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Sample records for neuronopathic lysosomal diseases

  1. Neuronopathic Lysosomal Storage Diseases: Clinical and Pathologic Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prada, Carlos E.; Grabowski, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The lysosomal--autophagocytic system diseases (LASDs) affect multiple body systems including the central nervous system (CNS). The progressive CNS pathology has its onset at different ages, leading to neurodegeneration and early death. Methods: Literature review provided insight into the current clinical neurological findings,…

  2. Substrate deprivation therapy: a new hope for patients suffering from neuronopathic forms of inherited lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Wegrzyn, Alicja; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2007-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases are a group of disorders caused by defects in enzymes responsible for degradation of particular compounds in lysosomes. In most cases, these diseases are fatal, and until recently no treatment was available. Introduction of enzyme replacement therapy was a breakthrough in the treatment of some of the diseases. However, while this therapy is effective in reduction of many somatic symptoms, its efficacy in the treatment of the central nervous system is negligible, if any, mainly because of problems with crossing the blood-brain-barrier by intravenously administered enzyme molecules. On the other hand, there are many lysosomal storage diseases in which the central nervous system is affected. Results of very recent studies indicate that in at least some cases, another type of therapy, called substrate deprivation therapy (or substrate reduction therapy) may be effective in the treatment of neuronopathic forms of lysosomal storage diseases. This therapy, based on inhibition of synthesis of the compounds that cannot be degraded in cells of the patients, has been shown to be effective in several animal models of various diseases, and recent reports demonstrate its efficacy in the treatment of patients suffering from Niemann-Pick C disease and Sanfilippo disease. PMID:17998597

  3. Myeloid/Microglial Driven Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy Corrects a Neuronopathic Lysosomal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sergijenko, Ana; Langford-Smith, Alexander; Liao, Ai Y; Pickford, Claire E; McDermott, John; Nowinski, Gabriel; Langford-Smith, Kia J; Merry, Catherine LR; Jones, Simon A; Wraith, J Edmond; Wynn, Robert F; Wilkinson, Fiona L; Bigger, Brian W

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPSIIIA) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH), resulting in heparan sulfate (HS) accumulation and progressive neurodegeneration. There are no treatments. We previously demonstrated improved neuropathology in MPSIIIA mice using lentiviral vectors (LVs) overexpressing SGSH in wild-type (WT) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplants (HSCTs), achieved via donor monocyte/microglial engraftment in the brain. However, neurological disease was not corrected using LVs in autologous MPSIIIA HSCTs. To improve brain expression via monocyte/microglial specificity, LVs expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) or myeloid-specific promoters were compared in transplanted HSCs. LV-CD11b-GFP gave significantly higher monocyte/B-cell eGFP expression than LV-PGK-GFP or LV-CD18-GFP after 6 months. Subsequently, autologous MPSIIIA HSCs were transduced with either LV-PGK-coSGSH or LV-CD11b-coSGSH vectors expressing codon-optimized SGSH and transplanted into MPSIIIA mice. Eight months after HSCT, LV-PGK-coSGSH vectors produced bone marrow SGSH (576% normal activity) similar to LV-CD11b-coSGSH (473%), but LV-CD11b-coSGSH had significantly higher brain expression (11 versus 7%), demonstrating improved brain specificity. LV-CD11b-coSGSH normalized MPSIIIA behavior, brain HS, GM2 ganglioside, and neuroinflammation to WT levels, whereas LV-PGK-coSGSH partly corrected neuropathology but not behavior. We demonstrate compelling evidence of neurological disease correction using autologous myeloid driven lentiviral-HSC gene therapy in MPSIIIA mice. PMID:23748415

  4. Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Storage Disorders and Other Neuronopathic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Matern, Dietrich; Oglesbee, Devin; Tortorelli, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) is a public health program aimed at identifying treatable conditions in presymptomatic newborns to avoid premature mortality, morbidity, and disabilities. Currently, every newborn in the Unites States is screened for at least 29 conditions where evidence suggests that early detection is possible and beneficial. With new or improved treatment options and development of high-throughput screening tests, additional conditions have been proposed for inclusion into NBS programs. Among those are several conditions with a strong neuronopathic component. Some of these conditions have already been added to a few national and international screening programs, whereas others are undergoing pilot studies to determine the test performance metrics. Here, we review the current state of NBS for 13 lysosomal storage disorders, X-adrenoleukodystrophy, Wilson disease, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:23798012

  5. Newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders and other neuronopathic conditions.

    PubMed

    Matern, Dietrich; Oglesbee, Devin; Tortorelli, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) is a public health program aimed at identifying treatable conditions in presymptomatic newborns to avoid premature mortality, morbidity, and disabilities. Currently, every newborn in the Unites States is screened for at least 29 conditions where evidence suggests that early detection is possible and beneficial. With new or improved treatment options and development of high-throughput screening tests, additional conditions have been proposed for inclusion into NBS programs. Among those are several conditions with a strong neuronopathic component. Some of these conditions have already been added to a few national and international screening programs, whereas others are undergoing pilot studies to determine the test performance metrics. Here, we review the current state of NBS for 13 lysosomal storage disorders, X-adrenoleukodystrophy, Wilson disease, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:23798012

  6. Multiple pathogenic proteins implicated in neuronopathic Gaucher disease mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, You-hai; Xu, Kui; Sun, Ying; Liou, Benjamin; Quinn, Brian; Li, Rong-hua; Xue, Ling; Zhang, Wujuan; Setchell, Kenneth D.R.; Witte, David; Grabowski, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease, a prevalent lysosomal storage disease (LSD), is caused by insufficient activity of acid β-glucosidase (GCase) and the resultant glucosylceramide (GC)/glucosylsphingosine (GS) accumulation in visceral organs (Type 1) and the central nervous system (Types 2 and 3). Recent clinical and genetic studies implicate a pathogenic link between Gaucher and neurodegenerative diseases. The aggregation and inclusion bodies of α-synuclein with ubiquitin are present in the brains of Gaucher disease patients and mouse models. Indirect evidence of β-amyloid pathology promoting α-synuclein fibrillation supports these pathogenic proteins as a common feature in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, multiple proteins are implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic neuronopathic Gaucher disease (nGD). Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses showed significant amounts of β-amyloid and amyloid precursor protein (APP) aggregates in the cortex, hippocampus, stratum and substantia nigra of the nGD mice. APP aggregates were in neuronal cells and colocalized with α-synuclein signals. A majority of APP co-localized with the mitochondrial markers TOM40 and Cox IV; a small portion co-localized with the autophagy proteins, P62/LC3, and the lysosomal marker, LAMP1. In cultured wild-type brain cortical neural cells, the GCase-irreversible inhibitor, conduritol B epoxide (CBE), reproduced the APP/α-synuclein aggregation and the accumulation of GC/GS. Ultrastructural studies showed numerous larger-sized and electron-dense mitochondria in nGD cerebral cortical neural cells. Significant reductions of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate production and oxygen consumption (28–40%) were detected in nGD brains and in CBE-treated neural cells. These studies implicate defective GCase function and GC/GS accumulation as risk factors for mitochondrial dysfunction and the multi-proteinopathies (α-synuclein-, APP- and Aβ-aggregates) in nGD. PMID:24599400

  7. Viable Neuronopathic Gaucher Disease Model in Medaka (Oryzias latipes) Displays Axonal Accumulation of Alpha-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Norihito; Koike, Masato; Ansai, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Masato; Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Matsui, Hideaki; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Sakamoto, Naoaki; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Todo, Takeshi; Takeda, Shunichi; Yamakado, Hodaka; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Homozygous mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene result in Gaucher disease (GD), the most common lysosomal storage disease. Recent genetic studies have revealed that GBA mutations confer a strong risk for sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). To investigate how GBA mutations cause PD, we generated GBA nonsense mutant (GBA-/-) medaka that are completely deficient in glucocerebrosidase (GCase) activity. In contrast to the perinatal death in humans and mice lacking GCase activity, GBA-/- medaka survived for months, enabling analysis of the pathological progression. GBA-/- medaka displayed the pathological phenotypes resembling human neuronopathic GD including infiltration of Gaucher cell-like cells into the brains, progressive neuronal loss, and microgliosis. Detailed pathological findings represented lysosomal abnormalities in neurons and alpha-synuclein (α-syn) accumulation in axonal swellings containing autophagosomes. Unexpectedly, disruption of α-syn did not improve the life span, formation of axonal swellings, neuronal loss, or neuroinflammation in GBA-/- medaka. Taken together, the present study revealed GBA-/- medaka as a novel neuronopathic GD model, the pahological mechanisms of α-syn accumulation caused by GCase deficiency, and the minimal contribution of α-syn to the pathogenesis of neuronopathic GD. PMID:25835295

  8. CNS-accessible Inhibitor of Glucosylceramide Synthase for Substrate Reduction Therapy of Neuronopathic Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, John; Sun, Ying; Bangari, Dinesh S; Budman, Eva; Park, Hyejung; Nietupski, Jennifer B; Allaire, Amy; Cromwell, Mary A; Wang, Bing; Grabowski, Gregory A; Leonard, John P; Cheng, Seng H

    2016-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by a deficiency of glucocerebrosidase and the consequent lysosomal accumulation of unmetabolized glycolipid substrates. Enzyme-replacement therapy adequately manages the visceral manifestations of nonneuronopathic type-1 Gaucher patients, but not the brain disease in neuronopathic types 2 and 3 GD. Substrate reduction therapy through inhibition of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) has also been shown to effectively treat the visceral disease. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of a novel small molecule inhibitor of GCS with central nervous system (CNS) access (Genz-682452) to treat the brain disease. Treatment of the conduritol β epoxide-induced mouse model of neuronopathic GD with Genz-682452 reduced the accumulation of liver and brain glycolipids (>70% and >20% respectively), extent of gliosis, and severity of ataxia. In the genetic 4L;C* mouse model, Genz-682452 reduced the levels of substrate in the brain by >40%, the extent of gliosis, and paresis. Importantly, Genz-682452-treated 4L;C* mice also exhibited an ~30% increase in lifespan. Together, these data indicate that an orally available antagonist of GCS that has CNS access is effective at attenuating several of the neuropathologic and behavioral manifestations associated with mouse models of neuronopathic GD. Therefore, Genz-682452 holds promise as a potential therapeutic approach for patients with type-3 GD. PMID:26948439

  9. Lysosomal Storage Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Edward M.

    2001-05-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), over 40 different diseases, are now considered treatable disorders. Only a few short years ago, Lysosomal storage disorders were seen as interesting neurodegenerative disorders without any potential for treatment. Effective treatment strategies such as bone marrow transplantation (BMT), enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), and glycolipid synthesis inhibition have been developed in the last 20 years and continue to be researched and evaluated. Bone marrow transplantation began approximately 15 years ago and has shown benefit for some of the lysosomal storage disorders. In order to be effective, the transplant must be performed early in the course of the disease, before the development of irreversible neurologic damage. Diseases such as Hurler appear to respond to BMT, however, improvement in bone disease is much less vigorous than responses in other organs. Krabbe disease responds if the transplant is performed before irreversible signs of neurologic damage appear. Metachromatic leukodystrophy may respond if the transplant can be performed early enough although peripheral nerve findings appear to progress. Other diseases, eg, GM1- and GM2-gangliosidoses do not appear to be altered by BMT. Despite its high cost, ERT has been very effective treatment for type I (non-neuronopathic) Gaucher disease. Enzyme replacement therapy for other LSDs, including ERT for Fabry and Pompe diseases, which are planned to be imminently introduced, and other enzymes such as for Morquio and Hunter diseases that are in the study phases, may be marketed in the very near future. Glycolipid inhibitors, such as N-butyldeoxynijirimycin (OGS-918), have been effective in reducing the liver and spleen volume in type I Gaucher disease. These oral inhibitors may prove to be important adjuncts to ERT and provide the advantage of being able to cross the blood/brain barrier, which limits enzyme access to brain. Currently, clinical studies are being conducted on patients

  10. Successful therapy for protein-losing enteropathy caused by chronic neuronopathic Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Mhanni, A.A.; Kozenko, M.; Hartley, J.N.; Deneau, M.; El-Matary, W.; Rockman-Greenberg, C.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (OMIM #230800) is caused by β-glucosidase deficiency and primarily involves the mononuclear phagocyte system (also called Reticuloendothelial System or Macrophage System). The disease is classified into three main phenotypes based on the presence or absence of neurological manifestations: non-neuronopathic (type 1), acute neuronopathic (type 2) and chronic neuronopathic (type 3). Typical manifestations include hepatosplenomegaly, skeletal deformities, hematological abnormalities, interstitial lung fibrosis and neurodegeneration in neuronopathic cases. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy with resultant protein losing enteropathy (PLE) has only been rarely described. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy may lead to intestinal lymphatic obstruction and secondary lymphangiectasia resulting in chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain and weight loss. Fecal protein loss with secondary hypoalbuminemia can be significant. We report a male with Chronic Neuronopathic Gaucher disease (GD) (homozygous for c.1448T > C (NM_000157.3) GBA mutation) who at 16 years of age developed intractable abdominal pain, diarrhea and weight loss. This was caused by PLE secondary to intestinal lymphangiectasia caused by calcified mesenteric lymphadenopathy despite prior long term enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and/or substrate reduction therapy (SRT). His older similarly affected sister who had been receiving treatment with ERT and/or SRT remains stable on these treatments with no evidence of mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Medical management with total parenteral nutrition, daily medium chain triglyceride-oil (MCT) supplementation, low dose oral budesonide, continued oral SRT and an increased dose of parenteral ERT has stabilized his condition with resolution of the gastrointestinal symptoms and appropriate weight gain. PMID:27014572

  11. Successful therapy for protein-losing enteropathy caused by chronic neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Mhanni, A A; Kozenko, M; Hartley, J N; Deneau, M; El-Matary, W; Rockman-Greenberg, C

    2016-03-01

    Gaucher disease (OMIM #230800) is caused by β-glucosidase deficiency and primarily involves the mononuclear phagocyte system (also called Reticuloendothelial System or Macrophage System). The disease is classified into three main phenotypes based on the presence or absence of neurological manifestations: non-neuronopathic (type 1), acute neuronopathic (type 2) and chronic neuronopathic (type 3). Typical manifestations include hepatosplenomegaly, skeletal deformities, hematological abnormalities, interstitial lung fibrosis and neurodegeneration in neuronopathic cases. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy with resultant protein losing enteropathy (PLE) has only been rarely described. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy may lead to intestinal lymphatic obstruction and secondary lymphangiectasia resulting in chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain and weight loss. Fecal protein loss with secondary hypoalbuminemia can be significant. We report a male with Chronic Neuronopathic Gaucher disease (GD) (homozygous for c.1448T > C (NM_000157.3) GBA mutation) who at 16 years of age developed intractable abdominal pain, diarrhea and weight loss. This was caused by PLE secondary to intestinal lymphangiectasia caused by calcified mesenteric lymphadenopathy despite prior long term enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and/or substrate reduction therapy (SRT). His older similarly affected sister who had been receiving treatment with ERT and/or SRT remains stable on these treatments with no evidence of mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Medical management with total parenteral nutrition, daily medium chain triglyceride-oil (MCT) supplementation, low dose oral budesonide, continued oral SRT and an increased dose of parenteral ERT has stabilized his condition with resolution of the gastrointestinal symptoms and appropriate weight gain. PMID:27014572

  12. A new glucocerebrosidase-gene missense mutation responsible for neuronopathic Gaucher disease in Japanese patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kawame, H; Eto, Y

    1991-01-01

    We have identified a new T-to-A single-base substitution at nucleotide 3548 (in the genomic sequence) in exon 6 in the glucocerebrosidase gene from a patient with Gaucher disease type 3. This mutation caused a substitution of isoleucine for phenylalanine at amino acid residue 213 (of 497 residues in the mature protein). By in vitro expression study in cultured mammalian cells, this mutation resulted in deficient activity of glucocerebrosidase. By allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization of selectively PCR-amplified DNA from eight unrelated Japanese Gaucher disease patients, this mutant allele was observed in other neuronopathic Japanese Gaucher disease patients, in moderately frequent occurrence (three of six neuronopathic patients). This observation suggests that this allele was one of severe [corrected] alleles which were related to the development of neurological manifestations of Gaucher disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1840477

  13. Lysosomal Lipid Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Heike; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    Lysosomal lipid storage diseases, or lipidoses, are inherited metabolic disorders in which typically lipids accumulate in cells and tissues. Complex lipids, such as glycosphingolipids, are constitutively degraded within the endolysosomal system by soluble hydrolytic enzymes with the help of lipid binding proteins in a sequential manner. Because of a functionally impaired hydrolase or auxiliary protein, their lipid substrates cannot be degraded, accumulate in the lysosome, and slowly spread to other intracellular membranes. In Niemann-Pick type C disease, cholesterol transport is impaired and unesterified cholesterol accumulates in the late endosome. In most lysosomal lipid storage diseases, the accumulation of one or few lipids leads to the coprecipitation of other hydrophobic substances in the endolysosomal system, such as lipids and proteins, causing a “traffic jam.” This can impair lysosomal function, such as delivery of nutrients through the endolysosomal system, leading to a state of cellular starvation. Therapeutic approaches are currently restricted to mild forms of diseases with significant residual catabolic activities and without brain involvement. PMID:21502308

  14. Newborn screening for neuropathic lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Lee, Ni-Chung

    2010-08-01

    Interest in newborn screening (NBS) for lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) has increased significantly due to newly developed enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), the need for early diagnosis, and advances in technical developments. Since the central nervous system cannot be treated by ERT, neuronopathic LSDs are generally not the primary target of NBS. An exception is Krabbe disease, in which hematopoietic stem cell transplantation before the onset of symptoms has benefits. However, NBS for LSD relies on measuring enzyme activities, so the most severely affected individuals (usually patients with neuronopathic subtypes) will be detected together with patients with less severe disease. In the near future, NBS is likely to be developed for diseases such as Gaucher, Niemann-Pick A/B, and certain mucopolysaccharidoses. The ability to predict phenotypes (neuronopathic or not) by enzyme activity and genotyping will therefore be critical for adequate patient management. This article reviews the status of LSD screening and issues concerning detection of neuronopathic LSDs by screening. PMID:20532820

  15. Progression of Behavioral and CNS Deficits in a Viable Murine Model of Chronic Neuronopathic Gaucher Disease.

    PubMed

    Dai, Mei; Liou, Benjamin; Swope, Brittany; Wang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Wujuan; Inskeep, Venette; Grabowski, Gregory A; Sun, Ying; Pan, Dao

    2016-01-01

    To study the neuronal deficits in neuronopathic Gaucher Disease (nGD), the chronological behavioral profiles and the age of onset of brain abnormalities were characterized in a chronic nGD mouse model (9V/null). Progressive accumulation of glucosylceramide (GC) and glucosylsphingosine (GS) in the brain of 9V/null mice were observed at as early as 6 and 3 months of age for GC and GS, respectively. Abnormal accumulation of α-synuclein was present in the 9V/null brain as detected by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. In a repeated open-field test, the 9V/null mice (9 months and older) displayed significantly less environmental habituation and spent more time exploring the open-field than age-matched WT group, indicating the onset of short-term spatial memory deficits. In the marble burying test, the 9V/null group had a shorter latency to initiate burying activity at 3 months of age, whereas the latency increased significantly at ≥12 months of age; 9V/null females buried significantly more marbles to completion than the WT group, suggesting an abnormal response to the instinctive behavior and an abnormal activity in non-associative anxiety-like behavior. In the conditional fear test, only the 9V/null males exhibited a significant decrease in response to contextual fear, but both genders showed less response to auditory-cued fear compared to age- and gender-matched WT at 12 months of age. These results indicate hippocampus-related emotional memory defects. Abnormal gait emerged in 9V/null mice with wider front-paw and hind-paw widths, as well as longer stride in a gender-dependent manner with different ages of onset. Significantly higher liver- and spleen-to-body weight ratios were detected in 9V/null mice with different ages of onsets. These data provide temporal evaluation of neurobehavioral dysfunctions and brain pathology in 9V/null mice that can be used for experimental designs to evaluate novel therapies for nGD. PMID:27598339

  16. Diagnosis of lysosomal storage disorders: Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Britt A; Dajnoki, Angela; Bodamer, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher Disease (GD) is a progressive lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of glucocerebrosidase (GBA). The clinical phenotype follows a spectrum ranging from severe early-onset to milder late-onset disease. The absence of neurological involvement defines GD type I, whereas neuronopathic features define GD type II and III. Early diagnosis may be important for timely initiation of enzyme replacement therapy to prevent disease complications, although the enzyme does not cross the blood brain barrier. Diagnosis of GD can be readily achieved by analysis of GBA in leukocytes, fibroblasts, and/or dried blood spots using fluorometric, microfluidic or mass spectrometry-based assays. Low GBA activities are typically confirmed through molecular analysis of the GBA gene. GBA analysis in dried blood spots may be attractive for high-throughput screening of at-risk individuals and/or newborn infants. The method detailed in this unit is based on GBA analysis by tandem mass spectrometry following incubation of dried blood spots with the GBA-specific substrate D-glucosyl-β1-1'-N-dodecanoyl-D-erythro-sphingosine [C12-glucocerebroside (C36H69NO8)] and internal standard N-myristoyl-D-erythro-sphingosine [C14-ceramide (C32H63NO3)]. GBA activities in more than 2,000 newborn infants showed a mean of 22.0 ± 13.8 μmol/hr/liter (median: 19.9 μmol/hr/liter; 95% CI: 21.41-22.59 μmol/hr/liter). GBA activities in an adult population (n >1,200) showed generally lower enzyme activities than newborns, with a mean of 9.87 ± 9.35 μmol/hr/liter (median: 8.06 μmol/hr/liter). GBA activities in ten adult patients with confirmed GD were less than 4.2 μmol/hr/liter and in seven infants and children with GD less than 1.24 μmol/hr/liter. This method is robust, sensitive, and suitable for high-throughput analysis of hundreds of samples. PMID:25042717

  17. [Gene therapy in lysosomal diseases].

    PubMed

    Moullier, P; Salvetti, A; Bohl, D; Danos, O; Heard, J M

    1996-01-01

    The study of the mechanisms of secretion and recapture of lysosomal enzymes has lead to the proposal of a treatment of lysosomal diseases by enzyme replacement. Autologous implants of genetically modified cells which secrete enzymes ensure systemic distribution of the lacking enzyme. A procedure which permits reimplantation of genetically modified fibroblasts is described. The stable secretion of human glucuronidase by autologous fibroblasts was thus obtained in animal species. This approach should by applicable to the treatment of Hurler's syndrome by obtaining the production and distribution of alpha-L-iduronidase in patients lacking this enzyme by retroviral transfer of the human alpha-L-iduronidase gene to cultured fibroblasts and by preparation of implants. PMID:8881268

  18. Glycosphingolipid analysis in a naturally occurring ovine model of acute neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Karageorgos, Litsa; Hein, Leanne; Rozaklis, Tina; Adams, Melissa; Duplock, Stephen; Snel, Marten; Hemsley, Kim; Kuchel, Tim; Smith, Nicholas; Hopwood, John J

    2016-07-01

    Gaucher disease arises from mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene which encodes an enzyme required for the lysosomal catabolism of glucosylceramide. We have identified a naturally occurring mutation in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene in sheep that leads to Gaucher disease with acute neurological symptoms. Here we have examined the clinical phenotype at birth and subsequently quantified lipids in Gaucher lamb brain, in order to characterise the disorder. Enzyme activity assessments showed that a reduction in β-glucocerebrosidase activity to 1-5% of wild-type occurs consistently across newborn Gaucher lamb brain regions. We analyzed glucosylceramide, glucosylsphingosine, bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and ganglioside profiles in brain, liver, and spleen, and observed 30- to 130-fold higher glucosylceramide, and 500- to 2000-fold higher glucosylsphingosine concentrations in Gaucher diseased lambs compared to wild-type. Significant increases of bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and gangliosides [GM1, GM2, GM3] concentrations were also detected in the brain. As these glycosphingolipids are involved in many cellular events, an imbalance or disruption of the cell membrane lipid homeostasis would be expected to impair normal neuronal function. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed analysis of glycosphingolipids in various brain regions in a large animal model of neuronal disease, which permits the mechanistic investigation of lipid deregulation and their contribution to neurodegenerative process. PMID:26976737

  19. Oral small molecule therapy for lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, Neal J

    2013-11-01

    For more than 20 years, "enzyme replacement therapy" (ERT) has been the prevalent treatment approach for lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs). Unfortunately, ERT, as currently administered, is ineffective for primary neuronopathic LSDs. For LSDs whose major disease burden is non-neurological, ERT efficacy is limited by uneven tissue distribution and penetration, immunological intolerance, and disturbed intracellular homeostasis associated with persistent mutant enzymes that are not "replaced" by ERT. Many of these limitations might be circumvented by oral, low molecular weight pharmaceuticals that address relevant LSD pathophysiology and distribute widely in steady state concentrations in all cells and body tissues including the CNS. Two oral small molecule drugs (miglustat and cysteamine) are currently approved for clinical use and two (eliglustat and migalastat) are in advanced stage clinical trials. Several others are in early stages of clinical or pre-clinical investigation. This article reviews current knowledge of small molecule treatment for LSDs including approaches such as substrate synthesis inhibition, pharmacological chaperones, and proteostasis modification. PMID:24380126

  20. Impaired lysosomal cobalamin transport in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Li, Hongyun; Ruberu, Kalani; Garner, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B12) is required for erythrocyte formation and DNA synthesis and it plays a crucial role in maintaining neurological function. As a coenzyme for methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, cobalamin utilization depends on its efficient transit through the intracellular lysosomal compartment and subsequent delivery to the cytosol and mitochondria. Lysosomal function deteriorates in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Lysosomal acidification is defective in AD and lysosomal proteolysis is disrupted by AD-related presenilin 1 mutation. In this study, we propose that AD related lysosomal dysfunction may impair lysosomal cobalamin transport. The experiments use in vitro and in vivo models of AD to define how lysosomal dysfunction directly affects cobalamin utilization. SH-SY5Y-AβPP mutant cells were treated with a proteasome inhibitor to induce lysosomal amyloid-β accumulation. We metabolically labeled these cells with [57Co] cobalamin and isolated purified lysosomes, mitochondria, and cytosol fractions. The results indicated that proteasome inhibition was associated with lysosomal amyloid-β accumulation and a doubling of lysosomal [57Co] cobalamin levels. We also used AβPPxPS1 transgenic AD mice that were intraperitoneally injected with [57Co] cobalamin. The amount of [57Co] cobalamin in the major organs of these mice was measured and the subcellular [57Co] cobalamin distribution in the brain was assessed. The results demonstrated that lysosomal [57Co] cobalamin level was significantly increased by 56% in the AβPPxPS1 AD mouse brains as compared to wild type control mice. Together these data provide evidence that lysosomal cobalamin may be impaired in AD in association with amyloid-β accumulation. PMID:25125476

  1. Bicyclic derivatives of L-idonojirimycin as pharmacological chaperones for neuronopathic forms of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Pilar; Andreu, Vanesa; Pino-Angeles, Almudena; Moya-García, Aurelio A; García-Moreno, M Isabel; Rodríguez-Rey, José C; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Pocoví, Miguel; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, Jose M; Giraldo, Pilar

    2013-05-27

    New human β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase) ligands with rigid 1,6-anhydro-β-L-idonojirimycin cores have been designed with the aid of molecular modeling. Efficient pharmacological chaperones for the L444P (trafficking-incompetent) mutant GCase enzyme associated with type 2 and 3 Gaucher disease (GD) were identified. PMID:23606264

  2. Neuroinflammatory paradigms in lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Megan E.; Kielian, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) include approximately 70 distinct disorders that collectively account for 14% of all inherited metabolic diseases. LSDs are caused by mutations in various enzymes/proteins that disrupt lysosomal function, which impairs macromolecule degradation following endosome-lysosome and phagosome-lysosome fusion and autophagy, ultimately disrupting cellular homeostasis. LSDs are pathologically typified by lysosomal inclusions composed of a heterogeneous mixture of various proteins and lipids that can be found throughout the body. However, in many cases the CNS is dramatically affected, which may result from heightened neuronal vulnerability based on their post-mitotic state. Besides intrinsic neuronal defects, another emerging factor common to many LSDs is neuroinflammation, which may negatively impact neuronal survival and contribute to neurodegeneration. Microglial and astrocyte activation is a hallmark of many LSDs that affect the CNS, which often precedes and predicts regions where eventual neuron loss will occur. However, the timing, intensity, and duration of neuroinflammation may ultimately dictate the impact on CNS homeostasis. For example, a transient inflammatory response following CNS insult/injury can be neuroprotective, as glial cells attempt to remove the insult and provide trophic support to neurons. However, chronic inflammation, as seen in several LSDs, can promote neurodegeneration by creating a neurotoxic environment due to elevated levels of cytokines, chemokines, and pro-apoptotic molecules. Although neuroinflammation has been reported in several LSDs, the cellular basis and mechanisms responsible for eliciting neuroinflammatory pathways are just beginning to be defined. This review highlights the role of neuroinflammation in select LSDs and its potential contribution to neuron loss. PMID:26578874

  3. Nanoparticles restore lysosomal acidification defects: Implications for Parkinson and other lysosomal-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bourdenx, Mathieu; Daniel, Jonathan; Genin, Emilie; Soria, Federico N; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Bezard, Erwan; Dehay, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Lysosomal impairment causes lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) and is involved in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, notably Parkinson disease (PD). Strategies enhancing or restoring lysosomal-mediated degradation thus appear as tantalizing disease-modifying therapeutics. Here we demonstrate that poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) acidic nanoparticles (aNP) restore impaired lysosomal function in a series of toxin and genetic cellular models of PD, i.e. ATP13A2-mutant or depleted cells or glucocerebrosidase (GBA)-mutant cells, as well as in a genetic model of lysosomal-related myopathy. We show that PLGA-aNP are transported to the lysosome within 24 h, lower lysosomal pH and rescue chloroquine (CQ)-induced toxicity. Re-acidification of defective lysosomes following PLGA-aNP treatment restores lysosomal function in different pathological contexts. Finally, our results show that PLGA-aNP may be detected after intracerebral injection in neurons and attenuate PD-related neurodegeneration in vivo by mechanisms involving a rescue of compromised lysosomes. PMID:26761717

  4. Pathogenic cascades in lysosomal disease-Why so complex?

    PubMed

    Walkley, S U

    2009-04-01

    Lysosomal disease represents a large group of more than 50 clinically recognized conditions resulting from inborn errors of metabolism affecting the organelle known as the lysosome. The lysosome is an integral part of the larger endosomal/lysosomal system, and is closely allied with the ubiquitin-proteosomal and autophagosomal systems, which together comprise essential cell machinery for substrate degradation and recycling, homeostatic control, and signalling. More than two-thirds of lysosomal diseases affect the brain, with neurons appearing particularly vulnerable to lysosomal compromise and showing diverse consequences ranging from specific axonal and dendritic abnormalities to neuron death. While failure of lysosomal function characteristically leads to lysosomal storage, new studies argue that lysosomal diseases may also be appropriately viewed as 'states of deficiency' rather than simply overabundance (storage). Interference with signalling events and salvage processing normally controlled by the endosomal/lysosomal system may represent key mechanisms accounting for the inherent complexity of lysosomal disorders. Analysis of lysosomal disease pathogenesis provides a unique window through which to observe the importance of the greater lysosomal system for normal cell health. PMID:19130290

  5. Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gelb, Michael H.; Scott, C. Ronald; Turecek, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is worldwide interest in newborn screening for lysosomal storage diseases because of the development of treatment options that give better results when carried out early in life. Screens with high differentiation between affected and nonaffected individuals are critical because of the large number of potential false positives. CONTENT This review summarizes 3 screening methods: (a) direct assay of enzymatic activities using tandem mass spectrometry or fluorometry, (b) immunocapture-based measurement of lysosomal enzyme abundance, and (c) measurement of biomarkers. Assay performance is compared on the basis of small-scale studies as well as on large-scale pilot studies of mass spectrometric and fluorometric screens. SUMMARY Tandem mass spectrometry and fluorometry techniques for direct assay of lysosomal enzymatic activity in dried blood spots have emerged as the most studied approaches. Comparative mass spectrometry vs fluorometry studies show that the former better differentiates between nonaffected vs affected individuals. This in turn leads to a manageable number of screen positives that can be further evaluated with second-tier methods. PMID:25477536

  6. Molecular pathologies of and enzyme replacement therapies for lysosomal diseases.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Sawada, Makoto; Matsuzawa, Fumiko; Aikawa, Sei-ichi; Chiba, Yasunori; Jigami, Yoshifumi; Itoh, Kohji

    2006-08-01

    Lysosomal diseases comprise a group of inherited disorders resulting from defects of lysosomal enzymes and their cofactors, and in many of them the nervous system is affected. Recently, enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant lysosomal enzymes has been clinically available for several lysosomal diseases. Such enzyme replacement therapies can improve non-neurological disorders but is not effective for neurological ones. In this review, we discuss the molecular pathologies of lysosomal diseases from the protein structural aspect, current enzyme replacement therapies, and attempts to develop enzyme replacement therapies effective for lysosomal diseases associated with neurological disorders, i.e., production of enzymes, brain-specific delivery and incorporation of lysosomal enzymes into cells. PMID:16918392

  7. Altered lysosomal positioning affects lysosomal functions in a cellular model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Erie, Christine; Sacino, Matthew; Houle, Lauren; Lu, Michael L; Wei, Jianning

    2015-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary and devastating neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the huntingtin protein. Understanding the functions of normal and mutant huntingtin protein is the key to revealing the pathogenesis of HD and developing therapeutic targets. Huntingtin plays an important role in vesicular and organelle trafficking. Lysosomes are dynamic organelles that integrate several degradative pathways and regulate the activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). In the present study, we found that the perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes was increased in a cellular model of HD derived from HD knock-in mice and primary fibroblasts from an HD patient. This perinuclear lysosomal accumulation could be reversed when normal huntingtin was overexpressed in HD cells. When we further investigated the functional significance of the increased perinuclear lysosomal accumulation in HD cells, we demonstrated that basal mTORC1 activity was increased in HD cells. In addition, autophagic influx was also increased in HD cells in response to serum deprivation, which leads to premature fusion of lysosomes with autophagosomes. Taken together, our data suggest that the increased perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes may play an important role in HD pathogenesis by altering lysosomal-dependent functions. PMID:25997742

  8. Clinical studies in lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boudes, Pol F

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) consist of over 40 diseases, some of which are amenable to treatment. In this review, we consider the regulatory context in which LSDs studies are performed, highlight design specificities and explore operational challenges. Orphan drug legislations, both in Europe and US, were effective to stimulate LSDs drug development. However, regulators flexibilities toward approval vary leading to global discrepancies in access to treatments. Study designs are constrained because few patients can be studied. This implies LSDs treatments need to demonstrate large levels of clinical efficacy. If not, an appropriate level of evidence is difficult to achieve. While biomarkers could address this issue, none have been truly accepted as primary outcome. Enrichment of study population can increase the chance of success, especially with clinical outcomes. Adaptive designs are operationally challenging. Innovative methods of analysis can be used, notably using a patient as his/her own control and responder analysis. The use of extension phases and patient registries as a source of historical comparison can facilitate data interpretation. Operationally, few patients are available per centers and multiple centers need to be initiated in multiple countries. This impacts time-lines and budget. In the future, regulators flexibility will be essential to provide patients access to innovative treatments. PMID:25003011

  9. Pompe disease: Shared and unshared features of lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeong-A; Kakhlon, Or; Li, Lishu; Myerowitz, Rachel; Raben, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Pompe disease, an inherited deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase (GAA), is a severe metabolic myopathy with a wide range of clinical manifestations. It is the first recognized lysosomal storage disorder and the first neuromuscular disorder for which a therapy (enzyme replacement) has been approved. As GAA is the only enzyme that hydrolyses glycogen to glucose in the acidic environment of the lysosome, its deficiency leads to glycogen accumulation within and concomitant enlargement of this organelle. Since the introduction of the therapy, the overall understanding of the disease has progressed significantly, but the pathophysiology of muscle damage is still not fully understood. The emerging complex picture of the pathological cascade involves disturbance of calcium homeostasis, mitochondrial abnormalities, dysfunctional autophagy, accumulation of toxic undegradable materials, and accelerated production of lipofuscin deposits that are unrelated to aging. The relationship of Pompe disease to other lysosomal storage disorders and potential therapeutic interventions for Pompe disease are discussed. PMID:26619007

  10. [Neurological presentations of lysosomal diseases in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Sedel, F; Turpin, J-C; Baumann, N

    2007-10-01

    Lysosomal diseases represent a large group of genetic storage disorders characterized by a defect in the catabolism of complex molecules within the lysosome. Effective treatments are now possible for some of them given progresses in bone-marrow transplantation, enzyme replacement therapy and substrate reduction therapy. Neurologists and psychiatrists are concerned by these diseases because they can present in adolescence or adulthood with progressive neuropsychiatric signs. Here we focus on late-onset clinical forms which can be met in an adult neurology or psychiatric department. Lysosomal diseases were classified into 3 groups: (1) leukodystrophies (metachromatic leukodystrophy, Krabbe's disease and Salla's disease); (2) Neurodegenerative or psychiatric-like diseases (GM1 and GM2 gangliosidoses, Niemann Pick type C disease, sialidosis type I, ceroid-lipofuscinosis, mucopolysaccharidosis type III); (3) multisystemic diseases (Gaucher's disease, Fabry's disease, alpha and B mannosidosis, Niemann Pick disease type B, fucosidosis, Schindler/Kanzaki disease, and mucopolysaccharidosis type I and II. We propose a diagnostic approach guided by clinical examination, brain MRI, electrodiagnostic studies and abdominal echography. PMID:18033028

  11. Mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis in lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kiselyov, Kirill; Muallem, Shmuel

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a class of genetic disorders in which proteins responsible for digestion or absorption of endocytosed material do not function or do not localize properly. The resulting cellular “indigestion” causes buildup of intracellular storage inclusions that contain unprocessed lipids and proteins that form macromolecular complexes. The buildup of storage material is associated with degenerative processes that are observed in all LSDs, albeit the correlation between the amount of storage inclusions and the severity of the degenerative processes is not always evident. The latter suggests that a specific mechanism set in motion by aberrant lysosomal function drives the degenerative processes in LSDs. It is becoming increasingly clear that in addition to their function in degrading endocytosed material, lysosomes are essential housekeeping organelles responsible for maintaining healthy population of intracellular organelles, in particular mitochondria. The present review surveys the current knowledge on the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis and its possible role as a contributing factor to mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis and to cell death in LSDs. PMID:18242695

  12. Pharmacological Chaperones and Coenzyme Q10 Treatment Improves Mutant β-Glucocerebrosidase Activity and Mitochondrial Function in Neuronopathic Forms of Gaucher Disease.

