the augmented command before the integrator winds up. In the case of damage sufficient to affect the handling qualities of the aircraft, an Adaptive Critic is utilized to reduce the reference model frequencies and gains to stay within a flyable envelope of the aircraft.

  9. Modulation Depth Estimation and Variable Selection in State-Space Models for Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Leigh R.; Donoghue, John P.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid developments in neural interface technology are making it possible to record increasingly large signal sets of neural activity. Various factors such as asymmetrical information distribution and across-channel redundancy may, however, limit the benefit of high-dimensional signal sets, and the increased computational complexity may not yield corresponding improvement in system performance. High-dimensional system models may also lead to overfitting and lack of generalizability. To address these issues, we present a generalized modulation depth measure using the state-space framework that quantifies the tuning of a neural signal channel to relevant behavioral covariates. For a dynamical system, we develop computationally efficient procedures for estimating modulation depth from multivariate data. We show that this measure can be used to rank neural signals and select an optimal channel subset for inclusion in the neural decoding algorithm. We present a scheme for choosing the optimal subset based on model order selection criteria. We apply this method to neuronal ensemble spike-rate decoding in neural interfaces, using our framework to relate motor cortical activity with intended movement kinematics. With offline analysis of intracortical motor imagery data obtained from individuals with tetraplegia using the BrainGate neural interface, we demonstrate that our variable selection scheme is useful for identifying and ranking the most information-rich neural signals. We demonstrate that our approach offers several orders of magnitude lower complexity but virtually identical decoding performance compared to greedy search and other selection schemes. Our statistical analysis shows that the modulation depth of human motor cortical single-unit signals is well characterized by the generalized Pareto distribution. Our variable selection scheme has wide applicability in problems involving multisensor signal modeling and estimation in biomedical engineering systems. PMID

  10. Modulation depth estimation and variable selection in state-space models for neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Malik, Wasim Q; Hochberg, Leigh R; Donoghue, John P; Brown, Emery N

    2015-02-01

    Rapid developments in neural interface technology are making it possible to record increasingly large signal sets of neural activity. Various factors such as asymmetrical information distribution and across-channel redundancy may, however, limit the benefit of high-dimensional signal sets, and the increased computational complexity may not yield corresponding improvement in system performance. High-dimensional system models may also lead to overfitting and lack of generalizability. To address these issues, we present a generalized modulation depth measure using the state-space framework that quantifies the tuning of a neural signal channel to relevant behavioral covariates. For a dynamical system, we develop computationally efficient procedures for estimating modulation depth from multivariate data. We show that this measure can be used to rank neural signals and select an optimal channel subset for inclusion in the neural decoding algorithm. We present a scheme for choosing the optimal subset based on model order selection criteria. We apply this method to neuronal ensemble spike-rate decoding in neural interfaces, using our framework to relate motor cortical activity with intended movement kinematics. With offline analysis of intracortical motor imagery data obtained from individuals with tetraplegia using the BrainGate neural interface, we demonstrate that our variable selection scheme is useful for identifying and ranking the most information-rich neural signals. We demonstrate that our approach offers several orders of magnitude lower complexity but virtually identical decoding performance compared to greedy search and other selection schemes. Our statistical analysis shows that the modulation depth of human motor cortical single-unit signals is well characterized by the generalized Pareto distribution. Our variable selection scheme has wide applicability in problems involving multisensor signal modeling and estimation in biomedical engineering systems. PMID

  11. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing contributions from the 39th Neural Interfaces Conference Special issue containing contributions from the 39th Neural Interfaces Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James D.

    2011-07-01

    Implantable neural interfaces provide substantial benefits to individuals with neurological disorders. That was the unequivocal message delivered by speaker after speaker from the podium of the 39th Neural Interfaces Conference (NIC2010) held in Long Beach, California, in June 2010. Giving benefit to patients is the most important measure for any biomedical technology, and myriad presentations at NIC2010 made clear that implantable neurostimulation technology has achieved this goal. Cochlear implants allow deaf people to communicate through speech. Deep brain stimulators give back mobility and dexterity necessary for so many daily tasks that are often taken for granted. Chronic pain can be alleviated through spinal cord stimulation. Motor prosthesis systems have been demonstrated in humans, through both reanimation of paralyzed limbs and neural control of robotic arms. Earlier this year, a retinal prosthesis was approved for sale in Europe, providing some hope for the blind. In sum, current clinical implants have been tremendously beneficial for today's patients and experimental systems that will be translated to the clinic promise to expand the number of people helped through bioelectronic therapies. Yet there are significant opportunities for improvement. For sensory prostheses, patients report an artificial sensation, clearly different from the natural sensation they remember. Neuromodulation systems, such as deep brain stimulation and pain stimulators, often have side effects that are tolerated as long as the side effects are less impactful than the disease. The papers published in the special issue from NIC2010 reflect the maturing and expanding field of neural interfaces. Our field has moved past proof-of-principle demonstrations and is now focusing on proving the longevity required for clinical implementation of new devices, extending existing approaches to new diseases and improving current devices for better outcomes. Closed-loop neuromodulation is a

  12. Integration of active devices on smart polymers for neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendano-Bolivar, Adrian Emmanuel

    The increasing ability to ever more precisely identify and measure neural interactions and other phenomena in the central and peripheral nervous systems is revolutionizing our understanding of the human body and brain. To facilitate further understanding, more sophisticated neural devices, perhaps using microelectronics processing, must be fabricated. Materials often used in these neural interfaces, while compatible with these fabrication processes, are not optimized for long-term use in the body and are often orders of magnitude stiffer than the tissue with which they interact. Using the smart polymer substrates described in this work, suitability for processing as well as chronic implantation is demonstrated. We explore how to integrate reliable circuitry onto these flexible, biocompatible substrates that can withstand the aggressive environment of the body. To increase the capabilities of these devices beyond individual channel sensing and stimulation, active electronics must also be included onto our systems. In order to add this functionality to these substrates and explore the limits of these devices, we developed a process to fabricate single organic thin film transistors with mobilities up to 0.4 cm2/Vs and threshold voltages close to 0V. A process for fabricating organic light emitting diodes on flexible substrates is also addressed. We have set a foundation and demonstrated initial feasibility for integrating multiple transistors onto thin-film flexible devices to create new applications, such as matrix addressable functionalized electrodes and organic light emitting diodes. A brief description on how to integrate waveguides for their use in optogenetics is addressed. We have built understanding about device constraints on mechanical, electrical and in vivo reliability and how various conditions affect the electronics' lifetime. We use a bi-layer gate dielectric using an inorganic material such as HfO 2 combined with organic Parylene-c. A study of

  13. A Fully Implantable 96-channel Neural Data Acquisition System

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Michael; Bossetti, Chad A; Jochum, Thomas A; Callender, Stephen H; Nicolelis, Miguel A L; Turner, Dennis A; Wolf, Patrick D

    2009-01-01

    A fully implantable neural data acquisition system is a key component of a clinically viable brain-machine interface. This type of system must communicate with the outside world and obtain power without the use of wires that cross through the skin. We present a 96-channel fully implantable neural data acquisition system. This system performs spike detection and extraction within the body and wirelessly transmits data to an external unit. Power is supplied wirelessly through the use of inductively-coupled coils. The system was implanted acutely in sheep and successfully recorded, processed, and transmitted neural data. Bidirectional communication between the implanted system and an external unit was successful over a range of 2 m. The system is also shown to integrate well into a brain-machine interface. This demonstration of a high channel-count fully implanted neural data acquisition system is a critical step in the development of a clinically viable brain-machine interface. PMID:19255459

  14. Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber as nano-neuron interface for monitoring neural function

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, Milton Nance; McKnight, Timothy E; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Morrison, Barclay; Yu, Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Neural chips, which are capable of simultaneous, multi-site neural recording and stimulation, have been used to detect and modulate neural activity for almost 30 years. As a neural interface, neural chips provide dynamic functional information for neural decoding and neural control. By improving sensitivity and spatial resolution, nano-scale electrodes may revolutionize neural detection and modulation at cellular and molecular levels as nano-neuron interfaces. We developed a carbon-nanofiber neural chip with lithographically defined arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanofiber electrodes and demonstrated its capability of both stimulating and monitoring electrophysiological signals from brain tissues in vitro and monitoring dynamic information of neuroplasticity. This novel nano-neuron interface can potentially serve as a precise, informative, biocompatible, and dual-mode neural interface for monitoring of both neuroelectrical and neurochemical activity at the single cell level and even inside the cell.

  15. Studies in RF Power Communication, SAR, and Temperature Elevation in Wireless Implantable Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujuan; Tang, Lin; Rennaker, Robert; Hutchens, Chris; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2013-01-01

    Implantable neural interfaces are designed to provide a high spatial and temporal precision control signal implementing high degree of freedom real-time prosthetic systems. The development of a Radio Frequency (RF) wireless neural interface has the potential to expand the number of applications as well as extend the robustness and longevity compared to wired neural interfaces. However, it is well known that RF signal is absorbed by the body and can result in tissue heating. In this work, numerical studies with analytical validations are performed to provide an assessment of power, heating and specific absorption rate (SAR) associated with the wireless RF transmitting within the human head. The receiving antenna on the neural interface is designed with different geometries and modeled at a range of implanted depths within the brain in order to estimate the maximum receiving power without violating SAR and tissue temperature elevation safety regulations. Based on the size of the designed antenna, sets of frequencies between 1 GHz to 4 GHz have been investigated. As expected the simulations demonstrate that longer receiving antennas (dipole) and lower working frequencies result in greater power availability prior to violating SAR regulations. For a 15 mm dipole antenna operating at 1.24 GHz on the surface of the brain, 730 uW of power could be harvested at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) SAR violation limit. At approximately 5 cm inside the head, this same antenna would receive 190 uW of power prior to violating SAR regulations. Finally, the 3-D bio-heat simulation results show that for all evaluated antennas and frequency combinations we reach FCC SAR limits well before 1 °C. It is clear that powering neural interfaces via RF is possible, but ultra-low power circuit designs combined with advanced simulation will be required to develop a functional antenna that meets all system requirements. PMID:24223123

  16. Integrating and Interfacing Library Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Richard W.

    1985-01-01

    This overview of local library online systems that integrate several functions covers functional integration, benefits of integrated systems, turnkey systems, minicomputer and microcomputer-based systems, interfacing automated systems, types of interfaces, linking homogenous and heterogeneous systems, role of vendors, library applications, linking…

  17. Neural bases of syntax-semantics interface processing.

    PubMed

    Malaia, Evguenia; Newman, Sharlene

    2015-06-01

    The binding problem-question of how information between the modules of the linguistic system is integrated during language processing-is as yet unresolved. The remarkable speed of language processing and comprehension (Pulvermüller et al. 2009) suggests that at least coarse semantic information (e.g. noun animacy) and syntactically-relevant information (e.g. verbal template) are integrated rapidly to allow for coarse comprehension. This EEG study investigated syntax-semantics interface processing during word-by-word sentence reading. As alpha-band neural activity serves as an inhibition mechanism for local networks, we used topographical distribution of alpha power to help identify the timecourse of the binding process. We manipulated the syntactic parameter of verbal event structure, and semantic parameter of noun animacy in reduced relative clauses (RRCs, e.g. "The witness/mansion seized/protected by the agent was in danger"), to investigate the neural bases of interaction between syntactic and semantic networks during sentence processing. The word-by-word stimulus presentation method in the present experiment required manipulation of both syntactic structure and semantic features in the working memory. The results demonstrated a gradient distribution of early components (biphasic posterior P1-N2 and anterior N1-P2) over function words "by" and "the", and the verb, corresponding to facilitation or conflict resulting from the syntactic (telicity) and semantic (animacy) cues in the preceding portion of the sentence. This was followed by assimilation of power distribution in the α band at the second noun. The flattened distribution of α power during the mental manipulation with high demand on working memory-thematic role re-assignment-demonstrates a state of α equilibrium with strong functional coupling between posterior and anterior regions. These results demonstrate that the processing of semantic and syntactic features during sentence comprehension proceeds

  18. On Design and Implementation of Neural-Machine Interface for Artificial Legs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaorong; Liu, Yuhong; Zhang, Fan; Ren, Jin; Sun, Yan (Lindsay); Yang, Qing

    2011-01-01

    The quality of life of leg amputees can be improved dramatically by using a cyber physical system (CPS) that controls artificial legs based on neural signals representing amputees’ intended movements. The key to the CPS is the neural-machine interface (NMI) that senses electromyographic (EMG) signals to make control decisions. This paper presents a design and implementation of a novel NMI using an embedded computer system to collect neural signals from a physical system - a leg amputee, provide adequate computational capability to interpret such signals, and make decisions to identify user’s intent for prostheses control in real time. A new deciphering algorithm, composed of an EMG pattern classifier and a post-processing scheme, was developed to identify the user’s intended lower limb movements. To deal with environmental uncertainty, a trust management mechanism was designed to handle unexpected sensor failures and signal disturbances. Integrating the neural deciphering algorithm with the trust management mechanism resulted in a highly accurate and reliable software system for neural control of artificial legs. The software was then embedded in a newly designed hardware platform based on an embedded microcontroller and a graphic processing unit (GPU) to form a complete NMI for real time testing. Real time experiments on a leg amputee subject and an able-bodied subject have been carried out to test the control accuracy of the new NMI. Our extensive experiments have shown promising results on both subjects, paving the way for clinical feasibility of neural controlled artificial legs. PMID:22389637

  19. Encapsulating Elastically Stretchable Neural Interfaces: Yield, Resolution, and Recording/Stimulation of Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Barclay; Goletiani, Cezar; Yu, Zhe; Wagner, Sigurd

    2013-01-01

    A high resolution elastically stretchable microelectrode array (SMEA) to interface with neural tissue is described. The SMEA consists of an elastomeric substrate, such as poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), elastically stretchable gold conductors, and an electrically insulating encapsulating layer in which contact holes are opened. We demonstrate the feasibility of producing contact holes with 40 µm × 40 µm openings, show why the adhesion of the encapsulation layer to the underlying silicone substrate is weakened during contact hole fabrication, and provide remedies. These improvements result in greatly increased fabrication yield and reproducibility. An SMEA with 28 microelectrodes was fabricated. The contact holes (100 µm × 100 µm) in the encapsulation layer are only ~10% the size of the previous generation, allowing a larger number of microelectrodes per unit area, thus affording the capability to interface with a smaller neural population per electrode. This new SMEA is used to record spontaneous and evoked activity in organotypic hippocampal tissue slices at 0% strain before stretching, at 5 % and 10 % equibiaxial strain, and again at 0% strain after relaxation. The noise of the recordings increases with increasing strain. The frequency of spontaneous neural activity also increases when the SMEA is stretched. Upon relaxation, the noise returns to pre-stretch levels, while the frequency of neural activity remains elevated. Stimulus-response curves at each strain level are measured. The SMEA shows excellent biocompatibility for at least two weeks. PMID:24093006

  20. Organic electrode coatings for next-generation neural interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Aregueta-Robles, Ulises A.; Woolley, Andrew J.; Poole-Warren, Laura A.; Lovell, Nigel H.; Green, Rylie A.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional neuronal interfaces utilize metallic electrodes which in recent years have reached a plateau in terms of the ability to provide safe stimulation at high resolution or rather with high densities of microelectrodes with improved spatial selectivity. To achieve higher resolution it has become clear that reducing the size of electrodes is required to enable higher electrode counts from the implant device. The limitations of interfacing electrodes including low charge injection limits, mechanical mismatch and foreign body response can be addressed through the use of organic electrode coatings which typically provide a softer, more roughened surface to enable both improved charge transfer and lower mechanical mismatch with neural tissue. Coating electrodes with conductive polymers or carbon nanotubes offers a substantial increase in charge transfer area compared to conventional platinum electrodes. These organic conductors provide safe electrical stimulation of tissue while avoiding undesirable chemical reactions and cell damage. However, the mechanical properties of conductive polymers are not ideal, as they are quite brittle. Hydrogel polymers present a versatile coating option for electrodes as they can be chemically modified to provide a soft and conductive scaffold. However, the in vivo chronic inflammatory response of these conductive hydrogels remains unknown. A more recent approach proposes tissue engineering the electrode interface through the use of encapsulated neurons within hydrogel coatings. This approach may provide a method for activating tissue at the cellular scale, however, several technological challenges must be addressed to demonstrate feasibility of this innovative idea. The review focuses on the various organic coatings which have been investigated to improve neural interface electrodes. PMID:24904405

  1. Organic electrode coatings for next-generation neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Aregueta-Robles, Ulises A; Woolley, Andrew J; Poole-Warren, Laura A; Lovell, Nigel H; Green, Rylie A

    2014-01-01

    Traditional neuronal interfaces utilize metallic electrodes which in recent years have reached a plateau in terms of the ability to provide safe stimulation at high resolution or rather with high densities of microelectrodes with improved spatial selectivity. To achieve higher resolution it has become clear that reducing the size of electrodes is required to enable higher electrode counts from the implant device. The limitations of interfacing electrodes including low charge injection limits, mechanical mismatch and foreign body response can be addressed through the use of organic electrode coatings which typically provide a softer, more roughened surface to enable both improved charge transfer and lower mechanical mismatch with neural tissue. Coating electrodes with conductive polymers or carbon nanotubes offers a substantial increase in charge transfer area compared to conventional platinum electrodes. These organic conductors provide safe electrical stimulation of tissue while avoiding undesirable chemical reactions and cell damage. However, the mechanical properties of conductive polymers are not ideal, as they are quite brittle. Hydrogel polymers present a versatile coating option for electrodes as they can be chemically modified to provide a soft and conductive scaffold. However, the in vivo chronic inflammatory response of these conductive hydrogels remains unknown. A more recent approach proposes tissue engineering the electrode interface through the use of encapsulated neurons within hydrogel coatings. This approach may provide a method for activating tissue at the cellular scale, however, several technological challenges must be addressed to demonstrate feasibility of this innovative idea. The review focuses on the various organic coatings which have been investigated to improve neural interface electrodes. PMID:24904405

  2. Uniform and Non-uniform Perturbations in Brain-Machine Interface Task Elicit Similar Neural Strategies.

    PubMed

    Armenta Salas, Michelle; Helms Tillery, Stephen I

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that take place during learning and adaptation can be directly probed with brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). We developed a BMI controlled paradigm that enabled us to enforce learning by introducing perturbations which changed the relationship between neural activity and the BMI's output. We introduced a uniform perturbation to the system, through a visuomotor rotation (VMR), and a non-uniform perturbation, through a decorrelation task. The controller in the VMR was essentially unchanged, but produced an output rotated at 30° from the neurally specified output. The controller in the decorrelation trials decoupled the activity of neurons that were highly correlated in the BMI task by selectively forcing the preferred directions of these cell pairs to be orthogonal. We report that movement errors were larger in the decorrelation task, and subjects needed more trials to restore performance back to baseline. During learning, we measured decreasing trends in preferred direction changes and cross-correlation coefficients regardless of task type. Conversely, final adaptations in neural tunings were dependent on the type controller used (VMR or decorrelation). These results hint to the similar process the neural population might engage while adapting to new tasks, and how, through a global process, the neural system can arrive to individual solutions. PMID:27601981

  3. Uniform and Non-uniform Perturbations in Brain-Machine Interface Task Elicit Similar Neural Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Armenta Salas, Michelle; Helms Tillery, Stephen I.

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that take place during learning and adaptation can be directly probed with brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). We developed a BMI controlled paradigm that enabled us to enforce learning by introducing perturbations which changed the relationship between neural activity and the BMI's output. We introduced a uniform perturbation to the system, through a visuomotor rotation (VMR), and a non-uniform perturbation, through a decorrelation task. The controller in the VMR was essentially unchanged, but produced an output rotated at 30° from the neurally specified output. The controller in the decorrelation trials decoupled the activity of neurons that were highly correlated in the BMI task by selectively forcing the preferred directions of these cell pairs to be orthogonal. We report that movement errors were larger in the decorrelation task, and subjects needed more trials to restore performance back to baseline. During learning, we measured decreasing trends in preferred direction changes and cross-correlation coefficients regardless of task type. Conversely, final adaptations in neural tunings were dependent on the type controller used (VMR or decorrelation). These results hint to the similar process the neural population might engage while adapting to new tasks, and how, through a global process, the neural system can arrive to individual solutions. PMID:27601981

  4. Titania nanotube arrays as interfaces for neural prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Jonathan A.; Hughes, Stephen; Soares, Paulo; Popat, Ketul C.

    2015-01-01

    Neural prostheses have become ever more acceptable treatments for many different types of neurological damage and disease. Here we investigate the use of two different morphologies of titania nanotube arrays as interfaces to advance the longevity and effectiveness of these prostheses. The nanotube arrays were characterized for their nanotopography, crystallinity, conductivity, wettability, surface mechanical properties and adsorption of key proteins: fibrinogen, albumin and laminin. The loosely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using a diethylene glycol based electrolyte, contained a higher presence of the anatase crystal phase and were subsequently more conductive. These arrays yielded surfaces with higher wettability and lower modulus than the densely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using water based electrolyte. Further the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of the C17.2 neural stem cell line was investigated on the nanotube arrays. The proliferation ratio of the cells as well as the level of neuronal differentiation was seen to increase on the loosely packed arrays. The results indicate that loosely packed nanotube arrays similar to the ones produced here with a DEG based electrolyte, may provide a favorable template for growth and maintenance of C17.2 neural stem cell line. PMID:25687003

  5. Drug release from porous silicon for stable neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Tsang, Wei Mong; Park, Woo-Tae

    2014-02-01

    70 μm-thick porous Si (PSi) layer with the pore size of 11.1 ± 7.6 nm was formed on an 8-in. Si wafer via an anodization process for the microfabrication of a microelectrode to record neural signals. To reduce host tissue responses to the microelectrode and achieve a stable neural interface, water-soluble dexamethesone (Dex) was loaded into the PSi via incubation with the drug solution overnight. After the drug loading process, the pore size of PSi reduced to 4.7 ± 2.6 nm on the basis of scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images, while its wettability was remarkably enhanced. Fluorescence images demonstrated that Dex was loaded into the porous structure of the PSi. Degradation rate of the PSi was investigated by incubation in distilled water for 21 days. Moreover, the drug release profile of the Dex-loaded PSi was a combination of an initial burst release and subsequent sustained release. To evaluate cellular responses to the drug release from the PSi, primary astrocytes were seeded on the surface of samples. After 2 days of culture, the Dex-loaded PSi could not only moderately prevent astrocyte adhesion in comparison with Si, but also more effectively suppress the activation of primary astrocytes than unloaded PSi due to the drug release. Therefore, it might be an effective method to reduce host tissue responses and stabilize the quality of the recorded neural signal by means of loading drugs into the PSi component of the microelectrode.