    PubMed

    de la Mata, Mario; Cotán, David; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Delgado Pavón, Ana; Alcocer-Gómez, Elizabet; de Lavera, Isabel; Ybot-González, Patricia; Paula Zaderenko, Ana; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, José M; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene, which encodes lysosomal β-glucocerebrosidase. Homozygosity for the L444P mutation in GBA1 is associated with high risk of neurological manifestations which are not improved by enzyme replacement therapy. Alternatively, pharmacological chaperones (PCs) capable of restoring the correct folding and trafficking of the mutant enzyme represent promising alternative therapies.Here, we report on how the L444P mutation affects mitochondrial function in primary fibroblast derived from GD patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction was associated with reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitophagy activation and impaired autophagic flux.Both abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction and deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity, were partially restored by supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) or a L-idonojirimycin derivative, N-[N'-(4-adamantan-1-ylcarboxamidobutyl)thiocarbamoyl]-1,6-anhydro-L-idonojirimycin (NAdBT-AIJ), and more markedly by the combination of both treatments. These data suggest that targeting both mitochondria function by CoQ and protein misfolding by PCs can be promising therapies in neurological forms of GD. PMID:26045184

  13. Pharmacological Chaperones and Coenzyme Q10 Treatment Improves Mutant β-Glucocerebrosidase Activity and Mitochondrial Function in Neuronopathic Forms of Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    de la Mata, Mario; Cotán, David; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D.; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Delgado Pavón, Ana; Alcocer-Gómez, Elizabet; de Lavera, Isabel; Ybot-González, Patricia; Paula Zaderenko, Ana; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Fernández, José M. García; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene, which encodes lysosomal β-glucocerebrosidase. Homozygosity for the L444P mutation in GBA1 is associated with high risk of neurological manifestations which are not improved by enzyme replacement therapy. Alternatively, pharmacological chaperones (PCs) capable of restoring the correct folding and trafficking of the mutant enzyme represent promising alternative therapies.Here, we report on how the L444P mutation affects mitochondrial function in primary fibroblast derived from GD patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction was associated with reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitophagy activation and impaired autophagic flux.Both abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction and deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity, were partially restored by supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) or a L-idonojirimycin derivative, N-[N’-(4-adamantan-1-ylcarboxamidobutyl)thiocarbamoyl]-1,6-anhydro-L-idonojirimycin (NAdBT-AIJ), and more markedly by the combination of both treatments. These data suggest that targeting both mitochondria function by CoQ and protein misfolding by PCs can be promising therapies in neurological forms of GD. PMID:26045184

  14. Targeting the Autophagy/Lysosomal Degradation Pathway in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Ríos, Pilar; Madero-Pérez, Jesús; Fernández, Belén; Hilfiker, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular quality control mechanism crucial for neuronal homeostasis. Defects in autophagy are critically associated with mechanisms underlying Parkinson's disease (PD), a common and debilitating neurodegenerative disorder. Autophagic dysfunction in PD can occur at several stages of the autophagy/lysosomal degradative machinery, contributing to the formation of intracellular protein aggregates and eventual neuronal cell death. Therefore, autophagy inducers may comprise a promising new therapeutic approach to combat neurodegeneration in PD. Several currently available FDA-approved drugs have been shown to enhance autophagy, which may allow for their repurposing for use in novel clinical conditions including PD. This review summarizes our current knowledge of deficits in the autophagy/lysosomal degradation pathways associated with PD, and highlight current approaches which target this pathway as possible means towards novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26517050

  15. Impairment of chaperone-mediated autophagy leads to selective lysosomal degradation defects in the lysosomal storage disease cystinosis

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Gennaro; Johnson, Jennifer L; He, Jing; Rocca, Celine J; Monfregola, Jlenia; Pestonjamasp, Kersi; Cherqui, Stephanie; Catz, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite accumulation in lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) results in impaired cell function and multi-systemic disease. Although substrate reduction and lysosomal overload-decreasing therapies can ameliorate disease progression, the significance of lysosomal overload-independent mechanisms in the development of cellular dysfunction is unknown for most LSDs. Here, we identify a mechanism of impaired chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in cystinosis, a LSD caused by defects in the cystine transporter cystinosin (CTNS) and characterized by cystine lysosomal accumulation. We show that, different from other LSDs, autophagosome number is increased, but macroautophagic flux is not impaired in cystinosis while mTOR activity is not affected. Conversely, the expression and localization of the CMA receptor LAMP2A are abnormal in CTNS-deficient cells and degradation of the CMA substrate GAPDH is defective in Ctns−/− mice. Importantly, cysteamine treatment, despite decreasing lysosomal overload, did not correct defective CMA in Ctns−/− mice or LAMP2A mislocalization in cystinotic cells, which was rescued by CTNS expression instead, suggesting that cystinosin is important for CMA activity. In conclusion, CMA impairment contributes to cell malfunction in cystinosis, highlighting the need for treatments complementary to current therapies that are based on decreasing lysosomal overload. PMID:25586965

  16. [Structural basis for β-galactosidase associated with lysosomal disease].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    G(M1)-gangliosidosis and Morquio B are rare lysosomal storage diseases associated with a neurodegenerative disorder or dwarfism and skeletal abnormalities, respectively. These diseases are caused by deficiencies in the lysosomal enzyme human β-D-galactosidase (h-β-GAL), which lead to accumulations of the h-β-GAL substrates, G(M1) ganglioside and keratan sulfate due to mutations in the h-β-GAL gene. H-β-GAL is an exoglycosidase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal β-linked galactose residues. Here, we present the crystal structures of h-β-GAL in complex with its catalytic product galactose or with its inhibitor 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin. H-β-GAL showed a novel homodimer structure; each monomer was comprised of a catalytic TIM barrel domain followed by β-domain 1 and β-domain 2. The long loop region connecting the TIM barrel domain with β-domain 1 was responsible for the dimerization. To gain structural insight into the molecular defects of h-β-GAL in the above diseases, the disease-causing mutations were mapped onto the three-dimensional structure. Finally, the possible causes of the diseases are discussed. PMID:23649392

  17. Lysosomal Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haoxing; Ren, Dejian

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic compartments filled with more than 60 different types of hydrolases. They mediate the degradation of extracellular particles from endocytosis and of intracellular components from autophagy. The digested products are transported out of the lysosome via specific catabolite exporters or via vesicular membrane trafficking. Lysosomes also contain more than 50 membrane proteins and are equipped with the machinery to sense nutrient availability, which determines the distribution, number, size, and activity of lysosomes to control the specificity of cargo flux and timing (the initiation and termination) of degradation. Defects in degradation, export, or trafficking result in lysosomal dysfunction and lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Lysosomal channels and transporters mediate ion flux across perimeter membranes to regulate lysosomal ion homeostasis, membrane potential, catabolite export, membrane trafficking, and nutrient sensing. Dysregulation of lysosomal channels underlies the pathogenesis of many LSDs and possibly that of metabolic and common neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25668017

  18. Lysosomal physiology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haoxing; Ren, Dejian

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic compartments filled with more than 60 different types of hydrolases. They mediate the degradation of extracellular particles from endocytosis and of intracellular components from autophagy. The digested products are transported out of the lysosome via specific catabolite exporters or via vesicular membrane trafficking. Lysosomes also contain more than 50 membrane proteins and are equipped with the machinery to sense nutrient availability, which determines the distribution, number, size, and activity of lysosomes to control the specificity of cargo flux and timing (the initiation and termination) of degradation. Defects in degradation, export, or trafficking result in lysosomal dysfunction and lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Lysosomal channels and transporters mediate ion flux across perimeter membranes to regulate lysosomal ion homeostasis, membrane potential, catabolite export, membrane trafficking, and nutrient sensing. Dysregulation of lysosomal channels underlies the pathogenesis of many LSDs and possibly that of metabolic and common neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25668017

  19. Infant case of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency: Wolman's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sadhukhan, Meghmala; Saha, Amit; Vara, Roshni; Bhaduri, Bim

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which causes two distinct clinical phenotypes: Wolman's disease and cholesterol ester storage disease. LAL hydrolyses LDL-derived triglycerides and cholesterol esters to glycerol or cholesterol and free fatty acids. Its deficiency leads to accumulation of intracellular triglycerides and/or cholesterol esters. In early onset LAL deficiency, clinical manifestations start in the first few weeks of life with persistent vomiting, failure to thrive, hepatosplenomegaly, liver dysfunction and hepatic failure. Adrenal calcification is a striking feature but is present in only about 50% of cases. We report a case of an infant presenting with vomiting, diarrhoea, hepatosplenomegaly and poor weight gain that was subsequently diagnosed as Wolman's disease. He was entered into a clinical trial for LAL replacement therapy. This case reinforces that early onset LAL deficiency should be considered in a baby presenting with failure to thrive, gastrointestinal symptoms and hepatosplenomegaly. PMID:24832708

  20. Genomic Expression Analyses Reveal Lysosomal, Innate Immunity Proteins, as Disease Correlates in Murine Models of a Lysosomal Storage Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md. Suhail; Getz, Michelle; Safeukui, Innocent; Yi, Sue; Tamez, Pamela; Shin, Jenny; Velázquez, Peter; Haldar, Kasturi

    2012-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease is a rare, genetic, lysosomal disorder with progressive neurodegeneration. Poor understanding of the pathophysiology and a lack of blood-based diagnostic markers are major hurdles in the treatment and management of NPC and several additional, neurological lysosomal disorders. To identify disease severity correlates, we undertook whole genome expression profiling of sentinel organs, brain, liver, and spleen of Balb/c Npc1−/− mice relative to Npc1+/− at an asymptomatic stage, as well as early- and late-symptomatic stages. Unexpectedly, we found prominent up regulation of innate immunity genes with age-dependent change in their expression, in all three organs. We shortlisted a set of 12 secretory genes whose expression steadily increased with age in both brain and liver, as potential plasma correlates of neurological and/or liver disease. Ten were innate immune genes with eight ascribed to lysosomes. Several are known to be elevated in diseased organs of murine models of other lysosomal diseases including Gaucher’s disease, Sandhoff disease and MPSIIIB. We validated the top candidate lysozyme, in the plasma of Npc1−/− as well as Balb/c Npc1nmf164 mice (bearing a point mutation closer to human disease mutants) and show its reduction in response to an emerging therapeutic. We further established elevation of innate immunity in Npc1−/− mice through multiple functional assays including inhibition of bacterial infection as well as cellular analysis and immunohistochemistry. These data revealed neutrophil elevation in the Npc1−/− spleen and liver (where large foci were detected proximal to damaged tissue). Together our results yield a set of lysosomal, secretory innate immunity genes that have potential to be developed as pan or specific plasma markers for neurological diseases associated with lysosomal storage and where diagnosis is a major problem. Further, the accumulation of neutrophils in diseased organs (hitherto

  1. Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Storage Disorders and Other Neuronopathic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matern, Dietrich; Oglesbee, Devin; Tortorelli, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) is a public health program aimed at identifying treatable conditions in presymptomatic newborns to avoid premature mortality, morbidity, and disabilities. Currently, every newborn in the Unites States is screened for at least 29 conditions where evidence suggests that early detection is possible and beneficial. With new or…

  2. Fusion of lysosomes with secretory organelles leads to uncontrolled exocytosis in the lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type IV.

    PubMed

    Park, Soonhong; Ahuja, Malini; Kim, Min Seuk; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Jha, Archana; Zeng, Mei; Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Ling-Gang; Wassif, Christopher A; Porter, Forbes D; Zerfas, Patricia M; Eckhaus, Michael A; Brailoiu, Eugen; Shin, Dong Min; Muallem, Shmuel

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in TRPML1 cause the lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV). The role of TRPML1 in cell function and how the mutations cause the disease are not well understood. Most studies focus on the role of TRPML1 in constitutive membrane trafficking to and from the lysosomes. However, this cannot explain impaired neuromuscular and secretory cells' functions that mediate regulated exocytosis. Here, we analyzed several forms of regulated exocytosis in a mouse model of MLIV and, opposite to expectations, we found enhanced exocytosis in secretory glands due to enlargement of secretory granules in part due to fusion with lysosomes. Preliminary exploration of synaptic vesicle size, spontaneous mEPSCs, and glutamate secretion in neurons provided further evidence for enhanced exocytosis that was rescued by re-expression of TRPML1 in neurons. These features were not observed in Niemann-Pick type C1. These findings suggest that TRPML1 may guard against pathological fusion of lysosomes with secretory organelles and suggest a new approach toward developing treatment for MLIV. PMID:26682800

  3. Lysosomal Dysfunction and α-Synuclein Aggregation in Parkinson's Disease: Diagnostic Links.

    PubMed

    Moors, Tim; Paciotti, Silvia; Chiasserini, Davide; Calabresi, Paolo; Parnetti, Lucilla; Beccari, Tommaso; van de Berg, Wilma D J

    2016-06-01

    Lysosomal impairment is increasingly recognized as a central event in the pathophysiology of PD. Genetic associations between lysosomal storage disorders, including Gaucher disease and PD, highlight common risk factors and pathological mechanisms. Because the autophagy-lysosomal system is involved in the intralysosomal hydrolysis of dysfunctional proteins, lysosomal impairment may contribute to α-synuclein aggregation in PD. The degradation of α-synuclein is a complex process involving different proteolytic mechanisms depending on protein burden, folding, posttranslational modifications, and yet unknown factors. In this review, evidence for lysosomal dysfunction in PD and its intimate relationship with α-synuclein aggregation are discussed, after which the question of whether lysosomal proteins may serve as diagnostic biomarkers for PD is addressed. Changes in lysosomal enzymes, such as reduced glucocerebrosidase and cathepsin levels, have been observed in affected brain regions in PD patients. The detection of lysosomal proteins in CSF may provide a read-out of lysosomal dysfunction in PD and holds promise for the development of diagnostic PD biomarkers. Initial PD biomarker studies demonstrated altered lysosomal enzyme activities in CSF of PD patients when compared with controls. However, CSF lysosomal enzyme activities alone could not discriminate between PD patients and controls. The combination of CSF lysosomal markers with α-synuclein species and indicators of mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, and other pathological proteins in PD may be able to facilitate a more accurate diagnosis of PD. Further CSF biomarker studies are needed to investigate the utility of CSF lysosomal proteins as measures of disease state and disease progression in PD. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26923732

  4. Autophagy failure in Alzheimer’s disease and the role of defective lysosomal acidification

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Devin M.; Lee, Ju-hyun; Kumar, Asok; Lee, Sooyeon; Orenstein, Samantha J.; Nixon, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative process to recycle cellular waste and eliminate potentially toxic damaged organelles and protein aggregates. The important cytoprotective functions of autophagy are evidenced by the diverse pathogenic consequences that may stem from autophagy dysregulation in a growing number of neurodegenerative disorders. In many of the diseases associated with autophagy anomalies, it is the final stage of autophagy-lysosomal degradation that is disrupted. In several disorders, including AD, defective lysosomal acidification contributes to this proteolytic failure. The complex regulation of lysosomal pH makes this process vulnerable to disruption by many factors and reliable lysosomal pH measurements have become increasingly important in investigations of disease mechanisms. Although various reagents for pH quantification have been developed over several decades, they are not all equally well-suited for measuring the pH of lysosomes. Here, we evaluate the most commonly used pH probes for sensitivity and localization and identify Lysosensor Yellow/Blue-Dextran, among currently used probes, as having the most optimal profile of properties for measuring lysosomal pH. In addition, we review evidence that lysosomal acidification is defective in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and extend our original findings of elevated lysosomal pH in presenilin 1 (PS1)-deficient blastocysts and neurons to additional cell models of PS1- and PS1/2-deficiency, to fibroblasts from AD patients with PS1 mutations, and to neurons in the PS/APP mouse model of AD. PMID:23773064

  5. [Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of lysosomal storage diseases].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi-ru; Bao, Xin-hua

    2005-08-18

    Lysosomal storage diseases are a group of genetic disorders that result from the defect in lysosomal function. Signs and symptoms are variable, it is difficult to diagnose this group of disease merely by the clinical manifestation. The diagnosis usually is made by measuring the activity of the corresponding enzyme. Gene mutational analysis is useful for the diagnosis of some of the lysosome storage diseases. The treatment has focused on the replacement of the defective enzyme responsible for the disease and the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Both of them have achieved exciting outcomes in some of the diseases. PMID:16086072

  6. Massive accumulation of luminal protease-deficient axonal lysosomes at Alzheimer’s disease amyloid plaques

    PubMed Central

    Gowrishankar, Swetha; Yuan, Peng; Wu, Yumei; Schrag, Matthew; Paradise, Summer; Grutzendler, Jaime; De Camilli, Pietro; Ferguson, Shawn M.

    2015-01-01

    Through a comprehensive analysis of organellar markers in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease, we document a massive accumulation of lysosome-like organelles at amyloid plaques and establish that the majority of these organelles reside within swollen axons that contact the amyloid deposits. This close spatial relationship between axonal lysosome accumulation and extracellular amyloid aggregates was observed from the earliest stages of β-amyloid deposition. Notably, we discovered that lysosomes that accumulate in such axons are lacking in multiple soluble luminal proteases and thus are predicted to be unable to efficiently degrade proteinaceous cargos. Of relevance to Alzheimer’s disease, β-secretase (BACE1), the protein that initiates amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein and which is a substrate for these proteases, builds up at these sites. Furthermore, through a comparison between the axonal lysosome accumulations at amyloid plaques and neuronal lysosomes of the wild-type brain, we identified a similar, naturally occurring population of lysosome-like organelles in neuronal processes that is also defined by its low luminal protease content. In conjunction with emerging evidence that the lysosomal maturation of endosomes and autophagosomes is coupled to their retrograde transport, our results suggest that extracellular β-amyloid deposits cause a local impairment in the retrograde axonal transport of lysosome precursors, leading to their accumulation and a blockade in their further maturation. This study both advances understanding of Alzheimer’s disease brain pathology and provides new insights into the subcellular organization of neuronal lysosomes that may have broader relevance to other neurodegenerative diseases with a lysosomal component to their pathology. PMID:26124111

  7. Lysosomal storage diseases and the heat shock response: convergences and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Ingemann, Linda; Kirkegaard, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes play a vital role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis through the recycling of cell constituents, a key metabolic function which is highly dependent on the correct function of the lysosomal hydrolases and membrane proteins, as well as correct membrane lipid stoichiometry and composition. The critical role of lysosomal functionality is evident from the severity of the diseases in which the primary lesion is a genetically defined loss-of-function of lysosomal hydrolases or membrane proteins. This group of diseases, known as lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), number more than 50 and are associated with severe neurodegeneration, systemic disease, and early death, with only a handful of the diseases having a therapeutic option. Another key homeostatic system is the metabolic stress response or heat shock response (HSR), which is induced in response to a number of physiological and pathological stresses, such as protein misfolding and aggregation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, nutrient deprivation, elevated temperature, viral infections, and various acute traumas. Importantly, the HSR and its cardinal members of the heat shock protein 70 family has been shown to protect against a number of degenerative diseases, including severe diseases of the nervous system. The cytoprotective actions of the HSR also include processes involving the lysosomal system, such as cell death, autophagy, and protection against lysosomal membrane permeabilization, and have shown promise in a number of LSDs. This review seeks to describe the emerging understanding of the interplay between these two essential metabolic systems, the lysosomes and the HSR, with a particular focus on their potential as a therapeutic target for LSDs. PMID:24837749

  8. Two motifs target Batten disease protein CLN3 to lysosomes in transfected nonneuronal and neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Kyttälä, Aija; Ihrke, Gudrun; Vesa, Jouni; Schell, Michael J; Luzio, J Paul

    2004-03-01

    Batten disease is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting from mutations in CLN3, a polytopic membrane protein, whose predominant intracellular destination in nonneuronal cells is the lysosome. The topology of CLN3 protein, its lysosomal targeting mechanism, and the development of Batten disease are poorly understood. We provide experimental evidence that both the N and C termini and one large loop domain of CLN3 face the cytoplasm. We have identified two lysosomal targeting motifs that mediate the sorting of CLN3 in transfected nonneuronal and neuronal cells: an unconventional motif in the long C-terminal cytosolic tail consisting of a methionine and a glycine separated by nine amino acids [M(X)9G], and a more conventional dileucine motif, located in the large cytosolic loop domain and preceded by an acidic patch. Each motif on its own was sufficient to mediate lysosomal targeting, but optimal efficiency required both. Interestingly, in primary neurons, CLN3 was prominently seen both in lysosomes in the cell body and in endosomes, containing early endosomal antigen-1 along neuronal processes. Because there are few lysosomes in axons and peripheral parts of dendrites, the presence of CLN3 in endosomes of neurons may be functionally important. Endosomal association of the protein was independent of the two lysosomal targeting motifs. PMID:14699076

  9. Molecular basis of multiple sulfatase deficiency, mucolipidosis II/III and Niemann-Pick C1 disease - Lysosomal storage disorders caused by defects of non-lysosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Thomas; Schlotawa, Lars; Frese, Marc-André; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; von Figura, Kurt; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2009-04-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), mucolipidosis (ML) II/III and Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease are rare but fatal lysosomal storage disorders caused by the genetic defect of non-lysosomal proteins. The NPC1 protein mainly localizes to late endosomes and is essential for cholesterol redistribution from endocytosed LDL to cellular membranes. NPC1 deficiency leads to lysosomal accumulation of a broad range of lipids. The precise functional mechanism of this membrane protein, however, remains puzzling. ML II, also termed I cell disease, and the less severe ML III result from deficiencies of the Golgi enzyme N-acetylglucosamine 1-phosphotransferase leading to a global defect of lysosome biogenesis. In patient cells, newly synthesized lysosomal proteins are not equipped with the critical lysosomal trafficking marker mannose 6-phosphate, thus escaping from lysosomal sorting at the trans Golgi network. MSD affects the entire sulfatase family, at least seven members of which are lysosomal enzymes that are specifically involved in the degradation of sulfated glycosaminoglycans, sulfolipids or other sulfated molecules. The combined deficiencies of all sulfatases result from a defective post-translational modification by the ER-localized formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE), which oxidizes a specific cysteine residue to formylglycine, the catalytic residue enabling a unique mechanism of sulfate ester hydrolysis. This review gives an update on the molecular bases of these enigmatic diseases, which have been challenging researchers since many decades and so far led to a number of surprising findings that give deeper insight into both the cell biology and the pathobiochemistry underlying these complex disorders. In case of MSD, considerable progress has been made in recent years towards an understanding of disease-causing FGE mutations. First approaches to link molecular parameters with clinical manifestation have been described and even therapeutical options have been

  10. Positive Lysosomal Modulation As a Unique Strategy to Treat Age-Related Protein Accumulation Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Meagan L.; Butler, David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lysosomes are involved in degrading and recycling cellular ingredients, and their disruption with age may contribute to amyloidogenesis, paired helical filaments (PHFs), and α-synuclein and mutant huntingtin aggregation. Lysosomal cathepsins are upregulated by accumulating proteins and more so by the modulator Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK). Such positive modulators of the lysosomal system have been studied in the well-characterized hippocampal slice model of protein accumulation that exhibits the pathogenic cascade of tau aggregation, tubulin breakdown, microtubule destabilization, transport failure, and synaptic decline. Active cathepsins were upregulated by PADK; Rab proteins were modified as well, indicating enhanced trafficking, whereas lysosome-associated membrane protein and proteasome markers were unchanged. Lysosomal modulation reduced the pre-existing PHF deposits, restored tubulin structure and transport, and recovered synaptic components. Further proof-of-principle studies used Alzheimer disease mouse models. It was recently reported that systemic PADK administration caused dramatic increases in cathepsin B protein and activity levels, whereas neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, α-secretase, and β-secretase were unaffected by PADK. In the transgenic models, PADK treatment resulted in clearance of intracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide and concomitant reduction of extracellular deposits. Production of the less pathogenic Aβ1–38 peptide corresponded with decreased levels of Aβ1–42, supporting the lysosome's antiamyloidogenic role through intracellular truncation. Amelioration of synaptic and behavioral deficits also indicates a neuroprotective function of the lysosomal system, identifying lysosomal modulation as an avenue for disease-modifying therapies. From the in vitro and in vivo findings, unique lysosomal modulators represent a minimally invasive, pharmacologically controlled strategy against protein accumulation disorders

  11. Wilson Disease Protein ATP7B Utilizes Lysosomal Exocytosis to Maintain Copper Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Polishchuk, Elena V.; Concilli, Mafalda; Iacobacci, Simona; Chesi, Giancarlo; Pastore, Nunzia; Piccolo, Pasquale; Paladino, Simona; Baldantoni, Daniela; van IJzendoorn, Sven C.D.; Chan, Jefferson; Chang, Christopher J.; Amoresano, Angela; Pane, Francesca; Pucci, Piero; Tarallo, Antonietta; Parenti, Giancarlo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea; Polishchuk, Roman S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Copper is an essential yet toxic metal and its overload causes Wilson disease, a disorder due to mutations in copper transporter ATP7B. To remove excess copper into the bile, ATP7B traffics toward canalicular area of hepatocytes. However, the trafficking mechanisms of ATP7B remain elusive. Here, we show that, in response to elevated copper, ATP7B moves from the Golgi to lysosomes and imports metal into their lumen. ATP7B enables lysosomes to undergo exocytosis through the interaction with p62 subunit of dynactin that allows lysosome translocation toward the canalicular pole of hepatocytes. Activation of lysosomal exocytosis stimulates copper clearance from the hepatocytes and rescues the most frequent Wilson-disease-causing ATP7B mutant to the appropriate functional site. Our findings indicate that lysosomes serve as an important intermediate in ATP7B trafficking, whereas lysosomal exocytosis operates as an integral process in copper excretion and hence can be targeted for therapeutic approaches to combat Wilson disease. PMID:24909901

  12. Wilson disease protein ATP7B utilizes lysosomal exocytosis to maintain copper homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, Elena V; Concilli, Mafalda; Iacobacci, Simona; Chesi, Giancarlo; Pastore, Nunzia; Piccolo, Pasquale; Paladino, Simona; Baldantoni, Daniela; van IJzendoorn, Sven C D; Chan, Jefferson; Chang, Christopher J; Amoresano, Angela; Pane, Francesca; Pucci, Piero; Tarallo, Antonietta; Parenti, Giancarlo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea; Polishchuk, Roman S

    2014-06-23

    Copper is an essential yet toxic metal and its overload causes Wilson disease, a disorder due to mutations in copper transporter ATP7B. To remove excess copper into the bile, ATP7B traffics toward canalicular area of hepatocytes. However, the trafficking mechanisms of ATP7B remain elusive. Here, we show that, in response to elevated copper, ATP7B moves from the Golgi to lysosomes and imports metal into their lumen. ATP7B enables lysosomes to undergo exocytosis through the interaction with p62 subunit of dynactin that allows lysosome translocation toward the canalicular pole of hepatocytes. Activation of lysosomal exocytosis stimulates copper clearance from the hepatocytes and rescues the most frequent Wilson-disease-causing ATP7B mutant to the appropriate functional site. Our findings indicate that lysosomes serve as an important intermediate in ATP7B trafficking, whereas lysosomal exocytosis operates as an integral process in copper excretion and hence can be targeted for therapeutic approaches to combat Wilson disease. PMID:24909901

  13. Non-inhibitory antibodies impede lysosomal storage reduction during enzyme replacement therapy of a lysosomal storage disease.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Ulrich; Matthes, Frank; Weigelt, Cecilia; Andersson, Claes; Eistrup, Carl; Fogh, Jens; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2008-04-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy is a treatment option for several lysosomal storage disorders. We reported previously that treatment of a knockout mouse model of the sphingolipid storage disease metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) by intravenous injection of recombinant human arylsulfatase A (rhASA) reduces sulfatide storage and improves nervous system pathology and function. Here, we show that treated mice can develop anti-rhASA antibodies, which impede sulfatide clearance without inhibiting enzyme activity. The neutralizing effect of antibodies was reproduced in cell culture models of MLD by demonstrating that mouse immune serum reduces the ability of rhASA to clear sulfatide from cultured ASA-deficient Schwann and kidney cells. We show that reduced clearance is due to an antibody-mediated blockade of mannose 6-phosphate receptor-dependent enzyme uptake, retargeting of rhASA from sulfatide-storing cells to macrophages, intracellular misrouting of rhASA, and reduction of enzyme stability. Induction of immunotolerance to rhASA by transgenic expression of an active site mutant of human ASA restores sulfatide clearance in mice. The data indicate that the influence of non-inhibitory antibodies must be more intensively considered in evaluating the therapeutic efficacy of enzyme replacement in lysosomal storage disorders in general and in patients without cross-reacting material specifically. PMID:18360747

  14. Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagral, Aabha

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the commonest lysosomal storage disease seen in India and worldwide. It should be considered in any child or adult with an unexplained splenohepatomegaly and cytopenia which are seen in the three types of Gaucher disease. Type 1 is the non-neuronopathic form and type 2 and 3 are the neuronopathic forms. Type 2 is a more severe neuronopathic form leading to mortality by 2 years of age. Definitive diagnosis is made by a blood test–the glucocerebrosidase assay. There is no role for histological examination of the bone marrow, liver or spleen for diagnosis of the disease. Molecular studies for mutations are useful for confirming diagnosis, screening family members and prognosticating the disease. A splenectomy should not be performed except for palliation or when there is no response to enzyme replacement treatment or no possibility of getting any definitive treatment. Splenectomy may worsen skeletal and lung manifestations in Gaucher disease. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has completely revolutionized the prognosis and is now the standard of care for patients with this disease. Best results are seen in type 1 disease with good resolution of splenohepatomegaly, cytopenia and bone symptoms. Neurological symptoms in type 3 disease need supportive care. ERT is of no benefit in type 2 disease. Monitoring of patients on ERT involves evaluation of growth, blood counts, liver and spleen size and biomarkers such as chitotriosidase which reflect the disease burden. Therapy with ERT is very expensive and though patients in India have so far got the drug through a charitable access programme, there is a need for the government to facilitate access to treatment for this potentially curable disease. Bone marrow transplantation is an inferior option but may be considered when access to expensive ERT is not possible. PMID:25755533

  15. Gene Therapy Approaches for Lysosomal Storage Disease: Next-Generation Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Darin J.; Clément, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lysosomal storage diseases are a group of rare inborn errors of metabolism resulting from deficiency in normal lysosomal function. These diseases are characterized by progressive accumulation of storage material within the lysosomes of affected cells, ultimately leading to cellular dysfunction. Multiple tissues ranging from musculoskeletal and visceral to tissues of the central nervous system are typically involved in disease pathology. Since the advent of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) to manage some LSDs, general clinical outcomes have significantly improved; however, treatment with infused protein is lifelong and continued disease progression is still evident in patients. Viral gene therapy may provide a viable alternative or adjunctive therapy to current management strategies for LSDs. In this review, we discuss the various viral vector systems that have been developed and some of the strategy designs for the treatment of LSDs. PMID:22794786

  16. Disease models for the development of therapies for lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miao; Motabar, Omid; Ferrer, Marc; Marugan, Juan J; Zheng, Wei; Ottinger, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of rare diseases in which the function of the lysosome is disrupted by the accumulation of macromolecules. The complexity underlying the pathogenesis of LSDs and the small, often pediatric, population of patients make the development of therapies for these diseases challenging. Current treatments are only available for a small subset of LSDs and have not been effective at treating neurological symptoms. Disease-relevant cellular and animal models with high clinical predictability are critical for the discovery and development of new treatments for LSDs. In this paper, we review how LSD patient primary cells and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cellular models are providing novel assay systems in which phenotypes are more similar to those of the human LSD physiology. Furthermore, larger animal disease models are providing additional tools for evaluation of the efficacy of drug candidates. Early predictors of efficacy and better understanding of disease biology can significantly affect the translational process by focusing efforts on those therapies with the higher probability of success, thus decreasing overall time and cost spent in clinical development and increasing the overall positive outcomes in clinical trials. PMID:27144735

  17. Role of Nanotechnology for Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Lysosomal Diseases. A Focus on Gaucher's Disease.

    PubMed

    Martín-Banderas, L; Holgado, M A; Durán-Lobato, M; Infante, J J; Álvarez-Fuentes, J; Fernández-Arévalo, M

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) comprise a group of rare inherited chronic syndromes that cause deficiency of specific native enzymes within the lysosomes. The macromolecular compounds that are usually catabolized by lysosomal enzymes are accumulated within these organelles, causing progressive damage to tissues, skeleton and organs and, in several cases, the central nervous system (CNS). The damage caused by substrate accumulation finally results in physical deterioration, functional impairment and potential death. Up to date, the most promising therapy for most LSDs is enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT), which provides patients with the corresponding active enzyme. However, these enzymes do not have enough stability in blood, the treatment must be therefore periodically administrated by i.v. infusion under medical supervision, and immunogenicity issues are frequent. In addition, affected areas within the CNS, where the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle, cannot be reached by the enzymes. Nanotechnology can provide useful carriers to successfully protect and preserve enzymes, and transport them through the BBB towards brain locations. Several strategies based on targeting specific receptors on the BBB have led to nanoparticles that successfully carry sensitive molecules to the brain. Then, the main LSDs are described and a thorough review of nanotechnology strategies for brain delivery studied up to date is presented. PMID:26860997

  18. Combination Therapies for Lysosomal Storage Diseases: A Complex Answer to a Simple Problem.

    PubMed

    Macauley, Shannon L

    2016-06-01

    Abstract Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of 40-50 rare monogenic disorders that result in disrupted lysosomal function and subsequent lysosomal pathology. Depending on the protein or enzyme deficiency associated with each disease, LSDs affect an array of organ systems and elicit a complex set of secondary disease mechanisms that make many of these disorders difficult to fully treat. The etiology of most LSDs is known and the innate biology of lysosomal enzymes favors therapeutic intervention, yet most attempts at treating LSDs with enzyme replacement strategies fall short of being curative. Even with the advent of more sophisticated approaches, like substrate reduction therapy, pharmacologic chaperones, gene therapy or stem cell therapy, comprehensive treatments for LSDs have yet to be achieved. Given the limitations with individual therapies, recent research has focused on using a combination approach to treat LSDs. By coupling protein-, cell-, and gene- based therapies with small molecule drugs, researchers have found greater success in eradicating the clinical features of disease. This review seeks to discuss the positive and negatives of singular therapies used to treat LSDs, and discuss how, in combination, studies have demonstrated a more holistic benefit on pathological and functional parameters. By optimizing routes of delivery, therapeutic timing, and targeting secondary disease mechanisms, combination therapy represents the future for LSD treatment. PMID:27491211

  19. Gaucher Disease: The Metabolic Defect, Pathophysiology, Phenotypes And Natural History

    PubMed Central

    Baris, Hagit N.; Cohen, Ian J.; Mistry, Pramod K.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), a prototype lysosomal storage disorder, results from inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to biallelic mutations in GBA. The result is widespread accumulation of macrophages engorged with predominantly lysosomal glucocerebroside. A complex multisystem phenotype arises involving the liver, spleen, bone marrow and occasionally the lungs in type 1 Gaucher disease; in neuronopathic fulminant type 2 and chronic type 3 disease there is in addition progressive neurodegenerative disease. Manifestations of Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1) include hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenia, a complex pattern of bone involvement with avascular osteonecrosis (AVN), osteoporosis, fractures and lytic lesions. Enzyme replacement therapy became the standard of care in 1991, and this has transformed the natural history of GD1. This article reviews the clinical phenotypes of GD, diagnosis, pathophysiology and its natural history. A subsequent chapter discusses the treatment options. PMID:25345088

  20. Genetic perspective on the role of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Gan-Or, Ziv; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD), once considered as a prototype of a sporadic disease, is now known to be considerably affected by various genetic factors, which interact with environmental factors and the normal process of aging, leading to PD. Large studies determined that the hereditary component of PD is at least 27%, and in some populations, single genetic factors are responsible for more than 33% of PD patients. Interestingly, many of these genetic factors, such as LRRK2, GBA, SMPD1, SNCA, PARK2, PINK1, PARK7, SCARB2, and others, are involved in the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). Some of these genes encode lysosomal enzymes, whereas others correspond to proteins that are involved in transport to the lysosome, mitophagy, or other autophagic-related functions. Is it possible that all these factors converge into a single pathway that causes PD? In this review, we will discuss these genetic findings and the role of the ALP in the pathogenesis of PD and will try to answer this question. We will suggest a novel hypothesis for the pathogenic mechanism of PD that involves the lysosome and the different autophagy pathways. PMID:26207393

  1. Inhibition of lysosomal protease cathepsin D reduces renal fibrosis in murine chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Christopher; Cocchiaro, Pasquale; Oakley, Fiona; Howarth, Rachel; Callaghan, Krystena; Leslie, Jack; Luli, Saimir; Wood, Katrina M.; Genovese, Federica; Sheerin, Neil S.; Moles, Anna

    2016-01-01

    During chronic kidney disease (CKD) there is a dysregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) homeostasis leading to renal fibrosis. Lysosomal proteases such as cathepsins (Cts) regulate this process in other organs, however, their role in CKD is still unknown. Here we describe a novel role for cathepsins in CKD. CtsD and B were located in distal and proximal tubular cells respectively in human disease. Administration of CtsD (Pepstatin A) but not B inhibitor (Ca074-Me), in two mouse CKD models, UUO and chronic ischemia reperfusion injury, led to a reduction in fibrosis. No changes in collagen transcription or myofibroblasts numbers were observed. Pepstatin A administration resulted in increased extracellular urokinase and collagen degradation. In vitro and in vivo administration of chloroquine, an endo/lysosomal inhibitor, mimicked Pepstatin A effect on renal fibrosis. Therefore, we propose a mechanism by which CtsD inhibition leads to increased collagenolytic activity due to an impairment in lysosomal recycling. This results in increased extracellular activity of enzymes such as urokinase, triggering a proteolytic cascade, which culminates in more ECM degradation. Taken together these results suggest that inhibition of lysosomal proteases, such as CtsD, could be a new therapeutic approach to reduce renal fibrosis and slow progression of CKD. PMID:26831567

  2. Inhibition of lysosomal protease cathepsin D reduces renal fibrosis in murine chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher; Cocchiaro, Pasquale; Oakley, Fiona; Howarth, Rachel; Callaghan, Krystena; Leslie, Jack; Luli, Saimir; Wood, Katrina M; Genovese, Federica; Sheerin, Neil S; Moles, Anna

    2016-01-01

    During chronic kidney disease (CKD) there is a dysregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) homeostasis leading to renal fibrosis. Lysosomal proteases such as cathepsins (Cts) regulate this process in other organs, however, their role in CKD is still unknown. Here we describe a novel role for cathepsins in CKD. CtsD and B were located in distal and proximal tubular cells respectively in human disease. Administration of CtsD (Pepstatin A) but not B inhibitor (Ca074-Me), in two mouse CKD models, UUO and chronic ischemia reperfusion injury, led to a reduction in fibrosis. No changes in collagen transcription or myofibroblasts numbers were observed. Pepstatin A administration resulted in increased extracellular urokinase and collagen degradation. In vitro and in vivo administration of chloroquine, an endo/lysosomal inhibitor, mimicked Pepstatin A effect on renal fibrosis. Therefore, we propose a mechanism by which CtsD inhibition leads to increased collagenolytic activity due to an impairment in lysosomal recycling. This results in increased extracellular activity of enzymes such as urokinase, triggering a proteolytic cascade, which culminates in more ECM degradation. Taken together these results suggest that inhibition of lysosomal proteases, such as CtsD, could be a new therapeutic approach to reduce renal fibrosis and slow progression of CKD. PMID:26831567

  3. Prevention of lysosomal storage diseases and derivation of mutant stem cell lines by preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Altarescu, Gheona; Beeri, Rachel; Eiges, Rachel; Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Elstein, Deborah; Zimran, Ari; Margalioth, Ehud J; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Renbaum, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) allows birth of unaffected children for couples at risk for a genetic disorder. We present the strategy and outcome of PGD for four lysosomal storage disorders (LSD): Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), Gaucher disease (GD), Fabry disease (FD), and Hunter syndrome (HS), and subsequent development of stem cell lines. For each disease, we developed a family-specific fluorescent multiplex single-cell PCR protocol that included the familial mutation and informative markers surrounding the mutation. Embryo biopsy and PGD analysis were performed on either oocytes (polar bodies one and two) or on single blastomeres from a six-cell embryo. We treated twenty families carrying mutations in these lysosomal storage disorders, including 3 couples requiring simultaneous analysis for two disorders (TSD/GD, TSD/balanced Robertsonian translocation 45XYder(21;14), and HS/oculocutaneus albinism). These analyses led to an overall pregnancy rate/embryo transfer of 38% and the birth of 20 unaffected children from 17 families. We have found that PGD for lysosomal disorders is a safe and effective method to prevent birth of affected children. In addition, by using mutant embryos for the derivation of stem cell lines, we have successfully established GD and HS hESC lines for use as valuable models in LSD research. PMID:23320174

  4. Therapy Development for the Lysosomal Storage Disease Fucosidosis using the Canine Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jessica L; Taylor, Rosanne M

    2016-06-01

    Abstract Fucosidosis (OMIM 23000) is an inherited neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase a-L-fucosidase due to mutations in the FUCA1 gene. Without enzyme-targeted therapy patients rarely survive beyond the first decade of life, and therapy options other than supportive care are limited. Hematopoietic transplants, first developed in the fucosidosis dog model, are the only treatment option available capable of delaying the disease course. However, due to the risks and exclusion criteria of this treatment additional therapies are required. The development of additional therapies including intravenous and intra-cerebrospinal fluid enzyme replacement therapy and gene therapy, which have been trialed in the canine model, will be discussed. PMID:27491218

  5. Distribution of saposin proteins (sphingolipid activator proteins) in lysosomal storage and other diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, S; Yamamoto, Y; O'Brien, J S; Kishimoto, Y

    1990-01-01

    Saposins (A, B, C, and D) are small glycoproteins required for the hydrolysis of sphingolipids by specific lysosomal hydrolases. Concentrations of these saposins in brain, liver, and spleen from normal humans as well as patients with lysosomal storage disease were determined. A quantitative HPLC method was used for saposin A, C, and D and a stimulation assay was used for saposin B. In normal tissues, saposin D was the most abundant of the four saposins. Massive accumulations of saposins, especially saposin A (about 80-fold increase over normal), were found in brain of patients with Tay-Sachs disease or infantile Sandhoff disease. In spleen of adult patients with Gaucher disease, saposin A and D accumulations (60- and 17-fold, respectively, over normal) were higher than that of saposin C (about 16-fold over normal). Similar massive accumulations of saposins A and D were found in liver of patients with fucosidosis (about 70- and 20-fold, respectively, over normal). Saposin D was the primary saposin stored in the liver of a patient with Niemann-Pick disease (about 30-fold over normal). Moderate increases of saposins B and D were found in a patient with GM1 gangliosidosis. Normal or near normal levels of all saposins were found in patients with Krabbe disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, adrenoleukodystrophy, I-cell disease, mucopolysaccharidosis types 2 and 3B, or Jansky-Bielschowsky disease. The implications of the storage of saposins in these diseases are discussed. PMID:2110365

  6. Expression of the disease on female carriers of X-linked lysosomal disorders: a brief review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Most lysosomal diseases (LD) are inherited as autosomal recessive traits, but two important conditions have X-linked inheritance: Fabry disease and Mucopolysaccharidosis II (MPS II). These two diseases show a very different pattern regarding expression on heterozygotes, which does not seem to be explained by the X-inactivation mechanism only. While MPS II heterozygotes are asymptomatic in most instances, in Fabry disease most of female carriers show some disease manifestation, which is sometimes severe. It is known that there is a major difference among X-linked diseases depending on the cell autonomy of the gene product involved and, therefore, on the occurrence of cross-correction. Since lysosomal enzymes are usually secreted and uptaken by neighbor cells, the different findings between MPS II and Fabry disease heterozygotes can also be due to different efficiency of cross-correction (higher in MPS II and lower in Fabry disease). In this paper, we review these two X-linked LD in order to discuss the mechanisms that could explain the different rates of penetrance and expressivity observed in the heterozygotes; this could be helpful to better understand the expression of X-linked traits. PMID:20509947

  7. Glyco-engineering strategies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherent diseases characterized by massive accumulation of undigested compounds in lysosomes, which is caused by genetic defects resulting in the deficiency of a lysosomal hydrolase. Currently, enzyme replacement therapy has been successfully used for treatment of 7 LSDs with 10 approved therapeutic enzymes whereas new approaches such as pharmacological chaperones and gene therapy still await evaluation in clinical trials. While therapeutic enzymes for Gaucher disease have N-glycans with terminal mannose residues for targeting to macrophages, the others require N-glycans containing mannose-6-phosphates that are recognized by mannose-6-phosphate receptors on the plasma membrane for cellular uptake and targeting to lysosomes. Due to the fact that efficient lysosomal delivery of therapeutic enzymes is essential for the clearance of accumulated compounds, the suitable glycan structure and its high content are key factors for efficient therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, glycan remodeling strategies to improve lysosomal targeting and tissue distribution have been highlighted. This review describes the glycan structures that are important for lysosomal targeting and provides information on recent glyco-engineering technologies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(8): 438-444] PMID:25999178

  8. Glyco-engineering strategies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2015-08-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherent diseases characterized by massive accumulation of undigested compounds in lysosomes, which is caused by genetic defects resulting in the deficiency of a lysosomal hydrolase. Currently, enzyme replacement therapy has been successfully used for treatment of 7 LSDs with 10 approved therapeutic enzymes whereas new approaches such as pharmacological chaperones and gene therapy still await evaluation in clinical trials. While therapeutic enzymes for Gaucher disease have N-glycans with terminal mannose residues for targeting to macrophages, the others require N-glycans containing mannose-6-phosphates that are recognized by mannose-6-phosphate receptors on the plasma membrane for cellular uptake and targeting to lysosomes. Due to the fact that efficient lysosomal delivery of therapeutic enzymes is essential for the clearance of accumulated compounds, the suitable glycan structure and its high content are key factors for efficient therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, glycan remodeling strategies to improve lysosomal targeting and tissue distribution have been highlighted. This review describes the glycan structures that are important for lysosomal targeting and provides information on recent glyco-engineering technologies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy. PMID:25999178

  9. Acid sphingomyelinase modulates the autophagic process by controlling lysosomal biogenesis in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Kil; Jin, Hee Kyung; Park, Min Hee; Kim, Bo-ra; Lee, Phil Hyu; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Carter, Janet E.; He, Xingxuan; Schuchman, Edward H.