  6. An Implantable Wireless Neural Interface for Recording Cortical Circuit Dynamics in Moving Primates

    PubMed Central

    Borton, David A.; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-01-01

    Objective Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims, and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable, and effective. Approach We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous, and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based MEA via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1Hz to 7.8kHz, ×200 gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized, and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) was transmitted by a wireless data link carried on an frequency shift key modulated signal at 3.2GHz and 3.8GHz to a receiver 1 meter away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7-hour continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2MHz. Main results Device verification and early validation was performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. Significance We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight on how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile patient use, have

  7. An implantable wireless neural interface for recording cortical circuit dynamics in moving primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borton, David A.; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable and effective. Approach. We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based microelectrode array via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1 Hz to 7.8 kHz, 200× gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) were transmitted by a wireless data link carried on a frequency-shift-key-modulated signal at 3.2 and 3.8 GHz to a receiver 1 m away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7 h continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2 MHz. Main results. Device verification and early validation were performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. Significance. We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight into how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile

  8. A TinyOS-enabled MICA2-based wireless neural interface.

    PubMed

    Farshchi, Shahin; Nuyujukian, Paul H; Pesterev, Aleksey; Mody, Istvan; Judy, Jack W

    2006-07-01

    Existing approaches used to develop compact low-power multichannel wireless neural recording systems range from creating custom-integrated circuits to assembling commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) PC-based components. Custom-integrated-circuit designs yield extremely compact and low-power devices at the expense of high development and upgrade costs and turn-around times, while assembling COTS-PC-technology yields high performance at the expense of large system size and increased power consumption. To achieve a balance between implementing an ultra-compact custom-fabricated neural transceiver and assembling COTS-PC-technology, an overlay of a neural interface upon the TinyOS-based MICA2 platform is described. The system amplifies, digitally encodes, and transmits neural signals real-time at a rate of 9.6 kbps, while consuming less than 66 mW of power. The neural signals are received and forwarded to a client PC over a serial connection. This data rate can be divided for recording on up to 6 channels, with a resolution of 8 bits/sample. This work demonstrates the strengths and limitations of the TinyOS-based sensor technology as a foundation for chronic remote biological monitoring applications and, thus, provides an opportunity to create a system that can leverage from the frequent networking and communications advancements being made by the global TinyOS-development community. PMID:16830946

  9. Integrated wireless neural interface based on the Utah electrode array.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Bhandari, R; Klein, M; Negi, S; Rieth, L; Tathireddy, P; Toepper, M; Oppermann, H; Solzbacher, F

    2009-04-01

    This report presents results from research towards a fully integrated, wireless neural interface consisting of a 100-channel microelectrode array, a custom-designed signal processing and telemetry IC, an inductive power receiving coil, and SMD capacitors. An integration concept for such a device was developed, and the materials and methods used to implement this concept were investigated. We developed a multi-level hybrid assembly process that used the Utah Electrode Array (UEA) as a circuit board. The signal processing IC was flip-chip bonded to the UEA using Au/Sn reflow soldering, and included amplifiers for up to 100 channels, signal processing units, an RF transmitter, and a power receiving and clock recovery module. An under bump metallization (UBM) using potentially biocompatible materials was developed and optimized, which consisted of a sputter deposited Ti/Pt/Au thin film stack with layer thicknesses of 50/150/150 nm, respectively. After flip-chip bonding, an underfiller was applied between the IC and the UEA to improve mechanical stability and prevent fluid ingress in in vivo conditions. A planar power receiving coil fabricated by patterning electroplated gold films on polyimide substrates was connected to the IC by using a custom metallized ceramic spacer and SnCu reflow soldering. The SnCu soldering was also used to assemble SMD capacitors on the UEA. The mechanical properties and stability of the optimized interconnections between the UEA and the IC and SMD components were measured. Measurements included the tape tests to evaluate UBM adhesion, shear testing between the Au/Sn solder bumps and the substrate, and accelerated lifetime testing of the long-term stability for the underfiller material coated with a a-SiC(x):H by PECVD, which was intended as a device encapsulation layer. The materials and processes used to generate the integrated neural interface device were found to yield a robust and reliable integrated package. PMID:19067174

  10. Topographic guidance based on microgrooved electroactive composite films for neural interface.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoyao; Xiao, Yinghong; Xiao, Hengyang; Harris, Gary; Wang, Tongxin; Che, Jianfei

    2016-09-01

    Topographical features are essential to neural interface for better neuron attachment and growth. This paper presents a facile and feasible route to fabricate an electroactive and biocompatible micro-patterned Single-walled carbon nanotube/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) composite films (SWNT/PEDOT) for interface of neural electrodes. The uniform SWNT/PEDOT composite films with nanoscale pores and microscale grooves significantly enlarged the electrode-electrolyte interface, facilitated ion transfer within the bulk film, and more importantly, provided topology cues for the proliferation and differentiation of neural cells. Electrochemical analyses indicated that the introduction of PEDOT greatly improved the stability of the SWNT/PEDOT composite film and decreased the electrode/electrolyte interfacial impedance. Further, in vitro culture of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells and MTT testing showed that the grooved SWNT/PEDOT composite film was non-toxic and favorable to guide the growth and extension of neurite. Our results demonstrated that the fabricated microscale groove patterns were not only beneficial in the development of models for nervous system biology, but also in creating therapeutic approaches for nerve injuries. PMID:27295493

  11. Visualization of the intact interface between neural tissue and implanted microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Holecko, Matthew M; Williams, Justin C; Massia, Stephen P

    2005-12-01

    This research presents immunohistochemical strategies for assessing the interactions at the immediate interface between micro-scale implanted devices and the surrounding brain tissue during inflammatory astrogliotic reactions. This includes preparation, microscopy and analysis techniques for obtaining images of the intimate contact between neural cells and the surface of implantable micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. The ability to visualize the intact interface between an implant and the surrounding tissue allows researchers to examine tissue that is unchanged from its native implanted state. Conversely, current popular techniques involve removing the implant. This tends to cause damage to the tissue immediately surrounding the implant and can hinder one's ability to differentiate inflammatory responses to the implant versus physical damage occurring from removal of the implant from the tissue. Due to advances in microscopy and staining techniques, it is now possible to visualize the intact tissue-implant interface. This paper presents the development of imaging techniques for visualizing the intact interface between neural tissue and implanted devices. This is particularly important for understanding both the acute and chronic neuroinflammatory responses to devices intended for long-term use in a prosthetic system. Non-functional, unbonded devices were imaged in vitro and in vivo at different times post-implantation via a range of techniques. Using these techniques, detailed interactions could be seen between delicate cellular processes and the electrode surface, which would have been destroyed using conventional histology processes. PMID:16317233

  12. Using reinforcement learning to provide stable brain-machine interface control despite neural input reorganization.

    PubMed

    Pohlmeyer, Eric A; Mahmoudi, Babak; Geng, Shijia; Prins, Noeline W; Sanchez, Justin C

    2014-01-01

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) systems give users direct neural control of robotic, communication, or functional electrical stimulation systems. As BMI systems begin transitioning from laboratory settings into activities of daily living, an important goal is to develop neural decoding algorithms that can be calibrated with a minimal burden on the user, provide stable control for long periods of time, and can be responsive to fluctuations in the decoder's neural input space (e.g. neurons appearing or being lost amongst electrode recordings). These are significant challenges for static neural decoding algorithms that assume stationary input/output relationships. Here we use an actor-critic reinforcement learning architecture to provide an adaptive BMI controller that can successfully adapt to dramatic neural reorganizations, can maintain its performance over long time periods, and which does not require the user to produce specific kinetic or kinematic activities to calibrate the BMI. Two marmoset monkeys used the Reinforcement Learning BMI (RLBMI) to successfully control a robotic arm during a two-target reaching task. The RLBMI was initialized using random initial conditions, and it quickly learned to control the robot from brain states using only a binary evaluative feedback regarding whether previously chosen robot actions were good or bad. The RLBMI was able to maintain control over the system throughout sessions spanning multiple weeks. Furthermore, the RLBMI was able to quickly adapt and maintain control of the robot despite dramatic perturbations to the neural inputs, including a series of tests in which the neuron input space was deliberately halved or doubled. PMID:24498055

  13. Using Reinforcement Learning to Provide Stable Brain-Machine Interface Control Despite Neural Input Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Pohlmeyer, Eric A.; Mahmoudi, Babak; Geng, Shijia; Prins, Noeline W.; Sanchez, Justin C.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) systems give users direct neural control of robotic, communication, or functional electrical stimulation systems. As BMI systems begin transitioning from laboratory settings into activities of daily living, an important goal is to develop neural decoding algorithms that can be calibrated with a minimal burden on the user, provide stable control for long periods of time, and can be responsive to fluctuations in the decoder’s neural input space (e.g. neurons appearing or being lost amongst electrode recordings). These are significant challenges for static neural decoding algorithms that assume stationary input/output relationships. Here we use an actor-critic reinforcement learning architecture to provide an adaptive BMI controller that can successfully adapt to dramatic neural reorganizations, can maintain its performance over long time periods, and which does not require the user to produce specific kinetic or kinematic activities to calibrate the BMI. Two marmoset monkeys used the Reinforcement Learning BMI (RLBMI) to successfully control a robotic arm during a two-target reaching task. The RLBMI was initialized using random initial conditions, and it quickly learned to control the robot from brain states using only a binary evaluative feedback regarding whether previously chosen robot actions were good or bad. The RLBMI was able to maintain control over the system throughout sessions spanning multiple weeks. Furthermore, the RLBMI was able to quickly adapt and maintain control of the robot despite dramatic perturbations to the neural inputs, including a series of tests in which the neuron input space was deliberately halved or doubled. PMID:24498055

  14. Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Automated remote fluid servicing will be necessary for future space missions, as future satellites will be designed for on-orbit consumable replenishment. In order to develop an on-orbit remote servicing capability, a standard interface between a tanker and the receiving satellite is needed. The objective of the Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS) program is to design, fabricate, and functionally demonstrate compliance with all design requirements for an automated fluid interface system. A description and documentation of the Fairchild AFIS design is provided.

  15. Memory Storage and Neural Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkon, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates memory storage and molecular nature of associative-memory formation by analyzing Pavlovian conditioning in marine snails and rabbits. Presented is the design of a computer-based memory system (neural networks) using the rules acquired in the investigation. Reports that the artificial network recognized patterns well. (YP)

  16. User interfaces to expert systems

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.; Emrich, M.L.

    1988-10-01

    Expert Systems are becoming increasingly popular in environments where the user is not well versed in computers or the subject domain. They offer expert advice and can also explain their lines of reasoning. As these systems are applied to highly technical areas, they become complex and large. Therefore, User Systems Interfaces (USIs) become critical. This paper discusses recent technologies that can be applied to improved user communication. In particular, bar menus/graphics, mouse interfaces, touch screens, and voice links will be highlighted. Their applications in the context of SOFTMAN (The Software Manager Apprentice) a knowledge-based system are discussed. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Control aspects of motor neural prosthesis: sensory interface.

    PubMed

    Popović, Dejan B; Dosen, Strahinja; Popović, Mirjana B; Stefanović, Filip; Kojović, Jovana

    2007-01-01

    A neural prosthesis (NP) has two applications: permanent assistance of function, and temporary assistance that contributes to long-term recovery of function. Here, we address control issues for a therapeutic NP which uses surface electrodes. We suggest that the effective NP for therapy needs to implement rule-based control. Rule-based control relies on the triggering of preprogrammed sequences of electrical stimulation by the sensory signals. The sensory system in the therapeutic NP needs to be simple for installation, allow self-calibration, it must be robust, and sufficiently redundant in order to guarantee safe operation. The sensory signals need to generate control signals; hence, sensory fusion is needed. MEMS technology today provides sensors that fulfill the technical requirements (accelerometers, gyroscopes, force sensing resistors). Therefore, the task was to design a sensory signal processing method from the mentioned solid state sensors that would recognize phases during the gait cycle. This is necessary for the control of multi channel electrical stimulation. The sensory fusion consists of the following two phases: 1) estimation of vertical and horizontal components of the ground reaction force, center of pressure, and joint angles from the solid-state sensors, and 2) fusion of the estimated signals into a sequence of command signals. The first phase was realized by the use of artificial neural networks and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems, while the second by the use of inductive learning described in our earlier work [1]. PMID:18002969

  18. Neural system prediction and identification challenge

    PubMed Central

    Vlachos, Ioannis; Zaytsev, Yury V.; Spreizer, Sebastian; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Can we infer the function of a biological neural network (BNN) if we know the connectivity and activity of all its constituent neurons?This question is at the core of neuroscience and, accordingly, various methods have been developed to record the activity and connectivity of as many neurons as possible. Surprisingly, there is no theoretical or computational demonstration that neuronal activity and connectivity are indeed sufficient to infer the function of a BNN. Therefore, we pose the Neural Systems Identification and Prediction Challenge (nuSPIC). We provide the connectivity and activity of all neurons and invite participants (1) to infer the functions implemented (hard-wired) in spiking neural networks (SNNs) by stimulating and recording the activity of neurons and, (2) to implement predefined mathematical/biological functions using SNNs. The nuSPICs can be accessed via a web-interface to the NEST simulator and the user is not required to know any specific programming language. Furthermore, the nuSPICs can be used as a teaching tool. Finally, nuSPICs use the crowd-sourcing model to address scientific issues. With this computational approach we aim to identify which functions can be inferred by systematic recordings of neuronal activity and connectivity. In addition, nuSPICs will help the design and application of new experimental paradigms based on the structure of the SNN and the presumed function which is to be discovered. PMID:24399966

  19. Human facial neural activities and gesture recognition for machine-interfacing applications

    PubMed Central

    Hamedi, M; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Tan, TS; Ismail, K; Ali, J; Dee-Uam, C; Pavaganun, C; Yupapin, PP

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a new method of recognizing different human facial gestures through their neural activities and muscle movements, which can be used in machine-interfacing applications. Human–machine interface (HMI) technology utilizes human neural activities as input controllers for the machine. Recently, much work has been done on the specific application of facial electromyography (EMG)-based HMI, which have used limited and fixed numbers of facial gestures. In this work, a multipurpose interface is suggested that can support 2–11 control commands that can be applied to various HMI systems. The significance of this work is finding the most accurate facial gestures for any application with a maximum of eleven control commands. Eleven facial gesture EMGs are recorded from ten volunteers. Detected EMGs are passed through a band-pass filter and root mean square features are extracted. Various combinations of gestures with a different number of gestures in each group are made from the existing facial gestures. Finally, all combinations are trained and classified by a Fuzzy c-means classifier. In conclusion, combinations with the highest recognition accuracy in each group are chosen. An average accuracy >90% of chosen combinations proved their ability to be used as command controllers. PMID:22267930

  20. Computational Assessment of Neural Probe and Brain Tissue Interface under Transient Motion

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Michael; Bawab, Sebastian; Yoon, Hargsoon

    2016-01-01

    The functional longevity of a neural probe is dependent upon its ability to minimize injury risk during the insertion and recording period in vivo, which could be related to motion-related strain between the probe and surrounding tissue. A series of finite element analyses was conducted to study the extent of the strain induced within the brain in an area around a neural probe. This study focuses on the transient behavior of neural probe and brain tissue interface with a viscoelastic model. Different stages of the interface from initial insertion of neural probe to full bonding of the probe by astro-glial sheath formation are simulated utilizing analytical tools to investigate the effects of relative motion between the neural probe and the brain while friction coefficients and kinematic frequencies are varied. The analyses can provide an in-depth look at the quantitative benefits behind using soft materials for neural probes. PMID:27322338

  1. Computational Assessment of Neural Probe and Brain Tissue Interface under Transient Motion.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Michael; Bawab, Sebastian; Yoon, Hargsoon

    2016-01-01

    The functional longevity of a neural probe is dependent upon its ability to minimize injury risk during the insertion and recording period in vivo, which could be related to motion-related strain between the probe and surrounding tissue. A series of finite element analyses was conducted to study the extent of the strain induced within the brain in an area around a neural probe. This study focuses on the transient behavior of neural probe and brain tissue interface with a viscoelastic model. Different stages of the interface from initial insertion of neural probe to full bonding of the probe by astro-glial sheath formation are simulated utilizing analytical tools to investigate the effects of relative motion between the neural probe and the brain while friction coefficients and kinematic frequencies are varied. The analyses can provide an in-depth look at the quantitative benefits behind using soft materials for neural probes. PMID:27322338

  2. Intelligent interfaces for expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, James A.; Wang, Lui

    1988-01-01

    Vital to the success of an expert system is an interface to the user which performs intelligently. A generic intelligent interface is being developed for expert systems. This intelligent interface was developed around the in-house developed Expert System for the Flight Analysis System (ESFAS). The Flight Analysis System (FAS) is comprised of 84 configuration controlled FORTRAN subroutines that are used in the preflight analysis of the space shuttle. In order to use FAS proficiently, a person must be knowledgeable in the areas of flight mechanics, the procedures involved in deploying a certain payload, and an overall understanding of the FAS. ESFAS, still in its developmental stage, is taking into account much of this knowledge. The generic intelligent interface involves the integration of a speech recognizer and synthesizer, a preparser, and a natural language parser to ESFAS. The speech recognizer being used is capable of recognizing 1000 words of connected speech. The natural language parser is a commercial software package which uses caseframe instantiation in processing the streams of words from the speech recognizer or the keyboard. The systems configuration is described along with capabilities and drawbacks.

  3. A microsystem integration platform dedicated to build multi-chip-neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Amer E; Gosselin, Benoit; Sawan, Mohamad

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present an electrical discharge machining (EDM) technique associated with electrochemical steps to construct an appropriate biological interface to neural tissues. The presented microprobe design permits to short the time of production compared to available techniques, while improving the integrity of the electrodes. In addition, we are using a 3D approach to create compact and independent microsystem integration platefrom incorporating array of electrodes and signal processing chips. System-in-package and die-stacking are used to connect the integrated circuits and the array of electrodes on the platform. This approach enables to build a device that will fit in a volume smaller than 1.7 x 1.7 x 3.0 mm(3). This demonstrates the possibility of creating small devices that are suitable to fit in restricted areas for interfacing the brain. PMID:18003539

  4. Brain-computer interfaces: an overview of the hardware to record neural signals from the cortex.

    PubMed

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Rubehn, Birthe; Henle, Christian; Kisban, Sebastian; Herwik, Stanislav; Ruther, Patrick; Schuettler, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) record neural signals from cortical origin with the objective to control a user interface for communication purposes, a robotic artifact or artificial limb as actuator. One of the key components of such a neuroprosthetic system is the neuro-technical interface itself, the electrode array. In this chapter, different designs and manufacturing techniques will be compared and assessed with respect to scaling and assembling limitations. The overview includes electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes and epicortical brain-machine interfaces to record local field potentials (LFPs) from the surface of the cortex as well as intracortical needle electrodes that are intended to record single-unit activity. Two exemplary complementary technologies for micromachining of polyimide-based arrays and laser manufacturing of silicone rubber are presented and discussed with respect to spatial resolution, scaling limitations, and system properties. Advanced silicon micromachining technologies have led to highly sophisticated intracortical electrode arrays for fundamental neuroscientific applications. In this chapter, major approaches from the USA and Europe will be introduced and compared concerning complexity, modularity, and reliability. An assessment of the different technological solutions comparable to a strength weaknesses opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis might serve as guidance to select the adequate electrode array configuration for each control paradigm and strategy to realize robust, fast, and reliable BCIs. PMID:19660664

  5. Volitional control of neural activity: implications for brain–computer interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Fetz, Eberhard E

    2007-01-01

    Successful operation of brain–computer interfaces (BCI) and brain–machine interfaces (BMI) depends significantly on the degree to which neural activity can be volitionally controlled. This paper reviews evidence for such volitional control in a variety of neural signals, with particular emphasis on the activity of cortical neurons. Some evidence comes from conventional experiments that reveal volitional modulation in neural activity related to behaviours, including real and imagined movements, cognitive imagery and shifts of attention. More direct evidence comes from studies on operant conditioning of neural activity using biofeedback, and from BCI/BMI studies in which neural activity controls cursors or peripheral devices. Limits in the degree of accuracy of control in the latter studies can be attributed to several possible factors. Some of these factors, particularly limited practice time, can be addressed with long-term implanted BCIs. Preliminary observations with implanted circuits implementing recurrent BCIs are summarized. PMID:17234689

  6. The LILARTI neural network system

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.D. Jr.; Schell, F.M.; Dodd, C.V.

    1992-10-01

    The material of this Technical Memorandum is intended to provide the reader with conceptual and technical background information on the LILARTI neural network system of detail sufficient to confer an understanding of the LILARTI method as it is presently allied and to facilitate application of the method to problems beyond the scope of this document. Of particular importance in this regard are the descriptive sections and the Appendices which include operating instructions, partial listings of program output and data files, and network construction information.

  7. Tracking Neural Modulation Depth by Dual Sequential Monte Carlo Estimation on Point Processes for Brain-Machine Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwen; She, Xiwei; Liao, Yuxi; Li, Hongbao; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Zhang, Shaomin; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Principe, Jose

    2016-08-01

    Classic brain-machine interface (BMI) approaches decode neural signals from the brain responsible for achieving specific motor movements, which subsequently command prosthetic devices. Brain activities adaptively change during the control of the neuroprosthesis in BMIs, where the alteration of the preferred direction and the modulation of the gain depth are observed. The static neural tuning models have been limited by fixed codes, resulting in a decay of decoding performance over the course of the movement and subsequent instability in motor performance. To achieve stable performance, we propose a dual sequential Monte Carlo adaptive point process method, which models and decodes the gradually changing modulation depth of individual neuron over the course of a movement. We use multichannel neural spike trains from the primary motor cortex of a monkey trained to perform a target pursuit task using a joystick. Our results show that our computational approach successfully tracks the neural modulation depth over time with better goodness-of-fit than classic static neural tuning models, resulting in smaller errors between the true kinematics and the estimations in both simulated and real data. Our novel decoding approach suggests that the brain may employ such strategies to achieve stable motor output, i.e., plastic neural tuning is a feature of neural systems. BMI users may benefit from this adaptive algorithm to achieve more complex and controlled movement outcomes. PMID:26584486

  8. Photochemically modified diamond-like carbon surfaces for neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hopper, A P; Dugan, J M; Gill, A A; Regan, E M; Haycock, J W; Kelly, S; May, P W; Claeyssens, F

    2016-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) was modified using a UV functionalization method to introduce surface-bound amine and aldehyde groups. The functionalization process rendered the DLC more hydrophilic and significantly increased the viability of neurons seeded to the surface. The amine functionalized DLC promoted adhesion of neurons and fostered neurite outgrowth to a degree indistinguishable from positive control substrates (glass coated with poly-L-lysine). The aldehyde-functionalized surfaces performed comparably to the amine functionalized surfaces and both additionally supported the adhesion and growth of primary rat Schwann cells. DLC has many properties that are desirable in biomaterials. With the UV functionalization method demonstrated here it may be possible to harness these properties for the development of implantable devices to interface with the nervous system. PMID:26478422

  9. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Kenji; Jeewan, Horagodage Prabhath; Yamagiwa, Shota; Kawano, Takeshi; Ishida, Makoto; Akita, Ippei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI) chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm) enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna). In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT), the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction. PMID:26694407

  10. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Kenji; Jeewan, Horagodage Prabhath; Yamagiwa, Shota; Kawano, Takeshi; Ishida, Makoto; Akita, Ippei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI) chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm) enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna). In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT), the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction. PMID:26694407

  11. Learning in Artificial Neural Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matheus, Christopher J.; Hohensee, William E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an overview and analysis of learning in Artificial Neural Systems (ANS's). It begins with a general introduction to neural networks and connectionist approaches to information processing. The basis for learning in ANS's is then described, and compared with classical Machine learning. While similar in some ways, ANS learning deviates from tradition in its dependence on the modification of individual weights to bring about changes in a knowledge representation distributed across connections in a network. This unique form of learning is analyzed from two aspects: the selection of an appropriate network architecture for representing the problem, and the choice of a suitable learning rule capable of reproducing the desired function within the given network. The various network architectures are classified, and then identified with explicit restrictions on the types of functions they are capable of representing. The learning rules, i.e., algorithms that specify how the network weights are modified, are similarly taxonomized, and where possible, the limitations inherent to specific classes of rules are outlined.