    2014-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), abnormal sphingolipid metabolism has been reported, although the pathogenic consequences of these changes have not been fully characterized. We show that acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is increased in fibroblasts, brain, and/or plasma from patients with AD and in AD mice, leading to defective autophagic degradation due to lysosomal depletion. Partial genetic inhibition of ASM (ASM+/−) in a mouse model of familial AD (FAD; amyloid precursor protein [APP]/presenilin 1 [PS1]) ameliorated the autophagocytic defect by restoring lysosomal biogenesis, resulting in improved AD clinical and pathological findings, including reduction of amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and improvement of memory impairment. Similar effects were noted after pharmacologic restoration of ASM to the normal range in APP/PS1 mice. Autophagic dysfunction in neurons derived from FAD patient induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was restored by partial ASM inhibition. Overall, these results reveal a novel mechanism of ASM pathogenesis in AD that leads to defective autophagy due to impaired lysosomal biogenesis and suggests that partial ASM inhibition is a potential new therapeutic intervention for the disease. PMID:25049335

  10. Exosome Secretion Ameliorates Lysosomal Storage of Cholesterol in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Katrin; Goebel, Cornelia; Runz, Heiko; Möbius, Wiebke; Weiss, Sievert; Feussner, Ivo; Simons, Mikael; Schneider, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 disease is an autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder. Loss of function of the npc1 gene leads to abnormal accumulation of free cholesterol and sphingolipids within the late endosomal and lysosomal compartments resulting in progressive neurodegeneration and dysmyelination. Here, we show that oligodendroglial cells secrete cholesterol by exosomes when challenged with cholesterol or U18666A, which induces late endosomal cholesterol accumulation. Up-regulation of exosomal cholesterol release was also observed after siRNA-mediated knockdown of NPC1 and in fibroblasts derived from NPC1 patients and could be reversed by expression of wild-type NPC1. We provide evidence that exosomal cholesterol secretion depends on the presence of flotillin. Our findings indicate that exosomal release of cholesterol may serve as a cellular mechanism to partially bypass the traffic block that results in the toxic lysosomal cholesterol accumulation in Niemann-Pick type C1 disease. Furthermore, we suggest that secretion of cholesterol by exosomes contributes to maintain cellular cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:20554533

  11. Treating lysosomal storage diseases with pharmacological chaperones: from concept to clinics

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Giancarlo

    2009-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of genetic disorders due to defects in any aspect of lysosomal biology. During the past two decades, different approaches have been introduced for the treatment of these conditions. Among them, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) represented a major advance and is used successfully in the treatment of some of these disorders. However, ERT has limitations such as insufficient biodistribution of recombinant enzymes and high costs. An emerging strategy for the treatment of LSDs is pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT), based on the use of chaperone molecules that assist the folding of mutated enzymes and improve their stability and lysosomal trafficking. After proof-of-concept studies, PCT is now being translated into clinical applications for Fabry, Gaucher and Pompe disease. This approach, however, can only be applied to patients carrying chaperone-responsive mutations. The recent demonstration of a synergistic effect of chaperones and ERT expands the applications of PCT and prompts a re-evaluation of their therapeutic use and potential. This review discusses the strengths and drawbacks of the potential therapies available for LSDs and proposes that future research should be directed towards the development of treatment protocols based on the combination of different therapies to improve the clinical outcome of LSD patients. PMID:20049730

  12. Low Serum Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity Correlates with Advanced Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Shteyer, Eyal; Villenchik, Rivka; Mahamid, Mahmud; Nator, Nidaa; Safadi, Rifaat

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver has become the most common liver disorder and is recognized as a major health burden in the Western world. The causes for disease progression are not fully elucidated but lysosomal impairment is suggested. Here we evaluate a possible role for lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) activity in liver disease. To study LAL levels in patients with microvesicular, idiopathic cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Medical records of patients with microvesicular steatosis, cryptogenic cirrhosis and NAFLD, diagnosed on the basis of liver biopsies, were included in the study. Measured serum LAL activity was correlated to clinical, laboratory, imaging and pathological data. No patient exhibited LAL activity compatible with genetic LAL deficiency. However, serum LAL activity inversely predicted liver disease severity. A LAL level of 0.5 was the most sensitive for detecting both histologic and noninvasive markers for disease severity, including lower white blood cell count and calcium, and elevated γ-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, uric acid and coagulation function. Serum LAL activity <0.5 indicates severe liver injury in patients with fatty liver and cirrhosis. Further studies should define the direct role of LAL in liver disease severity and consider the possibility of replacement therapy. PMID:26927097

  13. Low Serum Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity Correlates with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shteyer, Eyal; Villenchik, Rivka; Mahamid, Mahmud; Nator, Nidaa; Safadi, Rifaat

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver has become the most common liver disorder and is recognized as a major health burden in the Western world. The causes for disease progression are not fully elucidated but lysosomal impairment is suggested. Here we evaluate a possible role for lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) activity in liver disease. To study LAL levels in patients with microvesicular, idiopathic cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Medical records of patients with microvesicular steatosis, cryptogenic cirrhosis and NAFLD, diagnosed on the basis of liver biopsies, were included in the study. Measured serum LAL activity was correlated to clinical, laboratory, imaging and pathological data. No patient exhibited LAL activity compatible with genetic LAL deficiency. However, serum LAL activity inversely predicted liver disease severity. A LAL level of 0.5 was the most sensitive for detecting both histologic and noninvasive markers for disease severity, including lower white blood cell count and calcium, and elevated γ-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, uric acid and coagulation function. Serum LAL activity <0.5 indicates severe liver injury in patients with fatty liver and cirrhosis. Further studies should define the direct role of LAL in liver disease severity and consider the possibility of replacement therapy. PMID:26927097

  14. Induced pluripotent stem cell technology for disease modeling and drug screening with emphasis on lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The recent derivation of disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from somatic cells of patients with familial and sporadic forms of diseases and the demonstration of their ability to give rise to disease-relevant cell types provide an excellent opportunity to gain further insights into the mechanisms responsible for the pathophysiology of these diseases and develop novel therapeutic drugs. Here, we review the recent advances in iPSC technology for modeling of various lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) and discuss possible strategies through which LSD-iPSCs can be exploited to identify novel drugs and improve future clinical treatment of LSDs. PMID:22925465

  15. Cystinosis as a lysosomal storage disease with multiple mutant alleles: Phenotypic-genotypic correlations

    PubMed Central

    Al-Haggar, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease with an unclear enzymatic defect causing lysosomal cystine accumulation with no corresponding elevation of plasma cystine levels leading to multisystemic dysfunction. The systemic manifestations include a proximal renal tubular defect (Fanconi-like), endocrinal disturbances, eye involvements, with corneal, conjunctival and retinal depositions, and neurological manifestations in the form of brain and muscle dysfunction. Most of the long-term ill effects of cystinosis are observed particularly in patients with long survival as a result of a renal transplant. Its responsible CTNS gene that encodes the lysosomal cystine carrier protein (cystinosin) has been mapped on the short arm of chromosome 17 (Ch17 p13). There are three clinical forms based on the onset of main symptoms: nephropathic infantile form, nephropathic juvenile form and non-nephropathic adult form with predominant ocular manifestations. Avoidance of eye damage from sun exposure, use of cystine chelators (cysteamine) and finally renal transplantation are the main treatment lines. Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for carrier parents is pivotal in the prevention of recurrence. PMID:24255892

  16. Magnetic resonance findings of the corpus callosum in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Tamura, Shinji; Nakamoto, Yuya; Matsuki, Naoaki; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Fujita, Michio; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Several reports have described magnetic resonance (MR) findings in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases such as gangliosidoses and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Although most of those studies described the signal intensities of white matter in the cerebrum, findings of the corpus callosum were not described in detail. A retrospective study was conducted on MR findings of the corpus callosum as well as the rostral commissure and the fornix in 18 cases of canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases. This included 6 Shiba Inu dogs and 2 domestic shorthair cats with GM1 gangliosidosis; 2 domestic shorthair cats, 2 familial toy poodles, and a golden retriever with GM2 gangliosidosis; and 2 border collies and 3 chihuahuas with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, to determine whether changes of the corpus callosum is an imaging indicator of those diseases. The corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were difficult to recognize in all cases of juvenile-onset gangliosidoses (GM1 gangliosidosis in Shiba Inu dogs and domestic shorthair cats and GM2 gangliosidosis in domestic shorthair cats) and GM2 gangliosidosis in toy poodles with late juvenile-onset. In contrast, the corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were confirmed in cases of GM2 gangliosidosis in a golden retriever and canine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses with late juvenile- to early adult-onset, but were extremely thin. Abnormal findings of the corpus callosum on midline sagittal images may be a useful imaging indicator for suspecting lysosomal storage diseases, especially hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of the corpus callosum in juvenile-onset gangliosidoses. PMID:24386203

  17. Magnetic Resonance Findings of the Corpus Callosum in Canine and Feline Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Tamura, Shinji; Nakamoto, Yuya; Matsuki, Naoaki; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Fujita, Michio; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Several reports have described magnetic resonance (MR) findings in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases such as gangliosidoses and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Although most of those studies described the signal intensities of white matter in the cerebrum, findings of the corpus callosum were not described in detail. A retrospective study was conducted on MR findings of the corpus callosum as well as the rostral commissure and the fornix in 18 cases of canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases. This included 6 Shiba Inu dogs and 2 domestic shorthair cats with GM1 gangliosidosis; 2 domestic shorthair cats, 2 familial toy poodles, and a golden retriever with GM2 gangliosidosis; and 2 border collies and 3 chihuahuas with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, to determine whether changes of the corpus callosum is an imaging indicator of those diseases. The corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were difficult to recognize in all cases of juvenile-onset gangliosidoses (GM1 gangliosidosis in Shiba Inu dogs and domestic shorthair cats and GM2 gangliosidosis in domestic shorthair cats) and GM2 gangliosidosis in toy poodles with late juvenile-onset. In contrast, the corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were confirmed in cases of GM2 gangliosidosis in a golden retriever and canine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses with late juvenile- to early adult-onset, but were extremely thin. Abnormal findings of the corpus callosum on midline sagittal images may be a useful imaging indicator for suspecting lysosomal storage diseases, especially hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of the corpus callosum in juvenile-onset gangliosidoses. PMID:24386203

  18. Niemann-Pick disease.

    PubMed

    Elleder, M

    1989-09-01

    Results of the investigation carried out during this decade brought unambigous evidence of biochemical heterogeneity inside the complex of Niemann-Pick disease according to which two entirely different metabolic disorders can be recognized. 1. Niemann-Pick sphingomyelinosis, a clear-cut enzymopathy, the pivotal lesion of which is the deficiency of lysosomal spingomyelinase leading to widespread lysosomal deposition of sphingomyelin liquid crystals. Two main allelic variants are known. The first one, neuronopathic (former type A) known as infantile with rapid course, may also manifest considerably prolonged course or an atypical course with predominantly visceral symptomatology. Patients with the second, visceral, variant (former type B), display mainly slow clinical course and often reach adulthood. With rare exceptions the neuronopathic variant can be biochemically recognized from the visceral one by much lower values of the in vivo sphingomyelin degradation test in the former. 2. The rest of the complex comprising types C-D differs substantially from the sphingomyelinase deficiency group by the remarkable heterogeneity in the lysosomal stored lipid pattern given by differences among the affected cell populations. Sphingomyelin storage could be proved histochemically solely in the histiocytic population together with cholesterol, neutral glycosphingolipids and lysobisphosphatidic acid, whereas the brain neurons displayed only neutral glycosphingolipid storage. There is an increasing evidence of the crucial biochemical lesion in this group being an altered intracellular traffic of exogenously derived cholesterol caused probably by its deficient translocation from lysosomes to other intracellular membrane sites. This leads to decreased cholesterol esterification rate which is the basis of the newly developed diagnostic test. Inconstant depression of sphingomyelinase activity is considered to be a secondary phenomenon. The so-called lactosylceramidosis is a rare

  19. Niemann-Pick C disease and mobilization of lysosomal cholesterol by cyclodextrin

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Jean E.; Karten, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disease in which endocytosed cholesterol becomes sequestered in late endosomes/lysosomes (LEs/Ls) because of mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 gene. Mutations in either of these genes can lead to impaired functions of the NPC1 or NPC2 proteins and progressive neurodegeneration as well as liver and lung disease. NPC1 is a polytopic protein of the LE/L limiting membrane, whereas NPC2 is a soluble protein in the LE/L lumen. These two proteins act in tandem and promote the export of cholesterol from LEs/Ls. Consequently, a defect in either NPC1 or NPC2 causes cholesterol accumulation in LEs/Ls. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms leading to NPC disease, particularly in the CNS. Recent exciting data on the mechanism by which the cholesterol-sequestering agent cyclodextrin can bypass the functions of NPC1 and NPC2 in the LEs/Ls, and mobilize cholesterol from LEs/Ls, will be highlighted. Moreover, the possible use of cyclodextrin as a valuable therapeutic agent for treatment of NPC patients will be considered. PMID:24664998

  20. Lysosomal storage disease: gene therapy on both sides of the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Aronovich, Elena L.; Hackett, Perry B.

    2014-01-01

    Most lysosomal storage disorders affect the nervous system as well as other tissues and organs of the body. Previously, the complexities of these diseases, particularly in treating neurologic abnormalities, were too great to surmount. However, based on recent developments there are realistic expectations that effective therapies are coming soon. Gene therapy offers the possibility of affordable, comprehensive treatment associated with these diseases currently not provided by standards of care. With a focus on correction of neurologic disease by systemic gene therapy of mucopolysaccharidoses types I and IIIA, we review some of the major recent advances in viral and non-viral vectors, methods of their delivery and strategies leading to correction of both the nervous and somatic tissues as well as evaluation of functional correction of neurologic manifestations in animal models. We discuss two questions: what systemic gene therapy strategies work best for correction of both somatic and neurologic abnormalities in a lysosomal storage disorder and is there evidence that targeting peripheral tissues (e.g., in the liver) has a future for ameliorating neurologic disease in patients? PMID:25410058

  1. Lysosomal storage disorders: The cellular impact of lysosomal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a family of disorders that result from inherited gene mutations that perturb lysosomal homeostasis. LSDs mainly stem from deficiencies in lysosomal enzymes, but also in some non-enzymatic lysosomal proteins, which lead to abnormal storage of macromolecular substrates. Valuable insights into lysosome functions have emerged from research into these diseases. In addition to primary lysosomal dysfunction, cellular pathways associated with other membrane-bound organelles are perturbed in these disorders. Through selective examples, we illustrate why the term “cellular storage disorders” may be a more appropriate description of these diseases and discuss therapies that can alleviate storage and restore normal cellular function. PMID:23185029

  2. Targeting the lysosome in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Shengfu; Amaravadi, Ravi K.

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound intracellular organelles that receive macromolecules delivered by endocytosis, phagocytosis, and autophagy for degradation and recycling. Over the last decade, advances in lysosome research have established a broad role for the lysosome in the pathophysiology of disease. In this review, we highlight the recent discoveries in lysosome biology, with an emphasis on their implications for cancer therapy. We focus on targeting the lysosome in cancer by exploring lysosomal biogenesis and its role in the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy. We also discuss how lysosomal inhibition could emerge as a new therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer. PMID:26599426

  3. 4-Trifluoromethylumbelliferyl glycosides as new substrates for revealing diseases connected with hereditary deficiency of lysosome glycosidases.

    PubMed

    Karpova, E A; Voznyi YaV; Dudukina, T V; Tsvetkova, I V

    1991-08-01

    The following glycosides of 4-trifluoromethylumbelliferone: alpha-D-mannopyranoside, alpha-L-fucopyranoside, alpha-D-glucopyranoside, beta-D-glucopyranoside, alpha-D-galactopyranoside, beta-D-galactopyranoside, alpha-L-iduronide and beta-D-glucuronide were studied. 4-Trifluoromethylumbelliferyl glycosides were shown to be substrates for glycosidases. Some of them were cleaved even better than the corresponding methylumbelliferyl glycosides. 4-Trifluoromethylumbelliferyl glycosides were applied for revealing the corresponding enzyme deficiencies upon diagnosis of Gaucher and Hurler diseases as well as GM1 gangliosidosis and alpha-mannosidosis. 4-Trifluoromethylumbelliferone released after enzymatic hydrolysis of 4-trifluoromethylumbelliferyl glycosides exhibits more contrast yellow fluorescence in UV-light than the blue one of methylumbelliferone upon exposure of enzyme activity on solid supports. Therefore 4-trifluoromethylumbelliferyl glycosides are convenient substrates for revealing glycosidase activity directly in tissue samples, e.g. in placenta, and thus for fast prenatal diagnosis of lysosomal diseases. PMID:1781792

  4. Interconversion of the Specificities of Human Lysosomal Enzymes Associated with Fabry and Schindler Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasic, Ivan B.; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Guce, Abigail I.; Clark, Nathaniel E.; Garman, Scott C.

    2010-09-03

    The human lysosomal enzymes {alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-GAL, EC 3.2.1.22) and {alpha}-N-acetylgalactosaminidase ({alpha}-NAGAL, EC 3.2.1.49) share 46% amino acid sequence identity and have similar folds. The active sites of the two enzymes share 11 of 13 amino acids, differing only where they interact with the 2-position of the substrates. Using a rational protein engineering approach, we interconverted the enzymatic specificity of {alpha}-GAL and {alpha}-NAGAL. The engineered {alpha}-GAL (which we call {alpha}-GALSA) retains the antigenicity of {alpha}-GAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of {alpha}-NAGAL. Conversely, the engineered {alpha}-NAGAL (which we call {alpha}-NAGAL{sup EL}) retains the antigenicity of {alpha}-NAGAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of the {alpha}-GAL enzyme. Comparison of the crystal structures of the designed enzyme {alpha}-GAL{sup SA} to the wild-type enzymes shows that active sites of {alpha}-GAL{sup SA} and {alpha}-NAGAL superimpose well, indicating success of the rational design. The designed enzymes might be useful as non-immunogenic alternatives in enzyme replacement therapy for treatment of lysosomal storage disorders such as Fabry disease.

  5. Interconversion of the specificities of human lysosomal enzymes associated with Fabry and Schindler diseases.

    PubMed

    Tomasic, Ivan B; Metcalf, Matthew C; Guce, Abigail I; Clark, Nathaniel E; Garman, Scott C

    2010-07-01

    The human lysosomal enzymes alpha-galactosidase (alpha-GAL, EC 3.2.1.22) and alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-NAGAL, EC 3.2.1.49) share 46% amino acid sequence identity and have similar folds. The active sites of the two enzymes share 11 of 13 amino acids, differing only where they interact with the 2-position of the substrates. Using a rational protein engineering approach, we interconverted the enzymatic specificity of alpha- GAL and alpha-NAGAL. The engineered alpha-GAL (which we call alpha-GAL(SA)) retains the antigenicity of alpha-GAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of alpha-NAGAL. Conversely, the engineered alpha-NAGAL (which we call alpha-NAGAL(EL)) retains the antigenicity of alpha-NAGAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of the alpha-GAL enzyme. Comparison of the crystal structures of the designed enzyme alpha-GAL(SA) to the wild-type enzymes shows that active sites of alpha-GAL(SA) and alpha-NAGAL superimpose well, indicating success of the rational design. The designed enzymes might be useful as non-immunogenic alternatives in enzyme replacement therapy for treatment of lysosomal storage disorders such as Fabry disease. PMID:20444686

  6. An aberrant sugar modification of BACE1 blocks its lysosomal targeting in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Kitazume, Shinobu; Fujinawa, Reiko; Saito, Takashi; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Saido, Takaomi C; Nakano, Miyako; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Shigeo; Manya, Hiroshi; Endo, Tamao; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE1), an essential protease for the generation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, is a major drug target for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there is a concern that inhibiting BACE1 could also affect several physiological functions. Here, we show that BACE1 is modified with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), a sugar modification highly expressed in brain, and demonstrate that AD patients have higher levels of bisecting GlcNAc on BACE1. Analysis of knockout mice lacking the biosynthetic enzyme for bisecting GlcNAc, GnT-III (Mgat3), revealed that cleavage of Aβ-precursor protein (APP) by BACE1 is reduced in these mice, resulting in a decrease in Aβ plaques and improved cognitive function. The lack of this modification directs BACE1 to late endosomes/lysosomes where it is less colocalized with APP, leading to accelerated lysosomal degradation. Notably, other BACE1 substrates, CHL1 and contactin-2, are normally cleaved in GnT-III-deficient mice, suggesting that the effect of bisecting GlcNAc on BACE1 is selective to APP. Considering that GnT-III-deficient mice remain healthy, GnT-III may be a novel and promising drug target for AD therapeutics. PMID:25592972

  7. Abnormal pupillary light reflex with chromatic pupillometry in Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Narita, Aya; Shirai, Kentarou; Kubota, Norika; Takayama, Rumiko; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Onuki, Takanori; Numakura, Chikahiko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Hamada, Yusuke; Sakai, Norio; Ohno, Atsuko; Asami, Maya; Matsushita, Shoko; Hayashi, Anri; Kumada, Tomohiro; Fujii, Tatsuya; Horino, Asako; Inoue, Takeshi; Kuki, Ichiro; Asakawa, Ken; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Ohno, Koyo; Nishimura, Yoko; Tamasaki, Akiko; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Kousaku

    2014-02-01

    The hallmark of neuronopathic Gaucher disease (GD) is oculomotor abnormalities, but ophthalmological assessment is difficult in uncooperative patients. Chromatic pupillometry is a quantitative method to assess the pupillary light reflex (PLR) with minimal patient cooperation. Thus, we investigated whether chromatic pupillometry could be useful for neurological evaluations in GD. In our neuronopathic GD patients, red light-induced PLR was markedly impaired, whereas blue light-induced PLR was relatively spared. In addition, patients with non-neuronopathic GD showed no abnormalities. These novel findings show that chromatic pupillometry is a convenient method to detect neurological signs and monitor the course of disease in neuronopathic GD. PMID:25356393

  8. Abnormal pupillary light reflex with chromatic pupillometry in Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Aya; Shirai, Kentarou; Kubota, Norika; Takayama, Rumiko; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Onuki, Takanori; Numakura, Chikahiko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Hamada, Yusuke; Sakai, Norio; Ohno, Atsuko; Asami, Maya; Matsushita, Shoko; Hayashi, Anri; Kumada, Tomohiro; Fujii, Tatsuya; Horino, Asako; Inoue, Takeshi; Kuki, Ichiro; Asakawa, Ken; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Ohno, Koyo; Nishimura, Yoko; Tamasaki, Akiko; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Kousaku

    2014-01-01

    The hallmark of neuronopathic Gaucher disease (GD) is oculomotor abnormalities, but ophthalmological assessment is difficult in uncooperative patients. Chromatic pupillometry is a quantitative method to assess the pupillary light reflex (PLR) with minimal patient cooperation. Thus, we investigated whether chromatic pupillometry could be useful for neurological evaluations in GD. In our neuronopathic GD patients, red light-induced PLR was markedly impaired, whereas blue light-induced PLR was relatively spared. In addition, patients with non-neuronopathic GD showed no abnormalities. These novel findings show that chromatic pupillometry is a convenient method to detect neurological signs and monitor the course of disease in neuronopathic GD. PMID:25356393

  9. Kinetics of lysosomal storage of indigestible matter.

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, J; Alward, J

    1975-01-01

    In lysosomal storage diseases and in accumulation of lipofusion in the lysosomes there is a gradual eroding of the lysosomal system due to overloading the lysosomes by molecules which cannot be digested or expelled. The kinetics of this accumulation is examined for tissue cultures in terms of the cell growth rate, lysosomal production rate, and of generation of the indigestible element. PMID:1125388

  10. Dataset and standard operating procedure for newborn screening of six lysosomal storage diseases: By tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Susan; Buroker, Norman; Cournoyer, Jason J; Potier, Anna M; Trometer, Joseph D; Elbin, Carole; Schermer, Mack J; Kantola, Jaana; Boyce, Aaron; Turecek, Frantisek; Gelb, Michael H; Scott, C Ronald

    2016-09-01

    In this data article we provide a detailed standard operating procedure for performing a tandem mass spectrometry, multiplex assay of 6 lysosomal enzymes for newborn screening of the lysosomal storage diseases Mucopolysaccharidosis-I, Pompe, Fabry, Niemann-Pick-A/B, Gaucher, and Krabbe, (Elliott, et al., 2016) [1]. We also provide the mass spectrometry peak areas for the product and internal standard ions typically observed with a dried blood spot punch from a random newborn, and we provide the daily variation of the daily mean activities for all 6 enzymes. PMID:27508243

  11. Early deficits in motor coordination and cognitive dysfunction in a mouse model of the neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder, Sandhoff disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulinello, Maria; Chen, Fengying; Dobrenis, Kostantin

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models of lysosomal storage diseases, including Sandhoff disease, are frequently employed to test therapies directed at the central nervous system. We backbred such mice and conducted a behavioral test battery which included sensorimotor and cognitive assessments. This is the first report of short-term memory deficits in a murine model of Sandhoff disease. We also document early onset of motor deficits using the balance beam test. PMID:18611415

  12. Ambroxol improves lysosomal biochemistry in glucocerebrosidase mutation-linked Parkinson disease cells

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Alisdair; Magalhaes, Joana; Shen, Chengguo; Chau, Kai-Yin; Hughes, Derralyn; Mehta, Atul; Foltynie, Tom; Cooper, J. Mark; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Gegg, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene, which encodes the lysosomal hydrolase glucosylceramidase. Patients with Gaucher disease and heterozygous glucocerebrosidase mutation carriers are at increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease. Indeed, glucocerebrosidase mutations are the most frequent risk factor for Parkinson’s disease in the general population. Therefore there is an urgent need to understand the mechanisms by which glucocerebrosidase mutations predispose to neurodegeneration to facilitate development of novel treatments. To study this we generated fibroblast lines from skin biopsies of five patients with Gaucher disease and six heterozygous glucocerebrosidase mutation carriers with and without Parkinson’s disease. Glucosylceramidase protein and enzyme activity levels were assayed. Oxidative stress was assayed by single cell imaging of dihydroethidium. Glucosylceramidase enzyme activity was significantly reduced in fibroblasts from patients with Gaucher disease (median 5% of controls, P = 0.0001) and heterozygous mutation carriers with (median 59% of controls, P = 0.001) and without (56% of controls, P = 0.001) Parkinson’s disease compared with controls. Glucosylceramidase protein levels, assessed by western blot, were significantly reduced in fibroblasts from Gaucher disease (median glucosylceramidase levels 42% of control, P < 0.001) and heterozygous mutation carriers with (median 59% of control, P < 0.001) and without (median 68% of control, P < 0.001) Parkinson’s disease. Single cell imaging of dihydroethidium demonstrated increased production of cytosolic reactive oxygen species in fibroblasts from patients with Gaucher disease (dihydroethidium oxidation rate increased by a median of 62% compared to controls, P < 0.001) and heterozygous mutation carriers with (dihydroethidium oxidation rate increased by a median of 68% compared with controls, P < 0.001) and without (dihydroethidium oxidation rate increased

  13. Ambroxol improves lysosomal biochemistry in glucocerebrosidase mutation-linked Parkinson disease cells.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Alisdair; Magalhaes, Joana; Shen, Chengguo; Chau, Kai-Yin; Hughes, Derralyn; Mehta, Atul; Foltynie, Tom; Cooper, J Mark; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gegg, Matthew; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2014-05-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene, which encodes the lysosomal hydrolase glucosylceramidase. Patients with Gaucher disease and heterozygous glucocerebrosidase mutation carriers are at increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Indeed, glucocerebrosidase mutations are the most frequent risk factor for Parkinson's disease in the general population. Therefore there is an urgent need to understand the mechanisms by which glucocerebrosidase mutations predispose to neurodegeneration to facilitate development of novel treatments. To study this we generated fibroblast lines from skin biopsies of five patients with Gaucher disease and six heterozygous glucocerebrosidase mutation carriers with and without Parkinson's disease. Glucosylceramidase protein and enzyme activity levels were assayed. Oxidative stress was assayed by single cell imaging of dihydroethidium. Glucosylceramidase enzyme activity was significantly reduced in fibroblasts from patients with Gaucher disease (median 5% of controls, P = 0.0001) and heterozygous mutation carriers with (median 59% of controls, P = 0.001) and without (56% of controls, P = 0.001) Parkinson's disease compared with controls. Glucosylceramidase protein levels, assessed by western blot, were significantly reduced in fibroblasts from Gaucher disease (median glucosylceramidase levels 42% of control, P < 0.001) and heterozygous mutation carriers with (median 59% of control, P < 0.001) and without (median 68% of control, P < 0.001) Parkinson's disease. Single cell imaging of dihydroethidium demonstrated increased production of cytosolic reactive oxygen species in fibroblasts from patients with Gaucher disease (dihydroethidium oxidation rate increased by a median of 62% compared to controls, P < 0.001) and heterozygous mutation carriers with (dihydroethidium oxidation rate increased by a median of 68% compared with controls, P < 0.001) and without (dihydroethidium oxidation rate increased by a

  14. Altered lysosomal proteins in neural-derived plasma exosomes in preclinical Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Adam; Schwartz, Janice B.; Abner, Erin L.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Miller, Bruce L.; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Diverse autolysosomal proteins were quantified in neurally derived blood exosomes from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and controls to investigate disordered neuronal autophagy. Methods: Blood exosomes obtained once from patients with AD (n = 26) or frontotemporal dementia (n = 16), other patients with AD (n = 20) both when cognitively normal and 1 to 10 years later when diagnosed, and case controls were enriched for neural sources by anti-human L1CAM antibody immunoabsorption. Extracted exosomal proteins were quantified by ELISAs and normalized with the CD81 exosomal marker. Results: Mean exosomal levels of cathepsin D, lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1), and ubiquitinylated proteins were significantly higher and of heat-shock protein 70 significantly lower for AD than controls in cross-sectional studies (p ≤ 0.0005). Levels of cathepsin D, LAMP-1, and ubiquitinylated protein also were significantly higher for patients with AD than for patients with frontotemporal dementia (p ≤ 0.006). Step-wise discriminant modeling of the protein levels correctly classified 100% of patients with AD. Exosomal levels of all proteins were similarly significantly different from those of matched controls in 20 patients 1 to 10 years before and at diagnosis of AD (p ≤ 0.0003). Conclusions: Levels of autolysosomal proteins in neurally derived blood exosomes distinguish patients with AD from case controls and appear to reflect the pathology of AD up to 10 years before clinical onset. These preliminary results confirm in living patients with AD the early appearance of neuronal lysosomal dysfunction and suggest that these proteins may be useful biomarkers in large prospective studies. PMID:26062630

  15. Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency: diagnosis and treatment of Wolman and Cholesteryl Ester Storage Diseases.

    PubMed

    Porto, Anthony F

    2014-09-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is responsible for the hydrolysis of cholesterol esters and triglycerides. LAL is coded by the LIPA gene on chromosome 10q23.31. Its deficiency leads to two autosomal recessive disorders, Wolman disease (WD) and Cholesteryl Ester Storage Disease (CESD). WD has an estimated incidence of 1 in 500,000 live births and is the result of a complete loss of LAL and presents in infancy with vomiting, diarrhea, poor weight gain and hepatomegaly subsequently leading to death. CESD is the result of partial loss of LAL and its presentation is more variable. Patients may be asymptomatic or present with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms, hepatomegaly, elevated transaminases and dystipidemia which may be confused with the diagnosis of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. CESD is currently underdiagnosed and has an estimated prevalence as high as I in 40,000 individuals. Radiologic findings in WD is calcification of the adrenal glands. Hepatomegaly is noted on CT scan in both WD and CESD. MRI may demonstrate accumulation of cholesterol esters and may be useful to study effects of potential medical therapies. The diagnosis of WD and CESD is based on LIPA gene sequencing and the measurement of LAL levels in peripheral blood leukocytes. Treatment of LAL deficiency is currently limited to control of cholesterol levels and to prevent premature atherosclerosis. Use of enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human LAL in short-term studies has shown to be safe and effective. PMID:25345094

  16. Very prolonged liposomal amphotericin B use leading to a lysosomal storage disease.

    PubMed

    Michot, J M; Gubavu, C; Fourn, E; Maigne, G; Teicher, E; Angoulvant, A; Blanche, S; Lortholary, O; Coilly, A; Duclos-Vallée, J C; Sebagh, M; Guettier, C; Aumont, C; Delfraissy, J F; Lambotte, O

    2014-06-01

    Amphotericin B is a powerful polyene antifungal drug used for treating systemic fungal infections and is usually administered for a short period. Side effects after prolonged use are unknown in humans. Here we report the case of a 28-year-old man suffering from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), treated for invasive cerebral aspergillosis with liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) for a very long time (8 consecutive years). We describe the efficacy and safety of this treatment in the long term. Aspergillosis was kept under control as long as L-AmB therapy was maintained, but relapsed when the dose was reduced. No overt renal toxicity was noted. The patient gradually developed hepatosplenomegaly and pancytopenia. Abnormalities of bone marrow were similar to the sea-blue histiocyte syndrome. Liver biopsy showed images of nodular regenerative hyperplasia related to CGD as well as a histiocytic storage disease. We discuss the very prolonged use of L-AmB leading to the development of a lysosomal storage disease. PMID:24787480

  17. Partial Restoration of Mutant Enzyme Homeostasis in Three Distinct Lysosomal Storage Disease Cell Lines by Altering Calcium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Ting-Wei; Fowler, Douglas M; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2008-01-01

    A lysosomal storage disease (LSD) results from deficient lysosomal enzyme activity, thus the substrate of the mutant enzyme accumulates in the lysosome, leading to pathology. In many but not all LSDs, the clinically most important mutations compromise the cellular folding of the enzyme, subjecting it to endoplasmic reticulum–associated degradation instead of proper folding and lysosomal trafficking. A small molecule that restores partial mutant enzyme folding, trafficking, and activity would be highly desirable, particularly if one molecule could ameliorate multiple distinct LSDs by virtue of its mechanism of action. Inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels, using either diltiazem or verapamil—both US Food and Drug Administration–approved hypertension drugs—partially restores N370S and L444P glucocerebrosidase homeostasis in Gaucher patient–derived fibroblasts; the latter mutation is associated with refractory neuropathic disease. Diltiazem structure-activity studies suggest that it is its Ca2+ channel blocker activity that enhances the capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum to fold misfolding-prone proteins, likely by modest up-regulation of a subset of molecular chaperones, including BiP and Hsp40. Importantly, diltiazem and verapamil also partially restore mutant enzyme homeostasis in two other distinct LSDs involving enzymes essential for glycoprotein and heparan sulfate degradation, namely α-mannosidosis and type IIIA mucopolysaccharidosis, respectively. Manipulation of calcium homeostasis may represent a general strategy to restore protein homeostasis in multiple LSDs. However, further efforts are required to demonstrate clinical utility and safety. PMID:18254660

  18. Gaucher disease due to saposin C deficiency is an inherited lysosomal disease caused by rapidly degraded mutant proteins.