  12. Neural substrates for semantic memory of familiar songs: is there an interface between lyrics and melodies?

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoko; Ishii, Kenji; Sakuma, Naoko; Kawasaki, Keiichi; Oda, Keiichi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    Findings on song perception and song production have increasingly suggested that common but partially distinct neural networks exist for processing lyrics and melody. However, the neural substrates of song recognition remain to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the neural substrates involved in the accessing "song lexicon" as corresponding to a representational system that might provide links between the musical and phonological lexicons using positron emission tomography (PET). We exposed participants to auditory stimuli consisting of familiar and unfamiliar songs presented in three ways: sung lyrics (song), sung lyrics on a single pitch (lyrics), and the sung syllable 'la' on original pitches (melody). The auditory stimuli were designed to have equivalent familiarity to participants, and they were recorded at exactly the same tempo. Eleven right-handed nonmusicians participated in four conditions: three familiarity decision tasks using song, lyrics, and melody and a sound type decision task (control) that was designed to engage perceptual and prelexical processing but not lexical processing. The contrasts (familiarity decision tasks versus control) showed no common areas of activation between lyrics and melody. This result indicates that essentially separate neural networks exist in semantic memory for the verbal and melodic processing of familiar songs. Verbal lexical processing recruited the left fusiform gyrus and the left inferior occipital gyrus, whereas melodic lexical processing engaged the right middle temporal sulcus and the bilateral temporo-occipital cortices. Moreover, we found that song specifically activated the left posterior inferior temporal cortex, which may serve as an interface between verbal and musical representations in order to facilitate song recognition. PMID:23029492

  13. Long term in vitro functional stability and recording longevity of fully integrated wireless neural interfaces based on the Utah Slant Electrode Array.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Asha; Rieth, Loren; Tathireddy, Prashant; Harrison, Reid; Oppermann, Hermann; Klein, Matthias; Töpper, Michael; Jung, Erik; Normann, Richard; Clark, Gregory; Solzbacher, Florian

    2011-08-01

    We evaluate the encapsulation and packaging reliability of a fully integrated wireless neural interface based on a Utah Slant Electrode Array/integrated neural interface-recording version 5 (USEA/INI-R5) system by monitoring the long term in vitro functional stability and recording longevity. The INI encapsulated with 6 µm Parylene-C was immersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for a period of over 276 days (with the monitoring of the functional device still ongoing). The full functionality (wireless radio-frequency power, command and signal transmission) and the ability of the electrodes to record artificial neural signals even after 276 days of PBS soaking with little change (within 14%) in signal/noise amplitude constitute a major milestone in long term stability and allow us to study and evaluate the encapsulation reliability, functional stability and its potential usefulness for a wireless neural interface for future chronic implants. PMID:21775785

  14. [A telemetery system for neural signal acquiring and processing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Song, Yongji; Suen, Jiantao; Zhao, Yiliang; Jia, Aibin; Zhu, Jianping

    2011-02-01

    Recording and extracting characteristic brain signals in freely moving animals is the basic and significant requirement in the study of brain-computer interface (BCI). To record animal's behaving and extract characteristic brain signals simultaneously could help understand the complex behavior of neural ensembles. Here, a system was established to record and analyse extracellular discharge in freely moving rats for the study of BCI. It comprised microelectrode and micro-driver assembly, analog front end (AFE), programmer system on chip (PSoC), wireless communication and the LabVIEW used as the platform for the graphic user interface. PMID:21485182

  15. Neural network based system for equipment surveillance

    DOEpatents

    Vilim, R.B.; Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.

    1998-04-28

    A method and system are disclosed for performing surveillance of transient signals of an industrial device to ascertain the operating state. The method and system involves the steps of reading into a memory training data, determining neural network weighting values until achieving target outputs close to the neural network output. If the target outputs are inadequate, wavelet parameters are determined to yield neural network outputs close to the desired set of target outputs and then providing signals characteristic of an industrial process and comparing the neural network output to the industrial process signals to evaluate the operating state of the industrial process. 33 figs.

  16. Neural network based system for equipment surveillance

    DOEpatents

    Vilim, Richard B.; Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for performing surveillance of transient signals of an industrial device to ascertain the operating state. The method and system involves the steps of reading into a memory training data, determining neural network weighting values until achieving target outputs close to the neural network output. If the target outputs are inadequate, wavelet parameters are determined to yield neural network outputs close to the desired set of target outputs and then providing signals characteristic of an industrial process and comparing the neural network output to the industrial process signals to evaluate the operating state of the industrial process.

  17. EPICS system: system structure and user interface

    SciTech Connect

    West, R.E.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bobbitt, J.S.; Lahey, T.E.; Kramper, B.J.; MacKinnon, B.A.

    1984-02-01

    This paper present the user's view of and the general organization of the EPICS control system at Fermilab. Various subsystems of the EPICS control system are discussed. These include the user command language, software protection, the device database, remote computer interfaces, and several application utilities. This paper is related to two other papers on EPICS: an overview paper and a detailed implementation paper.

  18. The neural crest: a versatile organ system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongcheng; Ighaniyan, Samiramis; Stathopoulos, Lefteris; Rollo, Benjamin; Landman, Kerry; Hutson, John; Newgreen, Donald

    2014-09-01

    The neural crest is the name given to the strip of cells at the junction between neural and epidermal ectoderm in neurula-stage vertebrate embryos, which is later brought to the dorsal neural tube as the neural folds elevate. The neural crest is a heterogeneous and multipotent progenitor cell population whose cells undergo EMT then extensively and accurately migrate throughout the embryo. Neural crest cells contribute to nearly every organ system in the body, with derivatives of neuronal, glial, neuroendocrine, pigment, and also mesodermal lineages. This breadth of developmental capacity has led to the neural crest being termed the fourth germ layer. The neural crest has occupied a prominent place in developmental biology, due to its exaggerated migratory morphogenesis and its remarkably wide developmental potential. As such, neural crest cells have become an attractive model for developmental biologists for studying these processes. Problems in neural crest development cause a number of human syndromes and birth defects known collectively as neurocristopathies; these include Treacher Collins syndrome, Hirschsprung disease, and 22q11.2 deletion syndromes. Tumors in the neural crest lineage are also of clinical importance, including the aggressive melanoma and neuroblastoma types. These clinical aspects have drawn attention to the selection or creation of neural crest progenitor cells, particularly of human origin, for studying pathologies of the neural crest at the cellular level, and also for possible cell therapeutics. The versatility of the neural crest lends itself to interlinked research, spanning basic developmental biology, birth defect research, oncology, and stem/progenitor cell biology and therapy. PMID:25227568

  19. A regenerative microchannel neural interface for recording from and stimulating peripheral axons in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FitzGerald, James J.; Lago, Natalia; Benmerah, Samia; Serra, Jordi; Watling, Christopher P.; Cameron, Ruth E.; Tarte, Edward; Lacour, Stéphanie P.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Fawcett, James W.

    2012-02-01

    Neural interfaces are implanted devices that couple the nervous system to electronic circuitry. They are intended for long term use to control assistive technologies such as muscle stimulators or prosthetics that compensate for loss of function due to injury. Here we present a novel design of interface for peripheral nerves. Recording from axons is complicated by the small size of extracellular potentials and the concentration of current flow at nodes of Ranvier. Confining axons to microchannels of ˜100 µm diameter produces amplified potentials that are independent of node position. After implantation of microchannel arrays into rat sciatic nerve, axons regenerated through the channels forming ‘mini-fascicles’, each typically containing ˜100 myelinated fibres and one or more blood vessels. Regenerated motor axons reconnected to distal muscles, as demonstrated by the recovery of an electromyogram and partial prevention of muscle atrophy. Efferent motor potentials and afferent signals evoked by muscle stretch or cutaneous stimulation were easily recorded from the mini-fascicles and were in the range of 35-170 µV. Individual motor units in distal musculature were activated from channels using stimulus currents in the microampere range. Microchannel interfaces are a potential solution for applications such as prosthetic limb control or enhancing recovery after nerve injury.

  20. A regenerative microchannel neural interface for recording from and stimulating peripheral axons in vivo.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, James J; Lago, Natalia; Benmerah, Samia; Serra, Jordi; Watling, Christopher P; Cameron, Ruth E; Tarte, Edward; Lacour, Stéphanie P; McMahon, Stephen B; Fawcett, James W

    2012-02-01

    Neural interfaces are implanted devices that couple the nervous system to electronic circuitry. They are intended for long term use to control assistive technologies such as muscle stimulators or prosthetics that compensate for loss of function due to injury. Here we present a novel design of interface for peripheral nerves. Recording from axons is complicated by the small size of extracellular potentials and the concentration of current flow at nodes of Ranvier. Confining axons to microchannels of ~100 µm diameter produces amplified potentials that are independent of node position. After implantation of microchannel arrays into rat sciatic nerve, axons regenerated through the channels forming 'mini-fascicles', each typically containing ~100 myelinated fibres and one or more blood vessels. Regenerated motor axons reconnected to distal muscles, as demonstrated by the recovery of an electromyogram and partial prevention of muscle atrophy. Efferent motor potentials and afferent signals evoked by muscle stretch or cutaneous stimulation were easily recorded from the mini-fascicles and were in the range of 35-170 µV. Individual motor units in distal musculature were activated from channels using stimulus currents in the microampere range. Microchannel interfaces are a potential solution for applications such as prosthetic limb control or enhancing recovery after nerve injury. PMID:22258138

  1. Neural Control of the Immune System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundman, Eva; Olofsson, Peder S.

    2014-01-01

    Neural reflexes support homeostasis by modulating the function of organ systems. Recent advances in neuroscience and immunology have revealed that neural reflexes also regulate the immune system. Activation of the vagus nerve modulates leukocyte cytokine production and alleviates experimental shock and autoimmune disease, and recent data have…

  2. Neural network system for traffic flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, John F.; Elibiary, Khalid J.; Petersson, L. E. Rickard

    1992-09-01

    Atlanta will be the home of several special events during the next five years ranging from the 1996 Olympics to the 1994 Super Bowl. When combined with the existing special events (Braves, Falcons, and Hawks games, concerts, festivals, etc.), the need to effectively manage traffic flow from surface streets to interstate highways is apparent. This paper describes a system for traffic event response and management for intelligent navigation utilizing signals (TERMINUS) developed at Georgia Tech for adaptively managing special event traffic flows in the Atlanta, Georgia area. TERMINUS (the original name given Atlanta, Georgia based upon its role as a rail line terminating center) is an intelligent surface street signal control system designed to manage traffic flow in Metro Atlanta. The system consists of three components. The first is a traffic simulation of the downtown Atlanta area around Fulton County Stadium that models the flow of traffic when a stadium event lets out. Parameters for the surrounding area include modeling for events during various times of day (such as rush hour). The second component is a computer graphics interface with the simulation that shows the traffic flows achieved based upon intelligent control system execution. The final component is the intelligent control system that manages surface street light signals based upon feedback from control sensors that dynamically adapt the intelligent controller's decision making process. The intelligent controller is a neural network model that allows TERMINUS to control the configuration of surface street signals to optimize the flow of traffic away from special events.

  3. iSpike: a spiking neural interface for the iCub robot.

    PubMed

    Gamez, D; Fidjeland, A K; Lazdins, E

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents iSpike: a C++ library that interfaces between spiking neural network simulators and the iCub humanoid robot. It uses a biologically inspired approach to convert the robot's sensory information into spikes that are passed to the neural network simulator, and it decodes output spikes from the network into motor signals that are sent to control the robot. Applications of iSpike range from embodied models of the brain to the development of intelligent robots using biologically inspired spiking neural networks. iSpike is an open source library that is available for free download under the terms of the GPL. PMID:22617339

  4. Using brain-computer interfaces to induce neural plasticity and restore function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse-Wentrup, Moritz; Mattia, Donatella; Oweiss, Karim

    2011-04-01

    Analyzing neural signals and providing feedback in realtime is one of the core characteristics of a brain-computer interface (BCI). As this feature may be employed to induce neural plasticity, utilizing BCI technology for therapeutic purposes is increasingly gaining popularity in the BCI community. In this paper, we discuss the state-of-the-art of research on this topic, address the principles of and challenges in inducing neural plasticity by means of a BCI, and delineate the problems of study design and outcome evaluation arising in this context. We conclude with a list of open questions and recommendations for future research in this field.

  5. Biomaterials. Electronic dura mater for long-term multimodal neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Minev, Ivan R; Musienko, Pavel; Hirsch, Arthur; Barraud, Quentin; Wenger, Nikolaus; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Gandar, Jérôme; Capogrosso, Marco; Milekovic, Tomislav; Asboth, Léonie; Torres, Rafael Fajardo; Vachicouras, Nicolas; Liu, Qihan; Pavlova, Natalia; Duis, Simone; Larmagnac, Alexandre; Vörös, Janos; Micera, Silvestro; Suo, Zhigang; Courtine, Grégoire; Lacour, Stéphanie P

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical mismatch between soft neural tissues and stiff neural implants hinders the long-term performance of implantable neuroprostheses. Here, we designed and fabricated soft neural implants with the shape and elasticity of dura mater, the protective membrane of the brain and spinal cord. The electronic dura mater, which we call e-dura, embeds interconnects, electrodes, and chemotrodes that sustain millions of mechanical stretch cycles, electrical stimulation pulses, and chemical injections. These integrated modalities enable multiple neuroprosthetic applications. The soft implants extracted cortical states in freely behaving animals for brain-machine interface and delivered electrochemical spinal neuromodulation that restored locomotion after paralyzing spinal cord injury. PMID:25574019

  6. Approaches for the efficient extraction and processing of biopotentials in implantable neural interfacing microsystems.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    The accelerating pace of research in neurosciences and rehabilitation engineering has created a considerable demand for implantable microsystems capable of interfacing with large groups of neurons. Such microsystems must provide multiple recording channels incorporating low-noise amplifiers, filters, data converters, neural signal processing circuitry, power management units and low-power transmitters to extract and wirelessly transfer the relevant neural data outside the body for computing and storage. This paper is reviewing several electronic recording strategies to address the challenge of operating large numbers of channels to gather the neural information from several neurons within very low-power constraints. PMID:22255671

  7. High-density stretchable microelectrode arrays: An integrated technology platform for neural and muscular surface interfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang

    2011-12-01

    Numerous applications in neuroscience research and neural prosthetics, such as retinal prostheses, spinal-cord surface stimulation for prosthetics, electrocorticogram (ECoG) recording for epilepsy detection, etc., involve electrical interaction with soft excitable tissues using a surface stimulation and/or recording approach. These applications require an interface that is able to set up electrical communications with a high throughput between electronics and the excitable tissue and that can dynamically conform to the shape of the soft tissue. Being a compliant and biocompatible material with mechanical impedance close to that of soft tissues, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) offers excellent potential as the substrate material for such neural interfaces. However, fabrication of electrical functionalities on PDMS has long been very challenging. This thesis work has successfully overcome many challenges associated with PDMS-based microfabrication and achieved an integrated technology platform for PDMS-based stretchable microelectrode arrays (sMEAs). This platform features a set of technological advances: (1) we have fabricated uniform current density profile microelectrodes as small as 10 mum in diameter; (2) we have patterned high-resolution (feature as small as 10 mum), high-density (pitch as small as 20 mum) thin-film gold interconnects on PDMS substrate; (3) we have developed a multilayer wiring interconnect technology within the PDMS substrate to further boost the achievable integration density of such sMEA; and (4) we have invented a bonding technology---via-bonding---to facilitate high-resolution, high-density integration of the sMEA with integrated circuits (ICs) to form a compact implant. Taken together, this platform provides a high-resolution, high-density integrated system solution for neural and muscular surface interfacing. sMEAs of example designs are evaluated through in vitro and in vivo experimentations on their biocompatibility, surface conformability

  8. The Elements Of Adaptive Neural Expert Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Michael J.

    1989-03-01

    The generalization properties of a class of neural architectures can be modelled mathematically. The model is a parallel predicate calculus based on pattern recognition and self-organization of long-term memory in a neural network. It may provide the basis for adaptive expert systems capable of inductive learning and rapid processing in a highly complex and changing environment.

  9. Neural control of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Sundman, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Neural reflexes support homeostasis by modulating the function of organ systems. Recent advances in neuroscience and immunology have revealed that neural reflexes also regulate the immune system. Activation of the vagus nerve modulates leukocyte cytokine production and alleviates experimental shock and autoimmune disease, and recent data have suggested that vagus nerve stimulation can improve symptoms in human rheumatoid arthritis. These discoveries have generated an increased interest in bioelectronic medicine, i.e., therapeutic delivery of electrical impulses that activate nerves to regulate immune system function. Here, we discuss the physiology and potential therapeutic implications of neural immune control. PMID:25039084

  10. A PDMS-based integrated stretchable microelectrode array (isMEA) for neural and muscular surface interfacing.

    PubMed

    Liang Guo; Guvanasen, G S; Xi Liu; Tuthill, C; Nichols, T R; DeWeerth, S P

    2013-02-01

    Numerous applications in neuroscience research and neural prosthetics, such as electrocorticogram (ECoG) recording and retinal prosthesis, involve electrical interactions with soft excitable tissues using a surface recording and/or stimulation approach. These applications require an interface that is capable of setting up high-throughput communications between the electrical circuit and the excitable tissue and that can dynamically conform to the shape of the soft tissue. Being a compliant material with mechanical impedance close to that of soft tissues, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) offers excellent potential as a substrate material for such neural interfaces. This paper describes an integrated technology for fabrication of PDMS-based stretchable microelectrode arrays (MEAs). Specifically, as an integral part of the fabrication process, a stretchable MEA is directly fabricated with a rigid substrate, such as a thin printed circuit board (PCB), through an innovative bonding technology-via-bonding-for integrated packaging. This integrated strategy overcomes the conventional challenge of high-density packaging for this type of stretchable electronics. Combined with a high-density interconnect technology developed previously, this stretchable MEA technology facilitates a high-resolution, high-density integrated system solution for neural and muscular surface interfacing. In this paper, this PDMS-based integrated stretchable MEA (isMEA) technology is demonstrated by an example design that packages a stretchable MEA with a small PCB. The resulting isMEA is assessed for its biocompatibility, surface conformability, electrode impedance spectrum, and capability to record muscle fiber activity when applied epimysially. PMID:23853274

  11. Echoes in correlated neural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helias, M.; Tetzlaff, T.; Diesmann, M.

    2013-02-01

    Correlations are employed in modern physics to explain microscopic and macroscopic phenomena, like the fractional quantum Hall effect and the Mott insulator state in high temperature superconductors and ultracold atoms. Simultaneously probed neurons in the intact brain reveal correlations between their activity, an important measure to study information processing in the brain that also influences the macroscopic signals of neural activity, like the electroencephalogram (EEG). Networks of spiking neurons differ from most physical systems: the interaction between elements is directed, time delayed, mediated by short pulses and each neuron receives events from thousands of neurons. Even the stationary state of the network cannot be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics. Here we develop a quantitative theory of pairwise correlations in finite-sized random networks of spiking neurons. We derive explicit analytic expressions for the population-averaged cross correlation functions. Our theory explains why the intuitive mean field description fails, how the echo of single action potentials causes an apparent lag of inhibition with respect to excitation and how the size of the network can be scaled while maintaining its dynamical state. Finally, we derive a new criterion for the emergence of collective oscillations from the spectrum of the time-evolution propagator.

  12. Silicon-based wire electrode array for neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Weihua; Zhao, Hui; Zhao, Shanshan; Fang, Xiaolei; Chen, Sanyuan; Gui, Qiang; Tang, Rongyu; Chen, Yuanfang; Hong, Bo; Gao, Xiaorong; Chen, Hongda

    2014-09-01

    Objectives. Metal-wire electrode arrays are widely used to record and stimulate neurons. Commonly, these devices are fabricated from a long insulated metal wire by cutting it into the proper length and using the cross-section as the electrode site. The assembly of a micro-wire electrode array with regular spacing is difficult. With the help of micro-machine technology, a silicon-based wire electrode array (SWEA) is proposed to simplify the assembling process and provide a wire-type electrode with tapered tips. Approach. Silicon wires with regular spacing coated with metal are generated from a silicon wafer through micro-fabrication and are ordered into a 3D array. A silicon wafer is cut into a comb-like structure with hexagonal teeth on both sides by anisotropic etching. To establish an array of silicon-based linear needles through isotropic wet etching, the diameters of these hexagonal teeth are reduced; their sharp edges are smoothed out and their tips are sharpened. The needle array is coated with a layer of parylene after metallization. The tips of the needles are then exposed to form an array of linear neural electrodes. With these linear electrode arrays, an array of area electrodes can be fabricated. Main results. A 6  ×  6 array of wire-type electrodes based on silicon is developed using this method. The time required to manually assemble the 3D array decreases significantly with the introduction of micro-fabricated 2D array. Meanwhile, the tip intervals in the 2D array are accurate and are controlled at no more than 1%. The SWEA is effective both in vitro and in vivo. Significance. Using this method, the SWEA can be batch-prepared in advance along with its parameters, such as spacing, length, and diameter. Thus, neural scientists can assemble proper electrode arrays in a short time.

  13. New User Interface Capabilities for Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kasemir, Kay

    2009-01-01

    Latest technologies promise new control system User Interface (UI) features and greater interoperability of applications. New developments using Java and Eclipse aim to unify diverse control systems and make communication between applications seamless. Web based user interfaces can improve portability and remote access. Modern programming tools improve efficiency, support testing and facilitate shared code. This paper will discuss new developments aimed at improving control system interfaces and their development environment.

  14. Optimizing growth and post treatment of diamond for high capacitance neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wei; Fox, Kate; Zamani, Akram; Turnley, Ann M; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Ahnood, Arman; Cicione, Rosemary; Meffin, Hamish; Prawer, Steven; Stacey, Alastair; Garrett, David J

    2016-10-01

    Electrochemical and biological properties are two crucial criteria in the selection of the materials to be used as electrodes for neural interfaces. For neural stimulation, materials are required to exhibit high capacitance and to form intimate contact with neurons for eliciting effective neural responses at acceptably low voltages. Here we report on a new high capacitance material fabricated using nitrogen included ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD). After exposure to oxygen plasma for 3 h, the activated N-UNCD exhibited extremely high electrochemical capacitance greater than 1 mF/cm(2), which originates from the special hybrid sp(2)/sp(3) structure of N-UNCD. The in vitro biocompatibility of the activated N-UNCD was then assessed using rat cortical neurons and surface roughness was found to be critical for healthy neuron growth, with best results observed on surfaces with a roughness of approximately 20 nm. Therefore, by using oxygen plasma activated N-UNCD with appropriate surface roughness, and considering the chemical and mechanical stability of diamond, the fabricated neural interfaces are expected to exhibit high efficacy, long-term stability and a healthy neuron/electrode interface. PMID:27424214

  15. Progress of Flexible Electronics in Neural Interfacing - A Self-Adaptive Non-Invasive Neural Ribbon Electrode for Small Nerves Recording.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhuolin; Yen, Shih-Cheng; Sheshadri, Swathi; Wang, Jiahui; Lee, Sanghoon; Liu, Yu-Hang; Liao, Lun-De; Thakor, Nitish V; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-06-01

    A novel flexible neural ribbon electrode with a self-adaptive feature is successfully implemented for various small nerves recording. As a neural interface, the selective recording capability is characterized by having reliable signal acquisitions from the sciatic nerve and its branches such as the peroneal nerve, the tibial nerve, and the sural nerve. PMID:26568483

  16. A Low Noise Amplifier for Neural Spike Recording Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Amaya, Jesus; Rodriguez-Perez, Alberto; Delgado-Restituto, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) for neural spike recording applications. The proposed topology, based on a capacitive feedback network using a two-stage OTA, efficiently solves the triple trade-off between power, area and noise. Additionally, this work introduces a novel transistor-level synthesis methodology for LNAs tailored for the minimization of their noise efficiency factor under area and noise constraints. The proposed LNA has been implemented in a 130 nm CMOS technology and occupies 0.053 mm-sq. Experimental results show that the LNA offers a noise efficiency factor of 2.16 and an input referred noise of 3.8 μVrms for 1.2 V power supply. It provides a gain of 46 dB over a nominal bandwidth of 192 Hz–7.4 kHz and consumes 1.92 μW. The performance of the proposed LNA has been validated through in vivo experiments with animal models. PMID:26437411

  17. A Low Noise Amplifier for Neural Spike Recording Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Amaya, Jesus; Rodriguez-Perez, Alberto; Delgado-Restituto, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) for neural spike recording applications. The proposed topology, based on a capacitive feedback network using a two-stage OTA, efficiently solves the triple trade-off between power, area and noise. Additionally, this work introduces a novel transistor-level synthesis methodology for LNAs tailored for the minimization of their noise efficiency factor under area and noise constraints. The proposed LNA has been implemented in a 130 nm CMOS technology and occupies 0.053 mm-sq. Experimental results show that the LNA offers a noise efficiency factor of 2.16 and an input referred noise of 3.8 μVrms for 1.2 V power supply. It provides a gain of 46 dB over a nominal bandwidth of 192 Hz-7.4 kHz and consumes 1.92 μW. The performance of the proposed LNA has been validated through in vivo experiments with animal models. PMID:26437411

  18. Bias voltages at microelectrodes change neural interface properties in vivo.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M D; Otto, K J; Williams, J C; Kipke, D R

    2004-01-01

    Rejuvenation of iridium microelectrode sites, which involves applying a 1.5 V bias for 4 s, has been shown to reduce site impedances of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. This study applied complex impedance spectroscopy measurements to an equivalent circuit model of the electrode-tissue interface. Rejuvenation was found to cause a transient increase in electrode conductivity through an IrO2 layer and a decrease in the surrounding extracellular resistance by 85 +/- 1% (n=73, t-test p < 0.001) and a decrease in the immediate site resistance by 44 +/- 7% (n=73, t-test p<0.001). These findings may be useful as an intervention strategy to prolong the lifetime of chronic microelectrode implants for neuroprostheses. PMID:17271203

  19. Diagnosing Parkinson's Diseases Using Fuzzy Neural System

    PubMed Central

    Abiyev, Rahib H.; Abizade, Sanan

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the design of the recognition system that will discriminate between healthy people and people with Parkinson's disease. A diagnosing of Parkinson's diseases is performed using fusion of the fuzzy system and neural networks. The structure and learning algorithms of the proposed fuzzy neural system (FNS) are presented. The approach described in this paper allows enhancing the capability of the designed system and efficiently distinguishing healthy individuals. It was proved through simulation of the system that has been performed using data obtained from UCI machine learning repository. A comparative study was carried out and the simulation results demonstrated that the proposed fuzzy neural system improves the recognition rate of the designed system. PMID:26881009

  20. Intelligent subsystem interface for modular hardware system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krening, Douglas N. (Inventor); Lannan, Gregory B. (Inventor); Schneiderwind, Michael J. (Inventor); Schneiderwind, Robert A. (Inventor); Caffrey, Robert T. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A single chip application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which provides a flexible, modular interface between a subsystem and a standard system bus. The ASIC includes a microcontroller/microprocessor, a serial interface for connection to the bus, and a variety of communications interface devices available for coupling to the subsystem. A three-bus architecture, utilizing arbitration, provides connectivity within the ASIC and between the ASIC and the subsystem. The communication interface devices include UART (serial), parallel, analog, and external device interface utilizing bus connections paired with device select signals. A low power (sleep) mode is provided as is a processor disable option.