    PubMed

    Motta, Marialetizia; Camerini, Serena; Tatti, Massimo; Casella, Marialuisa; Torreri, Paola; Crescenzi, Marco; Tartaglia, Marco; Salvioli, Rosa

    2014-11-01

    Saposin (Sap) C is an essential cofactor for the lysosomal degradation of glucosylceramide (GC) by glucosylceramidase (GCase) and its functional impairment underlies a rare variant form of Gaucher disease (GD). Sap C promotes rearrangement of lipid organization in lysosomal membranes favoring substrate accessibility to GCase. It is characterized by six invariantly conserved cysteine residues involved in three intramolecular disulfide bonds, which make the protein remarkably stable to acid environment and degradation. Five different mutations (i.e. p.C315S, p.342_348FDKMCSKdel, p.L349P, p.C382G and p.C382F) have been identified to underlie Sap C deficiency. The molecular mechanism by which these mutations affect Sap C function, however, has not been delineated in detail. Here, we characterized biochemically and functionally four of these gene lesions. We show that all Sap C mutants are efficiently produced, and exhibit lipid-binding properties, modulatory behavior on GCase activity and subcellular localization comparable with those of the wild-type protein. We then delineated the structural rearrangement of these mutants, documenting that most proteins assume diverse aberrant disulfide bridge arrangements, which result in a substantial diminished half-life, and rapid degradation via autophagy. These findings further document the paramount importance of disulfide bridges in the stability of Sap C and provide evidence that accelerated degradation of the Sap C mutants is the underlying pathogenetic mechanism of Sap C deficiency. PMID:24925315

  19. TFEB Participates in the Aβ-Induced Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease by Regulating the Autophagy-Lysosome Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-dan; Zhao, Jian-jun

    2015-11-01

    To investigate whether transcriptional factor EB (TFEB) participates in amyloid-β(1-42) (Aβ(1-42))-induced pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its underlying mechanisms. Three-month-old and 8-month-old transgenic APP/PS1 AD mice and age-matched wild mice were used in this study. We found that the 8-month-old AD animals presented significantly higher deposition of Aβ(1-42) and expression of TFEB and its targeted proteins, such as LAMP-1 and cathepsin D, and autophagy-associated LC3-II and p62 in brain tissues than in others. In an in vitro study, TFEB overexpression rescued autophagic flux that blocked by Aβ(1-42) and the degradation of the absorbed Aβ(1-42), relieved Aβ(1-42)-mediated induction of overloaded autophagy. In addition, TFEB overexpression enhanced cathepsin D expression and activity, restored Aβ(1-42)-disturbed acid environment of lysosome, and promoted the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes. Furthermore, TFEB upregulation reduced Aβ(1-42)-induced production of malondialdehyde, oxidative carbonyl proteins, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell apoptosis mainly dependent on the removal of Aβ(1-42) by the autophagy-lysosome pathway. TFEB overexpression alleviated AD progression by reducing Aβ accumulation through regulating the autophagy-lysosome pathway and reducing Aβ-induced ROS production and cell apoptosis. PMID:26368054

  20. Mitochondria and Quality Control Defects in a Mouse Model of Gaucher Disease—Links to Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Osellame, Laura D.; Rahim, Ahad A.; Hargreaves, Iain P.; Gegg, Matthew E.; Richard-Londt, Angela; Brandner, Sebastian; Waddington, Simon N.; Schapira, Anthony H.V.; Duchen, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (gba) gene cause Gaucher disease (GD), the most common lysosomal storage disorder, and increase susceptibility to Parkinson’s disease (PD). While the clinical and pathological features of idiopathic PD and PD related to gba (PD-GBA) mutations are very similar, cellular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in each are unclear. Using a mouse model of neuronopathic GD, we show that autophagic machinery and proteasomal machinery are defective in neurons and astrocytes lacking gba. Markers of neurodegeneration—p62/SQSTM1, ubiquitinated proteins, and insoluble α-synuclein—accumulate. Mitochondria were dysfunctional and fragmented, with impaired respiration, reduced respiratory chain complex activities, and a decreased potential maintained by reversal of the ATP synthase. Thus a primary lysosomal defect causes accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria as a result of impaired autophagy and dysfunctional proteasomal pathways. These data provide conclusive evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in GD and provide insight into the pathogenesis of PD and PD-GBA. PMID:23707074

  1. [Thrombocyte lysosomal hydrolase activity in patients with ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia and obesity against a background of different diets].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, A V; Shimanovskaia, N P; Pogozheva, A V; Samsonov, M A; Tutel'ian, V A

    1987-01-01

    Investigation of lysosomal hydrolase activity in platelets of patients has revealed drastic activation of cathepsins B, C and phospholipase A1, the degree of which rose in the following range: coronary heart disease; coronary heart disease aggravated by obesity: obesity and hyperlipidemia (type II). Administration of the adequate dietotherapy resulted in normalization of enzymologic parameters, whereas the results of the clinico-biochemical analysis of the blood were less informative in all cases. The data obtained could be used in the evaluation of the dietotherapy effectiveness, as well as for the early diagnosis of the corresponding diseases. PMID:3439081

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomal Ca2+ stores are remodelled in GBA1-linked Parkinson disease patient fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, Bethan S.; Magalhaes, Joana; Beavan, Michelle S.; McNeill, Alisdair; Gegg, Matthew E.; Cleeter, Michael W.J.; Bloor-Young, Duncan; Churchill, Grant C.; Duchen, Michael R.; Schapira, Anthony H.; Patel, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in β-glucocerebrosidase (encoded by GBA1) cause Gaucher disease (GD), a lysosomal storage disorder, and increase the risk of developing Parkinson disease (PD). The pathogenetic relationship between the two disorders is unclear. Here, we characterised Ca2+ release in fibroblasts from type I GD and PD patients together with age-matched, asymptomatic carriers, all with the common N370S mutation in β-glucocerebrosidase. We show that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ release was potentiated in GD and PD patient fibroblasts but not in cells from asymptomatic carriers. ER Ca2+ signalling was also potentiated in fibroblasts from aged healthy subjects relative to younger individuals but not further increased in aged PD patient cells. Chemical or molecular inhibition of β-glucocerebrosidase in fibroblasts and a neuronal cell line did not affect ER Ca2+ signalling suggesting defects are independent of enzymatic activity loss. Conversely, lysosomal Ca2+ store content was reduced in PD fibroblasts and associated with age-dependent alterations in lysosomal morphology. Accelerated remodelling of Ca2+ stores by pathogenic GBA1 mutations may therefore feature in PD. PMID:26691915

  3. Loss of PIKfyve in platelets causes a lysosomal disease leading to inflammation and thrombosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sang H.; Suzuki, Aae; Stalker, Timothy J.; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Yuhuan; McKennan, Chris; Riese, Matthew J.; Guzman, Jessica F.; Zhang, Suhong; Lian, Lurong; Joshi, Rohan; Meng, Ronghua; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Choi, John K.; Koretzky, Gary; Marks, Michael S.; Abrams, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    PIKfyve is a lipid kinase that is essential for the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(3,5)P2], and for the regulation of membrane dynamics within the endolysosomal system in mammals. Depletion of intracellular pools of PtdIns(3,5)P2 in humans and in mice is associated with neurodegeneration and early lethality. However, the biological role of PtdIns(3,5)P2 in non-neural tissues is not well understood. Platelets are hematopoietic cells that function in a variety of physiological responses. Essential to many of these functions is the activation-dependent release of effectors from distinct storage granules - alpha granules, dense granules, and lysosomes - that derive from the endolysosomal system. Here we show that platelet-specific ablation of the PIKfyve gene in mice results in accelerated arterial thrombosis, but also unexpectedly to multiorgan defects that impair development, body mass, fertility, and survival by inducing inappropriate inflammatory responses characterized by macrophage accumulation in multiple tissues. Platelet depletion in vivo significantly impairs the progression of multiorgan defects in these mice, confirming that these defects reflect a platelet-specific process. Although PIKfyve-null platelets generate and release normal amounts of alpha granule and dense granule contents, they develop defective maturation and excessive storage of lysosomal enzymes, which are released upon platelet activation. Remarkably, impairing the secretion of lysosomes from PIKfyve-deficient platelets in vivo significantly attenuates the multiorgan defects in mice, suggesting that platelet lysosome secretion contributes to pathogenesis. Together, these results demonstrate that PIKfyve is an essential regulator for the biogenesis of platelet lysosomes, and highlight the previously unrecognized and important pathological contributions of platelet lysosomes in inflammation, arterial thrombosis, and macrophage biology. PMID:25178411

  4. DNA analysis of an uncommon missense mutation in a Gaucher disease patient of Jewish-Polish-Russian descent

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, F.Y.M.; Wei, C.; Applegarth, D.A.; McGillivray, B.C.

    1994-06-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal lipid storage disease. It results from deficient glucocerebrosidase activity and is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Three clinical forms of Gaucher disease have been described: type 1, non-neuronopathic; type 2, acute neuronopathic; and type 3, subacute neuronopathic. We have sequenced the full length cDNA of the glucocerebrosidase gene and identified an uncommon mutation in nucleotide position 1604 (genoma DNA nucleotide position 6683) from a Gaucher disease patient of Jewish-Polish-Russian descent with type 1 Gaucher disease. It is a G{yields}A transition in exon 11 that results in {sup 496}Arg{yields}{sup 496}His of glucocerebrosidase. This missense mutation is present in the heterozygous form and creates a new cleavage site for the endonuclease HphI. We have developed a simple method to detect the presence of this mutation by using HphI restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of glucocerebrosidase genomic DNA or cDNA. The mutation in the other Gaucher allele of this patient is an A{yields}G transition at cDNA nucleotide position 1226 which creates an XhoI cleavage site after PCR mismatch amplification. The presence of this mutation was also confirmed by sequence analysis. Based on previous reports that mutation 1226 is present only in type 1 Gaucher disease and the observation that there is no neurological involvement in this patient, we conclude that our patient with the 1226/1604 genotype is diagnosed as having type 1 Gaucher disease. Since it was also postulated that mutation 1226 in the homozygous form will usually result in a good prognosis, we speculate that the orthopedic complications and the unusual presence of glomerulosclerosis in this patient may be attributable to the mutation at nucleotide 1604. This speculation will require a description of more patients with this mutation for confirmation. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Thiadiazole Carbamates: Potent Inhibitors of Lysosomal Acid Lipase and Potential Niemann-Pick Type C Disease Therapeuticsa

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Anton I.; Cosner, Casey C.; Mariani, Christopher J.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Wiest, Olaf; Helquist, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized at the cellular level by abnormal accumulation of cholesterol and other lipids in lysosomal storage organelles. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) has been recently identified as a potential therapeutic target for NPC. LAL can be specifically inhibited by a variety of 3,4-disubstituted thiadiazole carbamates. An efficient synthesis of the C(3) oxygenated/C(4) aminated analogues has been developed that furnishes the products in high yields and high degrees of purity. Common intermediates can also be used for the synthesis of the C(3) carbon substituted derivatives. Herein we tested various thiadiazole carbamates, amides, esters, and ketones for inhibition of LAL. In addition, we tested a diverse selection of commercially available non-thiadiazole carbamates. Our studies show that, among the compounds examined herein, only thiadiazole carbamates are effective inhibitors of LAL. We present a mechanism for LAL inhibition by these compounds whereby LAL transiently carbamoylates the enzyme similarly to previously described inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by rivastigmine and other carbamates as well as acylation of various lipases by orlistat. PMID:20557099

  6. Lysosomal dysfunction in a mouse model of Sandhoff disease leads to accumulation of ganglioside-bound amyloid-β peptide.

    PubMed

    Keilani, Serene; Lun, Yi; Stevens, Anthony C; Williams, Hadis N; Sjoberg, Eric R; Khanna, Richie; Valenzano, Kenneth J; Checler, Frederic; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Yanagisawa, Katsuhiko; Lockhart, David J; Wustman, Brandon A; Gandy, Sam

    2012-04-11

    Alterations in the lipid composition of endosomal-lysosomal membranes may constitute an early event in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated the possibility that GM2 ganglioside accumulation in a mouse model of Sandhoff disease might be associated with the accumulation of intraneuronal and extracellular proteins commonly observed in AD. Our results show intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ)-like, α-synuclein-like, and phospho-tau-like immunoreactivity in the brains of β-hexosaminidase knock-out (HEXB KO) mice. Biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed that at least some of the intraneuronal Aβ-like immunoreactivity (iAβ-LIR) represents amyloid precursor protein C-terminal fragments (APP-CTFs) and/or Aβ. In addition, we observed increased levels of Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides in the lipid-associated fraction of HEXB KO mouse brains, and intraneuronal accumulation of ganglioside-bound Aβ (GAβ) immunoreactivity in a brain region-specific manner. Furthermore, α-synuclein and APP-CTFs and/or Aβ were found to accumulate in different regions of the substantia nigra, indicating different mechanisms of accumulation or turnover pathways. Based on the localization of the accumulated iAβ-LIR to endosomes, lysosomes, and autophagosomes, we conclude that a significant accumulation of iAβ-LIR may be associated with the lysosomal-autophagic turnover of Aβ and fragments of APP-containing Aβ epitopes. Importantly, intraneuronal GAβ immunoreactivity, a proposed prefibrillar aggregate found in AD, was found to accumulate throughout the frontal cortices of postmortem human GM1 gangliosidosis, Sandhoff disease, and Tay-Sachs disease brains. Together, these results establish an association between the accumulation of gangliosides, autophagic vacuoles, and the intraneuronal accumulation of proteins associated with AD. PMID:22496568

  7. TFEB regulates lysosomal proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Song, Wensi; Wang, Fan; Savini, Marzia; Ake, Ashley; di Ronza, Alberto; Sardiello, Marco; Segatori, Laura

    2013-05-15

    Loss-of-function diseases are often caused by destabilizing mutations that lead to protein misfolding and degradation. Modulating the innate protein homeostasis (proteostasis) capacity may lead to rescue of native folding of the mutated variants, thereby ameliorating the disease phenotype. In lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), a number of highly prevalent alleles have missense mutations that do not impair the enzyme's catalytic activity but destabilize its native structure, resulting in the degradation of the misfolded protein. Enhancing the cellular folding capacity enables rescuing the native, biologically functional structure of these unstable mutated enzymes. However, proteostasis modulators specific for the lysosomal system are currently unknown. Here, we investigate the role of the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and function, in modulating lysosomal proteostasis in LSDs. We show that TFEB activation results in enhanced folding, trafficking and lysosomal activity of a severely destabilized glucocerebrosidase (GC) variant associated with the development of Gaucher disease (GD), the most common LSD. TFEB specifically induces the expression of GC and of key genes involved in folding and lysosomal trafficking, thereby enhancing both the pool of mutated enzyme and its processing through the secretory pathway. TFEB activation also rescues the activity of a β-hexosaminidase mutant associated with the development of another LSD, Tay-Sachs disease, thus suggesting general applicability of TFEB-mediated proteostasis modulation to rescue destabilizing mutations in LSDs. In summary, our findings identify TFEB as a specific regulator of lysosomal proteostasis and suggest that TFEB may be used as a therapeutic target to rescue enzyme homeostasis in LSDs. PMID:23393155

  8. A New Perspective of Lysosomal Cation Channel-Dependent Homeostasis in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ezeani, Martin; Omabe, Maxwell

    2016-04-01

    Studies have reported typically biophysical lysosomal cation channels including TPCs. Their plausible biological roles are being elucidated by pharmacological, genetic and conventional patch clamp procedures. The best characterized so far among these channels is the ML1 isoform of TRP. The reported TRPs and TPCs are bypass for cation fluxes and are strategic for homeostasis of ionic milieu of the acidic organelles they confine to. Ca(2+) homeostasis and adequate acidic pHL are critically influential for the regulation of a plethora of biological functions these intracellular cation channels perform. In lysosomal ion channel biology, we review: ML1 and TPC2 in Ca(2+) signaling, ML1 and TPC2 in pH(L) regulation. Using Aβ42 and tau proteins found along clathrin endolysosomal internalization pathway (Fig. 3), we proffer a mechanism of abnormal pH(L) and ML1/TPC2-dependent cation homeostasis in AD. PMID:25691454

  9. Lipid rafts participate in aberrant degradative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta peptide in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Yang, Chun; Liu, Yufeng; Li, Peng; Yang, Huiying; Dai, Jingxing; Qu, Rongmei; Yuan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide is the main component of amyloid plaques, which are found in Alzheimer's disease. The generation and deposition of amyloid-beta is one of the crucial factors for the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Lipid rafts are glycolipid-rich liquid domains of the plasma membrane, where certain types of protein tend to aggregate and intercalate. Lipid rafts are involved in the generation of amyloid-beta oligomers and the formation of amyloid-beta peptides. In this paper, we review the mechanism by which lipid rafts disturb the aberrant degradative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta, which plays an important role in the pathological process of Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, we describe this mechanism from the view of the Two-system Theory of fasciology and thus, suggest that lipid rafts may be a new target of Alzheimer's disease treatment. PMID:25206748

  10. Production of α-L-iduronidase in maize for the potential treatment of a human lysosomal storage disease.

    PubMed

    He, Xu; Haselhorst, Thomas; von Itzstein, Mark; Kolarich, Daniel; Packer, Nicolle H; Gloster, Tracey M; Vocadlo, David J; Clarke, Lorne A; Qian, Yi; Kermode, Allison R

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases are a class of over 70 rare genetic diseases that are amenable to enzyme replacement therapy. Towards developing a plant-based enzyme replacement therapeutic for the lysosomal storage disease mucopolysaccharidosis I, here we expressed α-L-iduronidase in the endosperm of maize seeds by a previously uncharacterized mRNA-targeting-based mechanism. Immunolocalization, cellular fractionation and in situ RT-PCR demonstrate that the α-L-iduronidase protein and mRNA are targeted to endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived protein bodies and to protein body-ER regions, respectively, using regulatory (5'- and 3'-UTR) and signal-peptide coding sequences from the γ-zein gene. The maize α-L-iduronidase exhibits high activity, contains high-mannose N-glycans and is amenable to in vitro phosphorylation. This mRNA-based strategy is of widespread importance as plant N-glycan maturation is controlled and the therapeutic protein is generated in a native form. For our target enzyme, the N-glycan structures are appropriate for downstream processing, a prerequisite for its potential as a therapeutic protein. PMID:22990858

  11. Amyloidosis, Synucleinopathy, and Prion Encephalopathy in a Neuropathic Lysosomal Storage Disease: The CNS-Biomarker Potential of Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, Bartholomew J.; Duncan, F. Jason; Murrey, Darren; Ware, Tierra; Meadows, Aaron; McCarty, Douglas M.; Fu, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB is a devastating neuropathic lysosomal storage disease with complex pathology. This study identifies molecular signatures in peripheral blood that may be relevant to MPS IIIB pathogenesis using a mouse model. Genome-wide gene expression microarrays on pooled RNAs showed dysregulation of 2,802 transcripts in blood from MPS IIIB mice, reflecting pathological complexity of MPS IIIB, encompassing virtually all previously reported and as yet unexplored disease aspects. Importantly, many of the dysregulated genes are reported to be tissue-specific. Further analyses of multiple genes linked to major pathways of neurodegeneration demonstrated a strong brain-blood correlation in amyloidosis and synucleinopathy in MPS IIIB. We also detected prion protein (Prnp) deposition in the CNS and Prnp dysregulation in the blood in MPS IIIB mice, suggesting the involvement of Prnp aggregation in neuropathology. Systemic delivery of trans-BBB-neurotropic rAAV9-hNAGLU vector mediated not only efficient restoration of functional α-N-acetylglucosaminidase and clearance of lysosomal storage pathology in the central nervous system (CNS) and periphery, but also the correction of impaired neurodegenerative molecular pathways in the brain and blood. Our data suggest that molecular changes in blood may reflect pathological status in the CNS and provide a useful tool for identifying potential CNS-specific biomarkers for MPS IIIB and possibly other neurological diseases. PMID:24278249

  12. Levels of enzyme activities in six lysosomal storage diseases in Japanese neonates determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mashima, Ryuichi; Sakai, Eri; Kosuga, Motomichi; Okuyama, Torayuki

    2016-12-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are caused by defective enzyme activities in lysosomes, characterized by the accumulation of glycolipids, oligosaccharides, mucopolysaccharides, sphingolipids, and other biological substances. Accumulating evidence has suggested that early detection of individuals with LSDs, followed by the immediate initiation of appropriate therapy during the presymptomatic period, usually results in better therapeutic outcomes. The activities of individual enzymes are measured using fluorescent substrates. However, the simultaneous determination of multiple enzyme activities has been awaited in neonatal screening of LSDs because the prevalence of individual LSDs is rare. In this study, the activities of six enzymes associated with LSDs were examined with 6-plex enzyme assay using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The accumulation of enzyme products was almost linear for 0-20 h at 37 °C. Dried blood spots (DBSs) provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were used for quality control (QC). The intraday and interday coefficient of variance values were < 25%. The enzyme activities of healthy individuals were higher than those of LSD-confirmed individuals. These results suggest that the levels of enzyme activities of six LSDs in a Japanese population were comparable to those of a recent report [Elliott et al. Mol Genet Metab 118 (2016) 304-309], providing additional evidence that the 6-plex LSD enzyme assay is a reproducible analytical procedure for neonatal screening. PMID:27625992

  13. Novel Patient Cell-Based HTS Assay for Identification of Small Molecules for a Lysosomal Storage Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ribbens, Jameson; Zheng, Wei; Southall, Noel; Hu, Xin; Marugan, Juan J.; Ferrer, Marc; Maegawa, Gustavo H. B.

    2011-01-01

    Small molecules have been identified as potential therapeutic agents for lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), inherited metabolic disorders caused by defects in proteins that result in lysosome dysfunctional. Some small molecules function assisting the folding of mutant misfolded lysosomal enzymes that are otherwise degraded in ER-associated degradation. The ultimate result is the enhancement of the residual enzymatic activity of the deficient enzyme. Most of the high throughput screening (HTS) assays developed to identify these molecules are single-target biochemical assays. Here we describe a cell-based assay using patient cell lines to identify small molecules that enhance the residual arylsulfatase A (ASA) activity found in patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), a progressive neurodegenerative LSD. In order to generate sufficient cell lines for a large scale HTS, primary cultured fibroblasts from MLD patients were transformed using SV40 large T antigen. These SV40 transformed (SV40t) cells showed to conserve biochemical characteristics of the primary cells. Using a specific colorimetric substrate para-nitrocatechol sulfate (pNCS), detectable ASA residual activity were observed in primary and SV40t fibroblasts from a MLD patient (ASA-I179S) cultured in multi-well plates. A robust fluorescence ASA assay was developed in high-density 1,536-well plates using the traditional colorimetric pNCS substrate, whose product (pNC) acts as “plate fluorescence quencher” in white solid-bottom plates. The quantitative cell-based HTS assay for ASA generated strong statistical parameters when tested against a diverse small molecule collection. This cell-based assay approach can be used for several other LSDs and genetic disorders, especially those that rely on colorimetric substrates which traditionally present low sensitivity for assay-miniaturization. In addition, the quantitative cell-based HTS assay here developed using patient cells creates an opportunity to

  14. Lysosomal Adaptation: How the Lysosome Responds to External Cues

    PubMed Central

    Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the importance of the lysosome in cell metabolism and organism physiology goes far beyond the simple disposal of cellular garbage. This dynamic organelle is situated at the crossroad of the most important cellular pathways and is involved in sensing, signaling, and transcriptional mechanisms that respond to environmental cues, such as nutrients. Two main mediators of these lysosomal adaptation mechanisms are the mTORC1 kinase complex and the transcription factor EB (TFEB). These two factors are linked in a lysosome-to-nucleus signaling pathway that provides the lysosome with the ability to adapt to extracellular cues and control its own biogenesis. Modulation of lysosomal function by acting on TFEB has a profound impact on cellular clearance and energy metabolism and is a promising therapeutic target for a large variety of disease conditions. PMID:24799353

  15. Novel insertion mutation in a non-Jewish Caucasian type 1 Gaucher disease patient

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, F.Y.M.; Humphries, M.L.; Ferreira, P.

    1997-01-20

    Gaucher disease is the most prevalent lysosomal storage disorder. It is autosomal recessive, resulting in lysosomal glucocerebrosidase deficiency. Three clinical forms of Gaucher disease have been described: type 1 (nonneuronopathic), type 2 (acute neuronopathic), and type 3 (subacute neuronopathic). We performed PCR-thermal cycle sequence analysis of glucocerebrosidase genomic DNA and identified a novel mutation in a non-Jewish type 1 Gaucher disease patient. It is a C insertion in exon 3 at cDNA nucleotide position 122 and genomic nucleotide position 1626. This mutation causes a frameshift and, subsequently, four of the five codons immediately downstream of the insertion were changed while the sixth was converted to a stop codon, resulting in premature termination of protein translation. The 122CC insertion abolishes a Cac81 restriction endonuclease cleavage site, allowing a convenient and reliable method for detection using RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified glucocerebrosidase genomic DNA. The mutation in the other Gaucher allele was found to be an A{r_arrow}G substitution at glucocerebrosidase cDNA nucleotide position 1226 that so far has only been reported among type 1 Gaucher disease patients. Since mutation 122CC causes a frameshift and early termination of protein translation, it most likely results in a meaningless transcript and subsequently no residual glucocerebrosidase enzyme activity. We speculate that mutation 122CC may result in a worse prognosis than mutations associated with partial activity. When present in the homozygous form, it could be a lethal allele similar to what has been postulated for the other known insertion mutation, 84GG. Our patient, who is a compound heterozygote 122CC/1226G, has moderately severe type 1 Gaucher disease. Her clinical response to Ceredase{reg_sign} therapy that began 31 months ago has been favorable, though incomplete. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Structural Basis of Sterol Binding by NPC2, a Lysosomal Protein Deficient in Niemann-Pick Type C2 Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,S.; Benoff, B.; Liou, H.; Lobel, P.; Stock, A.

    2007-01-01

    NPC2 is a small lysosomal glycoprotein that binds cholesterol with submicromolar affinity. Deficiency in NPC2 is the cause of Niemann-Pick type C2 disease, a fatal neurovisceral disorder characterized by accumulation of cholesterol in lysosomes. Here we report the crystal structure of bovine NPC2 bound to cholesterol-3-O-sulfate, an analog that binds with greater apparent affinity than cholesterol. Structures of both apo-bound and sterol-bound NPC2 were observed within the same crystal lattice, with an asymmetric unit containing one molecule of apoNPC2 and two molecules of sterol-bound NPC2. As predicted from a previously determined structure of apoNPC2, the sterol binds in a deep hydrophobic pocket sandwiched between the two {beta}-sheets of NPC2, with only the sulfate substituent of the ligand exposed to solvent. In the two available structures of apoNPC2, the incipient ligand-binding pocket, which ranges from a loosely packed hydrophobic core to a small tunnel, is too small to accommodate cholesterol. In the presence of sterol, the pocket expands, facilitated by a slight separation of the {beta}-strands and substantial reorientation of some side chains, resulting in a perfect molding of the pocket around the hydrocarbon portion of cholesterol. A notable feature is the repositioning of two aromatic residues at the tunnel entrance that are essential for NPC2 function. The NPC2 structures provide evidence of a malleable binding site, consistent with the previously documented broad range of sterol ligand specificity.

  17. Loss of AP-5 results in accumulation of aberrant endolysosomes: defining a new type of lysosomal storage disease

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Jennifer; Edgar, James R.; Esteves, Typhaine; Darios, Frédéric; Madeo, Marianna; Chang, Jaerak; Roda, Ricardo H.; Dürr, Alexandra; Anheim, Mathieu; Gellera, Cinzia; Li, Jun; Züchner, Stephan; Mariotti, Caterina; Stevanin, Giovanni; Blackstone, Craig; Kruer, Michael C.; Robinson, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptor proteins (AP 1–5) are heterotetrameric complexes that facilitate specialized cargo sorting in vesicular-mediated trafficking. Mutations in AP5Z1, encoding a subunit of the AP-5 complex, have been reported to cause hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), although their impact at the cellular level has not been assessed. Here we characterize three independent fibroblast lines derived from skin biopsies of patients harbouring nonsense mutations in AP5Z1 and presenting with spastic paraplegia accompanied by neuropathy, parkinsonism and/or cognitive impairment. In all three patient-derived lines, we show that there is complete loss of AP-5 ζ protein and a reduction in the associated AP-5 µ5 protein. Using ultrastructural analysis, we show that these patient-derived lines consistently exhibit abundant multilamellar structures that are positive for markers of endolysosomes and are filled with aberrant storage material organized as exaggerated multilamellar whorls, striated belts and ‘fingerprint bodies’. This phenotype can be replicated in a HeLa cell culture model by siRNA knockdown of AP-5 ζ. The cellular phenotype bears striking resemblance to features described in a number of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Collectively, these findings reveal an emerging picture of the role of AP-5 in endosomal and lysosomal homeostasis, illuminates a potential pathomechanism that is relevant to the role of AP-5 in neurons and expands the understanding of recessive HSPs. Moreover, the resulting accumulation of storage material in endolysosomes leads us to propose that AP-5 deficiency represents a new type of LSDs. PMID:26085577

  18. Multiple mutations are responsible for the high frequency of 2 lysosomal storage diseases in a small geographic area

    SciTech Connect

    Zlotogora, J.; Heinisch, U.; Bach, G. |

    1994-09-01

    Late infantile metachromatic leukodystrophy is relatively frequent among Arabs in the Galilee. The disease has been diagnosed in 7 Christian and Muslem unrelated families originating from 7 villages in a 20x20 kms area. Molecular analysis of the aryl sulfatase A gene revealed that the disease is caused in these 7 families by 5 different mutations. In each case the patients were homozygous for one of the mutations. Four of the mutations are unique up to now while the other mutation has been reported in Australian patients originating from Lebanon (T274M). This mutation may have been introduced to the Galilee from Lebanon. Comparable observations have been reported by Bach who demonstrated that the high incidence of another lysosmal storage disease, Hurler syndrome, among Arabs and Druses originating from the same region of the Galilee is due to 3 different novel mutations. The Arab population in the lower Galilee is very inbred and large families are very frequent. In this type of population it is expected that relatively soon (3 generations) after a first mutation event the first affected individual will be born. The possible causes for the increase frequency of new mutations in the region are under investigation. We will try to determine whether it may be a general phenomenon which affects various genes or whether it is unique to lysosomal storage disorders.

  19. Lysosomal Trafficking Regulator (LYST).

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaojie; Chang, Bo; Naggert, Jürgen K; Nishina, Patsy M

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of vesicle trafficking to lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles (LROs) as well as regulation of the size of these organelles are critical to maintain their functions. Disruption of the lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) results in Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, prolonged bleeding, severe immunodeficiency, recurrent bacterial infection, neurologic dysfunction and hemophagocytic lympohistiocytosis (HLH). The classic diagnostic feature of the syndrome is enlarged LROs in all cell types, including lysosomes, melanosomes, cytolytic granules and platelet dense bodies. The most striking CHS ocular pathology observed is an enlargement of melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which leads to aberrant distribution of eye pigmentation, and results in photophobia and decreased visual acuity. Understanding the molecular function of LYST and identification of its interacting partners may provide therapeutic targets for CHS and other diseases associated with the regulation of LRO size and/or vesicle trafficking, such as asthma, urticaria and Leishmania amazonensis infections. PMID:26427484

  20. Lysosomal Acid Phosphatase Biosynthesis and Dysfunction: A Mini Review Focused on Lysosomal Enzyme Dysfunction in Brain.

    PubMed

    Ashtari, N; Jiao, X; Rahimi-Balaei, M; Amiri, S; Mehr, S E; Yeganeh, B; Marzban, H

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles that are responsible for degrading and recycling macromolecules. Lysosomal dysfunction occurs in enzymatic and non-enzymatic deficiencies, which result in abnormal accumulation of materials. Although lysosomal storage disorders affect different organs, the central nervous system is the most vulnerable. Evidence shows the role of lysosomal dysfunction in different neurodegenerative diseases, such as Niemann-Pick Type C disease, juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Lysosomal enzymes such as lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2) play a critical role in mannose-6-phosphate removal and Acp2 controls molecular and cellular functions in the brain during development and adulthood. Acp2 is essential in cerebellar development, and mutations in this gene cause severe cerebellar neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. In this mini-review, we highlight lysosomal dysfunctions in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental and/or neurodegenerative diseases with special attention to Acp2 dysfunction. PMID:27132795

  1. Human recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Espejo-Mojica, Ángela J; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Rodríguez, Alexander; Mosquera, Ángela; Díaz, Dennis; Beltrán, Laura; Díaz, Sergio; Pimentel, Natalia; Moreno, Jefferson; Sánchez, Jhonnathan; Sánchez, Oscar F; Córdoba, Henry; Poutou-Piñales, Raúl A; Barrera, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are caused by accumulation of partially degraded substrates within the lysosome, as a result of a function loss of a lysosomal protein. Recombinant lysosomal proteins are usually produced in mammalian cells, based on their capacity to carry out post-translational modifications similar to those observed in human native proteins. However, during the last years, a growing number of studies have shown the possibility to produce active forms of lysosomal proteins in other expression systems, such as plants and microorganisms. In this paper, we review the production and characterization of human lysosomal proteins, deficient in several LSDs, which have been produced in microorganisms. For this purpose, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Ogataea minuta have been used as expression systems. The recombinant lysosomal proteins expressed in these hosts have shown similar substrate specificities, and temperature and pH stability profiles to those produced in mammalian cells. In addition, pre-clinical results have shown that recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms can be taken-up by cells and reduce the substrate accumulated within the lysosome. Recently, metabolic engineering in yeasts has allowed the production of lysosomal enzymes with tailored N-glycosylations, while progresses in E. coli N-glycosylations offer a potential platform to improve the production of these recombinant lysosomal enzymes. In summary, microorganisms represent convenient platform for the production of recombinant lysosomal proteins for biochemical and physicochemical characterization, as well as for the development of ERT for LSD. PMID:26071627

  2. First pilot newborn screening for four lysosomal storage diseases in an Italian region: identification and analysis of a putative causative mutation in the GBA gene.

    PubMed

    Paciotti, Silvia; Persichetti, Emanuele; Pagliardini, Severo; Deganuto, Marta; Rosano, Camillo; Balducci, Chiara; Codini, Michela; Filocamo, Mirella; Menghini, Anna Rita; Pagliardini, Veronica; Pasqui, Silvio; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea; Beccari, Tommaso

    2012-11-20

    We report the first newborn screening pilot study in an Italian region for four lysosomal disorders including Pompe disease, Gaucher disease, Fabry disease and mucopolysaccharidosis type 1. The screening has been performed using enzymatic assay on Dry Blood Spot on filter paper. A total of 3403 newborns were screened. One newborn showed a reduction of β-glucosidase activity in leucocytes. Molecular analysis revealed a status of compound heterozygous for the panethnic mutation N370S and for the sequence variation E388K, not yet correlated to Gaucher disease onset. The functional consequences of the E388K replacement on β-glucosidase activity were evaluated by in vitro expression, showing that the mutant protein retained 48% of wild type activity. Structural modeling predicted that the E388K replacement, localized to a surface of the enzyme, would change the local charges distribution which, in the native protein, displays an overwhelming presence of negative charges. However, the newborn, and a 4 year old sister showing the same genomic alterations, are currently asymptomatic. This pilot newborn screening for lysosomal diseases appears to be feasible and affordable to be extended to large populations. Moreover other lysosomal diseases for which a therapy is available or will be available, could be included in the screening. PMID:22820396

  3. Circadian profiling in two mouse models of lysosomal storage disorders; Niemann Pick type-C and Sandhoff disease

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Katie; Livieratos, Achilleas; Dumbill, Richard; Hughes, Steven; Ang, Gauri; Smith, David A.; Morris, Lauren; Brown, Laurence A.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Platt, Frances M.; Davies, Kay E.; Oliver, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption is frequently associated with neurodegenerative disease, yet it is unclear how the specific pathology in these disorders leads to abnormal rest/activity profiles. To investigate whether the pathological features of lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) influence the core molecular clock or the circadian behavioural abnormalities reported in some patients, we examined mouse models of Niemann-Pick Type-C (Npc1 mutant, Npc1nih) and Sandhoff (Hexb knockout, Hexb−/−) disease using wheel-running activity measurement, neuropathology and clock gene expression analysis. Both mutants exhibited regular, entrained rest/activity patterns under light:dark (LD) conditions despite the onset of their respective neurodegenerative phenotypes. A slightly shortened free-running period and changes in Per1 gene expression were observed in Hexb−/− mice under constant dark conditions (DD); however, no overt neuropathology was detected in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Conversely, despite extensive cholesterol accumulation in the SCN of Npc1nih mutants, no circadian disruption was observed under constant conditions. Our results indicate the accumulation of specific metabolites in LSDs may differentially contribute to circadian deregulation at the molecular and behavioural level. PMID:26467605

  4. Circadian profiling in two mouse models of lysosomal storage disorders; Niemann Pick type-C and Sandhoff disease.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Katie; Livieratos, Achilleas; Dumbill, Richard; Hughes, Steven; Ang, Gauri; Smith, David A; Morris, Lauren; Brown, Laurence A; Peirson, Stuart N; Platt, Frances M; Davies, Kay E; Oliver, Peter L

    2016-01-15

    Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption is frequently associated with neurodegenerative disease, yet it is unclear how the specific pathology in these disorders leads to abnormal rest/activity profiles. To investigate whether the pathological features of lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) influence the core molecular clock or the circadian behavioural abnormalities reported in some patients, we examined mouse models of Niemann-Pick Type-C (Npc1 mutant, Npc1(nih)) and Sandhoff (Hexb knockout, Hexb(-/-)) disease using wheel-running activity measurement, neuropathology and clock gene expression analysis. Both mutants exhibited regular, entrained rest/activity patterns under light:dark (LD) conditions despite the onset of their respective neurodegenerative phenotypes. A slightly shortened free-running period and changes in Per1 gene expression were observed in Hexb(-/-) mice under constant dark conditions (DD); however, no overt neuropathology was detected in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Conversely, despite extensive cholesterol accumulation in the SCN of Npc1(nih) mutants, no circadian disruption was observed under constant conditions. Our results indicate the accumulation of specific metabolites in LSDs may differentially contribute to circadian deregulation at the molecular and behavioural level. PMID:26467605

  5. AAV-mediated gene delivery in a feline model of Sandhoff disease corrects lysosomal storage in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Hannah E; McCurdy, Victoria J; Eaton, Samuel C; Wilson, Diane U; Johnson, Aime K; Randle, Ashley N; Bradbury, Allison M; Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Baker, Henry J; Hudson, Judith A; Cox, Nancy R; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Seyfried, Thomas N; Martin, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the gene for the β-subunit of β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex), resulting in the inability to catabolize ganglioside GM2 within the lysosomes. SD presents with an accumulation of GM2 and its asialo derivative GA2, primarily in the central nervous system. Myelin-enriched glycolipids, cerebrosides and sulfatides, are also decreased in SD corresponding with dysmyelination. At present, no treatment exists for SD. Previous studies have shown the therapeutic benefit of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy in the treatment of SD in murine and feline models. In this study, we treated presymptomatic SD cats with AAVrh8 vectors expressing feline Hex in the thalamus combined with intracerebroventricular (Thal/ICV) injections. Treated animals showed clearly improved neurologic function and quality of life, manifested in part by prevention or attenuation of whole-body tremors characteristic of untreated animals. Hex activity was significantly elevated, whereas storage of GM2 and GA2 was significantly decreased in tissue samples taken from the cortex, cerebellum, thalamus, and cervical spinal cord. Treatment also increased levels of myelin-enriched cerebrosides and sulfatides in the cortex and thalamus. This study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of AAV for feline SD and suggests a similar potential for human SD patients. PMID:25873306

  6. AAV-Mediated Gene Delivery in a Feline Model of Sandhoff Disease Corrects Lysosomal Storage in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, Hannah E.; McCurdy, Victoria J.; Eaton, Samuel C.; Wilson, Diane U.; Johnson, Aime K.; Randle, Ashley N.; Bradbury, Allison M.; Gray-Edwards, Heather L.; Baker, Henry J.; Hudson, Judith A.; Cox, Nancy R.; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Seyfried, Thomas N.

    2015-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the gene for the β-subunit of β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex), resulting in the inability to catabolize ganglioside GM2 within the lysosomes. SD presents with an accumulation of GM2 and its asialo derivative GA2, primarily in the central nervous system. Myelin-enriched glycolipids, cerebrosides and sulfatides, are also decreased in SD corresponding with dysmyelination. At present, no treatment exists for SD. Previous studies have shown the therapeutic benefit of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy in the treatment of SD in murine and feline models. In this study, we treated presymptomatic SD cats with AAVrh8 vectors expressing feline Hex in the thalamus combined with intracerebroventricular (Thal/ICV) injections. Treated animals showed clearly improved neurologic function and quality of life, manifested in part by prevention or attenuation of whole-body tremors characteristic of untreated animals. Hex activity was significantly elevated, whereas storage of GM2 and GA2 was significantly decreased in tissue samples taken from the cortex, cerebellum, thalamus, and cervical spinal cord. Treatment also increased levels of myelin-enriched cerebrosides and sulfatides in the cortex and thalamus. This study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of AAV for feline SD and suggests a similar potential for human SD patients. PMID:25873306

  7. Immune response to enzyme replacement therapies in lysosomal storage diseases and the role of immune tolerance induction.

    PubMed

    Kishnani, Priya S; Dickson, Patricia I; Muldowney, Laurie; Lee, Jessica J; Rosenberg, Amy; Abichandani, Rekha; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Burton, Barbara K; Dewey, Maureen; Freitas, Alexandra; Gavin, Derek; Griebel, Donna; Hogan, Melissa; Holland, Stephen; Tanpaiboon, Pranoot; Turka, Laurence A; Utz, Jeanine J; Wang, Yow-Ming; Whitley, Chester B; Kazi, Zoheb B; Pariser, Anne R

    2016-02-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and National Organization for Rare Disease (NORD) convened a public workshop titled "Immune Responses to Enzyme Replacement Therapies: Role of Immune Tolerance Induction" to discuss the impact of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) on efficacy and safety of enzyme replacement therapies (ERTs) intended to treat patients with lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Participants in the workshop included FDA staff, clinicians, scientists, patients, industry, and advocacy group representatives. The risks and benefits of implementing prophylactic immune tolerance induction (ITI) to reduce the potential clinical impact of antibody development were considered. Complications due to immune responses to ERT are being recognized with increasing experience and lengths of exposure to ERTs to treat several LSDs. Strategies to mitigate immune responses and to optimize therapies are needed. Discussions during the workshop resulted in the identification of knowledge gaps and future areas of research, as well as the following proposals from the participants: (1) systematic collection of longitudinal data on immunogenicity to better understand the impact of ADAs on long-term clinical outcomes; (2) development of disease-specific biomarkers and outcome measures to assess the effect of ADAs and ITI on efficacy and safety; (3) development of consistent approaches to ADA assays to allow comparisons of immunogenicity data across different products and disease groups, and to expedite reporting of results; (4) establishment of a system to widely share data on antibody titers following treatment with ERTs; (5) identification of components of the protein that are immunogenic so that triggers and components of the immune responses can be targeted in ITI; and (6) consideration of early ITI in patients who are at risk of developing clinically relevant ADA that have been demonstrated to worsen treatment outcomes. PMID:26597321

  8. Expression of Human Gaucher Disease Gene GBA Generates Neurodevelopmental Defects and ER Stress in Drosophila Eye

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kumpei; Hanai, Shuji; Aizawa, Hidenobu; Kato, Tomoki; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Terumi; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Tsuji, Shoji; Ishida, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is the most common of the lysosomal storage disorders and is caused by defects in the GBA gene encoding glucocerebrosidase (GlcCerase). The accumulation of its substrate, glucocylceramide (GlcCer) is considered the main cause of GD. We found here that the expression of human mutated GlcCerase gene (hGBA) that is associated with neuronopathy in GD patients causes neurodevelopmental defects in Drosophila eyes. The data indicate that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was elevated in Drosophila eye carrying mutated hGBAs by using of the ER stress markers dXBP1 and dBiP. We also found that Ambroxol, a potential pharmacological chaperone for mutated hGBAs, can alleviate the neuronopathic phenotype through reducing ER stress. We demonstrate a novel mechanism of neurodevelopmental defects mediated by ER stress through expression of mutants of human GBA gene in the eye of Drosophila. PMID:23936319

  9. Newborn screening for lysosomal diseases: current status and potential interface with population medical genetics in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Giugliani, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    The aim of newborn screening (NBS) programs is to detect a condition in a presymptomatic baby and provide management measures which could significantly improve the natural history of the disease. NBS programs for metabolic diseases were first introduced in North America and Europe and in the 1960s for phenylketonuria, expanded a few years later to include congenital hypothyroidism, and have been growing steadily in terms of number of conditions tested for and number of countries and births covered. Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of around 50 genetic conditions in which a defect in a lysosomal function occurs. LSDs are progressive conditions, being usually asymptomatic at birth, but with clinical features becoming apparent in childhood, with severe manifestations in most instances, high morbidity and shortened life span. Although individually rare, the prevalence of LSDs is significant when the group is considered as a whole (around 1:4,000-1:9,000 live births). Several management techniques, including bone marrow transplantation, enzyme replacement therapy, substrate inhibition therapy, pharmacological chaperones and many other approaches are transforming the LSDs into treatable conditions. However, lack of awareness and lack of access to tests cause a significant delay between onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Several lines of evidence showing that the earlier introduction of therapy may provide a better outcome, are bringing support to the idea of including LSDs in NBS programs. Due to advances in technology, high-throughput multiplex methods are now available for mass screening of several LSDs. Pilot projects were already developed in many countries for some LSDs, with interesting results. Although some NBS in Latin America has been carried out since the 1970s, it has so far been incorporated as a public health program in only a few countries in the region. It will probably take many years before NBS is implemented in most Latin American countries

  10. Functional and genetic characterization of the non-lysosomal glucosylceramidase 2 as a modifier for Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gaucher disease (GD) is the most common inherited lysosomal storage disorder in humans, caused by mutations in the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GBA1). GD is clinically heterogeneous and although the type of GBA1 mutation plays a role in determining the type of GD, it does not explain the clinical variability seen among patients. Cumulative evidence from recent studies suggests that GBA2 could play a role in the pathogenesis of GD and potentially interacts with GBA1. Methods We used a framework of functional and genetic approaches in order to further characterize a potential role of GBA2 in GD. Glucosylceramide (GlcCer) levels in spleen, liver and brain of GBA2-deficient mice and mRNA and protein expression of GBA2 in GBA1-deficient murine fibroblasts were analyzed. Furthermore we crossed GBA2-deficient mice with conditional Gba1 knockout mice in order to quantify the interaction between GBA1 and GBA2. Finally, a genetic approach was used to test whether genetic variation in GBA2 is associated with GD and/ or acts as a modifier in Gaucher patients. We tested 22 SNPs in the GBA2 and GBA1 genes in 98 type 1 and 60 type 2/3 Gaucher patients for single- and multi-marker association with GD. Results We found a significant accumulation of GlcCer compared to wild-type controls in all three organs studied. In addition, a significant increase of Gba2-protein and Gba2-mRNA levels in GBA1-deficient murine fibroblasts was observed. GlcCer levels in the spleen from Gba1/Gba2 knockout mice were much higher than the sum of the single knockouts, indicating a cross-talk between the two glucosylceramidases and suggesting a partially compensation of the loss of one enzyme by the other. In the genetic approach, no significant association with severity of GD was found for SNPs at the GBA2 locus. However, in the multi-marker analyses a significant result was detected for p.L444P (GBA1) and rs4878628 (GBA2), using a model that does not take marginal

  11. Lysosomal sorting of amyloid-β by the SORLA receptor is impaired by a familial Alzheimer's disease mutation.

    PubMed

    Caglayan, Safak; Takagi-Niidome, Shizuka; Liao, Fan; Carlo, Anne-Sophie; Schmidt, Vanessa; Burgert, Tilman; Kitago, Yu; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Füchtbauer, Annette; Holtzman, David M; Takagi, Junichi; Willnow, Thomas E

    2014-02-12

    SORLA/SORL1 is a unique neuronal sorting receptor for the amyloid precursor protein that has been causally implicated in both sporadic and autosomal dominant familial forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Brain concentrations of SORLA are inversely correlated with amyloid-β (Aβ) in mouse models and AD patients, suggesting that increasing expression of this receptor could be a therapeutic option for decreasing the amount of amyloidogenic products in affected individuals. We characterize a new mouse model in which SORLA is overexpressed, and show a decrease in Aβ concentrations in mouse brain. We trace the underlying molecular mechanism to the ability of this receptor to direct lysosomal targeting of nascent Aβ peptides. Aβ binds to the amino-terminal VPS10P domain of SORLA, and this binding is impaired by a familial AD mutation in SORL1. Thus, loss of SORLA's Aβ sorting function is a potential cause of AD in patients, and SORLA may be a new therapeutic target for AD drug development. PMID:24523320

  12. Gene-Wise Association of Variants in Four Lysosomal Storage Disorder Genes in Neuropathologically Confirmed Lewy Body Disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Lorraine N.; Chan, Robin; Cheng, Rong; Liu, Xinmin; Park, Naeun; Parmalee, Nancy; Kisselev, Sergey; Cortes, Etty; Torres, Paola A.; Pastores, Gregory M.; Vonsattel, Jean P.; Alcalay, Roy; Marder, Karen; Honig, Lawrence L.; Fahn, Stanley; Mayeux, Richard; Shelanski, Michael; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Lee, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Variants in GBA are associated with Lewy Body (LB) pathology. We investigated whether variants in other lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) genes also contribute to disease pathogenesis. Methods We performed a genetic analysis of four LSD genes including GBA, HEXA, SMPD1, and MCOLN1 in 231 brain autopsies. Brain autopsies included neuropathologically defined LBD without Alzheimer Disease (AD) changes (n = 59), AD without significant LB pathology (n = 71), Alzheimer disease and lewy body variant (ADLBV) (n = 68), and control brains without LB or AD neuropathology (n = 33). Sequencing of HEXA, SMPD1, MCOLN1 and GBA followed by ‘gene wise’ genetic association analysis was performed. To determine the functional effect, a biochemical analysis of GBA in a subset of brains was also performed. GCase activity was measured in a subset of brain samples (n = 64) that included LBD brains, with or without GBA mutations, and control brains. A lipidomic analysis was also performed in brain autopsies (n = 67) which included LBD (n = 34), ADLBV (n = 3), AD (n = 4), PD (n = 9) and control brains (n = 17), comparing GBA mutation carriers to non-carriers. Results In a ‘gene-wise’ analysis, variants in GBA, SMPD1 and MCOLN1 were significantly associated with LB pathology (p range: 0.03–4.14 x10-5). Overall, the mean levels of GCase activity were significantly lower in GBA mutation carriers compared to non-carriers (p<0.001). A significant increase and accumulation of several species for the lipid classes, ceramides and sphingolipids, was observed in LBD brains carrying GBA mutations compared to controls (p range: p<0.05-p<0.01). Interpretation Our study indicates that variants in GBA, SMPD1 and MCOLN1 are associated with LB pathology. Biochemical data comparing GBA mutation carrier to non-carriers support these findings, which have important implications for biomarker development and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25933391

  13. LITAF Mutations Associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease 1C Show Mislocalization from the Late Endosome/Lysosome to the Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira Lacerda, Andressa; Hartjes, Emily; Brunetti, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is one of the most common heritable neuromuscular disorders, affecting 1 in every 2500 people. Mutations in LITAF have been shown to be causative for CMT type 1C disease. In this paper we explore the subcellular localization of wild type LITAF and mutant forms of LITAF known to cause CMT1C (T49M, A111G, G112S, T115N, W116G, L122V and P135T). The results show that LITAF mutants A111G, G112S, W116G, and T115N mislocalize from the late endosome/lysosome to the mitochondria while the mutants T49M, L122V, and P135T show partial mislocalization with a portion of the total protein present in the late endosome/lysosome and the remainder of the protein localized to the mitochondria. This suggests that different mutants of LITAF will produce differing severity of disease. We also explored the effect of the presence of mutant LITAF on wild-type LITAF localization. We showed that in cells heterozygous for LITAF, CMT1C mutants T49M and G112S are dominant since wild-type LITAF localized to the mitochondria when co-transfected with a LITAF mutant. Finally, we demonstrated how LITAF transits to the endosome and mitochondria compartments of the cell. Using Brefeldin A to block ER to Golgi transport we demonstrated that wild type LITAF traffics through the secretory pathway to the late endosome/lysosome while the LITAF mutants transit to the mitochondria independent of the secretory pathway. In addition, we demonstrated that the C-terminus of LITAF is necessary and sufficient for targeting of wild-type LITAF to the late endosome/lysosome and the mutants to the mitochondria. Together these data provide insight into how mutations in LITAF cause CMT1C disease. PMID:25058650

  14. The development and use of small molecule inhibitors of glycosphingolipid metabolism for lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shayman, James A.; Larsen, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosphingolipid (GSL) storage diseases have been the focus of efforts to develop small molecule therapeutics from design, experimental proof of concept studies, and clinical trials. Two primary alternative strategies that have been pursued include pharmacological chaperones and GSL synthase inhibitors. There are theoretical advantages and disadvantages to each of these approaches. Pharmacological chaperones are specific for an individual glycoside hydrolase and for the specific mutation present, but no candidate chaperone has been demonstrated to be effective for all mutations leading to a given disorder. Synthase inhibitors target single enzymes such as glucosylceramide synthase and inhibit the formation of multiple GSLs. A glycolipid synthase inhibitor could potentially be used to treat multiple diseases, but at the risk of lowering nontargeted cellular GSLs that are important for normal health. The basis for these strategies and specific examples of compounds that have led to clinical trials is the focus of this review. PMID:24534703

  15. Intracellular Protein Degradation: From a Vague Idea through the Lysosome and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and onto Human Diseases and Drug Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code was transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins were degraded had remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis was largely non-lysosomal, but the mechanisms involved have remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs. PMID:23908826

  16. Evaluation of Aminoglycoside and Non-Aminoglycoside Compounds for Stop-Codon Readthrough Therapy in Four Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Grau, Marta; Garrido, Elena; Cozar, Mónica; Rodriguez-Sureda, Víctor; Domínguez, Carmen; Arenas, Concepción; Gatti, Richard A.; Cormand, Bru; Grinberg, Daniel; Vilageliu, Lluïsa

    2015-01-01

    Nonsense mutations are quite prevalent in inherited diseases. Readthrough drugs could provide a therapeutic option for any disease caused by this type of mutation. Geneticin (G418) and gentamicin were among the first to be described. Novel compounds have been generated, but only a few have shown improved results. PTC124 is the only compound to have reached clinical trials. Here we first investigated the readthrough effects of gentamicin on fibroblasts from one patient with Sanfilippo B, one with Sanfilippo C, and one with Maroteaux-Lamy. We found that ARSB activity (Maroteaux-Lamy case) resulted in an increase of 2–3 folds and that the amount of this enzyme within the lysosomes was also increased, after treatment. Since the other two cases (Sanfilippo B and Sanfilippo C) did not respond to gentamicin, the treatments were extended with the use of geneticin and five non-aminoglycoside (PTC124, RTC13, RTC14, BZ6 and BZ16) readthrough compounds (RTCs). No recovery was observed at the enzyme activity level. However, mRNA recovery was observed in both cases, nearly a two-fold increase for Sanfilippo B fibroblasts with G418 and around 1.5 fold increase for Sanfilippo C cells with RTC14 and PTC124. Afterwards, some of the products were assessed through in vitro analyses for seven mutations in genes responsible for those diseases and, also, for Niemann-Pick A/B. Using the coupled transcription/translation system (TNT), the best results were obtained for SMPD1 mutations with G418, reaching a 35% recovery at 0.25 μg/ml, for the p.W168X mutation. The use of COS cells transfected with mutant cDNAs gave positive results for most of the mutations with some of the drugs, although to a different extent. The higher enzyme activity recovery, of around two-fold increase, was found for gentamicin on the ARSB p.W146X mutation. Our results are promising and consistent with those of other groups. Further studies of novel compounds are necessary to find those with more consistent

  17. Sensitivity to Lysosome-Dependent Cell Death Is Directly Regulated by Lysosomal Cholesterol Content

    PubMed Central

    Appelqvist, Hanna; Sandin, Linnea; Björnström, Karin; Saftig, Paul; Garner, Brett; Öllinger, Karin; Kågedal, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in lipid homeostasis are implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, although the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. We evaluated the impact of cholesterol accumulation, induced by U18666A, quinacrine or mutations in the cholesterol transporting Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) protein, on lysosomal stability and sensitivity to lysosome-mediated cell death. We found that neurons with lysosomal cholesterol accumulation were protected from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. In addition, human fibroblasts with cholesterol-loaded lysosomes showed higher lysosomal membrane stability than controls. Previous studies have shown that cholesterol accumulation is accompanied by the storage of lipids such as sphingomyelin, glycosphingolipids and sphingosine and an up regulation of lysosomal associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2), which may also influence lysosomal stability. However, in this study the use of myriocin and LAMP deficient fibroblasts excluded these factors as responsible for the rescuing effect and instead suggested that primarily lysosomal cholesterol content determineD the cellular sensitivity to toxic insults. Further strengthening this concept, depletion of cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin or 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased the stability of lysosomes and cells became more prone to undergo apoptosis. In conclusion, cholesterol content regulated lysosomal membrane permeabilization and thereby influenced cell death sensitivity. Our data suggests that lysosomal cholesterol modulation might be used as a therapeutic strategy for conditions associated with accelerated or repressed apoptosis. PMID:23166840

  18. PEG-lipid micelles enable cholesterol efflux in Niemann-Pick Type C1 disease-based lysosomal storage disorder.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anna; Patel, Siddharth; Ward, Carl; Lorenz, Anna; Ortiz, Mauren; DuRoss, Allison; Wieghardt, Fabian; Esch, Amanda; Otten, Elsje G; Heiser, Laura M; Korolchuk, Viktor I; Sun, Conroy; Sarkar, Sovan; Sahay, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    2-Hydroxy-propyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), a cholesterol scavenger, is currently undergoing Phase 2b/3 clinical trial for treatment of Niemann Pick Type C-1 (NPC1), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that stems from abnormal cholesterol accumulation in the endo/lysosomes. Unfortunately, the extremely high doses of HPβCD required to prevent progressive neurodegeneration exacerbates ototoxicity, pulmonary toxicity and autophagy-based cellular defects. We present unexpected evidence that a poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG)-lipid conjugate enables cholesterol clearance from endo/lysosomes of Npc1 mutant (Npc1(-/-)) cells. Herein, we show that distearyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-PEG (DSPE-PEG), which forms 12-nm micelles above the critical micelle concentration, accumulates heavily inside cholesterol-rich late endosomes in Npc1(-/-) cells. This potentially results in cholesterol solubilization and leakage from lysosomes. High-throughput screening revealed that DSPE-PEG, in combination with HPβCD, acts synergistically to efflux cholesterol without significantly aggravating autophagy defects. These well-known excipients can be used as admixtures to treat NPC1 disorder. Increasing PEG chain lengths from 350 Da-30 kDa in DSPE-PEG micelles, or increasing DSPE-PEG content in an array of liposomes packaged with HPβCD, improved cholesterol egress, while Pluronic block copolymers capable of micelle formation showed slight effects at high concentrations. We postulate that PEG-lipid based nanocarriers can serve as bioactive drug delivery systems for effective treatment of lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:27572704

  19. Binding of 3,4,5,6-Tetrahydroxyazepanes to the Acid-[beta]-glucosidase Active Site: Implications for Pharmacological Chaperone Design for Gaucher Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Orwig, Susan D.; Tan, Yun Lei; Grimster, Neil P.; Yu, Zhanqian; Powers, Evan T.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2013-03-07

    Pharmacologic chaperoning is a therapeutic strategy being developed to improve the cellular folding and trafficking defects associated with Gaucher disease, a lysosomal storage disorder caused by point mutations in the gene encoding acid-{beta}-glucosidase (GCase). In this approach, small molecules bind to and stabilize mutant folded or nearly folded GCase in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), increasing the concentration of folded, functional GCase trafficked to the lysosome where the mutant enzyme can hydrolyze the accumulated substrate. To date, the pharmacologic chaperone (PC) candidates that have been investigated largely have been active site-directed inhibitors of GCase, usually containing five- or six-membered rings, such as modified azasugars. Here we show that a seven-membered, nitrogen-containing heterocycle (3,4,5,6-tetrahydroxyazepane) scaffold is also promising for generating PCs for GCase. Crystal structures reveal that the core azepane stabilizes GCase in a variation of its proposed active conformation, whereas binding of an analogue with an N-linked hydroxyethyl tail stabilizes GCase in a conformation in which the active site is covered, also utilizing a loop conformation not seen previously. Although both compounds preferentially stabilize GCase to thermal denaturation at pH 7.4, reflective of the pH in the ER, only the core azepane, which is a mid-micromolar competitive inhibitor, elicits a modest increase in enzyme activity for the neuronopathic G202R and the non-neuronopathic N370S mutant GCase in an intact cell assay. Our results emphasize the importance of the conformational variability of the GCase active site in the design of competitive inhibitors as PCs for Gaucher disease.

  20. Loss of Mitochondrial Function Impairs Lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Demers-Lamarche, Julie; Guillebaud, Gérald; Tlili, Mouna; Todkar, Kiran; Bélanger, Noémie; Grondin, Martine; Nguyen, Angela P; Michel, Jennifer; Germain, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Alterations in mitochondrial function, as observed in neurodegenerative diseases, lead to disrupted energy metabolism and production of damaging reactive oxygen species. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial dysfunction also disrupts the structure and function of lysosomes, the main degradation and recycling organelle. Specifically, inhibition of mitochondrial function, following deletion of the mitochondrial protein AIF, OPA1, or PINK1, as well as chemical inhibition of the electron transport chain, impaired lysosomal activity and caused the appearance of large lysosomal vacuoles. Importantly, our results show that lysosomal impairment is dependent on reactive oxygen species. Given that alterations in both mitochondrial function and lysosomal activity are key features of neurodegenerative diseases, this work provides important insights into the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26987902

  1. A molecular mechanism to regulate lysosome motility for lysosome positioning and tubulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinran; Rydzewski, Nicholas; Hider, Ahmad; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yang, Junsheng; Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Cheng, Xiping; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-04-01

    To mediate the degradation of biomacromolecules, lysosomes must traffic towards cargo-carrying vesicles for subsequent membrane fusion or fission. Mutations of the lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 cause lysosomal storage disease (LSD) characterized by disordered lysosomal membrane trafficking in cells. Here we show that TRPML1 activity is required to promote Ca(2+)-dependent centripetal movement of lysosomes towards the perinuclear region (where autophagosomes accumulate) following autophagy induction. ALG-2, an EF-hand-containing protein, serves as a lysosomal Ca(2+) sensor that associates physically with the minus-end-directed dynactin-dynein motor, while PtdIns(3,5)P(2), a lysosome-localized phosphoinositide, acts upstream of TRPML1. Furthermore, the PtdIns(3,5)P(2)-TRPML1-ALG-2-dynein signalling is necessary for lysosome tubulation and reformation. In contrast, the TRPML1 pathway is not required for the perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes observed in many LSDs, which is instead likely to be caused by secondary cholesterol accumulation that constitutively activates Rab7-RILP-dependent retrograde transport. Ca(2+) release from lysosomes thus provides an on-demand mechanism regulating lysosome motility, positioning and tubulation. PMID:26950892

  2. Human tonsil-derived follicular dendritic-like cells are refractory to human prion infection in vitro and traffic disease-associated prion protein to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Krejciova, Zuzana; De Sousa, Paul; Manson, Jean; Ironside, James W; Head, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in human cellular susceptibility to prion infection remain poorly defined. This is due, in part, to the absence of any well characterized and relevant cultured human cells susceptible to infection with human prions, such as those involved in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. In variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, prion replication is thought to occur first in the lymphoreticular system and then spread into the brain. We have, therefore, examined the susceptibility of a human tonsil-derived follicular dendritic cell-like cell line (HK) to prion infection. HK cells were found to display a readily detectable, time-dependent increase in cell-associated abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE)) when exposed to medium spiked with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brain homogenate, resulting in a coarse granular perinuclear PrP(TSE) staining pattern. Despite their high level of cellular prion protein expression, HK cells failed to support infection, as judged by longer term maintenance of PrP(TSE) accumulation. Colocalization studies revealed that exposure of HK cells to brain homogenate resulted in increased numbers of detectable lysosomes and that these structures immunostained intensely for PrP(TSE) after exposure to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brain homogenate. Our data suggest that human follicular dendritic-like cells and perhaps other human cell types are able to avoid prion infection by efficient lysosomal degradation of PrP(TSE). PMID:24183781

  3. 'Doctor Google' ending the diagnostic odyssey in lysosomal storage disorders: parents using internet search engines as an efficient diagnostic strategy in rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Bouwman, Machtelt G; Teunissen, Quirine G A; Wijburg, Frits A; Linthorst, Gabor E

    2010-08-01

    The expansion of the internet has resulted in widespread availability of medical information for both patients and physicians. People increasingly spend time on the internet searching for an explanation, diagnosis or treatment for their symptoms. Regarding rare diseases, the use of the internet may be an important tool in the diagnostic process. The authors present two cases in which concerned parents made a correct diagnosis of a lysosomal storage disorder in their child by searching the internet after a long doctor's delay. These cases illustrate the utility of publicly available internet search engines in diagnosing rare disorders and in addition illustrate the lengthy diagnostic odyssey which is common in these disorders. PMID:20418338

  4. PEG-lipid micelles enable cholesterol efflux in Niemann-Pick Type C1 disease-based lysosomal storage disorder

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Anna; Patel, Siddharth; Ward, Carl; Lorenz, Anna; Ortiz, Mauren; DuRoss, Allison; Wieghardt, Fabian; Esch, Amanda; Otten, Elsje G.; Heiser, Laura M.; Korolchuk, Viktor I.; Sun, Conroy; Sarkar, Sovan; Sahay, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    2-Hydroxy-propyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), a cholesterol scavenger, is currently undergoing Phase 2b/3 clinical trial for treatment of Niemann Pick Type C-1 (NPC1), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that stems from abnormal cholesterol accumulation in the endo/lysosomes. Unfortunately, the extremely high doses of HPβCD required to prevent progressive neurodegeneration exacerbates ototoxicity, pulmonary toxicity and autophagy-based cellular defects. We present unexpected evidence that a poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG)-lipid conjugate enables cholesterol clearance from endo/lysosomes of Npc1 mutant (Npc1−/−) cells. Herein, we show that distearyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-PEG (DSPE-PEG), which forms 12-nm micelles above the critical micelle concentration, accumulates heavily inside cholesterol-rich late endosomes in Npc1−/− cells. This potentially results in cholesterol solubilization and leakage from lysosomes. High-throughput screening revealed that DSPE-PEG, in combination with HPβCD, acts synergistically to efflux cholesterol without significantly aggravating autophagy defects. These well-known excipients can be used as admixtures to treat NPC1 disorder. Increasing PEG chain lengths from 350 Da-30 kDa in DSPE-PEG micelles, or increasing DSPE-PEG content in an array of liposomes packaged with HPβCD, improved cholesterol egress, while Pluronic block copolymers capable of micelle formation showed slight effects at high concentrations. We postulate that PEG-lipid based nanocarriers can serve as bioactive drug delivery systems for effective treatment of lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:27572704

  5. The risk of Parkinson's disease in type 1 Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Bultron, Gilberto; Kacena, Katherine; Pearson, Daniel; Boxer, Michael; Yang, Ruhua; Sathe, Swati; Pastores, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    In Gaucher disease, defective lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to mutations in the GBA1 gene results in lysosomal accumulation of glucocerebroside in mononuclear phagocytes and a multisystemic phenotype. Observations of occurrence of Parkinson's disease in some patients with non-neuronopathic type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1) and their first degree relatives has led to the identification of GBA1 heterozygous mutations as a genetic risk factor for idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the magnitude of risk of PD in patients with known GD1 has not been determined, and it is not known whether GD1/PD represents a specific sub-phenotype of GD1 with distinctive genotype/phenotype characteristics. We estimated the risk of PD in a cohort of 444 consecutively evaluated patients with GD1 compared to that in the general population. Eleven patients developed parkinsonian syndrome during a 12-year follow-up period. The adjusted life-time risk ratio of PD in GD1 compared to that in the general population was 21.4 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 10.7–38.3], with a higher risk in men compared to women. In our cohort, GD1/Parkinson's disease phenotype (GD1/PD) was characterized by higher GD1 severity score, due to higher incidence of avascular osteonecrosis. The clinical spectrum of PD varied from mild to potentially life-threatening disease. All but one patient with GD1/PD phenotype had at least one N370S GBA1 allele. In conclusion, compared to the general population, patients with GD1 have an almost 20-fold increased life-time risk of developing PD. PMID:20177787

  6. Selective screening for lysosomal storage diseases with dried blood spots collected on filter paper in 4,700 high-risk colombian subjects.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Alfredo; Giugliani, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a very heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders. The diagnostic process usually involves complex sampling, processing, testing, and validation procedures, performed by specialized laboratories only, which causes great limitations in reaching a diagnosis for patients affected by these diseases.There are few studies about LSDs in Colombia. The diagnostic limitations often make medical practitioners disregard the possibility of these disorders while diagnosing their patients. The current study documents the results of a 7-year screening in high-risk patients, aimed to detect LSDs using dried blood spots (DBS) collected on filter paper, with a micromethodology that facilitates diagnosis even with a large number of samples.The activities of α-galactosidase A, α glucosidase, α-L-iduronidase, arylsulfatase B, β-galactosidase, β-glucosidase, total hexosaminidase, iduronate sulfatase, and chitotriosidase were analyzed in high-risk patients for lysosomal disease. The catalytic activity was evaluated with fluorometric micromethods using artificial substrates marked with 4-methylumbelliferone.The reference values for a control population were established for the enzymes listed above, and 242 patients were found to have an enzyme deficiency, guiding to the following diagnoses: Fabry disease (n = 31), Pompe disease (n = 16), Hurler Syndrome (n = 15), Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome (n = 34), GM1 Gangliosidosis (n = 10), Morquio B (n = 1), Gaucher disease (n = 101), Sandhoff disease (n = 1), Mucolipidosis (n = 2), and Hunter Syndrome (n = 31). In conclusion, this protocol provides a comprehensive diagnostic approach which could be carried out in Colombia and made it available to medical services spread around the country, enabling the identification of a large number of patients affected by LSDs, which could potentially benefit from the therapeutic tools already available for many of these diseases. PMID:23609959

  7. Lysosomal and phagocytic activity is increased in astrocytes during disease progression in the SOD1 G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David J.; Blackburn, Daniel J.; Keatinge, Marcus; Sokhi, Dilraj; Viskaitis, Paulius; Heath, Paul R.; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Kirby, Janine; Shaw, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Previously, gene expression profiling of astrocytes from the pre-symptomatic stage of the SOD1G93A model of ALS has revealed reduced lactate metabolism and altered trophic support. Here, we have performed microarray analysis of symptomatic and late-stage disease astrocytes isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM) from the lumbar spinal cord of the SOD1G93A mouse to complete the picture of astrocyte behavior throughout the disease course. Astrocytes at symptomatic and late-stage disease show a distinct up-regulation of transcripts defining a reactive phenotype, such as those involved in the lysosome and phagocytic pathways. Functional analysis of hexosaminidase B enzyme activity in the spinal cord and of astrocyte phagocytic ability has demonstrated a significant increase in lysosomal enzyme activity and phagocytic activity in SOD1G93A vs. littermate controls, validating the findings of the microarray study. In addition to the increased reactivity seen at both stages, astrocytes from late-stage disease showed decreased expression of many transcripts involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Staining for the master regulator of cholesterol synthesis, SREBP2, has revealed an increased localization to the cytoplasm of astrocytes and motor neurons in late-stage SOD1G93A spinal cord, indicating that down-regulation of transcripts may be due to an excess of cholesterol in the CNS during late-stage disease possibly due to phagocytosis of neuronal debris. Our data reveal that SOD1G93A astrocytes are characterized more by a loss of supportive function than a toxic phenotype during ALS disease progression and future studies should focus upon restorative therapies. PMID:26528138

  8. Podocytes degrade endocytosed albumin primarily in lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Carson, John M; Okamura, Kayo; Wakashin, Hidefumi; McFann, Kim; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Blaine, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria is a strong, independent predictor of chronic kidney disease progression. We hypothesize that podocyte processing of albumin via the lysosome may be an important determinant of podocyte injury and loss. A human urine derived podocyte-like epithelial cell (HUPEC) line was used for in vitro experiments. Albumin uptake was quantified by Western blot after loading HUPECs with fluorescein-labeled (FITC) albumin. Co-localization of albumin with lysosomes was determined by confocal microscopy. Albumin degradation was measured by quantifying FITC-albumin abundance in HUPEC lysates by Western blot. Degradation experiments were repeated using HUPECs treated with chloroquine, a lysosome inhibitor, or MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor. Lysosome activity was measured by fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching (FRAP). Cytokine production was measured by ELISA. Cell death was determined by trypan blue staining. In vivo, staining with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) was performed on tissue from a Denys-Drash trangenic mouse model of nephrotic syndrome. HUPECs endocytosed albumin, which co-localized with lysosomes. Choloroquine, but not MG-132, inhibited albumin degradation, indicating that degradation occurs in lysosomes. Cathepsin B activity, measured by FRAP, significantly decreased in HUPECs exposed to albumin (12.5% of activity in controls) and chloroquine (12.8%), and declined further with exposure to albumin plus chloroquine (8.2%, p<0.05). Cytokine production and cell death were significantly increased in HUPECs exposed to albumin and chloroquine alone, and these effects were potentiated by exposure to albumin plus chloroquine. Compared to wild-type mice, glomerular staining of LAMP-1 was significantly increased in Denys-Drash mice and appeared to be most prominent in podocytes. These data suggest lysosomes are involved in the processing of endocytosed albumin in podocytes, and lysosomal dysfunction may contribute to podocyte injury and

  9. Podocytes Degrade Endocytosed Albumin Primarily in Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Carson, John M.; Okamura, Kayo; Wakashin, Hidefumi; McFann, Kim; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Blaine, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria is a strong, independent predictor of chronic kidney disease progression. We hypothesize that podocyte processing of albumin via the lysosome may be an important determinant of podocyte injury and loss. A human urine derived podocyte-like epithelial cell (HUPEC) line was used for in vitro experiments. Albumin uptake was quantified by Western blot after loading HUPECs with fluorescein-labeled (FITC) albumin. Co-localization of albumin with lysosomes was determined by confocal microscopy. Albumin degradation was measured by quantifying FITC-albumin abundance in HUPEC lysates by Western blot. Degradation experiments were repeated using HUPECs treated with chloroquine, a lysosome inhibitor, or MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor. Lysosome activity was measured by fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching (FRAP). Cytokine production was measured by ELISA. Cell death was determined by trypan blue staining. In vivo, staining with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) was performed on tissue from a Denys-Drash trangenic mouse model of nephrotic syndrome. HUPECs endocytosed albumin, which co-localized with lysosomes. Choloroquine, but not MG-132, inhibited albumin degradation, indicating that degradation occurs in lysosomes. Cathepsin B activity, measured by FRAP, significantly decreased in HUPECs exposed to albumin (12.5% of activity in controls) and chloroquine (12.8%), and declined further with exposure to albumin plus chloroquine (8.2%, p<0.05). Cytokine production and cell death were significantly increased in HUPECs exposed to albumin and chloroquine alone, and these effects were potentiated by exposure to albumin plus chloroquine. Compared to wild-type mice, glomerular staining of LAMP-1 was significantly increased in Denys-Drash mice and appeared to be most prominent in podocytes. These data suggest lysosomes are involved in the processing of endocytosed albumin in podocytes, and lysosomal dysfunction may contribute to podocyte injury and

  10. Clinical manifestations and management of Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Linari, Silvia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gaucher disease is a rare multi-systemic metabolic disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase, which leads to the accumulation of its normal substrate, glucocerebroside, in tissue macrophages with damage to haematological, visceral and bone systems. Anaemia, thrombocytopenia, enlargement of liver and/or spleen, skeletal abnormalities (osteopenia, lytic lesions, pathological fractures, chronic bone pain, bone crisis, bone infarcts, osteonecrosis and skeletal deformities) are typical manifestations of the most prevalent form of the disease, the so-called non-neuronopathic type 1. However, severity and coexistence of different symptoms are highly variable. The determination of deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity in leukocytes or fibroblasts by enzymatic assay is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Gaucher disease. Comprehensive and reproducible evaluation and monitoring of all clinically relevant aspects are fundamental for the effective management of Gaucher disease patients. Enzyme replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing glucocerebroside storage burden and diminishing the deleterious effects caused by its accumulation. Tailored treatment plan for each patient should be directed to symptom relief, general improvement of quality of life, and prevention of irreversible damage. PMID:26604942

  11. Clinical utility of neuronal cells directly converted from fibroblasts of patients for neuropsychiatric disorders: studies of lysosomal storage diseases and channelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kano, S; Yuan, M; Cardarelli, R A; Maegawa, G; Higurashi, N; Gaval-Cruz, M; Wilson, A M; Tristan, C; Kondo, M A; Chen, Y; Koga, M; Obie, C; Ishizuka, K; Seshadri, S; Srivastava, R; Kato, T A; Horiuchi, Y; Sedlak, T W; Lee, Y; Rapoport, J L; Hirose, S; Okano, H; Valle, D; O'Donnell, P; Sawa, A; Kai, M

    2015-01-01

    Methodologies for generating functional neuronal cells directly from human fibroblasts [induced neuronal (iN) cells] have been recently developed, but the research so far has only focused on technical refinements or recapitulation of known pathological phenotypes. A critical question is whether this novel technology will contribute to elucidation of novel disease mechanisms or evaluation of therapeutic strategies. Here we have addressed this question by studying Tay-Sachs disease, a representative lysosomal storage disease, and Dravet syndrome, a form of severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy, using human iN cells with feature of immature postmitotic glutamatergic neuronal cells. In Tay-Sachs disease, we have successfully characterized canonical neuronal pathology, massive accumulation of GM2 ganglioside, and demonstrated the suitability of this novel cell culture for future drug screening. In Dravet syndrome, we have identified a novel functional phenotype that was not suggested by studies of classical mouse models and human autopsied brains. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that human iN cells are useful for translational neuroscience research to explore novel disease mechanisms and evaluate therapeutic compounds. In the future, research using human iN cells with well-characterized genomic landscape can be integrated into multidisciplinary patient-oriented research on neuropsychiatric disorders to address novel disease mechanisms and evaluate therapeutic strategies. PMID:25732146

  12. Clinical utility of neuronal cells directly converted from fibroblasts of patients for neuropsychiatric disorders: studies of lysosomal storage diseases and channelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kano, Shin-ichi; Yuan, Ming; Cardarelli, Ross A.; Maegawa, Gustavo; Higurashi, Norimichi; Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Wilson, Ashley M.; Tristan, Carlos; Kondo, Mari A.; Chen, Yian; Koga, Minori; Obie, Cassandra; Ishizuka, Koko; Seshadri, Saurav; Srivastava, Rupali; Kato, Takahiro A.; Horiuchi, Yasue; Sedlak, Thomas W.; Lee, Yohan; Rapoport, Judith L.; Hirose, Shinichi; Okano, Hideyuki; Valle, David; O'Donnell, Patricio; Sawa, Akira; Kai, Mihoko

    2015-01-01

    Methodologies for generating functional neuronal cells directly from human fibroblasts [induced neuronal (iN) cells] have been recently developed, but the research so far has only focused on technical refinements or recapitulation of known pathological phenotypes. A critical question is whether this novel technology will contribute to elucidation of novel disease mechanisms or evaluation of therapeutic strategies. Here we have addressed this question by studying Tay-Sachs disease, a representative lysosomal storage disease, and Dravet syndrome, a form of severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy, using human iN cells with feature of immature postmitotic glutamatergic neuronal cells. In Tay-Sachs disease, we have successfully characterized canonical neuronal pathology, massive accumulation of GM2 ganglioside, and demonstrated the suitability of this novel cell culture for future drug screening. In Dravet syndrome, we have identified a novel functional phenotype that was not suggested by studies of classical mouse models and human autopsied brains. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that human iN cells are useful for translational neuroscience research to explore novel disease mechanisms and evaluate therapeutic compounds. In the future, research using human iN cells with well-characterized genomic landscape can be integrated into multidisciplinary patient-oriented research on neuropsychiatric disorders to address novel disease mechanisms and evaluate therapeutic strategies. PMID:25732146

  13. Miglustat therapy in juvenile Sandhoff disease.

    PubMed

    Tallaksen, C M E; Berg, J E

    2009-12-01

    GM(2)-gangliosidosis is a rare and heterogeneous inherited metabolic disorder caused by autosomal recessive mutations in genes encoding the lysosomal enzyme β-hexosaminidase, resulting in the accumulation of ganglioside GM(2) in various tissues, particularly the central nervous system. It is characterized by progressive neurological deterioration that mainly affects motor and spinocerebellar function. Several forms of GM(2)-gangliosidosis exist, including the Sandhoff variant. Currently there is no treatment for these conditions, except for palliative care. Miglustat (Zavesca) is a reversible inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthase, which catalyses the first committed step in the synthesis of glucose-based glycolipids. Miglustat has pharmacokinetic properties that allow it to cross the blood-brain barrier, and preclinical data suggest that it may benefit neuronopathic lysosomal storage diseases. Here we present a case report of a Norwegian patient with Sandhoff disease treated with miglustat at our centre in Norway. The patient initially presented with ataxia and dysarthria at 2-3 years of age, which progressed slowly during childhood. At age 14, he experienced episodes of depression and apathy, leading to weight loss. He was diagnosed with Sandhoff disease at age 16. Following 2.5 years of treatment with miglustat, his body weight was stabilized and disease progression appeared to have slowed, as evidenced by the lack of progressive brain atrophy. His depressive symptoms were managed using electroconvulsive treatment (ECT), which improved general functioning. These findings suggest that miglustat may provide beneficial effects in patients with juvenile Sandhoff disease, and that ECT may alleviate depressive symptoms. PMID:19898953