  1. Layered carbon nanotube-polyelectrolyte electrodes outperform traditional neural interface materials.

    PubMed

    Jan, Edward; Hendricks, Jeffrey L; Husaini, Vincent; Richardson-Burns, Sarah M; Sereno, Andrew; Martin, David C; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2009-12-01

    The safety, function, and longevity of implantable neuroprosthetic and cardiostimulating electrodes depend heavily on the electrical properties of the electrode-tissue interface, which in many cases requires substantial improvement. While different variations of carbon nanotube materials have been shown to be suitable for neural excitation, it is critical to evaluate them versus other materials used for bioelectrical interfacing, which have not been done in any study performed so far despite strong interest to this area. In this study, we carried out this evaluation and found that composite multiwalled carbon nanotube-polyelectrolyte (MWNT-PE) multilayer electrodes substantially outperform in one way or the other state-of-the-art neural interface materials available today, namely activated electrochemically deposited iridium oxide (IrOx) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT). Our findings provide the concrete experimental proof to the much discussed possibility that carbon nanotube composites can serve as excellent new material for neural interfacing with a strong possibility to lead to a new generation of implantable electrodes. PMID:19785391

  2. Optimal feedback control successfully explains changes in neural modulations during experiments with brain-machine interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Benyamini, Miri; Zacksenhouse, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments with brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs) indicate that the extent of neural modulations increased abruptly upon starting to operate the interface, and especially after the monkey stopped moving its hand. In contrast, neural modulations that are correlated with the kinematics of the movement remained relatively unchanged. Here we demonstrate that similar changes are produced by simulated neurons that encode the relevant signals generated by an optimal feedback controller during simulated BMI experiments. The optimal feedback controller relies on state estimation that integrates both visual and proprioceptive feedback with prior estimations from an internal model. The processing required for optimal state estimation and control were conducted in the state-space, and neural recording was simulated by modeling two populations of neurons that encode either only the estimated state or also the control signal. Spike counts were generated as realizations of doubly stochastic Poisson processes with linear tuning curves. The model successfully reconstructs the main features of the kinematics and neural activity during regular reaching movements. Most importantly, the activity of the simulated neurons successfully reproduces the observed changes in neural modulations upon switching to brain control. Further theoretical analysis and simulations indicate that increasing the process noise during normal reaching movement results in similar changes in neural modulations. Thus, we conclude that the observed changes in neural modulations during BMI experiments can be attributed to increasing process noise associated with the imperfect BMI filter, and, more directly, to the resulting increase in the variance of the encoded signals associated with state estimation and the required control signal. PMID:26042002

  3. Dynamics and kinematics of simple neural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovich, M. |; Selverston, A.; Rubchinsky, L.; Huerta, R.

    1996-09-01

    The dynamics of simple neural systems is of interest to both biologists and physicists. One of the possible roles of such systems is the production of rhythmic patterns, and their alterations (modification of behavior, processing of sensory information, adaptation, control). In this paper, the neural systems are considered as a subject of modeling by the dynamical systems approach. In particular, we analyze how a stable, ordinary behavior of a small neural system can be described by simple finite automata models, and how more complicated dynamical systems modeling can be used. The approach is illustrated by biological and numerical examples: experiments with and numerical simulations of the stomatogastric central pattern generators network of the California spiny lobster. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Dynamics and kinematics of simple neural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Mikhail; Selverston, Allen; Rubchinsky, Leonid; Huerta, Ramón

    1996-09-01

    The dynamics of simple neural systems is of interest to both biologists and physicists. One of the possible roles of such systems is the production of rhythmic patterns, and their alterations (modification of behavior, processing of sensory information, adaptation, control). In this paper, the neural systems are considered as a subject of modeling by the dynamical systems approach. In particular, we analyze how a stable, ordinary behavior of a small neural system can be described by simple finite automata models, and how more complicated dynamical systems modeling can be used. The approach is illustrated by biological and numerical examples: experiments with and numerical simulations of the stomatogastric central pattern generators network of the California spiny lobster.

  5. Interfaces for Distributed Systems of Information Servers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahle, Brewster; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes two systems--Wide Area Information Servers (WAIS) and Rosebud--that provide protocol-based mechanisms for accessing remote full-text information servers. Design constraints, human interface design, and implementation are examined for five interfaces to these systems developed to run on the Macintosh or Unix terminals. Sample screen…

  6. Human-system Interfaces for Automatic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins,J.; Fleger, S.; Barnes V.

    2010-11-07

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, our study identified several topics for additional research.

  7. A flexible microchannel electrode array for peripheral nerves to interface with neural prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landrith, Ryan; Nothnagle, Caleb; Kim, Young-tae; Wijesundara, Muthu B. J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to control neural prosthetics by recording signals from peripheral nerves with the required specificity, high density electrode arrays that can be easily implanted on very small peripheral nerves (50μm-500μm) are needed. Interfacing with these small nerves is surgically challenging due to their size and fragile nature. To address this problem, a Flexible MicroChannel Electrode Array for interfacing with small diameter peripheral nerves and nerve fascicles was developed. The electrochemical characterization and electrophysiological recordings from the common peroneal nerve of a rat are presented along with demonstration of the surgical ease-of-use of the array.

  8. Switchable Polymer Based Thin Film Coils as a Power Module for Wireless Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S.; Zoschke, K.; Klein, M.; Black, D.; Buschick, K.; Toepper, M.; Tathireddy, P.; Harrison, R.; Solzbacher, F.

    2008-01-01

    Reliable chronic operation of implantable medical devices such as the Utah Electrode Array (UEA) for neural interface requires elimination of transcutaneous wire connections for signal processing, powering and communication of the device. A wireless power source that allows integration with the UEA is therefore necessary. While (rechargeable) micro batteries as well as biological micro fuel cells are yet far from meeting the power density and lifetime requirements of an implantable neural interface device, inductive coupling between two coils is a promising approach to power such a device with highly restricted dimensions. The power receiving coils presented in this paper were designed to maximize the inductance and quality factor of the coils and microfabricated using polymer based thin film technologies. A flexible configuration of stacked thin film coils allows parallel and serial switching, thereby allowing to tune the coil’s resonance frequency. The electrical properties of the fabricated coils were characterized and their power transmission performance was investigated in laboratory condition. PMID:18438447

  9. Multimodal optogenetic neural interfacing device fabricated by scalable optical fiber drawing technique.

    PubMed

    Davey, Christopher J; Argyros, Alexander; Fleming, Simon C; Solomon, Samuel G

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel approach to the design and manufacture of optrodes for use in the biomedical research field of optogenetic neural interfacing. Using recently developed optical fiber drawing techniques that involve co-drawing metal/polymer composite fiber, we have assembled and characterized a novel optrode with promising optical and electrical functionality. The fabrication technique is flexible, scalable, and amenable to extension to implantable optrodes with high-density arrays of multiple electrodes, waveguides, and drug delivery channels. PMID:26836662

  10. Development of the neural network algorithm projecting system Neural Architecture and its application in combining medical expert systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeew, Sergey; Eliseev, Vladimir; Tcherkassov, Oleg; Birukow, Valentin; Orbachevskyi, Leonid; Shamsutdinov, Uriy

    1998-04-01

    Some problems of creation of medical expert systems and the ways of their overcoming using artificial neural networks are discussed. The instrumental system for projecting neural network algorithms `Neural Architector', developed by the authors, is described. It allows to perform effective modeling of artificial neural networks and to analyze their work. The example of the application of the `Neural Architector' system in composing an expert system for diagnostics of pulmonological diseases is shown.

  11. On Building a Search Interface Discovery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, Denis

    A huge portion of the Web known as the deep Web is accessible via search interfaces to myriads of databases on the Web. While relatively good approaches for querying the contents of web databases have been recently proposed, one cannot fully utilize them having most search interfaces unlocated. Thus, the automatic recognition of search interfaces to online databases is crucial for any application accessing the deep Web. This paper describes the architecture of the I-Crawler, a system for finding and classifying search interfaces. The I-Crawler is intentionally designed to be used in the deep web characterization surveys and for constructing directories of deep web resources.

  12. Methods for estimating neural firing rates, and their application to brain-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, John P; Gilja, Vikash; Ryu, Stephen I; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2009-11-01

    Neural spike trains present analytical challenges due to their noisy, spiking nature. Many studies of neuroscientific and neural prosthetic importance rely on a smoothed, denoised estimate of a spike train's underlying firing rate. Numerous methods for estimating neural firing rates have been developed in recent years, but to date no systematic comparison has been made between them. In this study, we review both classic and current firing rate estimation techniques. We compare the advantages and drawbacks of these methods. Then, in an effort to understand their relevance to the field of neural prostheses, we also apply these estimators to experimentally gathered neural data from a prosthetic arm-reaching paradigm. Using these estimates of firing rate, we apply standard prosthetic decoding algorithms to compare the performance of the different firing rate estimators, and, perhaps surprisingly, we find minimal differences. This study serves as a review of available spike train smoothers and a first quantitative comparison of their performance for brain-machine interfaces. PMID:19349143

  13. Microchannel neural interface manufacture by stacking silicone and metal foil laminae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancashire, Henry T.; Vanhoestenberghe, Anne; Pendegrass, Catherine J.; Ajam, Yazan Al; Magee, Elliot; Donaldson, Nick; Blunn, Gordon W.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Microchannel neural interfaces (MNIs) overcome problems with recording from peripheral nerves by amplifying signals independent of node of Ranvier position. Selective recording and stimulation using an MNI requires good insulation between microchannels and a high electrode density. We propose that stacking microchannel laminae will improve selectivity over single layer MNI designs due to the increase in electrode number and an improvement in microchannel sealing. Approach. This paper describes a manufacturing method for creating MNIs which overcomes limitations on electrode connectivity and microchannel sealing. Laser cut silicone—metal foil laminae were stacked using plasma bonding to create an array of microchannels containing tripolar electrodes. Electrodes were DC etched and electrode impedance and cyclic voltammetry were tested. Main results. MNIs with 100 μm and 200 μm diameter microchannels were manufactured. High electrode density MNIs are achievable with electrodes present in every microchannel. Electrode impedances of 27.2 ± 19.8 kΩ at 1 kHz were achieved. Following two months of implantation in Lewis rat sciatic nerve, micro-fascicles were observed regenerating through the MNI microchannels. Significance. Selective MNIs with the peripheral nervous system may allow upper limb amputees to control prostheses intuitively.

  14. Stability of the interface between neural tissue and chronically implanted intracortical microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; McCreery, D B; Carter, R R; Bullara, L A; Yuen, T G; Agnew, W F

    1999-09-01

    The stability of the interface between neural tissue and chronically implanted microelectrodes is very important for obtaining reliable control signals for neuroprosthetic devices. Stability is also crucial for chronic microstimulation of the cerebral cortex. However, changes of the electrode-tissue interface can be caused by a variety of mechanisms. In the present study, intracortical microelectrode arrays were implanted into the pericruciate gyrus of cats and neural activities were recorded on a regular basis for several months. An algorithm based on cluster analysis and interspike interval analysis was developed to sort the extracellular action potentials into single units. We tracked these units based on their waveform and their response to somatic stimulation or stereotypical movements by the cats. Our results indicate that, after implantation, the electrode-tissue interface may change from day-to-day over the first 1-2 weeks, week-to-week for 1-2 months, and become quite stable thereafter. A stability index is proposed to quantify the stability of the electrode-tissue interface. The reasons for the pattern of changes are discussed. PMID:10498377

  15. Concept of software interface for BCI systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svejda, Jaromir; Zak, Roman; Jasek, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) technology is intended to control external system by brain activity. One of main part of such system is software interface, which carries about clear communication between brain and either computer or additional devices connected to computer. This paper is organized as follows. Firstly, current knowledge about human brain is briefly summarized to points out its complexity. Secondly, there is described a concept of BCI system, which is then used to build an architecture of proposed software interface. Finally, there are mentioned disadvantages of sensing technology discovered during sensing part of our research.

  16. Kannada character recognition system using neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Suresh D. S.; Kamalapuram, Srinivasa K.; Kumar, Ajay B. R.

    2013-03-01

    Handwriting recognition has been one of the active and challenging research areas in the field of pattern recognition. It has numerous applications which include, reading aid for blind, bank cheques and conversion of any hand written document into structural text form. As there is no sufficient number of works on Indian language character recognition especially Kannada script among 15 major scripts in India. In this paper an attempt is made to recognize handwritten Kannada characters using Feed Forward neural networks. A handwritten Kannada character is resized into 20x30 Pixel. The resized character is used for training the neural network. Once the training process is completed the same character is given as input to the neural network with different set of neurons in hidden layer and their recognition accuracy rate for different Kannada characters has been calculated and compared. The results show that the proposed system yields good recognition accuracy rates comparable to that of other handwritten character recognition systems.

  17. Parietal Neural Prosthetic Control of a Computer Cursor in a Graphical-User-Interface Task

    PubMed Central

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson NS; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To date, the majority of Brain Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. Approach A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in Area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like “Face in a Crowd” task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the “Crowd”) using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the Crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a “Crowd Off” condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Main Results Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the Crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Significance Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet

  18. Parietal neural prosthetic control of a computer cursor in a graphical-user-interface task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson NS; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. To date, the majority of Brain-Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. Approach. A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like ‘Face in a Crowd’ task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the ‘Crowd’) using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a ‘Crowd Off’ condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Main results. Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Significance. Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet

  19. Electronic Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Anil

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on electronic neural networks for space station are presented. Topics covered include: electronic neural networks; electronic implementations; VLSI/thin film hybrid hardware for neurocomputing; computations with analog parallel processing; features of neuroprocessors; applications of neuroprocessors; neural network hardware for terrain trafficability determination; a dedicated processor for path planning; neural network system interface; neural network for robotic control; error backpropagation algorithm for learning; resource allocation matrix; global optimization neuroprocessor; and electrically programmable read only thin-film synaptic array.

  20. Integrated Neural Flight and Propulsion Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneshige, John; Gundy-Burlet, Karen; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated neural flight and propulsion control system. which uses a neural network based approach for applying alternate sources of control power in the presence of damage or failures. Under normal operating conditions, the system utilizes conventional flight control surfaces. Neural networks are used to provide consistent handling qualities across flight conditions and for different aircraft configurations. Under damage or failure conditions, the system may utilize unconventional flight control surface allocations, along with integrated propulsion control, when additional control power is necessary for achieving desired flight control performance. In this case, neural networks are used to adapt to changes in aircraft dynamics and control allocation schemes. Of significant importance here is the fact that this system can operate without emergency or backup flight control mode operations. An additional advantage is that this system can utilize, but does not require, fault detection and isolation information or explicit parameter identification. Piloted simulation studies were performed on a commercial transport aircraft simulator. Subjects included both NASA test pilots and commercial airline crews. Results demonstrate the potential for improving handing qualities and significantly increasing survivability rates under various simulated failure conditions.

  1. Interfacing the human into information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Eugene, Jr.; Brown, Scott M.

    2000-03-01

    The current state of user interfaces for large information spaces imposes an unmanageable cognitive burden upon the user. Determining how to get the right information into the right form with the right tool at the right time has become a monumental task. Interface agents address the problem of increasing task load by serving as either an assistant or associate, extracting and analyzing relevant information, providing information abstractions of that information, and providing timely, beneficial assistance to suers. Interface agents communicate with the user through the existing user interface and also adapt to user needs and behaviors. User modeling, on the other hand, is concerned with how to represent users' knowledge and interaction within a system to adapt the system to the needs of users. The inclusion of a user model within the overall system architecture allows the system to adapt its response to the preferences, biases, expertise level, goals and needs.

  2. Hypocretins, Neural Systems, Physiology, and Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Bin; Jones, Jeff R; de Lecea, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The hypocretins (Hcrts), also known as orexins, have been among the most intensely studied neuropeptide systems since their discovery about two decades ago. Anatomical evidence shows that the hypothalamic neurons that produce hypocretins/orexins project widely throughout the entire brain, innervating the noradrenergic locus coeruleus, the cholinergic basal forebrain, the dopaminergic ventral tegmental area, the serotonergic raphe nuclei, the histaminergic tuberomammillary nucleus, and many other brain regions. By interacting with other neural systems, the Hcrt system profoundly modulates versatile physiological processes including arousal, food intake, emotion, attention, and reward. Importantly, interruption of the interactions between these systems has the potential to cause neurological and psychiatric diseases. Here, we review the modulation of diverse neural systems by Hcrts and summarize potential therapeutic strategies based on our understanding of the Hcrt system's role in physiology and pathophysiological processes. PMID:26733323

  3. The PennBMBI: Design of a General Purpose Wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Subei, Basheer; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy H; Van der Spiegel, Jan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a general purpose wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface (BMBI) system is presented. The system integrates four battery-powered wireless devices for the implementation of a closed-loop sensorimotor neural interface, including a neural signal analyzer, a neural stimulator, a body-area sensor node and a graphic user interface implemented on the PC end. The neural signal analyzer features a four channel analog front-end with configurable bandpass filter, gain stage, digitization resolution, and sampling rate. The target frequency band is configurable from EEG to single unit activity. A noise floor of 4.69 μVrms is achieved over a bandwidth from 0.05 Hz to 6 kHz. Digital filtering, neural feature extraction, spike detection, sensing-stimulating modulation, and compressed sensing measurement are realized in a central processing unit integrated in the analyzer. A flash memory card is also integrated in the analyzer. A 2-channel neural stimulator with a compliance voltage up to ± 12 V is included. The stimulator is capable of delivering unipolar or bipolar, charge-balanced current pulses with programmable pulse shape, amplitude, width, pulse train frequency and latency. A multi-functional sensor node, including an accelerometer, a temperature sensor, a flexiforce sensor and a general sensor extension port has been designed. A computer interface is designed to monitor, control and configure all aforementioned devices via a wireless link, according to a custom designed communication protocol. Wireless closed-loop operation between the sensory devices, neural stimulator, and neural signal analyzer can be configured. The proposed system was designed to link two sites in the brain, bridging the brain and external hardware, as well as creating new sensory and motor pathways for clinical practice. Bench test and in vivo experiments are performed to verify the functions and performances of the system. PMID:25769171

  4. The 128-channel fully differential digital integrated neural recording and stimulation interface.

    PubMed

    Shahrokhi, Farzaneh; Abdelhalim, Karim; Serletis, Demitre; Carlen, Peter L; Genov, Roman

    2010-06-01

    We present a fully differential 128-channel integrated neural interface. It consists of an array of 8 X 16 low-power low-noise signal-recording and generation circuits for electrical neural activity monitoring and stimulation, respectively. The recording channel has two stages of signal amplification and conditioning with and a fully differential 8-b column-parallel successive approximation (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The total measured power consumption of each recording channel, including the SAR ADC, is 15.5 ¿W. The measured input-referred noise is 6.08 ¿ Vrms over a 5-kHz bandwidth, resulting in a noise efficiency factor of 5.6. The stimulation channel performs monophasic or biphasic voltage-mode stimulation, with a maximum stimulation current of 5 mA and a quiescent power dissipation of 51.5 ¿W. The design is implemented in 0.35-¿m complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology with the channel pitch of 200 ¿m for a total die size of 3.4 mm × 2.5 mm and a total power consumption of 9.33 mW. The neural interface was validated in in vitro recording of a low-Mg(2+)/high-K(+) epileptic seizure model in an intact hippocampus of a mouse. PMID:23853339

  5. A lysinated thiophene-based semiconductor as a multifunctional neural bioorganic interface.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Simone; Pistone, Assunta; Brucale, Marco; Karges, Saskia; Favaretto, Laura; Zambianchi, Massimo; Posati, Tamara; Sagnella, Anna; Caprini, Marco; Toffanin, Stefano; Zamboni, Roberto; Camaioni, Nadia; Muccini, Michele; Melucci, Manuela; Benfenati, Valentina

    2015-06-01

    Lysinated molecular organic semiconductors are introduced as valuable multifunctional platforms for neural cells growth and interfacing. Cast films of quaterthiophene (T4) semiconductor covalently modified with lysine-end moieties (T4Lys) are fabricated and their stability, morphology, optical/electrical, and biocompatibility properties are characterized. T4Lys films exhibit fluorescence and electronic transport as generally observed for unsubstituted oligothiophenes combined to humidity-activated ionic conduction promoted by the charged lysine-end moieties. The Lys insertion in T4 enables adhesion of primary culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG), which is not achievable by plating cells on T4. Notably, on T4Lys, the number on adhering neurons/area is higher and displays a twofold longer neurite length than neurons plated on glass coated with poly-l-lysine. Finally, by whole-cell patch-clamp, it is shown that the biofunctionality of neurons cultured on T4Lys is preserved. The present study introduces an innovative concept for organic material neural interface that combines optical and iono-electronic functionalities with improved biocompatibility and neuron affinity promoted by Lys linkage and the softness of organic semiconductors. Lysinated organic semiconductors could set the scene for the fabrication of simplified bioorganic devices geometry for cells bidirectional communication or optoelectronic control of neural cells biofunctionality. PMID:25721438

  6. Accelerating bioelectric functional development of neural stem cells by graphene coupling: Implications for neural interfacing with conductive materials.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rongrong; Zhang, Shasha; Xiao, Miao; Qian, Fuping; He, Zuhong; Li, Dan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Huawei; Yang, Xiaowei; Wang, Ming; Chai, Renjie; Tang, Mingliang

    2016-11-01

    In order to govern cell-specific behaviors in tissue engineering for neural repair and regeneration, a better understanding of material-cell interactions, especially the bioelectric functions, is extremely important. Graphene has been reported to be a potential candidate for use as a scaffold and neural interfacing material. However, the bioelectric evolvement of cell membranes on these conductive graphene substrates remains largely uninvestigated. In this study, we used a neural stem cell (NSC) model to explore the possible changes in membrane bioelectric properties - including resting membrane potentials and action potentials - and cell behaviors on graphene films under both proliferation and differentiation conditions. We used a combination of single-cell electrophysiological recordings and traditional cell biology techniques. Graphene did not affect the basic membrane electrical parameters (capacitance and input resistance), but resting membrane potentials of cells on graphene substrates were more strongly negative under both proliferation and differentiation conditions. Also, NSCs and their progeny on graphene substrates exhibited increased firing of action potentials during development compared to controls. However, graphene only slightly affected the electric characterizations of mature NSC progeny. The modulation of passive and active bioelectric properties on the graphene substrate was accompanied by enhanced NSC differentiation. Furthermore, spine density, synapse proteins expressions and synaptic activity were all increased in graphene group. Modeling of the electric field on conductive graphene substrates suggests that the electric field produced by the electronegative cell membrane is much higher on graphene substrates than that on control, and this might explain the observed changes of bioelectric development by graphene coupling. Our results indicate that graphene is able to accelerate NSC maturation during development, especially with regard to

  7. NeuroArray: a universal interface for patterning and interrogating neural circuitry with single cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xu, Zhen; Huang, Junzhe; Lin, Xudong; Luo, Rongcong; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Recreation of neural network in vitro with designed topology is a valuable tool to decipher how neurons behave when interacting in hierarchical networks. In this study, we developed a simple and effective platform to pattern primary neurons in array formats for interrogation of neural circuitry with single cell resolution. Unlike many surface-chemistry-based patterning methods, our NeuroArray technique is specially designed to accommodate neuron's polarized morphologies to make regular arrays of cells without restricting their neurite outgrowth, and thus allows formation of freely designed, well-connected, and spontaneously active neural network. The NeuroArray device was based on a stencil design fabricated using a novel sacrificial-layer-protected PDMS molding method that enables production of through-structures in a thin layer of PDMS with feature sizes as small as 3 µm. Using the NeuroArray along with calcium imaging, we have successfully demonstrated large-scale tracking and recording of neuronal activities, and used such data to characterize the spiking dynamics and transmission within a diode-like neural network. Essentially, the NeuroArray is a universal patterning platform designed for, but not limited to neuron cells. With little adaption, it can be readily interfaced with other interrogation modalities for high-throughput drug testing, and for building neuron culture based live computational devices. PMID:24759264

  8. NeuroArray: A Universal Interface for Patterning and Interrogating Neural Circuitry with Single Cell Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Xu, Zhen; Huang, Junzhe; Lin, Xudong; Luo, Rongcong; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2014-04-01

    Recreation of neural network in vitro with designed topology is a valuable tool to decipher how neurons behave when interacting in hierarchical networks. In this study, we developed a simple and effective platform to pattern primary neurons in array formats for interrogation of neural circuitry with single cell resolution. Unlike many surface-chemistry-based patterning methods, our NeuroArray technique is specially designed to accommodate neuron's polarized morphologies to make regular arrays of cells without restricting their neurite outgrowth, and thus allows formation of freely designed, well-connected, and spontaneously active neural network. The NeuroArray device was based on a stencil design fabricated using a novel sacrificial-layer-protected PDMS molding method that enables production of through-structures in a thin layer of PDMS with feature sizes as small as 3 µm. Using the NeuroArray along with calcium imaging, we have successfully demonstrated large-scale tracking and recording of neuronal activities, and used such data to characterize the spiking dynamics and transmission within a diode-like neural network. Essentially, the NeuroArray is a universal patterning platform designed for, but not limited to neuron cells. With little adaption, it can be readily interfaced with other interrogation modalities for high-throughput drug testing, and for building neuron culture based live computational devices.

  9. An optical neural interface: in vivo control of rodent motor cortex with integrated fiberoptic and optogenetic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravanis, Alexander M.; Wang, Li-Ping; Zhang, Feng; Meltzer, Leslie A.; Mogri, Murtaza Z.; Schneider, M. Bret; Deisseroth, Karl

    2007-09-01

    Neural interface technology has made enormous strides in recent years but stimulating electrodes remain incapable of reliably targeting specific cell types (e.g. excitatory or inhibitory neurons) within neural tissue. This obstacle has major scientific and clinical implications. For example, there is intense debate among physicians, neuroengineers and neuroscientists regarding the relevant cell types recruited during deep brain stimulation (DBS); moreover, many debilitating side effects of DBS likely result from lack of cell-type specificity. We describe here a novel optical neural interface technology that will allow neuroengineers to optically address specific cell types in vivo with millisecond temporal precision. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), an algal light-activated ion channel we developed for use in mammals, can give rise to safe, light-driven stimulation of CNS neurons on a timescale of milliseconds. Because ChR2 is genetically targetable, specific populations of neurons even sparsely embedded within intact circuitry can be stimulated with high temporal precision. Here we report the first in vivo behavioral demonstration of a functional optical neural interface (ONI) in intact animals, involving integrated fiberoptic and optogenetic technology. We developed a solid-state laser diode system that can be pulsed with millisecond precision, outputs 20 mW of power at 473 nm, and is coupled to a lightweight, flexible multimode optical fiber, ~200 µm in diameter. To capitalize on the unique advantages of this system, we specifically targeted ChR2 to excitatory cells in vivo with the CaMKIIα promoter. Under these conditions, the intensity of light exiting the fiber (~380 mW mm-2) was sufficient to drive excitatory neurons in vivo and control motor cortex function with behavioral output in intact rodents. No exogenous chemical cofactor was needed at any point, a crucial finding for in vivo work in large mammals. Achieving modulation of behavior with optical control of

  10. System and method for determining stability of a neural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Disclosed are methods, systems, and computer-readable media for determining stability of a neural system. The method includes tracking a function world line of an N element neural system within at least one behavioral space, determining whether the tracking function world line is approaching a psychological stability surface, and implementing a quantitative solution that corrects instability if the tracked function world line is approaching the psychological stability surface.

  11. The quantum human central neural system.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, Athanasios; Rekkas, John

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we present Excess Entropy Production for human aging system as the sum of their respective subsystems and electrophysiological status. Additionally, we support the hypothesis of human brain and central neural system quantumness and we strongly suggest the theoretical and philosophical status of human brain as one of the unknown natural Dirac magnetic monopoles placed in the center of a Riemann sphere. PMID:25416114

  12. Coal-shale interface detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. A.; Hudgins, J. L.; Morris, P. W.; Reid, H., Jr.; Zimmerman, J. E. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A coal-shale interface detection system for use with coal cutting equipment consists of a reciprocating hammer on which an accelerometer is mounted to measure the impact of the hammer as it penetrates the ceiling or floor surface of a mine. A pair of reflectometers simultaneously view the same surface. The outputs of the accelerometer and reflectometers are detected and jointly registered to determine when an interface between coal and shale is being cut through.

  13. Analysis of complex systems using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1992-01-01

    The application of neural networks, alone or in conjunction with other advanced technologies (expert systems, fuzzy logic, and/or genetic algorithms), to some of the problems of complex engineering systems has the potential to enhance the safety, reliability, and operability of these systems. Typically, the measured variables from the systems are analog variables that must be sampled and normalized to expected peak values before they are introduced into neural networks. Often data must be processed to put it into a form more acceptable to the neural network (e.g., a fast Fourier transformation of the time-series data to produce a spectral plot of the data). Specific applications described include: (1) Diagnostics: State of the Plant (2) Hybrid System for Transient Identification, (3) Sensor Validation, (4) Plant-Wide Monitoring, (5) Monitoring of Performance and Efficiency, and (6) Analysis of Vibrations. Although specific examples described deal with nuclear power plants or their subsystems, the techniques described can be applied to a wide variety of complex engineering systems.

  14. Analysis of complex systems using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E. |

    1992-12-31

    The application of neural networks, alone or in conjunction with other advanced technologies (expert systems, fuzzy logic, and/or genetic algorithms), to some of the problems of complex engineering systems has the potential to enhance the safety, reliability, and operability of these systems. Typically, the measured variables from the systems are analog variables that must be sampled and normalized to expected peak values before they are introduced into neural networks. Often data must be processed to put it into a form more acceptable to the neural network (e.g., a fast Fourier transformation of the time-series data to produce a spectral plot of the data). Specific applications described include: (1) Diagnostics: State of the Plant (2) Hybrid System for Transient Identification, (3) Sensor Validation, (4) Plant-Wide Monitoring, (5) Monitoring of Performance and Efficiency, and (6) Analysis of Vibrations. Although specific examples described deal with nuclear power plants or their subsystems, the techniques described can be applied to a wide variety of complex engineering systems.

  15. An in vitro demonstration of CMOS-based optoelectronic neural interface device for optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, T; Nakajima, S; Maezawa, Y; Noda, T; Sasagawa, K; Ishikawa, Y; Shiosaka, S; Ohta, J

    2013-01-01

    A CMOS-based neural interface device equipped with an integrated micro light source array for optogenetics was fabricated and demonstrated. A GaInN LED array formed on sapphire substrate was successfully assembled with a multifunctional CMOS image sensor that is capable of on-chip current injection. We demonstrated a functionality of light stimulation onto ChR2-expressed cells in an in vitro experiment. A ChR2-expressed cell were successfully stimulated with the light emitted from the fabricated device. PMID:24109808

  16. Decoding a new neural machine interface for control of artificial limbs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Lowery, Madeleine M; Englehart, Kevin B; Huang, He; Li, Guanglin; Hargrove, Levi; Dewald, Julius P A; Kuiken, Todd A

    2007-11-01

    An analysis of the motor control information content made available with a neural-machine interface (NMI) in four subjects is presented in this study. We have developed a novel NMI-called targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR)-to improve the function of artificial arms for amputees. TMR involves transferring the residual amputated nerves to nonfunctional muscles in amputees. The reinnervated muscles act as biological amplifiers of motor commands in the amputated nerves and the surface electromyogram (EMG) can be used to enhance control of a robotic arm. Although initial clinical success with TMR has been promising, the number of degrees of freedom of the robotic arm that can be controlled has been limited by the number of reinnervated muscle sites. In this study we assess how much control information can be extracted from reinnervated muscles using high-density surface EMG electrode arrays to record surface EMG signals over the reinnervated muscles. We then applied pattern classification techniques to the surface EMG signals. High accuracy was achieved in the classification of 16 intended arm, hand, and finger/thumb movements. Preliminary analyses of the required number of EMG channels and computational demands demonstrate clinical feasibility of these methods. This study indicates that TMR combined with pattern-recognition techniques has the potential to further improve the function of prosthetic limbs. In addition, the results demonstrate that the central motor control system is capable of eliciting complex efferent commands for a missing limb, in the absence of peripheral feedback and without retraining of the pathways involved. PMID:17728391

  17. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System.

    PubMed

    El-Helw, Hadi M; Al-Hasheem, Mohamed; Marei, Mostafa I

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converter for Photovoltaic (PV) arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O) Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system. PMID:27560138

  18. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System

    PubMed Central

    El-Helw, Hadi M.; Al-Hasheem, Mohamed; Marei, Mostafa I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converter for Photovoltaic (PV) arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O) Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system. PMID:27560138

  19. A 96-channel neural stimulation system for driving AIROF microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Troyk, P; Cogan, S

    2004-01-01

    We present the design and testing of a 96-channel stimulation system to drive activated iridium oxide (AIROF) microelectrodes within safe charge-injection limits. Our system improves upon the traditional capacitively coupled, symmetric charge-balanced biphasic stimulation waveform so as to maximize charge-injection capacity without endangering the microelectrodes. It can deliver computer-controlled cathodic current pulse for to up to 96 AIROF microelectrodes and positively bias them during the inter-pulse interval. The stimulation system is comprised of (1) 12 custom-designed PCB boards each hosting an 8-channel ASIC chip, (2) a motherboard to communicate between these 12 boards and the PC, (3) the PC interface equipped with a DIO card and the corresponding software. We plan to use this system in animal experiments for intracortical neural stimulation of implanted electrodes within our visual prosthesis project. PMID:17271241

  20. Virtual reality interface devices in the reorganization of neural networks in the brain of patients with neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo

    2014-04-15

    Two key characteristics of all virtual reality applications are interaction and immersion. Systemic interaction is achieved through a variety of multisensory channels (hearing, sight, touch, and smell), permitting the user to interact with the virtual world in real time. Immersion is the degree to which a person can feel wrapped in the virtual world through a defined interface. Virtual reality interface devices such as the Nintendo® Wii and its peripheral nunchuks-balance board, head mounted displays and joystick allow interaction and immersion in unreal environments created from computer software. Virtual environments are highly interactive, generating great activation of visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems during the execution of a video game. In addition, they are entertaining and safe for the user. Recently, incorporating therapeutic purposes in virtual reality interface devices has allowed them to be used for the rehabilitation of neurological patients, e.g., balance training in older adults and dynamic stability in healthy participants. The improvements observed in neurological diseases (chronic stroke and cerebral palsy) have been shown by changes in the reorganization of neural networks in patients' brain, along with better hand function and other skills, contributing to their quality of life. The data generated by such studies could substantially contribute to physical rehabilitation strategies. PMID:25206907

  1. Virtual reality interface devices in the reorganization of neural networks in the brain of patients with neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Two key characteristics of all virtual reality applications are interaction and immersion. Systemic interaction is achieved through a variety of multisensory channels (hearing, sight, touch, and smell), permitting the user to interact with the virtual world in real time. Immersion is the degree to which a person can feel wrapped in the virtual world through a defined interface. Virtual reality interface devices such as the Nintendo® Wii and its peripheral nunchuks-balance board, head mounted displays and joystick allow interaction and immersion in unreal environments created from computer software. Virtual environments are highly interactive, generating great activation of visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems during the execution of a video game. In addition, they are entertaining and safe for the user. Recently, incorporating therapeutic purposes in virtual reality interface devices has allowed them to be used for the rehabilitation of neurological patients, e.g., balance training in older adults and dynamic stability in healthy participants. The improvements observed in neurological diseases (chronic stroke and cerebral palsy) have been shown by changes in the reorganization of neural networks in patients’ brain, along with better hand function and other skills, contributing to their quality of life. The data generated by such studies could substantially contribute to physical rehabilitation strategies. PMID:25206907

  2. Simulating neural systems with Xyce.

    SciTech Connect

    Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Mei, Ting; Warrender, Christina E.; Aimone, James Bradley; Teeter, Corinne; Duda, Alex M.

    2012-12-01

    Sandia's parallel circuit simulator, Xyce, can address large scale neuron simulations in a new way extending the range within which one can perform high-fidelity, multi-compartment neuron simulations. This report documents the implementation of neuron devices in Xyce, their use in simulation and analysis of neuron systems.

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: Prosthetic interfaces with the visual system: biological issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Ethan D.

    2007-06-01

    The design of effective visual prostheses for the blind represents a challenge for biomedical engineers and neuroscientists. Significant progress has been made in the miniaturization and processing power of prosthesis electronics; however development lags in the design and construction of effective machine brain interfaces with visual system neurons. This review summarizes what has been learned about stimulating neurons in the human and primate retina, lateral geniculate nucleus and visual cortex. Each level of the visual system presents unique challenges for neural interface design. Blind patients with the retinal degenerative disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are a common population in clinical trials of visual prostheses. The visual performance abilities of normals and RP patients are compared. To generate pattern vision in blind patients, the visual prosthetic interface must effectively stimulate the retinotopically organized neurons in the central visual field to elicit patterned visual percepts. The development of more biologically compatible methods of stimulating visual system neurons is critical to the development of finer spatial percepts. Prosthesis electrode arrays need to adapt to different optimal stimulus locations, stimulus patterns, and patient disease states.

  4. A 128-Channel Extreme Learning Machine-Based Neural Decoder for Brain Machine Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Yao, Enyi; Basu, Arindam

    2016-06-01

    Currently, state-of-the-art motor intention decoding algorithms in brain-machine interfaces are mostly implemented on a PC and consume significant amount of power. A machine learning coprocessor in 0.35- μm CMOS for the motor intention decoding in the brain-machine interfaces is presented in this paper. Using Extreme Learning Machine algorithm and low-power analog processing, it achieves an energy efficiency of 3.45 pJ/MAC at a classification rate of 50 Hz. The learning in second stage and corresponding digitally stored coefficients are used to increase robustness of the core analog processor. The chip is verified with neural data recorded in monkey finger movements experiment, achieving a decoding accuracy of 99.3% for movement type. The same coprocessor is also used to decode time of movement from asynchronous neural spikes. With time-delayed feature dimension enhancement, the classification accuracy can be increased by 5% with limited number of input channels. Further, a sparsity promoting training scheme enables reduction of number of programmable weights by ≈ 2X. PMID:26672048

  5. NEVESIM: event-driven neural simulation framework with a Python interface

    PubMed Central

    Pecevski, Dejan; Kappel, David; Jonke, Zeno

    2014-01-01

    NEVESIM is a software package for event-driven simulation of networks of spiking neurons with a fast simulation core in C++, and a scripting user interface in the Python programming language. It supports simulation of heterogeneous networks with different types of neurons and synapses, and can be easily extended by the user with new neuron and synapse types. To enable heterogeneous networks and extensibility, NEVESIM is designed to decouple the simulation logic of communicating events (spikes) between the neurons at a network level from the implementation of the internal dynamics of individual neurons. In this paper we will present the simulation framework of NEVESIM, its concepts and features, as well as some aspects of the object-oriented design approaches and simulation strategies that were utilized to efficiently implement the concepts and functionalities of the framework. We will also give an overview of the Python user interface, its basic commands and constructs, and also discuss the benefits of integrating NEVESIM with Python. One of the valuable capabilities of the simulator is to simulate exactly and efficiently networks of stochastic spiking neurons from the recently developed theoretical framework of neural sampling. This functionality was implemented as an extension on top of the basic NEVESIM framework. Altogether, the intended purpose of the NEVESIM framework is to provide a basis for further extensions that support simulation of various neural network models incorporating different neuron and synapse types that can potentially also use different simulation strategies. PMID:25177291

  6. NEVESIM: event-driven neural simulation framework with a Python interface.

    PubMed

    Pecevski, Dejan; Kappel, David; Jonke, Zeno

    2014-01-01

    NEVESIM is a software package for event-driven simulation of networks of spiking neurons with a fast simulation core in C++, and a scripting user interface in the Python programming language. It supports simulation of heterogeneous networks with different types of neurons and synapses, and can be easily extended by the user with new neuron and synapse types. To enable heterogeneous networks and extensibility, NEVESIM is designed to decouple the simulation logic of communicating events (spikes) between the neurons at a network level from the implementation of the internal dynamics of individual neurons. In this paper we will present the simulation framework of NEVESIM, its concepts and features, as well as some aspects of the object-oriented design approaches and simulation strategies that were utilized to efficiently implement the concepts and functionalities of the framework. We will also give an overview of the Python user interface, its basic commands and constructs, and also discuss the benefits of integrating NEVESIM with Python. One of the valuable capabilities of the simulator is to simulate exactly and efficiently networks of stochastic spiking neurons from the recently developed theoretical framework of neural sampling. This functionality was implemented as an extension on top of the basic NEVESIM framework. Altogether, the intended purpose of the NEVESIM framework is to provide a basis for further extensions that support simulation of various neural network models incorporating different neuron and synapse types that can potentially also use different simulation strategies. PMID:25177291

  7. Ultrasmall implantable composite microelectrodes with bioactive surfaces for chronic neural interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kozai, Takashi D. Yoshida; Langhals, Nicholas B.; Patel, Paras R.; Deng, Xiaopei; Zhang, Huanan; Smith, Karen L.; Lahann, Joerg; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2012-01-01

    Implantable neural microelectrodes that can record extracellular biopotentials from small, targeted groups of neurons are critical for neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications including brain-controlled prosthetic devices. The crucial material-dependent problem is developing microelectrodes that record neural activity from the same neurons for years with high fidelity and reliability. Here, we report the development of an integrated composite electrode consisting of a carbon-fibre core, a poly(p-xylylene)-based thin-film coating that acts as a dielectric barrier and that is functionalized to control intrinsic biological processes, and a poly(thiophene)-based recording pad. The resulting implants are an order of magnitude smaller than traditional recording electrodes, and more mechanically compliant with brain tissue. They were found to elicit much reduced chronic reactive tissue responses and enabled single-neuron recording in acute and early chronic experiments in rats. This technology, taking advantage of new composites, makes possible highly selective and stealthy neural interface devices towards realizing long-lasting implants. PMID:23142839

  8. An Analysis of EMG Electrode Configuration for Targeted Muscle Reinnervation Based Neural Machine Interface

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Zhou, Ping; Li, Guanglin; Kuiken, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) is a novel neural machine interface for improved myoelectric prosthesis control. Previous high-density (HD) surface electromyography (EMG) studies have indicated that tremendous neural control information can be extracted from the reinnervated muscles by EMG pattern recognition (PR). However, using a large number of EMG electrodes hinders clinical application of the TMR technique. This study investigated a reduced number of electrodes and the placement required to extract sufficient neural control information for accurate identification of user movement intents. An electrode selection algorithm was applied to the HD EMG recordings from each of 4 TMR amputee subjects. The results show that when using only 12 selected bipolar electrodes the average accuracy over subjects for classifying 16 movement intents was 93.0(±3.3)%, just 1.2% lower than when using the entire HD electrode complement. The locations of selected electrodes were consistent with the anatomical reinnervation sites. Additionally, a practical protocol for clinical electrode placement was developed, which does not rely on complex HD EMG experiment and analysis while maintaining a classification accuracy of 88.7±4.5%. These outcomes provide important guidelines for practical electrode placement that can promote future clinical application of TMR and EMG PR in the control of multifunctional prostheses. PMID:18303804

  9. Ultrasmall implantable composite microelectrodes with bioactive surfaces for chronic neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida Kozai, Takashi D.; Langhals, Nicholas B.; Patel, Paras R.; Deng, Xiaopei; Zhang, Huanan; Smith, Karen L.; Lahann, Joerg; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2012-12-01

    Implantable neural microelectrodes that can record extracellular biopotentials from small, targeted groups of neurons are critical for neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications including brain-controlled prosthetic devices. The crucial material-dependent problem is developing microelectrodes that record neural activity from the same neurons for years with high fidelity and reliability. Here, we report the development of an integrated composite electrode consisting of a carbon-fibre core, a poly(p-xylylene)-based thin-film coating that acts as a dielectric barrier and that is functionalized to control intrinsic biological processes, and a poly(thiophene)-based recording pad. The resulting implants are an order of magnitude smaller than traditional recording electrodes, and more mechanically compliant with brain tissue. They were found to elicit much reduced chronic reactive tissue responses and enabled single-neuron recording in acute and early chronic experiments in rats. This technology, taking advantage of new composites, makes possible highly selective and stealthy neural interface devices towards realizing long-lasting implants.