  14. Neuropathic Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pastores, Gregory M.; Maegawa, Gustavo H.B.

    2014-01-01

    The lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of inborn errors of metabolism, associated with the accumulation of incompletely degraded macromolecules within several cellular sites. Affected individuals present with a broad range of clinical problems, including hepatosplenomegaly and skeletal dysplasia. Onset of symptoms may range from birth to adulthood. The majority are associated with neurological features, including developmental delay, behavioral/psychiatric disturbances, seizures, acroparesthesia, motor weakness, cerebrovascular ischemic events and extra-pyramidal signs. It should be noted that later-onset forms are often misdiagnosed as symptoms, which might include psychiatric manifestations, are slowly progressive and may precede other neurologic or systemic features. Inheritance is primarily autosomal recessive. For all subtypes, diagnosis can be confirmed using a combination of biochemical and/or molecular assays. In a few LSDs, treatment with either hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, enzyme replacement or substrate reduction therapy is available. Genetic counseling is important, so patients and their families can be informed of reproductive risks, disease prognosis and therapeutic options. Investigations of disease mechanisms are providing insights into potential therapeutic approaches. Symptomatic care, which remains the mainstay for most subtypes, can lead to significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24176423

  15. Gene therapy for lysosomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Naffakh, N; Bohl, D; Salvetti, A; Moullier, P; Danos, O; Heard, J M

    1994-01-01

    Genetic defects of lysosomal hydrolases result in severe storage diseases and treatments based on enzyme replacement have been proposed. In mice lacking beta-glucuronidase, which develop a disease homologous to human mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII, sly syndrome), we have used autologous implants of genetically-modified cells for the continuous in vivo production of the enzyme. A retroviral vector containing the human beta-glucuronidase cDNA under the control of the mouse phosphoglycerate kinase promoter was used to infect primary skin fibroblasts, bone marrow cells, or myoblasts from mutant MPS VII animals. The fibroblasts were embedded into collagen lattices and reimplanted into the peritoneal cavity of recipient MPS VII mice. All animals, when analysed 10 to 155 days later, expressed beta-glucuronidase from the vascularised neo-organs that developed after implantation, and accumulated the enzyme in their tissues. A complete disappearance of the lysosomal storage lesions was observed in their liver and spleen. This procedure has been scaled up for long term lysosomal enzyme delivery in dogs. The bone marrow cells were used for partial hematopoietic reconstruction of sublethally irradiated MPS VII mice. Five months after gene transfer, animals in which under 5% of genetically-modified hematopoietic cells were detected in the spleen showed a drastic reduction of lysosomal storage lesions in the liver and spleen. Genetically-modified myoblasts were transplanted into injured muscles, where they participated in the regeneration of a significant proportion of muscle fibers. Enzyme secretion and liver uptake were observed for at least one month.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8177709

  16. Disruption of murine Hexa gene leads to enzymatic deficiency and to neuronal lysosomal storage, similar to that observed in Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Tannoudji, M; Marchand, P; Akli, S; Sheardown, S A; Puech, J P; Kress, C; Gressens, P; Nassogne, M C; Beccari, T; Muggleton-Harris, A L

    1995-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by beta-hexosaminidase A deficiency and leads to death in early childhood. The disease results from mutations in the HEXA gene, which codes for the alpha chain of beta-hexosaminidase. The castastrophic neurodegenerative progression of the disease is thought to be a consequence of massive neuronal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside and related glycolipids in the brain and nervous system of the patients. Fuller understanding of the pathogenesis and the development of therapeutic procedures have both suffered from the lack of an animal model. We have used gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells to disrupt the mouse Hexa gene. Mice homozygous for the disrupted allele mimic several biochemical and histological features of human Tay-Sachs disease. Hexa-/- mice displayed a total deficiency of beta-hexosaminidase A activity, and membranous cytoplasmic inclusions typical of GM2 gangliosidoses were found in the cytoplasm of their neurons. However, while the number of storage neurons increased with age, it remained low compared with that found in human, and no apparent motor or behavioral disorders could be observed. This suggests that the presence of beta-hexosaminidase A is not an absolute requirement of ganglioside degradation in mice. These mice should help us to understand several aspects of the disease as well as the physiological functions of hexosaminidase in mice. They should also provide a valuable animal model in which to test new forms of therapy, and in particular gene delivery into the central nervous system. PMID:8747922

  17. Regulation of lysosomal ion homeostasis by channels and transporters.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jian; Zhu, Michael X

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomes are the major organelles that carry out degradation functions. They integrate and digest materials compartmentalized by endocytosis, phagocytosis or autophagy. In addition to more than 60 hydrolases residing in the lysosomes, there are also ion channels and transporters that mediate the flux or transport of H(+), Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) across the lysosomal membranes. Defects in ionic exchange can lead to abnormal lysosome morphology, defective vesicle trafficking, impaired autophagy, and diseases such as neurodegeneration and lysosomal storage disorders. The latter are characterized by incomplete lysosomal digestion and accumulation of toxic materials inside enlarged intracellular vacuoles. In addition to degradation, recent studies have revealed the roles of lysosomes in metabolic pathways through kinases such as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transcriptional regulation through calcium signaling molecules such as transcription factor EB (TFEB) and calcineurin. Owing to the development of new approaches including genetically encoded fluorescence probes and whole endolysosomal patch clamp recording techniques, studies on lysosomal ion channels have made remarkable progress in recent years. In this review, we will focus on the current knowledge of lysosome-resident ion channels and transporters, discuss their roles in maintaining lysosomal function, and evaluate how their dysfunction can result in disease. PMID:27430889

  18. Action of polystyrene nanoparticles of different sizes on lysosomal function and integrity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Data from environmental exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) suggest that chronic exposure may increase the incidence of lung, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Impairment of cell function by intracellular accumulation of NPs is also suspected. Many types of NPs have been detected in the endosomal-lysosomal system and, upon repeated exposure, alterations of the endosomal-lysosomal system may occur. To identify such effects we compared the effect of carboxyl polystyrene particles (CPS) of different sizes (20-500 nm) on lysosomes of the endothelial cell line EAhy926 after short (24h) and long (72h-96h) exposure times. Lysosomal localization of CPS, as well as lysosomal pH, lysosomal membrane integrity, morphology of the endosomal-lysosomal system and activities of the lysosomal enzymes,cathepsin B and sulfatases, upon exposure to CPS were recorded. Results CPS in sizes ≤100 nm showed high co-localization with lysosomes already after 4h, larger CPS after 24h. None of the particles at non-cytotoxic concentrations caused marked changes in lysosomal pH or destroyed lysosomal membrane integrity. At 24h of exposure, 20 nm CPS induced significant dilatation of the endosomal-lysosomal system and reduced activity of lysosomal sulfatases. After 72h, these alterations were less pronounced. Conclusions Despite accumulation in lysosomes CPS induced only small changes in lysosomes. Upon longer contact, these changes are even less pronounced. The presented panel of assays may serve to identify effects on lysosomes also for other NPs. PMID:22789069

  19. In situ localization of the genetic locus encoding the lysosomal acid lipase/cholesteryl esterase (LIPA) deficient in wolman disease to chromosome 10q23. 2-q23. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Rao, N.; Byrum, R.S.; Rothschild, C.B.; Bowden, D.W.; Hayworth, R.; Pettenati, M. )

    1993-01-01

    Human acid lipase/cholesteryl esterase (EC 3.1.1.13) is a 46-kDa glycoprotein required for the lysosomal hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides that cells acquire through the receptor-mediated endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins. This activity is essential in the provision of free cholesterol for cell metabolism as well as for the feedback signal that modulates endogenous cellular cholesterol production. The extremely low level of lysosomal acid lipase in patients afflicted with the hereditary, allelic lysosomal storage disorders Woman disease (WD) and cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) (MIM Number 278000 (6)) is associated with the massive intralysosomal lipid storage and derangements in the regulation of cellular cholesterol production (10). Both WD and CESD cells lack a specific acid lipase isoenzyme and it is thought that the different mutations associated with WD and CESD are in the structural gene for this isoenzyme, LIPA. Analysis of the activity of the acid lipase isoenzyme in cell extracts from human-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids (4, 11) demonstrated the concordant segregation of the gene locus for lysosomal acid lipase with the glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase-1 (GOT1) enzyme marker for human chromosome 10 which was subsequently localized to 10q24.1 q25.1 (8). 11 refs., 1 figs.

  20. Lysosomal Integral Membrane Protein-2: A New Player in Lysosome-Related Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Ashley; Valeiras, Mark; Sidransky, Ellen; Tayebi, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes require the presence of many specialized proteins to facilitate their roles in cellular maintenance. One such protein that has proven to be an important player in the lysosomal field is lysosomal integral membrane protein-2 (LIMP-2), encoded by the gene SCARB2. LIMP-2 is required for the normal biogenesis and maintenance of lysosomes and endosomes and has been identified as the specific receptor for glucocerebrosidase, the enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease. Research into LIMP-2 and the SCARB2 gene indicate that it may be a factor contributing to the clinical heterogeneity seen among patients with Gaucher disease. Mutations in SCARB2 have also been identified as the cause of action myoclonus renal failure (AMRF), and in some cases progressive myoclonic epilepsy. A total of 14 disease-causing SCARB2 mutations have been identified to date. The role of LIMP-2 in human pathology has expanded with its identification as a component of the intercalated disc in cardiac muscle and as a receptor for specific enteroviruses, two unanticipated findings that reaffirm the myriad roles of lysosomal proteins. Studies into the full impact of LIMP-2 deficiency and the LIMP2/glucocerebrosidase molecular pathway will lead to a better understanding of disease pathogenesis in Gaucher disease and AMRF, and to new insights into lysosomal processing, trafficking and function. PMID:24389070

  1. Endo-Lysosomal Dysfunction in Human Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cells Deficient for Lysosomal Cystine Transporter Cystinosin

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Heuvel, Lambertus; Pastore, Anna; Dijkman, Henry; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Levtchenko, Elena N.

    2015-01-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the CTNS gene encoding cystine transporter cystinosin that results in accumulation of amino acid cystine in the lysosomes throughout the body and especially affects kidneys. Early manifestations of the disease include renal Fanconi syndrome, a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction. Current therapy of cystinosis is based on cystine-lowering drug cysteamine that postpones the disease progression but offers no cure for the Fanconi syndrome. We studied the mechanisms of impaired reabsorption in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC) deficient for cystinosin and investigated the endo-lysosomal compartments of cystinosin-deficient PTEC by means of light and electron microscopy. We demonstrate that cystinosin-deficient cells had abnormal shape and distribution of the endo-lysosomal compartments and impaired endocytosis, with decreased surface expression of multiligand receptors and delayed lysosomal cargo processing. Treatment with cysteamine improved surface expression and lysosomal cargo processing but did not lead to a complete restoration and had no effect on the abnormal morphology of endo-lysosomal compartments. The obtained results improve our understanding of the mechanism of proximal tubular dysfunction in cystinosis and indicate that impaired protein reabsorption can, at least partially, be explained by abnormal trafficking of endosomal vesicles. PMID:25811383

  2. Ezetimibe markedly attenuates hepatic cholesterol accumulation and improves liver function in the lysosomal acid lipase-deficient mouse, a model for cholesteryl ester storage disease.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Lopez, Adam M; Posey, Kenneth S; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-01-17

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) plays a critical role in the intracellular handling of lipids by hydrolyzing cholesteryl esters (CE) and triacylglycerols (TAG) contained in newly internalized lipoproteins. In humans, mutations in the LAL gene result in cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD), or in Wolman disease (WD) when the mutations cause complete loss of LAL activity. A rat model for WD and a mouse model for CESD have been described. In these studies we used LAL-deficient mice to investigate how modulating the amount of intestinally-derived cholesterol reaching the liver might impact its mass, cholesterol content, and function in this model. The main experiment tested if ezetimibe, a potent cholesterol absorption inhibitor, had any effect on CE accumulation in mice lacking LAL. In male Lal(-/-) mice given ezetimibe in their diet (20 mg/day/kg bw) for 4 weeks starting at 21 days of age, both liver mass and hepatic cholesterol concentration (mg/g) were reduced to the extent that whole-liver cholesterol content (mg/organ) in the treated mice (74.3±3.4) was only 56% of that in those not given ezetimibe (133.5±6.7). There was also a marked improvement in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity. Thus, minimizing cholesterol absorption has a favorable impact on the liver in CESD. PMID:24370824

  3. Swainsonine-induced lysosomal storage disease in goats caused by the ingestion of Turbina cordata in Northeastern Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A disease of the central nervous system in goats was observed in the municipalities of Juazeiro, Casa Nova and Curaça, state of Bahia, and Petrolina, state of Pernambuco, Northeastern Brazil. The disease was produced experimentally in two goats by the administration of dry Turbina cordata mixed with...

  4. Lysosomal destabilization in p53-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xi-Ming; Li, Wei; Dalen, Helge; Lotem, Joseph; Kama, Rachel; Sachs, Leo; Brunk, Ulf T.

    2002-01-01

    The tumor suppressor wild-type p53 can induce apoptosis. M1-t-p53 myeloid leukemic cells have a temperature-sensitive p53 protein that changes its conformation to wild-type p53 after transfer from 37°C to 32°C. We have now found that these cells showed an early lysosomal rupture after transfer to 32°C. Mitochondrial damage, including decreased membrane potential and release of cytochrome c, and the appearance of apoptotic cells occurred later. Lysosomal rupture, mitochondrial damage, and apoptosis were all inhibited by the cytokine IL-6. Some other compounds can also inhibit apoptosis induced by p53. The protease inhibitor N-tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone inhibited the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release, the Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin inhibited only cytochrome c release, and the antioxidant butylated hydroxyanisole inhibited only the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. In contrast to IL-6, these other compounds that inhibited some of the later occurring mitochondrial damage did not inhibit the earlier p53-induced lysosomal damage. The results indicate that apoptosis is induced by p53 through a lysosomal-mitochondrial pathway that is initiated by lysosomal destabilization, and that this pathway can be dissected by using different apoptosis inhibitors. These findings on the induction of p53-induced lysosomal destabilization can also help to formulate new therapies for diseases with apoptotic disorders. PMID:11959917

  5. The Pharmacological Chaperone AT2220 Increases the Specific Activity and Lysosomal Delivery of Mutant Acid Alpha-Glucosidase, and Promotes Glycogen Reduction in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Yi; Soska, Rebecca; Feng, Jessie; Dhulipala, Rohini; Frascella, Michelle; Garcia, Anadina; Pellegrino, Lee J.; Xu, Su; Brignol, Nastry; Toth, Matthew J.; Do, Hung V.; Lockhart, David J.; Wustman, Brandon A.; Valenzano, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Pompe disease is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder that results from a deficiency in acid α-glucosidase (GAA) activity due to mutations in the GAA gene. Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of lysosomal glycogen primarily in heart and skeletal muscles, which leads to progressive muscle weakness. We have shown previously that the small molecule pharmacological chaperone AT2220 (1-deoxynojirimycin hydrochloride, duvoglustat hydrochloride) binds and stabilizes wild-type as well as multiple mutant forms of GAA, and can lead to higher cellular levels of GAA. In this study, we examined the effect of AT2220 on mutant GAA, in vitro and in vivo, with a primary focus on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-retained P545L mutant form of human GAA (P545L GAA). AT2220 increased the specific activity of P545L GAA toward both natural (glycogen) and artificial substrates in vitro. Incubation with AT2220 also increased the ER export, lysosomal delivery, proteolytic processing, and stability of P545L GAA. In a new transgenic mouse model of Pompe disease that expresses human P545L on a Gaa knockout background (Tg/KO) and is characterized by reduced GAA activity and elevated glycogen levels in disease-relevant tissues, daily oral administration of AT2220 for 4 weeks resulted in significant and dose-dependent increases in mature lysosomal GAA isoforms and GAA activity in heart and skeletal muscles. Importantly, oral administration of AT2220 also resulted in significant glycogen reduction in disease-relevant tissues. Compared to daily administration, less-frequent AT2220 administration, including repeated cycles of 4 or 5 days with AT2220 followed by 3 or 2 days without drug, respectively, resulted in even greater glycogen reductions. Collectively, these data indicate that AT2220 increases the specific activity, trafficking, and lysosomal stability of P545L GAA, leads to increased levels of mature GAA in lysosomes, and promotes glycogen reduction in situ. As such, AT2220 may

  6. Impaired clearance of accumulated lysosomal glycogen in advanced Pompe disease despite high-level vector-mediated transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Bird, Andrew; Li, Songtao; Young, Sarah P.; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Infantile-onset glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease; MIM 232300) causes death early in childhood from cardiorespiratory failure in absence of effective treatment, whereas late-onset Pompe disease causes a progressive skeletal myopathy. The limitations of enzyme replacement therapy could potentially be addressed with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy. Methods AAV vectors containing tissue-specific regulatory cassettes, either liver-specific or muscle-specific, were administered to 12 and 17 month old Pompe disease mice to evaluate the efficacy of gene therapy in advanced Pompe disease. Biochemical correction was evaluated through GAA activity and glycogen content analyses of the heart and skeletal muscle. Western blotting, urinary biomarker, and Rotarod performance were evaluated following vector administration. Results The AAV vector containing the liver-specific regulatory cassette secreted high-level hGAA into the blood and corrected glycogen storage in the heart and diaphragm. The biochemical correction of the heart and diaphragm was associated with efficacy, as reflected by increased Rotarod performance; however, the clearance of glycogen from skeletal muscles was relatively impaired, in comparison with younger Pompe disease mice. An alternative vector containing a muscle-specific regulatory cassette transduced skeletal muscle with high efficiency, but also failed to achieve complete clearance of accumulated glycogen. Decreased transduction of the heart and liver in older mice, especially in females, was implicated as a cause for reduced efficacy in advanced Pompe disease. Conclusion The impaired efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy in old Pompe disease mice emphasized the need for early treatment to achieve full efficacy. PMID:19621331

  7. Lysosomal Disorders Drive Susceptibility to Tuberculosis by Compromising Macrophage Migration

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Russell D.; Levitte, Steven; O’Sullivan, Mary P.; O’Leary, Seónadh M.; Cambier, C.J.; Cameron, James; Takaki, Kevin K.; Moens, Cecilia B.; Tobin, David M.; Keane, Joseph; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2016-01-01

    Summary A zebrafish genetic screen for determinants of susceptibility to Mycobacterium marinum identified a hypersusceptible mutant deficient in lysosomal cysteine cathepsins that manifests hallmarks of human lysosomal storage diseases. Under homeostatic conditions, mutant macrophages accumulate undigested lysosomal material, which disrupts endocytic recycling and impairs their migration to, and thus engulfment of, dying cells. This causes a buildup of unengulfed cell debris. During mycobacterial infection, macrophages with lysosomal storage cannot migrate toward infected macrophages undergoing apoptosis in the tuberculous granuloma. The unengulfed apoptotic macrophages undergo secondary necrosis, causing granuloma breakdown and increased mycobacterial growth. Macrophage lysosomal storage similarly impairs migration to newly infecting mycobacteria. This phenotype is recapitulated in human smokers, who are at increased risk for tuberculosis. A majority of their alveolar macrophages exhibit lysosomal accumulations of tobacco smoke particulates and do not migrate to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The incapacitation of highly microbicidal first-responding macrophages may contribute to smokers’ susceptibility to tuberculosis. PMID:27015311

  8. Rag GTPases are cardioprotective by regulating lysosomal function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Chul; Mo, Jung-Soon; Jewell, Jenna L.; Russell, Ryan C.; Wu, Xiaohui; Sadoshima, Junichi; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2014-01-01

    The Rag family proteins are Ras-like small GTPases that play a critical role in amino acid-stimulated mTORC1 activation by recruiting mTORC1 to lysosome. Despite progress in the mechanistic understanding of Rag GTPases in mTORC1 activation, little is known about the physiological function of Rag GTPases in vivo. Here, we show that loss of RagA and RagB (RagA/B) in cardiomyocytes results in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and phenocopies lysosomal storage diseases although mTORC1 activity is not substantially impaired in vivo. We demonstrate that despite upregulation of lysosomal protein expression by constitutive activation of the transcription factor EB (TFEB) in RagA/B knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, lysosomal acidification is compromised due to decreased v-ATPase level in the lysosome fraction. Our study uncovers RagA/B GTPases as key regulators of lysosomal function and cardiac protection. PMID:24980141

  9. Lysosomal Disorders Drive Susceptibility to Tuberculosis by Compromising Macrophage Migration.

    PubMed

    Berg, Russell D; Levitte, Steven; O'Sullivan, Mary P; O'Leary, Seónadh M; Cambier, C J; Cameron, James; Takaki, Kevin K; Moens, Cecilia B; Tobin, David M; Keane, Joseph; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2016-03-24

    A zebrafish genetic screen for determinants of susceptibility to Mycobacterium marinum identified a hypersusceptible mutant deficient in lysosomal cysteine cathepsins that manifests hallmarks of human lysosomal storage diseases. Under homeostatic conditions, mutant macrophages accumulate undigested lysosomal material, which disrupts endocytic recycling and impairs their migration to, and thus engulfment of, dying cells. This causes a buildup of unengulfed cell debris. During mycobacterial infection, macrophages with lysosomal storage cannot migrate toward infected macrophages undergoing apoptosis in the tuberculous granuloma. The unengulfed apoptotic macrophages undergo secondary necrosis, causing granuloma breakdown and increased mycobacterial growth. Macrophage lysosomal storage similarly impairs migration to newly infecting mycobacteria. This phenotype is recapitulated in human smokers, who are at increased risk for tuberculosis. A majority of their alveolar macrophages exhibit lysosomal accumulations of tobacco smoke particulates and do not migrate to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The incapacitation of highly microbicidal first-responding macrophages may contribute to smokers' susceptibility to tuberculosis. PMID:27015311

  10. Immunomodulatory gene therapy in lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Koeberl, D.D.; Kishnani, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Significant advances in therapy for lysosomal storage disorders have occurred with an accelerating pace over the past decade. Although enzyme replacement therapy has improved the outcome of lysosomal storage disorders, antibody responses have occurred and sometimes prevented efficacy, especially in cross-reacting immune material negative patients with Pompe disease. Preclinical gene therapy experiments have revealed the relevance of immune responses to long-term efficacy. The choice of regulatory cassette played a critical role in evading humoral and cellular immune responses to gene therapy in knockout mouse models, at least in adult animals. Liver-specific regulatory cassettes prevented antibody formation and enhanced the efficacy of gene therapy. Regulatory T cells prevented transgene directed immune responses, as shown by adoptive transfer of antigen-specific immune tolerance to enzyme therapy. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a very low vector dose could enhance the efficacy of enzyme therapy in Pompe disease and other lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:19807648

  11. Immunomodulatory gene therapy in lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Kishnani, Priya S

    2009-12-01

    Significant advances in therapy for lysosomal storage disorders have occurred with an accelerating pace over the past decade. Although enzyme replacement therapy has improved the outcome of lysosomal storage disorders, antibody responses have occurred and sometimes prevented efficacy, especially in cross-reacting immune material negative patients with Pompe disease. Preclinical gene therapy experiments have revealed the relevance of immune responses to long-term efficacy. The choice of regulatory cassette played a critical role in evading humoral and cellular immune responses to gene therapy in knockout mouse models, at least in adult animals. Liver-specific regulatory cassettes prevented antibody formation and enhanced the efficacy of gene therapy. Regulatory T cells prevented transgene directed immune responses, as shown by adoptive transfer of antigen-specific immune tolerance to enzyme therapy. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a very low vector dose could enhance the efficacy of enzyme therapy in Pompe disease and other lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:19807648

  12. Lysosomal Storage Diseases—Regulating Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Onyenwoke, Rob U.; Brenman, Jay E.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a complex pathway regulated by numerous signaling events that recycles macromolecules and can be perturbed in lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). The concept of LSDs, which are characterized by aberrant, excessive storage of cellular material in lysosomes, developed following the discovery of an enzyme deficiency as the cause of Pompe disease in 1963. Great strides have since been made in better understanding the biology of LSDs. Defective lysosomal storage typically occurs in many cell types, but the nervous system, including the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system, is particularly vulnerable to LSDs, being affected in two-thirds of LSDs. This review provides a summary of some of the better characterized LSDs and the pathways affected in these disorders. PMID:27081317

  13. Reactivation of Lysosomal Ca2+ Efflux Rescues Abnormal Lysosomal Storage in FIG4-Deficient Cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianlong; Hu, Bo; Arpag, Sezgi; Yan, Qing; Hamilton, Audra; Zeng, Yuan-Shan; Vanoye, Carlos G; Li, Jun

    2015-04-29

    Loss of function of FIG4 leads to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 4J, Yunis-Varon syndrome, or an epilepsy syndrome. FIG4 is a phosphatase with its catalytic specificity toward 5'-phosphate of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-diphosphate (PI3,5P2). However, the loss of FIG4 decreases PI3,5P2 levels likely due to FIG4's dominant effect in scaffolding a PI3,5P2 synthetic protein complex. At the cellular level, all these diseases share similar pathology with abnormal lysosomal storage and neuronal degeneration. Mice with no FIG4 expression (Fig4(-/-)) recapitulate the pathology in humans with FIG4 deficiency. Using a flow cytometry technique that rapidly quantifies lysosome sizes, we detected an impaired lysosomal fission, but normal fusion, in Fig4(-/-) cells. The fission defect was associated with a robust increase of intralysosomal Ca(2+) in Fig4(-/-) cells, including FIG4-deficient neurons. This finding was consistent with a suppressed Ca(2+) efflux of lysosomes because the endogenous ligand of lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 is PI3,5P2 that is deficient in Fig4(-/-) cells. We reactivated the TRPML1 channels by application of TRPML1 synthetic ligand, ML-SA1. This treatment reduced the intralysosomal Ca(2+) level and rescued abnormal lysosomal storage in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and ex vivo DRGs. Furthermore, we found that the suppressed Ca(2+) efflux in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and Fig4(-/-) mouse brains profoundly downregulated the expression/activity of dynamin-1, a GTPase known to scissor organelle membranes during fission. This downregulation made dynamin-1 unavailable for lysosomal fission. Together, our study revealed a novel mechanism explaining abnormal lysosomal storage in FIG4 deficiency. Synthetic ligands of the TRPML1 may become a potential therapy against diseases with FIG4 deficiency. PMID:25926456

  14. Expanding Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Disorders: Opportunities and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Darrel J.; Tan, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS), since its implementation in the 1960s, has traditionally been successful in reducing mortality and disability in children with a range of different conditions. Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are a heterogeneous group of inherited metabolic diseases that result from lysosomal dysfunction. Based on available treatment and…

  15. Analysis of glucocerebrosidase activity using N-(1-[14C]hexanoyl)-D-erythroglucosylsphingosine demonstrates a correlation between levels of residual enzyme activity and the type of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed Central

    Meivar-Levy, I; Horowitz, M; Futerman, A H

    1994-01-01

    Glucosylceramide, a degradation product of complex glycosphingolipids, is hydrolysed in lysosomes by glucocerebrosidase (GlcCerase). Mutations in the human GlcCerase gene cause a reduction in GlcCerase activity and accumulation of glucosylceramide, which results in the onset of Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disease. Significant clinical heterogeneity is observed in Gaucher disease, with three main types known, but no clear correlation has been reported between the different types and levels of residual GlcCerase activity. We now demonstrate that a correlation exists by using a radioactive, short-acyl chain substrate, N-(1-[14C]hexanoyl)-D-erythro-glucosylsphingosine ([14C]hexanoyl-GlcCer). This substrate rapidly transferred into biological membranes in the absence of detergent [Futerman and Pagano (1991) Biochem. J. 280, 295-302] and was hydrolyzed to N-(1-[14C]hexanoyl)-D-erythro-sphingosine ([14C]hexanoyl-Cer) both in vitro and in situ, with an acid pH optimum. A strict correlation was observed between levels of [14C]hexanoyl-GlcCer hydrolysis and Gaucher type in human skin fibroblasts. The mean residual activity measured in vitro for 3 h incubation in type 1 Gaucher fibroblasts (the mild form of the disease) was 46.3 +/- 4.6 nmol of [14C]hexanoyl-Cer formed per mg protein (n = 9), and in type 2 and 3 fibroblasts (the neuronopathic forms of the disease) was 19.6 +/- 6.5 (n = 9). A similar correlation was observed when activity was measured in situ, suggesting that the clinical severity of a lysosomal storage disease is related to levels of residual enzyme activity. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7980395

  16. Acidic Nanoparticles Are Trafficked to Lysosomes and Restore an Acidic Lysosomal pH and Degradative Function to Compromised ARPE-19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baltazar, Gabriel C.; Guha, Sonia; Lu, Wennan; Lim, Jason; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Laties, Alan M.; Tyagi, Puneet; Kompella, Uday B.; Mitchell, Claire H.

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomal enzymes function optimally in acidic environments, and elevation of lysosomal pH can impede their ability to degrade material delivered to lysosomes through autophagy or phagocytosis. We hypothesize that abnormal lysosomal pH is a key aspect in diseases of accumulation and that restoring lysosomal pH will improve cell function. The propensity of nanoparticles to end up in the lysosome makes them an ideal method of delivering drugs to lysosomes. This study asked whether acidic nanoparticles could traffic to lysosomes, lower lysosomal pH and enhance lysosomal degradation by the cultured human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line ARPE-19. Acidic nanoparticles composed of poly (DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) 502 H, PLGA 503 H and poly (DL-lactide) (PLA) colocalized to lysosomes of ARPE-19 cells within 60 min. PLGA 503 H and PLA lowered lysosomal pH in cells compromised by the alkalinizing agent chloroquine when measured 1 hr. after treatment, with acidification still observed 12 days later. PLA enhanced binding of Bodipy-pepstatin-A to the active site of cathepsin D in compromised cells. PLA also reduced the cellular levels of opsin and the lipofuscin-like autofluorescence associated with photoreceptor outer segments. These observations suggest the acidification produced by the nanoparticles was functionally effective. In summary, acid nanoparticles lead to a rapid and sustained lowering of lysosomal pH and improved degradative activity. PMID:23272048

  17. Newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Hattori, Kiyoko; Endo, Fumio

    2011-02-15

    Lysosomes are intracellular organelles containing acid hydrolases that degrade biological macromolecules. Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are caused by absent activity of one or more of these enzymes due to mutations of genes encoding lysosomal hydrolases or enzymes that process, target, and transport these enzymes. The specific signs and symptoms of each LSD derive from the type of material accumulated within the lysosome, the site (organ) of accumulation and the response of the body (sometimes in the form of an inflammatory or immune response) to the accumulated material. Interest for inclusion of these disorders in newborn screening programs derives from the availability of effective therapy in the form of enzyme replacement or substrate reduction therapy and bone marrow transplant that may improve long-term outcome especially if started prior to irreversible organ damage. Based on the availability of therapy and suitable screening methods, Gaucher disease, Fabry disease, Pompe disease, mucopolysaccharidosis I and II, Niemann-Pick disease, and Krabbe disease are candidates for newborn screening. Pilot newborn screening projects have been performed for some of these conditions that indicate the feasibility of this approach. This review will provide insight into these screening strategies and discuss their advantages and limitations. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21312327

  18. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator contributes to reacidification of alkalinized lysosomes in RPE cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ji; Lu, Wennan; Guha, Sonia; Baltazar, Gabriel C.; Coffey, Erin E.; Laties, Alan M.; Rubenstein, Ronald C.; Reenstra, William W.

    2012-01-01

    The role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in lysosomal acidification has been difficult to determine. We demonstrate here that CFTR contributes more to the reacidification of lysosomes from an elevated pH than to baseline pH maintenance. Lysosomal alkalinization is increasingly recognized as a factor in diseases of accumulation, and we previously showed that cAMP reacidified alkalinized lysosomes in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. As the influx of anions to electrically balance proton accumulation may enhance lysosomal acidification, the contribution of the cAMP-activated anion channel CFTR to lysosomal reacidification was probed. The antagonist CFTRinh-172 had little effect on baseline levels of lysosomal pH in cultured human RPE cells but substantially reduced the reacidification of compromised lysosomes by cAMP. Likewise, CFTR activators had a bigger impact on cells whose lysosomes had been alkalinized. Knockdown of CFTR with small interfering RNA had a larger effect on alkalinized lysosomes than on baseline levels. Inhibition of CFTR in isolated lysosomes altered pH. While CFTR and Lamp1 were colocalized, treatment with cAMP did not increase targeting of CFTR to the lysosome. The inhibition of CFTR slowed lysosomal degradation of photoreceptor outer segments while activation of CFTR enhanced their clearance from compromised lysosomes. Activation of CFTR acidified RPE lysosomes from the ABCA4−/− mouse model of recessive Stargardt's disease, whose lysosomes are considerably alkalinized. In summary, CFTR contributes more to reducing lysosomal pH from alkalinized levels than to maintaining baseline pH. Treatment to activate CFTR may thus be of benefit in disorders of accumulation associated with lysosomal alkalinization. PMID:22572847

  19. Newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Matern, Dietrich; Gavrilov, Dimitar; Oglesbee, Devin; Raymond, Kimiyo; Rinaldo, Piero; Tortorelli, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Every newborn in the U.S. is screened for at least 29 disorders, where evidence suggests that early detection is possible and beneficial. With new or improved treatment options and development of high-throughput screening tests, additional conditions have been proposed for inclusion in newborn screening programs. Among those are several lysosomal storage disorders that have been evaluated in limited pilot studies or that are already included in a few national or international newborn screening programs. These conditions include Pompe disease, Niemann-Pick type A/B disease, Fabry disease, Krabbe disease, Mucopolysaccharidoses types I and II, and Gaucher disease. Here, we review the current state of newborn screening for these lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:25891428

  20. Lysosomal storage causes cellular dysfunction in mucolipidosis II skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Otomo, Takanobu; Higaki, Katsumi; Nanba, Eiji; Ozono, Keiichi; Sakai, Norio

    2011-10-01

    Mucolipidosis II (ML-II) is a fatal inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of GlcNAc-phosphotransferase, which plays a role in generating the mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker on lysosomal enzymes. In ML-II, many lysosomal acid hydrolases are mistargeted out of cells, and lysosomes become filled with undigested substrates, which explains inclusion cell disease as an alternative name for this disease. In this study, we revealed various cellular phenotypes in ML-II skin fibroblasts. We quantitated phospholipid and cholesterol within cells and showed ~2-fold accumulation in ML-II as compared with normal cells. Lysosomal pH of ML-II cells was higher than that of normal cells (5.29 ± 0.08 versus 4.79 ± 0.10, p < 0.001). The proliferated lysosomes in ML-II cells were accumulated ~3-fold in amount as compared with normal cells. Intracellular logistics including endocytosis and mannose 6-phosphate receptor recycling were impaired in ML-II cells. To confirm whether these ML-II cellular phenotypes derive from deficient lysosomal acid hydrolases within lysosomes, we performed supplementation of lysosomal enzymes using a partially purified total enzyme mixture, which was derived from the conditioned culture medium of normal skin fibroblasts after NH(4)Cl treatment. This supplementation corrected all of the previously described ML-II phenotypes. In addition, the autophagic and mitochondrial impairment that we have previously reported improved, and inclusion bodies disappeared on electron micrography following total lysosomal enzyme supplementation. Our results indicate that various cellular phenotypes in ML-II are caused by the deficiency of many lysosomal enzymes and massive accumulation of undigested substrates. PMID:21846724

  1. Lysosomal Storage Causes Cellular Dysfunction in Mucolipidosis II Skin Fibroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Otomo, Takanobu; Higaki, Katsumi; Nanba, Eiji; Ozono, Keiichi; Sakai, Norio

    2011-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (ML-II) is a fatal inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of GlcNAc-phosphotransferase, which plays a role in generating the mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker on lysosomal enzymes. In ML-II, many lysosomal acid hydrolases are mistargeted out of cells, and lysosomes become filled with undigested substrates, which explains inclusion cell disease as an alternative name for this disease. In this study, we revealed various cellular phenotypes in ML-II skin fibroblasts. We quantitated phospholipid and cholesterol within cells and showed ∼2-fold accumulation in ML-II as compared with normal cells. Lysosomal pH of ML-II cells was higher than that of normal cells (5.29 ± 0.08 versus 4.79 ± 0.10, p < 0.001). The proliferated lysosomes in ML-II cells were accumulated ∼3-fold in amount as compared with normal cells. Intracellular logistics including endocytosis and mannose 6-phosphate receptor recycling were impaired in ML-II cells. To confirm whether these ML-II cellular phenotypes derive from deficient lysosomal acid hydrolases within lysosomes, we performed supplementation of lysosomal enzymes using a partially purified total enzyme mixture, which was derived from the conditioned culture medium of normal skin fibroblasts after NH4Cl treatment. This supplementation corrected all of the previously described ML-II phenotypes. In addition, the autophagic and mitochondrial impairment that we have previously reported improved, and inclusion bodies disappeared on electron micrography following total lysosomal enzyme supplementation. Our results indicate that various cellular phenotypes in ML-II are caused by the deficiency of many lysosomal enzymes and massive accumulation of undigested substrates. PMID:21846724

  2. Systems biology of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jegga, Anil G; Schneider, Lonnie; Ouyang, Xiaosen

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of the control and activity of the autophagy-lysosomal protein degradation machinery are emerging as an important theme for neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration. However, the underlying regulatory and functional networks of known genes controlling autophagy and lysosomal function and their role in disease are relatively unexplored. We performed a systems biology-based integrative computational analysis to study the interactions between molecular components and to develop models for regulation and function of genes involved in autophagy and lysosomal function. Specifically, we analyzed transcriptional and microRNA-based post-transcriptional regulation of these genes and performed functional enrichment analyses to understand their involvement in nervous system-related diseases and phenotypes. Transcriptional regulatory network analysis showed that binding sites for transcription factors, SREBP1, USF, AP-1 and NFE2, are common among autophagy and lysosomal genes. MicroRNA enrichment analysis revealed miR-130, 98, 124, 204 and 142 as the putative post-transcriptional regulators of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway genes. Pathway enrichment analyses revealed that the mTOR and insulin signaling pathways are important in the regulation of genes involved in autophagy. In addition, we found that glycosaminoglycan and glycosphingolipid pathways also make a major contribution to lysosomal gene regulation. The analysis confirmed the known contribution of the autophagy-lysosomal genes to Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and also revealed potential involvement in tuberous sclerosis, neuronal ceroidlipofuscinoses, sepsis and lung, liver and prostatic neoplasms. To further probe the impact of autophagy-lysosomal gene deficits on neurologically-linked phenotypes, we also mined the mouse knockout phenotype data for the autophagy-lysosomal genes and found them to be highly predictive of nervous system dysfunction. Overall this study demonstrates the utility of systems

  3. The endoplasmic reticulum, not the pH gradient, drives calcium refilling of lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Garrity, Abigail G; Wang, Wuyang; Collier, Crystal MD; Levey, Sara A; Gao, Qiong; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-01-01

    Impaired homeostasis of lysosomal Ca2+ causes lysosome dysfunction and lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), but the mechanisms by which lysosomes acquire and refill Ca2+ are not known. We developed a physiological assay to monitor lysosomal Ca2+ store refilling using specific activators of lysosomal Ca2+ channels to repeatedly induce lysosomal Ca2+ release. In contrast to the prevailing view that lysosomal acidification drives Ca2+ into the lysosome, inhibiting the V-ATPase H+ pump did not prevent Ca2+ refilling. Instead, pharmacological depletion or chelation of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Ca2+ prevented lysosomal Ca2+ stores from refilling. More specifically, antagonists of ER IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) rapidly and completely blocked Ca2+ refilling of lysosomes, but not in cells lacking IP3Rs. Furthermore, reducing ER Ca2+ or blocking IP3Rs caused a dramatic LSD-like lysosome storage phenotype. By closely apposing each other, the ER may serve as a direct and primary source of Ca2+for the lysosome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15887.001 PMID:27213518

  4. The endoplasmic reticulum, not the pH gradient, drives calcium refilling of lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Garrity, Abigail G; Wang, Wuyang; Collier, Crystal Md; Levey, Sara A; Gao, Qiong; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-01-01

    Impaired homeostasis of lysosomal Ca(2+) causes lysosome dysfunction and lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), but the mechanisms by which lysosomes acquire and refill Ca(2+) are not known. We developed a physiological assay to monitor lysosomal Ca(2+) store refilling using specific activators of lysosomal Ca(2+) channels to repeatedly induce lysosomal Ca(2+) release. In contrast to the prevailing view that lysosomal acidification drives Ca(2+) into the lysosome, inhibiting the V-ATPase H(+) pump did not prevent Ca(2+) refilling. Instead, pharmacological depletion or chelation of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) prevented lysosomal Ca(2+) stores from refilling. More specifically, antagonists of ER IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) rapidly and completely blocked Ca(2+) refilling of lysosomes, but not in cells lacking IP3Rs. Furthermore, reducing ER Ca(2+) or blocking IP3Rs caused a dramatic LSD-like lysosome storage phenotype. By closely apposing each other, the ER may serve as a direct and primary source of Ca(2+)for the lysosome. PMID:27213518

  5. Prosaposin facilitates sortilin-independent lysosomal trafficking of progranulin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaolai; Sun, Lirong; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco; Qi, Xiaoyang; Brown, William J.; Smolka, Marcus B.; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the progranulin (PGRN) gene have been linked to two distinct neurodegenerative diseases, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Accumulating evidence suggests a critical role of PGRN in lysosomes. However, how PGRN is trafficked to lysosomes is still not clear. Here we report a novel pathway for lysosomal delivery of PGRN. We found that prosaposin (PSAP) interacts with PGRN and facilitates its lysosomal targeting in both biosynthetic and endocytic pathways via the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor and low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1. PSAP deficiency in mice leads to severe PGRN trafficking defects and a drastic increase in serum PGRN levels. We further showed that this PSAP pathway is independent of, but complementary to, the previously identified PGRN lysosomal trafficking mediated by sortilin. Collectively, our results provide new understanding on PGRN trafficking and shed light on the molecular mechanisms behind FTLD and NCL caused by PGRN mutations. PMID:26370502

  6. Niemann-Pick disease: A frequent missense mutation in the acid sphingomyelinase gene of Ashkenazi Jewish type A and B patients

    SciTech Connect

    Levran, O.; Desnick, R.J.; Schuchan, E.H. )

    1991-05-01

    Although the A and B subtypes of Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) both result from the deficient activity of acid sphingomyelinase and the lysosomal accumulation of sphingomyelin, they have remarkably distinct phenotypes. Type A disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder of infancy, whereas type B disease has no neurologic manifestations and is characterized primarily by reticuloendothelial involvement and survival into adulthood. Both disorders are more frequent among individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry than in the general population. The recent isolation and characterization of cDNA and genomic sequences encoding ASM has facilitated investigation of the molecular lesions causing the NPD subtypes. Total RNA was reverse-transcribed, and the ASm cDNA from an Ashkenazi Jewish type A patient was specifically amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Molecular analysis of the PCR products revealed a G{r arrow} T transversion of nucleotide 1,487, which occurred at a CpG dinucleotide and predicted an Arg{r arrow} Leu substitution and that both parents and several other relatives were heterozygous. These findings identify a frequent missense mutation among NPD patients of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry that results in neuronopathic type A disease when homoallelic and can result in the nonneuronopathic type B phenotype when heteroallelic. The identification of this ASM mutation in Ashkenazi Jewish patients should facilitate the prevention of NPD in this population by carrier detection with molecular diagnostic techniques.