  10. Neuromechanism study of insect-machine interface: flight control by neural electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huixia; Zheng, Nenggan; Ribi, Willi A; Zheng, Huoqing; Xue, Lei; Gong, Fan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Hu, Fuliang

    2014-01-01

    The insect-machine interface (IMI) is a novel approach developed for man-made air vehicles, which directly controls insect flight by either neuromuscular or neural stimulation. In our previous study of IMI, we induced flight initiation and cessation reproducibly in restrained honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) via electrical stimulation of the bilateral optic lobes. To explore the neuromechanism underlying IMI, we applied electrical stimulation to seven subregions of the honeybee brain with the aid of a new method for localizing brain regions. Results showed that the success rate for initiating honeybee flight decreased in the order: α-lobe (or β-lobe), ellipsoid body, lobula, medulla and antennal lobe. Based on a comparison with other neurobiological studies in honeybees, we propose that there is a cluster of descending neurons in the honeybee brain that transmits neural excitation from stimulated brain areas to the thoracic ganglia, leading to flight behavior. This neural circuit may involve the higher-order integration center, the primary visual processing center and the suboesophageal ganglion, which is also associated with a possible learning and memory pathway. By pharmacologically manipulating the electrically stimulated honeybee brain, we have shown that octopamine, rather than dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine, plays a part in the circuit underlying electrically elicited honeybee flight. Our study presents a new brain stimulation protocol for the honeybee-machine interface and has solved one of the questions with regard to understanding which functional divisions of the insect brain participate in flight control. It will support further studies to uncover the involved neurons inside specific brain areas and to test the hypothesized involvement of a visual learning and memory pathway in IMI flight control. PMID:25409523

  11. Neuromechanism Study of Insect–Machine Interface: Flight Control by Neural Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huixia; Zheng, Nenggan; Ribi, Willi A.; Zheng, Huoqing; Xue, Lei; Gong, Fan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Hu, Fuliang

    2014-01-01

    The insect–machine interface (IMI) is a novel approach developed for man-made air vehicles, which directly controls insect flight by either neuromuscular or neural stimulation. In our previous study of IMI, we induced flight initiation and cessation reproducibly in restrained honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) via electrical stimulation of the bilateral optic lobes. To explore the neuromechanism underlying IMI, we applied electrical stimulation to seven subregions of the honeybee brain with the aid of a new method for localizing brain regions. Results showed that the success rate for initiating honeybee flight decreased in the order: α-lobe (or β-lobe), ellipsoid body, lobula, medulla and antennal lobe. Based on a comparison with other neurobiological studies in honeybees, we propose that there is a cluster of descending neurons in the honeybee brain that transmits neural excitation from stimulated brain areas to the thoracic ganglia, leading to flight behavior. This neural circuit may involve the higher-order integration center, the primary visual processing center and the suboesophageal ganglion, which is also associated with a possible learning and memory pathway. By pharmacologically manipulating the electrically stimulated honeybee brain, we have shown that octopamine, rather than dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine, plays a part in the circuit underlying electrically elicited honeybee flight. Our study presents a new brain stimulation protocol for the honeybee–machine interface and has solved one of the questions with regard to understanding which functional divisions of the insect brain participate in flight control. It will support further studies to uncover the involved neurons inside specific brain areas and to test the hypothesized involvement of a visual learning and memory pathway in IMI flight control. PMID:25409523

  12. Olfactory instruction for fear: neural system analysis

    PubMed Central

    Canteras, Newton S.; Pavesi, Eloisa; Carobrez, Antonio P.

    2015-01-01

    Different types of predator odors engage elements of the hypothalamic predator-responsive circuit, which has been largely investigated in studies using cat odor exposure. Studies using cat odor have led to detailed mapping of the neural sites involved in innate and contextual fear responses. Here, we reviewed three lines of work examining the dynamics of the neural systems that organize innate and learned fear responses to cat odor. In the first section, we explored the neural systems involved in innate fear responses and in the acquisition and expression of fear conditioning to cat odor, with a particular emphasis on the role of the dorsal premammillary nucleus (PMd) and the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (PAGdl), which are key sites that influence innate fear and contextual conditioning. In the second section, we reviewed how chemical stimulation of the PMd and PAGdl may serve as a useful unconditioned stimulus in an olfactory fear conditioning paradigm; these experiments provide an interesting perspective for the understanding of learned fear to predator odor. Finally, in the third section, we explored the fact that neutral odors that acquire an aversive valence in a shock-paired conditioning paradigm may mimic predator odor and mobilize elements of the hypothalamic predator-responsive circuit. PMID:26300721

  13. Instantaneous estimation of motor cortical neural encoding for online brain-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiwen; Principe, Jose C.

    2010-10-01

    Recently, the authors published a sequential decoding algorithm for motor brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that infers movement directly from spike trains and produces a new kinematic output every time an observation of neural activity is present at its input. Such a methodology also needs a special instantaneous neuronal encoding model to relate instantaneous kinematics to every neural spike activity. This requirement is unlike the tuning methods commonly used in computational neuroscience, which are based on time windows of neural and kinematic data. This paper develops a novel, online, encoding model that uses the instantaneous kinematic variables (position, velocity and acceleration in 2D or 3D space) to estimate the mean value of an inhomogeneous Poisson model. During BMI decoding the mapping from neural spikes to kinematics is one to one and easy to implement by simply reading the spike times directly. Due to the high temporal resolution of the encoding, the delay between motor cortex neurons and kinematics needs to be estimated in the encoding stage. Mutual information is employed to select the optimal time index defined as the lag for which the spike event is maximally informative with respect to the kinematics. We extensively compare the windowed tuning models with the proposed method. The big difference between them resides in the high firing rate portion of the tuning curve, which is rather important for BMI-decoding performance. This paper shows that implementing such an instantaneous tuning model in sequential Monte Carlo point process estimation based on spike timing provides statistically better kinematic reconstructions than the linear and exponential spike-tuning models.

  14. Neural system for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Mannur J.; Schulz, Mark J.; Ghoshal, Anindya; Martin, William N., Jr.; Pratap, Promod R.

    2001-08-01

    This is an overview paper that discusses the concept of an embeddable structural health monitoring system for use in composite and heterogeneous material systems. The sensor system is formed by integrating groups of autonomous unit cells into a structure, much like neurons in biological systems. Each unit cell consists of an embedded processor and a group of distributed sensors that gives the structure the ability to sense damage. In addition, each unit cell periodically updates a central processor on the status of health in its neighborhood. This micro-architectured synthetic nervous system has an advanced sensing capability based on new continuous sensor technology. This technology uses a plurality of serially connected piezoceramic nodes to form a distributed sensor capable of measuring waves generated in structures by damage events, including impact and crack propagation. Simulations show that the neural system can detect faint acoustic waves in large plates. An experiment demonstrates the use of a simple neural system that was able to measure simulated acoustic emissions that were not clearly recognizable by a single conventional piezoceramic sensor.

  15. Dynamic Artificial Neural Networks with Affective Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schuman, Catherine D.; Birdwell, J. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are processors that are trained to perform particular tasks. We couple a computational ANN with a simulated affective system in order to explore the interaction between the two. In particular, we design a simple affective system that adjusts the threshold values in the neurons of our ANN. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that this simple affective system can control the firing rate of the ensemble of neurons in the ANN, as well as to explore the coupling between the affective system and the processes of long term potentiation (LTP) and long term depression (LTD), and the effect of the parameters of the affective system on its performance. We apply our networks with affective systems to a simple pole balancing example and briefly discuss the effect of affective systems on network performance. PMID:24303015

  16. A Modular System of Interfacing Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Describes a system of interfacing allowing a range of signal conditioning and control modules to be connected to microcomputers, enabling execution of such experiments as: examining rate of cooling; control by light-activated switch; pH measurements; control frequency of signal generators; and making automated measurements of frequency response of…

  17. Interfaces for Distributed Systems of Information Servers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahle, Brewster M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes five interfaces to remote, full-text databases accessed through distributed systems of servers. These are WAIStation for the Macintosh, XWAIS for X-Windows, GWAIS for Gnu-Emacs; SWAIS for dumb terminals, and Rosebud for the Macintosh. Sixteen illustrations provide examples of display screens. Problems and needed improvements are…

  18. Garden Banks 388 ROV interface systems

    SciTech Connect

    Granhaug, O.; Brewster, D.; Soliah, J.; Dubea, C.

    1995-12-31

    ROV systems integration has become an important part of the planning and implementation of deep water field development. This paper provides an overview of the GB 388 subsea development project and describes the ROV interface systems in use on the various subsea production components. The paper continues with an account of the purpose-built ROV system developed for the project. Finally, the paper describes in some detail the specialized ROV tooling and intervention systems that have been developed to assist in the installation, operation and maintenance of the subsea production equipment. The subsea intervention solutions developed for the GB 388 development project have direct application to all deep water field development projects. ROV interface systems are an integral part of current and future subsea completion technology.

  19. Dynamical systems, attractors, and neural circuits

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Biology is the study of dynamical systems. Yet most of us working in biology have limited pedagogical training in the theory of dynamical systems, an unfortunate historical fact that can be remedied for future generations of life scientists. In my particular field of systems neuroscience, neural circuits are rife with nonlinearities at all levels of description, rendering simple methodologies and our own intuition unreliable. Therefore, our ideas are likely to be wrong unless informed by good models. These models should be based on the mathematical theories of dynamical systems since functioning neurons are dynamic—they change their membrane potential and firing rates with time. Thus, selecting the appropriate type of dynamical system upon which to base a model is an important first step in the modeling process. This step all too easily goes awry, in part because there are many frameworks to choose from, in part because the sparsely sampled data can be consistent with a variety of dynamical processes, and in part because each modeler has a preferred modeling approach that is difficult to move away from. This brief review summarizes some of the main dynamical paradigms that can arise in neural circuits, with comments on what they can achieve computationally and what signatures might reveal their presence within empirical data. I provide examples of different dynamical systems using simple circuits of two or three cells, emphasizing that any one connectivity pattern is compatible with multiple, diverse functions. PMID:27408709

  20. Development of closed-loop neural interface technology in a rat model: combining motor cortex operant conditioning with visual cortex microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Marzullo, Timothy Charles; Lehmkuhle, Mark J; Gage, Gregory J; Kipke, Daryl R

    2010-04-01

    Closed-loop neural interface technology that combines neural ensemble decoding with simultaneous electrical microstimulation feedback is hypothesized to improve deep brain stimulation techniques, neuromotor prosthetic applications, and epilepsy treatment. Here we describe our iterative results in a rat model of a sensory and motor neurophysiological feedback control system. Three rats were chronically implanted with microelectrode arrays in both the motor and visual cortices. The rats were subsequently trained over a period of weeks to modulate their motor cortex ensemble unit activity upon delivery of intra-cortical microstimulation (ICMS) of the visual cortex in order to receive a food reward. Rats were given continuous feedback via visual cortex ICMS during the response periods that was representative of the motor cortex ensemble dynamics. Analysis revealed that the feedback provided the animals with indicators of the behavioral trials. At the hardware level, this preparation provides a tractable test model for improving the technology of closed-loop neural devices. PMID:20144922

  1. The desktop interface in intelligent tutoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baudendistel, Stephen; Hua, Grace

    1987-01-01

    The interface between an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) and the person being tutored is critical to the success of the learning process. If the interface to the ITS is confusing or non-supportive of the tutored domain, the effectiveness of the instruction will be diminished or lost entirely. Consequently, the interface to an ITS should be highly integrated with the domain to provide a robust and semantically rich learning environment. In building an ITS for ZetaLISP on a LISP Machine, a Desktop Interface was designed to support a programming learning environment. Using the bitmapped display, windows, and mouse, three desktops were designed to support self-study and tutoring of ZetaLISP. Through organization, well-defined boundaries, and domain support facilities, the desktops provide substantial flexibility and power for the student and facilitate learning ZetaLISP programming while screening the student from the complex LISP Machine environment. The student can concentrate on learning ZetaLISP programming and not on how to operate the interface or a LISP Machine.

  2. A graphical, rule based robotic interface system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, James W.; Wolfsberger, John

    1988-01-01

    The ability of a human to take control of a robotic system is essential in any use of robots in space in order to handle unforeseen changes in the robot's work environment or scheduled tasks. But in cases in which the work environment is known, a human controlling a robot's every move by remote control is both time consuming and frustrating. A system is needed in which the user can give the robotic system commands to perform tasks but need not tell the system how. To be useful, this system should be able to plan and perform the tasks faster than a telerobotic system. The interface between the user and the robot system must be natural and meaningful to the user. A high level user interface program under development at the University of Alabama, Huntsville, is described. A graphical interface is proposed in which the user selects objects to be manipulated by selecting representations of the object on projections of a 3-D model of the work environment. The user may move in the work environment by changing the viewpoint of the projections. The interface uses a rule based program to transform user selection of items on a graphics display of the robot's work environment into commands for the robot. The program first determines if the desired task is possible given the abilities of the robot and any constraints on the object. If the task is possible, the program determines what movements the robot needs to make to perform the task. The movements are transformed into commands for the robot. The information defining the robot, the work environment, and how objects may be moved is stored in a set of data bases accessible to the program and displayable to the user.

  3. Sensory System for Implementing a Human—Computer Interface Based on Electrooculography

    PubMed Central

    Barea, Rafael; Boquete, Luciano; Rodriguez-Ascariz, Jose Manuel; Ortega, Sergio; López, Elena

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a sensory system for implementing a human–computer interface based on electrooculography. An acquisition system captures electrooculograms and transmits them via the ZigBee protocol. The data acquired are analysed in real time using a microcontroller-based platform running the Linux operating system. The continuous wavelet transform and neural network are used to process and analyse the signals to obtain highly reliable results in real time. To enhance system usability, the graphical interface is projected onto special eyewear, which is also used to position the signal-capturing electrodes. PMID:22346579

  4. Implications of the Dependence of Neuronal Activity on Neural Network States for the Design of Brain-Machine Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Panzeri, Stefano; Safaai, Houman; De Feo, Vito; Vato, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) can improve the quality of life of patients with sensory and motor disabilities by both decoding motor intentions expressed by neural activity, and by encoding artificially sensed information into patterns of neural activity elicited by causal interventions on the neural tissue. Yet, current BMIs can exchange relatively small amounts of information with the brain. This problem has proved difficult to overcome by simply increasing the number of recording or stimulating electrodes, because trial-to-trial variability of neural activity partly arises from intrinsic factors (collectively known as the network state) that include ongoing spontaneous activity and neuromodulation, and so is shared among neurons. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the state dependence of neural responses, and in particular of how neural responses depend on endogenous slow fluctuations of network excitability. We then elaborate on how this knowledge may be used to increase the amount of information that BMIs exchange with brain. Knowledge of network state can be used to fine-tune the stimulation pattern that should reliably elicit a target neural response used to encode information in the brain, and to discount part of the trial-by-trial variability of neural responses, so that they can be decoded more accurately. PMID:27147955

  5. Nanoporous Gold as a Neural Interface Coating: Effects of Topography, Surface Chemistry, and Feature Size

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chapman, Christopher A. R.; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika M.; Lein, Pamela J.; Seker, Erkin

    2015-02-23

    We report that designing neural interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to an electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron–electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au’s interactionmore » with cortical neuron–glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au achieves close physical coupling of neurons by maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations in the dealloying conditions. In conclusion, our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage and may enhance neuron–electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation.« less

  6. Nanoporous Gold as a Neural Interface Coating: Effects of Topography, Surface Chemistry, and Feature Size

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Christopher A. R.; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika M.; Lein, Pamela J.; Seker, Erkin

    2015-02-23

    We report that designing neural interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to an electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron–electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au’s interaction with cortical neuron–glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au achieves close physical coupling of neurons by maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations in the dealloying conditions. In conclusion, our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage and may enhance neuron–electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation.

  7. Nanoporous gold as a neural interface coating: effects of topography, surface chemistry, and feature size.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Christopher A R; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika M; Lein, Pamela J; Seker, Erkin

    2015-04-01

    Designing neural interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to an electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron-electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au's interaction with cortical neuron-glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au achieves close physical coupling of neurons by maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations in the dealloying conditions. Our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage and may enhance neuron-electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation. PMID:25706691

  8. Nanoporous Gold as a Neural Interface Coating: Effects of Topography, Surface Chemistry, and Feature Size

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher A. R.; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika M.; Lein, Pamela J.; Seker, Erkin

    2015-01-01

    Designing neural-electrode interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to the electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron-electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au’s interaction with cortical neuron-glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au is achieving close physical coupling of neurons through maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations of the dealloying conditions. Our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage, and may enhance the neuron-electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation. PMID:25706691

  9. Design and validation of a real-time spiking-neural-network decoder for brain-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethier, Julie; Nuyujukian, Paul; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Boahen, Kwabena

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Cortically-controlled motor prostheses aim to restore functions lost to neurological disease and injury. Several proof of concept demonstrations have shown encouraging results, but barriers to clinical translation still remain. In particular, intracortical prostheses must satisfy stringent power dissipation constraints so as not to damage cortex. Approach. One possible solution is to use ultra-low power neuromorphic chips to decode neural signals for these intracortical implants. The first step is to explore in simulation the feasibility of translating decoding algorithms for brain-machine interface (BMI) applications into spiking neural networks (SNNs). Main results. Here we demonstrate the validity of the approach by implementing an existing Kalman-filter-based decoder in a simulated SNN using the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF), a general method for mapping control algorithms onto SNNs. To measure this system’s robustness and generalization, we tested it online in closed-loop BMI experiments with two rhesus monkeys. Across both monkeys, a Kalman filter implemented using a 2000-neuron SNN has comparable performance to that of a Kalman filter implemented using standard floating point techniques. Significance. These results demonstrate the tractability of SNN implementations of statistical signal processing algorithms on different monkeys and for several tasks, suggesting that a SNN decoder, implemented on a neuromorphic chip, may be a feasible computational platform for low-power fully-implanted prostheses. The validation of this closed-loop decoder system and the demonstration of its robustness and generalization hold promise for SNN implementations on an ultra-low power neuromorphic chip using the NEF.

  10. A classifier neural network for rotordynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, R.; Jionghua, Jin; Sankar, T. S.

    1995-07-01

    A feedforward backpropagation neural network is formed to identify the stability characteristic of a high speed rotordynamic system. The principal focus resides in accounting for the instability due to the bearing clearance effects. The abnormal operating condition of 'normal-loose' Coulomb rub, that arises in units supported by hydrodynamic bearings or rolling element bearings, is analysed in detail. The multiple-parameter stability problem is formulated and converted to a set of three-parameter algebraic inequality equations. These three parameters map the wider range of physical parameters of commonly-used rotordynamic systems into a narrow closed region, that is used in the supervised learning of the neural network. A binary-type state of the system is expressed through these inequalities that are deduced from the analytical simulation of the rotor system. Both the hidden layer as well as functional-link networks are formed and the superiority of the functional-link network is established. Considering the real time interpretation and control of the rotordynamic system, the network reliability and the learning time are used as the evaluation criteria to assess the superiority of the functional-link network. This functional-link network is further trained using the parameter values of selected rotor systems, and the classifier network is formed. The success rate of stability status identification is obtained to assess the potentials of this classifier network. The classifier network is shown that it can also be used, for control purposes, as an 'advisory' system that suggests the optimum way of parameter adjustment.

  11. Interfacing the expert: Characteristics and requirements for the user interface in expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Andrew

    1987-01-01

    Because expert systems deal with new sets of problems presenting unique interface requirements, special issues requiring special attention are presented to user interface designers. External knowledge representation (how knowdedge is represented across the user interface), modes of user-system interdependence (advisory, cooperative, and autonomous), and management of uncertainty (deciding what actions to take or recommend based on incomplete evidence) are discussed.

  12. A Web Interface for Eco System Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHenry, K.; Kooper, R.; Serbin, S. P.; LeBauer, D. S.; Desai, A. R.; Dietze, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed the Predictive Ecosystem Analyzer (PEcAn) as an open-source scientific workflow system and ecoinformatics toolbox that manages the flow of information in and out of regional-scale terrestrial biosphere models, facilitates heterogeneous data assimilation, tracks data provenance, and enables more effective feedback between models and field research. The over-arching goal of PEcAn is to make otherwise complex analyses transparent, repeatable, and accessible to a diverse array of researchers, allowing both novice and expert users to focus on using the models to examine complex ecosystems rather than having to deal with complex computer system setup and configuration questions in order to run the models. Through the developed web interface we hide much of the data and model details and allow the user to simply select locations, ecosystem models, and desired data sources as inputs to the model. Novice users are guided by the web interface through setting up a model execution and plotting the results. At the same time expert users are given enough freedom to modify specific parameters before the model gets executed. This will become more important as more and more models are added to the PEcAn workflow as well as more and more data that will become available as NEON comes online. On the backend we support the execution of potentially computationally expensive models on different High Performance Computers (HPC) and/or clusters. The system can be configured with a single XML file that gives it the flexibility needed for configuring and running the different models on different systems using a combination of information stored in a database as well as pointers to files on the hard disk. While the web interface usually creates this configuration file, expert users can still directly edit it to fine tune the configuration.. Once a workflow is finished the web interface will allow for the easy creation of plots over result data while also allowing the user to

  13. Darwinian optimization of synthetic neural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper suggests a synthesis of computer science and artificial intelligence with the resurgent ideas of artificial neural systems and genetic algorithms cast in a classical Darwinian mold. Just as Darwin's original theory avoided the need for teleological arguments, the thrust of the approach set forth here for synthetic systems avoids the problem of programmer omniscience and the resulting brittle programs for precisely the same reasons. The price to be paid is one of many long computations on, perhaps, many parallel processors. Hardware development leading to parallel networks of RISC processors should meet the near-term needs of evolutionary parameter determination and allow the ensuring synthetic systems to function in real-time for certain tasks. In the longer term, special-purpose devices will be needed.

  14. Testing of the Automated Fluid Interface System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. S.; Tyler, Tony R.

    1998-01-01

    The Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS) is an advanced development prototype satellite servicer. The device was designed to transfer consumables from one spacecraft to another. An engineering model was built and underwent development testing at Marshall Space Flight Center. While the current AFIS is not suitable for spaceflight, testing and evaluation of the AFIS provided significant experience which would be beneficial in building a flight unit.

  15. Geographic information system/watershed model interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Gary T.

    1989-01-01

    Geographic information systems allow for the interactive analysis of spatial data related to water-resources investigations. A conceptual design for an interface between a geographic information system and a watershed model includes functions for the estimation of model parameter values. Design criteria include ease of use, minimal equipment requirements, a generic data-base management system, and use of a macro language. An application is demonstrated for a 90.1-square-kilometer subbasin of the Patuxent River near Unity, Maryland, that performs automated derivation of watershed parameters for hydrologic modeling.

  16. Decentralized Multisensory Information Integration in Neural Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-hao; Chen, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    How multiple sensory cues are integrated in neural circuitry remains a challenge. The common hypothesis is that information integration might be accomplished in a dedicated multisensory integration area receiving feedforward inputs from the modalities. However, recent experimental evidence suggests that it is not a single multisensory brain area, but rather many multisensory brain areas that are simultaneously involved in the integration of information. Why many mutually connected areas should be needed for information integration is puzzling. Here, we investigated theoretically how information integration could be achieved in a distributed fashion within a network of interconnected multisensory areas. Using biologically realistic neural network models, we developed a decentralized information integration system that comprises multiple interconnected integration areas. Studying an example of combining visual and vestibular cues to infer heading direction, we show that such a decentralized system is in good agreement with anatomical evidence and experimental observations. In particular, we show that this decentralized system can integrate information optimally. The decentralized system predicts that optimally integrated information should emerge locally from the dynamics of the communication between brain areas and sheds new light on the interpretation of the connectivity between multisensory brain areas. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To extract information reliably from ambiguous environments, the brain integrates multiple sensory cues, which provide different aspects of information about the same entity of interest. Here, we propose a decentralized architecture for multisensory integration. In such a system, no processor is in the center of the network topology and information integration is achieved in a distributed manner through reciprocally connected local processors. Through studying the inference of heading direction with visual and vestibular cues, we show that

  17. Convolutional neural networks for P300 detection with application to brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cecotti, Hubert; Gräser, Axel

    2011-03-01

    A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is a specific type of human-computer interface that enables the direct communication between human and computers by analyzing brain measurements. Oddball paradigms are used in BCI to generate event-related potentials (ERPs), like the P300 wave, on targets selected by the user. A P300 speller is based on this principle, where the detection of P300 waves allows the user to write characters. The P300 speller is composed of two classification problems. The first classification is to detect the presence of a P300 in the electroencephalogram (EEG). The second one corresponds to the combination of different P300 responses for determining the right character to spell. A new method for the detection of P300 waves is presented. This model is based on a convolutional neural network (CNN). The topology of the network is adapted to the detection of P300 waves in the time domain. Seven classifiers based on the CNN are proposed: four single classifiers with different features set and three multiclassifiers. These models are tested and compared on the Data set II of the third BCI competition. The best result is obtained with a multiclassifier solution with a recognition rate of 95.5 percent, without channel selection before the classification. The proposed approach provides also a new way for analyzing brain activities due to the receptive field of the CNN models. PMID:20567055

  18. Convergent evolution of neural systems in ctenophores

    PubMed Central

    Moroz, Leonid L.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are defined as polarized secretory cells specializing in directional propagation of electrical signals leading to the release of extracellular messengers – features that enable them to transmit information, primarily chemical in nature, beyond their immediate neighbors without affecting all intervening cells en route. Multiple origins of neurons and synapses from different classes of ancestral secretory cells might have occurred more than once during ~600 million years of animal evolution with independent events of nervous system centralization from a common bilaterian/cnidarian ancestor without the bona fide central nervous system. Ctenophores, or comb jellies, represent an example of extensive parallel evolution in neural systems. First, recent genome analyses place ctenophores as a sister group to other animals. Second, ctenophores have a smaller complement of pan-animal genes controlling canonical neurogenic, synaptic, muscle and immune systems, and developmental pathways than most other metazoans. However, comb jellies are carnivorous marine animals with a complex neuromuscular organization and sophisticated patterns of behavior. To sustain these functions, they have evolved a number of unique molecular innovations supporting the hypothesis of massive homoplasies in the organization of integrative and locomotory systems. Third, many bilaterian/cnidarian neuron-specific genes and ‘classical’ neurotransmitter pathways are either absent or, if present, not expressed in ctenophore neurons (e.g. the bilaterian/cnidarian neurotransmitter, γ-amino butyric acid or GABA, is localized in muscles and presumed bilaterian neuron-specific RNA-binding protein Elav is found in non-neuronal cells). Finally, metabolomic and pharmacological data failed to detect either the presence or any physiological action of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, octopamine, acetylcholine or histamine – consistent with the hypothesis that ctenophore neural systems

  19. Convergent evolution of neural systems in ctenophores.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Leonid L

    2015-02-15

    Neurons are defined as polarized secretory cells specializing in directional propagation of electrical signals leading to the release of extracellular messengers - features that enable them to transmit information, primarily chemical in nature, beyond their immediate neighbors without affecting all intervening cells en route. Multiple origins of neurons and synapses from different classes of ancestral secretory cells might have occurred more than once during ~600 million years of animal evolution with independent events of nervous system centralization from a common bilaterian/cnidarian ancestor without the bona fide central nervous system. Ctenophores, or comb jellies, represent an example of extensive parallel evolution in neural systems. First, recent genome analyses place ctenophores as a sister group to other animals. Second, ctenophores have a smaller complement of pan-animal genes controlling canonical neurogenic, synaptic, muscle and immune systems, and developmental pathways than most other metazoans. However, comb jellies are carnivorous marine animals with a complex neuromuscular organization and sophisticated patterns of behavior. To sustain these functions, they have evolved a number of unique molecular innovations supporting the hypothesis of massive homoplasies in the organization of integrative and locomotory systems. Third, many bilaterian/cnidarian neuron-specific genes and 'classical' neurotransmitter pathways are either absent or, if present, not expressed in ctenophore neurons (e.g. the bilaterian/cnidarian neurotransmitter, γ-amino butyric acid or GABA, is localized in muscles and presumed bilaterian neuron-specific RNA-binding protein Elav is found in non-neuronal cells). Finally, metabolomic and pharmacological data failed to detect either the presence or any physiological action of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, octopamine, acetylcholine or histamine - consistent with the hypothesis that ctenophore neural systems evolved

  20. Time-free spiking neural P systems.

    PubMed

    Pan, Linqiang; Zeng, Xiangxiang; Zhang, Xingyi

    2011-05-01

    Different biological processes take different times to be completed, which can also be influenced by many environmental factors. In this work, a realistic definition of nonsynchronized spiking neural P systems (SN P systems, for short) is considered: during the work of an SN P system, the execution times of spiking rules cannot be known exactly (i.e., they are arbitrary). In order to establish robust systems against the environmental factors, a special class of SN P systems, called time-free SN P systems, is introduced, which always produce the same computation result independent of the execution times of the rules. The universality of time-free SN P systems is investigated. It is proved that these P systems with extended rules (several spikes can be produced by a rule) are equivalent to register machines. However, if the number of spikes present in the system is bounded, then the power of time-free SN P systems falls, and in this case, a characterization of semilinear sets of natural numbers is obtained. PMID:21299423

  1. A user-system interface agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakim, Nagi T.; Srivastava, Sadanand; Bousaidi, Mehdi; Goh, Gin-Hua

    1995-01-01

    Agent-based technologies answer to several challenges posed by additional information processing requirements in today's computing environments. In particular, (1) users desire interaction with computing devices in a mode which is similar to that used between people, (2) the efficiency and successful completion of information processing tasks often require a high-level of expertise in complex and multiple domains, (3) information processing tasks often require handling of large volumes of data and, therefore, continuous and endless processing activities. The concept of an agent is an attempt to address these new challenges by introducing information processing environments in which (1) users can communicate with a system in a natural way, (2) an agent is a specialist and a self-learner and, therefore, it qualifies to be trusted to perform tasks independent of the human user, and (3) an agent is an entity that is continuously active performing tasks that are either delegated to it or self-imposed. The work described in this paper focuses on the development of an interface agent for users of a complex information processing environment (IPE). This activity is part of an on-going effort to build a model for developing agent-based information systems. Such systems will be highly applicable to environments which require a high degree of automation, such as, flight control operations and/or processing of large volumes of data in complex domains, such as the EOSDIS environment and other multidisciplinary, scientific data systems. The concept of an agent as an information processing entity is fully described with emphasis on characteristics of special interest to the User-System Interface Agent (USIA). Issues such as agent 'existence' and 'qualification' are discussed in this paper. Based on a definition of an agent and its main characteristics, we propose an architecture for the development of interface agents for users of an IPE that is agent-oriented and whose resources

  2. A new architecture for neural signal amplification in implantable brain machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    ur Rehman, Sami; Kamboh, Awais M

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a new architecture for variable gain-bandwidth amplification of neural signals to be used in implantable multi-channel recording systems. The two most critical requirements in such a front-end circuit are low power consumption and chip area, especially as number of channels increases. The presented architecture employs a single super-performing amplifier, with tunable gain and bandwidth, combined with several low-key preamplifiers and multiplexors for multi-channel recordings. This is in contrast to using copies of high performing amplifier for each channel as is typically reported in earlier literature. The resulting circuits consume lower power and require smaller area as compared to existing designs. Designed in 0.5 µmCMOS, the 8-channel prototype can simultaneously record Local Field Potentials and neural spikes, with an effective power consumption of 3.5 µW per channel and net core area of 0.407 mm(2). PMID:24110295

  3. Power system interface and umbilical system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    System requirements and basic design criteria were defined for berthing or docking a payload to the 25 kW power module which will provide electrical power and attitude control, cooling, data transfer, and communication services to free-flying and Orbiter sortie payloads. The selected umbilical system concept consists of four assemblies and command and display equipment to be installed at the Orbiter payload specialist station: (1) a movable platen assembly which is attached to the power system with EVA operable devices; (2) a slave platen assembly which is attached to the payload with EVA operable devices; (3) a fixed secondary platen permanently installed in the power system; and (4) a fixed secondary platen permanently installed on the payload. Operating modes and sequences are described.

  4. Systems and methods for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, Nathan G; Lewis, Monte A.; Clark, Roger F

    2013-06-11

    Systems and methods are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface during a casting process. The systems and methods enable determination of the location of a solid-liquid interface during the casting process.

  5. Simulation of large systems with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.

    1994-09-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been shown capable of simulating the behavior of complex, nonlinear, systems, including structural systems. Under certain circumstances, it is desirable to simulate structures that are analyzed with the finite element method. For example, when we perform a probabilistic analysis with the Monte Carlo method, we usually perform numerous (hundreds or thousands of) repetitions of a response simulation with different input and system parameters to estimate the chance of specific response behaviors. In such applications, efficiency in computation of response is critical, and response simulation with ANNs can be valuable. However, finite element analyses of complex systems involve the use of models with tens or hundreds of thousands of degrees of freedom, and ANNs are practically limited to simulations that involve far fewer variables. This paper develops a technique for reducing the amount of information required to characterize the response of a general structure. We show how the reduced information can be used to train a recurrent ANN. Then the trained ANN can be used to simulate the reduced behavior of the original system, and the reduction transformation can be inverted to provide a simulation of the original system. A numerical example is presented.

  6. Application of hierarchical dissociated neural network in closed-loop hybrid system integrating biological and mechanical intelligence.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongcheng; Sun, Rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Hongyi

    2015-01-01

    Neural networks are considered the origin of intelligence in organisms. In this paper, a new design of an intelligent system merging biological intelligence with artificial intelligence was created. It was based on a neural controller bidirectionally connected to an actual mobile robot to implement a novel vehicle. Two types of experimental preparations were utilized as the neural controller including 'random' and '4Q' (cultured neurons artificially divided into four interconnected parts) neural network. Compared to the random cultures, the '4Q' cultures presented absolutely different activities, and the robot controlled by the '4Q' network presented better capabilities in search tasks. Our results showed that neural cultures could be successfully employed to control an artificial agent; the robot performed better and better with the stimulus because of the short-term plasticity. A new framework is provided to investigate the bidirectional biological-artificial interface and develop new strategies for a future intelligent system using these simplified model systems. PMID:25992579

  7. Used Fuel Management System Interface Analyses - 13578

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Robert; Busch, Ingrid; Nutt, Mark; Morris, Edgar; Puig, Francesc; Carter, Joe; Delley, Alexcia; Rodwell, Phillip; Hardin, Ernest; Kalinina, Elena; Clark, Robert; Cotton, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Preliminary system-level analyses of the interfaces between at-reactor used fuel management, consolidated storage facilities, and disposal facilities, along with the development of supporting logistics simulation tools, have been initiated to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other stakeholders with information regarding the various alternatives for managing used nuclear fuel (UNF) generated by the current fleet of light water reactors operating in the United States. An important UNF management system interface consideration is the need for ultimate disposal of UNF assemblies contained in waste packages that are sized to be compatible with different geologic media. Thermal analyses indicate that waste package sizes for the geologic media under consideration by the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign may be significantly smaller than the canisters being used for on-site dry storage by the nuclear utilities. Therefore, at some point along the UNF disposition pathway, there could be a need to repackage fuel assemblies already loaded and being loaded into the dry storage canisters currently in use. The implications of where and when the packaging or repackaging of commercial UNF will occur are key questions being addressed in this evaluation. The analysis demonstrated that thermal considerations will have a major impact on the operation of the system and that acceptance priority, rates, and facility start dates have significant system implications. (authors)

  8. Proceedings of intelligent engineering systems through artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Dagli, C.H. . Dept. of Engineering Management); Kumara, S.R. . Dept. of Industrial Management Systems Engineering); Shin, Y.C. . School of Mechanical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This book contains the edited versions of the technical presentation of ANNIE '91, the first international meeting on Artificial Neural Networks in Engineering. The conference covered the theory of Artificial Neural Networks and its contributions in the engineering domain and attracted researchers from twelve countries. The papers in this edited book are grouped into four categories: Artificial Neural Network Architectures; Pattern Recognition; Adaptive Control, Diagnosis and Process Monitoring; and Neuro-Engineering Systems.

  9. Support for User Interfaces for Distributed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eychaner, Glenn; Niessner, Albert

    2005-01-01

    An extensible Java(TradeMark) software framework supports the construction and operation of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) for distributed computing systems typified by ground control systems that send commands to, and receive telemetric data from, spacecraft. Heretofore, such GUIs have been custom built for each new system at considerable expense. In contrast, the present framework affords generic capabilities that can be shared by different distributed systems. Dynamic class loading, reflection, and other run-time capabilities of the Java language and JavaBeans component architecture enable the creation of a GUI for each new distributed computing system with a minimum of custom effort. By use of this framework, GUI components in control panels and menus can send commands to a particular distributed system with a minimum of system-specific code. The framework receives, decodes, processes, and displays telemetry data; custom telemetry data handling can be added for a particular system. The framework supports saving and later restoration of users configurations of control panels and telemetry displays with a minimum of effort in writing system-specific code. GUIs constructed within this framework can be deployed in any operating system with a Java run-time environment, without recompilation or code changes.

  10. Building intuitive 3D interfaces for virtual reality systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Vivek; Suryanarayanan, Srikanth; Seitel, Mathias; Mullick, Rakesh

    2007-03-01

    An exploration of techniques for developing intuitive, and efficient user interfaces for virtual reality systems. Work seeks to understand which paradigms from the better-understood world of 2D user interfaces remain viable within 3D environments. In order to establish this a new user interface was created that applied various understood principles of interface design. A user study was then performed where it was compared with an earlier interface for a series of medical visualization tasks.

  11. A 700mV low power low noise implantable neural recording system design.

    PubMed

    An, Guanglei; Hutchens, Chriswell; Rennaker, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    A low power, low noise implantable neural recording interface for use in a Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) is presented in this paper. A two stage neural amplifier and 8 bit Pipelined Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) are integrated in this system. The optimized number of amplifier stages demonstrates the minimum power and area consumption; The ADC utilizes a novel offset cancellation technique robust to device leakage to reduce the input offset voltage. The neural amplifier and ADC both utilize 700mV power supply. The midband gain of neural amplifier is 58.4dB with a 3dB bandwidth from 0.71 to 8.26 kHz. Measured input-referred noise and total power consumption are 20.7μVrms and 1.90 respectively. The ADC achieves 8 bit accuracy at 16Ksps with an input voltage of ±400mV. Combined simulation and measurement results demonstrate the neural recording interface's suitability for in situ neutral activity recording. PMID:25571498

  12. Neural networks for aircraft system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linse, Dennis J.

    1991-01-01

    Artificial neural networks offer some interesting possibilities for use in control. Our current research is on the use of neural networks on an aircraft model. The model can then be used in a nonlinear control scheme. The effectiveness of network training is demonstrated.

  13. Analog neural network-based helicopter gearbox health monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Monsen, P T; Dzwonczyk, M; Manolakos, E S

    1995-12-01

    The development of a reliable helicopter gearbox health monitoring system (HMS) has been the subject of considerable research over the past 15 years. The deployment of such a system could lead to a significant saving in lives and vehicles as well as dramatically reduce the cost of helicopter maintenance. Recent research results indicate that a neural network-based system could provide a viable solution to the problem. This paper presents two neural network-based realizations of an HMS system. A hybrid (digital/analog) neural system is proposed as an extremely accurate off-line monitoring tool used to reduce helicopter gearbox maintenance costs. In addition, an all analog neural network is proposed as a real-time helicopter gearbox fault monitor that can exploit the ability of an analog neural network to directly compute the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) as a sum of weighted samples. Hardware performance results are obtained using the Integrated Neural Computing Architecture (INCA/1) analog neural network platform that was designed and developed at The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory. The results indicate that it is possible to achieve a 100% fault detection rate with 0% false alarm rate by performing a DFT directly on the first layer of INCA/1 followed by a small-size two-layer feed-forward neural network and a simple post-processing majority voting stage. PMID:8550948

  14. Neural Network Based Intelligent Sootblowing System

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Rhode

    2005-04-01

    , particulate matter is also a by-product of coal combustion. Modern day utility boilers are usually fitted with electrostatic precipitators to aid in the collection of particulate matter. Although extremely efficient, these devices are sensitive to rapid changes in inlet mass concentration as well as total mass loading. Traditionally, utility boilers are equipped with devices known as sootblowers, which use, steam, water or air to dislodge and clean the surfaces within the boiler and are operated based upon established rule or operator's judgment. Poor sootblowing regimes can influence particulate mass loading to the electrostatic precipitators. The project applied a neural network intelligent sootblowing system in conjunction with state-of-the-art controls and instruments to optimize the operation of a utility boiler and systematically control boiler slagging/fouling. This optimization process targeted reduction of NOx of 30%, improved efficiency of 2% and a reduction in opacity of 5%. The neural network system proved to be a non-invasive system which can readily be adapted to virtually any utility boiler. Specific conclusions from this neural network application are listed below. These conclusions should be used in conjunction with the specific details provided in the technical discussions of this report to develop a thorough understanding of the process.

  15. A recurrent neural network for closed-loop intracortical brain-machine interface decoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussillo, David; Nuyujukian, Paul; Fan, Joline M.; Kao, Jonathan C.; Stavisky, Sergey D.; Ryu, Stephen; Shenoy, Krishna

    2012-04-01

    Recurrent neural networks (RNNs) are useful tools for learning nonlinear relationships in time series data with complex temporal dependences. In this paper, we explore the ability of a simplified type of RNN, one with limited modifications to the internal weights called an echostate network (ESN), to effectively and continuously decode monkey reaches during a standard center-out reach task using a cortical brain-machine interface (BMI) in a closed loop. We demonstrate that the RNN, an ESN implementation termed a FORCE decoder (from first order reduced and controlled error learning), learns the task quickly and significantly outperforms the current state-of-the-art method, the velocity Kalman filter (VKF), using the measure of target acquire time. We also demonstrate that the FORCE decoder generalizes to a more difficult task by successfully operating the BMI in a randomized point-to-point task. The FORCE decoder is also robust as measured by the success rate over extended sessions. Finally, we show that decoded cursor dynamics are more like naturalistic hand movements than those of the VKF. Taken together, these results suggest that RNNs in general, and the FORCE decoder in particular, are powerful tools for BMI decoder applications.

  16. Neural Systems for Speech and Song in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Grace; Pantazatos, Spiro P.; Schneider, Harry; Hirsch, Joy

    2012-01-01

    Despite language disabilities in autism, music abilities are frequently preserved. Paradoxically, brain regions associated with these functions typically overlap, enabling investigation of neural organization supporting speech and song in autism. Neural systems sensitive to speech and song were compared in low-functioning autistic and age-matched…

  17. Straddle Carrier Interface and Dispatching System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-13

    SCIDS is the Data Dispatching and Transfer Point (DDTP) component of a straddle carrier-based radiation detection system developed for the DOE Megaports Initiative for scanning shipping containers in transshipment ports. Its purpose is to communicate with a Radiation Detection Straddle Carrier (RDSC) developed by Detector Networks International, sending commands to the RDSC and receiving sensor data from the RDSC. Incoming sensor and status data from the RDSC is forwarded to a back-end data storage andmore » display system that is external to SCIDS. SCIDS provides a graphical user interface for port operations personnel that displays location and status of the RDSC and status of each container in the port, and accepts commands from the operator directing the scanning operations of the RDSC.« less

  18. CAD/CAM-Interface For Optical Systems And Optical Drawings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieder, Eckart

    1989-04-01

    It is explained why a general interface for optical data between CAD/CAM-Systems is necessary. The requirements for the interface are discussed. The philosophy of a solution is demonstrated and it is shown how to proceed.

  19. The crew activity planning system bus interface unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    The hardware and software designs used to implement a high speed parallel communications interface to the MITRE 307.2 kilobit/second serial bus communications system are described. The primary topic is the development of the bus interface unit.

  20. Neural fuzzy modeling of anaerobic biological wastewater treatment systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, J.H.; Zhang, X.

    1999-12-01

    Anaerobic biological wastewater treatment systems are difficult to model because their performance is complex and varies significantly with different reactor configurations, influent characteristics, and operational conditions. Instead of conventional kinetic modeling, advanced neural fuzzy technology was employed to develop a conceptual adaptive model for anaerobic treatment systems. The conceptual neural fuzzy model contains the robustness of fuzzy systems, the learning ability of neural networks, and can adapt to various situations. The conceptual model was used to simulate the daily performance of two high-rate anaerobic wastewater treatment systems with satisfactory results obtained.

  1. Styles Of Programming In Neural Networks And Expert Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, Richard O.

    1989-03-01

    Neural networks and expert systems provide different ways to reduce the programming effort required to build complex systems. Adaptive neural networks are programmed merely by training them with examples. Rule-based expert system are developed incrementally merely by adding rules. Although neural networks seem best suited for low-level sensory processing and expert systems seem best suited for high-level symbolic processing, strikingly similar issues arise when these approaches are used in large-scale applications. Illustrative examples of such applications are presented and discussed.

  2. Air support facilities. [interface between air and surface transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airports are discussed in terms of the interface between the ground and air for transportation systems. The classification systems, design, facilities, administration, and operations of airports are described.

  3. A neural network hybrid expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, J.R. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    When knowledge-based expert rules, equations, and proprietary languages extend Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD CAM) software, previously designed mechanisms can be scaled to satisfy new design requirements in the shortest time. However, embedded design alternatives needed by design engineers during the product conception and rework stages are lacking, and an operator is required who has a thorough understanding of the intended design and the how-to expertise needed to create and optimize the mechanisms. By applying neural network technology to build an expert system, a robust design supervisor system emerged which automated the embedded intellectual operations (e.g. questioning, identifying, selecting, and coordinating the design process) to (1) select the best mechanisms necessary to design a power transmission gearbox from proven solutions; (2) aid the inexperienced operator in developing complex design solutions; and (3) provide design alternatives which add back-to-the-drawing board capabilities to knowledge-based mechanical CAD/CAM software programs. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Adaptive Neural Network Based Control of Noncanonical Nonlinear Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Tao, Gang; Chen, Mou

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new study on the adaptive neural network-based control of a class of noncanonical nonlinear systems with large parametric uncertainties. Unlike commonly studied canonical form nonlinear systems whose neural network approximation system models have explicit relative degree structures, which can directly be used to derive parameterized controllers for adaptation, noncanonical form nonlinear systems usually do not have explicit relative degrees, and thus their approximation system models are also in noncanonical forms. It is well-known that the adaptive control of noncanonical form nonlinear systems involves the parameterization of system dynamics. As demonstrated in this paper, it is also the case for noncanonical neural network approximation system models. Effective control of such systems is an open research problem, especially in the presence of uncertain parameters. This paper shows that it is necessary to reparameterize such neural network system models for adaptive control design, and that such reparameterization can be realized using a relative degree formulation, a concept yet to be studied for general neural network system models. This paper then derives the parameterized controllers that guarantee closed-loop stability and asymptotic output tracking for noncanonical form neural network system models. An illustrative example is presented with the simulation results to demonstrate the control design procedure, and to verify the effectiveness of such a new design method. PMID:26285223

  5. System Identification of X-33 Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Shiv

    2003-01-01

    present attempt, as a start, focuses only on the entry phase. Since the main engine remains cut off in this phase, there is no thrust acting on the system. This considerably simplifies the equations of motion. We introduce another simplification by assuming the system to be linear after some non-linearities are removed analytically from our consideration. Under these assumptions, the problem could be solved by Classical Statistics by employing the least sum of squares approach. Instead we chose to use the Neural Network method. This method has many advantages. It is modern, more efficient, can be adapted to work even when the assumptions are diluted. In fact, Neural Networks try to model the human brain and are capable of pattern recognition.

  6. Short-term synaptic plasticity and heterogeneity in neural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejias, J. F.; Kappen, H. J.; Longtin, A.; Torres, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    We review some recent results on neural dynamics and information processing which arise when considering several biophysical factors of interest, in particular, short-term synaptic plasticity and neural heterogeneity. The inclusion of short-term synaptic plasticity leads to enhanced long-term memory capacities, a higher robustness of memory to noise, and irregularity in the duration of the so-called up cortical states. On the other hand, considering some level of neural heterogeneity in neuron models allows neural systems to optimize information transmission in rate coding and temporal coding, two strategies commonly used by neurons to codify information in many brain areas. In all these studies, analytical approximations can be made to explain the underlying dynamics of these neural systems.