  7. The Biogenesis of Lysosomes and Lysosome-Related Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Luzio, J. Paul; Hackmann, Yvonne; Dieckmann, Nele M.G.; Griffiths, Gillian M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes were once considered the end point of endocytosis, simply used for macromolecule degradation. They are now recognized to be dynamic organelles, able to fuse with a variety of targets and to be re-formed after fusion events. They are also now known to be the site of nutrient sensing and signaling to the cell nucleus. In addition, lysosomes are secretory organelles, with specialized machinery for regulated secretion of proteins in some cell types. The biogenesis of lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles is discussed, taking into account their dynamic nature and multiple roles. PMID:25183830

  8. The Role of Oxidized Cholesterol in Diabetes-Induced Lysosomal Dysfunction in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Bakeman, Anna; Rosko, Andrew; Glasser, Rebecca; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-05-01

    Abnormalities in lysosomal function have been reported in diabetes, aging, and age-related degenerative diseases. These lysosomal abnormalities are an early manifestation of neurodegenerative diseases and often precede the onset of clinical symptoms such as learning and memory deficits; however, the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction is not known. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction in the cortex and hippocampi, key structures involved in learning and memory, of a type 2 diabetes (T2D) mouse model, the leptin receptor deficient db/db mouse. We demonstrate for the first time that diabetes leads to destabilization of lysosomes as well as alterations in the protein expression, activity, and/or trafficking of two lysosomal enzymes, hexosaminidase A and cathepsin D, in the hippocampus of db/db mice. Pioglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD) commonly used in the treatment of diabetes due to its ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reverse hyperglycemia, was ineffective in reversing the diabetes-induced changes on lysosomal enzymes. Our previous work revealed that pioglitazone does not reverse hypercholesterolemia; thus, we investigated whether cholesterol plays a role in diabetes-induced lysosomal changes. In vitro, cholesterol promoted the destabilization of lysosomes, suggesting that lysosomal-related changes associated with diabetes are due to elevated levels of cholesterol. Since lysosome dysfunction precedes neurodegeneration, cognitive deficits, and Alzheimer's disease neuropathology, our results may provide a potential mechanism that links diabetes with complications of the central nervous system. PMID:25976368

  9. Gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders: a good start.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Alessandra

    2016-04-15

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited diseases with a collective frequency of ∼1 in 7000 births, resulting from the deficiency in one or more enzymes or transporters that normally reside within the lysosomes. Pathology results from the progressive accumulation of uncleaved lipids, glycoproteins and/or glycosaminoglycans in the lysosomes and secondary damages that affect the brain, viscera, bones and connective tissues. Most treatment modalities developed for LSD, including gene therapy (GT), are based on the lysosome-specific cross-correction mechanism, by which close proximity of normal cells leads to the correction of the biochemical consequences of enzymatic deficiency within the neighboring cells. Here, GT efforts addressing these disorders are reviewed with an up-to-date discussion of their impact on the LSD disease phenotype in animal models and patients. PMID:26604151

  10. Distinct Lysosomal Network Protein Profiles in Parkinsonian Syndrome Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Boman, Andrea; Svensson, Samuel; Boxer, Adam; Rojas, Julio C.; Seeley, William W.; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Bruce; Kågedal, Katarina; Svenningsson, Per

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes like Parkinson’s disease (PD), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is hampered by overlapping symptomatology and lack of diagnostic biomarkers, and definitive diagnosis is only possible post-mortem. Objective: Since impaired protein degradation plays an important role in many neurodegenerative disorders, we hypothesized that profiles of select lysosomal network proteins in cerebrospinal fluid could be differentially expressed in these parkinsonian syndromes. Methods: Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from PD patients (n = 18), clinically diagnosed 4-repeat tauopathy patients; corticobasal syndrome (CBS) (n = 3) and PSP (n = 8); and pathologically diagnosed PSP (n = 8) and CBD patients (n = 7). Each patient set was compared to its appropriate control group consisting of age and gender matched individuals. Select lysosomal network protein levels were detected via Western blotting. Factor analysis was used to test the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the select lysosomal network protein expression profiles. Results: PD, CBD and PSP were markedly different in their cerebrospinal fluid lysosomal network protein profiles. Lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 were significantly decreased in PD; early endosomal antigen 1 was decreased and lysozyme increased in PSP; and lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and lysozyme were increased in CBD. A panel of lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2, lysozyme and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain discriminated between controls, PD and 4-repeat tauopathies. Conclusions: This study offers proof of concept that select lysosomal network proteins are differentially expressed in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson’s disease, corticobasal syndrome and progressive supranuclear palsy. Lysosomal network protein analysis

  11. Newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Meikle, Peter J; Grasby, Dallas J; Dean, Caroline J; Lang, Debbie L; Bockmann, Michelle; Whittle, Alison M; Fietz, Michael J; Simonsen, Henrik; Fuller, Maria; Brooks, Douglas A; Hopwood, John J

    2006-08-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are chronic progressive diseases that have a devastating impact on the patient and family. Most patients are clinically normal at birth but develop symptoms early in childhood. Despite no curative treatment, a number of therapeutic options are available to improve quality of life. To achieve this, there is a pressing need for newborn screening to identify affected individuals early, before the onset of severe irreversible pathology. We have developed a multiplexed immune-quantification assay of 11 different lysosomal proteins for the identification of individuals with an LSD and evaluated this assay in a retrospective study using blood-spots from; newborns subsequently diagnosed with an LSD (n=19, six different LSD), individuals sampled after diagnosis of an LSD (n=92, 11 different LSD), newborn controls (n=433), and adult controls (n=200). All patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I), MPS II, MPS IIIA, MPS VI, metachromatic leukodystrophy, Niemann-Pick disease type A/B, and multiple sulfatase deficiency could be identified by reduced enzyme levels compared to controls. All mucolipidosis type II/III patients were identified by the elevation of several lysosomal enzymes, above the control range. Most Fabry, Pompe, and Gaucher disease patients were identified from either single protein differences or profiles of multiple protein markers. Newborn screening for multiple LSD is achievable using multiplexed immune-quantification of a panel of lysosomal proteins. With further validation, this method could be readily incorporated into existing screening laboratories and will have a substantial impact on patient management and counseling of families. PMID:16600651

  12. Activity of α1-Antitrypsin and Some Lysosomal Enzymes in the Blood Serum of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease after Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Bartosz; Woźniak, Alina; Konca, Jacek; Górecki, Dariusz; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Szpinda, Michał; Sutkowy, Paweł; Wesołowski, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The activity of α1-antitrypsin (AAT) and the lysosomal enzymes, cathepsin D (CTS D), arylsulfatase (ASA), and acid phosphatase, (AcP) was determined in patients with COPD (GOLD category A). Moreover, the diagnostic usefulness of these parameters in blood serum was assessed along with establishing whether smoking cessation affects these parameters. The study included 70 patients with COPD who ceased smoking (study group) and two control groups of 33 subjects each: nonsmokers without COPD (control I) and patients with COPD who continued smoking (control II). In control I, blood was taken once and in control II, at the start of the experiment and after the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd months. AAT in the patients exhibited higher activity than in the healthy subjects at all time points. AAT activity in the patients before the start of the experiment was ~80% higher (P < 0.001) than in control I. No statistically significant differences in CTS D, ASA, and AcP activity were found. COPD involves increased AAT activity and unchanged activities of the assessed lysosomal enzymes. Three-month tobacco abstinence does not affect these parameters in peripheral blood. Determining the AAT levels in blood serum can be used in the diagnostics of COPD. PMID:25802837

  13. Identification of lysosomotropic compounds based on the distribution and size of lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Seo, Incheol; Jha, Bijay Kumar; Lim, Jeong-Geun; Suh, Seong-Il; Suh, Min-Ho; Baek, Won-Ki

    2014-07-18

    Lysosomal accumulation of drugs with their specific physicochemical properties is of key importance to drug distribution in the body. Several attempts have been made to treat various human diseases by employing the accumulation of lysosomal drugs, and many methods to identify lysosomal accumulation of drugs have been proposed. Among those, the use of high-content screening has increased tremendously because of improved efficiency and accuracy as well as the development of automatic image acquisition and analytical techniques. Conventional methods to identify lysosomal accumulation of drugs by evaluating changes in the lysosomal area are unable to maximize the advantages of phenotypic high-content screening. Lysosomal distribution and the size of lysosomes are affected by lysosomal accumulating drugs. Therefore, we present image acquisition conditions and analytical methods to utilize lysosomal distribution and size as parameters for identifying lysosomal accumulating drugs. These two parameters will help to improve the reliability of the screening methods for identifying lysosomal accumulation of drugs by maximizing usage of information from image-based screening. PMID:24878535

  14. Autophagy in lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Andrew P.; Puertollano, Rosa; Raben, Nina; Slaugenhaupt, Susan; Walkley, Steven U.; Ballabio, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomes are ubiquitous intracellular organelles that have an acidic internal pH, and play crucial roles in cellular clearance. Numerous functions depend on normal lysosomes, including the turnover of cellular constituents, cholesterol homeostasis, downregulation of surface receptors, inactivation of pathogenic organisms, repair of the plasma membrane and bone remodeling. Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are characterized by progressive accumulation of undigested macromolecules within the cell due to lysosomal dysfunction. As a consequence, many tissues and organ systems are affected, including brain, viscera, bone and cartilage. The progressive nature of phenotype development is one of the hallmarks of LSDs. In recent years biochemical and cell biology studies of LSDs have revealed an ample spectrum of abnormalities in a variety of cellular functions. These include defects in signaling pathways, calcium homeostasis, lipid biosynthesis and degradation and intracellular trafficking. Lysosomes also play a fundamental role in the autophagic pathway by fusing with autophagosomes and digesting their content. Considering the highly integrated function of lysosomes and autophagosomes it was reasonable to expect that lysosomal storage in LSDs would have an impact upon autophagy. The goal of this review is to provide readers with an overview of recent findings that have been obtained through analysis of the autophagic pathway in several types of LSDs, supporting the idea that LSDs could be seen primarily as “autophagy disorders.” PMID:22647656

  15. Cholesterol transport through lysosome-peroxisome membrane contacts.

    PubMed

    Chu, Bei-Bei; Liao, Ya-Cheng; Qi, Wei; Xie, Chang; Du, Ximing; Wang, Jiang; Yang, Hongyuan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2015-04-01

    Cholesterol is dynamically transported among organelles, which is essential for multiple cellular functions. However, the mechanism underlying intracellular cholesterol transport has remained largely unknown. We established an amphotericin B-based assay enabling a genome-wide shRNA screen for delayed LDL-cholesterol transport and identified 341 hits with particular enrichment of peroxisome genes, suggesting a previously unappreciated pathway for cholesterol transport. We show dynamic membrane contacts between peroxisome and lysosome, which are mediated by lysosomal Synaptotagmin VII binding to the lipid PI(4,5)P2 on peroxisomal membrane. LDL-cholesterol enhances such contacts, and cholesterol is transported from lysosome to peroxisome. Disruption of critical peroxisome genes leads to cholesterol accumulation in lysosome. Together, these findings reveal an unexpected role of peroxisome in intracellular cholesterol transport. We further demonstrate massive cholesterol accumulation in human patient cells and mouse model of peroxisomal disorders, suggesting a contribution of abnormal cholesterol accumulation to these diseases. PMID:25860611

  16. Autophagosome-lysosome fusion triggers a lysosomal response mediated by TLR9 and controlled by OCRL.

    PubMed

    De Leo, Maria Giovanna; Staiano, Leopoldo; Vicinanza, Mariella; Luciani, Alessandro; Carissimo, Annamaria; Mutarelli, Margherita; Di Campli, Antonella; Polishchuk, Elena; Di Tullio, Giuseppe; Morra, Valentina; Levtchenko, Elena; Oltrabella, Francesca; Starborg, Tobias; Santoro, Michele; di Bernardo, Diego; Devuyst, Olivier; Lowe, Martin; Medina, Diego L; Ballabio, Andrea; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta

    2016-08-01

    Phosphoinositides (PtdIns) control fundamental cell processes, and inherited defects of PtdIns kinases or phosphatases cause severe human diseases, including Lowe syndrome due to mutations in OCRL, which encodes a PtdIns(4,5)P2 5-phosphatase. Here we unveil a lysosomal response to the arrival of autophagosomal cargo in which OCRL plays a key part. We identify mitochondrial DNA and TLR9 as the cargo and the receptor that triggers and mediates, respectively, this response. This lysosome-cargo response is required to sustain the autophagic flux and involves a local increase in PtdIns(4,5)P2 that is confined in space and time by OCRL. Depleting or inhibiting OCRL leads to an accumulation of lysosomal PtdIns(4,5)P2, an inhibitor of the calcium channel mucolipin-1 that controls autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Hence, autophagosomes accumulate in OCRL-depleted cells and in the kidneys of Lowe syndrome patients. Importantly, boosting the activity of mucolipin-1 with selective agonists restores the autophagic flux in cells from Lowe syndrome patients. PMID:27398910

  17. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. PMID:26613410

  18. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  19. Fig4 Deficiency: A Newly Emerged Lysosomal Storage Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Martyn, Colin; Li, Jun

    2012-01-01

    FIG4 (Sac3 in mammals) is a 5’-phosphoinositide phosphatase that coordinates the turnover of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2), a very low abundance phosphoinositide. Deficiency of FIG4 severely affects the human and mouse nervous systems by causing two distinct forms of abnormal lysosomal storage. The first form occurs in spinal sensory neurons, where vacuolated endolysosomes accumulate in perinuclear regions. A second form occurs in cortical/spinal motor neurons and glia, in which enlarged endolysosomes become filled with electron dense materials in a manner indistinguishable from other lysosomal storage disorders. Humans with a deficiency of FIG4 (known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4J or CMT4J) present with clinical and pathophysiological phenotypes indicative of spinal motor neuron degeneration and segmental demyelination. These findings reveal a signaling pathway involving FIG4 that appears to be important for lysosomal function. In this review, we discuss the biology of FIG4 and describe how the deficiency of FIG4 results in lysosomal phenotypes. We also discuss the implications of FIG4/PI(3,5)P2 signaling in understanding other lysosomal storage diseases, neuropathies, and acquired demyelinating diseases. PMID:23165282

  20. Epidemiology and diagnosis of lysosomal storage disorders; challenges of screening.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Sandra D K; Bodamer, Olaf A; Wijburg, Frits A

    2015-03-01

    The lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of genetic disorders resulting from defective lysosomal metabolism and subsequent accumulation of substrates. Patients present with a large phenotypic spectrum of disease manifestations that are generally not specific for LSDs, leading to considerable diagnostic delay and missed cases. Introduction of new disease modifying therapies for LSDs has made early diagnosis a priority. Increased awareness, but particularly the introduction of screening programs allow for early diagnosis and timely initiation of treatment. This review will provide insight into the epidemiology and diagnostic process for LSDs. In addition, challenges for carrier screening, high-risk screening and newborn population screening for LSDs are discussed. PMID:25987169

  1. Similar Therapeutic Efficacy Between a Single Administration of Gene Therapy and Multiple Administrations of Recombinant Enzyme in a Mouse Model of Lysosomal Storage Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferla, Rita; Claudiani, Pamela; Cotugno, Gabriella; Saccone, Paola; De Leonibus, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has become the standard of care for several lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs). Despite ERT's undisputed efficacy, the requirement for multiple and costly administrations as well as ERT's limited improvement of some LSD manifestations prompts the search for better therapies. Using a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis VI, we compared the efficacy of a single intravascular administration of an adeno-associated viral vector targeting liver to weekly infusions of human recombinant enzyme at the same doses used in mucopolysaccharidosis VI patients. While gene therapy results in increased and stable levels of circulating enzyme up to 1 year after vector administration, ERT has typical peak-and-drop serum kinetics. Both therapies similarly reduced glycosaminoglycan levels in urine and tissues including heart valves and myocardium, with gene therapy improving skeletal skull abnormalities slightly better, although not significantly, than ERT. Both therapies seem to similarly improve animal motor performance, with gene therapy possibly associated with less animal distress. Thus, a single vector administration that converts liver into a factory organ for systemic secretion of therapeutic proteins is at least as effective as ERT in a mouse model of LSD, potentially eliminating problems with compliance and costs. Only testing in humans will prove whether this holds true in a clinical setting. PMID:24725025

  2. Similar therapeutic efficacy between a single administration of gene therapy and multiple administrations of recombinant enzyme in a mouse model of lysosomal storage disease.

    PubMed

    Ferla, Rita; Claudiani, Pamela; Cotugno, Gabriella; Saccone, Paola; De Leonibus, Elvira; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-07-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has become the standard of care for several lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs). Despite ERT's undisputed efficacy, the requirement for multiple and costly administrations as well as ERT's limited improvement of some LSD manifestations prompts the search for better therapies. Using a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis VI, we compared the efficacy of a single intravascular administration of an adeno-associated viral vector targeting liver to weekly infusions of human recombinant enzyme at the same doses used in mucopolysaccharidosis VI patients. While gene therapy results in increased and stable levels of circulating enzyme up to 1 year after vector administration, ERT has typical peak-and-drop serum kinetics. Both therapies similarly reduced glycosaminoglycan levels in urine and tissues including heart valves and myocardium, with gene therapy improving skeletal skull abnormalities slightly better, although not significantly, than ERT. Both therapies seem to similarly improve animal motor performance, with gene therapy possibly associated with less animal distress. Thus, a single vector administration that converts liver into a factory organ for systemic secretion of therapeutic proteins is at least as effective as ERT in a mouse model of LSD, potentially eliminating problems with compliance and costs. Only testing in humans will prove whether this holds true in a clinical setting. PMID:24725025

  3. Iron-binding drugs targeted to lysosomes: a potential strategy to treat inflammatory lung disorders.

    PubMed

    Persson, H Lennart; Richardson, Des R

    2005-08-01

    In many inflammatory lung disorders, an abnormal assimilation of redox-active iron will exacerbate oxidative tissue damage. It may be that the most important cellular pool of redox-active iron exists within lysosomes, making these organelles vulnerable to oxidative stress. In experiments employing respiratory epithelial cells and macrophages, the chelation of intra-lysosomal iron efficiently prevented lysosomal rupture and the ensuing cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide, ionising radiation or silica particles. Furthermore, cell-permeable iron-binding agents (weak bases) that accumulate within lysosomes due to proton trapping were much more efficient for cytoprotection than the chelator, desferrioxamine. On a molar basis, the weak base alpha-lipoic acid plus was 5000 times more effective than desferrioxamine at preventing lysosomal rupture and apoptotic cell death in cell cultures exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Thus, iron-chelating therapy that targets the lysosome might be a future treatment strategy for inflammatory pulmonary diseases. PMID:16050792

  4. Deficiency of ATP13A2 leads to lysosomal dysfunction, α-synuclein accumulation and neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Usenovic, Marija; Tresse, Emilie; Mazzulli, Joseph R.; Taylor, J. Paul; Krainc, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    The autophagy-lysosomal pathway plays an important role in the clearance of long-lived proteins and dysfunctional organelles. Lysosomal dysfunction has been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease and related synucleinopathies that are characterized by accumulations of α-synuclein in Lewy bodies. Recent identification of mutations in genes linked to lysosomal function and neurodegeneration has offered a unique opportunity to directly examine the role of lysosomes in disease pathogenesis. Mutations in lysosomal membrane protein ATP13A2 (PARK9) cause familial Kufor-Rakeb syndrome characterized by early-onset parkinsonism, pyramidal degeneration and dementia. While previous data suggested a role of ATP13A2 in α-synuclein misfolding and toxicity, the mechanistic link has not been established. Here we report that loss of ATP13A2 in human fibroblasts from patients with Kufor-Rakeb syndrome or in mouse primary neurons leads to impaired lysosomal degradation capacity. This lysosomal dysfunction results in accumulation of α-synuclein and toxicity in primary cortical neurons. Importantly, silencing of endogenous α-synuclein attenuated the toxicity in ATP13A2-depleted neurons, suggesting that loss of ATP13A2 mediates neurotoxicity at least in part via the accumulation of α-synuclein. Our findings implicate lysosomal dysfunction in the pathogenesis of Kufor-Rakeb syndrome and suggest that upregulation of lysosomal function and downregulation of α-synuclein represent important therapeutic strategies for this disorder. PMID:22442086

  5. Neuronal lysosomal enzyme replacement using fragment C of tetanus toxin.

    PubMed

    Dobrenis, K; Joseph, A; Rattazzi, M C

    1992-03-15

    Development of a strategy for efficient delivery of exogenous enzyme to neuronal lysosomes is essential to achieve enzyme replacement in neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases. We tested whether effective lysosomal targeting of the human enzyme beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase A (Hex A; beta-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminide N-acetylhexosaminohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.52) can be obtained by coupling it via disulfide linkage to the atoxic fragment C of tetanus toxin (TTC) that is bound avidly by neuronal membrane. TTC-Hex A conjugation resulted in neuronal surface binding and enhanced endocytosis of enzyme as observed in immunofluorescence studies with rat brain cultures. In immunoelectrophoretic quantitative uptake studies, rat neuronal cell cultures contained 16- and 40-fold greater amounts of enzyme after incubation with TTC-Hex A than with nonderivatized Hex A. In cerebral cortex cell cultures from a feline model of human GM2 gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases), binding and uptake patterns of the enzymes were similar to those in the rat brain cell cultures. After exposure to extracellular concentrations of enzyme attainable in vivo, lysosomal storage of immunodetectable GM2 ganglioside was virtually eliminated in neurons exposed to TTC-Hex A, whereas a minimal effect was observed with Hex A. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of TTC adducts for effective neuronal lysosomal enzyme replacement. PMID:1532255

  6. The studies on substrate, product and inhibitor binding to a wild-type and neuronopathic form of human acid-beta-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Zubrzycki, Igor Z; Borcz, Agnieszka; Wiacek, Magdalena; Hagner, Wojciech

    2007-11-01

    Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of human acid beta-glucosidase. Recent x-ray structural elucidation of the enzyme alone and in the presence of its inhibitor was done, which provided an excellent template for further studies on the binding of substrate, product and inhibitor. To draw correlations between the clinical manifestation of the disease driven by point mutations, L444P and L444R, and the placement and function of putative S-binding sites, the presented theoretical studies were undertaken, which comprised of molecular dynamics and molecular docking methods. The obtained results indicate the D443 and D445 residues as extremely important for physiological functionality of an enzyme. They also show, although indirectly, that binding of the substrate is influenced by an interplay of E235 and E334 residues, constituting putative substrate binding site, and the region flanked by D435 and D445 residues. PMID:17713797

  7. Lysosome-related organelles: Unusual compartments become mainstream

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael S.; Heijnen, Harry F. G.; Raposo, Graça

    2013-01-01

    Lysosome-related organelles (LROs) comprise a group of cell type-specific subcellular compartments with unique composition, morphology and structure that share some features with endosomes and lysosomes and that function in varied processes such as pigmentation, hemostasis, lung plasticity and immunity. In recent years, studies of genetic diseases in which LRO functions are compromised have provided new insights into the mechanisms of LRO biogenesis and the regulated secretion of LRO contents. These insights have revealed previously unappreciated specialized endosomal sorting processes in all cell types, and are expanding our views of the plasticity of the endosomal and secretory systems in adapting to cell type-specific needs. PMID:23726022

  8. Expanding newborn screening for lysosomal disorders: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, Darrel J; Tan, Christopher A

    2011-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS), since its implementation in the 1960s, has traditionally been successful in reducing mortality and disability in children with a range of different conditions. Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are a heterogeneous group of inherited metabolic diseases that result from lysosomal dysfunction. Based on available treatment and suitable screening methods, the LSDs that are considered for NBS generally include Fabry, Gaucher, Krabbe, MPSI, MPSII, MPSV, Metachromatic leukodystrophy, Niemann-Pick, and Pompe. Utilizing traditional and expanded criteria for consideration of NBS leads to a set of fundamental questions that need to be explored when considering the opportunities and challenges of adding LSDs to NBS panels. PMID:22447749

  9. VCP-dependent muscle degeneration is linked to defects in a dynamic tubular lysosomal network in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alyssa E; Shu, Huidy; Hauswirth, Anna G; Tong, Amy; Davis, Graeme W

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes are classically viewed as vesicular structures to which cargos are delivered for degradation. Here, we identify a network of dynamic, tubular lysosomes that extends throughout Drosophila muscle, in vivo. Live imaging reveals that autophagosomes merge with tubular lysosomes and that lysosomal membranes undergo extension, retraction, fusion and fission. The dynamics and integrity of this tubular lysosomal network requires VCP, an AAA-ATPase that, when mutated, causes degenerative diseases of muscle, bone and neurons. We show that human VCP rescues the defects caused by loss of Drosophila VCP and overexpression of disease relevant VCP transgenes dismantles tubular lysosomes, linking tubular lysosome dysfunction to human VCP-related diseases. Finally, disruption of tubular lysosomes correlates with impaired autophagosome-lysosome fusion, increased cytoplasmic poly-ubiquitin aggregates, lipofuscin material, damaged mitochondria and impaired muscle function. We propose that VCP sustains sarcoplasmic proteostasis, in part, by controlling the integrity of a dynamic tubular lysosomal network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07366.001 PMID:26167652

  10. The Nutrient-Responsive Transcription Factor TFE3, Promotes Autophagy, Lysosomal Biogenesis, and Clearance of Cellular Debris

    PubMed Central

    Martina, José A.; Diab, Heba I.; Lishu, Li; Jeong-A, Lim; Patange, Simona; Raben, Nina; Puertollano, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a gene network regulating lysosomal biogenesis and its transcriptional regulator TFEB revealed that cells monitor lysosomal function and respond to degradation requirements and environmental cues. Here, we report the identification of transcription factor E3 (TFE3) as another regulator of lysosomal homeostasis that induced expression of genes encoding proteins involved in autophagy and lysosomal biogenesis in ARPE-19 cells in response to starvation and lysosomal stress. We found that in nutrient-replete cells, TFE3 was recruited to lysosomes through interaction with active Rag GTPases and exhibited mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation. Phosphorylated TFE3 was retained in the cytosol through its interaction with the cytosolic chaperone 14-3-3. Following starvation, TFE3 rapidly translocated to the nucleus and bound to the CLEAR elements present in the promoter region of many lysosomal genes, thereby inducing lysosomal biogenesis. Depletion of endogenous TFE3 entirely abolished the response of ARPE-19 cells to starvation, suggesting that TFE3 plays a critical role in nutrient sensing and regulation of energy metabolism. Furthermore, overexpression of TFE3 triggered lysosomal exocytosis and resulted in efficient cellular clearance in a cellular model of a lysosomal storage disorder, Pompe disease, thus identifying TFE3 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of lysosomal disorders. PMID:24448649

  11. Genetic Coding Variant in GPR65 Alters Lysosomal pH and Links Lysosomal Dysfunction with Colitis Risk.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Kara G; McKenzie, Craig I; Mari, Muriel; Murano, Tatsuro; Begun, Jakob; Baxt, Leigh A; Goel, Gautam; Villablanca, Eduardo J; Kuo, Szu-Yu; Huang, Hailiang; Macia, Laurence; Bhan, Atul K; Batten, Marcel; Daly, Mark J; Reggiori, Fulvio; Mackay, Charles R; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-06-21

    Although numerous polymorphisms have been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), identifying the function of these genetic factors has proved challenging. Here we identified a role for nine genes in IBD susceptibility loci in antibacterial autophagy and characterized a role for one of these genes, GPR65, in maintaining lysosome function. Mice lacking Gpr65, a proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, showed increased susceptibly to bacteria-induced colitis. Epithelial cells and macrophages lacking GPR65 exhibited impaired clearance of intracellular bacteria and accumulation of aberrant lysosomes. Similarly, IBD patient cells and epithelial cells expressing an IBD-associated missense variant, GPR65 I231L, displayed aberrant lysosomal pH resulting in lysosomal dysfunction, impaired bacterial restriction, and altered lipid droplet formation. The GPR65 I231L polymorphism was sufficient to confer decreased GPR65 signaling. Collectively, these data establish a role for GPR65 in IBD susceptibility and identify lysosomal dysfunction as a potentially causative element in IBD pathogenesis with effects on cellular homeostasis and defense. PMID:27287411

  12. Lysosomes and the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Norma W.

    2002-01-01

    Studies of the cell invasion mechanism of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi led to a series of novel findings, which revealed a previously unsuspected ability of conventional lysosomes to fuse with the plasma membrane. This regulated exocytic process, previously regarded mostly as a specialization of certain cell types, was recently shown to play an important role in the mechanism by which cells reseal their plasma membrane after injury. PMID:12147679

  13. Characterization of inducible models of Tay-Sachs and related disease.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, Timothy J; Drage, Deborah J; Wang, Susan; Apostolakis, Apostolos A; Cox, Timothy M; Cachón-González, M Begoña

    2012-09-01

    Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases are lethal inborn errors of acid β-N-acetylhexosaminidase activity, characterized by lysosomal storage of GM2 ganglioside and related glycoconjugates in the nervous system. The molecular events that lead to irreversible neuronal injury accompanied by gliosis are unknown; but gene transfer, when undertaken before neurological signs are manifest, effectively rescues the acute neurodegenerative illness in Hexb-/- (Sandhoff) mice that lack β-hexosaminidases A and B. To define determinants of therapeutic efficacy and establish a dynamic experimental platform to systematically investigate cellular pathogenesis of GM2 gangliosidosis, we generated two inducible experimental models. Reversible transgenic expression of β-hexosaminidase directed by two promoters, mouse Hexb and human Synapsin 1 promoters, permitted progression of GM2 gangliosidosis in Sandhoff mice to be modified at pre-defined ages. A single auto-regulatory tetracycline-sensitive expression cassette controlled expression of transgenic Hexb in the brain of Hexb-/- mice and provided long-term rescue from the acute neuronopathic disorder, as well as the accompanying pathological storage of glycoconjugates and gliosis in most parts of the brain. Ultimately, late-onset brainstem and ventral spinal cord pathology occurred and was associated with increased tone in the limbs. Silencing transgenic Hexb expression in five-week-old mice induced stereotypic signs and progression of Sandhoff disease, including tremor, bradykinesia, and hind-limb paralysis. As in germline Hexb-/- mice, these neurodegenerative manifestations advanced rapidly, indicating that the pathogenesis and progression of GM2 gangliosidosis is not influenced by developmental events in the maturing nervous system. PMID:23028353

  14. Characterization of Inducible Models of Tay-Sachs and Related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sargeant, Timothy J.; Drage, Deborah J.; Wang, Susan; Apostolakis, Apostolos A.

    2012-01-01

    Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases are lethal inborn errors of acid β-N-acetylhexosaminidase activity, characterized by lysosomal storage of GM2 ganglioside and related glycoconjugates in the nervous system. The molecular events that lead to irreversible neuronal injury accompanied by gliosis are unknown; but gene transfer, when undertaken before neurological signs are manifest, effectively rescues the acute neurodegenerative illness in Hexb−/− (Sandhoff) mice that lack β-hexosaminidases A and B. To define determinants of therapeutic efficacy and establish a dynamic experimental platform to systematically investigate cellular pathogenesis of GM2 gangliosidosis, we generated two inducible experimental models. Reversible transgenic expression of β-hexosaminidase directed by two promoters, mouse Hexb and human Synapsin 1 promoters, permitted progression of GM2 gangliosidosis in Sandhoff mice to be modified at pre-defined ages. A single auto-regulatory tetracycline-sensitive expression cassette controlled expression of transgenic Hexb in the brain of Hexb−/− mice and provided long-term rescue from the acute neuronopathic disorder, as well as the accompanying pathological storage of glycoconjugates and gliosis in most parts of the brain. Ultimately, late-onset brainstem and ventral spinal cord pathology occurred and was associated with increased tone in the limbs. Silencing transgenic Hexb expression in five-week-old mice induced stereotypic signs and progression of Sandhoff disease, including tremor, bradykinesia, and hind-limb paralysis. As in germline Hexb−/− mice, these neurodegenerative manifestations advanced rapidly, indicating that the pathogenesis and progression of GM2 gangliosidosis is not influenced by developmental events in the maturing nervous system. PMID:23028353

  15. Lysosomal dysfunction causes neurodegeneration in mucolipidosis II ‘knock-in’ mice

    PubMed Central

    Kollmann, K.; Damme, M.; Markmann, S.; Morelle, W.; Schweizer, M.; Hermans-Borgmeyer, I.; Röchert, A. K.; Pohl, S.; Lübke, T.; Michalski, J.-C.; Käkelä, R.; Walkley, S. U.