  7. Neural joint control for Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, Mark A.; Cox, Chadwick J.; Lothers, Michael D.; Pap, Robert M.; Thomas, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Neural networks are being used to control a robot arm in a telerobotic operation. The concept uses neural networks for both joint and inverse kinematics in a robotic control application. An upper level neural network is trained to learn inverse kinematic mappings. The output, a trajectory, is then fed to the Decentralized Adaptive Joint Controllers. This neural network implementation has shown that the controlled arm recovers from unexpected payload changes while following the reference trajectory. The neural network-based decentralized joint controller is faster, more robust and efficient than conventional approaches. Implementations of this architecture are discussed that would relax assumptions about dynamics, obstacles, and heavy loads. This system is being developed to use with the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System.

  8. Neural network based expert system for compressor stall monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Shi, G. Z.

    1991-01-01

    This research is designed to apply a new information processing technology, artificial neural networks, to monitoring compressor stall. The outputs of neural networks support the dynamic knowledge data base of an expert system. This is the open-loop mode to avoid compressor stall. The integration of a control system with neural networks is the closed-loop mode in stall avoidance. The feasibility of the concept has been demonstrated for the compressor of 16-foot transonic/supersonic propulsion wind tunnels. The construction of a prototpye expert system has been initiated.

  9. Java interface to a computer-aided diagnosis system for acute pulmonary embolism using PIOPED findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, Erik D.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Gauger, Matthew; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    1999-05-01

    An interface to a Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system for diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism (PE) from PIOPED radiographic findings was developed. The interface is based on Internet technology which is user-friendly and available on a broad range of computing platforms. It was designed to be used as a research tool and as a data collection tool, allowing researchers to observe the behavior of a CAD system and to collect radiographic findings on ventilation-perfusion lung scans and chest radiographs. The interface collects findings from physicians in the PIOPED reporting format, processes those findings and presents them as inputs to an artificial neural network (ANN) previously trained on findings from 1,064 patients from the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) study. The likelihood of PE predicted by the ANN and by the physician using the system is then saved for later analysis.

  10. Neural network simulations of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, J L

    1990-01-01

    Present knowledge of brain mechanisms is mainly based on anatomical and physiological studies. Such studies are however insufficient to understand the information processing of the brain. The present new focus on neural network studies is the most likely candidate to fill this gap. The present paper reviews some of the history and current status of neural network studies. It signals some of the essential problems for which answers have to be found before substantial progress in the field can be made. PMID:2245130

  11. Docosahexaenoic acid in neural signaling systems.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid has been conserved in neural signalling systems in the cephalopods, fish, amphibian, reptiles, birds, mammals, primates and humans. This extreme conservation, despite wide genomic changes over 500 million years, testifies to a uniqueness of this molecule in the brain. The brain selectively incorporates docosahexaenoic acid and its rate of incorporation into the developing brain has been shown to be greater than ten times more efficient than its synthesis from the omega 3 fatty acids of land plant origin. Data has now been published demonstrating a significant influence of dietary omega 3 fatty acids on neural gene expression. As docosahexaenoic acid is the only omega 3 fatty acid in the brain, it is likely that it is the ligand involved. The selective uptake, requirement for function and stimulation of gene expression would have conferred an advantage to a primate which separated from the chimpanzees in the forests and woodlands and sought a different ecological niche. In view of the paucity of docosahexaenoic acid in the land food chain it is likely that the advantage would have been gained from a lacustrine or marine coastal habitat with access to food rich in docosahexaenoic acid and the accessory micronutrients, such as iodine, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium, of importance in brain development and protection against peroxidation. Land agricultural development has, in recent time, come to dominate the human food chain. The decline in use and availability of aquatic resources is not considered important by Langdon (2006) as he considers the resource was not needed for human evolution and can be replaced from the terrestrial food chain. This notion is not supported by the biochemistry nor the molecular biology. He misses the point that the shoreline hypothesis is not just dependent on docosahexaenoic acid but also on the other accessory nutrients specifically required by the brain. Moreover he neglects the basic principle of Darwinian

  12. Verification and Validation of Neural Networks for Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, Dale; Nelson, Stacy; Schumman, Johann; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Center V&V working group and NASA Ames Research Center Automated Software Engineering (ASE) group collaborated to prepare this report. The purpose is to describe V&V processes and methods for certification of neural networks for aerospace applications, particularly adaptive flight control systems like Intelligent Flight Control Systems (IFCS) that use neural networks. This report is divided into the following two sections: 1) Overview of Adaptive Systems; and 2) V&V Processes/Methods.

  13. Verification and Validation of Neural Networks for Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, Dale; Nelson, Stacy; Schumann, Johann

    2002-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Center V&V working group and NASA Ames Research Center Automated Software Engineering (ASE) group collaborated to prepare this report. The purpose is to describe V&V processes and methods for certification of neural networks for aerospace applications, particularly adaptive flight control systems like Intelligent Flight Control Systems (IFCS) that use neural networks. This report is divided into the following two sections: Overview of Adaptive Systems and V&V Processes/Methods.

  14. Orbiter Interface Unit and Early Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobbs, Ronald M.; Cooke, Michael P.; Cox, Gary L.; Ellenberger, Richard; Fink, Patrick W.; Haynes, Dena S.; Hyams, Buddy; Ling, Robert Y.; Neighbors, Helen M.; Phan, Chau T.; Prendergast, Kelly M.; Siekierski, James D.; Wade, Randall S.; Weisskopf, George A.; Yim, Hester J.; Adkins, Antha A.; Carl, James R..; Loh, Y. C.; Roberts, Charles; Steele, Douglas J.; DeSilva, Buveneka Kanishka; Killenb, Harold B.; Williams, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the Orbiter Interface Unit (OIU) and the Early Communication System (ECOMM), which are systems of electronic hardware and software that serve as the primary communication links for the International Space Station (ISS). When a space shuttle is at or near the ISS during assembly and resupply missions, the OIU sends groundor crew-initiated commands from the space shuttle to the ISS and relays telemetry from the ISS to the space shuttle s payload data systems. The shuttle then forwards the telemetry to the ground. In the absence of a space shuttle, the ECOMM handles communications between the ISS and Johnson Space Center via the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Innovative features described in the report include (1) a "smart data-buffering algorithm that helps to preserve synchronization (and thereby minimize loss) of telemetric data between the OIU and the space-shuttle payload data interleaver; (2) an ECOMM antenna-autotracking algorithm that selects whichever of two phased-array antennas gives the best TDRSS signal and electronically steers that antenna to track the TDRSS source; and (3) an ECOMM radiation-latchup controller, which detects an abrupt increase in current indicative of radiation-induced latchup and temporarily turns off power to clear the latchup, restoring power after the charge dissipates.

  15. Neural network classification of autoregressive features from electroencephalogram signals for brain computer interface design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Nai-Jen; Palaniappan, Ramaswamy

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, we have designed a two-state brain-computer interface (BCI) using neural network (NN) classification of autoregressive (AR) features from electroencephalogram (EEG) signals extracted during mental tasks. The main purpose of the study is to use Keirn and Aunon's data to investigate the performance of different mental task combinations and different AR features for BCI design for individual subjects. In the experimental study, EEG signals from five mental tasks were recorded from four subjects. Different combinations of two mental tasks were studied for each subject. Six different feature extraction methods were used to extract the features from the EEG signals: AR coefficients computed with Burg's algorithm, AR coefficients computed with a least-squares (LS) algorithm and adaptive autoregressive (AAR) coefficients computed with a least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm. All the methods used order six applied to 125 data points and these three methods were repeated with the same data but with segmentation into five segments in increments of 25 data points. The multilayer perceptron NN trained by the back-propagation algorithm (MLP-BP) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were used to classify the computed features into different categories that represent the mental tasks. We compared the classification performances among the six different feature extraction methods. The results showed that sixth-order AR coefficients with the LS algorithm without segmentation gave the best performance (93.10%) using MLP-BP and (97.00%) using LDA. The results also showed that the segmentation and AAR methods are not suitable for this set of EEG signals. We conclude that, for different subjects, the best mental task combinations are different and proper selection of mental tasks and feature extraction methods are essential for the BCI design.

  16. Tuning of power system stabilizers using an artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Y.Y.; Chen, C.R. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on tuning of power system stabilizers (PSS) which is investigated using an artificial neural network (ANN). To have good damping characteristics over a wide range of operating conditions, it is desirable to adapt the PSS parameters in real-time based on generator loading conditions. To do this, a pair of on-line measurements, i.e. generator real power output (P) and power factor (PF), which are representative of generator operating condition, are chosen as the input signals to the neural net. The outputs of the neural net are the desired PSS parameters. The neural net, once trained by a set of input-output patterns in the training set, can yield proper PSS parameters under any generator loading condition. Digital simulations of a synchronous machine subject to a major disturbance of three-phase fault under different operating conditions are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed neural network.

  17. HermesC: low-power wireless neural recording system for freely moving primates.

    PubMed

    Chestek, Cynthia A; Gilja, Vikash; Nuyujukian, Paul; Kier, Ryan J; Solzbacher, Florian; Ryu, Stephen I; Harrison, Reid R; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2009-08-01

    Neural prosthetic systems have the potential to restore lost functionality to amputees or patients suffering from neurological injury or disease. Current systems have primarily been designed for immobile patients, such as tetraplegics functioning in a rather static, carefully tailored environment. However, an active patient such as amputee in a normal dynamic, everyday environment may be quite different in terms of the neural control of movement. In order to study motor control in a more unconstrained natural setting, we seek to develop an animal model of freely moving humans. Therefore, we have developed and tested HermesC-INI3, a system for recording and wirelessly transmitting neural data from electrode arrays implanted in rhesus macaques who are freely moving. This system is based on the integrated neural interface (INI3) microchip which amplifies, digitizes, and transmits neural data across a approximately 900 MHz wireless channel. The wireless transmission has a range of approximately 4 m in free space. All together this device consumes 15.8 mA and 63.2 mW. On a single 2 A-hr battery pack, this device runs contiguously for approximately six days. The smaller size and power consumption of the custom IC allows for a smaller package (51 x 38 x 38 mm (3)) than previous primate systems. The HermesC-INI3 system was used to record and telemeter one channel of broadband neural data at 15.7 kSps from a monkey performing routine daily activities in the home cage. PMID:19497829

  18. Dopamine system: manager of neural pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Simon

    2013-01-01

    There are a growing number of roles that midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons assume, such as, reward, aversion, alerting and vigor. Here I propose a theory that may be able to explain why the suggested functions of DA came about. It has been suggested that largely parallel cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortico loops exist to control different aspects of behavior. I propose that (1) the midbrain DA system is organized in a similar manner, with different groups of DA neurons corresponding to these parallel neural pathways (NPs). The DA system can be viewed as the “manager” of these parallel NPs in that it recruits and activates only the task-relevant NPs when they are needed. It is likely that the functions of those NPs that have been consistently activated by the corresponding DA groups are facilitated. I also propose that (2) there are two levels of DA roles: the How and What roles. The How role is encoded in tonic and phasic DA neuron firing patterns and gives a directive to its target NP: how vigorously its function needs to be carried out. The tonic DA firing is to provide the needed level of DA in the target NPs to support their expected behavioral and mental functions; it is only when a sudden unexpected boost or suppression of activity is required by the relevant target NP that DA neurons in the corresponding NP act in a phasic manner. The What role is the implementational aspect of the role of DA in the target NP, such as binding to D1 receptors to boost working memory. This What aspect of DA explains why DA seems to assume different functions depending on the region of the brain in which it is involved. In terms of the role of the lateral habenula (LHb), the LHb is expected to suppress maladaptive behaviors and mental processes by controlling the DA system. The demand-based smart management by the DA system may have given animals an edge in evolution with adaptive behaviors and a better survival rate in resource-scarce situations. PMID:24367324

  19. Dopamine system: manager of neural pathways.

    PubMed

    Hong, Simon

    2013-01-01

    There are a growing number of roles that midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons assume, such as, reward, aversion, alerting and vigor. Here I propose a theory that may be able to explain why the suggested functions of DA came about. It has been suggested that largely parallel cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortico loops exist to control different aspects of behavior. I propose that (1) the midbrain DA system is organized in a similar manner, with different groups of DA neurons corresponding to these parallel neural pathways (NPs). The DA system can be viewed as the "manager" of these parallel NPs in that it recruits and activates only the task-relevant NPs when they are needed. It is likely that the functions of those NPs that have been consistently activated by the corresponding DA groups are facilitated. I also propose that (2) there are two levels of DA roles: the How and What roles. The How role is encoded in tonic and phasic DA neuron firing patterns and gives a directive to its target NP: how vigorously its function needs to be carried out. The tonic DA firing is to provide the needed level of DA in the target NPs to support their expected behavioral and mental functions; it is only when a sudden unexpected boost or suppression of activity is required by the relevant target NP that DA neurons in the corresponding NP act in a phasic manner. The What role is the implementational aspect of the role of DA in the target NP, such as binding to D1 receptors to boost working memory. This What aspect of DA explains why DA seems to assume different functions depending on the region of the brain in which it is involved. In terms of the role of the lateral habenula (LHb), the LHb is expected to suppress maladaptive behaviors and mental processes by controlling the DA system. The demand-based smart management by the DA system may have given animals an edge in evolution with adaptive behaviors and a better survival rate in resource-scarce situations. PMID:24367324

  20. Vein matching using artificial neural network in vein authentication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori Hoshyar, Azadeh; Sulaiman, Riza

    2011-10-01

    Personal identification technology as security systems is developing rapidly. Traditional authentication modes like key; password; card are not safe enough because they could be stolen or easily forgotten. Biometric as developed technology has been applied to a wide range of systems. According to different researchers, vein biometric is a good candidate among other biometric traits such as fingerprint, hand geometry, voice, DNA and etc for authentication systems. Vein authentication systems can be designed by different methodologies. All the methodologies consist of matching stage which is too important for final verification of the system. Neural Network is an effective methodology for matching and recognizing individuals in authentication systems. Therefore, this paper explains and implements the Neural Network methodology for finger vein authentication system. Neural Network is trained in Matlab to match the vein features of authentication system. The Network simulation shows the quality of matching as 95% which is a good performance for authentication system matching.

  1. Ocular attention-sensing interface system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaklad, Allen; Glenn, Floyd A., III; Iavecchia, Helene P.; Stokes, James M.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to develop an innovative human-computer interface based on eye movement and voice control. By eliminating a manual interface (keyboard, joystick, etc.), OASIS provides a control mechanism that is natural, efficient, accurate, and low in workload.

  2. Neural networks for self-learning control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Derrick H.; Widrow, Bernard

    1990-01-01

    It is shown how a neural network can learn of its own accord to control a nonlinear dynamic system. An emulator, a multilayered neural network, learns to identify the system's dynamic characteristics. The controller, another multilayered neural network, next learns to control the emulator. The self-trained controller is then used to control the actual dynamic system. The learning process continues as the emulator and controller improve and track the physical process. An example is given to illustrate these ideas. The 'truck backer-upper,' a neural network controller that steers a trailer truck while the truck is backing up to a loading dock, is demonstrated. The controller is able to guide the truck to the dock from almost any initial position. The technique explored should be applicable to a wide variety of nonlinear control problems.

  3. Genetic learning in rule-based and neural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    The design of neural networks and fuzzy systems can involve complex, nonlinear, and ill-conditioned optimization problems. Often, traditional optimization schemes are inadequate or inapplicable for such tasks. Genetic Algorithms (GA's) are a class of optimization procedures whose mechanics are based on those of natural genetics. Mathematical arguments show how GAs bring substantial computational leverage to search problems, without requiring the mathematical characteristics often necessary for traditional optimization schemes (e.g., modality, continuity, availability of derivative information, etc.). GA's have proven effective in a variety of search tasks that arise in neural networks and fuzzy systems. This presentation begins by introducing the mechanism and theoretical underpinnings of GA's. GA's are then related to a class of rule-based machine learning systems called learning classifier systems (LCS's). An LCS implements a low-level production-system that uses a GA as its primary rule discovery mechanism. This presentation illustrates how, despite its rule-based framework, an LCS can be thought of as a competitive neural network. Neural network simulator code for an LCS is presented. In this context, the GA is doing more than optimizing and objective function. It is searching for an ecology of hidden nodes with limited connectivity. The GA attempts to evolve this ecology such that effective neural network performance results. The GA is particularly well adapted to this task, given its naturally-inspired basis. The LCS/neural network analogy extends itself to other, more traditional neural networks. Conclusions to the presentation discuss the implications of using GA's in ecological search problems that arise in neural and fuzzy systems.

  4. Implementations of learning control systems using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sartori, Michael A.; Antsaklis, Panos J.

    1992-01-01

    The systematic storage in neural networks of prior information to be used in the design of various control subsystems is investigated. Assuming that the prior information is available in a certain form (namely, input/output data points and specifications between the data points), a particular neural network and a corresponding parameter design method are introduced. The proposed neural network addresses the issue of effectively using prior information in the areas of dynamical system (plant and controller) modeling, fault detection and identification, information extraction, and control law scheduling.

  5. Hybrid neural network and rule-based pattern recognition system capable of self-modification

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, C.W.; Silliman, M.; Walker, M.; Spelt, P.F. ); Rao, N.S.V. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid neural network and rule-based pattern recognition system architecture which is capable of self-modification or learning. The central research issue to be addressed for a multiclassifier hybrid system is whether such a system can perform better than the two classifiers taken by themselves. The hybrid system employs a hierarchical architecture, and it can be interfaced with one or more sensors. Feature extraction routines operating on raw sensor data produce feature vectors which serve as inputs to neural network classifiers at the next level in the hierarchy. These low-level neural networks are trained to provide further discrimination of the sensor data. A set of feature vectors is formed from a concatenation of information from the feature extraction routines and the low-level neural network results. A rule-based classifier system uses this feature set to determine if certain expected environmental states, conditions, or objects are present in the sensors' current data stream. The rule-based system has been given an a priori set of models of the expected environmental states, conditions, or objects which it is expected to identify. The rule-based system forms many candidate directed graphs of various combinations of incoming features vectors, and it uses a suitably chosen metric to measure the similarity between candidate and model directed graphs. The rule-based system must decide if there is a match between one of the candidate graphs and a model graph. If a match is found, then the rule-based system invokes a routine to create and train a new high-level neural network from the appropriate feature vector data to recognize when this model state is present in future sensor data streams. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Brain-Machine Interactions for Assessing the Dynamics of Neural Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kositsky, Michael; Chiappalone, Michela; Alford, Simon T.; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.

    2008-01-01

    A critical advance for brain–machine interfaces is the establishment of bi-directional communications between the nervous system and external devices. However, the signals generated by a population of neurons are expected to depend in a complex way upon poorly understood neural dynamics. We report a new technique for the identification of the dynamics of a neural population engaged in a bi-directional interaction with an external device. We placed in vitro preparations from the lamprey brainstem in a closed-loop interaction with simulated dynamical devices having different numbers of degrees of freedom. We used the observed behaviors of this composite system to assess how many independent parameters − or state variables − determine at each instant the output of the neural system. This information, known as the dynamical dimension of a system, allows predicting future behaviors based on the present state and the future inputs. A relevant novelty in this approach is the possibility to assess a computational property – the dynamical dimension of a neuronal population – through a simple experimental technique based on the bi-directional interaction with simulated dynamical devices. We present a set of results that demonstrate the possibility of obtaining stable and reliable measures of the dynamical dimension of a neural preparation. PMID:19430593

  7. Multiple neural network approaches to clinical expert systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, Derek F.

    1990-08-01

    We briefly review the concept of computer aided medical diagnosis and more extensively review the the existing literature on neural network applications in the field. Neural networks can function as simple expert systems for diagnosis or prognosis. Using a public database we develop a neural network for the diagnosis of a major presenting symptom while discussing the development process and possible approaches. MEDICAL EXPERTS SYSTEMS COMPUTER AIDED DIAGNOSIS Biomedicine is an incredibly diverse and multidisciplinary field and it is not surprising that neural networks with their many applications are finding more and more applications in the highly non-linear field of biomedicine. I want to concentrate on neural networks as medical expert systems for clinical diagnosis or prognosis. Expert Systems started out as a set of computerized " ifthen" rules. Everything was reduced to boolean logic and the promised land of computer experts was said to be in sight. It never came. Why? First the computer code explodes as the number of " ifs" increases. All the " ifs" have to interact. Second experts are not very good at reducing expertise to language. It turns out that experts recognize patterns and have non-verbal left-brain intuition decision processes. Third learning by example rather than learning by rule is the way natural brains works and making computers work by rule-learning is hideously labor intensive. Neural networks can learn from example. They learn the results

  8. Adaptive control of nonlinear systems using multistage dynamic neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Madan M.; Rao, Dandina H.

    1992-11-01

    In this paper we present a new architecture of neuron, called the dynamic neural unit (DNU). The topology of the proposed neuronal model embodies delay elements, feedforward and feedback signals weighted by the synaptic weights and a time-varying nonlinear activation function, and is thus different from the conventionally and assumed architecture of neurons. The learning algorithm for the proposed neuronal structure and the corresponding implementation scheme are presented. A multi-stage dynamic neural network is developed using the DNU as the basic processing element. The performance evaluation of the dynamic neural network is presented for nonlinear dynamic systems under various situations. The capabilities of the proposed neural network model not only account for the learning and control actions emulating some of the biological control functions, but also provide a promising parallel-distributed intelligent control scheme for large-scale complex dynamic systems.

  9. An online EEG-based brain-computer interface for controlling hand grasp using an adaptive probabilistic neural network.

    PubMed

    Hazrati, Mehrnaz Kh; Erfanian, Abbas

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a new online single-trial EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI) for controlling hand holding and sequence of hand grasping and opening in an interactive virtual reality environment. The goal of this research is to develop an interaction technique that will allow the BCI to be effective in real-world scenarios for hand grasp control. One of the major challenges in the BCI research is the subject training. Currently, in most online BCI systems, the classifier was trained offline using the data obtained during the experiments without feedback, and used in the next sessions in which the subjects receive feedback. We investigated whether the subject could achieve satisfactory online performance without offline training while the subjects receive feedback from the beginning of the experiments during hand movement imagination. Another important issue in designing an online BCI system is the machine learning to classify the brain signal which is characterized by significant day-to-day and subject-to-subject variations and time-varying probability distributions. Due to these variabilities, we introduce the use of an adaptive probabilistic neural network (APNN) working in a time-varying environment for classification of EEG signals. The experimental evaluation on ten naïve subjects demonstrated that an average classification accuracy of 75.4% was obtained during the first experiment session (day) after about 3 min of online training without offline training, and 81.4% during the second session (day). The average rates during third and eighth sessions are 79.0% and 84.0%, respectively, using previously calculated classifier during the first sessions, without online training and without the need to calibrate. The results obtained from more than 5000 trials on ten subjects showed that the method could provide a robust performance over different experiment sessions and different subjects. PMID:20510641

  10. Recasting brain-machine interface design from a physical control system perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Chase, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    With the goal of improving the quality of life for people suffering from various motor control disorders, brain-machine interfaces provide direct neural control of prosthetic devices by translating neural signals into control signals. These systems act by reading motor intent signals directly from the brain and using them to control, for example, the movement of a cursor on a computer screen. Over the past two decades, much attention has been devoted to the decoding problem: how should recorded neural activity be translated into the movement of the cursor? Most approaches have focused on this problem from an estimation standpoint, i.e., decoders are designed to return the best estimate of motor intent possible, under various sets of assumptions about how the recorded neural signals represent motor intent. Here we recast the decoder design problem from a physical control system perspective, and investigate how various classes of decoders lead to different types of physical systems for the subject to control. This framework leads to new interpretations of why certain types of decoders have been shown to perform better than others. These results have implications for understanding how motor neurons are recruited to perform various tasks, and may lend insight into the brain's ability to conceptualize artificial systems. PMID:26142906