    2012-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II is a neurometabolic lysosomal trafficking disorder of infancy caused by loss of mannose 6-phosphate targeting signals on lysosomal proteins, leading to lysosomal dysfunction and accumulation of non-degraded material. However, the identity of storage material and mechanisms of neurodegeneration in mucolipidosis II are unknown. We have generated ‘knock-in’ mice with a common mucolipidosis II patient mutation that show growth retardation, progressive brain atrophy, skeletal abnormalities, elevated lysosomal enzyme activities in serum, lysosomal storage in fibroblasts and brain and premature death, closely mimicking the mucolipidosis II disease in humans. The examination of affected mouse brains at different ages by immunohistochemistry, ultrastructural analysis, immunoblotting and mass spectrometric analyses of glycans and anionic lipids revealed that the expression and proteolytic processing of distinct lysosomal proteins such as α-l-fucosidase, β-hexosaminidase, α-mannosidase or Niemann–Pick C2 protein are more significantly impacted by the loss of mannose 6-phosphate residues than enzymes reaching lysosomes independently of this targeting mechanism. As a consequence, fucosylated N-glycans, GM2 and GM3 gangliosides, cholesterol and bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate accumulate progressively in the brain of mucolipidosis II mice. Prominent astrogliosis and the accumulation of organelles and storage material in focally swollen axons were observed in the cerebellum and were accompanied by a loss of Purkinje cells. Moreover, an increased neuronal level of the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and the formation of p62-positive neuronal aggregates indicate an impairment of constitutive autophagy in the mucolipidosis II brain. Our findings demonstrate the essential role of mannose 6-phosphate for selected lysosomal proteins to maintain the capability for degradation of sequestered components in lysosomes and autophagolysosomes and prevent

  16. Treatment of lysosomal storage disorders: successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hollak, Carla E M; Wijburg, Frits A

    2014-07-01

    Treatment options for a number of lysosomal storage disorders have rapidly expanded and currently include enzyme replacement therapy, substrate reduction, chaperone treatment, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and gene-therapy. Combination treatments are also explored. Most therapies are not curative but change the phenotypic expression of the disease. The effectiveness of treatment varies considerably between the different diseases, but also between sub-groups of patients with a specific lysosomal storage disorder. The heterogeneity of the patient populations complicates the prediction of benefits of therapy, specifically in patients with milder disease manifestations. In addition, there is a lack of data on the natural history of diseases and disease phenotypes. Initial trial data show benefits on relevant short-term endpoints, but the real world situation may reveal different outcomes. Collaborative international studies are much needed to study the long-term clinical efficacy of treatments, and to detect new complications or associated conditions of the diseases. This review summarizes the available treatment modalities for lysosomal storage disorders and the challenges associated with long term clinical care for these patients. PMID:24820227

  17. Regulated lysosomal exocytosis mediates cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Eda; White-Gilbertson, Shai; van de Vlekkert, Diantha; Janke, Laura; Moshiach, Simon; Campos, Yvan; Finkelstein, David; Gomero, Elida; Mosca, Rosario; Qiu, Xiaohui; Morton, Christopher L.; Annunziata, Ida; d’Azzo, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how tumor cells transition to an invasive and drug-resistant phenotype is central to cancer biology, but the mechanisms underlying this transition remain unclear. We show that sarcomas gain these malignant traits by inducing lysosomal exocytosis, a ubiquitous physiological process. During lysosomal exocytosis, the movement of exocytic lysosomes along the cytoskeleton and their docking at the plasma membrane involve LAMP1, a sialylated membrane glycoprotein and target of the sialidase NEU1. Cleavage of LAMP1 sialic acids by NEU1 limits the extent of lysosomal exocytosis. We found that by down-regulation of NEU1 and accumulation of oversialylated LAMP1, tumor cells exacerbate lysosomal exocytosis of soluble hydrolases and exosomes. This facilitates matrix invasion and propagation of invasive signals, and purging of lysosomotropic chemotherapeutics. In Arf−⁄− mice, Neu1 haploinsufficiency fostered the development of invasive, pleomorphic sarcomas, expressing epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and lysosomal exocytosis effectors, LAMP1 and Myosin-11. These features are analogous to those of metastatic, pleomorphic human sarcomas, where low NEU1 levels correlate with high expression of lysosomal exocytosis markers. In a therapeutic proof of principle, we demonstrate that inhibiting lysosomal exocytosis reversed invasiveness and chemoresistance in aggressive sarcoma cells. Thus, we reveal that this unconventional, lysosome-regulated pathway plays a primary role in tumor progression and chemoresistance. PMID:26824057

  18. A cation counterflux supports lysosomal acidification

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Benjamin E.; Huynh, Kassidy K.; Brodovitch, Alexandre; Jabs, Sabrina; Stauber, Tobias; Jentsch, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    The profound luminal acidification essential for the degradative function of lysosomes requires a counter-ion flux to dissipate an opposing voltage that would prohibit proton accumulation. It has generally been assumed that a parallel anion influx is the main or only counter-ion transport that enables acidification. Indeed, defective anion conductance has been suggested as the mechanism underlying attenuated lysosome acidification in cells deficient in CFTR or ClC-7. To assess the individual contribution of counter-ions to acidification, we devised means of reversibly and separately permeabilizing the plasma and lysosomal membranes to dialyze the cytosol and lysosome lumen in intact cells, while ratiometrically monitoring lysosomal pH. Replacement of cytosolic Cl− with impermeant anions did not significantly alter proton pumping, while the presence of permeant cations in the lysosomal lumen supported acidification. Accordingly, the lysosomes were found to acidify to the same pH in both CFTR- and ClC-7–deficient cells. We conclude that cations, in addition to chloride, can support lysosomal acidification and defects in lysosomal anion conductance cannot explain the impaired microbicidal capacity of CF phagocytes. PMID:20566682

  19. The appearance of newly identified intraocular lesions in Gaucher disease type 3 despite long-term glucocerebrosidase replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sawicka-Gutaj, Nadia; Machaczka, Maciej; Kulińska-Niedziela, Izabela; Bernardczyk-Meller, Jadwiga; Gutaj, Paweł; Sowiński, Jerzy; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Background Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lipid storage disorder caused by the deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase. The presence of central nervous system disease is a hallmark of the neuronopathic forms of GD (types 2 and 3). Intraocular lesions (e.g. corneal clouding, retinal lesions, and vitreous opacities) have been infrequently reported in GD type 3 (GD3). Moreover, there are virtually no published data on the occurrence and natural course of intraocular lesions in GD3 patients treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Case presentation We describe the case of a 26-year-old Polish male with L444P homozygous GD3 (mutation c.1448T > C in the GBA1 gene) who developed fundus lesions despite 10 years of ERT. At the age of 23 years, a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination was performed which disclosed the presence of discrete lesions located preretinally, intraretinally in the nerve fiber layer, and in the vitreous body. A 3-year follow-up OCT examination has not shown any significant progression of the fundus lesions. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published report describing the occurrence of newly identified retinal and preretinal lesions occurring during long-term ERT in GD3. We recommend that a careful ophthalmic assessment, including a dilated fundus examination, should be included as part of annual follow-up in patients with GD3. Further studies are needed to understand the nature and clinical course of these changes and whether or not these intraocular findings have any predictive value in the context of neurologic and skeletal progression in GD3. PMID:27064303

  20. The Role of Autophagy, Mitophagy and Lysosomal Functions in Modulating Bioenergetics and Survival in the Context of Redox and Proteotoxic Damage: Implications for Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Redmann, Matthew; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Redox and proteotoxic stress contributes to age-dependent accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria and protein aggregates, and is associated with neurodegeneration. The free radical theory of aging inspired many studies using reactive species scavengers such as alpha-tocopherol, ascorbate and coenzyme Q to suppress the initiation of oxidative stress. However, clinical trials have had limited success in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. We ascribe this to the emerging literature which suggests that the oxidative stress hypothesis does not encompass the role of reactive species in cell signaling and therefore the interception with reactive species with antioxidant supplementation may result in disruption of redox signaling. In addition, the accumulation of redox modified proteins or organelles cannot be reversed by oxidant intercepting antioxidants and must then be removed by alternative mechanisms. We have proposed that autophagy serves this essential function in removing damaged or dysfunctional proteins and organelles thus preserving neuronal function and survival. In this review, we will highlight observations regarding the impact of autophagy regulation on cellular bioenergetics and survival in response to reactive species or reactive species generating compounds, and in response to proteotoxic stress. PMID:27114848

  1. The Role of Autophagy, Mitophagy and Lysosomal Functions in Modulating Bioenergetics and Survival in the Context of Redox and Proteotoxic Damage: Implications for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Redmann, Matthew; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Redox and proteotoxic stress contributes to age-dependent accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria and protein aggregates, and is associated with neurodegeneration. The free radical theory of aging inspired many studies using reactive species scavengers such as alpha-tocopherol, ascorbate and coenzyme Q to suppress the initiation of oxidative stress. However, clinical trials have had limited success in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. We ascribe this to the emerging literature which suggests that the oxidative stress hypothesis does not encompass the role of reactive species in cell signaling and therefore the interception with reactive species with antioxidant supplementation may result in disruption of redox signaling. In addition, the accumulation of redox modified proteins or organelles cannot be reversed by oxidant intercepting antioxidants and must then be removed by alternative mechanisms. We have proposed that autophagy serves this essential function in removing damaged or dysfunctional proteins and organelles thus preserving neuronal function and survival. In this review, we will highlight observations regarding the impact of autophagy regulation on cellular bioenergetics and survival in response to reactive species or reactive species generating compounds, and in response to proteotoxic stress. PMID:27114848

  2. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Sensitizes To Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Impairing Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Baulies, Anna; Ribas, Vicent; Núñez, Susana; Torres, Sandra; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Martínez, Laura; Suda, Jo; Ybanez, Maria D.; Kaplowitz, Neil; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, Jose C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of lysosomes in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the impact of genetic and drug-induced lysosomal cholesterol (LC) accumulation in APAP hepatotoxicity. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)−/− mice exhibit LC accumulation and higher mortality after APAP overdose compared to ASMase+/+ littermates. ASMase−/− hepatocytes display lower threshold for APAP-induced cell death and defective fusion of mitochondria-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes, which decreased mitochondrial quality control. LC accumulation in ASMase+/+ hepatocytes caused by U18666A reproduces the susceptibility of ASMase−/− hepatocytes to APAP and the impairment in the formation of mitochondria-containing autolysosomes. LC extraction by 25-hydroxycholesterol increased APAP-mediated mitophagy and protected ASMase−/− mice and hepatocytes against APAP hepatotoxicity, effects that were reversed by chloroquine to disrupt autophagy. The regulation of LC by U18666A or 25-hydroxycholesterol did not affect total cellular sphingomyelin content or its lysosomal distribution. Of relevance, amitriptyline-induced ASMase inhibition in human hepatocytes caused LC accumulation, impaired mitophagy and increased susceptibility to APAP. Similar results were observed upon glucocerebrosidase inhibition by conduritol β-epoxide, a cellular model of Gaucher disease. These findings indicate that LC accumulation determines susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity by modulating mitophagy, and imply that genetic or drug-mediated ASMase disruption sensitizes to APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:26657973

  3. Structure of human saposin A at lysosomal pH

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Chris H.; Read, Randy J.; Deane, Janet E.

    2015-06-27

    A 1.8 Å resolution structure of the sphingolipid activator protein saposin A has been determined at pH 4.8, the physiologically relevant lysosomal pH for hydrolase enzyme activation and lipid-transfer activity. The saposins are essential cofactors for the normal lysosomal degradation of complex glycosphingolipids by acid hydrolase enzymes; defects in either saposin or hydrolase function lead to severe metabolic diseases. Saposin A (SapA) activates the enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which catalyzes the breakdown of β-d-galactocerebroside, the principal lipid component of myelin. SapA is known to bind lipids and detergents in a pH-dependent manner; this is accompanied by a striking transition from a ‘closed’ to an ‘open’ conformation. However, previous structures were determined at non-lysosomal pH. This work describes a 1.8 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure determined at the physiologically relevant lysosomal pH 4.8. In the absence of lipid or detergent at pH 4.8, SapA is observeed to adopt a conformation closely resembling the previously determined ‘closed’ conformation, showing that pH alone is not sufficient for the transition to the ‘open’ conformation. Structural alignments reveal small conformational changes, highlighting regions of flexibility.

  4. β2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibrils Are Nanoparticles That Disrupt Lysosomal Membrane Protein Trafficking and Inhibit Protein Degradation by Lysosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Jakhria, Toral; Hellewell, Andrew L.; Porter, Morwenna Y.; Jackson, Matthew P.; Tipping, Kevin W.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Radford, Sheena E.; Hewitt, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Fragmentation of amyloid fibrils produces fibrils that are reduced in length but have an otherwise unchanged molecular architecture. The resultant nanoscale fibril particles inhibit the cellular reduction of the tetrazolium dye 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), a substrate commonly used to measure cell viability, to a greater extent than unfragmented fibrils. Here we show that the internalization of β2-microglobulin (β2m) amyloid fibrils is dependent on fibril length, with fragmented fibrils being more efficiently internalized by cells. Correspondingly, inhibiting the internalization of fragmented β2m fibrils rescued cellular MTT reduction. Incubation of cells with fragmented β2m fibrils did not, however, cause cell death. Instead, fragmented β2m fibrils accumulate in lysosomes, alter the trafficking of lysosomal membrane proteins, and inhibit the degradation of a model protein substrate by lysosomes. These findings suggest that nanoscale fibrils formed early during amyloid assembly reactions or by the fragmentation of longer fibrils could play a role in amyloid disease by disrupting protein degradation by lysosomes and trafficking in the endolysosomal pathway. PMID:25378395

  5. Subverting lysosomal function in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Alsford, Sam

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Microbial Cell, Koh and colleagues present data highlighting the utility of the lysosomotropic compound L-leucyl-L-leucyl methyl ester (LeuLeu-OMe) as an anti-Trypanosoma brucei agent, adding to the range of compounds that either directly target lysosomal enzymes or that can be used to subvert the function of the lysosome for parasite destruction.

  6. Deacetylation of TFEB promotes fibrillar Aβ degradation by upregulating lysosomal biogenesis in microglia.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jintao; Zheng, Liangjun; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xinya; Zhang, Xuefei; Li, Zeyang; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Zhong; Huo, Wei; Zhao, Xuyang; Shang, Shujiang; Wang, Qingsong; Zhang, Chen; Ji, Jianguo

    2016-06-01

    Microglia play a pivotal role in clearance of Aβ by degrading them in lysosomes, countering amyloid plaque pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidence suggests that lysosomal dysfunction leads to insufficient elimination of toxic protein aggregates. We tested whether enhancing lysosomal function with transcription factor EB (TFEB), an essential regulator modulating lysosomal pathways, would promote Aβ clearance in microglia. Here we show that microglial expression of TFEB facilitates fibrillar Aβ (fAβ) degradation and reduces deposited amyloid plaques, which are further enhanced by deacetylation of TFEB. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we firstly confirmed acetylation as a previously unreported modification of TFEB and found that SIRT1 directly interacted with and deacetylated TFEB at lysine residue 116. Subsequently, SIRT1 overexpression enhanced lysosomal function and fAβ degradation by upregulating transcriptional levels of TFEB downstream targets, which could be inhibited when TFEB was knocked down. Furthermore, overexpression of deacetylated TFEB at K116R mutant in microglia accelerated intracellular fAβ degradation by stimulating lysosomal biogenesis and greatly reduced the deposited amyloid plaques in the brain slices of APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Our findings reveal that deacetylation of TFEB could regulate lysosomal biogenesis and fAβ degradation, making microglial activation of TFEB a possible strategy for attenuating amyloid plaque deposition in AD. PMID:27209302

  7. Lysosomes and α-synuclein form a dangerous duet leading to neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bourdenx, Mathieu; Bezard, Erwan; Dehay, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are (i) characterized by a selective neuronal vulnerability to degeneration in specific brain regions; and (ii) likely to be caused by disease-specific protein misfolding. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by the presence of intraneuronal proteinacious cytoplasmic inclusions, called Lewy Bodies (LB). α-Synuclein, an aggregation prone protein, has been identified as a major protein component of LB and the causative for autosomal dominant PD. Lysosomes are responsible for the clearance of long-lived proteins, such as α-synuclein, and for the removal of old or damaged organelles, such as mitochondria. Interestingly, PD-linked α-synuclein mutants and dopamine-modified wild-type α-synuclein block its own degradation, which result in insufficient clearance, leading to its aggregation and cell toxicity. Moreover, both lysosomes and lysosomal proteases have been found to be involved in the activation of certain cell death pathways. Interestingly, lysosomal alterations are observed in the brains of patients suffering from sporadic PD and also in toxic and genetic rodent models of PD-related neurodegeneration. All these events have unraveled a causal link between lysosomal impairment, α-synuclein accumulation, and neurotoxicity. In this review, we emphasize the pathophysiological mechanisms connecting α-synuclein and lysosomal dysfunction in neuronal cell death. PMID:25177278

  8. Recent advances in gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rastall, David PW; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of genetic diseases that result in metabolic derangements of the lysosome. Most LSDs are due to the genetic absence of a single catabolic enzyme, causing accumulation of the enzyme’s substrate within the lysosome. Over time, tissue-specific substrate accumulations result in a spectrum of symptoms and disabilities that vary by LSD. LSDs are promising targets for gene therapy because delivery of a single gene into a small percentage of the appropriate target cells may be sufficient to impact the clinical course of the disease. Recently, there have been several significant advancements in the potential for gene therapy of these disorders, including the first human trials. Future clinical trials will build upon these initial attempts, with an improved understanding of immune system responses to gene therapy, the obstacle that the blood–brain barrier poses for neuropathic LSDs, as well other biological barriers that, when overcome, may facilitate gene therapy for LSDs. In this manuscript, we will highlight the recent innovations in gene therapy for LSDs and discuss the clinical limitations that remain to be overcome, with the goal of fostering an understanding and further development of this important field. PMID:26170711

  9. Lysosomal storage disorders: emerging therapeutic options require early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Meikle, Peter J; Hopwood, John J

    2003-12-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders have been recognised as one of the major groups of genetic disorders affecting children and adults. With over 40 different disorders and a combined prevalence of up to 1:5000 births, this group of disorders is a major public health problem and places an enormous burden on the individuals and families affected. Since the introduction of enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher disease over 10 years ago there has been considerable progress in the development of enzyme based therapies for other disorders, in addition to alternate therapies including substrate deprivation and gene based therapies. Early diagnosis of these disorders before the onset of irreversible pathologies will lead to better outcomes for current and proposed therapies. In this review we describe the strategies and technology being used for the development of newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders and discuss the future requirements for the early diagnosis and effective therapy of this group of disorders. PMID:14610674

  10. Use of BODIPY-Cholesterol (TF-Chol) for Visualizing Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit; Sezgin, Erdinc; Eggeling, Christian; Ikonen, Elina

    2016-09-01

    Dipyrromethene difluoride-cholesterol (TopFluor-Cholesterol, TF-Chol) is a widely used cholesterol analogue due to its excellent fluorescence properties and considerable similarity with natural cholesterol in terms of membrane partitioning. However, the suitability of TF-Chol for detecting lysosomal cholesterol deposition has recently been questioned. Here, we highlight the fact that the method of lipid delivery and the analysis of time-point both affect the membrane distribution and labeling pattern of TF-Chol, similarly as with radiolabeled cholesterol. Lysosomal sterol accumulation characteristic to a lysosomal storage disease is most readily detected when the probe is introduced via the physiological route, i.e. as a sterol fatty acid ester in low-density lipoprotein particles. When administered to cells from solvent, lysosomal sterol sequestration becomes evident after an overnight equilibration between membranes. PMID:27187581

  11. Lysosomes and autophagy in aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael N; Kohler, Angela; Lowe, David; Viarengo, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    The lysosomal-autophagic system appears to be a common target for many environmental pollutants, as lysosomes accumulate many toxic metals and organic xenobiotics, which perturb normal function and damage the lysosomal membrane. In fact, autophagic reactions frequently involving reduced lysosomal membrane integrity or stability appear to be effective generic indicators of cellular well-being in eukaryotes: in social amoebae (slime mold), mollusks and fish, autophagy/membrane destabilization is correlated with many stress and toxicological responses and pathological reactions. Prognostic use of adverse lysosomal and autophagic reactions to environmental pollutants can be used for predicting cellular dysfunction and health in aquatic animals, such as shellfish and fish, which are extensively used as sensitive bioindicators in monitoring ecosystem health; and also represent a significant food resource for at least 20% of the global human population. Explanatory frameworks for prediction of pollutant impact on health have been derived encompassing a conceptual mechanistic model linking lysosomal damage and autophagic dysfunction with injury to cells and tissues. Methods are described for tracking in vivo autophagy of fluorescently labeled cytoplasmic proteins, measuring degradation of radiolabeled intracellular proteins and morphometric measurement of lysosomal/cytoplasmic volume ratio. Additional methods for the determination of lysosomal membrane stability in lower animals are also described, which can be applied to frozen tissue sections, protozoans and isolated cells in vivo. Experimental and simulated results have also indicated that nutritional deprivation (analogous in marine mussels to caloric restriction)-induced autophagy has a protective function against toxic effects mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Finally, coupled measurement of lysosomal-autophagic reactions and simulation modelling is proposed as a practical toolbox for predicting toxic

  12. [Effect of anti-arteriosclerosis diet, containing soya protein isolate and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the activity of mononuclear and platelet lysosomal hydrolases in patients with hypertension and ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Samsonov, M A; Pogozhaeva, A V; Vasilév, A V; Bogdanova, S N; Pokrovskaia, G R; Varsanovich, E A; Orlova, L A

    1993-01-01

    In response to antiatherosclerosis dietotherapy containing 20 g of ichthyenic oil, coronary and hypertensive subjects showed lowered serum levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and atherogenic index, elevated HDLP cholesterol and corrected immunochemical shifts. SPI-containing diet resulted in changes of CIC IgM levels only. Shifts in the activity of mononuclear and platelet lysosomal hydrolases which occurred in the above patients due to relevant diets reflect higher sensitivity of this parameter in assessment of the dietotherapy effectiveness. PMID:7975402

  13. Electron probe X-ray analysis on human hepatocellular lysosomes with copper deposits: copper binding to a thiol-protein in lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hanaichi, T.; Kidokoro, R.; Hayashi, H.; Sakamoto, N.

    1984-11-01

    Livers of eight patients with chronic liver diseases were investigated by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. First, three kinds of preparations (osmium-Epon sections, glutaraldehyde-frozen sections, and unfixed-frozen sections) were compared for element detectability at a subcellular level. The glutaraldehyde-frozen sections were satisfactory as far as copper, sulfur, and phosphorus were concerned. Five patients (one patient with Wilson's disease, one chronic cholestasis, one chronic hepatitis, and two asymptomatic primary biliary cirrhosis) yielded x-ray images of copper and sulfur consistent with hepatocellular lysosomes. Second, the glutaraldehyde-frozen sections were utilized for a study of copper deposits in the patients' livers. There was a significant correlation between copper and sulfur contents in the lysosomes of all patients studied but no correlation in the remainder of the cytoplasm. Zinc was not detected in the lysosomes. Whatever the content of copper in the lysosomes, the ratio of delta copper to phosphorus (weight/weight) to delta sulfur to phosphorus was 0.60. These data indicate that most lysosomal copper binds to a thiol protein, probably metallothionein, in the liver.

  14. Neuraminidase of Influenza A Virus Binds Lysosome-Associated Membrane Proteins Directly and Induces Lysosome Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Xiangwu; Yan, Yiwu; Liu, Qiang; Li, Ning; Sheng, Miaomiao; Zhang, Lifang; Li, Xiao; Liang, Zhu; Huang, Fengming; Liu, Kangtai; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yanxu; Zou, Zhen; Du, Jianchao; Zhong, Ying; Zhou, Huandi; Yang, Peng; Lu, Huijun; Tian, Mingyao; Li, Dangsheng; Zhang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT As a recycling center, lysosomes are filled with numerous acid hydrolase enzymes that break down waste materials and invading pathogens. Recently, lysosomal cell death has been defined as “lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the consequent leakage of lysosome contents into cytosol.” Here, we show that the neuraminidase (NA) of H5N1 influenza A virus markedly deglycosylates and degrades lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs; the most abundant membrane proteins of lysosome), which induces lysosomal rupture, and finally leads to cell death of alveolar epithelial carcinoma A549 cells and human tracheal epithelial cells. The NA inhibitors peramivir and zanamivir could effectively block the deglycosylation of LAMPs, inhibit the virus cell entry, and prevent cell death induced by the H5N1 influenza virus. The NA of seasonal H1N1 virus, however, does not share these characteristics. Our findings not only reveal a novel role of NA in the early stage of the H5N1 influenza virus life cycle but also elucidate the molecular mechanism of lysosomal rupture crucial for influenza virus induced cell death. IMPORTANCE The integrity of lysosomes is vital for maintaining cell homeostasis, cellular defense and clearance of invading pathogens. This study shows that the H5N1 influenza virus could induce lysosomal rupture through deglycosylating lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) mediated by the neuraminidase activity of NA protein. NA inhibitors such as peramivir and zanamivir could inhibit the deglycosylation of LAMPs and protect lysosomes, which also further interferes with the H5N1 influenza virus infection at early stage of life cycle. This work is significant because it presents new concepts for NA's function, as well as for influenza inhibitors' mechanism of action, and could partially explain the high mortality and high viral load after H5N1 virus infection in human beings and why NA inhibitors have more potent therapeutic effects for lethal avian

  15. PPARα in lysosomal biogenesis: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Pahan, Kalipada

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound vesicles containing hydrolytic enzymes, ubiquitously present in all eukaryotic cells. Classically considered to be central to the cellular waste management machinery, recent studies revealed the role of lysosomes in a wide array of cellular processes like, degradation, cellular development, programmed cell death, secretion, plasma membrane repair, nutritional responses, and lipid metabolism. We recently studied the regulation of TFEB, considered to be the master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, by activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα), one of the key regulators of lipid metabolism. In this article, we discuss how the recent finding could be put in to perspective with the previous findings that relate lysosomal biogenesis to lipid metabolism, and comment on the possibility of a bi-directional interplay between these two distinct cellular processes upon activation of PPARα. PMID:26621249

  16. Role of lysosomal enzymes released by alveolar macrophages in the pathogenesis of the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, M. N.; Martín, T.; Sánchez, M. L.; Buitrago, J. M. González; Jiménez, A.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrolytic enzymes are the major constituents of alveolar macrophages (AM) and have been shown to be involved in many aspects of the inflammatory pulmonary response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of lysosomal enzymes in the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HPs). An experimental study on AM lysosomal enzymes of an HP-guinea-pig model was performed. The results obtained both in vivo and in vitro suggest that intracellular enzymatic activity decrease is, at least partly, due to release of lysosomal enzymes into the medium. A positive but slight correlation was found between extracellular lysosomal activity and four parameters of lung lesion (lung index, bronchoalveolar fluid total (BALF) protein concentration, BALF LDH and BALF alkaline phosphatase activities). All the above findings suggest that the AM release of lysosomal enzymes during HP is a factor involved, although possibly not the only one, in the pulmonary lesions appearing in this disease. PMID:18475615

  17. Lysosomal Storage Disorders in the Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Staretz-Chacham, Orna; Lang, Tess C.; LaMarca, Mary E.; Krasnewich, Donna; Sidransky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders are rare inborn errors of metabolism, with a combined incidence of 1 in 1500 to 7000 live births. These relatively rare disorders are seldom considered when evaluating a sick newborn. A significant number of the >50 different lysosomal storage disorders, however, do manifest in the neonatal period and should be part of the differential diagnosis of several perinatal phenotypes. We review the earliest clinical features, diagnostic tests, and treatment options for lysosomal storage disorders that can present in the newborn. Although many of the lysosomal storage disorders are characterized by a range in phenotypes, the focus of this review is on the specific symptoms and clinical findings that present in the perinatal period, including neurologic, respiratory, endocrine, and cardiovascular manifestations, dysmorphic features, hepatosplenomegaly, skin or ocular involvement, and hydrops fetalis/congenital ascites. A greater awareness of these features may help to reduce misdiagnosis and promote the early detection of lysosomal storage disorders. Implementing therapy at the earliest stage possible is crucial for several of the lysosomal storage disorders; hence, an early appreciation of these disorders by physicians who treat newborns is essential. PMID:19336380

  18. Regulation of membrane trafficking by signalling on endosomal and lysosomal membranes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinran; Garrity, Abigail G; Xu, Haoxing

    2013-01-01

    Endosomal and lysosomal membrane trafficking requires the coordination of multiple signalling events to control cargo sorting and processing, and endosome maturation. The initiation and termination of signalling events in endosomes and lysosomes is not well understood, but several key regulators have been identified, which include small GTPases, phosphoinositides, and Ca2+. Small GTPases act as master regulators and molecular switches in a GTP-dependent manner, initiating signalling cascades to regulate the direction and specificity of endosomal trafficking. Phosphoinositides are membrane-bound lipids that indicate vesicular identities for recruiting specific cytoplasmic proteins to endosomal membranes, thus allowing specificity of membrane fusion, fission, and cargo sorting to occur within and between specific vesicle compartments. In addition, phosphoinositides regulate the function of membrane proteins such as ion channels and transporters in a compartment-specific manner to mediate transport and signalling. Finally, Ca2+, a locally acting second messenger released from intracellular ion channels, may provide precise spatiotemporal regulation of endosomal signalling and trafficking events. Small GTPase signalling can regulate phosphoinositide conversion during endosome maturation, and electrophysiological studies on isolated endosomes have shown that endosomal and lysosomal Ca2+ channels are directly modulated by endosomal lipids. Thus trafficking and maturation of endosomes and lysosomes can be precisely regulated by dynamic changes in GTPases and membrane lipids, as well as Ca2+ signalling. Importantly, impaired phosphoinositide and Ca2+ signalling can cause endosomal and lysosomal trafficking defects at the cellular level, and a spectrum of lysosome storage diseases. PMID:23878375

  19. Prevention of lysosomal storage in Tay-Sachs mice treated with N-butyldeoxynojirimycin.

    PubMed

    Platt, F M; Neises, G R; Reinkensmeier, G; Townsend, M J; Perry, V H; Proia, R L; Winchester, B; Dwek, R A; Butters, T D

    1997-04-18

    The glycosphingolipid (GSL) lysosomal storage diseases result from the inheritance of defects in the genes encoding the enzymes required for catabolism of GSLs within lysosomes. A strategy for the treatment of these diseases, based on an inhibitor of GSL biosynthesis N-butyldeoxynojirimycin, was evaluated in a mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease. When Tay-Sachs mice were treated with N-butyldeoxynojirimycin, the accumulation of GM2 in the brain was prevented, with the number of storage neurons and the quantity of ganglioside stored per cell markedly reduced. Thus, limiting the biosynthesis of the substrate (GM2) for the defective enzyme (beta-hexosaminidase A) prevents GSL accumulation and the neuropathology associated with its lysosomal storage. PMID:9103204

  20. Occurrence of Parkinson's syndrome in type I Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, O; Giladi, N; Elstein, D; Abrahamov, A; Turezkite, T; Aghai, E; Reches, A; Bembi, B; Zimran, A

    1996-09-01

    Gaucher disease, the most prevalent glycolipid storage disorder, is classically subdivided into types according to the presence or absence of neurological involvement. Type I has hitherto been considered non-neuronopathic. We present six cases and a review of the literature of Parkinsonian symptoms in type I Gaucher disease patients. The hallmark of this atypical Parkinsonian syndrome is a relatively severe clinical course with early appearance of neurological signs in the 4th to 6th decade of life, aggressive progression of the signs and refractoriness to conventional anti-Parkinson therapy. We discuss the implications of these findings in the light of enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher disease. PMID:8917744

  1. [Application of lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring: research progress].

    PubMed

    Weng, You-Zhu; Fang, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Yu-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Lysosome is an important organelle existing in eukaryotic cells. With the development of the study on the structure and function of lysosome in recent years, lysosome is considered as a target of toxic substances on subcellular level, and has been widely applied abroad in marine pollution monitoring. This paper summarized the biological characteristics of lysosomal marker enzyme, lysosome-autophagy system, and lysosomal membrane, and introduced the principles and methods of applying lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring. Bivalve shellfish digestive gland and fish liver are the most sensitive organs for lysosomal detection. By adopting the lysosomal detection techniques such as lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) test, neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay, morphological measurement (MM) of lysosome, immunohistochemical (Ih) assay of lysosomal marker enzyme, and electron microscopy (EM), the status of marine pollution can be evaluated. It was suggested that the lysosome could be used as a biomarker for monitoring marine environmental pollution. The advantages and disadvantages of lysosomal detection and some problems worthy of attention were analyzed, and the application prospects of lysosomal detection were discussed. PMID:24564165

  2. Principles of lysosomal membrane digestion: stimulation of sphingolipid degradation by sphingolipid activator proteins and anionic lysosomal lipids.

    PubMed

    Kolter, Thomas; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2005-01-01

    Sphingolipids and glycosphingolipids are membrane components of eukaryotic cell surfaces. Their constitutive degradation takes place on the surface of intra-endosomal and intra-lysosomal membrane structures. During endocytosis, these intra-lysosomal membranes are formed and prepared for digestion by a lipid-sorting process during which their cholesterol content decreases and the concentration of the negatively charged bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP)--erroneously also called lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA)--increases. Glycosphingolipid degradation requires the presence of water-soluble acid exohydrolases, sphingolipid activator proteins, and anionic phospholipids like BMP. The lysosomal degradation of sphingolipids with short hydrophilic head groups requires the presence of sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs). These are the saposins (Saps) and the GM2 activator protein. Sphingolipid activator proteins are membrane-perturbing and lipid-binding proteins with different specificities for the bound lipid and the activated enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Their inherited deficiency leads to sphingolipid- and membrane-storage diseases. Sphingolipid activator proteins not only facilitate glycolipid digestion but also act as glycolipid transfer proteins facilitating the association of lipid antigens with immunoreceptors of the CD1 family. PMID:16212488

  3. Lysosomal NEU1 deficiency affects Amyloid Precursor Protein levels and amyloid-β secretion via deregulated lysosomal exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Annunziata, Ida; Patterson, Annette; Helton, Danielle; Hu, Huimin; Moshiach, Simon; Gomero, Elida; Nixon, Ralph; d’Azzo, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) belongs to a category of adult neurodegenerative conditions which are associated with intracellular and extracellular accumulation of neurotoxic protein aggregates. Understanding how these aggregates are formed, secreted and propagated by neurons has been the subject of intensive research, but so far no preventive or curative therapy for AD is available and clinical trials have been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that deficiency of the lysosomal sialidase NEU1 leads to the spontaneous occurrence of an AD-like amyloidogenic process in mice. This involves two consecutive events linked to NEU1 loss-of-function – accumulation and amyloidogenic processing of an oversialylated amyloid precursor protein in lysosomes, and extracellular release of Aβ-peptides by excessive lysosomal exocytosis. Furthermore, cerebral injection of NEU1 in an established AD mouse model substantially reduces β-amyloid plaques. Our findings identify an additional pathway for the secretion of Aβ and define NEU1 as a potential therapeutic molecule for AD. PMID:24225533

  4. Lysosomal cross-correction by hematopoietic stem cell-derived macrophages via tunneling nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Naphade, Swati; Sharma, Jay; Chevronnay, Héloïse P. Gaide; Shook, Michael A.; Yeagy, Brian A.; Rocca, Celine J.; Ur, Sarah N.; Lau, Athena J.; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Cherqui, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Despite controversies on the potential of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to promote tissue repair, we previously showed that HSC transplantation could correct cystinosis, a multi-systemic lysosomal storage disease, caused by a defective lysosomal membrane cystine transporter, cystinosin (CTNS). Addressing the cellular mechanisms, we here report vesicular cross-correction after HSC differentiation into macrophages. Upon co-culture with cystinotic fibroblasts, macrophages produced tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) allowing transfer of cystinosin-bearing lysosomes into Ctns-deficient cells, which exploited the same route to retrogradely transfer cystine-loaded lysosomes to macrophages, providing a bidirectional correction mechanism. TNT formation was enhanced by contact with diseased cells. In vivo, HSCs grafted to cystinotic kidneys also generated nanotubular extensions resembling invadopodia that crossed the dense basement membranes and delivered cystinosin into diseased proximal tubular cells. This is the first report of correction of a genetic lysosomal defect by bidirectional vesicular exchange via TNTs and suggests broader potential for HSC transplantation for other disorders due to defective vesicular proteins. PMID:25186209

  5. Calpain 1 induce lysosomal permeabilization by cleavage of lysosomal associated membrane protein 2.

    PubMed

    Villalpando Rodriguez, Gloria E; Torriglia, Alicia

    2013-10-01

    In light induced retinal degeneration (LIRD) photoreceptor cell death is mediated by caspase independent mechanisms. The activation of LEI/L-DNase II pathway in this model, is due to cathepsin D release from lysosomes, although the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. In this paper we studied the involvement of calpains in lysosomal permeabilization. We investigated, for the first time, the calpain targets at lysosomal membrane level. We found that calpain 1 is responsible for lysosomal permeabilization by cleavage of the lysosomal associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP 2). Moreover, LAMP 2 degradation and lysosomal permeabilization were rescued by calpain inhibition and the use of MEF(-/-)lamp 2 cells indicates that the cleavage of LAMP 2A is essential for this permeabilization. Finally, we found that LAMP 2 is cleaved in LIRD, suggesting that the mechanism of calpain induced lysosomal permeabilization is not exclusive of a single cell death model. Overall, these data shed new light on understanding the mechanisms of lysosomal and caspase-independent cell death and point to the original targets for development of the new therapeutic protocols. PMID:23747342

  6. Effect of reactive oxygen species on lysosomal membrane integrity. A study on a lysosomal fraction.

    PubMed

    Zdolsek, J M; Svensson, I

    1993-01-01

    Using a lysosome-enriched "light mitochondrial" fraction of a rat liver homogenate, the effects of the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide, superoxide- and hydroxyl radicals were determined. Alterations in the intralysosomal pH and the release of a lysosomal marker enzyme, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, were used as indicators of changes in the lysosomal membrane integrity. Lipid peroxidation of the fraction was assayed by TBARS measurement. Neither superoxide radicals, generated by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase, nor a bolus dose of hydrogen peroxide (0.5-1.5 mM) induced any lysosomal damage. If, however, Fe(III)ADP was included in the superoxide radical-generating system, lysosomal membrane damage was detected, both as an increase in lysosomal pH and as a release of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, but only after a lag phase of about 7 min. Lipid peroxidation, on the other hand, proceeded gradually. Lysosomes treated with hydrogen peroxide displayed similar dose-dependent alterations, albeit only if both Fe(III)ADP and the reducing amino acid cysteine were added. In the latter system, however, alterations of the lysosomal membrane stability occurred more rapidly, showing a lag phase of only 2 min. Lipid peroxidation, which proceeded faster and displayed no lag phase, levelled out within 10 min. The results indicate that neither superoxide radicals nor hydrogen peroxide are by themselves damaging to lysosomes. Available catalytically active iron in Fe(II) form, however, allows reactions yielding powerful oxidative species--probably hydroxyl radicals formed via Fenton reactions--to take place inducing peroxidation of the lysosomal membranes resulting in dissipation of the proton-gradient and leakage of their enzyme contents. PMID:8148962

  7. Leaving the lysosome behind: novel developments in autophagy inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Solitro, Abigail R; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P

    2016-01-01

    The search for a single silver bullet for the treatment of cancer has now been overshadowed by the identification of multiple therapeutic targets unique to each malignancy and even to each patient. In recent years, autophagy has emerged as one such therapeutic target. In response to both therapeutic and oncogenic stress, cancer cells upregulate and demonstrate an increased dependence upon this intracellular recycling process. Particularly in malignancies that currently lack targeted therapeutic options, autophagy inhibitors are the next hopeful prospects for the treatment of this disease. In this review, we discuss the rapid evolution of autophagy inhibitors from early lysosomotropic agents to next-generation lysosome-targeted drugs and beyond. PMID:26689099

  8. Mutation prevalence among 51 unrelated Spanish patients with Gaucher disease: identification of 11 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, P; Cenarro, A; Pérez-Calvo, J I; Giralt, M; Giraldo, P; Pocoví, M

    2001-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the lysosomal beta-glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene. Gaucher disease is a very heterogeneous entity due to the large number of different mutations existing in the GBA gene, resulting in a defective protein whose impaired activity is the cause of the disease. We present a mutation analysis of the GBA gene in 51 unrelated Spanish Gaucher disease patients together with clinical findings. Two common mutations, c.1226A>G (N370S) and c.1448T>C (L444P), were determined by restriction enzyme digestion after PCR amplification of genomic DNA. The remaining alleles were screened by amplifying the entire GBA gene followed by nested PCR and SSCP analysis under four different conditions. The c.1226A>G (N370S) and c.1448T>C (L444P) mutations were common, accounting for 56 alleles (55%) and 16 alleles (15%), respectively. In addition, 25 different mutations were found, 11 of which are described here for the first time: c.(-203)A>G, c.160G>A (V15M), c.256C>T (R47X), c.445-2a>g (IVS4-2a>g), c.485T>C (M123T), c.914C>T (P266L), c.953delT, c.1124T>C (L336P), c.1207A>C (S364R), c.1214delG,C, and c.1510delT,C,T (465delSer). Two mutations, S364R and P266L, were associated with neuronopathic forms of Gaucher disease: S364R mutation in heterozygosity with the L444P mutation and the P266L mutation in a homozygous state. Two type 1 patients were found to be carriers of two mutations in the same allele (genotypes [N370S] + [E326K + N188S] and [N370S] + [IVS4-2a>g+c.(-203)A>G]). This study allowed us to identify 100% of mutant alleles, and therefore we conclude that the method used to screen for mutations in the GBA gene is very reliable and there is a broad spectrum of mutations in the GBA gene in the Spanish population. PMID:11783951

  9. Identification of lysosomal Npc1-binding proteins: Cathepsin D activity is regulated by NPC1.

    PubMed

    Macías-Vidal, Judit; Guerrero-Hernández, Martina; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Aguado, Carmen; Knecht, Erwin; Coll, Maria Josep; Bachs, Oriol

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder, characterized by severe neurodegeneration. It is mostly produced by mutations in the NPC1 gene, encoding for a protein of the late endosomes/lysosomes membrane, involved in cholesterol metabolism. However, the specific role of this protein in NPC disease still remains unknown. We aimed to identify Npc1-binding proteins in order to define new putative NPC1 lysosomal functions. By affinity chromatography using an Npc1 peptide (amino acids 1032-1066 of loop I), as bait, we fished 31 lysosomal proteins subsequently identified by LC-MS/MS. Most of them were involved in proteolysis and lipid catabolism and included the protease cathepsin D. Cathepsin D and NPC1 interaction was validated by immunoprecipitation and the functional relevance of this interaction was studied. We found that fibroblasts from NPC patients with low levels of NPC1 protein have high amounts of procathepsin D but reduced quantities of the mature protein, thus showing a diminished cathepsin D activity. The increase of NPC1 protein levels in NPC cells by treatment with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, induced an elevation of cathepsin D activity. All these results suggest a new lysosomal function of NPC1 as a regulator of cathepsin D processing and activity. PMID:26507101

  10. Approaches for plasma membrane wounding and assessment of lysosome-mediated repair responses

    PubMed Central

    Corrotte, M.; Castro-Gomes, T.; Koushik, A.B.; Andrews, N.W.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid plasma membrane repair is essential to restore cellular homeostasis and improve cell survival after injury. Several mechanisms for plasma membrane repair have been proposed, including formation of an intracellular vesicle patch, reduction of plasma membrane tension, lesion removal by endocytosis, and/or shedding of the wounded membrane. Under all conditions studied to date, plasma membrane repair is strictly dependent on the entry of calcium into cells, from the extracellular medium. Calcium-dependent exocytosis of lysosomes is an important early step in the plasma membrane repair process, and defects in plasma membrane repair have been observed in cells carrying mutations responsible for serious lysosomal diseases, such as Chediak–Higashi (Huynh, Roth, Ward, Kaplan, & Andrews, 2004) and Niemann–Pick Disease type A (Tam et al., 2010). A functional role for release of the lysosomal enzyme acid sphingomyelinase, which generates ceramide on the cell surface and triggers endocytosis, has been described (Corrotte et al., 2013; Tam et al., 2010). Therefore, procedures for measuring the extent of lysosomal fusion with the plasma membrane of wounded cells are important indicators of the cellular repair response. The importance of carefully selecting the methodology for experimental plasma membrane injury, in order not to adversely impact the membrane repair machinery, is becoming increasingly apparent. Here, we describe physiologically relevant methods to induce different types of cellular wounds, and sensitive assays to measure the ability of cells to secrete lysosomes and reseal their plasma membrane. PMID:25665445